WorldWideScience

Sample records for subgroup student-level standard

  1. Treatment effect heterogeneity for univariate subgroups in clinical trials: Shrinkage, standardization, or else.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Treatment effect heterogeneity is a well-recognized phenomenon in randomized controlled clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss subgroup analyses with prespecified subgroups of clinical or biological importance. We explore various alternatives to the naive (the traditional univariate) subgroup analyses to address the issues of multiplicity and confounding. Specifically, we consider a model-based Bayesian shrinkage (Bayes-DS) and a nonparametric, empirical Bayes shrinkage approach (Emp-Bayes) to temper the optimism of traditional univariate subgroup analyses; a standardization approach (standardization) that accounts for correlation between baseline covariates; and a model-based maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach. The Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes methods model the variation in subgroup-specific treatment effect rather than testing the null hypothesis of no difference between subgroups. The standardization approach addresses the issue of confounding in subgroup analyses. The MLE approach is considered only for comparison in simulation studies as the "truth" since the data were generated from the same model. Using the characteristics of a hypothetical large outcome trial, we perform simulation studies and articulate the utilities and potential limitations of these estimators. Simulation results indicate that Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes can protect against optimism present in the naïve approach. Due to its simplicity, the naïve approach should be the reference for reporting univariate subgroup-specific treatment effect estimates from exploratory subgroup analyses. Standardization, although it tends to have a larger variance, is suggested when it is important to address the confounding of univariate subgroup effects due to correlation between baseline covariates. The Bayes-DS approach is available as an R package (DSBayes). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Treatment effect heterogeneity for univariate subgroups in clinical trials: Shrinkage, standardization, or else

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Treatment effect heterogeneity is a well-recognized phenomenon in randomized controlled clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss subgroup analyses with prespecified subgroups of clinical or biological importance. We explore various alternatives to the naive (the traditional univariate) subgroup analyses to address the issues of multiplicity and confounding. Specifically, we consider a model-based Bayesian shrinkage (Bayes-DS) and a nonparametric, empirical Bayes shrinkage approach (Emp-Bayes) to temper the optimism of traditional univariate subgroup analyses; a standardization approach (standardization) that accounts for correlation between baseline covariates; and a model-based maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach. The Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes methods model the variation in subgroup-specific treatment effect rather than testing the null hypothesis of no difference between subgroups. The standardization approach addresses the issue of confounding in subgroup analyses. The MLE approach is considered only for comparison in simulation studies as the “truth” since the data were generated from the same model. Using the characteristics of a hypothetical large outcome trial, we perform simulation studies and articulate the utilities and potential limitations of these estimators. Simulation results indicate that Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes can protect against optimism present in the naïve approach. Due to its simplicity, the naïve approach should be the reference for reporting univariate subgroup-specific treatment effect estimates from exploratory subgroup analyses. Standardization, although it tends to have a larger variance, is suggested when it is important to address the confounding of univariate subgroup effects due to correlation between baseline covariates. The Bayes-DS approach is available as an R package (DSBayes). PMID:26485117

  3. Microprocessing in European High Energy Physics Experiments - ECFA Working Group on Data Processing Standards - Report of the Microprocessor Subgroup May 1982

    CERN Document Server

    European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA)

    1982-01-01

    This document contains two reports on the use of microprocessors in European High-Energy Physics experiments. The first is a presentation of data collected by a sub-group of the ECFA working group on data procesing standards. The working group is organised by E. Lillestol, University of Bergen and E.M. Rimmer, CERN, DD Division; the Microprocessor sub-group organiser is L.O. Hertzberger, NIKHEF, Amsterdam. Data are given from projects numbered 81 - 194, and some CERN projects are included. Even though there is some duplication of information, a second report has been appended which covers a wider range of CERN projects. This was the result of a microprocessor survey made at CERN by P. Scharff-Hansen, DD Division, at the request of E. Gabthuler. The ECFA working group intends to have reports for all the sub-groups (10 in number) available in machine-readable form at the CERN computer centre. However, it was felt that the information herein is most valuable to designers and users of microprocessors, and that it...

  4. Does classification of persons with fibromyalgia into Multidimensional Pain Inventory subgroups detect differences in outcome after a standard chronic pain management program?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verra, M.L.; Angst, F.; Brioschi, R.; Lehmann, S.A.; Keefe, F.J.; Staal, J.B.; Bie, R.A. de; Aeschlimann, A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The present study aimed to replicate and validate the empirically derived subgroup classification based on the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI) in a sample of highly disabled fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Second, it examined how the identified subgroups differed in their response to

  5. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  6. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian M; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Recent efforts at stratifying medulloblastomas based on their molecular features have revolutionized our understanding of this morbidity. Collective efforts by multiple independent groups have subdivided medulloblastoma from a single disease into four distinct molecular subgroups characterized by disparate transcriptional signatures, mutational spectra, copy number profiles and, most importantly, clinical features. We present a summary of recent studies that have contributed to our understanding of the core medulloblastoma subgroups, focusing largely on clinically relevant discoveries that have already, and will continue to, shape research. PMID:22853794

  7. The congruence subgroup problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 4. The Congruence Subgroup Problem. M S Raghunathan. Invited Articles Volume 114 ... Author Affiliations. M S Raghunathan1. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  8. Subgroups Among Opiate Addicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzins, Juris I.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The principal objective of the present investigation was to delineate homogeneous MMPI profile subgroups (types) through multivariate clustering procedures and to compare the derived (replicable) types on measures of the components of "sociopathy" as well as on other psychometric devices. (Author)

  9. Subgrouping Automata: automatic sequence subgrouping using phylogenetic tree-based optimum subgrouping algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Joo-Hyun; Park, Jihyang; Kim, Eun-Mi; Kim, Juhan; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2014-02-01

    Sequence subgrouping for a given sequence set can enable various informative tasks such as the functional discrimination of sequence subsets and the functional inference of unknown sequences. Because an identity threshold for sequence subgrouping may vary according to the given sequence set, it is highly desirable to construct a robust subgrouping algorithm which automatically identifies an optimal identity threshold and generates subgroups for a given sequence set. To meet this end, an automatic sequence subgrouping method, named 'Subgrouping Automata' was constructed. Firstly, tree analysis module analyzes the structure of tree and calculates the all possible subgroups in each node. Sequence similarity analysis module calculates average sequence similarity for all subgroups in each node. Representative sequence generation module finds a representative sequence using profile analysis and self-scoring for each subgroup. For all nodes, average sequence similarities are calculated and 'Subgrouping Automata' searches a node showing statistically maximum sequence similarity increase using Student's t-value. A node showing the maximum t-value, which gives the most significant differences in average sequence similarity between two adjacent nodes, is determined as an optimum subgrouping node in the phylogenetic tree. Further analysis showed that the optimum subgrouping node from SA prevents under-subgrouping and over-subgrouping. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Finite groups all of whose minimal subgroups are NE-subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    subgroup of . In this article, we investigate the structure of under the assumption that subgroups of prime order are *-subgroups of . The finite groups, all of whose minimal subgroups of the generalized Fitting subgroup are *-subgroups ...

  11. Cytogenetic Prognostication Within Medulloblastoma Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, David J.H.; Northcott, Paul A.; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kool, Marcel; Luu, Betty; Yao, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Garzia, Livia; Peacock, John; Mack, Stephen C.; Wu, Xiaochong; Rolider, Adi; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M.G.; Jones, David T.W.; Zitterbart, Karel; Faria, Claudia C.; Schüller, Ulrich; Kren, Leos; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Shin Ra, Young; Garami, Miklós; Hauser, Peter; Chan, Jennifer A.; Robinson, Shenandoah; Bognár, László; Klekner, Almos; Saad, Ali G.; Liau, Linda M.; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam; Cinalli, Giuseppe; De Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo; Cooper, Michael K.; Thompson, Reid C.; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Michiels, Erna M.C.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Gupta, Nalin; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M.; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Eberhart, Charles G.; Fouladi, Maryam; Lach, Boleslaw; Jung, Shin; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Jouvet, Anne; Jabado, Nada; Pollack, Ian F.; Weiss, William A.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; de Torres, Carmen; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tabori, Uri; Olson, James M.; Gajjar, Amar; Packer, Roger J.; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pomeroy, Scott L.; French, Pim J.; Kloosterhof, Nanne K.; Kros, Johan M.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Clifford, Steven C.; Bourdeaut, Franck; Delattre, Olivier; Doz, François F.; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Malkin, David; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A.; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. Current medulloblastoma protocols stratify patients based on clinical features: patient age, metastatic stage, extent of resection, and histologic variant. Stark prognostic and genetic differences among the four subgroups suggest that subgroup-specific molecular biomarkers could improve patient prognostication. Patients and Methods Molecular biomarkers were identified from a discovery set of 673 medulloblastomas from 43 cities around the world. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical and cytogenetic biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Identified biomarkers were tested using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a nonoverlapping medulloblastoma tissue microarray (n = 453), with subsequent validation of the risk stratification models. Results Subgroup information improves the predictive accuracy of a multivariable survival model compared with clinical biomarkers alone. Most previously published cytogenetic biomarkers are only prognostic within a single medulloblastoma subgroup. Profiling six FISH biomarkers (GLI2, MYC, chromosome 11 [chr11], chr14, 17p, and 17q) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, we can reliably and reproducibly identify very low-risk and very high-risk patients within SHH, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas. Conclusion Combining subgroup and cytogenetic biomarkers with established clinical biomarkers substantially improves patient prognostication, even in the context of heterogeneous clinical therapies. The prognostic significance of most molecular biomarkers is restricted to a specific subgroup. We have identified a small panel of cytogenetic biomarkers that reliably identifies very high-risk and very low-risk groups of patients, making it an excellent tool for selecting patients for therapy intensification and therapy de-escalation in future clinical trials. PMID

  12. Soft n-Ary Subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Prince Williams

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soft set theory plays a vital role in solving many complicated problems with inherited uncertainty. An n-ary algebraic systems is a generalization of algebraic structures and it is the most natural way for the further development, deeper understanding of their properties. In this paper, we apply soft set theory to an n-ary algebraic systems and introduce the notions of soft n-ary groups and soft n-ary subgroups. Further, some operations on soft sets are extended to the former. Finally, we provide the characterization of soft n-ary subgroups over an n-ary group (G,f and study their related properties.

  13. On Cosets and Normal Subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    B. O. ONASANYA; S.A.Ilori

    2014-01-01

    The paper [5] has worked on fuzzy cosets and fuzzy normal subgroups of a group, [8] has extended the idea to fuzzy middle coset. In addition to what has been done, we make a link between fuzzy coset and fuzzy middle coset and investigate some more properties of the fuzzy middle coset. [7] made attempt with some results needing adjustment. [2], [8] and [9] have shown that if f 2 F(Sn), the set of all fuzzy subgroups of Sn, is such that Imf has the highest order and f is constant on the conjuga...

  14. Hopf algebras and congruence subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerhauser, Yorck

    2007-01-01

    We prove that the kernel of the natural action of the modular group on the center of the Drinfel'd double of a semisimple Hopf algebra is a congruence subgroup. To do this, we introduce a class of generalized Frobenius-Schur indicators and endow it with an action of the modular group that is compatible with the original one.

  15. Erratum The congruence subgroup problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    . 299–308). The congruence subgroup problem. M S RAGHUNATHAN. There is unfortunately an error in the paper cited above in the very first page. We correct this error (which does not materially affect the rest of the paper in any way) below.

  16. Beyond ORF: Student-Level Predictors of Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Angela I.; Proctor, Briley E.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored student-level predictors of reading achievement among third grade regular education students. Predictors included student demographics (sex and socioeconomic status (SES), using free and reduced lunch as proxy for SES), direct observations of reading skills (oral reading fluency (ORF) and word decoding skill (nonsense word…

  17. Finite groups all of whose minimal subgroups are NE∗ -subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove the following theorem which is an improvement of a recent result due to Asaad and Ramadan (see Theorem 1.1 of [2]). Hence, Q8 will denote the quaternion group of order 8 and a group G is called Q8-free if no quotient group of any subgroup of G is isomorphic to Q8. Throughout this paper, L will denote the class.

  18. Intertumoral Heterogeneity within Medulloblastoma Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Florence M G; Remke, Marc; Rampasek, Ladislav; Peacock, John; Shih, David J H; Luu, Betty; Garzia, Livia; Torchia, Jonathon; Nor, Carolina; Morrissy, A Sorana; Agnihotri, Sameer; Thompson, Yuan Yao; Kuzan-Fischer, Claudia M; Farooq, Hamza; Isaev, Keren; Daniels, Craig; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Faure-Conter, Cecile; Jouvet, Anne; Giannini, Caterina; Nageswara Rao, Amulya A; Li, Kay Ka Wai; Ng, Ho-Keung; Eberhart, Charles G; Pollack, Ian F; Hamilton, Ronald L; Gillespie, G Yancey; Olson, James M; Leary, Sarah; Weiss, William A; Lach, Boleslaw; Chambless, Lola B; Thompson, Reid C; Cooper, Michael K; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Hauser, Peter; van Veelen, Marie-Lise C; Kros, Johan M; French, Pim J; Ra, Young Shin; Kumabe, Toshihiro; López-Aguilar, Enrique; Zitterbart, Karel; Sterba, Jaroslav; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Massimino, Maura; Van Meir, Erwin G; Osuka, Satoru; Shofuda, Tomoko; Klekner, Almos; Zollo, Massimo; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Rubin, Joshua B; Jabado, Nada; Albrecht, Steffen; Mora, Jaume; Van Meter, Timothy E; Jung, Shin; Moore, Andrew S; Hallahan, Andrew R; Chan, Jennifer A; Tirapelli, Daniela P C; Carlotti, Carlos G; Fouladi, Maryam; Pimentel, José; Faria, Claudia C; Saad, Ali G; Massimi, Luca; Liau, Linda M; Wheeler, Helen; Nakamura, Hideo; Elbabaa, Samer K; Perezpeña-Diazconti, Mario; Chico Ponce de León, Fernando; Robinson, Shenandoah; Zapotocky, Michal; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Huang, Annie; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Tabori, Uri; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Dirks, Peter B; Rutka, James T; Bader, Gary D; Reimand, Jüri; Goldenberg, Anna; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2017-06-12

    While molecular subgrouping has revolutionized medulloblastoma classification, the extent of heterogeneity within subgroups is unknown. Similarity network fusion (SNF) applied to genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression data across 763 primary samples identifies very homogeneous clusters of patients, supporting the presence of medulloblastoma subtypes. After integration of somatic copy-number alterations, and clinical features specific to each cluster, we identify 12 different subtypes of medulloblastoma. Integrative analysis using SNF further delineates group 3 from group 4 medulloblastoma, which is not as readily apparent through analyses of individual data types. Two clear subtypes of infants with Sonic Hedgehog medulloblastoma with disparate outcomes and biology are identified. Medulloblastoma subtypes identified through integrative clustering have important implications for stratification of future clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Massachusetts, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Massachusetts for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Massachusetts showed across-the-board gains--improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low…

  20. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Kentucky, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Kentucky for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Kentucky showed mostly gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls.…

  1. Research methods for subgrouping low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Keating, Jennifer L; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable clinician and researcher interest in whether the outcomes for patients with low back pain, and the efficiency of the health systems that treat them, can be improved by 'subgrouping research'. Subgrouping research seeks to identify subgroups of people who have clinically...... studies (a method framework). The aims of this debate article are: (1) to present a method framework to inform the design and evaluation of subgrouping research in low back pain, (2) to describe method options when investigating prognostic effects or subgroup treatment effects, and (3) to discuss...

  2. Subgroup Analysis of Trials Is Rarely Easy (SATIRE: a study protocol for a systematic review to characterize the analysis, reporting, and claim of subgroup effects in randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaga German

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subgroup analyses in randomized trials examine whether effects of interventions differ between subgroups of study populations according to characteristics of patients or interventions. However, findings from subgroup analyses may be misleading, potentially resulting in suboptimal clinical and health decision making. Few studies have investigated the reporting and conduct of subgroup analyses and a number of important questions remain unanswered. The objectives of this study are: 1 to describe the reporting of subgroup analyses and claims of subgroup effects in randomized controlled trials, 2 to assess study characteristics associated with reporting of subgroup analyses and with claims of subgroup effects, and 3 to examine the analysis, and interpretation of subgroup effects for each study's primary outcome. Methods We will conduct a systematic review of 464 randomized controlled human trials published in 2007 in the 118 Core Clinical Journals defined by the National Library of Medicine. We will randomly select journal articles, stratified in a 1:1 ratio by higher impact versus lower impact journals. According to 2007 ISI total citations, we consider the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, and BMJ as higher impact journals. Teams of two reviewers will independently screen full texts of reports for eligibility, and abstract data, using standardized, pilot-tested extraction forms. We will conduct univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses to examine the association of pre-specified study characteristics with reporting of subgroup analyses and with claims of subgroup effects for the primary and any other outcomes. Discussion A clear understanding of subgroup analyses, as currently conducted and reported in published randomized controlled trials, will reveal both strengths and weaknesses of this practice. Our findings will contribute to a set of recommendations to optimize

  3. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Delaware students showed consistent gains in math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. There were mixed results in reading. Achievement gaps narrowed in both reading and math in…

  4. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Maine students had across-the-board gains. There were improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for the subgroups large enough to count, which were white students, low income students, and boys and girls. Results on…

  5. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Illinois students showed mostly gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. There was mixed progress made in narrowing achievement gaps in reading and math…

  6. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Florida students showed gains almost across the board in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. Progress has been made in narrowing achievement gaps in both…

  7. ∗-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    supplemented maximal and minimal subgroups of Sylow subgroups of finite groups, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 132(8) (2004) 2197–2204. [17] Wang Y, Wei H and Li Y, A generalization of Kramer's theorem and its applications,. Bull. Austral. Math.

  8. Existence of a dictatorial subgroup in social choice with independent subgroup utility scales, an alternative proof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna; van Deemen, Adrian; Rusinowska, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Social welfare orderings for different scales of individual utility measurement in distinct population subgroups are studied. In Khmelnitskaya (2000), employing the continuous version of Arrow’s impossibility theorem, it was shown that for combinations of independent subgroups scales every

  9. The effects of status on subgroup relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Hogg, Michael A

    2002-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the impact of status differentials on subgroup attitudes and behaviours. In Experiment 1, 73 math-science students were led to believe they had higher or lower status than humanities students. They then performed a non-interactive decision-making task during which they were categorized exclusively as a university student (superordinate condition), or as a university student and math-science student simultaneously (subgroups condition). Experiment 2 (N = 98) differed from Experiment 1 in that perceptions of relative subgroup status were measured rather than manipulated. Consistent with social identity theory, subgroup members tended to categorize themselves more at the superordinate (university) level the lower status they considered their subgroup to be. In Experiment 2, a series of interactions also emerged, showing that status and inter-subgroup bias were positively related when the participants had been categorized exclusively at the superordinate level. When superordinate and subgroup identities were activated simultaneously, perceptions of status had no effect on levels of bias. The results were interpreted in terms of participants' needs for identity enhancement and identity distinctiveness.

  10. Identifying Tinnitus Subgroups With Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Richard; Coelho, Claudia; Tao, Pan; Ji, Haihong; Noble, William; Gehringer, Anne; Gogel, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We believe it is important to uncover tinnitus subgroups to identify subsets of patients most likely to benefit from different treatments. We review strategies for subgrouping based on etiology, subjective reports, the audiogram, psychoacoustics, imaging, and cluster analysis. Method Preliminary results of a 2-step cluster analysis based on 246 participants from whom we had 26 categorical and 25 continuous variables were determined. Results A 4-cluster solution suggested the following subgroups: (a) constant distressing tinnitus, (b) varying tinnitus that is worse in noise, (c) tinnitus patients who are copers and whose tinnitus is not influenced by touch (somatic modulation), and (d) tinnitus patients who are copers but whose tinnitus is worse in quiet environments. Conclusions Subgroups of tinnitus patients can be identified by using statistical approaches. The subgroups we identify here represent a preliminary attempt at identifying such patients. One next step would be to explore clinical trials of tinnitus treatments based on subgroup analyses or on using subgroups in the selection criteria. PMID:19056922

  11. Identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chaleil

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some hypotheses concerning the identification of homogeneous subgroups among fibromyalgia (FM patients in order to improve the management of the disease. It also reviews the available literature about this subject. Three methods for subgrouping are discussed according to clinical features, biomarkers, and gait analysis. Clinical subgrouping based on cluster analysis has been used for the identification of homogeneous subgroups of patients and, more recently, homogeneous clinical features. So far, longitudinal studies using clinical subgroups to direct treatment and predict outcome are still required. Biomarkers in FM, which is a neurobiological disease, are of promising interest, nevertheless currently, none of them can be used to subgroup FM patients. Due to the fact that cortical and subcortical mechanisms of gait control share some cognitive functions which are involved in FM, gait markers have been proposed to evaluate and to subgroup FM patients, in clinical settings. Three out of 4 core FM symptoms are linked to gait markers. Kinesia measured by means of cranio-caudal power is correlated to pain, and could be proposed to assess pain behavior (kinesiophobia. Stride frequency, which is linked to physical component, allows the identification of a hyperkinetic subgroup. Moreover, SF has been correlated to fatigue during the 6 minute walking test. Stride regularity, which expresses the unsteadiness of gait, is correlated to cognitive dysfunction in FM. Decreased stride regularity allows the recognition of a homogeneous subgroup characterized by an increased anxiety and depression, and decreased cognitive functions. These results need further studies to be validated and so used in the daily clinical practice.

  12. SUBGR: A Program to Generate Subgroup Data for the Subgroup Resonance Self-Shielding Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-06

    The Subgroup Data Generation (SUBGR) program generates subgroup data, including levels and weights from the resonance self-shielded cross section table as a function of background cross section. Depending on the nuclide and the energy range, these subgroup data can be generated by (a) narrow resonance approximation, (b) pointwise flux calculations for homogeneous media; and (c) pointwise flux calculations for heterogeneous lattice cells. The latter two options are performed by the AMPX module IRFFACTOR. These subgroup data are to be used in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) neutronic simulator MPACT, for which the primary resonance self-shielding method is the subgroup method.

  13. Fast determination of structurally cohesive subgroups in large networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovits, Robert S; Moody, James; Oztan, B Tolga; White, Douglas R

    2016-11-01

    Structurally cohesive subgroups are a powerful and mathematically rigorous way to characterize network robustness. Their strength lies in the ability to detect strong connections among vertices that not only have no neighbors in common, but that may be distantly separated in the graph. Unfortunately, identifying cohesive subgroups is a computationally intensive problem, which has limited empirical assessments of cohesion to relatively small graphs of at most a few thousand vertices. We describe here an approach that exploits the properties of cliques, k-cores and vertex separators to iteratively reduce the complexity of the graph to the point where standard algorithms can be used to complete the analysis. As a proof of principle, we apply our method to the cohesion analysis of a 29,462-vertex biconnected component extracted from a 128,151-vertex co-authorship data set.

  14. Genetic and molecular alterations across medulloblastoma subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Patryk; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumour diagnosed in children. Over the last few decades, advances in radiation and chemotherapy have significantly improved the odds of survival. Nevertheless, one third of all patients still succumb to their disease, and many long-term survivors are afflicted with neurocognitive sequelae. Large-scale multi-institutional efforts have provided insight into the transcriptional and genetic landscape of medulloblastoma. Four distinct subgroups of medulloblastoma have been identified, defined by distinct transcriptomes, genetics, demographics and outcomes. Integrated genomic profiling of each of these subgroups has revealed distinct genetic alterations, driving pathways and in some instances cells of origin. In this review, we highlight, in a subgroup-specific manner, our current knowledge of the genetic and molecular alterations in medulloblastoma and underscore the possible avenues for future therapeutic intervention.

  15. A method for identifying genetic heterogeneity within phenotypically defined disease subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liley, James; Todd, John A; Wallace, Chris

    2017-02-01

    Many common diseases show wide phenotypic variation. We present a statistical method for determining whether phenotypically defined subgroups of disease cases represent different genetic architectures, in which disease-associated variants have different effect sizes in two subgroups. Our method models the genome-wide distributions of genetic association statistics with mixture Gaussians. We apply a global test without requiring explicit identification of disease-associated variants, thus maximizing power in comparison to standard variant-by-variant subgroup analysis. Where evidence for genetic subgrouping is found, we present methods for post hoc identification of the contributing genetic variants. We demonstrate the method on a range of simulated and test data sets, for which expected results are already known. We investigate subgroups of individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) defined by autoantibody positivity, establishing evidence for differential genetic architecture with positivity for thyroid-peroxidase-specific antibody, driven generally by variants in known T1D-associated genomic regions.

  16. On Preferential sylow fuzzy subgroups | Makamba | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, for a prime p, we propose some plausible denitions for the notion of Sylow fuzzy p-subgroup of a nite group. We derive a number of results for nite fuzzy groups using one of the proposed denitions. We also discuss some of the relationships between various proposed denitions for suitability, including the crisp ...

  17. Zero-sum problems with subgroup weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this note, we generalize some theorems on zero-sums with weights from [1], [4] and [5] in two directions. In particular, we consider Z Z p d for a general and subgroups of Z p ∗ as weights. Author Affiliations. S D Adhikari1 A A Ambily2 B Sury2. Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 ...

  18. Interpretation of Subgroup Effects in Published Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Mark J; Kjær, Per; Korsholm, Lars

    2013-01-01

    that report on treatment effect modifiers (subgroups) for specific physical therapy interventions. The key messages are: (1) point estimates of treatment modifier effect size (interaction effect) and their confidence intervals can be calculated using group-level data when individual patient-level data...

  19. On s-semipermutable subgroups of finite groups and p-nilpotency

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. All groups considered in this paper are finite groups. Most of the notations are standard and can be found in [4] and [3]. Recall that a group H is said to be s-permutable (s-quasinormal) [6] in G if HP = PH for all Sylow subgroups P of G. A subgroup H of a group G is called s-semipermutable [2]. inGif it is ...

  20. Topological groups with dense compactly generated subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujita

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available A topological group G is: (i compactly generated if it contains a compact subset algebraically generating G, (ii -compact if G is a union of countably many compact subsets, (iii 0-bounded if arbitrary neighborhood U of the identity element of G has countably many translates xU that cover G, and (iv finitely generated modulo open sets if for every non-empty open subset U of G there exists a finite set F such that F  U algebraically generates G. We prove that: (1 a topological group containing a dense compactly generated subgroup is both 0-bounded and finitely generated modulo open sets, (2 an almost metrizable topological group has a dense compactly generated subgroup if and only if it is both 0-bounded and finitely generated modulo open sets, and (3 an almost metrizable topological group is compactly generated if and only if it is -compact and finitely generated modulo open sets.

  1. Factorizing profinite groups into two Abelian subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Herfort

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We prove that the class of profinite groups $G$ that have a factorization $G=AB$with $A$ and $B$ abelian closed subgroups, is closed under taking strict projective limits.This is a generalization of a recent result by K.H.~Hofmann and F.G.~Russo.As an application we reprove their generalization of Iwasawa's structure theorem forquasihamiltonian pro-$p$ groups.

  2. MPACT Subgroup Self-Shielding Efficiency Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Yuxuan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Recent developments to improve the efficiency of the MOC solvers in MPACT have yielded effective kernels that loop over several energy groups at once, rather that looping over one group at a time. These kernels have produced roughly a 2x speedup on the MOC sweeping time during eigenvalue calculation. However, the self-shielding subgroup calculation had not been reevaluated to take advantage of these new kernels, which typically requires substantial solve time. The improvements covered in this report start by integrating the multigroup kernel concepts into the subgroup calculation, which are then used as the basis for further extensions. The next improvement that is covered is what is currently being termed as “Lumped Parameter MOC”. Because the subgroup calculation is a purely fixed source problem and multiple sweeps are performed only to update the boundary angular fluxes, the sweep procedure can be condensed to allow for the instantaneous propagation of the flux across a spatial domain, without the need to sweep along all segments in a ray. Once the boundary angular fluxes are considered to be converged, an additional sweep that will tally the scalar flux is completed. The last improvement that is investigated is the possible reduction of the number of azimuthal angles per octant in the shielding sweep. Typically 16 azimuthal angles per octant are used for self-shielding and eigenvalue calculations, but it is possible that the self-shielding sweeps are less sensitive to the number of angles than the full eigenvalue calculation.

  3. The ergodic theory of lattice subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Gorodnik, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The results established in this book constitute a new departure in ergodic theory and a significant expansion of its scope. Traditional ergodic theorems focused on amenable groups, and relied on the existence of an asymptotically invariant sequence in the group, the resulting maximal inequalities based on covering arguments, and the transference principle. Here, Alexander Gorodnik and Amos Nevo develop a systematic general approach to the proof of ergodic theorems for a large class of non-amenable locally compact groups and their lattice subgroups. Simple general conditions on the spectral theory of the group and the regularity of the averaging sets are formulated, which suffice to guarantee convergence to the ergodic mean

  4. Subgrouping the autism "spectrum": reflections on DSM-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Lai

    Full Text Available DSM-5 has moved autism from the level of subgroups ("apples and oranges" to the prototypical level ("fruit". But making progress in research, and ultimately improving clinical practice, will require identifying subgroups within the autism spectrum.

  5. Notes on relatively hyperbolic groups and relatively quasiconvex subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Yoshifumi; Oguni, Shin-ichi; Yamagata, Saeko

    2013-01-01

    We define relatively quasiconvex subgroups of relatively hyperbolic groups in the sense of Osin and show that such subgroups have expected properties. Also we state several definitions equivalent to the definition of relatively hyperbolic groups in the sense of Osin.

  6. Additive subgroups of topological vector spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Banaszczyk, Wojciech

    1991-01-01

    The Pontryagin-van Kampen duality theorem and the Bochner theorem on positive-definite functions are known to be true for certain abelian topological groups that are not locally compact. The book sets out to present in a systematic way the existing material. It is based on the original notion of a nuclear group, which includes LCA groups and nuclear locally convex spaces together with their additive subgroups, quotient groups and products. For (metrizable, complete) nuclear groups one obtains analogues of the Pontryagin duality theorem, of the Bochner theorem and of the Lévy-Steinitz theorem on rearrangement of series (an answer to an old question of S. Ulam). The book is written in the language of functional analysis. The methods used are taken mainly from geometry of numbers, geometry of Banach spaces and topological algebra. The reader is expected only to know the basics of functional analysis and abstract harmonic analysis.

  7. Can the tinnitus spectrum identify tinnitus subgroups?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin M Heijneman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tinnitus spectrum is a psycho-acoustic metric of tinnitus. Previous work found a tight relation between the spectrum and the tone audiogram. This suggests that the spectrum and the audiogram provide essentially the same information, and the added value of the spectrum is limited. In order to test whether the spectrum shows tinnitus characteristics that cannot be inferred from the audiogram, we re-examined the relation between the tinnitus spectrum and the tone audiogram, in a group of 80 tinnitus patients. We defined three subgroups of patients, using the shape of their tinnitus spectrum: (1 patients with a spectrum, monotonously increasing with frequency (2 patients with a distinct peak in their spectrum, (3 all other patients. Patients in group 3 typically showed low frequency tinnitus spectra. In all three groups, the largest hearing loss was at high frequencies (>2 kHz. The mean audiograms of group 1 and 2 were remarkably similar; group 3 had an additional hearing loss for the lower frequencies (<2 kHz. The three groups did not differ with respect to age, sex, or tinnitus questionnaire outcomes. In subgroups 2 and 3, the shape of the spectrum clearly differed from that of the tone audiogram. In other words, the spectrum technique provided information that could not have been obtained by tone audiometry alone. Therefore, the spectrum measurement may develop into a technique that can differentiate between classes of tinnitus. This may eventually contribute to the effective management of tinnitus, as various classes of tinnitus may require different therapeutic interventions.

  8. Subgroup analysis in burnout : Relations between fatigue, anxiety, and depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, A.

    2016-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup

  9. Prevalence, Gender and Level of Schooling Differences in Secondary School Students Level of Shyness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onukwufor, Jonathan N.; Iruloh, Betty-Ruth Ngozi

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to ascertain the prevalence, gender and level of schooling differences in secondary school students' level of shyness in Ikwerre Local Government Area of Rivers State. Population of the study comprised all the senior secondary school class two (SSS II) and all the Junior Secondary school class two (JSS II) students in the…

  10. The Impact of the University Students' Level of Alienation on Their Perception of General Satistaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçire, Ilhan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of university students' level of alienation on their general satisfaction. The study was carried out using rational screening model. The total participants of this study were 551 Dicle University students, studying at Medical, Technology, and Ziya Gökalp Education Faculty departments. The…

  11. Graduate Counseling Students' Levels of Ego Development, Wellness, and Psychological Disturbance: An Exploratory Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambie, Glenn W.; Smith, Heather L.; Ieva, Kara P.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the findings of a descriptive, correlational study of 111 graduate counseling students' levels of ego development (L. X. Hy & J. Loevinger, 1996), wellness (J. E. Myers & T. J. Sweeney, 2005), and psychological disturbance (M. J. Lambert et al., 2004). Higher levels of ego maturity were associated with higher wellness scores.…

  12. Weinberg Angle Derivation from Discrete Subgroups of SU(2 and All That

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Weinberg angle W of the Standard Model of leptons and quarks is derived from specific discrete (i.e., finite subgroups of the electroweak local gauge group SU(2 L U(1 Y . In addition, the cancellation of the triangle anomaly is achieved even when there are four quark families and three lepton families!

  13. Novel molecular subgroups for clinical classification and outcome prediction in childhood medulloblastoma: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Edward C; Lindsey, Janet C; Nakjang, Sirintra; Crosier, Stephen; Smith, Amanda J; Hicks, Debbie; Rafiee, Gholamreza; Hill, Rebecca M; Iliasova, Alice; Stone, Thomas; Pizer, Barry; Michalski, Antony; Joshi, Abhijit; Wharton, Stephen B; Jacques, Thomas S; Bailey, Simon; Williamson, Daniel; Clifford, Steven C

    2017-07-01

    childhood patients (≥4·3 years; MBSHH-Child; n=38). MBGrp3 and MBGrp4 were each split into high-risk (MBGrp3-HR [n=65] and MBGrp4-HR [n=85]) and low-risk (MBGrp3-LR [n=50] and MBGrp4-LR [n=73]) subgroups. These biological subgroups were validated in the independent cohort. We identified features of the seven subgroups that were predictive of outcome. Cross-validated subgroup-dependent survival models, incorporating these novel subgroups along with secondary clinicopathological and molecular features and established disease risk-factors, outperformed existing disease risk-stratification schemes. These subgroup-dependent models stratified patients into four clinical risk groups for 5-year progression-free survival: favourable risk (54 [25%] of 215 patients; 91% survival [95% CI 82-100]); standard risk (50 [23%] patients; 81% survival [70-94]); high-risk (82 [38%] patients; 42% survival [31-56]); and very high-risk (29 [13%] patients; 28% survival [14-56]). The discovery of seven novel, clinically significant subgroups improves disease risk-stratification and could inform treatment decisions. These data provide a new foundation for future research and clinical investigations. Cancer Research UK, The Tom Grahame Trust, Star for Harris, Action Medical Research, SPARKS, The JGW Patterson Foundation, The INSTINCT network (co-funded by The Brain Tumour Charity, Great Ormond Street Children's Charity, and Children with Cancer UK). Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Subgroups in Bilateral Meniere Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejo, Lidia; Soto-Varela, Andres; Santos-Perez, Sofía; Aran, Ismael; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Perez-Guillen, Vanesa; Perez-Garrigues, Herminio; Fraile, Jesus; Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Tapia, Maria C.; Trinidad, Gabriel; García-Arumi, Ana María; González-Aguado, Rocío; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Marques, Pedro; Perez, Paz; Benitez, Jesus; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Meniere disease (MD) is a heterogeneous clinical condition characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, episodic vestibular symptoms, and tinnitus associated with several comorbidities, such as migraine or autoimmune disorders (AD). The frequency of bilateral involvement may range from 5 to 50%, and it depends on the duration of the disease. We have performed a two-step cluster analysis in 398 patients with bilateral MD (BMD) to identify the best predictors to define clinical subgroups with a potential different etiology to improve the phenotyping of BMD and to develop new treatments. We have defined five clinical variants in BMD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 46% of patients, and is defined by metachronic hearing loss without migraine and without AD. Group 2 is found in 17% of patients, and it is defined by synchronic hearing loss without migraine or AD. Group 3, with 13% of patients, is characterized by familial MD, while group 4, that includes 12% of patients, is associated by the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by AD. This approach can be helpful in selecting patients for genetic and clinical research. However, further studies will be required to improve the phenotyping in these clinical variants for a better understanding of the diverse etiological factors contributing to BMD. PMID:27822199

  15. Report of the Production and Delivery Subgroup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R; Zalesky, R

    2004-11-01

    The Production and Delivery Subgroup was tasked with evaluating the various options that could be used for hydrogen production and delivery in terms of availability/industry readiness, technical and economic barriers, and environmental considerations. Hydrogen can be produced using a variety of feedstocks and conversion technologies. The feedstock options include water, natural gas, coal, petroleum, methanol, ethanol, biomass, and organic waste streams. Ultimately, using these domestic resources we will be able to produce all the hydrogen we will need for the complete conversion of our transportation infrastructure. The various conversion technologies include electrolysis, reforming (principally of natural gas, but also ethanol and methanol), photobiological and photoelectrochemical, biofermentation, pyrolysis and gasification of biomass and coal, high temperature thermochemical, and catalytic membranes. All of these production technologies are being actively researched by DOE's Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT); and other offices within DOE support work that complements the HFCIT Program activities. In addition, private industry is also dedicating significant resources to these efforts. In establishing the California Hydrogen Highway Network (CA H2 Net) we must utilize both distributed (that is, hydrogen that is produced at the point of use) as well as centralized production of hydrogen. Because of technical and economic barriers, most of the technologies for hydrogen production listed above will not become practical for either mode of hydrogen production in large quantities until at least the 2015-2030 timeframe. In the near term, that is, the transitional period between now and 2010 when we will establish a widely available hydrogen fueling infrastructure in California, the distributed production options of reforming and electrolysis will play the dominant role. In addition, production of hydrogen at centralized plants

  16. Planar algebra of the subgroup-subfactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The crucial step in this identification is an exhibition of a model for the basic construction tower, and thereafter of the standard invariant of R ⋊ H ⊂ R ⋊ G in terms of operator matrices. We also obtain an identification between the planar algebra of the fixed algebra subfactor R G ⊂ R H and the -invariant planar subalgebra ...

  17. Planar algebra of the subgroup-subfactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G in terms of operator matrices. We also obtain an identification between the planar algebra of the fixed algebra sub- factor RG ⊂ RH and the G-invariant planar subalgebra of the planar algebra of the 'flip' of ⋆n. Keywords. Planar algebras; subfactors; standard invariant. 1. Introduction. For every pair H ⊂ G of finite groups, ...

  18. Personalized dementia care: proven effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mierlo, L.D.; van der Roest, H.G.; Meiland, F.J.M.; Dröes, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Many psychosocial intervention studies report effects in subgroups of people with dementia. Insight into the characteristics of these subgroups is important for care practice. This study reviews personal characteristics of people with dementia (living in the community or in an institution) that are

  19. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: District of Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The District's demographics are such that achievement trends could only be determined for African American, male and female, and low income subgroups. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Washington, DC students showed gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels…

  20. Identifying subgroups of patients using latent class analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Mølgaard; Kent, Peter; Hestbæk, Lise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in patients with low back pain (LBP) is well recognised and different approaches to subgrouping have been proposed. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) is a statistical technique that is increasingly being used to identify subgroups based on patient characteristics. However, as ...

  1. A Systematic Approach to Subgroup Classification in Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalock, Robert L.; Luckasson, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a systematic approach to subgroup classification based on a classification framework and sequential steps involved in the subgrouping process. The sequential steps are stating the purpose of the classification, identifying the classification elements, using relevant information, and using clearly stated and purposeful…

  2. Characteristic properties of large subgroups in primary abelian groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Invariant properties of large subgroups. We start with some extensions of totally projective p-groups, namely: 1. p-torsion A-groups. Several details on A-groups appear in [7]. For example, any p- torsion abelian A-group is an isotype subgroup of a totally projective p-group with special properties described in [7]. Theorem 1.

  3. Multiplicity-adjusted semiparametric benefiting subgroup identification in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Patrick M; Müller, Peter; Tang, Qi; Carlin, Bradley P

    2018-02-01

    Background A recent focus in the health sciences has been the development of personalized medicine, which includes determining the population for which a given treatment is effective. Due to limited data, identifying the true benefiting population is a challenging task. To tackle this difficulty, the credible subgroups approach provides a pair of bounding subgroups for the true benefiting subgroup, constructed so that one is contained by the benefiting subgroup while the other contains the benefiting subgroup with high probability. However, the method has so far only been developed for parametric linear models. Methods In this article, we develop the details required to follow the credible subgroups approach in more realistic settings by considering nonlinear and semiparametric regression models, supported for regulatory science by conditional power simulations. We also present an improved multiple testing approach using a step-down procedure. We evaluate our approach via simulations and apply it to data from four trials of Alzheimer's disease treatments carried out by AbbVie. Results Semiparametric modeling yields credible subgroups that are more robust to violations of linear treatment effect assumptions, and careful choice of the population of interest as well as the step-down multiple testing procedure result in a higher rate of detection of benefiting types of patients. The approach allows us to identify types of patients that benefit from treatment in the Alzheimer's disease trials. Conclusion Attempts to identify benefiting subgroups of patients in clinical trials are often met with skepticism due to a lack of multiplicity control and unrealistically restrictive assumptions. Our proposed approach merges two techniques, credible subgroups, and semiparametric regression, which avoids these problems and makes benefiting subgroup identification practical and reliable.

  4. A comparison of five recursive partitioning methods to find person subgroups involved in meaningful treatment-subgroup interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doove, L. L.; Dusseldorp, E.; Van Deun, K.; Van Mechelen, I.

    2014-01-01

    In case multiple treatment alternatives are available for some medical problem, the detection of treatment–subgroup interactions (i.e., relative treatment effectiveness varying over subgroups of persons) is of key importance for personalized medicine and the development of optimal treatment

  5. Identification of Responders to Amiodarone: Subgroup Analysis of the EMIAT Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kehl, Victoria; Ulm, Kurt; Schmidt, G; Barthel, P.; Malik, Marek

    2003-01-01

    Clinical trials often judge the efficacy of a new treatment by comparing the survival patterns of patients who are randomly assigned to undergo the new or a standard/placebo treatment. Usually, the entire groups are analyzed, although certain subgroups of patients may react differently to the new treatment than others. Some patients taking the new treatment might benefit from it (the positive responders) while others may be harmed by it (the negative responders). We applied a newly developed ...

  6. Clinical trials with nested subgroups: Analysis, sample size determination and internal pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placzek, Marius; Friede, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The importance of subgroup analyses has been increasing due to a growing interest in personalized medicine and targeted therapies. Considering designs with multiple nested subgroups and a continuous endpoint, we develop methods for the analysis and sample size determination. First, we consider the joint distribution of standardized test statistics that correspond to each (sub)population. We derive multivariate exact distributions where possible, providing approximations otherwise. Based on these results, we present sample size calculation procedures. Uncertainties about nuisance parameters which are needed for sample size calculations make the study prone to misspecifications. We discuss how a sample size review can be performed in order to make the study more robust. To this end, we implement an internal pilot study design where the variances and prevalences of the subgroups are reestimated in a blinded fashion and the sample size is recalculated accordingly. Simulations show that the procedures presented here do not inflate the type I error significantly and maintain the prespecified power as long as the sample size of the smallest subgroup is not too small. We pay special attention to the case of small sample sizes and attain a lower boundary for the size of the internal pilot study.

  7. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  8. Demonstration of Microbial Subgroups among Normal Vaginal Microbiota Data

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, M.-L. T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we identified subgroups of observations relating to the healthy vaginal microbiota. This microbiota resides in a dynamic environment that undergoes cyclic change during the menstrual cycle. Cluster analysis procedures were applied to divide a set of 226 normal microbiota observations into groups. Three subgroups containing 100, 65, and 61 observations were identified. Plots of principal components determined by canonical analysis were obtained to demonstrate graphically the clus...

  9. On T-Characterized Subgroups of Compact Abelian Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saak Gabriyelyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A sequence \\(\\{ u_n \\}_{n\\in \\omega}\\ in abstract additively-written Abelian group \\(G\\ is called a \\(T\\-sequence if there is a Hausdorff group topology on \\(G\\ relative to which \\(\\lim_n u_n =0\\. We say that a subgroup \\(H\\ of an infinite compact Abelian group \\(X\\ is \\(T\\-characterized if there is a \\(T\\-sequence \\(\\mathbf{u} =\\{ u_n \\}\\ in the dual group of \\(X\\, such that \\(H=\\{ x\\in X: \\; (u_n, x\\to 1 \\}\\. We show that a closed subgroup \\(H\\ of \\(X\\ is \\(T\\-characterized if and only if \\(H\\ is a \\(G_\\delta\\-subgroup of \\(X\\ and the annihilator of \\(H\\ admits a Hausdorff minimally almost periodic group topology. All closed subgroups of an infinite compact Abelian group \\(X\\ are \\(T\\-characterized if and only if \\(X\\ is metrizable and connected. We prove that every compact Abelian group \\(X\\ of infinite exponent has a \\(T\\-characterized subgroup, which is not an \\(F_{\\sigma}\\-subgroup of \\(X\\, that gives a negative answer to Problem 3.3 in Dikranjan and Gabriyelyan (Topol. Appl. 2013, 160, 2427–2442.

  10. A Bayesian subgroup analysis using collections of ANOVA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinzhong; Sivaganesan, Siva; Laud, Purushottam W; Müller, Peter

    2017-07-01

    We develop a Bayesian approach to subgroup analysis using ANOVA models with multiple covariates, extending an earlier work. We assume a two-arm clinical trial with normally distributed response variable. We also assume that the covariates for subgroup finding are categorical and are a priori specified, and parsimonious easy-to-interpret subgroups are preferable. We represent the subgroups of interest by a collection of models and use a model selection approach to finding subgroups with heterogeneous effects. We develop suitable priors for the model space and use an objective Bayesian approach that yields multiplicity adjusted posterior probabilities for the models. We use a structured algorithm based on the posterior probabilities of the models to determine which subgroup effects to report. Frequentist operating characteristics of the approach are evaluated using simulation. While our approach is applicable in more general cases, we mainly focus on the 2 × 2 case of two covariates each at two levels for ease of presentation. The approach is illustrated using a real data example. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Subgroup Analysis in Burnout: Relations Between Fatigue, Anxiety, and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup analysis may also help clarify whether burnout is a distinct entity and whether subgroups of burnout overlap with other disorders such as depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. In a group of 113 clinically diagnosed burned out patients, levels of fatigue, depression, and anxiety were assessed. In order to identify possible subgroups, we performed a two-step cluster analysis. The analysis revealed two clusters that differed from one another in terms of symptom severity on the three aforementioned measures. Depression appeared to be the strongest predictor of group membership. These results are considered in the light of the scientific debate on whether burnout can be distinguished from depression and whether burnout subtyping is useful. Finally, implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:26869983

  12. Subgroup analysis in burnout: relations between fatigue, anxiety and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno eVan Dam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup analysis may also help clarify whether burnout is a distinct entity and whether subgroups of burnout overlap with other disorders such as depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. In a group of 113 clinically-diagnosed burned out patients, levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety were assessed. In order to identify possible subgroups, we performed a two-step cluster analysis. The analysis revealed two clusters that differed from one another in terms of symptom severity on the three aforementioned measures. Depression appeared to be the strongest predictor of group membership. These results are considered in the light of the scientific debate on whether burnout can be distinguished from depression and whether burnout subtyping is useful. Finally, implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  13. Cluster analysis of clinical data identifies fibromyalgia subgroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Docampo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Fibromyalgia (FM is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. RESULTS: VARIABLES CLUSTERED INTO THREE INDEPENDENT DIMENSIONS: "symptomatology", "comorbidities" and "clinical scales". Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1, high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2, and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3, showing differences in measures of disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment.

  14. Plateau Iris Distribution Across Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography Defined Subgroups of Subjects With Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sushma; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Oo, Hnin H; Atalay, Eray; Goh, David; Wong, Tina T; Perera, Shamira A; Aung, Tin

    2017-10-01

    We previously identified three distinct subgroups of patients with primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) based on anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT) imaging. Group 1 was characterized by a large iris area with deepest anterior chambers, group 2 by a large lens vault (LV) and shallow anterior chamber depth (ACD), and group 3 displayed intermediate values across iris area, LV, and ACD. The purpose of the present study was to determine the distribution of plateau iris in these subgroups using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) features. UBM images of the 210 subjects who were previously enrolled for the ASOCT subgrouping analysis and had undergone laser peripheral iridotomy were assessed and graded by a single glaucoma fellowship trained clinician. Plateau iris was defined as the presence of all the following UBM criteria in at least two quadrants: anteriorly directed ciliary body, absent ciliary sulcus, iris angulation, flat iris plane, and iridoangle touch. Of 210 subjects, 23 were excluded due to poor-quality images. Based on standardized UBM criteria, the overall prevalence of plateau iris was 36.9% (n = 187). The proportion of plateau iris was similar across the three groups (subgroup 1:35.4% (n = 29); subgroup 2:39.0% (n = 32); subgroup 3:34.8% (n = 8), P = 0.87). On multiple logistic regression analysis, iris thickness at 750 μm from the scleral spur (IT750) was the only variable associated with plateau iris (odds ratio: 1.5/100 μm increase in iris thickness [IT], P = 0.04). The proportion of plateau iris was similar across the three ASOCT-based PACG subgroups and more than one-third of subjects with PACG were diagnosed with plateau iris based on standardized UBM criteria. In addition, we noted that eyes with increased peripheral IT have an increased likelihood of plateau iris.

  15. Tracking cohesive subgroups over time in inferred social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Alvin; Chignell, Mark; Wang, Hao

    2010-04-01

    As a first step in the development of community trackers for large-scale online interaction, this paper shows how cohesive subgroup analysis using the Social Cohesion Analysis of Networks (SCAN; Chin and Chignell 2008) and Data-Intensive Socially Similar Evolving Community Tracker (DISSECT; Chin and Chignell 2010) methods can be applied to the problem of identifying cohesive subgroups and tracking them over time. Three case studies are reported, and the findings are used to evaluate how well the SCAN and DISSECT methods work for different types of data. In the largest of the case studies, variations in temporal cohesiveness are identified across a set of subgroups extracted from the inferred social network. Further modifications to the DISSECT methodology are suggested based on the results obtained. The paper concludes with recommendations concerning further research that would be beneficial in addressing the community tracking problem for online data.

  16. Young children with language difficulties: a dimensional approach to subgrouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rianne; Ceulemans, Eva; Grauwels, Jolien; Maljaars, Jarymke; Zink, Inge; Steyaert, Jean; Noens, Ilse

    2013-11-01

    A dimensional approach was used to create bottom-up constructed subgroups that captured the behavioral heterogeneity in 36 Dutch-speaking children with language difficulties. Four subgroups were delineated based upon differences in cognitive ability, symbol understanding, joint attention and autism spectrum disorder related characteristics. Children with a different developmental disorder were found within a single cluster. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that bottom-up constructed subgroups might capture the heterogeneous behavioral profiles of young children with developmental difficulties in a more meaningful way. Furthermore, joint attention and symbol understanding seem important skills to assess in young children presenting with language difficulties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential distributions of Synechococcus subgroups across the California Current System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan William Paerl

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Synechococcus is an abundant marine cyanobacterial genus composed of different populations that vary physiologically. Synechococcus narB gene sequences (encoding for nitrate reductase in cyanobacteria obtained previously from isolates and the environment (e.g. North Pacific Gyre Station ALOHA, Hawaii or Monterey Bay, California were used to develop quantitative PCR (qPCR assays. These qPCR assays were used to quantify populations from specific narB phylogenetic clades across the California Current System (CCS, a region composed of dynamic zones between a coastal-upwelling zone and the oligotrophic Pacific Ocean. Targeted populations (narB subgroups had different biogeographic patterns across the CCS, which appear to be driven by environmental conditions. Subgroups C_C1, D_C1 and D_C2 were abundant in coastal-upwelling to coastal-transition zone waters with relatively high to intermediate ammonium, nitrate and chl. a concentrations. Subgroups A_C1 and F_C1 were most abundant in coastal-transition zone waters with intermediate nutrient concentrations. E_O1 and G_O1 were most abundant at different depths of oligotrophic open-ocean waters (either in the upper mixed layer or just below. E_O1, A_C1 and F_C1 distributions differed from other narB subgroups and likely possess unique ecologies enabling them to be most abundant in waters between coastal and open-ocean waters. Different CCS zones possessed distinct Synechococcus communities. Core California Current (CC water possessed low numbers of narB subgroups relative to counted Synechococcus cells, and coastal-transition waters contained high abundances of Synechococcus cells and total number of narB subgroups. The presented biogeographic data provides insight on the distributions and ecologies of Synechococcus present in an eastern boundary current system.

  18. Discrete neurocognitive subgroups in fully or partially remitted bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johan Høy; Knorr, Ulla; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    significance difference pairwise comparison. RESULTS: Three discrete neurocognitive subgroups were detected: one that was cognitively intact (46.1%), one that was selectively impaired with deficits in processing speed (32.6%), and one that was globally impaired across verbal learning, working memory......, and executive skills (21.2%). The globally and selectively impaired subgroups were characterized by greater perceived stress and subjective cognitive complaints, poorer work and social adjustment, and reduced quality of life compared to patients who were cognitively intact. LIMITATIONS: The study design...

  19. Teacher's opinion about learning continuum of genetics based on student's level of competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniati, Etika; Subali, Bambang

    2017-08-01

    This study focuses on designing learning continuum for developing a curriculum. The objective of this study is to get the opinion of junior and senior high school teachers about Learning Continuum based on Student's Level of Competence and Specific Pedagogical Learning Material on Aspect of Genetics Aspects. This research is a survey research involving 281 teachers from junior and senior high school teachers as respondents taken from five districts and city in Yogyakarta Special Region. The results of this study show that most of the junior high school teachers argue that sub aspects individual reproduction should be taught to students of grade VII and IX, virus reproduction at the grade X, and cell reproduction to mutation at the grade IX with level of competence to understand (C2) while most of the senior high school teachers argue that sub aspects individual, cell, and virus reproduction must be taught to students of grade X and division mechanism to mutation at the grade XII with level of competence to understand (C2), apply (C3), and analyze (C4). Based on the opinion of teachers, sub concepts in genetics can be taught from junior high school with different in the scope of materials but learning continuum that has been developed is not relevant with the students cognitive development and their grades.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of digital versus film mammography: exploratory analysis of selected population subgroups in DMIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Etta D; Hendrick, R Edward; Yaffe, Martin J; Baum, Janet K; Acharyya, Suddhasatta; Cormack, Jean B; Hanna, Lucy A; Conant, Emily F; Fajardo, Laurie L; Bassett, Lawrence W; D'Orsi, Carl J; Jong, Roberta A; Rebner, Murray; Tosteson, Anna N A; Gatsonis, Constantine A

    2008-02-01

    To retrospectively compare the accuracy of digital versus film mammography in population subgroups of the Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) defined by combinations of age, menopausal status, and breast density, by using either biopsy results or follow-up information as the reference standard. DMIST included women who underwent both digital and film screening mammography. Institutional review board approval at all participating sites and informed consent from all participating women in compliance with HIPAA was obtained for DMIST and this retrospective analysis. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) for each modality were compared within each subgroup evaluated (age or= 65 years, dense vs nondense breasts at mammography, and pre- or perimenopausal vs postmenopausal status for the two younger age cohorts [10 new subgroups in toto]) while controlling for multiple comparisons (P film vs both vs neither), mammographic lesion type (mass, calcifications, or other), digital machine type, mammographic and pathologic size and diagnosis, existence of prior mammographic study at time of interpretation, months since prior mammographic study, and compressed breast thickness. Thirty-three centers enrolled 49 528 women. Breast cancer status was determined for 42,760 women, the group included in this study. Pre- or perimenopausal women younger than 50 years who had dense breasts at film mammography comprised the only subgroup for which digital mammography was significantly better than film (AUCs, 0.79 vs 0.54; P = .0015). Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System-based sensitivity in this subgroup was 0.59 for digital and 0.27 for film mammography. AUCs were not significantly different in any of the other subgroups. For women aged 65 years or older with fatty breasts, the AUC showed a nonsignificant tendency toward film being better than digital mammography (AUCs, 0.88 vs 0.70; P = .0025). Digital mammography performed significantly better

  1. Latino Male Ethnic Subgroups: Patterns in College Enrollment and Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponjuan, Luis; Palomin, Leticia; Calise, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines Latino male ethnic subgroups and their college enrollment and degree completion patterns. The chapter also offers recommendations to improve Latino male ethnic subgroups' educational achievement.

  2. A comparison of subgroup analyses in grant applications and publications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonacker, C.W.; Hoes, A.W.; Liere-Visser, K. van; Schilder, A.G.M.; Rovers, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the authors compare subgroup analyses as outlined in grant applications and their related publications. Grants awarded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) from 2001 onward that were finalized before March 1, 2010, were studied. Of the 79 grant

  3. Heterogeneity in response during multisystemic therapy: Exploring subgroups and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, E.C.A.; Dekovic, M.; Asscher, J.J.; Manders, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that Multisystemic Therapy (MST) is, at group level, an effective treatment for adolescents showing serious externalizing problem behavior. The current study expands previous research on MST by, first, examining whether subgroups of participants who respond differently to

  4. Heterogeneity in response during Multisystemic Therapy : Exploring subgroups and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, E.C.A.; Dekovic, M.; Asscher, J.J.; Manders, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that Multisystemic Therapy (MST) is, at group level, an effective treatment for adolescents showing serious externalizing problem behavior. The current study expands previous research on MST by, first, examining whether subgroups of participants who respond differently to

  5. Practical Algorithms for Subgroup Detection in Covert Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock; Qureshi, Pir Abdul Rasool

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present algorithms for subgroup detection and demonstrated them with a real-time case study of USS Cole bombing terrorist network. The algorithms are demonstrated in an application by a prototype system. The system finds associations between terrorist and terrorist organisations...

  6. Active medulloblastoma enhancers reveal subgroup-specific cellular origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles Y.; Erkek, Serap; Tong, Yiai; Yin, Linlin; Federation, Alexander J.; Zapatka, Marc; Haldipur, Parthiv; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Worst, Barbara C.; Ju, Bensheng; Orr, Brent A.; Zeid, Rhamy; Polaski, Donald R.; Segura-Wang, Maia; Waszak, Sebastian M.; Jones, David T.W.; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Buchhalter, Ivo; Sieber, Laura; Johann, Pascal; Chavez, Lukas; Gröschel, Stefan; Ryzhova, Marina; Korshunov, Andrey; Chen, Wenbiao; Chizhikov, Victor V.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Bradner, James E.; Northcott, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour, often inflicting devastating consequences on the developing child. Genomic studies have revealed four distinct molecular subgroups with divergent biology and clinical behaviour. An understanding of the regulatory circuitry governing the transcriptional landscapes of medulloblastoma subgroups, and how this relates to their respective developmental origins, is lacking. Using H3K27ac and BRD4 ChIP-Seq, coupled with tissue-matched DNA methylation and transcriptome data, we describe the active cis-regulatory landscape across 28 primary medulloblastoma specimens. Analysis of differentially regulated enhancers and super-enhancers reinforced inter-subgroup heterogeneity and revealed novel, clinically relevant insights into medulloblastoma biology. Computational reconstruction of core regulatory circuitry identified a master set of transcription factors, validated by ChIP-Seq, that are responsible for subgroup divergence and implicate candidate cells-of-origin for Group 4. Our integrated analysis of enhancer elements in a large series of primary tumour samples reveals insights into cis-regulatory architecture, unrecognized dependencies, and cellular origins. PMID:26814967

  7. Notes on discrete subgroups of Möbius transformations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Jørgensen's inequality gives a necessary condition for a nonelementary two generator subgroup of SL(2, C) to be discrete. By embedding SL(2, C) into. ˆU(1, 1; H), we obtain a new type of Jørgensen's inequality, which is in terms of the coefficients of involved isometries. We provide an example to show that this ...

  8. On approximation of Lie groups by discrete subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    voila.fr; salah.suissi@yahoo.fr. MS received 11 August 2012; revised 27 January 2013. Abstract. A locally compact group G is said to be approximated by discrete sub- groups (in the sense of Tôyama) if there is a sequence of discrete subgroups ...

  9. Depression in later life : three etiologically different subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, M.D.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Bouhuys, A.L.; Brilman, E.I.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Ormel, J.

    Background: Various studies support the notion that early onset depression and late onset depression have different etiological pathways. Late onset depression has been found to be a heterogeneous group. This study attempts to divide the late onset group in two subgroups with different aetiology and

  10. Detection of Problem Gambler Subgroups Using Recursive Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Francis; Young, Martin; Doran, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The multivariate socio-demographic risk factors for problem gambling have been well documented. While this body of research is valuable in determining risk factors aggregated across various populations, the majority of studies tend not to specifically identify particular subgroups of problem gamblers based on the interaction between variables. The…

  11. Differences in Psychosocial Predictors of Obesity Among LGBT Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jacob C; Smalley, K Bryant; Barefoot, K Nikki

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the overall presence of and differences in rates of overweight/obesity among a large, nationally diverse sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT)-identified individuals (i.e., cisgender lesbians, cisgender gay men, cisgender bisexual women, cisgender bisexual men, transgender women, and transgender men) and to identify specific psychosocial predictors of obesity within each of the six LGBT subgroups. A total of 2702 LGBT-identified participants participated in the online study. Participants completed a series of demographic questions (including weight and height) and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21. The percentage of participants who were overweight/obese did not differ significantly across LGBT subgroups, with 61.1% of the total sample being overweight/obese. However, the percentage of participants who self-reported body mass indexes in the obese range differed significantly across the six LGBT subgroups, with the highest prevalence in transgender men (46.0%). In addition, the predictors of obesity varied by subgroup, with age a significant predictor for cisgender lesbians, cisgender gay men, and cisgender bisexual women, relationship status for cisgender bisexual women, employment status for both cisgender gay men and cisgender bisexual women, education level for cisgender lesbians, and depression, anxiety, and stress for cisgender gay men. None of the examined psychosocial factors emerged as predictors of obesity for cisgender bisexual men, transgender women, or transgender men. These findings suggest that there are substantial variations in the presence and predictors of obesity across LGBT subgroups that support the need for culturally tailored healthy weight promotion efforts within the LGBT community.

  12. Clinical implications of medulloblastoma subgroups: incidence of CSF diversion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Rutka, James T; Remke, Marc; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    While medulloblastoma was initially thought to comprise a single homogeneous entity, it is now accepted that it in fact comprises 4 discrete subgroups, each with its own distinct demographics, clinical presentation, transcriptomics, genetics, and outcome. Hydrocephalus is a common complication of medulloblastoma and not infrequently requires CSF diversion. The authors report the incidence of CSF diversion surgery in each of the subgroups of medulloblastoma (Wnt, Shh, Group 3, and Group 4). The medical and imaging records for patients who underwent surgery for medulloblastoma at The Hospital for Sick Children were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome was the requirement for CSF diversion surgery either before or within 60 days of tumor resection. The modified Canadian Preoperative Prediction Rule for Hydrocephalus (mCPPRH) was compared among subgroups. Of 143 medulloblastoma patients, treated from 1991 to 2013, sufficient data were available for 130 patients (15 with Wnt, 30 with Shh, 30 with Group 3, and 55 with Group 4 medulloblastomas). Of these, 28 patients (22%) ultimately underwent CSF diversion surgery: 0% with Wnt, 29% with Shh, 29% with Group 3, and 43% with Group 4 tumors. Patients in the Wnt subgroup had a lower incidence of CSF diversion than all other patients combined (p = 0.04). Wnt patients had a lower mCPPRH score (lower risk of CSF diversion, p = 0.045), were older, had smaller ventricles at diagnosis, and had no leptomeningeal metastases. The overall rate of CSF diversion surgery for Shh, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas is around 30%, but no patients in the present series with a Wnt medulloblastoma required shunting. The low incidence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastoma likely reflects both host factors (age) and disease factors (lack of metastases). The absence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastomas likely contributes to their excellent rate of survival and may also contribute to a higher quality

  13. Cluster Analysis of Clinical Data Identifies Fibromyalgia Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, Elisa; Collado, Antonio; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Carbonell, Jordi; Rivera, Javier; Vidal, Javier; Alegre, José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia (FM) is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. Material and Methods 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. Results Variables clustered into three independent dimensions: “symptomatology”, “comorbidities” and “clinical scales”. Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1), high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2), and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3), showing differences in measures of disease severity. Conclusions We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment. PMID:24098674

  14. Measuring Educational Efficiency at Student Level with Parametric Stochastic Distance Functions: An Application to Spanish PISA Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, Sergio; Santin, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to examine the observed differences in Students' test performance across public and private-voucher schools in Spain. For this purpose, we explicitly consider that education is a multi-input multi-output production process subject to inefficient behaviors, which can be identified at student level using a parametric…

  15. Teachers' Motivating Methods to Support Thai Ninth Grade Students' Levels of Motivation and Learning in Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenthien, Sansanee; Loima, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this qualitative research were to investigate the level of motivation and learning of ninth grade students in mathematics classrooms in Thailand and to reveal how the teachers supported students' levels of motivation and learning. The participants were 333 students and 12 teachers in 12 mathematics classrooms from four regions of…

  16. The Predictive Degree of University Students' Levels of Metacognition and Need for Cognition on Their Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpur, Ugur

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the predictive degree of university students' levels of need for cognition and metacognition on their academic achievement. A total of 253 university students formed the study group. To collect the data of the study, "The Metacognition Awareness Inventory" (MAI) and "The Need for Cognition…

  17. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Alan G.; Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-06-18

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit wide vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.

  18. Distinguishing between Subgroups of Adolescents Who Self-Harm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, Emily; Hawton, Keith; Rodham, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The differences in factors associated with subgroups of adolescents in the continuum of deliberate self-harm (DSH) phenomena were investigated. In an anonymous self-report survey of 6,020 adolescents aged 15 and 16 years, 3.2% of adolescents (5.3% females, 1.3% males) reported DSH with intent to die, 2.8% (4.3% females; 1.5% males) reported DSH…

  19. Microscopic colitis: clinical findings, topography and persistence of histopathological subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnbak, C; Engel, P J H; Nielsen, P L; Munck, L K

    2011-11-01

    Uncertainty remains on topography and persistence of histological subgroups of microscopic colitis (MC). To assess longitudinal clinical, endoscopic, histological, and therapeutic description of MC subgroups including patients with incomplete findings of MC (MCi). Retrospective review of a consecutive cohort with MC and histological reassessment of MCi. Clinical characteristics of 168 patients with lymphocytic colitis (LC), 270 with collagenous colitis (CC) and 101 with MCi were similar. At colonoscopy 95% (95% CI: 91-98%) of CC and 98% (93-100%) of LC cases had diagnostic histopathology of MC in both left and right colon. Eight and three patients had characteristics of MC only in the left and right colon, respectively. Histology findings resembling coexistence of the other MC subtype was present in 48% (40-55%) with CC and 24% (18-31%) with LC. A first diagnosis of MC was made in 49 (30%) of 164 patients only at repeat endoscopy. Another 34 of 115 (30%) with MC in the first endoscopy did not fulfil the MC criteria at repeat endoscopy. Only seven cases had a primary endoscopy without histopathological abnormalities. Fifteen percentage of MCi were reclassified as MC. Ileal inflammation was present in 33 of 81 patients. Budesonide was efficacious in all MC subgroups irrespective of bile acid malabsorption. Clinical characteristics of microscopic colitis subgroups are indistinguishable. Biopsies from the left colon suffice to exclude microscopic colitis, and the histological diagnosis of microscopic colitis is inconsistent over time. Ileal inflammation is common. The term microscopic colitis should perhaps be considered one clinical entity and include lymphocytic colitis, collagenous colitis, and incomplete findings of microscopic colitis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Pain and Fatigue Variability Patterns Distinguish Subgroups of Fibromyalgia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Emily J; Robinson, Michael E; Staud, Roland

    2017-12-15

    The current study examined between- and within-subject variability in pain-related symptoms as predictors of pain and fatigue, and identified patient subgroups based upon symptom variability characteristics. Two hundred and fifty-six fibromyalgia (FM) patients completed daily diaries up to a period of 154 days and reported on symptoms of pain intensity, pain unpleasantness, fatigue, anxiety, and depressed mood. Measures of health status, quality of life, and somatic symptoms were obtained at baseline, and hierarchical linear modeling and cluster analyses were employed. Significant intra- and inter-individual variability in daily FM symptoms was observed. Higher levels of pain were associated with greater fluctuations in pain unpleasantness, fatigue, and depressed mood. Similar effects were observed for fatigue and individual variability in anxiety also emerged as a robust predictor. Three FM subgroups were revealed: low variability in symptoms (Cluster 1), high symptom variability (Cluster 2), and a mixed variability group characterized by low fluctuation in pain unpleasantness; moderate pain, fatigue, and depressed mood variability; and high anxiety variability (Cluster 3). Cluster 3 exhibited lower social functioning and higher levels of pain, compared to Cluster 1. These findings support the dynamic nature of FM pain and suggest the presence of FM subgroups based upon variation in mood and pain symptomatology. Fibromyalgia patients display significant intra- and inter-individual variability in pain, mood, and fatigue. Subgroups in mood and pain-related variability emerged, with phenotypic clusters differing across levels of pain intensity and social functioning. Better understanding of the processes impacting pain variability may facilitate targeted treatments for the control of pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Irreducible almost simple subgroups of classical algebraic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Burness, Timothy C; Marion, Claude; Testerman, Donna M

    2015-01-01

    Let G be a simple classical algebraic group over an algebraically closed field K of characteristic p\\geq 0 with natural module W. Let H be a closed subgroup of G and let V be a nontrivial p-restricted irreducible tensor indecomposable rational KG-module such that the restriction of V to H is irreducible. In this paper the authors classify the triples (G,H,V) of this form, where V \

  2. Distinct Histomorphology in Molecular Subgroups of Glioblastomas in Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Julia E; Dorostkar, Mario M; Korshunov, Andrey; Mawrin, Christian; Koch, Arend; Giese, Armin; Schüller, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are malignant brain tumors that can be divided into different molecular subtypes based on genetics, global gene expression, and methylation patterns. Among these subgroups, "IDH" GBMs carry mutations within IDH1 or IDH2 The "K27" and "G34" subgroups are characterized by distinct mutations within Histone 3 (H3). These subtypes can be identified by sequencing methods and are particularly found in younger patients. To determine whether the molecular subtypes correlate with distinct histological features among the diverse histologic patterns of GBM, we performed a blinded assessment of the histology of GBMs of 77 patients ≤30 years old at the time of biopsy. The tumors were of the following molecular subtypes: IDH (n = 12), H3 K27M (n = 25), H3 G34R (n = 12), or no IDH/H3 mutations (n = 28). Of IDH-mutated cases, 75% had microcystic features or gemistocytic tumor cells. K27 GBMs had higher cell densities and pronounced nuclear pleomorphism, with 28% harboring tumor giant cells. All G34 GBMs had variable extents of a poorly differentiated/primitive neuroectodermal tumor-like morphology. GBMs without IDH/H3 mutations had foci of epitheliod-appearing cells. Thus, molecular GBM subgroups are associated with distinct histological patterns, suggesting that morphological features reflect the specific underlying molecular genetic abnormalities. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gambaran Populasi Golongan Darah Subgroup A (A1, A2 di PMI Kulon Progo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieronymus Rayi Prasetya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Subgroup A1 and A2 are the most important in the blood group A. Subgroup A1 has the A antigen more than A2 subgroup, the A2 subgroup can cause misidentification of blood group due to poor A antigen and genetic variation possessed. Misidentification of the blood group will increase the risk of transfusion reactions. This research aims to describe the A1 and A2 subgroup population in Kulon Progo district. This study was conducted with a cross sectional sampling technique. The sample in this study were taken from donors of blood group A in Kulon Progo Red Cross. Identification of A1 and A2 subgroup is done by using lectin (Dolichos biflorus extract. The result of the examination of 53 samples showed that 96,2% was A1 subgroup and 3,8% was A2 subgroup. Key words : Subgroup A1, Subgroup A2, Population, Kulon Progo

  4. Informant discrepancy defines discrete, clinically useful autism spectrum disorder subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Matthew D; De Los Reyes, Andres; Drabick, Deborah A G; Gerber, Alan H; Gadow, Kenneth D

    2017-07-01

    Discrepancy between informants (parents and teachers) in severity ratings of core symptoms commonly arise when assessing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Whether such discrepancy yields unique information about the ASD phenotype and its clinical correlates has not been examined. We examined whether degree of discrepancy between parent and teacher ASD symptom ratings defines discrete, clinically meaningful subgroups of youth with ASD using an efficient, cost-effective procedure. Children with ASD (N = 283; 82% boys; M age  = 10.5 years) were drawn from a specialty ASD clinic. Parents and teachers provided ratings of the three core DSM-IV-TR domains of ASD symptoms (communication, social, and perseverative behavior) with the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-4R (CASI-4R). External validators included child psychotropic medication status, frequency of ASD-relevant school-based services, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS-2). Four distinct subgroups emerged that ranged from large between-informant discrepancy (informant-specific) to relative lack of discrepancy (i.e. informant agreement; cross-situational): Moderate Parent/Low Teacher or Low Parent/Moderate Teacher Severity (Discrepancy), and Moderate or High Symptom Severity (Agreement). Subgroups were highly distinct (mean probability of group assignment = 94%). Relative to Discrepancy subgroups, Agreement subgroups were more likely to receive psychotropic medication, school-based special education services, and an ADOS-2 diagnosis. These differential associations would not have been identified based solely on CASI-4R scores from one informant. The degree of parent-teacher discrepancy about ASD symptom severity appears to provide more clinically useful information than reliance on a specific symptom domain or informant, and thus yields an innovative, cost-effective approach to assessing functional impairment. This conclusion stands in contrast to existing symptom clustering approaches in

  5. Relationship of biomedical science content acquisition performance to students' level of PBL group interaction: are students learning during PBL group?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romito, Laura M; Eckert, George J

    2011-05-01

    This study assessed biomedical science content acquisition from problem-based learning (PBL) and its relationship to students' level of group interaction. We hypothesized that learning in preparation for exams results primarily from individual study of post-case learning objectives and that outcomes would be unrelated to students' group involvement. During dental curricular years 1 and 2, student-generated biomedical learning issues (LIs) were identified from six randomly chosen PBL cases. Knowledge and application of case concepts were assessed with quizzes based on the identified LIs prior to dissemination of the learning objectives. Students and facilitators were surveyed on students' level of group involvement for the assessed LI topics. Year 1 students had significantly higher assessment scores (p=0.0001). For both student classes, means were significantly higher for the recall item (Q1) than for the application item (Q2). Q1 scores increased along with the student's reported role for Year 1 (p=0.04). However, there was no relationship between the student's reported role and Q1 for Year 2 (p=0.20). There was no relationship between the student's reported role and Q2 for Year 1 (p=0.09) or Year 2 (p=0.19). This suggests that students' level of group involvement on the biomedical learning issues did not significantly impact students' assessment performance.

  6. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abel, Frida

    2011-04-14

    Abstract Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB); Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA) and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linked to NB pathogenesis. Results The present study explores subgroup discrimination by gene expression profiling using three published microarray studies on NB (47 samples). Four distinct clusters were identified by Principal Components Analysis (PCA) in two separate data sets, which could be verified by an unsupervised hierarchical clustering in a third independent data set (101 NB samples) using a set of 74 discriminative genes. The expression signature of six NB-associated genes ALK, BIRC5, CCND1, MYCN, NTRK1, and PHOX2B, significantly discriminated the four clusters (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA test). PCA clusters p1, p2, and p3 were found to correspond well to the postulated subtypes 1, 2A, and 2B, respectively. Remarkably, a fourth novel cluster was detected in all three independent data sets. This cluster comprised mainly 11q-deleted MNA-negative tumours with low expression of ALK, BIRC5, and PHOX2B, and was significantly associated with higher tumour stage, poor outcome and poor survival compared to the Type 1-corresponding favourable group (INSS stage 4 and\\/or dead of disease, p < 0.05, Fisher\\'s exact test). Conclusions Based on expression profiling we have identified four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma, which can be distinguished by a 6-gene signature. The fourth subgroup has not been described elsewhere, and efforts are currently made to further investigate this group\\'s specific characteristics.

  7. LIN28B overexpression defines a novel fetal-like subgroup of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsmoortel, Hetty H; Bresolin, Silvia; Lammens, Tim; Cavé, Hélène; Noellke, Peter; Caye, Aurélie; Ghazavi, Farzaneh; de Vries, Andrica; Hasle, Henrik; Labarque, Veerle; Masetti, Riccardo; Stary, Jan; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Philippé, Jan; Van Roy, Nadine; Benoit, Yves; Speleman, Frank; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Flotho, Christian; Basso, Giuseppe; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; De Moerloose, Barbara

    2016-03-03

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare and aggressive stem cell disease of early childhood. RAS activation constitutes the core component of oncogenic signaling. In addition, leukemic blasts in one-fourth of JMML patients present with monosomy 7, and more than half of patients show elevated age-adjusted fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the current standard of care and results in an event-free survival rate of 50% to 60%, indicating that novel molecular-driven therapeutic options are urgently needed. Using gene expression profiling in a series of 82 patient samples, we aimed at understanding the molecular biology behind JMML and identified a previously unrecognized molecular subgroup characterized by high LIN28B expression. LIN28B overexpression was significantly correlated with higher HbF levels, whereas patients with monosomy 7 seldom showed enhanced LIN28B expression. This finding gives a biological explanation of why patients with monosomy 7 are rarely diagnosed with high age-adjusted HbF levels. In addition, this new fetal-like JMML subgroup presented with reduced levels of most members of the let-7 microRNA family and showed characteristic overexpression of genes involved in fetal hematopoiesis and stem cell self-renewal. Lastly, high LIN28B expression was associated with poor clinical outcome in our JMML patient series but was not independent from other prognostic factors such as age and age-adjusted HbF levels. In conclusion, we identified elevated LIN28B expression as a hallmark of a novel fetal-like subgroup in JMML. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. AKT pathway genes define 5 prognostic subgroups in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Joy

    Full Text Available Activity of GFR/PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in glioblastoma clinical trials has not been robust. We hypothesized variations in the pathway between tumors contribute to poor response. We clustered GBM based on AKT pathway genes and discovered new subtypes then characterized their clinical and molecular features. There are at least 5 GBM AKT subtypes having distinct DNA copy number alterations, enrichment in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and patterns of expression for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling components. Gene Ontology terms indicate a different cell of origin or dominant phenotype for each subgroup. Evidence suggests one subtype is very sensitive to BCNU or CCNU (median survival 5.8 vs. 1.5 years; BCNU/CCNU vs other treatments; respectively. AKT subtyping advances previous approaches by revealing additional subgroups with unique clinical and molecular features. Evidence indicates it is a predictive marker for response to BCNU or CCNU and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors. We anticipate Akt subtyping may help stratify patients for clinical trials and augment discovery of class-specific therapeutic targets.

  9. AKT Pathway Genes Define 5 Prognostic Subgroups in Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Ivan; Reiser, Mark; Misra, Anjan; Shapiro, William R.; Mills, Gordon B.; Kim, Seungchan; Feuerstein, Burt G.

    2014-01-01

    Activity of GFR/PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in glioblastoma clinical trials has not been robust. We hypothesized variations in the pathway between tumors contribute to poor response. We clustered GBM based on AKT pathway genes and discovered new subtypes then characterized their clinical and molecular features. There are at least 5 GBM AKT subtypes having distinct DNA copy number alterations, enrichment in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and patterns of expression for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling components. Gene Ontology terms indicate a different cell of origin or dominant phenotype for each subgroup. Evidence suggests one subtype is very sensitive to BCNU or CCNU (median survival 5.8 vs. 1.5 years; BCNU/CCNU vs other treatments; respectively). AKT subtyping advances previous approaches by revealing additional subgroups with unique clinical and molecular features. Evidence indicates it is a predictive marker for response to BCNU or CCNU and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors. We anticipate Akt subtyping may help stratify patients for clinical trials and augment discovery of class-specific therapeutic targets. PMID:24984002

  10. Evaluation of Lymphocyte Subgroups in Children With Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Cahide; Doğan, Murat; Başarslan, Fatmagül; Yılmaz, Nebi; Yuca, Sevil; Bulan, Keziban; Kaya, Avni; Çaksen, Hüseyin

    2015-09-01

    In this study, lymphocyte subgroups including blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, CD19, and CD16.56 values were analyzed in children with Down syndrome (DS). The study includes 85 children with DS, followed at Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Yüzüncü Yil University and 64 healthy age-matched control participants. Blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, CD19, and CD16.56 values were examined in both the groups. Significantly decreased blood CD3, CD4, and CD19 values were found in the study group (P < .05) when compared with the control group. In conclusion, we would like to emphasize that blood CD3, CD4, and CD19 levels were found to be decreased in children with DS. Based on these finding, we think that these decreased lymphocyte subgroups might be responsible for increased susceptibility to infections in children with DS. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. AKT pathway genes define 5 prognostic subgroups in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Anna; Ramesh, Archana; Smirnov, Ivan; Reiser, Mark; Misra, Anjan; Shapiro, William R; Mills, Gordon B; Kim, Seungchan; Feuerstein, Burt G

    2014-01-01

    Activity of GFR/PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in glioblastoma clinical trials has not been robust. We hypothesized variations in the pathway between tumors contribute to poor response. We clustered GBM based on AKT pathway genes and discovered new subtypes then characterized their clinical and molecular features. There are at least 5 GBM AKT subtypes having distinct DNA copy number alterations, enrichment in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and patterns of expression for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling components. Gene Ontology terms indicate a different cell of origin or dominant phenotype for each subgroup. Evidence suggests one subtype is very sensitive to BCNU or CCNU (median survival 5.8 vs. 1.5 years; BCNU/CCNU vs other treatments; respectively). AKT subtyping advances previous approaches by revealing additional subgroups with unique clinical and molecular features. Evidence indicates it is a predictive marker for response to BCNU or CCNU and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors. We anticipate Akt subtyping may help stratify patients for clinical trials and augment discovery of class-specific therapeutic targets.

  12. Understanding Causal Distributional and Subgroup Effects with the Instrumental Propensity Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing; Lin, Winston

    2017-08-17

    To address issues with measured and unmeasured confounding in observational studies, this paper develops a unified approach to using an instrumental variable in more flexible ways to evaluate treatment effects. The approach is based on an instrumental propensity score conditional on baseline variables, which can then be incorporated in matching, regression, subclassification or weighting along with various parametric, semiparametric or nonparametric methods for the assessment of treatment effects. Therefore, the application of the instrumental propensity score allows different methods for outcome effect evaluations in addition to standard two-stage least square models while controlling for unmeasured confounders. Several properties of the instrumental propensity score are discussed in the paper. The approach is then illustrated using subclassification along with a semiparametric density ratio model and empirical likelihood. This method allows us to evaluate distributional and subgroup treatment effects in addition to the overall average treatment effect. Simulation studies show that the method works well. We apply our method to a study of the effects of attending a Catholic school versus a public school and find that attending a Catholic school had significant beneficial effects on subsequent wages among a subgroup of subjects. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. CKM and PMNS Mixing Matrices from Discrete Subgroups of SU(2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in particle physics is to determine the first principles origin of the quark and lepton mixing matrices CKM and PMNS that relate the flavor states to the mass states. This first principles derivation of both the PMNS and CKM matrices utilizes quaternion generators of the three discrete (i.e., finite binary rotational subgroups of SU(2 called [3,3,2], [4,3,2], and [5,3,2] for three lepton families in R 3 and four related discrete binary rotational subgroups [3,3,3], [4,3,3], [3,4,3], and [5,3,3] represented by four quark families in R 4 . The traditional 3 3 CKM matrix is extracted as a submatrix of the 4 4 CKM4 matrix. The predicted fourth family of quarks has not been discovered yet. If these two additional quarks exist, there is the possibility that the Standard Model lagrangian may apply all the way down to the Planck scale.

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Endovascular Stroke Therapy: A Patient Subgroup Analysis From a US Healthcare Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Wolfgang G; Hunink, M G Myriam; Sommer, Wieland H; Beyer, Sebastian E; Meinel, Felix G; Dorn, Franziska; Wirth, Stefan; Reiser, Maximilian F; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Thierfelder, Kolja M

    2016-11-01

    Endovascular therapy in addition to standard care (EVT+SC) has been demonstrated to be more effective than SC in acute ischemic large vessel occlusion stroke. Our aim was to determine the cost-effectiveness of EVT+SC depending on patients' initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, time from symptom onset, Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS), and occlusion location. A decision model based on Markov simulations estimated lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) associated with both strategies applied in a US setting. Model input parameters were obtained from the literature, including recently pooled outcome data of 5 randomized controlled trials (ESCAPE [Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Proximal Occlusion Ischemic Stroke], EXTEND-IA [Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits-Intra-Arterial], MR CLEAN [Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands], REVASCAT [Randomized Trial of Revascularization With Solitaire FR Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in the Treatment of Acute Stroke Due to Anterior Circulation Large Vessel Occlusion Presenting Within 8 Hours of Symptom Onset], and SWIFT PRIME [Solitaire With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment]). Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed to estimate uncertainty of the model results. Net monetary benefits, incremental costs, incremental effectiveness, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were derived from the probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The willingness-to-pay was set to $50 000/QALY. Overall, EVT+SC was cost-effective compared with SC (incremental cost: $4938, incremental effectiveness: 1.59 QALYs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio: $3110/QALY) in 100% of simulations. In all patient subgroups, EVT+SC led to gained QALYs (range: 0.47-2.12), and mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were considered cost

  15. Discovery-based protein expression profiling identifies distinct subgroups and pathways in leiomyosarcomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirik, Ufuk; Hansson, Karin; Krogh, Morten

    2014-01-01

    subgroups within the leiomyosarcomas with distinct protein expression patterns. Pathways analysis indicates that key biologic nodes like apoptosis, cytoskeleton remodeling, and telomere regulation are differentially regulated among these subgroups. Finally, investigating the similarities between protein...

  16. An overview of statistical planning to address subgroups in confirmatory clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Gary G; Schwartz, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    The effects of treatments within demographic and clinical subgroups of patients are of major interest in most confirmatory clinical trials. Potential factors for defining subgroups include gender, age, disease severity, and geographic region. A major statistical issue for the interpretation of treatment comparisons for subgroups is whether the role of a subgroup is inferential, supportive, or exploratory through respectively corresponding to a primary, key secondary, or hypothesis-generating assessment. This article discusses statistical planning to control type 1 error for the multiple comparisons that correspond to the scope of prespecified inferential subgroups, and it provides some suggestions for addressing the type 2 error that can pertain to prespecified supportive subgroups. Treatment comparisons for exploratory subgroups without a priori specification should always have a very cautious interpretation that accounts for how random variation can influence their pattern of results, although the suggested methods for supportive subgroups can be helpful in this light.

  17. Cumulative subgroup analysis to reduce waste in clinical research for individualised medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fujian; Bachmann, Max O

    2016-12-15

    Although subgroup analyses in clinical trials may provide evidence for individualised medicine, their conduct and interpretation remain controversial. Subgroup effect can be defined as the difference in treatment effect across patient subgroups. Cumulative subgroup analysis refers to a series of repeated pooling of subgroup effects after adding data from each of related trials chronologically, to investigate the accumulating evidence for subgroup effects. We illustrated the clinical relevance of cumulative subgroup analysis in two case studies using data from published individual patient data (IPD) meta-analyses. Computer simulations were also conducted to examine the statistical properties of cumulative subgroup analysis. In case study 1, an IPD meta-analysis of 10 randomised trials (RCTs) on beta blockers for heart failure reported significant interaction of treatment effects with baseline rhythm. Cumulative subgroup analysis could have detected the subgroup effect 15 years earlier, with five fewer trials and 71% less patients, than the IPD meta-analysis which first reported it. Case study 2 involved an IPD meta-analysis of 11 RCTs on treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension that reported significant subgroup effect by aetiology. Cumulative subgroup analysis could have detected the subgroup effect 6 years earlier, with three fewer trials and 40% less patients than the IPD meta-analysis. Computer simulations have indicated that cumulative subgroup analysis increases the statistical power and is not associated with inflated false positives. To reduce waste of research data, subgroup analyses in clinical trials should be more widely conducted and adequately reported so that cumulative subgroup analyses could be timely performed to inform clinical practice and further research.

  18. Does a subgroup of postpolio patients need different management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgens, Ruth

    2015-07-01

    Throughout the 30 years of postpolio syndrome (PPS) research, there have been many puzzling anomalies in the data and not enough information to make sense of them. It is therefore welcome that Winberg et al have examined physical activity in relation to life satisfaction, sex and age. They hypothesized that activity would decrease with age and found the opposite. This result is not so surprising as Ostlund et al found that vitality was associated with older age and that younger age was associated with more pain, increasing physical fatigue, decreasing sleep quality and reducing activity. This commentary will examine past postpolio research with unexpected results in order to describe a subgroup of patients who may be more susceptible to overusing muscles and have particular exercise and activity needs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pain Drawings Improve Subgrouping of Low Back Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüllemann, Philipp; Keller, Thomas; Kabelitz, Maria; Freynhagen, Rainer; Tölle, Thomas; Baron, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    Subgrouping of low back pain (LBP) patients may be improved when pain drawings are combined with the painDETECT (PD-Q) questionnaire. We hypothesized that (1) different LBP subgroups determined by their pain radiation show different clinical patterns and (2) the occurrence of neuropathic symptoms depends on pain radiation. A total of 19,263 acute ( 3 months) LBP patients were allocated prospectively into 4 groups based on the location of pain drawings on a manikin and compared regarding neuropathic pain components, functionality, depression, pain intensity, and surgical interventions. All items were investigated at baseline and follow-up visits. Group I was composed of patients with axial LBP without radiating pain; group II, LBP with radiation into the thigh; group III, LBP with radiation into the shank; and group IV, LBP with radiation into the feet. Side-dependent pain radiation was assessed additionally. Depression, functionality, and pain intensity showed no clinically relevant differences, whereas PD-Q scores and the probability to rate positive for neuropathic pain increased with more distally radiating pain. Surgery and medication intake were most frequent in group IV. Follow-up analyses showed that only axial LBP became more neuropathic, whereas pain intensity decreased over time. Radicular patterns of pain drawings in LBP patients indicate severe pain conditions with the most neuropathic components, while axial LBP has the fewest. For the categorization of LBP, pain drawings help explain the underlying mechanism of pain, which might further improve mechanism-based treatment when used in clinical routines and research. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  20. NATO Standards for Virtual Ships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraker, J.K. de; Duncan, J.; Budde, E.W.; Reading, R.

    2005-01-01

    The NATO Naval Armaments Group Sub-Group 61 on Virtual Ships has been chartered to establish NATO standards for modeling and simulation applied to ship acquisition. Its objective is to enable multi-national simulation re-use and interoperability, as well as simulation composability. Technical

  1. Dysexecutive versus amnestic Alzheimer disease subgroups: analysis of demographic, genetic, and vascular factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mez, Jesse; Cosentino, Stephanie; Brickman, Adam M; Huey, Edward D; Manly, Jennifer J; Mayeux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the demographic and vascular characteristics and APOE genotypes of a dysexecutive subgroup of Alzheimer disease (AD) with an amnestic subgroup of AD early in the disease course. A total of 2224 participants from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database who carried a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (n=1188) or mild AD (clinical dementia rating ≤1) (n=1036) were included in this study. A subset of the mild cognitive impairment (n=61) and mild AD (n=79) participants underwent an autopsy. A dysexecutive subgroup (n=587) was defined as having executive performance >1 SD worse than memory performance, and an amnestic subgroup (n=549) was defined conversely. Among the autopsy subset, the odds of an AD pathologic diagnosis were compared in the 2 subgroups. The demographics, APOE[Latin Small Letter Open E]4 status, and vascular risk factors were compared in the 2 subgroups. Among the autopsy subset, the odds of having an AD pathologic diagnosis did not differ between the dysexecutive and amnestic subgroups. Under an additive model, participants in the dysexecutive subgroup possessed the APOE[Latin Small Letter Open E]4 allele less frequently compared with those in the amnestic subgroup. The dysexecutive subgroup had a history of hypertension less frequently compared with the amnestic subgroup. These distinct characteristics add to accumulating evidence that a dysexecutive subgroup of AD may have a unique underlying pathophysiology.

  2. Criteria for phytoplasma 16Sr group/subgroup delineation and the need of a platform for proper registration of new groups and subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    As more phytoplasmas are discovered in emerging and re-emerging plant diseases worldwide, the scheme for classification of phytoplasmas into 16S rRNA gene RFLP (16Sr) groups and subgroups is experiencing an ongoing rapid expansion. Improper delineation or designation of new groups and subgroups can...

  3. High frequency of cultivable human subgroup F adenoviruses in stool samples from a paediatric population admitted to hospital with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Germini, Diego; Martorana, Davide; Rodighiero, Isabella; De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana

    2014-06-01

    The family Adenoviridae consists of five genera of which the genus Mastadenovirus includes human viruses classified into 57 serotypes clustered into seven subgroups (A-G). Serotypes 40 and 41 (subgroup F) are specifically associated with childhood gastroenteritis and are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in young children after rotaviruses and noroviruses. Standard methods for laboratory diagnosis of adenovirus infection include electron microscopy (EM) and conventional cell culture (CCC), although it is widely considered that adenoviruses 40 and 41 are difficult to cultivate, such that their circulation is most likely underestimated. One hundred and ten faecal specimens from paediatric patients with gastroenteritis were confirmed positive for adenovirus by EM and/or CCC at the Virology Unit of the University Hospital of Parma, Italy, during the period January 2010-December 2012. They were analysed to determine the actual prevalence of adenovirus 40 and 41 in these patients using PCR and restriction endonuclease analysis, and to evaluate their ability to be cultivated in standard cell lines. The results showed a high prevalence of subgroup F (62.7 %), with serotype 41 (89.8 %) predominating over serotype 40 (10.2 %). Surprisingly, among the 75 adenoviruses isolated by CCC, 37 (49 %) belonged to subgroup F, suggesting a higher capacity of adenovirus 40 and 41 to replicate in cell culture than previously thought. PCR and restriction enzyme techniques provide an efficient means of diagnosing enteric adenoviruses correctly, including subgroup F adenovirus strains in young children with gastroenteritis. © 2014 The Authors.

  4. How can latent trajectories of back pain be translated into defined subgroups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Hestbæk, Lise; Kent, Peter

    2017-01-01

    descriptive definitions, as a way to apply the same definitions of mutually exclusive subgroups across populations. In this study, we investigated if the course trajectories of two LBP cohorts fitted with previously suggested trajectory subgroup definitions, how distinctly different these subgroups were......BACKGROUND: Similar types of trajectory patterns have been identified by Latent Class Analyses (LCA) across multiple low back pain (LBP) cohorts, but these patterns are impractical to apply to new cohorts or individual patients. It would be useful to be able to identify trajectory subgroups from......, and if the subgroup definitions matched with LCA-derived patterns. METHODS: Weekly measures of LBP intensity and frequency during 1 year were available from two clinical cohorts. We applied definitions of 16 possible trajectory subgroups to these observations and calculated the prevalence of the subgroups...

  5. The Impact of Low-Level Lead Toxicity on School Performance among Hispanic Subgroups in the Chicago Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackowicz, Michael J; Hryhorczuk, Daniel O; Rankin, Kristin M; Lewis, Dan A; Haider, Danish; Lanphear, Bruce P; Evens, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Environmental lead exposure detrimentally affects children's educational performance, even at very low blood lead levels (BLLs). Among children in Chicago Public Schools (CPS), the severity of the effects of BLL on reading and math vary by racial subgroup (White vs. Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic Black). We investigated the impact of BLL on standardized test performance by Hispanic subgroup (Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Other Hispanic). We examined 12,319 Hispanic children born in Chicago between 1994 and 1998 who were tested for BLL between birth and 2006 and enrolled in the 3rd grade at a CPS school between 2003 and 2006. We linked the Chicago birth registry, the Chicago Blood Lead Registry, and 3rd grade Illinois Standard Achievement Test (ISAT) scores to examine associations between BLL and school performance. Primary analyses were restricted to children with BLL below 10 µg/dL (0.483 µmol/L). BLLs below 10 µg/dL (0.483 µmol/L) were inversely associated with reading and math scores in all Hispanic subgroups. Adjusted Relative Risks (RRadj) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for reading and math failure were 1.34 (95% CI = 1.25, 1.63) and 1.53 (95% CI = 1.32, 1.78), respectively, per each additional 5 µg/dL of lead exposure for Hispanic children; RRadj did not differ across subgroups. We estimate that 7.0% (95% CI = 1.8, 11.9) of reading and 13.6% (95% CI = 7.7, 19.2) of math failure among Hispanic children can be attributed to exposure to BLLs of 5-9 µg/dL (0.242 to 0.435 µmol/L) vs. 0-4 µg/dL (0-0.193 µmol/L). The RRadj of math failure for each 5 µg/dL (0.242 µmol/L) increase in BLL was notably (p = 0.074) stronger among black Puerto Rican children (RRadj = 5.14; 95% CI = 1.65-15.94) compared to white Puerto Rican children (RRadj = 1.50; 95% CI = 1.12-2.02). Early childhood lead exposure is associated with poorer achievement on standardized reading and math tests in the 3rd grade for Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Other Hispanic children enrolled in Chicago

  6. Topography and Volcanology of the Huangtsuishan Volcano Subgroup, Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Lai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining the shaded relief topography model and the slope map from the Digital Terrain Model (DTM images, toporaphical map, field occurrences and petrography, the volcanic sequences of the Huangtsuishan Volcano Subgroup (HVS can be constructed. Two types of volcanic centers can be identified in this area. One is the Tachienhou volcanic dome, which may be located in the center of an older caldera. The other is the Huangtsui composite volcano, which is composed of interbedding lava flows and pyroclastic deposits with a volcanic crater named the Huangtsui pond at the summit. Eight lava plateaus radiated from Mts. Huangtsui and Tachienhou to the north and the east can be distinguished based on the DTM images. The volcanic deposits are comprised of four lithofacies, the lava flows, pyroclastic breccias, tuffs and lahars on the base of field occurrences. At least thirteen layers of lava flow, named the H1 to H13 can be recognized in the HVS and can be reconstructed and categorized into four stages. An old and large volcano erupted lava flows to form the products of stages one and two, then collapsed to form a caldera with a dome for the third stage. The latest stage of lava flow was poured out from the Huangtsui volcano, which formed a crater at the summit.

  7. Personality style and impulsivity as determinants of suicidal subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazaa, Norman; Page, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Studies on suicide have often been inadequate in the sense of failing to understand or conceptualize the dynamics of suicidal behavior from a comprehensive theoretical basis. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine Blatt's theory of Dependent and Self-critical personality dimensions (Blatt, 1974, Blatt & Shichman, 1983) in the context of actual suicidal behavior, and also to utilize these dimensions to facilitate our understanding of suicidal action. Ninety-six undergraduate students who had attempted suicide in the past were administered a series of measures related to suicidal behavior, involving impulsivity, intent, and lethality. Participants were also identified as Dependent or Self-critical in their basic personality orientation. Dependents and Self-critics engaged in contrasting suicidal behaviors along several parameters, with Self-critical individuals generally posing greater risk. These differences were congruent with Blatt's theoretical framework. Implications for suicide risk assessment, management, and treatment are discussed, with special reference to the importance of identifying distinctive suicidal subgroups identified by Dependent and Self-critical personality dimensions.

  8. Evidence of separate subgroups of juvenile southern bluefin tuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Mark S; Sidhu, Leesa A; O'Neill, Ben; Sibanda, Nokuthaba

    2017-11-01

    Archival tagging studies of southern bluefin tuna (SBT , Thunnus maccoyii) have revealed that juveniles residing in the Great Australian Bight (GAB) over the austral summer undertake seasonal cyclic migrations to the southeast Indian Ocean and the Tasman Sea during winter. However, there remains disagreement about the extent of mixing between juvenile SBT regularly caught by longline fleets south of Africa and those observed in the GAB. Some researchers have argued that archival tag recoveries indicate most juveniles reside in the GAB over the austral summer. Others have suggested that recoveries of conventional and archival tags are better explained by a juvenile population consisting of separate groups on the eastern and western sides of the Indian Ocean with limited intermixing. We present analyses of catch and tag recovery data and re-examine archival tagging studies. The evidence provided strongly favors the hypothesis of separate juvenile subgroups, or contingents, with limited intermixing. We draw some tentative conclusions about the nature of the putative contingents and discuss some implications of these findings for the interpretation of existing datasets and future research priorities. We also provide the first evidence that the migration choices of juveniles that summer in the GAB are influenced by fidelity to winter feeding grounds and suggest this helps explain the collapse of the surface fishery off New South Wales in the 1980s.

  9. Resonance Elastic Scattering and Interference Effects Treatments in Subgroup Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhao Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the resonance integral (RI tables produced by the NJOY program, the conventional subgroup method usually ignores both the resonance elastic scattering and the resonance interference effects. In this paper, on one hand, to correct the resonance elastic scattering effect, RI tables are regenerated by using the Monte Carlo code, OpenMC, which employs the Doppler broadening rejection correction method for the resonance elastic scattering. On the other hand, a fast resonance interference factor method is proposed to efficiently handle the resonance interference effect. Encouraging conclusions have been indicated by the numerical results. (1 For a hot full power pressurized water reactor fuel pin-cell, an error of about +200 percent mille could be introduced by neglecting the resonance elastic scattering effect. By contrast, the approach employed in this paper can eliminate the error. (2 The fast resonance interference factor method possesses higher precision and higher efficiency than the conventional Bondarenko iteration method. Correspondingly, if the fast resonance interference factor method proposed in this paper is employed, the kinf can be improved by ∼100 percent mille with a speedup of about 4.56.

  10. Matching mice to malignancy: molecular subgroups and models of medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jasmine; Schmidt, Christin; Markant, Shirley L.; Taylor, Michael D.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medulloblastoma, the largest group of embryonal brain tumors, has historically been classified into five variants based on histopathology. More recently, epigenetic and transcriptional analyses of primary tumors have sub-classified medulloblastoma into four to six subgroups, most of which are incongruous with histopathological classification. Discussion Improved stratification is required for prognosis and development of targeted treatment strategies, to maximize cure and minimize adverse effects. Several mouse models of medulloblastoma have contributed both to an improved understanding of progression and to developmental therapeutics. In this review, we summarize the classification of human medulloblastoma subtypes based on histopathology and molecular features. We describe existing genetically engineered mouse models, compare these to human disease, and discuss the utility of mouse models for developmental therapeutics. Just as accurate knowledge of the correct molecular subtype of medulloblastoma is critical to the development of targeted therapy in patients, we propose that accurate modeling of each subtype of medulloblastoma in mice will be necessary for preclinical evaluation and optimization of those targeted therapies. PMID:22315164

  11. Challenges in identifying asthma subgroups using unsupervised statistical learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperi, Mattia C F; Sahiner, Umit M; Belgrave, Danielle; Sackesen, Cansin; Buchan, Iain E; Simpson, Angela; Yavuz, Tolga S; Kalayci, Omer; Custovic, Adnan

    2013-12-01

    Unsupervised statistical learning techniques, such as exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and hierarchical clustering (HC), have been used to identify asthma phenotypes, with partly consistent results. Some of the inconsistency is caused by the variable selection and demographic and clinical differences among study populations. To investigate the effects of the choice of statistical method and different preparations of data on the clustering results; and to relate these to disease severity. Several variants of EFA and HC were applied and compared using various sets of variables and different encodings and transformations within a dataset of 383 children with asthma. Variables included lung function, inflammatory and allergy markers, family history, environmental exposures, and medications. Clusters and original variables were related to asthma severity (logistic regression and Bayesian network analysis). EFA identified five components (eigenvalues ≥ 1) explaining 35% of the overall variance. Variations of the HC (as linkage-distance functions) did not affect the cluster inference; however, using different variable encodings and transformations did. The derived clusters predicted asthma severity less than the original variables. Prognostic factors of severity were medication usage, current symptoms, lung function, paternal asthma, body mass index, and age of asthma onset. Bayesian networks indicated conditional dependence among variables. The use of different unsupervised statistical learning methods and different variable sets and encodings can lead to multiple and inconsistent subgroupings of asthma, not necessarily correlated with severity. The search for asthma phenotypes needs more careful selection of markers, consistent across different study populations, and more cautious interpretation of results from unsupervised learning.

  12. Standards not that standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Cristina; Tanner, Kristie; Dorado-Morales, Pedro; Villaescusa, Paula; Chugani, Divya; Frías, Alba; Segredo, Ernesto; Molero, Xavier; Fritschi, Marco; Morales, Lucas; Ramón, Daniel; Peña, Carlos; Peretó, Juli; Porcar, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    There is a general assent on the key role of standards in Synthetic Biology. In two consecutive letters to this journal, suggestions on the assembly methods for the Registry of standard biological parts have been described. We fully agree with those authors on the need of a more flexible building strategy and we highlight in the present work two major functional challenges standardization efforts have to deal with: the need of both universal and orthogonal behaviors. We provide experimental data that clearly indicate that such engineering requirements should not be taken for granted in Synthetic Biology.

  13. Subgroup analyses in cost-effectiveness analyses to support health technology assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Christine; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Paget, Marie-Ange; Reid, Carol; Hawkins, Neil

    2014-01-01

    'Success' in drug development is bringing to patients a new medicine that has an acceptable benefit-risk profile and that is also cost-effective. Cost-effectiveness means that the incremental clinical benefit is deemed worth paying for by a healthcare system, and it has an important role in enabling manufacturers to obtain new medicines to patients as soon as possible following regulatory approval. Subgroup analyses are increasingly being utilised by decision-makers in the determination of the cost-effectiveness of new medicines when making recommendations. This paper highlights the statistical considerations when using subgroup analyses to support cost-effectiveness for a health technology assessment. The key principles recommended for subgroup analyses supporting clinical effectiveness published by Paget et al. are evaluated with respect to subgroup analyses supporting cost-effectiveness. A health technology assessment case study is included to highlight the importance of subgroup analyses when incorporated into cost-effectiveness analyses. In summary, we recommend planning subgroup analyses for cost-effectiveness analyses early in the drug development process and adhering to good statistical principles when using subgroup analyses in this context. In particular, we consider it important to provide transparency in how subgroups are defined, be able to demonstrate the robustness of the subgroup results and be able to quantify the uncertainty in the subgroup analyses of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Stratification of randomization is not required for a pre-specified subgroup analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lee D

    2013-01-01

    Published literature and regulatory agency guidance documents provide conflicting recommendations as to whether a pre-specified subgroup analysis also requires for its validity that the study employ randomization that is stratified on subgroup membership. This is an important issue, as subgroup analyses are often required to demonstrate efficacy in the development of drugs with a companion diagnostic. Here, it is shown, for typical randomization methods, that the fraction of patients in the subgroup given experimental treatment matches, on average, the target fraction in the entire study. Also, mean covariate values are balanced, on average, between treatment arms in the subgroup, and it is argued that the variance in covariate imbalance between treatment arms in the subgroup is at worst only slightly increased versus a subgroup-stratified randomization method. Finally, in an analysis of variance setting, a least-squares treatment effect estimator within the subgroup is shown to be unbiased whether or not the randomization is stratified on subgroup membership. Thus, a requirement that a study be stratified on subgroup membership would place an artificial roadblock to innovation and the goals of personalized healthcare. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Stratigraphy of the uppermost Old Red Sandstone of Svalbard (Mimerdalen Subgroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Piepjohn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Between the fjords Dicksonfjorden and Billefjorden in central Spitsbergen, Svalbard's youngest deposits (Early Givetian to Famennian in age of the Old Red Sandstone—the Mimerdalen Subgroup—are exposed. They form a narrow outcrop area parallel to the Billefjorden Fault Zone and overlie unconformably the multicoloured sandstones of the Lower Devonian Wood Bay Formation. Stratigraphic rank and subdivision of the succession were changed repeatedly since its first mention in 1910. Based on student work in 1996, as well as regional mapping by the authors in 1993 and 2003, the present work formalizes the stratigraphic framework of the succession. This framework has already been applied in recent geological maps. At the same time it is a continuation of the lithostratigraphic standardization carried out by the Committee on the Stratigraphy of Svalbard (1999, where only post-Devonian rocks were considered. Except for some small-pebble conglomerate layers in the Wood Bay Formation, the upper part of the Mimerdalen Subgroup contains the first coarse-grained deposits in Svalbard's Old Red since the lowermost Devonian Red Bay Group. Faulting between its formations as well as conglomerate pebbles derived from the Lower Devonian Wood Bay Formation indicate the onset of the Svalbardian Event after the tectonic stability during the deposition of the Wood Bay Formation. The Mimerdalen Subgroup is probably the detrital fill of a small foreland basin derived from erosion during the uplift of the Ny-Friesland Block to the east of the Billefjorden Fault Zone. It was later affected by compressional tectonic movements during the Svalbardian Event.

  16. Low Back Pain Subgroups using Fear-Avoidance Model Measures: Results of a Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneciuk, Jason M.; Robinson, Michael E.; George, Steven Z.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this secondary analysis was to test the hypothesis that an empirically derived psychological subgrouping scheme based on multiple Fear-Avoidance Model (FAM) constructs would provide additional capabilities for clinical outcomes in comparison to a single FAM construct. Methods Patients (n = 108) with acute or sub-acute low back pain (LBP) enrolled in a clinical trial comparing behavioral physical therapy interventions to classification based physical therapy completed baseline questionnaires for pain catastrophizing (PCS), fear-avoidance beliefs (FABQ-PA, FABQ-W), and patient-specific fear (FDAQ). Clinical outcomes were pain intensity and disability measured at baseline, 4-weeks, and 6-months. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was used to create distinct cluster profiles among FAM measures and discriminant analysis was used to interpret clusters. Changes in clinical outcomes were investigated with repeated measures ANOVA and differences in results based on cluster membership were compared to FABQ-PA subgrouping used in the original trial. Results Three distinct FAM subgroups (Low Risk, High Specific Fear, and High Fear & Catastrophizing) emerged from cluster analysis. Subgroups differed on baseline pain and disability (p’s<.01) with the High Fear & Catastrophizing subgroup associated with greater pain than the Low Risk subgroup (p<.01) and the greatest disability (p’s<.05). Subgroup × time interactions were detected for both pain and disability (p’s<.05) with the High Fear & Catastrophizing subgroup reporting greater changes in pain and disability than other subgroups (p’s<.05). In contrast, FABQ-PA subgroups used in the original trial were not associated with interactions for clinical outcomes. Discussion These data suggest that subgrouping based on multiple FAM measures may provide additional information on clinical outcomes in comparison to determining subgroup status by FABQ-PA alone. Subgrouping methods for

  17. Energetic materials standards – Chemical compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuukkanen, I.M.; Bouma, R.H.B.

    2014-01-01

    Subgroup A Energetic Materials Team, SG/A (EMT), develops and maintains standards that are relevant to all life-cycle phases of ammunition/weapon systems. STANAG 4147 is the standard regarding chemical compatibility of explosives with munition components, and is a document of prime importance.

  18. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ice, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barbee, T.; Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Howells, M.; Thompson, A.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Yun, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E{>=}5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called {open_quotes}jelly roll{close_quotes} or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes.

  19. Balance Impairments in Different Subgroups of Patients With Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Gabriela F; Bonato, Paolo; Florencio, Lidiane L; Pinheiro, Carina F; Dach, Fabiola; Bigal, Marcelo E; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Debora

    2017-03-01

    Patients with migraine often experience balance impairments. However, the relationship between clinical features - like aura and chronicity - and the severity of balance impairments is not well established. The objective of this study was to assess balance impairments in different subgroups of migraine patients. One hundred five subjects diagnosed according to the ICHD-III were recruited in the study. They were uniformly distributed among three groups: migraine with aura, migraine without aura, and chronic migraine. Thirty-five controls were also recruited in the study. Balance impairments were assessed in all subjects via the modified Sensory Organization test and the Limits of Stability test. The results in the four groups were compared using ANCOVA tests with age, BMI, presence of dizziness, level of physical activity, time of migraine onset, and medication intake as covariates. Subjects in the migraine with aura and the chronic migraine groups showed poorer balance control than control subjects in three of the four conditions tested using the modified Sensory Organization test: FirmCE: CG: 1.5 cm2 , 95%CI 1.3 to 1.7; M: 2.1 cm2 , 95%CI 1.6 to 2.6; MA: 4.5 cm2 , 95%CI 3.2 to 5.8; CM: 4.5 cm2 , 95%CI 3.0 to 6.0; P migraine without aura group (P migraine groups were found in the reaction time, movement velocity, endpoint excursion, and maximal excursion parameters (P  .05). There is evidence of balance control impairments in subjects with all subtypes of migraine compared to control subjects. The presence of aura and frequent migraine attacks reflect negatively in the postural control performance and may have a significant clinical impact in patients with migraine that should be addressed with appropriate clinical interventions. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  20. Is the performance of MRI in preoperative staging of breast cancer independent of clinical and histological factors? A subgroup analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira Gómez, C; Zamora Romero, J; Gil de Miguel, A; Chiva de Agustín, M; Plana Farrás, M N; Martínez González, J

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether preoperative breast MRI is more useful in patients according to their breast density, age, menopausal status, and biopsy findings of carcinoma in situ. We retrospectively studied 264 patients treated for breast cancer who had undergone mammography, ultrasonography, and MRI. We compared the size of the tumor on the three techniques and the sensitivity of the techniques for detecting additional lesions both in the overall group and in subgroups of patients classified according to their breast density, age, menopausal status, and histological findings of intraductal carcinoma. The definitive histological diagnosis was used as the gold standard. MRI was the technique that was most concordant with the histological findings for the size of the lesion, and it was also the technique that detected the most additional lesions. With MRI, we observed no differences in lesion size between the overall group and the subgroups in which MRI provided added value. Likewise, we observed no differences in the number of additional lesions detected in the overall group except for multicentric lesions, which was larger in older patients (P=.02). In the subgroup of patients in which MRI provided added value, the sensitivity for bilateral lesions was higher in patients with fatty breasts (P=.04). Multifocal lesions were detected significantly better in premenopausal patients (P=.03). MRI is better than mammography and better than ultrasonography for establishing the size of the tumor and for detecting additional lesions. Our results did not identify any subgroups in which the technique was more useful. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Uniformity under in vitro conditions: Changes in the phenotype of cancer cell lines derived from different medulloblastoma subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlapek, Petr; Zitterbart, Karel; Kren, Leos; Filipova, Lenka; Sterba, Jaroslav; Veselska, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Medulloblastoma comprises four main subgroups (WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4) originally defined by transcriptional profiling. In primary medulloblastoma tissues, these groups are thought to be distinguishable using the immunohistochemical detection of β-catenin, filamin A, GAB1 and YAP1 protein markers. To investigate the utility of these markers for in vitro studies using medulloblastoma cell lines, immunoblotting and indirect immunofluorescence were employed for the detection of β-catenin, filamin A, GAB1 and YAP1 in both DAOY and D283 Med reference cell lines and the panel of six medulloblastoma cell lines derived in our laboratory from the primary tumor tissues of known molecular subgroups. Immunohistochemical detection of these markers was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue of the matching primary tumors. The results revealed substantial divergences between the primary tumor tissues and matching cell lines in the immunoreactivity pattern of medulloblastoma-subgroup-specific protein markers. Regardless of the molecular subgroup of the primary tumor, all six patient-derived medulloblastoma cell lines exhibited a uniform phenotype: immunofluorescence showed the nuclear localization of YAP1, accompanied by strong cytoplasmic positivity for β-catenin and filamin A, as well as weak positivity for GAB1. The same immunoreactivity pattern was also found in both DAOY and D283 Med reference medulloblastoma cell lines. Therefore, we can conclude that various medulloblastoma cell lines tend to exhibit the same characteristics of protein marker expression under standard in vitro conditions. Such a finding emphasizes the importance of the analyses of primary tumors in clinically oriented medulloblastoma research and the urgent need to develop in vitro models of improved clinical relevance, such as 3D cultures and organotypic slice cultures.

  2. Clinical and epidemiological features of acute infantile gastroenteritis associated with human rotavirus subgroups 1 and 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Uhnoo, I; Svensson, L

    1986-01-01

    During a prospective 1-year study rotavirus isolates from 169 children with gastroenteritis were investigated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of 118 (70%) of the strains analyzed contained sufficient viral nucleic acid to give visible electrophoretic patterns; 36% were identified as strains belonging to subgroup 1 (short patterns), and 64% were identified as strains belonging to subgroup 2 (long patterns). The two subgroups cocirculated at equal frequencies during the first 7 m...

  3. Developing the group mind through functional subgrouping: linking systems-centered training (SCT) and interpersonal neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Susan P; Agazarian, Yvonne M

    2010-10-01

    This article introduces the systems-centered concept of the "group mind" by linking systems-centered thinking and interpersonal neurobiology, building on Siegel's definition of mind as the process of regulating the flow of energy and information. Functional subgrouping, the systems-centered group method for resolving conflicts, discriminates and integrates the flow of energy and information within and between group members, subgroups, and the group-as-a-whole, thus potentiating survival, development, and transformation. This article uses the interpersonal neurobiological framework to discuss functional subgrouping as a tool for developing the group mind: considering how functional subgrouping facilitates emotional regulation, creates a secure relational context, and potentiates neural integration.

  4. The effects of student-level and classroom-level factors on elementary students' science achievement in five countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Sibel

    The interest in raising levels of achievement in math and science has led to a focus on investigating the factors that shape achievement in these subjects (Lamb & Fullarton, 2002) as well as understanding how these factors operate across countries (Baker, Fabrega, Galindo, & Mishook, 2004). The current study examined the individual student factors and classroom factors on fourth grade science achievement within and across five countries. Guided by the previous school learning models, the elements of students' science learning were categorized as student-level and classroom-level factors. The student-level factors included gender, self-confidence in science, and home resources. The classroom-level factors included teacher characteristics, instructional variables and classroom composition. Results for the United States and four other countries, Singapore, Japan, Australia, and Scotland were reported. Multilevel effects of student and classroom variables were examined through Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) using the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2003 fourth grade dataset. The outcome variable was the TIMSS 2003 science score. Overall, the results of this study showed that selected student background characteristics were consistently related to elementary science achievement in countries investigated. At the student-level, higher levels of home resources and self-confidence and at the classroom-level, higher levels of class mean home resources yielded higher science scores on the TIMSS 2003. In general, teacher and instructional variables were minimally related to science achievement. There was evidence of positive effects of teacher support in the U.S. and Singapore. The emphasis on science inquiry was positively related to science achievement in Singapore and negatively related in the U.S. and Australia. Experimental studies that investigate the impacts of teacher and instructional factors on elementary science achievement are

  5. Etiological Subgroups of Small-for-Gestational-Age: Differential Neurodevelopmental Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuhong Li

    Full Text Available It remains unclear why substantial variations in neurodevelopmental outcomes exist within small-for-gestational-age (SGA children. We prospectively compared 5-y neurodevelopmental outcomes across SGA etiological subgroups.Children born SGA (N = 1050 from U.S. Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (2001-2007 was divided into etiological subgroups by each of 7 well-established prenatal risk factors. We fit linear regression models to compare 5-y reading, math, gross motor and fine motor scores across SGA subgroups, adjusting for socio-demographic confounders.Compared to singleton SGA subgroup, multiple-birth SGA subgroup had lower mean reading (adjusted mean difference, -4.08 [95% confidence interval, -6.10, -2.06] and math (-2.22 [-3.61, -0.84] scores. These disadvantages in reading and math existed only among multiple-birth SGA subgroup without ovulation stimulation (reading, -4.50 [-6.64, -2.36]; math, -2.91 [-4.37, -1.44], but not among those with ovulation stimulation (reading, -2.33 [-6.24, 1.57]; math 0.63 [-1.86, 3.12]. Compared to singleton SGA subgroup without maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain, singleton SGA subgroup with co-occurrence of maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG had lower mean reading (-4.81 [-8.50, -1.12] and math (-2.95 [-5.51, -0.38] scores. These differences were not mediated by Apgar score.Multiple-birth SGA subgroups (vs. singleton SGA or singleton SGA subgroup with co-occurrence of smoking and inadequate GWG (vs. singleton SGA subgroup without maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain have poorer cognitive development up to 5 y.

  6. Rapid, reliable, and reproducible molecular sub-grouping of clinical medulloblastoma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Shih, David J H; Remke, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Kool, Marcel; Hawkins, Cynthia; Eberhart, Charles G; Dubuc, Adrian; Guettouche, Toumy; Cardentey, Yoslayma; Bouffet, Eric; Pomeroy, Scott L; Marra, Marco; Malkin, David; Rutka, James T; Korshunov, Andrey; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of medulloblastoma likely encompasses several distinct entities, with recent evidence for the existence of at least four unique molecular subgroups that exhibit distinct genetic, transcriptional, demographic, and clinical features. Assignment of molecular subgroup through routine profiling of high-quality RNA on expression microarrays is likely impractical in the clinical setting. The planning and execution of medulloblastoma clinical trials that stratify by subgroup, or which are targeted to a specific subgroup requires technologies that can be economically, rapidly, reliably, and reproducibly applied to formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens. In the current study, we have developed an assay that accurately measures the expression level of 22 medulloblastoma subgroup-specific signature genes (CodeSet) using nanoString nCounter Technology. Comparison of the nanoString assay with Affymetrix expression array data on a training series of 101 medulloblastomas of known subgroup demonstrated a high concordance (Pearson correlation r = 0.86). The assay was validated on a second set of 130 non-overlapping medulloblastomas of known subgroup, correctly assigning 98% (127/130) of tumors to the appropriate subgroup. Reproducibility was demonstrated by repeating the assay in three independent laboratories in Canada, the United States, and Switzerland. Finally, the nanoString assay could confidently predict subgroup in 88% of recent FFPE cases, of which 100% had accurate subgroup assignment. We present an assay based on nanoString technology that is capable of rapidly, reliably, and reproducibly assigning clinical FFPE medulloblastoma samples to their molecular subgroup, and which is highly suited for future medulloblastoma clinical trials.

  7. Identifying Changes in Youth's Subgroup Membership over Time Based on Their Targeted Communication about Substance Use with Parents and Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Using latent class/transition analyses, this study: (a) identified subgroups of youth based on their targeted communication about substance use with parents and friends, (b) examined subgroup differences in substance use, and (c) considered changes in subgroup membership over four years. Among 5,874 youth, five subgroups emerged, with parents-only…

  8. Heterogeneity in chronic fatigue syndrome - empirically defined subgroups from the PACE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T E; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; White, P D

    2017-06-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is likely to be a heterogeneous condition. Previous studies have empirically defined subgroups using combinations of clinical and biological variables. We aimed to explore the heterogeneity of chronic fatigue syndrome. We used baseline data from the PACE trial, which included 640 participants with chronic fatigue syndrome. Variable reduction, using a combination of clinical knowledge and principal component analyses, produced a final dataset of 26 variables for 541 patients. Latent class analysis was then used to empirically define subgroups. The most statistically significant and clinically recognizable model comprised five subgroups. The largest, 'core' subgroup (33% of participants), had relatively low scores across all domains and good self-efficacy. A further three subgroups were defined by: the presence of mood disorders (21%); the presence of features of other functional somatic syndromes (such as fibromyalgia or irritable bowel syndrome) (21%); or by many symptoms - a group which combined features of both of the above (14%). The smallest 'avoidant-inactive' subgroup was characterized by physical inactivity, belief that symptoms were entirely physical in nature, and fear that they indicated harm (11%). Differences in the severity of fatigue and disability provided some discriminative validation of the subgroups. In addition to providing further evidence for the heterogeneity of chronic fatigue syndrome, the subgroups identified may aid future research into the important aetiological factors of specific subtypes of chronic fatigue syndrome and the development of more personalized treatment approaches.

  9. Quality-of-Life Differences among Diagnostic Subgroups of Children Receiving Ventilating Tubes for Otitis Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Christian Hamilton; Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathological picture may differ considerably between diagnostic subgroups of children with otitis media receiving ventilating tubes. The aims of this study are to investigate differences in quality of life among diagnostic subgroups of children treated with ventilating tubes and to...

  10. Orienting Schools toward Equity: Subgroup Accountability Pressure and School-Level Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    This article examines school-level responses to subgroup accountability pressure through an ethnographic case study of a school cited for failing to make adequate yearly progress for student subgroups. Concerns about the calculations and measures used to derive the citation and reservations about acting on accountability data delegitimized the…

  11. Level of evidence for promising subgroup findings in an overall non-significant trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanniou, Julien; van der Tweel, Ingeborg|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/262684438; Teerenstra, S.; Roes, Kit C.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/115147020

    2016-01-01

    In drug development and drug licensing, it sometimes occurs that a new drug does not demonstrate effectiveness for the full study population, but there appears to be benefit in a relevant, pre-defined subgroup. This raises the question, how strong the evidence from such a subgroup is, and which

  12. Measuring English Language Workplace Proficiency across Subgroups: Using CFA Models to Validate Test Score Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hanwook; Manna, Venessa F.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the factor structure of the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC®) Listening and Reading test, and its invariance across subgroups of test-takers. The subgroups were defined by (a) gender, (b) age, (c) employment status, (d) time spent studying English, and (e) having lived in a country where English is the…

  13. Latent class analysis derived subgroups of low back pain patients - do they have prognostic capacity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard Nielsen, Anne; Hestbaek, Lise; Vach, Werner

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in patients with low back pain is well recognised and different approaches to subgrouping have been proposed. One statistical technique that is increasingly being used is Latent Class Analysis as it performs subgrouping based on pattern recognition with high accuracy. Pr...

  14. Affiliative Subgroups in Preschool Classrooms: Integrating Constructs and Methods from Social Ethology and Sociometric Traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, António J; Daniel, João R; Fernandes, Carla; Vaughn, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of school-age children and adolescents have used social network analyses to characterize selection and socialization aspects of peer groups. Fewer network studies have been reported for preschool classrooms and many of those have focused on structural descriptions of peer networks, and/or, on selection processes rather than on social functions of subgroup membership. In this study we started by identifying and describing different types of affiliative subgroups (HMP- high mutual proximity, LMP- low mutual proximity, and ungrouped children) in a sample of 240 Portuguese preschool children using nearest neighbor observations. Next, we used additional behavioral observations and sociometric data to show that HMP and LMP subgroups are functionally distinct: HMP subgroups appear to reflect friendship relations, whereas LMP subgroups appear to reflect common social goals, but without strong, within-subgroup dyadic ties. Finally, we examined the longitudinal implications of subgroup membership and show that children classified as HMP in consecutive years had more reciprocated friendships than did children whose subgroup classification changed from LMP or ungrouped to HMP. These results extend previous findings reported for North American peer groups.

  15. Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity trial: benefits may vary in subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Peter G.; Schmidt, Barbara; Roberts, Robin S.; Doyle, Lex W.; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Haslam, Ross; Sinha, Sunil; Tin, Win; Schmidt, B.; D'Ilario, J.; Cairnie, J.; Dix, J.; Adams, B.; Faber, B.; Callanan, K.; Davis, N.; Duff, J.; Ford, G.; Golec, L.; Lacy, M.; Hohn, D.; Barnett, C.; Goodchildt, L.; Lontis, R.; Fraser, S.; Keng, J.; Saunders, K.; Opie, G.; Kelly, E.; Bairam, A.; Ferland, S.; Laperriere, L.; Bélanger, S.; St Amand, P.; Blayney, M.; Davis, D.; Frank, J.; Lemyre, L.; Solimano, A.; Singh, A.; Chalmers, M.; Ramsay, K.; Synnes, A.; Whitfield, M.; Rogers, M.; Tomlinson, J.; Offringa, M.; Nuytemans, D.; Vermeulen, E.; Kok, J.; van Wassenaer, A.; Arnon, S.; Chalaf, A.; Regev, R.; Netter, I.; Ohlsson, A.; Nesbitt, K.; O'Brien, K.; Hamilton, A. M.; Sankaran, K.; Morgan, S.; Proctor, P.; LaCorte, M.; LeBlanc, P.; Braithwaite, A.; Golan, A.; Barabi, T.; Goldstein, E.; Reynolds, G.; Dromgool, B.; Meskell, S.; McMillan, D.; Schaab, D.; Spellen, L.; Sauve, R.; Christianson, H.; Anseeuw-Deeks, D.; Alvaro, R.; Chiu, A.; Porter, C.; Turner, G.; Moddemann, D.; Granke, N.; Penner, K.; Mulder, T.; Ghys, A.; van der Hoeven, M.; Clarke, M.; Parfitt, J.; MacLean, H.; Nwaesei, C.; Kuhn, L.; Ryan, H.; Saunders, C.; Schulze, A.; Pudenz, P.; Muller, M.; Lagercrantz, H.; Bhiladvala, M.; Legneval, L.; Herlenius, E.; Matthew, D.; Amos, W.; Tulsiani, S.; Tan-Dy, C.; Turner, M.; Shinwell, E.; Levine, R.; Juster-Reicher, A.; Barrington, K.; Kokkotis, T.; Khairy, M.; Grier, P.; Vachon, J.; Tin, W.; Fritz, S.; Walti, H.; Royer, D.; Halliday, H.; Millar, D.; Berry, A.; Mayes, C.; Cummings, C.; Fahnenstich, H.; Philipp, K.; Tillmann, B.; Weber, P.; Canning, R.; Wariyar, U.; Embleton, N.; Bucher, H.-U.; Fauchere, J.-C.; Pfister, R.; Launoy, V.; Huppi, P.; Poets, C.; Urschitz-Duprat, P.; Davis, P.; Doyle, L. W.; Gent, M.; Fraser, W.; Hey, E.; Perlman, M.; Thorpe, K.; Gray, S.; Roberts, R. S.; Chambers, C.; Costantini, L.; McGean, L.; Scapinello, L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the benefits of caffeine vary in three subgroups of 2006 participants in the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity (CAP) trial. STUDY DESIGN: Post-hoc subgroup analyses were performed on the basis of: (1) indication for commencement of study drug: treat apnea, prevent

  16. Nilpotency and Theory of L-Subgroups of an L-Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Ajmal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the notion of commutator is modified and extended to L-setting. Also, the notion of descending central series is introduced which is used to formulate the important notion of nilpotent L-subgroup of an L-group. Moreover, the level subset characterization for the notion of nilpotent L-subgroup is provided.

  17. Subgrouping of Readers Based on Performance Measures: A Latent Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2010-01-01

    By using latent profile analysis eight stable and interpretable subgroups of readers were identified. The basis for subgrouping was different performance measures with four aspects of reading in focus: reading of continuous texts, reading of document texts, word reading and reading speed. Participants were 9-year-old Swedish students included in…

  18. Teachers' opinion about learning continuum based on student's level of competence and specific pedagogical material in classification topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriani, Aldina Eka; Subali, Bambang

    2017-08-01

    This research discusses learning continuum development for designing a curriculum. The objective of this study is to gather the opinion of public junior and senior high school teachers about learning continuum based on student's level of competence and specific pedagogical material in classification topics. This research was conducted in Yogyakarta province from October 2016 to January 2017. This research utilizes a descriptive survey method. Respondents in this study consist of 281 science teachers at junior and senior high school in Yogyakarta city and 4 regencies namely Sleman, Bantul, Kulonprogo, and Gunung Kidul. The sample were taken using a census. The collection of data used questionnaire that had been validated from the aspects of construct validity and experts judgements. Data were analyzed using a descriptive analysis technique. The results of the analysis show that the opinions of teachers regarding specific pedagogical material in classification topics of living things at the junior high school taught in grade VII to the ability level of C2 (Understanding). At senior high school level, it is taught in grade X with the ability level C2 (Understanding). Based on these results, it can be concluded that the opinions of teachers still refer to the current syllabus and curriculum so that the teachers do not have pure opinions about the student's competence level in classification topics that should be taught at the level of the grade in accordance with the level of corresponding competency.

  19. The learning continuum based on student's level of competence and specific pedagogical learning material on physiological aspects from teachers's opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Ria Fitriyani; Subali, Bambang

    2017-08-01

    The scope of learning continuum at the conceptual knowledge is formulated based on the student's level of competence and specific pedagogical learning material. The purpose of this study is to develop a learning continuum of specific pedagogical material aspects of physiology targeted for students in primary and secondary education. This research was conducted in Province of Yogyakarta Special Region from October 2016 to January 2017. The method used in this study was survey method. The data were collected using questionnaire that had been validated from the aspects of construct validity and experts judgements. Respondents in this study consist of 281 Science/Biology teachers at Public Junior and Senior High Schools in the Province of Yogyakarta Special Region which spread in Yogyakarta city and 4 regencies namely Sleman, Bantul, Kulonprogo, and Gunungkidul. The data were taken using a census. Data were analyzed using a descriptive analysis technique. The results show the learning continuum of physiology based on teachers's opinion from grade VII, VIII, and IX are taught in grade VII, VIII, IX and X on level of C2 (understanding) and the learning continuum of physiology based on teachers's opinion from grade X, XI and XII are taught in grade X and XI on level of C2 (understanding), C3 (applying), and C4 (analyzing) based on teachers's opinions. The conclusion is that many teachers refer to the existing curriculum rather than their own original idea for developing learning continuum.

  20. The learning continuum of ecology based on teachers' opinion about student's level of competence and specific pedagogical learning material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramesti, Indah Cahaya; Subali, Bambang

    2017-08-01

    This study aims at designing learning continuum for developing a curriculum based on teachers' opinion about student's level of competence and specific pedagogical learning material on ecological aspect targeted for students of Primary and Secondary Education. This research is a descriptive research using survey methods. The researchers conducted a census by distributing questionnaires that had been validated from the aspects of construct validity and experts judgements to 147 natural science teachers at junior high school and 134 Biology teachers at senior high school as a population throughout 4 regencies and 1 city in Yogyakarta Special Region.. Data analysis techniques used descriptive analysis. In conclusion, teacher's opinion is influenced by curriculum that exist today. According to the opinions of Natural Science teachers at Junior High School, most of the ecological aspects such as characteristics of biomes, characteristics of ecosystems, characteristics of communities, characteristics of populations, etc. should be taught in grade VII with the level of competence: to understand (C2), while Biology teachers at Senior High School state that the ecological aspect should be taught in class X with the level of competence: to understand (C2), apply (C3) and analyze (C4). Teachers should be a privy in the formulation of the curriculum, so they're not only accept and apply the existing curriculum but also give opinions to improve the curriculum, especially in terms of ecology.

  1. Teacher's opinions about learning continuum based on the student's level of competence and specific pedagogical materials on anatomical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Laili Dwi; Subali, Bambang

    2017-08-01

    This research deals with designing learning continuum for developing a curriculum. The objective of this study is to gather the opinion of public junior and high school teachers about Learning Continuum based on Student's Level of Competence and Specific Pedagogical Material on Anatomical Aspects. This is a survey research. The population of the research is natural science teachers at junior high school and biology teacher at senior high school in Yogyakarta Special Region. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using a descriptive analysis technique. Based on the results of the survey, the teachers opinion are in accordance with the level of the students they teach. Junior high school teachers argued that anatomical aspects were taught in grade VII,VIII, IX and X on the level of C2 (understanding), the high school teacher argued that anatomical aspects were taught in grade VIII, X and XI on the level of C2 (understanding) and C3 (apply). While according to the opinions of primary school teachers about aspects of anatomy resulted from the research of Subali (2016), anatomy is mostly not taught at the elementary school level, only some of the materials that are taught in this school level. Therefore, the results of the survey can be inferred that the opinions of teachers is still based on the existing curriculum.

  2. Identification of subgroups of patients with low back pain using Latent Class Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Mølgaard

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major global health problem but the evidence base available to inform clinical decision making and to provide prognostic information to patients, is less than ideal. Therefore, there is a need for further knowledge about this largely non‐specific condition. Within...... questionnaire and the clinicians’ findings on a standardised examination of the low back. By using pattern recognition, subgroups of patients were identified within which their responses and scores are similar, and therefore the patients are more alike within the subgroups than across the subgroups. Latent...... in the outcomes, their prognostic capacity was as high or higher than two existing subgrouping tools (STarT Back Tool and Quebec Task Force Classification), and three baseline characteristics (LBP intensity, leg pain intensity and pain‐related disability). In contrast, the novel subgroupings had a lower...

  3. Valid randomization-based p-values for partially post hoc subgroup analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph J; Rubin, Donald B

    2015-10-30

    By 'partially post-hoc' subgroup analyses, we mean analyses that compare existing data from a randomized experiment-from which a subgroup specification is derived-to new, subgroup-only experimental data. We describe a motivating example in which partially post hoc subgroup analyses instigated statistical debate about a medical device's efficacy. We clarify the source of such analyses' invalidity and then propose a randomization-based approach for generating valid posterior predictive p-values for such partially post hoc subgroups. Lastly, we investigate the approach's operating characteristics in a simple illustrative setting through a series of simulations, showing that it can have desirable properties under both null and alternative hypotheses. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Polymerase chain reaction detection of circulating tumour cells. EORTC Melanoma Cooperative Group, Immunotherapy Subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilholz, U; Willhauck, M; Scheibenbogen, C; de Vries, T J; Burchill, S

    1997-08-01

    Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based assays to detect occult neoplastic cells offer the highest sensitivity for the study of tumour dissemination and minimal residual disease. The detection of small numbers of tumour cells in a clinical sample may result in a redefinition of what constitutes residual disease and relapse, affecting future patient management. However, there remains disparity in the published data on the clinical value of RT-PCR for the detection of circulating tumour cells. This most likely reflects differences in the methods for sample preparation, RNA extraction, and cDNA synthesis among laboratories. Consequently the need for implementation of standard quality control measures is pressing in order to facilitate meaningful assessment of the methodology and it's clinical value. A 2-day workshop organized by the immunotherapy subgroup of the EORTC Melanoma Cooperative Group was held on this topic at the Ludwig Institute in Epalinges-sur-Lausanne, Switzerland in January 1996, with Stefan Carrel as the local host. Many pertinent issues were discussed in great detail, covering every step from sample handling to quality control. This workshop resulted in a concerted action leading to the preparation of laboratory guidelines, which are summarized in this review.

  5. Genetic Sequencing Analysis of A307 Subgroup of ABO Blood Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Lin, Jiajin; Zhu, Suiyong

    2015-09-18

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the serology and gene sequence characteristics of the A307 subgroup of the ABO blood group. MATERIAL AND METHODS Monoclonal anti-A and anti-B antibodies were used to detect the ABO antigens of a proband whose positive blood type was not consistent with the negative blood type of the ABO blood group. Standard A-, B-, and O-negative typing cells were used to test for ABO antibodies in the serum. Additionally, polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) was used to confirm the genotype, and subsequently, exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene were detected by gene sequencing. Samples from the wife and daughters of the proband were also used for serological and genetic testing. RESULTS Red blood cells of the proband showed weak agglutination reaction with anti-A antibody, while anti-B antibody was detected in the serum. Moreover, PCR-SSP detected A307 and O02 alleles, while gene sequencing revealed mutation of c.745C>T in exon 7, which produced a polypeptide chain p.R249W. The A307 gene of the proband was not inherited by his daughters. CONCLUSIONS A mutation (c.745 C>T) in exon 7 of the ABO blood group gene resulted in low activity of a-1,3-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl transferase, producing A3 phenotype.

  6. Individualizing antipsychotic treatment selection in schizophrenia: characteristics of empirically derived patient subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, C U; Cañas, F; Larmo, I; Levy, P; Montes, J-M; Fagiolini, A; Papageorgiou, G; Rossi, A; Sturlason, R; Zink, M

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotic drugs is frequently sub-optimal. One reason for this may be heterogeneity between patients with schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to identify patient, disease and treatment attributes that are important for physicians in choosing an antipsychotic drug, and to identify empirically subgroups of patients who may respond differentially to antipsychotic drugs. The survey was conducted by structured interview of 744 randomly-selected psychiatrists in four European countries who recruited 3996 patients with schizophrenia. Information on 39 variables was collected. Multiple component analysis was used to identify dimensions that explained the variance between patients. Three axes, accounting for 99% of the variance, were associated with disease severity (64%), socioeconomic status (27%) and patient autonomy (8%). These dimensions discriminated between six discrete patient subgroups, identified using ascending hierarchical classification analysis. The six subgroups differed regarding educational level, illness severity, autonomy, symptom presentation, addictive behaviors, comorbidities and cardiometabolic risk factors. Subgroup 1 patients had moderately severe physician-rated disease and addictive behaviours (23.2%); Subgroup 2 patients were well-integrated and autonomous with mild to moderate disease (6.7%); Subgroup 3 patients were less well-integrated with mild to moderate disease, living alone (11.2%); Subgroup 4 patients were women with low education levels (5.4%), Subgroup 5 patients were young men with severe disease (36.8%); and Subgroup 6 patients were poorly-integrated with moderately severe disease, needing caregiver support (16.7%). The presence of these subgroups, which require confirmation and extension regarding potentially identifiable biological markers, may help individualizing treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. IMPaCT Back study protocol. Implementation of subgrouping for targeted treatment systems for low back pain patients in primary care: a prospective population-based sequential comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Nadine E; Mullis, Ricky; Young, Julie; Doyle, Carol; Lewis, Martyn; Whitehurst, David; Hay, Elaine M

    2010-08-20

    Prognostic assessment tools to identify subgroups of patients at risk of persistent low back pain who may benefit from targeted treatments have been developed and validated in primary care. The IMPaCT Back study is investigating the effects of introducing and supporting a subgrouping for targeted treatment system in primary care. A prospective, population-based, quality improvement study in one Primary Care Trust in England with a before and after design. Phases 1 and 3 collect data on current practice, attitudes and behaviour of health care practitioners, patients' outcomes and health care costs. Phase 2 introduces and supports the subgrouping for targeted treatment system, via a multi-component, quality improvement intervention that includes educational courses and outreach visits led by opinion leaders, audit/feedback, mentoring and organisational support to embed the subgrouping tools within IT and clinical management systems.We aim to recruit 1000 low back pain patients aged 18 years and over consulting 7 GP practices within one Primary Care Trust in England, UK. The study includes GPs in participating practices and physiotherapists in associated services. The primary objective is to determine the effect of the subgrouping for targeted treatment system on back pain related disability and catastrophising at 2 and 6 months, comparing data from phase 1 with phase 3. Key secondary objectives are to determine the impact on: a) GPs' and physiotherapists' attitudes and behaviour regarding low back pain; b) The process of care that patients receive; c) The cost-effectiveness and sustainability of the new clinical system. This paper details the rationale, design, methods, planned analysis and operational aspects of the IMPaCT Back study. We aim to determine whether the new subgrouping for targeted treatment system is implemented and sustained in primary care, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision-making, patient outcomes and costs. International Standard

  8. IMPaCT Back study protocol. Implementation of subgrouping for targeted treatment systems for low back pain patients in primary care: a prospective population-based sequential comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Nadine E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic assessment tools to identify subgroups of patients at risk of persistent low back pain who may benefit from targeted treatments have been developed and validated in primary care. The IMPaCT Back study is investigating the effects of introducing and supporting a subgrouping for targeted treatment system in primary care. Methods/Design A prospective, population-based, quality improvement study in one Primary Care Trust in England with a before and after design. Phases 1 and 3 collect data on current practice, attitudes and behaviour of health care practitioners, patients' outcomes and health care costs. Phase 2 introduces and supports the subgrouping for targeted treatment system, via a multi-component, quality improvement intervention that includes educational courses and outreach visits led by opinion leaders, audit/feedback, mentoring and organisational support to embed the subgrouping tools within IT and clinical management systems. We aim to recruit 1000 low back pain patients aged 18 years and over consulting 7 GP practices within one Primary Care Trust in England, UK. The study includes GPs in participating practices and physiotherapists in associated services. The primary objective is to determine the effect of the subgrouping for targeted treatment system on back pain related disability and catastrophising at 2 and 6 months, comparing data from phase 1 with phase 3. Key secondary objectives are to determine the impact on: a GPs' and physiotherapists' attitudes and behaviour regarding low back pain; b The process of care that patients receive; c The cost-effectiveness and sustainability of the new clinical system. Discussion This paper details the rationale, design, methods, planned analysis and operational aspects of the IMPaCT Back study. We aim to determine whether the new subgrouping for targeted treatment system is implemented and sustained in primary care, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision

  9. Recovery of motor deficit accompanying sciatica--subgroup analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdevest, Gijsbert M; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Brand, Ronald; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2014-09-01

    In patients with sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation, it is generally recommended to reserve surgical treatment for those who suffer from intolerable pain or those who demonstrate persistent symptoms after conservative management. Controversy exists about the necessity of early surgical intervention for those patients that have an additional motor deficit. The aim of this study was to compare the recovery of motor deficit among patients receiving early surgery to those receiving prolonged conservative treatment. Subgroup analysis of a randomized controlled trial. This subgroup analysis focuses on 150 (53%) of 283 patients with sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation and whose symptoms at baseline (before randomization) were accompanied by a motor deficit. Motor deficit was assessed through manual muscle testing and graded according to the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale. In total, 150 patients with 6 to 12 weeks of sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation and whose symptoms were accompanied by a moderate (MRC Grade 4) or severe (MRC Grade 3) motor deficit were randomly allocated to early surgery or prolonged conservative treatment. Repeated standardized neurologic examinations were performed at baseline and at 8, 26, and 52 weeks after randomization. This study was supported by a grant from the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMW) and the Hoelen Foundation The Hague. Sciatica recovered among seven (10%) of the 70 patients assigned to early surgery before surgery could be performed, and of the 80 patients assigned to conservative treatment, 32 patients (40%) were treated surgically because of intolerable pain. Baseline severity of motor deficit was graded moderate in 84% of patients and severe in 16% of patients. Motor deficit recovered significantly faster among patients allocated to early surgery (p=.01), but the difference was no longer significant at 26 (p=.21) or 52 weeks (p=.92). At 1 year, complete recovery of motor

  10. Kindergarten Students' Levels of Understanding Some Science Concepts and Scientific Inquiry Processes According to Demographic Variables (The Sampling of Kilis Province in Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Nail; Tosun, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the kindergarten students' levels of understanding some science concepts (LUSSC) and scientific inquiry processes (SIP) and compare their LUSSC and SIP in terms of some demographic variables. Also, another purpose of this study is to identify the predictive power of those demographic variables over the…

  11. Chromosomal phylogeny of the Drosophila fasciola species subgroup revisited (Diptera, Drosophilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilda Maria Diniz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of polytene chromosomes in 26 strains of seven species in the Drosophila fasciola subgroup, from several locations in Brazil, in addition to strains of two species belonging to the Drosophila mulleri subgroup (D. aldrichi and D. mulleri, enabled us to determine that the 3c inversion found in the latter species differ in one of its break points from that present in the species of the fasciola subgroup. Therefore, a change in the mulleri complex denomination from inversion 3c to inversion 3u is proposed. Accordingly, the fasciola subgroup is no longer a lesser phylogenetic part within the mulleri subgroup. Rather, it is directly related to the likely ancestor of the repleta group, called Primitive I. This information removes the main obstacle to considering the Drosophila fasciola subgroup as an ancestral group within the Drosophila repleta species group, according to the hypothesis of Throckmorton. Our data also support the conclusion that D. onca and D. carolinae are closely related species based on one new inversion in chromosome 4 (4f², in both species. D. fascioloides and D. ellisoni also form a pair of sister species based on the presence of fusions of chromosomes 2-4 and 3-5. D. rosinae is related only to the likely ancestor of the fasciola subgroup, where the 3c inversion was fixed.

  12. Patterns of subgrouping and spatial affiliation in a community of mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezanson, Michelle; Garber, Paul A; Murphy, John T; Premo, L S

    2008-03-01

    Studies of social affiliation and social spacing offer important insight into the dynamics of subgroup formation and social strategies in living primates. Among the 11 species in the genus Alouatta, mantled howlers (A. palliata) are the only species to consistently form large, stable social groups composed of several adult males and several adult females. In this study, we examine patterns of subgrouping, activity, and partner preferences in a troop of 26-29 wild mantled howling monkeys (including 12-13 marked individuals) inhabiting Isla de Ometepe, Nicaragua. During two study seasons in 2000 and 2001, we simultaneously monitored the size, composition, and activities of individuals in two to three different subgroups. A half-weight association index was used to calculate partner preferences and patterns of spatial association. Results indicate that our howler study troop fragmented into subgroups of 1-20 with subgroups averaging five and six individuals. Subgroup size and membership reflected individual patterns of social affiliation and social tolerance, and in general remained consistent across activities and from year to year. We also found evidence of cliques or social networks of three to four individuals embedded within larger subgroups. A small number of adult males appeared to play an important social role as the nucleus of clique formation. We argue that the persistence of strong male-male and male-female partner preferences in mantled howlers helps to explain the stability of relatively large multimale-multifemale groups.

  13. Generators for the l-torsion subgroup of Jacobians of Genus Two Curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnshøj, Christian Robenhagen

    2008-01-01

    We give an explicit description of the matrix representation of the Frobenius endomorphism on the Jacobian of a genus two curve on the subgroup of l-torsion points. By using this description, we can describe the matrix representation of the Weil-pairing on the subgroup of l-torsion points...... explicitly. Finally, the explicit description of the Weil-pairing provides us with an efficient, probabilistic algorithm to find generators of the subgroup of l-torsion points on the Jacobian of a genus two curve....

  14. Debate: Subgroup analyses in clinical trials: fun to look at - but don't believe them!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sleight Peter

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysis of subgroup results in a clinical trial is surprisingly unreliable, even in a large trial. This is the result of a combination of reduced statistical power, increased variance and the play of chance. Reliance on such analyses is likely to be more erroneous, and hence harmful, than application of the overall proportional (or relative result in the whole trial to the estimate of absolute risk in that subgroup. Plausible explanations can usually be found for effects that are, in reality, simply due to the play of chance. When clinicians believe such subgroup analyses, there is a real danger of harm to the individual patient.

  15. On the use of genetic programming for mining comprehensible rules in subgroup discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, José María; Romero, José Raúl; Romero, Cristóbal; Ventura, Sebastián

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel grammar-guided genetic programming algorithm for subgroup discovery. This algorithm, called comprehensible grammar-based algorithm for subgroup discovery (CGBA-SD), combines the requirements of discovering comprehensible rules with the ability to mine expressive and flexible solutions owing to the use of a context-free grammar. Each rule is represented as a derivation tree that shows a solution described using the language denoted by the grammar. The algorithm includes mechanisms to adapt the diversity of the population by self-adapting the probabilities of recombination and mutation. We compare the approach with existing evolutionary and classic subgroup discovery algorithms. CGBA-SD appears to be a very promising algorithm that discovers comprehensible subgroups and behaves better than other algorithms as measures by complexity, interest, and precision indicate. The results obtained were validated by means of a series of nonparametric tests.

  16. Team negotiation: social, epistemic, economic, and psychological consequences of subgroup conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Nir

    2008-12-01

    Large collectives (e.g., organizations, political parties, nations) are seldom unitary players. Rather, they consist of different subgroups that often have conflicting interests. Nonetheless, negotiation research consistently regards negotiating teams, who represent these collectives, as monolithic parties with uniform interests. This article integrates concepts from social psychology, management, political science, and behavioral game theory to explore the effects of subgroup conflict on team negotiation. Specifically, the present research introduced a conflict of interests within negotiating teams and investigated how this internal conflict affects the outcome of the negotiation between teams. An experiment with 80 four-person teams found that conflict between subgroups had a detrimental effect on the performance of negotiating teams. This research also employed a recent model of motivated information processing in groups to investigate possible processes underlying the effect of subgroup conflict on team negotiation.

  17. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in subgroups of patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoeksma, H.L; Dekker, J; Ronday, H.K; Breedveld, F.C; Ende, van den, C.H.M

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. METHODS...

  18. Effects of hydroxyethyl starch in subgroups of patients with severe sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Rasmus G; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    It has been speculated that certain subgroups of sepsis patients may benefit from treatment with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.42, specifically in the earlier resuscitation of patients with more severely impaired circulation....

  19. Twelve-year trends in health insurance coverage among Latinos, by subgroup and immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N Sarita; Carrasquillo, Olveen

    2006-01-01

    We examine twelve-year trends in the Latino uninsured population by ethnic subgroup and immigration status. From 1993 to 1999, most Latino subgroups, particularly Puerto Ricans, had large decreases in Medicaid coverage. For some subgroups these were offset by increases in employer coverage, but not for Mexicans, resulting in a four-percentage-point increase in their uninsured population. During 2000-2004, Medicaid/SCHIP expansions benefited most subgroups and mitigated smaller losses in employer coverage. However, during 1993-2004, the percentage of noncitizen Latinos lacking coverage increased by several percentage points. This was attributable to Medicaid losses during 1993-1999 and losses in employer coverage during 2000-2004.

  20. Identification of atopic dermatitis subgroups in children from two longitudinal birth cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Savenije, Olga E M; Heron, Jon; Evans, David M; Vonk, Judith M; Brunekreef, Bert; Wijga, Alet H; Henderson, A John; Koppelman, Gerard H; Brown, Sara J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a prevalent disease with variable natural history. Longitudinal birth cohort studies provide an opportunity to define subgroups based on disease trajectories, which may represent different genetic and environmental pathomechanisms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the

  1. Discrete subgroups of adolescents diagnosed with borderline personality disorder: a latent class analysis of personality features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Vera; Canta, Guilherme; de Castro, Filipa; Leal, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    Research suggests that borderline personality disorder (BPD) can be diagnosed in adolescents and is marked by considerable heterogeneity. This study aimed to identify personality features characterizing adolescents with BPD and possible meaningful patterns of heterogeneity that could lead to personality subgroups. The authors analyzed data on 60 adolescents, ages 15 to 18 years, who met DSM criteria for a BPD diagnosis. The authors used latent class analysis (LCA) to identify subgroups based on the personality pattern scales from the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI). LCA indicated that the best-fitting solution was a two-class model, identifying two discrete subgroups of BPD adolescents that were described as internalizing and externalizing. The subgroups were then compared on clinical and sociodemographic variables, measures of personality dimensions, DSM BPD criteria, and perception of attachment styles. Adolescents with a BPD diagnosis constitute a heterogeneous group and vary meaningfully on personality features that can have clinical implications for treatment.

  2. TEST PREPARATION FOR THE GRE ANALYTICAL ABILITY MEASURE: DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS FOR SUBGROUPS OF GRE TEST TAKERS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Powers, Donald E

    1986-01-01

    ... on other sections of the GRE General Test. The results suggested little, if any, difference among subgroups of examinees with respect to their response to the particular kind of test preparation considered in the study...

  3. Incidence and follow-up of Braunwald subgroups in unstable angina pectoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. van Miltenburg-van Zijl (Addy); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); R.J. Veerhoek (Rinus); P.M.M. Bossuyt (Patrick)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractObjectives. This study was performed to establish the prognosis of patients with unstable angina within the subgroups of the Braunwald classification. Background. Among many classifications of unstable angina, the Braunwald classification is frequently used. However, the incidence

  4. Finite groups with the set of the number of subgroups of possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, Chen et al. [3] determined the groups in which the number of subgroups of possible order is less than or equal to 3, but there exist some gaps in the proof of their theorem. If we denote by n(G) the set of the number of subgroups of possible order of a group G, then we can investigate the structure of G by n(G).

  5. A recursive formula for the number of intuitionistic fuzzy subgroups of a finite cyclic group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandni, Sharma, P. K.; Singh, Pushpinder; Singh, Manreet

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we have given an explicit recursive formula for the number of intuitionistic fuzzy subgroups of a finite cyclic group G = Zp1 × Zp ×………..×Zpm, where p1, p2, ….., pm are distinct prime numbers. A method for constructing an intuitionistic fuzzy subgroup of a given group in terms of double pinned flags is also proposed.

  6. Resolution and Characterization of Distinct cpn60-Based Subgroups of Gardnerella vaginalis in the Vaginal Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramel Jayaprakash, Teenus; Schellenberg, John J.; Hill, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), characterized by a shift of the vaginal microbiota from a Lactobacillus-dominated community to a dense biofilm containing a complex mixture of organisms, is an important risk factor in poor reproductive health outcomes. The Nugent score, based on Gram stain, is used to diagnose BV and Gardnerella vaginalis abundance in the sample is one factor determining Nugent score. A high Nugent score is indicative of BV but does not always correspond to the presence of clinical symptoms. G. vaginalis is recognized as a heterogeneous group of organisms, which can also be part of the normal, healthy vaginal microbiome. In addition, asymptomatic BV and non-Gardnerella types of BV are being recognized. In an attempt to resolve the heterogeneous group of G. vaginalis, a phylogenetic tree of cpn60 universal target sequences from G. vaginalis isolates was constructed that indicates the existence of four subgroups of G. vaginalis. This subdivision, supported by whole genome similarity calculation of representative strains using JSpecies, demonstrates that these subgroups may represent different species. The cpn60 subgroupings did not correspond with the Piot biotyping scheme, but did show consistency with ARDRA genotyping and sialidase gene presence. Isolates from all four subgroups produced biofilm in vitro. We also investigated the distribution of G. vaginalis subgroups in vaginal samples from Kenyan women with Nugent scores consistent with BV, Intermediate and Normal microbiota (n = 44). All subgroups of G. vaginalis were detected in these women, with a significant difference (z = −3.372, n = 39, p = 0.001) in frequency of G. vaginalis subgroup B between BV and Normal groups. Establishment of a quantifiable relationship between G. vaginalis subgroup distribution and clinical status could have significant diagnostic implications. PMID:22900080

  7. Resolution and characterization of distinct cpn60-based subgroups of Gardnerella vaginalis in the vaginal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teenus Paramel Jayaprakash

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV, characterized by a shift of the vaginal microbiota from a Lactobacillus-dominated community to a dense biofilm containing a complex mixture of organisms, is an important risk factor in poor reproductive health outcomes. The Nugent score, based on Gram stain, is used to diagnose BV and Gardnerella vaginalis abundance in the sample is one factor determining Nugent score. A high Nugent score is indicative of BV but does not always correspond to the presence of clinical symptoms. G. vaginalis is recognized as a heterogeneous group of organisms, which can also be part of the normal, healthy vaginal microbiome. In addition, asymptomatic BV and non-Gardnerella types of BV are being recognized. In an attempt to resolve the heterogeneous group of G. vaginalis, a phylogenetic tree of cpn60 universal target sequences from G. vaginalis isolates was constructed that indicates the existence of four subgroups of G. vaginalis. This subdivision, supported by whole genome similarity calculation of representative strains using JSpecies, demonstrates that these subgroups may represent different species. The cpn60 subgroupings did not correspond with the Piot biotyping scheme, but did show consistency with ARDRA genotyping and sialidase gene presence. Isolates from all four subgroups produced biofilm in vitro. We also investigated the distribution of G. vaginalis subgroups in vaginal samples from Kenyan women with Nugent scores consistent with BV, Intermediate and Normal microbiota (n = 44. All subgroups of G. vaginalis were detected in these women, with a significant difference (z = -3.372, n = 39, p = 0.001 in frequency of G. vaginalis subgroup B between BV and Normal groups. Establishment of a quantifiable relationship between G. vaginalis subgroup distribution and clinical status could have significant diagnostic implications.

  8. Comparative review of some properties of fuzzy and anti fuzzy subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    B. O. ONASANYA

    2010-01-01

    This paper is to comparatively review some works in fuzzy and anti fuzzy group theory. The aim is to provide anti fuzzy versions of some existing theorems in fuzzy group theory and see how much similar they are to their fuzzy versions. The research therefore focuses on the properties of fuzzy subgroup, fuzzy cosets, fuzzy conjugacy and fuzzy normal subgroups of a group which are mimicked in anti fuzzy group theory.

  9. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Che Ngwa, Emmanuel; Zeeh, Christina; Messoudi, Ahmed; Büttner-Ennever, Jean A.; Horn, Anja K. E.

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior, and superior recti (MR, IR, and SR), inferior oblique (IO), and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems ...

  10. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel eChe-Ngwa; Christina eZeeh; Christina eZeeh; Ahmed eMessoudi; Jean Alice Büttner-Ennever; Anja Kerstin Ellen Horn; Anja Kerstin Ellen Horn

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior and superior recti (MR, IR, SR), inferior oblique (IO) and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems were i...

  11. Are there distinct cognitive and motivational sub-groups of children with ADHD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambek, Rikke; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Tannock, Rosemary; Sørensen, Anne Virring; Damm, Dorte; Thomsen, Per Hove

    2017-11-16

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is proposed to be a neuropsychologically heterogeneous disorder that encompasses two distinct sub-groups, one with executive function (EF) deficits and one with delay aversion (DA). However, such claims have often been based on studies that have operationalized neuropsychological deficits using a categorical approach - using intuitive but rather arbitrary, clinical cut-offs. The current study applied an alternative empirical approach to sub-grouping in ADHD, latent profile analysis (LPA), and attempted to validate emerging subgroups through clinically relevant correlates. One-hundred medication-naïve children with ADHD and 96 typically developing children (6-14 years) completed nine EF and three DA tasks as well as an odor identification test. Parents and teachers provided reports of the children's behavior (ADHD and EF). Models of the latent structure of scores on EF and DA tests were contrasted using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). LPA was carried out based on factor scores from the CFA and sub-groups were compared in terms of odor identification and behavior. A model with one DA and two EF factors best fit the data. LPA resulted in four sub-groups that differed in terms of general level of neuropsychological performance (ranging from high to very low), odor identification, and behavior. The sub-groups did not differ in terms of the relative EF and DA performance. Results in the ADHD group were replicated in the control group. While EF and DA appear to be dissociable constructs; they do not yield distinct sub-groups when sub-grouping is based on a statistical approach such as LPA.

  12. Classification of low back-related leg pain: do subgroups differ in disability and psychosocial factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeremy; Hall, Toby

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that patients with low back-related leg pain can be classified according to pain mechanisms into four distinct subgroups: Central Sensitization (CS), Denervation (D), Peripheral Nerve Sensitization (PNS), and Musculoskeletal (M). The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were any differences in terms of disability and psychosocial factors between these four subgroups. Forty-five subjects with low back-related leg pain completed the Oswestry Disability Index, the hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. Subsequently, an examiner blinded to the questionnaire results classified the subjects into one of the four subgroups, according to the findings of the self-administered Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms questionnaire and a physical examination. It was found that the PNS subgroup had significantly greater disability compared to all other subgroups and significantly greater fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity compared to the CS and D subgroups. This highlights the importance of sub-classification but also the need to take into account disability and psychosocial factors in the management of low back-related leg pain.

  13. IGHV1, IGHV5 and IGHV7 subgroup genes in the rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jon M; Howard, Wendy; Robbins, Helena; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K

    2003-03-01

    The diversity of the antibody response is achieved, in part, by rearrangement of different immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. The Ig heavy chain is made up of a variable region (IGHV), a diversity region (IGHD) and a joining region (IGHJ). Human germline IGHV genes have been grouped into seven multigene subgroups. Size and usage of these subgroups is not equal, the IGHV3 subgroup is the most commonly used (36%), followed by IGHV1/7 (26%), then IGHV4, IGHV5, IGHV2, IGHV6 (15%, 12%, 4%, 3% respectively). The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is a useful non-human primate model for studies of infection and the database of germline Ig genes for the macaque is gradually growing to become a useful tool in the study of B-cell responses. The proportions of IGHV subgroup usage in the macaque are similar to those in man. Representatives from IGHV3 and IGHV4 subgroups for the macaque have been published, as have germline sequences of the IGHD and IGHJ genes. However, to date there have been no sequences published from the second largest IGHV subgroup, IGHV1. We report the isolation and sequencing of a genomic fragment containing an IGHV1 gene from the macaque. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers designed from this sequence enabled us to amplify and sequence 25 new IGHV1 germline genes. We also isolated two IGHV7 genes, using the same primers, and two IGHV5 genes, using human IGHV5 primers.

  14. The impact of esophageal candidiasis on hospital charges and costs across patient subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Kuo B; Murtagh, Kirsten N; Lau, Christopher; Seifeldin, Raafat

    2008-01-01

    Assess the impact of esophageal candidiasis on US hospital inpatient charges, length of stay (LOS), and costs across clinically relevant subgroups. Total hospital charge (THC) and LOS data extracted from the 2005 National Inpatient Sample (NIS) were compared for patients with and without esophageal candidiasis within the top 20 most commonly assigned Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) for the disease. Total hospital costs were estimated using hospital charges in the 2005 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR) file and hospital cost-to-charge ratios published in the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Service's (CMS) 2005 Inpatient Prospective Payment System Standardization File. Across 274 DRGs, 45 727 esophageal candidiasis patients were identified. Mean age was 50.8 years; 52.5% were female, 59.3% Caucasian. Median LOS was 7 days; median THC was $25 649. Of all esophageal candidiasis cases identified, 65% fell into the top 20 most commonly assigned DRGs. Within this subset, HIV-related DRGs accounted for 22% of the esophageal candidiasis cases. The difference in mean THC and LOS for esophageal candidiasis patients in HIV-related DRGs was not significant. However, total hospital costs were higher for esophageal candidiasis patients in this subset ($11 886 vs. $10 534, p esophageal candidiasis cases were assigned to 19 non-HIV-related DRGs. Mean LOS, THC, and total hospital costs were significantly higher for esophageal candidiasis patients within these 19 non-HIV-related DRGs, (8.4 vs. 6.1; $35 704 vs. $23 874, and $10 917 vs. $7474, p Esophageal candidiasis affects a wide range of patient groups; it increases LOS and total charges within non-HIV-related hospitalizations. Although the costs presented in this study are estimates, they do suggest a significant increase in cost among esophageal candidiasis cases. Future studies on treatment and preventive care strategies for esophageal candidiasis should not be limited to HIV patients, but instead performed across

  15. Prognostic value of medulloblastoma extent of resection after accounting for molecular subgroup: a retrospective integrated clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Eric M; Hielscher, Thomas; Bouffet, Eric; Remke, Marc; Luu, Betty; Gururangan, Sridharan; McLendon, Roger E; Bigner, Darell D; Lipp, Eric S; Perreault, Sebastien; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Grant, Gerald; Kim, Seung-Ki; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Rao, Amulya A Nageswara; Giannini, Caterina; Li, Kay Ka Wai; Ng, Ho-Keung; Yao, Yu; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Low, David C Y; Seow, Wan Tew; Chang, Kenneth T E; Mora, Jaume; Pollack, Ian F; Hamilton, Ronald L; Leary, Sarah; Moore, Andrew S; Ingram, Wendy J; Hallahan, Andrew R; Jouvet, Anne; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Faure-Conter, Cecile; Shofuda, Tomoko; Kagawa, Naoki; Hashimoto, Naoya; Jabado, Nada; Weil, Alexander G; Gayden, Tenzin; Wataya, Takafumi; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Zitterbart, Karel; Sterba, Jaroslav; Kren, Leos; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Klekner, Almos; László, Bognár; Pócza, Tímea; Hauser, Peter; Schüller, Ulrich; Jung, Shin; Jang, Woo-Youl; French, Pim J; Kros, Johan M; van Veelen, Marie-Lise C; Massimi, Luca; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Rubin, Joshua B; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Chambless, Lola B; Cooper, Michael K; Thompson, Reid C; Faria, Claudia C; Carvalho, Alice; Nunes, Sofia; Pimentel, José; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M; López-Aguilar, Enrique; Lyden, David; Garzia, Livia; Shih, David J H; Kijima, Noriyuki; Schneider, Christian; Adamski, Jennifer; Northcott, Paul A; Kool, Marcel; Jones, David T W; Chan, Jennifer A; Nikolic, Ana; Garre, Maria Luisa; Van Meir, Erwin G; Osuka, Satoru; Olson, Jeffrey J; Jahangiri, Arman; Castro, Brandyn A; Gupta, Nalin; Weiss, William A; Moxon-Emre, Iska; Mabbott, Donald J; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Tabori, Uri; Drake, James; Kulkarni, Abhaya; Dirks, Peter; Rutka, James T; Korshunov, Andrey; Pfister, Stefan M; Packer, Roger J; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    benefit for gross total resection compared with near-total resection (HR 1·05, 0·71-1·53, p=0·8158 for progression-free survival and HR 1·14, 0·75-1·72, p=0·55 for overall survival). No significant survival benefit existed for greater extent of resection for patients with WNT, SHH, or group 3 tumours (HR 1·03, 0·67-1·58, p=0·89 for sub-total resection vs gross total resection). For patients with group 4 tumours, gross total resection conferred a benefit to progression-free survival compared with sub-total resection (HR 1·97, 1·22-3·17, p=0·0056), especially for those with metastatic disease (HR 2·22, 1·00-4·93, p=0·050). However, gross total resection had no effect on overall survival compared with sub-total resection in patients with group 4 tumours (HR 1·67, 0·93-2·99, p=0·084). The prognostic benefit of increased extent of resection for patients with medulloblastoma is attenuated after molecular subgroup affiliation is taken into account. Although maximum safe surgical resection should remain the standard of care, surgical removal of small residual portions of medulloblastoma is not recommended when the likelihood of neurological morbidity is high because there is no definitive benefit to gross total resection compared with near-total resection. Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute, Terry Fox Research Institute, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Institutes of Health, Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, and the Garron Family Chair in Childhood Cancer Research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pediatric RSV Infection During Two Winter Seasons in British Columbia: A Role for Subgroup Analysis in Young Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wilson

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies directed against the G, F and NP proteins of respiratory syncytial virus, 167 virus isolates from nasopharyngeal washing cultures at British Columbia Children’s Hospital during two consecutive epidemics were subgrouped. Slides made and frozen at the time of virus isolation or prepared from recovered frozen passage material, were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. Of 85 strains tested in 1987–88, 54 (64% were subgroup A, and 31 (36% subgroup B. By contrast, of 82 strains tested in 1988–89 five (6% were subgroup A and 77 (94% subgroup B. Review of patient charts did not reveal significant differences in clinical course of patients infected with the two subgroups, but the risk of infection with subgroup A was significantly greater than the risk of subgroup B infection in younger patients.

  17. Gardnerella vaginalis Subgroups Defined by cpn60 Sequencing and Sialidase Activity in Isolates from Canada, Belgium and Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Schellenberg

    Full Text Available Increased abundance of Gardnerella vaginalis and sialidase activity in vaginal fluid is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV, a common but poorly understood clinical entity associated with poor reproductive health outcomes. Since most women are colonized with G. vaginalis, its status as a normal member of the vaginal microbiota or pathogen causing BV remains controversial, and numerous classification schemes have been described. Since 2005, sequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target (cpn60 UT has distinguished four subgroups in isolate collections, clone libraries and deep sequencing datasets. To clarify potential clinical and diagnostic significance of cpn60 subgroups, we undertook phenotypic and molecular characterization of 112 G. vaginalis isolates from three continents. A total of 36 subgroup A, 33 B, 35 C and 8 D isolates were identified through phylogenetic analysis of cpn60 sequences as corresponding to four "clades" identified in a recently published study, based on sequencing 473 genes across 17 isolates. cpn60 subgroups were compared with other previously described molecular methods for classification of Gardnerella subgroups, including amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA and real-time PCR assays designed to quantify subgroups in vaginal samples. Although two ARDRA patterns were observed in isolates, each was observed in three cpn60 subgroups (A/B/D and B/C/D. Real-time PCR assays corroborated cpn60 subgroups overall, but 13 isolates from subgroups A, B and D were negative in all assays. A putative sialidase gene was detected in all subgroup B, C and D isolates, but only in a single subgroup A isolate. In contrast, sialidase activity was observed in all subgroup B isolates, 3 (9% subgroup C isolates and no subgroup A or D isolates. These observations suggest distinct roles for G. vaginalis subgroups in BV pathogenesis. We conclude that cpn60 UT sequencing is a robust approach for defining G. vaginalis

  18. Gardnerella vaginalis Subgroups Defined by cpn60 Sequencing and Sialidase Activity in Isolates from Canada, Belgium and Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, John J; Paramel Jayaprakash, Teenus; Withana Gamage, Niradha; Patterson, Mo H; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Hill, Janet E

    2016-01-01

    Increased abundance of Gardnerella vaginalis and sialidase activity in vaginal fluid is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), a common but poorly understood clinical entity associated with poor reproductive health outcomes. Since most women are colonized with G. vaginalis, its status as a normal member of the vaginal microbiota or pathogen causing BV remains controversial, and numerous classification schemes have been described. Since 2005, sequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target (cpn60 UT) has distinguished four subgroups in isolate collections, clone libraries and deep sequencing datasets. To clarify potential clinical and diagnostic significance of cpn60 subgroups, we undertook phenotypic and molecular characterization of 112 G. vaginalis isolates from three continents. A total of 36 subgroup A, 33 B, 35 C and 8 D isolates were identified through phylogenetic analysis of cpn60 sequences as corresponding to four "clades" identified in a recently published study, based on sequencing 473 genes across 17 isolates. cpn60 subgroups were compared with other previously described molecular methods for classification of Gardnerella subgroups, including amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and real-time PCR assays designed to quantify subgroups in vaginal samples. Although two ARDRA patterns were observed in isolates, each was observed in three cpn60 subgroups (A/B/D and B/C/D). Real-time PCR assays corroborated cpn60 subgroups overall, but 13 isolates from subgroups A, B and D were negative in all assays. A putative sialidase gene was detected in all subgroup B, C and D isolates, but only in a single subgroup A isolate. In contrast, sialidase activity was observed in all subgroup B isolates, 3 (9%) subgroup C isolates and no subgroup A or D isolates. These observations suggest distinct roles for G. vaginalis subgroups in BV pathogenesis. We conclude that cpn60 UT sequencing is a robust approach for defining G. vaginalis subgroups within the

  19. The Relationship Between Teachers' Self-efficacy Perception of Application-Based Educational Technology and Material Development Skills and Their Students' Level Certifying Exam Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan Varank

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to investigate the relationship between 6th., 7th., and 8th grade Turkish, math, science and technology, social sciences and foreign language teachers' self-efficacy perception of application-based educational technology and material development skills and their students' Level Certifying Exam scores. A total of 256 Turkish, math, science and technology, social sciences and foreign language teachers and their students from 48 elementary schools located in a city and one of its close districts in Inner Aegean area participated in the study. The significance levels of the models established to explain students' Level Certifying Exam performance show differences from subject to subject and from grade to grade. Similar results were found for the significance levels of the variables used in the models

  20. On the same side of the faultline: Inclusion in the leader’s subgroup and employee performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, B.; Shemla, M.; Li, J.; Wegge, J.

    Extending theory on faultlines and subgroups, we argue that faultlines splitting a team into homogeneous subgroups can have different effects on team members' individual performance, depending on different intra-subgroup processes. Specifically, we propose that the effect of faultline strength on

  1. ['Gold standard', not 'golden standard'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2005-01-01

    In medical literature, both 'gold standard' and 'golden standard' are employed to describe a reference test used for comparison with a novel method. The term 'gold standard' in its current sense in medical research was coined by Rudd in 1979, in reference to the monetary gold standard. In the same

  2. Functional dyspepsia: relationship between clinical subgroups and Helicobacter pylori status in Western Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saruc

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of functional dyspepsia is not known. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristics of functional dyspepsia in Western Turkey. We divided 900 patients with functional dyspepsia into three subgroups according to symptoms: ulcer-like (UL, 321 (35.6%, motility disorder-like (ML, 281 (31.2%, and the combination (C of these symptoms, 298 (33.1%. All patients were submitted to endoscopic evaluation, with two biopsies taken from the cardia and corpus, and four from the antrum of the stomach. All biopsy samples were studied for Helicobacter pylori (Hp density, chronic inflammation, activity, intestinal metaplasia, atrophy, and the presence of lymphoid aggregates by histological examination. One antral biopsy was used for the rapid urease test. Tissue cagA status was determined by PCR from an antral biopsy specimen by a random sampling method. We also determined the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and gastrin by the same method. Data were analyzed statistically by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and by analysis of variance. Hp and cagA positivity was significantly higher in the UL subgroup than in the others. The patients in the ML subgroup had the lowest Hp and cagA positivity and Hp density. The ML subgroup also showed the lowest level of Hp-induced inflammation among all subgroups. The serum levels of TNF-alpha and gastrin did not reveal any difference between groups. Our findings show a poor association of Hp with the ML subgroup of functional dyspepsia, but a stronger association with the UL and C subgroups.

  3. Divide and Conquer: Sub-Grouping of ASD Improves ASD Detection Based on Brain Morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katuwal, Gajendra J; Baum, Stefi A; Cahill, Nathan D; Michael, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Low success (ASD) classification using brain morphometry from the large multi-site ABIDE dataset and inconsistent findings on brain morphometric abnormalities in ASD can be attributed to the ASD heterogeneity. In this study, we show that ASD brain morphometry is highly heterogeneous, and demonstrate that the heterogeneity can be mitigated and classification improved if autism severity (AS), verbal IQ (VIQ) and age are used with morphometric features. Morphometric features from structural MRIs (sMRIs) of 734 males (ASD: 361, controls: 373) of ABIDE were derived using FreeSurfer. Applying the Random Forest classifier, an AUC of 0.61 was achieved. Adding VIQ and age to morphometric features, AUC improved to 0.68. Sub-grouping the subjects by AS, VIQ and age improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.8 in the moderate-AS sub-group (AS = 7-8). Matching subjects on age and/or VIQ in each sub-group further improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.92 in the low AS sub-group (AS = 4-5). AUC decreased with AS and VIQ, and was the lowest in the mid-age sub-group (13-18 years). The important features were mainly from the frontal, temporal, ventricular, right hippocampal and left amygdala regions. However, they highly varied with AS, VIQ and age. The curvature and folding index features from frontal, temporal, lingual and insular regions were dominant in younger subjects suggesting their importance for early detection. When the experiments were repeated using the Gradient Boosting classifier similar results were obtained. Our findings suggest that identifying brain biomarkers in sub-groups of ASD can yield more robust and insightful results than searching across the whole spectrum. Further, it may allow identification of sub-group specific brain biomarkers that are optimized for early detection and monitoring, increasing the utility of sMRI as an important tool for early detection of ASD.

  4. The interest of gait markers in the identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinet, Bernard; Chaleil, Denis; Cabane, Jean; Dumolard, Anne; Hatron, Pierre; Juvin, Robert; Lanteri-Minet, Michel; Mainguy, Yves; Negre-Pages, Laurence; Pillard, Fabien; Riviere, Daniel; Maugars, Yves-Michel

    2011-11-11

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a heterogeneous syndrome and its classification into subgroups calls for broad-based discussion. FM subgrouping, which aims to adapt treatment according to different subgroups, relies in part, on psychological and cognitive dysfunctions. Since motor control of gait is closely related to cognitive function, we hypothesized that gait markers could be of interest in the identification of FM patients' subgroups. This controlled study aimed at characterizing gait disorders in FM, and subgrouping FM patients according to gait markers such as stride frequency (SF), stride regularity (SR), and cranio-caudal power (CCP) which measures kinesia. A multicentre, observational open trial enrolled patients with primary FM (44.1 ± 8.1 y), and matched controls (44.1 ± 7.3 y). Outcome measurements and gait analyses were available for 52 pairs. A 3-step statistical analysis was carried out. A preliminary single blind analysis using k-means cluster was performed as an initial validation of gait markers. Then in order to quantify FM patients according to psychometric and gait variables an open descriptive analysis comparing patients and controls were made, and correlations between gait variables and main outcomes were calculated. Finally using cluster analysis, we described subgroups for each gait variable and looked for significant differences in self-reported assessments. SF was the most discriminating gait variable (73% of patients and controls). SF, SR, and CCP were different between patients and controls. There was a non-significant association between SF, FIQ and physical components from Short-Form 36 (p = 0.06). SR was correlated to FIQ (p = 0.01) and catastrophizing (p = 0.05) while CCP was correlated to pain (p = 0.01). The SF cluster identified 3 subgroups with a particular one characterized by normal SF, low pain, high activity and hyperkinesia. The SR cluster identified 2 distinct subgroups: the one with a reduced SR was distinguished by high FIQ

  5. The interest of gait markers in the identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auvinet Bernard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is a heterogeneous syndrome and its classification into subgroups calls for broad-based discussion. FM subgrouping, which aims to adapt treatment according to different subgroups, relies in part, on psychological and cognitive dysfunctions. Since motor control of gait is closely related to cognitive function, we hypothesized that gait markers could be of interest in the identification of FM patients' subgroups. This controlled study aimed at characterizing gait disorders in FM, and subgrouping FM patients according to gait markers such as stride frequency (SF, stride regularity (SR, and cranio-caudal power (CCP which measures kinesia. Methods A multicentre, observational open trial enrolled patients with primary FM (44.1 ± 8.1 y, and matched controls (44.1 ± 7.3 y. Outcome measurements and gait analyses were available for 52 pairs. A 3-step statistical analysis was carried out. A preliminary single blind analysis using k-means cluster was performed as an initial validation of gait markers. Then in order to quantify FM patients according to psychometric and gait variables an open descriptive analysis comparing patients and controls were made, and correlations between gait variables and main outcomes were calculated. Finally using cluster analysis, we described subgroups for each gait variable and looked for significant differences in self-reported assessments. Results SF was the most discriminating gait variable (73% of patients and controls. SF, SR, and CCP were different between patients and controls. There was a non-significant association between SF, FIQ and physical components from Short-Form 36 (p = 0.06. SR was correlated to FIQ (p = 0.01 and catastrophizing (p = 0.05 while CCP was correlated to pain (p = 0.01. The SF cluster identified 3 subgroups with a particular one characterized by normal SF, low pain, high activity and hyperkinesia. The SR cluster identified 2 distinct subgroups: the one with a

  6. Efficacy of Nintedanib in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis across Prespecified Subgroups in INPULSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costabel, Ulrich; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Richeldi, Luca; Collard, Harold R; Tschoepe, Inga; Stowasser, Susanne; Azuma, Arata

    2016-01-15

    In the two replicate, placebo-controlled, 52-week, phase III INPULSIS trials, nintedanib 150 mg twice daily significantly reduced the annual rate of decline in FVC, the primary endpoint, in subjects with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). It is unknown if this effect was uniform across all subjects treated with nintedanib. To investigate the potential association of demographic and clinical variables with the effect of nintedanib in subjects with IPF. Subgroup analyses of pooled data from the INPULSIS trials were prespecified. Subgroups were analyzed by sex, age (70%), baseline St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score (≤40, >40), smoking status (never, ex/current), systemic corticosteroid use (yes/no), and bronchodilator use (yes/no). A total of 1,061 subjects were treated (nintedanib n = 638, placebo n = 423). There was no statistically significant difference in the effect of nintedanib for the primary endpoint or the key secondary endpoints of change from baseline in SGRQ total score or time to first acute exacerbation in any subgroup. Treatment effects for the key secondary endpoints seemed more pronounced in subjects with baseline FVC ≤70% predicted, because the majority of acute exacerbations and a greater deterioration in SGRQ total score occurred in placebo-treated subjects in this subgroup. Pooled data from the INPULSIS trials support a consistent effect of nintedanib across a range of IPF phenotypes by slowing disease progression across a number of prespecified subgroups.

  7. [Identification of subgroups with lower level of stroke knowledge using decision-tree analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Kyung; Jeong, Seok Hee; Kang, Hyun Cheol

    2014-02-01

    This study was performed to explore levels of stroke knowledge and identify subgroups with lower levels of stroke knowledge among adults in Korea. A cross-sectional survey was used and data were collected in 2012. A national sample of 990 Koreans aged 20 to 74 years participated in this study. Knowledge of risk factors, warning signs, and first action for stroke were surveyed using face-to-face interviews. Descriptive statistics and decision tree analysis were performed using SPSS WIN 20.0 and Answer Tree 3.1. Mean score for stroke risk factor knowledge was 7.7 out of 10. The least recognized risk factor was diabetes and four subgroups with lower levels of knowledge were identified. Score for knowledge of stroke warning signs was 3.6 out of 6. The least recognized warning sign was sudden severe headache and six subgroups with lower levels of knowledge were identified. The first action for stroke was recognized by 65.7 percent of participants and four subgroups with lower levels of knowledge were identified. Multi-faceted education should be designed to improve stroke knowledge among Korean adults, particularly focusing on subgroups with lower levels of knowledge and less recognition of items in this study.

  8. Detecting treatment-subgroup interactions in clustered data with generalized linear mixed-effects model trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkema, M; Smits, N; Zeileis, A; Hothorn, T; Kelderman, H

    2017-10-25

    Identification of subgroups of patients for whom treatment A is more effective than treatment B, and vice versa, is of key importance to the development of personalized medicine. Tree-based algorithms are helpful tools for the detection of such interactions, but none of the available algorithms allow for taking into account clustered or nested dataset structures, which are particularly common in psychological research. Therefore, we propose the generalized linear mixed-effects model tree (GLMM tree) algorithm, which allows for the detection of treatment-subgroup interactions, while accounting for the clustered structure of a dataset. The algorithm uses model-based recursive partitioning to detect treatment-subgroup interactions, and a GLMM to estimate the random-effects parameters. In a simulation study, GLMM trees show higher accuracy in recovering treatment-subgroup interactions, higher predictive accuracy, and lower type II error rates than linear-model-based recursive partitioning and mixed-effects regression trees. Also, GLMM trees show somewhat higher predictive accuracy than linear mixed-effects models with pre-specified interaction effects, on average. We illustrate the application of GLMM trees on an individual patient-level data meta-analysis on treatments for depression. We conclude that GLMM trees are a promising exploratory tool for the detection of treatment-subgroup interactions in clustered datasets.

  9. Somatosensory nociceptive characteristics differentiate subgroups in people with chronic low back pain: a cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabey, Martin; Slater, Helen; OʼSullivan, Peter; Beales, Darren; Smith, Anne

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the existence of subgroups in a cohort with chronic low back pain (n = 294) based on the results of multimodal sensory testing and profile subgroups on demographic, psychological, lifestyle, and general health factors. Bedside (2-point discrimination, brush, vibration and pinprick perception, temporal summation on repeated monofilament stimulation) and laboratory (mechanical detection threshold, pressure, heat and cold pain thresholds, conditioned pain modulation) sensory testing were examined at wrist and lumbar sites. Data were entered into principal component analysis, and 5 component scores were entered into latent class analysis. Three clusters, with different sensory characteristics, were derived. Cluster 1 (31.9%) was characterised by average to high temperature and pressure pain sensitivity. Cluster 2 (52.0%) was characterised by average to high pressure pain sensitivity. Cluster 3 (16.0%) was characterised by low temperature and pressure pain sensitivity. Temporal summation occurred significantly more frequently in cluster 1. Subgroups were profiled on pain intensity, disability, depression, anxiety, stress, life events, fear avoidance, catastrophizing, perception of the low back region, comorbidities, body mass index, multiple pain sites, sleep, and activity levels. Clusters 1 and 2 had a significantly greater proportion of female participants and higher depression and sleep disturbance scores than cluster 3. The proportion of participants undertaking Low back pain, therefore, does not appear to be homogeneous. Pain mechanisms relating to presentations of each subgroup were postulated. Future research may investigate prognoses and interventions tailored towards these subgroups.

  10. Breast Cancer Prevalence and Mortality among Hispanic Subgroups in the United States, 2009–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijou R. Hunt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper presents data on breast cancer prevalence and mortality among US Hispanics and Hispanic subgroups, including Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American, and South American. Methods. Five-year average annual female breast cancer prevalence and mortality rates for 2009–2013 were examined using data from the National Health Interview Survey (prevalence and the National Center for Health Statistics and the American Community Survey (mortality rates. Results. Overall breast cancer prevalence among US Hispanic women was 1.03%. Although the estimates varied slightly by Hispanic subgroup, these differences were not statistically significant. The breast cancer mortality rate for Hispanics overall was 17.71 per 100,000 women. Higher rates were observed among Cubans (17.89, Mexicans (18.78, and Puerto Ricans (19.04, and a lower rate was observed among Central and South Americans (10.15. With the exception of the rate for Cubans, all Hispanic subgroup rates were statistically significantly different from the overall Hispanic rate. Additionally, all Hispanic subgroups rates were statistically significantly higher than the Central and South American rate. Conclusion. The data reveal significant differences in mortality across Hispanic subgroups. These data enable public health officials to develop targeted interventions to help lower breast cancer mortality among the highest risk populations.

  11. Fixed and Adaptive Parallel Subgroup-Specific Design for Survival Outcomes: Power and Sample Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranta Antoniou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker-guided clinical trial designs, which focus on testing the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment in improving patient health, have drawn considerable attention in the era of stratified medicine with many different designs being proposed in the literature. However, planning such trials to ensure they have sufficient power to test the relevant hypotheses can be challenging and the literature often lacks guidance in this regard. In this study, we focus on the parallel subgroup-specific design, which allows the evaluation of separate treatment effects in the biomarker-positive subgroup and biomarker-negative subgroup simultaneously. We also explore an adaptive version of the design, where an interim analysis is undertaken based on a fixed percentage of target events, with the option to stop each biomarker-defined subgroup early for futility or efficacy. We calculate the number of events and patients required to ensure sufficient power in each of the biomarker-defined subgroups under different scenarios when the primary outcome is time-to-event. For the adaptive version, stopping probabilities are also explored. Since multiple hypotheses are being tested simultaneously, and multiple interim analyses are undertaken, we also focus on controlling the overall type I error rate by way of multiplicity adjustment.

  12. Diversity among mandarin varieties and natural sub-groups in aroma volatiles compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Livnat; Yaniv, Yossi; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Carmi, Nir; Porat, Ron

    2016-01-15

    Mandarins constitute a large, diverse and important group within the Citrus family. Here, we analysed the aroma volatiles compositions of 13 mandarin varieties belonging to seven genetically different natural sub-groups that included common mandarin (C. reticulata Blanco), clementine (C. clementina Hort. ex. Tan), satsuma (C. unshiu Marcovitch), Mediterranean mandarin (C. deliciosa Tenore), King mandarin (C. nobilis Loureiro), and mandarin hybrids, such as tangor (C. reticulata × C. sinensis) and tangelo (C. reticulata × C. paradisi). We found that mandarin varieties among tangors ('Temple', 'Ortanique'), tangelos ('Orlando', 'Minneola') and King ('King') had more volatiles, at higher levels, and were richer in sesquiterpene and ester volatiles, than other varieties belonging to the sub-groups common mandarin ('Ora', 'Ponkan'), clementine ('Oroval', 'Caffin'), satsuma ('Okitsu', 'Owari') and Mediterranean mandarin ('Avana', 'Yusuf Efendi'). Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis accurately differentiated between mandarin varieties and natural sub-groups according to their aroma-volatile profiles. Although we found wide differences in aroma-volatiles compositions among varieties belonging to different natural sub-groups, we detected only minor differences among varieties within any natural sub-group. These findings suggest that selecting appropriate parents would enable manipulation of aroma-volatile compositions in future mandarin breeding programmes. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Accounting standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellinga, B.; Mügge, D.

    2014-01-01

    The European and global regulation of accounting standards have witnessed remarkable changes over the past twenty years. In the early 1990s, EU accounting practices were fragmented along national lines and US accounting standards were the de facto global standards. Since 2005, all EU listed

  14. Are there distinct cognitive and motivational sub-groups of children with ADHD?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambek, Rikke; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Tannock, Rosemary

    2017-01-01

    relevant correlates. One-hundred medication-naïve children with ADHD and 96 typically developing children (6–14 years) completed nine EF and three DA tasks as well as an odor identification test. Parents and teachers provided reports of the children's behavior (ADHD and EF). Models of the latent structure...... of scores on EF and DA tests were contrasted using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). LPA was carried out based on factor scores from the CFA and sub-groups were compared in terms of odor identification and behavior. A model with one DA and two EF factors best fit the data. LPA resulted in four sub......-groups that differed in terms of general level of neuropsychological performance (ranging from high to very low), odor identification, and behavior. The sub-groups did not differ in terms of the relative EF and DA performance. Results in the ADHD group were replicated in the control group. While EF and DA appear...

  15. Identity practices, ingroup projection, and the evaluation of subgroups: a study among Turkish-Dutch Sunnis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Jessamina Lih Yan; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on religious subgroup evaluations by examining the attitude of Turkish-Dutch Sunni Muslims towards Alevi and Shiite Muslims. Following the Ingroup Projection Model, it was expected that Sunni participants who practice Islam will project their self-defining subgroup practices on the superordinate Muslim category, which will be related to more ingroup bias towards Alevis, a Muslim subgroup that performs different religious practices. Two studies yielded consistent evidence that practicing Islam increased ingroup bias towards Alevis. Furthermore, in Study 2, we found evidence that the effect of practicing Islam on ingroup bias was mediated by relative ingroup prototypicality (RIP). Moreover, practicing Islam did not affect RIP in relation to Shiites who perform the same religious practices that we examined. These findings support the Ingroup Projection Model.

  16. Eating disorder behavior and early maladaptive schemas in subgroups of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unoka, Zsolt; Tölgyes, Tamás; Czobor, Pál; Simon, Lajos

    2010-06-01

    To examine relationship between Eating Disorder Behaviors (EDB) and Early Maladaptive Schemas (EMS) across eating disorder (ED) subgroups. EMS and ED behaviors were measured by Young Schema Questionnaire and Eating Behavior Severity Scale, respectively, among patients diagnosed with Restrictive or Binge/purging Anorexia, or bulimia nervosa. Canonical component analysis showed significant association between ED behaviors and EMSs. Canonical factor-pairs (EDB and EMS) revealed specific associations between certain patterns of EDBs, including binge-purging and physical exercise, and certain patterns of maladaptive cognitive schema, including Emotional deprivation, Abandonment, Enmeshments, Subjugation, and Emotional inhibition. ED subgroups significantly differred between the EMS and EDB canonical factors, respectively. Our findings indicate that EMS and EDB are associated, and that the factors that potentially mediate the association differ significantly among ED subgroups. These results are consistent with the notion that EMSs play a specific role in the development and maintenance of ED behaviors.

  17. Effect of Nintedanib in Subgroups of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis by Diagnostic Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, Ganesh; Wells, Athol U; Nicholson, Andrew G; Richeldi, Luca; Flaherty, Kevin R; Le Maulf, Florence; Stowasser, Susanne; Schlenker-Herceg, Rozsa; Hansell, David M

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of a surgical lung biopsy, patients diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in clinical practice could participate in the INPULSIS trials of nintedanib if they had honeycombing and/or traction bronchiectasis plus reticulation, without atypical features of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Thus, the patients in these trials represented patients with definite UIP and a large subgroup of patients with possible UIP. To investigate the potential impact of diagnostic subgroups on the progression of IPF and the effect of nintedanib. We conducted a post hoc subgroup analysis of patients with honeycombing on HRCT and/or confirmation of UIP by biopsy versus patients without either, using pooled data from the INPULSIS trials. Seven hundred twenty-three (68.1%) patients had honeycombing and/or biopsy, and 338 (31.9%) patients had no honeycombing or biopsy. In these subgroups, respectively, the adjusted annual rate of decline in FVC in patients treated with placebo was -225.7 and -221.0 ml/yr, and the nintedanib versus placebo difference in the adjusted annual rate of decline in FVC was 117.0 ml/yr (95% confidence interval, 76.3-157.8) and 98.9 ml/yr (95% confidence interval, 36.4-161.5). There was no significant treatment-by-subgroup interaction (P = 0.8139). Adverse events were similar between the subgroups. Patients with IPF diagnosed in clinical practice who had possible UIP with traction bronchiectasis on HRCT and had not undergone surgical lung biopsy had disease that progressed in a similar way, and responded similarly to nintedanib, to that of patients with honeycombing on HRCT and/or confirmation of UIP by biopsy.

  18. Subgroup and resistance analyses of raltegravir for resistant HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, David A; Steigbigel, Roy T; Gatell, Jose M

    2008-01-01

    conducted subgroup analyses of the data from week 48 in both studies according to baseline prognostic factors. Genotyping of the integrase gene was performed in raltegravir recipients who had virologic failure. RESULTS: Virologic responses to raltegravir were consistently superior to responses to placebo...... over placebo was shown in clinically relevant subgroups of patients, including those with baseline characteristics that typically predict a poor response to antiretroviral therapy: a high HIV-1 RNA level, low CD4 cell count, and low genotypic or phenotypic sensitivity score. (ClinicalTrials.gov numbers...

  19. Identification of a novel subgroup of Koala retrovirus from Koalas in Japanese zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojima, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Ohata, Takuji; Nakaoka, Rie; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    We identified a new subgroup of koala retrovirus (KoRV), named KoRV-J, which utilizes thiamine transport protein 1 as a receptor instead of the Pit-1 receptor used by KoRV (KoRV-A). By subgroup-specific PCR, KoRV-J and KoRV-A were detected in 67.5 and 100% of koalas originating from koalas from northern Australia, respectively. Altogether, our results indicate that the invasion of the koala population by KoRV-J may have occurred more recently than invasion by KoRV-A.

  20. The Importance of Risk and Subgroup Analysis of Nonparticipants in a Geriatric Intervention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, E.; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, C

    2016-01-01

    Background. A major concern in intervention studies is the generalizability of the findings due to refusal of intended participants to actually take part. In studies including ill older people the number of those declining to participate may be large and the concern is therefore relevant...... randomized study. Conclusion. We recommend that intervention studies among older people or other fragile patient groups include analysis of relevant risk and subgroup analyses of refusers........ Objectives. To compare patients characteristics, rates of acute readmission, and mortality after one and six months among older persons who agreed and those who declined to participate in a randomized controlled trial and to describe subgroups of nonparticipants. Design. Comparative study based...

  1. The Importance of Risk and Subgroup Analysis of Nonparticipants in a Geriatric Intervention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, E.; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, C

    2016-01-01

    . Objectives. To compare patients characteristics, rates of acute readmission, and mortality after one and six months among older persons who agreed and those who declined to participate in a randomized controlled trial and to describe subgroups of nonparticipants. Design. Comparative study based...... on a randomized controlled trial. Setting. University hospital in the Capital Region of Denmark. Participants. Patients >70 years discharged home after a short Emergency Department stay. 399 were requested to participate; 271 consented, whereas 128 refused. Results. Refusers were more likely to be readmitted (p...... randomized study. Conclusion. We recommend that intervention studies among older people or other fragile patient groups include analysis of relevant risk and subgroup analyses of refusers....

  2. A comparison of three clustering methods for finding subgroups in MRI, SMS or clinical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Jensen, Rikke K; Kongsted, Alice

    2014-01-01

    intensity data collected for 52 weeks by text (SMS) messaging (n = 1,121 people), and the last dataset contained a range of clinical variables measured in low back pain patients (n = 543 people). Four artificial datasets (n = 1,000 each) containing subgroups of varying complexity were also analysed testing......BACKGROUND: There are various methodological approaches to identifying clinically important subgroups and one method is to identify clusters of characteristics that differentiate people in cross-sectional and/or longitudinal data using Cluster Analysis (CA) or Latent Class Analysis (LCA...

  3. Optimizing Subgroups Formation for E-MBMS Transmissions in LTE Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algharem, M.; Omar, M. H.; Stiawan, D.; Budiarto, R.

    2017-04-01

    Long Term Evolution (LTE) network provides a high throughput with low latency which make it suitable for multicast and broadcast services. In Conventional Multicast Scheme (CMS), data is transmitted according to the user with worst channel condition which results in wasting network resources. To overcome the drawback of CMS, a new subgrouping mechanism is proposed to split the multicast group into several subgroups based on users channel quality. The performance of the proposed mechanism has been evaluated using LTE simulator. The simulation results show that the proposed mechanism increase the multicast performance compared to CMS in term of goodput and spectrum efficiency, while maintain fairness index of users in an acceptable level.

  4. Clinimetrics corner: choosing appropriate study designs for particular questions about treatment subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Hancock, Mark; Petersen, Ditte H.D

    2010-01-01

    , depending on the design of the trial. Objectives: This paper discusses the randomized controlled trial designs that are suitable to answer particular questions about treatment subgroups. It focuses on trial designs that are suitable to answer four questions: (1) 'Is the treatment effective in a pre...... that are inappropriate given the randomized controlled trial design used. The research design to choose, when developing a study protocol that investigates the effect of treatment subgroups, depends on the particular research question. Similarly, the inferences that can be drawn from an existing study will vary...

  5. Internalin profiling and multilocus sequence typing suggest four Listeria innocua subgroups with different evolutionary distances from Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecological, biochemical and genetic resemblance as well as clear differences of virulence between L. monocytogenes and L. innocua make this bacterial clade attractive as a model to examine evolution of pathogenicity. This study was attempted to examine the population structure of L. innocua and the microevolution in the L. innocua-L. monocytogenes clade via profiling of 37 internalin genes and multilocus sequence typing based on the sequences of 9 unlinked genes gyrB, sigB, dapE, hisJ, ribC, purM, gap, tuf and betL. Results L. innocua was genetically monophyletic compared to L. monocytogenes, and comprised four subgroups. Subgroups A and B correlated with internalin types 1 and 3 (except the strain 0063 belonging to subgroup C and internalin types 2 and 4 respectively. The majority of L. innocua strains belonged to these two subgroups. Subgroup A harbored a whole set of L. monocytogenes-L. innocua common and L. innocua-specific internalin genes, and displayed higher recombination rates than those of subgroup B, including the relative frequency of occurrence of recombination versus mutation (ρ/θ and the relative effect of recombination versus point mutation (r/m. Subgroup A also exhibited a significantly smaller exterior/interior branch length ratio than expected under the coalescent model, suggesting a recent expansion of its population size. The phylogram based on the analysis with correction for recombination revealed that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA of L. innocua subgroups A and B were similar. Additionally, subgroup D, which correlated with internalin type 5, branched off from the other three subgroups. All L. innocua strains lacked seventeen virulence genes found in L. monocytogenes (except for the subgroup D strain L43 harboring inlJ and two subgroup B strains bearing bsh and were nonpathogenic to mice. Conclusions L. innocua represents a young species descending from L. monocytogenes and

  6. Internalin profiling and multilocus sequence typing suggest four Listeria innocua subgroups with different evolutionary distances from Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianshun; Chen, Qiaomiao; Jiang, Lingli; Cheng, Changyong; Bai, Fan; Wang, Jun; Mo, Fan; Fang, Weihuan

    2010-03-31

    Ecological, biochemical and genetic resemblance as well as clear differences of virulence between L. monocytogenes and L. innocua make this bacterial clade attractive as a model to examine evolution of pathogenicity. This study was attempted to examine the population structure of L. innocua and the microevolution in the L. innocua-L. monocytogenes clade via profiling of 37 internalin genes and multilocus sequence typing based on the sequences of 9 unlinked genes gyrB, sigB, dapE, hisJ, ribC, purM, gap, tuf and betL. L. innocua was genetically monophyletic compared to L. monocytogenes, and comprised four subgroups. Subgroups A and B correlated with internalin types 1 and 3 (except the strain 0063 belonging to subgroup C) and internalin types 2 and 4 respectively. The majority of L. innocua strains belonged to these two subgroups. Subgroup A harbored a whole set of L. monocytogenes-L. innocua common and L. innocua-specific internalin genes, and displayed higher recombination rates than those of subgroup B, including the relative frequency of occurrence of recombination versus mutation (rho/theta) and the relative effect of recombination versus point mutation (r/m). Subgroup A also exhibited a significantly smaller exterior/interior branch length ratio than expected under the coalescent model, suggesting a recent expansion of its population size. The phylogram based on the analysis with correction for recombination revealed that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of L. innocua subgroups A and B were similar. Additionally, subgroup D, which correlated with internalin type 5, branched off from the other three subgroups. All L. innocua strains lacked seventeen virulence genes found in L. monocytogenes (except for the subgroup D strain L43 harboring inlJ and two subgroup B strains bearing bsh) and were nonpathogenic to mice. L. innocua represents a young species descending from L. monocytogenes and comprises four subgroups: two major subgroups A and B

  7. Exclusion of deep vein thrombosis using the Wells rule in clinically important subgroups: individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geersing, G J; Zuithoff, N P A; Kearon, C; Anderson, D R; Ten Cate-Hoek, A J; Elf, J L; Bates, S M; Hoes, A W; Kraaijenhagen, R A; Oudega, R; Schutgens, R E G; Stevens, S M; Woller, S C; Wells, P S; Moons, K G M

    2014-03-10

    To assess the accuracy of the Wells rule for excluding deep vein thrombosis and whether this accuracy applies to different subgroups of patients. Meta-analysis of individual patient data. Authors of 13 studies (n = 10,002) provided their datasets, and these individual patient data were merged into one dataset. Studies were eligible if they enrolled consecutive outpatients with suspected deep vein thrombosis, scored all variables of the Wells rule, and performed an appropriate reference standard. Multilevel logistic regression models, including an interaction term for each subgroup, were used to estimate differences in predicted probabilities of deep vein thrombosis by the Wells rule. In addition, D-dimer testing was added to assess differences in the ability to exclude deep vein thrombosis using an unlikely score on the Wells rule combined with a negative D-dimer test result. Overall, increasing scores on the Wells rule were associated with an increasing probability of having deep vein thrombosis. Estimated probabilities were almost twofold higher in patients with cancer, in patients with suspected recurrent events, and (to a lesser extent) in males. An unlikely score on the Wells rule (≤ 1) combined with a negative D-dimer test result was associated with an extremely low probability of deep vein thrombosis (1.2%, 95% confidence interval 0.7% to 1.8%). This combination occurred in 29% (95% confidence interval 20% to 40%) of patients. These findings were consistent in subgroups defined by type of D-dimer assay (quantitative or qualitative), sex, and care setting (primary or hospital care). For patients with cancer, the combination of an unlikely score on the Wells rule and a negative D-dimer test result occurred in only 9% of patients and was associated with a 2.2% probability of deep vein thrombosis being present. In patients with suspected recurrent events, only the modified Wells rule (adding one point for the previous event) is safe. Combined with a negative D

  8. Communications standards

    CERN Document Server

    Stokes, A V

    1986-01-01

    Communications Standards deals with the standardization of computer communication networks. This book examines the types of local area networks (LANs) that have been developed and looks at some of the relevant protocols in more detail. The work of Project 802 is briefly discussed, along with a protocol which has developed from one of the LAN standards and is now a de facto standard in one particular area, namely the Manufacturing Automation Protocol (MAP). Factors that affect the usage of networks, such as network management and security, are also considered. This book is divided into three se

  9. Differences in end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending between low back pain subgroups and genders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Shannon L.; Johnson, Molly B.; Zou, Dequan; Van Dillen, Linda R.

    2012-01-01

    Patterns of lumbar posture and motion are associated with low back pain (LBP). Research suggests LBP subgroups demonstrate different patterns during common tasks. This study assessed differences in end-range lumbar flexion during two tasks between two LBP subgroups classified according to the Movement System Impairment model. Additionally, the impact of gender differences on subgroup differences was assessed. Kinematic data were collected. Subjects in the Rotation (Rot) and Rotation with Extension (RotExt) LBP subgroups were asked to sit slumped and bend forward from standing. Lumbar end-range flexion was calculated. Subjects reported symptom behavior during each test. Compared to the RotExt subgroup, the Rot subgroup demonstrated greater end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and a trend towards greater end-range lumbar flexion with forward bending. Compared to females, males demonstrated greater end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending. A greater proportion of people in the Rot subgroup reported symptoms with each test compared to the RotExt subgroup. Males and females were equally likely to report symptoms with each test. Gender differences were not responsible for LBP subgroup differences. Subgrouping people with LBP provides insight into differences in lumbar motion within the LBP population. Results suggesting potential consistent differences across flexion-related tasks support the presence of stereotypical movement patterns that are related to LBP. PMID:22261650

  10. Differences in end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending between low back pain subgroups and genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Shannon L; Johnson, Molly B; Zou, Dequan; Van Dillen, Linda R

    2012-04-01

    Patterns of lumbar posture and motion are associated with low back pain (LBP). Research suggests LBP subgroups demonstrate different patterns during common tasks. This study assessed differences in end-range lumbar flexion during two tasks between two LBP subgroups classified according to the Movement System Impairment model. Additionally, the impact of gender differences on subgroup differences was assessed. Kinematic data were collected. Subjects in the Rotation (Rot) and Rotation with Extension (RotExt) LBP subgroups were asked to sit slumped and bend forward from standing. Lumbar end-range flexion was calculated. Subjects reported symptom behaviour during each test. Compared to the RotExt subgroup, the Rot subgroup demonstrated greater end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and a trend towards greater end-range lumbar flexion with forward bending. Compared to females, males demonstrated greater end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending. A greater proportion of people in the Rot subgroup reported symptoms with each test compared to the RotExt subgroup. Males and females were equally likely to report symptoms with each test. Gender differences were not responsible for LBP subgroup differences. Subgrouping people with LBP provides insight into differences in lumbar motion within the LBP population. Results suggesting potential consistent differences across flexion-related tasks support the presence of stereotypical movement patterns that are related to LBP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effect of Hemiscorpius lepturus (Scorpionida: Hemiscorpiidae Venom on Leukocytes and the Leukocyte Subgroups in Peripheral Blood of Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Ghafourian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Hemiscorpius lepturus venom on leukocytes and the leukocyte subgroups in peripheral blood of rat.Methods: In this experimental study, sixty N-Mari rats were divided into three groups of 20 rats. Then the rats in each group were divided into four subgroups based on the blood sampling time that was 2, 6, 24 and 48 hours after the venom injection, respectively. The control group did not receive anything, however, the first and the second ex­perimental groups received 0.1 and 0.01mg/kg of venom, subcutaneously. In accordance with a designated four sam­pling times, the blood sampling was carried out in three groups. After RBC lysis, the leukocytes and leukocyte sub­populations were determined and counted using appropriate hematological standard methods.Results: The leukocyte and the neutrophil count at two (P<0.05, six (P<0.01 and 24 (P<0.05 hours after the venom injection showed a significant decline compared with the control group, this decrease was significant at the dose of 0.1 mg/kg until 48 hours after the venom injection (P<0.05. The lymphocyte count showed a significant decline throughout the all hours of the experiment, compared with the control group (P<0.05.Conclusion: Leukocytes are probably affected by the cytotoxicity effect of the H. lepturus venom in a dose-dependent manner. This could be a wakeup call for the medical staff to perform quick and accurate treatment in the least time possible.

  12. An examination of school- and student-level characteristics associated with the likelihood of students' meeting the Canadian physical activity guidelines in the COMPASS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Amanda; Faulkner, Guy; Giangregorio, Lora; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2017-11-09

    To examine school- and student-level correlates of physical activity. Cross-sectional Year 2 data collected from 45 298 grade 9-12 students attending 89 secondary schools in the COMPASS study were examined using multi-level modelling to predict the likelihood of students a) achieving 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) daily; and b) achieving the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP) activity guideline for youth (60 minutes/MVPA daily, vigorous physical activity at least three days in a week, and resistance training at least three days in a week). The prevalence of students achieving 60 minutes of MVPA daily and meeting the CSEP guideline was 49.3% and 31.0% respectively. Modest between-school variability was identified (1.1% for 60 minutes MVPA and 0.8% for CSEP guideline). School-level characteristics significantly associated with the outcome measures included location, school size, quality of facilities, and accessibility of facilities. Significant student-level correlates included sex, grade, weekly income, binge drinking, fruit and vegetable consumption, and body mass index. Most youth in this large study reported inadequate physical activity levels. Students were more likely to achieve 60 minutes of MVPA if they attended a larger school or a school in an urban location, whereas students were less likely to meet the CSEP guideline if they attended a school in a small urban location. However, student-level factors, such as binge drinking and inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, were more strongly associated with the outcomes examined.

  13. High School Graduation Rates across English Learner Student Subgroups in Arizona. REL 2017-205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min; Haas, Eric; Zhu, Niufeng; Tran, Loan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have documented differences in academic achievement between current and former English learner students. These differences validate calls for more focused analyses of achievement across English learner student subgroups. Specifically, there is interest in examining variation in academic success based on the amount of time a student…

  14. Bounds for the orders of the finite subgroups of G(k)

    OpenAIRE

    Serre, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    If k is a commutative field and G a reductive (connected) algebraic group over k, we give bounds for the orders of the finite subgroups of G(k); these bounds depends on the type of G and on the Galois groups of the cyclotomic extensions of k.

  15. Can I retake it? Exploring subgroup differences and criterion-related validity in promotion retesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Morgeson, Frederick P; Schleicher, Deidra J; Campion, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Despite recent interest in the practice of allowing job applicants to retest, surprisingly little is known about how retesting affects 2 of the most critical factors on which staffing procedures are evaluated: subgroup differences and criterion-related validity. We examined these important issues in a sample of internal candidates who completed a job-knowledge test for a within-job promotion. This was a useful context for these questions because we had job-performance data on all candidates (N = 403), regardless of whether they passed or failed the promotion test (i.e., there was no direct range restriction). We found that retest effects varied by subgroup, such that females and younger candidates improved more upon retesting than did males and older candidates. There also was some evidence that Black candidates did not improve as much as did candidates from other racial groups. In addition, among candidates who retested, their retest scores were somewhat better predictors of subsequent job performance than were their initial test scores (rs = .38 vs. .27). The overall results suggest that retesting does not negatively affect criterion-related validity and may even enhance it. Furthermore, retesting may reduce the likelihood of adverse impact against some subgroups (e.g., female candidates) but increase the likelihood of adverse impact against other subgroups (e.g., older candidates). PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  16. Psychosocial and Friendship Characteristics of Bully/Victim Subgroups in Korean Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoolim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial and friendship characteristics of Korean children who engaged in bully/victim subgroups among their peer groups. The participants were 605 elementary school students in Bucheon City, Korea. The participants completed a peer nomination inventory as well as loneliness and social anxiety scales. Friendship quality…

  17. Using Social Network Analysis to Identify Sub-Groups in the Operating Room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Listyowardojo, Tita A.; Steglich, Christian; Peuchen, Stephen; Johnson, Addie; de Waard, D.; Godthelp, J.; Kooi, F.L.; Brookhuis, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    The frequency with which operating room (OR) staff work together can impact patient safety because staff who often work together share a set of experiences which may enable them to anticipate each other’s actions and reactions in the future. Identifying sub-groups of staff who frequently work

  18. Patterns of alcohol use and consequences among empirically derived sexual minority subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Amelia E; Sher, Kenneth J; Steinley, Douglas; Wood, Phillip K; Littlefield, Andrew K

    2012-03-01

    The current study develops an empirically determined classification of sexual orientation developmental patterns based on participants' annual reports of self-identifications, sexual attractions, and sexual behaviors during the first 4 years of college. A secondary aim of the current work was to examine trajectories of alcohol involvement among identified subgroups. Data were drawn from a subsample of a longitudinal study of incoming first-time college students at a large, public university (n = 2,068). Longitudinal latent class analysis was used to classify sexual minority participants into empirically derived subgroups based on three self-reported facets of sexual orientation. Multivariate repeated-measures analyses were conducted to examine how trajectories of alcohol involvement varied by sexual orientation class membership. Four unique subclasses of sexual orientation developmental patterns were identified for males and females: one consistently exclusively heterosexual group and three sexual minority groups. Despite generally similar alcohol use patterns among subclasses, certain sexual minority subgroups reported elevated levels of alcohol-related negative consequences and maladaptive motivations for use throughout college compared with their exclusively heterosexual counterparts. Elevations in coping and conformity motivations for alcohol use were seen among those subgroups that also evidenced heightened negative alcohol-related consequences. Implications and limitations of the current work are discussed.

  19. Contents of Stereotypes toward Woman Subgroups: An Investigation in the Framework of Stereotype Content Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timucin Aktan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the stereotype contents toward woman subgroups and relate these contents to social-structural predictors and sexism. In this respect, 119 university students were recruited for the first study and they were asked to rate 10 woman subgroups in terms of their competence and warmth, and their status and competitiveness. Participants' level of sexism was also measured using ambivalent sexism scale. The findings of the first study revealed that competence and warmth were the two fundamental dimensions of the stereotype contents, these stereotypes could be depicted in three clusters, the content of many women stereotypes were mixed, and status was linked to competence and competition was related to lack of warmth. Besides replicating the main hypotheses of stereotype content model, the findings supported its two basic assumptions, i.e. negative stereotypes are not necessary to reveal stereotype clusters and personal stereotypes are more open to motivational concerns. Finally, sexism was related only with competition, but not with stereotype contents. Since, high competent / high warm cluster was not observed in the first study, the number of woman subgroups was increased in the second study. Thus, 86 university students were asked to rate 18 women subgroups on the scales used in the first study. Results replicated the findings of the first study, supporting the main hypothesis of stereotype content model. The findings of the studies were discussed in the light of relevant literature.

  20. Structural Mobility, Exchange Mobility and Subgroup Consistent Mobility Measurement – US–German Mobility Measurements Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Schluter, C.; D. VAN DE GAER

    2008-01-01

    We formalize the concept of structural mobility and use the framework of subgroup consistent mobility measurement to derive a relative and an absolute measure of mobility that is increasing both in upward structural mobility and exchange mobility. In our empirical illustration, we contribute substantively to the ongoing debate about mobility rankings between the USA and Germany.

  1. Perceived discrimination and chronic health in adults from nine ethnic subgroups in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Shauna K

    2015-01-01

    This comparative analysis examines the association between chronic cardiovascular, respiratory and pain conditions, race, ethnicity, nativity, length of residency, and perceived discrimination among three racial and nine ethnic subgroups of Asian Americans (Vietnamese, Filipino, and Chinese), Latino-American (Cuban, Portuguese, and Mexican), and Afro-Caribbean American (Haitian, Jamaican, and Trinidadian/Tobagonian) respondents. Analysis used weighted Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys-merged data from the National Latino and Asian American Study and the National Survey of American Life. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine which groups within the model were more likely to report perceived discrimination effects. Afro-Caribbean subgroups were more likely to report perceived discrimination than Asian American and Latino-American subgroups were. Logistic regression revealed a significant positive association with perceived discrimination and chronic pain only for Latino-American respondents. Significant differences in reports of perceived discrimination emerged by race and ethnicity. Caribbean respondents were more likely to report high levels of perceived discrimination; however, they showed fewer significant associations related to chronic health conditions compared to Asian Americans and Latino-Americans. Examination of perceived discrimination across ethnic subgroups reveals large variations in the relationship between chronic health and discrimination by race and ethnicity. Examining perceived discrimination by ethnicity may reveal more complex chronic health patterns masked by broader racial groupings.

  2. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in subgroups of patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, van den C.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. METHODS: The study was performed in the out-patient clinic of physical therapy of a large hospital. Data

  3. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in specific subgroups of patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. METHODS: The study was performed in the out-patient clinic of physical therapy of a large hospital. Data

  4. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in subgroups of patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Breedveld, F.C.; van den Ende, C.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. Methods. The study was performed in the out-patient clinic of physical therapy of a large hospital. Data

  5. Young People with Harmful Sexual Behaviour: Do Those with Learning Disabilities Form a Distinct Subgroup?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Louise; Giles, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The study examines 102 young people with Learning Disabilities (n = 51) and without a learning disability (NLD; n = 51) to explore ways in which LD young people with harmful sexual behaviours (HSB) should be recognized as a subgroup requiring specialized treatment and intervention. Throughout this comparison of perpetrator, victim and abuse…

  6. Hecke Eigenforms in the Cohomology of Congruence Subgroups of SL(3, Z)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geemen, Bert van; Kallen, Wilberd van der; Top, Jaap; Verberkmoes, Alain

    1997-01-01

    We list here Hecke eigenvalues of several automorphic forms for congruence subgroups of SL(3; Z). To compute such tables, we describe an algorithm that combines techniques developed previously with the Lenstra–Lenstra–Lovász algorithm. With our implementation of this new algorithm we were able to

  7. The Influence of Working Memory on Reading Growth in Subgroups of Children with Reading Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, H. Lee; Jerman, Olga

    2007-01-01

    This 3-year longitudinal study determined whether (a) subgroups of children with reading disabilities (RD) (children with RD only, children with both reading and arithmetic deficits, and low verbal IQ readers) and skilled readers varied in working memory (WM) and short-term memory (STM) growth and (b) whether growth in an executive system and/or a…

  8. Identification and Characterization of Unique Subgroups of Chronic Pain Individuals with Dispositional Personality Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The current study attempted to identify and characterize distinct CP subgroups based on their level of dispositional personality traits. The secondary objective was to compare the difference among the subgroups in mood, coping, and disability. Methods. Individuals with chronic pain were assessed for demographic, psychosocial, and personality measures. A two-step cluster analysis was conducted in order to identify distinct subgroups of patients based on their level of personality traits. Differences in clinical outcomes were compared using the multivariate analysis of variance based on cluster membership. Results. In 229 participants, three clusters were formed. No significant difference was seen among the clusters on patient demographic factors including age, sex, relationship status, duration of pain, and pain intensity. Those with high levels of dispositional personality traits had greater levels of mood impairment compared to the other two groups (p<0.05. Significant difference in disability was seen between the subgroups. Conclusions. The study identified a high risk group of CP individuals whose level of personality traits significantly correlated with impaired mood and coping. Use of pharmacological treatment alone may not be successful in improving clinical outcomes among these individuals. Instead, a more comprehensive treatment involving psychological treatments may be important in managing the personality traits that interfere with recovery.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Unique Subgroups of Chronic Pain Individuals with Dispositional Personality Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S; Rice, D; McIntyre, A; Getty, H; Speechley, M; Sequeira, K; Shapiro, A P; Morley-Forster, P; Teasell, R W

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The current study attempted to identify and characterize distinct CP subgroups based on their level of dispositional personality traits. The secondary objective was to compare the difference among the subgroups in mood, coping, and disability. Methods. Individuals with chronic pain were assessed for demographic, psychosocial, and personality measures. A two-step cluster analysis was conducted in order to identify distinct subgroups of patients based on their level of personality traits. Differences in clinical outcomes were compared using the multivariate analysis of variance based on cluster membership. Results. In 229 participants, three clusters were formed. No significant difference was seen among the clusters on patient demographic factors including age, sex, relationship status, duration of pain, and pain intensity. Those with high levels of dispositional personality traits had greater levels of mood impairment compared to the other two groups (p disability was seen between the subgroups. Conclusions. The study identified a high risk group of CP individuals whose level of personality traits significantly correlated with impaired mood and coping. Use of pharmacological treatment alone may not be successful in improving clinical outcomes among these individuals. Instead, a more comprehensive treatment involving psychological treatments may be important in managing the personality traits that interfere with recovery.

  10. The Measurement of Collaborative Culture in Secondary Schools: An Informal Subgroup Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Chloé; Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Struyve, Charlotte; Vandecandelaere, Machteld; Gielen, Sarah; Kyndt, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Research on teacher collaboration underlines the importance of a collaborative culture for teachers' functioning. However, while scholars usually regard collaborative culture as a school team characteristic, this study argues that subgroups may be more meaningful units of analysis to conceptualize and assess teachers' perceptions of collaborative…

  11. Pooling of Individual Patient Data from Clinical Trials. Improvement of analyses of subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, L.

    2008-01-01

    Meta-analyses that use individual patient data (IPD), that is, the raw data of individual trials, rather than simply the overall results of each trial have been proposed as a major improvement in subgroup analyses. Since IPD meta-analyses often include more detailed data, they usually have greater

  12. Subgroup analyses of maraviroc in previously treated R5 HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Nelson, Mark; Lazzarin, Adriano; Konourina, Irina; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Lampiris, Harry; Hirschel, Bernard; Tebas, Pablo; Raffi, François; Trottier, Benoit; Bellos, Nicholaos; Saag, Michael; Cooper, David A.; Westby, Mike; Tawadrous, Margaret; Sullivan, John F.; Ridgway, Caroline; Dunne, Michael W.; Felstead, Steve; Mayer, Howard; van der Ryst, Elna; Angel, Jonathan; Conway, Brian; Gough, Kevin A.; Lalonde, Richard G.; Laplante, Francois; Leblanc, Roger P.; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Rachlis, Anita R.; Romanowski, Barbara; Rosser, Stuart J.; Rubinstein, Ethan; Shafran, Stephen David; Smaill, Fiona; Tremblay, Cecile; Trottier, Sylvie; Tsoukas, Christos; Walmsley, Sharon Lynn; Voskanian, Alen; Akil, Bisher; Arduino, Roberto Claudio; Asmuth, David; Beatty, George William; Becker, Stephen Lawrence; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Blue, Sky Robert; Bolan, Robert Key; Brand, John D.; Burnazian, George Ghazaros; Burnside, Alfred F.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Campo, Rafael E.; Casey, Kathleen King; Cimoch, Paul Joseph; Cohen, Calvin J.; Coodley, Gregg Oscar; Corales, Roberto B.; DeJesus, Edwin; Diaz, Leslie E.; Drusano, George L.; Ernst, Jerome A.; Feinberg, Judith E.; Feldman, Lawrence Edward; Fine, Steven M.; Flamm, Jason Andrew; Follansbee, Stephen Eliot; Fralich, Todd Allen; Gallant, Emanuel; Godofsky, Eliot Warren; Green, Gary; Greiger-Zanlungo, Paula Rosa; Gripshover, Barbara Marie; Groger, Richard K.; Gulick, Roy; Hardy, William David; Hassler, Shawn K.; Haubrich, Richard Harold; Hauptman, Stephen P.; Henry, David Holden; Henry, William Keith; Hernandez, Jose Norberto; Hicks, Charles Byron; Horberg, Michael Alan; Jemsek, Joseph G.; Kelly, Allan Rowan; Kinder, Clifford A.; Klein, Daniel Benjamin; Kogelman, Laura; Lalezari, Jacob Paul; LaMarca, Anthony; Lampiris, Harry William; Leibowitz, Matthew; Leider, Jason Mark; Lennox, Jeffrey Lloyd; Liporace, Ralph; Martin, Harold Luther; Martinez-Bejar, Lucia M.; Martorell, Claudia; McGowan, Joseph P.; Mildvan, Donna; Miles, Steven; Mitsuyasu, Ronald Takeshi; Morales-Ramirez, Javier Osvaldo; Morris, Anne B.; Mounzer, Karam Chucri; Myers, Robert Anderson; Nadler, Jeffrey P.; Pearce, Daniel; Pierone, Gerald; Rashbaum, Bruce Stephen; Ravishankar, Jayashree; Redfield, Robert Ray; Reichman, Richard Craig; Robbins, William Jay; Roberts, Stockton Edward; Rodriguez, Jorge E.; Sathasivam, Kunthavi; Sax, Paul Edward; Schwartz, Lawrence E.; Segal-Maurer, Sorana; Sension, Michael Grant; Sepulveda-Arzola, Gladys E.; Skolnik, Paul Richard; Sloan, Louis Marshall; Smith, Robert P.; Sosman, James Michael; Stapleton, Jack Thomas; Steigbigel, Roy; Steinhart, Corklin R.; Sweet, Donna Elaine; Swindells, Susan; Thompson, Melanie Ann; Sisneros, Silver; Towner, William James; Gordon, Peter; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Wheeler, David Allen; Williams, Sally; Wilcox, Dean; Williams, Steven; Wills, Todd Stephen; Wohlfeiler, Michael Bruce; Wright, David; Xavier, Angela; Yangco, Bienvenido Gamulo; Zingman, Barry Stephen; Zorrilla, Carmen D.; Allworth, Anthony M.; Bloch, Mark T.; Bodsworth, Neil J.; Chuah, John; Cooper, David; Doong, Nicholas; Dwyer, Dominic; Gold, Julian; Hoy, Jennifer Frances; Moore, Richard J.; Roth, Norman J.; Workman, Cassy; Clumeck, Nathan; Dellot, Patricia; Goffard, Jean Christophe; Moutschen, Michel; Vandercam, Bernard C.; Vogelaers, Dirk; Bentata, Michele; Cotte, Laurent; Delfraissy, Jean-Francois; Durant, Jacques; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Hocqueloux, Laurent; Landman, Roland; Lafeuillade, Alain; Martin, Isabelle Poizot; Molina, Jean-Michel; Pialoux, Gilles; Piketty, Christophe; Raffi, Francois; Reynes, Jacques; Verdon, Renaud; Arasteh, Keikawus; Bogner, Johannes Richard; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Esser, Stefan; Goebel, Frank-Detlef; Harrer, Thomas; Kern, Peter; Knechten, Heribert; van Lunzen, Jan; Mueller, Markus; Mutz, Antonius; Oette, Mark; Plettenberg, Andreas; Rockstroh, Juergen; Rump, Jorg-Andres; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Schneider, Lothar; Schuster, Dieter; Staszewski, Schlomo; Stellbrink, Hans-Juergen; Trein, Andreas; Weitner, Lutwinus; Aiuti, Fernando; Bassetti, Dante; Di Biagio, Antonio; Caramello, Pietro; Carosi, Giampiero; Esposito, Roberto; Leoncini, Francesco; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Mazzotta, Francesco; Montella, Francesco; Raise, Enzo; Vullo, Vicenzo; Hoepelman, Ilja Mohandas; Perenboom, Rosalinde Maria; Prins, J. M.; Richter, Clemens; van der Ende, Marchina Elisabeth; Beniowski, Marek; Boron-Kaczmarska, Anna; Flisiak, Robert; Halota, Waldemar; Horban, Andrzej; Mach, Tomasz; Smiatacz, Tomasz; Lozano de Leon, Fernando; Viciana Fernandez, Pompeyo; Rubio Garcia, Rafael; Gatell Artigas, Jose Josep; Gonzalez Garcia, Juan Julian; Gutierrez, Felix; Gonzalez Lahoz, Juan; Iribarren Loyarte, Jose; Moreno, Santiago; Pulido Ortega, Federico; Domingo Pedrol, Pere; Rivero, Antonio; Clotet, Bonaventura; Sarria, Cristina; Gisslen, Magnus; Flamholc, Leo; Karlsson, Anders; Battegay, Manuel; Bernasconi, Enos; Cavassini, Matthias; Drechsler, Henning; Opravil, Milos; Vernazza, Pietro; Easterbrook, Philippa Jane; Fisher, Martin; Hay, Philip; Johnson, Margaret A.; Leen, Clifford L.; Nelson, Mark R.; Ong, Edmund; Weber, Jonathan N.; White, David J.; Wilkins, Edmund; Wiselka, Martin; Alvarez-Jacinto, Ana Maria; Antoniskis, Diana; Atkinson, Barbara A.; Berger, Daniel S.; Blick, Gary; Brenna, Robert Owen; Burack, Jeffrey Howard; Church, L. W. Preston; Clay, Patrick G.; Cook, Paul Peniston; Creticos, Catherine Maria; Daly, Patrick William; Feleke, Getachew; File, Thomas Mc Donald; Galpin, Jeffrey Eliot; Green, Stephen Lloyd; Haas, Frances Fae; Hanna, Barbara J.; Hsiao, Chiu-Bin; Hsu, Ricky K.; Jones, Robert S.; Kadlecik, Peter; Kalayjian, Robert Charles; Keller, Robert H.; Kerkar, Shubha; Koirala, Janak; Lai, Leon Liang-Yu; Lalla-Reddy, Sujata; Macarthur, Rodger David; Malanoski, Gregory John; Markowitz, Norman Peter; McLeroth, Patrick L.; McMeeking, Alexander A.; Miljkovic, Goran; Montana, John Buscemi; Nixon, Daniel Edward; Norris, Dorece G.; Penico, Jesse Pullen; Perez-Limonte, Leonel; Posorske, Lynette H.; Prelutsky, David James; Riddell, James; Rodwick, Barry Michael; Ruane, Peter Jerome; Sampson, James; Santiago, Steven; Seinfeld, Amy; Sharp, Victoria Lee; Shebib, Zaher; Tanner, Mark Leslie; Timpone, Joseph G.; Wade, Barbara H.; Wallach, Frances; Weinberg, Winkler; Zurawski, Christine

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We conducted subanalyses of the combined results of the Maraviroc versus Optimized Therapy in Viremic Antiretroviral Treatment-Experienced Patients (MOTIVATE) 1 and MOTIVATE 2 studies to better characterize the efficacy and safety of maraviroc in key subgroups of patients. METHODS: We

  13. Identification of a genomic subgroup of BK polyomavirus spread in European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Saukko, Pekka J; Tertti, Risto; Metsärinne, Kaj P; Carr, Michael J; Crowley, Brendan; Sakurada, Koichi; Zheng, Huai-Ying; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Yogo, Yoshiaki

    2006-11-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is highly prevalent in the human population, infecting children without obvious symptoms and persisting in the kidney in a latent state. In immunosuppressed patients, BKV is reactivated and excreted in urine. BKV isolates worldwide are classified into four serologically distinct subtypes, I-IV, with subtype I being the most frequently detected. Furthermore, subtype I is subdivided into subgroups based on genomic variations. In this study, the distribution patterns of the subtypes and subgroups of BKV were compared among four patient populations with various immunosuppressive states and of various ethnic backgrounds: (A) Finnish renal-transplant recipients; (B) Irish/English haematopoietic stem-cell transplant recipients with and without haemorrhagic cystitis; (C) Japanese renal-transplant recipients; and (D) Japanese bone-marrow transplant recipients. The typing sequences (287 bp) of BKV in population A were determined in this study; those in populations B-D have been reported previously. These sequences were subjected to phylogenetic and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses. Based on the results of these analyses, the BKV isolates in the four patient populations were classified into subtypes and subgroups. The incidence of subtype IV varied significantly among patient populations. Furthermore, the incidence of subgroup Ib-2 within subtype I was high in populations A and B, whereas that of Ic was high in populations C and D (PBKV DNA sequences supported the hypothesis that there is geographical separation of European and Asian BKV strains.

  14. On finite groups whose every proper normal subgroup is a union of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    On finite groups whose every proper normal subgroup is a union of a given number of conjugacy classes. ALI REZA ASHRAFI and GEETHA VENKATARAMAN. ∗. Department of Mathematics, University of Kashan, Kashan, Iran. ∗. Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences Foundation, St. Stephen's. College ...

  15. Contribution of Dietary Supplements to Nutritional Adequacy by Socioeconomic Subgroups in Adults of the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Blumberg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Many Americans have inadequate intakes of several nutrients, and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015–2020 identified vitamins A, C, D, and E, in addition to calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, choline, and fiber as “underconsumed nutrients”. Based on nationally representative data on 10,698 adults from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES, 2009–2012, assessments were made of socioeconomic differences, based on the Poverty Income Ratio (PIR, in terms of the association of dietary supplement use on nutrient intake and nutrient inadequacies. Compared to food alone, the use of any dietary supplement plus food was associated with significantly (p < 0.01 higher intakes of 15–16 of 19 nutrients examined in all socioeconomic groups; and significantly reduced rates of inadequacy for 10/17 nutrients in the subgroup PIR > 1.85 (not poor, but only 4–5/17 nutrients (calcium and vitamins A, C, D, E for the poor and nearly poor subgroups (PIR < 1.35 and PIR 1.35 to ≤1.85, respectively. An increased prevalence of intakes above the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL was seen for 3–9/13 nutrients, but all were less than 5% in the PIR subgroups. In conclusion, dietary supplement use was associated with an increased micronutrient intake, decreased inadequacies, and a slight increase in the prevalence of intakes above the UL, with greater benefits seen in the PIR > 1.85 subgroup.

  16. Identification of New World Quails Susceptible to Infection with Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachý, Jiří; Reinišová, Markéta; Kučerová, Dana; Šenigl, Filip; Stepanets, Volodymyr; Hron, Tomáš; Trejbalová, Kateřina; Elleder, Daniel; Hejnar, Jiří

    2017-02-01

    The J subgroup of avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) infects domestic chickens, jungle fowl, and turkeys. This virus enters the host cell through a receptor encoded by the tvj locus and identified as Na+/H+ exchanger 1. The resistance to avian leukosis virus subgroup J in a great majority of galliform species has been explained by deletions or substitutions of the critical tryptophan 38 in the first extracellular loop of Na+/H+ exchanger 1. Because there are concerns of transspecies virus transmission, we studied natural polymorphisms and susceptibility/resistance in wild galliforms and found the presence of tryptophan 38 in four species of New World quails. The embryo fibroblasts of New World quails are susceptible to infection with avian leukosis virus subgroup J, and the cloned Na+/H+ exchanger 1 confers susceptibility on the otherwise resistant host. New World quails are also susceptible to new avian leukosis virus subgroup J variants but resistant to subgroups A and B and weakly susceptible to subgroups C and D of avian sarcoma/leukosis virus due to obvious defects of the respective receptors. Our results suggest that the avian leukosis virus subgroup J could be transmitted to New World quails and establish a natural reservoir of circulating virus with a potential for further evolution. Since its spread in broiler chickens in China and Southeast Asia in 2000, ALV-J remains a major enzootic challenge for the poultry industry. Although the virus diversifies rapidly in the poultry, its spillover and circulation in wild bird species has been prevented by the resistance of most species to ALV-J. It is, nevertheless, important to understand the evolution of the virus and its potential host range in wild birds. Because resistance to avian retroviruses is due particularly to receptor incompatibility, we studied Na+/H+ exchanger 1, the receptor for ALV-J. In New World quails, we found a receptor compatible with virus entry, and we confirmed the susceptibilities of four New

  17. Differences in eighth grade science student and teacher perceptions of students' level of input into academic planning and decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Jarrett Michael

    Teachers are expected to improve their planning, instruction, and assessment as they progress through their career. An important component to teachers knowing what to modify in their teaching style is being able to solicit meaningful feedback from students. This mixed-methods study was conducted to provide teachers with a quantitative method to collect data about their teaching using the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES). Phase 1 allowed students to provide anonymous feedback to their teachers that the teachers could later reflect upon in conjunction with the students' other feedback. Using measures of central tendencies, it was determined that of the five categories of the CLES the area of student negotiation was statistically different from the other categories. While eight teachers had sufficient (n>10) student data to be invited to participate in Phase 2, only five of the teachers choose to participate in a semi-structured interview to further examine the potential differences between teacher and student perception of student negotiation with the curriculum, instruction and assessment that occurs in the classroom. Coding the interview transcripts led to three categories: 1) teaching style (with themes including curriculum, instruction, and assessment, and sub themes of teacher centered and student centered); 2) external pressures (with themes of standards , standardized tests, and socioeconomic conditions); 3) effectiveness of student negotiation (with themes of positive effect or no effect on motivation). The five teachers who participated in Phase 2 had varying levels of awareness and willingness to adjust their classroom curriculum, instruction, and assessment to include student negotiation. All but one teacher, however, saw the value in increasing student negotiation in the classroom and desired to continue to change their teaching to include more student negotiation.

  18. Dietary and physical activity behaviors of New York City children from different ethnic minority subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangeepuram, Nita; Mervish, Nancy; Galvez, Maida P; Brenner, Barbara; Wolff, Mary S

    2012-01-01

    To examine racial/ethnic differences in diet and physical activity behaviors in ethnic minority New York City children. Cross-sectional data from a community-based study of 486 6- to 8-year-old children were used. Race/ethnicity was derived using a caregiver's report of child's race and Hispanic ancestry. Dietary intake was obtained by 24-hour diet recalls using the Nutrition Data System for Research. Physical activity was assessed with pedometers and caregiver interviews. We compared diet and activity measures across racial/ethnic subgroups using chi-square and analysis of variance tests. Multivariate analyses adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, and caregiver education (with breastfeeding history and total energy intake included in diet models). Participants (N = 486) were categorized as Mexican (29.4%), Dominican (8.4%), Puerto Rican (20.6%), other/mixed Hispanic (14.0%), or non-Hispanic black (27.6%). Obesity rates were lower in non-Hispanic blacks (18%) than in Hispanics (31%). Mexicans had the lowest obesity rates among Hispanic subgroups (25%), and Dominicans had the highest (39%). There were differences in mean daily servings of food groups, with Mexicans having healthier diets and Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic Blacks having less healthy diets. Sedentary time was lower in Mexicans than in other groups in adjusted models. Examination of additional models, including home language, did not show significant differences in the estimates. Diet and activity behaviors varied across racial/ethnic subgroups. Specifically, Mexican children had healthier diets, the least amount of sedentary time, and the lowest rates of obesity among the Hispanic subgroups examined. Targeted interventions in ethnic subgroups may be warranted to address specific behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Person-Centered Approach to Examining Heterogeneity and Subgroups Among Survivors of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, N. Tatiana; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Kaysen, Debra; Kajumulo, Kelly F.; Davis, Kelly Cue; George, William H.; Norris, Jeanette; Heiman, Julia R.

    2015-01-01

    This study identified subgroups of female sexual assault survivors based on characteristics of their victimization experiences, validated the subgroup structure in a second cohort of women recruited identically to the first, and examined subgroups' differential associations with sexual risk/safety behavior, heavy episodic drinking (HED), psychological distress symptomatology, incarceration, transactional sex, and experiences with controlling and violent partners. The community sample consisted of 667 female survivors of adolescent or adult sexual assault who were 21 to 30 years old (M=24.78, SD=2.66). Eligibility criteria included having unprotected sex within the past year, other HIV/STI risk factors, and some experience with HED, but without alcohol problems or dependence. Latent class analyses (LCA) were used to identify subgroups of women with similar victimization experiences. Three groups were identified and validated across two cohorts of women using multiple-group LCA: Contact or Attempted assault (17% of the sample), Incapacitated assault (52%), and Forceful Severe assault (31%). Groups did not differ in their sexual risk/safety behavior. Women in the Forceful Severe category had higher levels of anxiety, depression, and trauma symptoms, higher proportions of incarceration and transactional sex, and more experiences with controlling and violent partners than did women in the other two groups. Women in the Forceful Severe category also reported a higher frequency of HED than women in the Incapacitated category. Different types of assault experiences appear to be differentially associated with negative outcomes. Understanding heterogeneity and subgroups among sexual assault survivors has implications for improving clinical care and contributing to recovery. PMID:26052619

  20. Leading Causes of Death among Asian American Subgroups (2003-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine G Hastings

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of Asian American mortality patterns has been distorted by the historical aggregation of diverse Asian subgroups on death certificates, masking important differences in the leading causes of death across subgroups. In this analysis, we aim to fill an important knowledge gap in Asian American health by reporting leading causes of mortality by disaggregated Asian American subgroups.We examined national mortality records for the six largest Asian subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs from 2003-2011, and ranked the leading causes of death. We calculated all-cause and cause-specific age-adjusted rates, temporal trends with annual percent changes, and rate ratios by race/ethnicity and sex. Rankings revealed that as an aggregated group, cancer was the leading cause of death for Asian Americans. When disaggregated, there was notable heterogeneity. Among women, cancer was the leading cause of death for every group except Asian Indians. In men, cancer was the leading cause of death among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese men, while heart disease was the leading cause of death among Asian Indians, Filipino and Japanese men. The proportion of death due to heart disease for Asian Indian males was nearly double that of cancer (31% vs. 18%. Temporal trends showed increased mortality of cancer and diabetes in Asian Indians and Vietnamese; increased stroke mortality in Asian Indians; increased suicide mortality in Koreans; and increased mortality from Alzheimer's disease for all racial/ethnic groups from 2003-2011. All-cause rate ratios revealed that overall mortality is lower in Asian Americans compared to NHWs.Our findings show heterogeneity in the leading causes of death among Asian American subgroups. Additional research should focus on culturally competent and cost-effective approaches to prevent and treat specific diseases among these growing diverse populations.

  1. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Ngwa, Emmanuel; Zeeh, Christina; Messoudi, Ahmed; Büttner-Ennever, Jean A; Horn, Anja K E

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior, and superior recti (MR, IR, and SR), inferior oblique (IO), and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems were immunostained for different markers: choline acetyltransferase combined with glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), calretinin (CR) or glycine receptor. The cytoarchitecture was visualized with cresyl violet, Gallyas staining and expression of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments. Apart from nIV, seven subgroups were delineated in nIII: the central caudal nucleus (CCN), a dorsolateral (DL), dorsomedial (DM), central (CEN), and ventral (VEN) group, the nucleus of Perlia (NP) and the non-preganglionic centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp). DL, VEN, NP, and EWcp were characterized by a strong supply of GAD-positive terminals, in contrast to DM, CEN, and nIV. CR-positive terminals and fibers were confined to CCN, CEN, and NP. Based on location and histochemistry of the motoneuron subgroups in monkey, CEN is considered as the SR and IO motoneurons, DL and VEN as the B- and A-group of MR motoneurons, respectively, and DM as IR motoneurons. A good correlation between monkey and man is seen for the CR input, which labels only motoneurons of eye muscles participating in upgaze (SR, IO, and LP). The CCN contained LP motoneurons, and nIV those of SO. This study provides a map of the individual subgroups of motoneurons in human nIII for the first time, and suggests that NP may contain upgaze motoneurons. Surprisingly, a strong GABAergic input to human MR motoneurons was discovered, which is not seen in monkey and may indicate a functional oculomotor specialization.

  2. Serological relationships among subgroups in bovine viral diarrhea virus genotype 1 (BVDV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, Gizem; Yeşilbağ, Kadir

    2015-01-30

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has various economic impacts associated with diarrhea, poor performance, an increase in the frequency of other infections and lethal outcomes. Both genotypes, namely BVDV-1 and BVDV-2, as well as different subgroups within these genotypes have been reported worldwide. Understanding the serological differences among the BVDV subgroups is important for disease epidemiology and prevention as well as vaccination programs. The aim of this study was to determine the serological relatedness among the subgroups in BVDV-1. For that purpose, sheep hyperimmune sera were collected against representative strains from 6 of the subgroups of BVDV-1 (BVDV-1a, -1b, -1d, -1f, -1h and -1l). The serum samples that gave the peak antibody titer to the homologous strains were used to perform cross neutralization assays. The highest homologous antibody titer (1:5160) was obtained against BVDV-1h. Regarding the cross neutralizing (heterologous) antibodies, the lowest titer (1:20) was produced by the BVDV-1f antiserum against the BVDV-1a and BVDV1-b viruses. The highest cross neutralizing titer (1:2580) achieved by the BVDV-1h antiserum was against the BVDV-1b strain. The cross neutralization results indicated particular serological differences between the recently described subgroup (BVDV-1l) and BVDV-1a/-1b, which are widely used in commercial vaccines. Considering the cross neutralization titers, it is concluded that selected BVDV-1l and BVDV-1h strains can be used for the development of diagnostic and control tools. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The efficacy of natalizumab in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis: subgroup analyses of AFFIRM and SENTINEL.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The AFFIRM and SENTINEL studies showed that natalizumab was effective both as monotherapy and in combination with interferon beta (IFNbeta)-1a in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Further analyses of AFFIRM and SENTINEL data were conducted to determine the efficacy of natalizumab in prespecified patient subgroups according to baseline characteristics: relapse history 1 year before randomization (1, 2, > or = 3), Expanded Disability Status Scale score (< or = 3.5, > 3.5), number of T2 lesions (< 9, > or = 9), presence of gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) lesions (0, > or = 1), age (< 40, > or = 40) and gender (male, female). A post hoc analysis was conducted to determine the efficacy of natalizumab in patients with highly active disease (i. e., > or = 2 relapses in the year before study entry and > or = 1 Gd+ lesion at study entry). In both AFFIRM and SENTINEL studies natalizumab reduced the annualized relapse rates across all subgroups (except the small subgroups with < 9 baseline T2 lesions) over 2 years. In AFFIRM, natalizumab significantly reduced the risk of sustained disability progression in most subgroups. In SENTINEL, natalizumab significantly reduced the risk of sustained disability progression in the following subgroups: > or = 9 T2 lesions at baseline, > or = 1 Gd+ lesions at baseline, female patients and patients < 40 years of age. Natalizumab reduced the risk of disability progression by 64 % and relapse rate by 81 % in treatment- naive patients with highly active disease and by 58 % and 76 %, respectively, in patients with highly active disease despite IFNbeta-1a treatment. These results indicate that natalizumab is effective in reducing disability progression and relapses in patients with relapsing MS, particularly in patients with highly active disease.

  4. A post-hoc subgroup analysis of outcomes in the first phase III clinical study of edaravone (MCI-186) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Our first phase III study failed to demonstrate efficacy of edaravone for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) compared to placebo. Here, we performed post-hoc subgroup analysis to identify a subgroup in which edaravone might be expected to show efficacy. We focussed on two newly defined subgroups, EESP and dpEESP2y. The EESP was defined as the efficacy-expected subpopulation with % forced vital capacity of ≥80%, and ≥2 points for all item scores in the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) score before treatment. The dpEESP2y was defined as the greater-efficacy-expected subpopulation within EESP having a diagnosis of 'definite' or 'probable' ALS according to the El Escorial revised Airlie House diagnostic criteria and onset of disease within two years. The primary endpoint of the post-hoc analysis was the change in the ALSFRS-R score during the 24-week treatment period. The intergroup differences of the least-squares mean change in the ALSFRS-R score ± standard error during treatment were 0.65 ± 0.78 (p = 0.4108) in the full analysis set, 2.20 ± 1.03 (p = 0.0360) in the EESP, and 3.01 ± 1.33 (p = 0.0270) in the dpEESP2y. Edaravone exhibited efficacy in the dpEESP2y subgroup. A further clinical study in patients meeting dpEESP2y criteria is warranted.

  5. (Terminology standardization)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strehlow, R.A.

    1990-10-19

    Terminological requirements in information management was but one of the principal themes of the 2nd Congress on Terminology and Knowledge Engineering. The traveler represented the American Society for Testing and Materials' Committee on Terminology, of which he is the Chair. The traveler's invited workshop emphasized terminology standardization requirements in databases of material properties as well as practical terminology standardizing methods. The congress included six workshops in addition to approximately 82 lectures and papers from terminologists, artificial intelligence practitioners, and subject specialists from 18 countries. There were approximately 292 registrants from 33 countries who participated in the congress. The congress topics were broad. Examples were the increasing use of International Standards Organization (ISO) Standards in legislated systems such as the USSR Automated Data Bank of Standardized Terminology, the enhanced Physics Training Program based on terminology standardization in Physics in the Chinese province of Inner Mongolia, and the technical concept dictionary being developed at the Japan Electronic Dictionary Research Institute, which is considered to be the key to advanced artificial intelligence applications. The more usual roles of terminology work in the areas of machine translation. indexing protocols, knowledge theory, and data transfer in several subject specialties were also addressed, along with numerous special language terminology areas.

  6. Procedural justice and social regulation across group boundaries: does subgroup identity undermine relationship-based governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yuen J

    2003-03-01

    The relational model of authority suggests that people are inclined to accept the decisions of ethnic outgroup authorities when they identify with a superordinate category they share with the authority, and when the authority satisfies their relational justice concerns. Using responses from a random sample of African Americans, Latinos, and Whites about their cross-ethnic interactions with legal authorities, the findings indicated that those who are highly identified with the superordinate category of America indicate greater reliance on relational concerns and less on instrumental concerns when evaluating the authority's decision. In contrast, identification with one's ethnic subgroup did not moderate the linkage between relational concerns and acceptance. Across all ethnic groups, there were positive rather than negative correlations between measures of American and ethnic identity. Together, these findings indicate that subgroup identity does not undermine the relational basis of social regulation and that relationship-based governance is compatible with multiculturalism.

  7. Automatically high precision manufacturing technology for micro-optic subgroups; Techical Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sure, Thomas; Guyenot, Volker; Gerhardt, Michael

    2005-05-01

    To realize the image quality of high end objectives, e. g. high NA microscope objectives working in the DUV spectral region the subgroups have to be manufactured with a mechanical precision which is difficult to achieve cost effectively. For high end microscope objectives the accuracy of the diameter of the lens mount must be within 1 µm, the run-out must be met within 1 µm and the distance of the lens vertex relative to the shoulder of the mount must fit within 1 µm. To realize the required precision, today various measurement techniques and production processes are used. Picking up the subgroups on different machining tools and measurement systems will loosen the accuracy. Here, we present the concept and the layout of a new manufacturing tool where we implemented the different measurement techniques in one CNC machining center.

  8. Subgroup Benchmark Calculations for the Intra-Pellet Nonuniform Temperature Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jung, Yeon Sang [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Yuxuan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Joo, Han Gyu [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-01

    A benchmark suite has been developed by Seoul National University (SNU) for intrapellet nonuniform temperature distribution cases based on the practical temperature profiles according to the thermal power levels. Though a new subgroup capability for nonuniform temperature distribution was implemented in MPACT, no validation calculation has been performed for the new capability. This study focuses on bench-marking the new capability through a code-to-code comparison. Two continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes, McCARD and CE-KENO, are engaged in obtaining reference solutions, and the MPACT results are compared to the SNU nTRACER using a similar cross section library and subgroup method to obtain self-shielded cross sections.

  9. Exceptional quantum subgroups for the rank two Lie algebras B2 and G2

    CERN Document Server

    Coquereaux, R; Tahri, E H

    2010-01-01

    Exceptional modular invariants for the Lie algebras B2 (at levels 2,3,7,12) and G2 (at levels 3,4) can be obtained from conformal embeddings. We determine the associated alge bras of quantum symmetries and discover or recover, as a by-product, the graphs describing exceptional quantum subgroups of type B2 or G2 which encode their module structure over the associated fusion category. Global dimensions are given.

  10. Non-specific chronic low back pain: differences in spinal kinematics in subgroups during functional tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, Rebecca; Sheeran, Liba; van Deursen, Robert; Sparkes, Valerie

    2017-07-21

    A multidimensional classification approach suggests that motor control impairment subgroups exist in non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). Differences in sitting lumbar posture have been identified between two such subgroups [flexion pattern (FP) and active extension pattern (AEP)] and healthy individuals; however, functional spinal movement has not been explored. This study will evaluate whether NSCLBP subgroups exhibit regional spinal kinematic differences, compared to healthy individuals, during functional tasks. Observational, cross-sectional study design. Spinal kinematics of 50 NSCLBP subjects (27 FP, 23 AEP) and 28 healthy individuals were investigated using 3D motion analysis (Vicon™) during functional tasks [reaching upwards, step down, step up, lifting, and replacing a box, stand-to-sit, sit-to-stand, bending to retrieve (and returning from retrieving) a pen from the floor]. Mean sagittal angle for the total thoracic, total lumbar, upper thoracic, lower thoracic, upper lumbar, and lower lumbar regions between groups was compared. Significant differences were observed in lower thoracic and upper lumbar regions between NSCLBP subgroups during most tasks. Significant differences were observed between the FP and healthy group in the lower thoracic region during stand-to-sit-to-stand tasks and bending (and returning from) to retrieve a pen from the floor. All significant results demonstrated the FP group to operate in comparatively greater flexion. The thoraco-lumbar spine discriminated between FP and AEP, and FP and healthy groups during functional tasks. FP individuals demonstrated more kyphotic thoraco-lumbar postures, which may be pain provocative. No significant differences were observed between AEP and healthy groups, suggesting that alternative mechanisms may occur in AEP.

  11. Subgroup analysis of Asian patients in the INPULSIS® trials of nintedanib in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Xu, Zuojun; Azuma, Arata; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Li, Huiping; Fujimoto, Tsuyoshi; Bailes, Zelie; Schlenker-Herceg, Rozsa; Kim, Dong S

    2016-11-01

    In the two-replicate randomized Phase III INPULSIS® trials in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), nintedanib 150 mg bd significantly reduced the annual rate of decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) compared with placebo. The key secondary endpoints were time to first investigator-reported acute exacerbation and change from baseline in St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score, both over 52 weeks. Here, we assessed the effect of nintedanib in Asian patients. Pre-specified subgroup analyses of the effect of nintedanib on the primary and key secondary endpoints in Asian versus White patients were undertaken based on pooled data from the two INPULSIS® trials. Safety data were analyzed descriptively. Of the treated patients, 322 were Asian (nintedanib n = 194; placebo n = 128) and 608 were White (nintedanib n = 360; placebo n = 248). In Asian patients, the nintedanib versus placebo difference in the adjusted annual rate of decline in FVC was 94.1 mL/year (95% CI: 33.7, 154.6). The treatment effect of nintedanib on the annual rate of decline in FVC in Asian and White patients was similar (treatment-by-subgroup interaction P = 0.72) and consistent with the overall population. No significant treatment-by-subgroup interaction was observed for the key secondary endpoints between Asian and White patients. In Asian patients, the most common adverse event in the nintedanib group was diarrhoea (56.2% of patients vs 15.6% for placebo). In pre-specified subgroup analyses of Asian versus White patients with IPF in the INPULSIS® trials, race did not influence the effect of nintedanib on disease progression. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  12. Page 1 Congruence subgroup problem 95 have Q = Inv'(Q) × G ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In particular, for T = 2), this topology is the trivial topology. -. We prove: Theorem 5.1. Let G be as above and assume that if G is a form of *As then it is isotropic at every finite completion. Let Tº ={v:v is a finite place of K and G(K) is compact}. Then, any non-central normal subgroup of G(K) is T-adically closed. In particular, for.

  13. Pain Sensitivity Subgroups in Individuals With Spine Pain: Potential Relevance to Short-Term Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialosky, Joel E.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cluster analysis can be used to identify individuals similar in profile based on response to multiple pain sensitivity measures. There are limited investigations into how empirically derived pain sensitivity subgroups influence clinical outcomes for individuals with spine pain. Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to investigate empirically derived subgroups based on pressure and thermal pain sensitivity in individuals with spine pain and (2) to examine subgroup influence on 2-week clinical pain intensity and disability outcomes. Design A secondary analysis of data from 2 randomized trials was conducted. Methods Baseline and 2-week outcome data from 157 participants with low back pain (n=110) and neck pain (n=47) were examined. Participants completed demographic, psychological, and clinical information and were assessed using pain sensitivity protocols, including pressure (suprathreshold pressure pain) and thermal pain sensitivity (thermal heat threshold and tolerance, suprathreshold heat pain, temporal summation). A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was used to create subgroups based on pain sensitivity responses. Differences in data for baseline variables, clinical pain intensity, and disability were examined. Results Three pain sensitivity cluster groups were derived: low pain sensitivity, high thermal static sensitivity, and high pressure and thermal dynamic sensitivity. There were differences in the proportion of individuals meeting a 30% change in pain intensity, where fewer individuals within the high pressure and thermal dynamic sensitivity group (adjusted odds ratio=0.3; 95% confidence interval=0.1, 0.8) achieved successful outcomes. Limitations Only 2-week outcomes are reported. Conclusions Distinct pain sensitivity cluster groups for individuals with spine pain were identified, with the high pressure and thermal dynamic sensitivity group showing worse clinical outcome for pain intensity. Future studies should aim to confirm

  14. Mindfulness and Emotional Outcomes: Identifying Subgroups of College Students using Latent Profile Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Matthew R.; Lawless, Adrienne K.; Brown, David B.; Bravo, Adrian J.

    2015-01-01

    In non-meditating samples, distinct facets of mindfulness are found to be negatively correlated, preventing the meaningful creation of a total mindfulness score. The present study used person-centered analyses to distinguish subgroups of college students based on their mindfulness scores, which allows the examination of individuals who are high (or low) on all facets of mindfulness. Using the Lo-Mendell-Rubin Adjusted LRT test, we settled on a 4-class solution that included a high mindfulness...

  15. Which subgroups of fire fighters are more prone to work-related diminished health requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plat, Marie-Christine J; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether certain subgroups of fire fighters are prone to work-related diminished health requirements. The health requirements for fire-fighting were tested in a workers' health surveillance (WHS) setting. These health requirements included psychological, physical and sense-related components as well as cardiovascular risk factors. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for the presence of the diminished health requirements were calculated for the subgroups of gender, professionalism and age. The prevalence of diminished psychological requirements was equivalent among the subgroups, and no significant high-risk group was identified. As compared to men fire fighters, women fire fighters were more likely to have diminished physical requirements (OR 28.5; 95% CI 12.1-66.9) and less likely to have cardiovascular risk factors (OR 0.3; 0.1-0.5). As compared to volunteer fire fighters, professionals were less likely to have diminished physical requirements (OR 0.5; 0.3-0.9), but professionals had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors with an odds ratio of 1.9 (1.1-3.2). As compared to the youngest fire fighters, the oldest fire fighters were more likely to have diminished sense-related requirements (OR 7.1; 3.4-15.2); a similar comparison could be made between oldest and middle-aged fire fighters (OR 5.1; 2.5-10.5). In addition, the oldest fire fighters were more likely to have cardiovascular risk factors when compared to the youngest (OR 4.4; 1.7-11.1) and to the middle-aged fire fighters (OR 3.1; 1.2-7.9). Subgroups (gender, professionalism and age) of fire fighters are prone to at least one specific work-related diminished health requirement. Therefore, parts of the WHS could be applied with more attention to these high-risk groups.

  16. Evolutionary Dynamics of Male Reproductive Genes in the Drosophila virilis Subgroup

    OpenAIRE

    Yasir H. Ahmed-Braimah; Unckless, Robert L.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2017-01-01

    Postcopulatory sexual selection (PCSS) is a potent evolutionary force that can drive rapid changes of reproductive genes within species, and thus has the potential to generate reproductive incompatibilities between species. Male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) are major players in postmating interactions, and are important targets of PCSS in males. The virilis subgroup of Drosophila exhibits strong interspecific gametic incompatibilities, and can serve as a model to study the genetic basis of P...

  17. Restriction of complementary series representations of $O(1,N)$ to symmetric subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllers, Jan; Oshima, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    is given by a direct integral of principal series representations whereas the discrete part consists of finitely many complementary series representations. The explicit Plancherel formula is computed on the Fourier transformed side of the non-compact realization of the complementary series by using......We find the complete branching law for the restriction of complementary series representations of $O(1,n+1)$ to the symmetric subgroup $O(1,m+1)\\times O(n-m)$, $0\\leq m

  18. Restriction of complementary series representations of O(1,N) to symmetric subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllers, Jan; Oshima, Yoshiki

    by a direct integral of principal series representations whereas the discrete part consists of finitely many complementary series representations. The explicit Plancherel formula is computed on the Fourier transformed side of the non-compact realization of the complementary series by using the spectral......We find the complete branching law for the restriction of complementary series representations of O(1, n+1) to the symmetric subgroup O(1,m+1)× O(n − m), 0 m

  19. Centralizers of maximal regular subgroups in simple Lie groups and relative congruence classes of representations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larouche, M [Departement de Mathematiques et Statistique, Universite de Montreal, 2920 chemin de la Tour, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Lemire, F W [Department of Mathematics, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario (Canada); Patera, J, E-mail: larouche@dms.umontreal.ca, E-mail: lemire@uwindsor.ca, E-mail: patera@crm.umontreal.ca [Centre de Recherches Mathematiques, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128-Centre ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2011-10-14

    In this paper, we present a new, uniform and comprehensive description of centralizers of the maximal regular subgroups in compact simple Lie groups of all types and ranks. The centralizer is either a direct product of finite cyclic groups, a continuous group of rank 1, or a product, not necessarily direct, of a continuous group of rank 1 with a finite cyclic group. Explicit formulas for the action of such centralizers on irreducible representations of the simple Lie algebras are given. (paper)

  20. Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity trial: benefits may vary in subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Peter G; Schmidt, Barbara; Roberts, Robin S; Doyle, Lex W; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Haslam, Ross; Sinha, Sunil; Tin, Win

    2010-03-01

    To determine whether the benefits of caffeine vary in three subgroups of 2006 participants in the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity (CAP) trial. Post-hoc subgroup analyses were performed on the basis of: (1) indication for commencement of study drug: treat apnea, prevent apnea, or facilitate extubation; (2) positive pressure ventilation (PPV) at randomization: endotracheal tube (ETT), noninvasive ventilation, or none; and (3) timing of commencement of study drug: early or late (3 days). Outcomes assessed were those showing treatment effects in the original analyses. We investigated the consistency of caffeine effects by using regression models that incorporated treatment/subgroup factor interactions. There was little evidence of a differential treatment effect of caffeine in subgroups defined by the clinical indication for starting study drug. The size and direction of the caffeine effect on death or disability differed depending on PPV at randomization (P = .03). Odds ratios (95% CI) were: no support, 1.32 (0.81-2.14); noninvasive support, 0.73 (0.52-1.03); and ETT, 0.73 (0.57-0.94). Adjustment for baseline factors strengthened this effect (P = .02). Starting caffeine early resulted in larger reductions in days of respiratory support. Postmenstrual age at time of discontinuing PPV was shorter with earlier treatment (P = .01). Mean differences (95% CI) were: early, 1.35 weeks (0.90-1.81); and late 0.55 weeks (-0.11-0.99). Adjustment for baseline factors weakened this effect (P = .03). There is evidence of variable beneficial effects of caffeine. Infants receiving respiratory support appeared to derive more neurodevelopmental benefits from caffeine than infants not receiving support. Earlier initiation of caffeine may be associated with a greater reduction in time on ventilation. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Twitch and nontwitch motoneuron subgroups in the oculomotor nucleus of monkeys receive different afferent projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasicky, Richard; Horn, Anja K E; Büttner-Ennever, Jean A

    2004-11-08

    Motoneurons in the primate oculomotor nucleus can be divided into two categories, those supplying twitch muscle fibers and those supplying nontwitch muscle fibers. Recent studies have shown that twitch motoneurons lie within the classical oculomotor nucleus (nIII), and nontwitch motoneurons lie around the borders. Nontwitch motoneurons of medial and inferior rectus are in the C group dorsomedial to nIII, whereas those of inferior oblique and superior rectus lie near the midline are in the S group. In this anatomical study, afferents to the twitch and nontwitch subgroups of nIII have been anterogradely labeled by injections of tritiated leucine into three areas and compared. 1) Abducens nucleus injections gave rise to silver grain deposits over all medial rectus subgroups, both twitch and nontwitch. 2) Laterally placed vestibular complex injections that included the central superior vestibular nucleus labeled projections only in twitch motoneuron subgroups. However, injections into the parvocellular medial vestibular nucleus (mvp), or Y group, resulted in labeled terminals over both twitch and nontwitch motoneurons. 3) Pretectal injections that included the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT), and the olivary pretectal nucleus (OLN), labeled terminals only over nontwitch motoneurons, in the contralateral C group and in the S group. Our study demonstrates that twitch and nontwitch motoneuron subgroups do not receive identical afferent inputs. They can be controlled either in parallel, or independently, suggesting that they have basically different functions. We propose that twitch motoneurons primarily drive eye movements and nontwitch motoneurons the tonic muscle activity, as in gaze holding and vergence, possibly involving a proprioceptive feedback system. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. [Association between anxiety and quality of life in different subgroups irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosado-Gayosso, M; Casillas-Guzmán, G B; Serralde-Zúñiga, A E; Pérez-Hernández, J L; Higuera-de la Tijera, M F; Pérez-Torres, E; Abdo-Francis, J M

    2011-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a frequent functional digestive disorder. Several studies have established the relationship between IBS and anxiety. Also it has been described a negative impact on quality of life in patients who suffer it, but in our country none of these studies have used ROME III criteria for evaluation. To know the frequency of anxiety in the different subgroups of IBS and its impact on quality of life. The study was conducted in patients who attended for first time to the outpatient clinic of our hospital for ten months. Adult patients who met the criteria of IBS were included. We applied the SF-36 quality of life questionnaire and the Hamilton anxiety scale. One hundred and two patients who met for IBS criteria were included, of which 85% had anxiety. The IBS-C was the most frequent subgroup. Divided by subgroups, found that 52%, 85.1%, 90% and 80.9% had anxiety for IBS-C, IBS-D, IBS-M and IBS-NC respectively, without significant difference between groups. Patients with anxiety had lower quality of life scores in the categories of physical health, mental health and change in the state of health, (54.2 ± 18 vs. 72 ± 16, 52.8 ± 20 vs. 74 ± 14, 48 ± 28 vs. 59 ± 32) with respect to those who have no anxiety (p anxiety was not associated to any subgroup in particular of IBS, the presence of this influenced adversely and significantly on the quality of life of patients who suffer it.

  3. Exercise challenge in Gulf War Illness reveals two subgroups with altered brain structure and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakib U Rayhan

    Full Text Available Nearly 30% of the approximately 700,000 military personnel who served in Operation Desert Storm (1990-1991 have developed Gulf War Illness, a condition that presents with symptoms such as cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, debilitating fatigue and chronic widespread pain that implicate the central nervous system. A hallmark complaint of subjects with Gulf War Illness is post-exertional malaise; defined as an exacerbation of symptoms following physical and/or mental effort. To study the causal relationship between exercise, the brain, and changes in symptoms, 28 Gulf War veterans and 10 controls completed an fMRI scan before and after two exercise stress tests to investigate serial changes in pain, autonomic function, and working memory. Exercise induced two clinical Gulf War Illness subgroups. One subgroup presented with orthostatic tachycardia (n = 10. This phenotype correlated with brainstem atrophy, baseline working memory compensation in the cerebellar vermis, and subsequent loss of compensation after exercise. The other subgroup developed exercise induced hyperalgesia (n = 18 that was associated with cortical atrophy and baseline working memory compensation in the basal ganglia. Alterations in cognition, brain structure, and symptoms were absent in controls. Our novel findings may provide an understanding of the relationship between the brain and post-exertional malaise in Gulf War Illness.

  4. Kuwaiti population subgroup of nomadic Bedouin ancestry—Whole genome sequence and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumi Elsa John

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Kuwaiti native population comprises three distinct genetic subgroups of Persian, “city-dwelling” Saudi Arabian tribe, and nomadic “tent-dwelling” Bedouin ancestry. Bedouin subgroup is characterized by presence of 17% African ancestry; it owes it origin to nomadic tribes of the deserts of Arabian Peninsula and North Africa. By sequencing whole genome of a Kuwaiti male from this subgroup at 41X coverage, we report 3,752,878 SNPs, 411,839 indels, and 8451 structural variations. Neighbor-joining tree, based on shared variant positions carrying disease-risk alleles between the Bedouin and other continental genomes, places Bedouin genome at the nexus of African, Asian, and European genomes in concordance with geographical location of Kuwait and Peninsula. In congruence with participant's medical history for morbid obesity and bronchial asthma, risk alleles are seen at deleterious SNPs associated with obesity and asthma. Many of the observed deleterious ‘novel’ variants lie in genes associated with autosomal recessive disorders characteristic of the region.

  5. Pharmacotherapy effectiveness for clinical subgroups among children and adolescents with early onset schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrell, Jeanette M; McIntyre, Roger S; Deroche, Chelsea B

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to determine the effectiveness of pharmacotherapies among children and adolescents diagnosed with early onset schizophrenia subgrouped according to their co-occurring psychiatric disorders. A retrospective cohort design was employed, using South Carolina's (USA) Medicaid claims dataset covering outpatient and inpatient medical services, between January, 1999 and December, 2013 to identify patients ≤17 years of age. Random effects regression analyses assessed differential changes in acute psychiatric service utilization over time across the 3 subgroups associated with antipsychotic, mood stabilizer, psychostimulant, or antidepressant pharmacotherapy. For patients with schizophrenia and comorbid mood disorders or emotional dysregulation (Cluster 1), or schizophrenia and severe cognitive impairments (Cluster 2), those treated with monotherapy second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) over time demonstrated consistently lower use of acute psychiatric treatment services as did those coprescribed mood stabilizers, primarily lithium, or anticonvulsants. In all clusters, including the relatively homogenous subgroup of patients with early onset schizophrenia and few comorbid disorders, acute psychiatric service utilization was significantly higher and more variable over time for those prescribed multiple SGAs. Regardless of the specific constellation of symptoms and comorbid disorders targeted, the coprescription of multiple SGAs was not effective over time in stabilizing children and adolescents outside of acute care settings. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Prospective effects of hearing status on loneliness and depression in older persons: identification of subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Marieke; Deeg, Dorly J H; Smits, Cas; van Tilburg, Theo G; Kuik, Dirk J; Festen, Joost M; Kramer, Sophia E

    2011-12-01

    To determine the possible longitudinal relationships between hearing status and depression, and hearing status and loneliness in the older population. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess the associations between baseline hearing and 4-year follow-up of depression, social loneliness, and emotional loneliness. Hearing was measured both by self-report and a speech-in-noise test. Each model was corrected for age, gender, hearing aid use, baseline wellbeing, and relevant confounders. Subgroup effects were tested using interaction terms. We used data from two waves of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (2001-02 and 2005-06, ages 63-93). Sample sizes were 996 (self-report (SR) analyses) and 830 (speech-in-noise test (SNT) analyses). Both hearing measures showed significant adverse associations with both loneliness measures (p loneliness model) and men (SR and SNT-emotional loneliness model). No significant effects appeared for depression. We found significant adverse effects of poor hearing on emotional and social loneliness for specific subgroups of older persons. Future research should confirm the subgroup effects and may contribute to the development of tailored prevention and intervention programs.

  7. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY06 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2006-10-03

    This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2006 (FY06) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to the 2000 and 2004 Biological Opinions on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates implementation of the Estuary RME Plan. In FY06, EOS project accomplishments included: 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version May 2006) based on comments by EOS members, the Independent Scientific Review Panel, and other reviewers. In the context of uncertainty about the direction of the federal RME due to litigation on the FCRPS Biological Opinion, FY06 activities for the EOS project resulted in expanded substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, project tracking infrastructure, and a new version of the Estuary RME Plan.

  8. Kuwaiti population subgroup of nomadic Bedouin ancestry-Whole genome sequence and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Sumi Elsa; Thareja, Gaurav; Hebbar, Prashantha; Behbehani, Kazem; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse; Alsmadi, Osama

    2015-03-01

    Kuwaiti native population comprises three distinct genetic subgroups of Persian, "city-dwelling" Saudi Arabian tribe, and nomadic "tent-dwelling" Bedouin ancestry. Bedouin subgroup is characterized by presence of 17% African ancestry; it owes it origin to nomadic tribes of the deserts of Arabian Peninsula and North Africa. By sequencing whole genome of a Kuwaiti male from this subgroup at 41X coverage, we report 3,752,878 SNPs, 411,839 indels, and 8451 structural variations. Neighbor-joining tree, based on shared variant positions carrying disease-risk alleles between the Bedouin and other continental genomes, places Bedouin genome at the nexus of African, Asian, and European genomes in concordance with geographical location of Kuwait and Peninsula. In congruence with participant's medical history for morbid obesity and bronchial asthma, risk alleles are seen at deleterious SNPs associated with obesity and asthma. Many of the observed deleterious 'novel' variants lie in genes associated with autosomal recessive disorders characteristic of the region.

  9. Television viewing in low-income latino children: variation by ethnic subgroup and English proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Darcy A; Matson, Pamela A; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2013-02-01

    Television viewing is associated with an increased risk for obesity in children. Latino children are at high risk for obesity and yet little is known about differences in television viewing habits within this population. The purpose of this study is to determine if hours of television viewed by young children with low-income Latina mothers differs by maternal ethnic subgroup and English language proficiency. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Welfare, Children, & Families: A Three City Study. Participants were 422 low-income Latina mothers of Mexican and Puerto Rican descent with children ages 0-4 years old. The dependent variable was hours of daily television viewed by the child. The independent variable was maternal ethnic subgroup and English language proficiency. Analyses involved the use of multiple negative binomial regression models, which were adjusted for demographic variables. Multivariable regression analyses showed that compared to children with mothers of Mexican descent, children of mothers of Puerto Rican descent watch more daily television (television viewing (IRR=1.29, 95% CI 1.04, 1.61). No relationship was found for children of Puerto Rican descent. Child television viewing varies in low-income Latino children by maternal ethnic subgroup and English language proficiency. Interventionists must consider the varying sociocultural contexts of Latino children and their influence on television viewing.

  10. The Importance of Risk and Subgroup Analysis of Nonparticipants in a Geriatric Intervention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Rosted

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A major concern in intervention studies is the generalizability of the findings due to refusal of intended participants to actually take part. In studies including ill older people the number of those declining to participate may be large and the concern is therefore relevant. Objectives. To compare patients characteristics, rates of acute readmission, and mortality after one and six months among older persons who agreed and those who declined to participate in a randomized controlled trial and to describe subgroups of nonparticipants. Design. Comparative study based on a randomized controlled trial. Setting. University hospital in the Capital Region of Denmark. Participants. Patients ≥70 years discharged home after a short Emergency Department stay. 399 were requested to participate; 271 consented, whereas 128 refused. Results. Refusers were more likely to be readmitted (p<0.001 or die (p=0.006. The largest subgroup of refusers described as “too ill” had the highest risk of readmission (OR = 3.00, 95% CI = 1.61–5.47, p=0.001 and of mortality within six months (OR = 3.50, 95% CI = 1.64–7.49, p=0.002. However, this seems not to have affected the results of our randomized study. Conclusion. We recommend that intervention studies among older people or other fragile patient groups include analysis of relevant risk and subgroup analyses of refusers.

  11. Patterns and Risk Factors of Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis among Orang Asli Subgroups in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngui, Romano; Aziz, Shafie; Chua, Kek Heng; Aidil, Roslan Muhammad; Lee, Soo Ching; Tan, Tiong Kai; Sani, Mistam Mohd; Arine, Ahmad Fadzlun; Rohela, Mahmud; Lim, Yvonne A. L.

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to provide comprehensive data on the patterns and associated risk factors of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections among five Orang Asli subgroups in Peninsular Malaysia. The overall prevalence of STH infections was 59.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 56.1–63.7%). Trichuris trichiura (54.3%; 95% CI = 50.4–58.2%) was the predominant species followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (26.7%; 95% CI = 23.3–30.1%) and hookworm (9.1%; 95% CI = 6.9–11.3%). This study showed diversity for STH infections by subgroup with poverty and personal sanitary behavior as important risk factors for infection. Risk profile analyses indicating that Orang Kuala subgroup who has a generally well-developed infrastructure and better quality of life had a low rate of infection. There is a need for poverty reduction and promotion of deworming programs along with mass scale campaigns to create awareness about health and hygiene to reduce STH infections. PMID:26055746

  12. Efficacy of intravitreal ocriplasmin for treatment of vitreomacular adhesion: subgroup analyses from two randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Julia A; Stalmans, Peter; Benz, Matthew S; Gandorfer, Arnd; Pakola, Stephen J; Girach, Aniz; Kampik, Anselm; Jaffe, Glenn J; Toth, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a single intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin 125 μg across relevant subpopulations of patients with symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion (VMA)/vitreomacular traction (VMT), including when associated with macular hole. Two multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, 6-month studies. A total of 652 randomized patients (464 receiving ocriplasmin; 188 receiving placebo). A single intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin 125 μg or placebo in the study eye. Prespecified subgroup analyses were conducted to evaluate the effects on the proportion of patients with nonsurgical resolution of focal VMA at day 28, nonsurgical full-thickness macular hole (FTMH) closure at month 6, and categoric improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at month 6. Resolution of VMA at day 28 was achieved more often in younger patients (Treatment differences in favor of ocriplasmin were generally observed across each subgroup of subpopulations studied. Subgroup analyses confirmed the positive effect of ocriplasmin across relevant subpopulations. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patterns and Risk Factors of Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis Among Orang Asli Subgroups in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngui, Romano; Aziz, Shafie; Chua, Kek Heng; Aidil, Roslan Muhammad; Lee, Soo Ching; Tan, Tiong Kai; Sani, Mistam Mohd; Arine, Ahmad Fadzlun; Rohela, Mahmud; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-08-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to provide comprehensive data on the patterns and associated risk factors of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections among five Orang Asli subgroups in Peninsular Malaysia. The overall prevalence of STH infections was 59.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 56.1-63.7%). Trichuris trichiura (54.3%; 95% CI = 50.4-58.2%) was the predominant species followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (26.7%; 95% CI = 23.3-30.1%) and hookworm (9.1%; 95% CI = 6.9-11.3%). This study showed diversity for STH infections by subgroup with poverty and personal sanitary behavior as important risk factors for infection. Risk profile analyses indicating that Orang Kuala subgroup who has a generally well-developed infrastructure and better quality of life had a low rate of infection. There is a need for poverty reduction and promotion of deworming programs along with mass scale campaigns to create awareness about health and hygiene to reduce STH infections. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. A sensitive real-time PCR for detection and subgrouping of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Lien Anh Ha; van Doorn, H Rogier; Bryant, Juliet E; Nghiem, My Ngoc; Nguyen Van, Vinh Chau; Vo, Cong Khanh; Nguyen, Minh Dung; Tran, Tinh Hien; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D

    2012-01-01

    Improved diagnostic tools for rapid detection, quantitation, and subgrouping of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are needed to aid the development and evaluation of novel intervention strategies. A quantitative real-time RT-PCR using specific locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes was developed to identify RSV and to distinguish RSV subgroups A and B (RSV LNA assay). RSV subgroup diversity and the relationship between viral load and disease severity in confirmed RSV infections were also explored. 264 archived respiratory specimens from pediatric patients were tested in parallel using the commercial multiplex Seeplex™ RV detection kit (Seegene) and the novel RSV LNA assay. The LNA assay demonstrated a significantly higher sensitivity than Seeplex, improving overall detection rates from 24% (64/264) to 32% (84/264). Detection limits of 9.0×10(1) and 6.0×10(2)copies/mL were observed for RSV A and B, respectively. RSV A was detected in 53/84 (63%) cases, and 31/84 (37%) were positive for RSV B. This novel method offers a rapid, quantitative, highly specific and sensitive approach to laboratory diagnosis of RSV. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Personality does not distinguish people with fibromyalgia but identifies subgroups of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Xavier; Bailles, Eva; Valdes, Manuel; Gutierrez, Fernando; Peri, Josep-Maria; Arias, Anna; Gomez, Emili; Collado, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The objectives were to compare the personality of fibromyalgia (FM) patients with other chronic painful and nonpainful disorders considering the confusion due to psychopathology and to assess the clustering of FM patients according to their personality profile. Differences in the NEO Five-Factor Inventory between FM, non-FM chronic pain and drug-resistant epileptic patients were assessed including the confounding effect of demographics and psychopathological status by multivariate regression analysis. Clustering of FM patients was assessed by two-step cluster analysis. Differences in clinical severity and psychosocial problems between subgroups and their outcome 6 months after multidisciplinary treatment were assessed. The final sample comprised 874 patients. Once the effect of confounding variables was considered, clinically nonsignificant differences in personality were observed between groups. FM patients could, however, be grouped into two clusters. Cluster 1 was characterized by higher neuroticism and lower extraversion and showed a worse pretreatment clinical state including more psychosocial problems. In spite of having reached a wider general improvement at 6-month follow-up, Cluster 1 patients remained more anxious and depressed. Identifying personality-based subgroups of FM might allow implementing specific preventive strategies. FM treatment might be optimized by increasing medication compliance, improving therapeutic alliance and testing different therapeutic options and treatment sequencing for each personality subgroup. © 2013.

  16. How does undergraduate college biology students' level of understanding, in regard to the role of the seed plant root system, relate to their level of understanding of photosynthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeng'ere, James Gicheha

    This research study investigated how undergraduate college biology students' level of understanding of the role of the seed plant root system relates to their level of understanding of photosynthesis. This research was conducted with 65 undergraduate non-majors biology who had completed 1 year of biology at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge and Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond. A root probe instrument was developed from some scientifically acceptable propositional statements about the root system, the process of photosynthesis, as well as the holistic nature of the tree. These were derived from research reviews of the science education and the arboriculture literature. This was administered to 65 students selected randomly from class lists of the two institutions. Most of the root probe's items were based on the Live Oak tree. An in-depth, clinical interview-based analysis was conducted with 12 of those tested students. A team of root experts participated by designing, validating and answering the same questions that the students were asked. A "systems" lens as defined by a team of college instructors, root experts (Shigo, 1991), and this researcher was used to interpret the results. A correlational coefficient determining students' level of understanding of the root system and their level of understanding of the process of photosynthesis was established by means of Pearson's r correlation (r = 0.328) using the SAS statistical analysis (SAS, 1987). From this a coefficient of determination (r2 = 0.104) was determined. Students' level of understanding of the Live Oak root system (mean score 5.94) was not statistically different from their level of understanding of the process of photosynthesis (mean score 5.54) as assessed by the root probe, t (129) = 0.137, p > 0.05 one tailed-test. This suggests that, to some degree, level of the root system limits level of understanding of photosynthesis and vice versa. Analysis of quantitative and qualitative

  17. 78 FR 37845 - Meeting of the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area (ISDRA) Subgroup of the California Desert...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... California Desert District Advisory Council SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given, in accordance with Public Laws 92-463 and 94-579, that the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area Subgroup of the California Desert... filed in advance of the meeting for the California Desert District Advisory Council ISDRA Subgroup, c/o...

  18. Frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Of all measurement units, frequency is the one that may be determined with the highest degree of accuracy. It equally allows precise measurements of other physical and technical quantities, whenever they can be measured in terms of frequency.This volume covers the central methods and techniques relevant for frequency standards developed in physics, electronics, quantum electronics, and statistics. After a review of the basic principles, the book looks at the realisation of commonly used components. It then continues with the description and characterisation of important frequency standards

  19. Current Status of International Airborne Platform Data and Instrument Interface Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Freer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Commission I of the International Society for Photogrammetric and Remote Sensing formed working group I/1 for the purpose of standardizing airborne platform interfaces. The primary mission of this working group is to promote the standardization of instrument interfaces, data formats, and supporting infrastructures; and to facilitate more efficient, flexible, and cost-effective international science flight operations. Within WGI/1 are a number of focused subgroups. This paper addresses the efforts of some of these subgroups having interdependent and overlapping interests; including the development of standard software interfaces for sensors, standardized approaches to management of information over potentially intermittent wireless data links, the development of standardized processing algorithms, and data archival format standards. The data in this report reflect the outcome of work-to-date in the current subgroups.

  20. Current Status of International Airborne Platform Data and Instrument Interface Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Matt; Webster, Chris; Freundinger, Larry

    2016-06-01

    Commission I of the International Society for Photogrammetric and Remote Sensing formed working group I/1 for the purpose of standardizing airborne platform interfaces. The primary mission of this working group is to promote the standardization of instrument interfaces, data formats, and supporting infrastructures; and to facilitate more efficient, flexible, and cost-effective international science flight operations. Within WGI/1 are a number of focused subgroups. This paper addresses the efforts of some of these subgroups having interdependent and overlapping interests; including the development of standard software interfaces for sensors, standardized approaches to management of information over potentially intermittent wireless data links, the development of standardized processing algorithms, and data archival format standards. The data in this report reflect the outcome of work-to-date in the current subgroups.

  1. Functional divergence of the NIP III subgroup proteins involved altered selective constraints and positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhujun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nod26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs that belong to the aquaporin superfamily are unique to plants. According to homology modeling and phylogenetic analysis, the NIP subfamily can be further divided into three subgroups with distinct biological functions (NIP I, NIP II, and NIP III. In some grasses, the NIP III subgroup proteins (NIP2s were demonstrated to be permeable to solutes with larger diameter, such as silicic acid and arsenous acids. However, to date there is no data-mining or direct experimental evidences for the permeability of such larger solutes for dicot NIP2s, although they exhibit similar three-dimensional structures as those in grasses. It is therefore intriguing to investigate the molecular mechanisms that drive the evolution of plant NIP2s. Results The NIP III subgroup is more ancient with a divergence time that predates the monocot-dicot split. The proliferation of NIP2 genes in modern grass species is primarily attributed to whole genome and segmental chromosomal duplication events. The structure of NIP2 genes is relatively conserved, possessing five exons and four introns. All NIP2s possess an ar/R filter consisting of G, S, G, and R, except for the cucumber CsNIP2;2, where a small G in the H2 is substituted with the bulkier C residue. Our maximum likelihood analysis revealed that NIP2s, especially the loop A (LA region, have undergone strong selective pressure for adaptive evolution. The analysis at the amino acid level provided strong statistical evidences for the functional divergence between monocot and dicot NIP III subgroup proteins. In addition, several SDPs (Specificity Determining Positions responsible for functional specificity were predicted. Conclusions The present study provides the first evidences of functional divergence between dicot and monocot NIP2s, and suggests that positive selection, as well as a radical shift of evolutionary rate at some critical amino acid sites is the primary

  2. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eChe-Ngwa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The oculomotor nucleus (nIII contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior and superior recti (MR, IR, SR, inferior oblique (IO and levator palpebrae (LP muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV, which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO, to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems were immunostained for different markers: acetylcholine transferase (ChAT combined with glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, calretinin (CR or glycine receptor (GlyR. The cytoarchitecture was visualized with Cresyl violet, Gallyas staining and expression of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments (NP-NF. Apart from nIV, seven subgroups were delineated in nIII: the central caudal nucleus (CCN, a dorsolateral (DL, dorsomedial (DM, central (CEN, and ventral group (VEN, the nucleus of Perlia (NP and the non-preganglionic centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp. DL, VEN, NP and EWcp were characterized by a strong supply of GAD-positive terminals, in contrast to DM, CEN and nIV. CR-positive terminals and fibres were confined to CCN, CEN and NP. Based on location and histochemistry of the motoneuron subgroups in monkey, CEN is considered as the SR and IO motoneurons, DL and VEN as the B- and A-group of MR motoneurons, respectively, and DM as IR motoneurons. A good correlation between monkey and man is seen for the CR input, which labels only motoneurons of eye muscles participating in upgaze (SR, IO and LP. The CCN contained LP motoneurons, and nIV those of SO. This study provides a map of the individual subgroups of motoneurons in human nIII for the first time, and suggests that NP may contain upgaze motoneurons. Surprisingly, a strong GABAergic input to human MR motoneurons was discovered, which is not seen in monkey and may indicate a functional oculomotor specialization.

  3. Expanded risk groups help determine which prostate radiotherapy sub-group may benefit from adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Scott G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess whether an expanded (five level risk stratification system can be used to identify the sub-group of intermediate risk patients with prostate cancer who benefit from combining androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Materials and methods Using a previously validated 5-risk group schema, a prospective non-randomized data set of 1423 men treated at the British Columbia Cancer Agency was assessed for the primary end point of biochemical control (bNED with the RTOG-ASTRO "Phoenix" definition (lowest PSA to date + 2 ng/mL, both with and without adjuvant ADT. The median follow-up was 5 years. Results There was no bNED benefit for ADT in the low or low intermediate groups but there was a statistically significant bNED benefit in the high intermediate, high and extreme risk groups. The 5-year bNED rates with and without ADT were 70% and 73% respectively for the low intermediate group (p = non-significant and 72% and 58% respectively for the high intermediate group (p = 0.002. Conclusion There appears to be no advantage to ADT where the Gleason score is 6 or less and PSA is 15 or less. ADT is beneficial in patients treated to standard dose radiation with Gleason 6 disease and a PSA greater than 15 or where the Gleason score is 7 or higher.

  4. Association Between Endometrial/Subendometrial Vasculature and Embryo Transfer Outcome: A Meta-analysis and Subgroup Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianing; Xia, Fei; Zhou, Ying; Wei, Xuedong; Zhuang, Yanyan; Huang, Yingxue

    2018-01-01

    To examine the association between endometrial/subendometrial vasculature and in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) and frozen embryo transfer (FET) outcomes. A meta-analysis of studies using endometrial/subendometrial 3-dimensional ultrasound and power Doppler angiography was performed to examine the vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI), and vascularization-flow index (VFI) in pregnant and nonpregnant women. Ten articles were analyzed, including 895 pregnant women and 882 nonpregnant women. A subgroup analysis of the measuring time showed that the endometrial VI (standardized mean difference [SMD], 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40, 0.74; P endometrial VI (SMD, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.30, 0.74; P endometrial VI, FI, and VFI on the ET day are potentially associated with pregnancy occurrence during IVF-ET. The endometrial VI, FI, and VFI could help identify appropriate timing for FET. However, the accuracy of these indices in predicting pregnancy occurrence must be further evaluated in additional large-scale studies. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  5. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...

  6. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...

  7. PKI standards

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Chris J

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the current state of the art in standards for Public Key Infrastructures. The main focus of the paper is the recent work by the Internet Engineering Task Force, ITU-T, and ISO/IEC.

  8. Palivizumab for immunoprophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis in high-risk infants and young children: a systematic review and additional economic modelling of subgroup analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Bayliss, S; Meads, C

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a seasonal infectious disease, with epidemics occurring annually from October to March in the UK. It is a very common infection in infants and young children and can lead to hospitalisation, particularly in those who are premature or who have chronic lung disease (CLD) or congenital heart disease (CHD). Palivizumab (Synagis®, MedImmune) is a monoclonal antibody designed to provide passive immunity against RSV and thereby prevent or reduce the severity of RSV infection. It is licensed for the prevention of serious lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV in children at high risk. While it is recognised that a policy of using palivizumab for all children who meet the licensed indication does not meet conventional UK standards of cost-effectiveness, most clinicians feel that its use is justified in some children. To use systematic review evidence to estimate the cost-effectiveness of immunoprophylaxis of RSV using palivizumab in different subgroups of children with or without CLD or CHD who are at high risk of serious morbidity from RSV infection. A systematic review of the literature and an economic evaluation was carried out. The bibliographic databases included the Cochrane Library [Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) and Health Technology Assessment (HTA)] and five other databases, from inception to 2009. Research registries of ongoing trials including Current Controlled Trials metaRegister, Clinical Trials.gov and the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network Portfolio were also searched. Searches were conducted for prognostic and hospitalisation studies covering 1950-2009 (the original report searches conducted in 2007 covering the period 1950-2007 were rerun in August 2009 to cover the period 2007-9) and the database of all references from the original report was sifted to

  9. Identification of Subgroups of Women with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Central Sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Muñoz, Juan J; Navarro-Pardo, Esperanza; da-Silva-Pocinho, Ricardo F; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Pareja, Juan A

    2016-09-01

    Identification of subjects with different sensitization mechanisms can help to identify better therapeutic strategies for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The aim of the current study was to identify subgroups of women with CTS with different levels of sensitization. A total of 223 women with CTS were recruited. Self-reported variables included pain intensity, function, disability, and depression. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over median, ulnar, and radial nerves, C5-C6 joint, carpal tunnel, and tibialis anterior to assess widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia. Heat (HPT) and cold (CPT) pain thresholds were also bilaterally assessed over the carpal tunnel and the thenar eminence to determine thermal pain hyperalgesia. Pinch grip force between the thumb and the remaining fingers was calculated to determine motor assessment. Subgroups were determined according to the status on a previous clinical prediction rule: PPT over the affected C5-C6 joint 66 points. The ANOVA showed that women within group 1 (positive rule, n = 60) exhibited bilateral widespread pressure hyperalgesia (P < 0.001) and bilateral thermal thresholds (P < 0.001) than those within group 2 (negative rule, n = 162). Women in group 1 also exhibited higher depression than those in group 2 (P = 0.023). No differences in self-reported variables were observed. This study showed that a clinical prediction rule originally developed for identifying women with CTS who are likely to respond favorably to manual physical therapy was able to identify women exhibiting higher widespread pressure hyper-sensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. This subgroup of women with CTS exhibiting higher sensitization may need specific therapeutic programs. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Disentangling Heterogeneity of Childhood Disruptive Behavior Problems Into Dimensions and Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Koen; Lubke, Gitta H; van der Ende, Jan; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E M; Lichtenstein, Paul; Larsson, Henrik; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Kushner, Steven A; Verhulst, Frank C; Boomsma, Dorret I; Tiemeier, Henning

    2017-08-01

    Irritable and oppositional behaviors are increasingly considered as distinct dimensions of oppositional defiant disorder. However, few studies have explored this multidimensionality across the broader spectrum of disruptive behavior problems (DBPs). This study examined the presence of dimensions and distinct subgroups of childhood DBPs, and the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between these dimensions. Using factor mixture models (FMMs), the presence of dimensions and subgroups of DBPs was assessed in the Generation R Study at ages 6 (n = 6,209) and 10 (n = 4,724) years. Replications were performed in two population-based cohorts (Netherlands Twin Registry, n = 4,402, and Swedish Twin Study of Child and Adolescent Development, n = 1,089) and a clinical sample (n = 1,933). We used cross-lagged modeling in the Generation R Study to assess cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between dimensions. DBPs were assessed using mother-reported responses to the Child Behavior Checklist. Empirically obtained dimensions of DBPs were oppositional behavior (age 6 years), disobedient behavior, rule-breaking behavior (age 10 years), physical aggression, and irritability (both ages). FMMs suggested that one-class solutions had the best model fit for all dimensions in all three population-based cohorts. Similar results were obtained in the clinical sample. All three dimensions, including irritability, predicted subsequent physical aggression (range, 0.08-0.16). This study showed that childhood DBPs should be regarded as a multidimensional phenotype rather than comprising distinct subgroups. Incorporating multidimensionality will improve diagnostic accuracy and refine treatment. Future studies need to address the biological validity of the DBP dimensions observed in this study; herein lies an important opportunity for neuroimaging and genetic measures. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  11. Dissociation between two subgroups of the suprachiasmatic nucleus affected by the number of damped oscillated neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos HT

    2017-03-01

    In mammals, the main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain synchronizes the body rhythms to the environmental light-dark cycle. The SCN is composed of about 2 ×104 neurons which can be classified into three oscillatory phenotypes: self-sustained oscillators, damped oscillators, and arrhythmic neurons. Exposed to an artificial external light-dark cycle with a period of 22 h instead of 24 h , two subgroups of the SCN can become desynchronized (dissociated). The ventrolateral (VL) subgroup receives photic input and is entrained to the external cycle and a dorsomedial (DM) subgroup oscillates with its endogenous (i.e., free running) period and is synchronized to the external light-dark cycle through coupling from the VL. In the present study, we examined the effects of damped oscillatory neurons on the dissociation between VL and DM under an external 22 h cycle. We found that, with increasing numbers of damped oscillatory neurons located in the VL, the dissociation between the VL and DM emerges, but if these neurons are increasingly present in the DM the dissociation disappears. Hence, the damped oscillatory neurons in different subregions of the SCN play distinct roles in the dissociation between the two subregions of the SCN. This shows that synchrony between SCN subregions is affected by the number of damped oscillatory neurons and the location of these cells. We suggest that more knowledge on the number and the location of these cells may explain why some species do show a dissociation between the subregions and others do not, as the distribution of oscillatory types of neurons offers a plausible and novel candidate mechanism to explain heterogeneity.

  12. Three subgroups of pain profiles identified in 227 women with arthritis: a latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Katie; Parkinson, Lynne; Downie, Aron; Blyth, Fiona; Byles, Julie

    2017-03-01

    The objectives were to identify subgroups of women with arthritis based upon the multi-dimensional nature of their pain experience and to compare health and socio-demographic variables between subgroups. A latent class analysis of 227 women with self-reported arthritis was used to identify clusters of women based upon the sensory, affective, and cognitive dimensions of the pain experience. Multivariate multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between cluster membership and health and sociodemographic characteristics. A three-class cluster model was most parsimonious. 39.5 % of women had a unidimensional pain profile; 38.6 % of women had moderate multidimensional pain profile that included additional pain symptomatology such as sensory qualities and pain catastrophizing; and 21.9 % of women had severe multidimensional pain profile that included prominent pain symptomatology such as sensory and affective qualities of pain, pain catastrophizing, and neuropathic pain. Women with severe multidimensional pain profile have a 30.5 % higher risk of poorer quality of life and a 7.3 % higher risk of suffering depression, and women with moderate multidimensional pain profile have a 6.4 % higher risk of poorer quality of life when compared to women with unidimensional pain. This study identified three distinct subgroups of pain profiles in older women with arthritis. Women had very different experiences of pain, and cluster membership impacted significantly on health-related quality of life. These preliminary findings provide a stronger understanding of profiles of pain and may contribute to the development of tailored treatment options in arthritis.

  13. Taxonomic boundaries, phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of the Drosophila willistoni subgroup (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robe, L J; Cordeiro, J; Loreto, E L S; Valente, V L S

    2010-06-01

    The Drosophila willistoni subgroup represents a complex with varying taxonomic levels. It encompasses D. willistoni and its five sibling species: D. equinoxialis, D. insularis, D. paulistorum, D. pavlovskiana and D. tropicalis. Of these, D. equinoxialis, D. tropicalis and D. willistoni present differentiation at subspecific level, whereas D. paulistorum represents a superspecies, formed by six semispecies. Despite this taxonomic and evolutionary complexity, many of these semi and subspecific taxa have not yet had their phylogenetic status tested in an explicitly molecular study. Aiming to contribute to the understanding of the evolution of this challenging group, we analyzed nucleotide sequences from two mitochondrial and four nuclear datasets, both individually and simultaneously, through different phylogenetic methods. High levels of incongruence were detected among partitions, especially concerning the mitochondrial sequences. As this incongruence was found to be statistically significant and robust to the use of different models and approaches, and basically restricted to mitochondrial loci, we suggest that it may stem mainly from hybridization-mediated asymmetrical introgression. Despite this, our nuclear data finally led to a phylogenetic hypothesis which further refines several aspects related to the willistoni subgroup phylogeny. In this respect, D. insularis, D. tropicalis, D. willistoni and D. equinoxialis successively branched off from the willistoni subgroup main stem, which recently subdivided to produce D. paulistorum and D. pavlovskiana. As regards the semispecies evolution, we found evidence of a recent diversification, which highly influenced the obtained results due to the associated small levels of genetic differentiation, further worsened by the possibly associated incompletely sorted ancestral polymorphisms and by the possibility of introgression. This study also raises the question of whether these semispecies are monophyletic at all. This

  14. Differential impact of supported housing on selected subgroups of homeless veterans with substance abuse histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Maria J; Kasprow, Wesley J; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2012-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated that supported housing is an effective intervention for individuals who are homeless and have a mental illness or substance use disorder. This study examined data from an experimental trial of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program to identify differences in the program's impact on subgroups defined by sociodemographic or clinical characteristics. Data were analyzed from 259 male homeless veterans with substance abuse problems who were randomly assigned to HUD-VASH (intensive case management [ICM] plus rent subsidy vouchers), ICM only, or treatment as usual between June 1992 and December 1995. Four subgroups were defined: African American versus Caucasian, younger versus older than 42.3 years, co-occurring diagnoses of mental illness versus diagnosis of a substance use disorder only, and active versus less active substance use upon program entry. Mixed models were used to identify significant interactions between HUD-VASH assignment and each subgroup. Compared with ICM alone, HUD-VASH was associated with more positive housing outcomes for Caucasians, veterans with co-occurring mental disorders, and veterans who were active substance users. HUD-VASH was associated with more positive socioclinical outcomes for African Americans. No differences were observed in housing or socioclinical outcomes as a function of age. Among homeless veterans with a substance use disorder, Caucasians and those with active substance use showed greater housing benefits than other veterans from HUD-VASH than from ICM alone. African Americans showed greater socioclinical benefit than Caucasians from HUD-VASH versus ICM. Interaction analysis deserves further study.

  15. Quality-of-Life Differences among Diagnostic Subgroups of Children Receiving Ventilating Tubes for Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Christian Hamilton; Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse; Faber, Christian Emil; Johansen, Eva Charlotte Jung; Godballe, Christian

    2015-10-01

    The pathological picture may differ considerably between diagnostic subgroups of children with otitis media receiving ventilating tubes. The aims of this study are to investigate differences in quality of life among diagnostic subgroups of children treated with ventilating tubes and to investigate possible predictors for clinical success. Longitudinal observational study. Secondary care units. Four hundred ninety-one families were enrolled in the study. The Otitis Media-6 questionnaire was applied in the assessment of child quality of life. Caregivers completed questionnaires at 7 time points from before treatment to 18-month follow-up. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate possible predictors for clinical success. Response rates ranged from 96% to 81%; diagnostic distribution: 15% recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM), 47% otitis media with effusion (OME), and 38% mixed diagnosis of rAOM and OME (rAOM/OME). There were no significant differences between children diagnosed with rAOM and children diagnosed with rAOM/OME. However, these children had a significantly poorer quality of life at baseline compared with children diagnosed with only OME. Factors associated with clinical success included a diagnosis of rAOM, number of interrupted nights, physician visits, and canceled social activities due to OM. Results highlight the importance of distinguishing between diagnostic subgroups of children having ventilating tube treatment. A diagnosis of rAOM was found to predict baseline quality of life. Children with rAOM with or without OME were found to suffer significantly more than children with only OME before treatment. Factors associated with disease severity were found to predict clinical success. © American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  16. Somatosensory profiles in subgroups of patients with myogenic temporomandibular disorders and Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Doreen B; Rolke, Roman; Nickel, Ralf; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Daublaender, Monika

    2009-12-15

    Some patients with myofascial pain from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) report pain in extra-trigeminal body regions. Our aim was to distinguish TMD as regional musculoskeletal pain syndrome (n=23) from a widespread pain syndrome (FMS; n=18) based on patients' tender point scores, pain drawings and quantitative sensory testing (QST) profiles. Referenced to 18 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects significant group differences for cold, pressure and pinprick pain thresholds, suprathreshold pinprick sensitivity and mechanical detection thresholds were found. Pain sensitivity in TMD patients ranged between those of FMS patients and healthy controls. The group of TMD patients was inhomogeneous with respect to their tender point count with an insensitive group (n=12) resembling healthy controls and a sensitive TMD group (n=9) resembling FMS patients. Nevertheless sensitive TMD patients did not fulfil diagnostic criteria for FMS in regard to widespread pain as shown by their pain drawings. TMD subgroups did not differ with respect to psychological parameters. The sensitive subgroup was more sensitive compared to healthy controls and to insensitive TMD patients in regard to their QST profile over all test areas as well as to their tenderness over orofacial muscles and trigeminal foramina. However, sensitive TMD patients had a short pain duration arguing against a transition from TMD to FMS over time. Data rather suggest an overlap in pathophysiology with FMS, e.g. a disturbance of central pain processing, in this subgroup of TMD patients. Those patients could be identified on the basis of their tender point count as an easy practicable screening tool.

  17. Baseline hospital performance and the impact of medical emergency teams: Modelling vs. conventional subgroup analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillman Ken

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare two approaches to the statistical analysis of the relationship between the baseline incidence of adverse events and the effect of medical emergency teams (METs. Methods Using data from a cluster randomized controlled trial (the MERIT study, we analysed the relationship between the baseline incidence of adverse events and its change from baseline to the MET activation phase using quadratic modelling techniques. We compared the findings with those obtained with conventional subgroup analysis. Results Using linear and quadratic modelling techniques, we found that each unit increase in the baseline incidence of adverse events in MET hospitals was associated with a 0.59 unit subsequent reduction in adverse events (95%CI: 0.33 to 0.86 after MET implementation and activation. This applied to cardiac arrests (0.74; 95%CI: 0.52 to 0.95, unplanned ICU admissions (0.56; 95%CI: 0.26 to 0.85 and unexpected deaths (0.68; 95%CI: 0.45 to 0.90. Control hospitals showed a similar reduction only for cardiac arrests (0.95; 95%CI: 0.56 to 1.32. Comparison using conventional subgroup analysis, on the other hand, detected no significant difference between MET and control hospitals. Conclusions Our study showed that, in the MERIT study, when there was dependence of treatment effect on baseline performance, an approach based on regression modelling helped illustrate the nature and magnitude of such dependence while sub-group analysis did not. The ability to assess the nature and magnitude of such dependence may have policy implications. Regression technique may thus prove useful in analysing data when there is a conditional treatment effect.

  18. Identification of novel vibration- and deflection-sensitive neuronal subgroups in Johnston’s organ of the fruit fly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko eMatsuo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster responds behaviorally to sound, gravity, and wind. Johnston’s organ (JO at the antennal base serves as a sensory organ in the fruit fly to detect these mechanosensory stimuli. Among the five anatomically defined subgroups of sensory neurons in JO, subgroups A and B detect sound vibrations and subgroups C and E respond to static deflections, such as gravity and wind. The functions of subgroup-D JO neurons, however, remain unknown. In this study, we used molecular-genetic methods to explore the physiologic properties of subgroup-D JO neurons. Both vibrations and static deflection of the antennal receiver activated subgroup-D JO neurons. This finding clearly revealed that zone D in the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC, the projection target of subgroup-D JO neurons, is a primary center for antennal vibrations and deflection in the fly brain. We anatomically identified two types of interneurons downstream of subgroup-D JO neurons, AMMC LNs and AMMC D1 neurons. AMMC LNs are local neurons whose projections are confined within the AMMC, connecting zones B and D. On the other hand, AMMC D1 neurons have both local dendritic arborizations within the AMMC and descending projections to the thoracic ganglia, suggesting that AMMC D1 neurons are likely to relay information of the antennal movement detected by subgroup-D JO neurons from the AMMC directly to the thorax. Together, these findings provide a neural basis for how JO and its brain targets encode information of complex movements of the fruit fly antenna.

  19. Clustering Multiple Sclerosis Subgroups with Multifractal Methods and Self-Organizing Map Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Yeliz; Cattani, Carlo

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive method to detect chronic nervous system diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In this paper, Brownian motion Hölder regularity functions (polynomial, periodic (sine), exponential) for 2D image, such as multifractal methods were applied to MR brain images, aiming to easily identify distressed regions, in MS patients. With these regions, we have proposed an MS classification based on the multifractal method by using the Self-Organizing Map (SOM) algorithm. Thus, we obtained a cluster analysis by identifying pixels from distressed regions in MR images through multifractal methods and by diagnosing subgroups of MS patients through artificial neural networks.

  20. Fecal metagenomic profiles in subgroups of patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Williams, Brent L; Mishra, Nischay; Che, Xiaoyu; Lee, Bohyun; Bateman, Lucinda; Klimas, Nancy G; Komaroff, Anthony L; Levine, Susan; Montoya, Jose G; Peterson, Daniel L; Ramanan, Devi; Jain, Komal; Eddy, Meredith L; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W Ian

    2017-04-26

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is characterized by unexplained persistent fatigue, commonly accompanied by cognitive dysfunction, sleeping disturbances, orthostatic intolerance, fever, lymphadenopathy, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The extent to which the gastrointestinal microbiome and peripheral inflammation are associated with ME/CFS remains unclear. We pursued rigorous clinical characterization, fecal bacterial metagenomics, and plasma immune molecule analyses in 50 ME/CFS patients and 50 healthy controls frequency-matched for age, sex, race/ethnicity, geographic site, and season of sampling. Topological analysis revealed associations between IBS co-morbidity, body mass index, fecal bacterial composition, and bacterial metabolic pathways but not plasma immune molecules. IBS co-morbidity was the strongest driving factor in the separation of topological networks based on bacterial profiles and metabolic pathways. Predictive selection models based on bacterial profiles supported findings from topological analyses indicating that ME/CFS subgroups, defined by IBS status, could be distinguished from control subjects with high predictive accuracy. Bacterial taxa predictive of ME/CFS patients with IBS were distinct from taxa associated with ME/CFS patients without IBS. Increased abundance of unclassified Alistipes and decreased Faecalibacterium emerged as the top biomarkers of ME/CFS with IBS; while increased unclassified Bacteroides abundance and decreased Bacteroides vulgatus were the top biomarkers of ME/CFS without IBS. Despite findings of differences in bacterial taxa and metabolic pathways defining ME/CFS subgroups, decreased metabolic pathways associated with unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis and increased atrazine degradation pathways were independent of IBS co-morbidity. Increased vitamin B6 biosynthesis/salvage and pyrimidine ribonucleoside degradation were the top metabolic pathways in ME/CFS without IBS as well as in the

  1. Tailoring the implementation of new biomarkers based on their added predictive value in subgroups of individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A van Giessen

    Full Text Available The value of new biomarkers or imaging tests, when added to a prediction model, is currently evaluated using reclassification measures, such as the net reclassification improvement (NRI. However, these measures only provide an estimate of improved reclassification at population level. We present a straightforward approach to characterize subgroups of reclassified individuals in order to tailor implementation of a new prediction model to individuals expected to benefit from it.In a large Dutch population cohort (n = 21,992 we classified individuals to low (< 5% and high (≥ 5% fatal cardiovascular disease risk by the Framingham risk score (FRS and reclassified them based on the systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE. Subsequently, we characterized the reclassified individuals and, in case of heterogeneity, applied cluster analysis to identify and characterize subgroups. These characterizations were used to select individuals expected to benefit from implementation of SCORE.Reclassification after applying SCORE in all individuals resulted in an NRI of 5.00% (95% CI [-0.53%; 11.50%] within the events, 0.06% (95% CI [-0.08%; 0.22%] within the nonevents, and a total NRI of 0.051 (95% CI [-0.004; 0.116]. Among the correctly downward reclassified individuals cluster analysis identified three subgroups. Using the characterizations of the typically correctly reclassified individuals, implementing SCORE only in individuals expected to benefit (n = 2,707,12.3% improved the NRI to 5.32% (95% CI [-0.13%; 12.06%] within the events, 0.24% (95% CI [0.10%; 0.36%] within the nonevents, and a total NRI of 0.055 (95% CI [0.001; 0.123]. Overall, the risk levels for individuals reclassified by tailored implementation of SCORE were more accurate.In our empirical example the presented approach successfully characterized subgroups of reclassified individuals that could be used to improve reclassification and reduce implementation burden. In particular when newly

  2. Exhaled nitric oxide measure using multiple flows in clinically relevant subgroups of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, Nassim Bazeghi; Gerds, Thomas A; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2011-01-01

    Although there is widespread interest in fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) as a non-invasive, time and cost effective biomarker for assessing airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), its usefulness is still controversial. We examined the FeNO levels in clinically...... (Caw). All patients had spirometry, assessment of symptoms with questionnaires and low-dose CT scan as well as assessment of weight and body composition. We examined the following subgroups of COPD: Patients with 1) Severe emphysema, 2) Chronic bronchitis, 3) Frequent exacerbations, 4) Loss of lean...

  3. Pain rating schema: three distinct subgroups of individuals emerge when rating mild, moderate, and severe pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey-Law LA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura A Frey-Law,1 Jennifer E Lee,2,3 Alex M Wittry,4 Myles Melyon5 1Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2Mount Mercy University, Department of Psychology, Cedar Rapids, IA, USA; ³College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA; 5Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, USA Background: While the validity of pain assessment has been well documented, the underlying schema (ie, organized, preconceived ideas of how individuals interpret numerical pain ratings is not well understood. This study's objectives were to examine numerical pain intensity ratings, from (0 to 10 cm on the visual analog scale [VAS] across multiple severities of commonly experienced acute pain conditions to determine whether the ratings differed between these pain conditions and/or between individuals. Methods: A community sample (N=365, 66% female rated their anticipated pain intensity (VAS for threshold, mild, moderate, severe, and tolerance level, using several common pain conditions: headache, toothache, joint injury, delayed-onset muscle soreness, burns, and “general pain.” Results: Cluster analysis revealed three subgroups of individuals, suggesting three types of underlying pain rating schema: 1 Low Rating subgroup (low VAS pain intensity ratings across all the pain severity categories; 2 Low/High Rating subgroup (low VAS pain intensity rating for mild, but high VAS pain intensity rating for severe pain; and 3 High Rating subgroup (high VAS pain intensity ratings across all the pain severity categories. Overall, differences between pain conditions were small: muscle soreness pain intensity was consistently rated lower than the other pain types across severities. The highest pain ratings varied between joint injury and general pain, depending on severity level. No effects of sex or current experience of pain

  4. Standard deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Did you know that having a messy room will make you racist? Or that human beings possess the ability to postpone death until after important ceremonial occasions? Or that people live three to five years longer if they have positive initials, like ACE? All of these ‘facts' have been argued with a straight face by researchers and backed up with reams of data and convincing statistics.As Nobel Prize-winning economist Ronald Coase once cynically observed, ‘If you torture data long enough, it will confess.' Lying with statistics is a time-honoured con. In Standard Deviations, ec

  5. Commognitive analysis of undergraduate mathematics students' first encounter with the subgroup test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Marios

    2017-08-01

    This study analyses learning aspects of undergraduate mathematics students' first encounter with the subgroup test, using the commognitive theoretical framework. It focuses on students' difficulties as these are related to the object-level and metalevel mathematical learning in group theory, and, when possible, highlights any commognitive conflicts. In the data analysis, one can identify three types of difficulties, relevant to object-level learning: namely regarding the frequently observed confusion between groups and sets, the object-level rules of visual mediators, and the object-level rules of contextual notions, such as permutations, exponentials, sets and matrices. In addition, data analysis suggests two types of difficulties, relevant to metalevel learning. The first refers to the actual proof that the three conditions of subgroup test hold, and the second is related to syntactic inaccuracies, incomplete argumentation and problematic use of visual mediators. Finally, this study suggests that there are clear links between object-level and metalevel learning, mainly due to the fact that objectification of the various relevant mathematical notions influences the endorsement of the governing metarules.

  6. Subgroup variations in bone mineral density response to zoledronic acid after hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaziner, Jay S; Orwig, Denise L; Lyles, Kenneth W; Nordsletten, Lars; Boonen, Steven; Adachi, Jonathan D; Recknor, Chris; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Mesenbrink, Peter; Bucci-Rechtweg, Christina; Su, Guoqin; Johnson, Rasheeda; Pieper, Carl F

    2014-12-01

    Minimizing post-fracture bone loss is an important aspect of recovery from hip fracture, and determination of factors that affect bone mineral density (BMD) response to treatment after hip fracture may assist in the development of targeted therapeutic interventions. A post hoc analysis of the HORIZON Recurrent Fracture Trial was done to determine the effect of zoledronic acid (ZOL) on total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN) BMD in subgroups with low-trauma hip fracture. A total of 2127 patients were randomized (1:1) to yearly infusions of ZOL 5 mg (n = 1065) or placebo (n = 1062) within 90 days of operation for low-trauma hip fracture. The 1486 patients with a baseline and at least one post-baseline BMD assessment at TH or FN (ZOL = 745, placebo = 741) were included in the analyses. Percentage change from baseline in TH and FN BMD was assessed at months 12 and 24 and compared across subgroups of hip fracture patients. Percentage change from baseline in TH and FN BMD at months 12 and 24 was greater (p 6 weeks post-surgery; and for TH and FN BMD in patients with a history of one or more prior fractures. All interactions were limited to the first 12 months after treatment with none observed for the 24-month comparisons. (Clinical trial registration number NCT00046254.) © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  7. Subgrouping siblings of people with autism: Identifying the broader autism phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Carrie; Smith, Paula; Watson, Peter; Auyeung, Bonnie; Ring, Howard; Baron‐Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the broader autism phenotype (BAP) in siblings of individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC). Autistic traits were measured in typical controls (n = 2,000), siblings (n = 496), and volunteers with ASC (n = 2,322) using the Autism‐Spectrum Quotient (AQ), both self‐report and parent‐report versions. Using cluster analysis of AQ subscale scores, two sibling subgroups were identified for both males and females: a cluster of low‐scorers and a cluster of high‐scorers. Results show that while siblings as a group have intermediate levels of autistic traits compared to control individuals and participants with ASC, when examined on a cluster level, the low‐scoring sibling group is more similar to typical controls while the high‐scoring group is more similar to the ASC clinical group. Further investigation into the underlying genetic and epigenetic characteristics of these two subgroups will be informative in understanding autistic traits, both within the general population and in relation to those with a clinical diagnosis. Autism Res 2016, 9: 658–665. © 2015 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Autism Research PMID:26332889

  8. A novel subgroup 16SrVII-D phytoplasma identified in association with Erigeron witches' broom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flôres, Daniela; Amaral Mello, Ana Paula de Oliveira; Pereira, Thays Benites Camargo; Rezende, Jorge Alberto Marques; Bedendo, Ivan Paulo

    2015-08-01

    Erigeron sp. plants showing symptoms of witches' broom and stunting were found near orchards of passion fruit in São Paulo state, Brazil. These symptoms were indicative of infection by phytoplasmas. Thus, the aim of this study was to detect and identify possible phytoplasmas associated with diseased plants. Total DNA was extracted from symptomatic and asymptomatic plants and used in nested PCR conducted with the primer pairs P1/Tint and R16F2n/16R2. Amplification of genomic fragments of 1.2 kb from the 16S rRNA gene confirmed the presence of phytoplasma in all symptomatic samples. The sequence identity scores between the 16S rRNA gene of the phytoplasma strain identified in the current study and those of previously reported 'Candidatus Phytoplasma fraxini'-related strains ranged from 98% to 99% indicating the phytoplasma to be a strain affiliated with 'Candidatus Phytoplasma fraxini'. The results from a phylogenetic analysis and virtual RFLP analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence with 17 restriction enzymes revealed that the phytoplasma strain belongs to the ash yellows phytoplasma group (16SrVII); the similarity coefficient of RFLP patterns further suggested that the phytoplasma represents a novel subgroup, designated 16SrVII-D. The representative of this new subgroup was named EboWB phytoplasma (Erigeron bonariensis Witches' Broom).

  9. Ranibizumab in Myopic Choroidal Neovascularization: A Subgroup Analysis by Ethnicity, Age, and Ocular Characteristics in RADIANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Frank G; Tufail, Adnan; Leveziel, Nicolas; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Lanzetta, Paolo; Wong, Tien Y; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chen, You Xin; Heinrichs, Nikol; Pilz, Stefan; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of ethnicity, age, and ocular characteristics on ranibizumab efficacy in myopic choroidal neovascularization (CNV). In this post hoc subgroup analysis from the phase III RADIANCE study, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) outcomes and treatment exposure were analyzed in 105 patients treated with ranibizumab 0.5 mg. Baseline categories included ethnicity, age, baseline BCVA, lesion area, CNV lesion area, refraction sphere, axial length, subretinal fluid, and location of CNV. At month 12, the mean change in BCVA was numerically higher in East-Asians than in Caucasians (17.0 vs. 14.1 letters). The median number of injections varied with ethnicity (East-Asians vs. Caucasians: 2 vs. 3), baseline BCVA (highest vs. lowest: 1 vs. 4), CNV lesion area and lesion area (largest vs. smallest: 5 vs. 1 and 5 vs. 2). East-Asians showed numerically higher BCVA gains than Caucasians. The number of injections varied across subgroups, emphasizing the need for individualized treatment. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Bayesian additive decision trees of biomarker by treatment interactions for predictive biomarker detection and subgroup identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Zheng, Wei; Zhuo, Daisy Y; Lu, Yuefeng; Ma, Xiwen; Liu, Hengchang; Zeng, Zhen; Laird, Glen

    2017-10-11

    Personalized medicine, or tailored therapy, has been an active and important topic in recent medical research. Many methods have been proposed in the literature for predictive biomarker detection and subgroup identification. In this article, we propose a novel decision tree-based approach applicable in randomized clinical trials. We model the prognostic effects of the biomarkers using additive regression trees and the biomarker-by-treatment effect using a single regression tree. Bayesian approach is utilized to periodically revise the split variables and the split rules of the decision trees, which provides a better overall fitting. Gibbs sampler is implemented in the MCMC procedure, which updates the prognostic trees and the interaction tree separately. We use the posterior distribution of the interaction tree to construct the predictive scores of the biomarkers and to identify the subgroup where the treatment is superior to the control. Numerical simulations show that our proposed method performs well under various settings comparing to existing methods. We also demonstrate an application of our method in a real clinical trial.

  11. An observation on inappropriate probiotic subgroup classifications in the meta-analysis by Lau and Chamberlain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McFarl

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lynne V McFarland Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA I read with great interest the systematic review of meta-analysis assessing probiotics for the prevention of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD published in the International Journal of General Medicine. These authors pooled 26 randomized controlled trials (RCTs and concluded that Lactobacilli, mixtures, and Saccharomyces probiotics were effective in preventing CDAD. However, the meta-analysis by Lau and Chamberlain is flawed due to improper classification by the types of probiotics. It is important to recognize that the efficacy of probiotics for various diseases has been shown to be strain specific for each probiotic product, and thus the data should only be pooled for probiotics that are of the identical type. In their analysis of probiotic subgroups by various species, the authors have inappropriately merged different types of Lactobacilli into one subgroup “Lactobacilli” and different types of mixtures into one group classified as “Mix”.View the original paper by Lau and Chamberlain. 

  12. Sinaloa Tomato Leaf Curl Geminivirus: Biological and Molecular Evidence for a New Subgroup III Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, A M; Brown, J K

    1998-07-01

    ABSTRACT The biological and molecular properties of Sinaloa tomato leaf curl virus (STLCV) were investigated in line with the hypothesis that STLCV is a previously uncharacterized, whitefly-transmitted geminivirus from North America. STLCV causes yellow leaf curl symptoms in tomato and yellow-green foliar mottle in pepper. Five species belonging to two plant families were STLCV experimental hosts. STLCV had a persistent relationship with its whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci. Polymerase chain reaction fragments of STLCV common region (CR) sequences of the A or B genomic components and the viral coat protein gene (AV1) were molecularly cloned and sequenced. The STLCV A- and B-component CR sequences (174 nucleotides each) shared 97.9% identity and contained identical cis elements putatively involved in transcriptional regulation and an origin of replication (the AC cleavage site within the loop of the hairpin structure and two direct repeat sequences thought to constitute the Rep binding motif), which collectively are diagnostic for subgroup III geminiviruses. The STLCV CR sequence shared 23.1 to 77.6% identity with CR sequences of representative geminiviridae, indicating the STLCV CR sequence is unique. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of CR or AV1 sequences of STLCV and the respective sequences of 31 familial members supported the placement of STLCV as a unique bipartite, subgroup III virus most closely related to other viruses from the Western Hemisphere. STLCV is provisionally described as a new species within the genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae.

  13. Different outcomes in subgroups of patients with long-term musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Sture Skouen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Former studies have questioned the effectiveness of multidisciplinary rehabilitation for working-age adults with musculoskeletal pain problems. The lack of analysis within subgroups may explain why an effect of treatment of long-term musculoskeletal pain was not documented in former studies. In this article three later studies on long-term musculoskeletal pain patients are presented. The challenge of these studies was to identify subgroups of patients who benefit from different types of treatments. This article present the main findings of a large RCT with up till 54 months of follow-up among 664 persons sicklisted for musculoskeletal pain. It was hypothesised that different categories of patients need different treatment programs in order to get back to work. Patients with different prognoses for return to work were identified by means of a screening instrument, and it was tested whether those with poor prognosis need more extensive multidisciplinary treatment, compared to patients with less psychosocial and physical problems. Also, the effect of different treatment programs among patients with different diagnoses (ICD-9, low back pain and chronic widespread pain and among men and women was examined. The results of the three studies support the authors’ hypothesis that different categories of patients need different treatment programs. A higher percentage of return to work was demonstrated when the right treatment was given to the right patient, and considerable cost effectiveness was demonstrated

  14. Depressed serum IgM levels in SLE are restricted to defined subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönwall, Caroline; Hardt, Uta; Gustafsson, Johanna T; Elvin, Kerstin; Jensen-Urstad, Kerstin; Kvarnström, Marika; Grosso, Giorgia; Rönnelid, Johan; Padykov, Leonid; Gunnarsson, Iva; Silverman, Gregg J; Svenungsson, Elisabet

    2017-09-15

    Natural IgM autoantibodies have been proposed to convey protection from autoimmune pathogenesis. Herein, we investigated the IgM responses in 396 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, divided into subgroups based on distinct autoantibody profiles. Depressed IgM levels were more common in SLE than in matched population controls. Strikingly, an autoreactivity profile defined by IgG anti-Ro/La was associated with reduced levels of specific natural IgM targeting phosphorylcholine (PC) antigens and malondialdehyde (MDA) modified-protein, as well as total IgM, while no differences were detected in SLE patients with an autoreactivity profile defined by anti-cardiolipin/β2glycoprotein-I. We also observed an association of reduced IgM levels with the HLA-DRB1*03 allelic variant among SLE patients and controls. Associations of low IgM anti-PC with cardiovascular disease were primarily found in patients without antiphospholipid antibodies. These studies further highlight the clinical relevance of depressed IgM. Our results suggest that low IgM levels in SLE patients reflect immunological and genetic differences between SLE subgroups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy in histopathological subgroups of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, Milan; Dezortova, Monika [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic); Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir [Charles University, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Marusic, Petr; Tomasek, Martin; Krijtova, Hana [Charles University, Department of Neurology, Prague (Czech Republic); Zamecnik, Josef [Charles University, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Kyncl, Martin [Charles University, Department of Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-02-15

    The aim of the study was to analyze the lateralizing value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) in histopathologically different subgroups of mesial temporal lobe epilepsies (MTLE) and to correlate results with clinical, MRI and seizure outcome data. A group of 35 patients who underwent resective epilepsy surgery was retrospectively studied. Hippocampal {sup 1}H MR spectra were evaluated. Metabolite concentrations were obtained using LCModel and NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, NAA/(Cr+Cho), Cho/Cr ratios and coefficients of asymmetry were calculated. MRI correctly lateralized 89% of subjects and {sup 1}H MRS 83%. MRI together with {sup 1}H MRS correctly lateralized 100% of patients. Nineteen subjects had 'classical' hippocampal sclerosis (HS), whereas the remaining 16 patients had 'mild' HS. Nineteen patients had histopathologically proven malformation of cortical development (MCD) in the temporal pole; 16 subjects had only HS. No difference in {sup 1}H MRS findings was found between patients in different histopathological subgroups of MTLE. Our results support the hypothesis that {sup 1}H MRS abnormalities do not directly reflect histopathological changes in MTLE patients. Subjects with non-lateralized {sup 1}H MRS abnormalities did not have a worse postoperative seizure outcome. We found no significant impact of contralateral {sup 1}H MRS abnormality on post-surgical seizure outcome. (orig.)

  16. Subgroups of Paediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Might Differ Significantly in Genetic Predisposition to Asparaginase Hypersensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nóra Kutszegi

    Full Text Available L-asparaginase (ASP is a key element in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. However, hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs to ASP are major challenges in paediatric patients. Our aim was to investigate genetic variants that may influence the risk to Escherichia coli-derived ASP hypersensitivity. Sample and clinical data collection was carried out from 576 paediatric ALL patients who were treated according to protocols from the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Study Group. A total of 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in GRIA1 and GALNT10 genes were genotyped. Patients with GRIA1 rs4958351 AA/AG genotype showed significantly reduced risk to ASP hypersensitivity compared to patients with GG genotype in the T-cell ALL subgroup (OR = 0.05 (0.01-0.26; p = 4.70E-04, while no such association was found in pre-B-cell ALL. In the medium risk group two SNPs of GRIA1 (rs2055083 and rs707176 were associated significantly with the occurrence of ASP hypersensitivity (OR = 0.21 (0.09-0.53; p = 8.48E-04 and OR = 3.02 (1.36-6.73; p = 6.76E-03, respectively. Evaluating the genders separately, however, the association of rs707176 with ASP HSRs was confined only to females. Our results suggest that genetic variants of GRIA1 might influence the risk to ASP hypersensitivity, but subgroups of patients can differ significantly in this respect.

  17. The Effect of Parkinson's Disease Subgroups on Verbal and Nonverbal Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaywant, Abhishek; Musto, Giovanni; Neargarder, Sandy; Gilbert, Karina Stavitsky; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease (PD) leads to deficits in executive function, including verbal and nonverbal fluency, as a result of compromised fronto-striatal circuits. It is unknown whether deficits in verbal and nonverbal fluency in PD are driven by certain subgroups of patients, or how strategy use may facilitate performance. Participants Sixty-five non-demented individuals with PD, including 36 with right-body onset (RPD; 20 with tremor as their initial symptom, 16 non-tremor) and 29 with left-body onset (LPD; 14 with tremor as their initial symptom, 15 non-tremor), and 52 normal control participants (NC). Measurements Verbal fluency was assessed using the FAS and Animals tests. Nonverbal fluency was assessed using the Ruff Figural Fluency Test. Results Both RPD and LPD were impaired in generating words and in using clustering and switching strategies on phonemic verbal fluency, whereas different patterns of impairment were found on nonverbal fluency depending on the interaction of side of onset and initial motor symptom (tremor vs. non-tremor). Strategy use correlated with number of correct responses on verbal fluency in LPD, RPD, and NC. By contrast, on nonverbal fluency, strategy use correlated with correct responses for RPD and LPD, but not for NC. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate the importance of considering subgroups in PD and analyzing subcomponents of verbal and nonverbal fluency (correct responses, errors, and strategies), which may depend differently on the integrity of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex. PMID:24533593

  18. Distinct neuropsychological subgroups in typically developing youth inform heterogeneity in children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Damien A; Bathula, Deepti; Nikolas, Molly A; Nigg, Joel T

    2012-04-24

    Research and clinical investigations in psychiatry largely rely on the de facto assumption that the diagnostic categories identified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) represent homogeneous syndromes. However, the mechanistic heterogeneity that potentially underlies the existing classification scheme might limit discovery of etiology for most developmental psychiatric disorders. Another, perhaps less palpable, reality may also be interfering with progress-heterogeneity in typically developing populations. In this report we attempt to clarify neuropsychological heterogeneity in a large dataset of typically developing youth and youth with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), using graph theory and community detection. We sought to determine whether data-driven neuropsychological subtypes could be discerned in children with and without the disorder. Because individual classification is the sine qua non for eventual clinical translation, we also apply support vector machine-based multivariate pattern analysis to identify how well ADHD status in individual children can be identified as defined by the community detection delineated subtypes. The analysis yielded several unique, but similar subtypes across both populations. Just as importantly, comparing typically developing children with ADHD children within each of these distinct subgroups increased diagnostic accuracy. Two important principles were identified that have the potential to advance our understanding of typical development and developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. The first tenet suggests that typically developing children can be classified into distinct neuropsychological subgroups with high precision. The second tenet proposes that some of the heterogeneity in individuals with ADHD might be "nested" in this normal variation.

  19. Tailoring the implementation of new biomarkers based on their added predictive value in subgroups of individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Giessen, A; Moons, K G M; de Wit, G A; Verschuren, W M M; Boer, J M A; Koffijberg, H

    2015-01-01

    The value of new biomarkers or imaging tests, when added to a prediction model, is currently evaluated using reclassification measures, such as the net reclassification improvement (NRI). However, these measures only provide an estimate of improved reclassification at population level. We present a straightforward approach to characterize subgroups of reclassified individuals in order to tailor implementation of a new prediction model to individuals expected to benefit from it. In a large Dutch population cohort (n = 21,992) we classified individuals to low (improved the NRI to 5.32% (95% CI [-0.13%; 12.06%]) within the events, 0.24% (95% CI [0.10%; 0.36%]) within the nonevents, and a total NRI of 0.055 (95% CI [0.001; 0.123]). Overall, the risk levels for individuals reclassified by tailored implementation of SCORE were more accurate. In our empirical example the presented approach successfully characterized subgroups of reclassified individuals that could be used to improve reclassification and reduce implementation burden. In particular when newly added biomarkers or imaging tests are costly or burdensome such a tailored implementation strategy may save resources and improve (cost-)effectiveness.

  20. The Colony meteorite and the possible existence of a new chemical subgroup of CO3 chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, A. E.; James, J. A.; Keck, B. D.; Weeks, K. S.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1984-01-01

    The Colony meteorite, found in Oklahoma around 1975, has an unrecrystallized texture and contains heterogeneous olivine and low Ca pyroxene, kamacite with low Ni and Co and high Cr, amoeboid inclusions with low FeO and MnO, and numerous small chondrules with clear pink glass. These characteristics are shared by members of the least metamorphosed subgroup of CO3 chondrites. Colony contains a fine grained matrix that has higher FeO and K2O and lower MgO and Na2O than normal CO3 matrices. Allan Hills A77307 is another unmetamorphosed meteorite that has many petrologic similarities to normal CO chondrites, including matrix abundance, mineral compositions and chondrule size. However, it differs from them in its abundance of magnetite and presence of iron carbides. The olivine and low Ca pyroxene compositional distributions of Colony and A77307 are very similar. The shapes of the thermoluminescence glow curves of Colony and A77307 are very similar, but differ significantly from those of normal CO chondrites. It is suggested that Colony and A77307 represent a distinct chemical subgroup of CO3 chondrites, characterized by low Ni, Co, S, Ca, Mg, Mn and, possibly, high Cd.

  1. Blocking and binding folate receptor alpha autoantibodies identify novel autism spectrum disorder subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eugene Frye

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Folate receptor α (FRα autoantibodies (FRAAs are prevalent in autism spectrum disorder (ASD. They disrupt the transportation of folate across the blood-brain barrier by binding to the FRα. Children with ASD with FRAAs have been reported to respond well to treatment with a form of folate known as folinic acid, suggesting that they may be an important ASD subgroup to identify and treat. There has been no investigation of whether they manifest unique behavioral and physiological characteristics. Thus, in this study we measured both blocking and binding FRAAs, physiological measurements including indices of redox and methylation metabolism and inflammation as well as serum folate and B12 concentrations and measurements of development and behavior in 94 children with ASD. Children positive for the binding FRAA were found to have higher serum B12 levels as compared to those negative for binding FRAAs while children positive for the blocking FRAA were found to have relatively better redox metabolism and inflammation markers as compared to those negative for blocking FRAAs. In addition, ASD children positive for the blocking FRAA demonstrated better communication on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, stereotyped behavior on the Aberrant Behavioral Checklist and Mannerisms on the Social Responsiveness Scale. This study suggests that FRAAs are associated with specific physiological and behavioral characteristics in children with ASD and provides support for the notion that these biomarkers may be useful for subgrouping children with ASD, especially with respect to targeted treatments.

  2. Dynamic expression of the TRPM subgroup of ion channels in developing mouse sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staaf, Susanne; Franck, Marina C M; Marmigère, Frédéric; Mattsson, Jan P; Ernfors, Patrik

    2010-01-01

    Despite the significance of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in sensory physiology, little is known of the expression and developmental regulation of the TRPM (melastatin) subgroup in sensory neurons. In order to find out if the eight TRPM subgroup members (TRPM1-TRPM8) have a possible role in the sensory nervous system, we characterized the developmental regulation of their expression in mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) from embryonic (E) day 12 to adulthood. Transcripts for all channels except for TRPM1 were detected in lumbar and thoracic DRG and in nodose ganglion (NG) with distinguishable expression patterns from E12 until adult. For most channels, the expression increased from E14 to adult with the exception of TRPM5, which displayed transient high levels during embryonic and early postnatal stages. Cellular localization of TRPM8 mRNA was found only in a limited subset of very small diameter neurons distinct in size from other populations. These neurons did not bind isolectin B4 (IB4) and expressed neither the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) nor neurofilament (NF)200. This suggests that TRPM8(+) thermoreceptive sensory neurons fall into a separate group of very small sized neurons distinct from peptidergic and IB4(+) subtypes of sensory neurons. Our results, showing the expression and dynamic regulation of TRPM channels during development, indicate that many TRPM subfamily members could participate during nervous system development and in the adult by determining distinct physiological properties of sensory neurons.

  3. Differential Associations of Religious Involvement with the Mental Health of Asian-American Subgroups: A Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Amy L; Appel, Hoa B; Nicdao, Ethel G

    2016-12-01

    In the USA, Asian-Americans (AA) constitute the fastest growing ethnic minority group, in which heterogeneous religious patterns and acculturation experiences can impose significant impacts on their mental health. Using national data, the present study examined the contributions of religious involvement and social support to self-rated mental health (SRMH) of Chinese, Vietnamese, and Filipinos. Findings demonstrated cross-group variations, with Filipinos reporting the highest levels of SRMH, acculturation, and discrimination. However, religious involvement was associated with better SRMH in the least religious Chinese subgroup but not in the most religious Filipino subgroup. Social support predicted SRMH for both Chinese and Vietnamese subgroups. The differential religious patterns in the more acculturated generations between the two AA subgroups suggest religious assimilation as part of their acculturation in the context of divergent immigration experiences.

  4. MORS Workshop - Chem-Bio WMD: Understanding the Problem, Operations Analysis Working Group, Low Spectrum Conflict Subgroup

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andreozzi, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the insights developed by the Low Spectrum Conflict Subgroup of the Operations Analysis Working Group at the 30 January - 1 February 2001 Military Operations Research Society (MORS...

  5. Standardization work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    For several years now, the main civil aircraft manufacturers (Airbus and its partners, Boeing, Fokker, McDonnell Douglas) have been working jointly on the writing of technical recommendations and the drawing up of an international standard. This work concerns the evaluation of the processes and products used to strip aeronautical paint systems. This procedure was initiated on request from the main airlines. In effect, the airlines are faced with situations in which the financial and operational objectives are becoming increasingly important. The need was felt to rationalize and, if possible, harmonize the criteria and technical requirements of the various civil aircraft manufacturers in order to facilitate in-service maintenance of the fleets of airlines operating Airbus, Boeing, Douglas aircraft, etc.

  6. Mixture model analysis identifies irritable bowel syndrome subgroups characterised by specific profiles of gastrointestinal, extraintestinal somatic and psychological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polster, A; Van Oudenhove, L; Jones, M; Öhman, L; Törnblom, H; Simrén, M

    2017-09-01

    Current subgrouping of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is exclusively based on stool consistency without considering other relevant gastrointestinal (GI), extraintestinal somatic or psychological features. To identify subgroups based on a comprehensive set of IBS-related parameters. Mixture model analysis was used, with the following input variables: 13 single-item scores from the IBS-specific Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale, average stool consistency and frequency from a 7-day Bristol Stool Form diary, 12 single-item extraintestinal symptom scores from the Patient Health Questionnaire-12, and anxiety and depression subscale scores from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. The resulting latent subgroups were compared regarding symptom profiles using analysis of variance followed by pair-wise comparisons. One hundred and seventy-two IBS patients (Rome III; 69% female; mean age 33.7 [range 18-60] years) were included. The optimal subgrouping showed six latent groups, characterised by: (I) constipation with low comorbidities, (II) constipation with high comorbidities, (III) diarrhoea with low comorbidities, (IV) diarrhoea and pain with high comorbidities, (V) mixed GI symptoms with high comorbidities, (VI) a mix of symptoms with overall mild severity. The subgroups showed differences in the distribution of Rome III-subtypes, IBS severity, presence of anxiety and depression, and gender, but not regarding age, IBS duration or reported post-infectious onset of IBS. This model-based subgrouping of IBS partly supports the distinction of subgroups based on bowel habits, but additionally distinguishes subgroups with or without co-morbid extraintestinal somatic and psychological symptoms. The resulting groups show specific profiles of symptom combinations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The effect of active video games by ethnicity, sex and fitness: subgroup analysis from a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Louise; Jiang, Yannan; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Jull, Andrew; Prapavessis, Harry; Rodgers,Anthony; Maddison, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevention and treatment of childhood obesity is a key public health challenge. However, certain groups within populations have markedly different risk profiles for obesity and related health behaviours. Well-designed subgroup analysis can identify potential differential effects of obesity interventions, which may be important for reducing health inequalities. The study aim was to evaluate the consistency of the effects of active video games across important subgroups in a rand...

  8. Origins and biogeography of the Anolis crassulus subgroup (Squamata: Dactyloidae) in the highlands of Nuclear Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Erich P; Townsend, Josiah H

    2017-12-21

    Recent studies have begun to reveal the complex evolutionary and biogeographic histories of mainland anoles in Central America, but the origins and relationships of many taxa remain poorly understood. One such group is the Anolis (Norops) crassulus species subgroup, which contains ten morphologically similar highland taxa, the majority of which have restricted distributions. The nominal taxon A. crassulus has a disjunct distribution from Chiapas, Mexico, through Guatemala, in the highlands of El Salvador, and in the Chortís Highlands of Honduras. We test the relationships of these species using multiple mitochondrial and nuclear loci in concatenated and multispecies coalescent frameworks, in an effort to both resolve long-standing taxonomic confusion and present new insights into the evolution and biogeography of these taxa. Sequences of multiple mitochondrial and nuclear loci were generated for eight of the ten species of the Anolis crassulus species subgroup. We analyzed phylogenetic relationships and estimated divergence times and ancestral ranges of the subgroup, recovering a monophyletic subgroup within Anolis. Within the nominal taxon Anolis crassulus, we recovered multiple genetically distinct lineages corresponding to allopatric populations, and show that the Chortís Highland lineage split from the others over 13 MYA. Additionally, distinct mitochondrial lineages are present within the taxa A. heteropholidotus and A. morazani, and importantly, samples of A. crassulus and A. sminthus previously used in major anole phylogenetic analyses are not recovered as conspecific with those taxa. We infer a Chortís Highland origin for the ancestor of this subgroup, and estimate cladogenesis of this subgroup began approximately 22 MYA. Our results provide new insights into the evolution, biogeography, and timing of diversification of the Anolis crassulus species subgroup. The disjunctly distributed Anolis crassulus sensu lato represents several morphologically

  9. Comparing a stratified treatment strategy with the standard treatment in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Hong; Bretz, Frank; Gerke, Oke

    2016-01-01

    The increasing emergence of predictive markers for different treatments in the same patient population allows us to define stratified treatment strategies. We consider randomized clinical trials that compare a standard treatment with a new stratified treatment strategy that divides the study...... population into subgroups receiving different treatments. Because the new strategy may not be beneficial in all subgroups, we consider in this paper an intermediate approach that establishes a treatment effect in a subset of patients built by joining several subgroups. The approach is based on the simple...

  10. An Investigation on Elementary School Students' Level of Math Learning, Using Math E-Books (A Case Study: Pishtazan Computer Primary School, 4th Zone of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Naseri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the focus on technology exists in all schools and classes, teachers need to know how to apply it in their teaching practices. The use of ICT in education is an undeniable necessity. Since the use of information and communication technology can smooth the paths of teaching-learning process for students, the researchers in this study tried to apply one of the information and communication technology tools, called electronic books (E-books in teaching math. The aim of this study is to examine elementary school students' level of math learning, using math e-books with the focus on teaching multiplication (Case Study: Pishtazan computer primary school, the 4th zone of Tehran. Using a quasi-experimental study, 61 third grade students from two primary schools for girls located in the 4th education zone of Tehran were selected. Math tests were used to collect data. Using T-test for independent samples, the results showed that level of math learning was higher in the students who have been trained with the help of e-book, compared to the students who have been trained through traditional teaching method.

  11. Spatial analysis of air pollution and childhood asthma in Hamilton, Canada: comparing exposure methods in sensitive subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arain Altaf

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in air pollution exposure within a community may be associated with asthma prevalence. However, studies conducted to date have produced inconsistent results, possibly due to errors in measurement of the exposures. Methods A standardized asthma survey was administered to children in grades one and eight in Hamilton, Canada, in 1994–95 (N ~1467. Exposure to air pollution was estimated in four ways: (1 distance from roadways; (2 interpolated surfaces for ozone, sulfur dioxide, particulate matter and nitrous oxides from seven to nine governmental monitoring stations; (3 a kriged nitrogen dioxide (NO2 surface based on a network of 100 passive NO2 monitors; and (4 a land use regression (LUR model derived from the same monitoring network. Logistic regressions were used to test associations between asthma and air pollution, controlling for variables including neighbourhood income, dwelling value, state of housing, a deprivation index and smoking. Results There were no significant associations between any of the exposure estimates and asthma in the whole population, but large effects were detected the subgroup of children without hayfever (predominately in girls. The most robust effects were observed for the association of asthma without hayfever and NO2LUR OR = 1.86 (95%CI, 1.59–2.16 in all girls and OR = 2.98 (95%CI, 0.98–9.06 for older girls, over an interquartile range increase and controlling for confounders. Conclusion Our findings indicate that traffic-related pollutants, such as NO2, are associated with asthma without overt evidence of other atopic disorders among female children living in a medium-sized Canadian city. The effects were sensitive to the method of exposure estimation. More refined exposure models produced the most robust associations.

  12. Specific autoantibody profiles and disease subgroups correlate with circulating micro-RNA in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttge, Dirk M; Carlsen, Anting Liu; Teku, Gabriel; Steen, Samantha O; Wildt, Marie; Vihinen, Mauno; Hesselstrand, Roger; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the expression profiles of cell-free plasma miRNAs in SSc and to characterize their correlation with disease subgroups (lcSSc and dcSSc) and with autoantibody profiles. Using quantitative RT-PCR, the abundance of 45 mature miRNAs in plasma was determined in 95 patients (lcSSc = 63; dcSSc = 32), representing the following autoantibody subgroups: ACA, anti-DNA topoisomerase I, anti-RNA polymerase III and anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein. MiRNA data were correlated with clinical and paraclinical data. Multiple regression was used to model membership of the lcSSc, dcSSc and autoantibody subgroups, based on miRNA expression profiles. Thirty-six miRNAs were measurable in all samples. Four (miRNA-223, -181b, -342-3p and -184) were differently expressed in lcSSc and dcSSc (false discovery rate < 0.05). Ten miRNAs exhibited statistically significantly different levels in one or more autoantibody groups, and five (miRNA-409, -184, -92a, -29a and -101) remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Multiple regression models accurately predicted ACA and anti-DNA topoisomerase I antibody-positive patients (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.97 and 0.93, respectively) as well as membership of the dcSSc and lcSSc groups (AUC = 0.88). Circulating miRNA profiles differ between lcSSc and dcSSc patients and between patients with different autoantibodies. This is the first time autoantibody profiles, disease phenotypes and plasma miRNA profiles have been shown to correlate in an autoimmune disease. The data support a pathobiological role of miRNAs because specific miRNAs associate with autoantibody profiles of known diagnostic and prognostic value. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Sequence and analysis of a whole genome from Kuwaiti population subgroup of Persian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thareja, Gaurav; John, Sumi Elsa; Hebbar, Prashantha; Behbehani, Kazem; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse; Alsmadi, Osama

    2015-02-18

    The 1000 Genome project paved the way for sequencing diverse human populations. New genome projects are being established to sequence underrepresented populations helping in understanding human genetic diversity. The Kuwait Genome Project an initiative to sequence individual genomes from the three subgroups of Kuwaiti population namely, Saudi Arabian tribe; "tent-dwelling" Bedouin; and Persian, attributing their ancestry to different regions in Arabian Peninsula and to modern-day Iran (West Asia). These subgroups were in line with settlement history and are confirmed by genetic studies. In this work, we report whole genome sequence of a Kuwaiti native from Persian subgroup at >37X coverage. We document 3,573,824 SNPs, 404,090 insertions/deletions, and 11,138 structural variations. Out of the reported SNPs and indels, 85,939 are novel. We identify 295 'loss-of-function' and 2,314 'deleterious' coding variants, some of which carry homozygous genotypes in the sequenced genome; the associated phenotypes include pharmacogenomic traits such as greater triglyceride lowering ability with fenofibrate treatment, and requirement of high warfarin dosage to elicit anticoagulation response. 6,328 non-coding SNPs associate with 811 phenotype traits: in congruence with medical history of the participant for Type 2 diabetes and β-Thalassemia, and of participant's family for migraine, 72 (of 159 known) Type 2 diabetes, 3 (of 4) β-Thalassemia, and 76 (of 169) migraine variants are seen in the genome. Intergenome comparisons based on shared disease-causing variants, positions the sequenced genome between Asian and European genomes in congruence with geographical location of the region. On comparison, bead arrays perform better than sequencing platforms in correctly calling genotypes in low-coverage sequenced genome regions however in the event of novel SNP or indel near genotype calling position can lead to false calls using bead arrays. We report, for the first time, reference

  14. Prevalence and distribution of Gardnerella vaginalis subgroups in women with and without bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulaitiene, Migle; Paliulyte, Virginija; Grinceviciene, Svitrigaile; Zakareviciene, Jolita; Vladisauskiene, Alma; Marcinkute, Agne; Pleckaityte, Milda

    2017-06-05

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of the leading causes of vaginal complaints among women of childbearing age. The role of Gardnerella vaginalis remains controversial due to its presence in healthy and BV-type vaginal microflora. The phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of G. vaginalis suggested the existence of strain variants linked with different health conditions. We sought to analyze prevalence and distribution of G. vaginalis subgroups (clades) in BV-positive (n = 29), partial BV (n = 27), and BV-negative (n = 53) vaginal samples from Lithuanian women. Vaginal samples were characterized by Amsel criteria and the Nugent method. Bacterial signatures characteristic of BV and concomitant infections were identified by culture and PCR. Using singleplex PCR assays, G. vaginalis subgroups were identified in 109 noncultured vaginal specimens by targeting clade-specific genes. Isolated G. vaginalis clinical strains were subtyped and the presence of the sialidase coding gene was detected by PCR. Data analysis was performed using GraphPad Prism statistical software. G. vaginalis was found in 87% of women without BV. Clade 4 was most frequently detected (79.4%), followed by clade 1 (63.7%), clade 2 (42.2%), and clade 3 (15.7%). Multi-clade G. vaginalis communities showed a positive association with Nugent score (NS) ≥ 4 (OR 3.64; 95% CI 1.48-8.91; p = 0.005). Clade 1 and clade 2 were statistically significantly more common in samples with NS 7-10 (OR 4.69; 95% CI 1.38-15.88; p = 0.01 and OR 6.26; 95% CI 2.20-17.81; p ≤ 0.001, respectively). Clade 3 and clade 4 showed no association with high NS (OR 0.88; 95% CI 0.26-3.04; p = 1.00 and OR 1.31; 95% CI 0.39-4.41; p = 0.767, respectively). The gene coding for sialidase was detected in all isolates of clade 1 and clade 2, but not in clade 4 isolates. We showed an association between the microbial state of vaginal microflora and specific subgroups of G. vaginalis, the distribution of which may determine the clinical

  15. Number of patients needed to discriminate between subgroups in patient reported outcome measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Aksel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patient reported outcome-measures (PROs) are increasingly used in orthopedics. Information on number of patients needed in different settings is warranted. Aim: To assess the number of patients needed for different PROs to discriminate between subgroups of age, gender, and diagnosis...... with sample size calculations or by power calculations and simulated ANOVA F tests, depending on the number of groups. Results: To discriminate between gender, the least number needed to find a statistically significant difference in mean sum score in each group was 298 (OHS) while HOOS QoL required the most....... Methods: 5777 primary THA patients, operated 1‐2, 5‐6, and 10‐11 years ago. SF‐12 Health Survey (SF-12), EQ-5D, Oxford 12‐item Hip Score (OHS), and Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) were included. The different PRO subscales abilities to discriminate between groups were studied using...

  16. Identification of a CpG Island Methylator Phenotype that Defines a Distinct Subgroup of Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noushmehr, Houtan; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Diefes, Kristin; Phillips, Heidi S.; Pujara, Kanan; Berman, Benjamin P.; Pan, Fei; Pelloski, Christopher E.; Sulman, Erik P.; Bhat, Krishna P.; Verhaak, Roel G.W.; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Ding, Li; Wilson, Richard K.; Van Den Berg, David; Shen, Hui; Bengtsson, Henrik; Neuvial, Pierre; Cope, Leslie M.; Buckley, Jonathan; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Aldape, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Summary We have profiled promoter DNA methylation alterations in 272 glioblastoma tumors in the context of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We found that a distinct subset of samples displays concerted hypermethylation at a large number of loci, indicating the existence of a glioma-CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (G-CIMP). We validated G-CIMP in a set of non-TCGA glioblastomas and low-grade gliomas. G-CIMP tumors belong to the Proneural subgroup, are more prevalent among low-grade gliomas, display distinct copy-number alterations and are tightly associated with IDH1 somatic mutations. Patients with G-CIMP tumors are younger at the time of diagnosis and experience significantly improved outcome. These findings identify G-CIMP as a distinct subset of human gliomas on molecular and clinical grounds. PMID:20399149

  17. IQ subgroups in relation to neurocognitive profiles, psychopathology and brain volume in first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Høj; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Rostrup, Egill

    Background and Aim: Approximately half of patients with schizophrenia experience a deterioration in IQ before or around illness onset and recent studies have found apositive association between IQ and brain volume in first episode schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to examine the combined...... impact of estimated IQ trajectory and IQ level at illness onset on psychopathology, neurocognitive profiles and brain volume. Materials and methods: The design is a cross-sectional, case-control study of 60 first-episode antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 60 matched healthy controls....... Promorbid IQ was estimated using the Danish Adult Reading Test and current IQ using 4 subtests from Wechsler's Adult Intelligence Scale III. Patients were divided into 4 subgroups based on a combination of both IQ trajectory from premorbid levels (stable vs. deteriorating) and IQ at illness onset (high vs...

  18. Drinfeld Doubles for Finite Subgroups of SU(2 and SU(3 Lie Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Coquereaux

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drinfeld doubles of finite subgroups of SU(2 and SU(3 are investigated in detail. Their modular data – S, T and fusion matrices – are computed explicitly, and illustrated by means of fusion graphs. This allows us to reexamine certain identities on these tensor product or fusion multiplicities under conjugation of representations that had been discussed in our recent paper [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44 (2011, 295208, 26 pages], proved to hold for simple and affine Lie algebras, and found to be generally wrong for finite groups. It is shown here that these identities fail also in general for Drinfeld doubles, indicating that modularity of the fusion category is not the decisive feature. Along the way, we collect many data on these Drinfeld doubles which are interesting for their own sake and maybe also in a relation with the theory of orbifolds in conformal field theory.

  19. When subgroups secede: extending and refining the social psychological model of schism in groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Fabio

    2005-08-01

    This article is about a field study (N=1,080) concerning the secession of a subgroup from the Church of England, and it is aimed at extending and refining the existing social psychological model of schisms in groups. It was found that the first step toward a schism is the belief that the group identity has been subverted. This belief will prompt negative emotions (i.e., dejection and agitation) and decrease both group identification and perceived group entitativity (i.e., cohesion, oneness). In turn, low group entitativity will reduce the level of group identification. Finally, low group identification and high negative emotions will increase schismatic intentions. It is also demonstrated that the negative impact of group identification, and the positive impact of negative emotions, on schismatic intentions is moderated by the perceived ability to voice dissent (i.e., the greater the perceived voice, the weaker the impact).

  20. Subgroup analysis of telehealthcare for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt Udsen, Flemming; Lilholt, Pernille H.; Hejlesen, Ole K.

    2017-01-01

    -to-pay threshold values. The purpose of this article was to assess potential sources of variation across subgroups, which could explain overall cost-effectiveness results or be utilized in future economic studies in telehealthcare research. METHODS: First, the cost-structures and cost-effectiveness across COPD...... investigated post hoc. In analyzing cost-effectiveness, two separate linear mixed-effects models with treatment-by-covariate interactions were applied: one for quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gain and one for total healthcare and social sector costs. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used for each......PURPOSE: Results from the Danish cluster-randomized trial of telehealthcare to 1,225 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the Danish Telecare North Trial, concluded that the telehealthcare solution was unlikely to be cost-effective, by applying international willingness...

  1. Distribution of cytokine gene polymorphisms in six Orang Asli subgroups in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhalifah, Hanim K; Syafawati, Wan U Wan; Che Mat, Nor F; Chambers, Geoffrey K; Edinur, Hisham A

    2016-04-01

    Cytokines are involved in immune responses and the pathogenesis of various diseases. Allelic variations within the genes coding for various ∼30 kDa cytokine protein/glycoproteins have been reported for many populations and have been the subjects of many ancestry and health analyses. In this study, we typed 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 13 cytokine genes of 165 Orang Asli individuals by using sequence specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) assay. The volunteers came from all across the Peninsular of Malaysia and belong to six Orang Asli subgroups; Batek, Kensiu, Lanoh, Che Wong, Semai and Orang Kanaq. Here we report our general findings and original genotype data and their associated analyses (Hardy-Weinberg proportions, estimation of allele and haplotype frequencies) can be found in the supplementary files and will be held at Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 chronic pain patients to assess pressure pain threshold (cPPT), pressure pain tolerance (cPTT), temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to ten repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in c......PPT during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection (HDT) and heat pain thresholds (HPT) at clinical painful and non-painful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM four distinct groups were formed: Group 1 (n=85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 2 (n=148) had...... impaired CPM and normal TSP. Group 3 (n=45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 4 (n=122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions compared with the other three groups (PTSP plays an important role in widespread pain. Group 1...

  3. A Data-Driven Approach to Responder Subgroup Identification after Paired Continuous Theta Burst Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonio Heidegger

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modulation of cortical excitability by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is used for investigating human brain functions. A common observation is the high variability of long-term depression (LTD-like changes in human (motor cortex excitability. This study aimed at analyzing the response subgroup distribution after paired continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS as a basis for subject selection.Methods: The effects of paired cTBS using 80% active motor threshold (AMT in 31 healthy volunteers were assessed at the primary motor cortex (M1 corresponding to the representation of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI muscle of the left hand, before and up to 50 min after plasticity induction. The changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs were analyzed using machine-learning derived methods implemented as Gaussian mixture modeling (GMM and computed ABC analysis.Results: The probability density distribution of the MEP changes from baseline was tri-modal, showing a clear separation at 80.9%. Subjects displaying at least this degree of LTD-like changes were n = 6 responders. By contrast, n = 7 subjects displayed a paradox response with increase in MEP. Reassessment using ABC analysis as alternative approach led to the same n = 6 subjects as a distinct category.Conclusion: Depressive effects of paired cTBS using 80% AMT endure at least 50 min, however, only in a small subgroup of healthy subjects. Hence, plasticity induction by paired cTBS might not reflect a general mechanism in human motor cortex excitability. A mathematically supported criterion is proposed to select responders for enrolment in assessments of human brain functional networks using virtual brain lesions.

  4. Sub-grouping and sub-functionalization of the RIFIN multi-copy protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnhammer Erik L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic protozoans possess many multicopy gene families which have central roles in parasite survival and virulence. The number and variability of members of these gene families often make it difficult to predict possible functions of the encoded proteins. The families of extra-cellular proteins that are exposed to a host immune response have been driven via immune selection to become antigenically variant, and thereby avoid immune recognition while maintaining protein function to establish a chronic infection. Results We have combined phylogenetic and function shift analyses to study the evolution of the RIFIN proteins, which are antigenically variant and are encoded by the largest multicopy gene family in Plasmodium falciparum. We show that this family can be subdivided into two major groups that we named A- and B-RIFIN proteins. This suggested sub-grouping is supported by a recently published study that showed that, despite the presence of the Plasmodium export (PEXEL motif in all RIFIN variants, proteins from each group have different cellular localizations during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite. In the present study we show that function shift analysis, a novel technique to predict functional divergence between sub-groups of a protein family, indicates that RIFINs have undergone neo- or sub-functionalization. Conclusion These results question the general trend of clustering large antigenically variant protein groups into homogenous families. Assigning functions to protein families requires their subdivision into meaningful groups such as we have shown for the RIFIN protein family. Using phylogenetic and function shift analysis methods, we identify new directions for the investigation of this broad and complex group of proteins.

  5. Religious subgroups influencing vaccination coverage in the Dutch Bible belt: an ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knippenberg Hans

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Netherlands has experienced epidemics of vaccine preventable diseases largely confined to the Bible belt, an area where -among others- orthodox protestant groups are living. Lacking information on the vaccination coverage in this minority, and its various subgroups, control of vaccine preventable diseases is focused on the geographical area of the Bible belt. However, the adequacy of this strategy is questionable. This study assesses the influence of presence of various orthodox protestant subgroups (orthodox protestant denominations, OPDs on municipal vaccination coverage in the Bible belt. Methods We performed an ecological study at municipality level. Data on number of inhabitants, urbanization level, socio-economical status, immigration and vaccination coverage were obtained from national databases. As religion is not registered in the Netherlands, membership numbers of the OPDs had to be obtained from church year books and via church offices. For all municipalities in the Netherlands, the effect of presence or absence of OPDs on vaccination coverage was assessed by comparing mean vaccination coverage. For municipalities where OPDs were present, the effect of each of them (measured as membership ratio, the number of members proportional to total number of inhabitants on vaccination coverage was assessed by bivariate correlation and multiple regression analysis in a model containing the determinants immigration, socio-economical status and urbanization as well. Results Mean vaccination coverage (93.5% ± 4.7 in municipalities with OPDs (n = 135 was significantly lower (p Conclusion As variance in municipal vaccination coverage in the Bible belt is largely explained by membership ratios of the various OPDs, control of vaccine preventable diseases should be focused on these specific risk groups. In current policy part of the orthodox protestant risk group is missed.

  6. The role of anger in psychosocial subgrouping for patients with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenzon, Anne N; George, Steven Z; Beneciuk, Jason M; Wandner, Laura D; Torres, Calia; Robinson, Michael E

    2014-06-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common and costly condition that often becomes chronic if not properly addressed. Recent research has shown that psychosocial symptoms can complicate LBP, necessitating more comprehensive screening measures. The present study investigated the role of psychosocial factors, including anger regulation, in pain and disability using a screening measure designed for LBP treated with physical therapy. One hundred three LBP patients initiating physical therapy completed an established screening measure to assess risk for developing chronic pain, and psychosocial measures assessing anger, depression, anxiety, fear-avoidance, and pain-catastrophizing before and after 4 weeks of treatment. Dependent variables were pain intensity, physical impairment, and patient-reported disability. Risk subgrouping based on anger and other psychosocial measures was examined using established screening methods and through using an empirical statistical approach. Analyses revealed that risk subgroups differed according to corresponding levels of negative affect, as opposed to anger alone. General psychosocial distress also predicted disability posttreatment, but, interestingly, did not have a strong relationship to pain. Subsequent hierarchical agglomerative clustering procedures divided patients into overall high-distress and low-distress groups, with follow-up analyses revealing that the high-distress group had higher baseline measures of pain, disability, and impairment. Findings suggest that anger may be part of a generalized negative affect rather than a unique predictor when assessing risk for pain and disability in LBP treatment. Continued research in the area of screening for psychosocial prognostic indicators in LBP may ultimately guide treatment protocols in physical therapy for more comprehensive patient care.

  7. Evolutionary Dynamics of Male Reproductive Genes in the Drosophila virilis Subgroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir H. Ahmed-Braimah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Postcopulatory sexual selection (PCSS is a potent evolutionary force that can drive rapid changes of reproductive genes within species, and thus has the potential to generate reproductive incompatibilities between species. Male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs are major players in postmating interactions, and are important targets of PCSS in males. The virilis subgroup of Drosophila exhibits strong interspecific gametic incompatibilities, and can serve as a model to study the genetic basis of PCSS and gametic isolation. However, reproductive genes in this group have not been characterized. Here we utilize short-read RNA sequencing of male reproductive organs to examine the evolutionary dynamics of reproductive genes in members of the virilis subgroup: D. americana, D. lummei, D. novamexicana, and D. virilis. We find that the majority of male reproductive transcripts are testes-biased, accounting for ∼15% of all annotated genes. Ejaculatory bulb (EB-biased transcripts largely code for lipid metabolic enzymes, and contain orthologs of the D. melanogaster EB protein, Peb-me, which is involved in mating-plug formation. In addition, we identify 71 candidate SFPs, and show that this gene set has the highest rate of nonsynonymous codon substitution relative to testes- and EB-biased genes. Furthermore, we identify orthologs of 35 D. melanogaster SFPs that have conserved accessory gland expression in the virilis group. Finally, we show that several of the SFPs that have the highest rate of nonsynonymous codon substitution reside on chromosomal regions, which contributes to paternal gametic incompatibility between species. Our results show that SFPs rapidly diversify in the virilis group, and suggest that they likely play a role in PCSS and/or gametic isolation.

  8. Evolutionary Dynamics of Male Reproductive Genes in the Drosophila virilis Subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed-Braimah, Yasir H; Unckless, Robert L; Clark, Andrew G

    2017-09-07

    Postcopulatory sexual selection (PCSS) is a potent evolutionary force that can drive rapid changes of reproductive genes within species, and thus has the potential to generate reproductive incompatibilities between species. Male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) are major players in postmating interactions, and are important targets of PCSS in males. The virilis subgroup of Drosophila exhibits strong interspecific gametic incompatibilities, and can serve as a model to study the genetic basis of PCSS and gametic isolation. However, reproductive genes in this group have not been characterized. Here we utilize short-read RNA sequencing of male reproductive organs to examine the evolutionary dynamics of reproductive genes in members of the virilis subgroup: D. americana, D. lummei, D. novamexicana, and D. virilis We find that the majority of male reproductive transcripts are testes-biased, accounting for ∼15% of all annotated genes. Ejaculatory bulb (EB)-biased transcripts largely code for lipid metabolic enzymes, and contain orthologs of the D. melanogaster EB protein, Peb-me, which is involved in mating-plug formation. In addition, we identify 71 candidate SFPs, and show that this gene set has the highest rate of nonsynonymous codon substitution relative to testes- and EB-biased genes. Furthermore, we identify orthologs of 35 D. melanogaster SFPs that have conserved accessory gland expression in the virilis group. Finally, we show that several of the SFPs that have the highest rate of nonsynonymous codon substitution reside on chromosomal regions, which contributes to paternal gametic incompatibility between species. Our results show that SFPs rapidly diversify in the virilis group, and suggest that they likely play a role in PCSS and/or gametic isolation. Copyright © 2017 Ahmed-Braimah et al.

  9. The Role of Anger in Psychosocial Subgrouping for Patients with Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenzon, Anne N.; George, Steven Z.; Beneciuk, Jason M.; Wandner, Laura D.; Torres, Calia; Robinson, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common and costly condition that often becomes chronic if not properly addressed. Recent research has shown that psychosocial symptoms can complicate LBP, necessitating more comprehensive screening measures. The present study investigated the role of psychosocial factors, including anger regulation, in pain and disability using a screening measure designed for LBP treated with physical therapy. One-hundred and three LBP patients initiating physical therapy completed an established screening measure to assess risk for developing chronic pain, as well as psychosocial measures assessing anger, depression, anxiety, fear-avoidance, and pain-catastrophizing before and after four weeks of treatment. Dependent variables were pain intensity, physical impairment, and patient-reported disability. Risk subgrouping based on anger and other psychosocial measures was examined using established screening methods and through employing an empirical statistical approach. Analyses revealed that risk subgroups differed according to corresponding levels of negative affect, as opposed to anger alone. General psychosocial distress also predicted disability post-treatment, but, interestingly, did not have a strong relationship to pain. Subsequent hierarchical agglomerative clustering procedures divided patients into overall High and Low Distress groups, with follow-up analyses revealing that the High Distress group had higher baseline measures of pain, disability, and impairment. Findings suggest that anger may be part of generalized negative affect rather than a unique predictor when assessing risk for pain and disability in LBP treatment. Continued research in the area of screening for psychosocial prognostic indicators in LBP may ultimately guide treatment protocols in physical therapy for more comprehensive patient care. PMID:24281272

  10. Differences in MRI findings between subgroups of recent-onset childhood arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkhus, Eva [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Flatoe, Berit; Smith, Hans-Joergen [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet and University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Riise, Oeystein [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Pediatrics, Oslo (Norway); Reiseter, Tor [Oslo University Hospital, Ullevaal, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-04-15

    MRI is sensitive for joint inflammation, but its ability to separate subgroups of arthritis in children has been questioned. Infectious arthritis (IA), postinfectious arthritis (PA), transient arthritis (TA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are subgroups that may need early, different treatment. To determine whether MRI findings differ in IA, PA/TA and JIA in recent-onset childhood arthritis. Fifty-nine children from a prospective study of incidence of arthritis (n = 216) were, based on clinical and biochemical criteria, examined by MRI. Joint fluid, synovium, bone marrow, soft tissue and cartilage were scored retrospectively and analysed by Pearson chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Fifty-nine children had MRI of one station. IA was suggested by bone marrow oedema (OR 7.46, P = 0.011) and absence of T1-weighted and T2-weighted low signal intensity synovial tissue (OR 0.06, P = 0.015). Furthermore, soft-tissue oedema and reduced contrast enhancement in the epiphyses were more frequent in children with IA. JIA correlated positively with low signal intensity synovial tissue (OR 13.30, P < 0.001) and negatively with soft-tissue oedema (OR 0.20, P = 0.018). No significant positive determinants were found for PA/TA, but bone marrow oedema, soft-tissue oedema, irregular thickened synovium and low signal intensity synovial tissue was less frequent than in IA/JIA. In children with high clinical suspicion of recent onset arthritis, there was a significant difference in the distribution of specific MRI features among the diagnostic groups. (orig.)

  11. A Data-Driven Approach to Responder Subgroup Identification after Paired Continuous Theta Burst Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Tonio; Hansen-Goos, Onno; Batlaeva, Olga; Annak, Onur; Ziemann, Ulf; Lötsch, Jörn

    2017-01-01

    Background: Modulation of cortical excitability by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used for investigating human brain functions. A common observation is the high variability of long-term depression (LTD)-like changes in human (motor) cortex excitability. This study aimed at analyzing the response subgroup distribution after paired continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) as a basis for subject selection. Methods: The effects of paired cTBS using 80% active motor threshold (AMT) in 31 healthy volunteers were assessed at the primary motor cortex (M1) corresponding to the representation of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of the left hand, before and up to 50 min after plasticity induction. The changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were analyzed using machine-learning derived methods implemented as Gaussian mixture modeling (GMM) and computed ABC analysis. Results: The probability density distribution of the MEP changes from baseline was tri-modal, showing a clear separation at 80.9%. Subjects displaying at least this degree of LTD-like changes were n = 6 responders. By contrast, n = 7 subjects displayed a paradox response with increase in MEP. Reassessment using ABC analysis as alternative approach led to the same n = 6 subjects as a distinct category. Conclusion: Depressive effects of paired cTBS using 80% AMT endure at least 50 min, however, only in a small subgroup of healthy subjects. Hence, plasticity induction by paired cTBS might not reflect a general mechanism in human motor cortex excitability. A mathematically supported criterion is proposed to select responders for enrolment in assessments of human brain functional networks using virtual brain lesions.

  12. Whole-breast irradiation: a subgroup analysis of criteria to stratify for prone position treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramella, Sara, E-mail: s.ramella@unicampus.it [Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Trodella, Lucio; Ippolito, Edy; Fiore, Michele; Cellini, Francesco; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Greco, Carlo [Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Ramponi, Sara; Cammilluzzi, Eugenio; Cesarini, Claudio [Breast Unit, S. Pertini Hospital, Rome (Italy); Piermattei, Angelo [Department of Physics, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Cesario, Alfredo [CdC San Raffaele Velletri (Italy); Department of Thoracic Surgery, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); D' Angelillo, Rolando Maria [Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    To select among breast cancer patients and according to breast volume size those who may benefit from 3D conformal radiotherapy after conservative surgery applied with prone-position technique. Thirty-eight patients with early-stage breast cancer were grouped according to the target volume (TV) measured in the supine position: small ({<=}400 mL), medium (400-700 mL), and large ({>=}700 ml). An ad-hoc designed and built device was used for prone set-up to displace the contralateral breast away from the tangential field borders. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography in both the supine and prone positions. Dosimetric data to explore dose distribution and volume of normal tissue irradiated were calculated for each patient in both positions. Homogeneity index, hot spot areas, the maximum dose, and the lung constraints were significantly reduced in the prone position (p < 0.05). The maximum heart distance and the V{sub 5Gy} did not vary consistently in the 2 positions (p = 0.06 and p = 0.7, respectively). The number of necessary monitor units was significantly higher in the supine position (312 vs. 232, p < 0.0001). The subgroups analysis pointed out the advantage in lung sparing in all TV groups (small, medium and large) for all the evaluated dosimetric constraints (central lung distance, maximum lung distance, and V{sub 5Gy}, p < 0.0001). In the small TV group, a dose reduction in nontarget areas of 22% in the prone position was detected (p = 0.056); in the medium and high TV groups, the difference was of about -10% (p = NS). The decrease in hot spot areas in nontarget tissues was 73%, 47%, and 80% for small, medium, and large TVs in the prone position, respectively. Although prone breast radiotherapy is normally proposed in patients with breasts of large dimensions, this study gives evidence of dosimetric benefit in all patient subgroups irrespective of breast volume size.

  13. Identification of subgroups of inflammatory and degenerative MRI findings in the spine and sacroiliac joints: a latent class analysis of 1037 patients with persistent low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnbak, Bodil; Jensen, Rikke Krüger; Manniche, Claus

    2016-01-01

    findings' (n = 84). The two SIJ subgroups (Subgroups 4 and 5) had a higher median activity limitation score (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire calculated as a proportional score: 65 (IQR 48-78)/65 (48-78)) compared with Subgroups 1-3 (48 (35-74)/57 (39-74)/57 (39-74)), a higher prevalence of women (68...

  14. The effect of active video games by ethnicity, sex and fitness: subgroup analysis from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Louise; Jiang, Yannan; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Jull, Andrew; Prapavessis, Harry; Rodgers, Anthony; Maddison, Ralph

    2014-04-03

    The prevention and treatment of childhood obesity is a key public health challenge. However, certain groups within populations have markedly different risk profiles for obesity and related health behaviours. Well-designed subgroup analysis can identify potential differential effects of obesity interventions, which may be important for reducing health inequalities. The study aim was to evaluate the consistency of the effects of active video games across important subgroups in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). A two-arm, parallel RCT was conducted in overweight or obese children (n=322; aged 10-14 years) to determine the effect of active video games on body composition. Statistically significant overall treatment effects favouring the intervention group were found for body mass index, body mass index z-score and percentage body fat at 24 weeks. For these outcomes, pre-specified subgroup analyses were conducted among important baseline demographic (ethnicity, sex) and prognostic (cardiovascular fitness) groups. No statistically significant interaction effects were found between the treatment and subgroup terms in the main regression model (p=0.36 to 0.93), indicating a consistent treatment effect across these groups. Preliminary evidence suggests an active video games intervention had a consistent positive effect on body composition among important subgroups. This may support the use of these games as a pragmatic public health intervention to displace sedentary behaviour with physical activity in young people.

  15. An overview of statistical and regulatory issues in the planning, analysis, and interpretation of subgroup analyses in confirmatory clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Whether confirmatory or exploratory in nature, the investigation of subgroups poses statistical and interpretational challenges, yet these investigations can have important consequences for product licensing, labeling, reimbursement, and prescribing decisions. This article provides a high-level, nontechnical summary of key statistical issues in the analysis of subgroups, with a focus on the regulatory context in which drug development and licensing decisions are made. References to specific aspects of regulatory processes are based on the system in Europe, though it is hoped that the principles outlined can be generally applied to other regulatory regions. This article challenges the common assumption that a clinical trial population should be assumed to be homogeneous, with homogeneous response to treatment, and asks whether commonly employed strategies for handling and identifying potential heterogeneity are sufficient. Investigations into subgroups are unavoidable, yet subgroup analyses suffer from fundamental complications and limitations of which those planning and interpreting clinical trials must be aware. Some areas for further methodological work and an improved methodological framework for the conduct of exploratory subgroup analyses are discussed. Above all, the need for an integrated scientific approach is highlighted.

  16. Mood, Disability, and Quality of Life among a Subgroup of Rheumatoid Arthritis Individuals with Experiential Avoidance and Anxiety Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The current study aimed to identify and characterize distinct RA subgroups based on their level of EA and AS and compares the difference among the subgroups in mood, disability, and quality of life. Methods. Individuals with chronic pain for at least 3 months were recruited from an academic rheumatoid clinic. Participants were assessed for demographic, psychosocial, and personality measures. A two-step cluster analysis was conducted to identify distinct subgroups of patients. Differences in clinical outcomes were compared using the Multivariate ANOVA based on cluster membership. Results. From a total of 223 participants, three distinct subgroups were formed based on cluster analysis. Cluster 1 (N=78 included those with low levels of both EA and AS. Cluster 2 (N=81 consisted of individuals with moderate levels of EA and low levels AS. Cluster 3 (N=64 included those with moderate levels of EA and high AS. Compared to those in Cluster 1, those in Cluster 3 had significantly higher levels of mood impairment and disability and lower quality of life (p<0.05. Significantly lower levels of mood impairment were seen in Cluster 1 compared to Cluster 2 (p<0.05. However, no significant difference in disability or quality of life was seen between the two groups. Conclusions. The three subgroups differed significantly in levels of impairment in mood, disability, and quality of life. However, levels of EA had a greater impact on disability and quality of life than AS.

  17. Multiple invasions of Gypsy and Micropia retroelements in genus Zaprionus and melanogaster subgroup of the genus Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carareto Claudia MA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Zaprionus genus shares evolutionary features with the melanogaster subgroup, such as space and time of origin. Although little information about the transposable element content in the Zaprionus genus had been accumulated, some of their elements appear to be more closely related with those of the melanogaster subgroup, indicating that these two groups of species were involved in horizontal transfer events during their evolution. Among these elements, the Gypsy and the Micropia retroelements were chosen for screening in seven species of the two Zaprionus subgenera, Anaprionus and Zaprionus. Results Screening allowed the identification of diverse Gypsy and Micropia retroelements only in species of the Zaprionus subgenus, showing that they are transcriptionally active in the sampled species. The sequences of each retroelement were closely related to those of the melanogaster species subgroup, and the most parsimonious hypothesis would be that 15 horizontal transfer events shaped their evolution. The Gypsy retroelement of the melanogaster subgroup probably invaded the Zaprionus genomes about 11 MYA. In contrast, the Micropia retroelement may have been introduced into the Zaprionus subgenus and the melanogaster subgroup from an unknown donor more recently (~3 MYA. Conclusion Gypsy and Micropia of Zaprionus and melanogaster species share similar evolutionary patterns. The sharing of evolutionary, ecological and ethological features probably allowed these species to pass through a permissive period of transposable element invasion, explaining the proposed waves of horizontal transfers.

  18. Mood, Disability, and Quality of Life among a Subgroup of Rheumatoid Arthritis Individuals with Experiential Avoidance and Anxiety Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S; Rice, D; Janzen, S; Pope, J E; Harth, M; Shapiro, A P; Teasell, R W

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The current study aimed to identify and characterize distinct RA subgroups based on their level of EA and AS and compares the difference among the subgroups in mood, disability, and quality of life. Methods. Individuals with chronic pain for at least 3 months were recruited from an academic rheumatoid clinic. Participants were assessed for demographic, psychosocial, and personality measures. A two-step cluster analysis was conducted to identify distinct subgroups of patients. Differences in clinical outcomes were compared using the Multivariate ANOVA based on cluster membership. Results. From a total of 223 participants, three distinct subgroups were formed based on cluster analysis. Cluster 1 (N = 78) included those with low levels of both EA and AS. Cluster 2 (N = 81) consisted of individuals with moderate levels of EA and low levels AS. Cluster 3 (N = 64) included those with moderate levels of EA and high AS. Compared to those in Cluster 1, those in Cluster 3 had significantly higher levels of mood impairment and disability and lower quality of life (p impairment were seen in Cluster 1 compared to Cluster 2 (p disability or quality of life was seen between the two groups. Conclusions. The three subgroups differed significantly in levels of impairment in mood, disability, and quality of life. However, levels of EA had a greater impact on disability and quality of life than AS.

  19. Subgrouping of risky behaviors among Iranian college students: a latent class analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safiri S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Saeid Safiri,1,2 Afarin Rahimi-Movaghar,3 Masud Yunesian,4,5 Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani,6 Mansour Shamsipour,5 Mohammad Ali Mansournia,1 Akbar Fotouhi1 1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 2Department of Public Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Maragheh University of Medical Sciences, Maragheh, 3Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 4Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, 5Department of Research Methodology and Data Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 6Road Traffic Injury Research Center, Department of Statistics & Epidemiology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran Background: Risky behaviors may interrupt development or cause considerable morbidity or mortality. This study’s purpose was to determine subgroups of students based on risky behaviors and assess the prevalence of risky behaviors in each of the subgroups.Participants and methods: This anonymous cross-sectional study was carried out in October 2015 and November 2015, with 1,777 students from Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, through multistage random sampling method. The data were analyzed by latent class analysis.Results: The prevalence rates of cigarette smoking (more than or equal to ten cigarettes, hookah use (≥1 time/month, and alcohol consumption (≥1 time/month during the last year were 12.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.9–14.0, 11.6% (95% CI: 10.0–13.1, and 4.9% (95% CI: 3.8–5.9, respectively. The prevalence rates of illicit opioids (1.8%, 95% CI: 1.2–2.5, cannabis (1.2%, 95% CI: 0.7–1.7, methamphetamine (1.1%, 95% CI: 0.6–1.6, methylphenidate (2.5%, 95% CI: 1.7–3.2, and extramarital sex (5.5%, 95% CI: 4.5–6.6 over the last year were

  20. The Dynamics of Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsson, Nils; Rasche, Andreas; Seidl, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper suggests that when the phenomenon of standards and standardization is examined from the perspective of organization studies, three aspects stand out: the standardization of organizations, standardization by organizations and standardization as (a form of) organization. Following a comp...

  1. How does unemployment affect self-assessed health? A systematic review focusing on subgroup effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norström, Fredrik; Virtanen, Pekka; Hammarström, Anne; Gustafsson, Per E; Janlert, Urban

    2014-12-22

    Almost all studies on the effect on health from unemployment have concluded that unemployment is bad for your health. However, only a few review articles have dealt with this relation in recent years, and none of them have focused on the analysis of subgroups such as age, gender, and marital status. The objective of our article is to review how unemployment relates to self-assessed health with a focus on its effect on subgroups. A search was performed in Web of Science to find articles that measured the effect on health from unemployment. The selection of articles was limited to those written in English, consisting of original data, and published in 2003 or later. Our definition of health was restricted to self-assessed health. Mortality- and morbidity-related measurements were therefore not included in our analysis. For the 41 articles included, information about health measurements, employment status definitions, other factors included in the statistical analysis, study design (including study population), and statistical method were collected with the aim of analysing the results on both the population and factor level. Most of the studies in our review showed a negative effect on health from unemployment on a population basis. Results at the factor levels were most common for gender (25 articles), age (11 articles), geographic location (8 articles), and education level (5 articles). The analysis showed that there was a health effect for gender, age, education level, household income, and geographic location. However, this effect differed between studies and no clear pattern on who benefits or suffers more among these groups could be determined. The result instead seemed to depend on the study context. The only clear patterns of association found were for socioeconomic status (manual workers suffer more), reason for unemployment (being unemployed due to health reasons is worse), and social network (a strong network is beneficial). Unemployment affects groups of

  2. Cluster analysis for identifying sub-groups and selecting potential discriminatory variables in human encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowcroft Natasha S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encephalitis is an acute clinical syndrome of the central nervous system (CNS, often associated with fatal outcome or permanent damage, including cognitive and behavioural impairment, affective disorders and epileptic seizures. Infection of the central nervous system is considered to be a major cause of encephalitis and more than 100 different pathogens have been recognized as causative agents. However, a large proportion of cases have unknown disease etiology. Methods We perform hierarchical cluster analysis on a multicenter England encephalitis data set with the aim of identifying sub-groups in human encephalitis. We use the simple matching similarity measure which is appropriate for binary data sets and performed variable selection using cluster heatmaps. We also use heatmaps to visually assess underlying patterns in the data, identify the main clinical and laboratory features and identify potential risk factors associated with encephalitis. Results Our results identified fever, personality and behavioural change, headache and lethargy as the main characteristics of encephalitis. Diagnostic variables such as brain scan and measurements from cerebrospinal fluids are also identified as main indicators of encephalitis. Our analysis revealed six major clusters in the England encephalitis data set. However, marked within-cluster heterogeneity is observed in some of the big clusters indicating possible sub-groups. Overall, the results show that patients are clustered according to symptom and diagnostic variables rather than causal agents. Exposure variables such as recent infection, sick person contact and animal contact have been identified as potential risk factors. Conclusions It is in general assumed and is a common practice to group encephalitis cases according to disease etiology. However, our results indicate that patients are clustered with respect to mainly symptom and diagnostic variables rather than causal agents

  3. Religious subgroups influencing vaccination coverage in the Dutch Bible belt: an ecological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The Netherlands has experienced epidemics of vaccine preventable diseases largely confined to the Bible belt, an area where -among others- orthodox protestant groups are living. Lacking information on the vaccination coverage in this minority, and its various subgroups, control of vaccine preventable diseases is focused on the geographical area of the Bible belt. However, the adequacy of this strategy is questionable. This study assesses the influence of presence of various orthodox protestant subgroups (orthodox protestant denominations, OPDs) on municipal vaccination coverage in the Bible belt. Methods We performed an ecological study at municipality level. Data on number of inhabitants, urbanization level, socio-economical status, immigration and vaccination coverage were obtained from national databases. As religion is not registered in the Netherlands, membership numbers of the OPDs had to be obtained from church year books and via church offices. For all municipalities in the Netherlands, the effect of presence or absence of OPDs on vaccination coverage was assessed by comparing mean vaccination coverage. For municipalities where OPDs were present, the effect of each of them (measured as membership ratio, the number of members proportional to total number of inhabitants) on vaccination coverage was assessed by bivariate correlation and multiple regression analysis in a model containing the determinants immigration, socio-economical status and urbanization as well. Results Mean vaccination coverage (93.5% ± 4.7) in municipalities with OPDs (n = 135) was significantly lower (p municipalities without OPDs (96.9% ± 2.1). Multiple regression analyses showed that in municipalities with OPDs 84% of the variance in vaccination coverage was explained by the presence of these OPDs. Immigration had a significant, but small explanatory effect as well. Membership ratios of all OPDs were negatively related to vaccination coverage; this relationship was

  4. “Real-life” inhaled corticosteroid withdrawal in COPD: a subgroup analysis of DACCORD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelmeier C

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Claus Vogelmeier,1 Heinrich Worth,2 Roland Buhl,3 Carl-Peter Criée,4 Nadine S Lossi,5 Claudia Mailänder,5 Peter Kardos6 1Department of Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Philipps-University Marburg, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL, Marburg, 2Facharzt Forum Fürth, Fürth, 3Pulmonary Department, Mainz University Hospital, Mainz, 4Department of Sleep and Respiratory Medicine, Evangelical Hospital Göttingen-Weende, Bovenden, 5Clinical Research, Respiratory, Novartis Pharma GmbH, Nürnberg, 6Group Practice and Centre for Allergy, Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Red Cross Maingau Hospital, Frankfurt am Main, Germany Abstract: Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD receive inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs without a clear indication, and thus, the impact of ICS withdrawal on disease control is of great interest. DACCORD is a prospective, noninterventional 2-year study in the primary and secondary care throughout Germany. A subgroup of patients were taking ICS prior to entry – 1,022 patients continued to receive ICS for 2 years; physicians withdrew ICS on entry in 236 patients. Data from these two subgroups were analyzed to evaluate the impact of ICS withdrawal. Patients aged ≥40 years with COPD, initiating or changing COPD maintenance medication were recruited, excluding patients with asthma. Demographic and disease characteristics, prescribed COPD medication, COPD Assessment Test, exacerbations, and lung function were recorded. There were few differences in baseline characteristics; ICS withdrawn patients had shorter disease duration and better lung function, with 74.2% of ICS withdrawn patients not exacerbating, compared with 70.7% ICS-continued patients. During Year 1, exacerbation rates were 0.414 in the withdrawn group and 0.433 in the continued group. COPD Assessment Test total score improved from baseline in both groups. These data suggest

  5. Transfer of radiocaesium to the Swedish population and subgroups of special interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagren, G. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Radioecology

    1998-12-01

    As a result of the fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, whole body measurements of radiocesium in the population of Sweden were started in the late 1950`s. In the 1960`s the Saami population was recognised as a subgroup of the Swedish population with a greater risk than the general population of receiving high doses caused by their larger intake of reindeer meat. In 1986, a new deposition of radiocesium from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident occurred. The deposition from Chernobyl was, unlike the deposition from the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, inhomogeneous with a higher deposition in areas where population groups depending on food products from semi-natural ecosystems can be found. Since 1986, whole body measurements have been used to monitor the effects from the Chernobyl accident on several different subgroups of the Swedish population. The group with the highest whole body contents of radiocesium has been the Saamis. Studies of {sup 137}Cs in different ecosystems have shown that population groups living on food products from the forest ecosystem could receive significant committed doses since the effective ecological half times here have been found to be close to the physical half life of {sup 137}Cs (30 years). However, whole body measurements of hunters, which is one such group, have still not confirmed these long half times. In all studied populations the transfer of radiocesium to man was found to decrease with increasing ground deposition and men were found to have about twice as high whole body content of radiocaesium as women. For adults, the whole body content increases slightly with age with a maximum around the age 50-70 years. The committed collective 50-year internal dose to the total Swedish population after Chernobyl will be 1100 personSv of which about half (500 personSv) will be to hunter families and originate in the forest ecosystem. The committed 50-year collective dose to the Saami population will be less (25 person

  6. Patient characteristics in low back pain subgroups based on an existing classification system. A descriptive cohort study in chiropractic practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eirikstoft, Heidi; Kongsted, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Sub-grouping of low back pain (LBP) is believed to improve prediction of prognosis and treatment effects. The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine whether chiropractic patients could be sub-grouped according to an existing pathoanatomically-based classification system, (2) to describe...... reducible disc syndromes followed by facet joint pain, dysfunction and sacroiliac (SI)-joint pain. Classification was inconclusive in 5% of the patients. Differences in pain, activity limitation, and psychological factors were small across subgroups. Within 10 days, 82% were reported to belong to the same...... relevance of the classification system should be investigated by testing its value as a prognostic factor or a treatment effect modifier. It is recommended that this classification system be combined with psychological and social factors if it is to be useful....

  7. The Effectiveness of Mechanical Traction Among Subgroups of Patients With Low Back Pain and Leg Pain: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Anne; Fritz, Julie M; Childs, John D; Brennan, Gerard P

    2016-03-01

    Randomized clinical trial. Background The recommended initial management strategy for patients with low back pain and signs of nerve root compression is conservative treatment, but there is little evidence to guide the most appropriate management strategy. Preliminary research suggests that a treatment protocol of mechanical traction and extension-oriented exercises may be effective, particularly in a specific subgroup of patients. To examine the effectiveness of mechanical traction in patients with lumbar nerve root compression and within a predefined subgroup. One hundred twenty patients with low back pain with nerve root compression were recruited from physical therapy clinics. Using predefined subgrouping criteria, patients were stratified at baseline and randomized to receive an extension-oriented treatment approach with or without the addition of mechanical traction. During a 6-week period, patients received up to 12 treatment visits. Primary outcomes of pain and disability were collected at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year by assessors blinded to group allocation. Outcomes were examined using linear mixed-model analyses examining change over time by treatment and the interaction between treatment and subgrouping status. The mean ± SD age of participants was 41.1 ± 11.3 years, median duration of symptoms was 62 days, and 57% were male. No significant differences in disability or pain outcomes were noted between treatment groups at any time point, nor was any interaction found between subgroup status and treatment. Patients with lumbar nerve root compression presenting for physical therapy can expect significant changes in disability and pain over a 6-week treatment period. There is no evidence that mechanical lumbar traction in combination with an extension-oriented treatment is superior to extension-oriented exercises alone in the management of these patients or within a predefined subgroup of patients. The study protocol was registered with Clinical

  8. Prognostic subgroups for remission and response in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J MacLaren; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Bloch, Michael H

    2015-03-01

    Most patients with anxiety disorders receive treatment in primary care settings. Limited moderator data are available to inform clinicians of likely prognostic outcomes for individual patients. We identify baseline characteristics associated with outcome in adults seeking treatment for anxiety disorders. We conducted an exploratory moderator analysis from the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial. In the CALM trial, 1,004 adults who met DSM-IV criteria for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomized to usual care (UC) or a collaborative care intervention (ITV) of cognitive-behavioral therapy and/or pharmacotherapy between June 2006 and April 2008. Logistic regression was used to examine baseline characteristics associated with remission and response overall and by treatment condition. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analyses identified subgroups associated with similar likelihood of response and remission of global anxiety symptoms. Remission was defined as score CALM in community treatment centers where patients typically are of low socioeconomic status and may particularly benefit from ITV. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00347269. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  9. VEGFR-1 Overexpression Identifies a Small Subgroup of Aggressive Prostate Cancers in Patients Treated by Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Tsourlakis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The VEGFR-1 is suggested to promote tumor progression. In the current study we analyzed prevalence and prognostic impact of the VEGFR-1 by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing more than 3000 prostate cancer specimens. Results were compared to tumor phenotype, ETS-related gene (ERG status, and biochemical recurrence. Membranous VEGFR-1 expression was detectable in 32.6% of 2669 interpretable cancers and considered strong in 1.7%, moderate in 6.7% and weak in 24.2% of cases. Strong VEGFR-1 expression was associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusion status as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and immunohistochemistry (p < 0.0001 each. Elevated VEGFR-1 expression was linked to high Gleason grade and advanced pT stage in TMPRSS2:ERG negative cancers (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.001, while these associations were absent in TMPRSS2:ERG positive cancers. VEGFR-1 expression was also linked to phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN deletions. A comparison with prostate specific antigen (PSA recurrence revealed that the 1.7% of prostate cancers with the highest VEGFR-1 levels had a strikingly unfavorable prognosis. This could be seen in all cancers, in the subsets of TMPRSS2:ERG positive or negative, PTEN deleted or undeleted carcinomas (p < 0.0001 each. High level VEGFR-1 expression is infrequent in prostate cancer, but identifies a subgroup of aggressive cancers, which may be candidates for anti-VEGFR-1 targeted therapy.

  10. Substitutions between dairy product subgroups and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Daniel B; Laursen, Anne Sofie D; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations for specified substitutions between different subgroups of dairy products and the risk of type 2 diabetes. We used data from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort including 54 277 men and women aged 50-64 years at baseline. Information...... regarding intake of dairy products was obtained from a validated FFQ, and cases of type 2 diabetes were identified through the Danish National Diabetes Register. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to estimate associations. During a median follow-up of 15·3 years, 7137 cases were identified. Low......-fat yogurt products in place of whole-fat yogurt products were associated with a higher rate of type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio (HR) 1·17; 95 % CI 1·06, 1·29) per serving/d substituted. Whole-fat yogurt products in place of low-fat milk, whole-fat milk or buttermilk were associated with a lower rate of type 2...

  11. Persistent Super-Utilization of Acute Care Services Among Subgroups of Veterans Experiencing Homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymkowiak, Dorota; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Johnson, Erin E; Manning, Todd; O'Toole, Thomas P

    2017-10-01

    Acute health care utilization often occurs among persons experiencing homelessness. However, knowing which individuals will be persistent super-utilizers of acute care is less well understood. The objective of the study was to identify those more likely to be persistent super-utilizers of acute care services. We conducted a latent class analysis of secondary data from the Veterans Health Administration Corporate Data Warehouse, and Homeless Operations Management and Evaluation System. The study sample included 16,912 veterans who experienced homelessness and met super-utilizer criteria in any quarter between July 1, 2014 and December 31, 2015. The latent class analysis included veterans' diagnoses and acute care utilization. Medical, mental health, and substance use morbidity rates were high. More than half of the sample utilized Veterans Health Administration Homeless Programs concurrently with their super-utilization of acute care. There were 7 subgroups of super-utilizers, which varied considerably on the degree to which their super-utilization persisted over time. Approximately a third of the sample met super-utilizer criteria for ≥3 quarters; this group was older and disproportionately male, non-Hispanic white, and unmarried, with lower rates of post-9/11 service and higher rates of rural residence and service-connected disability. They were much more likely to be currently homeless with more medical, mental health, and substance use morbidity. Only a subset of homeless veterans were persistent super-utilizers, suggesting the need for more targeted interventions.

  12. Base excision repair dysfunction in a subgroup of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, A M; Gondek, L P; Szpurka, H; Nearman, Z P; Tiu, R V; Maciejewski, J P

    2008-03-01

    In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) increased chromosomal breaks point toward defects in DNA repair machinery including base excision repair (BER) pathway involved in handling of oxidative DNA damage. We investigated whether defects in this pathway can be found in MDS. Elevated levels of 8-oxoguanine (8-OG) were found in a significant proportion of MDS patients, indicating increased oxidative DNA damage or defective handling of oxidative load. In a distinct subgroup of patients, increased 8-OG content was associated with increased hOGG1 mRNA expression and activity. In some patients, increased numbers of abasic sites (AP sites) correlated with low levels of POLbeta. To further investigate the nature of this defect, we examined genetic lesions potentially explaining accumulation of 8-OG and AP sites. We genotyped a large cohort of MDS patients and found a correlation between increased oxidative damage and the presence of the hOGG1-Cys326 allele suggesting inadequate compensatory feedback. Overall, this hOGG1 variant was more frequent in MDS, particularly in advanced forms, as compared to controls. In summary, we demonstrated that BER dysfunction in some MDS patients may be responsible for the increased 8-OG incorporation and explains one aspect of the propensity to chromosomal breaks in MDS but other mechanisms may also be involved.

  13. Local inflammation increases vanilloid receptor 1 expression within distinct subgroups of DRG neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Oh-hashi, Kentaro; Naruse, Yoshihisa; Iijima, Norio; Ueda, Masashi; Shimosato, Goshun; Tominaga, Makoto; Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Masaki

    2003-02-14

    Vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1) is essential to the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. We investigated whether inflammation can increase in VR1 positive neuronal profiles in rat DRG neurons using histochemical methods. We also used size frequency analysis and double staining with several neuronal markers to investigate whether or not inflammation alters VR1 expression. Inflammation induced a 1.5-fold increase in percentage of VR1-like immunoreactivity (LI) positive profiles per total neuronal profiles, suggesting that the number of heat and pH sensitive neurons increase during inflammation. Area frequency histograms showed that VR1 expression increased in small and medium-sized neurons after inflammation. Double labeling of VR1 with NF200 showed that VR1 positive neurons with NF200 positive profiles significantly increased, indicating that the medium-sized VR1 positive neurons were neurons with myelinated A-fibers. Local inflammation thus increases in VR1 protein level within distinct subgroups of DRG neurons that may participate in the development and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia.

  14. Mindfulness and Emotional Outcomes: Identifying Subgroups of College Students using Latent Profile Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Matthew R; Lawless, Adrienne K; Brown, David B; Bravo, Adrian J

    2015-04-01

    In non-meditating samples, distinct facets of mindfulness are found to be negatively correlated, preventing the meaningful creation of a total mindfulness score. The present study used person-centered analyses to distinguish subgroups of college students based on their mindfulness scores, which allows the examination of individuals who are high (or low) on all facets of mindfulness. Using the Lo-Mendell-Rubin Adjusted LRT test, we settled on a 4-class solution that included a high mindfulness group (high on all 5 facets, N = 245), low mindfulness group (moderately low on all 5 facets, N = 563), judgmentally observing group (high on observing, but low on non-judging and acting with awareness, N =63), and non-judgmentally aware group (low on observing, but high on non-judging and acting with awareness, N =70). Consistent across all emotional outcomes including depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms (i.e., worry), affective instability, and distress intolerance, we found that the judgmentally observing group had the most maladaptive emotional outcomes followed by the low mindfulness group. Both the high mindfulness group and the non-judgmentally aware group had the most adaptive emotional outcomes. We discuss the implications of person-centered analyses to exploring mindfulness as it relates to important psychological health outcomes.

  15. Avian metapneumovirus subgroup C induces autophagy through the ATF6 UPR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lei; Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Quan, Rong; Li, Zixuan; Liu, Jue

    2017-10-03

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that macroautophagy/autophagy plays an important role in the infectious processes of diverse pathogens. However, it remains unknown whether autophagy is induced in avian metapneumovirus (aMPV)-infected host cells, and, if so, how this occurs. Here, we report that aMPV subgroup C (aMPV/C) induces autophagy in cultured cells. We demonstrated this relationship by detecting classical autophagic features, including the formation of autophagsomes, the presence of GFP-LC3 puncta and the conversation of LC3-I into LC3-II. Also, we used pharmacological regulators and siRNAs targeting ATG7 or LC3 to examine the role of autophagy in aMPV/C replication. The results showed that autophagy is required for efficient replication of aMPV/C. Moreover, infection with aMPV/C promotes autophagosome maturation and induces a complete autophagic process. Finally, the ATF6 pathway, of which one component is the unfolded protein response (UPR), becomes activated in aMPV/C-infected cells. Knockdown of ATF6 inhibited aMPV/C-induced autophagy and viral replication. Collectively, these results not only show that autophagy promotes aMPV/C replication in the cultured cells, but also reveal that the molecular mechanisms underlying aMPV/C-induced autophagy depends on regulation of the ER stress-related UPR pathway.

  16. Bovicin HJ50-like lantibiotics, a novel subgroup of lantibiotics featured by an indispensable disulfide bridge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available Lantibiotics are ribosomally-synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides with potent antimicrobial activities. Discovery of novel lantibiotics has been greatly accelerated with the soaring release of genomic information of microorganisms. As a unique class II lantibiotic, bovicin HJ50 is produced by Streptococcus bovis HJ50 and contains one rare disulfide bridge. By using its precursor BovA as a drive sequence, 16 BovA-like peptides were revealed in a wide variety of species. From them, three representative novel lan loci from Clostridium perfringens D str. JGS1721, Bacillus cereus As 1.348 and B. thuringiensis As 1.013 were identified by PCR screening. The corresponding mature lantibiotics designated perecin, cerecin and thuricin were obtained and structurally elucidated to be bovicin HJ50-like lantibiotics especially by containing a conserved disulfide bridge. The disulfide bridge was substantiated to be essential for the function of bovicin HJ50-like lantibiotics as its disruption eliminated their antimicrobial activities. Further analysis indicated that the disulfide bridge played a crucial role in maintaining the hydrophobicity of bovicin HJ50, which might facilitate it to exert antimicrobial function. This study unveiled a novel subgroup of disulfide-containing lantibiotics from bacteria of different niches and further demonstrated the indispensable role of disulfide bridge in these novel bovicin HJ50-like lantibiotics.

  17. Subgrouping High School Students for Substance Abuse-Related Behaviors: A Latent Class Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayyati, Fariba; Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar; Allahverdipour, Hamid; AsghariJafarabadi, Mohammad; Kouzekanani, Kamiar

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize the prevalence of latent groups in terms of smoking, hookah, and alcohol in a sample of Iranian high school students. In this cross-sectional study, 4,422 high school students were assessed in East Azerbaijan Province, Iran. Latent class analysis was applied to determine the subgroups and prevalence of each class using the procLCA in SAS 9.2 software. The prevalence of hookah smoking was the highest among the other substances and had the greatest abuse among males than females. Nearly 86%, 9.5%, and 4.6% of the participants were low risk, tobacco experimenter, and high risk, respectively. The odds ratio indices of membership in each class, compared with the first class, associated with the independent variables. A fair number of students, males in particular, were identified as high risk-takers. Considering the simultaneous incidence of multiple high-risk behaviors, interventions must cover multiple aspects of the issue at the same time.

  18. Widespread Positive Selection Drives Differentiation of Centromeric Proteins in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Emily A; Llopart, Ana

    2015-11-25

    Rapid evolution of centromeric satellite repeats is thought to cause compensatory amino acid evolution in interacting centromere-associated kinetochore proteins. Cid, a protein that mediates kinetochore/centromere interactions, displays particularly high amino acid turnover. Rapid evolution of both Cid and centromeric satellite repeats led us to hypothesize that the apparent compensatory evolution may extend to interacting partners in the Condensin I complex (i.e., SMC2, SMC4, Cap-H, Cap-D2, and Cap-G) and HP1s. Missense mutations in these proteins often result in improper centromere formation and aberrant chromosome segregation, thus selection for maintained function and coevolution among proteins of the complex is likely strong. Here, we report evidence of rapid evolution and recurrent positive selection in seven centromere-associated proteins in species of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, and further postulate that positive selection on these proteins could be a result of centromere drive and compensatory changes, with kinetochore proteins competing for optimal spindle attachment.

  19. Rapid identification of the genus Dekkera/Brettanomyces, the Dekkera subgroup and all individual species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulin, M; Harrison, E; Stratford, M; Wheals, A E

    2014-09-18

    The genus Dekkera/Brettanomyces comprises five described species: Dekkera bruxellensis, D. anomala, Brettanomyces custersianus, B. naardenensis and B. nanus. Some of them, especially D. bruxellensis, are important spoilage organisms, particularly in the wine and beverage industries. Because of their economic importance many different methods have been developed to identify members of the genus in general and D. bruxellensis in particular. These methods vary in their rapidity, complexity and cost but, partly because of confidentiality issues, it is unclear which methods are used, or how widely, in the relevant industries. Building on previous work with the genera Saccharomyces and Zygosaccharomyces, a suite of eight PCR primer pairs has been designed either on the D1-D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene or translation elongation factor TEF1-α. These primers can specifically identify the genus as a whole, only Dekkera species, each one of the five recognised species as well as a significant subgroup of D. bruxellensis represented by NCYC 3426. Multiplexing has also been tried and it has been shown to be possible with some combinations of genus or Dekkera-level and species-specific primers. Using direct colony PCR amplification followed by gel electrophoresis, a clear positive result can be obtained in less than 3h, thus providing a quick, reliable and inexpensive way to identify target species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The alcohol policy environment and policy subgroups as predictors of binge drinking measures among US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Ziming; Blanchette, Jason; Nelson, Toben F; Heeren, Timothy; Oussayef, Nadia; Naimi, Timothy S

    2015-04-01

    We examined the relationships of the state-level alcohol policy environment and policy subgroups with individual-level binge drinking measures. We used generalized estimating equations regression models to relate the alcohol policy environment based on data from 29 policies in US states from 2004 to 2009 to 3 binge drinking measures in adults from the 2005 to 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System surveys. A 10 percentage point higher alcohol policy environment score, which reflected increased policy effectiveness and implementation, was associated with an 8% lower adjusted odds of binge drinking and binge drinking 5 or more times, and a 10% lower adjusted odds of consuming 10 or more drinks. Policies that targeted the general population rather than the underage population, alcohol consumption rather than impaired driving, and raising the price or reducing the availability of alcohol had the strongest independent associations with reduced binge drinking. Alcohol taxes and outlet density accounted for approximately half of the effect magnitude observed for all policies. A small number of policies that raised alcohol prices and reduced its availability appeared to affect binge drinking.

  1. Detection and molecular characterization of J subgroup avian leukosis virus in wild ducks in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Zeng

    Full Text Available To assess the status of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J in wild ducks in China, we examined samples from 528 wild ducks, representing 17 species, which were collected in China over the past 3 years. Virus isolation and PCR showed that 7 ALV-J strains were isolated from wild ducks. The env genes and the 3'UTRs from these isolates were cloned and sequenced. The env genes of all 7 wild duck isolates were significantly different from those in the prototype strain HPRS-103, American strains, broiler ALV-J isolates and Chinese local chicken isolates, but showed close homology with those found in some layer chicken ALV-J isolates and belonged to the same group. The 3'UTRs of 7 ALV-J wild ducks isolates showed close homology with the prototype strain HPRS-103 and no obvious deletion was found in the 3'UTR except for a 1 bp deletion in the E element that introduced a binding site for c-Ets-1. Our study demonstrated the presence of ALV-J in wild ducks and investigated the molecular characterization of ALV-J in wild ducks isolates.

  2. Children as a sensitive subgroup and their role in regulatory toxicology: DGPT workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenk, M. [Federal Health Department Baden-Wuerttemberg, Department of Toxicology, Wiederholdstrasse 15, 70174 Stuttgart (Germany); Gundert-Remy, U.; Heinemeyer, G. [Federal Institute for Health Protection of Consumers and Veterinary Medicine (BgVV), Thielallee 88-92, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Olejniczak, K. [Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM), Kurt-Georg-Kiesinger-Allee 3, 53175 Bonn (Germany); Stahlmann, R. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Universitaetsklinikum Benjamin Franklin, Institute of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Berlin (Germany); Kaufmann, W.; Gelbke, H.P. [BASF AG, Department of Product Safety, Regulations, Toxicology and Ecology, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Bolt, H.M. [Institute of Occupational Physiology (IfADo), Ardeystrasse, 44139 Dortmund (Germany); Greim, H. [TU Muenchen, Institute of Toxicology, Hohenbachernstrasse 15, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Keutz, E. von [Bayer-AG, PH-PD P, Health Care Toxicology, Postfach 10 17 09, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    There is increasing discussion that children might be considered as a specific subgroup in public health regulations which could be more sensitive than the average ''adult'' human being. Differences between children and adults, with regard to susceptibility towards toxicants, may result from a combination of toxicokinetic, toxicodynamic and exposure factors. Kinetic factors are of importance mainly in the early postnatal period, largely as the result of immature elimination systems, i.e. metabolising enzymes and/or renal function. Specific vulnerability may prevail during several time periods, related to the development and maturation of organs (for example, brain, bone, endocrine system). For some substances, it has been shown that children at a specific age are less sensitive than adults. Specific exposures of toddlers to environmental chemicals may be high due to their moving behaviour and hand-to-mouth activities. Existing scenarios and models for exposure of children should be improved, in particular with respect to different ages. The outcome of model calculations must be verified by human biomonitoring analysis. At present, there is ongoing discussion of toxicological test models suitable to delineate human postnatal development. Experience with infant-orientated test systems is scarce (for example in developmental neurotoxicity). In general, tools for predicting toxicological sensitivity of children must be further improved. Regulators should also be aware that reduction of lifestyle-related toxic exposures such as smoking and drug abuse in children and adolescents is now an increasing public health problem in many countries. (orig.)

  3. An Authenticated Key Agreement Scheme Based on Cyclic Automorphism Subgroups of Random Orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Group-based cryptography is viewed as a modern cryptographic candidate solution to blocking quantum computer attacks, and key exchange protocols on the Internet are one of the primitives to ensure the security of communication. In 2016 Habeeb et al proposed a “textbook” key exchange protocol based on the semidirect product of two groups, which is insecure for use in real-world applications. In this paper, after discarding the unnecessary disguising notion of semidirect product in the protocol, we establish a simplified yet enhanced authenticated key agreement scheme based on cyclic automorphism subgroups of random orders by making hybrid use of certificates and symmetric-key encryption as challenge-and-responses in the public-key setting. Its passive security is formally analyzed, which is relative to the cryptographic hardness assumption of a computational number-theoretic problem. Cryptanalysis of this scheme shows that it is secure against the intruder-in-the-middle attack even in the worst case of compromising the signatures, and provides explicit key confirmation to both parties.

  4. EGR2 mutations define a new clinically aggressive subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E; Noerenberg, D; Mansouri, L; Ljungström, V; Frick, M; Sutton, L-A; Blakemore, S J; Galan-Sousa, J; Plevova, K; Baliakas, P; Rossi, D; Clifford, R; Roos-Weil, D; Navrkalova, V; Dörken, B; Schmitt, C A; Smedby, K E; Juliusson, G; Giacopelli, B; Blachly, J S; Belessi, C; Panagiotidis, P; Chiorazzi, N; Davi, F; Langerak, A W; Oscier, D; Schuh, A; Gaidano, G; Ghia, P; Xu, W; Fan, L; Bernard, O A; Nguyen-Khac, F; Rassenti, L; Li, J; Kipps, T J; Stamatopoulos, K; Pospisilova, S; Zenz, T; Oakes, C C; Strefford, J C; Rosenquist, R; Damm, F

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent mutations within EGR2 were recently reported in advanced-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and associated with a worse outcome. To study their prognostic impact, 2403 CLL patients were examined for mutations in the EGR2 hotspot region including a screening (n=1283) and two validation cohorts (UK CLL4 trial patients, n=366; CLL Research Consortium (CRC) patients, n=490). Targeted deep-sequencing of 27 known/postulated CLL driver genes was also performed in 38 EGR2-mutated patients to assess concurrent mutations. EGR2 mutations were detected in 91/2403 (3.8%) investigated cases, and associated with younger age at diagnosis, advanced clinical stage, high CD38 expression and unmutated IGHV genes. EGR2-mutated patients frequently carried ATM lesions (42%), TP53 aberrations (18%) and NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations (16%). EGR2 mutations independently predicted shorter time-to-first-treatment (TTFT) and overall survival (OS) in the screening cohort; they were confirmed associated with reduced TTFT and OS in the CRC cohort and independently predicted short OS from randomization in the UK CLL4 cohort. A particularly dismal outcome was observed among EGR2-mutated patients who also carried TP53 aberrations. In summary, EGR2 mutations were independently associated with an unfavorable prognosis, comparable to CLL patients carrying TP53 aberrations, suggesting that EGR2-mutated patients represent a new patient subgroup with very poor outcome.

  5. Research on subgroups is not research on equity attributes: Evidence from an overview of systematic reviews on vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Zuske, Meike-Kathrin; Auer, Christian

    2017-06-07

    Equity remains a priority in the international health development agenda. However, major inequities in vaccination coverage jeopardise the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. We aim at comprehensively describing how research has addressed equity issues related to vaccination. We carried out an overview of systematic reviews (SRs) that explicitly explored the effects of interventions to improve vaccination in any context; for any vaccine and, in any language. We followed standard research synthesis methods to systematically search for SR, assess them for inclusion and extracting relevant data, particularly on vaccination related outcomes. To gather evidence on equity issues addressed in the SR, we used the PROGRESS-plus framework. Our search obtained 2,003 hits which resulted in 54 included SRs, published between 1994 and 2014. The quality of SRs was generally poor, with less than half complying with most of the quality criteria. Reported vaccines included, by order of frequency, influenza and Expanded Programme on Immunisation vaccines. The types of interventions more frequently reported were related to vaccination delivery strategies, financial support and information, education and communication. Most of the SRs suggested effects favouring intervention groups as opposed to comparison groups. The most frequently reported equity attribute was 'place of residence' and the least reported equity attributes were sexual orientation and religion. Very few estimates of effects actually measured differences or changes between groups having those attributes and all of them referred to the place of residence. No data was found about reducing equity gaps for vulnerable groups or minorities, or attributes such as sexual orientation, education or specific religious groups. Although research on vulnerable populations as a subgroup is abundant, it fails to report on the interventions that will actually reduce inequities and consider how redistribution of health care

  6. Distinct Wound Healing and Quality-of-Life Outcomes in Subgroups of Patients With Venous Leg Ulcers With Different Symptom Cluster Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Kathleen; Miaskowski, Christine; Alexander, Kimberly; Liu, Wei-Hong; Aouizerat, Bradley; Parker, Christina; Maresco-Pennisi, Diane; Edwards, Helen

    2017-05-01

    Adults with venous leg ulcers frequently experience multiple symptoms that may influence quality of life (QOL). The objective of this study was to identify patient subgroups based on their experience with a pain-depression-fatigue-sleep disturbance symptom cluster and to identify differences in patient characteristics and wound-healing and QOL outcomes between the subgroups. Secondary data analysis from previous longitudinal studies of 247 patients with venous leg ulcers. Latent class analysis identified subgroups of patients with distinct experiences with the symptom cluster of pain, depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Hierarchical regression analysis identified relationships between the subgroups and QOL outcomes. Survival analysis identified differences between the subgroups and ulcer healing. Latent class analysis found 67% of patients were in a mild symptom subgroup (i.e., experiencing no or mild pain, depressive symptoms, fatigue, or sleep disturbance). One-third of the samples were in a severe symptom subgroup, who reported moderate-to-severe levels of these symptoms. Compared with the mild subgroup, patients in the severe subgroup had poorer QOL scores (t = 8.06, P ulcer healing, decreased QOL, and membership in the severe symptom subgroup. These findings suggest that comprehensive symptom assessment is needed to identify patients at higher risk for poor outcomes and enable early intervention. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MMN/P3a deficits in first episode psychosis: comparing schizophrenia-spectrum and affective-spectrum subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manreena; Battisti, Robert A; Ward, Philip B; Ahmed, Arnab; Hickie, Ian B; Hermens, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    Reduced mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a amplitudes are neurophysiological biomarkers for schizophrenia that index deviance detection and the orienting response, respectively. First-episode psychosis (FEP) patients show reduced amplitudes of the 'MMN/P3a complex', but it is unclear whether this occurs across the FEP spectrum. Fifty-three young people (17-36 years) were assessed: 17 FEP affective-spectrum (bipolar disorder with psychotic features and major depressive disorder with psychotic features), 18 FEP schizophrenia-spectrum (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophreniform disorder), and 18 healthy controls. MMN/P3a was acquired during a two-tone, auditory paradigm with 8% duration deviants. Clinical, psychosocial and neuropsychological assessments were also undertaken. FEP schizophrenia- and FEP affective-spectrum showed significantly reduced fronto-central MMN and central P3a amplitudes compared to controls. FEP subgroups also showed significantly poorer cognitive and psychosocial functioning. The combined FEP sample showed significant correlations between fronto-central MMN amplitudes and cognitive measures. FEP schizophrenia-spectrum and FEP affective-spectrum were similarly impaired in two biomarkers for schizophrenia. FEP subgroups showed impairments in fronto-central MMN consistent with chronic patients. Similarly, both subgroups showed reductions in P3a; although the affective subgroup showed an 'intermediate' frontal response. These findings suggest that FEP patients with both affective and schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses share common neurobiological disturbances in deviance detection/orienting processes in the early phase of illness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Could the clinical interpretability of subgroups detected using clustering methods be improved by using a novel two-stage approach?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Wulff Christensen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    presentation of 580 patients. Results The new two-stage clustering resulted in two subgroups that approximated the classic textbook descriptions of musculoskeletal chest pain and atypical angina chest pain. The traditional single-stage clustering resulted in five clusters that were also clinically recognisable...

  9. Analysis of efficacy and safety of treatment with collagenase Clostridium histolyticum among subgroups of patients with Dupuytren contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Raymond B; Kushner, Harvey; Nguyen, Dat; Naam, Nash; Curtin, Catherine

    2014-09-01

    Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) injection is a nonoperative treatment of hand contractures from Dupuytren disease. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of CCH in several subgroups of patients with increased surgical risk.Data were pooled from 3 randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials. This analysis included 271 patients with metacarpophalangeal (n = 167) or proximal interphalangeal (n = 104) joint contractures greater than or equal to 20 degrees treated with CCH (0.58 mg collagenase per injection). Subgroups included age, sex, and diabetes status. End points included rate of clinical success (reduction in contracture to 0-5 degrees of normal) and percentage of adverse events.There was no significant difference in clinical success by age, diabetes status, or sex with 63% reaching the end point. There was no difference in adverse events among the subgroups, with peripheral edema, contusion, and injection-site hemorrhage being most common.High-risk subgroups do not demonstrate differences in efficacy or safety with CCH treatment of Dupuytren-related contractures.

  10. Subgroups of the BENEFIT study: Risk of developing MS and treatment effect of interferon beta-1b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polman, C.; Kappos, L.; Freedman, M.; Edan, G.; Hartung, H.P.; Miller, D.H.; Montalbán, X.; Barkhof, F.; Selmaj, K.; Uitdehaag, B.; Dahms, S.; Bauer, L.; Pohl, C.; Sandbrink, R.

    2007-01-01

    Background The BENEFIT study examined interferon beta (IFNB)-1b treatment in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and ≥ 2 clinically silent brain MRI lesions. Methods Subgroups of 468 patients (IFNB- 1b: n = 292; placebo: n = 176) were created for demographics,

  11. Identification of five chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subgroups with different prognoses in the ECLIPSE cohort using cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, Stephen I; Locantore, Nicholas; Delafont, Bruno; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Silverman, Edwin K; Vestbo, Jørgen; Miller, Bruce E; Bakke, Per; Celli, Bartolomé; Calverley, Peter M A; Coxson, Harvey; Crim, Courtney; Edwards, Lisa D; Lomas, David A; MacNee, William; Wouters, Emiel F M; Yates, Julie C; Coca, Ignacio; Agustí, Alvar

    2015-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease that likely includes clinically relevant subgroups. To identify subgroups of COPD in ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints) subjects using cluster analysis and to assess clinically meaningful outcomes of the clusters during 3 years of longitudinal follow-up. Factor analysis was used to reduce 41 variables determined at recruitment in 2,164 patients with COPD to 13 main factors, and the variables with the highest loading were used for cluster analysis. Clusters were evaluated for their relationship with clinically meaningful outcomes during 3 years of follow-up. The relationships among clinical parameters were evaluated within clusters. Five subgroups were distinguished using cross-sectional clinical features. These groups differed regarding outcomes. Cluster A included patients with milder disease and had fewer deaths and hospitalizations. Cluster B had less systemic inflammation at baseline but had notable changes in health status and emphysema extent. Cluster C had many comorbidities, evidence of systemic inflammation, and the highest mortality. Cluster D had low FEV1, severe emphysema, and the highest exacerbation and COPD hospitalization rate. Cluster E was intermediate for most variables and may represent a mixed group that includes further clusters. The relationships among clinical variables within clusters differed from that in the entire COPD population. Cluster analysis using baseline data in ECLIPSE identified five COPD subgroups that differ in outcomes and inflammatory biomarkers and show different relationships between clinical parameters, suggesting the clusters represent clinically and biologically different subtypes of COPD.

  12. Can Failure Succeed? Using Racial Subgroup Rules to Analyze the Effect of School Accountability Failure on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Many school accountability programs are built on the premise that the sanctions attached to failure will produce higher future student achievement. Furthermore, such programs often include subgroup achievement rules that attempt to hold schools accountable for the performance of all demographic classes of students. This paper looks at two issues:…

  13. EULAR/ACR classification criteria for adult and juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and their major subgroups: a methodology report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottai, Matteo; Tjärnlund, Anna; Santoni, Giola; Werth, Victoria P.; Pilkington, Clarissa; de Visser, Marianne; Alfredsson, Lars; Amato, Anthony A.; Barohn, Richard J.; Liang, Matthew H.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Arnardottir, Snjolaug; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G.; Danko, Katalin; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Feldman, Brian M.; García-de la Torre, Ignacio; Gordon, Patrick; Hayashi, Taichi; Katz, James D.; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Lang, Bianca A.; Li, Yuhui; Oddis, Chester V.; Olesinka, Marzena; Reed, Ann M.; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Sanner, Helga; Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Wook Song, Yeong; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Amoruso, Maria; Andersson, Helena; Bayat, Nastaran; Bhansing, Kavish J.; Bucher, Sara; Champbell, Richard; Charles-Schoeman, Christina; Chaudhry, Vinay; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Chung, Lorinda; Cronin, Mary; Curry, Theresa; Dahlbom, Kathe; Distler, Oliver; Efthimiou, Petros; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; Faiq, Abdullah; Farhadi, Payam Noroozi; Fiorentino, David; Hengstman, Gerald; Hoogendijk, Jessica; Huber, Adam; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Katsumata, Yasuhiro; Kim, Susan; Kong-Rosario, Michelle; Kontzias, Apostolos; Krol, Petra; Kurita, Takashi; Li, Zhan-Guo; Lindvall, Björn; Linklater, Helen; Maillard, Sue; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Mantegazza, Renato; Marder, Galina S.; Nagahashi Marie, Suely Kazue; Mathiesen, Pernille; Mavragani, Clio P.; McHugh, Neil J.; Michaels, Mimi; Mohammed, Reem; Morgan, Gabrielle; Moser, David W.; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M.

    2017-01-01

    To describe the methodology used to develop new classification criteria for adult and juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) and their major subgroups. An international, multidisciplinary group of myositis experts produced a set of 93 potentially relevant variables to be tested for

  14. Suicide Risk across Latent Class Subgroups: A Test of the Generalizability of the Interpersonal Psychological Theory of Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jennifer S; Batterham, Philip J; Calear, Alison L; Han, Jin

    2018-01-06

    It remains unclear whether the Interpersonal Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS; Joiner, ) is generalizable to the population or holds more explanatory power for certain subgroups compared to others. The aim of this study was to (1) identify subgroups of individuals who endorsed suicide ideation in the past month based on a range of mental health and demographic variables, (2) compare levels of the IPTS constructs within these subgroups, and (3) test the IPTS predictions for suicide ideation and suicide attempt for each group. Latent class, negative binomial, linear, and logistic regression analyses were conducted on population-based data obtained from 1,321 adults recruited from Facebook. Among participants reporting suicide ideation, four distinct patterns of risk factors emerged based on age and severity of mental health symptoms. Groups with highly elevated mental health symptoms reported the highest levels of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. Tests of the IPTS interactions provided partial support for the theory, primarily in young adults with elevated mental health symptoms. Lack of support found for the IPTS predictions across the subgroups and full sample in this study raise some questions around the broad applicability of the theory. © 2018 The American Association of Suicidology.

  15. The prevalence of risk factors for general recidivism in female adolescent sexual offenders: A comparison of three subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Put, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    To our knowledge, there are no former studies in which subgroups of female adolescent sexual offenders are studied. Therefore, we examined differences in risk factors for general recidivism between female adolescents who have committed a felony sexual offense against a younger child (CSO, n = 25),

  16. Exploring subgroup effects by socioeconomic position of three effective school-based dietary interventions: the European TEENAGE project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lien, N.; Haerens, L.; te Velde, S.J.; Mercken, L.; Klepp, K.I.; Moore, L.; de Bourdeaudhuij, I.; Faggiano, F.; Lenthe, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore subgroup effects by high and low socioeconomic position (SEP) of three previously conducted, effective European interventions. Methods: Reanalyses stratified by SEP were conducted by the research groups of each study. All studies were school-based:

  17. Eating habits of obese patients in the Netherlands: a comparison between various subgroups and the general Dutch population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, M.L.; Koppeschaar, H.P.F.

    1995-01-01

    It is still uncertain whether subgroups of obese subjects demonstrate different eating patterns. The aim of this report is to compare data on dietary intake obtained by different methods (dietary history and dietary diary) in several groups of obese patients in which the effects of weight-reducing

  18. GADD45ß, an anti-tumor gene, inhibits avian leukosis virus subgroup J replication in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a retrovirus that induces neoplasia, hepatomegaly, immunosuppression and poor performance in chickens. The tumorigenic and pathogenic mechanisms of ALV-J remain a hot topic. To explore anti-tumor genes that confer genetic resistance to ALV-J infection in ch...

  19. Circular RNA alterations are involved in resistance to avian leukosis virus subgroup-J-induced tumor formation in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup (ALV-J) is an oncogenic neoplasm-inducing retrovirus that causes significant economic losses in the poultry industry. Recent studies have demonstrated circular RNAs (circRNAs) are implicated in pathogenic processes; however, no research has indicated circRNAs are invol...

  20. Differences in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and perceived risks regarding colorectal cancer screening among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese sub-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, T Domi; Carney, Patricia A; Lee-Lin, Frances; Mori, Motomi; Chen, Zunqiu; Leung, Holden; Lau, Christine; Lieberman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Asian ethnic subgroups are often treated as a single demographic group in studies looking at cancer screening and health disparities. To evaluate knowledge and health beliefs associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) and CRC screening among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese subgroups, a survey assessed participants' demographic characteristics, healthcare utilization, knowledge, beliefs, attitudes associated with CRC and CRC screening. Exploratory factor analysis identified six factors accounting >60 % of the total variance in beliefs and attitudes. Cronbach's alpha coefficients assessed internal consistency. Differences among Asian subgroups were assessed using a Chi square, Fisher's exact, or Kruskal-Wallis test. Pearson's correlation coefficient assessed an association among factors. 654 participants enrolled: 238 Chinese, 217 Korean, and 199 Vietnamese. Statistically significant differences existed in demographic and health care provider characteristics, knowledge, and attitude/belief variables regarding CRC. These included knowledge of CRC screening modalities, reluctance to discuss cancer, belief that cancer is preventable by diet and lifestyle, and intention to undergo CRC screening. Chinese subjects were more likely to use Eastern medicine (52 % Chinese, 25 % Korean, 27 % Vietnamese; p Korean subjects were less likely to see herbs as a form of cancer prevention (34 % Chinese, 20 % Korean, 35 % Vietnamese; p Korean, 80 % Vietnamese; p < 0.0001). Important differences exist in knowledge, attitudes, and health beliefs among Asian subgroups. Understanding these differences will enable clinicians to deliver tailored, effective health messages to improve CRC screening and other health behaviors.

  1. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring and Evaluation FY08 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, GE; Diefenderfer, HL [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-09-29

    The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In fiscal year 2008 (FY08), EOS project accomplishments included (1) subgroup meetings; (2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; (3) project management via BPA's project tracking system, Pisces; (4) quarterly project status reports; and (5) a major revision to the Estuary RME document and its subsequent regional release (new version January 2008). Many of the estuary RME recommendations in this document were incorporated into the Biological Opinion on FCRPS operations (May 2008). In summary, the FY08 EOS project resulted in expanded, substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, a new version of the federal Estuary RME program document, and implementation coordination. This annual report is a FY08 deliverable for the project titled Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup.

  2. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY08 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2008-09-29

    The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In fiscal year 2008 (FY08), EOS project accomplishments included 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, Pisces; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME document and its subsequent regional release (new version January 2008). Many of the estuary RME recommendations in this document were incorporated into the Biological Opinion on hydrosystem operations (May 2008). In summary, the FY08 EOS project resulted in expanded, substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, a new version of the federal Estuary RME program document, and implementation coordination. This annual report is a FY08 deliverable for the project titled Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup.

  3. Gender by Preferred Gambling Activity in Treatment Seeking Problem Gamblers: A Comparison of Subgroup Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanbhai, Yasmin; Smith, David; Battersby, Malcolm

    2017-03-01

    Problem gambling is a growing public health concern and treatment incompletion levels remain high. The study aims to support and extend previous studies in relation to the heterogeneity of the gambling population based on gender and gambling type, and the implications of subgroup differences on treatment outcomes. Additionally, the concept of drop-out is addressed in terms of categorical treatment measures. The empirical findings are examined in the context of the theoretical framework of the pathways model. Participants were recruited from the Statewide Gambling Therapy Service and stratified into subgroups based on gender and gambling mode preference [Electronic Gambling Machines (EGM) or track race betters]. Baseline predictors collected and analysed using multinomial logistical regression included demographic information as well as gambling variables, while treatment outcomes consisted of three therapist rated measures. Significant differences between the subgroups were found for age, marital and employment status, gambling duration, alcohol use and the Kessler 10 measure of psychological distress. Specifically, male track race gamblers were younger, married, employed, had a longer duration of gambling, higher alcohol use and lower psychological distress relative to EGM users. No difference was found in any of the treatment outcomes, however, consistent with previous studies, all subgroups had high treatment incompletion levels. The findings demonstrate the importance of screening, assessing and treating problem gamblers as a heterogeneous group with different underlying demographics and psychopathologies. It is also hoped future studies will continue to address treatment incompletion with a re-conceptualisation of the term drop-out.

  4. Differences in fat and sodium intake across hypertension subgroups in the Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living (MCHL) Nutrition Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study is to examine differences between self-reported intakes of sodium, trans-fat, and total fat among hypertension (HTN) subgroups of participants in Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living nutrition education intervention. Dietary intake was measured using a food frequenc...

  5. Use of a fragment of the tuf gene for phytoplasma 16Sr group/subgroup differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contaldo, Nicoletta; Canel, Alessandro; Makarova, Olga

    2011-01-01

    The usefulness of RFLP analyses on a 435 bp fragment of the tuf gene for preliminary identification of phytoplasmas from a number of phytoplasma ribosomal groups and/or 'Candidatus. Phytoplasma' was verified. The strains employed belong to thirteen 16Sr DNA groups and 22 different subgroups and w...

  6. Nintedanib in Japanese patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: A subgroup analysis of the INPULSIS® randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Arata; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Ogura, Takashi; Homma, Sakae; Fujimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Wataru; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2017-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a specific form of chronic, progressive fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Nintedanib significantly reduced the annual rate of decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) compared with placebo in patients with IPF in two replicate trials (INPULSIS®). We examined the efficacy and safety of nintedanib in Japanese patients. We conducted pre-specified subgroup analyses of the annual rate of decline in FVC, time to first acute exacerbation (AE), change from baseline in St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score and safety using pooled data from the INPULSIS® trials for Japanese patients. In the overall population, 76 of 638 and 50 of 423 patients in the nintedanib and placebo groups, respectively, were Japanese. Results in Japanese patients were consistent with those in the overall population. In Japanese patients, the adjusted annual rate of decline in FVC was -135.9 mL/year in the nintedanib group and -267.7 mL/year in the placebo group (difference (95% CI): 131.9 (50.7, 213.1) mL/year); the hazard ratio for the time to first AE was 0.25 (0.06, 1.02); and the adjusted mean change from baseline in SGRQ total score at week 52 was 5.81 in the nintedanib group and 9.68 in the placebo group (difference: -3.87 (-8.51, 0.76)). Diarrhoea and liver-related adverse events were the most common events in the nintedanib group, but were reversible following dose reduction, drug interruption or symptomatic therapy. The present results indicate that the efficacy and safety of nintedanib in Japanese patients are comparable with those in the overall population. © 2016 The Authors. Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  7. Legionella detection and subgrouping in water air-conditioning cooling tower systems in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Matawah, Qadreyah; Al-Zenki, Sameer; Al-Azmi, Ahmad; Al-Waalan, Tahani; Al-Salameen, Fadila; Hejji, Ahmad Ben

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of the study was to test for the presence of Legionnaires' disease-causing microorganisms in air-conditioned buildings in Kuwait using molecular technologies. For this purpose, 547 samples were collected from 38 cooling towers for the analysis of Legionella pneumophila. These samples included those from water (n = 178), air (n = 231), and swabs (n = 138). Out of the 547 samples, 226 (41%) samples were presumptive positive for L. pneumophila, with L. pneumophila viable counts in the positive water samples ranging from 1 to 88 CFU/ml. Of the Legionella culture-positive samples, 204 isolates were examined by latex agglutination. These isolates were predominately identified as L. pneumophila serogroup (sg) 2-14. Using the Dresden panel of monoclonal antibodies, 74 representatives isolates were further serogrouped. Results showed that 51% of the isolates belonged to serogroup 7 followed by 1 (18%) and 3 (18%). Serogroups 4 (4%) and 10 (7%) were isolated at a lower frequency, and two isolates could not be assigned to a serogroup. These results indicate the wide prevalence of L. pneumophila serogroup 7 as the predominant serogroup at the selected sampling sites. Furthermore, the 74 L. pneumophila (sg1 = 13; sg3 = 13; sg4 = 3; sg7 = 38; sg10 = 5; sgX = 2) isolates were genotyped using the seven gene protocol sequence-based typing (SBT) scheme developed by the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI). The results show that Legionella isolates were discriminated into nine distinct sequence typing (ST) profiles, five of which were new to the SBT database of EWGLI. Additionally, all of the ST1 serogroup 1 isolates were of the OLDA/Oxford subgroup. These baseline data will form the basis for the development of a Legionella environmental surveillance program and used for future epidemiological investigations.

  8. B Subgroup: Bx blood Group in a Patient : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Khatun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of a case of B Sub Group: Bx, first ever detected in Bangladesh, while doing compatibility test of a sample of a patient undergoing cardiac surgery. The patient was referred to the transfusion medicine department of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University to do cross-match with 8 proposed donors of same ABO group prior to cardiac surgery. His red cells showed weak agglutination with anti-B, anti-AB and in his serum there was potent Anti-A and weak anti-B which was not detected at 370C. After adsorption with anti-B an elute was prepared from patient’s cells which agglutinate with B and AB cells but did not agglutinate with A or O cells. The patient could be transfused with B blood but in this situation of cardiac surgery, as he should have to be kept in hypothermic condition, we transfused him with O washed red cell with AB plasma during operation. Patient was released from hospital without any complication. The weak B subgroups are: B3, Bx & Bel. B3 shows a mixed field of agglutination with anti B. Bx shows a weak agglutination and weak anti-B is found in the serum. Bel is not agglutinated with anti-B but is only adsorbed anti-B. With meticulous attention, cell & serum grouping of recipient and proposed donor/s to be done along with 3 phase cross-matching (Saline phase at room temp, at 4 and 37 degree Celsius temp, Indirect Coomb’s Test phase to ensure right blood to the right patient at right time.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v5i1.11032 BSMMU J 2012; 5(1:81-82 

  9. Expression levels of HMGA2 in adipocytic tumors correlate with morphologic and cytogenetic subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartuma Hammurabi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HMGA2 gene encodes a protein that alters chromatin structure. Deregulation, typically through chromosomal rearrangements, of HMGA2 has an important role in the development of several mesenchymal neoplasms. These rearrangements result in the expression of a truncated protein lacking the acidic C-terminus, a fusion protein consisting of the AT-hook domains encoded by exons 1–3 and parts from another gene, or a full-length protein; loss of binding sites for regulatory microRNA molecules from the 3' untranslated region (UTR of HMGA2 has been suggested to be a common denominator. Methods Seventy adipocytic tumors, representing different morphologic and cytogenetic subgroups, were analyzed by qRT-PCR to study the expression status of HMGA2; 18 of these tumors were further examined by PCR to search for mutations or deletions in the 3'UTR. Results Type (full-length or truncated and level of expression varied with morphology and karyotype, with the highest levels in atypical lipomatous tumors and lipomas with rearrangements of 12q13-15 and the lowest in lipomas with 6p- or 13q-rearrangements, hibernomas, spindle cell lipomas and myxoid liposarcomas. All 18 examined tumors showed reduced or absent expression of the entire, or parts of, the 3'UTR, which was not due to mutations at the DNA level. Conclusion In adipocytic tumors with deregulated HMGA2 expression, the 3'UTR is consistently lost, either due to physical disruption of HMGA2 or a shift to production of shorter 3'UTR.

  10. Molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Nagasawa, Koo; Kimura, Ryusuke; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Hirano, Eiko; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Misaki, Takako; Oishi, Kazunori; Kuroda, Makoto; Ryo, Akihide

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we examined the molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup B (HRSV-B). First, we performed time-scale evolution analyses using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. Next, we performed genetic distance, linear B-cell epitope prediction, N-glycosylation, positive/negative selection site, and Bayesian skyline plot analyses. We also constructed a structural model of the F protein and mapped the amino acid substitutions and the predicted B-cell epitopes. The MCMC-constructed phylogenetic tree indicated that the HRSV F gene diverged from the bovine respiratory syncytial virus gene approximately 580years ago and had a relatively low evolutionary rate (7.14×10(-4)substitutions/site/year). Furthermore, a common ancestor of HRSV-A and -B diverged approximately 290years ago, while HRSV-B diverged into three clusters for approximately 60years. The genetic similarity of the present strains was very high. Although a maximum of 11 amino acid substitutions were observed in the structural model of the F protein, only one strain possessed an amino acid substitution located within the palivizumab epitope. Four epitopes were predicted, although these did not correspond to the neutralization sites of the F protein including the palivizumab epitope. In addition, five N-glycosylation sites of the present HRSV-B strains were inferred. No positive selection sites were identified; however, many sites were found to be under negative selection. The effective population size of the gene has remained almost constant. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that the HRSV-B F gene is highly conserved, as is the F protein of HRSV-A. Moreover, our prediction of B-cell epitopes does not show that the palivizumab reaction site may be recognized as an epitope during naturally occurring infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antineutrophil antibodies define clinical and genetic subgroups in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hov, Johannes R; Boberg, Kirsten M; Taraldsrud, Eli; Vesterhus, Mette; Boyadzhieva, Maria; Solberg, Inger Camilla; Schrumpf, Erik; Vatn, Morten H; Lie, Benedicte A; Molberg, Øyvind; Karlsen, Tom H

    2017-03-01

    The strongest genetic risk factors in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are encoded in the HLA complex. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been reported in up to 94% of PSC patients, but their clinical significance and immunogenetic basis are ill defined. We aimed to characterize clinical and genetic associations of ANCA in PSC. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were analysed with indirect immunofluorescence in 241 Norwegian PSC patients. HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed in the patients and in 368 healthy controls. Data on perinuclear ANCA (pANCA) and HLA-DRB1 were available from 274 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients without known liver disease. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were found in 193 (80%) of the PSC patients, with pANCA in 169 (70%). ANCA-positive patients were younger than ANCA negative at diagnosis of PSC and had a lower frequency of biliary cancer (9% vs 19%, P=.047). There were no differences between PSC patients with and without inflammatory bowel disease. Genetically, the strong PSC risk factors HLA-B*08 (frequency in healthy 13%) and DRB1*03 (14%) were more prevalent in ANCA-positive than -negative patients (43% vs 25%, P=.0012 and 43% vs 25%, P=.0015 respectively). The results were similar when restricting the analysis to pANCA-positive patients. In UC patients without liver disease, HLA-DRB1*03 was more prevalent in pANCA-positive compared with -negative patients (P=.03). Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies identified PSC patients with particular clinical and genetic characteristics, suggesting that ANCA may mark a clinically relevant pathogenetic subgroup in the PSC-UC disease spectrum. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Persistence of megalencephaly in a subgroup of young boys with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libero, Lauren E; Nordahl, Christine W; Li, Deana D; Ferrer, Emilio; Rogers, Sally J; Amaral, David G

    2016-11-01

    A recurring finding in autism spectrum disorder research is that head and brain growth is disproportionate to body growth in early childhood. Nordahl et al. (2011) demonstrated that this occurs in approximately 15% of boys with autism. While the literature suggests that brain growth normalizes at older ages, this has never been evaluated in a longitudinal study. The current study evaluated head circumference and total cerebral volume in 129 male children with autism and 49 age-matched, typically developing controls. We determined whether 3-year-old boys with brain size disproportionate to height (which we call disproportionate megalencephaly) demonstrated an abnormal trajectory of head growth from birth and whether they maintained an enlarged brain at 5 years of age. Findings were based on longitudinal, structural MRI data collected around 3, 4, and 5 years of age and head circumference data from medical records. At 3 years of age, 19 boys with autism had enlarged brains while 110 had brain sizes in the normal range. Boys with disproportionate megalencephaly had greater total cerebral, gray matter, and white matter volumes from 3-5 years compared to boys with autism and normal sized brains and typically developing boys, but no differences in body size. While head circumference did not differ between groups at birth, it was significantly greater in the disproportionate megalencephaly group by around 2 years. These data suggest that there is a subgroup of boys with autism who have brains disproportionate to body size and that this continues until at least 5 years of age. Autism Res 2016, 9: 1169-1182. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Prevalence of HPV Infection in Racial-Ethnic Subgroups of Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragin, Camille; Liu, Jeffrey C; Jones, Gieira; Shoyele, Olubunmi; Sowunmi, Bukola; Kennett, Rachel; Groen, Harry J M; Gibbs, Denise; Blackman, Elizabeth; Esan, Michael; Brandwein, Margaret S; Devarajan, Karthik; Bussu, Francesco; Chernock, Rebecca; Chien, Chih-Yen; Cohen, Marc A; Samir, El-Mofty; Mikio, Suzuki; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Funchain, Pauline; Eng, Charis; Gollin, Susanne M; Hong, Angela; Jung, Yuh-S; Krüger, Maximilian; Lewis, James; Morbini, Patrizia; Landolfo, Santo; Rittà, Massimo; Straetmans, Jos; Szarka, Krisztina; Tachezy, Ruth; Worden, Francis P; Nelson, Deborah; Gathere, Samuel; Taioli, Emanuela

    2016-12-26

    The landscape of HPV infection in racial/ethnic subgroups of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients has not been evaluated carefully. In this study, a meta-analysis examined the prevalence of HPV in HNC patients of African ancestry. Additionally, a pooled analysis of subject-level data was also performed to investigate HPV prevalence and patterns of p16 (CDNK2A) expression amongst different racial groups. Eighteen publications (N = 798 Black HNC patients) were examined in the meta-analysis, and the pooled analysis included 29 datasets comprised of 3,129 HNC patients of diverse racial/ethnic background. The meta-analysis revealed that the prevalence of HPV16 was higher among Blacks with oropharyngeal cancer than Blacks with non-oropharyngeal cancer. However, there was great heterogeneity observed among studies (Q test P<0.0001). In the pooled analysis, after adjusting for each study, year of diagnosis, age, gender and smoking status, the prevalence of HPV16/18 in oropharyngeal cancer patients was highest in Whites (61.1%), followed by 58.0% in Blacks and 25.2% in Asians (P<0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in HPV16/18 prevalence in non-oropharyngeal cancer by race (P=0.682). With regard to the pattern of HPV16/18 status and p16 expression, White patients had the highest proportion of HPV16/18+/p16+ oropharyngeal cancer (52.3%), while Asians and Blacks had significantly lower proportions (23.0% and 22.6%, respectively) [P <0.0001]. Our findings suggest that the pattern of HPV16/18 status and p16 expression in oropharyngeal cancer appears to differ by race and this may contribute to survival disparities. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Paternal age related schizophrenia (PARS): Latent subgroups detected by k-means clustering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejoo; Malaspina, Dolores; Ahn, Hongshik; Perrin, Mary; Opler, Mark G; Kleinhaus, Karine; Harlap, Susan; Goetz, Raymond; Antonius, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Paternal age related schizophrenia (PARS) has been proposed as a subgroup of schizophrenia with distinct etiology, pathophysiology and symptoms. This study uses a k-means clustering analysis approach to generate hypotheses about differences between PARS and other cases of schizophrenia. We studied PARS (operationally defined as not having any family history of schizophrenia among first and second-degree relatives and fathers' age at birth ≥ 35 years) in a series of schizophrenia cases recruited from a research unit. Data were available on demographic variables, symptoms (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale; PANSS), cognitive tests (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised; WAIS-R) and olfaction (University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test; UPSIT). We conducted a series of k-means clustering analyses to identify clusters of cases containing high concentrations of PARS. Two analyses generated clusters with high concentrations of PARS cases. The first analysis (N=136; PARS=34) revealed a cluster containing 83% PARS cases, in which the patients showed a significant discrepancy between verbal and performance intelligence. The mean paternal and maternal ages were 41 and 33, respectively. The second analysis (N=123; PARS=30) revealed a cluster containing 71% PARS cases, of which 93% were females; the mean age of onset of psychosis, at 17.2, was significantly early. These results strengthen the evidence that PARS cases differ from other patients with schizophrenia. Hypothesis-generating findings suggest that features of PARS may include a discrepancy between verbal and performance intelligence, and in females, an early age of onset. These findings provide a rationale for separating these phenotypes from others in future clinical, genetic and pathophysiologic studies of schizophrenia and in considering responses to treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Preparation and immunoprotection of subgroup B avian leukosis virus inactivated vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Dong, Xuan; Sun, Xiaolong; Li, Weihua; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong; Wang, Xin

    2013-11-04

    To develop an inactivated vaccine against subgroup B avian leukosis virus (ALV-B) and determine if vaccination of chicken breeders could protect young chicks from ALV-B horizontal infection at early stage and accelerate eradication progress. Chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells were inoculated with SDAU09C2 strain of ALV-B and ALV-CEF was inactivated for preparation of oil-adjuvant vaccine. Eggs were collected from un-vaccinated and 9 vaccinated great parent female chickens for incubation. 1-day-old chicks were bled for testing their maternal antibodies to ALV-A/B and then inoculated with ALV-B. Viremia and cloaca p27 detection dynamics were tested and compared between chick groups with or without maternal antibody to ALV. In 3 weeks after 3 vaccination with the inactivated vaccine, all 9 vaccinated breeders developed high antibody titers against ALV-A/B with ELISA read values of 1.69-1.89 (the positive base line was 0.4) and kept at the high titers for at least another 4 weeks. Maternal antibody was detected in 70% (12/17) of chicks from breeders with high antibody titers to ALV-A/B. Only 4 of 12 chickens with maternal antibodies developed temporary viremia and no viremia was detected in the left 8 maternal antibody positive chickens during the whole 14 week after inoculation of ALV-B at 1 day of age. But the persistent viremia was detected in 2-8 weeks in all 9 maternal antibody negative chickens and the viremia persisted in the whole tested period of 14 weeks after inoculation of ALV-B. The inactivated ALV-B vaccine could induce high titer antibody reaction to ALV-B, it could provide maternal antibodies to 1-day-old chickens and protect chickens from early infection of ALV-B. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Defang; Wang, Guihua; Huang, Libo; Zheng, Qiankun; Li, Chengui; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2017-12-04

    The hypervariable antigenicity and immunosuppressive features of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) has led to great challenges to develop effective vaccines. Epitope vaccine will be a perspective trend. Previously, we identified a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope in hypervariable region 1 (hr1) of ALV-J, N-LRDFIA/E/TKWKS/GDDL/HLIRPYVNQS-C. BLAST analysis showed that the mutation of A, E, T and H in this epitope cover 79% of all ALV-J strains. Base on this data, we designed a multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine comprising the four mutation variants linked with glycine and serine. The recombinant multi-variant epitope gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The expressed protein of the variant multi-variant epitope gene can react with positive sera and monoclonal antibodies of ALV-J, while cannot react with ALV-J negative sera. The multi-variant epitope vaccine that conjugated Freund's adjuvant complete/incomplete showed high immunogenicity that reached the titer of 1:64,000 at 42 days post immunization and maintained the immune period for at least 126 days in SPF chickens. Further, we demonstrated that the antibody induced by the variant multi-variant ensemble epitope vaccine recognized and neutralized different ALV-J strains (NX0101, TA1, WS1, BZ1224 and BZ4). Protection experiment that was evaluated by clinical symptom, viral shedding, weight gain, gross and histopathology showed 100% chickens that inoculated the multi-epitope vaccine were well protected against ALV-J challenge. The result shows a promising multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine against hypervariable viruses in animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidence for cognitive subgroups in bipolar disorder and the influence of subclinical depression and sleep disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkert, J; Kopf, J; Kazmaier, J; Glaser, F; Zierhut, K C; Schiele, M A; Kittel-Schneider, S; Reif, A

    2015-02-01

    Recent research in bipolar disorder (BD) points to the relevance and persistence of cognitive deficits even in euthymia. Up to now, the mechanisms behind why some bipolar patients (BP) do not reach their former level of cognitive performance and psychosocial functioning while others remit completely, are not understood. In this study we aimed to identify a "cognitive deficit" vs. "non-deficit" subgroup within BD by using an extensive neuropsychological test battery. The test performance of 70 euthymic outpatients (BD-I and II, recruited as a sample of convenience from our bipolar disorder programme) was compared to 70 matched, healthy controls (HC). Furthermore, we investigated the association between demographic/clinical variables and the cognitive performance of BP. As expected, our sample of euthymic BP performed significantly worse than HC in psychomotor speed, divided attention, working memory, verbal memory, word fluency and problem solving. However, 41.4% of the patients did not have any neurocognitive deficits at all, and whether or not a patient belonged to the non-deficit group was not influenced by disease severity. Instead, our results demonstrate that patients suffering from persistent sleep disturbances and sub-threshold depressive symptomatology show more severe cognitive dysfunctions. In addition, antipsychotic treatment and comorbid anxiety disorder were associated with cognitive deficits. In sum, these results suggest that a major part of cognitive impairment is due to current symptomatology, especially sleep disorder and sub-syndromal depression. Rigorous treatment of these symptoms thus might well improve cognitive deficits and, as a consequence, overall functioning in BD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  18. Myoclonic epilepsy in Gaucher disease: genotype-phenotype insights from a rare patient subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joseph K; Orvisky, Eduard; Tayebi, Nahid; Kaneski, Christine; Lamarca, Mary E; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Martin, Brian M; Schiffmann, Raphael; Sidransky, Ellen

    2003-03-01

    Gaucher disease, the inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, presents with a wide spectrum of manifestations. Although Gaucher disease has been divided into three clinical types, patients with atypical presentations continue to be recognized. A careful phenotypic and genotypic assessment of patients with unusual symptoms may help define factors that modify phenotype in this disorder. One such example is a rare subgroup of patients with type 3 Gaucher disease who develop progressive myoclonic epilepsy. We evaluated 16 patients with myoclonic epilepsy, nine of whom were diagnosed by age 4 y with severe visceral involvement and myoclonus, and seven with a more chronic course, who were studied between ages 22 and 40. All of the patients had abnormal horizontal saccadic eye movements. Fourteen different genotypes were encountered, yet there were several shared alleles, including V394L (seen on two alleles), G377S (seen on three alleles), and L444P, N188S, and recombinant alleles (each found on four alleles). V394L, G377S, and N188S are mutations that have previously been associated with non-neuronopathic Gaucher disease. The spectrum of genotypes differed significantly from other patients with type 3 Gaucher disease, where genotypes L444P/L444P and R463C/null allele predominated. Northern blot studies revealed a normal glucocerebrosidase transcript, whereas Western studies showed that the patients studied lacked the processed 56 kD isoform of the enzyme, consistent with neuronopathic Gaucher disease. Brain autopsy samples from two patients demonstrated elevated levels of glucosylsphingosine, a toxic glycolipid, which could contribute to the development of myoclonus. Thus, although there were certain shared mutant alleles found in these patients, both the lack of a shared genotype and the variability in clinical presentations suggest that other modifiers must contribute to this rare phenotype.

  19. Treatment in patients who are not eligible for intravenous alteplase: MR CLEAN subgroup analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Maxim Jhl; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Fransen, Puck Ss; Beumer, Debbie; van den Berg, Lucie A; Lingsma, Hester F; Roos, Yvo Bwem; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; van Zwam, Wim H; Majoie, Charles Blm; van der Lugt, Aad; Dippel, Diederik Wj

    2016-08-01

    Patients with acute ischemic stroke due to intracranial large vessel occlusion benefit from intra-arterial therapy. Uncertainty exists about the effect of intra-arterial therapy in patients with contraindications for treatment with intravenous alteplase treatment. Our aim was to describe the clinical characteristics of this subgroup of patients and whether intra-arterial therapy is as safe and effective as it is after intravenous alteplase treatment. All 500 MR CLEAN patients were included and we distinguished between patients who were and were not treated with intravenous alteplase treatment. We estimated the effect of intra-arterial therapy on the shift on the modified Rankin Scale score with ordinal logistic regression analysis and tested for interaction of intravenous alteplase treatment with intra-arterial therapy on outcome. Furthermore, safety parameters and serious adverse events were analyzed. Fifty-five patients (11%) were not treated with intravenous alteplase treatment, mostly because of prolonged coagulation time tests or recent surgery. These patients were older and more often had atrial fibrillation or other vascular comorbidity. There was no interaction between intravenous alteplase treatment and intervention effect (p = 0.927). Intra-arterial therapy effect size in patients without intravenous alteplase treatment was 2.06 [95% CI: 0.69-6.13] and in patients with intravenous alteplase treatment 1.71 [95% CI: 1.22-2.40]. There were no safety issues. For patients with acute ischemic anterior circulation stroke caused by intracranial large vessel occlusion, who have contraindications for intravenous alteplase, intra-arterial treatment is not less effective or less safe than in patients who receive the treatment after intravenous alteplase. Clinical trial registration-URL: http://www.trialregister.nl. Unique identifier: (NTR)1804.Clinical trial registration-URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN10888758. © 2016 World

  20. Rivaroxaban for the treatment of symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in Chinese patients: a subgroup analysis of the EINSTEIN DVT and PE studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuqi; Wang, Chen; Chen, Zhong; Zhang, Jiwei; Liu, Zhihong; Jin, Bi; Ying, Kejing; Liu, Changwei; Shao, Yuxia; Jing, Zhicheng; Meng, Isabelle Ling; Prins, Martin H; Pap, Akos F; Müller, Katharina; Lensing, Anthonie Wa

    2013-12-16

    The worldwide EINSTEIN DVT and EINSTEIN PE studies randomized 8282 patients with acute symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or pulmonary embolism (PE) and, for the first time in trials in this setting, included patients in China. This analysis evaluates the results of these studies in this subgroup of patients. A total of 439 Chinese patients who had acute symptomatic DVT (n=211), or PE with or without DVT (n=228), were randomized to receive rivaroxaban (15 mg twice daily for 21 days, followed by 20 mg once daily) or standard therapy of enoxaparin overlapping with and followed by an adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist, for 3, 6, or 12 months. The primary efficacy outcome was symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism. The principal safety outcome was major or non-major clinically relevant bleeding. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in seven (3.2%) of the 220 patients in the rivaroxaban group and in seven (3.2%) of the 219 patients in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval 0.36-3.0; p=0.94). The principal safety outcome occurred in 13 (5.9%) patients in the rivaroxaban group and in 20 (9.2%) patients in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval 0.31-1.26; p=0.19). Major bleeding was observed in no patients in the rivaroxaban group and in five (2.3%) patients in the standard-therapy group. In fragile patients (defined as age >75 years, creatinine clearance EINSTEIN PE, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00439777; EINSTEIN DVT, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00440193.

  1. Could the clinical interpretability of subgroups detected using clustering methods be improved by using a novel two-stage approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Peter; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Kongsted, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of homogeneous subgroups of patients can usefully improve prediction of their outcomes and the targeting of treatment. There are a number of research approaches that have been used to recognise homogeneity in such subgroups and to test their implications. One approach is to use statistical clustering techniques, such as Cluster Analysis or Latent Class Analysis, to detect latent relationships between patient characteristics. Influential patient characteristics can come from diverse domains of health, such as pain, activity limitation, physical impairment, social role participation, psychological factors, biomarkers and imaging. However, such 'whole person' research may result in data-driven subgroups that are complex, difficult to interpret and challenging to recognise clinically. This paper describes a novel approach to applying statistical clustering techniques that may improve the clinical interpretability of derived subgroups and reduce sample size requirements. This approach involves clustering in two sequential stages. The first stage involves clustering within health domains and therefore requires creating as many clustering models as there are health domains in the available data. This first stage produces scoring patterns within each domain. The second stage involves clustering using the scoring patterns from each health domain (from the first stage) to identify subgroups across all domains. We illustrate this using chest pain data from the baseline presentation of 580 patients. The new two-stage clustering resulted in two subgroups that approximated the classic textbook descriptions of musculoskeletal chest pain and atypical angina chest pain. The traditional single-stage clustering resulted in five clusters that were also clinically recognisable but displayed less distinct differences. In this paper, a new approach to using clustering techniques to identify clinically useful subgroups of patients is suggested. Research designs, statistical

  2. Subgroup analysis of large trials can guide further research: a case study of vitamin E and pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Hemilä

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Harri Hemilä, Jaakko KaprioDepartment of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, FinlandBackground: Biology is complex and the effects of many interventions may vary between population groups. Subgroup analysis can give estimates for specific populations, but trials are usually too small for such analyses.Purpose: To test whether the effect of vitamin E on pneumonia risk is uniform over subgroups defined by smoking and exercise.Methods: The Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study examined the effects of vitamin E (50 mg per day and β-carotene (20 mg per day on lung cancer in 29,133 male smokers aged 50–69 years using a 2 × 2 factorial design. The trial was conducted among the general community in Finland during 1985–1993; the intervention lasted for 6.0 years (median. In the present study, we tested the uniformity of vitamin E effect on the risk of hospital-treated pneumonia (898 cases by adding a dummy variable to allow each subgroup its own vitamin E effect in a Cox model covering all participants.Results: Vitamin E effect was not uniform over eight subgroups defined by baseline smoking (5–19 vs ≥20 cigarettes per day, age of smoking initiation (≤20 vs ≥21 years, and exercise during leisure time (yes vs no. Vitamin E decreased pneumonia risk by 69% (95% CI: 43% to 83% among participants who had the least exposure to smoking and exercised during leisure time. Vitamin E increased pneumonia risk by 79% (95% CI: 27% to 150% among those who had the highest exposure to smoking and did not exercise.Limitations: Although the evidence of heterogeneity is strong, it is not evident to what extent the estimates of effect or the limits between the subgroups can be extrapolated to other populations.Conclusion: Subgroup analysis of large trials should be encouraged, though caution is needed in the interpretation of findings. The role of vitamin E in susceptibility to pneumonia in physically active nonsmokers warrants

  3. Analysis of Species, Subgroups, and Endosymbionts of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) From Southwestern Cotton Fields in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karut, Kamil; Mete Karaca, M; Döker, Ismail; Kazak, Cengiz

    2017-08-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is one of the most important insect pests worldwide including Turkey. Although there are substantial data regarding species composition of Turkish B. tabaci populations, the situation is still not clear and further investigations are needed. Therefore, in this study, species and subgroups of B. tabaci collected from cotton fields in southwestern part of Turkey (Antalya, Aydın, Denizli, and Muğla) were determined using microsatellite analysis, AluI-based mtCOI polymerase chain reaction-random length polymorphism, and sequencing. Secondary endosymbionts were also determined using diagnostic species-specific PCR. Middle East Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1), Mediterranean (MED) Q1, and MED Q2 were the species and subgroups found in this study. The MED species (85.3%) were found to be more dominant than MEAM1. Species status of B. tabaci varied depending on the location. Although all samples collected from Aydın were found to be Q1, three species and subgroups were found in Muğla. Secondary endosymbionts varied according to species and subgroups. Arsenophonus was found only from Q2, while Hamiltonella was detected in MEAM1 and Q1. In addition, high Rickettsia and low Wolbachia infections were detected in MEAM1 and Q1 populations, respectively. In conclusion, for the first time, we report the presence and symbiotic communities of Q1 from Turkey. We also found that the symbiont complement of the Q1 is more congruent with Q1 from Greece than other regions of the world, which may have some interesting implications for movement of this invasive subgroup. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Associations between gastric sensorimotor function, depression, somatization, and symptom-based subgroups in functional gastroduodenal disorders: are all symptoms equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauwaert, N; Jones, M P; Holvoet, L; Vandenberghe, J; Vos, R; Tack, J; Van Oudenhove, L

    2012-12-01

    Previous work indicated that psychosocial factors (depression and somatization) are more strongly associated with symptom severity and weight loss in functional dyspepsia (FD) than gastric sensorimotor function. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the association of these etiopathogenetic factors with Rome III symptom-based subgroups in FD [epigastric pain syndrome (EPS), postprandial distress syndrome (PDS)]. We aimed to test whether gastric sensitivity and emptying, depression, and somatization are differentially associated with empirically derived functional gastroduodenal disorders (FGD) symptom factors in one comprehensive model. In 259 tertiary care FD patients, we studied gastric sensorimotor function with barostat and gastric emptying breath test. Depression, somatization, and FGD symptoms were measured using self-report questionnaires. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on 7 FGD symptoms was used to determine the fit of a latent variable structure based on Rome III symptom-based subgroups. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the putative relationships of the symptom factors with gastric sensorimotor function, depression, and somatization. The results of the CFA show a good fit [C(min) /DF = 1.54, CFI(comparative fit index) = 0.97] for the three-factor solution based on Rome III subgroups. The SEM also fitted the data well (C(min) /DF = 1.24, CFI = 0.98) and demonstrated that gastric sensitivity and depression are associated with PDS and nausea and vomiting. Gastric emptying is uniquely associated with EPS and somatization is strongly associated with all three symptom factors. Confirmatory factor analysis confirms the existence of three FGD symptom factors, corresponding to Rome III symptom-based subgroups. The SEM results suggest that different psychobiological mechanisms may play a role in these subgroups. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Using a psychosocial subgroup assignment to predict sickness absence in a working population with neck and back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Irene

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overall objective was to evaluate the predictive validity of a subgroup classification based on the Swedish version of the MPI, the MPI-S, among gainfully employed workers with neck pain (NP and/or low back pain (LBP during a follow-up period of 18 and 36 months. Methods This is a prospective cohort study that is part of a larger longitudinal multi-centre study entitled Work and Health in the Process and Engineering Industries (AHA. The attempt was to classify individuals at risk for developing chronic disabling NP and LBP. This is the first study using the MPI-questionnaire in a working population with NP and LBP. Results Dysfunctional individuals (DYS demonstrated more statistically significant sickness absence compared to adaptive copers (AC after 36 months. DYS also had a threefold increase in the risk ratio of long-term sickness absence at 18 months. Interpersonally distressed (ID subgroup showed overall more sickness absence compared to the AC subgroup at the 36-month follow-up and had a twofold increase in the risk ratio of long-term sickness absence at 18 months. There was a significant difference in bodily pain, mental and physical health for ID and DYS subgroups compared to the AC group at both follow-ups. Conclusions The present study shows that this multidimensional approach to the classification of individuals based on psychological and psychosocial characteristics can distinguish different groups in gainfully employed working population with NP/LBP. The results in this study confirm the predictive validity of the MPI-S subgroup classification system.

  6. Using a psychosocial subgroup assignment to predict sickness absence in a working population with neck and back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The overall objective was to evaluate the predictive validity of a subgroup classification based on the Swedish version of the MPI, the MPI-S, among gainfully employed workers with neck pain (NP) and/or low back pain (LBP) during a follow-up period of 18 and 36 months. Methods This is a prospective cohort study that is part of a larger longitudinal multi-centre study entitled Work and Health in the Process and Engineering Industries (AHA). The attempt was to classify individuals at risk for developing chronic disabling NP and LBP. This is the first study using the MPI-questionnaire in a working population with NP and LBP. Results Dysfunctional individuals (DYS) demonstrated more statistically significant sickness absence compared to adaptive copers (AC) after 36 months. DYS also had a threefold increase in the risk ratio of long-term sickness absence at 18 months. Interpersonally distressed (ID) subgroup showed overall more sickness absence compared to the AC subgroup at the 36-month follow-up and had a twofold increase in the risk ratio of long-term sickness absence at 18 months. There was a significant difference in bodily pain, mental and physical health for ID and DYS subgroups compared to the AC group at both follow-ups. Conclusions The present study shows that this multidimensional approach to the classification of individuals based on psychological and psychosocial characteristics can distinguish different groups in gainfully employed working population with NP/LBP. The results in this study confirm the predictive validity of the MPI-S subgroup classification system. PMID:21521502

  7. GPR99, a new G protein-coupled receptor with homology to a new subgroup of nucleotide receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chica Schaller H

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on sequence similarity, the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPRs can be subdivided into several subfamilies, the members of which often share similar ligands. The sequence data provided by the human genome project allows us to identify new GPRs by in silico homology screening, and to predict their ligands. Results By searching the human genomic database with known nucleotide receptors we discovered the gene for GPR99, a new orphan GPR. The mRNA of GPR99 was found in kidney and placenta. Phylogenetic analysis groups GPR99 into the P2Y subfamily of GPRs. Based on the phylogenetic tree we propose a new classification of P2Y nucleotide receptors into two subgroups predicting a nucleotide ligand for GPR99. By assaying known nucleotide ligands on heterologously expressed GPR99, we could not identify specifically activating substances, indicating that either they are not agonists of GPR99 or that GPR99 was not expressed at the cell surface. Analysis of the chromosomal localization of all genes of the P2Y subfamily revealed that all members of subgroup "a" are encoded by less than 370 kb on chromosome 3q24, and that the genes of subgroup "b" are clustered on one hand to chromosome 11q13.5 and on the other on chromosome 3q24-25.1 close to the subgroup "a" position. Therefore, the P2Y subfamily is a striking example for local gene amplification. Conclusions We identified a new orphan receptor, GPR99, with homology to the family of G protein-coupled nucleotide receptors. Phylogenetic analysis separates this family into different subgroups predicting a nucleotide ligand for GPR99.

  8. Rotational Subgroup Voting and Pose Clustering for Robust 3D Object Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders Glent; Kiforenko, Lilita; Kraft, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    estimation. We then apply our method to four state of the art data sets for 3D object recognition that contain occluded and cluttered scenes. Our method achieves perfect recall on two LIDAR data sets and outperforms competing methods on two RGB-D data sets, thus setting a new standard for general 3D object...

  9. Investigating the Robustness of School-Performance Ratings to Three Factors Affecting the Underlying Student-Level Academic-Achievement Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hui Leng

    2012-01-01

    Standardized-test scores are increasingly important indicators of school success. But how robust are school-performance ratings when they are based on measures derived from these scores? In my thesis, using data from Houston Independent School District (HISD) and New York State (NYS), I examined the robustness of school-performance ratings across…

  10. Reading comprehension in children with specific language impairment: an examination of two subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Katrina; Fletcher, Janet; Lee, Penny

    2007-01-01

    In reading research, children with specific language impairment (SLI) have tended to be included in groups of children expected to have difficulties with both decoding and reading comprehension (generally poor readers). This is because generally children with specific language impairment display difficulties with phonology as well as syntax and/or semantics. However, children with specific language impairment are a heterogeneous group. Many children with specific language impairment have oral comprehension difficulties that are likely to limit reading comprehension. A subgroup of these children may exhibit intact phonological and decoding skills. If so, they would resemble the children with specific reading comprehension difficulties (poor comprehenders) reported in the literature. This study sought to identify a group of children with a poor comprehender reading profile amongst children with specific language impairment. It then compared the phonological and oral comprehension skills of the group of 15 poor comprehenders with a group of 15 generally poor readers with specific language impairment, to identify any differences in language skills. Secondarily, the study wanted to determine which of the language tasks best predicted group membership. The study was carried out in two phases. In Phase 1, children with specific language impairment were assessed on the Woodcock Word Attack to identify a group with adequate decoding skills. These children had poor reading comprehension on the Neale Analysis of Reading Ability. From the poor decoders on the Word Attack, a second group of children, matched for age and gender, was selected to form the generally poor reader group. In Phase 2, the participants were assessed on a battery of phonological and oral comprehension tasks. A group of children exhibiting a poor comprehender reading profile was found to exist amongst children with specific language impairment. As expected, the poor comprehenders performed significantly

  11. Phenome-Wide Association Study of Rheumatoid Arthritis Subgroups Identifies Association Between Seronegative Disease and Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Jayanth; Mo, Huan; Carroll, Robert J; Crofford, Leslie J; Denny, Joshua C

    2017-02-01

    The differences between seronegative and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have not been widely reported. We performed electronic health record (EHR)-based phenome-wide association studies (PheWAS) to identify disease associations in seropositive and seronegative RA. A validated algorithm identified RA subjects from the de-identified version of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center EHR. Serotypes were determined by rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) values. We tested EHR-derived phenotypes using PheWAS comparing seropositive RA and seronegative RA, yielding disease associations. PheWAS was also performed in RF-positive versus RF-negative subjects and ACPA-positive versus ACPA-negative subjects. Following PheWAS, select phenotypes were then manually reviewed, and fibromyalgia was specifically evaluated using a validated algorithm. A total of 2,199 RA individuals with either RF or ACPA testing were identified. Of these, 1,382 patients (63%) were classified as seropositive. Seronegative RA was associated with myalgia and myositis (odds ratio [OR] 2.1, P = 3.7 × 10-10 ) and back pain. A manual review of the health record showed that among subjects coded for Myalgia and Myositis, ∼80% had fibromyalgia. Follow-up with a specific EHR algorithm for fibromyalgia confirmed that seronegative RA was associated with fibromyalgia (OR 1.8, P = 4.0 × 10-6 ). Seropositive RA was associated with chronic airway obstruction (OR 2.2, P = 1.4 × 10-4 ) and tobacco use (OR 2.2, P = 7.0 × 10-4 ). This PheWAS of RA patients identifies a strong association between seronegativity and fibromyalgia. It also affirms relationships between seropositivity and chronic airway obstruction and between seropositivity and tobacco use. These findings demonstrate the utility of the PheWAS approach to discover novel phenotype associations within different subgroups of a disease. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  12. LITHIUM IN THE UPPER CENTAURUS LUPUS AND LOWER CENTAURUS CRUX SUBGROUPS OF SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bubar, Eric J. [Department of Biology and Physical Sciences, Marymount University, Arlington, VA 22207 (United States); Schaeuble, Marc; King, Jeremy R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29630-0978 (United States); Mamajek, Eric E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); Stauffer, John R. [Spitzer Science Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We utilize spectroscopically derived model atmosphere parameters and the Li I {lambda}6104 subordinate line and the {lambda}6708 doublet to derive lithium abundances for 12 members of the Upper Centaurus Lupus and Lower Centaurus Crux subgroups of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association. The results indicate any intrinsic Li scatter in our 0.9-1.4 M{sub Sun} stars is limited to {approx}0.15 dex, consistent with the lack of dispersion in {>=}1.0 M{sub Sun} stars in the 100 Myr Pleiades and 30-50 Myr IC 2391 and 2602 clusters. Both ab initio uncertainty estimates and the derived abundances themselves indicate that the {lambda}6104 line yields abundances with equivalent or less scatter than is found from the {lambda}6708 doublet as a result of lower uncertainties for the subordinate feature, a result of low sensitivity to broadening in the subordinate feature. Because non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) corrections are less susceptible to changes in surface gravity and/or metallicity for the 6104 A line, the subordinate Li feature is preferred for deriving lithium abundances in young Li-rich stellar association stars with T{sub eff} {>=} 5200 K. At these temperatures, we find no difference between the Li abundances derived from the two Li I lines. For cooler stars, having temperatures at which main-sequence dwarfs show abundance patterns indicating overexcitation and overionization, the {lambda}6104-based Li abundances are {approx}0.4 dex lower than those derived from the {lambda}6708 doublet. The trends of the abundances from each feature with T{sub eff} suggest that this difference is due to (near)UV photoionization, which in NLTE preferentially ionizes Li atoms in the subordinate 2p state relative to the 2s resonance line state due to opacity effects. Consequently, this overionization of Li in the 2p state, apparently not adequately accounted for in NLTE corrections, weakens the {lambda}6104 feature in cooler stars. Accordingly, the {lambda}6708-based

  13. Multimodality Management of Spetzler-Martin Grade 3 Brain Arteriovenous Malformations with Subgroup Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecassis, Isaac Josh; Nerva, John D; Feroze, Abdullah; Barber, Jason; Ghodke, Basavaraj V; Kim, Louis J; Sekhar, Laligam N

    2017-06-01

    Spetzler-Martin grade 3 (SM3) lesions entail 4 distinct subtypes described based on size, eloquence, and deep venous drainage (3A-3D). The ideal management of each is contentious, and the results of A Randomized Trial of Unruptured Brain AVMs (ARUBA) introduced additional controversy and attention toward management strategies of unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs). We retrospectively reviewed 114 patients with treated SM3 bAVMs, including both ruptured and unruptured lesions. Primary outcomes included modified Rankin score at most recent follow-up, angiographic cure, and permanent treatment-related complications (morbidity). Other outcomes included mortality, bAVM recurrence or rebleed, and transient treatment-related complications. We used univariate and multivariate modeling to determine whether any specific features were predictive of outcomes. For unruptured bAVMs, an "ARUBA eligible" subgroup analysis was performed. We also reviewed the literature on management of ruptured and unruptured SM3 bAVMs. Of the 114 identified SM3 bAVMs, 40% were unruptured. Most (43.5%) lesions in the unruptured group were type 3C, whereas most ruptured bAVMs (66.2%) were type 3A. Unruptured lesions were mostly managed with radiosurgery (47.8%) and ruptured ones with preoperative embolization and surgery (36.7%). Surgical intervention was predictive of angiographic cure in multivariate modeling, even after controlling for ≥2 years of follow-up, although associated with a slightly higher rate of morbidity. Focal neurological deficit was the only predictor of a worse (modified Rankin score ≥2) functional outcome in follow-up for unruptured bAVMs. For ruptured bAVMs, superficial and cerebellar locations were predictive of better outcomes in multivariate models, in the absence of a focal neurological deficit at presentation and new after surgery deficit. ARUBA SM3 bAVMs specifically underwent more embolization as a monotherapy and less microsurgical resection than

  14. Consistency of safety and efficacy of new oral anticoagulants across subgroups of patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Lega

    Full Text Available AIMS: The well-known limitations of vitamin K antagonists (VKA led to development of new oral anticoagulants (NOAC in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the consistency of treatment effects of NOAC irrespective of age, comorbidities, or prior VKA exposure. METHODS AND RESULTS: All randomized, controlled phase III trials comparing NOAC to VKA up to October 2012 were eligible provided their results (stroke/systemic embolism (SSE and major bleeding (MB were reported according to age (≤ or >75 years, renal function, CHADS2 score, presence of diabetes mellitus or heart failure, prior VKA use or previous cerebrovascular events. Interactions were considered significant at p <0.05. Three studies (50,578 patients were included, respectively evaluating apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran versus warfarin. A trend towards interaction with heart failure (p = 0.08 was observed with respect to SSE reduction, this being greater in patients not presenting heart failure (RR = 0.76 [0.67-0.86] than in those with heart failure (RR = 0.90 [0.78-1.04]; Significant interaction (p = 0.01 with CHADS2 score was observed, NOAC achieving a greater reduction in bleeding risk in patients with a score of 0-1 (RR 0.67 CI 0.57-0.79 than in those with a score ≥2 (RR 0.85 CI 0.74-0.98. Comparison of MB in patients with (RR 0.97 CI 0.79-1.18 and without (RR 0.76 CI 0.65-0.88 diabetes mellitus showed a similar trend (p = 0.06. No other interactions were found. All subgroups derived benefit from NOA in terms of SSE or MB reduction. CONCLUSIONS: NOAC appeared to be more effective and safer than VKA in reducing SSE or MB irrespective of patient comorbidities. Thromboembolism risk, evaluated by CHADS2 score and, to a lesser extent, diabetes mellitus modified the treatment effects of NOAC without complete loss of benefit with respect to MB reduction.

  15. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  16. Accounting for subgroup structure in line-transect abundance estimates of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) in Hawaiian waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Amanda L; Forney, Karin A; Oleson, Erin M; Barlow, Jay

    2014-01-01

    For biological populations that form aggregations (or clusters) of individuals, cluster size is an important parameter in line-transect abundance estimation and should be accurately measured. Cluster size in cetaceans has traditionally been represented as the total number of individuals in a group, but group size may be underestimated if group members are spatially diffuse. Groups of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) can comprise numerous subgroups that are dispersed over tens of kilometers, leading to a spatial mismatch between a detected group and the theoretical framework of line-transect analysis. Three stocks of false killer whales are found within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone of the Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiian EEZ): an insular main Hawaiian Islands stock, a pelagic stock, and a Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) stock. A ship-based line-transect survey of the Hawaiian EEZ was conducted in the summer and fall of 2010, resulting in six systematic-effort visual sightings of pelagic (n = 5) and NWHI (n = 1) false killer whale groups. The maximum number and spatial extent of subgroups per sighting was 18 subgroups and 35 km, respectively. These sightings were combined with data from similar previous surveys and analyzed within the conventional line-transect estimation framework. The detection function, mean cluster size, and encounter rate were estimated separately to appropriately incorporate data collected using different methods. Unlike previous line-transect analyses of cetaceans, subgroups were treated as the analytical cluster instead of groups because subgroups better conform to the specifications of line-transect theory. Bootstrap values (n = 5,000) of the line-transect parameters were randomly combined to estimate the variance of stock-specific abundance estimates. Hawai'i pelagic and NWHI false killer whales were estimated to number 1,552 (CV = 0.66; 95% CI = 479-5,030) and 552 (CV = 1.09; 95% CI = 97

  17. Accounting for subgroup structure in line-transect abundance estimates of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens in Hawaiian waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Bradford

    Full Text Available For biological populations that form aggregations (or clusters of individuals, cluster size is an important parameter in line-transect abundance estimation and should be accurately measured. Cluster size in cetaceans has traditionally been represented as the total number of individuals in a group, but group size may be underestimated if group members are spatially diffuse. Groups of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens can comprise numerous subgroups that are dispersed over tens of kilometers, leading to a spatial mismatch between a detected group and the theoretical framework of line-transect analysis. Three stocks of false killer whales are found within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone of the Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiian EEZ: an insular main Hawaiian Islands stock, a pelagic stock, and a Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI stock. A ship-based line-transect survey of the Hawaiian EEZ was conducted in the summer and fall of 2010, resulting in six systematic-effort visual sightings of pelagic (n = 5 and NWHI (n = 1 false killer whale groups. The maximum number and spatial extent of subgroups per sighting was 18 subgroups and 35 km, respectively. These sightings were combined with data from similar previous surveys and analyzed within the conventional line-transect estimation framework. The detection function, mean cluster size, and encounter rate were estimated separately to appropriately incorporate data collected using different methods. Unlike previous line-transect analyses of cetaceans, subgroups were treated as the analytical cluster instead of groups because subgroups better conform to the specifications of line-transect theory. Bootstrap values (n = 5,000 of the line-transect parameters were randomly combined to estimate the variance of stock-specific abundance estimates. Hawai'i pelagic and NWHI false killer whales were estimated to number 1,552 (CV = 0.66; 95% CI = 479-5,030 and 552 (CV = 1.09; 95% CI = 97

  18. Accounting for Subgroup Structure in Line-Transect Abundance Estimates of False Killer Whales (Pseudorca crassidens) in Hawaiian Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Amanda L.; Forney, Karin A.; Oleson, Erin M.; Barlow, Jay

    2014-01-01

    For biological populations that form aggregations (or clusters) of individuals, cluster size is an important parameter in line-transect abundance estimation and should be accurately measured. Cluster size in cetaceans has traditionally been represented as the total number of individuals in a group, but group size may be underestimated if group members are spatially diffuse. Groups of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) can comprise numerous subgroups that are dispersed over tens of kilometers, leading to a spatial mismatch between a detected group and the theoretical framework of line-transect analysis. Three stocks of false killer whales are found within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone of the Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiian EEZ): an insular main Hawaiian Islands stock, a pelagic stock, and a Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) stock. A ship-based line-transect survey of the Hawaiian EEZ was conducted in the summer and fall of 2010, resulting in six systematic-effort visual sightings of pelagic (n = 5) and NWHI (n = 1) false killer whale groups. The maximum number and spatial extent of subgroups per sighting was 18 subgroups and 35 km, respectively. These sightings were combined with data from similar previous surveys and analyzed within the conventional line-transect estimation framework. The detection function, mean cluster size, and encounter rate were estimated separately to appropriately incorporate data collected using different methods. Unlike previous line-transect analyses of cetaceans, subgroups were treated as the analytical cluster instead of groups because subgroups better conform to the specifications of line-transect theory. Bootstrap values (n = 5,000) of the line-transect parameters were randomly combined to estimate the variance of stock-specific abundance estimates. Hawai’i pelagic and NWHI false killer whales were estimated to number 1,552 (CV = 0.66; 95% CI = 479–5,030) and 552 (CV = 1.09; 95% CI = 97–3

  19. An Investigation of Language Impairment in Autism: Implications for Genetic Subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    Kjelgaard, Margaret M.; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2001-01-01

    Autism involves primary impairments in both language and communication, yet in recent years the main focus of research has been on the communicative deficits that define the population. The study reported in this paper investigated language functioning in a group of 89 children diagnosed with autism using the ADI-R, and meeting DSM-IV criteria. The children, who were between 4- and 14- years-old were administered a battery of standardized language tests tapping phonological, lexical, and high...

  20. Standards 101: The ASA Standards program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomer, Paul

    2004-05-01

    ASA serves as a standards developer under the auspices of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The Standards Program is organized through four technical committees (S1, S2, S3, and S12) and one administrative committee (ASACOS). S1 deals with physical acoustics, S2 deals with shock and vibration, S3 deals with physiological and psychological acoustics and S12 deals with noise. ASACOS is the ASA Committee on Standards. The program has three primary tasks: (1) development of national standards (ANSI Standards), (2) national adoption of international standards (ANSI NAIS Standards), (3) providing the USA input to the development of international standards (ISO and IEC Standards). At every level the main work is accomplished in Working Groups (WG) that are staffed by hundreds of volunteers, mainly ASA members from its various technical committees such as Noise, Physical Acoustics, Architectural Acoustics, Physiological and Psychological Acoustics, etc. Overall, the Standards Program involves more ASA members than does any other single function of the society except meetings. It is the biggest outreach function of ASA affecting the health, welfare, and economic well-being of large sectors of society. It is a main way the ASA diffuses the knowledge of acoustics and its practical application, perhaps the main way.

  1. Standards 101; the ASA standards program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomer, Paul D.

    2002-11-01

    ASA supports the development of standards by serving as the secretariat for standards committees of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The program is organized through four ANSI technical committees (S1, S2, S3, and S12) and one administrative committee (ASACOS). S1 deals with physical acoustics, S2 deals with shock and vibration, S3 deals with physiological and psychological acoustics, and S12 deals with noise. ASACOS is the ASA Committee on Standards. The program has three primary tasks: (1) the development of National Standards (ANSI Standards), (2) the national adoption of an international standard (ANSI NAIS Standards), (3) providing the USA input to the development of International Standards (ISO and IEC Standards). At every level the main work is accomplished in Working Groups (WG) that are ''staffed'' by hundreds of volunteers--mainly ASA members from its various technical committees such as Noise, Physical Acoustics, Architectural Acoustics, Psychological and Physiological Acoustics, etc. Overall, the Standards Program involves more ASA members than does any other single function of the Society except meetings and it is the biggest outreach function of ASA affecting the health, welfare, and economic well-being of large segments of the population, the business and industrial community, and government at all levels.

  2. Outcome of 24 years national surveillance in different hereditary colorectal cancer subgroups leading to more individualised surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Lars Joachim; Ladelund, Steen; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) have a high risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The benefits of colonic surveillance in Lynch syndrome and Amsterdam-positive (familial CRC type X familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX)) families are clear; only...... the interval between colonoscopies is debated. The potential benefits for families not fulfilling the Amsterdam criteria are uncertain. The aim of this study was to compare the outcome of colonic surveillance in different hereditary subgroups and to evaluate the surveillance programmes. METHODS: A prospective......, observational study on the outcome of colonic surveillance in different hereditary subgroups based on 24 years of surveillance data from the national Danish HNPCC register. RESULTS: We analysed 13 444 surveillance sessions, including 8768 incidence sessions and 20 450 years of follow-up. CRC was more incident...

  3. Subgrouping and TargetEd Exercise pRogrammes for knee and hip OsteoArthritis (STEER OA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden, Melanie A; Burke, Danielle L; Runhaar, Jos

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Therapeutic exercise is a recommended core treatment for people with knee and hip OA, however, the observed effect sizes for reducing pain and improving physical function are small to moderate. This may...... be due to insufficient targeting of exercise to subgroups of people who are most likely to respond and/or suboptimal content of exercise programmes. This study aims to identify: (1) subgroups of people with knee and hip OA that do/do not respond to therapeutic exercise and to different types of exercise...... and (2) mediators of the effect of therapeutic exercise for reducing pain and improving physical function. This will enable optimal targeting and refining the content of future exercise interventions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Systematic review and individual participant data meta-analyses. A previous...

  4. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY10 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-10-26

    The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. The EOS is one of multiple work groups in the federal research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the FCRPS. The EOS is tasked by NOAA Fisheries and the Action Agencies to design and coordinate implementation of the federal RME plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary, including the plume.

  5. Is there evidence for aetiologically distinct subgroups of idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus? A case-only study and pedigree analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda H Cardy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV is a common developmental foot disorder, the aetiology of which remains largely unknown. Some aspects of the epidemiology suggest the possibility of aetiologically distinct subgroups. Previous studies consider CTEV as a homogenous entity which may conceal risk factors in particular subgroups. We investigate evidence for aetiologically distinct subgroups of CTEV. METHODS: Parents of 785 probands completed a postal questionnaire. Family pedigrees were compiled by telephone. Case-only analysis was used to investigate interactions between risk factors and sex of the proband, CTEV laterality and CTEV family history. RESULTS: The male:female ratio was 2.3:1, 58% of probands were affected bilaterally and 11% had a first-second degree family history. There were modest interactions between family history and twin births (multivariate case - only odds ratio [ORca] = 3.87, 95%CI 1.19-12.62 and family history and maternal use of folic acid supplements in early pregnancy (ORca = 0.62, 95%CI 0.38-1.01; and between sex of the proband and maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy (female, positive history and alcohol consumed: ORca = 0.33, 95%CI 0.12-0.89. Previous reports of an interaction between maternal smoking and family history were not confirmed. Relatives of female probands were affected more often than relatives of male probands. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide tentative evidence for aetiologically distinct CTEV subgroups. They support the 'Carter effect', suggesting CTEV develops though a multifactorial threshold model with females requiring a higher risk factor 'load', and suggest areas where future aetiological investigation might focus. Large multi-centre studies are needed to further advance understanding of this common condition.

  6. Is there evidence for aetiologically distinct subgroups of idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus? A case-only study and pedigree analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardy, Amanda H; Sharp, Linda; Torrance, Nicola; Hennekam, Raoul C; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia

    2011-04-20

    Idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) is a common developmental foot disorder, the aetiology of which remains largely unknown. Some aspects of the epidemiology suggest the possibility of aetiologically distinct subgroups. Previous studies consider CTEV as a homogenous entity which may conceal risk factors in particular subgroups. We investigate evidence for aetiologically distinct subgroups of CTEV. Parents of 785 probands completed a postal questionnaire. Family pedigrees were compiled by telephone. Case-only analysis was used to investigate interactions between risk factors and sex of the proband, CTEV laterality and CTEV family history. The male:female ratio was 2.3:1, 58% of probands were affected bilaterally and 11% had a first-second degree family history. There were modest interactions between family history and twin births (multivariate case - only odds ratio [ORca] = 3.87, 95%CI 1.19-12.62) and family history and maternal use of folic acid supplements in early pregnancy (ORca = 0.62, 95%CI 0.38-1.01); and between sex of the proband and maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy (female, positive history and alcohol consumed: ORca = 0.33, 95%CI 0.12-0.89). Previous reports of an interaction between maternal smoking and family history were not confirmed. Relatives of female probands were affected more often than relatives of male probands. These results provide tentative evidence for aetiologically distinct CTEV subgroups. They support the 'Carter effect', suggesting CTEV develops though a multifactorial threshold model with females requiring a higher risk factor 'load', and suggest areas where future aetiological investigation might focus. Large multi-centre studies are needed to further advance understanding of this common condition.

  7. Prevalence of the most frequent ATC groups and subgroups in polypharmacized patients of Emergency medical service Belgrade

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov-Kiurski Miloranka; Živanović Slavoljub R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system classifies active ingredients of drugs according to the organ or system on which they act and their therapeutic, pharmacological, and chemical properties. Objective: To establish the five most frequently used drug groups and subgroups according to ATC classification system in patients on polypharmacy in relation to age and gender, and to establish the five most frequent combinations of drugs used by patients on polyphar...

  8. Characterization of courtship sounds of species of the subgroup fasciola (Diptera, Drosophilidae, Drosophila repleta group: interspecific and interpopulational analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. A. COSTA

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize the male courtship song pattern of various species of the fasciola subgroup and to determine the level of variation both within and among species. The parameters analyzed were intrapulse interval (PI, interpulse interval (IPI, and intrapulse frequency (IF. Six different species were analyzed: D. coroica (three populations, D. ellisoni, D. fascioloides, D. moju, D. onca, and D. rosinae (one population each. There were significant differences among the six species for these three courtship song parameters. The IPI was the most variable parameter among these species, suggesting that this parameter is important for female discrimination. Four different hypotheses could explain this variation: 1. different selection pressures with absence of flow gene; 2. intraspecific sexual selection; 3. sympatric effects on song evolution; and 4. genetic drift. The PI was the only parameter that was significantly different among the three population of D. coroica. Low variability among populations within the same species was already observed for other subgroups and could be explained by the following hypotheses: strong selection acting on the song parameters, gene flow, or recent colonization from a common source. Additional studies of the courtship song of other species of the fasciola subgroup, as well as for other subgroups of the repleta group, and studies, using molecular makers, that focus on the genetic basis of the differences among these species in courtship song would allow us to evaluate the association of courtship song and sexual isolation in these species, and would also help us to understand the evolution of these behavioural differences.

  9. Spatiotemporal modeling with temporal-invariant variogram subgroups to estimate fine particulate matter PM2.5 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chu-Chih; Wu, Chang-Fu; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2012-07-01

    Short-term exposure estimation of daily air pollution levels incorporating geographic information system (GIS) into spatiotemporal modeling remains a great challenge for assessing corresponding acute adverse health effects. Due to daily meteorological effects on the dispersion of pollutants, explanatory spatial covariables and their coefficients may not be the same as in classical land-use regression (LUR) modeling for long-term exposure. In this paper, we propose a two-stage spatiotemporal model for daily fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration prediction: first, daily nonlinear temporal trends are estimated through a generalized additive model, and second, GIS covariates are used to predict spatial variation in the temporal trend-removed residuals. To account for spatial dependence on meteorological conditions, the dates of the study period are divided by the sill of the daily empirical variogram into approximately temporal-invariant subgroups. Within each subgroup, daily PM2.5 estimations are obtained by combining the temporal and spatial parts of the estimations from the two stages. The proposed method is applied to the modeling of spatiotemporal PM2.5 concentrations observed at 18 ambient air monitoring stations in Taipei metropolitan area during 2006-2008. The results showed that the PM2.5 concentrations decreased whereas the relative humidity and wind speed increased with the sill subgroups, which may be due to the effects of daily meteorological conditions on the dispersions of the particles. Also, the covariates and their coefficients of the LUR models varied with subgroups and had in general higher adjusted R-squares and smaller root mean square errors in prediction than those of a single overall LUR model.

  10. iSubgraph: integrative genomics for subgroup discovery in hepatocellular carcinoma using graph mining and mixture models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir Ozdemir

    Full Text Available The high tumor heterogeneity makes it very challenging to identify key tumorigenic pathways as therapeutic targets. The integration of multiple omics data is a promising approach to identify driving regulatory networks in patient subgroups. Here, we propose a novel conceptual framework to discover patterns of miRNA-gene networks, observed frequently up- or down-regulated in a group of patients and to use such networks for patient stratification in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. We developed an integrative subgraph mining approach, called iSubgraph, and identified altered regulatory networks frequently observed in HCC patients. The miRNA and gene expression profiles were jointly analyzed in a graph structure. We defined a method to transform microarray data into graph representation that encodes miRNA and gene expression levels and the interactions between them as well. The iSubgraph algorithm was capable to detect cooperative regulation of miRNAs and genes even if it occurred only in some patients. Next, the miRNA-mRNA modules were used in an unsupervised class prediction model to discover HCC subgroups via patient clustering by mixture models. The robustness analysis of the mixture model showed that the class predictions are highly stable. Moreover, the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that the HCC subgroups identified by the algorithm have different survival characteristics. The pathway analyses of the miRNA-mRNA co-modules identified by the algorithm demonstrate key roles of Myc, E2F1, let-7, TGFB1, TNF and EGFR in HCC subgroups. Thus, our method can integrate various omics data derived from different platforms and with different dynamic scales to better define molecular tumor subtypes. iSubgraph is available as MATLAB code at http://www.cs.umd.edu/~ozdemir/isubgraph/.

  11. Simple changes within dietary subgroups can rapidly improve the nutrient adequacy of the diet of French adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Eric O; Holmes, Bridget A; Huneau, Jean François; Mariotti, François

    2014-06-01

    Identifying the dietary changes with the greatest potential for improving diet quality is critical to designing efficient nutrition communication campaigns. Our objective was to simulate the effects of different types of dietary substitutions to improve diet quality at the individual level. Starting from the observed diets of 1330 adults participating in the national French Nutrition and Health Survey (Etude Nationale Nutrition Santé), we simulated the effects of 3 different types of food and beverage substitutions with graded implementation difficulty for the consumer in a stepwise dietary counseling model based on the improvement in the PANDiet index, which measures diet quality in terms of nutrient adequacy. In scenario 1, substitutions of a food or beverage for its "lighter" version resulted in a modest improvement in the PANDiet score (Δ = +3.3 ± 0.1) and a decrease in energy intake (Δ = -114 ± 2 kcal/d). In scenario 2, substitutions of a food or beverage within the same food subgroup resulted in a marked improvement in the PANDiet score (Δ = +26.4 ± 0.2) with no significant change in energy intake. In this second scenario, the improvement in nutrient adequacy was due to substitutions in many subgroups, with no single subgroup contributing >8% to the increase in the PANDiet score. In scenario 3, substitutions of a food or beverage within the same food group resulted in the greatest improvement in the PANDiet score (Δ = +31.8 ± 0.2) but with an increase in energy intake (Δ = +204 ± 9 kcal/d). In this third scenario, the improvement in nutrient adequacy was largely due to substitutions of fish for meat and processed meat (∼30% of the increase in the PANDiet score). This study shows that a strategy based on simple substitutions within food subgroups is effective in rapidly improving the nutritional adequacy of the diet of French adults and could be used in public health nutrition actions. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Sodium intake in US ethnic subgroups and potential impact of a new sodium reduction technology: NHANES Dietary Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgoni, Victor L; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Spence, Lisa; Samuel, Priscilla

    2014-12-18

    Because excessive dietary sodium intake is a major contributor to hypertension, a reduction in dietary sodium has been recommended for the US population. Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2010 data, we estimated current sodium intake in US population ethnic subgroups and modeled the potential impact of a new sodium reduction technology on sodium intake. NHANES 2007-2010 data were analyzed using The National Cancer Institute method to estimate usual intake in population subgroups. Potential impact of SODA-LO® Salt Microspheres sodium reduction technology on sodium intake was modeled using suggested sodium reductions of 20-30% in 953 foods and assuming various market penetrations. SAS 9.2, SUDAAN 11, and NHANES survey weights were used in all calculations with assessment across age, gender and ethnic groups. Current sodium intake across all population subgroups exceeds the Dietary Guidelines 2010 recommendations and has not changed during the last decade. However, sodium intake measured as a function of food intake has decreased significantly during the last decade for all ethnicities. "Grain Products" and "Meat, Poultry, Fish, & Mixtures" contribute about 2/3rd of total sodium intake. Sodium reduction, using SODA-LO® Salt Microspheres sodium reduction technology (with 100% market penetration) was estimated to be 185-323 mg/day or 6.3-8.4% of intake depending upon age, gender and ethnic group. Current sodium intake in US ethnic subgroups exceeds the recommendations and sodium reduction technologies could potentially help reduce dietary sodium intake among those groups.

  13. Economic costs of adult obesity: a review of recent European studies with a focus on subgroup-specific costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lengerke, Thomas; Krauth, Christian

    2011-07-01

    This review aims to provide an update on economic costs of obesity in Europe with a focus on costs in subgroups defined by relevant third variables such as sex, age, socio-economic status, and morbidity factors. A structured search using MeSH-vocabulary and Title/Abstract-searches was conducted in PubMed for 2007 to 2010. All cost categories except intangible costs were considered. N = 19 primary cost of illness studies on adults from Europe which had included at least one cost category as an outcome were identified. Nine studies reported costs in specific subgroups. Two studies (both from Germany) took a societal perspective, with total (direct and indirect) costs of obesity accounting for 0.47-0.61% of gross domestic product. Excess per-capita direct costs ranged from € 117 to € 1873, depending on cost categories and comparison group (normal weight, non-obese). One study estimated lower lifetime health care costs given obesity. Regarding subgroups, higher costs of obesity were generally found in men, groups with higher socio-economic status (regarding costs of severe obesity), and groups with co-existing abdominal obesity, diabetes (especially type 1), elevated HbA1c (among patients with type 2 diabetes), and physical co-morbidities given BMI ≥ 27 (compared to a "BMI ≥ 30 only"-group). In conclusion, while substantial obesity costs were found in most studies, subgroup analyses and lifetime perspectives call for a differentiated approach to the costs of obesity. Findings such as the higher health care costs in severely obese groups with higher socio-economic status (despite fewer co-morbidities), and lower lifetime long-term care costs in obese groups (due to reduced life expectancy), may generate hypotheses both on under- vs. overuse of services, and target groups for interventions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Testing the measurement invariance of the University of Washington Self-Efficacy Scale short form across four diagnostic subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyewon; Kim, Jiseon; Park, Ryoungsun; Bamer, Alyssa M; Bocell, Fraser D; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2016-10-01

    The University of Washington Self-Efficacy Scale (UW-SES) was originally developed for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI). This study evaluates the measurement invariance of the 6-item short form of the UW-SES across four disability subgroups. Evidence of measurement invariance would extend the UW-SES for use in two additional diagnostic groups: muscular dystrophy (MD) and post-polio syndrome (PPS). Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate successive levels of measurement invariance of the 6-item short form, the UW-SES: (a) configural invariance, i.e., equivalent item-factor structures between groups; (b) metric invariance, i.e., equivalent unstandardized factor loadings between groups; and (c) scalar invariance, i.e., equivalent item intercepts between groups. Responses from the four groups with different diagnostic disorders were compared: MD (n = 172), MS (n = 868), PPS (n = 225), and SCI (n = 242). The results of this study support that the most rigorous form of invariance (i.e., scalar) holds for the 6-item short form of the UW-SES across the four diagnostic subgroups. The current study suggests that the 6-item short form of the UW-SES has the same meaning across the four diagnostic subgroups. Thus, the 6-item short form is validated for people with MD, MS, PPS, and SCI.

  15. The relationship between post traumatic stress disorder and post traumatic growth: gender differences in PTG and PTSD subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuchang; Xu, Jiuping; Liu, Dongyue

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and post traumatic growth (PTG) in 2,300 earthquake survivors 1 year after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between PTSD and PTG and also tested for the gender differences in PTSD and PTG subgroups. A stratification random sampling strategy and questionnaires were used to collect the data. The PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Check list-Civilian and the PTG was assessed using the Post traumatic growth inventory. 2,300 individuals were involved in the initial survey with 2,080 completing the final questionnaire, a response rate of 90.4%. One-way ANOVA analyses were performed to investigate the gender differences in the PTSD and PTG subgroups. One year following the earthquake, 40.1 and 51.1% of survivors reported PTSD and PTG, respectively. A bivariate correlation analysis indicated that there was a positive association between PTG and PTSD. The PTG and PTSD variance analysis conducted on female and male subgroups suggested that women were more affected than men. Given the relatively high PTG prevalence, it was concluded that researchers need to pay more attention to the positive outcomes of an earthquake rather than just focusing on the negative effects. The surveys and analyses indicated that psychological intervention and care for the earthquake disaster survivors should focus more on females and older people, who tend to be more adversely affected.

  16. Gene Expression Analyses of the Spatio-Temporal Relationships of Human Medulloblastoma Subgroups during Early Human Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Cornelia M.; Hawes, Susan M.; Kees, Ursula R.; Gottardo, Nicholas G.; Dallas, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common form of malignant paediatric brain tumour and is the leading cause of childhood cancer related mortality. The four molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma that have been identified – WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4 - have molecular and topographical characteristics suggestive of different cells of origin. Definitive identification of the cell(s) of origin of the medulloblastoma subgroups, particularly the poorer prognosis Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma, is critical to understand the pathogenesis of the disease, and ultimately for the development of more effective treatment options. To address this issue, the gene expression profiles of normal human neural tissues and cell types representing a broad neuro-developmental continuum, were compared to those of two independent cohorts of primary human medulloblastoma specimens. Clustering, co-expression network, and gene expression analyses revealed that WNT and SHH medulloblastoma may be derived from distinct neural stem cell populations during early embryonic development, while the transcriptional profiles of Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma resemble cerebellar granule neuron precursors at weeks 10–15 and 20–30 of embryogenesis, respectively. Our data indicate that Group 3 medulloblastoma may arise through abnormal neuronal differentiation, whereas deregulation of synaptic pruning-associated apoptosis may be driving Group 4 tumorigenesis. Overall, these data provide significant new insight into the spatio-temporal relationships and molecular pathogenesis of the human medulloblastoma subgroups, and provide an important framework for the development of more refined model systems, and ultimately improved therapeutic strategies. PMID:25412507

  17. Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among Hispanic subgroups in the United States: 1991–1992 and 2001–2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca-Garcia, Enrique; Perez-Rodriguez, M. Mercedes; Keyes, Katherine M.; Oquendo, Maria A.; Hasin, Deborah S.; Grant, Bridget F.; Blanco, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the prevalence of suicidal ideation/attempts among Hispanic subgroups in the US in 1991–1992 and 2001–2002, and identify high-risk groups. Method Data were drawn from the 1991–1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES, n=42,862) and the 2001–2002 National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC,n=43,093), two nationally representative surveys of individuals aged 18 years and older. Results 1) Puerto Ricans are the Hispanic ethnic subgroup with the highest rates of suicide attempts; 2) 45- to 64-year-old Puerto Rican women are a high- risk group for suicide attempts; 3) Over the 10 year period between the two surveys, the lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts significantly increased among 18- to 24-year-old Puerto Rican women and Cuban men, and among 45- to 64-year-old Puerto Rican men. Conclusion Hispanics in the US are not a homogeneous group. We identify high-risk groups among Hispanics. Specific interventions for subgroups of Hispanics at high risk for suicidal behaviors may be required. PMID:20937507

  18. One explanation to rule them all? Identifying sub-groups of non-drinking Swedish ninth graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raninen, Jonas; Livingston, Michael; Karlsson, Patrik; Leifman, Håkan; Guttormsson, Ulf; Svensson, Johan; Larm, Peter

    2018-02-06

    Researchers in a number of countries have recently identified major changes in adolescent alcohol consumption since the early 2000s, with the prevalence of teenage drinking more than halving in some countries. The major aims of the current study are to examine if there are sub-groups among non-drinking Swedish ninth graders and to describe how the prevalence of these groups has changed during the period 1999 to 2015. Data from five waves of the Swedish European School Survey Project on Alcohol and other Drugs study was used. The data covered 16 years and the total sample comprised 14 976 students. Latent class analysis was used to identify sub-groups of non-drinkers (n = 4267) based on parental approval towards drinking, parental monitoring, leisure time activities, school performance and use of other substances. Five latent classes were found: computer gamers (8.3%), strict parents (36.5%), liberal parents (27.0%), controlling but liberal parents (16.6%) and sports (11.6%). In the non-drinking sub-group the strict parents group increased most between 1999 and 2015. The results imply that there is notable within-group diversity in non-drinking youth. Several mechanisms and explanations are thus likely to be behind the decline in drinking participation among Swedish adolescents. © 2018 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  19. Current situation of International Organization for Standardization/Technical Committee 249 international standards of traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Qi; Wang, Yue-Xi; Shi, Nan-Nan; Han, Xue-Jie; Lu, Ai-Ping

    2017-05-01

    To review the current situation and progress of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) international standards, standard projects and proposals in International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/ technical committee (TC) 249. ISO/TC 249 standards and standard projects on the ISO website were searched and new standard proposals information were collected from ISO/TC 249 National Mirror Committee in China. Then all the available data were summarized in 5 closely related items, including proposed time, proposed country, assigned working group (WG), current stage and classifification. In ISO/TC 249, there were 2 international standards, 18 standard projects and 24 new standard proposals proposed in 2014. These 44 standard subjects increased year by year since 2011. Twenty-nine of them were proposed by China, 15 were assigned to WG 4, 36 were in preliminary and preparatory stage and 8 were categorized into 4 fifields, 7 groups and sub-groups based on International Classifification Standards. A rapid and steady development of international standardization in TCM can be observed in ISO/TC 249.

  20. Determinants of pain treatment response and nonresponse: identification of TMD patient subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Mark D; Porto, Felipe B

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if we could identify a specific subtype of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain patients that does not respond to treatment. Patients were 101 men and women with chronic TMD pain recruited from the community and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment conditions: a standard conservative care (STD) condition or a standard care plus cognitive-behavioral therapy condition (STD + CBT) in which patients received all elements of STD but also received cognitive-behavioral coping skills training. Growth mixture modeling, incorporating a series of treatment-related predictors, was used to distinguish several distinct classes of responders or nonresponders to treatment based on reported pain over a 1-year follow-up period. Results indicated that treatment nonresponders accounted for 16% of the sample and did not differ from treatment responders on demographics or temporomandibular joint pathology, but that they reported more psychiatric symptoms, poorer coping, and higher levels of catastrophizing. Treatment-related predictors of membership in treatment responder groups versus the nonresponder group included the addition of CBT to STD, treatment attendance, and decreasing catastrophization. It was concluded that CBT may be made more efficacious for TMD patients by placing further emphasis on decreasing catastrophization and on individualizing care. This article provides evidence that the TMD chronic pain population is heterogeneous and that a subsample of patients will be unresponsive to standard or psychosocial approaches. The addition of CBT to treatment may be helpful for this group, but new individualized approaches will be needed to treat all patients effectively. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In a secondary care setting, differences between neck pain subgroups classified using the Quebec task force classification system were typically small

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne; Kent, Peter; Kjaer, Per

    2015-01-01

    , differences in outcome were typically small in size and mostly differentiated the local NP subgroup from the other subgroups. A caveat to these results is that they were obtained in a cohort of chronic neck pain patients who only displayed small improvements over time and the results may not apply to other...

  2. Naturally occurred frame-shift mutations in the tvb receptor gene are responsible for decreased susceptibility to subgroups B, D, and E avian leukosis virus infection in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    The group of highly related avian leukosis viruses (ALVs) in chickens were thought to have evolved from a common retroviral ancestor into six subgroups, A to E and J. These ALV subgroups use diverse cellular proteins encoded by four genetic loci in chickens as receptors to gain entry into host cells...

  3. Trends in Achievement Gaps in First-Year College Courses for Racial/Ethnic, Income, and Gender Subgroups: A 12-Year Study. ACT Research Report Series 2013 (8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Julie; Ndum, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated gaps in the academic success of college student subgroups defined by race/ethnicity, income, and gender. We studied trends over time in the success of students in these subgroups in particular first-year college courses: English Composition I, College Algebra, social science courses, and Biology. The study is based…

  4. Differences in pain, function and coping in Multidimensional Pain Inventory subgroups of chronic back pain: a one-group pretest-posttest study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staal J Bart

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with non-specific back pain are not a homogeneous group but heterogeneous with regard to their bio-psycho-social impairments. This study examined a sample of 173 highly disabled patients with chronic back pain to find out how the three subgroups based on the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI differed in their response to an inpatient pain management program. Methods Subgroup classification was conducted by cluster analysis using MPI subscale scores at entry into the program. At program entry and at discharge after four weeks, participants completed the MPI, the MOS Short Form-36 (SF-36, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ. Pairwise analyses of the score changes of the mentioned outcomes of the three MPI subgroups were performed using the Mann-Whitney-U-test for significance. Results Cluster analysis identified three MPI subgroups in this highly disabled sample: a dysfunctional, interpersonally distressed and an adaptive copers subgroup. The dysfunctional subgroup (29% of the sample showed the highest level of depression in SF-36 mental health (33.4 ± 13.9, the interpersonally distressed subgroup (35% of the sample a modest level of depression (46.8 ± 20.4, and the adaptive copers subgroup (32% of the sample the lowest level of depression (57.8 ± 19.1. Significant differences in pain reduction and improvement of mental health and coping were observed across the three MPI subgroups, i.e. the effect sizes for MPI pain reduction were: 0.84 (0.44 - 1.24 for the dysfunctional subgroup, 1.22 (0.86 - 1.58 for the adaptive copers subgroup, and 0.53 (0.24 - 0.81 for the interpersonally distressed subgroup (p = 0.006 for pairwise comparison. Significant score changes between subgroups concerning activities and physical functioning could not be identified. Conclusions MPI subgroup classification showed significant differences in score changes for pain, mental health

  5. Standard Reference Tables -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Standard Reference Tables (SRT) provide consistent reference data for the various applications that support Flight Standards Service (AFS) business processes and...

  6. Two subgroups of antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients identified with a Gaussian mixture model on cognition and electrophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, N.; Ebdrup, B.H.; Oranje, B

    2017-01-01

    different disease subgroups. We applied machine learning algorithms on measures of electrophysiology and cognition to identify potential subgroups of schizophrenia. Next, we explored subgroup differences regarding treatment response. Sixty-six antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients......Deficits in information processing and cognition are among the most robust findings in schizophrenia patients. Previous efforts to translate group-level deficits into clinically relevant and individualized information have, however, been non-successful, which is possibly explained by biologically...... day). A reduced principal component space based on 19 electrophysiological variables and 26 cognitive variables was used as input for a Gaussian mixture model to identify subgroups of patients. With support vector machines, we explored the relation between PANSS subscores and the identified subgroups...

  7. An exploration of familial associations of two movement pattern-derived subgroups of chronic disabling low back pain; a cross-sectional cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneiro, Joao Paulo; Labie, Céline; Sulley, Emma; Briggs, Andrew M; Straker, Leon M; Burnett, Angus F; O'Sullivan, Peter B

    2016-04-01

    Altered movement patterns with pain have been demonstrated in children, adolescents and adults with chronic disabling low back pain (CDLBP). A previously developed classification system has identified different subgroups including active extension and multidirectional patterns in patients with CDLBP. While familial associations have been identified for certain spinal postures in standing, it is unknown whether a familial relationship might exist between movement pattern-derived subgroups in families with CDLBP. This study explored whether familial associations in movement pattern-derived subgroups within and between members of families with CDLBP existed. Cross-sectional cohort study. 33 parents and 28 children with CDLBP were classified into two subgroups based on clinical analysis of video footage of postures and functional movements, combined with aggravating factors obtained from Oswestry Disability Questionnaire. Prevalence of subgroups within family members was determined, associations between parent and child's subgroup membership was evaluated using Fisher's exact test, and spearman's correlation coefficient was used to determine the strength of association between familial dyads. The majority of parents were classified as active extenders, sons predominately multidirectional and daughters were evenly distributed between the two subgroups. No significant association was found when comparing subgroups in nine parent-child relationships. The exploration of a small cohort of family dyads in this study demonstrated that children's movement pattern-derived subgroups could not be explained by their parents' subgroup membership. These results cannot be generalised to the CLBP population due to this study's small sample. Larger sample studies are needed to further elucidate this issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. International Standardization of Bed Rest Standard Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the standardization of bed rest measures. The International Countermeasures Working Group attempted to define and agree internationally on standard measurements for spaceflight based bed rest studies. The group identified the experts amongst several stakeholder agencys. It included information on exercise, muscle, neurological, psychological, bone and cardiovascular measures.

  9. The status of and future research into Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: the need of accurate diagnosis, objective assessment, and acknowledging biological and clinical subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twisk, Frank N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Although Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) are used interchangeably, the diagnostic criteria define two distinct clinical entities. Cognitive impairment, (muscle) weakness, circulatory disturbances, marked variability of symptoms, and, above all, post-exertional malaise: a long-lasting increase of symptoms after a minor exertion, are distinctive symptoms of ME. This latter phenomenon separates ME, a neuro-immune illness, from chronic fatigue (syndrome), other disorders and deconditioning. The introduction of the label, but more importantly the diagnostic criteria for CFS have generated much confusion, mostly because chronic fatigue is a subjective and ambiguous notion. CFS was redefined in 1994 into unexplained (persistent or relapsing) chronic fatigue, accompanied by at least four out of eight symptoms, e.g., headaches and unrefreshing sleep. Most of the research into ME and/or CFS in the last decades was based upon the multivalent CFS criteria, which define a heterogeneous patient group. Due to the fact that fatigue and other symptoms are non-discriminative, subjective experiences, research has been hampered. Various authors have questioned the physiological nature of the symptoms and qualified ME/CFS as somatization. However, various typical symptoms can be assessed objectively using standardized methods. Despite subjective and unclear criteria and measures, research has observed specific abnormalities in ME/CFS repetitively, e.g., immunological abnormalities, oxidative and nitrosative stress, neurological anomalies, circulatory deficits and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, to improve future research standards and patient care, it is crucial that patients with post-exertional malaise (ME) and patients without this odd phenomenon are acknowledged as separate clinical entities that the diagnosis of ME and CFS in research and clinical practice is based upon accurate criteria and an objective assessment of characteristic symptoms

  10. Vorapaxar for secondary prevention of thrombotic events for patients with previous myocardial infarction: a prespecified subgroup analysis of the TRA 2°P-TIMI 50 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scirica, Benjamin M; Bonaca, Marc P; Braunwald, Eugene; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Isaza, Daniel; Lewis, Basil S; Mehrhof, Felix; Merlini, Piera A; Murphy, Sabina A; Sabatine, Marc S; Tendera, Michal; Van de Werf, Frans; Wilcox, Robert; Morrow, David A

    2012-10-13

    Vorapaxar inhibits platelet activation by antagonising thrombin-mediated activation of the protease-activated receptor 1 on human platelets. The effect of adding other antiplatelet drugs to aspirin for long-term secondary prevention of thrombotic events in stable patients with previous myocardial infarction is uncertain. We tested this effect in a subgroup of patients from the Thrombin Receptor Antagonist in Secondary Prevention of Atherothrombotic Ischemic Events (TRA 2°P)-TIMI 50 trial. In TRA 2°P-TIMI 50--a randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel trial--we randomly assigned patients with a history of atherothrombosis to receive vorapaxar (2·5 mg daily) or matching placebo in a 1:1 ratio. Patients, and those giving treatment, assessing outcomes, and analysing results were masked to treatment allocation. Patients with a qualifying myocardial infarction within the previous 2 weeks to 12 months were analysed as a pre-defined subgroup. The primary efficacy endpoint was cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke, analysed by intention to treat. We analysed events by Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared groups with a Cox proportional hazard model. TRA 2°P-TIMI 50 is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00526474). 17,779 of 26,449 patients had a qualifying myocardial infarction and were assigned treatment (8898 to vorapaxar and 8881 to placebo). Median follow-up was 2·5 years (IQR 2·0-2·9). Cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke occurred in 610 of 8898 patients in the vorapaxar group and 750 of 8881 in the placebo group (3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates 8·1%vs 9·7%, HR 0·80, 95% CI 0·72-0·89; p<0·0001). Moderate or severe bleeding was more common in the vorapaxar group versus the placebo group (241/8880 [3·4%, 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate] vs 151/8849 [2·1%, 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate], HR 1·61, 95% CI 1·31-1·97; p<0·0001). Intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 43 of 8880 patients (0·6%, 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate) with

  11. Calibrated permeation standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dameron, Arrelaine A.; Reese, Matthew O.; Kempe, Michael D.

    2017-11-21

    A permeation standard is provided. The permeation standard may include a substrate that is impermeable to an analyte, an orifice disposed in the substrate, and a permeable material filling the orifice. The orifice and the permeable material are configured to provide a predetermined transmission rate of the analyte through the permeation standard. Also provided herein are methods for forming the permeation standard.

  12. Creating standards: Creating illusions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Mai Skjøtt

    written standards may open up for the creation of illusions. These are created when written standards' content is not in accordance with the perception standard adopters and standard users have of the specific practice phenomenon's content. This general theoretical argument is exemplified by the specific...

  13. Distinctive subgroups derived by cluster analysis based on pain and psychological symptoms in Swedish older adults with chronic pain - a population study (PainS65+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Britt; Gerdle, Björn; Bernfort, Lars; Levin, Lars-Åke; Dragioti, Elena

    2017-09-02

    Improved knowledge based on clinical features of chronic pain in older adults would be valuable in terms of patient-orientated approaches and would provide support for health care systems in optimizing health care resources. This study identifies subgroups based on pain and psychological symptoms among Swedish older adults in the general population and compares derived subgroups with respect to socio-demographics, health aspects, and health care costs. This cross-sectional study uses data collected from four registers and one survey. The total sample comprised 2415 individuals ≥65 years old. A two-step cluster analysis was performed. Data on pain intensity, number of pain sites, anxiety, depression, and pain catastrophizing were used as classification variables. Differences in socio-demographics, quality of life, general health, insomnia, and health care costs among the clusters were investigated. Association of the clusters with the above parameters was further evaluated using multinomial logistic regression. Four major clusters were identified: Subgroup 1 (n = 325; 15%) - moderate pain and high psychological symptoms; Subgroup 2 (n = 516; 22%) - high pain and moderate psychological symptoms; Subgroup 3 (n = 686; 30%) - low pain and moderate psychological symptoms; and Subgroup 4 (n = 767; 33%) - low pain and low psychological symptoms. Significant differences were found between the four clusters with regard to age, sex, educational level, family status, quality of life, general health, insomnia, and health care costs. The multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed that Subgroups 1 and 2, compared to Subgroup 4, were significantly associated with decreased quality of life, decreased general health, and increased insomnia. Subgroup 3, compared to Subgroup 4, was associated with decreased general health and increased insomnia. In addition, compared to Subgroup 4, Subgroups 1 and 2 were significantly associated with higher health care costs. Two

  14. Standard model fermions and N=8 supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolai, Hermann [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Muehlenberg 1, Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In a scheme originally proposed by Gell-Mann, and subsequently shown to be realized at the SU(3) x U(1) stationary point of maximal gauged SO(8) supergravity, the 48 spin-1/2 fermions of the theory remaining after the removal of eight Goldstinos can be identified with the 48 quarks and leptons (including right-chiral neutrinos) of the Standard model, provided one identifies the residual SU(3) with the diagonal subgroup of the color group SU(3){sub c} and a family symmetry SU(3){sub f}. However, there remained a systematic mismatch in the electric charges by a spurion charge of ± 1/6. We here identify the ''missing'' U(1) that rectifies this mismatch, and that takes a surprisingly simple, though unexpected form, and show how it is related to the conjectured R symmetry K(E10) of M Theory.

  15. Pre-specified subgroup analyses of a placebo-controlled phase III trial (TEMSO) of oral teriflunomide in relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron E; O'Connor, Paul; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Confavreux, Christian; Kappos, Ludwig; Olsson, Tomas P; Truffinet, Philippe; Wang, Lin; D'Castro, Laura; Comi, Giancarlo; Freedman, Mark S

    2012-11-01

    The Teriflunomide Multiple Sclerosis Oral (TEMSO) trial, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study, demonstrated that teriflunomide significantly reduced annualized relapse rate (ARR), disease progression and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity, with a favorable safety profile in relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS) patients. The purpose of this study was to report the effects of teriflunomide on ARR and disability progression in pre-specified subgroups. RMS patients (n=1088) were randomized to placebo or teriflunomide, 7 mg or 14 mg, once daily, for 108 weeks. Subgroup analyses were performed for ARR and disability progression by baseline demographics (gender, race, age), disease characteristics (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) strata, relapse history, multiple sclerosis (MS) subtype), MRI parameters (gadolinium-enhancing lesions, total lesion volume) and prior use of MS drugs. A generalized estimating equation method and Cox regression model were used to assess consistency of the treatment effect across subgroups, utilizing a treatment-by-subgroup interaction test for each factor separately. Reductions in ARR and disability progression were consistent across subgroups in favor of teriflunomide, with no treatment-by-subgroup interaction test reaching statistical significance. The positive effects of teriflunomide were demonstrated consistently across subgroups in TEMSO.

  16. Implementation of the INEEL safety analyst training standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. E. Hochhalter

    2000-04-28

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) safety analysis units at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are in the process of implementing the recently issued INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107). Safety analyst training and qualifications are integral to the development and maintenance of core safety analysis capabilities. The INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107) was developed directly from EFCOG Training Subgroup draft safety analyst training plan template, but has been adapted to the needs and requirements of the INEEL safety analysis community. The implementation of this Safety Analyst Training Standard is part of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Implementation currently underway at the INEEL. The objective of this paper is to discuss (1) the INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard, (2) the development of the safety analyst individual training plans, (3) the implementation issues encountered during this initial phase of implementation, (4) the solutions developed, and (5) the implementation activities remaining to be completed.

  17. Classification-guided versus generalized postural intervention in subgroups of nonspecific chronic low back pain: a pragmatic randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Liba; van Deursen, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Sparkes, Valerie

    2013-09-01

    Pragmatic randomized controlled single-blinded study. To compare the effects of the classification system guided postural intervention (CSPI) with generalized postural intervention (GPI) in subgroups of nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). Spinal motor control impairments and the associated alterations in spinal postures adopted by patients with NSCLBP are highly variable. Research evaluating the effect of interventions that target the specific movement/posture impairments in NSCLBP subgroups is therefore warranted. A total of 49 patients with NSCLBP with a classification of flexion pattern (n = 29) and active extension pattern (n = 20) control impairment were recruited from a large cohort study and randomly assigned into CSPI and GPI. The primary outcome was change in Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, secondary outcomes were change in pain visual analogue scale, spinal repositioning sense including thoracic and lumbar absolute error, variable error, constant error, and trunk muscle activity during sitting and standing. The intervention was evaluated at baseline, immediately post one-to-one intervention and post 4-week home-based training. The CSPI produced statistically and clinically significant reduction in disability (4.2 [95% CI, 2.9-5.3]) and pain (2, [95% CI, 1.3-2.6]) compared with minimal change in the GPI disability (0.4, [95% CI, -0.8 to 1.6]) and pain (-0.2, [95% CI, -0.5 to 0.9]). Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed that CSPI significantly reduced absolute error in thoracic (sitting) and lumbar spine (standing) and constant error in lumbar spine (standing) post one-to-one phase, although this was no longer significant at 4 weeks. Neither intervention had an effect on trunk muscle activity. Compared with minimal change in the GPI group, the CSPI produced statistically and clinically significant improvements in disability and pain outcomes and short-term improvements in some parameters of spinal repositioning sense in NSCLBP

  18. Novel subgroups of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder identified by topological data analysis and their functional network modular organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeong, Sunghyon; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, Eunjoo

    2017-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a clinically heterogeneous condition and identification of clinically meaningful subgroups would open up a new window for personalized medicine. Thus, we aimed to identify new clinical phenotypes in children and adolescents with ADHD and to investigate whether neuroimaging findings validate the identified phenotypes. Neuroimaging and clinical data from 67 children with ADHD and 62 typically developing controls (TDCs) from the ADHD-200 database were selected. Clinical measures of ADHD symptoms and intelligence quotient (IQ) were used as input features into a topological data analysis (TDA) to identify ADHD subgroups within our sample. As external validators, graph theoretical measures obtained from the functional connectome were compared to address the biological meaningfulness of the identified subtypes. The TDA identified two unique subgroups of ADHD, labelled as mild symptom ADHD (mADHD) and severe symptom ADHD (sADHD). The output topology shape was repeatedly observed in the independent validation dataset. The graph theoretical analysis showed a decrease in the degree centrality and PageRank in the bilateral posterior cingulate cortex in the sADHD group compared with the TDC group. The mADHD group showed similar patterns of intra- and inter-module connectivity to the sADHD group. Relative to the TDC group, the inter-module connectivity between the default mode network and executive control network were significantly increased in the sADHD group but not in the mADHD group. Taken together, our results show that the data-driven TDA is potentially useful in identifying objective and biologically relevant disease phenotypes in children and adolescents with ADHD.

  19. Finasteride to Prevent Prostate Cancer: Should All Men or Only a High-Risk Subgroup Be Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Savage, Caroline J.; Lilja, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Finasteride has been shown to reduce the incidence of prostate cancer. Yet the use of finasteride remains low, likely because of the risk of adverse effects. We sought to determine whether prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels could identify a high-risk subgroup for which the benefits of finasteride treatment outweigh the potential harms. Patients and Methods Raw data from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial were used to model chemopreventive treatment strategies: treat all men, treat no men, or treat a high-risk subgroup based on PSA level. We weighted the benefits (reduction in cancer rate) and harms (treatment rate) of each strategy using numbers-needed-to-treat thresholds—the maximum number of men a clinician would treat with finasteride to prevent one cancer. Results Of 9,058 men, 1,957 were diagnosed with prostate cancer during the 7-year study. For the end point of all cancers, including both for-cause and end-of-study biopsies, the optimal strategy is to treat all or nearly all men. To reduce risk of cancers detected through routine care, treating men with PSA > 1.3 or > 2 ng/mL is optimal. For example, treating only men with PSA > 2 ng/mL reduced the treatment rate by 83% and resulted in a cancer rate only 1.1% higher than treating all men. Conclusion Clinicians wishing to reduce the risk of any biopsy-detectable prostate cancer should recommend finasteride to all men. Clinicians who believe that it is unnecessary to prevent all cancers, but that preventing those readily detectable by screening would be desirable, would be best off recommending finasteride only to a high-risk subgroup. PMID:20124185

  20. Classification tree analysis of race-specific subgroups at risk for a central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, James; Ekezue, Bola F; Tsulukidze, Maka; Honoré, Peggy; Moonesinghe, Ramal; Fisher, John

    2014-03-01

    Studies of racial disparities in patient safety events often do not use race-specific risk adjustment and do not account for reciprocal covariate interactions. These limitations were addressed by using classification tree analysis separately for black patients and white patients to identify characteristics that segment patients who have increased risks for a venous catheter-related bloodstream infection. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of 5,236,045 discharges from 103 Florida acute hospitals in 2005-2009 was conducted. Hospitals were rank ordered on the basis of the black/white Patient Safety Indicator (PSI) 7 rate ratio as follows: Group 1 (white rate higher), Group 2, (equivalent rates), Group 3, (black rate higher), and Group 4, (black rate highest). Predictor variables included 26 comorbidities (Elixhauser Comorbidity Index) and demographic characteristics. Four separate classification tree analyses were completed for each race/hospital group. Individual characteristics and groups of characteristics associated with increased PSI 7 risk differed for black and white patients. The average age for both races was different across the hospital groups (p < .01). Weight loss was the strongest single delineator and common to both races. The black subgroups with the highest PSI 7 risk were Medicare beneficiaries who were either < or = 25.5 years without hypertension or < or = 39.5 years without hypertension but with an emergency or trauma admission. The white subgroup with the highest PSI 7 risk consisted of patients < or = 45.5 years who had congestive heart failure but did not have either hypertension or weight loss. Identifying subgroups of patients at risk for a rare safety event such as PSI 7 should aid effective clinical decisions and efficient use of resources and help to guide patient safety interventions.