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Sample records for subgroup strongly retains

  1. Bioinspired superhydrophobic carbonaceous hairy microstructures with strong water adhesion and high gas retaining capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Qin, Minglei; Wang, Anjie; Kim, Dongpyo

    2013-09-06

    Various hydrophobic hairy carbonaceous fibers are obtained by a low-temperature CVD process on catalyst-patterned surface patches which are selectively coated with silica to make the surface superhydrophobic and yet allow strong water adhesion for the "Salvinia effect". The versatility of the functional hairy fiber surfaces is demonstrated with a liquid barrier grid for cell microarray, a gas retaining capability under water/liquid for a membrane-free microfluidic chemical process, and functionalized papillae for cell immobilization with green algae. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Clear retainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyakorn Chaimongkol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A clear retainer is a removable retainer that is popular in the present day. Compared with conventional fixed and removable orthodontic retainers, it is a more esthetic, comfortable, and inexpensive appliance. Although several studies have been published about clear retainers, it could be difficult to interpret the results because of the variety of study designs, sample sizes, and research methods. This article is intended to compile the content from previous studies and discuss advantages, disadvantages, fabrication, insertion, and adjustment. Moreover, the effectiveness in maintaining dental position, occlusion, retention protocols, thickness, and survival rate of clear retainers is discussed.

  3. Strong reproductive barriers in a narrow hybrid zone of West-Mediterranean green toads (Bufo viridis subgroup) with Plio-Pleistocene divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background One key question in evolutionary biology deals with the mode and rate at which reproductive isolation accumulates during allopatric speciation. Little is known about secondary contacts of recently diverged anuran species. Here we conduct a multi-locus field study to investigate a contact zone between two lineages of green toads with an estimated divergence time of 2.7 My, and report results from preliminary experimental crosses. Results The Sicilian endemic Bufo siculus and the Italian mainland-origin B. balearicus form a narrow hybrid zone east of Mt. Etna. Despite bidirectional mtDNA introgression over a ca. 40 km North-South cline, no F1 hybrids could be found, and nuclear genomes display almost no admixture. Populations from each side of the contact zone showed depressed genetic diversity and very strong differentiation (FST = 0.52). Preliminary experimental crosses point to a slightly reduced fitness in F1 hybrids, a strong hybrid breakdown in backcrossed offspring (F1 x parental, with very few reaching metamorphosis) and a complete and early mortality in F2 (F1 x F1). Conclusion Genetic patterns at the contact zone are molded by drift and selection. Local effective sizes are reduced by the geography and history of the contact zone, B. balearicus populations being at the front wave of a recent expansion (late Pleistocene). Selection against hybrids likely results from intrinsic genomic causes (disruption of coadapted sets of genes in backcrosses and F2-hybrids), possibly reinforced by local adaptation (the ranges of the two taxa roughly coincide with the borders of semiarid and arid climates). The absence of F1 in the field might be due to premating isolation mechanisms. Our results, show that these lineages have evolved almost complete reproductive isolation after some 2.7 My of divergence, contrasting sharply with evidence from laboratory experiments that some anuran species may still produce viable F1 offspring after > 20 My of divergence. PMID

  4. Statistical planning to address strongly correlated endpoints for inferential subgroups: An innovative approach for an illustrative clinical trial with complex multiplicity issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hengrui; Binkowitz, Bruce; Koch, Gary G

    2017-01-01

    Multiplicity is an important statistical issue that arises in clinical trials when the efficacy of the test treatment is evaluated in multiple ways. The major concern for multiplicity is that uncontrolled multiple assessments lead to inflated family-wise Type I error, and they thereby undermine the integrity of the statistical inferences. Multiplicity comes from different sources, for example, making inferences either on the overall population or some pre-specified sub-populations, while multiple endpoints need to be evaluated for each population. Therefore, a sound statistical strategy that controls the family-wise Type I error rate in a strong sense, without excessive loss of power from over-control, is crucial for the success of the trial. For a recent phase III cardiovascular trial with such complex multiplicity, we illustrate the use of a closed testing strategy that begins with a global test; and subsequent testing only proceeds when the global test is rejected. Also, we discuss a simulation study based on this trial to compare the power of the illustrated closed testing strategy to some well-known alternative approaches. We found that this strategy can comprehensively meet most of the primary objectives of the trial effectively with reasonably high overall power.

  5. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  6. Reality of Retainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You've probably seen a kid in the cafeteria take out his retainer before eating lunch. Carefully, ... your mouth along with bacteria, plaque, and leftover food particles. You should clean your retainer every day, ...

  7. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian M; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Recent efforts at stratifying medulloblastomas based on their molecular features have revolutionized our understanding of this morbidity. Collective efforts by multiple independent groups have subdivided medulloblastoma from a single disease into four distinct molecular subgroups characterized by disparate transcriptional signatures, mutational spectra, copy number profiles and, most importantly, clinical features. We present a summary of recent studies that have contributed to our understanding of the core medulloblastoma subgroups, focusing largely on clinically relevant discoveries that have already, and will continue to, shape research. PMID:22853794

  8. The congruence subgroup problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 4. The Congruence Subgroup Problem. M S Raghunathan. Invited Articles Volume 114 ... Author Affiliations. M S Raghunathan1. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  9. Subgroups Among Opiate Addicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzins, Juris I.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The principal objective of the present investigation was to delineate homogeneous MMPI profile subgroups (types) through multivariate clustering procedures and to compare the derived (replicable) types on measures of the components of "sociopathy" as well as on other psychometric devices. (Author)

  10. Subgrouping Automata: automatic sequence subgrouping using phylogenetic tree-based optimum subgrouping algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Joo-Hyun; Park, Jihyang; Kim, Eun-Mi; Kim, Juhan; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2014-02-01

    Sequence subgrouping for a given sequence set can enable various informative tasks such as the functional discrimination of sequence subsets and the functional inference of unknown sequences. Because an identity threshold for sequence subgrouping may vary according to the given sequence set, it is highly desirable to construct a robust subgrouping algorithm which automatically identifies an optimal identity threshold and generates subgroups for a given sequence set. To meet this end, an automatic sequence subgrouping method, named 'Subgrouping Automata' was constructed. Firstly, tree analysis module analyzes the structure of tree and calculates the all possible subgroups in each node. Sequence similarity analysis module calculates average sequence similarity for all subgroups in each node. Representative sequence generation module finds a representative sequence using profile analysis and self-scoring for each subgroup. For all nodes, average sequence similarities are calculated and 'Subgrouping Automata' searches a node showing statistically maximum sequence similarity increase using Student's t-value. A node showing the maximum t-value, which gives the most significant differences in average sequence similarity between two adjacent nodes, is determined as an optimum subgrouping node in the phylogenetic tree. Further analysis showed that the optimum subgrouping node from SA prevents under-subgrouping and over-subgrouping. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Earth retaining structures manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-29

    The objectives of this policy are to obtain statewide uniformity, establish standard : procedures and delineate responsibility for the preparation and review of plans, : design and construction control of earth retaining structures. In addition, it i...

  12. Finite groups all of whose minimal subgroups are NE-subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    subgroup of . In this article, we investigate the structure of under the assumption that subgroups of prime order are *-subgroups of . The finite groups, all of whose minimal subgroups of the generalized Fitting subgroup are *-subgroups ...

  13. A retained menstrual cup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, S

    2012-05-01

    A 20-year-old woman attended a genitourinary clinic with a retained vaginal Mooncup that she had inserted the night before. A Mooncup is one type of menstrual cup. On speculum examination the device was visualized high in the vagina and the cervix appeared firmly lodged within it. The physician experienced difficulty in retrieving the cup despite following product instructions. This case highlights a new adverse event with an increasingly used sanitation product. It is important that clinicians are familiar with the cup, its removal process and are able to counsel patients with retained devices on future correct placement.

  14. Postpartum MR diagnosis of retained placenta accreta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi; Itai, Yuji [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, 305-8575, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Shigemitsu, Sadahiko [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ryugasaki Saiseikai General Hospital, Ryagasaki (Japan); Ichikawa, Yoshihito; Sohda, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, 305-8575, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2004-06-01

    Retained placenta accreta can cause catastrophic postpartum hemorrhage. This study aims to determine whether MR imaging can differentiate retained placenta accreta from postpartum hemorrhage caused by other conditions. Fourteen cases suspicious for retained placenta were examined with MR imaging. Signal intensity, the enhancing pattern of uterine contents, and flow voids within the myometrium were retrospectively studied. As hysterectomy was performed in only two cases, final diagnosis was based on clinical outcome and analysis of uterine contents. Final diagnoses were retained placenta accreta in seven cases, retained normally attached placenta in four, hematoma in two, and placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT) in one. All seven cases with placenta accreta had a very hyperintense area on T2-weighted images, showing transient early enhancement. None demonstrated delayed strong enhancement around the hyperintense area. In two cases with retained normally attached placenta and in both with hematomas, there were no hyperintense areas on T2-weighted images. Of these, only one showed transient early enhancement. Flow voids were observed in four cases with placenta accreta, one with normally attached placenta, and the case with PSTT. A markedly hyperintense area on T2-weighted images and transient early enhancement without delayed strong enhancement between the mass and the myometrium can indicate retained placenta accreta. (orig.)

  15. Cytogenetic Prognostication Within Medulloblastoma Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, David J.H.; Northcott, Paul A.; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kool, Marcel; Luu, Betty; Yao, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Garzia, Livia; Peacock, John; Mack, Stephen C.; Wu, Xiaochong; Rolider, Adi; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M.G.; Jones, David T.W.; Zitterbart, Karel; Faria, Claudia C.; Schüller, Ulrich; Kren, Leos; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Shin Ra, Young; Garami, Miklós; Hauser, Peter; Chan, Jennifer A.; Robinson, Shenandoah; Bognár, László; Klekner, Almos; Saad, Ali G.; Liau, Linda M.; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam; Cinalli, Giuseppe; De Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo; Cooper, Michael K.; Thompson, Reid C.; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Michiels, Erna M.C.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Gupta, Nalin; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M.; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Eberhart, Charles G.; Fouladi, Maryam; Lach, Boleslaw; Jung, Shin; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Jouvet, Anne; Jabado, Nada; Pollack, Ian F.; Weiss, William A.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; de Torres, Carmen; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tabori, Uri; Olson, James M.; Gajjar, Amar; Packer, Roger J.; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pomeroy, Scott L.; French, Pim J.; Kloosterhof, Nanne K.; Kros, Johan M.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Clifford, Steven C.; Bourdeaut, Franck; Delattre, Olivier; Doz, François F.; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Malkin, David; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A.; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. Current medulloblastoma protocols stratify patients based on clinical features: patient age, metastatic stage, extent of resection, and histologic variant. Stark prognostic and genetic differences among the four subgroups suggest that subgroup-specific molecular biomarkers could improve patient prognostication. Patients and Methods Molecular biomarkers were identified from a discovery set of 673 medulloblastomas from 43 cities around the world. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical and cytogenetic biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Identified biomarkers were tested using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a nonoverlapping medulloblastoma tissue microarray (n = 453), with subsequent validation of the risk stratification models. Results Subgroup information improves the predictive accuracy of a multivariable survival model compared with clinical biomarkers alone. Most previously published cytogenetic biomarkers are only prognostic within a single medulloblastoma subgroup. Profiling six FISH biomarkers (GLI2, MYC, chromosome 11 [chr11], chr14, 17p, and 17q) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, we can reliably and reproducibly identify very low-risk and very high-risk patients within SHH, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas. Conclusion Combining subgroup and cytogenetic biomarkers with established clinical biomarkers substantially improves patient prognostication, even in the context of heterogeneous clinical therapies. The prognostic significance of most molecular biomarkers is restricted to a specific subgroup. We have identified a small panel of cytogenetic biomarkers that reliably identifies very high-risk and very low-risk groups of patients, making it an excellent tool for selecting patients for therapy intensification and therapy de-escalation in future clinical trials. PMID

  16. Soft n-Ary Subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Prince Williams

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soft set theory plays a vital role in solving many complicated problems with inherited uncertainty. An n-ary algebraic systems is a generalization of algebraic structures and it is the most natural way for the further development, deeper understanding of their properties. In this paper, we apply soft set theory to an n-ary algebraic systems and introduce the notions of soft n-ary groups and soft n-ary subgroups. Further, some operations on soft sets are extended to the former. Finally, we provide the characterization of soft n-ary subgroups over an n-ary group (G,f and study their related properties.

  17. On Cosets and Normal Subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    B. O. ONASANYA; S.A.Ilori

    2014-01-01

    The paper [5] has worked on fuzzy cosets and fuzzy normal subgroups of a group, [8] has extended the idea to fuzzy middle coset. In addition to what has been done, we make a link between fuzzy coset and fuzzy middle coset and investigate some more properties of the fuzzy middle coset. [7] made attempt with some results needing adjustment. [2], [8] and [9] have shown that if f 2 F(Sn), the set of all fuzzy subgroups of Sn, is such that Imf has the highest order and f is constant on the conjuga...

  18. Hopf algebras and congruence subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerhauser, Yorck

    2007-01-01

    We prove that the kernel of the natural action of the modular group on the center of the Drinfel'd double of a semisimple Hopf algebra is a congruence subgroup. To do this, we introduce a class of generalized Frobenius-Schur indicators and endow it with an action of the modular group that is compatible with the original one.

  19. Erratum The congruence subgroup problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    . 299–308). The congruence subgroup problem. M S RAGHUNATHAN. There is unfortunately an error in the paper cited above in the very first page. We correct this error (which does not materially affect the rest of the paper in any way) below.

  20. Finite groups all of whose minimal subgroups are NE∗ -subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove the following theorem which is an improvement of a recent result due to Asaad and Ramadan (see Theorem 1.1 of [2]). Hence, Q8 will denote the quaternion group of order 8 and a group G is called Q8-free if no quotient group of any subgroup of G is isomorphic to Q8. Throughout this paper, L will denote the class.

  1. Intertumoral Heterogeneity within Medulloblastoma Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Florence M G; Remke, Marc; Rampasek, Ladislav; Peacock, John; Shih, David J H; Luu, Betty; Garzia, Livia; Torchia, Jonathon; Nor, Carolina; Morrissy, A Sorana; Agnihotri, Sameer; Thompson, Yuan Yao; Kuzan-Fischer, Claudia M; Farooq, Hamza; Isaev, Keren; Daniels, Craig; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Faure-Conter, Cecile; Jouvet, Anne; Giannini, Caterina; Nageswara Rao, Amulya A; Li, Kay Ka Wai; Ng, Ho-Keung; Eberhart, Charles G; Pollack, Ian F; Hamilton, Ronald L; Gillespie, G Yancey; Olson, James M; Leary, Sarah; Weiss, William A; Lach, Boleslaw; Chambless, Lola B; Thompson, Reid C; Cooper, Michael K; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Hauser, Peter; van Veelen, Marie-Lise C; Kros, Johan M; French, Pim J; Ra, Young Shin; Kumabe, Toshihiro; López-Aguilar, Enrique; Zitterbart, Karel; Sterba, Jaroslav; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Massimino, Maura; Van Meir, Erwin G; Osuka, Satoru; Shofuda, Tomoko; Klekner, Almos; Zollo, Massimo; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Rubin, Joshua B; Jabado, Nada; Albrecht, Steffen; Mora, Jaume; Van Meter, Timothy E; Jung, Shin; Moore, Andrew S; Hallahan, Andrew R; Chan, Jennifer A; Tirapelli, Daniela P C; Carlotti, Carlos G; Fouladi, Maryam; Pimentel, José; Faria, Claudia C; Saad, Ali G; Massimi, Luca; Liau, Linda M; Wheeler, Helen; Nakamura, Hideo; Elbabaa, Samer K; Perezpeña-Diazconti, Mario; Chico Ponce de León, Fernando; Robinson, Shenandoah; Zapotocky, Michal; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Huang, Annie; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Tabori, Uri; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Dirks, Peter B; Rutka, James T; Bader, Gary D; Reimand, Jüri; Goldenberg, Anna; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2017-06-12

    While molecular subgrouping has revolutionized medulloblastoma classification, the extent of heterogeneity within subgroups is unknown. Similarity network fusion (SNF) applied to genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression data across 763 primary samples identifies very homogeneous clusters of patients, supporting the presence of medulloblastoma subtypes. After integration of somatic copy-number alterations, and clinical features specific to each cluster, we identify 12 different subtypes of medulloblastoma. Integrative analysis using SNF further delineates group 3 from group 4 medulloblastoma, which is not as readily apparent through analyses of individual data types. Two clear subtypes of infants with Sonic Hedgehog medulloblastoma with disparate outcomes and biology are identified. Medulloblastoma subtypes identified through integrative clustering have important implications for stratification of future clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Massachusetts, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Massachusetts for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Massachusetts showed across-the-board gains--improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low…

  3. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Kentucky, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Kentucky for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Kentucky showed mostly gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls.…

  4. Research methods for subgrouping low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Keating, Jennifer L; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable clinician and researcher interest in whether the outcomes for patients with low back pain, and the efficiency of the health systems that treat them, can be improved by 'subgrouping research'. Subgrouping research seeks to identify subgroups of people who have clinically...... studies (a method framework). The aims of this debate article are: (1) to present a method framework to inform the design and evaluation of subgrouping research in low back pain, (2) to describe method options when investigating prognostic effects or subgroup treatment effects, and (3) to discuss...

  5. Electrical transmission line diametrical retainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael; Fox, Joe

    2004-12-14

    The invention is a mechanism for retaining an electrical transmission line. In one embodiment of the invention it is a system for retaining an electrical transmission line within down hole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second end of a drill pipe, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The invention allows the electrical transmission line to with stand the tension and compression of drill pipe during routine drilling cycles.

  6. An unrecognized foreign body retained in the calcaneus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ro Woon; Choi, Soo Jung; Hwang, Jae Kwang; Ahn, Jae Hong; Kang, Chae Hoon; Shin, Dong Rock [Gangneung Asan Hospital, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    We describe a case of an unrecognized foreign body retained in the calcaneus. The patient denied any history of trauma. The skin overlying the calcaneus was intact with no local signs of inflammation. The retained foreign body was not observed on the radiograph of the calcaneus. Magnetic Resonance Imaging showed a tubular low signal intensity lesion in the calcaneal body, surrounded by strongly enhanced soft tissue and bone marrow edema caused by a foreign body reaction. A foreign body retained in the calcaneus was suspected on the basis of these findings. Surgical exploration and curettage was performed, and a rod shaped wooden fragment was found.

  7. Level of evidence for promising subgroup findings in an overall non-significant trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanniou, Julien; van der Tweel, Ingeborg|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/262684438; Teerenstra, S.; Roes, Kit C.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/115147020

    2016-01-01

    In drug development and drug licensing, it sometimes occurs that a new drug does not demonstrate effectiveness for the full study population, but there appears to be benefit in a relevant, pre-defined subgroup. This raises the question, how strong the evidence from such a subgroup is, and which

  8. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Delaware students showed consistent gains in math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. There were mixed results in reading. Achievement gaps narrowed in both reading and math in…

  9. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Maine students had across-the-board gains. There were improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for the subgroups large enough to count, which were white students, low income students, and boys and girls. Results on…

  10. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Illinois students showed mostly gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. There was mixed progress made in narrowing achievement gaps in reading and math…

  11. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Florida students showed gains almost across the board in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. Progress has been made in narrowing achievement gaps in both…

  12. ∗-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    supplemented maximal and minimal subgroups of Sylow subgroups of finite groups, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 132(8) (2004) 2197–2204. [17] Wang Y, Wei H and Li Y, A generalization of Kramer's theorem and its applications,. Bull. Austral. Math.

  13. Existence of a dictatorial subgroup in social choice with independent subgroup utility scales, an alternative proof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna; van Deemen, Adrian; Rusinowska, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Social welfare orderings for different scales of individual utility measurement in distinct population subgroups are studied. In Khmelnitskaya (2000), employing the continuous version of Arrow’s impossibility theorem, it was shown that for combinations of independent subgroups scales every

  14. Retained gas sampler visualization guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekarriz, A.

    1994-09-01

    In a series of experiments performed in Phase II of the retained gas sampler visualization task, the effect of sampler tip geometry on waste sampling process has been investigated. From flow visualizations, which were captured on video, it is clear that disturbances on the surrounding fluid and the fluid entering the sampler were reduced as the tip changed from a flat to a sharper truncated cone shape. It has been shown, throughout this report, that deformation and disturbance of the waste is dominated by shape of the sampler tip, which moves the stagnation point, and not by viscosity of the fluid or sampling rate.

  15. The effects of status on subgroup relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Hogg, Michael A

    2002-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the impact of status differentials on subgroup attitudes and behaviours. In Experiment 1, 73 math-science students were led to believe they had higher or lower status than humanities students. They then performed a non-interactive decision-making task during which they were categorized exclusively as a university student (superordinate condition), or as a university student and math-science student simultaneously (subgroups condition). Experiment 2 (N = 98) differed from Experiment 1 in that perceptions of relative subgroup status were measured rather than manipulated. Consistent with social identity theory, subgroup members tended to categorize themselves more at the superordinate (university) level the lower status they considered their subgroup to be. In Experiment 2, a series of interactions also emerged, showing that status and inter-subgroup bias were positively related when the participants had been categorized exclusively at the superordinate level. When superordinate and subgroup identities were activated simultaneously, perceptions of status had no effect on levels of bias. The results were interpreted in terms of participants' needs for identity enhancement and identity distinctiveness.

  16. Identifying Tinnitus Subgroups With Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Richard; Coelho, Claudia; Tao, Pan; Ji, Haihong; Noble, William; Gehringer, Anne; Gogel, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We believe it is important to uncover tinnitus subgroups to identify subsets of patients most likely to benefit from different treatments. We review strategies for subgrouping based on etiology, subjective reports, the audiogram, psychoacoustics, imaging, and cluster analysis. Method Preliminary results of a 2-step cluster analysis based on 246 participants from whom we had 26 categorical and 25 continuous variables were determined. Results A 4-cluster solution suggested the following subgroups: (a) constant distressing tinnitus, (b) varying tinnitus that is worse in noise, (c) tinnitus patients who are copers and whose tinnitus is not influenced by touch (somatic modulation), and (d) tinnitus patients who are copers but whose tinnitus is worse in quiet environments. Conclusions Subgroups of tinnitus patients can be identified by using statistical approaches. The subgroups we identify here represent a preliminary attempt at identifying such patients. One next step would be to explore clinical trials of tinnitus treatments based on subgroup analyses or on using subgroups in the selection criteria. PMID:19056922

  17. Identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chaleil

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some hypotheses concerning the identification of homogeneous subgroups among fibromyalgia (FM patients in order to improve the management of the disease. It also reviews the available literature about this subject. Three methods for subgrouping are discussed according to clinical features, biomarkers, and gait analysis. Clinical subgrouping based on cluster analysis has been used for the identification of homogeneous subgroups of patients and, more recently, homogeneous clinical features. So far, longitudinal studies using clinical subgroups to direct treatment and predict outcome are still required. Biomarkers in FM, which is a neurobiological disease, are of promising interest, nevertheless currently, none of them can be used to subgroup FM patients. Due to the fact that cortical and subcortical mechanisms of gait control share some cognitive functions which are involved in FM, gait markers have been proposed to evaluate and to subgroup FM patients, in clinical settings. Three out of 4 core FM symptoms are linked to gait markers. Kinesia measured by means of cranio-caudal power is correlated to pain, and could be proposed to assess pain behavior (kinesiophobia. Stride frequency, which is linked to physical component, allows the identification of a hyperkinetic subgroup. Moreover, SF has been correlated to fatigue during the 6 minute walking test. Stride regularity, which expresses the unsteadiness of gait, is correlated to cognitive dysfunction in FM. Decreased stride regularity allows the recognition of a homogeneous subgroup characterized by an increased anxiety and depression, and decreased cognitive functions. These results need further studies to be validated and so used in the daily clinical practice.

  18. SUBGR: A Program to Generate Subgroup Data for the Subgroup Resonance Self-Shielding Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-06

    The Subgroup Data Generation (SUBGR) program generates subgroup data, including levels and weights from the resonance self-shielded cross section table as a function of background cross section. Depending on the nuclide and the energy range, these subgroup data can be generated by (a) narrow resonance approximation, (b) pointwise flux calculations for homogeneous media; and (c) pointwise flux calculations for heterogeneous lattice cells. The latter two options are performed by the AMPX module IRFFACTOR. These subgroup data are to be used in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) neutronic simulator MPACT, for which the primary resonance self-shielding method is the subgroup method.

  19. Fast determination of structurally cohesive subgroups in large networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovits, Robert S; Moody, James; Oztan, B Tolga; White, Douglas R

    2016-11-01

    Structurally cohesive subgroups are a powerful and mathematically rigorous way to characterize network robustness. Their strength lies in the ability to detect strong connections among vertices that not only have no neighbors in common, but that may be distantly separated in the graph. Unfortunately, identifying cohesive subgroups is a computationally intensive problem, which has limited empirical assessments of cohesion to relatively small graphs of at most a few thousand vertices. We describe here an approach that exploits the properties of cliques, k-cores and vertex separators to iteratively reduce the complexity of the graph to the point where standard algorithms can be used to complete the analysis. As a proof of principle, we apply our method to the cohesion analysis of a 29,462-vertex biconnected component extracted from a 128,151-vertex co-authorship data set.

  20. Rebond strength of bonded lingual wire retainers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westing, K.; Algera, T.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    There is no consensus in the literature concerning the rebonding procedure for orthodontic retainers. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond and rebond strength of retainers bonded to enamel surfaces with and without composite remnants. The retainers were bonded with Excite and

  1. 9 CFR 441.10 - Retained water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retained water. 441.10 Section 441.10... STANDARDS: RAW PRODUCTS § 441.10 Retained water. (a) Raw livestock and poultry carcasses and parts will not be permitted to retain water resulting from post-evisceration processing unless the establishment...

  2. <strong>Mini-project>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katajainen, Jyrki

    2008-01-01

    In this project the goal is to develop the safe * family of containers for the CPH STL. The containers to be developed should be safer and more reliable than any of the existing implementations. A special focus should be put on strong exception safety since none of the existing prototypes availab...... at the CPH STL can give this guarantee for all operations. In spite of the safety requirements, the strict running-time requirements specified in the C++ standard, and additional requirements specified in the CPH STL design documents, must be fulfilled....

  3. Genetic and molecular alterations across medulloblastoma subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Patryk; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumour diagnosed in children. Over the last few decades, advances in radiation and chemotherapy have significantly improved the odds of survival. Nevertheless, one third of all patients still succumb to their disease, and many long-term survivors are afflicted with neurocognitive sequelae. Large-scale multi-institutional efforts have provided insight into the transcriptional and genetic landscape of medulloblastoma. Four distinct subgroups of medulloblastoma have been identified, defined by distinct transcriptomes, genetics, demographics and outcomes. Integrated genomic profiling of each of these subgroups has revealed distinct genetic alterations, driving pathways and in some instances cells of origin. In this review, we highlight, in a subgroup-specific manner, our current knowledge of the genetic and molecular alterations in medulloblastoma and underscore the possible avenues for future therapeutic intervention.

  4. Affiliative Subgroups in Preschool Classrooms: Integrating Constructs and Methods from Social Ethology and Sociometric Traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, António J; Daniel, João R; Fernandes, Carla; Vaughn, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of school-age children and adolescents have used social network analyses to characterize selection and socialization aspects of peer groups. Fewer network studies have been reported for preschool classrooms and many of those have focused on structural descriptions of peer networks, and/or, on selection processes rather than on social functions of subgroup membership. In this study we started by identifying and describing different types of affiliative subgroups (HMP- high mutual proximity, LMP- low mutual proximity, and ungrouped children) in a sample of 240 Portuguese preschool children using nearest neighbor observations. Next, we used additional behavioral observations and sociometric data to show that HMP and LMP subgroups are functionally distinct: HMP subgroups appear to reflect friendship relations, whereas LMP subgroups appear to reflect common social goals, but without strong, within-subgroup dyadic ties. Finally, we examined the longitudinal implications of subgroup membership and show that children classified as HMP in consecutive years had more reciprocated friendships than did children whose subgroup classification changed from LMP or ungrouped to HMP. These results extend previous findings reported for North American peer groups.

  5. On Preferential sylow fuzzy subgroups | Makamba | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, for a prime p, we propose some plausible denitions for the notion of Sylow fuzzy p-subgroup of a nite group. We derive a number of results for nite fuzzy groups using one of the proposed denitions. We also discuss some of the relationships between various proposed denitions for suitability, including the crisp ...

  6. Zero-sum problems with subgroup weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this note, we generalize some theorems on zero-sums with weights from [1], [4] and [5] in two directions. In particular, we consider Z Z p d for a general and subgroups of Z p ∗ as weights. Author Affiliations. S D Adhikari1 A A Ambily2 B Sury2. Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 ...

  7. Interpretation of Subgroup Effects in Published Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Mark J; Kjær, Per; Korsholm, Lars

    2013-01-01

    that report on treatment effect modifiers (subgroups) for specific physical therapy interventions. The key messages are: (1) point estimates of treatment modifier effect size (interaction effect) and their confidence intervals can be calculated using group-level data when individual patient-level data...

  8. Federal Aviation Administration retained savings program proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hostick, D.J.; Larson, L.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, C.J. [IBP, Inc., Pasco, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Federal legislation allows federal agencies to retain up to 50% of the savings associated with implementing energy efficiency and water conservation measures and practices. Given budget pressures to reduce expenditures, the use of retained savings to fund additional projects represents a source of funds outside of the traditional budget cycle. The Southwest Region Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a model retained savings program for Southwest Region FAA use and as a prototype for consideration by the FAA. PNNL recommends the following steps be taken in developing a Southwest Region FAA retained savings program: Establish a retained savings mechanism. Determine the level at which the retained savings should be consolidated into a fund. The preliminary recommendation is to establish a revolving efficiency loan fund at the regional level. Such a mechanism allows some consolidation of savings to fund larger projects, while maintaining a sense of facility ownership in that the funds will remain within the region.

  9. Topological groups with dense compactly generated subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujita

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available A topological group G is: (i compactly generated if it contains a compact subset algebraically generating G, (ii -compact if G is a union of countably many compact subsets, (iii 0-bounded if arbitrary neighborhood U of the identity element of G has countably many translates xU that cover G, and (iv finitely generated modulo open sets if for every non-empty open subset U of G there exists a finite set F such that F  U algebraically generates G. We prove that: (1 a topological group containing a dense compactly generated subgroup is both 0-bounded and finitely generated modulo open sets, (2 an almost metrizable topological group has a dense compactly generated subgroup if and only if it is both 0-bounded and finitely generated modulo open sets, and (3 an almost metrizable topological group is compactly generated if and only if it is -compact and finitely generated modulo open sets.

  10. Unexpected complications of bonded mandibular lingual retainers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsaros, C.; Livas, C.; Renkema, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) retainer is the most frequently used type of fixed retainer bonded on all 6 anterior teeth. Our aim in this article was to demonstrate unexpected posttreatment changes in the labiolingual position of the mandibular anterior teeth associated with the use

  11. Patients' thoughts on patient- retained medical records

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    retaining their own records. In the transcribed interviews, themes were identified through the cut-and-paste method ... The recommendations that arose from this study are that the use of the patient-retained medical health record booklet should be continued ... created a sense of partnership be- tween the health personnel ...

  12. Factorizing profinite groups into two Abelian subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Herfort

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We prove that the class of profinite groups $G$ that have a factorization $G=AB$with $A$ and $B$ abelian closed subgroups, is closed under taking strict projective limits.This is a generalization of a recent result by K.H.~Hofmann and F.G.~Russo.As an application we reprove their generalization of Iwasawa's structure theorem forquasihamiltonian pro-$p$ groups.

  13. MPACT Subgroup Self-Shielding Efficiency Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Yuxuan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Recent developments to improve the efficiency of the MOC solvers in MPACT have yielded effective kernels that loop over several energy groups at once, rather that looping over one group at a time. These kernels have produced roughly a 2x speedup on the MOC sweeping time during eigenvalue calculation. However, the self-shielding subgroup calculation had not been reevaluated to take advantage of these new kernels, which typically requires substantial solve time. The improvements covered in this report start by integrating the multigroup kernel concepts into the subgroup calculation, which are then used as the basis for further extensions. The next improvement that is covered is what is currently being termed as “Lumped Parameter MOC”. Because the subgroup calculation is a purely fixed source problem and multiple sweeps are performed only to update the boundary angular fluxes, the sweep procedure can be condensed to allow for the instantaneous propagation of the flux across a spatial domain, without the need to sweep along all segments in a ray. Once the boundary angular fluxes are considered to be converged, an additional sweep that will tally the scalar flux is completed. The last improvement that is investigated is the possible reduction of the number of azimuthal angles per octant in the shielding sweep. Typically 16 azimuthal angles per octant are used for self-shielding and eigenvalue calculations, but it is possible that the self-shielding sweeps are less sensitive to the number of angles than the full eigenvalue calculation.

  14. Patterns of subgrouping and spatial affiliation in a community of mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezanson, Michelle; Garber, Paul A; Murphy, John T; Premo, L S

    2008-03-01

    Studies of social affiliation and social spacing offer important insight into the dynamics of subgroup formation and social strategies in living primates. Among the 11 species in the genus Alouatta, mantled howlers (A. palliata) are the only species to consistently form large, stable social groups composed of several adult males and several adult females. In this study, we examine patterns of subgrouping, activity, and partner preferences in a troop of 26-29 wild mantled howling monkeys (including 12-13 marked individuals) inhabiting Isla de Ometepe, Nicaragua. During two study seasons in 2000 and 2001, we simultaneously monitored the size, composition, and activities of individuals in two to three different subgroups. A half-weight association index was used to calculate partner preferences and patterns of spatial association. Results indicate that our howler study troop fragmented into subgroups of 1-20 with subgroups averaging five and six individuals. Subgroup size and membership reflected individual patterns of social affiliation and social tolerance, and in general remained consistent across activities and from year to year. We also found evidence of cliques or social networks of three to four individuals embedded within larger subgroups. A small number of adult males appeared to play an important social role as the nucleus of clique formation. We argue that the persistence of strong male-male and male-female partner preferences in mantled howlers helps to explain the stability of relatively large multimale-multifemale groups.

  15. Retaining Walls Made of Precast Cylindrical Valuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ungureanu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Retaining walls are large category of engineering structures of multiple uses, having an essential safety ensuring role. The structural systems are varied because the situations and requirements derived from both site conditions and other criteria are varied. The paper enlarges upon retaining walls systems that use an outstanding amount of precast units and multiple cylindrical vault type structural systems supported by abutments [1], [2]. The paper proposes extending the structural system to retaining walls and develops certain specific issues. Some considerations regarding structural design are made.

  16. The ergodic theory of lattice subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Gorodnik, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The results established in this book constitute a new departure in ergodic theory and a significant expansion of its scope. Traditional ergodic theorems focused on amenable groups, and relied on the existence of an asymptotically invariant sequence in the group, the resulting maximal inequalities based on covering arguments, and the transference principle. Here, Alexander Gorodnik and Amos Nevo develop a systematic general approach to the proof of ergodic theorems for a large class of non-amenable locally compact groups and their lattice subgroups. Simple general conditions on the spectral theory of the group and the regularity of the averaging sets are formulated, which suffice to guarantee convergence to the ergodic mean

  17. Subgrouping the autism "spectrum": reflections on DSM-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Lai

    Full Text Available DSM-5 has moved autism from the level of subgroups ("apples and oranges" to the prototypical level ("fruit". But making progress in research, and ultimately improving clinical practice, will require identifying subgroups within the autism spectrum.

  18. Notes on relatively hyperbolic groups and relatively quasiconvex subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Yoshifumi; Oguni, Shin-ichi; Yamagata, Saeko

    2013-01-01

    We define relatively quasiconvex subgroups of relatively hyperbolic groups in the sense of Osin and show that such subgroups have expected properties. Also we state several definitions equivalent to the definition of relatively hyperbolic groups in the sense of Osin.

  19. Additive subgroups of topological vector spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Banaszczyk, Wojciech

    1991-01-01

    The Pontryagin-van Kampen duality theorem and the Bochner theorem on positive-definite functions are known to be true for certain abelian topological groups that are not locally compact. The book sets out to present in a systematic way the existing material. It is based on the original notion of a nuclear group, which includes LCA groups and nuclear locally convex spaces together with their additive subgroups, quotient groups and products. For (metrizable, complete) nuclear groups one obtains analogues of the Pontryagin duality theorem, of the Bochner theorem and of the Lévy-Steinitz theorem on rearrangement of series (an answer to an old question of S. Ulam). The book is written in the language of functional analysis. The methods used are taken mainly from geometry of numbers, geometry of Banach spaces and topological algebra. The reader is expected only to know the basics of functional analysis and abstract harmonic analysis.

  20. Can the tinnitus spectrum identify tinnitus subgroups?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin M Heijneman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tinnitus spectrum is a psycho-acoustic metric of tinnitus. Previous work found a tight relation between the spectrum and the tone audiogram. This suggests that the spectrum and the audiogram provide essentially the same information, and the added value of the spectrum is limited. In order to test whether the spectrum shows tinnitus characteristics that cannot be inferred from the audiogram, we re-examined the relation between the tinnitus spectrum and the tone audiogram, in a group of 80 tinnitus patients. We defined three subgroups of patients, using the shape of their tinnitus spectrum: (1 patients with a spectrum, monotonously increasing with frequency (2 patients with a distinct peak in their spectrum, (3 all other patients. Patients in group 3 typically showed low frequency tinnitus spectra. In all three groups, the largest hearing loss was at high frequencies (>2 kHz. The mean audiograms of group 1 and 2 were remarkably similar; group 3 had an additional hearing loss for the lower frequencies (<2 kHz. The three groups did not differ with respect to age, sex, or tinnitus questionnaire outcomes. In subgroups 2 and 3, the shape of the spectrum clearly differed from that of the tone audiogram. In other words, the spectrum technique provided information that could not have been obtained by tone audiometry alone. Therefore, the spectrum measurement may develop into a technique that can differentiate between classes of tinnitus. This may eventually contribute to the effective management of tinnitus, as various classes of tinnitus may require different therapeutic interventions.

  1. Subgroup analysis in burnout : Relations between fatigue, anxiety, and depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, A.

    2016-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup

  2. Retained laser fibre: insights and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekich, C; Hannah, P

    2014-06-01

    To describe a case of retained endovenous laser fibre. To review the literature and Food and Drug Administration device failure reports. To suggest protocols for avoiding this complication and a method of removal. A case of retained fibre removal is described. Fibre removal techniques in vivo and ex vivo in a bovine model on the laboratory bench are presented. Successful in vivo and ex vivo fibre removal was performed using duplex ultrasound scan guided phlebectomy techniques. Unexplained measured fibre-length discrepancies due to misleading manufacturer's packaging was discovered. Simple ultrasound-guided micro-phlebectomy techniques can be used to remove retained laser fibres in the office environment. Laser fibre length measurements before and after treatment are recommended. Some preventive guidelines are described to avoid, or at least diagnose immediately, this complication, such as the 'Laser Eclipse Sign'. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Localization of nuclear retained mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Rune; Libri, Domenico; Boulay, Jocelyne; Rosbash, Michael; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2003-09-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common conditional phenotype associated with deletion or mutation of genes encoding mRNA export factors is the rapid accumulation of mRNAs in intranuclear foci, suggested to be near transcription sites. The nuclear RNA exosome has been implicated in retaining RNAs in these foci; on deletion of the exosome component Rrp6p, the RNA is released. To determine the exact nuclear location of retained as well as released mRNAs, we have used mRNA export mutant strains to analyze the spatial relationship between newly synthesized heat shock mRNA, the chromosomal site of transcription, and known S. cerevisiae nuclear structures such as the nucleolus and the nucleolar body. Our results show that retained SSA4 RNA localizes to an area in close proximity to the SSA4 locus. On deletion of Rrp6p and release from the genomic locus, heat shock mRNAs produced in the rat7-1 strain colocalize predominantly with nucleolar antigens. Bulk poly(A)(+) RNA, on the other hand, is localized primarily to the nuclear rim. Interestingly, the RNA binding nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Npl3p shows strong colocalization with bulk poly(A)(+) RNA, regardless of its nuclear location. Taken together, our data show that retention occurs close to the gene and indicate distinct nuclear fates of different mRNAs.

  4. Transmural migration of retained surgical sponges: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zantvoord, Yvette; van der Weiden, Robin M F; van Hooff, Marcel H A

    2008-07-01

    Retained surgical sponges have been reported to occur after a diversity of surgical procedures, but transmural migration is a very unusual sequela. This article reports a case in which a retained surgical sponge eroded from the intra-abdominal space into the intestinal lumen, migrated distally, and spontaneously passed with defecation 12 weeks after the cesarean section. We performed a systematic review of the literature in Pubmed and found 64 cases of transmural migration of retained surgical sponges. Sixty-four cases have been reported of transmural migration, mainly after intra-abdominal surgery. The most frequent site of impaction is the intestine (75%), but we also found 2 cases that describe migration into the stomach and 7 into the bladder. Five more cases have been published describing transdiaphragmic migration. Only 4 cases describe a sponge spontaneously expelled through the rectum, whereas more than 93% needed re-intervention. We strongly advise only the use sponges with radiopaque markers during surgery and additional methodical wound/body cavity examination.

  5. Disruption of lactogenesis by retained placental fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A M

    2001-05-01

    This case report describes a situation in which lack of milk production led the mother to seek help from a lactation consultant in private practice. Despite extensive breast stimulation with the baby at breast and mechanical breast expression, no milk was produced. Retained placenta was suspected by the lactation consultant. The mother was later diagnosed with placenta increta. Only when this condition was diagnosed and resolved did milk onset occur. It is important to evaluate for retained placental fragments when lactation appears to be delayed.

  6. 76 FR 69126 - Graduated Retained Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... retained interest, or other payment from the property for life, for any period not ascertainable without... specified period (as opposed to payments that were payable to the decedent prior to the decedent's death but... the end, of a payment period (see Table K or J of Sec. 20.2031- 7(d)(6)) by the section 7520 rate...

  7. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to retained lumbar drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guppy, Kern H; Silverthorn, James W; Akins, Paul T

    2011-12-01

    Intrathecal spinal catheters (lumbar drains) are indicated for several medical and surgical conditions. In neurosurgical procedures, they are used to reduce intracranial and intrathecal pressures by diverting CSF. They have also been placed for therapeutic access to administer drugs, and more recently, vascular surgeons have used them to improve spinal cord perfusion during the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Insertion of these lumbar drains is not without attendant complications. One complication is the shearing of the distal end of the catheter with a resultant retained fragment. The authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the migration of a retained lumbar drain that sheared off during its removal. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of rostral migration of a retained intrathecal catheter causing subarachnoid hemorrhage. The authors review the literature on retained intrathecal spinal catheters, and their findings support either early removal of easily accessible catheters or close monitoring with serial imaging.

  8. Psychosocial effects of implant-retained overdentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, J; Boerrigter, LM; VanOort, RP; vanSonderen, E; Boering, G

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare implant-retained mandibular overdentures and two conventional treatments for their effects on functional ability (chewing, speaking, etc), patient satisfaction, and quality of life (psychosocial functioning). Assignment of 90 patients was executed by means of a

  9. Retained gas sampler system acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, N.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-18

    Acceptance test results for the Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS) obtained in the 306E laboratory are reported. The RGSS will be utilized to retrieve and analyze samples from the Hanford flammable gas watch-list tanks to determine the quantity and chemistry of gases confined within the waste.

  10. Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CRAWFORD, B.A.

    2000-01-05

    This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis.

  11. Retaining Excellent Teachers through Effective Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Connie

    2013-01-01

    School districts continue to face challenges in retaining talented teachers in their schools. There are many factors that contribute to teacher retention, including working conditions, a lack of leadership support, and poor leadership behavior. In a southeastern U.S. state, local school officials were seeking strategies to provide an excellent…

  12. Clinical Subgroups in Bilateral Meniere Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejo, Lidia; Soto-Varela, Andres; Santos-Perez, Sofía; Aran, Ismael; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Perez-Guillen, Vanesa; Perez-Garrigues, Herminio; Fraile, Jesus; Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Tapia, Maria C.; Trinidad, Gabriel; García-Arumi, Ana María; González-Aguado, Rocío; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Marques, Pedro; Perez, Paz; Benitez, Jesus; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Meniere disease (MD) is a heterogeneous clinical condition characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, episodic vestibular symptoms, and tinnitus associated with several comorbidities, such as migraine or autoimmune disorders (AD). The frequency of bilateral involvement may range from 5 to 50%, and it depends on the duration of the disease. We have performed a two-step cluster analysis in 398 patients with bilateral MD (BMD) to identify the best predictors to define clinical subgroups with a potential different etiology to improve the phenotyping of BMD and to develop new treatments. We have defined five clinical variants in BMD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 46% of patients, and is defined by metachronic hearing loss without migraine and without AD. Group 2 is found in 17% of patients, and it is defined by synchronic hearing loss without migraine or AD. Group 3, with 13% of patients, is characterized by familial MD, while group 4, that includes 12% of patients, is associated by the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by AD. This approach can be helpful in selecting patients for genetic and clinical research. However, further studies will be required to improve the phenotyping in these clinical variants for a better understanding of the diverse etiological factors contributing to BMD. PMID:27822199

  13. USING BRANDING TO ATTRACT, RECRUIT, AND RETAIN TALENTED STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Valentina FLOREA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this environment in continuous changing it is hard for organizations toattract and maintain the best candidates. The organizations use manymethods to recruit and hire, but now it is time to use the organization’s brandto attract talents the organization would like. This article will define theemployer brand as the organization’s image, as an exceptional place to workin the minds of the current employees as well as potential candidates, clients,customers, and stakeholders. The case study is made in six largeorganizations from Dambovita County, Romania, and describes how to usethe organization’s brand to attract, retain, and engage the people it needs. Imade a survey and the data collected I putted them in a model of analyzeand can be applied to any organization which wants to find out if it is usingcorrectly its strong powers to attract and retain the best candidates. Theemployer brand is the value proposition that organization conveys itsemployees and the external labor market. Great organizations create such astrong brand that it draws the talent to them rather than having to spendsignificant time and money on selling the organization to the talent market.Many benefits in the recruiting world are provided by a strong employmentbrand.

  14. Report of the Production and Delivery Subgroup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R; Zalesky, R

    2004-11-01

    The Production and Delivery Subgroup was tasked with evaluating the various options that could be used for hydrogen production and delivery in terms of availability/industry readiness, technical and economic barriers, and environmental considerations. Hydrogen can be produced using a variety of feedstocks and conversion technologies. The feedstock options include water, natural gas, coal, petroleum, methanol, ethanol, biomass, and organic waste streams. Ultimately, using these domestic resources we will be able to produce all the hydrogen we will need for the complete conversion of our transportation infrastructure. The various conversion technologies include electrolysis, reforming (principally of natural gas, but also ethanol and methanol), photobiological and photoelectrochemical, biofermentation, pyrolysis and gasification of biomass and coal, high temperature thermochemical, and catalytic membranes. All of these production technologies are being actively researched by DOE's Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT); and other offices within DOE support work that complements the HFCIT Program activities. In addition, private industry is also dedicating significant resources to these efforts. In establishing the California Hydrogen Highway Network (CA H2 Net) we must utilize both distributed (that is, hydrogen that is produced at the point of use) as well as centralized production of hydrogen. Because of technical and economic barriers, most of the technologies for hydrogen production listed above will not become practical for either mode of hydrogen production in large quantities until at least the 2015-2030 timeframe. In the near term, that is, the transitional period between now and 2010 when we will establish a widely available hydrogen fueling infrastructure in California, the distributed production options of reforming and electrolysis will play the dominant role. In addition, production of hydrogen at centralized plants

  15. Dynamic Response of Wall Backfill Retaining System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas Alampalli

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available An in situ full-scale test is conducted to measure the dynamic response of a long cantilever wall that retains backfill soil. The recorded modal parameters of this retaining wall exhibited significant similarity to those of a clamped cantilever plate (rather than those of a cantilever beam or plane-strain analysis. Such a three-dimensional (3-D response pattern is not accounted for by current analysis procedures. A simple 3-D finite element model is employed to further analyze the observed resonant configurations. The results indicate that such configurations play an important role in the seismic response of wall backfill soil systems of variable height, such as wing walls supporting highway approach ramps.

  16. Climate retainment in carbon dioxide incubators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuh Matthias B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring optimal climate conditions during cultivation is essential for successful and reproducible cell culture based investigation. Being the gold standard, carbon dioxide incubators fulfill this demand in various geometries and sizes to suit diverse cultivation applications. A door opening results in a climate breakdown followed by a restoration period during which optimal conditions cannot be guaranteed. The following paper investigates the influence of incubator door design to optimize climate retainment during the above mentioned event.

  17. Retaining nursing faculty beyond retirement age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Marvel L; Cook, Linda; Salmeron, Lois; Burton, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The number of nursing faculty planning to retire by 2020 is alarming. To develop strategies for retaining faculty, researchers asked: What factors influence the decision by nursing faculty to stay in the workforce past retirement age? What barriers could be removed that would encourage faculty to stay longer? Using Giorgi's analysis method, findings from 6 faculty teaching past retirement age revealed key meaning units and grand themes that match Maslow's Hierarchy of Inborn Needs.

  18. Guideline Implementation: Prevention of Retained Surgical Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    A surgical item unintentionally retained in a patient after an operative or other invasive procedure is a serious, preventable medical error with the potential to cause the patient great harm. Perioperative RNs play a key role in preventing retained surgical items (RSIs). The updated AORN "Guideline for prevention of retained surgical items" provides guidance for implementing a consistent, multidisciplinary approach to RSI prevention; accounting for surgical items; preventing retention of device fragments; reconciling count discrepancies; and using adjunct technologies to supplement manual count procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel provide optimal care during a procedure. Key points addressed include taking responsibility for RSI prevention as a team; minimizing distractions, noise, and interruptions during counts; using consistent counting methods; reconciling discrepancies; and participating in performance-improvement activities. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance in writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Orthodontic retainers: analysis of prescriptions sent to laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Komatsu Assumpção

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the most commonly fabricated orthodontic retainers. METHODS: Information on the type and amount of maxillary and mandibular retainers produced in a three-month period was collected from six laboratories in the cities of São Paulo, Mauá and Guarulhos - Brazil. The retainers were grouped according to the total production. For the maxillary arch, the groups were: 1S - Begg retainer, 2S - Hawley retainer, 3S - transpalatal arch retainer, 4S - buccal resin-arch retainer and 5S - vacuum-formed retainer, Planas appliance, bonded lingual retainer and V-loop bonded lingual retainer. The groups relative to the mandibular arch were: 1I - 3-3 bonded lingual retainer (canine to canine, 2I - Hawley retainer and V-loop bonded lingual retainer, 3I - Begg retainer, 4I - buccal resin-arch retainer, vacuum-formed retainer and Planas appliance. The data were presented in box plots. Groups were compared using the Student's-t test with Bonferroni correction. RESULTS: The average of maxillary appliances fabricated ranged from 189.5 (1S to 3.95 (5S. There were significant differences between groups 1S versus 5S and 2S versus 5S (p < 0.0001. Mean values for the mandibular retainers ranged from 55.3 (1I to 4.2 (4I. Significant difference was observed between groups 2I and 4I (p < 0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: For the maxillary arch, the most requested retainers were Begg and Hawley retainers. Regarding the mandibular arch, bonded lingual retainers and Hawley retainer were the most frequent ones.

  20. A technique for placement of direct bonded lingual retainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattarki, Rohan S

    2012-01-01

    Different methods of bonding lingual retainers have evolved over the past three decades, both direct and indirect methods. The indirect method involves certain laboratory procedures to hold the retainer wire on the teeth, whereas the direct technique involves bonding the prefabricated retainer wire. The present article describes a new technique for direct-bonded lingual retainer.

  1. Characteristics of the Transformation of Retained Austenite in Tempered Austempered Ductile Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingxu; Barber, Gary; Sun, Xichen; Shaw, Michael; Seaton, Phil

    2017-05-01

    Controlling the amount of retained austenite is a concern in austempered ductile iron formation. Retained austenite has a strong influence on austempered ductile iron properties, such as hardness and wear resistance. In this research, the characteristics of the transformation of retained austenite were investigated as a function of the number of tempering cycles. The hardness of the austempered ductile iron samples was measured, and the specific amount of retained austenite was analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Wear tests were conducted on a ball-on-flat sliding fixture. The tempering process was found to have no effect on the hardness of the austempered ductile iron samples. This may be due to retained austenite being partially converted into brittle quenched martensite during the tempering process. However, tougher tempered martensite was also formed from existing martensite. The two effects seemed to offset each other, and no significant differences occurred in overall hardness. XRD analysis showed that under the same austempering temperature and holding time, the amount of retained austenite decreased with additional tempering cycles. Also, with the same holding time and tempering cycles, less retained austenite was contained in the matrix at higher austempering temperatures. This was due to more high carbon content austenite and needle-like ferrite being present in the austempered ductile iron matrix. In addition, tempered austempered ductile iron exhibited significantly higher wear resistance as compared to traditionally treated ductile iron.

  2. Evidence of separate subgroups of juvenile southern bluefin tuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Mark S; Sidhu, Leesa A; O'Neill, Ben; Sibanda, Nokuthaba

    2017-11-01

    Archival tagging studies of southern bluefin tuna (SBT , Thunnus maccoyii) have revealed that juveniles residing in the Great Australian Bight (GAB) over the austral summer undertake seasonal cyclic migrations to the southeast Indian Ocean and the Tasman Sea during winter. However, there remains disagreement about the extent of mixing between juvenile SBT regularly caught by longline fleets south of Africa and those observed in the GAB. Some researchers have argued that archival tag recoveries indicate most juveniles reside in the GAB over the austral summer. Others have suggested that recoveries of conventional and archival tags are better explained by a juvenile population consisting of separate groups on the eastern and western sides of the Indian Ocean with limited intermixing. We present analyses of catch and tag recovery data and re-examine archival tagging studies. The evidence provided strongly favors the hypothesis of separate juvenile subgroups, or contingents, with limited intermixing. We draw some tentative conclusions about the nature of the putative contingents and discuss some implications of these findings for the interpretation of existing datasets and future research priorities. We also provide the first evidence that the migration choices of juveniles that summer in the GAB are influenced by fidelity to winter feeding grounds and suggest this helps explain the collapse of the surface fishery off New South Wales in the 1980s.

  3. Personalized dementia care: proven effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mierlo, L.D.; van der Roest, H.G.; Meiland, F.J.M.; Dröes, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Many psychosocial intervention studies report effects in subgroups of people with dementia. Insight into the characteristics of these subgroups is important for care practice. This study reviews personal characteristics of people with dementia (living in the community or in an institution) that are

  4. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: District of Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The District's demographics are such that achievement trends could only be determined for African American, male and female, and low income subgroups. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Washington, DC students showed gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels…

  5. Identifying subgroups of patients using latent class analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Mølgaard; Kent, Peter; Hestbæk, Lise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in patients with low back pain (LBP) is well recognised and different approaches to subgrouping have been proposed. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) is a statistical technique that is increasingly being used to identify subgroups based on patient characteristics. However, as ...

  6. A Systematic Approach to Subgroup Classification in Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalock, Robert L.; Luckasson, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a systematic approach to subgroup classification based on a classification framework and sequential steps involved in the subgrouping process. The sequential steps are stating the purpose of the classification, identifying the classification elements, using relevant information, and using clearly stated and purposeful…

  7. Characteristic properties of large subgroups in primary abelian groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Invariant properties of large subgroups. We start with some extensions of totally projective p-groups, namely: 1. p-torsion A-groups. Several details on A-groups appear in [7]. For example, any p- torsion abelian A-group is an isotype subgroup of a totally projective p-group with special properties described in [7]. Theorem 1.

  8. Evolutionary Dynamics of Male Reproductive Genes in the Drosophila virilis Subgroup

    OpenAIRE

    Yasir H. Ahmed-Braimah; Unckless, Robert L.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2017-01-01

    Postcopulatory sexual selection (PCSS) is a potent evolutionary force that can drive rapid changes of reproductive genes within species, and thus has the potential to generate reproductive incompatibilities between species. Male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) are major players in postmating interactions, and are important targets of PCSS in males. The virilis subgroup of Drosophila exhibits strong interspecific gametic incompatibilities, and can serve as a model to study the genetic basis of P...

  9. Validity of the proliferation markers Ki67, TOP2A, and RacGAP1 in molecular subgroups of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde-Langosch, Karin; Karn, Thomas; Müller, Volkmar; Witzel, Isabell; Rody, Achim; Schmidt, Markus; Wirtz, Ralph M

    2013-01-01

    High proliferation rates are characteristic of cancer, and proliferation markers make up the majority of genes included in RNA-based prognostic gene signatures applied for breast cancer patients. Based on prior data on differences in molecular subgroups of breast cancer, we hypothesized that the significance of single proliferation markers might differ in luminal, Her2-positive and triple-negative subtypes. Therefore, we compared mRNA expression data of Ki67, TOP2A, and RacGAP1 using a pool of 562 Affymetrix U133A microarrays from breast cancer samples. "Luminal," "triple-negative," and "Her2-positive" subcohorts were defined by ESR1 and ERBB2 mRNA expression using pre-defined cut-offs. The analysis of the three potential proliferation markers revealed subtype-specific differences: in luminal carcinomas, expression of all three markers was a significant indictor of early recurrence in univariate and multivariate analysis, but RacGAP1 was superior to Ki67 and TOP2A in significance. In triple-negative tumors, only Ki67 was a significant and independent marker, whereas none of the markers showed a significant prognostic impact in Her2-positive cases. Within the group of luminal carcinomas, the proliferation markers had different impact depending on the treatment of patients: in untreated patients, Ki67, TOP2A, and RacGAP1 were significant and independent prognostic markers. In chemotherapy-treated patients, overexpression of all three markers was predictive for early recurrence, but only RacGAP1 retained significance in multivariate analysis. In contrast, RacGAP1 was the only predictive proliferation marker in the endocrine treatment group. These data point to subtype-specific differences in the relevance of proliferation-associated genes, and RacGAP1 might be a strong prognostic and predictive marker in the luminal subgroup.

  10. Facilitating Direct Bonding for Lingual Retainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerich, Leonardo; Ruellas, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Directly bonded lingual retainers are not always easy because the available techniques do not keep the wire totally stable in position and there is risk of moist contamination. Indirect methods help to keep a moist-free environment and reduce chair time but have other drawbacks, such as lack of control over the composite placement leading to adhesive-tooth failure or undesirable flow of adhesive to gingival embrasures. The purpose of this report is to show a direct bonding method, helped by a laboratory made acrylic guide, which has benefits of direct and indirect techniques.

  11. Retained Surgical Foreign Bodies after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valon A. Zejnullahu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of retained surgical bodies (RSB after surgery is an issue for surgeons, hospitals and the entire medical team. They have potentially harmful consequences for the patient as they can be life threatening and usually, a further operation is necessary. The incidence of RSB is between 0.3 to 1.0 per 1,000 abdominal operations, and they occur due to a lack of organisation and communication between surgical staff during the process. Typically, the RSB are surgical sponges and instruments located in the abdomen, retroperitoneum and pelvis.

  12. Are forensic experts biased by the side that retained them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrie, Daniel C; Boccaccini, Marcus T; Guarnera, Lucy A; Rufino, Katrina A

    2013-10-01

    How objective are forensic experts when they are retained by one of the opposing sides in an adversarial legal proceeding? Despite long-standing concerns from within the legal system, little is known about whether experts can provide opinions unbiased by the side that retained them. In this experiment, we paid 108 forensic psychologists and psychiatrists to review the same offender case files, but deceived some to believe that they were consulting for the defense and some to believe that they were consulting for the prosecution. Participants scored each offender on two commonly used, well-researched risk-assessment instruments. Those who believed they were working for the prosecution tended to assign higher risk scores to offenders, whereas those who believed they were working for the defense tended to assign lower risk scores to the same offenders; the effect sizes (d) ranged up to 0.85. The results provide strong evidence of an allegiance effect among some forensic experts in adversarial legal proceedings.

  13. Carba-cyclophellitols Are Neutral Retaining-Glucosidase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenakker, Thomas J M; Wander, Dennis P A; Offen, Wendy A; Artola, Marta; Raich, Lluís; Ferraz, Maria J; Li, Kah-Yee; Houben, Judith H P M; van Rijssel, Erwin R; Hansen, Thomas; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Codée, Jeroen D C; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Rovira, Carme; Davies, Gideon J; Overkleeft, Herman S

    2017-05-17

    The conformational analysis of glycosidases affords a route to their specific inhibition through transition-state mimicry. Inspired by the rapid reaction rates of cyclophellitol and cyclophellitol aziridine-both covalent retaining β-glucosidase inhibitors-we postulated that the corresponding carba "cyclopropyl" analogue would be a potent retaining β-glucosidase inhibitor for those enzymes reacting through the 4H3 transition-state conformation. Ab initio metadynamics simulations of the conformational free energy landscape for the cyclopropyl inhibitors show a strong bias for the 4H3 conformation, and carba-cyclophellitol, with an N-(4-azidobutyl)carboxamide moiety, proved to be a potent inhibitor (Ki = 8.2 nM) of the Thermotoga maritima TmGH1 β-glucosidase. 3-D structural analysis and comparison with unreacted epoxides show that this compound indeed binds in the 4H3 conformation, suggesting that conformational strain induced through a cyclopropyl unit may add to the armory of tight-binding inhibitor designs.

  14. Multiplicity-adjusted semiparametric benefiting subgroup identification in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Patrick M; Müller, Peter; Tang, Qi; Carlin, Bradley P

    2018-02-01

    Background A recent focus in the health sciences has been the development of personalized medicine, which includes determining the population for which a given treatment is effective. Due to limited data, identifying the true benefiting population is a challenging task. To tackle this difficulty, the credible subgroups approach provides a pair of bounding subgroups for the true benefiting subgroup, constructed so that one is contained by the benefiting subgroup while the other contains the benefiting subgroup with high probability. However, the method has so far only been developed for parametric linear models. Methods In this article, we develop the details required to follow the credible subgroups approach in more realistic settings by considering nonlinear and semiparametric regression models, supported for regulatory science by conditional power simulations. We also present an improved multiple testing approach using a step-down procedure. We evaluate our approach via simulations and apply it to data from four trials of Alzheimer's disease treatments carried out by AbbVie. Results Semiparametric modeling yields credible subgroups that are more robust to violations of linear treatment effect assumptions, and careful choice of the population of interest as well as the step-down multiple testing procedure result in a higher rate of detection of benefiting types of patients. The approach allows us to identify types of patients that benefit from treatment in the Alzheimer's disease trials. Conclusion Attempts to identify benefiting subgroups of patients in clinical trials are often met with skepticism due to a lack of multiplicity control and unrealistically restrictive assumptions. Our proposed approach merges two techniques, credible subgroups, and semiparametric regression, which avoids these problems and makes benefiting subgroup identification practical and reliable.

  15. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Ngwa, Emmanuel; Zeeh, Christina; Messoudi, Ahmed; Büttner-Ennever, Jean A; Horn, Anja K E

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior, and superior recti (MR, IR, and SR), inferior oblique (IO), and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems were immunostained for different markers: choline acetyltransferase combined with glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), calretinin (CR) or glycine receptor. The cytoarchitecture was visualized with cresyl violet, Gallyas staining and expression of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments. Apart from nIV, seven subgroups were delineated in nIII: the central caudal nucleus (CCN), a dorsolateral (DL), dorsomedial (DM), central (CEN), and ventral (VEN) group, the nucleus of Perlia (NP) and the non-preganglionic centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp). DL, VEN, NP, and EWcp were characterized by a strong supply of GAD-positive terminals, in contrast to DM, CEN, and nIV. CR-positive terminals and fibers were confined to CCN, CEN, and NP. Based on location and histochemistry of the motoneuron subgroups in monkey, CEN is considered as the SR and IO motoneurons, DL and VEN as the B- and A-group of MR motoneurons, respectively, and DM as IR motoneurons. A good correlation between monkey and man is seen for the CR input, which labels only motoneurons of eye muscles participating in upgaze (SR, IO, and LP). The CCN contained LP motoneurons, and nIV those of SO. This study provides a map of the individual subgroups of motoneurons in human nIII for the first time, and suggests that NP may contain upgaze motoneurons. Surprisingly, a strong GABAergic input to human MR motoneurons was discovered, which is not seen in monkey and may indicate a functional oculomotor specialization.

  16. A comparison of five recursive partitioning methods to find person subgroups involved in meaningful treatment-subgroup interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doove, L. L.; Dusseldorp, E.; Van Deun, K.; Van Mechelen, I.

    2014-01-01

    In case multiple treatment alternatives are available for some medical problem, the detection of treatment–subgroup interactions (i.e., relative treatment effectiveness varying over subgroups of persons) is of key importance for personalized medicine and the development of optimal treatment

  17. Reconstruction of endodontically treated teeth: intraradicular retainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Bonatelli Bispo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many ways of restoring endodontically treated teeth. The quantity and quality of the dental remainder after endodontic treatment is questionable in terms of clinical longevity, not because of the coronal opening and therapy in themselves, but because of the destruction inherent to teeth affected by fractures and invasive carious processes. There are many commercial brands of posts and marketing artifices with the goal of maximizing resistance to masticatory forces. However, the major complexity found with regard to the definitive restoration is the doubt whether to insert a prefabricated post, cast metal or porcelain core as filling core. However, nothing is feasible if the parameters said to be safe were not used and the minimum mechanical requirements were not demanded. Growing commercial demand leads to unrestrained confusion in professionals that end up forgetting about or ignoring the minimum criteria demandable for a favorable prognosis. Compliance with the biomechanical bases is the most important parameter for increasing the quality of the intraradicular retainer. The aim of this study is to present basic techniques for more reliable restorations, maximizing the quality of the dental remainder when making extensive restorations that use intraradicular retainers in endodontically treated teeth.

  18. Recruiting and retaining indigenous farmworker participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Stephanie; de Jesus Gonzalez, Carmen; Hall, Jennifer; Samples, Julie; Ventura, Santiago; Sanchez, Valentin; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information on the specific practices used to successfully recruit and retain indigenous and Latino farmworkers in research studies. This article describes the strategies used in a community-based participatory research project with indigenous agricultural workers. Participants were recruited through consulting with indigenous relatives and friends, identifying and meeting with indigenous leaders from hometown associations in countries of origin, and asking current participants to recruit fellow farmworkers. Adjustments were initiated to the second year protocol to enhance recruitment and retention. The difference in attrition rates between years one and two was statistically significant, a difference partially attributed to modifications to recruitment and retention protocol. Findings confirmed that active recruitment techniques and word-of-mouth recruitment were more effective than passive methods. Trust among academic, organization, and community partners, and shared language and culture between those doing the recruitment and the participants, contributed to sustained farmworker participation. PMID:23733354

  19. Recruiting and retaining indigenous farmworker participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Stephanie; de Jesus Gonzalez, Carmen; Hall, Jennifer; Samples, Julie; Ventura, Santiago; Sanchez, Valentin; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2014-10-01

    There is limited information on the specific practices used to successfully recruit and retain indigenous and Latino farmworkers in research studies. This article describes the strategies used in a community-based participatory research project with indigenous agricultural workers. Participants were recruited through consulting with indigenous relatives and friends, identifying and meeting with indigenous leaders from hometown associations in countries of origin, and asking current participants to recruit fellow farmworkers. Adjustments were initiated to the second year protocol to enhance recruitment and retention. The difference in attrition rates between years one and two was statistically significant, a difference partially attributed to modifications to recruitment and retention protocol. Findings confirmed that active recruitment techniques and word-of-mouth recruitment were more effective than passive methods. Trust among academic, organization, and community partners, and shared language and culture between those doing the recruitment and the participants, contributed to sustained farmworker participation.

  20. Delayed inflammation associated with retained perfluorocarbon liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 55-year-old woman, with history of cataract surgery 1 year back, presented with features of ocular inflammation for last 3 months. She had no history of any other intraocular surgery. On examination, anterior segment showed frothy material in the inferior angle with moderate anterior chamber reaction (cells+/flare+ and sulcus intraocular lens with large posterior capsule rent. Fundoscopy showed multiple, small to medium-sized transparent bubbles of perfluorocarbon liquid (PFCL with membranes in the vitreous cavity. Ultrasonography confirmed the presence of PFCL in the vitreous cavity. Pars plana vitrectomy with anterior chamber wash was done which led to good visual recovery. To conclude, retained PFCL can cause late onset fibrinous inflammation after a quiescent period but surgical intervention may lead to good visual outcome.

  1. Transabdominal Migration of Retained Surgical Sponge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Guner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Retained surgical sponge (RSS is a rare surgical complication. The RSSs are mostly located intra-abdominally but they can also be left in the thorax, spine, extremity, cranium, and breast. RSS is often difficult to diagnose because of the nonspecific clinical symptoms and radiologic findings. Clinically, RSS may present as an exudative reaction in the early postoperative period or may also cause an aseptic fibrous tissue response. A foreign body may remain asymptomatically silent for a long time, and it may later present with obstruction, fistulization, or mass formation. In this report, we present a case in which an RSS has migrated through the abdominal wall and caused an anterior abdominal wall abscess.

  2. Radiologically inserted gastrostomy: differences of maintenance of balloon- vs. loop-retained devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, J D; Herrmann, J; Adam, G; Habermann, C R

    2016-12-01

    To compare outcome and associated complications of ballon- vs. loop-retained devices for radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG). From 2007 to 2011 233 patients (age 63.7 ± 10.6 years) were referred for a RIG because of pharyngeal stricture Intervention was performed with four different devices: balloon-retained - Freka(®) GastroTube, Fresenius Kabi (n = 121); MIC(®) Gastrostomy Feeding Tube, Kimberly-Clark (n = 34); Russell(®) Gastrostomy Tray, Cook Medical Inc. (n = 17); and loop-retained - Tilma(®) Gastrostomy Set, Cook Medical Inc. (n = 50). Follow-up was performed with regard to RIG-related complications, cause of removal and fatalities. Revision-free survival times after RIG were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and group differences by log-rank tests. For analysis of demographic and methodical variables multivariate Cox regression models were used. With a primary technical success rate of 95.3% (222/233) a total of 92 instances of revisions were necessary in 66 patients (66/233, 28.3%) during follow-up (mean 182.8 ± 86.6 days). The most common complication was tube dislodgement (14.3%). There were no significant differences between the distinct devices (p = 0.098), but analyzing the data in subgroups of balloon-compared to loop-retained gastrostomy tubes we observed a significantly higher probability of minor complications for the latter (p = 0.023). As it is significantly less prone to minor complications we recommend the use of balloon-retained gastrostomy tubes to improve the practicability and maintenance of RIG.

  3. Strong moderate deviation theorems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inglot, Tadeusz; Kallenberg, W.C.M.; Ledwina, Teresa

    1992-01-01

    Strong moderate deviation theorems are concerned with relative errors in the tails caused by replacing the exact distribution function by its limiting distribution function. A new approach for deriving such theorems is presented using strong approximation inequalities. In this way a strong moderate

  4. Soil Retaining Structures : Development of models for structural analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the development of models for the structural analysis of soil retaining structures. The soil retaining structures being looked at are; block revetments, flexible retaining walls and bored tunnels in soft soil. Within this context typical structural behavior of these

  5. 40 CFR 98.267 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.267... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.267 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in...

  6. 40 CFR 98.367 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.367... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.367 Records that must be retained. In addition to the information required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the calibration records for all...

  7. 40 CFR 98.257 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.257... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.257 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records of all parameters...

  8. 40 CFR 98.247 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.247... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.247 Records that must be retained. In addition to the recordkeeping requirements in § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified...

  9. 40 CFR 98.427 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.427... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.427 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g) of subpart A of this part, you must retain the...

  10. 40 CFR 98.77 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.77... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.77 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the following records specified in...

  11. 40 CFR 98.37 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.37 Section 98.37 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... that must be retained. In addition to the requirements of § 98.3(g), you must retain the applicable...

  12. 40 CFR 98.147 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.147... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.147 Records that must be retained. In addition to the information required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records listed in paragraphs (a), (b...

  13. 40 CFR 98.87 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.87... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.87 Records that must be retained. (a) If a CEMS is used to measure CO2 emissions, then you must retain under this subpart the records...

  14. 40 CFR 98.277 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.277... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Pulp and Paper Manufacturing § 98.277 Records that must be retained. In addition to the information required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records in paragraphs...

  15. 40 CFR 98.177 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.177... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.177 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in...

  16. 40 CFR 98.197 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.197... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lime Manufacturing § 98.197 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in paragraphs (a) and...

  17. 40 CFR 98.117 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.117... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.117 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in paragraphs...

  18. 40 CFR 98.217 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.217... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Miscellaneous Uses of Carbonate § 98.217 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in...

  19. 40 CFR 98.347 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.347... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.347 Records that must be retained. In addition to the information required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the calibration records for...

  20. 40 CFR 98.167 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.167... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.167 Records that must be retained. In addition to the information required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in paragraphs (a...

  1. 40 CFR 98.317 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.317... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.317 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in...

  2. 40 CFR 98.297 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.297... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.297 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in paragraphs...

  3. 40 CFR 98.387 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.387 Section 98.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... must be retained. You must retain records according to the requirements in § 98.397 as if they applied...

  4. 40 CFR 98.287 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.287... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.287 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in...

  5. 40 CFR 98.57 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.57... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.57 Records that must be retained. In addition to the information required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in...

  6. 40 CFR 98.67 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.67... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.67 Records that must be retained. In addition to the information required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the following records: (a) Monthly...

  7. 40 CFR 98.227 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.227... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Nitric Acid Production § 98.227 Records that must be retained. In addition to the information required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in...

  8. 40 CFR 98.337 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.337... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.337 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), you must retain the records specified in paragraphs (a...

  9. Retained Placenta Aspect of Clinical Management in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Retained placenta is a significant cause of postpartum haemorrhage, maternal morbidity and occasionally mortality. This study assessed the clinical presentation, management and outcomes of retained placenta at the Ebonyi State University teaching Hospital. Method: Analysis of records relating to retained ...

  10. 5 CFR 531.241 - Retaining and losing GM status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retaining and losing GM status. 531.241... UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Determining Rate of Basic Pay Special Rules for Gm Employees § 531.241 Retaining and losing GM status. (a) An employee retains status as a GM employee (as defined in § 531.203...

  11. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  12. Demonstration of Microbial Subgroups among Normal Vaginal Microbiota Data

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, M.-L. T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we identified subgroups of observations relating to the healthy vaginal microbiota. This microbiota resides in a dynamic environment that undergoes cyclic change during the menstrual cycle. Cluster analysis procedures were applied to divide a set of 226 normal microbiota observations into groups. Three subgroups containing 100, 65, and 61 observations were identified. Plots of principal components determined by canonical analysis were obtained to demonstrate graphically the clus...

  13. On T-Characterized Subgroups of Compact Abelian Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saak Gabriyelyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A sequence \\(\\{ u_n \\}_{n\\in \\omega}\\ in abstract additively-written Abelian group \\(G\\ is called a \\(T\\-sequence if there is a Hausdorff group topology on \\(G\\ relative to which \\(\\lim_n u_n =0\\. We say that a subgroup \\(H\\ of an infinite compact Abelian group \\(X\\ is \\(T\\-characterized if there is a \\(T\\-sequence \\(\\mathbf{u} =\\{ u_n \\}\\ in the dual group of \\(X\\, such that \\(H=\\{ x\\in X: \\; (u_n, x\\to 1 \\}\\. We show that a closed subgroup \\(H\\ of \\(X\\ is \\(T\\-characterized if and only if \\(H\\ is a \\(G_\\delta\\-subgroup of \\(X\\ and the annihilator of \\(H\\ admits a Hausdorff minimally almost periodic group topology. All closed subgroups of an infinite compact Abelian group \\(X\\ are \\(T\\-characterized if and only if \\(X\\ is metrizable and connected. We prove that every compact Abelian group \\(X\\ of infinite exponent has a \\(T\\-characterized subgroup, which is not an \\(F_{\\sigma}\\-subgroup of \\(X\\, that gives a negative answer to Problem 3.3 in Dikranjan and Gabriyelyan (Topol. Appl. 2013, 160, 2427–2442.

  14. A Bayesian subgroup analysis using collections of ANOVA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinzhong; Sivaganesan, Siva; Laud, Purushottam W; Müller, Peter

    2017-07-01

    We develop a Bayesian approach to subgroup analysis using ANOVA models with multiple covariates, extending an earlier work. We assume a two-arm clinical trial with normally distributed response variable. We also assume that the covariates for subgroup finding are categorical and are a priori specified, and parsimonious easy-to-interpret subgroups are preferable. We represent the subgroups of interest by a collection of models and use a model selection approach to finding subgroups with heterogeneous effects. We develop suitable priors for the model space and use an objective Bayesian approach that yields multiplicity adjusted posterior probabilities for the models. We use a structured algorithm based on the posterior probabilities of the models to determine which subgroup effects to report. Frequentist operating characteristics of the approach are evaluated using simulation. While our approach is applicable in more general cases, we mainly focus on the 2 × 2 case of two covariates each at two levels for ease of presentation. The approach is illustrated using a real data example. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. RETAINED STONE PIECE IN ANTERIOR CHAMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZvornicaninJasmin, Nadarevic-VodencarevicAmra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We read with interest the article by Surekha et al. regarding the retained stone piece in anterior chamber. Similar to the results of previous studies, the authors found that delayed intraocular foreign body (IOFB management can result in good visual outcome without an apparent increased risk of endophthalmitis or other deleterious side effects. However, the authors failed to explain the exact reason for the diminution of vision in patients left eye. It is unclear what the uncorrected visual acuity was and what kind of correction was used, more precisely type and amount of cylinder, given the presence of the corneal opacity. Since the size of the IOFB is approximately 4x4x1mm, significant irido-corneal angle changes resulting in intraocular pressure raise and optic nerve head damage can be expected. Traumatic glaucoma following open globe injury can occur in 2.7 to 19% of cases, with several risk factors associated with glaucoma development (advanced age, poor visual acuity at presentation,perforating rather than penetrating ocular injury,lens injury, presence of vitreous hemorrhage and presence of an IOFB. Earlier reportsof latetraumaticoptic neuropathy onset, even after several years, indicate that this possibility cannot be completely ruled out too. Therefore, repeated intraocular pressure measurements, gonioscopy, pupillary reaction assessment, together with through posterior segment examination including visual field and optical coherence tomography examinations can be useful in determining the possible optic nerve damage as one of the possible reasons for visual acuity reduction. The authors did not suggest any operative treatment at this time. However, it should bear in mind that the inert anterior chamber IOFB could be a risk factor for non-infectious endophthalmitis development even after many years. Also, long term retained anterior chamber foreign body leads to permanent endothelial cell loss and can even result in a corneal

  16. Quantification of retained austenite by X-ray diffraction and saturation magnetization in a supermartensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sicupira, Felipe Lucas [Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais - Escola de Engenharia da UFMG, 31270–901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Sandim, Maria José R.; Sandim, Hugo R.Z. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena – USP, 12600–970 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dagoberto Brandão [Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais - Escola de Engenharia da UFMG, 31270–901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Renzetti, Reny Angela, E-mail: renzetti.ra@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Itajubá - UNIFEI, 35903–087 Itabira, MG (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    The good performance of supermartensitic stainless steels is strongly dependent on the volume fraction of retained austenite at room temperature. The present work investigates the effect of secondary tempering temperatures on this phase transformation and quantifies the amount of retained austenite by X-ray diffraction and saturation magnetization. The steel samples were tempered for 1 h within a temperature range of 600–800 °C. The microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Results show that the amount of retained austenite decreased with increasing secondary tempering temperature in both quantification methods. - Highlights: • The phase transformation during secondary tempering temperatures was observed. • Phases were quantified by X-ray diffraction and DC-saturation magnetization. • More retained austenite forms with increasing secondary tempering temperature. • The retained austenite is mainly located at the grain and lath boundaries.

  17. Patient compliance with orthodontic retainers in the postretention phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Michael C; Kluemper, G Thomas; Lindstrom, Adam F

    2011-08-01

    Retention is an important, even critical, component of orthodontic treatment. There is little research on practice protocols and patient compliance with long-term or short-term retention. This lack of information leaves our specialty with many opinions and practice protocols. The purposes of this study were to evaluate and quantify orthodontic retainer wear according to several variables, including patient age, sex, time in retention, and retainer type, and to identify predictors of compliance and reasons for noncompliance with removable orthodontic retainers. Questionnaires were mailed to patients who finished full fixed appliance therapy in either the orthodontic graduate clinic or the orthodontic faculty practice at the University of Kentucky within the past 6 years. Of the 1085 questionnaires mailed, 280 were returned (25.8%). A logistic regression model that described the probabilities of retainer wear was created (P compliance was greater with vacuum-formed retainers (VFRs) for the first 2 years after debonding. However, compliance with VFRs decreased at a much faster rate than with Hawley retainers. Because of this, patient compliance was greater with Hawley retainers at any time longer than 2 years after debonding, and patient compliance overall was greater with Hawley retainers. This evidence disagrees with the current anecdotal trend of orthodontists who favor switching from Hawley retainers to VFRs. An unexpected finding was that patients reported few esthetic concerns about retainers, and the few that were reported were equally distributed between Hawley retainers and VFRs. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Removable partial denture assisted by implant-retained fixed prosthesis opposing implant-retained overdenture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyun-seok; Song, Kwang-yeob; Park, Ju-mi; Oh, Won-suk

    2012-01-01

    Restoring an edentulous mouth is a challenge when the patient has both high esthetic expectations and financial limitations. This case report describes the prosthodontic management of an elderly edentulous patient with a maxillary anterior implant-supported fixed partial denture in conjunction with a distal extension-base removable partial denture opposing a mandibular implant-retained overdenture. The patient's clinical outcome after 30 months is presented.

  19. Rigidly framed earth retaining structures thermal soil structure interaction of buildings supporting unbalanced lateral earth pressures

    CERN Document Server

    Aboumoussa, Walid

    2014-01-01

    Structures placed on hillsides often present a number of challenges and a limited number of economical choices for site design. An option sometimes employed is to use the building frame as a retaining element, comprising a Rigidly Framed Earth Retaining Structure (RFERS). The relationship between temperature and earth pressure acting on RFERS, is explored in this monograph through a 4.5 year monitoring program of a heavily instrumented in service structure. The data indicated that the coefficient of earth pressure behind the monitored RFERS had a strong linear correlation with temperature. The study also revealed that thermal cycles, rather than lateral earth pressure, were the cause of failure in many structural elements. The book demonstrates that depending on the relative stiffness of the retained soil mass and that of the structural frame, the developed lateral earth pressure, during thermal expansion, can reach magnitudes several times larger than those determined using classical earth pressure theories....

  20. Tensile Ductility of Nanostructured Bainitic Steels: Influence of Retained Austenite Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Sourmail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High silicon (>1.5% steels with different compositions were isothermally transformed to bainite at 220 and 250 °C to produce what is often referred to as nanostructured bainite. Interrupted tensile tests were carried out and the retained austenite was measured as a function of strain. Results were correlated with tensile ductility. The role of retained austenite stability is remarkably underlined as strongly affecting the propensity to brittle failure, but also the tensile ductility. A simple quantitative relationship is proposed that clearly delimitates the different behaviours (brittle/ductile and correlates well with the measured ductility. Conclusions are proposed as to the role of retained austenite fraction and the existence of a threshold value associated with tensile rupture.

  1. Subgroup Analysis in Burnout: Relations Between Fatigue, Anxiety, and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup analysis may also help clarify whether burnout is a distinct entity and whether subgroups of burnout overlap with other disorders such as depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. In a group of 113 clinically diagnosed burned out patients, levels of fatigue, depression, and anxiety were assessed. In order to identify possible subgroups, we performed a two-step cluster analysis. The analysis revealed two clusters that differed from one another in terms of symptom severity on the three aforementioned measures. Depression appeared to be the strongest predictor of group membership. These results are considered in the light of the scientific debate on whether burnout can be distinguished from depression and whether burnout subtyping is useful. Finally, implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:26869983

  2. Subgroup analysis in burnout: relations between fatigue, anxiety and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno eVan Dam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup analysis may also help clarify whether burnout is a distinct entity and whether subgroups of burnout overlap with other disorders such as depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. In a group of 113 clinically-diagnosed burned out patients, levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety were assessed. In order to identify possible subgroups, we performed a two-step cluster analysis. The analysis revealed two clusters that differed from one another in terms of symptom severity on the three aforementioned measures. Depression appeared to be the strongest predictor of group membership. These results are considered in the light of the scientific debate on whether burnout can be distinguished from depression and whether burnout subtyping is useful. Finally, implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  3. Cluster analysis of clinical data identifies fibromyalgia subgroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Docampo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Fibromyalgia (FM is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. RESULTS: VARIABLES CLUSTERED INTO THREE INDEPENDENT DIMENSIONS: "symptomatology", "comorbidities" and "clinical scales". Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1, high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2, and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3, showing differences in measures of disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment.

  4. Periodontal implication of bonded and removable retainers: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Mondal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare the periodontal health of the lower anterior teeth retained with the use of removable and fixed retainers. Fifty four cases receiving comprehensive orthodontic treatment in between 10 to 30 years were randomly selected and divided into 2 groups of 27 each. One group was given removable retainers and other was given fixed retainers. The periodontal status of the patients was accessed with bleeding on probing index, Plaque index and Calculus index. The mean plaque index in case of removable retainers at 1st, 3rd and 6th month were 0.5, 1.0 and 1.7 where as in case of fixed retainers that were 1.8, 3.0 and 4.5. The mean dental calculus index in case of removable retainers at 1st, 3rd and 6th month were 0.0, 0.1 and 0.1 where as in case of fixed retainers that were 0.1, 0.9 and 1.8. In conclusion, removable retainers are superior in oral hygiene maintenance, yet the use of fixed retainers cannot be denied.

  5. Tracking cohesive subgroups over time in inferred social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Alvin; Chignell, Mark; Wang, Hao

    2010-04-01

    As a first step in the development of community trackers for large-scale online interaction, this paper shows how cohesive subgroup analysis using the Social Cohesion Analysis of Networks (SCAN; Chin and Chignell 2008) and Data-Intensive Socially Similar Evolving Community Tracker (DISSECT; Chin and Chignell 2010) methods can be applied to the problem of identifying cohesive subgroups and tracking them over time. Three case studies are reported, and the findings are used to evaluate how well the SCAN and DISSECT methods work for different types of data. In the largest of the case studies, variations in temporal cohesiveness are identified across a set of subgroups extracted from the inferred social network. Further modifications to the DISSECT methodology are suggested based on the results obtained. The paper concludes with recommendations concerning further research that would be beneficial in addressing the community tracking problem for online data.

  6. Young children with language difficulties: a dimensional approach to subgrouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rianne; Ceulemans, Eva; Grauwels, Jolien; Maljaars, Jarymke; Zink, Inge; Steyaert, Jean; Noens, Ilse

    2013-11-01

    A dimensional approach was used to create bottom-up constructed subgroups that captured the behavioral heterogeneity in 36 Dutch-speaking children with language difficulties. Four subgroups were delineated based upon differences in cognitive ability, symbol understanding, joint attention and autism spectrum disorder related characteristics. Children with a different developmental disorder were found within a single cluster. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that bottom-up constructed subgroups might capture the heterogeneous behavioral profiles of young children with developmental difficulties in a more meaningful way. Furthermore, joint attention and symbol understanding seem important skills to assess in young children presenting with language difficulties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential distributions of Synechococcus subgroups across the California Current System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan William Paerl

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Synechococcus is an abundant marine cyanobacterial genus composed of different populations that vary physiologically. Synechococcus narB gene sequences (encoding for nitrate reductase in cyanobacteria obtained previously from isolates and the environment (e.g. North Pacific Gyre Station ALOHA, Hawaii or Monterey Bay, California were used to develop quantitative PCR (qPCR assays. These qPCR assays were used to quantify populations from specific narB phylogenetic clades across the California Current System (CCS, a region composed of dynamic zones between a coastal-upwelling zone and the oligotrophic Pacific Ocean. Targeted populations (narB subgroups had different biogeographic patterns across the CCS, which appear to be driven by environmental conditions. Subgroups C_C1, D_C1 and D_C2 were abundant in coastal-upwelling to coastal-transition zone waters with relatively high to intermediate ammonium, nitrate and chl. a concentrations. Subgroups A_C1 and F_C1 were most abundant in coastal-transition zone waters with intermediate nutrient concentrations. E_O1 and G_O1 were most abundant at different depths of oligotrophic open-ocean waters (either in the upper mixed layer or just below. E_O1, A_C1 and F_C1 distributions differed from other narB subgroups and likely possess unique ecologies enabling them to be most abundant in waters between coastal and open-ocean waters. Different CCS zones possessed distinct Synechococcus communities. Core California Current (CC water possessed low numbers of narB subgroups relative to counted Synechococcus cells, and coastal-transition waters contained high abundances of Synechococcus cells and total number of narB subgroups. The presented biogeographic data provides insight on the distributions and ecologies of Synechococcus present in an eastern boundary current system.

  8. Discrete neurocognitive subgroups in fully or partially remitted bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johan Høy; Knorr, Ulla; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    significance difference pairwise comparison. RESULTS: Three discrete neurocognitive subgroups were detected: one that was cognitively intact (46.1%), one that was selectively impaired with deficits in processing speed (32.6%), and one that was globally impaired across verbal learning, working memory......, and executive skills (21.2%). The globally and selectively impaired subgroups were characterized by greater perceived stress and subjective cognitive complaints, poorer work and social adjustment, and reduced quality of life compared to patients who were cognitively intact. LIMITATIONS: The study design...

  9. Strong intrinsic motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Dessi, Roberta; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    A large literature in psychology, and more recently in economics, has argued that monetary rewards can reduce intrinsic motivation. We investigate whether the negative impact persists when intrinsic motivation is strong, and test this hypothesis experimentally focusing on the motivation to undertake interesting and challenging tasks, informative about individual ability. We find that this type of task can generate strong intrinsic motivation, that is impervious to the effect of monetary incen...

  10. Functional divergence of the NIP III subgroup proteins involved altered selective constraints and positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhujun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nod26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs that belong to the aquaporin superfamily are unique to plants. According to homology modeling and phylogenetic analysis, the NIP subfamily can be further divided into three subgroups with distinct biological functions (NIP I, NIP II, and NIP III. In some grasses, the NIP III subgroup proteins (NIP2s were demonstrated to be permeable to solutes with larger diameter, such as silicic acid and arsenous acids. However, to date there is no data-mining or direct experimental evidences for the permeability of such larger solutes for dicot NIP2s, although they exhibit similar three-dimensional structures as those in grasses. It is therefore intriguing to investigate the molecular mechanisms that drive the evolution of plant NIP2s. Results The NIP III subgroup is more ancient with a divergence time that predates the monocot-dicot split. The proliferation of NIP2 genes in modern grass species is primarily attributed to whole genome and segmental chromosomal duplication events. The structure of NIP2 genes is relatively conserved, possessing five exons and four introns. All NIP2s possess an ar/R filter consisting of G, S, G, and R, except for the cucumber CsNIP2;2, where a small G in the H2 is substituted with the bulkier C residue. Our maximum likelihood analysis revealed that NIP2s, especially the loop A (LA region, have undergone strong selective pressure for adaptive evolution. The analysis at the amino acid level provided strong statistical evidences for the functional divergence between monocot and dicot NIP III subgroup proteins. In addition, several SDPs (Specificity Determining Positions responsible for functional specificity were predicted. Conclusions The present study provides the first evidences of functional divergence between dicot and monocot NIP2s, and suggests that positive selection, as well as a radical shift of evolutionary rate at some critical amino acid sites is the primary

  11. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eChe-Ngwa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The oculomotor nucleus (nIII contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior and superior recti (MR, IR, SR, inferior oblique (IO and levator palpebrae (LP muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV, which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO, to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems were immunostained for different markers: acetylcholine transferase (ChAT combined with glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, calretinin (CR or glycine receptor (GlyR. The cytoarchitecture was visualized with Cresyl violet, Gallyas staining and expression of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments (NP-NF. Apart from nIV, seven subgroups were delineated in nIII: the central caudal nucleus (CCN, a dorsolateral (DL, dorsomedial (DM, central (CEN, and ventral group (VEN, the nucleus of Perlia (NP and the non-preganglionic centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp. DL, VEN, NP and EWcp were characterized by a strong supply of GAD-positive terminals, in contrast to DM, CEN and nIV. CR-positive terminals and fibres were confined to CCN, CEN and NP. Based on location and histochemistry of the motoneuron subgroups in monkey, CEN is considered as the SR and IO motoneurons, DL and VEN as the B- and A-group of MR motoneurons, respectively, and DM as IR motoneurons. A good correlation between monkey and man is seen for the CR input, which labels only motoneurons of eye muscles participating in upgaze (SR, IO and LP. The CCN contained LP motoneurons, and nIV those of SO. This study provides a map of the individual subgroups of motoneurons in human nIII for the first time, and suggests that NP may contain upgaze motoneurons. Surprisingly, a strong GABAergic input to human MR motoneurons was discovered, which is not seen in monkey and may indicate a functional oculomotor specialization.

  12. Retaining professional nurses in South Africa: Nurse managers’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie J. Ehlers

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available South Africa is experiencing a serious shortage of nurses, which has to be addressed to prevent crises in health care services. Previous studies (Fletcher 2001:324; Oosthuizen 2005:117 found that nurses change their work environment due to dissatisfaction with their job situations. This implies that creating a favourable environment in the workplace situation could help retain professional nurses in their posts, implying that retention strategies should be effective.

    An exploratory, descriptive, contextual and qualitative design was used to describe nurse managers’views on factors which could influence professional nurse retention, as well as their views regarding attributes that were required to enable them to contribute towards enhancing professional nurse retention. A purposive sample of nurse managers employed in public and private hospitals in the Gauteng province was selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 nurse managers.The results were analysed qualitatively and contextualised within Vogt, Cox, Velthouse and Thames’s Cork-Top (Bottleneck Theory of Nurse Retention (1983 and Lewin’s Force-Field Analysis Theory (1952.

    Factors pertaining to individual nurses, the organisation and nurse managers could influence the retention of professional nurses. Poor working conditions, long and inconvenient working hours,uncompetitive salaries and professional development of nurses have to be addressed to enhance professional nurses’ retention. Unsafe working environments and a lack of resources threaten the safety and well-being of nurses and patients and contribute to high turnover rates. Nurse managers have to address shortcomings in their managerial and leadership skills and implement changes within a multigenerational nursing workforce and challenging working environments.

    <strong>Opsomming>

    Suid-Afrika ervaar ’n ernstige tekort aan verpleegkundiges wat aangespreek moet word ten einde krisisse

  13. Latino Male Ethnic Subgroups: Patterns in College Enrollment and Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponjuan, Luis; Palomin, Leticia; Calise, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines Latino male ethnic subgroups and their college enrollment and degree completion patterns. The chapter also offers recommendations to improve Latino male ethnic subgroups' educational achievement.

  14. A comparison of subgroup analyses in grant applications and publications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonacker, C.W.; Hoes, A.W.; Liere-Visser, K. van; Schilder, A.G.M.; Rovers, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the authors compare subgroup analyses as outlined in grant applications and their related publications. Grants awarded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) from 2001 onward that were finalized before March 1, 2010, were studied. Of the 79 grant

  15. Heterogeneity in response during multisystemic therapy: Exploring subgroups and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, E.C.A.; Dekovic, M.; Asscher, J.J.; Manders, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that Multisystemic Therapy (MST) is, at group level, an effective treatment for adolescents showing serious externalizing problem behavior. The current study expands previous research on MST by, first, examining whether subgroups of participants who respond differently to

  16. Heterogeneity in response during Multisystemic Therapy : Exploring subgroups and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, E.C.A.; Dekovic, M.; Asscher, J.J.; Manders, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that Multisystemic Therapy (MST) is, at group level, an effective treatment for adolescents showing serious externalizing problem behavior. The current study expands previous research on MST by, first, examining whether subgroups of participants who respond differently to

  17. Practical Algorithms for Subgroup Detection in Covert Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock; Qureshi, Pir Abdul Rasool

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present algorithms for subgroup detection and demonstrated them with a real-time case study of USS Cole bombing terrorist network. The algorithms are demonstrated in an application by a prototype system. The system finds associations between terrorist and terrorist organisations...

  18. Active medulloblastoma enhancers reveal subgroup-specific cellular origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles Y.; Erkek, Serap; Tong, Yiai; Yin, Linlin; Federation, Alexander J.; Zapatka, Marc; Haldipur, Parthiv; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Worst, Barbara C.; Ju, Bensheng; Orr, Brent A.; Zeid, Rhamy; Polaski, Donald R.; Segura-Wang, Maia; Waszak, Sebastian M.; Jones, David T.W.; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Buchhalter, Ivo; Sieber, Laura; Johann, Pascal; Chavez, Lukas; Gröschel, Stefan; Ryzhova, Marina; Korshunov, Andrey; Chen, Wenbiao; Chizhikov, Victor V.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Bradner, James E.; Northcott, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour, often inflicting devastating consequences on the developing child. Genomic studies have revealed four distinct molecular subgroups with divergent biology and clinical behaviour. An understanding of the regulatory circuitry governing the transcriptional landscapes of medulloblastoma subgroups, and how this relates to their respective developmental origins, is lacking. Using H3K27ac and BRD4 ChIP-Seq, coupled with tissue-matched DNA methylation and transcriptome data, we describe the active cis-regulatory landscape across 28 primary medulloblastoma specimens. Analysis of differentially regulated enhancers and super-enhancers reinforced inter-subgroup heterogeneity and revealed novel, clinically relevant insights into medulloblastoma biology. Computational reconstruction of core regulatory circuitry identified a master set of transcription factors, validated by ChIP-Seq, that are responsible for subgroup divergence and implicate candidate cells-of-origin for Group 4. Our integrated analysis of enhancer elements in a large series of primary tumour samples reveals insights into cis-regulatory architecture, unrecognized dependencies, and cellular origins. PMID:26814967

  19. Notes on discrete subgroups of Möbius transformations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Jørgensen's inequality gives a necessary condition for a nonelementary two generator subgroup of SL(2, C) to be discrete. By embedding SL(2, C) into. ˆU(1, 1; H), we obtain a new type of Jørgensen's inequality, which is in terms of the coefficients of involved isometries. We provide an example to show that this ...

  20. On approximation of Lie groups by discrete subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    voila.fr; salah.suissi@yahoo.fr. MS received 11 August 2012; revised 27 January 2013. Abstract. A locally compact group G is said to be approximated by discrete sub- groups (in the sense of Tôyama) if there is a sequence of discrete subgroups ...

  1. Depression in later life : three etiologically different subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, M.D.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Bouhuys, A.L.; Brilman, E.I.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Ormel, J.

    Background: Various studies support the notion that early onset depression and late onset depression have different etiological pathways. Late onset depression has been found to be a heterogeneous group. This study attempts to divide the late onset group in two subgroups with different aetiology and

  2. Detection of Problem Gambler Subgroups Using Recursive Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Francis; Young, Martin; Doran, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The multivariate socio-demographic risk factors for problem gambling have been well documented. While this body of research is valuable in determining risk factors aggregated across various populations, the majority of studies tend not to specifically identify particular subgroups of problem gamblers based on the interaction between variables. The…

  3. On Strong Anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, N; Turvey, M T

    2010-06-01

    We examine Dubois's (2003) distinction between weak anticipation and strong anticipation. Anticipation is weak if it arises from a model of the system via internal simulations. Anticipation is strong if it arises from the system itself via lawful regularities embedded in the system's ordinary mode of functioning. The assumption of weak anticipation dominates cognitive science and neuroscience and in particular the study of perception and action. The assumption of strong anticipation, however, seems to be required by anticipation's ubiquity. It is, for example, characteristic of homeostatic processes at the level of the organism, organs, and cells. We develop the formal distinction between strong and weak anticipation by elaboration of anticipating synchronization, a phenomenon arising from time delays in appropriately coupled dynamical systems. The elaboration is conducted in respect to (a) strictly physical systems, (b) the defining features of circadian rhythms, often viewed as paradigmatic of biological behavior based in internal models, (c) Pavlovian learning, and (d) forward models in motor control. We identify the common thread of strongly anticipatory systems and argue for its significance in furthering understanding of notions such as "internal", "model" and "prediction".

  4. Differences in Psychosocial Predictors of Obesity Among LGBT Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jacob C; Smalley, K Bryant; Barefoot, K Nikki

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the overall presence of and differences in rates of overweight/obesity among a large, nationally diverse sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT)-identified individuals (i.e., cisgender lesbians, cisgender gay men, cisgender bisexual women, cisgender bisexual men, transgender women, and transgender men) and to identify specific psychosocial predictors of obesity within each of the six LGBT subgroups. A total of 2702 LGBT-identified participants participated in the online study. Participants completed a series of demographic questions (including weight and height) and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21. The percentage of participants who were overweight/obese did not differ significantly across LGBT subgroups, with 61.1% of the total sample being overweight/obese. However, the percentage of participants who self-reported body mass indexes in the obese range differed significantly across the six LGBT subgroups, with the highest prevalence in transgender men (46.0%). In addition, the predictors of obesity varied by subgroup, with age a significant predictor for cisgender lesbians, cisgender gay men, and cisgender bisexual women, relationship status for cisgender bisexual women, employment status for both cisgender gay men and cisgender bisexual women, education level for cisgender lesbians, and depression, anxiety, and stress for cisgender gay men. None of the examined psychosocial factors emerged as predictors of obesity for cisgender bisexual men, transgender women, or transgender men. These findings suggest that there are substantial variations in the presence and predictors of obesity across LGBT subgroups that support the need for culturally tailored healthy weight promotion efforts within the LGBT community.

  5. Clinical implications of medulloblastoma subgroups: incidence of CSF diversion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Rutka, James T; Remke, Marc; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    While medulloblastoma was initially thought to comprise a single homogeneous entity, it is now accepted that it in fact comprises 4 discrete subgroups, each with its own distinct demographics, clinical presentation, transcriptomics, genetics, and outcome. Hydrocephalus is a common complication of medulloblastoma and not infrequently requires CSF diversion. The authors report the incidence of CSF diversion surgery in each of the subgroups of medulloblastoma (Wnt, Shh, Group 3, and Group 4). The medical and imaging records for patients who underwent surgery for medulloblastoma at The Hospital for Sick Children were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome was the requirement for CSF diversion surgery either before or within 60 days of tumor resection. The modified Canadian Preoperative Prediction Rule for Hydrocephalus (mCPPRH) was compared among subgroups. Of 143 medulloblastoma patients, treated from 1991 to 2013, sufficient data were available for 130 patients (15 with Wnt, 30 with Shh, 30 with Group 3, and 55 with Group 4 medulloblastomas). Of these, 28 patients (22%) ultimately underwent CSF diversion surgery: 0% with Wnt, 29% with Shh, 29% with Group 3, and 43% with Group 4 tumors. Patients in the Wnt subgroup had a lower incidence of CSF diversion than all other patients combined (p = 0.04). Wnt patients had a lower mCPPRH score (lower risk of CSF diversion, p = 0.045), were older, had smaller ventricles at diagnosis, and had no leptomeningeal metastases. The overall rate of CSF diversion surgery for Shh, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas is around 30%, but no patients in the present series with a Wnt medulloblastoma required shunting. The low incidence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastoma likely reflects both host factors (age) and disease factors (lack of metastases). The absence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastomas likely contributes to their excellent rate of survival and may also contribute to a higher quality

  6. Cluster Analysis of Clinical Data Identifies Fibromyalgia Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, Elisa; Collado, Antonio; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Carbonell, Jordi; Rivera, Javier; Vidal, Javier; Alegre, José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia (FM) is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. Material and Methods 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. Results Variables clustered into three independent dimensions: “symptomatology”, “comorbidities” and “clinical scales”. Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1), high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2), and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3), showing differences in measures of disease severity. Conclusions We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment. PMID:24098674

  7. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally...... wrong even though that human being is not being deprived of a "valuable future". So Marquis would be wrong in thinking that what is essential about the wrongness of killing an adult human being is that they are being deprived of a valuable future. This paper shows that whichever way the concept...... of "valuable future" is interpreted, the proposed counterexamples fail: if it is interpreted as "future like ours", the proposed counterexamples have no bearing on Marquis's argument. If the concept is interpreted as referring to the patient's preferences, it must be either conceded that the patients in Strong...

  8. Porous micropillar structures for retaining low surface tension liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agonafer, Damena D; Lee, Hyoungsoon; Vasquez, Pablo A; Won, Yoonjin; Jung, Ki Wook; Lingamneni, Srilakshmi; Ma, Binjian; Shan, Li; Shuai, Shuai; Du, Zichen; Maitra, Tanmoy; Palko, James W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2018-03-15

    The ability to manipulate fluid interfaces, e.g., to retain liquid behind or within porous structures, can be beneficial in multiple applications, including microfluidics, biochemical analysis, and the thermal management of electronic systems. While there are a variety of strategies for controlling the disposition of liquid water via capillarity, such as the use of chemically modified porous adhesive structures and capillary stop valves or surface geometric features, methods that work well for low surface tension liquids are far more difficult to implement. This study demonstrates the microfabrication of a silicon membrane that can retain exceptionally low surface tension fluorinated liquids against a significant pressure difference across the membrane via an array of porous micropillar structures. The membrane uses capillary forces along the triple phase contact line to maintain stable liquid menisci that yield positive working Laplace pressures. The micropillars have inner diameters and thicknesses of 1.5-3 μm and ∼1 μm, respectively, sustaining Laplace pressures up to 39 kPa for water and 9 kPa for Fluorinert™ (FC-40). A theoretical model for predicting the change in pressure as the liquid advances along the porous micropillar structure is derived based on a free energy analysis of the liquid meniscus with capped spherical geometry. The theoretical prediction was found to overestimate the burst pressure compared with the experimental measurements. To elucidate this deviation, transient numerical simulations based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) were performed to explore the liquid pressure and evolution of meniscus shape under different flow rates (i.e., Capillary numbers). The results from VOF simulations reveal strong dynamic effects where the anisotropic expansion of liquid along the outer micropillar edge leads to an irregular meniscus shape before the liquid spills along the micropillar edge. These findings suggest that the analytical prediction

  9. 40 CFR 98.187 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.187... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lead Production § 98.187 Records that must be retained. In addition to the records required by § 98.3(g), each annual report must contain the information specified in...

  10. 40 CFR 98.157 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.157 Section 98.157 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... that must be retained. (a) In addition to the data required by § 98.3(g), HCFC-22 production facilities...

  11. 40 CFR 98.47 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.47 Section 98.47 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.47 Records that must be retained...

  12. 40 CFR 98.417 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.417 Section 98.417 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... must be retained. (a) In addition to the data required by § 98.3(g), the fluorinated GHG production...

  13. 40 CFR 98.407 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.407... Records that must be retained. In addition to the information required by § 98.3(g), each annual report must contain the following information: (a) Records of all daily meter readings and documentation to...

  14. The challenge of retaining customers acquired with free trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datta, H.; Foubert, B.; van Heerde, H.J.

    Many service firms acquire customers by offering free-trial promotions. A crucial challenge is to retain customers acquired with these free trials. To address this challenge, firms need to understand how free-trial customers differ from regular customers in terms of their decision making to retain

  15. Strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakr W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision measurements on the thermodynamics of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the superfluid transition. The onset of superfluidity is directly observed in the compressibility, the chemical potential, the entropy, and the heat capacity. Our measurements provide benchmarks for current many-body theories on strongly interacting fermions. Secondly, we have studied the evolution of fermion pairing from three to two dimensions in these gases, relating to the physics of layered superconductors. In the presence of p-wave interactions, Fermi gases are predicted to display toplogical superfluidity carrying Majorana edge states. Two possible avenues in this direction are discussed, our creation and direct observation of spin-orbit coupling in Fermi gases and the creation of fermionic molecules of 23Na 40K that will feature strong dipolar interactions in their absolute ground state.

  16. Strongly coupled partitioned FSI using proper orthogonal decomposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bogaers, Alfred EJ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available -squares) coupling scheme. The performance of the original IBQN-LS method is strongly governed by the number of previous time step histories that are retained, where there exists a problem specific optimal choice. In this paper we will demonstrate...

  17. Strong Field Spherical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Numerical models of the geodynamo are usually classified in two categories: those denominated dipolar modes, observed when the inertial term is small enough, and multipolar fluctuating dynamos, for stronger forcing. I show that a third dynamo branch corresponding to a dominant force balance between the Coriolis force and the Lorentz force can be produced numerically. This force balance is usually referred to as the strong field limit. This solution co-exists with the often described viscous branch. Direct numerical simulations exhibit a transition from a weak-field dynamo branch, in which viscous effects set the dominant length scale, and the strong field branch in which viscous and inertial effects are largely negligible. These results indicate that a distinguished limit needs to be sought to produce numerical models relevant to the geodynamo and that the usual approach of minimizing the magnetic Prandtl number (ratio of the fluid kinematic viscosity to its magnetic diffusivity) at a given Ekman number is mi...

  18. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Alan G.; Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-06-18

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit wide vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.

  19. Distinguishing between Subgroups of Adolescents Who Self-Harm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, Emily; Hawton, Keith; Rodham, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The differences in factors associated with subgroups of adolescents in the continuum of deliberate self-harm (DSH) phenomena were investigated. In an anonymous self-report survey of 6,020 adolescents aged 15 and 16 years, 3.2% of adolescents (5.3% females, 1.3% males) reported DSH with intent to die, 2.8% (4.3% females; 1.5% males) reported DSH…

  20. Microscopic colitis: clinical findings, topography and persistence of histopathological subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnbak, C; Engel, P J H; Nielsen, P L; Munck, L K

    2011-11-01

    Uncertainty remains on topography and persistence of histological subgroups of microscopic colitis (MC). To assess longitudinal clinical, endoscopic, histological, and therapeutic description of MC subgroups including patients with incomplete findings of MC (MCi). Retrospective review of a consecutive cohort with MC and histological reassessment of MCi. Clinical characteristics of 168 patients with lymphocytic colitis (LC), 270 with collagenous colitis (CC) and 101 with MCi were similar. At colonoscopy 95% (95% CI: 91-98%) of CC and 98% (93-100%) of LC cases had diagnostic histopathology of MC in both left and right colon. Eight and three patients had characteristics of MC only in the left and right colon, respectively. Histology findings resembling coexistence of the other MC subtype was present in 48% (40-55%) with CC and 24% (18-31%) with LC. A first diagnosis of MC was made in 49 (30%) of 164 patients only at repeat endoscopy. Another 34 of 115 (30%) with MC in the first endoscopy did not fulfil the MC criteria at repeat endoscopy. Only seven cases had a primary endoscopy without histopathological abnormalities. Fifteen percentage of MCi were reclassified as MC. Ileal inflammation was present in 33 of 81 patients. Budesonide was efficacious in all MC subgroups irrespective of bile acid malabsorption. Clinical characteristics of microscopic colitis subgroups are indistinguishable. Biopsies from the left colon suffice to exclude microscopic colitis, and the histological diagnosis of microscopic colitis is inconsistent over time. Ileal inflammation is common. The term microscopic colitis should perhaps be considered one clinical entity and include lymphocytic colitis, collagenous colitis, and incomplete findings of microscopic colitis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Pain and Fatigue Variability Patterns Distinguish Subgroups of Fibromyalgia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Emily J; Robinson, Michael E; Staud, Roland

    2017-12-15

    The current study examined between- and within-subject variability in pain-related symptoms as predictors of pain and fatigue, and identified patient subgroups based upon symptom variability characteristics. Two hundred and fifty-six fibromyalgia (FM) patients completed daily diaries up to a period of 154 days and reported on symptoms of pain intensity, pain unpleasantness, fatigue, anxiety, and depressed mood. Measures of health status, quality of life, and somatic symptoms were obtained at baseline, and hierarchical linear modeling and cluster analyses were employed. Significant intra- and inter-individual variability in daily FM symptoms was observed. Higher levels of pain were associated with greater fluctuations in pain unpleasantness, fatigue, and depressed mood. Similar effects were observed for fatigue and individual variability in anxiety also emerged as a robust predictor. Three FM subgroups were revealed: low variability in symptoms (Cluster 1), high symptom variability (Cluster 2), and a mixed variability group characterized by low fluctuation in pain unpleasantness; moderate pain, fatigue, and depressed mood variability; and high anxiety variability (Cluster 3). Cluster 3 exhibited lower social functioning and higher levels of pain, compared to Cluster 1. These findings support the dynamic nature of FM pain and suggest the presence of FM subgroups based upon variation in mood and pain symptomatology. Fibromyalgia patients display significant intra- and inter-individual variability in pain, mood, and fatigue. Subgroups in mood and pain-related variability emerged, with phenotypic clusters differing across levels of pain intensity and social functioning. Better understanding of the processes impacting pain variability may facilitate targeted treatments for the control of pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Irreducible almost simple subgroups of classical algebraic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Burness, Timothy C; Marion, Claude; Testerman, Donna M

    2015-01-01

    Let G be a simple classical algebraic group over an algebraically closed field K of characteristic p\\geq 0 with natural module W. Let H be a closed subgroup of G and let V be a nontrivial p-restricted irreducible tensor indecomposable rational KG-module such that the restriction of V to H is irreducible. In this paper the authors classify the triples (G,H,V) of this form, where V \

  3. Distinct Histomorphology in Molecular Subgroups of Glioblastomas in Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Julia E; Dorostkar, Mario M; Korshunov, Andrey; Mawrin, Christian; Koch, Arend; Giese, Armin; Schüller, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are malignant brain tumors that can be divided into different molecular subtypes based on genetics, global gene expression, and methylation patterns. Among these subgroups, "IDH" GBMs carry mutations within IDH1 or IDH2 The "K27" and "G34" subgroups are characterized by distinct mutations within Histone 3 (H3). These subtypes can be identified by sequencing methods and are particularly found in younger patients. To determine whether the molecular subtypes correlate with distinct histological features among the diverse histologic patterns of GBM, we performed a blinded assessment of the histology of GBMs of 77 patients ≤30 years old at the time of biopsy. The tumors were of the following molecular subtypes: IDH (n = 12), H3 K27M (n = 25), H3 G34R (n = 12), or no IDH/H3 mutations (n = 28). Of IDH-mutated cases, 75% had microcystic features or gemistocytic tumor cells. K27 GBMs had higher cell densities and pronounced nuclear pleomorphism, with 28% harboring tumor giant cells. All G34 GBMs had variable extents of a poorly differentiated/primitive neuroectodermal tumor-like morphology. GBMs without IDH/H3 mutations had foci of epitheliod-appearing cells. Thus, molecular GBM subgroups are associated with distinct histological patterns, suggesting that morphological features reflect the specific underlying molecular genetic abnormalities. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gambaran Populasi Golongan Darah Subgroup A (A1, A2 di PMI Kulon Progo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieronymus Rayi Prasetya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Subgroup A1 and A2 are the most important in the blood group A. Subgroup A1 has the A antigen more than A2 subgroup, the A2 subgroup can cause misidentification of blood group due to poor A antigen and genetic variation possessed. Misidentification of the blood group will increase the risk of transfusion reactions. This research aims to describe the A1 and A2 subgroup population in Kulon Progo district. This study was conducted with a cross sectional sampling technique. The sample in this study were taken from donors of blood group A in Kulon Progo Red Cross. Identification of A1 and A2 subgroup is done by using lectin (Dolichos biflorus extract. The result of the examination of 53 samples showed that 96,2% was A1 subgroup and 3,8% was A2 subgroup. Key words : Subgroup A1, Subgroup A2, Population, Kulon Progo

  5. Informant discrepancy defines discrete, clinically useful autism spectrum disorder subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Matthew D; De Los Reyes, Andres; Drabick, Deborah A G; Gerber, Alan H; Gadow, Kenneth D

    2017-07-01

    Discrepancy between informants (parents and teachers) in severity ratings of core symptoms commonly arise when assessing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Whether such discrepancy yields unique information about the ASD phenotype and its clinical correlates has not been examined. We examined whether degree of discrepancy between parent and teacher ASD symptom ratings defines discrete, clinically meaningful subgroups of youth with ASD using an efficient, cost-effective procedure. Children with ASD (N = 283; 82% boys; M age  = 10.5 years) were drawn from a specialty ASD clinic. Parents and teachers provided ratings of the three core DSM-IV-TR domains of ASD symptoms (communication, social, and perseverative behavior) with the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-4R (CASI-4R). External validators included child psychotropic medication status, frequency of ASD-relevant school-based services, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS-2). Four distinct subgroups emerged that ranged from large between-informant discrepancy (informant-specific) to relative lack of discrepancy (i.e. informant agreement; cross-situational): Moderate Parent/Low Teacher or Low Parent/Moderate Teacher Severity (Discrepancy), and Moderate or High Symptom Severity (Agreement). Subgroups were highly distinct (mean probability of group assignment = 94%). Relative to Discrepancy subgroups, Agreement subgroups were more likely to receive psychotropic medication, school-based special education services, and an ADOS-2 diagnosis. These differential associations would not have been identified based solely on CASI-4R scores from one informant. The degree of parent-teacher discrepancy about ASD symptom severity appears to provide more clinically useful information than reliance on a specific symptom domain or informant, and thus yields an innovative, cost-effective approach to assessing functional impairment. This conclusion stands in contrast to existing symptom clustering approaches in

  6. Associations between gastric sensorimotor function, depression, somatization, and symptom-based subgroups in functional gastroduodenal disorders: are all symptoms equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauwaert, N; Jones, M P; Holvoet, L; Vandenberghe, J; Vos, R; Tack, J; Van Oudenhove, L

    2012-12-01

    Previous work indicated that psychosocial factors (depression and somatization) are more strongly associated with symptom severity and weight loss in functional dyspepsia (FD) than gastric sensorimotor function. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the association of these etiopathogenetic factors with Rome III symptom-based subgroups in FD [epigastric pain syndrome (EPS), postprandial distress syndrome (PDS)]. We aimed to test whether gastric sensitivity and emptying, depression, and somatization are differentially associated with empirically derived functional gastroduodenal disorders (FGD) symptom factors in one comprehensive model. In 259 tertiary care FD patients, we studied gastric sensorimotor function with barostat and gastric emptying breath test. Depression, somatization, and FGD symptoms were measured using self-report questionnaires. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on 7 FGD symptoms was used to determine the fit of a latent variable structure based on Rome III symptom-based subgroups. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the putative relationships of the symptom factors with gastric sensorimotor function, depression, and somatization. The results of the CFA show a good fit [C(min) /DF = 1.54, CFI(comparative fit index) = 0.97] for the three-factor solution based on Rome III subgroups. The SEM also fitted the data well (C(min) /DF = 1.24, CFI = 0.98) and demonstrated that gastric sensitivity and depression are associated with PDS and nausea and vomiting. Gastric emptying is uniquely associated with EPS and somatization is strongly associated with all three symptom factors. Confirmatory factor analysis confirms the existence of three FGD symptom factors, corresponding to Rome III symptom-based subgroups. The SEM results suggest that different psychobiological mechanisms may play a role in these subgroups. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  8. Knowledge and attitude of dentists toward implant retained ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-13

    planning factors for implant‑retained prosthesis. Analysis of comparative response frequencies and significance grades was done using the Chi‑square and independent t‑test. Results: Of 552 respondents, 64% were SP and ...

  9. Endoscopic removal of retained large surgical gauze: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Khoshbaten

    Full Text Available In this paper, a 63-year-old woman was reported with recurrent abdominal pain after cholecystectomy. A retained surgical towel was seen by CT-scan in the peritoneal cavity, where it migrated across duodenum wall toward pre-pyloric region of the stomach. Endoscopic removal of the large retained gauze in size of 40 cm x 40 cm was successfully performed without laparotomy and with no complication. In the last years, the main method for removal of retained foreign objects has been open laparotomy or laparoscopy. We claimed that removal of large retained surgical long gauze is actually possible using upper GI endoscopy by expert endoscopists, and, therefore, there is no need for anesthesia or surgery as well as no occurrence of complication and laceration.

  10. Peripartal leukogram in cows with and without retained placenta

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lužajić Tijana; Danilović Jelena; Katić Marko; Božić Tatjana; Kovačević-Filipović Milica

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether prepartal leukogram in cows with retained placenta could indicate the presence of subclinical systemic inflammatory response before the onset of disease...

  11. Assessment of Soil Arching Factor for Retaining Wall Pile Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    Despite the prevalence of the soldier piles retaining wall systems as temporary and even permanent shoring systems along state highways, relatively little is known on the effect of the foreslope bench width and the slope inclination on the arching ca...

  12. Gossypiboma – the retained surgical swab: An enduring clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that raise clinical suspicion, of a condition that may be elusive in presentation on ... A review of the English literature reporting retained abdominal swabs between 1992 and 2012 revealed 100 cases. .... help to explain the variety of associated.

  13. Peripartal leukogram in cows with and without retained placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Lužajić Tijana; Danilović Jelena; Katić Marko; Božić Tatjana; Kovačević-Filipović Milica

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether prepartal leukogram in cows with retained placenta could indicate the presence of subclinical systemic inflammatory response before the onset of disease. After calving, sixteen highly pregnant Holstein cows, aged 3 to 9 years, without clinical signs of the disease prior to calving were divided into two groups: the first group (n=9) were animals without retained placenta, or any visible inflammation after birt...

  14. Subgroup Analysis of Trials Is Rarely Easy (SATIRE: a study protocol for a systematic review to characterize the analysis, reporting, and claim of subgroup effects in randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaga German

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subgroup analyses in randomized trials examine whether effects of interventions differ between subgroups of study populations according to characteristics of patients or interventions. However, findings from subgroup analyses may be misleading, potentially resulting in suboptimal clinical and health decision making. Few studies have investigated the reporting and conduct of subgroup analyses and a number of important questions remain unanswered. The objectives of this study are: 1 to describe the reporting of subgroup analyses and claims of subgroup effects in randomized controlled trials, 2 to assess study characteristics associated with reporting of subgroup analyses and with claims of subgroup effects, and 3 to examine the analysis, and interpretation of subgroup effects for each study's primary outcome. Methods We will conduct a systematic review of 464 randomized controlled human trials published in 2007 in the 118 Core Clinical Journals defined by the National Library of Medicine. We will randomly select journal articles, stratified in a 1:1 ratio by higher impact versus lower impact journals. According to 2007 ISI total citations, we consider the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, and BMJ as higher impact journals. Teams of two reviewers will independently screen full texts of reports for eligibility, and abstract data, using standardized, pilot-tested extraction forms. We will conduct univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses to examine the association of pre-specified study characteristics with reporting of subgroup analyses and with claims of subgroup effects for the primary and any other outcomes. Discussion A clear understanding of subgroup analyses, as currently conducted and reported in published randomized controlled trials, will reveal both strengths and weaknesses of this practice. Our findings will contribute to a set of recommendations to optimize

  15. Geometric attributes of retaining glycosyltransferase enzymes favor an orthogonal mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock Schuman

    Full Text Available Retaining glycosyltransferase enzymes retain the stereochemistry of the donor glycosidic linkage after transfer to an acceptor molecule. The mechanism these enzymes utilize to achieve retention of the anomeric stereochemistry has been a matter of much debate. Re-analysis of previously released structural data from retaining and inverting glycosyltransferases allows competing mechanistic proposals to be evaluated. The binding of metal-nucleotide-sugars between inverting and retaining enzymes is conformationally unique and requires the donor substrate to occupy two different orientations in the two types of glycosyltransferases. The available structures of retaining glycosyltransferases lack appropriately positioned enzymatic dipolar residues to initiate or stabilize the intermediates of a dissociative mechanism. Further, available structures show that the acceptor nucleophile and anomeric carbon of the donor sugar are in close proximity. Structural features support orthogonal (front-side attack from a position lying ≤ 90° from the C1-O phosphate bond for retaining enzymes. These structural conclusions are consistent with the geometric conclusions of recent kinetic and computational studies.

  16. The adhesive bridge inlay retained in the therapy of minimal partial edentulism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staletović Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In care of minimal partial edentulism, ie the lack of a tooth, as an alternative method can be used inlay retained adhesive restorations. The aim of this paper is to present possibilities for the application ceramic systems used for adhesive prosthetic restorations. In the making inlay restorations in the region of the posterior teeth can be applied ceramic system of higher strength which can be veneered with translucent ceramics. With the development of adhesive dentistry, it is possible to establish a strong link between restoration and teeth by means of composite cements and thus ensure sustainability of recovery. The clinical procedure is simple, minimally invasive, and provides a glimpse into a way of making inlay retained fixed restorations.

  17. LIGO: The strong belief

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years of designing, building and testing a number of innovative technologies, with the strong belief that the endeavour would lead to a historic breakthrough. The Bulletin publishes an abstract of the Courier’s interview with Barry Barish, one of the founding fathers of LIGO.   The plots show the signals of gravitational waves detected by the twin LIGO observatories at Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. (Image: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) On 11 February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo collaborations published a historic paper in which they showed a gravitational signal emitted by the merger of two black holes. These results come after 20 years of hard work by a large collaboration of scientists operating the two LIGO observatories in the US. Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and former Director of the Global Design Effort for the Internat...

  18. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abel, Frida

    2011-04-14

    Abstract Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB); Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA) and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linked to NB pathogenesis. Results The present study explores subgroup discrimination by gene expression profiling using three published microarray studies on NB (47 samples). Four distinct clusters were identified by Principal Components Analysis (PCA) in two separate data sets, which could be verified by an unsupervised hierarchical clustering in a third independent data set (101 NB samples) using a set of 74 discriminative genes. The expression signature of six NB-associated genes ALK, BIRC5, CCND1, MYCN, NTRK1, and PHOX2B, significantly discriminated the four clusters (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA test). PCA clusters p1, p2, and p3 were found to correspond well to the postulated subtypes 1, 2A, and 2B, respectively. Remarkably, a fourth novel cluster was detected in all three independent data sets. This cluster comprised mainly 11q-deleted MNA-negative tumours with low expression of ALK, BIRC5, and PHOX2B, and was significantly associated with higher tumour stage, poor outcome and poor survival compared to the Type 1-corresponding favourable group (INSS stage 4 and\\/or dead of disease, p < 0.05, Fisher\\'s exact test). Conclusions Based on expression profiling we have identified four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma, which can be distinguished by a 6-gene signature. The fourth subgroup has not been described elsewhere, and efforts are currently made to further investigate this group\\'s specific characteristics.

  19. Analysis of Different Positions of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Retainers versus Multistrand Wire Retainers Using the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Jahanbin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate root displacement of the lower incisors fixed with FRC in different positions versus FSW retainers using the finite element method. Materials and Methods. 3D finite element models were designed for a mandibular anterior segment: Model 1: flexible spiral wire bonded to the lingual teeth surfaces, Model 2: FRC bonded to the upper third of lingual teeth surfaces, and Model 3: FRC bonded to the middle third. FE analysis was performed for three models and then tooth displacements were evaluated. Results. In contrast to lateral incisors and canines, the FSW retainer caused the central teeth to move more than the teeth bonded with FRC in both loadings. Comparison between Models 2 and 3 (in vertical loading showed that FRC retainers that bonded at the upper third of lingual teeth surfaces made central and canine teeth move less than FRC retainers bonded at the middle third; however, for lateral teeth it was the opposite. Conclusion. FRC retainers bonded at the upper third of lingual teeth surfaces make central and canine teeth move less than FRC retainers bonded at the middle third in vertical loading; however, for lateral teeth it was the opposite.

  20. Peripartal leukogram in cows with and without retained placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lužajić Tijana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether prepartal leukogram in cows with retained placenta could indicate the presence of subclinical systemic inflammatory response before the onset of disease. After calving, sixteen highly pregnant Holstein cows, aged 3 to 9 years, without clinical signs of the disease prior to calving were divided into two groups: the first group (n=9 were animals without retained placenta, or any visible inflammation after birth; the second group (n=7 were cows with retained placenta. Blood was sampled three times before parturition, at intervals of one week, and once 24 hours after birth. The number of total leukocytes, segmented and non segmented neutrophilic granulocytes (NG, lymphocytes and monocytes were determined by standard laboratory techniques. The results have shown that in the group of cows with retained placenta the number of mature neutrophils was slightly elevated in the third, second and last week before calving, and equal number of non segmented neutrophils in regard to the group with no retention. The results have also shown that, in both groups of cows, 24 hours after calving, the number of total leukocytes and the number of segmented neutrophils decreased, but the number of the non segmented neutrophils increased. Based on this, we can conclude that cows with retained placenta had no systemic inflammatory response during three weeks prepartal period, but 24 hours after calving, systemic inflammatory response was documented in all the cows. Moreover, the intensity of inflammatory response in cows with retained placenta was not more pronounced in comparison to cows without retained placenta. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175061

  1. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Document Server

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  2. AKT pathway genes define 5 prognostic subgroups in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Joy

    Full Text Available Activity of GFR/PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in glioblastoma clinical trials has not been robust. We hypothesized variations in the pathway between tumors contribute to poor response. We clustered GBM based on AKT pathway genes and discovered new subtypes then characterized their clinical and molecular features. There are at least 5 GBM AKT subtypes having distinct DNA copy number alterations, enrichment in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and patterns of expression for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling components. Gene Ontology terms indicate a different cell of origin or dominant phenotype for each subgroup. Evidence suggests one subtype is very sensitive to BCNU or CCNU (median survival 5.8 vs. 1.5 years; BCNU/CCNU vs other treatments; respectively. AKT subtyping advances previous approaches by revealing additional subgroups with unique clinical and molecular features. Evidence indicates it is a predictive marker for response to BCNU or CCNU and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors. We anticipate Akt subtyping may help stratify patients for clinical trials and augment discovery of class-specific therapeutic targets.

  3. AKT Pathway Genes Define 5 Prognostic Subgroups in Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Ivan; Reiser, Mark; Misra, Anjan; Shapiro, William R.; Mills, Gordon B.; Kim, Seungchan; Feuerstein, Burt G.

    2014-01-01

    Activity of GFR/PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in glioblastoma clinical trials has not been robust. We hypothesized variations in the pathway between tumors contribute to poor response. We clustered GBM based on AKT pathway genes and discovered new subtypes then characterized their clinical and molecular features. There are at least 5 GBM AKT subtypes having distinct DNA copy number alterations, enrichment in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and patterns of expression for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling components. Gene Ontology terms indicate a different cell of origin or dominant phenotype for each subgroup. Evidence suggests one subtype is very sensitive to BCNU or CCNU (median survival 5.8 vs. 1.5 years; BCNU/CCNU vs other treatments; respectively). AKT subtyping advances previous approaches by revealing additional subgroups with unique clinical and molecular features. Evidence indicates it is a predictive marker for response to BCNU or CCNU and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors. We anticipate Akt subtyping may help stratify patients for clinical trials and augment discovery of class-specific therapeutic targets. PMID:24984002

  4. Evaluation of Lymphocyte Subgroups in Children With Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Cahide; Doğan, Murat; Başarslan, Fatmagül; Yılmaz, Nebi; Yuca, Sevil; Bulan, Keziban; Kaya, Avni; Çaksen, Hüseyin

    2015-09-01

    In this study, lymphocyte subgroups including blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, CD19, and CD16.56 values were analyzed in children with Down syndrome (DS). The study includes 85 children with DS, followed at Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Yüzüncü Yil University and 64 healthy age-matched control participants. Blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, CD19, and CD16.56 values were examined in both the groups. Significantly decreased blood CD3, CD4, and CD19 values were found in the study group (P < .05) when compared with the control group. In conclusion, we would like to emphasize that blood CD3, CD4, and CD19 levels were found to be decreased in children with DS. Based on these finding, we think that these decreased lymphocyte subgroups might be responsible for increased susceptibility to infections in children with DS. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. AKT pathway genes define 5 prognostic subgroups in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Anna; Ramesh, Archana; Smirnov, Ivan; Reiser, Mark; Misra, Anjan; Shapiro, William R; Mills, Gordon B; Kim, Seungchan; Feuerstein, Burt G

    2014-01-01

    Activity of GFR/PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in glioblastoma clinical trials has not been robust. We hypothesized variations in the pathway between tumors contribute to poor response. We clustered GBM based on AKT pathway genes and discovered new subtypes then characterized their clinical and molecular features. There are at least 5 GBM AKT subtypes having distinct DNA copy number alterations, enrichment in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and patterns of expression for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling components. Gene Ontology terms indicate a different cell of origin or dominant phenotype for each subgroup. Evidence suggests one subtype is very sensitive to BCNU or CCNU (median survival 5.8 vs. 1.5 years; BCNU/CCNU vs other treatments; respectively). AKT subtyping advances previous approaches by revealing additional subgroups with unique clinical and molecular features. Evidence indicates it is a predictive marker for response to BCNU or CCNU and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors. We anticipate Akt subtyping may help stratify patients for clinical trials and augment discovery of class-specific therapeutic targets.

  6. Investigation of Stability Alarming for Retaining Wall Structures with Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To warn of the stability of retaining wall structures with damage, a simplified mechanical model and a finite element model of this retaining wall-soil coupling system are established. Via finite element model updating, a baseline finite element model of the wall-soil system is acquired. A damage alarming index ERSD (Energy Ratio Standard Deviation is proposed via the wavelet packet analysis of a virtual impulse response function of dynamic responses to this baseline finite element model. The internal relationships among the alarming index, earth pressure, and damage stability of the wall are analyzed. Then, a damage stability alarming method for the retaining walls is advanced. To verify the feasibility and validity of this alarming method, vibration tests on the baseline finite element model of a pile plate retaining wall are performed. The ERSD is used as an alarm for the damage stability of the wall. Analysis results show that, with an increase in the ERSD, the stability of the wall changes from a stable state to an unstable one. The wall reaches a critical stable state when the alarming index reaches its threshold value. Thus, the damage stability of this pile plate retaining wall can be alarmed via ERSD.

  7. Follicular Dendritic Cells Retain Infectious HIV in Cycling Endosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balthasar A Heesters

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART, it does not cure Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and discontinuation results in viral rebound. Follicular dendritic cells (FDC are in direct contact with CD4+ T cells and they retain intact antigen for prolonged periods. We found that human FDC isolated from patients on ART retain infectious HIV within a non-degradative cycling compartment and transmit infectious virus to uninfected CD4 T cells in vitro. Importantly, treatment of the HIV+ FDC with a soluble complement receptor 2 purges the FDC of HIV virions and prevents viral transmission in vitro. Our results provide an explanation for how FDC can retain infectious HIV for extended periods and suggest a therapeutic strategy to achieve cure in HIV-infected humans.

  8. The stability of gabion walls for earth retaining structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyuddin Ramli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability of earth retaining structures in flood prone areas has become a serious problem in many countries. The two most basic causes of failure arising from flooding are scouring and erosion of the foundation of the superstructure. Hence, a number of structures like bridges employ scour-arresting devices, e.g., gabions to acting on the piers and abutments during flooding. Research was therefore undertaken to improve gabion resistance against lateral movement by means of an interlocking configuration instead of the conventional stack-and-pair system. This involved simulating lateral thrusts against two dimensionally identical retaining wall systems configured according to the rectangular and hexagonal gabion type. The evolution of deformation observed suggested that the interlocking design exhibits better structural integrity than the conventional box gabion-based wall in resisting lateral movement and therefore warrants consideration for use as an appropriate scour-arresting device for earth retaining structures.

  9. Removal of retained subfoveal perfluoro-n-octane liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Daniel B; Sears, Jonathan E; Lewis, Hilel

    2004-08-01

    To report a novel technique to remove retained submacular perfluorocarbon liquid. Retrospective cases series. Two patients with retained subfoveal perfluorocarbon liquid were treated with this technique. With a three-port pars plana approach, a 39-gauge flexible cannula was used to perform a retinotomy adjacent to the subfoveal perfluorocarbon bubble. The tip of the cannula was inserted into the bubble, which was removed with active suction. Both patients underwent successful removal of the perfluorocarbon liquid without complications. In one patient, visual acuity improved from 20/70 to 20/30, with resolution of his preoperative central scotoma. The second patient required removal of subfoveal perfluorocarbon liquid at the time of silicone oil removal. The preoperative vision of finger counting improved to 20/60. Subretinal perfluorocarbon can be removed using a flexible 39-gauge cannula without inducing retinal detachment or making a large retinotomy. This technique may benefit patients with retained subfoveal perfluorocarbon liquid.

  10. Discovery-based protein expression profiling identifies distinct subgroups and pathways in leiomyosarcomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirik, Ufuk; Hansson, Karin; Krogh, Morten

    2014-01-01

    subgroups within the leiomyosarcomas with distinct protein expression patterns. Pathways analysis indicates that key biologic nodes like apoptosis, cytoskeleton remodeling, and telomere regulation are differentially regulated among these subgroups. Finally, investigating the similarities between protein...

  11. An overview of statistical planning to address subgroups in confirmatory clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Gary G; Schwartz, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    The effects of treatments within demographic and clinical subgroups of patients are of major interest in most confirmatory clinical trials. Potential factors for defining subgroups include gender, age, disease severity, and geographic region. A major statistical issue for the interpretation of treatment comparisons for subgroups is whether the role of a subgroup is inferential, supportive, or exploratory through respectively corresponding to a primary, key secondary, or hypothesis-generating assessment. This article discusses statistical planning to control type 1 error for the multiple comparisons that correspond to the scope of prespecified inferential subgroups, and it provides some suggestions for addressing the type 2 error that can pertain to prespecified supportive subgroups. Treatment comparisons for exploratory subgroups without a priori specification should always have a very cautious interpretation that accounts for how random variation can influence their pattern of results, although the suggested methods for supportive subgroups can be helpful in this light.

  12. Subgroup analysis of large trials can guide further research: a case study of vitamin E and pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Hemilä

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Harri Hemilä, Jaakko KaprioDepartment of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, FinlandBackground: Biology is complex and the effects of many interventions may vary between population groups. Subgroup analysis can give estimates for specific populations, but trials are usually too small for such analyses.Purpose: To test whether the effect of vitamin E on pneumonia risk is uniform over subgroups defined by smoking and exercise.Methods: The Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study examined the effects of vitamin E (50 mg per day and β-carotene (20 mg per day on lung cancer in 29,133 male smokers aged 50–69 years using a 2 × 2 factorial design. The trial was conducted among the general community in Finland during 1985–1993; the intervention lasted for 6.0 years (median. In the present study, we tested the uniformity of vitamin E effect on the risk of hospital-treated pneumonia (898 cases by adding a dummy variable to allow each subgroup its own vitamin E effect in a Cox model covering all participants.Results: Vitamin E effect was not uniform over eight subgroups defined by baseline smoking (5–19 vs ≥20 cigarettes per day, age of smoking initiation (≤20 vs ≥21 years, and exercise during leisure time (yes vs no. Vitamin E decreased pneumonia risk by 69% (95% CI: 43% to 83% among participants who had the least exposure to smoking and exercised during leisure time. Vitamin E increased pneumonia risk by 79% (95% CI: 27% to 150% among those who had the highest exposure to smoking and did not exercise.Limitations: Although the evidence of heterogeneity is strong, it is not evident to what extent the estimates of effect or the limits between the subgroups can be extrapolated to other populations.Conclusion: Subgroup analysis of large trials should be encouraged, though caution is needed in the interpretation of findings. The role of vitamin E in susceptibility to pneumonia in physically active nonsmokers warrants

  13. Cumulative subgroup analysis to reduce waste in clinical research for individualised medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fujian; Bachmann, Max O

    2016-12-15

    Although subgroup analyses in clinical trials may provide evidence for individualised medicine, their conduct and interpretation remain controversial. Subgroup effect can be defined as the difference in treatment effect across patient subgroups. Cumulative subgroup analysis refers to a series of repeated pooling of subgroup effects after adding data from each of related trials chronologically, to investigate the accumulating evidence for subgroup effects. We illustrated the clinical relevance of cumulative subgroup analysis in two case studies using data from published individual patient data (IPD) meta-analyses. Computer simulations were also conducted to examine the statistical properties of cumulative subgroup analysis. In case study 1, an IPD meta-analysis of 10 randomised trials (RCTs) on beta blockers for heart failure reported significant interaction of treatment effects with baseline rhythm. Cumulative subgroup analysis could have detected the subgroup effect 15 years earlier, with five fewer trials and 71% less patients, than the IPD meta-analysis which first reported it. Case study 2 involved an IPD meta-analysis of 11 RCTs on treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension that reported significant subgroup effect by aetiology. Cumulative subgroup analysis could have detected the subgroup effect 6 years earlier, with three fewer trials and 40% less patients than the IPD meta-analysis. Computer simulations have indicated that cumulative subgroup analysis increases the statistical power and is not associated with inflated false positives. To reduce waste of research data, subgroup analyses in clinical trials should be more widely conducted and adequately reported so that cumulative subgroup analyses could be timely performed to inform clinical practice and further research.

  14. Localization of nuclear retained mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, Rune; Libri, Domenico; BOULAY, JOCELYNE; Rosbash, Michael; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2003-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common conditional phenotype associated with deletion or mutation of genes encoding mRNA export factors is the rapid accumulation of mRNAs in intranuclear foci, suggested to be near transcription sites. The nuclear RNA exosome has been implicated in retaining RNAs in these foci; on deletion of the exosome component Rrp6p, the RNA is released. To determine the exact nuclear location of retained as well as released mRNAs, we have used mRNA export mutant ...

  15. A Two-Pronged Approach to Retaining Millennial Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Jenna; Deline, Marisa; Virkstis, Katherine

    2017-12-01

    Despite increased staff engagement and improved new hire on-boarding, organizations struggle to retain millennial nurses. One dominant trait is shared by organizations that have successfully reduced turnover for this group: investment in select strategies that cement loyalty to the organization. In this article, the authors describe 2 strategies for retaining early-tenure millennial nurses. In the 1st article of this series, the authors described why nursing leaders must supplement their organization's current investments in engagement with strategies targeted at millennials in their 1st 3 years. This 2nd part of the series will outline these strategies.

  16. Reversible Corneal Toxicity of Retained Intracameral Perfluoro-n-octane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Saad S; Asiri, Mohammed S

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old female presented with intracameral retained perfluoro-n-octane (PFO) following previous retinal reattachment surgery. After 4 years of follow-up without related sequelae, the patient complained of a gradual decrease in vision secondary to corneal edema with whitish corneal precipitate inferiorly corresponding to the area of retained PFO. Three weeks after anterior chamber washout, corneal edema resolved and the patient obtained 20/40 visual acuity. Even though PFO considered to have a relatively good safety profile, early anterior chamber washout may prevent corneal toxicity and avoid later persistent corneal decompensation.

  17. Does a subgroup of postpolio patients need different management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgens, Ruth

    2015-07-01

    Throughout the 30 years of postpolio syndrome (PPS) research, there have been many puzzling anomalies in the data and not enough information to make sense of them. It is therefore welcome that Winberg et al have examined physical activity in relation to life satisfaction, sex and age. They hypothesized that activity would decrease with age and found the opposite. This result is not so surprising as Ostlund et al found that vitality was associated with older age and that younger age was associated with more pain, increasing physical fatigue, decreasing sleep quality and reducing activity. This commentary will examine past postpolio research with unexpected results in order to describe a subgroup of patients who may be more susceptible to overusing muscles and have particular exercise and activity needs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pain Drawings Improve Subgrouping of Low Back Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüllemann, Philipp; Keller, Thomas; Kabelitz, Maria; Freynhagen, Rainer; Tölle, Thomas; Baron, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    Subgrouping of low back pain (LBP) patients may be improved when pain drawings are combined with the painDETECT (PD-Q) questionnaire. We hypothesized that (1) different LBP subgroups determined by their pain radiation show different clinical patterns and (2) the occurrence of neuropathic symptoms depends on pain radiation. A total of 19,263 acute ( 3 months) LBP patients were allocated prospectively into 4 groups based on the location of pain drawings on a manikin and compared regarding neuropathic pain components, functionality, depression, pain intensity, and surgical interventions. All items were investigated at baseline and follow-up visits. Group I was composed of patients with axial LBP without radiating pain; group II, LBP with radiation into the thigh; group III, LBP with radiation into the shank; and group IV, LBP with radiation into the feet. Side-dependent pain radiation was assessed additionally. Depression, functionality, and pain intensity showed no clinically relevant differences, whereas PD-Q scores and the probability to rate positive for neuropathic pain increased with more distally radiating pain. Surgery and medication intake were most frequent in group IV. Follow-up analyses showed that only axial LBP became more neuropathic, whereas pain intensity decreased over time. Radicular patterns of pain drawings in LBP patients indicate severe pain conditions with the most neuropathic components, while axial LBP has the fewest. For the categorization of LBP, pain drawings help explain the underlying mechanism of pain, which might further improve mechanism-based treatment when used in clinical routines and research. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  19. Dysexecutive versus amnestic Alzheimer disease subgroups: analysis of demographic, genetic, and vascular factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mez, Jesse; Cosentino, Stephanie; Brickman, Adam M; Huey, Edward D; Manly, Jennifer J; Mayeux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the demographic and vascular characteristics and APOE genotypes of a dysexecutive subgroup of Alzheimer disease (AD) with an amnestic subgroup of AD early in the disease course. A total of 2224 participants from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database who carried a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (n=1188) or mild AD (clinical dementia rating ≤1) (n=1036) were included in this study. A subset of the mild cognitive impairment (n=61) and mild AD (n=79) participants underwent an autopsy. A dysexecutive subgroup (n=587) was defined as having executive performance >1 SD worse than memory performance, and an amnestic subgroup (n=549) was defined conversely. Among the autopsy subset, the odds of an AD pathologic diagnosis were compared in the 2 subgroups. The demographics, APOE[Latin Small Letter Open E]4 status, and vascular risk factors were compared in the 2 subgroups. Among the autopsy subset, the odds of having an AD pathologic diagnosis did not differ between the dysexecutive and amnestic subgroups. Under an additive model, participants in the dysexecutive subgroup possessed the APOE[Latin Small Letter Open E]4 allele less frequently compared with those in the amnestic subgroup. The dysexecutive subgroup had a history of hypertension less frequently compared with the amnestic subgroup. These distinct characteristics add to accumulating evidence that a dysexecutive subgroup of AD may have a unique underlying pathophysiology.

  20. Knowledge and attitude of dentists toward implant retained ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and attitude of dentists toward implant retained restorations in Saudi Arabia. ... knowledge and attitudes of specialists (SP) and general dental practitioners (GDP) ... of GDP used SRR in <50% and <25% of their implant practice respectively. The opinion of GDP and SP was significantly different with regards to ...

  1. Virtual techniques for designing and fabricating a retainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasef, Ahmed A; El-Beialy, Amr R; Mostafa, Yehya A

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to report a procedure for using 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography imaging, computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and rapid prototyping to design and produce a retainer. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of retained encrusted urethral catheter with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Anwar Kunzman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of non-deflating heavily encrusted Foley catheter successfully removed by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL. To our knowledge this is the first case of using ESWL to remove encrusted foley catheter retained in the bladder.

  3. Structural analysis of a thermal insulation retainer assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, William H.; Gray, Carl E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In January 1989 an accident occurred in the National Transonic Facility wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center that was believed to be caused by the failure of a thermal insulation retainer. A structural analysis of this retainer assembly was performed in order to understand the possible failure mechanisms. Two loading conditions are important and were considered in the analysis. The first is the centrifugal force due to the fact that this retainer is located on the fan drive shaft. The second loading is a differential temperature between the retainer assembly and the underlying shaft. Geometrically nonlinear analysis is required to predict the stiffness of this component and to account for varying contact regions between various components in the assembly. High, local stresses develop in the band part of the assembly near discontinuities under both the centrifugal and thermal loadings. The presence of an aluminum ring during a portion of the part's operating life was found to increase the stresses in other regions of the band. Under the centrifugal load, high bending stresses develop near the intersection of the band with joints in the assembly. These high bending stresses are believed to be the most likely cause for failure of the assembly.

  4. Magnet‑retained Prophylactic Appliance for Post‑excisional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnet‑retained Prophylactic Appliance for Post‑excisional. Pressure Therapy and Custom‑made Acrylic Therapeutic. Pressure Appliance for Auricular Keloid: A Clinical Report. Manu Rathee, Renu Kundu. INTRODUCTION. Keloid is a cutaneous fibrous scar that represents disequilibrium in the dermal wound healing.

  5. “Gallstone Hip” and Other Sequelae of Retained Gallstones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Chin

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The fate of gallstones spilled during laparoscopic cholecystostomy has been thought to be relatively benign. Recent experience and a review of the recent literature shows that this is not always the case. We report three cases of complications of retained stones and analyse the literature with regard to types of complications, time to presentation, and recommendations for managing spilled gallstones. Retained gallstones have been shown to cause adhesions in the rat and inflammatory reactions in dogs with no evidence of absorption. The average time to presentation of complications arising from retained gallstones is 27.3 weeks. Complications include: Intraabdominal abscess formation with or without abdominal wall sinus tract formation, persisting abdominal wall sinus tracts from port site abscess, subhepatic inflammatory masses, cholelithoptysis, microabscesses and granuloma formation, liver abscess and “dumbell” shaped abscess with one side of the “dumbell” forming a subcutaneous abscess. We recommend the judicious use of retrieval devices during the extraction phase of the laparoscopic cholecystectomy, diligent removal of any spilled stones and awareness of delayed postoperative pain and tenderness as a harbinger of symptomatic retained gallstones. Documentation of intraoperative gallstone spillage, volume, type of gallstones, and effort to retrieve is recommended.

  6. Severe complication of a bonded mandibular lingual retainer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pazera, P.; Fudalej, P.S.; Katsaros, C.

    2012-01-01

    Bonding a flexible spiral wire retainer to the lingual surfaces of all 6 anterior mandibular teeth is a commonly used type of retention. Complications are rare but can be serious enough to produce biologic damage. This article presents a serious complication of a lingual flexible spiral wire

  7. RETAINED SECOND TWIN: EXPERIENCE FROM ILE-IFE, NIGERIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-02-02

    Feb 2, 2003 ... Objective: To review the current incidence, management, fate and outcome of both the retained foetus and its mother, with a ... accidents or placenta abruptio, maternal injuries are mainly as a result of interventions ... The perinatal mortality and still birth rates of the second twins were thus 47.3% and 41.9% ...

  8. Knowledge and attitude of dentists toward implant retained ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-13

    Sep 13, 2014 ... practice for prosthetic rehabilitations. Although, reports have shown comparable survival results for CRR and. Knowledge and attitude of dentists toward implant retained restorations in Saudi Arabia. Vohra F, Habib R. Department of Prosthetic Dental Science, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, ...

  9. Attracting and Retaining Women in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Sue V.

    2003-01-01

    Fiscal year 2001 marked an important milestone in policies to attract and retain women in science and engineering. That year, the National Science Foundation (NSF) initiated an awards program called ADVANCE at a funding level of $19 million. The program supports efforts by institutions and individuals to empower women to participate fully in…

  10. Unusual Presentation of Retained Foreign Body in Ocular Adnexa of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tulyasys

    also to family physicians and to pediatricians who probably represent the ideal educators for children and their parents. This article reports summary of circumstances, ophthalmic intervention, and therapeutic outcome of an unusual case of retained ocular adnexal foreign body (FB) in a pediatric patient. CASE REPORT.

  11. Management of Retained Genital Piercings: A Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Moulton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of genital piercing among women is increasing. As the popularity increases, the number of complications from infection, injury, and retained jewelry is likely to rise. Techniques to remove embedded jewelry are not well described in the literature. The purpose of this report was to describe a case of a patient with a retained clitoral glans piercing, discuss a simple technique for outpatient removal, and review current evidence regarding associated risks of clitoral piercings. A 24-year-old female presented to the emergency department with an embedded clitoral glans piercing. Local anesthetic was injected into the periclitoral skin and a small superficial vertical incision was made to remove the ball of the retained barbell safely. In conclusion, among patients with retained genital piercing, outpatient removal of embedded jewelry is feasible. While the practice of female genital piercing is not regulated, piercing of the glans of the clitoris is associated with increased injury to the nerves and blood supply of the clitoris structures leading to future fibrosis and diminished function compared to piercing of the clitoral hood.

  12. Retained sponge after abdominal surgery: experience from a third ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Retained abdominal sponge after surgery is a quite rare condition which can have heavy medico-legal consequences; its frequency is generally underestimated. Few reports of these conditions are available in African environment with specific technical and medico-legal background. We present our local ...

  13. A Market-Driven Approach to Retaining Talent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Employee retention must be rethought in a free-agent market. Compensation can shape who leaves and stays. Job design and customization can tailor jobs to employee needs. Encouraging social ties among colleagues and selecting appealing locations for workplaces are other ways to retain talented workers. (SK)

  14. Myomectomy for Retained Placenta Due to Incarcerated Fibroid Mass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effects on the woman's reproductive life. Fibroid mass as a cause of retained placenta is extremely .... oxytocin administered during or after delivery has not been shown to increase the incidence of PPH as a result of ... effects of surgery on her reproductive function made her to decline myomectomy which was offered to her ...

  15. Patients' thoughts on patient-retained medical records | Norden ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A qualitative study was conducted using focus group discussions to explore the patients' thoughts on retaining their own records. In the transcribed interviews, themes were identified through the cut-and-paste method and the results where interpreted and compared with currently available literature. Results: The ...

  16. Gossypiboma – the retained surgical swab: An enduring clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    language publications were excluded and abstracts of relevant articles were evaluated for .... [5] The diagnosis of a gossypiboma may be made easily on plain film if the radio-opaque marker is intact; however, ... radio-opaque markers are helpful in identification of retained swabs using plain X-ray. An X-ray is taken on table ...

  17. 40 CFR 98.397 - Records that must be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records that must be retained. 98.397 Section 98.397 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Petroleum Products § 98.397 Records that must be...

  18. Retained Fractured Fragment of A Central Venous Catheter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2016-01-01

    Jan 1, 2016 ... of the catheter was notably missing, and an emergency chest radiograph confirmed our diagnosis of a ... Emergency chest radiograph was requested, and it confirmed the diagnosis of retained fractured central venous catheter (Figure 1). The case was ... and septic shock secondary to line related sepsis.

  19. Prevalence of retained primary teeth among children with anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study revealed a high predominance of retained primary teeth amongst Orthodontic patients with anterior arch crowding in Benin City. This baseline information will aid in diagnosis, prevention, interception and management of anterior arch crowding in children due to prolonged retention of primary teeth.

  20. 31 CFR 203.16 - Retainer and investor depositaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retainer and investor depositaries. 203.16 Section 203.16 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE PAYMENT OF FEDERAL TAXES AND THE...

  1. A retained plastic protective cover mimicking malignancy: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy, Mustafa; Celep, Bahadır; Ozsan, Ismail; Bal, Ahmet; Ozkececi, Ziya Taner; Arikan, Yuksel

    2013-01-01

    Cases of retained foreign bodies during surgery are more frequently seen in developing countries. Following surgical procedures, unintentionally retained foreign bodies can cause serious complications, in addition to medico-legal issues. A 60-year-old man presented with abdominal cramps. He had previously undergone a laparoscopic radical right nephrectomy due to renal cell carcinoma. Abdominal tomography revealed a mass surrounding the main vascular structures with malignant features in the location of previously performed nephrectomy. Further evaluation of the mass was undertaken by PET/CT. Increased FDG uptake on the PET/CT scan suggested disease recurrence. Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection was performed. The dissection specimen was opened to determine the nature of the mass. Retained plastic foreign bodies were found. There were no malignant cells in the histopathological examination of the surgical specimen. A granulomatous reaction which is mainly responsible for morbidity occurs around the foreign bodies due to the inflammatory response. These granulomas may cause confusion during patient follow-up, especially in those who have undergone major abdominal surgery due to cancer. Following surgical resection for malignancy, unintentionally retained foreign bodies can produce a moderate increase in FDG uptake mimicking disease recurrence. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Vesicovaginal fistula, bladder calculus, retained foreign body or all ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L. Paik

    Retained foreign bodies causing vesicovaginal fistula has been reported in the literature, specifically aerosol bottle caps [1–3]. Contraception and masturbation have been described as reasons for placing an aerosol cap within the vagina [1], but sexual abuse must also be considered as a possibility in these cases. It is also ...

  3. O-ring attachments for transitional implant-retained overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Sato, Jun-Ichi; Hosoi, Toshio; Kurtz, Kenneth S

    2004-02-01

    The lack of proper stability and retention is frequently found in mandibular complete dentures. The stability and retention of existing complete dentures may be improved by using transitional implants (TIs) incorporating the O-ring retention system. This article describes the procedures used to convert an existing conventional complete denture to a TI-retained complete overdenture with O-ring.

  4. Criteria for phytoplasma 16Sr group/subgroup delineation and the need of a platform for proper registration of new groups and subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    As more phytoplasmas are discovered in emerging and re-emerging plant diseases worldwide, the scheme for classification of phytoplasmas into 16S rRNA gene RFLP (16Sr) groups and subgroups is experiencing an ongoing rapid expansion. Improper delineation or designation of new groups and subgroups can...

  5. Thoracic irrigation prevents retained hemothorax: A prospective propensity scored analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Nathan W; Carver, Thomas W; Milia, David; Paul, Jasmeet S

    2017-12-01

    Thoracic trauma resulting in hemothorax (HTx) is typically managed with thoracostomy tube (TT) placement; however, up to 20% of patients develop retained HTx which may necessitate further intervention for definitive management. Although optimal management of retained HTx has been extensively researched, little is known about prevention of this complication. We hypothesized that thoracic irrigation at the time of TT placement would significantly decrease the rate of retained HTx necessitating secondary intervention. A prospective, comparative study of patients with traumatic HTx who underwent bedside TT placement was conducted. The control group consisted of patients who underwent standard TT placement, whereas the irrigation group underwent standard TT placement with immediate irrigation using 1 L of warmed sterile 0.9% saline. Patients who underwent emergency thoracotomy, those with TTs removed within 24 hours, or those who died within 30 days of discharge were excluded. The primary end point was secondary intervention defined by additional TT placement or operative management for retained HTx. A propensity-matched analysis was performed with scores estimated using a logistic regression model based on age, sex, mechanism of injury, Abbreviated Injury Scale chest score, and TT size. In over a 30-month period, a total of 296 patients underwent TT placement for the management of traumatic HTx. Patients were predominantly male (79.6%) at a median age of 40 years and were evenly split between blunt (48.8%) and penetrating (51.2%) mechanisms. Sixty (20%) patients underwent thoracic irrigation at time of initial TT placement. The secondary intervention rate was significantly lower within the study group (5.6% vs. 21.8%; OR, 0.16; p irrigation and control cohort. Thoracic irrigation at the time of initial TT placement for traumatic HTx significantly reduced the need for secondary intervention for retained HTx. Therapeutic Study, Level III.

  6. How can latent trajectories of back pain be translated into defined subgroups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Hestbæk, Lise; Kent, Peter

    2017-01-01

    descriptive definitions, as a way to apply the same definitions of mutually exclusive subgroups across populations. In this study, we investigated if the course trajectories of two LBP cohorts fitted with previously suggested trajectory subgroup definitions, how distinctly different these subgroups were......BACKGROUND: Similar types of trajectory patterns have been identified by Latent Class Analyses (LCA) across multiple low back pain (LBP) cohorts, but these patterns are impractical to apply to new cohorts or individual patients. It would be useful to be able to identify trajectory subgroups from......, and if the subgroup definitions matched with LCA-derived patterns. METHODS: Weekly measures of LBP intensity and frequency during 1 year were available from two clinical cohorts. We applied definitions of 16 possible trajectory subgroups to these observations and calculated the prevalence of the subgroups...

  7. A strategy that iteratively retains informative variables for selecting optimal variable subset in multivariate calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yong-Huan; Wang, Wei-Ting; Tan, Min-Li; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Li, Hong-Dong; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Lu, Hong-Mei; Xu, Qing-Song

    2014-01-07

    Nowadays, with a high dimensionality of dataset, it faces a great challenge in the creation of effective methods which can select an optimal variables subset. In this study, a strategy that considers the possible interaction effect among variables through random combinations was proposed, called iteratively retaining informative variables (IRIV). Moreover, the variables are classified into four categories as strongly informative, weakly informative, uninformative and interfering variables. On this basis, IRIV retains both the strongly and weakly informative variables in every iterative round until no uninformative and interfering variables exist. Three datasets were employed to investigate the performance of IRIV coupled with partial least squares (PLS). The results show that IRIV is a good alternative for variable selection strategy when compared with three outstanding and frequently used variable selection methods such as genetic algorithm-PLS, Monte Carlo uninformative variable elimination by PLS (MC-UVE-PLS) and competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS). The MATLAB source code of IRIV can be freely downloaded for academy research at the website: http://code.google.com/p/multivariate-calibration/downloads/list. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Summary report on the design of the retained gas sampler system (retained gas sampler, extruder and extractor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootan, D.W.; Bolden, R.C.; Bridges, A.E.; Cannon, N.S.; Chastain, S.A.; Hey, B.E.; Knight, R.C.; Linschooten, C.G.; Pitner, A.L.; Webb, B.J.

    1994-09-29

    This document summarizes work performs in Fiscal Year 1994 to develop the three main components of Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS). These primary components are the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), the Retained Gas Extruder (RGE), and the Retained Gas Extractor (RGEx). The RGS is based on the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Universal Sampler design, and includes modifications to reduce gas leakage. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. Significant progress has been made in developing the RGSS. The RGSS is being developed by WHC to extract a representative waste sample from a Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks and to measure both the amount and composition of free and {open_quotes}bound{close_quotes} gases. Sudden releases of flammable gas mixtures are a safety concern for normal waste storage operations and eventual waste retrieval. Flow visualization testing was used to identify important fluid dynamic issues related to the sampling process. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. The safety analysis for the RGSS is being performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and is more than sixty percent (60%) complete.

  9. The role of anger in psychosocial subgrouping for patients with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenzon, Anne N; George, Steven Z; Beneciuk, Jason M; Wandner, Laura D; Torres, Calia; Robinson, Michael E

    2014-06-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common and costly condition that often becomes chronic if not properly addressed. Recent research has shown that psychosocial symptoms can complicate LBP, necessitating more comprehensive screening measures. The present study investigated the role of psychosocial factors, including anger regulation, in pain and disability using a screening measure designed for LBP treated with physical therapy. One hundred three LBP patients initiating physical therapy completed an established screening measure to assess risk for developing chronic pain, and psychosocial measures assessing anger, depression, anxiety, fear-avoidance, and pain-catastrophizing before and after 4 weeks of treatment. Dependent variables were pain intensity, physical impairment, and patient-reported disability. Risk subgrouping based on anger and other psychosocial measures was examined using established screening methods and through using an empirical statistical approach. Analyses revealed that risk subgroups differed according to corresponding levels of negative affect, as opposed to anger alone. General psychosocial distress also predicted disability posttreatment, but, interestingly, did not have a strong relationship to pain. Subsequent hierarchical agglomerative clustering procedures divided patients into overall high-distress and low-distress groups, with follow-up analyses revealing that the high-distress group had higher baseline measures of pain, disability, and impairment. Findings suggest that anger may be part of a generalized negative affect rather than a unique predictor when assessing risk for pain and disability in LBP treatment. Continued research in the area of screening for psychosocial prognostic indicators in LBP may ultimately guide treatment protocols in physical therapy for more comprehensive patient care.

  10. Evolutionary Dynamics of Male Reproductive Genes in the Drosophila virilis Subgroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir H. Ahmed-Braimah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Postcopulatory sexual selection (PCSS is a potent evolutionary force that can drive rapid changes of reproductive genes within species, and thus has the potential to generate reproductive incompatibilities between species. Male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs are major players in postmating interactions, and are important targets of PCSS in males. The virilis subgroup of Drosophila exhibits strong interspecific gametic incompatibilities, and can serve as a model to study the genetic basis of PCSS and gametic isolation. However, reproductive genes in this group have not been characterized. Here we utilize short-read RNA sequencing of male reproductive organs to examine the evolutionary dynamics of reproductive genes in members of the virilis subgroup: D. americana, D. lummei, D. novamexicana, and D. virilis. We find that the majority of male reproductive transcripts are testes-biased, accounting for ∼15% of all annotated genes. Ejaculatory bulb (EB-biased transcripts largely code for lipid metabolic enzymes, and contain orthologs of the D. melanogaster EB protein, Peb-me, which is involved in mating-plug formation. In addition, we identify 71 candidate SFPs, and show that this gene set has the highest rate of nonsynonymous codon substitution relative to testes- and EB-biased genes. Furthermore, we identify orthologs of 35 D. melanogaster SFPs that have conserved accessory gland expression in the virilis group. Finally, we show that several of the SFPs that have the highest rate of nonsynonymous codon substitution reside on chromosomal regions, which contributes to paternal gametic incompatibility between species. Our results show that SFPs rapidly diversify in the virilis group, and suggest that they likely play a role in PCSS and/or gametic isolation.

  11. Evolutionary Dynamics of Male Reproductive Genes in the Drosophila virilis Subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed-Braimah, Yasir H; Unckless, Robert L; Clark, Andrew G

    2017-09-07

    Postcopulatory sexual selection (PCSS) is a potent evolutionary force that can drive rapid changes of reproductive genes within species, and thus has the potential to generate reproductive incompatibilities between species. Male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) are major players in postmating interactions, and are important targets of PCSS in males. The virilis subgroup of Drosophila exhibits strong interspecific gametic incompatibilities, and can serve as a model to study the genetic basis of PCSS and gametic isolation. However, reproductive genes in this group have not been characterized. Here we utilize short-read RNA sequencing of male reproductive organs to examine the evolutionary dynamics of reproductive genes in members of the virilis subgroup: D. americana, D. lummei, D. novamexicana, and D. virilis We find that the majority of male reproductive transcripts are testes-biased, accounting for ∼15% of all annotated genes. Ejaculatory bulb (EB)-biased transcripts largely code for lipid metabolic enzymes, and contain orthologs of the D. melanogaster EB protein, Peb-me, which is involved in mating-plug formation. In addition, we identify 71 candidate SFPs, and show that this gene set has the highest rate of nonsynonymous codon substitution relative to testes- and EB-biased genes. Furthermore, we identify orthologs of 35 D. melanogaster SFPs that have conserved accessory gland expression in the virilis group. Finally, we show that several of the SFPs that have the highest rate of nonsynonymous codon substitution reside on chromosomal regions, which contributes to paternal gametic incompatibility between species. Our results show that SFPs rapidly diversify in the virilis group, and suggest that they likely play a role in PCSS and/or gametic isolation. Copyright © 2017 Ahmed-Braimah et al.

  12. The Role of Anger in Psychosocial Subgrouping for Patients with Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenzon, Anne N.; George, Steven Z.; Beneciuk, Jason M.; Wandner, Laura D.; Torres, Calia; Robinson, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common and costly condition that often becomes chronic if not properly addressed. Recent research has shown that psychosocial symptoms can complicate LBP, necessitating more comprehensive screening measures. The present study investigated the role of psychosocial factors, including anger regulation, in pain and disability using a screening measure designed for LBP treated with physical therapy. One-hundred and three LBP patients initiating physical therapy completed an established screening measure to assess risk for developing chronic pain, as well as psychosocial measures assessing anger, depression, anxiety, fear-avoidance, and pain-catastrophizing before and after four weeks of treatment. Dependent variables were pain intensity, physical impairment, and patient-reported disability. Risk subgrouping based on anger and other psychosocial measures was examined using established screening methods and through employing an empirical statistical approach. Analyses revealed that risk subgroups differed according to corresponding levels of negative affect, as opposed to anger alone. General psychosocial distress also predicted disability post-treatment, but, interestingly, did not have a strong relationship to pain. Subsequent hierarchical agglomerative clustering procedures divided patients into overall High and Low Distress groups, with follow-up analyses revealing that the High Distress group had higher baseline measures of pain, disability, and impairment. Findings suggest that anger may be part of generalized negative affect rather than a unique predictor when assessing risk for pain and disability in LBP treatment. Continued research in the area of screening for psychosocial prognostic indicators in LBP may ultimately guide treatment protocols in physical therapy for more comprehensive patient care. PMID:24281272

  13. VEGFR-1 Overexpression Identifies a Small Subgroup of Aggressive Prostate Cancers in Patients Treated by Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Tsourlakis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The VEGFR-1 is suggested to promote tumor progression. In the current study we analyzed prevalence and prognostic impact of the VEGFR-1 by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing more than 3000 prostate cancer specimens. Results were compared to tumor phenotype, ETS-related gene (ERG status, and biochemical recurrence. Membranous VEGFR-1 expression was detectable in 32.6% of 2669 interpretable cancers and considered strong in 1.7%, moderate in 6.7% and weak in 24.2% of cases. Strong VEGFR-1 expression was associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusion status as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and immunohistochemistry (p < 0.0001 each. Elevated VEGFR-1 expression was linked to high Gleason grade and advanced pT stage in TMPRSS2:ERG negative cancers (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.001, while these associations were absent in TMPRSS2:ERG positive cancers. VEGFR-1 expression was also linked to phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN deletions. A comparison with prostate specific antigen (PSA recurrence revealed that the 1.7% of prostate cancers with the highest VEGFR-1 levels had a strikingly unfavorable prognosis. This could be seen in all cancers, in the subsets of TMPRSS2:ERG positive or negative, PTEN deleted or undeleted carcinomas (p < 0.0001 each. High level VEGFR-1 expression is infrequent in prostate cancer, but identifies a subgroup of aggressive cancers, which may be candidates for anti-VEGFR-1 targeted therapy.

  14. Topography and Volcanology of the Huangtsuishan Volcano Subgroup, Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Lai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining the shaded relief topography model and the slope map from the Digital Terrain Model (DTM images, toporaphical map, field occurrences and petrography, the volcanic sequences of the Huangtsuishan Volcano Subgroup (HVS can be constructed. Two types of volcanic centers can be identified in this area. One is the Tachienhou volcanic dome, which may be located in the center of an older caldera. The other is the Huangtsui composite volcano, which is composed of interbedding lava flows and pyroclastic deposits with a volcanic crater named the Huangtsui pond at the summit. Eight lava plateaus radiated from Mts. Huangtsui and Tachienhou to the north and the east can be distinguished based on the DTM images. The volcanic deposits are comprised of four lithofacies, the lava flows, pyroclastic breccias, tuffs and lahars on the base of field occurrences. At least thirteen layers of lava flow, named the H1 to H13 can be recognized in the HVS and can be reconstructed and categorized into four stages. An old and large volcano erupted lava flows to form the products of stages one and two, then collapsed to form a caldera with a dome for the third stage. The latest stage of lava flow was poured out from the Huangtsui volcano, which formed a crater at the summit.

  15. Personality style and impulsivity as determinants of suicidal subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazaa, Norman; Page, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Studies on suicide have often been inadequate in the sense of failing to understand or conceptualize the dynamics of suicidal behavior from a comprehensive theoretical basis. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine Blatt's theory of Dependent and Self-critical personality dimensions (Blatt, 1974, Blatt & Shichman, 1983) in the context of actual suicidal behavior, and also to utilize these dimensions to facilitate our understanding of suicidal action. Ninety-six undergraduate students who had attempted suicide in the past were administered a series of measures related to suicidal behavior, involving impulsivity, intent, and lethality. Participants were also identified as Dependent or Self-critical in their basic personality orientation. Dependents and Self-critics engaged in contrasting suicidal behaviors along several parameters, with Self-critical individuals generally posing greater risk. These differences were congruent with Blatt's theoretical framework. Implications for suicide risk assessment, management, and treatment are discussed, with special reference to the importance of identifying distinctive suicidal subgroups identified by Dependent and Self-critical personality dimensions.

  16. Resonance Elastic Scattering and Interference Effects Treatments in Subgroup Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhao Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the resonance integral (RI tables produced by the NJOY program, the conventional subgroup method usually ignores both the resonance elastic scattering and the resonance interference effects. In this paper, on one hand, to correct the resonance elastic scattering effect, RI tables are regenerated by using the Monte Carlo code, OpenMC, which employs the Doppler broadening rejection correction method for the resonance elastic scattering. On the other hand, a fast resonance interference factor method is proposed to efficiently handle the resonance interference effect. Encouraging conclusions have been indicated by the numerical results. (1 For a hot full power pressurized water reactor fuel pin-cell, an error of about +200 percent mille could be introduced by neglecting the resonance elastic scattering effect. By contrast, the approach employed in this paper can eliminate the error. (2 The fast resonance interference factor method possesses higher precision and higher efficiency than the conventional Bondarenko iteration method. Correspondingly, if the fast resonance interference factor method proposed in this paper is employed, the kinf can be improved by ∼100 percent mille with a speedup of about 4.56.

  17. Matching mice to malignancy: molecular subgroups and models of medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jasmine; Schmidt, Christin; Markant, Shirley L.; Taylor, Michael D.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medulloblastoma, the largest group of embryonal brain tumors, has historically been classified into five variants based on histopathology. More recently, epigenetic and transcriptional analyses of primary tumors have sub-classified medulloblastoma into four to six subgroups, most of which are incongruous with histopathological classification. Discussion Improved stratification is required for prognosis and development of targeted treatment strategies, to maximize cure and minimize adverse effects. Several mouse models of medulloblastoma have contributed both to an improved understanding of progression and to developmental therapeutics. In this review, we summarize the classification of human medulloblastoma subtypes based on histopathology and molecular features. We describe existing genetically engineered mouse models, compare these to human disease, and discuss the utility of mouse models for developmental therapeutics. Just as accurate knowledge of the correct molecular subtype of medulloblastoma is critical to the development of targeted therapy in patients, we propose that accurate modeling of each subtype of medulloblastoma in mice will be necessary for preclinical evaluation and optimization of those targeted therapies. PMID:22315164

  18. Challenges in identifying asthma subgroups using unsupervised statistical learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperi, Mattia C F; Sahiner, Umit M; Belgrave, Danielle; Sackesen, Cansin; Buchan, Iain E; Simpson, Angela; Yavuz, Tolga S; Kalayci, Omer; Custovic, Adnan

    2013-12-01

    Unsupervised statistical learning techniques, such as exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and hierarchical clustering (HC), have been used to identify asthma phenotypes, with partly consistent results. Some of the inconsistency is caused by the variable selection and demographic and clinical differences among study populations. To investigate the effects of the choice of statistical method and different preparations of data on the clustering results; and to relate these to disease severity. Several variants of EFA and HC were applied and compared using various sets of variables and different encodings and transformations within a dataset of 383 children with asthma. Variables included lung function, inflammatory and allergy markers, family history, environmental exposures, and medications. Clusters and original variables were related to asthma severity (logistic regression and Bayesian network analysis). EFA identified five components (eigenvalues ≥ 1) explaining 35% of the overall variance. Variations of the HC (as linkage-distance functions) did not affect the cluster inference; however, using different variable encodings and transformations did. The derived clusters predicted asthma severity less than the original variables. Prognostic factors of severity were medication usage, current symptoms, lung function, paternal asthma, body mass index, and age of asthma onset. Bayesian networks indicated conditional dependence among variables. The use of different unsupervised statistical learning methods and different variable sets and encodings can lead to multiple and inconsistent subgroupings of asthma, not necessarily correlated with severity. The search for asthma phenotypes needs more careful selection of markers, consistent across different study populations, and more cautious interpretation of results from unsupervised learning.

  19. Multiple mechanisms promote the retained expression of gene duplicates in the tetraploid frog Xenopus laevis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication provides a window of opportunity for biological variants to persist under the protection of a co-expressed copy with similar or redundant function. Duplication catalyzes innovation (neofunctionalization, subfunction degeneration (subfunctionalization, and genetic buffering (redundancy, and the genetic survival of each paralog is triggered by mechanisms that add, compromise, or do not alter protein function. We tested the applicability of three types of mechanisms for promoting the retained expression of duplicated genes in 290 expressed paralogs of the tetraploid clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. Tests were based on explicit expectations concerning the ka/ks ratio, and the number and location of nonsynonymous substitutions after duplication. Functional constraints on the majority of paralogs are not significantly different from a singleton ortholog. However, we recover strong support that some of them have an asymmetric rate of nonsynonymous substitution: 6% match predictions of the neofunctionalization hypothesis in that (1 each paralog accumulated nonsynonymous substitutions at a significantly different rate and (2 the one that evolves faster has a higher ka/ks ratio than the other paralog and than a singleton ortholog. Fewer paralogs (3% exhibit a complementary pattern of substitution at the protein level that is predicted by enhancement or degradation of different functional domains, and the remaining 13% have a higher average ka/ks ratio in both paralogs that is consistent with altered functional constraints, diversifying selection, or activity-reducing mutations after duplication. We estimate that these paralogs have been retained since they originated by genome duplication between 21 and 41 million years ago. Multiple mechanisms operate to promote the retained expression of duplicates in the same genome, in genes in the same functional class, over the same period of time following duplication, and sometimes in the same pair of

  20. Drill bit assembly for releasably retaining a drill bit cutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowka, David A.; Raymond, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A drill bit assembly is provided for releasably retaining a polycrystalline diamond compact drill bit cutter. Two adjacent cavities formed in a drill bit body house, respectively, the disc-shaped drill bit cutter and a wedge-shaped cutter lock element with a removable fastener. The cutter lock element engages one flat surface of the cutter to retain the cutter in its cavity. The drill bit assembly thus enables the cutter to be locked against axial and/or rotational movement while still providing for easy removal of a worn or damaged cutter. The ability to adjust and replace cutters in the field reduces the effect of wear, helps maintains performance and improves drilling efficiency.

  1. Early Decomposition of Retained Heavy Silicone Oil Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touka Banaee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of early decomposition of retained heavy silicone oil droplets. Case Report: The single highly myopic eye of a 16-year-old boy with history of scleral buckling and buckle revision developed redetachment due to inferior retinal dialysis. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy and injection of heavy silicone oil. Early emulsification of the silicone oil was observed following surgery, which was removed 4 weeks later in another operation. Retained heavy silicone droplets lost their heavier- than-water specific gravity within 2 months together with extensive iris depigmentation, and release of pigment granules into the anterior chamber and vitreous cavity. Conclusion: This case report demonstrates that heavy silicone oil droplets can undergo in vivo chemical decomposition with possible toxic effects on ocular tissues.

  2. Novel magnet-retained prosthetic system for facial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mostafa M; Piper, James M; Hansen, Nancy A; Sutton, Alan J; Schmalbach, Cecelia E

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic facial defects negatively impact speech, mastication, deglutition, dental hygiene, and psychosocial well-being. Reconstruction must address restoration of function and aesthetics to provide quality of life. This report describes soft-tissue reconstruction using a novel magnet-retained facial prosthesis without osseointegrated abutments, performed in a patient after traumatic loss of the entire left lower part of the face, including lips, commissure, and mentum. This reconstructive technique successfully addressed the cosmetic defect while also restoring function with respect to speech and oral nutrition. For this reason, magnet-retained facial prosthesis should be added to free tissue transfer and regional flaps as a reasonable option in the reconstructive algorithm for complex soft-tissue defects of the lower face.

  3. Implant-retained craniofacial prostheses for facial defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, Philipp A.

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial prostheses, also known as epistheses, are artificial substitutes for facial defects. The breakthrough for rehabilitation of facial defects with implant-retained prostheses came with the development of the modern silicones and bone anchorage. Following the discovery of the osseointegration of titanium in the 1950s, dental implants have been made of titanium in the 1960s. In 1977, the first extraoral titanium implant was inserted in a patient. Later, various solitary extraoral implant systems were developed. Grouped implant systems have also been developed which may be placed more reliably in areas with low bone presentation, as in the nasal and orbital region, or the ideally pneumatised mastoid process. Today, even large facial prostheses may be securely retained. The classical atraumatic surgical technique has remained an unchanged prerequisite for successful implantation of any system. This review outlines the basic principles of osseointegration as well as the main features of extraoral implantology. PMID:22073096

  4. A survey of failed post-retained restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peutzfeldt, A; Sahafi, A; Asmussen, E

    2008-01-01

    Survival of endodontically treated, post-restored teeth depends on a multitude of factors, all of which are practically impossible to include in a randomized, controlled clinical study. The purpose of this survey was to characterize and analyze reported failures of post-retained restorations...... to identify factors critical to failure and to type of failure. A questionnaire was mailed to private practitioners in Denmark with a request to complete the questionnaire whenever a patient presented with a failed post-retained restoration. Information was gathered on factors related to the patient......, the tooth, the restorative materials, and the techniques. Two-hundred and sixty questionnaires were collected from 171 practitioners over a 3-year period. Functioning time until failure varied between 3 months and 38 years. Mean survival time until failure was 11 years. Of the failed restorations, 61% had...

  5. Subgroup analyses in cost-effectiveness analyses to support health technology assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Christine; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Paget, Marie-Ange; Reid, Carol; Hawkins, Neil

    2014-01-01

    'Success' in drug development is bringing to patients a new medicine that has an acceptable benefit-risk profile and that is also cost-effective. Cost-effectiveness means that the incremental clinical benefit is deemed worth paying for by a healthcare system, and it has an important role in enabling manufacturers to obtain new medicines to patients as soon as possible following regulatory approval. Subgroup analyses are increasingly being utilised by decision-makers in the determination of the cost-effectiveness of new medicines when making recommendations. This paper highlights the statistical considerations when using subgroup analyses to support cost-effectiveness for a health technology assessment. The key principles recommended for subgroup analyses supporting clinical effectiveness published by Paget et al. are evaluated with respect to subgroup analyses supporting cost-effectiveness. A health technology assessment case study is included to highlight the importance of subgroup analyses when incorporated into cost-effectiveness analyses. In summary, we recommend planning subgroup analyses for cost-effectiveness analyses early in the drug development process and adhering to good statistical principles when using subgroup analyses in this context. In particular, we consider it important to provide transparency in how subgroups are defined, be able to demonstrate the robustness of the subgroup results and be able to quantify the uncertainty in the subgroup analyses of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Stratification of randomization is not required for a pre-specified subgroup analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lee D

    2013-01-01

    Published literature and regulatory agency guidance documents provide conflicting recommendations as to whether a pre-specified subgroup analysis also requires for its validity that the study employ randomization that is stratified on subgroup membership. This is an important issue, as subgroup analyses are often required to demonstrate efficacy in the development of drugs with a companion diagnostic. Here, it is shown, for typical randomization methods, that the fraction of patients in the subgroup given experimental treatment matches, on average, the target fraction in the entire study. Also, mean covariate values are balanced, on average, between treatment arms in the subgroup, and it is argued that the variance in covariate imbalance between treatment arms in the subgroup is at worst only slightly increased versus a subgroup-stratified randomization method. Finally, in an analysis of variance setting, a least-squares treatment effect estimator within the subgroup is shown to be unbiased whether or not the randomization is stratified on subgroup membership. Thus, a requirement that a study be stratified on subgroup membership would place an artificial roadblock to innovation and the goals of personalized healthcare. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Low Back Pain Subgroups using Fear-Avoidance Model Measures: Results of a Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneciuk, Jason M.; Robinson, Michael E.; George, Steven Z.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this secondary analysis was to test the hypothesis that an empirically derived psychological subgrouping scheme based on multiple Fear-Avoidance Model (FAM) constructs would provide additional capabilities for clinical outcomes in comparison to a single FAM construct. Methods Patients (n = 108) with acute or sub-acute low back pain (LBP) enrolled in a clinical trial comparing behavioral physical therapy interventions to classification based physical therapy completed baseline questionnaires for pain catastrophizing (PCS), fear-avoidance beliefs (FABQ-PA, FABQ-W), and patient-specific fear (FDAQ). Clinical outcomes were pain intensity and disability measured at baseline, 4-weeks, and 6-months. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was used to create distinct cluster profiles among FAM measures and discriminant analysis was used to interpret clusters. Changes in clinical outcomes were investigated with repeated measures ANOVA and differences in results based on cluster membership were compared to FABQ-PA subgrouping used in the original trial. Results Three distinct FAM subgroups (Low Risk, High Specific Fear, and High Fear & Catastrophizing) emerged from cluster analysis. Subgroups differed on baseline pain and disability (p’s<.01) with the High Fear & Catastrophizing subgroup associated with greater pain than the Low Risk subgroup (p<.01) and the greatest disability (p’s<.05). Subgroup × time interactions were detected for both pain and disability (p’s<.05) with the High Fear & Catastrophizing subgroup reporting greater changes in pain and disability than other subgroups (p’s<.05). In contrast, FABQ-PA subgroups used in the original trial were not associated with interactions for clinical outcomes. Discussion These data suggest that subgrouping based on multiple FAM measures may provide additional information on clinical outcomes in comparison to determining subgroup status by FABQ-PA alone. Subgrouping methods for

  8. A study of the carbon distribution in retained austenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, C.P. [Arcelor Research SA, Voie Romaine - BP 30320, F-57283 Maizieres-les-Metz (France)], E-mail: colin.scott@arcelor.com; Drillet, J. [Arcelor Research SA, Voie Romaine - BP 30320, F-57283 Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    2007-03-15

    Cold-rolled and annealed transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels were overaged to modify the carbon concentrations (C{sub {gamma}}) in retained austenite. Experimental C{sub {gamma}} values were directly obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy and compared with data derived from X-ray diffraction measurements of the austenite lattice parameter (a{sub {gamma}}). In this way, we evaluated the different expressions available in the literature relating C{sub {gamma}} to a{sub {gamma}}.

  9. Analysis of Embedded Retaining Wall Using the Subgrade Reaction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasik Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the distribution of internal forces and displacements of embedded retaining wall in Quaternary deposits and Tertiary clays. Calculations have been based on the Subgrade Reaction Method (SRM for two different types of earth pressure behind the wall (active, at-rest in order to show the differences resulting from adopting the limit values. An algorithm for calculation of “cantilever wall” using the Mathematica program was proposed.

  10. Attracting and retaining IT talent within the insurance industry

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Com. (Business Management) Globalisation and the multi-generational workforce have made an impact on the workforce and the workplace. Demographic shifts are creating an aging population, creating a growing skills shortage which is putting pressure on businesses to create knowledge workers with cutting-edge expertise. Coupled with the explosion of new technologies and the application of , these issues have changed the way organisations work, recruit, and retain their employees. Organisati...

  11. Method for residual stress relief and retained austenite destabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2004-08-10

    A method using of a magnetic field to affect residual stress relief or phase transformations in a metallic material is disclosed. In a first aspect of the method, residual stress relief of a material is achieved at ambient temperatures by placing the material in a magnetic field. In a second aspect of the method, retained austenite stabilization is reversed in a ferrous alloy by applying a magnetic field to the alloy at ambient temperatures.

  12. An integrated framework for transmission cost allocation retaining efficiency concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, J.W. Marangon [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, MG (Brazil); Gorenstin, B.G.; Vieira Filho, X. [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Chipp, H.J.; Alvarenga Filho, S. [ELETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hirota, M. [Companhia Energetica de Sao Paulo (CESP), SP (Brazil); Pereira, M.V.F. [Power System Research, Inc., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a methodology for allocating transmission costs among utilities and wheeling agents. The proposed approach is based on the extension of marginal cost theory to take into account discrete component sizes and economy of scale, while retaining desirable economic properties such as revenue reconciliation and incentives for all participants to remain in the pool. The methodology is illustrated in case studies with the Brazilian system. (author) 21 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Characterization of courtship sounds of species of the subgroup fasciola (Diptera, Drosophilidae, Drosophila repleta group: interspecific and interpopulational analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. A. COSTA

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize the male courtship song pattern of various species of the fasciola subgroup and to determine the level of variation both within and among species. The parameters analyzed were intrapulse interval (PI, interpulse interval (IPI, and intrapulse frequency (IF. Six different species were analyzed: D. coroica (three populations, D. ellisoni, D. fascioloides, D. moju, D. onca, and D. rosinae (one population each. There were significant differences among the six species for these three courtship song parameters. The IPI was the most variable parameter among these species, suggesting that this parameter is important for female discrimination. Four different hypotheses could explain this variation: 1. different selection pressures with absence of flow gene; 2. intraspecific sexual selection; 3. sympatric effects on song evolution; and 4. genetic drift. The PI was the only parameter that was significantly different among the three population of D. coroica. Low variability among populations within the same species was already observed for other subgroups and could be explained by the following hypotheses: strong selection acting on the song parameters, gene flow, or recent colonization from a common source. Additional studies of the courtship song of other species of the fasciola subgroup, as well as for other subgroups of the repleta group, and studies, using molecular makers, that focus on the genetic basis of the differences among these species in courtship song would allow us to evaluate the association of courtship song and sexual isolation in these species, and would also help us to understand the evolution of these behavioural differences.

  14. Uniformity under in vitro conditions: Changes in the phenotype of cancer cell lines derived from different medulloblastoma subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlapek, Petr; Zitterbart, Karel; Kren, Leos; Filipova, Lenka; Sterba, Jaroslav; Veselska, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Medulloblastoma comprises four main subgroups (WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4) originally defined by transcriptional profiling. In primary medulloblastoma tissues, these groups are thought to be distinguishable using the immunohistochemical detection of β-catenin, filamin A, GAB1 and YAP1 protein markers. To investigate the utility of these markers for in vitro studies using medulloblastoma cell lines, immunoblotting and indirect immunofluorescence were employed for the detection of β-catenin, filamin A, GAB1 and YAP1 in both DAOY and D283 Med reference cell lines and the panel of six medulloblastoma cell lines derived in our laboratory from the primary tumor tissues of known molecular subgroups. Immunohistochemical detection of these markers was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue of the matching primary tumors. The results revealed substantial divergences between the primary tumor tissues and matching cell lines in the immunoreactivity pattern of medulloblastoma-subgroup-specific protein markers. Regardless of the molecular subgroup of the primary tumor, all six patient-derived medulloblastoma cell lines exhibited a uniform phenotype: immunofluorescence showed the nuclear localization of YAP1, accompanied by strong cytoplasmic positivity for β-catenin and filamin A, as well as weak positivity for GAB1. The same immunoreactivity pattern was also found in both DAOY and D283 Med reference medulloblastoma cell lines. Therefore, we can conclude that various medulloblastoma cell lines tend to exhibit the same characteristics of protein marker expression under standard in vitro conditions. Such a finding emphasizes the importance of the analyses of primary tumors in clinically oriented medulloblastoma research and the urgent need to develop in vitro models of improved clinical relevance, such as 3D cultures and organotypic slice cultures.

  15. Nanomechanical characterization of exfoliated and retained deciduous incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Ahmed, Naseer

    2014-01-01

    The anisotropic natures of dental tissues result in variable properties from one point to the other within the same tooth. The aim of this study was to analyze deciduous incisors enamel and dentin for elastic modulus and hardness. In addition, retained deciduous incisors were assessed to compare properties with exfoliated teeth. Deciduous mandibular incisors either exfoliated at physiological age or retained were included in this study. Samples were prepared by dissecting teeth in transverse sections and surfaces under investigation were prepared and polished for nanoindentation. Nanoindentation was performed at multiple sites using Hysitron [TI 725 Ubi] testing instrument. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software (version 20) to calculate absolute hardness and elastic modulus. The statistical significance was calculated using the t-test. The hardness of human deciduous incisor varies between 0.01-7 GPa. The highest value of hardness was observed for the incisal edge (5.09 ± 0.64 GPa) followed by mid-surface enamel and cervical enamel. The hardness of mantle dentin was (0.56 ± 0.19 GPa) and the inner dentin was (0.34 ± 0.12 GPa). The average hardness of primary teeth enamel is lower than permanent teeth enamel. The hardness of retained teeth enamel is greater than exfoliated teeth however lower than permanent teeth enamel of the equivalent region.

  16. [Clinical application of implant supported magnet-retained overdenture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Ping; Lin, Ye; Li, Jian-hui; Qiu, Li-xin; Chen, Bo; Wang, Xing

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical effects of implants supported magnet-retained overdenture. From November 1999 to March 2005, 25 cases with edentulous jaws underwent implant-supported magnet-retained overdenture. Among them, 14 patients were male, 11 patients were female. The average age of the patients was 67.6 years. (Range 45 - 79 years). Ninety-five implants used included Komet (18), IMZ (11), Frialit-2 (12), Ankylos (10), Camlog (44). The fellow-up time was from 6 months to 70 months. Clinical examination and radiographs were conducted. No infections, nerve or sinus damage or other sequelae occurred. The overdentures were stable and functioned effectively. From November 1999 to March 2005, One Komet abutment was fracture and 1 Frialit-2 implant was lost because of overloading during follow-up. The remaining implants achieved successful osseointegration. Patients were satisfied with the treatment. Implant-supported magnet-retained overdenture was a predictable and reliable method, especially for old patients with edentulous jaws.

  17. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ice, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barbee, T.; Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Howells, M.; Thompson, A.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Yun, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E{>=}5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called {open_quotes}jelly roll{close_quotes} or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes.

  18. Balance Impairments in Different Subgroups of Patients With Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Gabriela F; Bonato, Paolo; Florencio, Lidiane L; Pinheiro, Carina F; Dach, Fabiola; Bigal, Marcelo E; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Debora

    2017-03-01

    Patients with migraine often experience balance impairments. However, the relationship between clinical features - like aura and chronicity - and the severity of balance impairments is not well established. The objective of this study was to assess balance impairments in different subgroups of migraine patients. One hundred five subjects diagnosed according to the ICHD-III were recruited in the study. They were uniformly distributed among three groups: migraine with aura, migraine without aura, and chronic migraine. Thirty-five controls were also recruited in the study. Balance impairments were assessed in all subjects via the modified Sensory Organization test and the Limits of Stability test. The results in the four groups were compared using ANCOVA tests with age, BMI, presence of dizziness, level of physical activity, time of migraine onset, and medication intake as covariates. Subjects in the migraine with aura and the chronic migraine groups showed poorer balance control than control subjects in three of the four conditions tested using the modified Sensory Organization test: FirmCE: CG: 1.5 cm2 , 95%CI 1.3 to 1.7; M: 2.1 cm2 , 95%CI 1.6 to 2.6; MA: 4.5 cm2 , 95%CI 3.2 to 5.8; CM: 4.5 cm2 , 95%CI 3.0 to 6.0; P migraine without aura group (P migraine groups were found in the reaction time, movement velocity, endpoint excursion, and maximal excursion parameters (P  .05). There is evidence of balance control impairments in subjects with all subtypes of migraine compared to control subjects. The presence of aura and frequent migraine attacks reflect negatively in the postural control performance and may have a significant clinical impact in patients with migraine that should be addressed with appropriate clinical interventions. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  19. Cosmology with strong lensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiada, Marek

    2017-08-01

    Strong gravitational lensing has now developed into a mature tool for investigating galactic structure and dynamics as well as cosmological models. In this lecture the phenomenon of strong gravitational lensing, its history and applications are reviewed with an emphasis on the recent ideas developed by the author. Expected massive discoveries of strong lensing galactic scale systems in forthcoming projects like Euclid or LSST herald the bright future of gravitational lensing in cosmology.

  20. Clinical and epidemiological features of acute infantile gastroenteritis associated with human rotavirus subgroups 1 and 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Uhnoo, I; Svensson, L

    1986-01-01

    During a prospective 1-year study rotavirus isolates from 169 children with gastroenteritis were investigated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of 118 (70%) of the strains analyzed contained sufficient viral nucleic acid to give visible electrophoretic patterns; 36% were identified as strains belonging to subgroup 1 (short patterns), and 64% were identified as strains belonging to subgroup 2 (long patterns). The two subgroups cocirculated at equal frequencies during the first 7 m...

  1. Handedness as a continuous variable with dextral shift: sex, generation, and family handedness in subgroups of left- and right-handers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, M

    1994-01-01

    Percentages of left-handed relatives were compared between subgroups of left-handers and of right-handers to test the prediction that the subgroups are ordered for probability of carrying the rs +/gene (hypothesized by the right-shift theory of handedness). Data included families of undergraduates and Open University students who described their children as well as other relatives. Linear relationships were found between subgroup order and percentage of left-handed relatives. In agreement with previous evidence that some right-writers with weak sinistral preferences (class 2) are in fact more dextral than consistent right-handers (class 1), class 2 tended to have fewer left-handed relatives than class 1 in both samples. Left writers with weak dextral tendencies (class 7) tended to have more left-handed relatives that consistent left-handers (class 8). Comparisons of the distribution of subgroup handedness in undergraduates and their parents revealed strong effects for sex and for generation. In both cases, the main contrasts were not between left-handers and right-handers but between left-handers plus right-handers with weak dextrality and right-handers with strong dextrality. The findings are consistent with the theory that the relevant factor is not handedness as such but, rather, the absence or presence of the rs +/gene.

  2. Developing the group mind through functional subgrouping: linking systems-centered training (SCT) and interpersonal neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Susan P; Agazarian, Yvonne M

    2010-10-01

    This article introduces the systems-centered concept of the "group mind" by linking systems-centered thinking and interpersonal neurobiology, building on Siegel's definition of mind as the process of regulating the flow of energy and information. Functional subgrouping, the systems-centered group method for resolving conflicts, discriminates and integrates the flow of energy and information within and between group members, subgroups, and the group-as-a-whole, thus potentiating survival, development, and transformation. This article uses the interpersonal neurobiological framework to discuss functional subgrouping as a tool for developing the group mind: considering how functional subgrouping facilitates emotional regulation, creates a secure relational context, and potentiates neural integration.

  3. Strong WW Interaction at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaez, Jose R

    1998-12-14

    We present a brief pedagogical introduction to the Effective Electroweak Chiral Lagrangians, which provide a model independent description of the WW interactions in the strong regime. When it is complemented with some unitarization or a dispersive approach, this formalism allows the study of the general strong scenario expected at the LHC, including resonances.

  4. Overdenture retaining bar stress distribution: a finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Conrado Reinoldes; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes

    2015-05-01

    Evaluate the stress distribution on the peri-implant bone tissue and prosthetic components of bar-clip retaining systems for overdentures presenting different implant inclinations, vertical misfit and framework material. Three-dimensional models of a jaw and an overdenture retained by two implants and a bar-clip attachment were modeled using specific software (SolidWorks 2010). The studied variables were: latero-lateral inclination of one implant (-10°, -5°, 0°, +5°, +10°); vertical misfit on the other implant (50, 100, 200 µm); and framework material (Au type IV, Ag-Pd, Ti cp, Co-Cr). Solid models were imported into mechanical simulation software (ANSYS Workbench 11). All nodes on the bone's external surface were constrained and a displacement was applied to simulate the settling of the framework on the ill-fitted component. Von Mises stress for the prosthetic components and maximum principal stress to the bone tissue were evaluated. The +10° inclination presented the worst biomechanical behavior, promoting the highest stress values on the bar framework and peri-implant bone tissue. The -5° group presented the lowest stress values on the prosthetic components and the lowest stress value on peri-implant bone tissue was observed in -10°. Increased vertical misfit caused an increase on the stress values in all evaluated structures. Stiffer framework materials caused a considerable stress increase in the framework itself, prosthetic screw of the fitted component and peri-implant bone tissue. Inclination of one implant associated with vertical misfit caused a relevant effect on the stress distribution in bar-clip retained overdentures. Different framework materials promoted increased levels of stress in all the evaluated structures.

  5. Total rewards that retain: A study of demographic preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Pregnolato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Changing workplace demographics and a dearth of employees with scarce skills have forced employers to better understand the various factors that retain talented employees.Research purpose: In this empirical study, the reward preferences and ideal combination of total reward elements (based on an estimation of their relative importance that retain employees from various demographic groups, including employees of different race, gender and age groups, were investigated.Motivation for study: Organisations are competing for talented employees and to benefit from the value these individuals add, it is required of them to stay at the respective businesses. Previous studies have indicated that employees who are offered a reward package that is aligned to their personal preferences are prone to stay longer at the organisation and to be more engaged at work. However, new and novel ways need to be found to identify the reward preferences of employees.Research design, approach and method: A quantitative approach and descriptive research design was employed to estimate the individual reward preferences and identify an ideal mix of total reward elements that retain different cohorts of employees. Three questionnaires were distributed, including a Remuneration Managers Questionnaire (n = 7, a Remuneration Preference Questionnaire (n = 368 and a Choice-based Conjoint Task Questionnaire (n = 368. The latter two questionnaires were distributed as an online questionnaire to South African businesses and consisted of eight choice-based conjoint tasks, as well as a field survey.Main findings: The results of the choice-based conjoint analysis revealed that all respondents considered financial rewards (Benefits, Performance and Recognition, Remuneration, Career, in that order as relatively speaking, the most important components in their total rewards package that would lead to their retention. For most demographic groups, the remaining three places (i

  6. Medulloblastoma in China: clinicopathologic analyses of SHH, WNT, and non-SHH/WNT molecular subgroups reveal different therapeutic responses to adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma (MB is one of the most common primary central nervous system tumors in children. Data is lacking of a large cohort of medulloblastoma patients in China. Also, our knowledge on the sensitivity of different molecular subgroups of MB to adjuvant radiation therapy (RT or chemotherapy (CHT is still limited. The authors performed a retrospective study of 173 medulloblastoma patients treated at two institutions from 2002 to 2011. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues were available in all the cases and sections were stained to classify histological and molecular subgroups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to investigate prognostic factors. Of 173 patients, there were 118 children and 55 adults, 112 males and 61 females. Estimated 5-year overall survival (OS rates for all patients, children and adults were 52%, 48% and 63%, respectively. After multivariate analysis, postoperative primary radiation therapy (RT and chemotherapy (CHT were revealed as favorable prognostic factors influencing OS and EFS. Postoperative primary chemotherapy (CHT was found significantly improving the survival of children (p<0.001 while it was not a significant prognostic factor for adult patients. Moreover, patients in WNT subtype had better OS (p = 0.028 than others (SHH and Non-SHH/WNT subtypes given postoperative adjuvant therapies. Postoperative primary RT was found to be a strong prognostic factor influencing the survival in all histological and molecular subgroups (p<0.001. Postoperative primary CHT was found significantly to influence the survival of classic medulloblastoma (CMB (OS p<0.001, EFS p<0.001, SHH subgroup (OS p = 0.020, EFS p = 0.049 and WNT subgroup (OS p = 0.003, EFS p = 0.016 but not in desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma (DMB (OS p = 0.361, EFS p = 0.834 and Non-SHH/WNT subgroup (OS p = 0.127, EFS p = 0.055. Our study showed postoperative primary CHT significantly influence the

  7. Etiological Subgroups of Small-for-Gestational-Age: Differential Neurodevelopmental Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuhong Li

    Full Text Available It remains unclear why substantial variations in neurodevelopmental outcomes exist within small-for-gestational-age (SGA children. We prospectively compared 5-y neurodevelopmental outcomes across SGA etiological subgroups.Children born SGA (N = 1050 from U.S. Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (2001-2007 was divided into etiological subgroups by each of 7 well-established prenatal risk factors. We fit linear regression models to compare 5-y reading, math, gross motor and fine motor scores across SGA subgroups, adjusting for socio-demographic confounders.Compared to singleton SGA subgroup, multiple-birth SGA subgroup had lower mean reading (adjusted mean difference, -4.08 [95% confidence interval, -6.10, -2.06] and math (-2.22 [-3.61, -0.84] scores. These disadvantages in reading and math existed only among multiple-birth SGA subgroup without ovulation stimulation (reading, -4.50 [-6.64, -2.36]; math, -2.91 [-4.37, -1.44], but not among those with ovulation stimulation (reading, -2.33 [-6.24, 1.57]; math 0.63 [-1.86, 3.12]. Compared to singleton SGA subgroup without maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain, singleton SGA subgroup with co-occurrence of maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG had lower mean reading (-4.81 [-8.50, -1.12] and math (-2.95 [-5.51, -0.38] scores. These differences were not mediated by Apgar score.Multiple-birth SGA subgroups (vs. singleton SGA or singleton SGA subgroup with co-occurrence of smoking and inadequate GWG (vs. singleton SGA subgroup without maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain have poorer cognitive development up to 5 y.

  8. Rapid, reliable, and reproducible molecular sub-grouping of clinical medulloblastoma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Shih, David J H; Remke, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Kool, Marcel; Hawkins, Cynthia; Eberhart, Charles G; Dubuc, Adrian; Guettouche, Toumy; Cardentey, Yoslayma; Bouffet, Eric; Pomeroy, Scott L; Marra, Marco; Malkin, David; Rutka, James T; Korshunov, Andrey; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of medulloblastoma likely encompasses several distinct entities, with recent evidence for the existence of at least four unique molecular subgroups that exhibit distinct genetic, transcriptional, demographic, and clinical features. Assignment of molecular subgroup through routine profiling of high-quality RNA on expression microarrays is likely impractical in the clinical setting. The planning and execution of medulloblastoma clinical trials that stratify by subgroup, or which are targeted to a specific subgroup requires technologies that can be economically, rapidly, reliably, and reproducibly applied to formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens. In the current study, we have developed an assay that accurately measures the expression level of 22 medulloblastoma subgroup-specific signature genes (CodeSet) using nanoString nCounter Technology. Comparison of the nanoString assay with Affymetrix expression array data on a training series of 101 medulloblastomas of known subgroup demonstrated a high concordance (Pearson correlation r = 0.86). The assay was validated on a second set of 130 non-overlapping medulloblastomas of known subgroup, correctly assigning 98% (127/130) of tumors to the appropriate subgroup. Reproducibility was demonstrated by repeating the assay in three independent laboratories in Canada, the United States, and Switzerland. Finally, the nanoString assay could confidently predict subgroup in 88% of recent FFPE cases, of which 100% had accurate subgroup assignment. We present an assay based on nanoString technology that is capable of rapidly, reliably, and reproducibly assigning clinical FFPE medulloblastoma samples to their molecular subgroup, and which is highly suited for future medulloblastoma clinical trials.

  9. Widespread Positive Selection Drives Differentiation of Centromeric Proteins in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Emily A; Llopart, Ana

    2015-11-25

    Rapid evolution of centromeric satellite repeats is thought to cause compensatory amino acid evolution in interacting centromere-associated kinetochore proteins. Cid, a protein that mediates kinetochore/centromere interactions, displays particularly high amino acid turnover. Rapid evolution of both Cid and centromeric satellite repeats led us to hypothesize that the apparent compensatory evolution may extend to interacting partners in the Condensin I complex (i.e., SMC2, SMC4, Cap-H, Cap-D2, and Cap-G) and HP1s. Missense mutations in these proteins often result in improper centromere formation and aberrant chromosome segregation, thus selection for maintained function and coevolution among proteins of the complex is likely strong. Here, we report evidence of rapid evolution and recurrent positive selection in seven centromere-associated proteins in species of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, and further postulate that positive selection on these proteins could be a result of centromere drive and compensatory changes, with kinetochore proteins competing for optimal spindle attachment.

  10. Identifying Changes in Youth's Subgroup Membership over Time Based on Their Targeted Communication about Substance Use with Parents and Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Using latent class/transition analyses, this study: (a) identified subgroups of youth based on their targeted communication about substance use with parents and friends, (b) examined subgroup differences in substance use, and (c) considered changes in subgroup membership over four years. Among 5,874 youth, five subgroups emerged, with parents-only…

  11. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  12. A new skeletal retention system for retaining anterior open bites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodore Albaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Relapse of anterior open bite after treatment poses a challenge to orthodontists and warrants finding new methods. We aimed to compare the effect of a skeletal retention (SR system to the conventional retention (CR commonly used. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients participated in this study. SR group ten patients (five females and five males with mean age of 16.2 years, CR group ten patients (five females and five males with mean age of 17.1 years in pretreatment stage. The SR system is comprised of four self-drilling miniscrews and vacuum retainers with interarch elastics where the CR group is comprised of removable or fixed retainers. Pretreatment (T1, posttreatment (T2, and 1-year follow up (T3 lateral cephalograms were taken and analyzed to compare the stability of both retention modalities. Results: The overbite in the CR group showed more relapse in the form of significant reduction when compared to the SR group (P < 0.001. The overbite was reduced only by 0.1 mm (±0.3 in the SR group compared to 1.4 mm (±0.9 in the CR group. In the CR group, the upper incisors and first molar showed a more significant relapse compared to the SR group (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Skeletal retention using miniscrews and vertical elastic is an effective method for retention of anterior open bite cases.

  13. Retained Intraabdominal Gossypiboma, Five Years after Bilateral Orchiopexy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem Moslemi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gossypiboma or textiloma is used to describe a retained surgical swab in the body after an operation. Intraabdominal surgical sponge is an uncommon surgical error. The incidence of gossypiboma has been reported as high as 1 in 1000 to 15,000 intraabdominal operations. Gossypiboma may cause serious morbidity and may lead to mortality. Case presentation. Herein, we report a 24 years-old man who was admitted due to the intraabdominal mass after evaluation of primary infertility. He had a surgical history of bilateral abdominal orchiopexy 5 years previously, performed at another hospital. Hydatid cyst was suspected by abdominal computed tomography. After laparotomy excision, the cyst wall opened incidentally, and draining of a large amount of thick pus with retained surgical gauze within the cyst was found, with final diagnosis of gossypiboma. Conclusion. The policy that prevention is far more important than cure is highly appreciated. Accurate sponge and instrument counts, along with radiologic evaluation when a discrepancy is found, can be helpful. Although human errors cannot be completely avoided, continuous medical training and strict adherence to rules of the operation room should reduce the incidence of gossypiboma to a minimum. Surgical sponges should be counted once at the start and twice at the end of all surgical operations.

  14. Salary is not enough to attract and retain the best

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Fuchs Ángeles

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Organizations face the challenge of attracting and retaining talented staff. In some instances, a reference to the existence of a war for talent is made. It is that way that the retention of workers has stopped being managed, exclusively, with the offer of good salaries. This paper explores, in a first instance, the theoretical framework that describes the principal tools of talent retention that companies develop, and that are considered as part of the total remuneration that workers receive: economic compensations, recognition, career plans and staff development, feedback, personal and professional life balance, social network and team making, proper relationship with superiors and organizational climate life. Later, the results that were obtained from interviews with ten of the best companies to work for in Peru, according to the Great Place to Work Institute ranking in 2007, on retaining talent tools that they implement are shown. Finally, conclusions on the case studies are presented.

  15. Self retaining contact lens system for vitreous surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalam Kakarla

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the principle and design of a new self-retaining contact lens system for vitreous surgery. The system has three lenses: the plano-concave, prism and magnifying lens. This system is based on the principle of a direct imaging contact lens, designed for a 150-200mm focal length operating microscope. The contact lenses are designed to have an inferior concave surface [radius of curvature (ROC 7.7mm], modified by the addition of four footplates to provide stability and centration during vitreous surgery. The lenses are used with a drop of viscoelastic material placed between the concave surface of the contact lens and cornea. This induces negative suction and helps retain the lens in position during surgery. These specially designed lenses provide a stable, well-centered, high-resolution, magnified view of the fundus. This system eliminates the need for a skilled assistant or for suturing the lens to the sclera during vitreous surgery.

  16. Chronic Pelvic Pain and Infertility Resulting from Unrecognized Retained Laminaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Nilsson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 2013, the abortion rate in the United States was found to be 200 abortions per 1,000 live births. Of these, the CDC estimates that nearly 49% were performed using unsafe measures. Even when these procedures are safely performed, patients are at risk for immediate or delayed complications. In second-trimester terminations, mechanical dilation with an osmotic dilator is common to allow for delivery of the fetus. The Japanese seaweed Laminaria japonica is used to achieve this purpose. Case. A 28-year-old primigravida presented with chronic pelvic pain and infertility. She had irregular menstrual cycles and reported scant yellow discharge. A transvaginal ultrasound revealed an abnormally appearing endometrium with an elongated structure suspicious for a foreign body. The patient reported a voluntary termination of pregnancy twelve years earlier, for which laminaria were placed prior to the dilation and extraction. She underwent an operative hysteroscopy confirming our suspicion for retained laminaria. The pathology report demonstrated chronic severe endometritis and plant based material. Conclusion. Retained laminaria are associated with chronic pelvic pain and chronic infertility. Since they can be difficult to detect on conventional imaging, proper counting prior to insertion and after removal is an essential physician responsibility.

  17. GPCR genes are preferentially retained after whole genome duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenia Semyonov

    Full Text Available One of the most interesting questions in biology is whether certain pathways have been favored during evolution, and if so, what properties could cause such a preference. Due to the lack of experimental evidence, whether select gene families have been preferentially retained over time after duplication in metazoan organisms remains unclear. Here, by syntenic mapping of nonchemosensory G protein-coupled receptor genes (nGPCRs which represent half the receptome for transmembrane signaling in the vertebrate genomes, we found that, as opposed to the 8-15% retention rate for whole genome duplication (WGD-derived gene duplicates in the entire genome of pufferfish, greater than 27.8% of WGD-derived nGPCRs which interact with a nonpeptide ligand were retained after WGD in pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis. In addition, we show that concurrent duplication of cognate ligand genes by WGD could impose selection of nGPCRs that interact with a polypeptide ligand. Against less than 2.25% probability for parallel retention of a pair of WGD-derived ligands and a pair of cognate receptor duplicates, we found a more than 8.9% retention of WGD-derived ligand-nGPCR pairs--threefold greater than one would surmise. These results demonstrate that gene retention is not uniform after WGD in vertebrates, and suggest a Darwinian selection of GPCR-mediated intercellular communication in metazoan organisms.

  18. Nitroglycerin for Management of Retained Placenta: A Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bullarbo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim was to determine if sequential administration of oxytocin and nitroglycerin is effective for management of retained placenta when performed by obstetricians with no experience of the method. Secondary aims were to examine possible adverse effects of nitroglycerin. One hundred and five women with retained placenta were randomly selected to receive either 1 mg nitroglycerin or placebo tablets sublingually if intravenous oxytocin had failed to expel the placenta. At two of the hospitals some of the midwives were familiar with the use of nitroglycerin. The other midwives and all the participating obstetricians had no clinical experience of the method. In the treatment group, detachment of placenta following nitroglycerin occurred in 37.3% of the women compared to 20.4% in the placebo group (P=0.056. In the two hospitals with some experience of the method, placenta was removed in 9 of 19 (47.4% women in the nitroglycerin group compared to 3 of 17 (15.0% women in the placebo group. No adverse effects of clinical importance were registered. Although the difference between the two groups did not reach statistical significance, the higher success rate in the two hospitals with some experience could indicate that clinical experience is of importance in order to achieve placental detachment.

  19. Heterogeneity in chronic fatigue syndrome - empirically defined subgroups from the PACE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T E; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; White, P D

    2017-06-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is likely to be a heterogeneous condition. Previous studies have empirically defined subgroups using combinations of clinical and biological variables. We aimed to explore the heterogeneity of chronic fatigue syndrome. We used baseline data from the PACE trial, which included 640 participants with chronic fatigue syndrome. Variable reduction, using a combination of clinical knowledge and principal component analyses, produced a final dataset of 26 variables for 541 patients. Latent class analysis was then used to empirically define subgroups. The most statistically significant and clinically recognizable model comprised five subgroups. The largest, 'core' subgroup (33% of participants), had relatively low scores across all domains and good self-efficacy. A further three subgroups were defined by: the presence of mood disorders (21%); the presence of features of other functional somatic syndromes (such as fibromyalgia or irritable bowel syndrome) (21%); or by many symptoms - a group which combined features of both of the above (14%). The smallest 'avoidant-inactive' subgroup was characterized by physical inactivity, belief that symptoms were entirely physical in nature, and fear that they indicated harm (11%). Differences in the severity of fatigue and disability provided some discriminative validation of the subgroups. In addition to providing further evidence for the heterogeneity of chronic fatigue syndrome, the subgroups identified may aid future research into the important aetiological factors of specific subtypes of chronic fatigue syndrome and the development of more personalized treatment approaches.

  20. Quality-of-Life Differences among Diagnostic Subgroups of Children Receiving Ventilating Tubes for Otitis Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Christian Hamilton; Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathological picture may differ considerably between diagnostic subgroups of children with otitis media receiving ventilating tubes. The aims of this study are to investigate differences in quality of life among diagnostic subgroups of children treated with ventilating tubes and to...

  1. Orienting Schools toward Equity: Subgroup Accountability Pressure and School-Level Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    This article examines school-level responses to subgroup accountability pressure through an ethnographic case study of a school cited for failing to make adequate yearly progress for student subgroups. Concerns about the calculations and measures used to derive the citation and reservations about acting on accountability data delegitimized the…

  2. Measuring English Language Workplace Proficiency across Subgroups: Using CFA Models to Validate Test Score Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hanwook; Manna, Venessa F.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the factor structure of the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC®) Listening and Reading test, and its invariance across subgroups of test-takers. The subgroups were defined by (a) gender, (b) age, (c) employment status, (d) time spent studying English, and (e) having lived in a country where English is the…

  3. Latent class analysis derived subgroups of low back pain patients - do they have prognostic capacity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard Nielsen, Anne; Hestbaek, Lise; Vach, Werner

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in patients with low back pain is well recognised and different approaches to subgrouping have been proposed. One statistical technique that is increasingly being used is Latent Class Analysis as it performs subgrouping based on pattern recognition with high accuracy. Pr...

  4. Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity trial: benefits may vary in subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Peter G.; Schmidt, Barbara; Roberts, Robin S.; Doyle, Lex W.; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Haslam, Ross; Sinha, Sunil; Tin, Win; Schmidt, B.; D'Ilario, J.; Cairnie, J.; Dix, J.; Adams, B.; Faber, B.; Callanan, K.; Davis, N.; Duff, J.; Ford, G.; Golec, L.; Lacy, M.; Hohn, D.; Barnett, C.; Goodchildt, L.; Lontis, R.; Fraser, S.; Keng, J.; Saunders, K.; Opie, G.; Kelly, E.; Bairam, A.; Ferland, S.; Laperriere, L.; Bélanger, S.; St Amand, P.; Blayney, M.; Davis, D.; Frank, J.; Lemyre, L.; Solimano, A.; Singh, A.; Chalmers, M.; Ramsay, K.; Synnes, A.; Whitfield, M.; Rogers, M.; Tomlinson, J.; Offringa, M.; Nuytemans, D.; Vermeulen, E.; Kok, J.; van Wassenaer, A.; Arnon, S.; Chalaf, A.; Regev, R.; Netter, I.; Ohlsson, A.; Nesbitt, K.; O'Brien, K.; Hamilton, A. M.; Sankaran, K.; Morgan, S.; Proctor, P.; LaCorte, M.; LeBlanc, P.; Braithwaite, A.; Golan, A.; Barabi, T.; Goldstein, E.; Reynolds, G.; Dromgool, B.; Meskell, S.; McMillan, D.; Schaab, D.; Spellen, L.; Sauve, R.; Christianson, H.; Anseeuw-Deeks, D.; Alvaro, R.; Chiu, A.; Porter, C.; Turner, G.; Moddemann, D.; Granke, N.; Penner, K.; Mulder, T.; Ghys, A.; van der Hoeven, M.; Clarke, M.; Parfitt, J.; MacLean, H.; Nwaesei, C.; Kuhn, L.; Ryan, H.; Saunders, C.; Schulze, A.; Pudenz, P.; Muller, M.; Lagercrantz, H.; Bhiladvala, M.; Legneval, L.; Herlenius, E.; Matthew, D.; Amos, W.; Tulsiani, S.; Tan-Dy, C.; Turner, M.; Shinwell, E.; Levine, R.; Juster-Reicher, A.; Barrington, K.; Kokkotis, T.; Khairy, M.; Grier, P.; Vachon, J.; Tin, W.; Fritz, S.; Walti, H.; Royer, D.; Halliday, H.; Millar, D.; Berry, A.; Mayes, C.; Cummings, C.; Fahnenstich, H.; Philipp, K.; Tillmann, B.; Weber, P.; Canning, R.; Wariyar, U.; Embleton, N.; Bucher, H.-U.; Fauchere, J.-C.; Pfister, R.; Launoy, V.; Huppi, P.; Poets, C.; Urschitz-Duprat, P.; Davis, P.; Doyle, L. W.; Gent, M.; Fraser, W.; Hey, E.; Perlman, M.; Thorpe, K.; Gray, S.; Roberts, R. S.; Chambers, C.; Costantini, L.; McGean, L.; Scapinello, L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the benefits of caffeine vary in three subgroups of 2006 participants in the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity (CAP) trial. STUDY DESIGN: Post-hoc subgroup analyses were performed on the basis of: (1) indication for commencement of study drug: treat apnea, prevent

  5. Nilpotency and Theory of L-Subgroups of an L-Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Ajmal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the notion of commutator is modified and extended to L-setting. Also, the notion of descending central series is introduced which is used to formulate the important notion of nilpotent L-subgroup of an L-group. Moreover, the level subset characterization for the notion of nilpotent L-subgroup is provided.

  6. Subgrouping of Readers Based on Performance Measures: A Latent Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2010-01-01

    By using latent profile analysis eight stable and interpretable subgroups of readers were identified. The basis for subgrouping was different performance measures with four aspects of reading in focus: reading of continuous texts, reading of document texts, word reading and reading speed. Participants were 9-year-old Swedish students included in…

  7. Strong nonlinear oscillators analytical solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2017-01-01

    This book outlines an analytical solution procedure of the pure nonlinear oscillator system, offering a solution for free and forced vibrations of the one-degree-of-freedom strong nonlinear system with constant and time variable parameter. Includes exercises.

  8. Compactons in strongly nonlinear lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Ahnert, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, we study wave phenomena in strongly nonlinear lattices. Such lattices are characterized by the absence of classical linear waves. We demonstrate that compactons – strongly localized solitary waves with tails decaying faster than exponential – exist and that they play a major role in the dynamics of the system under consideration. We investigate compactons in different physical setups. One part deals with lattices of dispersively coupled limit cycle oscillators which find ...

  9. Identification of subgroups of patients with low back pain using Latent Class Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Mølgaard

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major global health problem but the evidence base available to inform clinical decision making and to provide prognostic information to patients, is less than ideal. Therefore, there is a need for further knowledge about this largely non‐specific condition. Within...... questionnaire and the clinicians’ findings on a standardised examination of the low back. By using pattern recognition, subgroups of patients were identified within which their responses and scores are similar, and therefore the patients are more alike within the subgroups than across the subgroups. Latent...... in the outcomes, their prognostic capacity was as high or higher than two existing subgrouping tools (STarT Back Tool and Quebec Task Force Classification), and three baseline characteristics (LBP intensity, leg pain intensity and pain‐related disability). In contrast, the novel subgroupings had a lower...

  10. Valid randomization-based p-values for partially post hoc subgroup analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph J; Rubin, Donald B

    2015-10-30

    By 'partially post-hoc' subgroup analyses, we mean analyses that compare existing data from a randomized experiment-from which a subgroup specification is derived-to new, subgroup-only experimental data. We describe a motivating example in which partially post hoc subgroup analyses instigated statistical debate about a medical device's efficacy. We clarify the source of such analyses' invalidity and then propose a randomization-based approach for generating valid posterior predictive p-values for such partially post hoc subgroups. Lastly, we investigate the approach's operating characteristics in a simple illustrative setting through a series of simulations, showing that it can have desirable properties under both null and alternative hypotheses. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A method for identifying genetic heterogeneity within phenotypically defined disease subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liley, James; Todd, John A; Wallace, Chris

    2017-02-01

    Many common diseases show wide phenotypic variation. We present a statistical method for determining whether phenotypically defined subgroups of disease cases represent different genetic architectures, in which disease-associated variants have different effect sizes in two subgroups. Our method models the genome-wide distributions of genetic association statistics with mixture Gaussians. We apply a global test without requiring explicit identification of disease-associated variants, thus maximizing power in comparison to standard variant-by-variant subgroup analysis. Where evidence for genetic subgrouping is found, we present methods for post hoc identification of the contributing genetic variants. We demonstrate the method on a range of simulated and test data sets, for which expected results are already known. We investigate subgroups of individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) defined by autoantibody positivity, establishing evidence for differential genetic architecture with positivity for thyroid-peroxidase-specific antibody, driven generally by variants in known T1D-associated genomic regions.

  12. How does unemployment affect self-assessed health? A systematic review focusing on subgroup effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norström, Fredrik; Virtanen, Pekka; Hammarström, Anne; Gustafsson, Per E; Janlert, Urban

    2014-12-22

    Almost all studies on the effect on health from unemployment have concluded that unemployment is bad for your health. However, only a few review articles have dealt with this relation in recent years, and none of them have focused on the analysis of subgroups such as age, gender, and marital status. The objective of our article is to review how unemployment relates to self-assessed health with a focus on its effect on subgroups. A search was performed in Web of Science to find articles that measured the effect on health from unemployment. The selection of articles was limited to those written in English, consisting of original data, and published in 2003 or later. Our definition of health was restricted to self-assessed health. Mortality- and morbidity-related measurements were therefore not included in our analysis. For the 41 articles included, information about health measurements, employment status definitions, other factors included in the statistical analysis, study design (including study population), and statistical method were collected with the aim of analysing the results on both the population and factor level. Most of the studies in our review showed a negative effect on health from unemployment on a population basis. Results at the factor levels were most common for gender (25 articles), age (11 articles), geographic location (8 articles), and education level (5 articles). The analysis showed that there was a health effect for gender, age, education level, household income, and geographic location. However, this effect differed between studies and no clear pattern on who benefits or suffers more among these groups could be determined. The result instead seemed to depend on the study context. The only clear patterns of association found were for socioeconomic status (manual workers suffer more), reason for unemployment (being unemployed due to health reasons is worse), and social network (a strong network is beneficial). Unemployment affects groups of

  13. Individualizing antipsychotic treatment selection in schizophrenia: characteristics of empirically derived patient subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, C U; Cañas, F; Larmo, I; Levy, P; Montes, J-M; Fagiolini, A; Papageorgiou, G; Rossi, A; Sturlason, R; Zink, M

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotic drugs is frequently sub-optimal. One reason for this may be heterogeneity between patients with schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to identify patient, disease and treatment attributes that are important for physicians in choosing an antipsychotic drug, and to identify empirically subgroups of patients who may respond differentially to antipsychotic drugs. The survey was conducted by structured interview of 744 randomly-selected psychiatrists in four European countries who recruited 3996 patients with schizophrenia. Information on 39 variables was collected. Multiple component analysis was used to identify dimensions that explained the variance between patients. Three axes, accounting for 99% of the variance, were associated with disease severity (64%), socioeconomic status (27%) and patient autonomy (8%). These dimensions discriminated between six discrete patient subgroups, identified using ascending hierarchical classification analysis. The six subgroups differed regarding educational level, illness severity, autonomy, symptom presentation, addictive behaviors, comorbidities and cardiometabolic risk factors. Subgroup 1 patients had moderately severe physician-rated disease and addictive behaviours (23.2%); Subgroup 2 patients were well-integrated and autonomous with mild to moderate disease (6.7%); Subgroup 3 patients were less well-integrated with mild to moderate disease, living alone (11.2%); Subgroup 4 patients were women with low education levels (5.4%), Subgroup 5 patients were young men with severe disease (36.8%); and Subgroup 6 patients were poorly-integrated with moderately severe disease, needing caregiver support (16.7%). The presence of these subgroups, which require confirmation and extension regarding potentially identifiable biological markers, may help individualizing treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment effect heterogeneity for univariate subgroups in clinical trials: Shrinkage, standardization, or else.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Treatment effect heterogeneity is a well-recognized phenomenon in randomized controlled clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss subgroup analyses with prespecified subgroups of clinical or biological importance. We explore various alternatives to the naive (the traditional univariate) subgroup analyses to address the issues of multiplicity and confounding. Specifically, we consider a model-based Bayesian shrinkage (Bayes-DS) and a nonparametric, empirical Bayes shrinkage approach (Emp-Bayes) to temper the optimism of traditional univariate subgroup analyses; a standardization approach (standardization) that accounts for correlation between baseline covariates; and a model-based maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach. The Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes methods model the variation in subgroup-specific treatment effect rather than testing the null hypothesis of no difference between subgroups. The standardization approach addresses the issue of confounding in subgroup analyses. The MLE approach is considered only for comparison in simulation studies as the "truth" since the data were generated from the same model. Using the characteristics of a hypothetical large outcome trial, we perform simulation studies and articulate the utilities and potential limitations of these estimators. Simulation results indicate that Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes can protect against optimism present in the naïve approach. Due to its simplicity, the naïve approach should be the reference for reporting univariate subgroup-specific treatment effect estimates from exploratory subgroup analyses. Standardization, although it tends to have a larger variance, is suggested when it is important to address the confounding of univariate subgroup effects due to correlation between baseline covariates. The Bayes-DS approach is available as an R package (DSBayes). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Treatment effect heterogeneity for univariate subgroups in clinical trials: Shrinkage, standardization, or else

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Treatment effect heterogeneity is a well-recognized phenomenon in randomized controlled clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss subgroup analyses with prespecified subgroups of clinical or biological importance. We explore various alternatives to the naive (the traditional univariate) subgroup analyses to address the issues of multiplicity and confounding. Specifically, we consider a model-based Bayesian shrinkage (Bayes-DS) and a nonparametric, empirical Bayes shrinkage approach (Emp-Bayes) to temper the optimism of traditional univariate subgroup analyses; a standardization approach (standardization) that accounts for correlation between baseline covariates; and a model-based maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach. The Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes methods model the variation in subgroup-specific treatment effect rather than testing the null hypothesis of no difference between subgroups. The standardization approach addresses the issue of confounding in subgroup analyses. The MLE approach is considered only for comparison in simulation studies as the “truth” since the data were generated from the same model. Using the characteristics of a hypothetical large outcome trial, we perform simulation studies and articulate the utilities and potential limitations of these estimators. Simulation results indicate that Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes can protect against optimism present in the naïve approach. Due to its simplicity, the naïve approach should be the reference for reporting univariate subgroup-specific treatment effect estimates from exploratory subgroup analyses. Standardization, although it tends to have a larger variance, is suggested when it is important to address the confounding of univariate subgroup effects due to correlation between baseline covariates. The Bayes-DS approach is available as an R package (DSBayes). PMID:26485117

  16. Oscillations of Magnetic Fluid Column in Strong Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, V. M.; Storozhenko, A. M.; Platonov, V. B.; Lobova, O. V.; Ryapolov, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the results of measuring the elastic parameters (ponderomotive elasticity coefficient, oscillation frequency, attenuation coefficient) of the oscillatory system with an inertial element that is a magnetic fluid column retained in a tube due to magnetic levitation in a strong magnetic field. Elasticity is provided by the ponderomotive force which affects the upper and lower thin layers of the fluid column. Measurement results of vibration parameters of the oscillatory system can be useful for the investigations of magnetophoresis and aggregation of nanoparticles in magnetic fluids.

  17. Milk hydrolysis products may retain their allergenic reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Barkholt, Vibeke; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    was to investigate some extensively hydrolyzed milk whey products for their ability to retain sensitizing and reacting activity in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model. Method: BN rats were immunized i.p. three times without the use of adjuvant with 200 µg of either PBS (control), intact β-lactoglobulin (BLG), enzyme...... and PEPTIGEN had no sensitizing capacity. However, antibodies from all rats immunized with the intact BLG could still react with both hydrolyzed BLG and PEPTIGEN in a manner that was statistically significant. Conclusion: The extensively hydrolyzed milk whey products investigated in this study showed......Background: Milk allergy is one of the most common allergies in small children. Extensively hydrolyzed milk formulas are therefore an important source of nutrients for infants being predisposed for allergy and not being breastfeed and to infants with cows milk allergy. The aim of this study...

  18. Video endoscopy: removal of retained sewing needles from the duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajbhiye, Ashok S; Gajbhiye, Raj N; Tirupude, Bhupesh H; Bajaj, Prasang P; Gupta, Tarush H

    2013-06-01

    We report an interesting case of a 21-year-old unmarried girl who swallowed six sewing needles. Her complaints were pain in the epigastrium, associated with nausea and vomiting. On examination, there was mild tenderness in the epigastrium. X-ray of the abdomen and endoscopy confirmed the presence of six needles in the duodenum, with tips lodged in the duodenal wall. Psychiatric opinion was sought which was normal. Under video endoscope (Pentax 2.8, EG 27708) guidance with Captura biopsy forceps without spikes (Cook DBF-2.4-160-S), six sewing needles were removed successfully from the duodenum through the endoscope channel without any complications. However, a video endoscopic removal of the retained six needles from duodenum is probably being reported for the first time.

  19. Implant-retained finger prosthesis with modified retention system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Amoroso, Andressa Paschoal; Gennari Filho, Humberto; Dekon, Stefan Fiuza de Carvalho

    2013-08-01

    Amputations affect both the physical and the psychological aspects of an individual, causing significant impact on self-esteem. The main causes of finger amputations are work-related accidents with dangerous machinery, road traffic accidents, and animal bites, as well as systemic diseases such as diabetes. This report aims to describe a simple technique for fabrication of implant-retained finger prosthesis with a modified base of the retention system. The O-Ring retention system was used with a modified hexagon-shaped base and a metallic capsule adapted to the acrylic resin to attach the prosthesis to the implant. The prosthesis was made with silicone, and after osseointegration, it was installed without complications, leading to a patient satisfied with the end result and encouraged to return to social life. Restoring self-esteem in the patient and static and functional rehabilitation.

  20. Transorbital Stab Injury with Retained Knife: A Narrow Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asim Rana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transorbital penetrating injuries are unusual but may cause severe brain damage if cranium is entered. These kinds of injuries are dangerous as the walls of orbit are very thin, hence easily broken by the otherwise innocent objects. Because of the very critical anatomical area involved, these injuries pose a serious challenge to the physicians who first receive them as well as the treating team. These may present as trivial trauma or may be occult and are often associated with serious complications and delayed sequel. Prompt evaluation by utilizing best diagnostic modality available and timely interference to remove them are the key aspects to avoid damage to vital organs surrounding the injury and to minimize the late complications. We report a case of transorbital assault with a 13 centimeter long knife which got broken from the handle and the blade was retained. The interesting aspect is that there was no neurological deficit on presentation or after removal.

  1. Apparatus and Process for Controlled Nanomanufacturing Using Catalyst Retaining Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the controlled fabrication of nanostructures using catalyst retaining structures is disclosed. The apparatus includes one or more modified force microscopes having a nanotube attached to the tip portion of the microscopes. An electric current is passed from the nanotube to a catalyst layer of a substrate, thereby causing a localized chemical reaction to occur in a resist layer adjacent the catalyst layer. The region of the resist layer where the chemical reaction occurred is etched, thereby exposing a catalyst particle or particles in the catalyst layer surrounded by a wall of unetched resist material. Subsequent chemical vapor deposition causes growth of a nanostructure to occur upward through the wall of unetched resist material having controlled characteristics of height and diameter and, for parallel systems, number density.

  2. Transformation of retained austenite in carburized 4320 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, R. W.; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    1991-07-01

    A systematic study of stress-induced and thermal-induced transformation of retained austenite in carburized 4320 steel with an initial retained austenite of 35 pct has been conducted. The transformation was monitored by recording the change in volume of smooth fatigue specimens. Stress-induced transformation was studied by conducting monotonic and cyclic tests at temperatures in the range from 22 °C to 150 °C. The volumetric transformation strain was as large as 0.006 at 22 °C. The anisotropy of the transformation was such that the axial transformation strain component exceeded the diametral transformation strain component by a factor of 1.4. Thermal-induced transformation was investigated with temperature stepup tests in the range from 150 °C to 255 °C at constant stress (-500 MPa, 0 MPa, and 500 MPa) and with static tests where temperature was held constant at zero load. The maximum thermal-induced volumetric transformation strain of 0.006 was independent of stress. However, the anisotropy of the transformation strain components was dependent on stress direction and magnitude. An axial tensile stress increased the axial transformation strain relative to the diametral transformation strain. The influence of low-temperature creep (T = 150 °C) on the anisotropy of strains is noted. The differences between stress-induced and thermal-induced transformation mechanisms are discussed. Thermal-induced transformation primarily occurred at temperatures between 100 °C and 200 °C, with the rate of transformation increasing with temperature, while the stress-induced transformation primarily occurred at 22 °C, with the rate of transformation decreasing with increasing temperature. There was no stress-induced transformation above 60 °C.

  3. Chromosomal phylogeny of the Drosophila fasciola species subgroup revisited (Diptera, Drosophilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilda Maria Diniz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of polytene chromosomes in 26 strains of seven species in the Drosophila fasciola subgroup, from several locations in Brazil, in addition to strains of two species belonging to the Drosophila mulleri subgroup (D. aldrichi and D. mulleri, enabled us to determine that the 3c inversion found in the latter species differ in one of its break points from that present in the species of the fasciola subgroup. Therefore, a change in the mulleri complex denomination from inversion 3c to inversion 3u is proposed. Accordingly, the fasciola subgroup is no longer a lesser phylogenetic part within the mulleri subgroup. Rather, it is directly related to the likely ancestor of the repleta group, called Primitive I. This information removes the main obstacle to considering the Drosophila fasciola subgroup as an ancestral group within the Drosophila repleta species group, according to the hypothesis of Throckmorton. Our data also support the conclusion that D. onca and D. carolinae are closely related species based on one new inversion in chromosome 4 (4f², in both species. D. fascioloides and D. ellisoni also form a pair of sister species based on the presence of fusions of chromosomes 2-4 and 3-5. D. rosinae is related only to the likely ancestor of the fasciola subgroup, where the 3c inversion was fixed.

  4. Supernova forecast with strong lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Yudai

    2018-02-01

    In the coming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope era, we will observe O(100) of lensed supernovae (SNe). In this paper, we investigate the possibility for predicting time and sky position of an SN using strong lensing. We find that it will be possible to predict the time and position of the fourth image of SNe which produce four images by strong lensing, with combined information from the three previous images. It is useful to perform multimessenger observations of the very early phase of SN explosions including the shock breakout.

  5. Long-term effectiveness of canine-to-canine bonded flexible spiral wire lingual retainers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, Anne-Marie; Renkema, Alianne; Bronkhorst, Ewald; Katsaros, Christos

    Introduction: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) canine-to-canine lingual retainer bonded to all 6 anterior teeth is a frequently used type of mandibular fixed retainer. This study aimed to assess the long-term effectiveness of FSW canine-to-canine lingual retainers in maintaining the alignment of the

  6. Effectiveness of lingual retainers bonded to the canines in preventing mandibular incisor relapse.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, A.M.; Al-Assad, S.; Bronkhorst, E.; Weindel, S.; Katsaros, C.; Lisson, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A retainer bonded to the lingual surfaces of the mandibular canines (3-3 retainer) is a widely used type of retention. Our aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of the 3-3 mandibular lingual stainless steel retainer to prevent relapse of the orthodontic treatment in the

  7. 41 CFR 102-42.25 - Who retains custody of gifts and decorations pending disposal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who retains custody of..., Handling and Disposition § 102-42.25 Who retains custody of gifts and decorations pending disposal? (a) The employing agency retains custody of gifts and decorations that employees have expressed an interest in...

  8. Fabrication of a screw-retained fixed provisional prosthesis supported by dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kökat, Ali Murat; Akça, Kivanç

    2004-03-01

    Screw-retained provisional implant-supported prostheses may have advantages over cement-retained prostheses in certain situations. This article describes a technique for fabrication of screw-retained provisional acrylic resin implant-supported prostheses from the modified metal components provided with the implant.

  9. Retained second twin: experience from from Ile-Ife, Nigeria | Ezechi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Retained second twin contributes significantly to perinatal morbidity and mortality, as well as maternal morbidity and mortality, usually arising as a result of intervention to salvage the retained foetus. Objective: To review the current incidence, management, fate and outcome of both the retained foetus and its ...

  10. Veterans Health Administration: Actions Needed to Better Recruit and Retain Clinical and Administrative Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Actions Needed to Better Recruit and Retain Clinical and Administrative Staff Statement of...the Subcommittee on Health, Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, House of Representatives. March 22, 2017 VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Actions...Needed to Better Recruit and Retain Clinical and Administrative Staff What GAO Found Challenges in recruiting and retaining both clinical and human

  11. 9 CFR 310.3 - Carcasses and parts in certain instances to be retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carcasses and parts in certain instances to be retained. 310.3 Section 310.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... retained by the Program employee at the time of inspection. The identity of every such retained carcass...

  12. Retained placenta in Friesian mares : incidence, risk factors, therapy, and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevinga, M; Hesselink, JW; Barkema, H.W.

    2001-01-01

    This study concerns incidence, risk factors, therapy and consequences of retained placenta after normal foalings in Friesian mares. Retained placenta was defined as failure to expel all fetal membranes within 3 hours after the delivery of the foal. Incidence of retained placenta was studied in 495

  13. Unravelling offending in schizophrenia: factors characterising subgroups of offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Josanne; Buck, Nicole; Van Marle, Hjalmar

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have led to suggestions that there are at least three sub-types of offenders with schizophrenia, but these have not previously been examined simultaneously in one sample. The aims of this study were to investigate categorisation of offenders with psychosis as early or late starters or late first offenders, and test the hypotheses that, compared with non-offenders with psychosis, early starters would be characterised by low educational or occupational achievement, negative childhood experiences and early substance use, whereas positive psychotic symptoms would characterise late starters or late first offenders. A retrospective file study was conducted, yielding 97 early starters, 100 late starters and 26 late first offenders identified from a specialist inpatient forensic mental health assessment service and 129 non-offenders identified from general psychiatric services in the same geographic region, all with schizophreniform psychoses. We found little difference between early and later starters in terms of measured antecedents, but substance misuse was up to 20 times less likely among late first offenders. Persecutory and/or grandiose delusions were more strongly associated with each offender group compared with non-offenders, most so with late first offenders. Our findings underscore the importance of treating delusions--for safety as well as health. Childhood antecedents may be less important indicators of offender sub-types among people with psychosis than previously thought. When patients present with grandiose or persecutory delusions over the age of 35 years without co-morbid substance misuse disorders, but with a history of childhood neglect and low educational achievement, particular care should be taken to assess risk of violence. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Generators for the l-torsion subgroup of Jacobians of Genus Two Curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnshøj, Christian Robenhagen

    2008-01-01

    We give an explicit description of the matrix representation of the Frobenius endomorphism on the Jacobian of a genus two curve on the subgroup of l-torsion points. By using this description, we can describe the matrix representation of the Weil-pairing on the subgroup of l-torsion points...... explicitly. Finally, the explicit description of the Weil-pairing provides us with an efficient, probabilistic algorithm to find generators of the subgroup of l-torsion points on the Jacobian of a genus two curve....

  15. Debate: Subgroup analyses in clinical trials: fun to look at - but don't believe them!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sleight Peter

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysis of subgroup results in a clinical trial is surprisingly unreliable, even in a large trial. This is the result of a combination of reduced statistical power, increased variance and the play of chance. Reliance on such analyses is likely to be more erroneous, and hence harmful, than application of the overall proportional (or relative result in the whole trial to the estimate of absolute risk in that subgroup. Plausible explanations can usually be found for effects that are, in reality, simply due to the play of chance. When clinicians believe such subgroup analyses, there is a real danger of harm to the individual patient.

  16. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, David; Senatore, Gaetano

    2009-05-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS), held from 29 July-2 August 2008 at the University of Camerino. Camerino is an ancient hill-top town located in the Apennine mountains of Italy, 200 kilometres northeast of Rome, with a university dating back to 1336. The Camerino conference was the 11th in a series which started in 1977: 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (hosted by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (hosted by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, New York, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) 2005: Moscow, Russia (hosted by Vladimir E Fortov and Vladimir Vorob'ev). The name of the series was changed in 1996 from Strongly Coupled Plasmas to Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems to reflect a wider range of topics. 'Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems' encompasses diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. The purpose of the conferences is to provide a regular international forum for the presentation and discussion of research achievements and ideas relating to a variety of plasma, liquid and condensed matter systems that are dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphases that have followed new discoveries and new techniques. The field has continued to see new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions, most recently in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas

  17. Strong Decomposition of Random Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Jørgensen, Jørgen; Kagan, Abram M.; Pitt, Loren D.

    2007-01-01

    A random variable X is stongly decomposable if X=Y+Z where Y=Φ(X) and Z=X-Φ(X) are independent non-degenerated random variables (called the components). It is shown that at least one of the components is singular, and we derive a necessary and sufficient condition for strong decomposability...... of a discrete random variable....

  18. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting ... representation for the two-point functions, anticipating the QCD sum rules. The latter are obtained ... resentation of SU(2)V. In particular, if they belong to the adjoint (triplet) representation, such as the vector and ...

  19. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting particles as they move through a heat bath. The first one is the general method of chiral perturbation theory, which may be readily applied to this problem. The other is the method of thermal QCD sum rules.

  20. Strong gravitational lensing with SKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, LVE; Browne, IWA; Jackson, NJ

    2004-01-01

    The advent of new observational facilities in the last two decades has allowed the rapid discovery and high-resolution optical imaging of many strong lens systems from galaxy to cluster scales, as well as their spectroscopic follow-up. Radio telescopes have played the dominant role in the systematic

  1. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.L. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Burdman, G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Chivukula, R.S. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  2. Strong tissue glue with tunable elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmansky, Regina; McAlvin, Brian J; Nyska, Abraham; Dohlman, Jenny C; Chiang, Homer H; Hashimoto, Michinao; Kohane, Daniel S; Mizrahi, Boaz

    2017-04-15

    Many bio-adhesive materials adhere weakly to tissue due to their high water content and weak structural integrity. Others provide desirable adhesive strength but suffer from rigid structure and lack of elasticity after administration. We have developed two water-free, liquid four-armed PEG pre-polymers modified with NHS or with NH 2 end groups which upon mixing changed from liquids to an elastic solid. The sealant and adhesive properties increased with the amount of the %v/v PEG 4 -NHS pre-polymer, and achieved adhesive properties comparable to those of cyanoacrylate glues. All mixtures showed minimal cytotoxicity in vitro. Mixtures of 90%v/v PEG 4 -NHS were retained in the subcutaneous space in vivo for up to 14days with minimal inflammation. This material's combination of desirable mechanical properties and biocompatibility has potential in numerous biomedical applications. Many bio-adhesive materials adhere weakly to tissue (e.g. hydrogels) due to their high water content and weak structural integrity. Others provide desirable mechanical properties but suffer from poor biocompatibility (e.g. cyanoacrylates). This study proposes a new concept for the formation of super strong and tunable tissue glues. Our bio-materials' enhanced performance is the product of new neat (without water or other solvents) liquid polymers that solidify after administration while allowing interactions with the tissue. Moreover, the elastic modulus of these materials could easily be tuned without compromising biocompatibility. This system could be an attractive alternative to sutures and staples since it can be applied more quickly, causes less pain and may require less equipment while maintaining the desired adhesion strength. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Subgroup analysis of telehealthcare for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the cluster-randomized Danish Telecare North Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witt Udsen F

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Flemming Witt Udsen,1 Pernille H Lilholt,2 Ole K Hejlesen,2 Lars H Ehlers1 1Danish Centre for Healthcare Improvements, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; 2Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Purpose: Results from the Danish cluster-randomized trial of telehealthcare to 1,225 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the Danish Telecare North Trial, concluded that the telehealthcare solution was unlikely to be cost-effective, by applying international willingness-to-pay threshold values. The purpose of this article was to assess potential sources of variation across subgroups, which could explain overall cost-effectiveness results or be utilized in future economic studies in telehealthcare research. Methods: First, the cost-structures and cost-effectiveness across COPD severities were analyzed. Second, five additional subgroup analyses were conducted, focusing on differences in cost-effectiveness across a set of comorbidities, age-groups, genders, resource patterns (resource use in the social care sector prior to randomization, and delivery sites. All subgroups were ­investigated post hoc. In analyzing cost-effectiveness, two separate linear mixed-effects models with treatment-by-covariate interactions were applied: one for quality-adjusted life-year (QALY gain and one for total healthcare and social sector costs. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used for each subgroup result in order to quantify the uncertainty around the cost-effectiveness results. Results: The study concludes that, across the COPD severities, patients with severe COPD (GOLD 3 classification are likely to be the most cost-effective group. This is primarily due to lower hospital-admission and primary-care costs. Telehealthcare for patients younger than 60 years is also more likely to be cost-effective than for older COPD patients. Overall, results indicate that existing resource patterns of patients and

  4. Phylogenomic analysis of proteins that are distinctive of Archaea and its main subgroups and the origin of methanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Radhey S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Archaea are highly diverse in terms of their physiology, metabolism and ecology. Presently, very few molecular characteristics are known that are uniquely shared by either all archaea or the different main groups within archaea. The evolutionary relationships among different groups within the Euryarchaeota branch are also not clearly understood. Results We have carried out comprehensive analyses on each open reading frame (ORFs in the genomes of 11 archaea (3 Crenarchaeota – Aeropyrum pernix, Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius; 8 Euryarchaeota – Pyrococcus abyssi, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanopyrus kandleri, Methanococcoides burtonii, Halobacterium sp. NCR-1, Haloquadratum walsbyi, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Picrophilus torridus to search for proteins that are unique to either all Archaea or for its main subgroups. These studies have identified 1448 proteins or ORFs that are distinctive characteristics of Archaea and its various subgroups and whose homologues are not found in other organisms. Six of these proteins are unique to all Archaea, 10 others are only missing in Nanoarchaeum equitans and a large number of other proteins are specific for various main groups within the Archaea (e.g. Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Sulfolobales and Desulfurococcales, Halobacteriales, Thermococci, Thermoplasmata, all methanogenic archaea or particular groups of methanogens. Of particular importance is the observation that 31 proteins are uniquely present in virtually all methanogens (including M. kandleri and 10 additional proteins are only found in different methanogens as well as A. fulgidus. In contrast, no protein was exclusively shared by various methanogen and any of the Halobacteriales or Thermoplasmatales. These results strongly indicate that all methanogenic archaea form a monophyletic group exclusive of other archaea and that this lineage likely evolved from Archaeoglobus. In addition, 15 proteins

  5. Antineutrophil antibodies define clinical and genetic subgroups in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hov, Johannes R; Boberg, Kirsten M; Taraldsrud, Eli; Vesterhus, Mette; Boyadzhieva, Maria; Solberg, Inger Camilla; Schrumpf, Erik; Vatn, Morten H; Lie, Benedicte A; Molberg, Øyvind; Karlsen, Tom H

    2017-03-01

    The strongest genetic risk factors in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are encoded in the HLA complex. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been reported in up to 94% of PSC patients, but their clinical significance and immunogenetic basis are ill defined. We aimed to characterize clinical and genetic associations of ANCA in PSC. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were analysed with indirect immunofluorescence in 241 Norwegian PSC patients. HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed in the patients and in 368 healthy controls. Data on perinuclear ANCA (pANCA) and HLA-DRB1 were available from 274 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients without known liver disease. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were found in 193 (80%) of the PSC patients, with pANCA in 169 (70%). ANCA-positive patients were younger than ANCA negative at diagnosis of PSC and had a lower frequency of biliary cancer (9% vs 19%, P=.047). There were no differences between PSC patients with and without inflammatory bowel disease. Genetically, the strong PSC risk factors HLA-B*08 (frequency in healthy 13%) and DRB1*03 (14%) were more prevalent in ANCA-positive than -negative patients (43% vs 25%, P=.0012 and 43% vs 25%, P=.0015 respectively). The results were similar when restricting the analysis to pANCA-positive patients. In UC patients without liver disease, HLA-DRB1*03 was more prevalent in pANCA-positive compared with -negative patients (P=.03). Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies identified PSC patients with particular clinical and genetic characteristics, suggesting that ANCA may mark a clinically relevant pathogenetic subgroup in the PSC-UC disease spectrum. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. On the use of genetic programming for mining comprehensible rules in subgroup discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, José María; Romero, José Raúl; Romero, Cristóbal; Ventura, Sebastián

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel grammar-guided genetic programming algorithm for subgroup discovery. This algorithm, called comprehensible grammar-based algorithm for subgroup discovery (CGBA-SD), combines the requirements of discovering comprehensible rules with the ability to mine expressive and flexible solutions owing to the use of a context-free grammar. Each rule is represented as a derivation tree that shows a solution described using the language denoted by the grammar. The algorithm includes mechanisms to adapt the diversity of the population by self-adapting the probabilities of recombination and mutation. We compare the approach with existing evolutionary and classic subgroup discovery algorithms. CGBA-SD appears to be a very promising algorithm that discovers comprehensible subgroups and behaves better than other algorithms as measures by complexity, interest, and precision indicate. The results obtained were validated by means of a series of nonparametric tests.

  7. Team negotiation: social, epistemic, economic, and psychological consequences of subgroup conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Nir

    2008-12-01

    Large collectives (e.g., organizations, political parties, nations) are seldom unitary players. Rather, they consist of different subgroups that often have conflicting interests. Nonetheless, negotiation research consistently regards negotiating teams, who represent these collectives, as monolithic parties with uniform interests. This article integrates concepts from social psychology, management, political science, and behavioral game theory to explore the effects of subgroup conflict on team negotiation. Specifically, the present research introduced a conflict of interests within negotiating teams and investigated how this internal conflict affects the outcome of the negotiation between teams. An experiment with 80 four-person teams found that conflict between subgroups had a detrimental effect on the performance of negotiating teams. This research also employed a recent model of motivated information processing in groups to investigate possible processes underlying the effect of subgroup conflict on team negotiation.

  8. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in subgroups of patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoeksma, H.L; Dekker, J; Ronday, H.K; Breedveld, F.C; Ende, van den, C.H.M

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. METHODS...

  9. Effects of hydroxyethyl starch in subgroups of patients with severe sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Rasmus G; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    It has been speculated that certain subgroups of sepsis patients may benefit from treatment with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.42, specifically in the earlier resuscitation of patients with more severely impaired circulation....

  10. Twelve-year trends in health insurance coverage among Latinos, by subgroup and immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N Sarita; Carrasquillo, Olveen

    2006-01-01

    We examine twelve-year trends in the Latino uninsured population by ethnic subgroup and immigration status. From 1993 to 1999, most Latino subgroups, particularly Puerto Ricans, had large decreases in Medicaid coverage. For some subgroups these were offset by increases in employer coverage, but not for Mexicans, resulting in a four-percentage-point increase in their uninsured population. During 2000-2004, Medicaid/SCHIP expansions benefited most subgroups and mitigated smaller losses in employer coverage. However, during 1993-2004, the percentage of noncitizen Latinos lacking coverage increased by several percentage points. This was attributable to Medicaid losses during 1993-1999 and losses in employer coverage during 2000-2004.

  11. Identification of atopic dermatitis subgroups in children from two longitudinal birth cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Savenije, Olga E M; Heron, Jon; Evans, David M; Vonk, Judith M; Brunekreef, Bert; Wijga, Alet H; Henderson, A John; Koppelman, Gerard H; Brown, Sara J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a prevalent disease with variable natural history. Longitudinal birth cohort studies provide an opportunity to define subgroups based on disease trajectories, which may represent different genetic and environmental pathomechanisms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the

  12. Novel molecular subgroups for clinical classification and outcome prediction in childhood medulloblastoma: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Edward C; Lindsey, Janet C; Nakjang, Sirintra; Crosier, Stephen; Smith, Amanda J; Hicks, Debbie; Rafiee, Gholamreza; Hill, Rebecca M; Iliasova, Alice; Stone, Thomas; Pizer, Barry; Michalski, Antony; Joshi, Abhijit; Wharton, Stephen B; Jacques, Thomas S; Bailey, Simon; Williamson, Daniel; Clifford, Steven C

    2017-07-01

    International consensus recognises four medulloblastoma molecular subgroups: WNT (MBWNT), SHH (MBSHH), group 3 (MBGrp3), and group 4 (MBGrp4), each defined by their characteristic genome-wide transcriptomic and DNA methylomic profiles. These subgroups have distinct clinicopathological and molecular features, and underpin current disease subclassification and initial subgroup-directed therapies that are underway in clinical trials. However, substantial biological heterogeneity and differences in survival are apparent within each subgroup, which remain to be resolved. We aimed to investigate whether additional molecular subgroups exist within childhood medulloblastoma and whether these could be used to improve disease subclassification and prognosis predictions. In this retrospective cohort study, we assessed 428 primary medulloblastoma samples collected from UK Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group (CCLG) treatment centres (UK), collaborating European institutions, and the UKCCSG-SIOP-PNET3 European clinical trial. An independent validation cohort (n=276) of archival tumour samples was also analysed. We analysed samples from patients with childhood medulloblastoma who were aged 0-16 years at diagnosis, and had central review of pathology and comprehensive clinical data. We did comprehensive molecular profiling, including DNA methylation microarray analysis, and did unsupervised class discovery of test and validation cohorts to identify consensus primary molecular subgroups and characterise their clinical and biological significance. We modelled survival of patients aged 3-16 years in patients (n=215) who had craniospinal irradiation and had been treated with a curative intent. Seven robust and reproducible primary molecular subgroups of childhood medulloblastoma were identified. MBWNT remained unchanged and each remaining consensus subgroup was split in two. MBSHH was split into age-dependent subgroups corresponding to infant (<4·3 years; MBSHH-Infant; n=65) and

  13. Discrete subgroups of adolescents diagnosed with borderline personality disorder: a latent class analysis of personality features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Vera; Canta, Guilherme; de Castro, Filipa; Leal, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    Research suggests that borderline personality disorder (BPD) can be diagnosed in adolescents and is marked by considerable heterogeneity. This study aimed to identify personality features characterizing adolescents with BPD and possible meaningful patterns of heterogeneity that could lead to personality subgroups. The authors analyzed data on 60 adolescents, ages 15 to 18 years, who met DSM criteria for a BPD diagnosis. The authors used latent class analysis (LCA) to identify subgroups based on the personality pattern scales from the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI). LCA indicated that the best-fitting solution was a two-class model, identifying two discrete subgroups of BPD adolescents that were described as internalizing and externalizing. The subgroups were then compared on clinical and sociodemographic variables, measures of personality dimensions, DSM BPD criteria, and perception of attachment styles. Adolescents with a BPD diagnosis constitute a heterogeneous group and vary meaningfully on personality features that can have clinical implications for treatment.

  14. TEST PREPARATION FOR THE GRE ANALYTICAL ABILITY MEASURE: DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS FOR SUBGROUPS OF GRE TEST TAKERS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Powers, Donald E

    1986-01-01

    ... on other sections of the GRE General Test. The results suggested little, if any, difference among subgroups of examinees with respect to their response to the particular kind of test preparation considered in the study...

  15. Incidence and follow-up of Braunwald subgroups in unstable angina pectoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. van Miltenburg-van Zijl (Addy); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); R.J. Veerhoek (Rinus); P.M.M. Bossuyt (Patrick)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractObjectives. This study was performed to establish the prognosis of patients with unstable angina within the subgroups of the Braunwald classification. Background. Among many classifications of unstable angina, the Braunwald classification is frequently used. However, the incidence

  16. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  17. Flavour Democracy in Strong Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, S A; Abel, Steven; King, Steven

    1998-01-01

    We show that the fermion mass spectrum may naturally be understood in terms of flavour democratic fixed points in supersymmetric theories which have a large domain of attraction in the presence of "strong unification". Our approach provides an alternative to the approximate Yukawa texture zeroes of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss a particular model based on a broken gauged $SU(3)_L\\times SU(3)_R$ family symmetry which illustrates our approach.

  18. On s-semipermutable subgroups of finite groups and p-nilpotency

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. All groups considered in this paper are finite groups. Most of the notations are standard and can be found in [4] and [3]. Recall that a group H is said to be s-permutable (s-quasinormal) [6] in G if HP = PH for all Sylow subgroups P of G. A subgroup H of a group G is called s-semipermutable [2]. inGif it is ...

  19. Finite groups with the set of the number of subgroups of possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, Chen et al. [3] determined the groups in which the number of subgroups of possible order is less than or equal to 3, but there exist some gaps in the proof of their theorem. If we denote by n(G) the set of the number of subgroups of possible order of a group G, then we can investigate the structure of G by n(G).

  20. A recursive formula for the number of intuitionistic fuzzy subgroups of a finite cyclic group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandni, Sharma, P. K.; Singh, Pushpinder; Singh, Manreet

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we have given an explicit recursive formula for the number of intuitionistic fuzzy subgroups of a finite cyclic group G = Zp1 × Zp ×………..×Zpm, where p1, p2, ….., pm are distinct prime numbers. A method for constructing an intuitionistic fuzzy subgroup of a given group in terms of double pinned flags is also proposed.

  1. Resolution and Characterization of Distinct cpn60-Based Subgroups of Gardnerella vaginalis in the Vaginal Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramel Jayaprakash, Teenus; Schellenberg, John J.; Hill, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), characterized by a shift of the vaginal microbiota from a Lactobacillus-dominated community to a dense biofilm containing a complex mixture of organisms, is an important risk factor in poor reproductive health outcomes. The Nugent score, based on Gram stain, is used to diagnose BV and Gardnerella vaginalis abundance in the sample is one factor determining Nugent score. A high Nugent score is indicative of BV but does not always correspond to the presence of clinical symptoms. G. vaginalis is recognized as a heterogeneous group of organisms, which can also be part of the normal, healthy vaginal microbiome. In addition, asymptomatic BV and non-Gardnerella types of BV are being recognized. In an attempt to resolve the heterogeneous group of G. vaginalis, a phylogenetic tree of cpn60 universal target sequences from G. vaginalis isolates was constructed that indicates the existence of four subgroups of G. vaginalis. This subdivision, supported by whole genome similarity calculation of representative strains using JSpecies, demonstrates that these subgroups may represent different species. The cpn60 subgroupings did not correspond with the Piot biotyping scheme, but did show consistency with ARDRA genotyping and sialidase gene presence. Isolates from all four subgroups produced biofilm in vitro. We also investigated the distribution of G. vaginalis subgroups in vaginal samples from Kenyan women with Nugent scores consistent with BV, Intermediate and Normal microbiota (n = 44). All subgroups of G. vaginalis were detected in these women, with a significant difference (z = −3.372, n = 39, p = 0.001) in frequency of G. vaginalis subgroup B between BV and Normal groups. Establishment of a quantifiable relationship between G. vaginalis subgroup distribution and clinical status could have significant diagnostic implications. PMID:22900080

  2. Resolution and characterization of distinct cpn60-based subgroups of Gardnerella vaginalis in the vaginal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teenus Paramel Jayaprakash

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV, characterized by a shift of the vaginal microbiota from a Lactobacillus-dominated community to a dense biofilm containing a complex mixture of organisms, is an important risk factor in poor reproductive health outcomes. The Nugent score, based on Gram stain, is used to diagnose BV and Gardnerella vaginalis abundance in the sample is one factor determining Nugent score. A high Nugent score is indicative of BV but does not always correspond to the presence of clinical symptoms. G. vaginalis is recognized as a heterogeneous group of organisms, which can also be part of the normal, healthy vaginal microbiome. In addition, asymptomatic BV and non-Gardnerella types of BV are being recognized. In an attempt to resolve the heterogeneous group of G. vaginalis, a phylogenetic tree of cpn60 universal target sequences from G. vaginalis isolates was constructed that indicates the existence of four subgroups of G. vaginalis. This subdivision, supported by whole genome similarity calculation of representative strains using JSpecies, demonstrates that these subgroups may represent different species. The cpn60 subgroupings did not correspond with the Piot biotyping scheme, but did show consistency with ARDRA genotyping and sialidase gene presence. Isolates from all four subgroups produced biofilm in vitro. We also investigated the distribution of G. vaginalis subgroups in vaginal samples from Kenyan women with Nugent scores consistent with BV, Intermediate and Normal microbiota (n = 44. All subgroups of G. vaginalis were detected in these women, with a significant difference (z = -3.372, n = 39, p = 0.001 in frequency of G. vaginalis subgroup B between BV and Normal groups. Establishment of a quantifiable relationship between G. vaginalis subgroup distribution and clinical status could have significant diagnostic implications.

  3. Comparative review of some properties of fuzzy and anti fuzzy subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    B. O. ONASANYA

    2010-01-01

    This paper is to comparatively review some works in fuzzy and anti fuzzy group theory. The aim is to provide anti fuzzy versions of some existing theorems in fuzzy group theory and see how much similar they are to their fuzzy versions. The research therefore focuses on the properties of fuzzy subgroup, fuzzy cosets, fuzzy conjugacy and fuzzy normal subgroups of a group which are mimicked in anti fuzzy group theory.

  4. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Che Ngwa, Emmanuel; Zeeh, Christina; Messoudi, Ahmed; Büttner-Ennever, Jean A.; Horn, Anja K. E.

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior, and superior recti (MR, IR, and SR), inferior oblique (IO), and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems ...

  5. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel eChe-Ngwa; Christina eZeeh; Christina eZeeh; Ahmed eMessoudi; Jean Alice Büttner-Ennever; Anja Kerstin Ellen Horn; Anja Kerstin Ellen Horn

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior and superior recti (MR, IR, SR), inferior oblique (IO) and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems were i...

  6. Are there distinct cognitive and motivational sub-groups of children with ADHD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambek, Rikke; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Tannock, Rosemary; Sørensen, Anne Virring; Damm, Dorte; Thomsen, Per Hove

    2017-11-16

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is proposed to be a neuropsychologically heterogeneous disorder that encompasses two distinct sub-groups, one with executive function (EF) deficits and one with delay aversion (DA). However, such claims have often been based on studies that have operationalized neuropsychological deficits using a categorical approach - using intuitive but rather arbitrary, clinical cut-offs. The current study applied an alternative empirical approach to sub-grouping in ADHD, latent profile analysis (LPA), and attempted to validate emerging subgroups through clinically relevant correlates. One-hundred medication-naïve children with ADHD and 96 typically developing children (6-14 years) completed nine EF and three DA tasks as well as an odor identification test. Parents and teachers provided reports of the children's behavior (ADHD and EF). Models of the latent structure of scores on EF and DA tests were contrasted using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). LPA was carried out based on factor scores from the CFA and sub-groups were compared in terms of odor identification and behavior. A model with one DA and two EF factors best fit the data. LPA resulted in four sub-groups that differed in terms of general level of neuropsychological performance (ranging from high to very low), odor identification, and behavior. The sub-groups did not differ in terms of the relative EF and DA performance. Results in the ADHD group were replicated in the control group. While EF and DA appear to be dissociable constructs; they do not yield distinct sub-groups when sub-grouping is based on a statistical approach such as LPA.

  7. Use of the orbicularis retaining ligament in lower eyelid reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, J; Hardy, T; Kirkpatrick, N; Joshi, N; Kelly, M

    2009-07-01

    The orbicularis retaining ligament (ORL) is a distinct anatomical structure that has only been recently characterised. A variety of techniques, based on Hamra's concepts, now divide this ligament during lower lid blepharoplasty. This often produces a substantial skin excess which is discarded. We set out to investigate the validity of this surgical manoeuvre as a means of recruiting anterior lamella for the purposes of lower lid reconstruction. Between September 2002 and August 2004, 23 patients underwent reconstruction of the anterior lamella of their lower eyelid using this technique. The mean age of the patients was 56 years (range 26-86 years). The mean follow-up time was 20 months (range 12-36 months). Clinical evaluation was carried out preoperatively and postoperatively to assess the presence of palpebral non occlusion, epiphora, the sensation of a dry eye, ectropion, conjunctivitis and keratitis. Assessment of the tissue deficit was made clinically and with standardised digital photographs. Satisfactory reconstruction of the anterior lamella of the lower eyelid was achieved in 19/23 patients. Preoperative symptoms of epiphora and lower lid position were improved. The visual analogue scale of appearance was improved postoperatively. In some cases, particularly in the atrophic lower lid, the results were short lived and further surgery was required to achieve optimal results. In cases of isolated cutaneous deficit where the lid support mechanisms are intact, the procedure is both successful and aesthetically favourable for resurfacing this challenging area.

  8. Pregnancy outcomes of women with failure to retain rubella immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzenburg, Christopher J; Gilmandyar, Dzhamala; Thornburg, Loralei L; Hackney, David N

    2014-12-01

    We sought to explore the clinical variables associated with the loss of rubella immunity during pregnancy and to determine if these changes are linked to obstetrical complications. This is a case-control study in which women were identified whose rubella antibody titers were equivocal or non-immune and compared to those who had retained immunity. Two hundred and eighty-five cases were identified and compared to the same number of controls using Student's t test, Mann-Whitney U-test or Fisher's exact test. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were employed. Subjects with diminished immunity were more likely to have public insurance and higher gravidity with a trend toward increased tobacco use. Diminished rubella immunity was not associated with adverse obstetrical outcomes, including preterm birth and pre-eclampsia and is likely not a risk factor for these pregnancy outcomes. While no adverse pregnancy outcomes were associated with a loss of rubella immunity, women with greater number of pregnancies appear to lose their immunity to rubella. This relationship needs to be explored further and if proven, revaccination prior to pregnancy may need to be addressed.

  9. Older Runners Retain Youthful Running Economy Despite Biomechanical Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Owen N.; Kipp, Shalaya; Roby, Jaclyn M.; Grabowski, Alena M.; Kram, Rodger; Ortega, Justus D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sixty-five years of age typically marks the onset of impaired walking economy. However, running economy has not been assessed beyond the age of 65 years. Furthermore, a critical determinant of running economy is the spring-like storage and return of elastic energy from the leg during stance, which is related to leg stiffness. Therefore, we investigated whether runners over the age of 65 years retain youthful running economy and/or leg stiffness across running speeds. Methods Fifteen young and fifteen older runners ran on a force-instrumented treadmill at 2.01, 2.46, and 2.91 m·s−1. We measured their rates of metabolic energy consumption (i.e. metabolic power), ground reaction forces, and stride kinematics. Results There were only small differences in running economy between young and older runners across the range of speeds. Statistically, the older runners consumed 2–9% less metabolic energy than the young runners across speeds (p=0.012). Also, the leg stiffness of older runners was 10–20% lower than that of young runners across the range of speeds (p=0.002) and in contrast to the younger runners, the leg stiffness of older runners decreased with speed (prunning economy despite biomechanical differences. It may be that vigorous exercise, such as running, prevents the age related deterioration of muscular efficiency, and therefore may make everyday activities easier. PMID:26587844

  10. A case report of a retained and knotted caudal catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Joselyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Caudal catheters advanced to the lumbar and thoracic regions can be used to provide excellent analgesia for pre-term neonates undergoing major abdominal and thoracic procedures. Despite their frequent use, attention to detail is mandatory to avoid complications related to the medications used or the placement technique. We present a 2-day-old, 2 kg, pre-term infant who was born at 32 weeks gestational age with a tracheoesophageal fistula. Following anesthetic induction, a caudal epidural catheter was placed with the intent of threading it to the mid-thoracic level. The intraoperative and post-operative courses were uneventful with the epidural catheter providing adequate analgesia without the need for supplemental intravenous opioids. During catheter removal, resistance was noted and it could not be easily removed. With repositioning and various other maneuvers, the catheter was removed with some difficulty. On examination of the catheter, a complete knot was noted. Options for catheter advancement from the caudal space to the thoracic dermatomes are reviewed and techniques discussed for removal of a retained epidural catheter.

  11. Grass Plants Bind, Retain, Uptake, and Transport Infectious Prions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pritzkow

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here, we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrPSc to plants. Small quantities of PrPSc contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild-type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrPSc for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves. These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease.

  12. Automated identification of retained surgical items in radiological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, Gady; Gan, Lin; Moric, Mario; Gluncic, Vicko

    2015-03-01

    Retained surgical items (RSIs) in patients is a major operating room (OR) patient safety concern. An RSI is any surgical tool, sponge, needle or other item inadvertently left in a patients body during the course of surgery. If left undetected, RSIs may lead to serious negative health consequences such as sepsis, internal bleeding, and even death. To help physicians efficiently and effectively detect RSIs, we are developing computer-aided detection (CADe) software for X-ray (XR) image analysis, utilizing large amounts of currently available image data to produce a clinically effective RSI detection system. Physician analysis of XRs for the purpose of RSI detection is a relatively lengthy process that may take up to 45 minutes to complete. It is also error prone due to the relatively low acuity of the human eye for RSIs in XR images. The system we are developing is based on computer vision and machine learning algorithms. We address the problem of low incidence by proposing synthesis algorithms. The CADe software we are developing may be integrated into a picture archiving and communication system (PACS), be implemented as a stand-alone software application, or be integrated into portable XR machine software through application programming interfaces. Preliminary experimental results on actual XR images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  13. Organizational configuration of hospitals succeeding in attracting and retaining nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stordeur, Sabine; D'Hoore, William

    2007-01-01

    This paper contrasts structural and managerial characteristics of low- and high-turnover hospitals, and describes the organizational configuration of attractive hospitals. In countries facing nurse shortages and turnover, some hospitals succeed in recruiting and retaining nurses. In Magnet Hospitals, managerial practices and environmental characteristics increase nurses' job satisfaction and their commitment to the organization, which in turn decreases nurse turnover. Such an approach suggests that organizations are best understood as clusters of interconnected structures and practices, i.e. organizational configurations rather than entities whose components can be understood in isolation. From a sample of 12 hospitals whose nurse turnover was studied for 1 year, structural and organizational features of hospitals in the first and fourth quartiles, i.e. attractive (turnover vs. conventional (turnover >11.8%) were contrasted. A questionnaire, including perceptions of health-related factors, job demands, stressors, work schedules, organizational climate, and work adjustments antecedent to turnover, was received from 401 nurses working in attractive hospitals (response rate = 53.8%) and 774 nurses in conventional hospitals (response rate = 54.5%). Structural characteristics did not differentiate attractive and conventional hospitals, but employee perceptions towards the organization differed strikingly. Differences were observed for risk exposure, emotional demands, role ambiguity and conflicts, work-family conflicts, effort-reward imbalance and the meaning of work, all in favour of attractive hospitals (P organizations. The concept of attractive institutions could serve as a catalyst for improvement in nurses' work environments in Europe.

  14. Older Runners Retain Youthful Running Economy despite Biomechanical Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Owen N; Kipp, Shalaya; Roby, Jaclyn M; Grabowski, Alena M; Kram, Rodger; Ortega, Justus D

    2016-04-01

    Sixty-five years of age typically marks the onset of impaired walking economy. However, running economy has not been assessed beyond the age of 65 yr. Furthermore, a critical determinant of running economy is the spring-like storage and return of elastic energy from the leg during stance, which is related to leg stiffness. Therefore, we investigated whether runners older than 65 yr retain youthful running economy and/or leg stiffness across running speeds. Fifteen young and 15 older runners ran on a force-instrumented treadmill at 2.01, 2.46, and 2.91 m·s(-1). We measured their rates of metabolic energy consumption (i.e., metabolic power), ground reaction forces, and stride kinematics. There were only small differences in running economy between young and older runners across the range of speeds. Statistically, the older runners consumed 2% to 9% less metabolic energy than the young runners across speeds (P = 0.012). Also, the leg stiffness of older runners was 10% to 20% lower than that of young runners across the range of speeds (P = 0.002), and in contrast to the younger runners, the leg stiffness of older runners decreased with speed (P economy despite biomechanical differences. It may be that vigorous exercise, such as running, prevents the age related deterioration of muscular efficiency and, therefore, may make everyday activities easier.

  15. Retained medullary cord extending to a sacral subcutaneous meningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Nobuya; Morioka, Takato; Shimogawa, Takafumi; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Mukae, Nobutaka; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iihara, Koji

    2017-11-03

    A retained medullary cord (RMC) is a rare closed spinal dysraphism with a robust elongated neural structure continuous from the conus and extending to the dural cul-de-sac. One case extending down to the base of a subcutaneous meningocele at the sacral level has been reported. We report on three cases of closed spinal dysraphism, in which a spinal cord-like tethering structure extended out from the dural cul-de-sac and terminated at a skin-covered meningocele sac in the sacrococcygeal region, which was well delineated in curvilinear coronal reconstructed images of 3D-heavily T2-weighted images (3D-hT2WI). Intraoperative neurophysiology revealed the spinal cord-like tethering structure was nonfunctional, and histopathology showed that it consisted of central nervous system tissue, consistent with RMC. The tethering structure histologically contained a glioneuronal core with an ependymal-like lumen and smooth muscle, which may indicate developmental failure during secondary neurulation. When the RMC extending to a meningocele is demonstrated with the detailed magnet resonance imaging including 3D-hT2WI, decision to cut the cord-like structure for untethering of the nervous tissue should be made under careful intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

  16. Retaining physicians in Lithuania: integrating research and health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkiene, Liudvika; Macijauskiene, Jurate; Riklikiene, Olga; Stricka, Marius; Padaiga, Zilvinas

    2013-04-01

    Many of the strategic planning studies worldwide have made recommendations to the policy makers on the steps to be taken in eliminating the perceived shortages of physician workforce or in improving their distribution and retention. Policy makers have also considered various policy interventions to ensure adequate numbers of physicians. This study reviewed the research evidence and health policy decisions taken from 2000 to 2010 in Lithuania and evaluated the chronological links over time between scientific recommendations and policy decisions. From the analysis it would seem that Lithuania's success in retaining physicians between 2000 and 2010 was influenced by the timely implementation of particular research recommendations, such as increased salaries and increased enrolment to physician training programmes. In addition were the health policy interventions such as health sector reform, change in the legal status of medical residents and establishment of professional re-entry programmes. Based on this evidence it is recommended that policy makers in Lithuania as well as in other countries should consider comprehensive and systematic health policy approaches that combine and address various aspects of physician training, retention, geographic mal-distribution and emigration. Implementation of such an inclusive policy however is impossible without the integration of research into strategic decision making in workforce planning and effective health policy interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Decellularized scaffold of cryopreserved rat kidney retains its recellularization potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldeep Chani

    Full Text Available The multi-cellular nature of renal tissue makes it the most challenging organ for regeneration. Therefore, till date whole organ transplantations remain the definitive treatment for the end stage renal disease (ESRD. The shortage of available organs for the transplantation has, thus, remained a major concern as well as an unsolved problem. In this regard generation of whole organ scaffold through decellularization followed by regeneration of the whole organ by recellularization is being viewed as a potential alternative for generating functional tissues. Despite its growing interest, the optimal processing to achieve functional organ still remains unsolved. The biggest challenge remains is the time line for obtaining kidney. Keeping these facts in mind, we have assessed the effects of cryostorage (3 months on renal tissue architecture and its potential for decellularization and recellularization in comparison to the freshly isolated kidneys. The light microscopy exploiting different microscopic stains as well as immuno-histochemistry and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated that ECM framework is well retained following kidney cryopreservation. The strength of these structures was reinforced by calculating mechanical stress which confirmed the similarity between the freshly isolated and cryopreserved tissue. The recellularization of these bio-scaffolds, with mesenchymal stem cells quickly repopulated the decellularized structures irrespective of the kidneys status, i.e. freshly isolated or the cryopreserved. The growth pattern employing mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated their equivalent recellularization potential. Based on these observations, it may be concluded that cryopreserved kidneys can be exploited as scaffolds for future development of functional organ.

  18. Grass plants bind, retain, uptake, and transport infectious prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzkow, Sandra; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Khan, Uffaf; Telling, Glenn C; Hoover, Edward; Soto, Claudio

    2015-05-26

    Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here, we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrP(Sc)) to plants. Small quantities of PrP(Sc) contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces) can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild-type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrP(Sc) for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves). These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Grass plants bind, retain, uptake and transport infectious prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzkow, Sandra; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Khan, Uffaf; Telling, Glenn C.; Hoover, Edward; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrPSc) to plants. Small quantities of PrPSc contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces) can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrPSc for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves). These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease. PMID:25981035

  20. Leading a multigenerational workforce: strategies for attracting and retaining millennials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Terrence F; Sedrak, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, leaders in healthcare have noticed an increase in generational tension among employees, most often focused on the attitudes and behaviors of the arriving millennials (generation Y). While these employee relations issues were a nuisance, they rarely rose to the level of a priority demanding leadership intervention. Some leaders, in fact, hoped that the issues would resolve themselves as these young employees settled in and learned that they had to demonstrate new behaviors to be successful in the workplace. Most organizations adopted this wait-and-see attitude. Not so today. As the boomer generation has begun its exodus from the workplace, organizations are increasingly looking at the millennials as not a problem but a solution to the workplace manpower transition that is under way. Our problem is that we don't yet know how best to lead such a diverse, multigenerational workforce. This article examines the generational topic and provides advice concerning a variety of changes that leaders may implement to advance their organization's ability to attract and to retain the millennials.

  1. Classification of low back-related leg pain: do subgroups differ in disability and psychosocial factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeremy; Hall, Toby

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that patients with low back-related leg pain can be classified according to pain mechanisms into four distinct subgroups: Central Sensitization (CS), Denervation (D), Peripheral Nerve Sensitization (PNS), and Musculoskeletal (M). The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were any differences in terms of disability and psychosocial factors between these four subgroups. Forty-five subjects with low back-related leg pain completed the Oswestry Disability Index, the hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. Subsequently, an examiner blinded to the questionnaire results classified the subjects into one of the four subgroups, according to the findings of the self-administered Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms questionnaire and a physical examination. It was found that the PNS subgroup had significantly greater disability compared to all other subgroups and significantly greater fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity compared to the CS and D subgroups. This highlights the importance of sub-classification but also the need to take into account disability and psychosocial factors in the management of low back-related leg pain.

  2. IGHV1, IGHV5 and IGHV7 subgroup genes in the rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jon M; Howard, Wendy; Robbins, Helena; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K

    2003-03-01

    The diversity of the antibody response is achieved, in part, by rearrangement of different immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. The Ig heavy chain is made up of a variable region (IGHV), a diversity region (IGHD) and a joining region (IGHJ). Human germline IGHV genes have been grouped into seven multigene subgroups. Size and usage of these subgroups is not equal, the IGHV3 subgroup is the most commonly used (36%), followed by IGHV1/7 (26%), then IGHV4, IGHV5, IGHV2, IGHV6 (15%, 12%, 4%, 3% respectively). The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is a useful non-human primate model for studies of infection and the database of germline Ig genes for the macaque is gradually growing to become a useful tool in the study of B-cell responses. The proportions of IGHV subgroup usage in the macaque are similar to those in man. Representatives from IGHV3 and IGHV4 subgroups for the macaque have been published, as have germline sequences of the IGHD and IGHJ genes. However, to date there have been no sequences published from the second largest IGHV subgroup, IGHV1. We report the isolation and sequencing of a genomic fragment containing an IGHV1 gene from the macaque. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers designed from this sequence enabled us to amplify and sequence 25 new IGHV1 germline genes. We also isolated two IGHV7 genes, using the same primers, and two IGHV5 genes, using human IGHV5 primers.

  3. Pediatric RSV Infection During Two Winter Seasons in British Columbia: A Role for Subgroup Analysis in Young Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wilson

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies directed against the G, F and NP proteins of respiratory syncytial virus, 167 virus isolates from nasopharyngeal washing cultures at British Columbia Children’s Hospital during two consecutive epidemics were subgrouped. Slides made and frozen at the time of virus isolation or prepared from recovered frozen passage material, were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. Of 85 strains tested in 1987–88, 54 (64% were subgroup A, and 31 (36% subgroup B. By contrast, of 82 strains tested in 1988–89 five (6% were subgroup A and 77 (94% subgroup B. Review of patient charts did not reveal significant differences in clinical course of patients infected with the two subgroups, but the risk of infection with subgroup A was significantly greater than the risk of subgroup B infection in younger patients.

  4. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  5. Gardnerella vaginalis Subgroups Defined by cpn60 Sequencing and Sialidase Activity in Isolates from Canada, Belgium and Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Schellenberg

    Full Text Available Increased abundance of Gardnerella vaginalis and sialidase activity in vaginal fluid is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV, a common but poorly understood clinical entity associated with poor reproductive health outcomes. Since most women are colonized with G. vaginalis, its status as a normal member of the vaginal microbiota or pathogen causing BV remains controversial, and numerous classification schemes have been described. Since 2005, sequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target (cpn60 UT has distinguished four subgroups in isolate collections, clone libraries and deep sequencing datasets. To clarify potential clinical and diagnostic significance of cpn60 subgroups, we undertook phenotypic and molecular characterization of 112 G. vaginalis isolates from three continents. A total of 36 subgroup A, 33 B, 35 C and 8 D isolates were identified through phylogenetic analysis of cpn60 sequences as corresponding to four "clades" identified in a recently published study, based on sequencing 473 genes across 17 isolates. cpn60 subgroups were compared with other previously described molecular methods for classification of Gardnerella subgroups, including amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA and real-time PCR assays designed to quantify subgroups in vaginal samples. Although two ARDRA patterns were observed in isolates, each was observed in three cpn60 subgroups (A/B/D and B/C/D. Real-time PCR assays corroborated cpn60 subgroups overall, but 13 isolates from subgroups A, B and D were negative in all assays. A putative sialidase gene was detected in all subgroup B, C and D isolates, but only in a single subgroup A isolate. In contrast, sialidase activity was observed in all subgroup B isolates, 3 (9% subgroup C isolates and no subgroup A or D isolates. These observations suggest distinct roles for G. vaginalis subgroups in BV pathogenesis. We conclude that cpn60 UT sequencing is a robust approach for defining G. vaginalis

  6. Gardnerella vaginalis Subgroups Defined by cpn60 Sequencing and Sialidase Activity in Isolates from Canada, Belgium and Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, John J; Paramel Jayaprakash, Teenus; Withana Gamage, Niradha; Patterson, Mo H; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Hill, Janet E

    2016-01-01

    Increased abundance of Gardnerella vaginalis and sialidase activity in vaginal fluid is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), a common but poorly understood clinical entity associated with poor reproductive health outcomes. Since most women are colonized with G. vaginalis, its status as a normal member of the vaginal microbiota or pathogen causing BV remains controversial, and numerous classification schemes have been described. Since 2005, sequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target (cpn60 UT) has distinguished four subgroups in isolate collections, clone libraries and deep sequencing datasets. To clarify potential clinical and diagnostic significance of cpn60 subgroups, we undertook phenotypic and molecular characterization of 112 G. vaginalis isolates from three continents. A total of 36 subgroup A, 33 B, 35 C and 8 D isolates were identified through phylogenetic analysis of cpn60 sequences as corresponding to four "clades" identified in a recently published study, based on sequencing 473 genes across 17 isolates. cpn60 subgroups were compared with other previously described molecular methods for classification of Gardnerella subgroups, including amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and real-time PCR assays designed to quantify subgroups in vaginal samples. Although two ARDRA patterns were observed in isolates, each was observed in three cpn60 subgroups (A/B/D and B/C/D). Real-time PCR assays corroborated cpn60 subgroups overall, but 13 isolates from subgroups A, B and D were negative in all assays. A putative sialidase gene was detected in all subgroup B, C and D isolates, but only in a single subgroup A isolate. In contrast, sialidase activity was observed in all subgroup B isolates, 3 (9%) subgroup C isolates and no subgroup A or D isolates. These observations suggest distinct roles for G. vaginalis subgroups in BV pathogenesis. We conclude that cpn60 UT sequencing is a robust approach for defining G. vaginalis subgroups within the

  7. Strongly Interacting Light Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bruggisser, Sebastian; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM) can appear weakly coupled at small energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini) are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  8. Scalar strong interaction hadron theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Fang Chao

    2015-01-01

    The scalar strong interaction hadron theory, SSI, is a first principles' and nonlocal theory at quantum mechanical level that provides an alternative to low energy QCD and Higgs related part of the standard model. The quark-quark interaction is scalar rather than color-vectorial. A set of equations of motion for mesons and another set for baryons have been constructed. This book provides an account of the present state of a theory supposedly still at its early stage of development. This work will facilitate researchers interested in entering into this field and serve as a basis for possible future development of this theory.

  9. Evaluation of stress patterns produced by implant-retained overdentures and implant-retained fixed partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaro, José Vitor Quinelli; Filho, Humberto Gennari; Vedovatto, Eduardo; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Rezende, Maria Cristina Rosifini Alves; Zavanelli, Adriana Cristina

    2011-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to photoelastically measure the biomechanical behavior of 4 implants retaining different cantilevered bar mandibular overdenture designs and to compare a fixed partial denture (FPD). A photoelastic model of a human edentulous mandible was fabricated, which contained 4 screw-type implants (3.75 × 10 mm) embedded in the parasymphyseal area. An FPD and 3 overdenture designs with the following attachments were evaluated: 3 plastic Hader clips, 1 Hader clip with 2 posterior resilient cap attachments, and 3 ball/O-ring attachments. Vertical occlusal forces of 100 N were applied between the central incisor and unilaterally to the right and left second premolars and second molars. Stresses that developed in the supporting structure were monitored photoelastically and recorded photographically. The results showed that the anterior loading, the overdenture with 3 plastic Hader clips, displayed the largest stress concentration at the medium implant. With premolar loading, the FPD and overdenture with 3 plastic Hader clips displayed the highest stresses to the ipsilateral terminal implant. With molar loading, the overdenture with 3 ball/O-ring attachments displayed the most uniform stress distribution in the posterior edentulous ridge, with less overloading in the terminal implant. It was concluded that vertical forces applied to the bar-clip overdenture and FPD created immediate stress patterns of greater magnitude and concentration on the ipsilateral implants, whereas the ball/O-ring attachments transferred minimal stress to the implants. The increased cantilever in the FPD caused the highest stresses to the terminal implant.

  10. The role of organizational culture in retaining nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Castle, Nicholas G; Lin, Michael K; Shrivastwa, Nijika; Spreitzer, Gretchen

    2015-06-01

    We examined how organizational culture in nursing homes affects staff turnover, because culture is a first step to creating satisfactory work environments. Nursing home administrators were asked in 2009 to report on facility culture and staff turnover. We received responses from 419 of 1,056 administrators contacted. Respondents reported the strength of cultural values using scales from a Competing Values Framework and percent of staff leaving annually for Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practice Nurse (LPN), and nursing aide (NA) staff. We estimated negative binomial models predicting turnover.  Turnover rates are lower than found in past but remain significantly higher among NAs than among RNs or LPNs. Facilities with stronger market values had increased turnover among RNs and LPNs, and among NAs when turnover was adjusted for facilities with few staff. Facilities emphasizing hierarchical internal processes had lower RN turnover. Group and developmental values focusing on staff and innovation only lowered LPN turnover. Finally, effects on NA turnover become insignificant when turnover was adjusted if voluntary turnover was reported. Organizational culture had differential effects on the turnover of RN, LPN, and NA staff that should be addressed in developing culture-change strategies. More flexible organizational culture values were important for LPN staff only, whereas unexpectedly, greater emphasis on rigid internal rules helped facilities retain RNs. Facilities with a stronger focus on customer needs had higher turnover among all staff. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Kinematics of a bicruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyse, Thomas J; Slane, Joshua; Peersman, Geert; Dirckx, Margo; van de Vyver, Arne; Dworschak, Philipp; Fuchs-Winkelmann, Susanne; Scheys, Lennart

    2017-06-01

    The recently reintroduced bicruciate-retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty (BCR TKA) is an interesting approach in the quest for close replication of knee joint biomechanics and kinematics closer to the native knee. Therefore, this study aimed at providing a detailed biomechanical view on the functional resemblance of BCR TKA to the native knee joint. Seven fresh-frozen full leg cadaver specimens (76 ± 10 year) were mounted in a 6 degrees-of-freedom kinematic rig that applied a dynamic squatting motion knee flexion. Two motion patterns were performed pre- and post-implantation of a fixed bearing BCR TKA: passive flexion-extension and squatting while an infrared camera system tracked the location of reflective markers attached to the tibia and femur. Additionally, specimen laxity was assessed using Lachman tests and varus/valgus stress tests in triplicate. Overall, differences in tibiofemoral kinematics between native knee and BCR TKA were small. Some minor differences appeared under the load of a squat: less internal tibial rotation and some minor paradoxical anterior translation of the medial femoral condyle during mid-flexion. BCR TKA may slightly elevate the joint line. Knee laxity as measured by the Lachman and varus/valgus tests was not significantly influenced by BCR TKA implantation. As both cruciate ligaments are preserved with BCR TKA the unloaded knee closely resembles native knee kinematics including preserving the rollback mechanism. The loss of the conforming anatomy of menisci and tibial cartilage and replacement via a relatively flat polyethylene inlay may account for the loss of tibial internal rotation and the slight paradoxical AP motion of the medial femoral condyle with BCR TKA. This phenomenon reproduces findings made earlier with fixed bearing unicondylar knee arthroplasty.

  12. Design principles for engaging and retaining virtual citizen scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Dara M; Longo, Justin; Dobell, A R

    2016-06-01

    Citizen science initiatives encourage volunteer participants to collect and interpret data and contribute to formal scientific projects. The growth of virtual citizen science (VCS), facilitated through websites and mobile applications since the mid-2000s, has been driven by a combination of software innovations and mobile technologies, growing scientific data flows without commensurate increases in resources to handle them, and the desire of internet-connected participants to contribute to collective outputs. However, the increasing availability of internet-based activities requires individual VCS projects to compete for the attention of volunteers and promote their long-term retention. We examined program and platform design principles that might allow VCS initiatives to compete more effectively for volunteers, increase productivity of project participants, and retain contributors over time. We surveyed key personnel engaged in managing a sample of VCS projects to identify the principles and practices they pursued for these purposes and led a team in a heuristic evaluation of volunteer engagement, website or application usability, and participant retention. We received 40 completed survey responses (33% response rate) and completed a heuristic evaluation of 20 VCS program sites. The majority of the VCS programs focused on scientific outcomes, whereas the educational and social benefits of program participation, variables that are consistently ranked as important for volunteer engagement and retention, were incidental. Evaluators indicated usability, across most of the VCS program sites, was higher and less variable than the ratings for participant engagement and retention. In the context of growing competition for the attention of internet volunteers, increased attention to the motivations of virtual citizen scientists may help VCS programs sustain the necessary engagement and retention of their volunteers. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  13. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, -9p, and -11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas.

  14. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Nakae

    Full Text Available Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1 mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, -9p, and -11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas.

  15. On the same side of the faultline: Inclusion in the leader’s subgroup and employee performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, B.; Shemla, M.; Li, J.; Wegge, J.

    Extending theory on faultlines and subgroups, we argue that faultlines splitting a team into homogeneous subgroups can have different effects on team members' individual performance, depending on different intra-subgroup processes. Specifically, we propose that the effect of faultline strength on

  16. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  17. Functional dyspepsia: relationship between clinical subgroups and Helicobacter pylori status in Western Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saruc

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of functional dyspepsia is not known. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristics of functional dyspepsia in Western Turkey. We divided 900 patients with functional dyspepsia into three subgroups according to symptoms: ulcer-like (UL, 321 (35.6%, motility disorder-like (ML, 281 (31.2%, and the combination (C of these symptoms, 298 (33.1%. All patients were submitted to endoscopic evaluation, with two biopsies taken from the cardia and corpus, and four from the antrum of the stomach. All biopsy samples were studied for Helicobacter pylori (Hp density, chronic inflammation, activity, intestinal metaplasia, atrophy, and the presence of lymphoid aggregates by histological examination. One antral biopsy was used for the rapid urease test. Tissue cagA status was determined by PCR from an antral biopsy specimen by a random sampling method. We also determined the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and gastrin by the same method. Data were analyzed statistically by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and by analysis of variance. Hp and cagA positivity was significantly higher in the UL subgroup than in the others. The patients in the ML subgroup had the lowest Hp and cagA positivity and Hp density. The ML subgroup also showed the lowest level of Hp-induced inflammation among all subgroups. The serum levels of TNF-alpha and gastrin did not reveal any difference between groups. Our findings show a poor association of Hp with the ML subgroup of functional dyspepsia, but a stronger association with the UL and C subgroups.

  18. Divide and Conquer: Sub-Grouping of ASD Improves ASD Detection Based on Brain Morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katuwal, Gajendra J; Baum, Stefi A; Cahill, Nathan D; Michael, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Low success (ASD) classification using brain morphometry from the large multi-site ABIDE dataset and inconsistent findings on brain morphometric abnormalities in ASD can be attributed to the ASD heterogeneity. In this study, we show that ASD brain morphometry is highly heterogeneous, and demonstrate that the heterogeneity can be mitigated and classification improved if autism severity (AS), verbal IQ (VIQ) and age are used with morphometric features. Morphometric features from structural MRIs (sMRIs) of 734 males (ASD: 361, controls: 373) of ABIDE were derived using FreeSurfer. Applying the Random Forest classifier, an AUC of 0.61 was achieved. Adding VIQ and age to morphometric features, AUC improved to 0.68. Sub-grouping the subjects by AS, VIQ and age improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.8 in the moderate-AS sub-group (AS = 7-8). Matching subjects on age and/or VIQ in each sub-group further improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.92 in the low AS sub-group (AS = 4-5). AUC decreased with AS and VIQ, and was the lowest in the mid-age sub-group (13-18 years). The important features were mainly from the frontal, temporal, ventricular, right hippocampal and left amygdala regions. However, they highly varied with AS, VIQ and age. The curvature and folding index features from frontal, temporal, lingual and insular regions were dominant in younger subjects suggesting their importance for early detection. When the experiments were repeated using the Gradient Boosting classifier similar results were obtained. Our findings suggest that identifying brain biomarkers in sub-groups of ASD can yield more robust and insightful results than searching across the whole spectrum. Further, it may allow identification of sub-group specific brain biomarkers that are optimized for early detection and monitoring, increasing the utility of sMRI as an important tool for early detection of ASD.

  19. Strong moduli stabilization and phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian; Mambrini, Yann; Mustafayev, Azar; Olive, Keith A

    2013-01-01

    We describe the resulting phenomenology of string theory/supergravity models with strong moduli stabilization. The KL model with F-term uplifting, is one such example. Models of this type predict universal scalar masses equal to the gravitino mass. In contrast, A-terms receive highly suppressed gravity mediated contributions. Under certain conditions, the same conclusion is valid for gaugino masses, which like A-terms, are then determined by anomalies. In such models, we are forced to relatively large gravitino masses (30-1000 TeV). We compute the low energy spectrum as a function of m_{3/2}. We see that the Higgs masses naturally takes values between 125-130 GeV. The lower limit is obtained from the requirement of chargino masses greater than 104 GeV, while the upper limit is determined by the relic density of dark matter (wino-like).

  20. A tractable molecular theory of flow in strongly inhomogeneous fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsanis, I.; Vanderlick, T. K.; Tirrell, M.; Davis, H. T.

    1988-09-01

    A recently introduced model is used to study several flows in fluids with large density variations over distances comparable to their molecular dimensions (strongly inhomogeneous fluids). According to our model, the local average density model (LADM), local viscosity coefficients can be assigned at each point in a strongly inhomogeneous fluid and the stress tensor retains its Newtonian form provided that the properly defined local viscosities are used. The model has been previously shown to agree with the results of molecular dynamics simulations on diffusion and flow properties in plane Couette flow. Application of this model requires determination of the molecular density profiles in the flow region. Using a successful closure for the pair distribution function, we solve the Yvon-Born-Green (YBG) equation of fluid structure in order to determine the density profiles of a fluid confined between planar micropore walls only a few molecular diameters apart. The fluid confinement produces a strongly inhomogeneous structure. Subsequently we apply LADM to set up the fluid mechanical equations for Couette flow, Poiseuille flow, and squeezing flow between parallel plates. With the use of the YBG theoretical density profiles we solve the flow equations and predict velocity profiles, stress distributions, and effective viscosities. The dependence of these quantities on the fluid inhomogeneity is described. The effective viscosity of strongly inhomogeneous fluids is found to be quite sensitive to the nature of the flow. Our squeezing flow analysis provides a first explanation of recent experimental findings on the effective viscosity of simple fluids confined in very narrow spaces.

  1. The interest of gait markers in the identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinet, Bernard; Chaleil, Denis; Cabane, Jean; Dumolard, Anne; Hatron, Pierre; Juvin, Robert; Lanteri-Minet, Michel; Mainguy, Yves; Negre-Pages, Laurence; Pillard, Fabien; Riviere, Daniel; Maugars, Yves-Michel

    2011-11-11

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a heterogeneous syndrome and its classification into subgroups calls for broad-based discussion. FM subgrouping, which aims to adapt treatment according to different subgroups, relies in part, on psychological and cognitive dysfunctions. Since motor control of gait is closely related to cognitive function, we hypothesized that gait markers could be of interest in the identification of FM patients' subgroups. This controlled study aimed at characterizing gait disorders in FM, and subgrouping FM patients according to gait markers such as stride frequency (SF), stride regularity (SR), and cranio-caudal power (CCP) which measures kinesia. A multicentre, observational open trial enrolled patients with primary FM (44.1 ± 8.1 y), and matched controls (44.1 ± 7.3 y). Outcome measurements and gait analyses were available for 52 pairs. A 3-step statistical analysis was carried out. A preliminary single blind analysis using k-means cluster was performed as an initial validation of gait markers. Then in order to quantify FM patients according to psychometric and gait variables an open descriptive analysis comparing patients and controls were made, and correlations between gait variables and main outcomes were calculated. Finally using cluster analysis, we described subgroups for each gait variable and looked for significant differences in self-reported assessments. SF was the most discriminating gait variable (73% of patients and controls). SF, SR, and CCP were different between patients and controls. There was a non-significant association between SF, FIQ and physical components from Short-Form 36 (p = 0.06). SR was correlated to FIQ (p = 0.01) and catastrophizing (p = 0.05) while CCP was correlated to pain (p = 0.01). The SF cluster identified 3 subgroups with a particular one characterized by normal SF, low pain, high activity and hyperkinesia. The SR cluster identified 2 distinct subgroups: the one with a reduced SR was distinguished by high FIQ

  2. The interest of gait markers in the identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auvinet Bernard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is a heterogeneous syndrome and its classification into subgroups calls for broad-based discussion. FM subgrouping, which aims to adapt treatment according to different subgroups, relies in part, on psychological and cognitive dysfunctions. Since motor control of gait is closely related to cognitive function, we hypothesized that gait markers could be of interest in the identification of FM patients' subgroups. This controlled study aimed at characterizing gait disorders in FM, and subgrouping FM patients according to gait markers such as stride frequency (SF, stride regularity (SR, and cranio-caudal power (CCP which measures kinesia. Methods A multicentre, observational open trial enrolled patients with primary FM (44.1 ± 8.1 y, and matched controls (44.1 ± 7.3 y. Outcome measurements and gait analyses were available for 52 pairs. A 3-step statistical analysis was carried out. A preliminary single blind analysis using k-means cluster was performed as an initial validation of gait markers. Then in order to quantify FM patients according to psychometric and gait variables an open descriptive analysis comparing patients and controls were made, and correlations between gait variables and main outcomes were calculated. Finally using cluster analysis, we described subgroups for each gait variable and looked for significant differences in self-reported assessments. Results SF was the most discriminating gait variable (73% of patients and controls. SF, SR, and CCP were different between patients and controls. There was a non-significant association between SF, FIQ and physical components from Short-Form 36 (p = 0.06. SR was correlated to FIQ (p = 0.01 and catastrophizing (p = 0.05 while CCP was correlated to pain (p = 0.01. The SF cluster identified 3 subgroups with a particular one characterized by normal SF, low pain, high activity and hyperkinesia. The SR cluster identified 2 distinct subgroups: the one with a

  3. Efficacy of Nintedanib in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis across Prespecified Subgroups in INPULSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costabel, Ulrich; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Richeldi, Luca; Collard, Harold R; Tschoepe, Inga; Stowasser, Susanne; Azuma, Arata

    2016-01-15

    In the two replicate, placebo-controlled, 52-week, phase III INPULSIS trials, nintedanib 150 mg twice daily significantly reduced the annual rate of decline in FVC, the primary endpoint, in subjects with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). It is unknown if this effect was uniform across all subjects treated with nintedanib. To investigate the potential association of demographic and clinical variables with the effect of nintedanib in subjects with IPF. Subgroup analyses of pooled data from the INPULSIS trials were prespecified. Subgroups were analyzed by sex, age (70%), baseline St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score (≤40, >40), smoking status (never, ex/current), systemic corticosteroid use (yes/no), and bronchodilator use (yes/no). A total of 1,061 subjects were treated (nintedanib n = 638, placebo n = 423). There was no statistically significant difference in the effect of nintedanib for the primary endpoint or the key secondary endpoints of change from baseline in SGRQ total score or time to first acute exacerbation in any subgroup. Treatment effects for the key secondary endpoints seemed more pronounced in subjects with baseline FVC ≤70% predicted, because the majority of acute exacerbations and a greater deterioration in SGRQ total score occurred in placebo-treated subjects in this subgroup. Pooled data from the INPULSIS trials support a consistent effect of nintedanib across a range of IPF phenotypes by slowing disease progression across a number of prespecified subgroups.

  4. [Identification of subgroups with lower level of stroke knowledge using decision-tree analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Kyung; Jeong, Seok Hee; Kang, Hyun Cheol

    2014-02-01

    This study was performed to explore levels of stroke knowledge and identify subgroups with lower levels of stroke knowledge among adults in Korea. A cross-sectional survey was used and data were collected in 2012. A national sample of 990 Koreans aged 20 to 74 years participated in this study. Knowledge of risk factors, warning signs, and first action for stroke were surveyed using face-to-face interviews. Descriptive statistics and decision tree analysis were performed using SPSS WIN 20.0 and Answer Tree 3.1. Mean score for stroke risk factor knowledge was 7.7 out of 10. The least recognized risk factor was diabetes and four subgroups with lower levels of knowledge were identified. Score for knowledge of stroke warning signs was 3.6 out of 6. The least recognized warning sign was sudden severe headache and six subgroups with lower levels of knowledge were identified. The first action for stroke was recognized by 65.7 percent of participants and four subgroups with lower levels of knowledge were identified. Multi-faceted education should be designed to improve stroke knowledge among Korean adults, particularly focusing on subgroups with lower levels of knowledge and less recognition of items in this study.

  5. Detecting treatment-subgroup interactions in clustered data with generalized linear mixed-effects model trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkema, M; Smits, N; Zeileis, A; Hothorn, T; Kelderman, H

    2017-10-25

    Identification of subgroups of patients for whom treatment A is more effective than treatment B, and vice versa, is of key importance to the development of personalized medicine. Tree-based algorithms are helpful tools for the detection of such interactions, but none of the available algorithms allow for taking into account clustered or nested dataset structures, which are particularly common in psychological research. Therefore, we propose the generalized linear mixed-effects model tree (GLMM tree) algorithm, which allows for the detection of treatment-subgroup interactions, while accounting for the clustered structure of a dataset. The algorithm uses model-based recursive partitioning to detect treatment-subgroup interactions, and a GLMM to estimate the random-effects parameters. In a simulation study, GLMM trees show higher accuracy in recovering treatment-subgroup interactions, higher predictive accuracy, and lower type II error rates than linear-model-based recursive partitioning and mixed-effects regression trees. Also, GLMM trees show somewhat higher predictive accuracy than linear mixed-effects models with pre-specified interaction effects, on average. We illustrate the application of GLMM trees on an individual patient-level data meta-analysis on treatments for depression. We conclude that GLMM trees are a promising exploratory tool for the detection of treatment-subgroup interactions in clustered datasets.

  6. Somatosensory nociceptive characteristics differentiate subgroups in people with chronic low back pain: a cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabey, Martin; Slater, Helen; OʼSullivan, Peter; Beales, Darren; Smith, Anne

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the existence of subgroups in a cohort with chronic low back pain (n = 294) based on the results of multimodal sensory testing and profile subgroups on demographic, psychological, lifestyle, and general health factors. Bedside (2-point discrimination, brush, vibration and pinprick perception, temporal summation on repeated monofilament stimulation) and laboratory (mechanical detection threshold, pressure, heat and cold pain thresholds, conditioned pain modulation) sensory testing were examined at wrist and lumbar sites. Data were entered into principal component analysis, and 5 component scores were entered into latent class analysis. Three clusters, with different sensory characteristics, were derived. Cluster 1 (31.9%) was characterised by average to high temperature and pressure pain sensitivity. Cluster 2 (52.0%) was characterised by average to high pressure pain sensitivity. Cluster 3 (16.0%) was characterised by low temperature and pressure pain sensitivity. Temporal summation occurred significantly more frequently in cluster 1. Subgroups were profiled on pain intensity, disability, depression, anxiety, stress, life events, fear avoidance, catastrophizing, perception of the low back region, comorbidities, body mass index, multiple pain sites, sleep, and activity levels. Clusters 1 and 2 had a significantly greater proportion of female participants and higher depression and sleep disturbance scores than cluster 3. The proportion of participants undertaking Low back pain, therefore, does not appear to be homogeneous. Pain mechanisms relating to presentations of each subgroup were postulated. Future research may investigate prognoses and interventions tailored towards these subgroups.

  7. Breast Cancer Prevalence and Mortality among Hispanic Subgroups in the United States, 2009–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijou R. Hunt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper presents data on breast cancer prevalence and mortality among US Hispanics and Hispanic subgroups, including Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American, and South American. Methods. Five-year average annual female breast cancer prevalence and mortality rates for 2009–2013 were examined using data from the National Health Interview Survey (prevalence and the National Center for Health Statistics and the American Community Survey (mortality rates. Results. Overall breast cancer prevalence among US Hispanic women was 1.03%. Although the estimates varied slightly by Hispanic subgroup, these differences were not statistically significant. The breast cancer mortality rate for Hispanics overall was 17.71 per 100,000 women. Higher rates were observed among Cubans (17.89, Mexicans (18.78, and Puerto Ricans (19.04, and a lower rate was observed among Central and South Americans (10.15. With the exception of the rate for Cubans, all Hispanic subgroup rates were statistically significantly different from the overall Hispanic rate. Additionally, all Hispanic subgroups rates were statistically significantly higher than the Central and South American rate. Conclusion. The data reveal significant differences in mortality across Hispanic subgroups. These data enable public health officials to develop targeted interventions to help lower breast cancer mortality among the highest risk populations.

  8. Fixed and Adaptive Parallel Subgroup-Specific Design for Survival Outcomes: Power and Sample Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranta Antoniou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker-guided clinical trial designs, which focus on testing the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment in improving patient health, have drawn considerable attention in the era of stratified medicine with many different designs being proposed in the literature. However, planning such trials to ensure they have sufficient power to test the relevant hypotheses can be challenging and the literature often lacks guidance in this regard. In this study, we focus on the parallel subgroup-specific design, which allows the evaluation of separate treatment effects in the biomarker-positive subgroup and biomarker-negative subgroup simultaneously. We also explore an adaptive version of the design, where an interim analysis is undertaken based on a fixed percentage of target events, with the option to stop each biomarker-defined subgroup early for futility or efficacy. We calculate the number of events and patients required to ensure sufficient power in each of the biomarker-defined subgroups under different scenarios when the primary outcome is time-to-event. For the adaptive version, stopping probabilities are also explored. Since multiple hypotheses are being tested simultaneously, and multiple interim analyses are undertaken, we also focus on controlling the overall type I error rate by way of multiplicity adjustment.

  9. Diversity among mandarin varieties and natural sub-groups in aroma volatiles compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Livnat; Yaniv, Yossi; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Carmi, Nir; Porat, Ron

    2016-01-15

    Mandarins constitute a large, diverse and important group within the Citrus family. Here, we analysed the aroma volatiles compositions of 13 mandarin varieties belonging to seven genetically different natural sub-groups that included common mandarin (C. reticulata Blanco), clementine (C. clementina Hort. ex. Tan), satsuma (C. unshiu Marcovitch), Mediterranean mandarin (C. deliciosa Tenore), King mandarin (C. nobilis Loureiro), and mandarin hybrids, such as tangor (C. reticulata × C. sinensis) and tangelo (C. reticulata × C. paradisi). We found that mandarin varieties among tangors ('Temple', 'Ortanique'), tangelos ('Orlando', 'Minneola') and King ('King') had more volatiles, at higher levels, and were richer in sesquiterpene and ester volatiles, than other varieties belonging to the sub-groups common mandarin ('Ora', 'Ponkan'), clementine ('Oroval', 'Caffin'), satsuma ('Okitsu', 'Owari') and Mediterranean mandarin ('Avana', 'Yusuf Efendi'). Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis accurately differentiated between mandarin varieties and natural sub-groups according to their aroma-volatile profiles. Although we found wide differences in aroma-volatiles compositions among varieties belonging to different natural sub-groups, we detected only minor differences among varieties within any natural sub-group. These findings suggest that selecting appropriate parents would enable manipulation of aroma-volatile compositions in future mandarin breeding programmes. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Retained austenite variation in dual-phase steel after mechanical stressing and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, L.; Tiziani, A.; Zambon, A. (Dipt. di Innovazione Meccanica e Gestionale, Padua Univ. (Italy)); Matteazzi, P. (Ist. di Chimica, Univ. di Udine (Italy))

    1991-01-20

    Retained austenite changes in a dual-phase steel have been studied after mechanical and thermal treatments. In order to determine the quantitative variations of retained austenite, whose amount in the examined steel is of the order of 5%, Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used. Retained austenite undergoes a martensitic transformation during deformation, but does not transform under the heat treatments performed on the sheet during anticorrosion and painting processes. (orig.).

  11. A Modified Design for Posterior Inlay-Retained Fixed Dental Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulaziz Samran; Mohammad Zakaria Nassani; Marwan Aswad; Amid Abdulkarim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case with bilateral missing mandibular second premolars that were restored by metal-ceramic inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses. The first prosthesis was of a traditional design and the second was of a modified design. The suggested design is created by modifying the retainer wings of the traditional resin-bonded inlay-retained fixed dental prosthesis and covering the wings with composite resin. The modified design is relatively conservative, e...

  12. A Modified Design for Posterior Inlay-Retained Fixed Dental Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Samran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case with bilateral missing mandibular second premolars that were restored by metal-ceramic inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses. The first prosthesis was of a traditional design and the second was of a modified design. The suggested design is created by modifying the retainer wings of the traditional resin-bonded inlay-retained fixed dental prosthesis and covering the wings with composite resin. The modified design is relatively conservative, esthetic and provides an extra element for the retention of posterior metal-ceramic inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses.

  13. Strong Winds over the Keel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The latest ESO image reveals amazing detail in the intricate structures of one of the largest and brightest nebulae in the sky, the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372), where strong winds and powerful radiation from an armada of massive stars are creating havoc in the large cloud of dust and gas from which the stars were born. ESO PR Photo 05a/09 The Carina Nebula ESO PR Video 05a/09 Pan over the Carina Nebula ESO PR Video 05b/09 Carina Nebula Zoom-in The large and beautiful image displays the full variety of this impressive skyscape, spattered with clusters of young stars, large nebulae of dust and gas, dust pillars, globules, and adorned by one of the Universe's most impressive binary stars. It was produced by combining exposures through six different filters from the Wide Field Imager (WFI), attached to the 2.2 m ESO/MPG telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory, in Chile. The Carina Nebula is located about 7500 light-years away in the constellation of the same name (Carina; the Keel). Spanning about 100 light-years, it is four times larger than the famous Orion Nebula and far brighter. It is an intensive star-forming region with dark lanes of cool dust splitting up the glowing nebula gas that surrounds its many clusters of stars. The glow of the Carina Nebula comes mainly from hot hydrogen basking in the strong radiation of monster baby stars. The interaction between the hydrogen and the ultraviolet light results in its characteristic red and purple colour. The immense nebula contains over a dozen stars with at least 50 to 100 times the mass of our Sun. Such stars have a very short lifespan, a few million years at most, the blink of an eye compared with the Sun's expected lifetime of ten billion years. One of the Universe's most impressive stars, Eta Carinae, is found in the nebula. It is one of the most massive stars in our Milky Way, over 100 times the mass of the Sun and about four million times brighter, making it the most luminous star known. Eta Carinae is highly

  14. Brain extracellular matrix retains connectivity in neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbaev, Arthur; Frischknecht, Renato; Heine, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of connectivity are critically important for the processing and storage of information in neuronal networks. The brain extracellular matrix (ECM) appears during postnatal development and surrounds most neurons in the adult mammalian brain. Importantly, the removal of the ECM was shown to improve plasticity and post-traumatic recovery in the CNS, but little is known about the mechanisms. Here, we investigated the role of the ECM in the regulation of the network activity in dissociated hippocampal cultures grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs). We found that enzymatic removal of the ECM in mature cultures led to transient enhancement of neuronal activity, but prevented disinhibition-induced hyperexcitability that was evident in age-matched control cultures with intact ECM. Furthermore, the ECM degradation followed by disinhibition strongly affected the network interaction so that it strongly resembled the juvenile pattern seen in naïve developing cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the ECM plays an important role in retention of existing connectivity in mature neuronal networks that can be exerted through synaptic confinement of glutamate. On the other hand, removal of the ECM can play a permissive role in modification of connectivity and adaptive exploration of novel network architecture. PMID:26417723

  15. Are there distinct cognitive and motivational sub-groups of children with ADHD?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambek, Rikke; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Tannock, Rosemary

    2017-01-01

    relevant correlates. One-hundred medication-naïve children with ADHD and 96 typically developing children (6–14 years) completed nine EF and three DA tasks as well as an odor identification test. Parents and teachers provided reports of the children's behavior (ADHD and EF). Models of the latent structure...... of scores on EF and DA tests were contrasted using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). LPA was carried out based on factor scores from the CFA and sub-groups were compared in terms of odor identification and behavior. A model with one DA and two EF factors best fit the data. LPA resulted in four sub......-groups that differed in terms of general level of neuropsychological performance (ranging from high to very low), odor identification, and behavior. The sub-groups did not differ in terms of the relative EF and DA performance. Results in the ADHD group were replicated in the control group. While EF and DA appear...

  16. Identity practices, ingroup projection, and the evaluation of subgroups: a study among Turkish-Dutch Sunnis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Jessamina Lih Yan; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on religious subgroup evaluations by examining the attitude of Turkish-Dutch Sunni Muslims towards Alevi and Shiite Muslims. Following the Ingroup Projection Model, it was expected that Sunni participants who practice Islam will project their self-defining subgroup practices on the superordinate Muslim category, which will be related to more ingroup bias towards Alevis, a Muslim subgroup that performs different religious practices. Two studies yielded consistent evidence that practicing Islam increased ingroup bias towards Alevis. Furthermore, in Study 2, we found evidence that the effect of practicing Islam on ingroup bias was mediated by relative ingroup prototypicality (RIP). Moreover, practicing Islam did not affect RIP in relation to Shiites who perform the same religious practices that we examined. These findings support the Ingroup Projection Model.

  17. Eating disorder behavior and early maladaptive schemas in subgroups of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unoka, Zsolt; Tölgyes, Tamás; Czobor, Pál; Simon, Lajos

    2010-06-01

    To examine relationship between Eating Disorder Behaviors (EDB) and Early Maladaptive Schemas (EMS) across eating disorder (ED) subgroups. EMS and ED behaviors were measured by Young Schema Questionnaire and Eating Behavior Severity Scale, respectively, among patients diagnosed with Restrictive or Binge/purging Anorexia, or bulimia nervosa. Canonical component analysis showed significant association between ED behaviors and EMSs. Canonical factor-pairs (EDB and EMS) revealed specific associations between certain patterns of EDBs, including binge-purging and physical exercise, and certain patterns of maladaptive cognitive schema, including Emotional deprivation, Abandonment, Enmeshments, Subjugation, and Emotional inhibition. ED subgroups significantly differred between the EMS and EDB canonical factors, respectively. Our findings indicate that EMS and EDB are associated, and that the factors that potentially mediate the association differ significantly among ED subgroups. These results are consistent with the notion that EMSs play a specific role in the development and maintenance of ED behaviors.

  18. Trust as a factor in determining how to attract, motivate and retain talentT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Martins

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to validate a questionnaire that can be used to determine how employees select the best company to work for. The second focus was to determine the role of trust in a relationship where employers must attract, motivate and retain employees. The confirmatory factor analysis resulted in 10 dimensions that supported most of the theoretically constructed dimensions. A second-order factor analysis was done and it became clear that there are two second-order factors underlying factor 1, namely leadership and trust. A strong correlation was found between trust and the dimensions of job satisfaction, relationships and leadership. Opsomming Die doel van die studie was om ‘n vraelys te valideer wat gebruik kon word om te bepaal hoe werknemers die beste organisasie om voor te werk kies. Die tweede fokus was om die rol van vertroue te bepaal in ‘n vertrouensverhouding waar werkgewers werknemers moet lok, motiveer en behou. ‘n Bevestigende faktorontleding het tien faktore tot gevolg gehad wat die meeste van die teoreties opgestelde dimensies ondersteun. ‘n Tweede-orde-faktorontleding van faktor een het aangetoon dat die faktor uit twee tweede-orde-faktore, leierskap en vertroue bestaan. ‘n Sterk korrelasie het voorgekom tussen vertroue en die dimensies van postevredenheid, verhoudinge en leierskap.

  19. Preserved extracellular matrix components and retained biological activity in decellularized porcine mesothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoganson, David M; Owens, Gwen E; O'Doherty, Elisabeth M; Bowley, Chris M; Goldman, Scott M; Harilal, Dina O; Neville, Craig M; Kronengold, Russell T; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2010-09-01

    Mesothelium tissues such as peritoneum and pleura have a thin and strong layer of extracellular matrix that supports mesothelial cells capable of rapid healing. Decellularized porcine mesothelium was characterized for strength, composition of the matrix and biological activity. The tensile strength of the material was 40.65 +/- 21.65 N/cm. Extracellular matrix proteins collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin as well as glycosaminoglycans were present in the material. Cytokines inherent in the extracellular matrix were preserved. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) were retained and the levels of VEGF and TGF-beta in the decellularized mesothelium were higher than those found in decellularized small intestinal submucosa (SIS). The decellularized mesothelium also stimulated human fibroblasts to produce more VEGF than fibroblasts grown on tissue culture plastic. Decellularized mesothelium is a sheet material with a combination of strength and biological activity that may have many potential applications in surgical repair and regenerative medicine. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Phenome-Wide Association Study of Rheumatoid Arthritis Subgroups Identifies Association Between Seronegative Disease and Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Jayanth; Mo, Huan; Carroll, Robert J; Crofford, Leslie J; Denny, Joshua C

    2017-02-01

    The differences between seronegative and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have not been widely reported. We performed electronic health record (EHR)-based phenome-wide association studies (PheWAS) to identify disease associations in seropositive and seronegative RA. A validated algorithm identified RA subjects from the de-identified version of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center EHR. Serotypes were determined by rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) values. We tested EHR-derived phenotypes using PheWAS comparing seropositive RA and seronegative RA, yielding disease associations. PheWAS was also performed in RF-positive versus RF-negative subjects and ACPA-positive versus ACPA-negative subjects. Following PheWAS, select phenotypes were then manually reviewed, and fibromyalgia was specifically evaluated using a validated algorithm. A total of 2,199 RA individuals with either RF or ACPA testing were identified. Of these, 1,382 patients (63%) were classified as seropositive. Seronegative RA was associated with myalgia and myositis (odds ratio [OR] 2.1, P = 3.7 × 10-10 ) and back pain. A manual review of the health record showed that among subjects coded for Myalgia and Myositis, ∼80% had fibromyalgia. Follow-up with a specific EHR algorithm for fibromyalgia confirmed that seronegative RA was associated with fibromyalgia (OR 1.8, P = 4.0 × 10-6 ). Seropositive RA was associated with chronic airway obstruction (OR 2.2, P = 1.4 × 10-4 ) and tobacco use (OR 2.2, P = 7.0 × 10-4 ). This PheWAS of RA patients identifies a strong association between seronegativity and fibromyalgia. It also affirms relationships between seropositivity and chronic airway obstruction and between seropositivity and tobacco use. These findings demonstrate the utility of the PheWAS approach to discover novel phenotype associations within different subgroups of a disease. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Strong ideal convergence in probabilistic metric spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a sequence in this ...

  2. Strong ideal convergence in probabilistic metric spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a ...

  3. John Strong - 1941-2006

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on 31 July, a few days before his 65th birthday. John started his career and obtained his PhD in a group from Westfield College, initially working on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). From the early 1970s onwards, however, his research was focused on experiments in CERN, with several particularly notable contributions. The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras (a type of television camera) to record the sparks in the spark chambers. This highly automated system allowed Omega to be used in a similar way to bubble chambers. He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems. In these experiments the Westfield group joined forces with Italian colleagues to measure the form factors of the pion and the kaon, and the lifetime of some of the newly discovered charm particles. Such h...

  4. Effect of Nintedanib in Subgroups of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis by Diagnostic Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, Ganesh; Wells, Athol U; Nicholson, Andrew G; Richeldi, Luca; Flaherty, Kevin R; Le Maulf, Florence; Stowasser, Susanne; Schlenker-Herceg, Rozsa; Hansell, David M

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of a surgical lung biopsy, patients diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in clinical practice could participate in the INPULSIS trials of nintedanib if they had honeycombing and/or traction bronchiectasis plus reticulation, without atypical features of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Thus, the patients in these trials represented patients with definite UIP and a large subgroup of patients with possible UIP. To investigate the potential impact of diagnostic subgroups on the progression of IPF and the effect of nintedanib. We conducted a post hoc subgroup analysis of patients with honeycombing on HRCT and/or confirmation of UIP by biopsy versus patients without either, using pooled data from the INPULSIS trials. Seven hundred twenty-three (68.1%) patients had honeycombing and/or biopsy, and 338 (31.9%) patients had no honeycombing or biopsy. In these subgroups, respectively, the adjusted annual rate of decline in FVC in patients treated with placebo was -225.7 and -221.0 ml/yr, and the nintedanib versus placebo difference in the adjusted annual rate of decline in FVC was 117.0 ml/yr (95% confidence interval, 76.3-157.8) and 98.9 ml/yr (95% confidence interval, 36.4-161.5). There was no significant treatment-by-subgroup interaction (P = 0.8139). Adverse events were similar between the subgroups. Patients with IPF diagnosed in clinical practice who had possible UIP with traction bronchiectasis on HRCT and had not undergone surgical lung biopsy had disease that progressed in a similar way, and responded similarly to nintedanib, to that of patients with honeycombing on HRCT and/or confirmation of UIP by biopsy.

  5. Complex factors in the etiology of Gulf War illness: wartime exposures and risk factors in veteran subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Lea; Sastre, Antonio; Gerkovich, Mary M; Cook, Mary R

    2012-01-01

    At least one-fourth of U.S. veterans who served in the 1990-1991 Gulf War are affected by the chronic symptomatic illness known as Gulf War illness (GWI). Clear determination of the causes of GWI has been hindered by many factors, including limitations in how epidemiologic studies have assessed the impact of the complex deployment environment on veterans' health. We sought to address GWI etiologic questions by evaluating the association of symptomatic illness with characteristics of veterans' deployment. We compared veteran-reported wartime experiences in a population-based sample of 304 Gulf War veterans: 144 cases who met preestablished criteria for GWI and 160 controls. Veteran subgroups and confounding among deployment variables were considered in the analyses. Deployment experiences and the prevalence of GWI differed significantly by veterans' location in theater. Among personnel who were in Iraq or Kuwait, where all battles took place, GWI was most strongly associated with using pyridostigmine bromide pills [odds ratio (OR) = 3.5; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7, 7.4] and being within 1 mile of an exploding SCUD missile (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.5, 6.1). For veterans who remained in support areas, GWI was significantly associated only with personal pesticide use, with increased prevalence (OR = 12.7; 95% CI: 2.6, 61.5) in the relatively small subgroup that wore pesticide-treated uniforms, nearly all of whom also used skin pesticides. Combat service was not significantly associated with GWI. Findings support a role for a limited number of wartime exposures in the etiology of GWI, which differed in importance with the deployment milieu in which veterans served.

  6. Subgroup and resistance analyses of raltegravir for resistant HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, David A; Steigbigel, Roy T; Gatell, Jose M

    2008-01-01

    conducted subgroup analyses of the data from week 48 in both studies according to baseline prognostic factors. Genotyping of the integrase gene was performed in raltegravir recipients who had virologic failure. RESULTS: Virologic responses to raltegravir were consistently superior to responses to placebo...... over placebo was shown in clinically relevant subgroups of patients, including those with baseline characteristics that typically predict a poor response to antiretroviral therapy: a high HIV-1 RNA level, low CD4 cell count, and low genotypic or phenotypic sensitivity score. (ClinicalTrials.gov numbers...

  7. Identification of a novel subgroup of Koala retrovirus from Koalas in Japanese zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojima, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Ohata, Takuji; Nakaoka, Rie; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    We identified a new subgroup of koala retrovirus (KoRV), named KoRV-J, which utilizes thiamine transport protein 1 as a receptor instead of the Pit-1 receptor used by KoRV (KoRV-A). By subgroup-specific PCR, KoRV-J and KoRV-A were detected in 67.5 and 100% of koalas originating from koalas from northern Australia, respectively. Altogether, our results indicate that the invasion of the koala population by KoRV-J may have occurred more recently than invasion by KoRV-A.

  8. The Importance of Risk and Subgroup Analysis of Nonparticipants in a Geriatric Intervention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, E.; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, C

    2016-01-01

    Background. A major concern in intervention studies is the generalizability of the findings due to refusal of intended participants to actually take part. In studies including ill older people the number of those declining to participate may be large and the concern is therefore relevant...... randomized study. Conclusion. We recommend that intervention studies among older people or other fragile patient groups include analysis of relevant risk and subgroup analyses of refusers........ Objectives. To compare patients characteristics, rates of acute readmission, and mortality after one and six months among older persons who agreed and those who declined to participate in a randomized controlled trial and to describe subgroups of nonparticipants. Design. Comparative study based...

  9. The Importance of Risk and Subgroup Analysis of Nonparticipants in a Geriatric Intervention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, E.; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, C

    2016-01-01

    . Objectives. To compare patients characteristics, rates of acute readmission, and mortality after one and six months among older persons who agreed and those who declined to participate in a randomized controlled trial and to describe subgroups of nonparticipants. Design. Comparative study based...... on a randomized controlled trial. Setting. University hospital in the Capital Region of Denmark. Participants. Patients >70 years discharged home after a short Emergency Department stay. 399 were requested to participate; 271 consented, whereas 128 refused. Results. Refusers were more likely to be readmitted (p...... randomized study. Conclusion. We recommend that intervention studies among older people or other fragile patient groups include analysis of relevant risk and subgroup analyses of refusers....

  10. A comparison of three clustering methods for finding subgroups in MRI, SMS or clinical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Jensen, Rikke K; Kongsted, Alice

    2014-01-01

    intensity data collected for 52 weeks by text (SMS) messaging (n = 1,121 people), and the last dataset contained a range of clinical variables measured in low back pain patients (n = 543 people). Four artificial datasets (n = 1,000 each) containing subgroups of varying complexity were also analysed testing......BACKGROUND: There are various methodological approaches to identifying clinically important subgroups and one method is to identify clusters of characteristics that differentiate people in cross-sectional and/or longitudinal data using Cluster Analysis (CA) or Latent Class Analysis (LCA...

  11. Optimizing Subgroups Formation for E-MBMS Transmissions in LTE Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algharem, M.; Omar, M. H.; Stiawan, D.; Budiarto, R.

    2017-04-01

    Long Term Evolution (LTE) network provides a high throughput with low latency which make it suitable for multicast and broadcast services. In Conventional Multicast Scheme (CMS), data is transmitted according to the user with worst channel condition which results in wasting network resources. To overcome the drawback of CMS, a new subgrouping mechanism is proposed to split the multicast group into several subgroups based on users channel quality. The performance of the proposed mechanism has been evaluated using LTE simulator. The simulation results show that the proposed mechanism increase the multicast performance compared to CMS in term of goodput and spectrum efficiency, while maintain fairness index of users in an acceptable level.

  12. Clinimetrics corner: choosing appropriate study designs for particular questions about treatment subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Hancock, Mark; Petersen, Ditte H.D

    2010-01-01

    , depending on the design of the trial. Objectives: This paper discusses the randomized controlled trial designs that are suitable to answer particular questions about treatment subgroups. It focuses on trial designs that are suitable to answer four questions: (1) 'Is the treatment effective in a pre...... that are inappropriate given the randomized controlled trial design used. The research design to choose, when developing a study protocol that investigates the effect of treatment subgroups, depends on the particular research question. Similarly, the inferences that can be drawn from an existing study will vary...

  13. Mental health service utilization for psychiatric disorders among Latinos living in the United States: the role of ethnic subgroup, ethnic identity, and language/social preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, K M; Martins, S S; Hatzenbuehler, M L; Blanco, C; Bates, L M; Hasin, Deborah S

    2012-03-01

    To examine aspects of Latino experience in the US as predicting service utilization for mood, anxiety, and substance disorders. Latino participants 18 and older in the NESARC (N = 6,359), a US national face to face survey. Outcomes were lifetime service utilization for DSM-IV lifetime mood/anxiety or substance disorders, diagnosed via structured interview (AUDADIS-IV). Main predictors were ethnic subgroup, ethnic identity, linguistic/social preferences, nativity/years in the US, and age at immigration. Higher levels of Latino ethnic identity and Spanish language/Latino social preferences predicted lower service utilization for mood disorders [ethnic identity OR = 0.52, language/social OR = 0.44] and anxiety disorders [ethnic identity OR = 0.67, language/social OR = 0.47], controlling for ethnic subgroup, disorder severity, time spent in the US, and economic and practical barriers Service utilization for alcohol/drug disorders was low across all Latino subgroups, without variation by examined predictors. Ethnic/cultural factors are strong determinants of service utilization for mood/anxiety, but not substance use disorders among Latinos in the US strategies to increase service utilization among Latinos with psychiatric disorders should be disorder specific, and recognize the role of ethnicity and identity as important components of a help-seeking model.

  14. Promoting Strong Written Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reason that an improvement in the quality of technical writing is still needed in the classroom is due to the fact that universities are facing challenging problems not only on the technological front but also on the socio-economic front. The universities are actively responding to the changes that are taking place in the global consumer marketplace. Obviously, there are numerous benefits of promoting strong written communication skills. They can be summarized into the following six categories. First, and perhaps the most important: The University achieves learner satisfaction. The learner has documented verbally, that the necessary knowledge has been successfully acquired. This results in learner loyalty that in turn will attract more qualified learners.Second, quality communication lowers the cost per pupil, consequently resulting in increased productivity backed by a stronger economic structure and forecast. Third, quality communications help to improve the cash flow and cash reserves of the university. Fourth, having high quality communication enables the university to justify the need for high costs of tuition and fees. Fifth, better quality in written communication skills result in attracting top-quality learners. This will lead to happier and satisfied learners, not to mention greater prosperity for the university as a whole. Sixth, quality written communication skills result in reduced complaints, thus meaning fewer hours spent on answering or correcting the situation. The University faculty and staff are thus able to devote more time on scholarly activities, meaningful research and productive community service. References Boyer, Ernest L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the Professorate.Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Hawkins, P., & Winter, J. (1997). Mastering change: Learning the lessons of the enterprise.London: Department for Education and Employment. Buzzel, Robert D., and Bradley T. Gale. (1987

  15. Strong agreement of nationally recommended retention measures from the Institute of Medicine and Department of Health and Human Services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F Rebeiro

    Full Text Available We sought to quantify agreement between Institute of Medicine (IOM and Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS retention indicators, which have not been compared in the same population, and assess clinical retention within the largest HIV cohort collaboration in the U.S.Observational study from 2008-2010, using clinical cohort data in the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD.Retention definitions used HIV primary care visits. The IOM retention indicator was: ≥2 visits, ≥90 days apart, each calendar year. This was extended to a 2-year period; retention required meeting the definition in both years. The DHHS retention indicator was: ≥1 visit each semester over 2 years, each ≥60 days apart. Kappa statistics detected agreement between indicators and C statistics (areas under Receiver-Operating Characteristic curves from logistic regression analyses summarized discrimination of the IOM indicator by the DHHS indicator.Among 36,769 patients in 2008-2009 and 34,017 in 2009-2010, there were higher percentages of participants retained in care under the IOM indicator than the DHHS indicator (80% vs. 75% in 2008-2009; 78% vs. 72% in 2009-2010, respectively (p<0.01, persisting across all demographic and clinical characteristics (p<0.01. There was high agreement between indicators overall (κ = 0.83 in 2008-2009; κ = 0.79 in 2009-2010, p<0.001, and C statistics revealed a very strong ability to predict retention according to the IOM indicator based on DHHS indicator status, even within characteristic strata.Although the IOM indicator consistently reported higher retention in care compared with the DHHS indicator, there was strong agreement between IOM and DHHS retention indicators in a cohort demographically similar to persons living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S. Persons with poorer retention represent subgroups of interest for retention improvement programs nationally, particularly in light of the

  16. Pengaruh Komposisi Glass Fiber Non Dental dan Penambahan Silane terhadap Kekuatan Geser Fiber Reinforced Composite sebagai Retainer Ortodonsi

    OpenAIRE

    Imam, Dian Noviyanti Agus; Sunarintyas, Siti; Nuryono, Nuryono

    2015-01-01

    Retainer dibutuhkan untuk membantu menstabilkan posisi gigi geligi selama proses reorganisasi jaringan periodontal berlangsung. Retainer FRC ortodonsi dikembangkan sebagai alternatif material estetika serta aman bagi pasien alergi terhadap nikel. E-glass fiber lebih sering digunakan sebagai retainer ortodonsi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengkaji pengaruh komposisi glass fiber non dental dan penambahan silane terhadap kekuatan geser FRC sebagai retainer ortodonsi. Subjek penelitian terdiri...

  17. Internalin profiling and multilocus sequence typing suggest four Listeria innocua subgroups with different evolutionary distances from Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecological, biochemical and genetic resemblance as well as clear differences of virulence between L. monocytogenes and L. innocua make this bacterial clade attractive as a model to examine evolution of pathogenicity. This study was attempted to examine the population structure of L. innocua and the microevolution in the L. innocua-L. monocytogenes clade via profiling of 37 internalin genes and multilocus sequence typing based on the sequences of 9 unlinked genes gyrB, sigB, dapE, hisJ, ribC, purM, gap, tuf and betL. Results L. innocua was genetically monophyletic compared to L. monocytogenes, and comprised four subgroups. Subgroups A and B correlated with internalin types 1 and 3 (except the strain 0063 belonging to subgroup C and internalin types 2 and 4 respectively. The majority of L. innocua strains belonged to these two subgroups. Subgroup A harbored a whole set of L. monocytogenes-L. innocua common and L. innocua-specific internalin genes, and displayed higher recombination rates than those of subgroup B, including the relative frequency of occurrence of recombination versus mutation (ρ/θ and the relative effect of recombination versus point mutation (r/m. Subgroup A also exhibited a significantly smaller exterior/interior branch length ratio than expected under the coalescent model, suggesting a recent expansion of its population size. The phylogram based on the analysis with correction for recombination revealed that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA of L. innocua subgroups A and B were similar. Additionally, subgroup D, which correlated with internalin type 5, branched off from the other three subgroups. All L. innocua strains lacked seventeen virulence genes found in L. monocytogenes (except for the subgroup D strain L43 harboring inlJ and two subgroup B strains bearing bsh and were nonpathogenic to mice. Conclusions L. innocua represents a young species descending from L. monocytogenes and

  18. Internalin profiling and multilocus sequence typing suggest four Listeria innocua subgroups with different evolutionary distances from Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianshun; Chen, Qiaomiao; Jiang, Lingli; Cheng, Changyong; Bai, Fan; Wang, Jun; Mo, Fan; Fang, Weihuan

    2010-03-31

    Ecological, biochemical and genetic resemblance as well as clear differences of virulence between L. monocytogenes and L. innocua make this bacterial clade attractive as a model to examine evolution of pathogenicity. This study was attempted to examine the population structure of L. innocua and the microevolution in the L. innocua-L. monocytogenes clade via profiling of 37 internalin genes and multilocus sequence typing based on the sequences of 9 unlinked genes gyrB, sigB, dapE, hisJ, ribC, purM, gap, tuf and betL. L. innocua was genetically monophyletic compared to L. monocytogenes, and comprised four subgroups. Subgroups A and B correlated with internalin types 1 and 3 (except the strain 0063 belonging to subgroup C) and internalin types 2 and 4 respectively. The majority of L. innocua strains belonged to these two subgroups. Subgroup A harbored a whole set of L. monocytogenes-L. innocua common and L. innocua-specific internalin genes, and displayed higher recombination rates than those of subgroup B, including the relative frequency of occurrence of recombination versus mutation (rho/theta) and the relative effect of recombination versus point mutation (r/m). Subgroup A also exhibited a significantly smaller exterior/interior branch length ratio than expected under the coalescent model, suggesting a recent expansion of its population size. The phylogram based on the analysis with correction for recombination revealed that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of L. innocua subgroups A and B were similar. Additionally, subgroup D, which correlated with internalin type 5, branched off from the other three subgroups. All L. innocua strains lacked seventeen virulence genes found in L. monocytogenes (except for the subgroup D strain L43 harboring inlJ and two subgroup B strains bearing bsh) and were nonpathogenic to mice. L. innocua represents a young species descending from L. monocytogenes and comprises four subgroups: two major subgroups A and B

  19. Entanglement evolution of twisted photons in strong atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Filippus S.; Wellens, Thomas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav N.

    2015-07-01

    Considering the evolution of the quantum state of a pair of entangled photons in a turbulent atmosphere and using the quadratic approximation to the Kolmogorov model of turbulence, we provide an analytical solution for the dynamical equation (an infinitesimal propagation equation) that describes this evolution in the plane-wave basis. As such, this solution fully incorporates the effect of multiple scattering, caused by the medium. After being converted into a discrete orbital angular momentum (OAM) basis, this solution retains the effect of coupling between different OAM modes on the twin-photon state for arbitrary propagation distances and arbitrary turbulence strengths. We define a minimal set of parameters that determines the entanglement evolution in the regime of strong scintillation. Furthermore, we show that in the limit of weak scintillation, our solutions reduce to those obtained from the single-phase-screen model.

  20. Fracture resistance of direct inlay-retained adhesive bridges : Effect of pontic material and occlusal morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuklander, Marijn; Salihoglu-Yener, Esra; Ozcan, Mutlu

    This study evaluated the effect of a) pontic materials and b) occlusal morphologies on the fracture resistance of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Inlay-retained FRC FPDs (N=45, n=9) were constructed using a) resin composite (deep anatomy), b) natural

  1. Differential Growth Trajectories for Achievement among Children Retained in First Grade: A Growth Mixture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Hughes, Jan N.; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the differential effect of retention on the development of academic achievement from grades 1 to 5 on children retained in grade 1 over 6 years. Growth mixture model (GMM) analyses supported the existence of two distinct trajectory groups of retained children for both reading and math among 125 ethnically and…

  2. A study on the saturation degree dependency of the seismic behaviour of retaining walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Momeni, M. J.; Habibagahi, G.; Nikooee, E.

    2016-01-01

    Retaining walls are important geotechnical structures that are often used in soil slopes and trenches to bring ground surface at appropriate level for the construction of roads, highways and buildings. It is common practice to assume that the soil behind a retaining structure is either fully

  3. Model Tests on the Retaining Walls Constructed from Geobags Filled with Construction Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geobag retaining wall using construction waste is a new flexible supporting structure, and the usage of construction waste to fill geobags can facilitate the construction recycling. In this paper, model tests were performed on geobag retaining wall using construction waste. The investigation was concentrated on the slope top settlement, the distribution characteristics of the earth pressures on retaining walls and horizontal wall displacements, and slope failure modes. The results indicated that the ultimate loads that the slope tops with retaining walls could bear were 87.5%~125% higher than that of the slope top without retaining walls. The ultimate loading of strengthened slopes with different slope ratios from 1 : 0.75 to 1 : 0.25 could be reduced by 11.8% to 29.4%. The horizontal displacements of the retaining walls constructed from geobags were distributed in a drum shape, with the greatest horizontal displacements occurring about 1/3~1/2 of the wall height away from the bottom of the wall. As the slope ratio increased, the failure of the slope soil supported by geobag retaining wall using construction waste changed from sliding to sliding-toppling (dominated by sliding and then to toppling-sliding (dominated by toppling. The range of 1/3~1/2 of wall height is the weak part of the retaining walls, which should be strengthened with certain measures during the process of design and construction.

  4. Heritable and non-heritable genetic effects on retained placenta in Meuse-Rhine-Yssel cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benedictus, L.; Koets, A.P.; Kuijpers, F.H.J.; Joosten, I.; Eldik, van P.; Heuven, H.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Failure of the timely expulsion of the fetal membranes, called retained placenta, leads to reduced fertility, increased veterinary costs and reduced milk yields. The objectives of this study were to concurrently look at the heritable and non-heritable genetic effects on retained placenta and test

  5. An Appraisal of Retained Placenta in Sokoto: a five-year review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Retained placenta is one of the major causes of primary and secondary postpartum haemorrhage associated with increased risk of maternal morbidity and mortality. Objective: To determine the incidence, method of treatment and maternal outcome of patients with retained placenta. Methodology: This is a ...

  6. Reproductive performance of Friesian mares after retained placenta and manual removal of the placenta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevinga, M; Hesselink, JW; Barkema, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Because the incidence of retained placenta in Friesian mares is estimated to be high, and no reports have been published on the reproductive performance of Friesian mares after retained placenta, we studied postpartum reproductive performance in Friesian brood mares with (n = 54) and without (n =

  7. 19 CFR 141.46 - Power of attorney retained by customhouse broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Power of attorney retained by customhouse broker... attorney retained by customhouse broker. Before transacting Customs business in the name of his principal, a customhouse broker is required to obtain a valid power of attorney to do so. He is not required to...

  8. Differences in end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending between low back pain subgroups and genders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Shannon L.; Johnson, Molly B.; Zou, Dequan; Van Dillen, Linda R.

    2012-01-01

    Patterns of lumbar posture and motion are associated with low back pain (LBP). Research suggests LBP subgroups demonstrate different patterns during common tasks. This study assessed differences in end-range lumbar flexion during two tasks between two LBP subgroups classified according to the Movement System Impairment model. Additionally, the impact of gender differences on subgroup differences was assessed. Kinematic data were collected. Subjects in the Rotation (Rot) and Rotation with Extension (RotExt) LBP subgroups were asked to sit slumped and bend forward from standing. Lumbar end-range flexion was calculated. Subjects reported symptom behavior during each test. Compared to the RotExt subgroup, the Rot subgroup demonstrated greater end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and a trend towards greater end-range lumbar flexion with forward bending. Compared to females, males demonstrated greater end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending. A greater proportion of people in the Rot subgroup reported symptoms with each test compared to the RotExt subgroup. Males and females were equally likely to report symptoms with each test. Gender differences were not responsible for LBP subgroup differences. Subgrouping people with LBP provides insight into differences in lumbar motion within the LBP population. Results suggesting potential consistent differences across flexion-related tasks support the presence of stereotypical movement patterns that are related to LBP. PMID:22261650

  9. Differences in end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending between low back pain subgroups and genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Shannon L; Johnson, Molly B; Zou, Dequan; Van Dillen, Linda R

    2012-04-01

    Patterns of lumbar posture and motion are associated with low back pain (LBP). Research suggests LBP subgroups demonstrate different patterns during common tasks. This study assessed differences in end-range lumbar flexion during two tasks between two LBP subgroups classified according to the Movement System Impairment model. Additionally, the impact of gender differences on subgroup differences was assessed. Kinematic data were collected. Subjects in the Rotation (Rot) and Rotation with Extension (RotExt) LBP subgroups were asked to sit slumped and bend forward from standing. Lumbar end-range flexion was calculated. Subjects reported symptom behaviour during each test. Compared to the RotExt subgroup, the Rot subgroup demonstrated greater end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and a trend towards greater end-range lumbar flexion with forward bending. Compared to females, males demonstrated greater end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending. A greater proportion of people in the Rot subgroup reported symptoms with each test compared to the RotExt subgroup. Males and females were equally likely to report symptoms with each test. Gender differences were not responsible for LBP subgroup differences. Subgrouping people with LBP provides insight into differences in lumbar motion within the LBP population. Results suggesting potential consistent differences across flexion-related tasks support the presence of stereotypical movement patterns that are related to LBP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pulsatile lavage irrigator tip, a rare radiolucent retained foreign body in the pelvis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archdeacon Michael T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retained foreign bodies after surgery have the potential to cause serious medical complications for patients and bring fourth serious medico-legal consequences for surgeons and hospitals. Standard operating room protocols have been adopted to reduce the occurrence of the most common retained foreign bodies. Despite these precautions, radiolucent objects and uncounted components/pieces of instruments are at risk to be retained in the surgical wound. We report the unusual case of a retained plastic pulsatile lavage irrigator tip in the surgical wound during acetabulum fracture fixation, which was subsequently identified on routine postoperative computed tomography. Revision surgery was required in order to remove the retained object, and the patient had no further complications.

  11. Removable cast chrome cobalt retainers for extended or indefinite period clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Simon; Singh, Parmjit; Mizrahi, Eliakim

    2015-09-01

    Patients are frequently being asked to wear orthodontic retainers for as long as they want their teeth to remain in the post-treatment position. Fixed retainers, which are placed on the lingual surface of anterior teeth only, have the advantage of minimal compliance issues but are not without their problems related to wire fracture, adhesive failure and potential gingival or periodontal disease. Plastic retainers, although associated with relatively good aesthetics and compliance, have limitations related to their physical and mechanical properties. This paper describes a chrome cobalt metal retainer that could be used as a long-term retainer with few drawbacks. The properties of chrome cobalt are described and the clinical procedure is outlined.

  12. High School Graduation Rates across English Learner Student Subgroups in Arizona. REL 2017-205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min; Haas, Eric; Zhu, Niufeng; Tran, Loan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have documented differences in academic achievement between current and former English learner students. These differences validate calls for more focused analyses of achievement across English learner student subgroups. Specifically, there is interest in examining variation in academic success based on the amount of time a student…

  13. Bounds for the orders of the finite subgroups of G(k)

    OpenAIRE

    Serre, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    If k is a commutative field and G a reductive (connected) algebraic group over k, we give bounds for the orders of the finite subgroups of G(k); these bounds depends on the type of G and on the Galois groups of the cyclotomic extensions of k.

  14. Can I retake it? Exploring subgroup differences and criterion-related validity in promotion retesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Morgeson, Frederick P; Schleicher, Deidra J; Campion, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Despite recent interest in the practice of allowing job applicants to retest, surprisingly little is known about how retesting affects 2 of the most critical factors on which staffing procedures are evaluated: subgroup differences and criterion-related validity. We examined these important issues in a sample of internal candidates who completed a job-knowledge test for a within-job promotion. This was a useful context for these questions because we had job-performance data on all candidates (N = 403), regardless of whether they passed or failed the promotion test (i.e., there was no direct range restriction). We found that retest effects varied by subgroup, such that females and younger candidates improved more upon retesting than did males and older candidates. There also was some evidence that Black candidates did not improve as much as did candidates from other racial groups. In addition, among candidates who retested, their retest scores were somewhat better predictors of subsequent job performance than were their initial test scores (rs = .38 vs. .27). The overall results suggest that retesting does not negatively affect criterion-related validity and may even enhance it. Furthermore, retesting may reduce the likelihood of adverse impact against some subgroups (e.g., female candidates) but increase the likelihood of adverse impact against other subgroups (e.g., older candidates). PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  15. Psychosocial and Friendship Characteristics of Bully/Victim Subgroups in Korean Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoolim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial and friendship characteristics of Korean children who engaged in bully/victim subgroups among their peer groups. The participants were 605 elementary school students in Bucheon City, Korea. The participants completed a peer nomination inventory as well as loneliness and social anxiety scales. Friendship quality…

  16. Using Social Network Analysis to Identify Sub-Groups in the Operating Room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Listyowardojo, Tita A.; Steglich, Christian; Peuchen, Stephen; Johnson, Addie; de Waard, D.; Godthelp, J.; Kooi, F.L.; Brookhuis, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    The frequency with which operating room (OR) staff work together can impact patient safety because staff who often work together share a set of experiences which may enable them to anticipate each other’s actions and reactions in the future. Identifying sub-groups of staff who frequently work

  17. Patterns of alcohol use and consequences among empirically derived sexual minority subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Amelia E; Sher, Kenneth J; Steinley, Douglas; Wood, Phillip K; Littlefield, Andrew K

    2012-03-01

    The current study develops an empirically determined classification of sexual orientation developmental patterns based on participants' annual reports of self-identifications, sexual attractions, and sexual behaviors during the first 4 years of college. A secondary aim of the current work was to examine trajectories of alcohol involvement among identified subgroups. Data were drawn from a subsample of a longitudinal study of incoming first-time college students at a large, public university (n = 2,068). Longitudinal latent class analysis was used to classify sexual minority participants into empirically derived subgroups based on three self-reported facets of sexual orientation. Multivariate repeated-measures analyses were conducted to examine how trajectories of alcohol involvement varied by sexual orientation class membership. Four unique subclasses of sexual orientation developmental patterns were identified for males and females: one consistently exclusively heterosexual group and three sexual minority groups. Despite generally similar alcohol use patterns among subclasses, certain sexual minority subgroups reported elevated levels of alcohol-related negative consequences and maladaptive motivations for use throughout college compared with their exclusively heterosexual counterparts. Elevations in coping and conformity motivations for alcohol use were seen among those subgroups that also evidenced heightened negative alcohol-related consequences. Implications and limitations of the current work are discussed.

  18. Contents of Stereotypes toward Woman Subgroups: An Investigation in the Framework of Stereotype Content Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timucin Aktan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the stereotype contents toward woman subgroups and relate these contents to social-structural predictors and sexism. In this respect, 119 university students were recruited for the first study and they were asked to rate 10 woman subgroups in terms of their competence and warmth, and their status and competitiveness. Participants' level of sexism was also measured using ambivalent sexism scale. The findings of the first study revealed that competence and warmth were the two fundamental dimensions of the stereotype contents, these stereotypes could be depicted in three clusters, the content of many women stereotypes were mixed, and status was linked to competence and competition was related to lack of warmth. Besides replicating the main hypotheses of stereotype content model, the findings supported its two basic assumptions, i.e. negative stereotypes are not necessary to reveal stereotype clusters and personal stereotypes are more open to motivational concerns. Finally, sexism was related only with competition, but not with stereotype contents. Since, high competent / high warm cluster was not observed in the first study, the number of woman subgroups was increased in the second study. Thus, 86 university students were asked to rate 18 women subgroups on the scales used in the first study. Results replicated the findings of the first study, supporting the main hypothesis of stereotype content model. The findings of the studies were discussed in the light of relevant literature.

  19. Clinical trials with nested subgroups: Analysis, sample size determination and internal pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placzek, Marius; Friede, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The importance of subgroup analyses has been increasing due to a growing interest in personalized medicine and targeted therapies. Considering designs with multiple nested subgroups and a continuous endpoint, we develop methods for the analysis and sample size determination. First, we consider the joint distribution of standardized test statistics that correspond to each (sub)population. We derive multivariate exact distributions where possible, providing approximations otherwise. Based on these results, we present sample size calculation procedures. Uncertainties about nuisance parameters which are needed for sample size calculations make the study prone to misspecifications. We discuss how a sample size review can be performed in order to make the study more robust. To this end, we implement an internal pilot study design where the variances and prevalences of the subgroups are reestimated in a blinded fashion and the sample size is recalculated accordingly. Simulations show that the procedures presented here do not inflate the type I error significantly and maintain the prespecified power as long as the sample size of the smallest subgroup is not too small. We pay special attention to the case of small sample sizes and attain a lower boundary for the size of the internal pilot study.

  20. Structural Mobility, Exchange Mobility and Subgroup Consistent Mobility Measurement – US–German Mobility Measurements Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Schluter, C.; D. VAN DE GAER

    2008-01-01

    We formalize the concept of structural mobility and use the framework of subgroup consistent mobility measurement to derive a relative and an absolute measure of mobility that is increasing both in upward structural mobility and exchange mobility. In our empirical illustration, we contribute substantively to the ongoing debate about mobility rankings between the USA and Germany.

  1. Perceived discrimination and chronic health in adults from nine ethnic subgroups in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Shauna K

    2015-01-01

    This comparative analysis examines the association between chronic cardiovascular, respiratory and pain conditions, race, ethnicity, nativity, length of residency, and perceived discrimination among three racial and nine ethnic subgroups of Asian Americans (Vietnamese, Filipino, and Chinese), Latino-American (Cuban, Portuguese, and Mexican), and Afro-Caribbean American (Haitian, Jamaican, and Trinidadian/Tobagonian) respondents. Analysis used weighted Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys-merged data from the National Latino and Asian American Study and the National Survey of American Life. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine which groups within the model were more likely to report perceived discrimination effects. Afro-Caribbean subgroups were more likely to report perceived discrimination than Asian American and Latino-American subgroups were. Logistic regression revealed a significant positive association with perceived discrimination and chronic pain only for Latino-American respondents. Significant differences in reports of perceived discrimination emerged by race and ethnicity. Caribbean respondents were more likely to report high levels of perceived discrimination; however, they showed fewer significant associations related to chronic health conditions compared to Asian Americans and Latino-Americans. Examination of perceived discrimination across ethnic subgroups reveals large variations in the relationship between chronic health and discrimination by race and ethnicity. Examining perceived discrimination by ethnicity may reveal more complex chronic health patterns masked by broader racial groupings.

  2. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in subgroups of patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, van den C.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. METHODS: The study was performed in the out-patient clinic of physical therapy of a large hospital. Data

  3. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in specific subgroups of patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. METHODS: The study was performed in the out-patient clinic of physical therapy of a large hospital. Data

  4. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in subgroups of patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Breedveld, F.C.; van den Ende, C.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. Methods. The study was performed in the out-patient clinic of physical therapy of a large hospital. Data

  5. Young People with Harmful Sexual Behaviour: Do Those with Learning Disabilities Form a Distinct Subgroup?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Louise; Giles, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The study examines 102 young people with Learning Disabilities (n = 51) and without a learning disability (NLD; n = 51) to explore ways in which LD young people with harmful sexual behaviours (HSB) should be recognized as a subgroup requiring specialized treatment and intervention. Throughout this comparison of perpetrator, victim and abuse…

  6. Hecke Eigenforms in the Cohomology of Congruence Subgroups of SL(3, Z)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geemen, Bert van; Kallen, Wilberd van der; Top, Jaap; Verberkmoes, Alain

    1997-01-01

    We list here Hecke eigenvalues of several automorphic forms for congruence subgroups of SL(3; Z). To compute such tables, we describe an algorithm that combines techniques developed previously with the Lenstra–Lenstra–Lovász algorithm. With our implementation of this new algorithm we were able to

  7. The Influence of Working Memory on Reading Growth in Subgroups of Children with Reading Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, H. Lee; Jerman, Olga

    2007-01-01

    This 3-year longitudinal study determined whether (a) subgroups of children with reading disabilities (RD) (children with RD only, children with both reading and arithmetic deficits, and low verbal IQ readers) and skilled readers varied in working memory (WM) and short-term memory (STM) growth and (b) whether growth in an executive system and/or a…

  8. Identification and Characterization of Unique Subgroups of Chronic Pain Individuals with Dispositional Personality Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The current study attempted to identify and characterize distinct CP subgroups based on their level of dispositional personality traits. The secondary objective was to compare the difference among the subgroups in mood, coping, and disability. Methods. Individuals with chronic pain were assessed for demographic, psychosocial, and personality measures. A two-step cluster analysis was conducted in order to identify distinct subgroups of patients based on their level of personality traits. Differences in clinical outcomes were compared using the multivariate analysis of variance based on cluster membership. Results. In 229 participants, three clusters were formed. No significant difference was seen among the clusters on patient demographic factors including age, sex, relationship status, duration of pain, and pain intensity. Those with high levels of dispositional personality traits had greater levels of mood impairment compared to the other two groups (p<0.05. Significant difference in disability was seen between the subgroups. Conclusions. The study identified a high risk group of CP individuals whose level of personality traits significantly correlated with impaired mood and coping. Use of pharmacological treatment alone may not be successful in improving clinical outcomes among these individuals. Instead, a more comprehensive treatment involving psychological treatments may be important in managing the personality traits that interfere with recovery.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Unique Subgroups of Chronic Pain Individuals with Dispositional Personality Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S; Rice, D; McIntyre, A; Getty, H; Speechley, M; Sequeira, K; Shapiro, A P; Morley-Forster, P; Teasell, R W

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The current study attempted to identify and characterize distinct CP subgroups based on their level of dispositional personality traits. The secondary objective was to compare the difference among the subgroups in mood, coping, and disability. Methods. Individuals with chronic pain were assessed for demographic, psychosocial, and personality measures. A two-step cluster analysis was conducted in order to identify distinct subgroups of patients based on their level of personality traits. Differences in clinical outcomes were compared using the multivariate analysis of variance based on cluster membership. Results. In 229 participants, three clusters were formed. No significant difference was seen among the clusters on patient demographic factors including age, sex, relationship status, duration of pain, and pain intensity. Those with high levels of dispositional personality traits had greater levels of mood impairment compared to the other two groups (p disability was seen between the subgroups. Conclusions. The study identified a high risk group of CP individuals whose level of personality traits significantly correlated with impaired mood and coping. Use of pharmacological treatment alone may not be successful in improving clinical outcomes among these individuals. Instead, a more comprehensive treatment involving psychological treatments may be important in managing the personality traits that interfere with recovery.

  10. The Measurement of Collaborative Culture in Secondary Schools: An Informal Subgroup Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Chloé; Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Struyve, Charlotte; Vandecandelaere, Machteld; Gielen, Sarah; Kyndt, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Research on teacher collaboration underlines the importance of a collaborative culture for teachers' functioning. However, while scholars usually regard collaborative culture as a school team characteristic, this study argues that subgroups may be more meaningful units of analysis to conceptualize and assess teachers' perceptions of collaborative…

  11. Pooling of Individual Patient Data from Clinical Trials. Improvement of analyses of subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, L.

    2008-01-01

    Meta-analyses that use individual patient data (IPD), that is, the raw data of individual trials, rather than simply the overall results of each trial have been proposed as a major improvement in subgroup analyses. Since IPD meta-analyses often include more detailed data, they usually have greater

  12. Weinberg Angle Derivation from Discrete Subgroups of SU(2 and All That

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Weinberg angle W of the Standard Model of leptons and quarks is derived from specific discrete (i.e., finite subgroups of the electroweak local gauge group SU(2 L U(1 Y . In addition, the cancellation of the triangle anomaly is achieved even when there are four quark families and three lepton families!

  13. Subgroup analyses of maraviroc in previously treated R5 HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Nelson, Mark; Lazzarin, Adriano; Konourina, Irina; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Lampiris, Harry; Hirschel, Bernard; Tebas, Pablo; Raffi, François; Trottier, Benoit; Bellos, Nicholaos; Saag, Michael; Cooper, David A.; Westby, Mike; Tawadrous, Margaret; Sullivan, John F.; Ridgway, Caroline; Dunne, Michael W.; Felstead, Steve; Mayer, Howard; van der Ryst, Elna; Angel, Jonathan; Conway, Brian; Gough, Kevin A.; Lalonde, Richard G.; Laplante, Francois; Leblanc, Roger P.; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Rachlis, Anita R.; Romanowski, Barbara; Rosser, Stuart J.; Rubinstein, Ethan; Shafran, Stephen David; Smaill, Fiona; Tremblay, Cecile; Trottier, Sylvie; Tsoukas, Christos; Walmsley, Sharon Lynn; Voskanian, Alen; Akil, Bisher; Arduino, Roberto Claudio; Asmuth, David; Beatty, George William; Becker, Stephen Lawrence; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Blue, Sky Robert; Bolan, Robert Key; Brand, John D.; Burnazian, George Ghazaros; Burnside, Alfred F.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Campo, Rafael E.; Casey, Kathleen King; Cimoch, Paul Joseph; Cohen, Calvin J.; Coodley, Gregg Oscar; Corales, Roberto B.; DeJesus, Edwin; Diaz, Leslie E.; Drusano, George L.; Ernst, Jerome A.; Feinberg, Judith E.; Feldman, Lawrence Edward; Fine, Steven M.; Flamm, Jason Andrew; Follansbee, Stephen Eliot; Fralich, Todd Allen; Gallant, Emanuel; Godofsky, Eliot Warren; Green, Gary; Greiger-Zanlungo, Paula Rosa; Gripshover, Barbara Marie; Groger, Richard K.; Gulick, Roy; Hardy, William David; Hassler, Shawn K.; Haubrich, Richard Harold; Hauptman, Stephen P.; Henry, David Holden; Henry, William Keith; Hernandez, Jose Norberto; Hicks, Charles Byron; Horberg, Michael Alan; Jemsek, Joseph G.; Kelly, Allan Rowan; Kinder, Clifford A.; Klein, Daniel Benjamin; Kogelman, Laura; Lalezari, Jacob Paul; LaMarca, Anthony; Lampiris, Harry William; Leibowitz, Matthew; Leider, Jason Mark; Lennox, Jeffrey Lloyd; Liporace, Ralph; Martin, Harold Luther; Martinez-Bejar, Lucia M.; Martorell, Claudia; McGowan, Joseph P.; Mildvan, Donna; Miles, Steven; Mitsuyasu, Ronald Takeshi; Morales-Ramirez, Javier Osvaldo; Morris, Anne B.; Mounzer, Karam Chucri; Myers, Robert Anderson; Nadler, Jeffrey P.; Pearce, Daniel; Pierone, Gerald; Rashbaum, Bruce Stephen; Ravishankar, Jayashree; Redfield, Robert Ray; Reichman, Richard Craig; Robbins, William Jay; Roberts, Stockton Edward; Rodriguez, Jorge E.; Sathasivam, Kunthavi; Sax, Paul Edward; Schwartz, Lawrence E.; Segal-Maurer, Sorana; Sension, Michael Grant; Sepulveda-Arzola, Gladys E.; Skolnik, Paul Richard; Sloan, Louis Marshall; Smith, Robert P.; Sosman, James Michael; Stapleton, Jack Thomas; Steigbigel, Roy; Steinhart, Corklin R.; Sweet, Donna Elaine; Swindells, Susan; Thompson, Melanie Ann; Sisneros, Silver; Towner, William James; Gordon, Peter; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Wheeler, David Allen; Williams, Sally; Wilcox, Dean; Williams, Steven; Wills, Todd Stephen; Wohlfeiler, Michael Bruce; Wright, David; Xavier, Angela; Yangco, Bienvenido Gamulo; Zingman, Barry Stephen; Zorrilla, Carmen D.; Allworth, Anthony M.; Bloch, Mark T.; Bodsworth, Neil J.; Chuah, John; Cooper, David; Doong, Nicholas; Dwyer, Dominic; Gold, Julian; Hoy, Jennifer Frances; Moore, Richard J.; Roth, Norman J.; Workman, Cassy; Clumeck, Nathan; Dellot, Patricia; Goffard, Jean Christophe; Moutschen, Michel; Vandercam, Bernard C.; Vogelaers, Dirk; Bentata, Michele; Cotte, Laurent; Delfraissy, Jean-Francois; Durant, Jacques; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Hocqueloux, Laurent; Landman, Roland; Lafeuillade, Alain; Martin, Isabelle Poizot; Molina, Jean-Michel; Pialoux, Gilles; Piketty, Christophe; Raffi, Francois; Reynes, Jacques; Verdon, Renaud; Arasteh, Keikawus; Bogner, Johannes Richard; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Esser, Stefan; Goebel, Frank-Detlef; Harrer, Thomas; Kern, Peter; Knechten, Heribert; van Lunzen, Jan; Mueller, Markus; Mutz, Antonius; Oette, Mark; Plettenberg, Andreas; Rockstroh, Juergen; Rump, Jorg-Andres; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Schneider, Lothar; Schuster, Dieter; Staszewski, Schlomo; Stellbrink, Hans-Juergen; Trein, Andreas; Weitner, Lutwinus; Aiuti, Fernando; Bassetti, Dante; Di Biagio, Antonio; Caramello, Pietro; Carosi, Giampiero; Esposito, Roberto; Leoncini, Francesco; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Mazzotta, Francesco; Montella, Francesco; Raise, Enzo; Vullo, Vicenzo; Hoepelman, Ilja Mohandas; Perenboom, Rosalinde Maria; Prins, J. M.; Richter, Clemens; van der Ende, Marchina Elisabeth; Beniowski, Marek; Boron-Kaczmarska, Anna; Flisiak, Robert; Halota, Waldemar; Horban, Andrzej; Mach, Tomasz; Smiatacz, Tomasz; Lozano de Leon, Fernando; Viciana Fernandez, Pompeyo; Rubio Garcia, Rafael; Gatell Artigas, Jose Josep; Gonzalez Garcia, Juan Julian; Gutierrez, Felix; Gonzalez Lahoz, Juan; Iribarren Loyarte, Jose; Moreno, Santiago; Pulido Ortega, Federico; Domingo Pedrol, Pere; Rivero, Antonio; Clotet, Bonaventura; Sarria, Cristina; Gisslen, Magnus; Flamholc, Leo; Karlsson, Anders; Battegay, Manuel; Bernasconi, Enos; Cavassini, Matthias; Drechsler, Henning; Opravil, Milos; Vernazza, Pietro; Easterbrook, Philippa Jane; Fisher, Martin; Hay, Philip; Johnson, Margaret A.; Leen, Clifford L.; Nelson, Mark R.; Ong, Edmund; Weber, Jonathan N.; White, David J.; Wilkins, Edmund; Wiselka, Martin; Alvarez-Jacinto, Ana Maria; Antoniskis, Diana; Atkinson, Barbara A.; Berger, Daniel S.; Blick, Gary; Brenna, Robert Owen; Burack, Jeffrey Howard; Church, L. W. Preston; Clay, Patrick G.; Cook, Paul Peniston; Creticos, Catherine Maria; Daly, Patrick William; Feleke, Getachew; File, Thomas Mc Donald; Galpin, Jeffrey Eliot; Green, Stephen Lloyd; Haas, Frances Fae; Hanna, Barbara J.; Hsiao, Chiu-Bin; Hsu, Ricky K.; Jones, Robert S.; Kadlecik, Peter; Kalayjian, Robert Charles; Keller, Robert H.; Kerkar, Shubha; Koirala, Janak; Lai, Leon Liang-Yu; Lalla-Reddy, Sujata; Macarthur, Rodger David; Malanoski, Gregory John; Markowitz, Norman Peter; McLeroth, Patrick L.; McMeeking, Alexander A.; Miljkovic, Goran; Montana, John Buscemi; Nixon, Daniel Edward; Norris, Dorece G.; Penico, Jesse Pullen; Perez-Limonte, Leonel; Posorske, Lynette H.; Prelutsky, David James; Riddell, James; Rodwick, Barry Michael; Ruane, Peter Jerome; Sampson, James; Santiago, Steven; Seinfeld, Amy; Sharp, Victoria Lee; Shebib, Zaher; Tanner, Mark Leslie; Timpone, Joseph G.; Wade, Barbara H.; Wallach, Frances; Weinberg, Winkler; Zurawski, Christine

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We conducted subanalyses of the combined results of the Maraviroc versus Optimized Therapy in Viremic Antiretroviral Treatment-Experienced Patients (MOTIVATE) 1 and MOTIVATE 2 studies to better characterize the efficacy and safety of maraviroc in key subgroups of patients. METHODS: We

  14. Identification of a genomic subgroup of BK polyomavirus spread in European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Saukko, Pekka J; Tertti, Risto; Metsärinne, Kaj P; Carr, Michael J; Crowley, Brendan; Sakurada, Koichi; Zheng, Huai-Ying; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Yogo, Yoshiaki

    2006-11-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is highly prevalent in the human population, infecting children without obvious symptoms and persisting in the kidney in a latent state. In immunosuppressed patients, BKV is reactivated and excreted in urine. BKV isolates worldwide are classified into four serologically distinct subtypes, I-IV, with subtype I being the most frequently detected. Furthermore, subtype I is subdivided into subgroups based on genomic variations. In this study, the distribution patterns of the subtypes and subgroups of BKV were compared among four patient populations with various immunosuppressive states and of various ethnic backgrounds: (A) Finnish renal-transplant recipients; (B) Irish/English haematopoietic stem-cell transplant recipients with and without haemorrhagic cystitis; (C) Japanese renal-transplant recipients; and (D) Japanese bone-marrow transplant recipients. The typing sequences (287 bp) of BKV in population A were determined in this study; those in populations B-D have been reported previously. These sequences were subjected to phylogenetic and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses. Based on the results of these analyses, the BKV isolates in the four patient populations were classified into subtypes and subgroups. The incidence of subtype IV varied significantly among patient populations. Furthermore, the incidence of subgroup Ib-2 within subtype I was high in populations A and B, whereas that of Ic was high in populations C and D (PBKV DNA sequences supported the hypothesis that there is geographical separation of European and Asian BKV strains.

  15. On finite groups whose every proper normal subgroup is a union of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    On finite groups whose every proper normal subgroup is a union of a given number of conjugacy classes. ALI REZA ASHRAFI and GEETHA VENKATARAMAN. ∗. Department of Mathematics, University of Kashan, Kashan, Iran. ∗. Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences Foundation, St. Stephen's. College ...

  16. Contribution of Dietary Supplements to Nutritional Adequacy by Socioeconomic Subgroups in Adults of the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Blumberg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Many Americans have inadequate intakes of several nutrients, and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015–2020 identified vitamins A, C, D, and E, in addition to calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, choline, and fiber as “underconsumed nutrients”. Based on nationally representative data on 10,698 adults from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES, 2009–2012, assessments were made of socioeconomic differences, based on the Poverty Income Ratio (PIR, in terms of the association of dietary supplement use on nutrient intake and nutrient inadequacies. Compared to food alone, the use of any dietary supplement plus food was associated with significantly (p < 0.01 higher intakes of 15–16 of 19 nutrients examined in all socioeconomic groups; and significantly reduced rates of inadequacy for 10/17 nutrients in the subgroup PIR > 1.85 (not poor, but only 4–5/17 nutrients (calcium and vitamins A, C, D, E for the poor and nearly poor subgroups (PIR < 1.35 and PIR 1.35 to ≤1.85, respectively. An increased prevalence of intakes above the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL was seen for 3–9/13 nutrients, but all were less than 5% in the PIR subgroups. In conclusion, dietary supplement use was associated with an increased micronutrient intake, decreased inadequacies, and a slight increase in the prevalence of intakes above the UL, with greater benefits seen in the PIR > 1.85 subgroup.

  17. Double-crown-retained removable dental prostheses: a retrospective study of survival and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Dittmann, Britta; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Research data are scarce on double-crown-retained removable dental prostheses. In double-crown-retained removable dental prostheses, crown-like copings are definitively cemented to the abutment teeth and serve as prosthesis attachments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the survival of double-crown-retained removable dental prostheses in use for 7 years and to determine their most common complications. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the clinical outcome of 117 prostheses in 86 patients with 385 abutment teeth. Thirty-two telescopic-crown-retained removable dental prostheses, 51 conical-crown-retained removable dental prostheses, and 34 resilient telescopic-crown-retained overdentures were clinically reexamined by 1 investigator. Prosthesis success was defined as survival without severe complications (abutment tooth extraction). Statistical analyses were performed with Kaplan-Meier modeling and Cox regression (α=.05). Minor complications, for example, the decementation of primary crowns (34.2%), failure of the veneer of secondary crowns (11.1%), fracture of the denture base (17.1%), and the need for relining (12%), were common. Cumulative prosthesis survival for all types of prostheses was 93.8% after 7 years. After the same period, prosthesis success was 90% for telescopic-crown-retained removable dental prostheses and 78.5% for conical-crown-retained removable dental prostheses and resilient telescopic-crown-retained overdentures. The medium-term double-crown-retained removable dental prosthesis survival found in this retrospective investigation appears acceptable. When bearing in mind the limits of this study, this kind of prosthesis might be a viable treatment option for patients with a reduced dentition. However, more laboratory and clinical research is necessary to reduce the incidence of minor complications and confirm the present in vivo results in larger patient groups. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of

  18. Retaining STEM women with community-based mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, M.

    2011-12-01

    While women have been graduating from physical oceanography programs in increasing numbers for the past two decades, the number of women occupying senior positions in the field remains relatively low. Thus, the disparity between the percentages of women at various career stages seems to be related to the retention of those completing graduate school in physical oceanography, not in recruiting women to the field. Studies indicate that a positive mentoring experience is strongly correlated with success in science, and as such, MPOWIR (Mentoring Physical Oceanography Women to Increase Retention) provides this essential mentoring to physical oceanographers from late graduate school through their early careers. Our network includes over 400 scientists at 70 institutions participating in a variety of online and face-to-face mentoring opportunities. The MPOWIR website (www.mpowir.org) includes resources for junior scientists, ways to get involved, data and career profiles, and a blog with job postings and relevant information. In October 2011, we will hold the third Pattullo conference to bring mentors and mentees together. The 43 participants at this conference will share their research, attend professional development sessions, and openly discuss issues related to the retention of young scientists in the field.

  19. Identification of New World Quails Susceptible to Infection with Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachý, Jiří; Reinišová, Markéta; Kučerová, Dana; Šenigl, Filip; Stepanets, Volodymyr; Hron, Tomáš; Trejbalová, Kateřina; Elleder, Daniel; Hejnar, Jiří

    2017-02-01

    The J subgroup of avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) infects domestic chickens, jungle fowl, and turkeys. This virus enters the host cell through a receptor encoded by the tvj locus and identified as Na+/H+ exchanger 1. The resistance to avian leukosis virus subgroup J in a great majority of galliform species has been explained by deletions or substitutions of the critical tryptophan 38 in the first extracellular loop of Na+/H+ exchanger 1. Because there are concerns of transspecies virus transmission, we studied natural polymorphisms and susceptibility/resistance in wild galliforms and found the presence of tryptophan 38 in four species of New World quails. The embryo fibroblasts of New World quails are susceptible to infection with avian leukosis virus subgroup J, and the cloned Na+/H+ exchanger 1 confers susceptibility on the otherwise resistant host. New World quails are also susceptible to new avian leukosis virus subgroup J variants but resistant to subgroups A and B and weakly susceptible to subgroups C and D of avian sarcoma/leukosis virus due to obvious defects of the respective receptors. Our results suggest that the avian leukosis virus subgroup J could be transmitted to New World quails and establish a natural reservoir of circulating virus with a potential for further evolution. Since its spread in broiler chickens in China and Southeast Asia in 2000, ALV-J remains a major enzootic challenge for the poultry industry. Although the virus diversifies rapidly in the poultry, its spillover and circulation in wild bird species has been prevented by the resistance of most species to ALV-J. It is, nevertheless, important to understand the evolution of the virus and its potential host range in wild birds. Because resistance to avian retroviruses is due particularly to receptor incompatibility, we studied Na+/H+ exchanger 1, the receptor for ALV-J. In New World quails, we found a receptor compatible with virus entry, and we confirmed the susceptibilities of four New

  20. The use of specialty training to retain doctors in Malawi: A discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, Kate L; Ulaya, Godwin; Lagarde, Mylène; Muula, Adamson S; Dzowela, Titha; Hanson, Kara

    2016-11-01

    Emigration has contributed to a shortage of doctors in many sub-Saharan African countries. Specialty training is highly valued by doctors and a potential tool for retention. Yet not all types of training may be valued equally. In the first study to examine preferences for postgraduate training in depth, we carried out a discrete choice experiment as part of a cross-sectional survey of all Malawian doctors within seven years of graduation and not yet in specialty training. Over August 2012 to March 2013, 148 doctors took part out of 153 eligible in Malawi. Despite evidence that specialty training is highly sought after, Malawian junior doctors would not accept all types of training. Doctors preferred timely training outside of Malawi in core specialties (internal medicine, general surgery, paediatrics, obstetrics & gynaecology). Specialty preferences are particularly strong, with most junior doctors requiring nearly double their monthly salary to accept training all in Malawi and over six-fold to accept training in ophthalmology (representing a bundle of unpopular but priority specialties). In contrast, the location of work before training did not significantly influence most doctors' choices when guaranteed specialty training. Using a latent class model, we identified four subgroups of junior doctors with distinct preferences. Policy simulations showed that these preferences could be leveraged by policymakers to improve retention in exchange for guaranteed specialty training, however incentivising the uptake of training in priority specialties will only be effective in those with more flexible preferences. These results indicate that indiscriminate expansion of postgraduate training to slow emigration of doctors from sub-Saharan African countries may not be effective unless doctors' preferences are taken into account. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Dietary and physical activity behaviors of New York City children from different ethnic minority subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangeepuram, Nita; Mervish, Nancy; Galvez, Maida P; Brenner, Barbara; Wolff, Mary S

    2012-01-01

    To examine racial/ethnic differences in diet and physical activity behaviors in ethnic minority New York City children. Cross-sectional data from a community-based study of 486 6- to 8-year-old children were used. Race/ethnicity was derived using a caregiver's report of child's race and Hispanic ancestry. Dietary intake was obtained by 24-hour diet recalls using the Nutrition Data System for Research. Physical activity was assessed with pedometers and caregiver interviews. We compared diet and activity measures across racial/ethnic subgroups using chi-square and analysis of variance tests. Multivariate analyses adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, and caregiver education (with breastfeeding history and total energy intake included in diet models). Participants (N = 486) were categorized as Mexican (29.4%), Dominican (8.4%), Puerto Rican (20.6%), other/mixed Hispanic (14.0%), or non-Hispanic black (27.6%). Obesity rates were lower in non-Hispanic blacks (18%) than in Hispanics (31%). Mexicans had the lowest obesity rates among Hispanic subgroups (25%), and Dominicans had the highest (39%). There were differences in mean daily servings of food groups, with Mexicans having healthier diets and Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic Blacks having less healthy diets. Sedentary time was lower in Mexicans than in other groups in adjusted models. Examination of additional models, including home language, did not show significant differences in the estimates. Diet and activity behaviors varied across racial/ethnic subgroups. Specifically, Mexican children had healthier diets, the least amount of sedentary time, and the lowest rates of obesity among the Hispanic subgroups examined. Targeted interventions in ethnic subgroups may be warranted to address specific behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Person-Centered Approach to Examining Heterogeneity and Subgroups Among Survivors of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, N. Tatiana; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Kaysen, Debra; Kajumulo, Kelly F.; Davis, Kelly Cue; George, William H.; Norris, Jeanette; Heiman, Julia R.

    2015-01-01

    This study identified subgroups of female sexual assault survivors based on characteristics of their victimization experiences, validated the subgroup structure in a second cohort of women recruited identically to the first, and examined subgroups' differential associations with sexual risk/safety behavior, heavy episodic drinking (HED), psychological distress symptomatology, incarceration, transactional sex, and experiences with controlling and violent partners. The community sample consisted of 667 female survivors of adolescent or adult sexual assault who were 21 to 30 years old (M=24.78, SD=2.66). Eligibility criteria included having unprotected sex within the past year, other HIV/STI risk factors, and some experience with HED, but without alcohol problems or dependence. Latent class analyses (LCA) were used to identify subgroups of women with similar victimization experiences. Three groups were identified and validated across two cohorts of women using multiple-group LCA: Contact or Attempted assault (17% of the sample), Incapacitated assault (52%), and Forceful Severe assault (31%). Groups did not differ in their sexual risk/safety behavior. Women in the Forceful Severe category had higher levels of anxiety, depression, and trauma symptoms, higher proportions of incarceration and transactional sex, and more experiences with controlling and violent partners than did women in the other two groups. Women in the Forceful Severe category also reported a higher frequency of HED than women in the Incapacitated category. Different types of assault experiences appear to be differentially associated with negative outcomes. Understanding heterogeneity and subgroups among sexual assault survivors has implications for improving clinical care and contributing to recovery. PMID:26052619

  3. Leading Causes of Death among Asian American Subgroups (2003-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine G Hastings

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of Asian American mortality patterns has been distorted by the historical aggregation of diverse Asian subgroups on death certificates, masking important differences in the leading causes of death across subgroups. In this analysis, we aim to fill an important knowledge gap in Asian American health by reporting leading causes of mortality by disaggregated Asian American subgroups.We examined national mortality records for the six largest Asian subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs from 2003-2011, and ranked the leading causes of death. We calculated all-cause and cause-specific age-adjusted rates, temporal trends with annual percent changes, and rate ratios by race/ethnicity and sex. Rankings revealed that as an aggregated group, cancer was the leading cause of death for Asian Americans. When disaggregated, there was notable heterogeneity. Among women, cancer was the leading cause of death for every group except Asian Indians. In men, cancer was the leading cause of death among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese men, while heart disease was the leading cause of death among Asian Indians, Filipino and Japanese men. The proportion of death due to heart disease for Asian Indian males was nearly double that of cancer (31% vs. 18%. Temporal trends showed increased mortality of cancer and diabetes in Asian Indians and Vietnamese; increased stroke mortality in Asian Indians; increased suicide mortality in Koreans; and increased mortality from Alzheimer's disease for all racial/ethnic groups from 2003-2011. All-cause rate ratios revealed that overall mortality is lower in Asian Americans compared to NHWs.Our findings show heterogeneity in the leading causes of death among Asian American subgroups. Additional research should focus on culturally competent and cost-effective approaches to prevent and treat specific diseases among these growing diverse populations.

  4. Serological relationships among subgroups in bovine viral diarrhea virus genotype 1 (BVDV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, Gizem; Yeşilbağ, Kadir

    2015-01-30

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has various economic impacts associated with diarrhea, poor performance, an increase in the frequency of other infections and lethal outcomes. Both genotypes, namely BVDV-1 and BVDV-2, as well as different subgroups within these genotypes have been reported worldwide. Understanding the serological differences among the BVDV subgroups is important for disease epidemiology and prevention as well as vaccination programs. The aim of this study was to determine the serological relatedness among the subgroups in BVDV-1. For that purpose, sheep hyperimmune sera were collected against representative strains from 6 of the subgroups of BVDV-1 (BVDV-1a, -1b, -1d, -1f, -1h and -1l). The serum samples that gave the peak antibody titer to the homologous strains were used to perform cross neutralization assays. The highest homologous antibody titer (1:5160) was obtained against BVDV-1h. Regarding the cross neutralizing (heterologous) antibodies, the lowest titer (1:20) was produced by the BVDV-1f antiserum against the BVDV-1a and BVDV1-b viruses. The highest cross neutralizing titer (1:2580) achieved by the BVDV-1h antiserum was against the BVDV-1b strain. The cross neutralization results indicated particular serological differences between the recently described subgroup (BVDV-1l) and BVDV-1a/-1b, which are widely used in commercial vaccines. Considering the cross neutralization titers, it is concluded that selected BVDV-1l and BVDV-1h strains can be used for the development of diagnostic and control tools. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The efficacy of natalizumab in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis: subgroup analyses of AFFIRM and SENTINEL.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The AFFIRM and SENTINEL studies showed that natalizumab was effective both as monotherapy and in combination with interferon beta (IFNbeta)-1a in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Further analyses of AFFIRM and SENTINEL data were conducted to determine the efficacy of natalizumab in prespecified patient subgroups according to baseline characteristics: relapse history 1 year before randomization (1, 2, > or = 3), Expanded Disability Status Scale score (< or = 3.5, > 3.5), number of T2 lesions (< 9, > or = 9), presence of gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) lesions (0, > or = 1), age (< 40, > or = 40) and gender (male, female). A post hoc analysis was conducted to determine the efficacy of natalizumab in patients with highly active disease (i. e., > or = 2 relapses in the year before study entry and > or = 1 Gd+ lesion at study entry). In both AFFIRM and SENTINEL studies natalizumab reduced the annualized relapse rates across all subgroups (except the small subgroups with < 9 baseline T2 lesions) over 2 years. In AFFIRM, natalizumab significantly reduced the risk of sustained disability progression in most subgroups. In SENTINEL, natalizumab significantly reduced the risk of sustained disability progression in the following subgroups: > or = 9 T2 lesions at baseline, > or = 1 Gd+ lesions at baseline, female patients and patients < 40 years of age. Natalizumab reduced the risk of disability progression by 64 % and relapse rate by 81 % in treatment- naive patients with highly active disease and by 58 % and 76 %, respectively, in patients with highly active disease despite IFNbeta-1a treatment. These results indicate that natalizumab is effective in reducing disability progression and relapses in patients with relapsing MS, particularly in patients with highly active disease.

  6. Recruiting and Retaining Geology Majors at CSUSB: Successes and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. L.; McGill, S. F.; Fryxell, J. E.; Leatham, W. B.; Melchiorre, E.; Brunkhorst, B.

    2003-12-01

    Our efforts to build a strong geology department at CSUSB have focused on two main areas (1) increasing the number of geology majors, and (2) involving our majors more directly in the department through their involvement in scientific research and outreach activities. To increase the number of majors we have undertaken a three pronged approach: (a) by actively working with middle and high school teachers to better prepare them to teach Earth Sciences in their schools, by providing them with the necessary tools to accomplish this, and by developing a new course on Earth Sciences with emphasis on the California Earth Science Standards to be taken by students in the multi-subject credential program; (b) by showing middle school, high school, and college students that geology is interesting and exciting by involving them in geological activities such as field trips, hands on geological exercises, and in directed research projects; and (c) by conducting a public relations campaign to inform both potential students and the general public about activities being undertaken by the department. The latter has been accomplished by the use of a glossy color brochure designed to illustrate what geology is, and what kinds of careers are possible; by flyers sent to approximately 120 local schools outlining opportunities for field trips and for teachers to bring their students to our campus for various activities; by developing an outreach web site; and by various newspaper articles on departmental activities. We are also looking into the use of TV spots on geological subjects to be aired on public access television. Since the start of our efforts two years ago we have seen a positive response by local teachers, and an increase in the number of applications to study geology at CSUSB, including a significant increase in the number of minority applicants. A major barrier to recruitment has been the misconceived idea in local schools that a course in Earth Sciences does not count

  7. Effects of Geofoam Panels on Static Behavior of Cantilever Retaining Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Hasanpouri Notash

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Geofoam is one of the geosynthetic products that can be used in geotechnical applications. According to researches, expanded polystyrene (EPS geofoam placed directly against a rigid retaining wall has been proposed as a strategy to reduce static loads on the wall. This study employed a finite difference analysis using a 2-D FLAC computer program by considering yielding and nonyielding states for retaining walls to explore the effectiveness of geofoam panels in improving the static performance of cantilever retaining walls. Retaining walls at heights of 3, 6, and 9 meters and geofoam panels with densities of 15, 20, and 25 (kg/m3 at three relative thicknesses of t/H = 0.05, 0.2, and 0.4 were modelled in this numerical study. In addition, the performance of the double EPS buffer system, which involves two vertical geofoam panels, in retaining walls’ stability with four panel spacing (50, 100, 150, and 200 cm was also evaluated in this research. The results showed that use of EPS15 with density equal to 15 (kg/m3 which has the lowest density among other geofoam panels has a significant role in reduction of lateral stresses, although the performance of geofoam in nonyielding retaining walls is better than yielding retaining walls.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Tire Reinforced Sand behind Retaining Wall Under Earthquake Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lazizi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the numerical simulations of retaining walls supporting tire reinforced sand subjected to El Centro earthquake excitation using finite element analysis. For this, four cases are studied: cantilever retaining wall supporting sand under static and dynamical excitation, and cantilever retaining wall supporting waste tire reinforced sand under static and dynamical excitation. Analytical external stability analyses of the selected retaining wall show that, for all four cases, the factors of safety for base sliding and overturning are less than default minimum values. Numerical analyses show that there are no large differences between the case of wall supporting waste tire reinforced sand and the case of wall supporting sand for static loading. Under seismic excitation, the higher value of Von Mises stress for the case of retaining wall supporting waste tire reinforced sand is 3.46 times lower compared to the case of retaining wall supporting sand. The variation of horizontal displacement (U1 and vertical displacement (U2 near the retaining wall, with depth, are also presented.

  9. Factors influencing success of cement versus screw-retained implant restorations: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Manawar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: As more and more dental practitioners are focusing on implant-supported fixed restorations, some clinicians favor the use of cement retained restorations while others consider screw retained prosthesis to be the best choice. Discussion: In screw-retained restorations, the fastening screw provides a solid joint between the restoration and the implant abutment, while in cement-retained prostheses the restorative screw is eliminated to enhance esthetics, occlusal stability, and passive fit of the restorations. The factors that influence the type of fixation of the prostheses to the implants like passivity of the framework, ease of fabrication, occlusion, esthetics, accessibility, retention and retrievability are discussed in this article with scientific studies demonstrating superior outcomes of one technique over another. Screwretained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention, retrievability and lack of potentially retained subgingival cement. However, a few disadvantages exist such as precise placement of the implant for optimal and esthetic location of the screw access hole and obtaining passive fit. On the other hand, cement retained restorations eliminate unesthetic screw access holes, have passive fit of castings, reduced complexity of clinical and lab procedures, enhanced esthetics, reduced cost factors and non disrupted morphology of the occlusal table. Conclusion: This article compares the advantages, potential disadvantages and limitations of screw and cement retained restorations and their specific implications in the most common clinical situation.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of digital versus film mammography: exploratory analysis of selected population subgroups in DMIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Etta D; Hendrick, R Edward; Yaffe, Martin J; Baum, Janet K; Acharyya, Suddhasatta; Cormack, Jean B; Hanna, Lucy A; Conant, Emily F; Fajardo, Laurie L; Bassett, Lawrence W; D'Orsi, Carl J; Jong, Roberta A; Rebner, Murray; Tosteson, Anna N A; Gatsonis, Constantine A

    2008-02-01

    To retrospectively compare the accuracy of digital versus film mammography in population subgroups of the Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) defined by combinations of age, menopausal status, and breast density, by using either biopsy results or follow-up information as the reference standard. DMIST included women who underwent both digital and film screening mammography. Institutional review board approval at all participating sites and informed consent from all participating women in compliance with HIPAA was obtained for DMIST and this retrospective analysis. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) for each modality were compared within each subgroup evaluated (age or= 65 years, dense vs nondense breasts at mammography, and pre- or perimenopausal vs postmenopausal status for the two younger age cohorts [10 new subgroups in toto]) while controlling for multiple comparisons (P film vs both vs neither), mammographic lesion type (mass, calcifications, or other), digital machine type, mammographic and pathologic size and diagnosis, existence of prior mammographic study at time of interpretation, months since prior mammographic study, and compressed breast thickness. Thirty-three centers enrolled 49 528 women. Breast cancer status was determined for 42,760 women, the group included in this study. Pre- or perimenopausal women younger than 50 years who had dense breasts at film mammography comprised the only subgroup for which digital mammography was significantly better than film (AUCs, 0.79 vs 0.54; P = .0015). Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System-based sensitivity in this subgroup was 0.59 for digital and 0.27 for film mammography. AUCs were not significantly different in any of the other subgroups. For women aged 65 years or older with fatty breasts, the AUC showed a nonsignificant tendency toward film being better than digital mammography (AUCs, 0.88 vs 0.70; P = .0025). Digital mammography performed significantly better

  11. Clinical-Radiological Correlation of Retained Silicone Sponge Presenting as Orbital Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal J. Rubinstein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old female who underwent scleral buckle removal presented 5 weeks postoperatively with a red, fluctuant subconjunctival mass. CT scan identified an irregularly bordered, hypoattenuated lesion next to the globe with the density of air. Ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgeons were consulted to evaluate orbital cellulitis with intraorbital gas, at which point it was deemed that the hypoattenuated mass was likely a retained sponge element based on its radiological features. Additional surgical exploration identified the retained silicone sponge. This clinical photographic-radiological correlation of retained silicone sponges presenting as orbital inflammation reminds surgeons to meticulously explant buckle material.

  12. Instrumental and sensory quantification of oral coatings retained after swallowing semi-solid foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, J F; Huntjens, L; de Wijk, R A

    2006-12-01

    After a mouthful of food has been swallowed, some food material is always retained in the mouth. With semi-solid foods this is in the form of a coating that adheres to the oral mucosa. The amount and location of this material may play an important role in food sensations. In this study two quantitative methods of describing the coatings, generated by a set of 16 model custards varying in degree of lubrication (fat content) and degree of viscosity (starch concentration) are investigated. In the first method, a trained quantitative descriptive analysis panel (N=8) was instructed to take single mouthfuls of semi-solid foods, swallow and then rinse twice for 5s with water and spit out. The turbidity of the rinse water was then measured. During the same session, sensory assessments of the products were obtained. In the second method the thickness of the coating on the anterior and middle one-thirds of the tongue was quantified using a pair of opto-electronic reflectance sensors mounted on a probe which was placed on the tongue, one sensor measuring the anterior part of the tongue the other the posterior (middle third) of the tongue. Turbidity of the first rinse related strongly to the food's viscosity, as well as to sensory attributes associated with the food's fat content and viscosity, such as perceived thickness, creaminess and fattiness. Turbidity of subsequent rinses related primarily to fat content. These results indicate that turbidity of rinse water is a useful tool in fundamental (e.g., food texture research) as well as applied research (e.g., product development and quality assurance in food industry). Reflectance varied primarily with fat content and did not relate well to sensory attributes.

  13. How do you recruit and retain a prebirth cohort? Lessons learnt from growing up in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Susan M B; Grant, Cameron C; Carr, Polly E Atatoa; Robinson, Elizabeth M; Kinloch, Jennifer M; Fleming, Courtney J; Kingi, Te Kani R; Perese, Lana M; Liang, Renee

    2014-12-01

    Growing Up in New Zealand, a longitudinal study following nearly 7,000 children, has faced some unique challenges in identifying, enrolling, and retaining a large and diverse antenatal cohort. Identification of a study region with population demographics that enabled enrollment of an appropriately diverse sample was required as was intensive community and participant engagement in order to promote the study. Complementary methods used included direct engagement with prospective participants and the community and indirect engagement via media. Thus far, retention rates above 95% have been achieved by maintaining a multimethod approach that includes valuing participants and building trusting relationships, strong brand recognition, community engagement, maintenance of participant contact and location records, ensuring high-quality interactions between the participants and the study, pretesting measures and methods prior to the main cohort, and using participant feedback to inform the measures and methods used in future waves of data collection. © The Author(s) 2012.

  14. A randomized clinical trial of manual therapy and physiotherapy for persistent back and neck complaints: subgroup analysis and relationship between outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koes, B W; Bouter, L M; van Mameren, H; Essers, A H; Verstegen, G J; Hofhuizen, D M; Houben, J P; Knipschild, P G

    1993-05-01

    To study the efficacy of manual therapy and physiotherapy in subgroups of patients with persistent back and neck complaints. The second objective was to determine the correlation between three important outcome measures used in this trial. Randomized clinical trial (subgroup analysis). Primary health care in the Netherlands. Two hundred fifty-six patients with nonspecific back and neck complaints of at least 6 wk duration who had not received physiotherapy or manual therapy in the past 2 yr. At the discretion of the manual therapists, physiotherapists and general practitioners. Physiotherapy consisted of exercises, massage and physical therapy (heat, electrotherapy, ultrasound, shortwave diathermy). Manual therapy consisted of manipulation and mobilization of the spine. Treatment by the general practitioner consisted of drugs (e.g., analgesics), advice about posture, home exercises and (bed)rest. Placebo treatment consisted of detuned shortwave diathermy (10 min) and detuned ultrasound (10 min). Changes in severity of the main complaint and limitation of physical functioning measured on 10-point scales by a blinded research assistant and global perceived effect measured on a 6-point scale by the patients. Improvement in the main complaint was larger with manual therapy (4.3) than with physiotherapy (2.5) for patients with chronic conditions (duration complaint of 1 yr or longer). Also, improvement in the main complaint was larger with manual therapy (5.5) than with physiotherapy (4.0) for patients younger than 40 yr (both were measured after 12-mo follow-up). Labeling of patients by the treating manual therapists as "suitable" or "not suitable" for treatment with manual therapy did not predict differences in outcomes. Generally, there was a moderate to strong correlation between the three outcome measures, although a considerable number of patients gave a relatively low score for perceived benefit, while the research assistant gave a high improvement score for the

  15. Procedural justice and social regulation across group boundaries: does subgroup identity undermine relationship-based governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yuen J

    2003-03-01

    The relational model of authority suggests that people are inclined to accept the decisions of ethnic outgroup authorities when they identify with a superordinate category they share with the authority, and when the authority satisfies their relational justice concerns. Using responses from a random sample of African Americans, Latinos, and Whites about their cross-ethnic interactions with legal authorities, the findings indicated that those who are highly identified with the superordinate category of America indicate greater reliance on relational concerns and less on instrumental concerns when evaluating the authority's decision. In contrast, identification with one's ethnic subgroup did not moderate the linkage between relational concerns and acceptance. Across all ethnic groups, there were positive rather than negative correlations between measures of American and ethnic identity. Together, these findings indicate that subgroup identity does not undermine the relational basis of social regulation and that relationship-based governance is compatible with multiculturalism.

  16. Automatically high precision manufacturing technology for micro-optic subgroups; Techical Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sure, Thomas; Guyenot, Volker; Gerhardt, Michael

    2005-05-01

    To realize the image quality of high end objectives, e. g. high NA microscope objectives working in the DUV spectral region the subgroups have to be manufactured with a mechanical precision which is difficult to achieve cost effectively. For high end microscope objectives the accuracy of the diameter of the lens mount must be within 1 µm, the run-out must be met within 1 µm and the distance of the lens vertex relative to the shoulder of the mount must fit within 1 µm. To realize the required precision, today various measurement techniques and production processes are used. Picking up the subgroups on different machining tools and measurement systems will loosen the accuracy. Here, we present the concept and the layout of a new manufacturing tool where we implemented the different measurement techniques in one CNC machining center.

  17. Subgroup Benchmark Calculations for the Intra-Pellet Nonuniform Temperature Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jung, Yeon Sang [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Yuxuan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Joo, Han Gyu [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-01

    A benchmark suite has been developed by Seoul National University (SNU) for intrapellet nonuniform temperature distribution cases based on the practical temperature profiles according to the thermal power levels. Though a new subgroup capability for nonuniform temperature distribution was implemented in MPACT, no validation calculation has been performed for the new capability. This study focuses on bench-marking the new capability through a code-to-code comparison. Two continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes, McCARD and CE-KENO, are engaged in obtaining reference solutions, and the MPACT results are compared to the SNU nTRACER using a similar cross section library and subgroup method to obtain self-shielded cross sections.

  18. Defining subgroups of low socioeconomic status women at risk for depressive symptoms: the importance of perceived stress and cumulative risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waerden, Judith E B; Hoefnagels, Cees; Hosman, Clemens M H; Jansen, Maria W J

    2014-12-01

    Most disadvantaged women are exposed to risk factors for depression, but not all necessarily have an identical risk for this mental health problem. A better prediction of which low socioeconomic status (SES) women are most at risk for depressive symptoms can help target preventive interventions at high-risk subgroups most in need of support. Exploring which demographic, socioeconomic and psychological risk factors are associated with self-reported depressive symptoms in a sample of low-SES women and whether the number of risk factors might expose them to an accumulated risk. Between April 2005 and November 2007, 519 disadvantaged women from urban neighbourhoods in Maastricht, a southern Dutch city, participated in a cross-sectional survey on stress and depressive symptoms. Lower education levels, no current employment and lower net monthly family incomes were socioeconomic risk factors associated with higher scores for depressive symptoms. The psychological risk factor 'perceived stress' had the highest explained variance and was most strongly associated with depressive symptoms. Women exposed to multiple risk factors across domains had a cumulated risk for depressive symptomatology. Low-SES women who seem most eligible for targeted preventive action are those with cumulative risks. Depression prevention strategies for this population may benefit from focusing on perceived stress since this is an important modifiable risk factor. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Electrochemical immunosensor with nanocellulose-Au composite assisted multiple signal amplification for detection of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Dong, Jing; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Cheng, Ziqiang; Ai, Shiyun

    2018-03-15

    A sensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor was developed for the detection of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), which benefitted from multiple signal amplification involving graphene-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid nanocomposites (GR-PTCA), nanocellulose-Au NP composites (NC-Au) and the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) catalytic reaction. GR-PTCA nanocomposites on glassy carbon electrodes served as the immunosensor platform. Due to their excellent electrical conductivity and abundant polycarboxylic sites, the GR-PTCA nanocomposites allowed fast electron transfer and good immobilization of primary antibodies, thereby affording a strong immunosensor signal in the presence of ALV-J. The detected signal could be further amplified by the introduction of NC-Au composites as a carrier of secondary antibodies (Ab2) and by harnessing the catalytic properties of Au and ALP. Under optimized testing conditions, the electrochemical immunosensor displayed excellent analytical performance for the detection of ALV-J, showing a linear current response from 102.08 to 104.0 TCID50/mL (TCID50: 50% tissue culture infective dose) with a low detection limit of 101.98 TCID50/mL (S/N = 3). In addition to high sensitivity, the immunosensor showed very good selectivity, reproducibility and operational stability, demonstrating potential application for the quantitative detection of ALV-J in clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ovarian clear cell carcinoma with plasma cell-rich inflammatory stroma: a clear cell carcinoma subgroup with distinct clinicopathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Noriko; Kurotaki, Hidekachi; Uchigasaki, Shinya; Fukase, Masayuki; Kurose, Akira

    2016-03-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma has a unique stroma. Although a hyalinized or mucoid stroma is more common, the stroma sometimes shows a dense inflammatory infiltrate, simulating a dysgerminoma. The aim of this study was to analyse the character and significance of the inflammatory stroma. Twelve of 60 (20%) clear cell carcinomas showed an inflammatory stroma. The inflammatory stroma and hyalinized/mucoid stroma were mutually exclusive. Inflammatory cells were predominantly composed of CD138-positive plasma cells. As compared with the non-inflammatory cases, the epithelial component frequently showed a solid growth pattern and immunoreactivity for cyclooxygenase-2, one of the critical proinflammatory enzymes (P cell carcinoma cell lines into athymic nude mice. In particular, xenografts of one cell line (JHOC-5) were infiltrated by mature plasma cells, indicating that plasma cell differentiation was stimulated by JHOC-5 cells, independently of T lymphocytes. Clinicopathologically, the frequency of International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics stage III was higher in the cases with an inflammatory stroma than in those without it (P cell carcinomas with an inflammatory stroma constitute a distinct clinicopathological subgroup. It is strongly suggested that tumour cells themselves are responsible for inducing inflammation and stimulating plasma cell differentiation in a paracrine manner. © 2015 The Authors. Histopathology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.