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Sample records for subgroup j-mediated immunosuppression

  1. Immunosuppressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment recommendations. Print Email Read related articles Brain Death HIV and Kidney Transplantation/Donation Incompatible Blood Types and Paired Exchange Programs Knowing Your Immunosuppressive (anti-rejection) Medications Organ and Tissue Donation The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) ...

  2. [Infections in immunosuppressed patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, María Angeles; Alvarez-Martínez, Miriam J; Niubó, Jordi; Pumarola, Tomàs

    2008-07-01

    Molecular biology techniques represent a major advance in the microbiologic diagnosis of infectious diseases, since these methods are able to detect etiological microorganisms with high sensitivity. Moreover, these procedures can also establish prognostic and therapeutic efficacy markers with a sufficiently short turnaround time for the results to have a real impact on the clinical management of immunosuppressed patients. However, these techniques still have substantial limitations that should be solved in the near future: lack of standardization, inter- and intra-assay variability, the difficulty of comparing results among different laboratories and low positive predictive value, due to their high sensitivity, leading to problems in the interpretation of results. The present article reviews the usefulness of molecular biology techniques in the diagnosis and clinical management of infectious diseases caused by human cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes viruses 6 and 7, JC and BK viruses, Toxoplasma gondii and Pneumocystis jiroveci in immunosuppressed patients.

  3. Immunosuppressive Therapy, 1987

    OpenAIRE

    Kahan, Barry D.

    1987-01-01

    The use of cyclosporine in transplant practice has at least doubled graft survival in renal transplantation, and has improved patient survival as well. In cardiac transplants, cyclosporine was first used in combination with prednisone to achieve immunosuppression by inhibition of the synthesis of lymphokines. When stimulated in vitro, lymphocytes from cyclosporine-treated patients display an impaired ability to produce the critical lymphokine interleukin-2. When there is in vitro inhibition, ...

  4. Dogs, zoonoses and immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R A; Pugh, R N

    2002-06-01

    Dogs are the source of a wide range of zoonotic infections that pose a significant threat to human health. This is particularly the case for immunocompromised people, although there are few robust studies that determine immunosuppression as a risk factor for transmission of zoonoses from dogs to humans. An increasing proportion of human society is immunodeficient, principally through the advent of HIV infection and through more people, particularly the expanding elderly group, being subjected to immunosuppressive agents. This is happening at a time when more such people are capitalizing on the acknowledged benefits of dog ownership, making for a potentially dangerous mix. Enteric pathogens (for example, Salmonella, Campylobacter and Cryptosporidium species, that may be canine derived) are a frequent risk to the health of immunocompromised persons. Veterinarians and physicians can be criticised for not communicating with each other, and for not providing adequate risk assessment to pet owners. There is scope for voluntary groups to provide information and support for the immunosuppressed who wish to keep their dogs. Key recommendations are to maintain a clean personal environment and intact mucocutaneous barriers. Public health professionals could help rectify the current communications gap between veterinary and medical staff and so facilitate in the appropriate management of dog-owning immunocompromised people.

  5. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  6. Cancer immunotherapy by immunosuppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prehn Liisa M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have previously suggested that the stimulatory effect of a weak immune reaction on tumor growth may be necessary for the growth of incipient tumors. In the present paper, we enlarge upon and extend that idea by collecting evidence in the literature bearing upon this new hypothesis that a growing cancer, whether in man or mouse, is throughout its lifespan, probably growing and progressing because of continued immune stimulation by a weak immune reaction. We also suggest that prolonged immunosuppression might interfere with progression and thus be an aid to therapy. While most of the considerable evidence that supports the hypothesis comes from observations of experimental mouse tumors, there is suggestive evidence that human tumors may behave in much the same way, and as far as we can ascertain, there is no present evidence that necessarily refutes the hypothesis.

  7. Transcription factor RBP-J-mediated signalling regulates basophil immunoregulatory function in mouse asthma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shuo-Yao; He, Ya-Long; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Chang-Gui

    2017-09-01

    Basophils (BA) play an important role in the promotion of aberrant T helper type 2 (Th2) immune responses in asthma. It is not only the effective cell, but also modulates the initiation of Th2 immune responses. We earlier demonstrated that Notch signalling regulates the biological function of BAin vitro. However, whether this pathway plays the same role in vivo is not clear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of Notch signalling on BA function in the regulation of allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma. Bone marrow BA were prepared by bone marrow cell culture in the presence of recombinant interleukin-3 (rIL-3; 300 pg/ml) for 7 days, followed by isolation of the CD49b+ microbeads. The recombination signal binding protein J (RBP-J-/- ) BA were co-cultured with T cells, and the supernatant and the T-cell subtypes were examined. The results indicated disruption of the capacity of BA for antigen presentation alongside an up-regulation of the immunoregulatory function. This was possibly due to the low expression of OX40L in the RBP-J-/- BA. Basophils were adoptively transferred to ovalbumin-sensitized recipient mice, to establish an asthma model. Lung pathology, cytokine profiles of brobchoalveolar fluid, airway hyperactivity and the absolute number of Th1/Th2 cells in lungs were determined. Overall, our results indicate that the RBP-J-mediated Notch signalling is critical for BA-dependent immunoregulation. Deficiency of RBP-J influences the immunoregulatory functions of BA, which include activation of T cells and their differentiation into T helper cell subtypes. The Notch signalling pathway is a potential therapeutic target for BA-based immunotherapy against asthma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Review papers immunosuppressive treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kryś

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sebaceous carcinoma (sebaceous gland carcinoma – SC is a very aggressive malignant skin tumor that arises from the epithelium of sebaceous glands. Sun exposure and long-term immunosuppression, mainly in organ transplant recipients, are the most common risk factors. The tumor was first well described by Allaire in 1891. Sebaceous carcinoma is rare and accounts for less than 1% of all cutaneous malignancies and from 1% to 5.5% of all eyelid malignancies. The most common localization is the eyelids, where it derives from the Meibomian and Zeiss glands. Most cases occur in woman between 60 and 80 years of age, but the tumor can be seen at any age, even in childhood. It appears mostly as a small, slowly growing, painless and firm mass, sometimes as a small yellowish plaque or ulceration. SC has a tendency for local recurrence and distant metastases. The local recurrence rate ranges from 9 to 36% and tends to appear within the first 5 years from diagnosis. The most effective method of treatment is surgical excision (Mohs’ microsurgical excision if it is possible. The rate of metastases is about 14-25%. The sites of metastases are usually lymph nodes, liver, lungs, bones, and brain. The mortality rate is about 22% but it increases to 50% at 5 years in patients with metastatic disease.

  9. Immunosuppressive treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    Glucocorticoids and retrobulbar irradiation are the most employed immunosuppressive treatment modalities in Graves' ophthalmopathy. The response rate is approximately 60%. Efficacy is good for improvement of appearance and visual acuity, moderate for correction of extraocular muscle dysfunction, and

  10. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian M; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Recent efforts at stratifying medulloblastomas based on their molecular features have revolutionized our understanding of this morbidity. Collective efforts by multiple independent groups have subdivided medulloblastoma from a single disease into four distinct molecular subgroups characterized by disparate transcriptional signatures, mutational spectra, copy number profiles and, most importantly, clinical features. We present a summary of recent studies that have contributed to our understanding of the core medulloblastoma subgroups, focusing largely on clinically relevant discoveries that have already, and will continue to, shape research. PMID:22853794

  11. The congruence subgroup problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 4. The Congruence Subgroup Problem. M S Raghunathan. Invited Articles Volume 114 ... Author Affiliations. M S Raghunathan1. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  12. Subgroups Among Opiate Addicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzins, Juris I.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The principal objective of the present investigation was to delineate homogeneous MMPI profile subgroups (types) through multivariate clustering procedures and to compare the derived (replicable) types on measures of the components of "sociopathy" as well as on other psychometric devices. (Author)

  13. Picornavirus infection leading to immunosuppression

    OpenAIRE

    Cusick, Matthew F; Libbey, Jane E.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses, such as HIV, hepatitis A, poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 and foot-and-mouth disease virus, use a variety of mechanisms to suppress the human immune system in order to evade clearance by the host. Therefore, investigating how a few changes in the viral genome of a nonlethal virus can lead to an alteration in disease, from survivable to immunosuppression and death, would provide valuable information into viral pathogenesis. In addition, we propose that gaining a better insight into how ...

  14. Subgrouping Automata: automatic sequence subgrouping using phylogenetic tree-based optimum subgrouping algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Joo-Hyun; Park, Jihyang; Kim, Eun-Mi; Kim, Juhan; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2014-02-01

    Sequence subgrouping for a given sequence set can enable various informative tasks such as the functional discrimination of sequence subsets and the functional inference of unknown sequences. Because an identity threshold for sequence subgrouping may vary according to the given sequence set, it is highly desirable to construct a robust subgrouping algorithm which automatically identifies an optimal identity threshold and generates subgroups for a given sequence set. To meet this end, an automatic sequence subgrouping method, named 'Subgrouping Automata' was constructed. Firstly, tree analysis module analyzes the structure of tree and calculates the all possible subgroups in each node. Sequence similarity analysis module calculates average sequence similarity for all subgroups in each node. Representative sequence generation module finds a representative sequence using profile analysis and self-scoring for each subgroup. For all nodes, average sequence similarities are calculated and 'Subgrouping Automata' searches a node showing statistically maximum sequence similarity increase using Student's t-value. A node showing the maximum t-value, which gives the most significant differences in average sequence similarity between two adjacent nodes, is determined as an optimum subgrouping node in the phylogenetic tree. Further analysis showed that the optimum subgrouping node from SA prevents under-subgrouping and over-subgrouping. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Finite groups all of whose minimal subgroups are NE-subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    subgroup of . In this article, we investigate the structure of under the assumption that subgroups of prime order are *-subgroups of . The finite groups, all of whose minimal subgroups of the generalized Fitting subgroup are *-subgroups ...

  16. Review on immunosuppression in liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Moini, Maryam; Schilsky, Michael L; Tichy, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    The optimal level of immunosuppression in solid organ transplantation, in particular for the liver, is a delicate balance between the benefit of preventing rejection and the adverse side effects of immunosuppression. There is uncertainty about when this level is achieved in any individual recipient. Immunosuppression regimens vary between individual centers and changes with time as new agents and data are available. Presently concerns about the adverse side effects of calcineurin inhibitor, t...

  17. Immunosuppressant-Associated Neurotoxicity Responding to Olanzapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Bourgeois

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressants, particularly tacrolimus, can induce neurotoxicity in solid organ transplantation cases. A lower clinical threshold to switch from tacrolimus to another immunosuppressant agent has been a common approach to reverse this neurotoxicity. However, immunosuppressant switch may place the graft at risk, and, in some cases, continuation of the same treatment protocol may be necessary. We report a case of immunosuppressant-associated neurotoxicity with prominent neuropsychiatric manifestation and describe psychiatric intervention with olanzapine that led to clinical improvement while continuing tacrolimus maintenance.

  18. Immunosuppression – tough ally in torrid time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Ograczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Immunosuppression is a condition characterized by weakened or inhibited immune response. It occurred both in humoral and cellular response. This is related to the variable levels of deficiency for each antibody class (IgG, IgM, IgA and a decrease in the number and function of immune cells, mainly T cells which results in the inhibition of cytokine production, signaling transduction and clonal expansion. Immunosuppressive therapy is used in many fields of medicine, such as transplantology, oncology, autoimmune disorders. Immunosuppression can be induced in several ways, by the surgical resection of the organs of the immune system, physical methods using X-rays or chemical methods using pharmacological agents. The most common way to induce immunosuppression is the administration of immunosuppressive drugs, amongst others: glucocorticoids, cytostatic drugs, immunophilin-binding agents, monoclonal antibodies. Unfortunately, the desired therapeutic effects of immunosuppression may be accompanied by a number of side effects associated with both impaired immunity (susceptibility to infections, including those caused by opportunistic microorganisms, toxic effects on the tissues (nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, or with a direct impact on the processes of malignancy. This harmful influence can be limited by the modification of the existing drugs, looking for new ones or developing new methods for the controlled kinetics of releasing the immunosuppressive pharmaceuticals. The personalization of immunosuppressant treatment according to genetic/genomic characteristics of individual patient represents the quite innovative look into the issue of immunosuppression.

  19. Immunosuppressive sesquiterpenes from Buddleja daviddi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Yao, Zhi; Zhang, Yan Wen; Zhang, Xing Xiang; Takaishi, Yoshihisa; Duan, Hong Quan

    2010-11-01

    Six new sesquiterpenes, 2,6(12),10-humulatrien-7β-ol-1-one (1), 2 α-acetoxy-5α-methoxy-enantio-caryophylla-8(15)-en-3-one (2), 2α-acetoxy-5α-hydroxy-enantio-caryophylla-8(15)-en-3-one (3), 2α-acetoxy-4β,5α-hydroxy-enantio-caryophylla-8(15)-en-3-one ( 4), 2α-acetoxy-4β,5β-hydroxy-enantio-caryophylla-8(15)-en-3-one (5), 2β-acetoxy-4-caryophyllen-8β-ol-3-one (6), and nineteen known compounds were isolated from the ethanol extract of Buddleja daviddi. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Compounds 8-11, 14, 16, 17, and 20 showed significant immunosuppressive activities, and 8-11 and 14 were cytotoxic on HeLa and L929 cell lines. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Immunosuppression and Chagas disease: a management challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Jesús Pinazo

    Full Text Available Immunosuppression, which has become an increasingly relevant clinical condition in the last 50 years, modifies the natural history of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in most patients with Chagas disease. The main goal in this setting is to prevent the consequences of reactivation of T. cruzi infection by close monitoring. We analyze the relationship between Chagas disease and three immunosuppressant conditions, including a description of clinical cases seen at our center, a brief review of the literature, and recommendations for the management of these patients based on our experience and on the data in the literature. T. cruzi infection is considered an opportunistic parasitic infection indicative of AIDS, and clinical manifestations of reactivation are more severe than in acute Chagas disease. Parasitemia is the most important defining feature of reactivation. Treatment with benznidazole and/or nifurtimox is strongly recommended in such cases. It seems reasonable to administer trypanocidal treatment only to asymptomatic immunosuppressed patients with detectable parasitemia, and/or patients with clinically defined reactivation. Specific treatment for Chagas disease does not appear to be related to a higher incidence of neoplasms, and a direct role of T. cruzi in the etiology of neoplastic disease has not been confirmed. Systemic immunosuppressive diseases or immunosuppressants can modify the natural course of T. cruzi infection. Immunosuppressive doses of corticosteroids have not been associated with higher rates of reactivation of Chagas disease. Despite a lack of evidence-based data, treatment with benznidazole or nifurtimox should be initiated before immunosuppression where possible to reduce the risk of reactivation. Timely antiparasitic treatment with benznidazole and nifurtimox (or with posaconazole in cases of therapeutic failure has proven to be highly effective in preventing Chagas disease reactivation, even if such treatment has not been

  1. Immunosuppression and Chagas disease: a management challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo, María-Jesús; Espinosa, Gerard; Cortes-Lletget, Cristina; Posada, Elizabeth de Jesús; Aldasoro, Edelweiss; Oliveira, Inés; Muñoz, Jose; Gállego, Montserrat; Gascon, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Immunosuppression, which has become an increasingly relevant clinical condition in the last 50 years, modifies the natural history of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in most patients with Chagas disease. The main goal in this setting is to prevent the consequences of reactivation of T. cruzi infection by close monitoring. We analyze the relationship between Chagas disease and three immunosuppressant conditions, including a description of clinical cases seen at our center, a brief review of the literature, and recommendations for the management of these patients based on our experience and on the data in the literature. T. cruzi infection is considered an opportunistic parasitic infection indicative of AIDS, and clinical manifestations of reactivation are more severe than in acute Chagas disease. Parasitemia is the most important defining feature of reactivation. Treatment with benznidazole and/or nifurtimox is strongly recommended in such cases. It seems reasonable to administer trypanocidal treatment only to asymptomatic immunosuppressed patients with detectable parasitemia, and/or patients with clinically defined reactivation. Specific treatment for Chagas disease does not appear to be related to a higher incidence of neoplasms, and a direct role of T. cruzi in the etiology of neoplastic disease has not been confirmed. Systemic immunosuppressive diseases or immunosuppressants can modify the natural course of T. cruzi infection. Immunosuppressive doses of corticosteroids have not been associated with higher rates of reactivation of Chagas disease. Despite a lack of evidence-based data, treatment with benznidazole or nifurtimox should be initiated before immunosuppression where possible to reduce the risk of reactivation. Timely antiparasitic treatment with benznidazole and nifurtimox (or with posaconazole in cases of therapeutic failure) has proven to be highly effective in preventing Chagas disease reactivation, even if such treatment has not been formally

  2. Cytogenetic Prognostication Within Medulloblastoma Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, David J.H.; Northcott, Paul A.; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kool, Marcel; Luu, Betty; Yao, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Garzia, Livia; Peacock, John; Mack, Stephen C.; Wu, Xiaochong; Rolider, Adi; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M.G.; Jones, David T.W.; Zitterbart, Karel; Faria, Claudia C.; Schüller, Ulrich; Kren, Leos; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Shin Ra, Young; Garami, Miklós; Hauser, Peter; Chan, Jennifer A.; Robinson, Shenandoah; Bognár, László; Klekner, Almos; Saad, Ali G.; Liau, Linda M.; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam; Cinalli, Giuseppe; De Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo; Cooper, Michael K.; Thompson, Reid C.; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Michiels, Erna M.C.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Gupta, Nalin; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M.; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Eberhart, Charles G.; Fouladi, Maryam; Lach, Boleslaw; Jung, Shin; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Jouvet, Anne; Jabado, Nada; Pollack, Ian F.; Weiss, William A.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; de Torres, Carmen; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tabori, Uri; Olson, James M.; Gajjar, Amar; Packer, Roger J.; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pomeroy, Scott L.; French, Pim J.; Kloosterhof, Nanne K.; Kros, Johan M.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Clifford, Steven C.; Bourdeaut, Franck; Delattre, Olivier; Doz, François F.; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Malkin, David; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A.; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. Current medulloblastoma protocols stratify patients based on clinical features: patient age, metastatic stage, extent of resection, and histologic variant. Stark prognostic and genetic differences among the four subgroups suggest that subgroup-specific molecular biomarkers could improve patient prognostication. Patients and Methods Molecular biomarkers were identified from a discovery set of 673 medulloblastomas from 43 cities around the world. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical and cytogenetic biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Identified biomarkers were tested using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a nonoverlapping medulloblastoma tissue microarray (n = 453), with subsequent validation of the risk stratification models. Results Subgroup information improves the predictive accuracy of a multivariable survival model compared with clinical biomarkers alone. Most previously published cytogenetic biomarkers are only prognostic within a single medulloblastoma subgroup. Profiling six FISH biomarkers (GLI2, MYC, chromosome 11 [chr11], chr14, 17p, and 17q) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, we can reliably and reproducibly identify very low-risk and very high-risk patients within SHH, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas. Conclusion Combining subgroup and cytogenetic biomarkers with established clinical biomarkers substantially improves patient prognostication, even in the context of heterogeneous clinical therapies. The prognostic significance of most molecular biomarkers is restricted to a specific subgroup. We have identified a small panel of cytogenetic biomarkers that reliably identifies very high-risk and very low-risk groups of patients, making it an excellent tool for selecting patients for therapy intensification and therapy de-escalation in future clinical trials. PMID

  3. Cytomegalovirus in Immunosuppressed Patients: A Silent and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a recognized cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised individuals. This review will concentrate on understanding the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and laboratory diagnostic options for CMV infection. Keywords: Review, Cytomegalovirus, Immunosuppressed ...

  4. Immunosuppressive therapies after heart transplantation--The balance between under- and over-immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Carl; Rådegran, Göran

    2015-07-01

    Since the first heart transplantation (HT) in 1967, survival has steadily improved. Issues related to over- and under-immunosuppression are, however, still common following HT. Whereas under-immunosuppression may result in rejection, over-immunosuppression may render other medical problems, including infections, malignancies and chronic kidney disease (CKD). As such complications constitute major limiting factors for long-term survival following HT, identifying improved diagnostic and preventive methods has been the focus of many studies. Notably, research on antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) has recently led to the development of nomenclatures that may aid in their diagnosis and treatment. Moreover, novel immunosuppressants (such as mammalian target of rapamycin [m-TOR] inhibitors) and strategies aimed at minimizing the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) and corticosteroids (CSs), have provided alternatives to the traditional combination maintenance immunosuppressive therapy of CSs, cyclosporine (CSA) or tacrolimus (TAC), and azathioprine (AZA) or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Research within this field of medicine is not only extensive, but also in constant progress. The purpose of the present review was therefore to summarize some major points regarding immunosuppressive therapies after HT and the balance between under- and over-immunosuppression. Transplant immunology, rejection, common medical problems related to over-immunosuppression, as well as induction and maintenance immunosuppressive drugs and therapies, are addressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Soft n-Ary Subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Prince Williams

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soft set theory plays a vital role in solving many complicated problems with inherited uncertainty. An n-ary algebraic systems is a generalization of algebraic structures and it is the most natural way for the further development, deeper understanding of their properties. In this paper, we apply soft set theory to an n-ary algebraic systems and introduce the notions of soft n-ary groups and soft n-ary subgroups. Further, some operations on soft sets are extended to the former. Finally, we provide the characterization of soft n-ary subgroups over an n-ary group (G,f and study their related properties.

  6. On Cosets and Normal Subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    B. O. ONASANYA; S.A.Ilori

    2014-01-01

    The paper [5] has worked on fuzzy cosets and fuzzy normal subgroups of a group, [8] has extended the idea to fuzzy middle coset. In addition to what has been done, we make a link between fuzzy coset and fuzzy middle coset and investigate some more properties of the fuzzy middle coset. [7] made attempt with some results needing adjustment. [2], [8] and [9] have shown that if f 2 F(Sn), the set of all fuzzy subgroups of Sn, is such that Imf has the highest order and f is constant on the conjuga...

  7. Hopf algebras and congruence subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerhauser, Yorck

    2007-01-01

    We prove that the kernel of the natural action of the modular group on the center of the Drinfel'd double of a semisimple Hopf algebra is a congruence subgroup. To do this, we introduce a class of generalized Frobenius-Schur indicators and endow it with an action of the modular group that is compatible with the original one.

  8. Erratum The congruence subgroup problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    . 299–308). The congruence subgroup problem. M S RAGHUNATHAN. There is unfortunately an error in the paper cited above in the very first page. We correct this error (which does not materially affect the rest of the paper in any way) below.

  9. Finite groups all of whose minimal subgroups are NE∗ -subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove the following theorem which is an improvement of a recent result due to Asaad and Ramadan (see Theorem 1.1 of [2]). Hence, Q8 will denote the quaternion group of order 8 and a group G is called Q8-free if no quotient group of any subgroup of G is isomorphic to Q8. Throughout this paper, L will denote the class.

  10. GADD45ß, an anti-tumor gene, inhibits avian leukosis virus subgroup J replication in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a retrovirus that induces neoplasia, hepatomegaly, immunosuppression and poor performance in chickens. The tumorigenic and pathogenic mechanisms of ALV-J remain a hot topic. To explore anti-tumor genes that confer genetic resistance to ALV-J infection in ch...

  11. Intertumoral Heterogeneity within Medulloblastoma Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Florence M G; Remke, Marc; Rampasek, Ladislav; Peacock, John; Shih, David J H; Luu, Betty; Garzia, Livia; Torchia, Jonathon; Nor, Carolina; Morrissy, A Sorana; Agnihotri, Sameer; Thompson, Yuan Yao; Kuzan-Fischer, Claudia M; Farooq, Hamza; Isaev, Keren; Daniels, Craig; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Faure-Conter, Cecile; Jouvet, Anne; Giannini, Caterina; Nageswara Rao, Amulya A; Li, Kay Ka Wai; Ng, Ho-Keung; Eberhart, Charles G; Pollack, Ian F; Hamilton, Ronald L; Gillespie, G Yancey; Olson, James M; Leary, Sarah; Weiss, William A; Lach, Boleslaw; Chambless, Lola B; Thompson, Reid C; Cooper, Michael K; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Hauser, Peter; van Veelen, Marie-Lise C; Kros, Johan M; French, Pim J; Ra, Young Shin; Kumabe, Toshihiro; López-Aguilar, Enrique; Zitterbart, Karel; Sterba, Jaroslav; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Massimino, Maura; Van Meir, Erwin G; Osuka, Satoru; Shofuda, Tomoko; Klekner, Almos; Zollo, Massimo; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Rubin, Joshua B; Jabado, Nada; Albrecht, Steffen; Mora, Jaume; Van Meter, Timothy E; Jung, Shin; Moore, Andrew S; Hallahan, Andrew R; Chan, Jennifer A; Tirapelli, Daniela P C; Carlotti, Carlos G; Fouladi, Maryam; Pimentel, José; Faria, Claudia C; Saad, Ali G; Massimi, Luca; Liau, Linda M; Wheeler, Helen; Nakamura, Hideo; Elbabaa, Samer K; Perezpeña-Diazconti, Mario; Chico Ponce de León, Fernando; Robinson, Shenandoah; Zapotocky, Michal; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Huang, Annie; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Tabori, Uri; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Dirks, Peter B; Rutka, James T; Bader, Gary D; Reimand, Jüri; Goldenberg, Anna; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2017-06-12

    While molecular subgrouping has revolutionized medulloblastoma classification, the extent of heterogeneity within subgroups is unknown. Similarity network fusion (SNF) applied to genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression data across 763 primary samples identifies very homogeneous clusters of patients, supporting the presence of medulloblastoma subtypes. After integration of somatic copy-number alterations, and clinical features specific to each cluster, we identify 12 different subtypes of medulloblastoma. Integrative analysis using SNF further delineates group 3 from group 4 medulloblastoma, which is not as readily apparent through analyses of individual data types. Two clear subtypes of infants with Sonic Hedgehog medulloblastoma with disparate outcomes and biology are identified. Medulloblastoma subtypes identified through integrative clustering have important implications for stratification of future clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cutaneous toxoplasmosis in an immunosuppressed dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A seven-year-old female spayed Schnauzer was presented with cutaneous ulcerated nodular lesions shortly after the beginning of an immunosuppressive treatment for immune-mediated hemolytic disease. Cytology was performed and a great number of neutrophils and banana-shaped organisms were observed. Biopsy showed a neutrophilic and histiocytic dermatitis and panniculitis with myriads of intralesional bradyzoites cysts and tachyzoites. PCR analysis was positive for Toxoplasma gondii and negative for Neospora caninum. Immunohistochemistry confirmed intralesional T. gondii antigens. This study reports a rare case of cutaneous toxoplasmosis in an immunosuppressed dog.

  13. Renal transport and drug interactions of immunosuppressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Sheikh, Azza Ali Kamel

    2008-01-01

    Immunosuppressants are drugs that are used to treat inflammatory diseases, organ transplantation rejection, and cancer. These drugs are given to patients as single drugs, in combination, or together with other medications to treat accompanying diseases. Several severe side effects may result due to

  14. Immune tolerance and immunosuppression in solid organ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Organ transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage organ failure. Most of them will require lifelong immunosuppression to prevent both acute and chronic rejection. T-cell recognition of the allograft major histocompatibility complex antigens is the central event initiating cellular rejection of the allograft, ...

  15. Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Immunosuppressed Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Janice E. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Brewer, Jerry D., E-mail: brewer.jerry@mayo.edu [Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive cutaneous malignancy. The infectivity of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), an apparent agent in MCC development, may be exacerbated with impaired immune responses. This paper reviews relevant data regarding the role of immunosuppression in the development of MCC and describes modes of immunodeficient states. Because of the inherently low incidence rate of MCC, several case studies and series are also briefly mentioned to provide a more comprehensive summary of MCC in the setting of immunosuppression. We describe immunosuppressed patients who have experienced excessive UV radiation, organ transplantation, human immunodeficiency virus infection/AIDS, autoimmune diseases, and lymphoproliferative disorders. Iatrogenic forms of immunosuppression are also highlighted. Studies that quantify risks consistently report that individuals with a history of solid organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases, AIDS, and/or lymphoproliferative diseases have a significantly elevated risk of developing MCC. Overall, immunocompromised patients also appear to have an early onset and more aggressive course of MCC, with poorer outcomes. Recommendations for multidisciplinary approaches are proposed to effectively prevent and manage MCC in these patients.

  16. Optimizing the immunosuppressive regimen in heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Howard; Ross, Heather

    2004-05-01

    The use of immunosuppression regimens containing a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI), an adjunct immunosuppressant (e.g., azathioprine, everolimus or mycophenolate mofetil) and corticosteroids has effectively reduced the risk of early graft loss due to acute rejection in heart transplant recipients. At present, late graft loss due to cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains a major challenge for transplant teams. CAV is characterized by intimal hyperplasia as a result of endothelial cell injury. Factors relating to the transplant procedure itself (e.g., ischemic time and reperfusion injury), cardiovascular risks (e.g., donor age, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, pre-existing diabetes and new-onset diabetes after transplantation), immunologic risks (e.g., acute rejection episodes, anti-HLA antibodies) and the side effects of immunosuppression with CNIs or corticosteroids (e.g., cytomegalovirus infection, nephrotoxicity) have all been implicated in the development of CAV. The 2 main approaches to the prevention of CAV are modification of underlying risk factors (e.g., treatment with anti-hypertensive agents and lipid-lowering drugs, and optimizing the immunosuppressive regimen) and improvement in immunosuppression. CNIs remain the cornerstone of immunosuppressive regimens in heart transplantation, but new parameters for monitoring CNI exposure and new immunosuppressive regimens hold the promise of reduced overall CNI exposure with consequent reductions in vascular toxicity and improved clinical outcomes. Traditionally, trough levels of cyclosporine (C(0)) have been used to monitor exposure to cyclosporine and to assess the need for dose adjustment. However, optimal cyclosporine exposure can now be achieved through monitoring of cyclosporine levels 2 hours after dosing (C(2) monitoring). Furthermore, in a pivotal trial in heart transplantation, the new proliferation signal inhibitor, everolimus, plus full-dose cyclosporine and corticosteroids, has been shown to have

  17. Corticosteroid-sparing agents: conventional systemic immunosuppressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruh, Jonathan; Foster, C Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of corticosteroids in the mid-20th century to control inflammatory eye disease revolutionized treatment practices. As long-term use of corticosteroids became the backbone of immunosuppressive therapy, it soon became evident that it was associated with significant morbidity to the patient. For this reason, other immunosuppressant agents were sought. Thereafter, the first generation of immunosuppressive agents were born. The main action of all such agents involves the inhibition of lymphoid proliferation. The agents can be further subdivided into the following categories based on their specific mechanism of action: alkylating (cyclophosphamide and chlorambucil), antimetabolite (methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and azathioprine), and antibiotic/calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine, tacrolimus and sirolimus). These immunomodulating agents serve as the foundation to modern corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive therapy. Many times, these agents are now even indicated as first-line therapy for the treatment of systemic inflammatory diseases with destructive ocular sequela, e.g. Behçet's disease and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's). Choosing the most appropriate immunomodulatory agent to initiate therapy can often be difficult; a multifactorial approach in the decision-making process is essential. Special attention must be given to the patient's medical history, type and severity of inflammatory disease, social history, compliance, age, and sex. Oftentimes, it takes a joint effort between the ophthalmologist and multiple sub-specialists (rheumatology, oncology, and hematology) to administer and monitor these therapies. Even though each of these systemic immunosuppressive agents has its own array of potential side effects, with careful monitoring and titration of dosages, such potential side effects can be minimized or avoided altogether. Ultimately, these patients are afforded a much more favorable long-term outcome, free of the

  18. Identification of a genomic subgroup of BK polyomavirus spread in European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Saukko, Pekka J; Tertti, Risto; Metsärinne, Kaj P; Carr, Michael J; Crowley, Brendan; Sakurada, Koichi; Zheng, Huai-Ying; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Yogo, Yoshiaki

    2006-11-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is highly prevalent in the human population, infecting children without obvious symptoms and persisting in the kidney in a latent state. In immunosuppressed patients, BKV is reactivated and excreted in urine. BKV isolates worldwide are classified into four serologically distinct subtypes, I-IV, with subtype I being the most frequently detected. Furthermore, subtype I is subdivided into subgroups based on genomic variations. In this study, the distribution patterns of the subtypes and subgroups of BKV were compared among four patient populations with various immunosuppressive states and of various ethnic backgrounds: (A) Finnish renal-transplant recipients; (B) Irish/English haematopoietic stem-cell transplant recipients with and without haemorrhagic cystitis; (C) Japanese renal-transplant recipients; and (D) Japanese bone-marrow transplant recipients. The typing sequences (287 bp) of BKV in population A were determined in this study; those in populations B-D have been reported previously. These sequences were subjected to phylogenetic and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses. Based on the results of these analyses, the BKV isolates in the four patient populations were classified into subtypes and subgroups. The incidence of subtype IV varied significantly among patient populations. Furthermore, the incidence of subgroup Ib-2 within subtype I was high in populations A and B, whereas that of Ic was high in populations C and D (PBKV DNA sequences supported the hypothesis that there is geographical separation of European and Asian BKV strains.

  19. New Immunosuppressive Therapies in Uveitis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Mérida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Uveitis is an inflammatory process that initially starts in the uvea, but can also affect other adjacent eye structures, and is currently the fourth cause of blindness in developed countries. Corticoids are probably the most widespread treatment, but resorting to other immunosuppressive treatments is a frequent practice. Since the implication of different cytokines in uveitis has been well demonstrated, the majority of recent treatments for this disease include inhibitors or antibodies against these. Nevertheless, adequate treatment for each uveitis type entails a difficult therapeutic decision as no clear recommendations are found in the literature, despite the few protocolized clinical assays and many case-control studies done. This review aims to present, in order, the mechanisms and main indications of the most modern immunosuppressive drugs against cytokines.

  20. Immunosuppressive decalin derivatives from red yeast rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Lu, Jing-Guang; Li, Ting; Zhu, Guo-Yuan; Han, Quan-Bin; Hsiao, Wen-Luan; Liu, Liang; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2012-04-27

    Five new decalin derivatives (1-5), together with two known compounds (6 and 7), were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of red yeast rice. Their structures were elucidated by means of NMR and mass spectroscopic analyses. Monascusic lactone A (1) is the first reported naturally occurring decalin derivative possessing a spiro lactone at the C-1 position. The immunosuppressive effects of all these isolates (1-7) on human T cell proliferation were investigated, and all, especially monascusic acids B (2), C (3), D (4), and A (6) and heptaketide (7), suppressed human T cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner from 10 to 100 μM. This is the first report on the immunosuppressive activity of decalin derivatives. © 2012 American Chemical Society and American Society of Pharmacognosy

  1. Immunosuppression and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Rebolj, Matejka; Garred, Peter

    2013-01-01

    increase the risk of cervical cancer, while poor diet only moderately increased the risk. It is difficult to determine whether sexually transmitted infections other than human papillomavirus infection are independent risk factors. Identifying those groups of women likely to fail in clearing persistent......A markedly increased risk of cervical cancer is known in women immunosuppressed due to AIDS or therapy following organ transplantation. The aim of this review is to determine the association between other conditions affecting the immune system and the risk of cervical cancer. Patients with end......-stage renal disease seem to be at an increased risk of cervical cancer. A higher risk of cervical precancerous lesions was found in patients with some autoimmune diseases; particularly if treated with immunosuppressants. Among behavioral factors weakening the immune system, smoking appeared to strongly...

  2. New Immunosuppressive Therapies in Uveitis Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida, Salvador; Palacios, Elena; Navea, Amparo; Bosch-Morell, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Uveitis is an inflammatory process that initially starts in the uvea, but can also affect other adjacent eye structures, and is currently the fourth cause of blindness in developed countries. Corticoids are probably the most widespread treatment, but resorting to other immunosuppressive treatments is a frequent practice. Since the implication of different cytokines in uveitis has been well demonstrated, the majority of recent treatments for this disease include inhibitors or antibodies against these. Nevertheless, adequate treatment for each uveitis type entails a difficult therapeutic decision as no clear recommendations are found in the literature, despite the few protocolized clinical assays and many case-control studies done. This review aims to present, in order, the mechanisms and main indications of the most modern immunosuppressive drugs against cytokines. PMID:26270662

  3. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Massachusetts, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Massachusetts for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Massachusetts showed across-the-board gains--improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low…

  4. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Kentucky, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Kentucky for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Kentucky showed mostly gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls.…

  5. Immunity and immunosuppression in experimental visceral leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Goto H; Lindoso J.A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a disease caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania, and visceral leishmaniasis is a form in which the inner organs are affected. Since knowledge about immunity in experimental visceral leishmaniasis is poor, we present here a review on immunity and immunosuppression in experimental visceral leishmaniasis in mouse and hamster models. We show the complexity of the mechanisms involved and differences when compared with the cutaneous form of leishmaniasis. Resistance in viscera...

  6. Immunity and immunosuppression in experimental visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto H.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a disease caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania, and visceral leishmaniasis is a form in which the inner organs are affected. Since knowledge about immunity in experimental visceral leishmaniasis is poor, we present here a review on immunity and immunosuppression in experimental visceral leishmaniasis in mouse and hamster models. We show the complexity of the mechanisms involved and differences when compared with the cutaneous form of leishmaniasis. Resistance in visceral leishmaniasis involves both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and interleukin (IL-2, interferon (IFN- gamma, and IL-12, the latter in a mechanism independent of IFN- gamma and linked to transforming growth factor (TGF-ß production. Susceptibility involves IL-10 but not IL-4, and B cells. In immune animals, upon re-infection, the elements involved in resistance are different, i.e., CD8+ T cells and IL-2. Since one of the immunopathological consequences of active visceral leishmaniasis in humans is suppression of T-cell responses, many studies have been conducted using experimental models. Immunosuppression is mainly Leishmania antigen specific, and T cells, Th2 cells and adherent antigen-presenting cells have been shown to be involved. Interactions of the co-stimulatory molecule family B7-CTLA-4 leading to increased level of TGF-ß as well as apoptosis of CD4+ T cells and inhibition of macrophage apoptosis by Leishmania infection are other components participating in immunosuppression. A better understanding of this complex immune response and the mechanisms of immunosuppression in experimental visceral leishmaniasis will contribute to the study of human disease and to vaccine development.

  7. HHV-8 prevalence, immunosuppression and Kaposi's sarcoma in South Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispo, A; Tamburini, M; De Marco, M R; Ascierto, P; Silvestro, P; Ronga, D; Tridente, V; Desicato, S; Carbone, S; Fabbrocini, G; Spiteri, D; Montella, M

    2001-05-01

    The identification of HHV-8 has opened the way for numerous epidemiological studies aimed at determining both the prevalence of HHV-8 in various sub-groups of the population (affected or not by KS) and at identifying possible cofactors necessary for the development of KS. We set up a study to evaluate the prevalence of HHV-8 in the South of Italy in KS cases, hospital patients and blood donors and to verify the role of immunosuppression in KS. In KS patients the prevalence of lytic and latent antigens were both 91% (29 positive cases). Lytic and latent antigens have prevalence rates of 20% and 15% respectively in hospital patients. In the donor group the rates were 16% for lytic antigens and 2% for latent antigens. The most recurrent chronic pathology in KS patients was cardiopathy (5 cases). The pathological case histories report 4 cases of Herpes Zoster, 6 of diabetes, one case of hepatitis C who had also had gonorrea. There was also a case, negative to HHV-8, who had had malaria after residing for three years in Oristano in Sardinia (a zone with high endemic malaria). Our study confirms that in Southern Italy there are relatively high prevalences of HHV-8 both in the general population and in blood donors and that immunodysregulation may be involved in the pathogenesis of KS. Other studies are necessary to confirm the sexual transmission of the HHV-8 virus and to better understand the natural history of HHV-8 infection.

  8. Research methods for subgrouping low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Keating, Jennifer L; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable clinician and researcher interest in whether the outcomes for patients with low back pain, and the efficiency of the health systems that treat them, can be improved by 'subgrouping research'. Subgrouping research seeks to identify subgroups of people who have clinically...... studies (a method framework). The aims of this debate article are: (1) to present a method framework to inform the design and evaluation of subgrouping research in low back pain, (2) to describe method options when investigating prognostic effects or subgroup treatment effects, and (3) to discuss...

  9. Immunosuppression associated with chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to cancer development via multiple mechanisms. One potential mechanism is that chronic inflammation can generate an immunosuppressive microenvironment that allows advantages for tumor formation and progression. The immunosuppressive environment in certain chronic inflammatory diseases and solid cancers is characterized by accumulation of proinflammatory mediators, infiltration of immune suppressor cells and activation of immune checkpoint pathways in effector T cells. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of how immunosuppression contributes to cancer and how proinflammatory mediators induce the immunosuppressive microenvironment via induction of immunosuppressive cells and activation of immune checkpoint pathways. PMID:26354776

  10. Management of Sepsis-Induced Immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venet, Fabienne; Rimmelé, Thomas; Monneret, Guillaume

    2018-01-01

    It is now well established that profound immunosuppression develops within a few days after sepsis onset in patients. This should be considered additional organ failure because it is associated with increased rate of nosocomial infections, mortality, and long-term complications, thus constituting the rationale for immunomodulation in patients. Nevertheless, the demonstration of the efficacy of such therapeutic strategy in improving deleterious outcomes in sepsis remains to be made. Results from clinical trials based on interleukin 7 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor immunoadjuvant therapies in septic shock patients are expected for 2018. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Persistent Inflammation, Immunosuppression and Catabolism Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Juan C; Brakenridge, Scott C; Moldawer, Lyle L; Moore, Frederick A

    2017-04-01

    Following advances in critical care, in-hospital multiple organ failure-related mortality is declining. Consequently, incidence of chronic critical illness is increasing. These patients linger in the intensive care unit, have high resource utilization, and poor long-term outcomes. Within this population, the authors propose that a substantial subset of patients have a new phenotype: persistent inflammation, immunosuppression, and catabolism syndrome. There is evidence that myelodysplasia with expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, innate and adaptive immune suppression, and protein catabolism with malnutrition are major contributors. Optimal care of these patients will require novel multimodality interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ocular toxoplasmosis in immunosuppressed nonhuman primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, G.N.; O' Connor, G.R.; Diaz, R.F.; Minasi, P.; Wara, W.M.

    1988-06-01

    To investigate the role of cellular immunodeficiency in recurrent toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis, six Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) with healed toxoplasmic lesions of the retina were immunosuppressed by total lymphoid irradiation. Three months prior to irradiation 30,000 Toxoplasma gondii organisms of the Beverley strain had been inoculated onto the macula of eye in each monkey via a pars plana approach. Toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis developed in each animal, and lesions were allowed to heal without treatment. During total lymphoid irradiation animals received 2000 centigrays (cGy) over a 7-week period. Irradiation resulted in an immediate drop in total lymphocyte counts and decreased ability to stimulate lymphocytes by phytohemagglutinin. Weekly ophthalmoscopic examinations following irradiation failed to show evidence of recurrent ocular disease despite persistent immunodeficiency. Four months after irradiation live organisms were reinoculated onto the nasal retina of the same eye in each animal. Retinochoroidal lesions identical to those seen in primary disease developed in five of six animals. Toxoplasma organisms therefore were able to proliferate in ocular tissue following the administration of immunosuppressive therapy. This study fails to support the hypothesis that cellular immunodeficiency alone will initiate recurrent toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis. Results suggest that reactivation of disease from encysted organisms involves factors other than suppression of Toxoplasma proliferation. If reactivation occurs by other mechanisms, however, cellular immunodeficiency then may allow development of extensive disease.

  13. Nonadherence to immunosuppression: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreso F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Francesc Moreso,1 Irina B Torres,1 Gemma Costa-Requena,2 Daniel Serón1 1Nephrology Department, 2Psychiatry Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Passeig Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Nonadherence to immunosuppressant treatment is common after renal transplantation involving >20% of patients. It is associated with cellular rejection, appearance of donor-specific antibodies, and chronic rejection. It has been estimated that nonadherence can be detected in approximately 50% of failing grafts. Since the evaluation of sociodemographic factors do not allow characterizing the target population, it is necessary to combine different measures of adherence (self-reporting and collateral reporting, pill counts, biological monitoring of blood samples, or others to increase its diagnostic accuracy. During the last decade, it has been shown that the implementation of a multidimensional intervention including information, motivation, and behavioral interventions may lead to an improvement of adherence to treatment. On the other hand, it has been shown that one-off feedback from a nurse, simplification of treatment, or financial assistance programs offered little improvement. Thus, increasing the effectiveness of adherence interventions might have a far greater impact on the long-term outcome of renal transplants than any improvement in specific medical treatments. This will require coordinated action from health professionals, researchers, health planners, and policy makers. Keywords: renal transplantation, nonadherence, immunosuppressive treatment

  14. Immunosuppressive and biologic therapy for ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardizzone, Sandro; Cassinotti, Andrea; de Franchis, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Recent insight into the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis have led to the development of new treatment options. A better understanding of IBD pathophysiology has progressively led to a more frequent use of immunosuppressants and biologics. The use of the conventional immunomodulators, such as azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate, cyclosporine and tacrolimus, and anti-TNF-α agents, such as infliximab and adalimumab, in the treatment of ulcerative colitis are reviewed. Moreover, the ongoing studies evaluating the efficacy of emerging immunosuppressants in treating patients with ulcerative colitis are discussed. An effort is made to explore some critical areas in which early and more diffuse use of these agents may be advocated. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic condition mainly affecting young people in their more productive age, and determining high indirect costs to the patient and to society. Thus, there is a need for optimizing and renewing our traditional therapeutic approach to UC, and new therapies beyond conventional treatment options possibly aiming to change the poor clinical course of many patients with ulcerative colitis. Keeping in mind this potentially new therapeutic scenario, there are some critical areas in which early and more diffuse use of conventional and emerging new immunomodulators is advocated.

  15. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Delaware students showed consistent gains in math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. There were mixed results in reading. Achievement gaps narrowed in both reading and math in…

  16. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Maine students had across-the-board gains. There were improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for the subgroups large enough to count, which were white students, low income students, and boys and girls. Results on…

  17. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Illinois students showed mostly gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. There was mixed progress made in narrowing achievement gaps in reading and math…

  18. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Florida students showed gains almost across the board in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. Progress has been made in narrowing achievement gaps in both…

  19. ∗-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    supplemented maximal and minimal subgroups of Sylow subgroups of finite groups, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 132(8) (2004) 2197–2204. [17] Wang Y, Wei H and Li Y, A generalization of Kramer's theorem and its applications,. Bull. Austral. Math.

  20. Existence of a dictatorial subgroup in social choice with independent subgroup utility scales, an alternative proof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna; van Deemen, Adrian; Rusinowska, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Social welfare orderings for different scales of individual utility measurement in distinct population subgroups are studied. In Khmelnitskaya (2000), employing the continuous version of Arrow’s impossibility theorem, it was shown that for combinations of independent subgroups scales every

  1. Clinical aspects of immunosuppression in poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rеsаnоvić Rаdmilа

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunity is ability to stop an infection. Immunosupression is a status where the immunity is reduced. Humoral (antibodies and/or cell immunity may be depressed. Immunosupression can be caused by infectious agents, improper feeding balance (deficiencies, lack of biosecurity, management failures, stress or by a combination of these factors. Each of these possible causes must be seriously worked out to prevent the consequences of immunosupression on profitability. Environmental factors and numerous infectious pathogens have been identified as a multi-factorial cause of various degrees of immunosupression. Mainly subclinical character and coinfections make the diagnosis of the primary immunosuppressive agents difficult. On the other hand, early diagnosis and identification of contributing factors are important to develop strategies to fight immunosupression in birds successfully. A combination of biosecurity measures, optimized housing condition and stress reduction together with appropriate vaccination strategies is necessary for the successful control of immunosupression in commercial poultry.

  2. Cardiac transplantation. Selection, immunosuppression, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, L W; Laks, H; Terasaki, P I; Kahan, B D; Drinkwater, D C

    1988-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation has evolved from an experiment to an accepted therapy for severe heart failure. Increasing competition for donor organs mandates a greater emphasis on selection and timing for transplantation and paradoxically forces more reliance on aggressive medical therapy for all patients after evaluation. The growth of recipient and donor pools may enhance the opportunity for assessing histocompatibility, for which distinguishing between autoantibodies and human leukocyte antigen-determined reactivity is important, and some general nonresponders may be detected. Therapy with cyclosporine has improved the outcome after transplantation, but further refinement is needed, perhaps with pharmacologic synergy, to minimize nephrotoxicity and maximize specific immunosuppression. Survival is more than 80% at 1 year, after which the incidence of acute rejection and infection declines and accelerated atherosclerosis becomes prominent. Although resuming employment is not always possible, the overall quality of life is excellent after cardiac transplantation. Images PMID:3074557

  3. Belatacept for Maintenance Immunosuppression in Lung Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hui PharmD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Belatacept is a novel immunosuppressant that blocks a T-cell costimulation pathway and is approved for use in adult kidney transplant recipients. Its safety and efficacy have not been established after lung transplantation. We present a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with belatacept. A 56-year-old man underwent bilateral lung retransplantation for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS. In the third year posttransplant, he developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS attributed to tacrolimus. Tacrolimus was changed to sirolimus. One month later, he presented with worsening renal function and HUS attributed to sirolimus. Plasmapheresis and steroid pulse were initiated with clinical improvement, and sirolimus was switched to belatacept. He experienced no episodes of cellular rejection but developed recurrent BOS. Complications during treatment included anemia and recurrent pneumonias. The safety and efficacy of belatacept in lung transplantation remains unclear; further studies are needed.

  4. Viruses in cancers among the immunosuppressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Bzhalava, Zurab; Hortlund, Maria; Lagheden, Camilla; Nordqvist Kleppe, Sara; Bzhalava, Davit; Hultin, Emilie; Dillner, Joakim

    2017-12-15

    Most cancer forms known to be caused by viruses are increased among the immunosuppressed, but several cancer forms without established viral etiology are also increased, notably nonmelanoma skin carcinoma (NMSC). We followed all 13,429 solid organ transplantation patients in Sweden for cancer occurrence after transplantation. We requested these tumor specimens and sequenced the first 89 specimens received (62 NMSCs, 27 other cancers). The sequences were analyzed for viruses based on two bioinformatics algorithms (paracel-blast (sensitive for detection of known viruses) and hidden Markov model (HMM; sensitive for distantly related viruses)). Among the 62 NMSCs, the virus family detected in the largest proportion of specimens was Mimiviridae (9/62 NMSCs). The majority of the virus-related reads belonged to Papillomaviridae. The HMM analysis identified 86 additional previously not described viral contigs related to 11 virus families, with reads related to Mimiviridae being the most common (detected in 28/62 NMSCs) with the most prevalent contig (Mimivirus SE906, 1937 bp) detected in 17/62 NMSCs. Among the 27 other cancers, viral sequences were detected in only 5 specimens by blast analysis, compared to in all 27 specimens by HMM (Mimiviridae, Poxviridae, Phycodnaviridae and virus-related sequences yet unclassified to any family). 99% of the virus reads belonged to a single previously not described sequence (Mimivirus SE996, 911 bp). A multitude of viruses is readily detectable in specimens with cancers occurring among the immunosuppressed, with sequences related to Mimiviridae being the most prevalent. Further research would be needed to elucidate the biological significance of the viruses. © 2017 UICC.

  5. Down-regulation of RBP-J mediated by microRNA-133a suppresses dendritic cells and functions as a potential tumor suppressor in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuren; Han, Dong; Fan, Weimin

    2016-12-10

    In recent years, immunotherapy for the treatment of tumors have been established. Dendritic cells (DCs) are extremely efficient and professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), which are an important target for immune therapeutic interventions in cancer. In present study, we investigated whether RBP-J signaling regulated by miR-133a was involved in the DCs mediated tumor suppressor in osteosarcoma. DCs were isolated from 30 osteosarcoma patients and 30 healthy subjects. Mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 were cultured and osteosarcoma mouse model with injection of murine osteosarcoma cell line S180 were established. In osteosarcoma patients, miR-133a expression level of DCs was increased, and RBP-J expression in mRNA and protein levels were decreased. MiR-133a inhibitor promoted maturation and activation of DCs in osteosarcoma patients. In osteosarcoma mouse model, miR-133a mimic suppressed the maturation and activation of spleen DCs, while miR-133a inhibitor promoted them. Overexpression of miR-133a decreased therapeutic effect of DCs on osteosarcoma mice. In RAW264.7 cells, miR-133a was observed to target RBP-J and regulate its expression. MiR-133a mimic inhibited the maturation of DCs in cells exposed to LPS, the effect of which was reversed by overexpression of RBP-J. RBP-J mediated by miR-133a probably contributed to the regulation of DCs maturation and activation in osteosarcoma, which functioned as a therapeutic target for the immunotherapy in cancers. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The effects of status on subgroup relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Hogg, Michael A

    2002-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the impact of status differentials on subgroup attitudes and behaviours. In Experiment 1, 73 math-science students were led to believe they had higher or lower status than humanities students. They then performed a non-interactive decision-making task during which they were categorized exclusively as a university student (superordinate condition), or as a university student and math-science student simultaneously (subgroups condition). Experiment 2 (N = 98) differed from Experiment 1 in that perceptions of relative subgroup status were measured rather than manipulated. Consistent with social identity theory, subgroup members tended to categorize themselves more at the superordinate (university) level the lower status they considered their subgroup to be. In Experiment 2, a series of interactions also emerged, showing that status and inter-subgroup bias were positively related when the participants had been categorized exclusively at the superordinate level. When superordinate and subgroup identities were activated simultaneously, perceptions of status had no effect on levels of bias. The results were interpreted in terms of participants' needs for identity enhancement and identity distinctiveness.

  7. Identifying Tinnitus Subgroups With Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Richard; Coelho, Claudia; Tao, Pan; Ji, Haihong; Noble, William; Gehringer, Anne; Gogel, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We believe it is important to uncover tinnitus subgroups to identify subsets of patients most likely to benefit from different treatments. We review strategies for subgrouping based on etiology, subjective reports, the audiogram, psychoacoustics, imaging, and cluster analysis. Method Preliminary results of a 2-step cluster analysis based on 246 participants from whom we had 26 categorical and 25 continuous variables were determined. Results A 4-cluster solution suggested the following subgroups: (a) constant distressing tinnitus, (b) varying tinnitus that is worse in noise, (c) tinnitus patients who are copers and whose tinnitus is not influenced by touch (somatic modulation), and (d) tinnitus patients who are copers but whose tinnitus is worse in quiet environments. Conclusions Subgroups of tinnitus patients can be identified by using statistical approaches. The subgroups we identify here represent a preliminary attempt at identifying such patients. One next step would be to explore clinical trials of tinnitus treatments based on subgroup analyses or on using subgroups in the selection criteria. PMID:19056922

  8. Identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chaleil

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some hypotheses concerning the identification of homogeneous subgroups among fibromyalgia (FM patients in order to improve the management of the disease. It also reviews the available literature about this subject. Three methods for subgrouping are discussed according to clinical features, biomarkers, and gait analysis. Clinical subgrouping based on cluster analysis has been used for the identification of homogeneous subgroups of patients and, more recently, homogeneous clinical features. So far, longitudinal studies using clinical subgroups to direct treatment and predict outcome are still required. Biomarkers in FM, which is a neurobiological disease, are of promising interest, nevertheless currently, none of them can be used to subgroup FM patients. Due to the fact that cortical and subcortical mechanisms of gait control share some cognitive functions which are involved in FM, gait markers have been proposed to evaluate and to subgroup FM patients, in clinical settings. Three out of 4 core FM symptoms are linked to gait markers. Kinesia measured by means of cranio-caudal power is correlated to pain, and could be proposed to assess pain behavior (kinesiophobia. Stride frequency, which is linked to physical component, allows the identification of a hyperkinetic subgroup. Moreover, SF has been correlated to fatigue during the 6 minute walking test. Stride regularity, which expresses the unsteadiness of gait, is correlated to cognitive dysfunction in FM. Decreased stride regularity allows the recognition of a homogeneous subgroup characterized by an increased anxiety and depression, and decreased cognitive functions. These results need further studies to be validated and so used in the daily clinical practice.

  9. SUBGR: A Program to Generate Subgroup Data for the Subgroup Resonance Self-Shielding Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-06

    The Subgroup Data Generation (SUBGR) program generates subgroup data, including levels and weights from the resonance self-shielded cross section table as a function of background cross section. Depending on the nuclide and the energy range, these subgroup data can be generated by (a) narrow resonance approximation, (b) pointwise flux calculations for homogeneous media; and (c) pointwise flux calculations for heterogeneous lattice cells. The latter two options are performed by the AMPX module IRFFACTOR. These subgroup data are to be used in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) neutronic simulator MPACT, for which the primary resonance self-shielding method is the subgroup method.

  10. Evidence of immunosuppression by Demodex canis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, O O; al-Khalidi, N W; Martin, S; Wyman, M

    1992-04-01

    Three clinically normal beagles, 3 beagles with localized demodectic mange (LDM), and 3 beagles with generalized demodectic mange (GDM) were investigated simultaneously 1-3 and 4-6 weeks from the appearance of the clinical signs. Blood clinical examination and reactivity of peripheral lymphocytes to Con A and PHA were investigated in the first instance, and reactivity to Con A, PHA, and LPS in the second. Eight aliquots were used in each blastogenesis assay for each dog. All dogs were negative for rheumatoid factor. The results of blastogenesis showed that many observations were distributed non-normally, and that not all dogs in each group responded homogeneously. Comparison of blastogenesis results between dogs demands careful statistical analysis. Responses to mitogens were normal in all dogs at 1-3 weeks except for the LDM dogs that showed an increased response to PHA. Only the response to Con A was moderately inhibited in the LDM dogs at 4-6 weeks. All responses were severely depressed in the GDM dogs at 4-6 weeks. This means that immunosuppression follows rather than precedes the clinical manifestations of GDM, and implies that the phenomenon is induced by the parasite or the host's reaction to it.

  11. Imunossupressores na Dermatologia Immunosuppressive agents in Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lopes Bressan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Os imunossupressores são drogas que agem na divisão celular e têm propriedades anti-inflamatórias. Sendo assim, são essencialmente prescritos na prevenção de rejeição de transplantes e no tratamento das doenças autoimunes e inflamatórias crônicas, que, na Dermatologia, têm a psoríase como maior representante. Nesta sessão serão descritas as principais drogas imunossupressoras, com orientações para seu manejo adequado.Immunosupressants are drugs that act in cell division and have anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, they are essentially prescribed in the prevention of transplant rejection and in the treatment of autoimmune disorders and chronic inflammatory diseases, whose main example in Dermatology is psoriasis. In this work the most important immunosuppressive drugs and orientation to properly administer them are going to be described.

  12. Immunosuppression during Rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li; Lu, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobium infects host legumes to elicit new plant organs, nodules where dinitrogen is fixed as ammonia that can be directly utilized by plants. The nodulation factor (NF) produced by Rhizobium is one of the determinant signals for rhizobial infection and nodule development. Recently, it was found to suppress the innate immunity on host and nonhost plants as well as its analogs, chitins. Therefore, NF can be recognized as a microbe/pathogen-associated molecular pattern (M/PAMP) like chitin to induce the M/PAMP triggered susceptibility (M/PTS) of host plants to rhizobia. Whether the NF signaling pathway is directly associated with the innate immunity is not clear till now. In fact, other MAMPs such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), exopolysaccharide (EPS) and cyclic-β-glucan, together with type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors are also required for rhizobial infection or survival in leguminous nodule cells. Interestingly, most of them play similarly negative roles in the innate immunity of host plants, though their signaling is not completely elucidated. Taken together, we believe that the local immunosuppression on host plants induced by Rhizobium is essential for the establishment of their symbiosis.

  13. Renoprotective strategies in lupus nephritis: beyond immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, B; Lightstone, L

    2013-10-01

    Lupus nephritis needs to be diagnosed promptly and treated specifically with appropriate immunosuppression. However, all patients with lupus nephritis have by definition chronic kidney disease (CKD) as they will have proteinuria with varying degrees of renal impairment. CKD requires careful additional management, not only to reduce the risk of progression to end-stage renal disease but also because it is probably the strongest risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review focuses on the evidence underscoring strategies to prevent progression of CKD beyond the "simple" treatment of the lupus nephritis. The strategies include immaculate control of blood pressure, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system to reduce blood pressure and proteinuria, and the benefits of lifestyle modifications such as tackling smoking, obesity and exercise. We also review the literature on control of dyslipidaemias which, although clearly of cardiovascular benefit, provide less compelling data for offering renoprotection. We touch on the emerging area of the importance of controlling urate levels in protecting against progressive renal impairment. Finally, there is a reminder about the importance of considering the nephrotoxicity of all medications prescribed for patients with lupus nephritis - above all the need to avoid the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Overall, the theme is that there is much more to the management of patients with lupus nephritis than "just" the nephritis - a multidisciplinary approach involving nephrologists as well as rheumatologists is more likely to provide the appropriate wider care required for all patients with lupus nephritis.

  14. Superior rejection profile during the first 24 months after heart transplantation under tacrolimus as baseline immunosuppressive regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmschrott M

    2014-09-01

    significantly longer time to first biopsy-proven rejection was also found in the primary TAC subgroup (log-rank test P=0.0297. Further subgroup analysis in the TAC subgroups showed no statistically significant differences in time to biopsy-proven rejection under extended-release TAC compared to conventional TAC (intention-to-treat analysis, log-rank test P=0.1736.Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that a TAC-based primary immunosuppressive therapy is superior to a CSA-based immunosuppressive regimen in patients after HTX regarding time to first biopsy-proven rejection. Keywords: extended-release tacrolimus, cyclosporine A, renal function

  15. Nicotinamide reduces photodynamic therapy-induced immunosuppression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanos, S M; Halliday, G M; Damian, D L

    2012-09-01

    The immune suppressive effects of topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) are potential contributors to treatment failure after PDT for nonmelanoma skin cancer. Nicotinamide (vitamin B(3) ) prevents immune suppression by ultraviolet radiation, but its effects on PDT-induced immunosuppression are unknown. To determine the effects of topical and oral nicotinamide on PDT-induced immunosuppression in humans. Twenty healthy Mantoux-positive volunteers received 5% nicotinamide lotion or vehicle to either side of the back daily for 3 days. Another group of 30 volunteers received 500 mg oral nicotinamide or placebo twice daily for 1 week in a randomized, double-blinded, crossover design. In each study, methylaminolaevulinate cream was applied to discrete areas on the back, followed by narrowband red light irradiation (37 J cm(-2) ) delivered at high (75 mW cm(-2) ) or low (15 mW cm(-2) ) irradiance rates. Adjacent, nonirradiated sites served as controls. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (Mantoux) reactions were assessed at treatment and control sites to determine immunosuppression. High irradiance rate PDT with vehicle or with placebo caused significant immunosuppression (equivalent to 48% and 50% immunosuppression, respectively; both P nicotinamide reduced this immunosuppression by 59% and 66%, respectively (both P nicotinamide study (15% immunosuppression, not significant), but caused 22% immunosuppression in the oral study (placebo arm; P = 0·006); nicotinamide reduced this immunosuppression by 69% (P = 0·045). While the clinical relevance of these findings is currently unknown, nicotinamide may provide an inexpensive means of preventing PDT-induced immune suppression and enhancing PDT cure rates. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  16. [Visceral leishmaniasis, pemphigus and immunosuppressive treatment: case report from Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleb, A; Messaoudi, N; Chbouki, O; Daoudi, N; Oumghar, K; Lahmadi, K; Elmoussaoui, D; Ezzahraoui, K; Ngoh, Akwa E; Benomar, F; Abi, R; Jeaidi, A; Nazih, M; Belmekki, A; Chakour, M

    2011-02-01

    Atypical forms of visceral leishmaniasis associated with immunosuppressive treatment are difficult to diagnose and cause high mortality. The purpose of this report is to describe a case involving a 42-year-old patient living in a leishmaniasis-endemic area, who was undergoing immunosuppressive treatment using corticosteroids and methotrexate for pemphigus. Despite clinical and laboratory findings consistent with visceral leishmaniasis, detection of Leishmania bodies was a coincidental finding of cytological examination of bone marrow during workup for pancytopenia and associated clinical signs. This case argues in favor of systematic screening for this opportunistic parasitic disease before undertaking immunosuppressive treatment in patients presenting risk factors and consistent clinical/laboratory findings.

  17. Immunosuppressive T-cell antibody induction for heart transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Møller, Christian H; Gustafsson, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Heart transplantation has become a valuable and well-accepted treatment option for end-stage heart failure. Rejection of the transplanted heart by the recipient's body is a risk to the success of the procedure, and life-long immunosuppression is necessary to avoid this. Clear evidence is required...... to identify the best, safest and most effective immunosuppressive treatment strategy for heart transplant recipients. To date, there is no consensus on the use of immunosuppressive antibodies against T-cells for induction after heart transplantation....

  18. Comprehensive comparison of three different immunosuppressive regimens for liver transplant patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: steroid-free immunosuppression, induction immunosuppression and standard immunosuppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Liu

    Full Text Available The different choices of immunosuppression (IS regimens influenced the outcomes of liver transplantation. Steroid was applied as a standard IS to prevent and treat rejections. However, steroid-related complications were increasingly prominent. This study compared the efficacy and safety of standard IS regimens with the efficacy and safety of steroid-free IS regimen and induction IS regimen in Chinese liver transplantation recipients for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. A total of 329 patients who underwent liver transplantation from January 2008 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Three different groups of patients received standard triple-drug IS regimen of steroid, tacrolimus (TAC and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF (triple-drug regimen group; n=57, induction-contained IS regimen of basiliximab, steroid, TAC and MMF (BS group; n=241, and induction-contained and steroid-free regimen of basiliximab, TAC and MMF (SF group; n=31, respectively. There were no significant differences in terms of patient, tumor-free and graft survival rates. The acute rejection rate and rejection time were equivalent in different groups. But compared with BS group, higher incidences of biliary complications (11.52% vs. 30.77%, p=0.013 and graft dysfunction (0.48% vs. 13.64%, p=0.003 were observed in SF group. Furthermore, compared with the two groups, incidence of pleural effusion was also higher in SF group (15.79%, 11.96% vs. 45.45%, respectively, both p<0.01. And a trend towards less proportion of De novo diabetes was revealed in SF group. Although it was found that patient, tumor-free and graft survival rates were equivalent among three IS regimens, higher incidences of complications were demonstrated in steroid-free regimen in patients for HCC. These findings suggested that steroid-free IS regimen has no clear advantages in comparison with standard IS regimens for liver transplant recipients with HCC and the postoperative complications should be treated with

  19. Genetic and molecular alterations across medulloblastoma subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Patryk; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumour diagnosed in children. Over the last few decades, advances in radiation and chemotherapy have significantly improved the odds of survival. Nevertheless, one third of all patients still succumb to their disease, and many long-term survivors are afflicted with neurocognitive sequelae. Large-scale multi-institutional efforts have provided insight into the transcriptional and genetic landscape of medulloblastoma. Four distinct subgroups of medulloblastoma have been identified, defined by distinct transcriptomes, genetics, demographics and outcomes. Integrated genomic profiling of each of these subgroups has revealed distinct genetic alterations, driving pathways and in some instances cells of origin. In this review, we highlight, in a subgroup-specific manner, our current knowledge of the genetic and molecular alterations in medulloblastoma and underscore the possible avenues for future therapeutic intervention.

  20. Immunosuppression for Mooren's ulcer: evaluation of the stepladder approach--topical, oral and intravenous immunosuppressive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashar, Jatin N; Mathur, Anurag; Sangwan, Virender S

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate a step ladder approach for immunosuppressive regimen for Mooren's ulcer. We retrospectively analysed patients of Mooren's ulcer presenting to a tertiary care centre in south India from 1987 to 2010. Patients were analysed for the age, disease severity at time of presentation in terms of the quadrants of peripheral corneal involvement and amount of peripheral corneal thinning. According to the disease severity, patients were instituted either topical steroids (prednisolone acetate 1%) single agent or in combination with oral steroids (prednisolone 1-1.5 mg/kg/day), oral immunomodulators (methotrexate 7.5-12.5 mg/week), intravenous pulsed methyl prednisolone 1 g or pulsed cyclophosphamide 1 g. The main outcome measure was control of disease activity. Topical steroids as a single therapy had a disease resolution rate in 76% of the cases. Cases that required oral steroids, oral methotrexate, intravenous pulsed methyl prednisolone and combination of pulsed methyl prednisolone and cyclophosphamide had a resolution rate of 86%, 78.5%, 71.4% and 73.3%, respectively. The most common complication was secondary infection. Most of the cases that failed therapy had perforation of the cornea and required corneal transplantation. An aggressive immunosuppressive regimen that is tailor made based on disease severity as a first line of therapy improves the chances of disease control even in cases of aggressive Mooren's ulcer.

  1. Cyclosporin versus tacrolimus as primary immunosuppressant after liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlister, V C; Haddad, E; Renouf, E

    2006-01-01

    A systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCT) was undertaken to evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of immunosuppression with cyclosporin versus tacrolimus for liver transplanted patients. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central and Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Registers were...

  2. Inferior results with basis immunosuppression with sirolimus in kidney transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akker, J.M. van den; Hene, R.J.; Hoitsma, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The introduction of sirolimus has provided the opportunity to develop an immunosuppressive regimen without the nephrotoxic calcineurin inhibitors. METHODS: We conducted a first trial in 30 renal allograft recipients. Ten patients were followed prospectively and received sirolimus, to

  3. Legionella infections in cyclosporine-immunosuppressed cardiac transplants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Favor, A; Frazier, O H; Cooley, D A; Okereke, O U; Radovancevic, B; Powers, P; Chandler, L

    1985-01-01

    ... of the care of transplant patients. One such opportunistic Organism, Legionella pneumophila, was responsible for four episodes of infection in three of our patients who survived due to better management of immunosuppression, together...

  4. Legionella Infection in Cyclosporine-Immunosuppressed Cardiac Transplants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Favor, Arsenio; Frazier, O.H; Cooley, Denton A; Okereke, O.U. John; Radovancevic, Branislav; Powers, Penny; Chandler, Linda

    1985-01-01

    ... of the care of transplant patients. One such opportunistic Organism, Legionella pneumophila, was responsible for four episodes of infection in three of our patients who survived due to better management of immunosuppression, together...

  5. On Preferential sylow fuzzy subgroups | Makamba | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, for a prime p, we propose some plausible denitions for the notion of Sylow fuzzy p-subgroup of a nite group. We derive a number of results for nite fuzzy groups using one of the proposed denitions. We also discuss some of the relationships between various proposed denitions for suitability, including the crisp ...

  6. Zero-sum problems with subgroup weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this note, we generalize some theorems on zero-sums with weights from [1], [4] and [5] in two directions. In particular, we consider Z Z p d for a general and subgroups of Z p ∗ as weights. Author Affiliations. S D Adhikari1 A A Ambily2 B Sury2. Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 ...

  7. Interpretation of Subgroup Effects in Published Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Mark J; Kjær, Per; Korsholm, Lars

    2013-01-01

    that report on treatment effect modifiers (subgroups) for specific physical therapy interventions. The key messages are: (1) point estimates of treatment modifier effect size (interaction effect) and their confidence intervals can be calculated using group-level data when individual patient-level data...

  8. Molecular characterization of rotavirus genotypes in immunosuppressed and non-immunosuppressed pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luciane A; Ferreira, Carla E O; Turchetto, Giovana D; Nogueira, Meri B; Vidal, Luine R; Cruz, Cristina R; Debur, Maria C; Almeida, Sergio M de; Raboni, Sonia M

    2013-01-01

    To describe the genotypic variability of group A rotavirus (RVA) found in immunosuppressed and non-immunosuppressed pediatric patients treated at the Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná (HC-UFPR), Curitiba, Paraná. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 1,140 stool samples collected from April, 2001 to December, 2008 in outpatients and hospitalized patients with acute gastroenteritis referred to the hospital. RVA diagnosis was performed through the latex agglutination method and enzyme immunoassay. Reverse transcription followed by multiplex hemi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleotide sequencing were used for genotype characterization. Genotype combinations, clinical, epidemiological, laboratory data, and presence of hospital-acquired infections were reported. A total of 80 rotavirus-positive stool samples were analyzed. The most frequent associations between genotypes G and P were: G4 P[8] (38.9%), G1 P[8] (30.5%), G9 P[8] (13.9%), G2 P[4] (6.9%), and G3 P[8] (1.4%). G2 P[4] was the most prevalent genotype after the vaccine implementation in the years 2006 and 2008. A total of 62,5% of infected children were aged less than 12 months. Of these, 55.6% had severe dehydration and 26.7% needed intensive care. A frequency of 12.5% of nosocomial infections was found. No correlation was observed between genotype and severity of infection in the study patients. RVA infections can be associated with severe clinical manifestations, and the surveillance of genotypic variability of this virus is crucial to monitor the emergence of new strains and the impact of the immunization in these patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Topological groups with dense compactly generated subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujita

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available A topological group G is: (i compactly generated if it contains a compact subset algebraically generating G, (ii -compact if G is a union of countably many compact subsets, (iii 0-bounded if arbitrary neighborhood U of the identity element of G has countably many translates xU that cover G, and (iv finitely generated modulo open sets if for every non-empty open subset U of G there exists a finite set F such that F  U algebraically generates G. We prove that: (1 a topological group containing a dense compactly generated subgroup is both 0-bounded and finitely generated modulo open sets, (2 an almost metrizable topological group has a dense compactly generated subgroup if and only if it is both 0-bounded and finitely generated modulo open sets, and (3 an almost metrizable topological group is compactly generated if and only if it is -compact and finitely generated modulo open sets.

  10. Analysis of malignancies in patients after heart transplantation with subsequent immunosuppressive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivinius R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rasmus Rivinius,1 Matthias Helmschrott,1 Arjang Ruhparwar,2 Bastian Schmack,2 Berthold Klein,2 Christian Erbel,1 Christian A Gleissner,1 Mohammadreza Akhavanpoor,1 Lutz Frankenstein,1 Fabrice F Darche,1 Dierk Thomas,1 Philipp Ehlermann,1 Tom Bruckner,3 Hugo A Katus,1 Andreas O Doesch11Department of Cardiology, Angiology and Pneumology, 2Department of Cardiac Surgery, 3Institute for Medical Biometry and Informatics, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, GermanyObjective: The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of malignancies in patients after heart transplantation (HTX and to evaluate the risk factors including immunosuppressive therapy with regard to the development of malignancies and survival. Special emphasis was placed on the effects of a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR containing immunosuppressive regimen.Methods: A total of 381 patients (age ≥18 years receiving HTX were included in the present analysis. All patients were followed-up at the University of Heidelberg Heart Center, Heidelberg, Germany. Data were retrieved from the Heidelberg Registry for Heart Transplantation being collected between 1989 and 2014. According to center standard, all patients received induction therapy with anti-thymocyte globulin guided by T-cell monitoring since 1994. The initial immunosuppressive regimen consisting of cyclosporine A (CsA and azathioprine (AZA was replaced by CsA and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF in 2001 and by tacrolimus (TAC and MMF in 2006. Additionally, mTOR inhibitors (everolimus/sirolimus were applied since 2003.Results: Mean recipient age at HTX was 51.2±10.5 years and the mean follow-up period after HTX was 9.7±5.9 years. During follow-up, 130 patients developed a neoplasm (34.1% of total. Subgroup analysis revealed 58 patients with cutaneous malignancy only (15.2%, 56 patients with noncutaneous malignancy only (14.7%, and 16 patients with both cutaneous and noncutaneous malignancy (4.2%. Statistically significant

  11. Factorizing profinite groups into two Abelian subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Herfort

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We prove that the class of profinite groups $G$ that have a factorization $G=AB$with $A$ and $B$ abelian closed subgroups, is closed under taking strict projective limits.This is a generalization of a recent result by K.H.~Hofmann and F.G.~Russo.As an application we reprove their generalization of Iwasawa's structure theorem forquasihamiltonian pro-$p$ groups.

  12. [Infectious complications due to immunosuppression in organ transplant patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelon, Emmanuel; Touraine, Jean-Louis

    2007-10-15

    Prevention and treatment of allograft rejection by immunosuppressive treatments expose organ transplant patients to frequent and sometimes severe infectious complications. Immunosuppressive drugs inhibit both the immune response to alloantigens, and the anti-infectious immunity; they promote intracellular infections, including infections with viruses and with bacterial, parasitic and mycotic agents. Infectious risks are related to duration of immunosuppression exposure, type of immunosuppressive drugs, combination of drugs and trough levels required to control rejection. Assessment of the risk of infectious diseases in transplant patients before transplantation has to take into account past medical history, number of previous transplantations, immunosuppressive regimen, and the risk of infectious diseases transmitted from the donor. After the graft, infectious risks have to be assessed by clinical examination, repeated white blood cell count to detect leucopenia. In high risk population, monitoring for CMV and EBV infections is based on analysis of replication using nucleic acid based assays or antigenemia studies. Prophylactic anti-infectious therapy in high-risk patients has resulted in reduction of the consequences of overimmunosuppression in organ transplantation.

  13. MPACT Subgroup Self-Shielding Efficiency Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Yuxuan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Recent developments to improve the efficiency of the MOC solvers in MPACT have yielded effective kernels that loop over several energy groups at once, rather that looping over one group at a time. These kernels have produced roughly a 2x speedup on the MOC sweeping time during eigenvalue calculation. However, the self-shielding subgroup calculation had not been reevaluated to take advantage of these new kernels, which typically requires substantial solve time. The improvements covered in this report start by integrating the multigroup kernel concepts into the subgroup calculation, which are then used as the basis for further extensions. The next improvement that is covered is what is currently being termed as “Lumped Parameter MOC”. Because the subgroup calculation is a purely fixed source problem and multiple sweeps are performed only to update the boundary angular fluxes, the sweep procedure can be condensed to allow for the instantaneous propagation of the flux across a spatial domain, without the need to sweep along all segments in a ray. Once the boundary angular fluxes are considered to be converged, an additional sweep that will tally the scalar flux is completed. The last improvement that is investigated is the possible reduction of the number of azimuthal angles per octant in the shielding sweep. Typically 16 azimuthal angles per octant are used for self-shielding and eigenvalue calculations, but it is possible that the self-shielding sweeps are less sensitive to the number of angles than the full eigenvalue calculation.

  14. Withdrawal of immunosuppression following pediatric liver transplantation: a Markov analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Saeed; Li, Zhe; Englesbe, Michael; Skaro, Anton; Alonso, Estella

    2014-08-01

    Survivors of pediatric liver transplantation are at risk for developing complications related to posttransplant immunosuppressive medications. Withdrawal is possible in selected patients but carries the risk of graft rejection and loss. We modeled the effect of withdrawing immunosuppressive medications on survival, cost, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) in a hypothetical cohort of pediatric patients who received transplantation for biliary atresia with stable liver enzymes and no recent episodes of rejection, and who were free from immunosuppression-related adverse effects. A decision analysis tree was developed, and Monte Carlo simulations were used to track patients through the model during a 10-year time course with 1-year cycles. Data from the literature were used to assign probabilities to major clinical events and preference-based utility scores to the values of health outcomes. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to evaluate the impact of uncertainty. Patients following the withdrawal strategy had a 10-year survival rate of 95.8% and experienced 8.61 QALYs versus 88.6% survival and 8.01 QALYs for those taking immunosuppressive medications. Each additional QALY is attained at a cost of -$18,992.41 and was therefore cost saving. Patients in our model who had their immunosuppression withdrawn had improved survival and QALYs with lower costs. Although every effort was made to validate the model, it is limited by the accuracy of the underlying assumptions. Therefore, clinical trials are needed to determine predictors of successful immunosuppression withdrawal to allow for personalization of medication regimens.

  15. The ergodic theory of lattice subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Gorodnik, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The results established in this book constitute a new departure in ergodic theory and a significant expansion of its scope. Traditional ergodic theorems focused on amenable groups, and relied on the existence of an asymptotically invariant sequence in the group, the resulting maximal inequalities based on covering arguments, and the transference principle. Here, Alexander Gorodnik and Amos Nevo develop a systematic general approach to the proof of ergodic theorems for a large class of non-amenable locally compact groups and their lattice subgroups. Simple general conditions on the spectral theory of the group and the regularity of the averaging sets are formulated, which suffice to guarantee convergence to the ergodic mean

  16. Tacrolimus versus cyclosporin as primary immunosuppression for lung transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Penninga, Ida Elisabeth Irene; Møller, Christian H

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a well-accepted treatment for people with most end-stage lung diseases. Although both tacrolimus and cyclosporin are used as primary immunosuppressive agents in lung transplant recipients, it is unclear which of these drugs is better in reducing rejection and death without...

  17. Immunosuppressive principles from Achillea talagonica, an endemic species of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saeidnia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background and the purpose of study: Achillea talagonica Boiss. (Asteraceae grows in the western and central parts of Iran. This plant has long been used in traditional medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent for treatment of rheumatic pain. Previously, the immunosuppressive activity of the aqueous extract of this endemic plant in experimental animals was reported. In this research, isolation of the main immunologically active components of A. talagonica, which were effective on humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice is elucidated. Methods: In order to find the main immunosuppressive components of A. talagonica, methanol and methanol-water (80% and 50% v:v extracts were injected to BALB/c mice and the hemagglutinating antibody titer was assayed after immunization with SRBC (sheep red blood cells. Guided by this assay, active principles were separated by chromatographic methods. Results: Isolated compounds were identified as caffeic acid 9-O-glucoside (1, quercetin (2, luteolin (3, 3'-methoxy luteolin (4, proline (5 and choline (6 by comparison of their spectral data with those of reported in literatures. Immunosuppressive property of choline (5 mgkg-1 was comparable to those of prednisolone (10 mgkg-1; although, quercetin (20 mgkg-1 and caffeoyl glucoside (20 mgkg-1 decreased anti-SRBC titer in comparison with control groups. Major conclusion: Immunosuppressive effects of A. talagonica are due to some components belonging to betaine, flavonol and phenoilc esters.

  18. Candida meningitis in a suspected immunosuppressive patient - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candida meningitis in a suspected immunosuppressive patient - A case report. EO Sanya, NB Ameen, BA Onile. Abstract. No Abstract. West African Journal of Medicine Vol. 25 (1) 2006: pp.79-81. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  19. Cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorder complicating infectious mononucleosis in an immunosuppressed patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Cindy England; Callen, Jeffrey P; Bahrami, Soon

    2011-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is the syndrome produced by primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus during adolescence or early adulthood. In immunosuppressed individuals, depressed T-cell function allows the Epstein-Barr virus-driven B-cell proliferation to continue unabated, potentially leading to a lymphoproliferative disorder. A 15-year-old girl with a history of ulcerative colitis treated with 6-mercaptopurine and mesalamine presented with the acute onset of a rapidly enlarging, ulcerative nodule on her left lower eyelid 4 weeks following recovery from infectious mononucleosis. The biopsy revealed an Epstein-Barr virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorder. Systemic disease was absent. Following discontinuation of 6-mercaptopurine, the patient was treated with two courses of intravenous cyclophosphamide. The lesion resolved completely and she remains disease free at 14 months following diagnosis. We report a solitary cutaneous lesion of an immunosuppression-related lymphoproliferative disorder (IR-LPD) occurring as a complication of infectious mononucleosis, and review the pathogenesis and reported cases of Epstein-Barr virus-related immunosuppression-related lymphoproliferative disorder arising in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It is important for dermatologists and dermatopathologists to be aware of the occurrence of IR-LPD in patients being treated for inflammatory conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease. Given the role of primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus in the development of IR-LPD, consideration may be given to assessing Epstein-Barr virus status prior to initiating immunosuppressive therapy in young patients. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Outcomes of immunosuppressive therapy in chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji Adegunsoye

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (CHP, lack of improvement or declining lung function may prompt use of immunosuppressive therapy. We hypothesised that use of azathioprine or mycophenolate mofetil with prednisone reduces adverse events and lung function decline, and improves transplant-free survival. Patients with CHP were identified. Demographic features, pulmonary function tests, incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs and transplant-free survival were characterised, compared and analysed between patients stratified by immunosuppressive therapy. A multicentre comparison was performed across four independent tertiary medical centres. Among 131 CHP patients at the University of Chicago medical centre (Chicago, IL, USA, 93 (71% received immunosuppressive therapy, and had worse baseline forced vital capacity (FVC and diffusing capacity, and increased mortality compared with those who did not. Compared to patients treated with prednisone alone, TEAEs were 54% less frequent with azathioprine therapy (p=0.04 and 66% less frequent with mycophenolate mofetil (p=0.002. FVC decline and survival were similar between treatment groups. Analyses of datasets from four external tertiary medical centres confirmed these findings. CHP patients who did not receive immunosuppressive therapy had better survival than those who did. Use of mycophenolate mofetil or azathioprine was associated with a decreased incidence of TEAEs, and no difference in lung function decline or survival when compared with prednisone alone. Early transition to mycophenolate mofetil or azathioprine may be an appropriate therapeutic approach in CHP, but more studies are needed.

  1. Role of immunosuppression in the evolution of Legionnaires' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro-Botet, M L; Sabria-Leal, M; Sopena, N; Manterola, J M; Morera, J; Blavia, R; Padilla, E; Matas, L; Gimeno, J M

    1998-01-01

    The clinical course of legionella pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients is uncertain. This study was undertaken to determine the clinical evolution of legionellosis on the basis of the immune state and to establish the variables associated with death directly related to legionellosis. The study included 78 patients: 28 with chronic disease who had received immunosuppressive treatment (group 1), 24 with chronic disease without immunosuppressive treatment (group 2), and 26 controls. Inclusion criteria were the occurrence of nosocomially acquired pneumonia, Legionella pneumophila infection, and erythromycin therapy that was initiated within 72 hours following diagnosis. Respiratory and extrarespiratory complications were observed more frequently in groups 1 and 2. Bilateral radiological involvement was most frequent in group 1, and recurrence of legionella pneumonia was observed exclusively in group 1. None of these variables achieved statistical significance. The global mortality of the series was 11.5% (17.9%, 12.5%, and 3.8% in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Variables statistically related to mortality were acute renal failure, shock, and need for mechanical ventilation. Although many of the variables analyzed lacked statistical significance, a trend was seen between complications and basal immunosuppression, as previously suggested.

  2. Hacking macrophage-associated immunosuppression for regulating glioblastoma angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xin; Morales, Renee-Tyler Tan; Qian, Weiyi; Wang, Haoyu; Gagner, Jean-Pierre; Dolgalev, Igor; Placantonakis, Dimitris; Zagzag, David; Cimmino, Luisa; Snuderl, Matija; Lam, Raymond H W; Chen, Weiqiang

    2018-02-02

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal primary adult brain tumor and its pathology is hallmarked by distorted neovascularization, diffuse tumor-associated macrophage infiltration, and potent immunosuppression. Reconstituting organotypic tumor angiogenesis models with biomimetic cell heterogeneity and interactions, pro-/anti-inflammatory milieu and extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics is critical for preclinical anti-angiogenic therapeutic screening. However, current in vitro systems do not accurately mirror in vivo human brain tumor microenvironment. Here, we engineered a three-dimensional (3D), microfluidic angiogenesis model with controllable and biomimetic immunosuppressive conditions, immune-vascular and cell-matrix interactions. We demonstrate in vitro, GL261 and CT-2A GBM-like tumors steer macrophage polarization towards a M2-like phenotype for fostering an immunosuppressive and proangiogenic niche, which is consistent with human brain tumors. We distinguished that GBM and M2-like immunosuppressive macrophages promote angiogenesis, while M1-like pro-inflammatory macrophages suppress angiogenesis, which we coin "inflammation-driven angiogenesis." We observed soluble immunosuppressive cytokines, predominantly TGF-β1, and surface integrin (α v β 3 ) endothelial-macrophage interactions are required in inflammation-driven angiogenesis. We demonstrated tuning cell-adhesion receptors using an integrin (α v β 3 )-specific collagen hydrogel regulated inflammation-driven angiogenesis through Src-PI3K-YAP signaling, highlighting the importance of altered cell-ECM interactions in inflammation. To validate the preclinical applications of our 3D organoid model and mechanistic findings of inflammation-driven angiogenesis, we screened a novel dual integrin (α v β 3 ) and cytokine receptor (TGFβ-R1) blockade that suppresses GBM tumor neovascularization by simultaneously targeting macrophage-associated immunosuppression, endothelial-macrophage interactions, and

  3. Subgrouping the autism "spectrum": reflections on DSM-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Lai

    Full Text Available DSM-5 has moved autism from the level of subgroups ("apples and oranges" to the prototypical level ("fruit". But making progress in research, and ultimately improving clinical practice, will require identifying subgroups within the autism spectrum.

  4. Notes on relatively hyperbolic groups and relatively quasiconvex subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Yoshifumi; Oguni, Shin-ichi; Yamagata, Saeko

    2013-01-01

    We define relatively quasiconvex subgroups of relatively hyperbolic groups in the sense of Osin and show that such subgroups have expected properties. Also we state several definitions equivalent to the definition of relatively hyperbolic groups in the sense of Osin.

  5. Additive subgroups of topological vector spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Banaszczyk, Wojciech

    1991-01-01

    The Pontryagin-van Kampen duality theorem and the Bochner theorem on positive-definite functions are known to be true for certain abelian topological groups that are not locally compact. The book sets out to present in a systematic way the existing material. It is based on the original notion of a nuclear group, which includes LCA groups and nuclear locally convex spaces together with their additive subgroups, quotient groups and products. For (metrizable, complete) nuclear groups one obtains analogues of the Pontryagin duality theorem, of the Bochner theorem and of the Lévy-Steinitz theorem on rearrangement of series (an answer to an old question of S. Ulam). The book is written in the language of functional analysis. The methods used are taken mainly from geometry of numbers, geometry of Banach spaces and topological algebra. The reader is expected only to know the basics of functional analysis and abstract harmonic analysis.

  6. Can the tinnitus spectrum identify tinnitus subgroups?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin M Heijneman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tinnitus spectrum is a psycho-acoustic metric of tinnitus. Previous work found a tight relation between the spectrum and the tone audiogram. This suggests that the spectrum and the audiogram provide essentially the same information, and the added value of the spectrum is limited. In order to test whether the spectrum shows tinnitus characteristics that cannot be inferred from the audiogram, we re-examined the relation between the tinnitus spectrum and the tone audiogram, in a group of 80 tinnitus patients. We defined three subgroups of patients, using the shape of their tinnitus spectrum: (1 patients with a spectrum, monotonously increasing with frequency (2 patients with a distinct peak in their spectrum, (3 all other patients. Patients in group 3 typically showed low frequency tinnitus spectra. In all three groups, the largest hearing loss was at high frequencies (>2 kHz. The mean audiograms of group 1 and 2 were remarkably similar; group 3 had an additional hearing loss for the lower frequencies (<2 kHz. The three groups did not differ with respect to age, sex, or tinnitus questionnaire outcomes. In subgroups 2 and 3, the shape of the spectrum clearly differed from that of the tone audiogram. In other words, the spectrum technique provided information that could not have been obtained by tone audiometry alone. Therefore, the spectrum measurement may develop into a technique that can differentiate between classes of tinnitus. This may eventually contribute to the effective management of tinnitus, as various classes of tinnitus may require different therapeutic interventions.

  7. Subgroup analysis in burnout : Relations between fatigue, anxiety, and depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, A.

    2016-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup

  8. Mucosal Immune Responses against Live Newcastle Disease Vaccine in Immunosuppressed Chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengui Yan, Yijun Du1, Qingyou Zhao, Ruifeng Fan, Wenlong Guo, Rongde Ma, Xinjian Wang and Ruiliang Zhu*

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate mucosal immunity of normal and immunosuppressed chickens vaccinated with live Newcastle disease (ND) vaccine, cyclophosphamide (CY) was used to generate immunosuppressed chickens. Normal and immunosuppressed chickens were vaccinated with the Lasota ND vaccine by ocular-nasal route at three weeks of age and challenged with virulent ND virus (vNDV) at day 28 post-vaccination (pv). The immunosuppressed chickens had significantly lower relative weight of the bursa of Fabricius and ser...

  9. [Hepatitis B virus infection in pregnancy and the immunosuppressed patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Buti, María

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection continues to be a major public health problem worldwide. Although treatment indications are well established in clinical practice guidelines, there are some risk groups, such as pregnant women and immunosuppressed patients, who require different and specific management of HBV infection. In pregnant women, treatment indication should be individualized and the risk of HBV transmission to the newborn evaluated because cases of vertical transmission continue to be reported, despite active and passive immunoprophylaxis. In patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, HBV reactivation is associated with high morbidity and mortality, even in patients with past HBV infection, highlighting the importance of screening and the need to evaluate prophylactic therapy in some cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  10. Immunosuppressive drugs for the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is one of the few diseases of the pancreas characterized by the possibility of curing the illness using immunosuppressant drugs. In this paper, the therapeutic approach used to treat autoimmune pancreatitis patients and the clinical outcome related to each treatment modality were reviewed. Steroids are useful in alleviating the symptoms of the acute presentation of autoimmune pancreatitis, but some questions remain open, such as a shared definition of the disease's remission as well as autoimmune pancreatitis relapse, the dosage of steroids in the symptomatic phase of the disease and the duration of steroid therapy. Finally, it should be determined if other immunosuppressive nonsteroidal drugs could become first-line therapy in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis without jaundice and without atrophic pancreas.

  11. IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE EFFECTS OF ARGININE DEIMINASE FROM STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Starikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogens use metabolic pathway of arginine for successful dissemination. Bacterial arginine deiminase hydrolyzes arginine to form one molecule of ammonia and two molecules of ATP. The activity of the enzyme contributes to the improvement of survival of pathogenic bacteria in conditions of low pH at the site of infection or in phagolysosome, as well as in anaerobic conditions, and also leads to deficiency of arginine. Metabolism of arginine plays an important role in regulating the functions of immune system cells in mammals. Arginine is a substrate of enzymes NOS and arginase. Arginine depletion, potentially contributs to immunosuppression. The review analyzed the literature data on the effect of streptococcal arginine deiminase on the metabolism of arginine eukaryotic cells, and discusses immunosuppressive action of the enzyme.

  12. [Immunosuppressants for auto-immune diseases and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elefant, Elisabeth; Cournot, Marie-Pierre; Assari, Faïza; Vauzelle, Catherine

    2008-11-01

    Therapeutic stability of a systemic disease is a priority during pregnancy. To stop an effective treatment, to reduce dosages or to switch to less effective treatments might induce some loss of chance for pregnant women, and eventually harmful consequences for fetuses. Due to the teratogenic effects of some immunosuppressants, childbearing susceptible women should use effective contraception and be informed of risks in case of pregnancy. A pre-conceptional consultation is of interest, allowing an adaptation of treatment and advices before pregnancy is ongoing. Mycophenolate is highly suspected to be teratogenic in humans. Mycophenolate should not be prescribed in women of childbearing potential unless some criteria are met. Maternal (even fetal) infectious conditions can occur during immunosuppressive treatments. Therefore, obstetricians and pediatricians should be aware of the maternal treatment in order to allow adequate monitoring of the mother and the neonate.

  13. Neurologic emergencies in HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-De-Villoria, J A; Fernández-García, P; Borrego-Ruiz, P J

    HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients comprise a heterogeneous group including transplant patients, patients undergoing treatment with immunosuppressors, uremic patients, alcoholics, undernourished patients, diabetics, patients on dialysis, elderly patients, and those diagnosed with severe or neoplastic processes. Epileptic seizures, focal neurologic signs, and meningoencephalitis are neurologic syndromes that require urgent action. In most of these situations, neuroimaging tests are necessary, but the findings can be different from those observed in immunocompetent patients in function of the inflammatory response. Infectious disease is the first diagnostic suspicion, and the identification of an opportunistic pathogen should be oriented in function of the type and degree of immunosuppression. Other neurologic emergencies include ischemic stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, neoplastic processes, and pharmacological neurotoxicity. This article reviews the role of neuroimaging in HIV-negative immunodepressed patients with a neurologic complication that requires urgent management. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coisy, Solène; Ebran, Jean-Marc; Milea, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and responsible for severe visual loss. Case Report A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. Conclusion VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:24926266

  15. Progressive outer retinal necrosis and immunosuppressive therapy in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coisy, Solène; Ebran, Jean-Marc; Milea, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and responsible for severe visual loss. A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  16. Impact of immunosuppression and chemotherapy on reactivation of Viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Fallahian Farahnaz; Alavian Seyed-Moayed; Fallahian Vida; Zamani Farhad

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy drugs, biological medications that are used to treat cancer, may cause hepatic side effects. Patients with pre-existing viral hepatitis may be more susceptible to exacer-bation of their underlying liver disease, and risk of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. We conducted a search on immunosuppression, and its impact on reactivation of viral hepatitis, using the electro-nic medical databases. Before starting chemotherapy, it is recommended to record the past history of liver disease and...

  17. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solène Coisy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV and responsible for severe visual loss. Case Report: A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. Conclusion: VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  18. Immunomodulators and Immunosuppressants for Japanese Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeki Bamba; Tomoyuki Tsujikawa; Masaya Sasaki; Yoshihide Fujiyama; Akira Andoh

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by a long-standing chronic course with remissions and exacerbations. Previously, patients do not respond to 5-aminosalicylic acid compounds and corticosteroids are considered for colectomies, however, in recent years, alternative treatments emerged for steroid-refractory or steroid-dependent UC. In this review article, we focus on immunomodulators (such as azathioprine [AZA] and 6-mercaptopurine [6-MP]) and immunosuppressants (such as cyclosporine A [C...

  19. A rationale for age-adapted immunosuppression in organ transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzien, Felix; ElKhal, Abdallah; Quante, Markus; Biefer, Hector Rodriguez Cetina; Hirofumi, Uehara; Gabardi, Steven; Tullius, Stefan G.

    2015-01-01

    Demographic changes are associated with a steady increase of older patients with end-stage organ failure in need for transplantation. As a result, the majority of transplant recipients are currently older >50 years and organs from elderly donors are more frequently utilized. Nevertheless, the benefit of transplantation in older patients is well recognized whereas the most frequent causes of death among older recipients are potentially linked to side effects of their immunosuppressants. Immunosenescence is a physiological part of aging linked to higher rates of diabetes, bacterial infections and malignancies representing the major causes of death in older patients. These age-related changes impact older transplant candidates and may have significant implications for an age-adapted immunosuppression. For instance, immunosenescence is linked to lower rates of acute rejections in older recipients while the engraftment of older organs has been associated with higher rejection rates. Moreover, new-onset diabetes mellitus following transplantation is more frequent in the elderly, potentially related to corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors. This review presents current knowledge for an age-adapted immunosuppression based on both, experimental and clinical studies in and beyond transplantation. Recommendations of maintenance and induction therapy may help to improve graft function and to design future clinical trials in the elderly. PMID:26244716

  20. Effect of Calcineurin Inhibitor-Free, Everolimus-Based Immunosuppressive Regimen on Albuminuria and Glomerular Filtration Rate After Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lærke Marie; Andreassen, Arne Kristian; Andersson, Bert; Gude, Einar; Eiskjær, Hans; Rådegran, Göran; Dellgren, Göran; Gullestad, Lars; Gustafsson, Finn

    2017-11-01

    Albuminuria in maintenance heart transplantation (HTx) is associated with poor renal response when switching to a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-lowered or CNI-free immunosuppressive regimen using everolimus (EVR), but the significance of albuminuria associated with EVR treatment after early CNI withdrawal in de novo HTx is unknown. We tested if measured glomerular filtration rate (mGFR, by chrome-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid clearance) was associated with urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) post-HTx in a subgroup of patients included in the Scandinavian Heart Transplant Everolimus De Novo Study With Early Calcineurin Inhibitor Avoidance trial, where de novo HTx patients (n = 115) were randomized to EVR with complete CNI elimination 7 to 11 weeks post-HTx or standard CNI immunosuppression. In 66 patients, UACR measures were available at 1 year. In 7 patients in the EVR group, a CNI was reintroduced within 12 months. Median mGFR was significantly higher in the EVR group both 1 and 3 years post-HTx (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.03, respectively). Median UACR at 1 year was significantly higher in the EVR group (P = 0.002). There was no correlation between log(UACR) at 1 year and mGFR at 1 or 3 years (r = -0.01, P = 0.9 and r = 0.15, P = 0.26, respectively) and in the EVR group between log(UACR) at 1 year and change in mGFR (Δ1-3 years) (r = 0.27, P = 0.14). Excluding patients in the EVR group in whom a CNI was reintroduced did not significantly change the results. The effects of EVR with early CNI withdrawal after HTx on albuminuria and renal function seem dissociated; hence, the clinical significance of albuminuria in this setting is uncertain and should not necessarily rule out EVR-based immunosuppression.

  1. Reported Nonadherence to Immunosuppressive Medication in Young Adults After Heart Transplantation: A Retrospective Analysis of a National Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; McConnell, Patrick I; Galantowicz, Mark; Tobias, Joseph D; Hayes, Don

    2017-02-01

    Young adult heart transplantation (HTx) recipients experience high mortality risk attributed to increased nonadherence to immunosuppressive medication in this age window. This study sought to test whether a high-risk age window in HTx recipients persisted in the absence of reported nonadherence. Heart transplantation recipients aged 2 to 40 years, transplanted between October 1999 and January 2007, were identified in the United Network for Organ Sharing database. Multivariable survival analysis was used to estimate influences of age at transplantation and attained posttransplant age on mortality hazard among patients stratified by center report of nonadherence to immunosuppression that compromised recovery. Three thousand eighty-one HTx recipients were included, with univariate analysis demonstrating peak hazards of mortality and reported nonadherence among 567 patients transplanted between ages 17 and 24 years. Multivariable analysis adjusting for reported nonadherence demonstrated lower mortality among patients transplanted at younger (hazards ratio, 0.813; 95% confidence interval, 0.663-0.997; P = 0.047) or older (hazards ratio, 0.835; 95% confidence interval, 0.701-0.994; P = 0.042) ages. Peak mortality hazard at ages 17 to 24 years was confirmed in the subgroup of patients with no nonadherence reported during follow-up. This result was replicated using attained age after HTx as the time metric, with younger and older ages predicting improved survival in the absence of reported nonadherence. Late adolescence and young adulthood coincide with greater mortality hazard and greater chances of nonadherence to immunosuppressive medication after HTx, but the elevation of mortality hazard in this age range persists in the absence of reported nonadherence. Other causes of the high-risk age window for post-HTx mortality should be demonstrated to identify opportunities for intervention.

  2. Clinical Subgroups in Bilateral Meniere Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejo, Lidia; Soto-Varela, Andres; Santos-Perez, Sofía; Aran, Ismael; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Perez-Guillen, Vanesa; Perez-Garrigues, Herminio; Fraile, Jesus; Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Tapia, Maria C.; Trinidad, Gabriel; García-Arumi, Ana María; González-Aguado, Rocío; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Marques, Pedro; Perez, Paz; Benitez, Jesus; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Meniere disease (MD) is a heterogeneous clinical condition characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, episodic vestibular symptoms, and tinnitus associated with several comorbidities, such as migraine or autoimmune disorders (AD). The frequency of bilateral involvement may range from 5 to 50%, and it depends on the duration of the disease. We have performed a two-step cluster analysis in 398 patients with bilateral MD (BMD) to identify the best predictors to define clinical subgroups with a potential different etiology to improve the phenotyping of BMD and to develop new treatments. We have defined five clinical variants in BMD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 46% of patients, and is defined by metachronic hearing loss without migraine and without AD. Group 2 is found in 17% of patients, and it is defined by synchronic hearing loss without migraine or AD. Group 3, with 13% of patients, is characterized by familial MD, while group 4, that includes 12% of patients, is associated by the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by AD. This approach can be helpful in selecting patients for genetic and clinical research. However, further studies will be required to improve the phenotyping in these clinical variants for a better understanding of the diverse etiological factors contributing to BMD. PMID:27822199

  3. Miliary tuberculosis occurred after immunosuppressive drug in PNH patient with completely cured tuberculosis; a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a clonal disorder that presents with hemolytic anemia, marrow failure and thrombophilia. During acute attacks, corticosteroid can alleviate the hemolytic paroxysm, but the prolonged administration induces serious toxicity including immunosuppression. So American thoracic society (ATS) for tuberculosis (TB) recommends prophylactic anti-TB medication in patients with a long-term steroid therapy. However, in the patient who was treated for active TB in the past, there are no guidelines of the test for determining patients who have latent TB infection (LTBI) and no recommendations of TB prophylaxis if there is no evidence of reactivation at present. A 40-year-old male patient presented with fever and aggravated weakness for a week. He was diagnosed with PNH a month ago and took corticosteroid for 3 weeks. In the past, he was diagnosed with pulmonary TB and completely cured after treatment. According to guideline, he was not indicated with TB prophylaxis. However, he caught miliary TB, progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome. We experience this embarrassing case, and emphasize the need to investigate multicentral TB prevalence and to make the guidelines of anti-TB medication in subgroups of hematologic diseases including PNH. PMID:22554314

  4. Miliary tuberculosis occurred after immunosuppressive drug in PNH patient with completely cured tuberculosis; a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jihyun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a clonal disorder that presents with hemolytic anemia, marrow failure and thrombophilia. During acute attacks, corticosteroid can alleviate the hemolytic paroxysm, but the prolonged administration induces serious toxicity including immunosuppression. So American thoracic society (ATS for tuberculosis (TB recommends prophylactic anti-TB medication in patients with a long-term steroid therapy. However, in the patient who was treated for active TB in the past, there are no guidelines of the test for determining patients who have latent TB infection (LTBI and no recommendations of TB prophylaxis if there is no evidence of reactivation at present. A 40-year-old male patient presented with fever and aggravated weakness for a week. He was diagnosed with PNH a month ago and took corticosteroid for 3 weeks. In the past, he was diagnosed with pulmonary TB and completely cured after treatment. According to guideline, he was not indicated with TB prophylaxis. However, he caught miliary TB, progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome. We experience this embarrassing case, and emphasize the need to investigate multicentral TB prevalence and to make the guidelines of anti-TB medication in subgroups of hematologic diseases including PNH.

  5. Effects of immunosuppressive treatment on protein expression in rat kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kędzierska K

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Karolina Kędzierska,1 Katarzyna Sporniak-Tutak,2 Krzysztof Sindrewicz,2 Joanna Bober,3 Leszek Domański,1 Mirosław Parafiniuk,4 Elżbieta Urasińska,5 Andrzej Ciechanowicz,6 Maciej Domański,1 Tomasz Smektała,2 Marek Masiuk,5 Wiesław Skrzypczak,6 Małgorzata Ożgo,6 Joanna Kabat-Koperska,1 Kazimierz Ciechanowski1 1Department of Nephrology, Transplantology, and Internal Medicine, 2Department of Dental Surgery, 3Department of Medical Chemistry, 4Department of Forensic Medicine, 5Department of Pathomorphology, Pomeranian Medical University, 6Department of Physiology, Cytobiology, and Proteomics, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland Abstract: The structural proteins of renal tubular epithelial cells may become a target for the toxic metabolites of immunosuppressants. These metabolites can modify the properties of the proteins, thereby affecting cell function, which is a possible explanation for the mechanism of immunosuppressive agents' toxicity. In our study, we evaluated the effect of two immunosuppressive strategies on protein expression in the kidneys of Wistar rats. Fragments of the rat kidneys were homogenized after cooling in liquid nitrogen and then dissolved in lysis buffer. The protein concentration in the samples was determined using a protein assay kit, and the proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The obtained gels were then stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue, and their images were analyzed to evaluate differences in protein expression. Identification of selected proteins was then performed using mass spectrometry. We found that the immunosuppressive drugs used in popular regimens induce a series of changes in protein expression in target organs. The expression of proteins involved in drug, glucose, amino acid, and lipid metabolism was pronounced. However, to a lesser extent, we also observed changes in nuclear, structural, and transport proteins' synthesis. Very slight differences

  6. Report of the Production and Delivery Subgroup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R; Zalesky, R

    2004-11-01

    The Production and Delivery Subgroup was tasked with evaluating the various options that could be used for hydrogen production and delivery in terms of availability/industry readiness, technical and economic barriers, and environmental considerations. Hydrogen can be produced using a variety of feedstocks and conversion technologies. The feedstock options include water, natural gas, coal, petroleum, methanol, ethanol, biomass, and organic waste streams. Ultimately, using these domestic resources we will be able to produce all the hydrogen we will need for the complete conversion of our transportation infrastructure. The various conversion technologies include electrolysis, reforming (principally of natural gas, but also ethanol and methanol), photobiological and photoelectrochemical, biofermentation, pyrolysis and gasification of biomass and coal, high temperature thermochemical, and catalytic membranes. All of these production technologies are being actively researched by DOE's Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT); and other offices within DOE support work that complements the HFCIT Program activities. In addition, private industry is also dedicating significant resources to these efforts. In establishing the California Hydrogen Highway Network (CA H2 Net) we must utilize both distributed (that is, hydrogen that is produced at the point of use) as well as centralized production of hydrogen. Because of technical and economic barriers, most of the technologies for hydrogen production listed above will not become practical for either mode of hydrogen production in large quantities until at least the 2015-2030 timeframe. In the near term, that is, the transitional period between now and 2010 when we will establish a widely available hydrogen fueling infrastructure in California, the distributed production options of reforming and electrolysis will play the dominant role. In addition, production of hydrogen at centralized plants

  7. SIGNIFICANCE OF THERAPY MONITORING OF IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE MEDICINES IN RENAL TRANSPLANTATION PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojko Đorđević

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressive medicines are characterized by specific pharmacokinetic profile which requires therapy monitoring by means of measuring their blood concentrations. Therapy monitoring, by means of determining blood concentration of the medicine, enables application of an optimal individual immunosuppressive therapy. Due to its variable pharmacokinetics, and small therapeutic index and potential interaction with numerous other medicines, the post-operative monitoring of immunosuppressive medicines is an essential element of therapy protocol for renal transplantation patients. Therapy monitoring represents an efficient way to reduce adverse effects of immunosuppressive medicines and to prevent transplantation rejection, by means of adapting the doses in renal transplantation patients. Determining the concentration of immunosuppressive medicines is of special importance in the modified dosing for patients with renal insufficiency. Pharmacokinetic analysis is important for proper interpretation of immunosuppressive medicines' blood concentrations. The interpretation of the received results must be multidisciplinary, considering that there are numerous factors of variability of patients and immunosuppressive medicines.

  8. [Discontinuation of immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory drugs in connective tissue diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targońska-Stępniak, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Remission in connective tissue diseases became a realistic goal of therapy nowadays. However, there is lack of recommendations on the management after achieving a remission. Chronic exposure to immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory drugs may be associated with adverse events, that is why temporal withdrawal or discontinuation of treatment is advisable. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who achieve sustained remission lasting for 6-12 months, an attempt to withdraw biological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) may be considered. In most patients with established RA discontinuation of bDMARDs is accompanied by a disease flare, butthe risk of loss of good therapeutic response is lower in case of slowly tapering by expanding the interval between doses or reducing the dose of bDMARDs. Patients with early RA are more likely to have successful discontinuation of therapy. Discontinuation of conventional DMARDs (cDMARDs) is usually associated with a disease flare, that is why tapering of doses is advised rather than stopping cDMARDs. DMARDs free remission occurs relatively rare, more often in patients with seronegative RA and with early onset of modifying treatment. In lupus nephritis (LN) patients with persistent, long-term remission, progressive tapering of doses of immunosuppressive drugs and glucocorticoids is recommended, with treatment discontinuation as a goal. An attempt of treatment withdrawal may be taken in patients remaining in LN complete remission as a consequence of maintenance therapy for 3 years.The process of slow tapering of doses preceding discontinuation of drugs, may last several months. The therapy with antimalarial drugs may be helpful to maintain remission after the treatment discontinuation. There is few data on treatment discontinuation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) without kidney involvement. Immunosuppressive drugs withdrawal is usually performed in patients with stable serological and clinically

  9. Pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients; Pneumonien bei immunsupprimierten Patienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solyanik, O.; Gaass, T.; Hellbach, K. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Dinkel, J. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Comprehensive Pneumology Center Munich (CPC-M), Muenchen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Pulmonary infections are a common complication in immunosuppressed patients with a frequently fatal prognosis despite modern prophylactic therapy. An early and correct diagnosis is important for initiation of the appropriate therapy. Chest radiography is the preferred initial imaging examination but is not accurate enough for the detection of pulmonary infections in immunosuppressed patients. Pneumonia is caused by a broad spectrum of pathogens in immunocompromised patients. In addition to imaging, the clinical history and epidemiology also play an important role in the diagnostics. Using epidemiological and anamnestic information, computed tomography (CT) shows a significantly better sensitivity and specificity particularly for the diagnosis of atypical forms of pneumonia. Due to the exact imaging of the different infiltration patterns CT provides an increased sensitivity with respect to the etiological classification of pulmonary infections. This article reviews in particular the radiological findings of commonly occurring pulmonary infections in immunosuppressed patients. (orig.) [German] Pneumonien bei immunsupprimierten Patienten sind haeufige Komplikationen, die trotzt moderner Prophylaxe toedlich verlaufen koennen. Eine korrekte Diagnose ist daher von entscheidender Bedeutung, um die richtige Therapie einleiten zu koennen. Die Roentgenthoraxaufnahme ist selten spezifisch genug fuer die genaue Einordnung atypischer Pneumonien in Folge einer Immunsuppression. Pneumonien unter Immunsuppression werden durch ein sehr breites Erregerspektrum verursacht. Eine wichtige Rolle bei der Diagnosefindung spielen neben der Bildgebung auch die klinische Anamnese und Epidemiologie. Mithilfe der klinischen Anamnese und Epidemiologie bietet die Computertomographie (CT) bei immunsupprimierten Patienten zum einen eine erhoehte Sensitivitaet bei der Detektion insbesondere atypischer Pneumonien. Zum anderen weist die CT durch die exakte Abbildung unterschiedlicher Infiltratmuster

  10. Contribution of dendritic cells to measles virus induced immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Melissa M; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2013-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) remains an important pathogen in children worldwide. The morbidity and mortality of MV is associated with severe immune suppression. Dendritic cells (DCs) were identified as initial target cells in vivo, and DCs were efficiently infected by MV in vitro. MV infection of DCs likely contributes to functional deficiency in these cells; therefore playing a role in MV-induced immunosuppression. DCs appeared to mature phenotypically; however, the ability of infected cells to stimulate T cells was compromised. Phenotypic maturation of infected immature DCs was partially controlled by IFN production; however, infected DCs also maintained markers of an immature phenotype such as the continued uptake of antigen and lack of expression of chemokine receptor CCR7. Furthermore, mature DCs did not appear to maintain phenotypic maturation following infection demonstrated by decreased MHC and co-stimulatory molecule expression. Several mechanisms of MV-induced DC dysfunction have been suggested, each likely contributing to the immunosuppressive effect of MV-infected DCs. Infected DCs responded aberrantly to secondary maturation stimuli such as CD40L or TLR4 stimulation. MV infection resulted in apoptosis in DC/T-cell cocultures, which may contribute to a reduced T-cell response. Additionally, the immunological synapse between infected DCs and T cells was compromised resulting in reduced T-cell interaction times and activation signaling. The mechanisms of MV contribution to DC dysfunction appear multifaceted and central to MV-induced immunosuppression. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. [Triple immunosuppressive therapy in the treatment of severe ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, B; Crespo, J; García-Suárez, C; Fábrega, E; Casafont, F; Pons-Romero, F

    2004-01-01

    Severe episodes of steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) were considered an indication for surgery until the introduction of new immunosuppressive agents such as cyclosporine. 1) To confirm the efficacy of intravenous cyclosporine in inducing remission in severe episodes of steroid-refractory UC; 2) To analyze the efficacy of triple immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine, azathioprine and prednisone in the maintenance of remission induced by intravenous cyclosporine. Fourteen patients diagnosed with a severe episode of steroid-refractory UC were treated with intravenous cyclosporine at a dose of 4 mg/kg/day. In all patients, after response was induced, this regimen was substituted by oral cyclosporine plus azathioprine at a dose of 2-2.5 mg/kg/day and decreasing doses of corticoids. Neoral cyclosporine was progressively reduced until discontinuation within 3 months, coinciding with a simultaneous decrease of oral steroids. All patients showed response to intravenous cyclosporine with a significant reduction in the Truelove index calculated before and after treatment. After remission was induced, all patients followed triple immunosuppressive therapy for 3 months. In the follow-up for a mean of 24 months (range: 14-34) only two patients required admission for a new episode of UC and colectomy was finally indicated in only one. None of the 14 patients treated with cyclosporine showed severe adverse effects attributable to the drug. Intravenous cyclosporine is a safe and effective alternative in the treatment of severe episodes of steroid-refractory UC. Early initiation of oral administration associated with azathioprine is useful in maintaining response, reducing subsequent relapses and the need for colectomy during the follow-up of these patients.

  12. [Immunosuppression--a tightrope walk between iatrogenic harm and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, P; Seitz, M

    1996-09-21

    The therapeutic effect of most immunosuppressive agents is unspecific and therefore often limited by an increased risk of infection by viral, bacterial or fungal organisms as well as by an increased incidence of malignant neoplasms. This short review includes the most commonly used immunosuppressants such as corticosteroids, azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide and cyclosporine. The most common risks of long-term corticosteroid treatment are Cushing-like changes, decreased glucose tolerance and the usually benign steroid diabetes. Also clinically important is osteoporosis, since it can be prevented by physical training, calcium supplementation and treatment with vitamin D if necessary. Although there is still no proof of a significantly increased risk of peptic ulcer during steroid therapy, patients may develop gastrointestinal hemorrhage and even perforation without producing pain while being treated with corticosteroids. Mineralocorticoid effects, such as salt and water retention, are seen only with hydrocortisone and prednisone, whereas with synthetic steroids such as dexamethasone, sodium retention is absent despite their strong antiphlogistic activity. The most important side effect of the cytotoxic agents azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide is marrow suppression. Due to the high turnover of neutrophils, patients most frequently suffer neutropenia rather than thrombocytopenia or anemia. Neutropenia, as well as impaired humoral and cellular immune mechanisms, are responsible for increased susceptibility to bacterial, viral or parasitic diseases during immunosuppressive therapy. Hepatotoxicity has been reported among patients receiving azathioprine (cholestatic hepatitis) and methotrexate (elevated AST levels and, rarely, liver fibrosis or cirrhosis). Cyclophosphamide causes hemorrhagic cystitis in a substantial proportion of patients, as well as an increased incidence of urothelial neoplasms. Both these side effects may be prevented by Mesna

  13. Immunosuppressive Activity of 8-Gingerol on Immune Responses in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wenhui Qian; Guoren Huang; Xuming Deng; Guanghong Xie; Xue Shen; Shuang Guan; Jing Lu

    2011-01-01

    8-Gingerol is one of the principal components of ginger, which is widely used in China and elsewhere as a food, spice and herb. It shows immunosuppressive activity on the immune responses to ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. In the present study, we found that 8-gingerol suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated splenocyte proliferation in vitro. In vivo, 8-gingerol not only significantly suppressed Con A-, LPS- and OVA-induced splenocyte proliferation (P < 0.05) but a...

  14. The immunosuppressive activity and solution structures of ubiquitin fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaremko, Lukasz; Jaremko, Mariusz; Pasikowski, Paweł; Cebrat, Marek; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Lisowski, Marek; Artym, Jolanta; Zimecki, Michał; Zhukov, Igor; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2009-06-01

    Recently, ubiquitin was suggested as a promising anti-inflammatory protein therapeutic. We found that a peptide fragment corresponding to the ubiquitin(50-59) sequence (LEDGRTLSDY) possessed the immunosuppressive activity comparable with that of ubiquitin. CD and NMR spectroscopies were used to determine the conformational preferences of LEDGRTLSDY in solution. The peptide mixture, obtained by pepsin digestion of ubiquitin, was even more potent than the intact protein. Although the peptide exhibited a well-defined conformation in methanol, its structure was distinct from the corresponding 50-59 fragment in the native ubiquitin molecule. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 91: 423-431, 2009.

  15. Effect of carnosine on the immunosuppressive effect of histamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpan, Yu. V.

    1985-04-01

    This paper studies the ability of carnosine (beta-imidazole-lactate) to affect histamine-induced immunosuppression of proliferative activity of various lymphocyte subpopulations and the realization of this effect through surface histamine receptors of the cells. The experiments were carried out on mice; lymphocytes were incubated with tritium-labeled thymidine for 4 h, after which their radioactivity was determined on a scintillation counter. The results show that histamine has an inhibitory action on antigen-induced proliferation of T suppressor lymphocytes through H-2 histamine receptors, for this effect was considerably inhibited by the H-2 histamine blockers metiamide, but not by the H-1 histamine blocker mepyramine.

  16. The targeting of immunosuppressive mechanisms in hematological malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M H

    2014-01-01

    to evade otherwise effective T-cell responses. A growing number of immune evasion mechanisms have been characterized mainly in solid tumors. In hematological malignancies, less is known about how different immune escape mechanisms influence tumor immune evasion and the extent of their impact on ongoing...... immune responses. The present review highlights the potential role of three well-defined immunosuppressive mechanisms in hematological malignancies: (i) inhibitory T-cell pathways (especially programmed death ligand 1/programmed death 1 (PD-L1/PD-1)), (ii) regulatory immune cells, and (iii) metabolic...

  17. UV radiation-induced immunosuppression is greater in men and prevented by topical nicotinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Diona L; Patterson, Clare R S; Stapelberg, Michael; Park, Joohong; Barnetson, Ross St C; Halliday, Gary M

    2008-02-01

    UV radiation-induced immunosuppression augments cutaneous carcinogenesis. The incidence of skin cancer continues to increase despite increased use of sunscreens, which are less effective at preventing immunosuppression than sunburn. Using the Mantoux reaction as a model of skin immunity, we investigated the effects of solar-simulated (ss) UV and its component UVA and UVB wavebands and tested the ability of topical nicotinamide to protect from UV-induced immunosuppression. Healthy, Mantoux-positive volunteers were UV-irradiated on their backs, with 5% nicotinamide or vehicle applied to different sites in a randomized, double-blinded manner. Subsequent Mantoux testing at irradiated and adjacent unirradiated sites enabled measurement of UV-induced immunosuppression with and without nicotinamide. Suberythemal ssUV caused significant immunosuppression, although component UVB and UVA doses delivered independently did not. Men were immunosuppressed by ssUV doses three times lower than those required to immunosuppress women. This may be an important cause of the higher skin cancer incidence and mortality observed in men. Topical nicotinamide prevented immunosuppression, with gene chip microarrays suggesting that the mechanisms of protection may include alterations in complement, energy metabolism and apoptosis pathways. Nicotinamide is a safe and inexpensive compound that could be added to sunscreens or after-sun lotions to improve protection from immunosuppression. immunosuppression.JID JOURNAL CLUB ARTICLE: For questions, answers, and open discussion about this article, please go to http://network.nature.com/group/jidclub

  18. Personalized dementia care: proven effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mierlo, L.D.; van der Roest, H.G.; Meiland, F.J.M.; Dröes, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Many psychosocial intervention studies report effects in subgroups of people with dementia. Insight into the characteristics of these subgroups is important for care practice. This study reviews personal characteristics of people with dementia (living in the community or in an institution) that are

  19. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: District of Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The District's demographics are such that achievement trends could only be determined for African American, male and female, and low income subgroups. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Washington, DC students showed gains in both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels…

  20. Identifying subgroups of patients using latent class analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Mølgaard; Kent, Peter; Hestbæk, Lise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in patients with low back pain (LBP) is well recognised and different approaches to subgrouping have been proposed. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) is a statistical technique that is increasingly being used to identify subgroups based on patient characteristics. However, as ...

  1. A Systematic Approach to Subgroup Classification in Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalock, Robert L.; Luckasson, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a systematic approach to subgroup classification based on a classification framework and sequential steps involved in the subgrouping process. The sequential steps are stating the purpose of the classification, identifying the classification elements, using relevant information, and using clearly stated and purposeful…

  2. Characteristic properties of large subgroups in primary abelian groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Invariant properties of large subgroups. We start with some extensions of totally projective p-groups, namely: 1. p-torsion A-groups. Several details on A-groups appear in [7]. For example, any p- torsion abelian A-group is an isotype subgroup of a totally projective p-group with special properties described in [7]. Theorem 1.

  3. Adherence to immunosuppressive therapy following liver transplantation: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Antônio Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate the evidence available in the literature on non-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy among patients undergoing liver transplantation. Method: integrative literature review, including research whose sample consisted of patients aged over 18 years undergoing liver transplantation. It excluded those containing patients undergoing multiple organ transplants. For the selection of articles, Medline / Pubmed, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus and Embase were searched. The search period corresponded to the initial date of indexation of different bases, up to the deadline of February 10, 2015, using controlled and uncontrolled descriptors: liver transplantation, hepatic transplantation, liver orthotopic transplantation, medication adherence, medication non-adherence, medication compliance and patient compliance. Results: were located 191 investigations, 10 of which met the objectives of the study and were grouped into four categories, namely: educational process and non-adherence; non-adherence related to the number of daily doses of immunosuppressive medications; detection methods for non-adherence and side effects of therapy. Conclusion: there were risk factors related to the health service, such as control and reduction of the number of doses; related to the individual, such as being male, divorced, alcohol or other substances user, exposed to low social support and being mentally ill.

  4. Impact of immunosuppression and chemotherapy on reactivation of viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahian, Farahnaz; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Fallahian, Vida; Zamani, Farhad

    2010-07-01

    Chemotherapy drugs, biological medications that are used to treat cancer, may cause hepatic side effects. Patients with pre-existing viral hepatitis may be more susceptible to exacerbation of their underlying liver disease, and risk of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. We conducted a search on immunosuppression, and its impact on reactivation of viral hepatitis, using the electro-nic medical databases. Before starting chemotherapy, it is recommended to record the past history of liver disease and check for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) serology. In immunosuppressed patients, radiation toxicity, graft versus host disease, hepatic veno-occlusive disease, acalculous cholecystitis, tumor infiltration, ischemia, other viruses such as CMV and her-pes virus, and systemic infection should also be considered. Transplant recipients with serologic evidence of previous infection with hepatitis B or C, or those who receive organs from a seropositive donor, should have viral load levels monitored before and after transplantation and, may also require treatment. We believe that there is a role for prophylactic use of antiviral treatment in patients at risk for HBV reactivation.

  5. Impact of immunosuppression and chemotherapy on reactivation of Viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallahian Farahnaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy drugs, biological medications that are used to treat cancer, may cause hepatic side effects. Patients with pre-existing viral hepatitis may be more susceptible to exacer-bation of their underlying liver disease, and risk of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. We conducted a search on immunosuppression, and its impact on reactivation of viral hepatitis, using the electro-nic medical databases. Before starting chemotherapy, it is recommended to record the past history of liver disease and check for hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV serology. In immunosuppressed patients, radiation toxicity, graft versus host disease, hepatic veno-occlusive disease, acalculous cholecystitis, tumor infiltration, ischemia, other viruses such as CMV and her-pes virus, and systemic infection should also be considered. Transplant recipients with serologic evidence of previous infection with hepatitis B or C, or those who receive organs from a seropo-sitive donor, should have viral load levels monitored before and after transplantation and, may also require treatment. We believe that there is a role for prophylactic use of antiviral treatment in patients at risk for HBV reactivation.

  6. Modified uterine allotransplantation and immunosuppression procedure in the sheep model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wei

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop an orthotopic, allogeneic, uterine transplantation technique and an effective immunosuppressive protocol in the sheep model. METHODS: In this pilot study, 10 sexually mature ewes were subjected to laparotomy and total abdominal hysterectomy with oophorectomy to procure uterus allografts. The cold ischemic time was 60 min. End-to-end vascular anastomosis was performed using continuous, non-interlocking sutures. Complete tissue reperfusion was achieved in all animals within 30 s after the vascular re-anastomosis, without any evidence of arterial or venous thrombosis. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and methylprednisolone tablets. Graft viability was assessed by transrectal ultrasonography and second-look laparotomy at 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. RESULTS: Viable uterine tissue and vascular patency were observed on transrectal ultrasonography and second-look laparotomy. Histological analysis of the graft tissue (performed in one ewe revealed normal tissue architecture with a very subtle inflammatory reaction but no edema or stasis. CONCLUSION: We have developed a modified procedure that allowed us to successfully perform orthotopic, allogeneic, uterine transplantation in sheep, whose uterine and vascular anatomy (apart from the bicornuate uterus is similar to the human anatomy, making the ovine model excellent for human uterine transplant research.

  7. Cervical HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in immunosuppressed Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roensbo, Mette T; Blaakaer, Jan; Skov, Karin

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Women receiving immunosuppressive treatment due to organ transplantation are at increased risk of Human papilloma virus (HPV)-related diseases, including cervical neoplasia. This pilot study aimed to describe the cervical HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in immunosuppressed...... in 2014 had three cervical cytologies performed; one before and two after transplantation. The samples were examined for cytological abnormalities and tested for HPV using Cobas(®) HPV Test and CLART(®) HPV2 Test. RESULTS: Of 94 eligible cases we included 60 RTR and BMTR. The overall prevalence of high......-risk HPV was 15.0 (95% CI; 7.1-26.6) and the prevalence was higher among BMTR (29.4, CI; 10.3-56.0) than in RTR (9.3%, CI; 2.6-22.1) although this was not statistically significant (p=0.10). The distribution of high-risk HPV was broad with HPV 45 as the most common genotype (3.3%). The prevalences of high...

  8. Multiplicity-adjusted semiparametric benefiting subgroup identification in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Patrick M; Müller, Peter; Tang, Qi; Carlin, Bradley P

    2018-02-01

    Background A recent focus in the health sciences has been the development of personalized medicine, which includes determining the population for which a given treatment is effective. Due to limited data, identifying the true benefiting population is a challenging task. To tackle this difficulty, the credible subgroups approach provides a pair of bounding subgroups for the true benefiting subgroup, constructed so that one is contained by the benefiting subgroup while the other contains the benefiting subgroup with high probability. However, the method has so far only been developed for parametric linear models. Methods In this article, we develop the details required to follow the credible subgroups approach in more realistic settings by considering nonlinear and semiparametric regression models, supported for regulatory science by conditional power simulations. We also present an improved multiple testing approach using a step-down procedure. We evaluate our approach via simulations and apply it to data from four trials of Alzheimer's disease treatments carried out by AbbVie. Results Semiparametric modeling yields credible subgroups that are more robust to violations of linear treatment effect assumptions, and careful choice of the population of interest as well as the step-down multiple testing procedure result in a higher rate of detection of benefiting types of patients. The approach allows us to identify types of patients that benefit from treatment in the Alzheimer's disease trials. Conclusion Attempts to identify benefiting subgroups of patients in clinical trials are often met with skepticism due to a lack of multiplicity control and unrealistically restrictive assumptions. Our proposed approach merges two techniques, credible subgroups, and semiparametric regression, which avoids these problems and makes benefiting subgroup identification practical and reliable.

  9. A comparison of five recursive partitioning methods to find person subgroups involved in meaningful treatment-subgroup interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doove, L. L.; Dusseldorp, E.; Van Deun, K.; Van Mechelen, I.

    2014-01-01

    In case multiple treatment alternatives are available for some medical problem, the detection of treatment–subgroup interactions (i.e., relative treatment effectiveness varying over subgroups of persons) is of key importance for personalized medicine and the development of optimal treatment

  10. Cytomegalovirus retinitis in a seronegative patient with systemic lupus erythematosus on immunosuppressive therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kelkar, Aditya; Kelkar, Jai; Kelkar, Shreekant; Bhirud, Shilpa; Biswas, Jyotirmoy

    2011-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study is to report a rare case of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in a seronegative patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) on immunosuppressive therapy. Methods A seronegative patient with SLE who was on immunosuppressive therapy developed CMV retinitis. The immunosuppressive therapy was tapered, and the patient was given intravitreal ganciclovir and foscarnet in addition to systemic ganciclovir. The follow-up visits were documented. Result The patient respond...

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate the Adverse Effects of Immunosuppressive Drugs on Distinct T Cell Subopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajkova, Michaela; Hermankova, Barbora; Javorkova, Eliska; Bohacova, Pavla; Zajicova, Alena; Holan, Vladimir; Krulova, Magdalena

    2017-02-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are widely used to treat undesirable immune reaction, however their clinical use is often limited by harmful side effects. The combined application of immunosuppressive agents with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offers a promising alternative approach that enables the reduction of immunosuppressive agent doses and simultaneously maintains or improves the outcome of therapy. The present study aimed to determinate the effects of immunosuppressants on individual T cell subpopulations and to investigate the efficacy of MSC-based treatment combined with immunosuppressive drugs. We tested the effect of five widely used immunosuppressants with different action mechanisms: cyclosporine A, mycophenolate mofetil, rapamycin, and two glucocorticoids - prednisone and dexamethasone in combination with MSCs on mouse CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte viability and activation, Th17 (RORγt+), Th1 (T-bet+), Th2 (GATA-3+) and Treg (Foxp3+) cell proportion and on the production of corresponding key cytokines (IL-17, IFNγ, IL-4 and IL-10). We showed that MSCs modulate the actions of immunosuppressants and in combination with immunosuppressive drugs display distinct effect on cell activation and balance among different T lymphocytes subpopulations and exert a suppressive effect on proinflammatory T cell subsets while promoting the functions of anti-inflammatory Treg lymphocytes. The results indicated that MSC-based therapy could be a powerful strategy to attenuate the negative effects of immunosuppressive drugs on the immune system.

  12. Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide inhibits subgroup J avian leucosis virus infection by directly blocking virus infection and improving immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cuilian; Wei, Kai; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Hu, Liping; Zhao, Peng; Meng, Xiuyan; Shao, Mingxu; Wang, Chuanwen; Zhu, Lijun; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yang; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2017-03-13

    Subgroup J avian leucosis virus (ALV-J) generally causes neoplastic diseases, immunosuppression and subsequently increases susceptibility to secondary infection in birds. The spread of ALV-J mainly depends on congenital infection and horizontal contact. Although ALV-J infection causes enormous losses yearly in the poultry industry worldwide, effective measures to control ALV-J remain lacking. In this study, we demonstrated that Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), a natural polysaccharide extracted from Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen, can significantly inhibit ALV-J replication in vitro by blocking viral adsorption to host cells. Electron microscopy and blocking ELISA tests revealed that TPPPS possibly blocks viral adsorption to host cells by interacting with the glycoprotein 85 protein of ALV-J. Furthermore, we artificially established a congenitally ALV-J-infected chicken model to examine the anti-viral effects of TPPPS in vivo. TPPPS significantly inhibited viral shedding and viral loads in immune organs and largely eliminated the immunosuppression caused by congenital ALV-J infection. Additionally, pre-administration of TPPPS obviously reduced the size and delayed the occurrence of tumors induced by acute oncogenic ALV-J infection. This study revealed the prominent effects and feasible mechanisms of TPPPS in inhibiting ALV-J infection, thereby providing a novel prospect to control ALV-J spread.

  13. Celiac Crisis in an Adult on Immunosuppressive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owayed Al Shammeri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Celiac crisis’ is a rare presentation of celiac disease with manifestations that include severe diarrhea, and severe metabolic and electrolyte abnormalities. It is most frequently seen in children younger than two years of age and has been rarely described in adults. A case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with diarrhea, severe dehydration, hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis is described. Based on positive serology and small bowel biopsy, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. She also had histological evidence of lymphocytic colitis. Microscopic colitis has not previously been described in association with celiac crisis, but it may have contributed to the presentation of celiac crisis in the current case. The patient was on corticosteroids and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis at the time of her presentation. The current case demonstrates that modest immunosuppression does not prevent a celiac crisis, although previous reports have shown that patients may respond rapidly to high-dose corticosteroids.

  14. Kaposi′s sarcoma following immunosuppressive therapy for vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Bouattar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi′s sarcoma (KS is widely reported to develop after renal transplantation and is induced by activation of a latent human herpes virus 8. We report the clinical features and outcome of a 50-year-old woman who presented with KS 18 weeks after starting immuno-suppressive therapy for vasculitis. She had positive-titer IgG antibody to human herpes virus 8. Cyclophosphamide pulses were interrupted, and prednisone was decreased gradually to 10 mg/day. Skin lesions showed important regression with stabilization of the general state and renal function. Eight months later, the patient presented with a diffuse cutaneous KS that required the discontinuation of steroids. Within 1 month, her general status and renal function deteriorated, and she died with a disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome.

  15. Zoledronic acid overcomes chemoresistance and immunosuppression of malignant mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopecka, Joanna; Gazzano, Elena; Sara, Orecchia; Ghigo, Dario; Riganti, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is characterized by a chemoresistant and immunosuppressive phenotype. An effective strategy to restore chemosensitivity and immune reactivity against HMM is lacking. We investigated whether the use of zoledronic acid is an effective chemo-immunosensitizing strategy. We compared primary HMM samples with non-transformed mesothelial cells. HMM cells had higher rate of cholesterol and isoprenoid synthesis, constitutive activation of Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2)/hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway and up-regulation of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp). By decreasing the isoprenoid supply, zoledronic acid down-regulated the Ras/ERK1/2/HIF-1α/Pgp axis and chemosensitized the HMM cells to Pgp substrates. The HMM cells also produced higher amounts of kynurenine, decreased the proliferation of T-lymphocytes and expanded the number of T-regulatory (Treg) cells. Kynurenine synthesis was due to the transcription of the indoleamine 1,2 dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme, consequent to the activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3). By reducing the activity of the Ras/ERK1/2/STAT3/IDO axis, zoledronic acid lowered the kyurenine synthesis and the expansion of Treg cells, and increased the proliferation of T-lymphocytes. Thanks to its ability to decrease Ras/ERK1/2 activity, which is responsible for both Pgp-mediated chemoresistance and IDO-mediated immunosuppression, zoledronic acid is an effective chemo-immunosensitizing agent in HMM cells. PMID:25544757

  16. Nutrition Support for Persistent Inflammation, Immunosuppression, and Catabolism Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Frederick A; Phillips, Stuart M; McClain, Craig J; Patel, Jayshil J; Martindale, Robert G

    2017-04-01

    Despite tremendous advances in critical care, multiple-organ failure continues to be a significant problem. However, in recent years, far fewer patients with multiple-organ failure die early, but many experience ongoing immune dysregulation and are developing persistent inflammation, immunosuppression, and catabolism syndrome (PICS). Most PICS patients are discharged to nonhome destinations, fail to rehabilitate, and succumb to indolent death. From a nutrition perspective, patients with PICS experience persistent inflammation-induced cachexia despite evidenced-based recommended intensive care unit nutrition support. Recent basic and translational research indicates that prolonged expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells plays a central role in the pathogenesis of PICS. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells express arginase 1, which depletes arginine, causing immunosuppression and impaired wound healing. This is the rationale for arginine supplementation in PICS. Other nutrition support recommendations for PICS are based on inferences made from other patient populations who experience similar persistent inflammation-induced cachexia. These include patients with established cancers, major burns, and sarcopenia. These patients experience anabolic resistance, but studies show that this can be overcome by providing higher levels of protein and certain specific amino acids. Nutrition support guidelines recommend provision of >1.5 g/kg/d of protein and indicate that higher levels may be needed. Protein composition is also important. There is good evidence that leucine can promote anabolism in patients with cancer and sarcopenia. Finally, anabolic interventions-including intensive insulin, oxandrolone, propranolol, and resistance exercise-have proven to be effective in patients with major burns and are likely relevant in combating PICS cachexia.

  17. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  18. Demonstration of Microbial Subgroups among Normal Vaginal Microbiota Data

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, M.-L. T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we identified subgroups of observations relating to the healthy vaginal microbiota. This microbiota resides in a dynamic environment that undergoes cyclic change during the menstrual cycle. Cluster analysis procedures were applied to divide a set of 226 normal microbiota observations into groups. Three subgroups containing 100, 65, and 61 observations were identified. Plots of principal components determined by canonical analysis were obtained to demonstrate graphically the clus...

  19. On T-Characterized Subgroups of Compact Abelian Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saak Gabriyelyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A sequence \\(\\{ u_n \\}_{n\\in \\omega}\\ in abstract additively-written Abelian group \\(G\\ is called a \\(T\\-sequence if there is a Hausdorff group topology on \\(G\\ relative to which \\(\\lim_n u_n =0\\. We say that a subgroup \\(H\\ of an infinite compact Abelian group \\(X\\ is \\(T\\-characterized if there is a \\(T\\-sequence \\(\\mathbf{u} =\\{ u_n \\}\\ in the dual group of \\(X\\, such that \\(H=\\{ x\\in X: \\; (u_n, x\\to 1 \\}\\. We show that a closed subgroup \\(H\\ of \\(X\\ is \\(T\\-characterized if and only if \\(H\\ is a \\(G_\\delta\\-subgroup of \\(X\\ and the annihilator of \\(H\\ admits a Hausdorff minimally almost periodic group topology. All closed subgroups of an infinite compact Abelian group \\(X\\ are \\(T\\-characterized if and only if \\(X\\ is metrizable and connected. We prove that every compact Abelian group \\(X\\ of infinite exponent has a \\(T\\-characterized subgroup, which is not an \\(F_{\\sigma}\\-subgroup of \\(X\\, that gives a negative answer to Problem 3.3 in Dikranjan and Gabriyelyan (Topol. Appl. 2013, 160, 2427–2442.

  20. A Bayesian subgroup analysis using collections of ANOVA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinzhong; Sivaganesan, Siva; Laud, Purushottam W; Müller, Peter

    2017-07-01

    We develop a Bayesian approach to subgroup analysis using ANOVA models with multiple covariates, extending an earlier work. We assume a two-arm clinical trial with normally distributed response variable. We also assume that the covariates for subgroup finding are categorical and are a priori specified, and parsimonious easy-to-interpret subgroups are preferable. We represent the subgroups of interest by a collection of models and use a model selection approach to finding subgroups with heterogeneous effects. We develop suitable priors for the model space and use an objective Bayesian approach that yields multiplicity adjusted posterior probabilities for the models. We use a structured algorithm based on the posterior probabilities of the models to determine which subgroup effects to report. Frequentist operating characteristics of the approach are evaluated using simulation. While our approach is applicable in more general cases, we mainly focus on the 2 × 2 case of two covariates each at two levels for ease of presentation. The approach is illustrated using a real data example. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Pulmonary tuberculosis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis undergoig immunosuppressive treatment: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Ceratti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease which characteristically affects the joints. Because it is an autoimmune disease, immunosuppressive drugs are widely used in its treatment. The present case report illustrates the association of immunosuppressive treatment with the development of opportunistic infections in a 64-year-old patient.

  2. Oral immunosuppressive drugs in the treatment of atopic dermatitis : improving performance and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, F.M.

    2018-01-01

    In this thesis the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) by the use of oral immunosuppressive drugs is discussed in order to improve the performance and safety. In the first part of this thesis we evaluated the qualitative and quantitative prescribing of oral immunosuppressive drugs in the

  3. Anti-inflammatory effect of a retrovirus-derived immunosuppressive peptide in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstrup, Martin; Johansen, Claus; Toft, Lars; Pedersen, Finn S; Funding, Anne; Bahrami, Shervin; Iversen, Lars; Østergaard, Lars; Duch, Mogens

    2013-11-18

    Short dimeric or mulitmeric peptides derived from a highly conserved stretch of amino acids from gammaretroviral envelope proteins has been found to have immunosuppressive properties in vitro. Here we test the hypothesis that such immunosuppressive peptides may serve as immunomodulatory reagents for treatment of inflammatory disorders. The anti-inflammatory effect of a synthetic retrovirus-derived immunosuppressive peptide of 17 amino acids was tested in two murine skin inflammation models, a TPA-induced acute toxic contact eczema model and an oxazolone-induced allergic contact dermatitis. Overall, mice (n = 24) treated with a topically applied cream containing the dimeric immunosuppressive peptide exhibited a reduction of 28.8% in ear thickness (range 20.1-42.5), whereas the application of a scrambled peptide dimer or a monomer of the immunosuppressive peptide remained without effect (p = 0.028). Furthermore, ear biopsies from mice treated with the dimeric immunosuppressive peptide showed a significant reduction in mRNA of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-17C, and IL-6 as well as the chemokine CXCL2 compared to mice treated with control peptides. Using two murine skin inflammation models, we show that an immunosuppressive retroviral peptide is capable of reducing inflammatory disorders. The results indicate that virus-derived immunosuppressive peptides capable of down-regulating several proinflammatory cytokines may represent a novel class of drugs for the treatment of excess inflammation.

  4. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A : results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Levesque, Herve; Nemes, Laszlo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kuehne, Angela; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knobl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; Andre, Helene; Aouba, A; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; dOiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valerie; Girault, Stephane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hezard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Levesque, Herve; Lifermann, Francois; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, J.; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quemeneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sebastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Huth-Kuhne, Angela; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Nemes, Laszlo; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Baudo, Francesco; Caimi, T.; Contino, L.; D'Angelo, Armando; Crippa, Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; D'inca, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; De Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyak, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W.G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P.W.G; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; Del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Arguelles, M.; Gonzalez Boullosa, Rosario; Gutierrez Pimentel, Maria Jose; Jimenez-Yuste, Victor [No Value; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Marco, Pascual; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia z; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana Maria; Maranon, HGUG [No Value; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Tengborn, Lilian; Boehlen, Francoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Collins, Peter; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive

  5. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knöbl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; André, Hélène; Aouba, Achille; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; d'Oiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valérie; Girault, Stéphane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hézard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Lifermann, François; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, Jacques; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quéméneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sébastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Caimi, Teresa; Contino, Laura; D'Angelo Armando, Crippa Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Dario; D'incà, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; de Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyák, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P. W. G.; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Argüelles, María; González Boullosa, Rosario; Gutiérrez Pimentel, María José; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia Z.; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana María; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Boehlen, Françoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive

  6. 42 CFR 410.30 - Prescription drugs used in immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prescription drugs used in immunosuppressive... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.30 Prescription drugs used in immunosuppressive therapy. (a) Scope. Payment...

  7. Subgroup Analysis in Burnout: Relations Between Fatigue, Anxiety, and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup analysis may also help clarify whether burnout is a distinct entity and whether subgroups of burnout overlap with other disorders such as depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. In a group of 113 clinically diagnosed burned out patients, levels of fatigue, depression, and anxiety were assessed. In order to identify possible subgroups, we performed a two-step cluster analysis. The analysis revealed two clusters that differed from one another in terms of symptom severity on the three aforementioned measures. Depression appeared to be the strongest predictor of group membership. These results are considered in the light of the scientific debate on whether burnout can be distinguished from depression and whether burnout subtyping is useful. Finally, implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:26869983

  8. Subgroup analysis in burnout: relations between fatigue, anxiety and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno eVan Dam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup analysis may also help clarify whether burnout is a distinct entity and whether subgroups of burnout overlap with other disorders such as depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. In a group of 113 clinically-diagnosed burned out patients, levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety were assessed. In order to identify possible subgroups, we performed a two-step cluster analysis. The analysis revealed two clusters that differed from one another in terms of symptom severity on the three aforementioned measures. Depression appeared to be the strongest predictor of group membership. These results are considered in the light of the scientific debate on whether burnout can be distinguished from depression and whether burnout subtyping is useful. Finally, implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  9. Cluster analysis of clinical data identifies fibromyalgia subgroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Docampo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Fibromyalgia (FM is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. RESULTS: VARIABLES CLUSTERED INTO THREE INDEPENDENT DIMENSIONS: "symptomatology", "comorbidities" and "clinical scales". Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1, high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2, and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3, showing differences in measures of disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment.

  10. Immunosuppressive Activity of 8-Gingerol on Immune Responses in Mice

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    Wenhui Qian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available 8-Gingerol is one of the principal components of ginger, which is widely used in China and elsewhere as a food, spice and herb. It shows immunosuppressive activity on the immune responses to ovalbumin (OVA in mice. In the present study, we found that 8-gingerol suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS and concanavalin A (ConA-stimulated splenocyte proliferation in vitro. In vivo, 8-gingerol not only significantly suppressed Con A-, LPS- and OVA-induced splenocyte proliferation (P < 0.05 but also decreased the percentage of CD19+ B cells and CD3+ T cell (P < 0.05 at high doses (50, 100 mg/kg. Moreover, OVA-specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2b levels in OVA-immunized mice were reduced by 8-gingerol at doses of 50, 100 mg/kg. These results suggest that 8-gingerol could suppress humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. The mechanism might be related to direct inhibition of sensitized T and B lymphocytes.

  11. The role of apoptosis in immunosuppression of dogs with demodicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shanker K; Dimri, Umesh; Sharma, Mahesh C; Swarup, Devendra; Sharma, Bhaskar; Pandey, Hari Om; Kumari, Priyambada

    2011-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the status of apoptosis in peripheral blood leukocytes of dogs with demodicosis. A total of 26 dogs suffering from demodicosis, and positive for Demodex canis mites by skin scraping, participated in the study, 13 with localized demodicosis (LD) and 13 with generalized demodicosis (GD). A further 13 clinically healthy dogs, all of whom were negative for mites upon skin scraping, were used as controls. The dogs with GD revealed significantly higher (P ≤ 0.0001) percentage of leukocytes with externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) and depolarized mitochondrial membrane potentials (ΔΨm) as compared with the dogs with LD and healthy controls. These dogs also revealed significantly lower values (P ≤ 0.0001) of hematological parameters viz. hemoglobin, total erythrocytes count total leukocytes count, lymphocytes, monocytes and neutrophils. Significantly higher (P ≤ 0.0001) percentages of leukocytes with externalization of PS and depolarized ΔΨm were also found in dogs with LD as compared with the healthy controls. These dogs also revealed significantly lower values of Hb (P ≤ 0.0001), TEC (P=0.025), TLC (P ≤ 0.0001), lymphocytes (P=0.008), monocytes (P ≤ 0.0001) and neutrophils (P=0.03). It is concluded that premature apoptosis of PBL may be implicated in the immunosuppression of the dogs with demodicosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma levels of immunosuppressive mediators during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Borrelli

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma levels of two mediators with immunosuppressive properties, complement fraction C3a (C3a and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, during extracorporeal circulation. The proliferation index after phytohaemagglutinin (PHA stimulation of isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also investigated. Sixteen patients undergoing hypothermic (n = 8, group 1 and normothermic (n = 8, group 2 cardiopulmormry bypass (CPB were enrolled in this study. As a control, we evaluated four patients undergoing thoracovascular operations without CPB. Blood samples were collected before CPB but after anaesthesia, every 30 min during CPB, at the end of CPB and 10 min after protamine administration. Both C3a and TGF-β1 increased significantly during CPB and after protamine administration in the hypothermic as well as the normothermic group. In the latter case the increase of C3a and TGF-β1, although more prominent, was not significantl higher than in the former group. Conversely, the proliferation, index of peripheral mononuclear cells had already decreased 30 min after CPB was started and remained depressed throughout the CPB time. These results suggest a possible role of C3a and TGF-β1 in the immunological changes occurring during extracorporeal circulation.

  13. Frequent hepatitis E in the Netherlands without traveling or immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koot, H; Hogema, B M; Koot, M; Molier, M; Zaaijer, H L

    2015-01-01

    In several Western countries, silent endemic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is common among blood donors. Immunocompromised persons may develop chronic hepatitis E, but the relevance of endemic HEV for immunocompetent persons remains largely unknown. We investigated the immune status and travel history in cases of hepatitis E in the Netherlands. Between January 2009 and May 2014, physicians throughout the Netherlands submitted samples from 4067 hepatitis patients to Sanquin Diagnostic Services for HEV antibody testing. For the 144 patients testing positive for HEV IgM and HEV RNA, travel behavior and immune status were assessed. Complete information was obtained for 81 patients. Surprisingly, the majority of patients (52/81, 64%) were immunocompetent and did not travel outside Europe. HEV genotyping was obtained for 47 non-traveling patients, all concerned HEV genotype 3. Our findings suggest that currently in Western countries the impact of hepatitis E for non-traveling, immunocompetent persons is underestimated. Historically cases of hepatitis A, B and C, but not cases of hepatitis E, are notifiable and warrant preventive measures. However, in parts of Western Europe HEV may have become the most important source of viral hepatitis, in immunocompetent and in immunosuppressed persons. Pending measures against the ongoing transmission of HEV genotype 3 in parts of Europe, physicians should consider hepatitis E in dealing with new hepatitis patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Orally administered immunosuppressants modify intestinal uptake of nutrients in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, V C; Madsen, K L; Yatscoff, R W; Doring, K; Thomson, A B

    1994-12-15

    The effect on intestinal nutrient transport of the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A (CsA), cyclosporin G (CsG), and rapamycin (RAP) was determined in New Zealand white rabbits. Rabbits received oral doses of CsA (20 mg/kg/day), CsG (10 mg/kg/day), or RAP (1 mg/kg/day) for 10 days. Animals receiving RAP had decreased food intake and weight gain compared with controls. This correlated with a decrease in both total ileal weight and corresponding mucosal weight. CsA and CsG administration had no effect on food intake, total weight gain, or intestinal weight. Villus surface area was significantly decreased in all groups as compared with controls. Jejunal uptake of D-glucose as well as 1 medium and 4 long chain fatty acids was not affected by drug administration, while both mucosal-to-serosal and net 3-0-methylglucose fluxes were increased (P nutritional importance, as these animals gained weight normally. In addition, in these animals the changes mainly occurred in the ileum, not in the jejunum, where most glucose is absorbed, and the associated alterations in the values of the Vmax and Km* would lead to reciprocal changes in the rates of uptake of varying luminal concentrations of glucose. In contrast, these changes are likely to be of more importance in RAP-treated animals, since they failed to gain weight normally. The significance of these findings needs to be established in chronically treated animals.

  15. Tracking cohesive subgroups over time in inferred social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Alvin; Chignell, Mark; Wang, Hao

    2010-04-01

    As a first step in the development of community trackers for large-scale online interaction, this paper shows how cohesive subgroup analysis using the Social Cohesion Analysis of Networks (SCAN; Chin and Chignell 2008) and Data-Intensive Socially Similar Evolving Community Tracker (DISSECT; Chin and Chignell 2010) methods can be applied to the problem of identifying cohesive subgroups and tracking them over time. Three case studies are reported, and the findings are used to evaluate how well the SCAN and DISSECT methods work for different types of data. In the largest of the case studies, variations in temporal cohesiveness are identified across a set of subgroups extracted from the inferred social network. Further modifications to the DISSECT methodology are suggested based on the results obtained. The paper concludes with recommendations concerning further research that would be beneficial in addressing the community tracking problem for online data.

  16. Young children with language difficulties: a dimensional approach to subgrouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rianne; Ceulemans, Eva; Grauwels, Jolien; Maljaars, Jarymke; Zink, Inge; Steyaert, Jean; Noens, Ilse

    2013-11-01

    A dimensional approach was used to create bottom-up constructed subgroups that captured the behavioral heterogeneity in 36 Dutch-speaking children with language difficulties. Four subgroups were delineated based upon differences in cognitive ability, symbol understanding, joint attention and autism spectrum disorder related characteristics. Children with a different developmental disorder were found within a single cluster. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that bottom-up constructed subgroups might capture the heterogeneous behavioral profiles of young children with developmental difficulties in a more meaningful way. Furthermore, joint attention and symbol understanding seem important skills to assess in young children presenting with language difficulties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Morphological features of IFN-γ–stimulated mesenchymal stromal cells predict overall immunosuppressive capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinker, Matthew W.; Marklein, Ross A.; Lo Surdo, Jessica L.; Wei, Cheng-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) lines can vary significantly in their functional characteristics, and the effectiveness of MSC-based therapeutics may be realized by finding predictive features associated with MSC function. To identify features associated with immunosuppressive capacity in MSCs, we developed a robust in vitro assay that uses principal-component analysis to integrate multidimensional flow cytometry data into a single measurement of MSC-mediated inhibition of T-cell activation. We used this assay to correlate single-cell morphological data with overall immunosuppressive capacity in a cohort of MSC lines derived from different donors and manufacturing conditions. MSC morphology after IFN-γ stimulation significantly correlated with immunosuppressive capacity and accurately predicted the immunosuppressive capacity of MSC lines in a validation cohort. IFN-γ enhanced the immunosuppressive capacity of all MSC lines, and morphology predicted the magnitude of IFN-γ–enhanced immunosuppressive activity. Together, these data identify MSC morphology as a predictive feature of MSC immunosuppressive function. PMID:28283659

  18. Mucosal Immune Responses against Live Newcastle Disease Vaccine in Immunosuppressed Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengui Yan, Yijun Du1, Qingyou Zhao, Ruifeng Fan, Wenlong Guo, Rongde Ma, Xinjian Wang and Ruiliang Zhu*

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate mucosal immunity of normal and immunosuppressed chickens vaccinated with live Newcastle disease (ND vaccine, cyclophosphamide (CY was used to generate immunosuppressed chickens. Normal and immunosuppressed chickens were vaccinated with the Lasota ND vaccine by ocular-nasal route at three weeks of age and challenged with virulent ND virus (vNDV at day 28 post-vaccination (pv. The immunosuppressed chickens had significantly lower relative weight of the bursa of Fabricius and serum antibody HI titers compared to CY-untreated chickens. Compared with normal chickens, significant lower levels of IgA antibodies were detected in tracheal washings, duodenal washings and bile of immunosuppressed chickens in the whole experimental period. Immuno-histochemical experiment also showed that small numbers of IgA positive cells were found in intestinal tissues of immunosuppressed chickens at day 28 pv. There was only a partial protective effect on immunosuppressed chickens post challenge with virulent ND virus (vNDV. These findings increase our understanding of the protective mucosal immune response against ND vaccine and suggest that mucosal immunity play an important role against NDV infection.

  19. Immunosuppressive drugs modulate the replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV in a hydrodynamic injection mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzhong Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV reactivation and recurrence are common in patients under immunosuppression and can be controlled by hepatitis B immunoglobulin, antivirals, and hepatitis B vaccine. However, the detailed analysis of HBV infection under immunosuppression is essential for the prophylaxis and therapy for HBV reactivation and recurrence. In this study, HBV replication and T cell responses were analyzed in a HBV-transfected mouse model under immunosuppressive therapy. During the treatment, HBV replication was at a high level in mice treated with dexamethasone, cyclosporine, and cyclophosphamide, whereas was terminated in mice treated with mycophenolate mofetil. After the withdrawal, HBV replication was at low or high levels in the dexamethasone-treated mice or in both cyclosporine- and cyclophosphamide-treated mice. The early withdrawal of cyclosporine allowed the recovery of suppressed T cell responses and led to subsequent HBV clearance, while the adoptive immune transfer to the mice with HBV persistence led to HBV suppression. Taken together, long-term HBV persistence under immunosuppression depends on the immunosuppressive drugs used and on the treatment duration and is mediated by the suppressed intrahepatic CD8 T cell response. These data may be helpful for individualized immunosuppressive therapy in patients with high risk of HBV reactivation and recurrence, and the mouse system is suitable for studying HBV reactivation and recurrence under immunosuppression.

  20. Effects of immunosuppression induced by thalidomide and cyclosporine in heterotopic heart transplantation in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, J B V; Petroianu, A; Travolo, E; de Oliveira, B H; Duarte, A B B; Alberti, L R

    2007-06-01

    Because of its anti-inflammatory and immunodepressive effects, thalidomide has been used for the treatment of dermatologic diseases and of host-versus-graft reactions in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. We evaluated the immunosuppressive action of thalidomide alone or in combination with cyclosporine on the prevention of rejection of heterotopic cardiac allografts in rabbits. Fifty rabbits were used including 25 donors and 25 recipients. Recipient animals were divided into five groups (n = 5 each): group 1 (control), non-immunosuppressed animals; group II, animals immunosuppressed with cyclosporine (10 mg/kg per day); group III, immunosuppressed with thalidomide (100 mg/kg per day); group IV, immunosuppressed with cyclosporine (5.0 mg/kg per day); and group V, immunosuppressed with cyclosporine (5.0 mg/kg per day) in combination with thalidomide (50 mg/kg per day). The medications were administered through an orogastric catheter starting on the day before the transplant. The heart of the donor was implanted into the recipient's abdomen. The combination of thalidomide and cyclosporine showed the lowest histopathological rejection score (P cyclosporine was effective against rejection, significantly increasing survival (P < .01). Thalidomide may be considered to be an adjuvant immunosuppressant.

  1. Differential distributions of Synechococcus subgroups across the California Current System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan William Paerl

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Synechococcus is an abundant marine cyanobacterial genus composed of different populations that vary physiologically. Synechococcus narB gene sequences (encoding for nitrate reductase in cyanobacteria obtained previously from isolates and the environment (e.g. North Pacific Gyre Station ALOHA, Hawaii or Monterey Bay, California were used to develop quantitative PCR (qPCR assays. These qPCR assays were used to quantify populations from specific narB phylogenetic clades across the California Current System (CCS, a region composed of dynamic zones between a coastal-upwelling zone and the oligotrophic Pacific Ocean. Targeted populations (narB subgroups had different biogeographic patterns across the CCS, which appear to be driven by environmental conditions. Subgroups C_C1, D_C1 and D_C2 were abundant in coastal-upwelling to coastal-transition zone waters with relatively high to intermediate ammonium, nitrate and chl. a concentrations. Subgroups A_C1 and F_C1 were most abundant in coastal-transition zone waters with intermediate nutrient concentrations. E_O1 and G_O1 were most abundant at different depths of oligotrophic open-ocean waters (either in the upper mixed layer or just below. E_O1, A_C1 and F_C1 distributions differed from other narB subgroups and likely possess unique ecologies enabling them to be most abundant in waters between coastal and open-ocean waters. Different CCS zones possessed distinct Synechococcus communities. Core California Current (CC water possessed low numbers of narB subgroups relative to counted Synechococcus cells, and coastal-transition waters contained high abundances of Synechococcus cells and total number of narB subgroups. The presented biogeographic data provides insight on the distributions and ecologies of Synechococcus present in an eastern boundary current system.

  2. Discrete neurocognitive subgroups in fully or partially remitted bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johan Høy; Knorr, Ulla; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    significance difference pairwise comparison. RESULTS: Three discrete neurocognitive subgroups were detected: one that was cognitively intact (46.1%), one that was selectively impaired with deficits in processing speed (32.6%), and one that was globally impaired across verbal learning, working memory......, and executive skills (21.2%). The globally and selectively impaired subgroups were characterized by greater perceived stress and subjective cognitive complaints, poorer work and social adjustment, and reduced quality of life compared to patients who were cognitively intact. LIMITATIONS: The study design...

  3. A Danish nationwide questionnaire study of hepatitis B virus screening before immunosuppressive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunyoz, Kristine Ifigenia; Krarup, Henrik; Weis, Nina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Difficulty in identifying patients who are at risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation makes it import-ant to screen for HBV before initiating immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate screening procedures for HBV infection before initiation...... of immunosuppressive therapy and to explore HBV treatment strategies. METHODS: All Danish units of haematology, oncology, dermatology, rheumatology and gastroenterology using immunosuppressive agents were invited to fill out a questionnaire for The Danish Database for Hepatitis B and C. RESULTS: A total of 28 (53...

  4. Efficacy of caspofungin in neutropenic and corticosteroid-immunosuppressed murine models of invasive pulmonary mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Russell E; Leventakos, Konstantinos; Liao, Guangling; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2011-07-01

    Caspofungin (CFG) was tested in neutropenic and corticosteroid-immunosuppressed mice challenged with a lethal sinopulmonary inoculum of Rhizopus oryzae. Compared to untreated controls, CFG administered at 1 mg/kg of body weight/day significantly improved survival (54% versus 19%; P = 0.003) and reduced median R. oryzae fungal burden by 1.5 log(10) for conidial equivalent DNA in neutropenic but not corticosteroid-immunosuppressed animals. CFG administered at 16 mg/kg/day was not significantly better than a saline control for treatment of invasive pulmonary mucormycosis (IPM) in either neutropenic or corticosteroid-immunosuppressed animals.

  5. Dimeric analogs of immunosuppressive decapeptide fragment of ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluczyk, Alicja; Cydzik, Marzena; Biernat, Monika; Bąchor, Remigiusz; Pasikowski, Paweł; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Artym, Jolanta; Zimecki, Michał; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2012-07-01

    Our previous studies revealed that ubiquitin and its decapeptide fragment with the LEDGRTLSDY sequence, located on the exposed molecule loop, strongly suppressed the immune response. This suggested that the loop may serve as a functional epitope of ubiquitin molecule and that a possible mechanism of biological action of the synthesized peptides is associated with interfering in interactions of ubiquitin with other molecules. Ubiquitin is known to exist in oligomeric forms, which can interact with various oligomeric receptors. We designed and synthesized new dimeric analogs of the ubiquitin fragment, to probe whether dimeric peptides may have higher affinity towards the ubiquitin receptors responsible for immunosuppression, which are believed to form oligomeric structures. Three dimerization strategies, N-terminus to N-terminus, C-terminus to C-terminus, and N-terminus to C-terminus (head-to-tail) via PEG derivatives were used to synthesize the dimeric peptides on solid support. In the course of our research, we developed a new and straightforward procedure of dimerization where α-amino groups of the C-terminal lysine residues of two peptide fragments were linked by PEG spacer directly on solid support. The effect of dimeric analogs on the immunological response was tested in the AFC in vitro experiment. The immunological tests showed that the head-to-tail dimerization caused a more profound increase in the biological activity than other tested dimerization methods. Our results suggest that such orientation of peptide components may correspond to orientation of the hypothetic ubiquitin receptors responsible for the immunomodulatory activity. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. [Immunosuppressive therapy and fertility preservation: Indications and methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choux, C; Cavalieri, M; Barberet, J; Samson, M; Bonnotte, B; Fauque, P; Sagot, P

    2018-02-27

    Fertility preservation is routinely performed in cancerology but less systematically used in the field of immune diseases, even though the use of gonadotoxic treatments in young patients may be required and even though the disease itself can alter fertility. This review aimed to clarify the indications and methods of fertility preservation in this context. Cyclophosphamide is the only immunosuppressive drug requiring fertility preservation in women. In men, fertility preservation should be proposed before treatment with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil or mTOR inhibitors. Other factors inherent to the disease or the patient may alter fertility. Thus, screening for infertility and fertility preservation have to be implemented as much as possible to increase the chances of successful procreation in patients with immune disease. For women, the choice between the different preservation methods depends on the patient's age, disease activity, the time available before the start of treatment, the possibility of future pregnancy and the woman's and even couple's wishes. Before puberty, the only accepted method is cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. After puberty, the first-line method is the cryopreservation of mature oocytes. If the treatment has to be started in an emergency, if ovarian hyperstimulation/oocyte retrieval is contraindicated or if the patient refuses this option, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue or GnRH agonists could be proposed. For men, the accepted method is sperm cryopreservation. For prepubertal boys, the cryopreservation of spermatogonia after testicular biopsy is still experimental. Copyright © 2018 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of immunosuppressant blood levels on serum concentration of interleukin-17 and -23 in stable liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábrega, E; López-Hoyos, M; San Segundo, D; Casafont, F; Benito, M J; Pons-Romero, F

    2009-04-01

    T(H)17 cells have been recently described to be involved in inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases, but there is no evidence of their role in human liver transplantation. Interleukin (IL)-23 is considered an inducer cytokine, whereas IL-17 is the main cytokine released by T(H)17 cells. The aim of our study was to measure the serum levels of IL-17 and IL-23 in stable liver transplant recipients and examine the influence of immunosuppressant concentrations. Serum levels of IL-23 and IL-17 were determined in 38 healthy subjects and 35 stable hepatic transplant recipients who were free of rejection episodes for at least 8 years. The results were analyzed according to the simultaneous blood levels of cyclosporine (n = 20) or tacrolimus (n = 15). No significant differences were observed in the serum levels of IL-17 and IL-23 between healthy subjects and transplanted patients. In addition, patients with low blood levels of tacrolimus (<6 ng/mL), but not cyclosporine, showed significantly lower serum levels of the 2 cytokines. These preliminary results suggested a lack of activation of the T(H)17 pathway, which was more pronounced among the patient subgroup treated with tacrolimus.

  8. Latino Male Ethnic Subgroups: Patterns in College Enrollment and Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponjuan, Luis; Palomin, Leticia; Calise, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines Latino male ethnic subgroups and their college enrollment and degree completion patterns. The chapter also offers recommendations to improve Latino male ethnic subgroups' educational achievement.

  9. A comparison of subgroup analyses in grant applications and publications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonacker, C.W.; Hoes, A.W.; Liere-Visser, K. van; Schilder, A.G.M.; Rovers, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the authors compare subgroup analyses as outlined in grant applications and their related publications. Grants awarded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) from 2001 onward that were finalized before March 1, 2010, were studied. Of the 79 grant

  10. Heterogeneity in response during multisystemic therapy: Exploring subgroups and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, E.C.A.; Dekovic, M.; Asscher, J.J.; Manders, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that Multisystemic Therapy (MST) is, at group level, an effective treatment for adolescents showing serious externalizing problem behavior. The current study expands previous research on MST by, first, examining whether subgroups of participants who respond differently to

  11. Heterogeneity in response during Multisystemic Therapy : Exploring subgroups and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, E.C.A.; Dekovic, M.; Asscher, J.J.; Manders, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that Multisystemic Therapy (MST) is, at group level, an effective treatment for adolescents showing serious externalizing problem behavior. The current study expands previous research on MST by, first, examining whether subgroups of participants who respond differently to

  12. Practical Algorithms for Subgroup Detection in Covert Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock; Qureshi, Pir Abdul Rasool

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present algorithms for subgroup detection and demonstrated them with a real-time case study of USS Cole bombing terrorist network. The algorithms are demonstrated in an application by a prototype system. The system finds associations between terrorist and terrorist organisations...

  13. Active medulloblastoma enhancers reveal subgroup-specific cellular origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles Y.; Erkek, Serap; Tong, Yiai; Yin, Linlin; Federation, Alexander J.; Zapatka, Marc; Haldipur, Parthiv; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Worst, Barbara C.; Ju, Bensheng; Orr, Brent A.; Zeid, Rhamy; Polaski, Donald R.; Segura-Wang, Maia; Waszak, Sebastian M.; Jones, David T.W.; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Buchhalter, Ivo; Sieber, Laura; Johann, Pascal; Chavez, Lukas; Gröschel, Stefan; Ryzhova, Marina; Korshunov, Andrey; Chen, Wenbiao; Chizhikov, Victor V.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Bradner, James E.; Northcott, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour, often inflicting devastating consequences on the developing child. Genomic studies have revealed four distinct molecular subgroups with divergent biology and clinical behaviour. An understanding of the regulatory circuitry governing the transcriptional landscapes of medulloblastoma subgroups, and how this relates to their respective developmental origins, is lacking. Using H3K27ac and BRD4 ChIP-Seq, coupled with tissue-matched DNA methylation and transcriptome data, we describe the active cis-regulatory landscape across 28 primary medulloblastoma specimens. Analysis of differentially regulated enhancers and super-enhancers reinforced inter-subgroup heterogeneity and revealed novel, clinically relevant insights into medulloblastoma biology. Computational reconstruction of core regulatory circuitry identified a master set of transcription factors, validated by ChIP-Seq, that are responsible for subgroup divergence and implicate candidate cells-of-origin for Group 4. Our integrated analysis of enhancer elements in a large series of primary tumour samples reveals insights into cis-regulatory architecture, unrecognized dependencies, and cellular origins. PMID:26814967

  14. Notes on discrete subgroups of Möbius transformations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Jørgensen's inequality gives a necessary condition for a nonelementary two generator subgroup of SL(2, C) to be discrete. By embedding SL(2, C) into. ˆU(1, 1; H), we obtain a new type of Jørgensen's inequality, which is in terms of the coefficients of involved isometries. We provide an example to show that this ...

  15. On approximation of Lie groups by discrete subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    voila.fr; salah.suissi@yahoo.fr. MS received 11 August 2012; revised 27 January 2013. Abstract. A locally compact group G is said to be approximated by discrete sub- groups (in the sense of Tôyama) if there is a sequence of discrete subgroups ...

  16. Depression in later life : three etiologically different subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, M.D.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Bouhuys, A.L.; Brilman, E.I.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Ormel, J.

    Background: Various studies support the notion that early onset depression and late onset depression have different etiological pathways. Late onset depression has been found to be a heterogeneous group. This study attempts to divide the late onset group in two subgroups with different aetiology and

  17. Detection of Problem Gambler Subgroups Using Recursive Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Francis; Young, Martin; Doran, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The multivariate socio-demographic risk factors for problem gambling have been well documented. While this body of research is valuable in determining risk factors aggregated across various populations, the majority of studies tend not to specifically identify particular subgroups of problem gamblers based on the interaction between variables. The…

  18. A novel multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Defang; Wang, Guihua; Huang, Libo; Zheng, Qiankun; Li, Chengui; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2017-12-04

    The hypervariable antigenicity and immunosuppressive features of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) has led to great challenges to develop effective vaccines. Epitope vaccine will be a perspective trend. Previously, we identified a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope in hypervariable region 1 (hr1) of ALV-J, N-LRDFIA/E/TKWKS/GDDL/HLIRPYVNQS-C. BLAST analysis showed that the mutation of A, E, T and H in this epitope cover 79% of all ALV-J strains. Base on this data, we designed a multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine comprising the four mutation variants linked with glycine and serine. The recombinant multi-variant epitope gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The expressed protein of the variant multi-variant epitope gene can react with positive sera and monoclonal antibodies of ALV-J, while cannot react with ALV-J negative sera. The multi-variant epitope vaccine that conjugated Freund's adjuvant complete/incomplete showed high immunogenicity that reached the titer of 1:64,000 at 42 days post immunization and maintained the immune period for at least 126 days in SPF chickens. Further, we demonstrated that the antibody induced by the variant multi-variant ensemble epitope vaccine recognized and neutralized different ALV-J strains (NX0101, TA1, WS1, BZ1224 and BZ4). Protection experiment that was evaluated by clinical symptom, viral shedding, weight gain, gross and histopathology showed 100% chickens that inoculated the multi-epitope vaccine were well protected against ALV-J challenge. The result shows a promising multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine against hypervariable viruses in animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Differences in Psychosocial Predictors of Obesity Among LGBT Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jacob C; Smalley, K Bryant; Barefoot, K Nikki

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the overall presence of and differences in rates of overweight/obesity among a large, nationally diverse sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT)-identified individuals (i.e., cisgender lesbians, cisgender gay men, cisgender bisexual women, cisgender bisexual men, transgender women, and transgender men) and to identify specific psychosocial predictors of obesity within each of the six LGBT subgroups. A total of 2702 LGBT-identified participants participated in the online study. Participants completed a series of demographic questions (including weight and height) and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21. The percentage of participants who were overweight/obese did not differ significantly across LGBT subgroups, with 61.1% of the total sample being overweight/obese. However, the percentage of participants who self-reported body mass indexes in the obese range differed significantly across the six LGBT subgroups, with the highest prevalence in transgender men (46.0%). In addition, the predictors of obesity varied by subgroup, with age a significant predictor for cisgender lesbians, cisgender gay men, and cisgender bisexual women, relationship status for cisgender bisexual women, employment status for both cisgender gay men and cisgender bisexual women, education level for cisgender lesbians, and depression, anxiety, and stress for cisgender gay men. None of the examined psychosocial factors emerged as predictors of obesity for cisgender bisexual men, transgender women, or transgender men. These findings suggest that there are substantial variations in the presence and predictors of obesity across LGBT subgroups that support the need for culturally tailored healthy weight promotion efforts within the LGBT community.

  20. Clinical implications of medulloblastoma subgroups: incidence of CSF diversion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Rutka, James T; Remke, Marc; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    While medulloblastoma was initially thought to comprise a single homogeneous entity, it is now accepted that it in fact comprises 4 discrete subgroups, each with its own distinct demographics, clinical presentation, transcriptomics, genetics, and outcome. Hydrocephalus is a common complication of medulloblastoma and not infrequently requires CSF diversion. The authors report the incidence of CSF diversion surgery in each of the subgroups of medulloblastoma (Wnt, Shh, Group 3, and Group 4). The medical and imaging records for patients who underwent surgery for medulloblastoma at The Hospital for Sick Children were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome was the requirement for CSF diversion surgery either before or within 60 days of tumor resection. The modified Canadian Preoperative Prediction Rule for Hydrocephalus (mCPPRH) was compared among subgroups. Of 143 medulloblastoma patients, treated from 1991 to 2013, sufficient data were available for 130 patients (15 with Wnt, 30 with Shh, 30 with Group 3, and 55 with Group 4 medulloblastomas). Of these, 28 patients (22%) ultimately underwent CSF diversion surgery: 0% with Wnt, 29% with Shh, 29% with Group 3, and 43% with Group 4 tumors. Patients in the Wnt subgroup had a lower incidence of CSF diversion than all other patients combined (p = 0.04). Wnt patients had a lower mCPPRH score (lower risk of CSF diversion, p = 0.045), were older, had smaller ventricles at diagnosis, and had no leptomeningeal metastases. The overall rate of CSF diversion surgery for Shh, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas is around 30%, but no patients in the present series with a Wnt medulloblastoma required shunting. The low incidence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastoma likely reflects both host factors (age) and disease factors (lack of metastases). The absence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastomas likely contributes to their excellent rate of survival and may also contribute to a higher quality

  1. Cluster Analysis of Clinical Data Identifies Fibromyalgia Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, Elisa; Collado, Antonio; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Carbonell, Jordi; Rivera, Javier; Vidal, Javier; Alegre, José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia (FM) is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. Material and Methods 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. Results Variables clustered into three independent dimensions: “symptomatology”, “comorbidities” and “clinical scales”. Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1), high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2), and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3), showing differences in measures of disease severity. Conclusions We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment. PMID:24098674

  2. Clinical and cost-effectiveness of newer immunosuppressive regimens in renal transplantation: a systematic review and modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodroffe, R; Yao, G L; Meads, C; Bayliss, S; Ready, A; Raftery, J; Taylor, R S

    2005-05-01

    difference in patient survival or graft loss at 1-year or 3-year follow-up. There appeared to be differences in the side-effect profiles of MMF and azathioprine (AZA). No RCTs comparing MMF with AZA were identified. One RCT compared mycophenolate sodium (MPS) to MMF and reported no difference between the two drugs in 1-year acute rejection rate, graft survival, patient survival or side-effect profile. Two RCTs suggest that addition of sirolimus to a ciclosporin-based initial/maintenance therapy reduces 1-year acute rejections in comparison to a ciclosporin (Neoral) dual therapy alone and substituting azathioprine with sirolimus in initial/maintenance therapy reduces the incidence of acute rejection. Graft and patient survival were not significantly different with either sirolimus regimen. Adding sirolimus increases the incidence of side-effects. The side-effect profiles of azathioprine and sirolimus appear to be different. For the treatment of acute rejection, three RCTs suggested that both tacrolimus and MMF reduce the incidence of subsequent acute rejection and the need for additional drug therapy. Only one RCT and one subgroup analysis in children (term (1-year) acute rejection compared with conventional immunosuppressive therapy. The independent use of basiliximab, daclizumab, tacrolimus and MMF was associated with a similar absolute reduction in 1-year acute rejection rate (approximately 15%). However, the effects of these drugs did not appear to be additive (e.g. benefit of tacrolimus with adjuvant MMF was 5% reduction in acute rejection rate compared with 15% reduction with adjuvant AZA). Thus, the addition of one of these drugs to a baseline immunosuppressant regimen was likely to affect adversely the incremental cost-effectiveness of the addition of another. The trials did not assess how the improvement in short-term outcomes (e.g. acute rejection rate or measures of graft function), together with the side-effect profile associated with each drug, translated into

  3. Emergence of cutaneous neosporosis in a dog receiving immunosuppressive therapy: molecular identification and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legnani, Sara; Pantchev, Nikola; Forlani, Annalisa; Zini, Eric; Schares, Gereon; Balzer, Jörg; Roccabianca, Paola; Ferri, Filippo; Zanna, Giordana

    2016-02-01

    Neosporosis is a multisystemic disease caused by the intracellular protozoan Neospora caninum. In dogs the disease primarily affects the central nervous system. Canine cutaneous neosporosis is a rare condition often associated with old age or concurrent immunosuppressive treatments for different underlying conditions. A 10-year-old female spayed golden retriever dog affected by primary immune-mediated myelofibrosis and treated with immunosuppressive therapies for 6 weeks that developed severe cutaneous lesions. Definitive diagnosis was based on several investigation techniques including serology (immunoblotting), immunohistochemistry (IHC), species-specific conventional and real-time PCR, and DNA sequencing. Remission of cutaneous neosporosis was obtained with the administration of clindamycin while the concurrent immunosuppressive therapy was maintained to manage the underlying primary condition. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first report of species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing used as diagnostic methods for canine cutaneous neosporosis emerging in a dog receiving immunosuppressive therapy. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  4. Maintenance immunosuppression with intermittent intravenous IL-2 receptor antibody therapy in renal transplant recipients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gabardi, Steven

    2011-09-01

    To report what we believe to be the first 2 cases of long-term (>24 months) intermittent intravenous interleukin-2 receptor antibody (IL-2RA) therapy for maintenance immunosuppression following renal transplantation.

  5. Cytomegalovirus retinitis in a seronegative patient with systemic lupus erythematosus on immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Aditya; Kelkar, Jai; Kelkar, Shreekant; Bhirud, Shilpa; Biswas, Jyotirmoy

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to report a rare case of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in a seronegative patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) on immunosuppressive therapy. A seronegative patient with SLE who was on immunosuppressive therapy developed CMV retinitis. The immunosuppressive therapy was tapered, and the patient was given intravitreal ganciclovir and foscarnet in addition to systemic ganciclovir. The follow-up visits were documented. The patient responded to the treatment and there was complete resolution. CMV retinitis is a rapidly progressive condition and patients on immunosuppressive therapy should be referred to an ophthalmologist for periodic check-up for early diagnosis and treatment of this devastating ophthalmic condition. For clinically resistant CMV retinitis in seronegative patients with SLE, a combination therapy of intravitreal foscarnet with oral and intravenous ganciclovir is useful.

  6. [Immunological aspects of corneal graft rejection and own experience in immunosuppressive therapy in high risk patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Anna; Szaflik, Jerzy; Minkiewicz-Timler, Grazyna; Sybilska, Małgorzata; Pawluczyk-Dyjecińska, Martyna; Smolarek, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to present factors responsible for immune privilege of corneal graft, pathogenesis of immunological corneal graft rejection, and the influence of immunosuppressive therapy on keeping clarity of corneal graft. We also present retrospective evaluation of prophylactic immunosuppressive therapy in high-risk patients and in cases of graft rejection, in group of patients after corneal transplantation performed in Department of Ophthalmology in years 2001-2003. 349 cases of penetrating keratoplasty, lamellar or penetrating with limbal transplantation were analyzed. Condition requiring keratoplasty, surgical procedures, profile of immunosuppressive therapy, number of recurrences of corneal graft rejection and changes of visual acuity were evaluated. Immunosuppressive therapy with oral corticosteroids and systemic Cyclosporine allow to keep clarity of corneal graft and useful visual acuity in 60% cases of high-risk patients.

  7. Optimizing immunosuppression with mTOR inhibitors in renal transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, Dirk Jan Alie Roelof

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to optimize immunosuppressive therapy, especially everolimus therapy in renal transplantation recipients by identifying pharmacological and pharmacogenetic risk factors influencing pharmacokinetics, and dynamics such as side effects and patient outcome. Therapeutic Drug

  8. The role of immunosuppression of mesenchymal stem cells in tissue repair and tumor growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zhipeng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have acquired great interests for their potential use in the clinical therapy of many diseases because of their functions including multiple lineage differentiation, low immunogenicity and immunosuppression. Many studies suggest that MSCs are strongly immunosuppressive in vitro and in vivo. MSCs exert a profound inhibitory effect on the proliferation of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and natural killer cells. In addition, several soluble factors have been reported to involved in the immunosuppressive effects by MSCs such as TGF-β, HGF, PGE2, IDO and iNOS. These results suggest that MSCs can be used in the therapy of immune disorder diseases, prevention of organ transplantation rejection and tissue injury. In recent study, we demonstrated that MSCs in tumor inflammatory microenvironment might be elicited of immunosuppressive function. Thus, the application of MSCs in cancer therapy might have negative effect by helping tumor cells escaping from the immune surveillance.

  9. The role of donor bone marrow infusions in withdrawal of immunosuppression in adult liver allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryphonopoulos, Panagiotis; Tzakis, Andreas G; Weppler, Debbie; Garcia-Morales, Rolando; Kato, Tomoaki; Madariaga, Juan R; Levi, David M; Nishida, Seigo; Moon, Jang; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Regev, Arie; Nery, Caio; Bejarano, Pablo; Khaled, Amr; Kleiner, Gary; Esquenazi, Violet; Miller, Joshua; Ruiz, Philip; Ricordi, Camillo

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the role of donor bone marrow cell (DBMC) infusions in immunosuppression withdrawal in adult liver transplantation. Patients enrolled were at least 3 years post-transplantation, with stable graft function. Forty-five (study group: G1) received DBMC, and 59 (control group: G2) did not. Immunosuppression was reduced by one third upon enrollment, by another third the second year of the study and was completely withdrawn the third year. Patient and graft survival were similar between the two groups. Although rejection episodes were significantly less in G1 the first 2 years of the study (35% vs. 57%, p = 0.016), there was no significant difference overall (74% vs. 81%, p = 0.14). Until February 2004, 20 patients, 10 in each group, were immunosuppression free for 1-3 years. Approximately 20% of long-term survivors of liver transplantation can successfully discontinue their immunosuppression. DBMC infusions, do not increase this likelihood.

  10. Non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteraemia: Epidemiology, clinical characteristics and its' association with severe immunosuppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatt Quek

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen associated with bacteraemia especially in immunosuppressed patients. However, there is limited data specifically describing the clinical characteristics and outcome amongst the immunosuppressed patients. Methods A total of 56,707 blood culture samples and 5,450 stool samples were received by the microbiology laboratory at a tertiary referral hospital in Malaysia, during a 4-year study period. Out of these samples, 55 non-duplicate NTS isolates were identified from blood and 121 from stool. A retrospective analysis of the 55 patients with NTS bacteraemia was then conducted to determine the predominant NTS serovars causing bacteraemia and its' blood invasive potential, epidemiological data, clinical characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility. Patients were then grouped as immunosuppressed and non-immunosuppressed to determine the association of severe immunosuppression on clinical features. Data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 15.0 using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test, Fisher's exact test or Chi-squared test. The odds ratio (OR and its 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. The P-value Results Out of 55 NTS bacteraemia cases identified, 81.8% (45/55 were community-acquired. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis had the highest blood invasiveness. An extra-intestinal focus of infection was noted in 30.9% (17/55 of the patients, most commonly involving the lungs and soft tissue. 90.9% (50/55 of the patients had an underlying disease and 65.5% (36/55 of the patients had severe clinical immunosuppressive condition with malignancy and HIV being the most common. Immunosuppressed patients had higher mortality (P = 0.04, presented more commonly with primary bacteraemia (P = 0.023, leukopenia (P = 0.001 and opportunistic infections (P = 0.01. In contrast, atherosclerotic conditions (P = 0

  11. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J

    2016-05-01

    Although immunosuppressive treatments and target concentration intervention (TCI) have significantly contributed to the success of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), there is currently no consensus on the best immunosuppressive strategies. Compared with solid organ transplantation, alloHCT is unique because of the potential for bidirectional reactions (i.e. host-versus-graft and graft-versus-host). Postgraft immunosuppression typically includes a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and a short course of methotrexate after high-dose myeloablative conditioning, or a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil after reduced-intensity conditioning. There are evolving roles for the antithymyocyte globulins (ATGs) and sirolimus as postgraft immunosuppression. A review of the pharmacokinetics and TCI of the main postgraft immunosuppressants is presented in this two-part review. All immunosuppressants are characterized by large intra- and interindividual pharmacokinetic variability and by narrow therapeutic indices. It is essential to understand immunosuppressants' pharmacokinetic properties and how to use them for individualized treatment incorporating TCI to improve outcomes. TCI, which is mandatory for the calcineurin inhibitors and sirolimus, has become an integral part of postgraft immunosuppression. TCI is usually based on trough concentration monitoring, but other approaches include measurement of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) over the dosing interval or limited sampling schedules with maximum a posteriori Bayesian personalization approaches. Interpretation of pharmacodynamic results is hindered by the prevalence of studies enrolling only a small number of patients, variability in the allogeneic graft source and variability in postgraft immunosuppression. Given the curative potential of alloHCT, the pharmacodynamics of these immunosuppressants deserves to be explored in depth. Development of

  12. Immunizations in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treated with Immunosuppressive Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Ying; Bousvaros, Athos

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) will receive immunosuppressive therapy at some point for their disease, whether for the short term (such as a course of corticosteroids) or long term (such as maintenance therapy with immunomodulators or biologics). The systemic immunosuppression places patients at increased risk for infections. Therefore, it is important that patients are up-to-date with immunizations to minimize vaccine-preventable infections. However, the ...

  13. Visual loss resulting from immunosuppressive therapy in patients with syphilitic uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Afonso, Vivian Cristina Costa; Nascimento, Heloisa; Belfort, Rubens M.; Sato, Emilia Inoue; Muccioli, Cristina; Belfort Jr., Rubens

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Permanent visual loss can be caused by improper use of immunosuppressive therapy in cases of uveitis without differential diagnosis of syphilitic uveitis. We present four cases of syphilitic uveitis that were incorrectly diagnosed as being secondary to rheumatic diseases and were subsequently treated with immunosuppressive therapy, leading to permanent visual loss. These cases highlight the importance of ruling out syphilis in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory ocular disease...

  14. From Leflunomide to Teriflunomide: Drug Development and Immunosuppressive Oral Drugs in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Lilian; Hemmer, Bernhard; Korn, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs have been used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) for a long time. Today, orally available second generation immunosuppressive agents have been approved or are filed for licensing as MS therapeutics. Due to semi-selective targeting of cellular processes, these second-generation immunosuppressive compounds might rather be immunomodulatory. For example, Teriflunomide inhibits the de novo pyrimidine synthesis and thus only targets rapidly proliferating cells, including lymphocytes. It is used as first line disease modifying therapy (DMT) in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Review of online content related to oral immunosuppressants in MS with an emphasis on Teriflunomide. Teriflunomide and Cladribine are second-generation immunosuppressants that are efficient in the treatment of MS patients. For Teriflunomide, a daily dose of 14 mg reduces the annualized relapse rate (ARR) by more than 30% and disability progression by 30% compared to placebo. Cladribine reduces the ARR by about 50% compared to placebo but has not yet been licensed due to unresolved safety concerns. We also discuss the significance of older immunosuppressive compounds including Azathioprine, Mycophenolate mofetile, and Cyclophosphamide in current MS therapy. Teriflunomide has shown a favorable safety and efficacy profile in RRMS and is a therapeutic option for a distinct group of adult patients with RRMS. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Immunosuppressant prescription pattern and trend in kidney transplantation: A multicenter study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ji-Yeun; Yu, Jihyun; Chung, Byung Ha; Yang, Jaeseok; Kim, Sung-Joo; Kim, Chan-Duck; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Jong Soo; Kim, Joong Kyung; Jung, Cheol Woong; Oh, Chang Kwon; Yang, Chul Woo

    2017-01-01

    The actual prescription pattern of immunosuppressive agents in kidney transplantation is unclear. We investigated the pattern and trend of immunosuppressive treatment for kidney transplant patients in South Korea. A total of 636 patients at nine transplant centers were enrolled and followed for one year. We reviewed medical records and evaluated induction therapy, as well as the changing pattern and cause of maintenance therapy. Most patients (n = 621, 97.6%) received induction therapy often comprising basiliximab (n = 542, 85.2%). The triple therapy including calcineurin inhibitor, mycophenolic acid, and steroids was the major initial maintenance immunosuppression (n = 518, 81.4%), but its proportion decreased by 14% (81.4% to 67.5%) after 1 year. Almost 40% of patients changed immunosuppressive regimen during the 1-year follow-up, most often at an early period (60.2% within the first 4 months). The primary reason for the change was gastrointestinal discomfort (n = 113, 29.8%), followed by infection (112, 29.6%). The most common changing pattern was mycophenolic acid withdrawal (n = 155, 39.1%). The initial immunosuppressive regimen is prone to change within the first year of kidney transplantation. Further studies are needed to evaluate the benefits and risks in patients who changed immunosuppressants.

  16. Immunosuppressant prescription pattern and trend in kidney transplantation: A multicenter study in Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yeun Chang

    Full Text Available The actual prescription pattern of immunosuppressive agents in kidney transplantation is unclear.We investigated the pattern and trend of immunosuppressive treatment for kidney transplant patients in South Korea. A total of 636 patients at nine transplant centers were enrolled and followed for one year. We reviewed medical records and evaluated induction therapy, as well as the changing pattern and cause of maintenance therapy.Most patients (n = 621, 97.6% received induction therapy often comprising basiliximab (n = 542, 85.2%. The triple therapy including calcineurin inhibitor, mycophenolic acid, and steroids was the major initial maintenance immunosuppression (n = 518, 81.4%, but its proportion decreased by 14% (81.4% to 67.5% after 1 year. Almost 40% of patients changed immunosuppressive regimen during the 1-year follow-up, most often at an early period (60.2% within the first 4 months. The primary reason for the change was gastrointestinal discomfort (n = 113, 29.8%, followed by infection (112, 29.6%. The most common changing pattern was mycophenolic acid withdrawal (n = 155, 39.1%.The initial immunosuppressive regimen is prone to change within the first year of kidney transplantation. Further studies are needed to evaluate the benefits and risks in patients who changed immunosuppressants.

  17. Sigmoid Colectomy for Acute Diverticulitis in Immunosuppressed vs Immunocompetent Patients: Outcomes From the ACS-NSQIP Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khamis, Ahmed; Abou Khalil, Jad; Demian, Marie; Morin, Nancy; Vasilevsky, Carol-Ann; Gordon, Philip H; Boutros, Marylise

    2016-02-01

    The management of acute diverticulitis in immunosuppressed patients is increasingly debated. The appropriate timing and type of operation remains controversial. This study examines the impact of immunosuppression on mortality and morbidity following colectomies for diverticulitis in the emergency and elective settings. With the use of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, the outcomes of immunosuppressed compared with immunocompetent patients who underwent colectomy for acute diverticulitis were compared. The multi-institutional database was queried for patients who underwent colectomy for acute diverticulitis from 2005 to 2012. The impact of immunosuppression on mortality, major morbidity, organ space infection, infectious complications, and wound dehiscence was assessed. Of 26,987 patients, 1332 were immunosuppressed and 25,655 were immunocompetent; 4271 patients had emergency (596 immunosuppressed and 3675 immunocompetent) and 22,716 patients had elective (736 immunosuppressed and 21,980 immunocompetent) colectomies for diverticulitis. In both groups, mortality and major morbidity were significantly higher in the emergency (immunosuppressed 16% and 45%, immunocompetent 4% and 28%) compared with the elective setting (immunosuppressed 2% and 25%, immunocompetent 0.4% and 12%), p < 0.001. On multivariate regression for the emergency setting, immunosuppression significantly increased mortality (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.17-2.75) and did not significantly increase morbidity. On multivariate regression for the elective setting, mortality was similar in immunosuppressed and immunocompetent groups; however, major morbidity (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.17-1.83) and wound dehiscence (OR, 2.69; 95% CI, 1.63-4.42) were significantly increased in immunosuppressed compared with immunocompetent patients. The retrospective design and standardized outcomes are based on heterogeneous data. Emergency colectomy for diverticulitis is associated

  18. Calcineurin phosphatase activity and immunosuppression. A review on the role of calcineurin phosphatase activity and the immunosuppressive effect of cyclosporin A and tacrolimus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj Anker; Koefoed-Nielsen, P.B.; Karamperis, N.

    2003-01-01

    The mode of immunosuppressive action of tacrolimus (FK506) and cyclosporin A has been elucidated. Both drugs bind to proteins in the cytoplasm to form complexes, which in turn inhibit the phosphatase activity of calcineurin, an important limiting step in the activation of T cells. The association...

  19. Adherence to immunosuppressive therapy following liver transplantation: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ramon Antônio; Turrini, Ruth Natália Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-08-29

    to investigate the evidence available in the literature on non-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy among patients undergoing liver transplantation. integrative literature review, including research whose sample consisted of patients aged over 18 years undergoing liver transplantation. It excluded those containing patients undergoing multiple organ transplants. For the selection of articles, Medline / Pubmed, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus and Embase were searched. The search period corresponded to the initial date of indexation of different bases, up to the deadline of February 10, 2015, using controlled and uncontrolled descriptors: liver transplantation, hepatic transplantation, liver orthotopic transplantation, medication adherence, medication non-adherence, medication compliance and patient compliance. were located 191 investigations, 10 of which met the objectives of the study and were grouped into four categories, namely: educational process and non-adherence; non-adherence related to the number of daily doses of immunosuppressive medications; detection methods for non-adherence and side effects of therapy. there were risk factors related to the health service, such as control and reduction of the number of doses; related to the individual, such as being male, divorced, alcohol or other substances user, exposed to low social support and being mentally ill. investigar as evidências disponíveis na literatura sobre a não adesão à terapêutica imunossupressora entre pacientes submetidos ao transplante de fígado. revisão integrativa da literatura, que incluiu investigações cuja amostra era composta por pacientes com idade igual ou superior a 18 anos, submetidos a transplante de fígado. Excluíram-se as que continham pacientes submetidos a transplantes de múltiplos órgãos. Para a seleção dos artigos foram consultadas as bases Medline/Pubmed, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus e Embase. O período de busca determinado correspondeu à data inicial de indexação das

  20. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Alan G.; Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-06-18

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit wide vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.

  1. Fast determination of structurally cohesive subgroups in large networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovits, Robert S; Moody, James; Oztan, B Tolga; White, Douglas R

    2016-11-01

    Structurally cohesive subgroups are a powerful and mathematically rigorous way to characterize network robustness. Their strength lies in the ability to detect strong connections among vertices that not only have no neighbors in common, but that may be distantly separated in the graph. Unfortunately, identifying cohesive subgroups is a computationally intensive problem, which has limited empirical assessments of cohesion to relatively small graphs of at most a few thousand vertices. We describe here an approach that exploits the properties of cliques, k-cores and vertex separators to iteratively reduce the complexity of the graph to the point where standard algorithms can be used to complete the analysis. As a proof of principle, we apply our method to the cohesion analysis of a 29,462-vertex biconnected component extracted from a 128,151-vertex co-authorship data set.

  2. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of immunosuppressants in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Bemer, Meagan J.

    2015-01-01

    Although immunosuppressive treatments and target concentration intervention (TCI) have significantly contributed to the success of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (alloHCT), there is currently no consensus on the best immunosuppressive strategies. Compared to solid organ transplant, alloHCT is unique because of the potential for bi-directional reactions (i.e., host-versus-graft and graft-versus-host). Postgraft immunosuppression typically includes a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and a short course of methotrexate after high-dose myeloablative conditioning or a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil after reduced-intensity conditioning. There are evolving roles for the antithymyocyte globulins (ATG) and sirolimus as postgraft immunosuppression. A review of the pharmacokinetics and TCI of the main postgraft immunosuppressants is presented in this two-part review. All immunosuppressants are characterized by large intra- and interindividual pharmacokinetic variability and by narrow therapeutic indices. It is essential to understand immunosuppressants’ pharmacokinetic properties and how to use them for individualized treatment incorporating TCI to improve outcomes. TCI, which is mandatory for the calcineurin inhibitors and sirolimus, has become an integral part of postgraft immunosuppression. TCI is usually based on trough concentration monitoring, but other approaches include measurement of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) over the dosing interval or limited sampling schedules with maximum a posteriori Bayesian personalization approaches. Interpretation of pharmacodynamic results is hindered by the prevalence of studies enrolling only a small number of patients, variability in the allogeneic graft source, and variability in postgraft immunosuppression. Given the curative potential of alloHCT, the pharmacodynamics of these immunosuppressives deserves to be explored in depth. The development of sophisticated

  3. Distinguishing between Subgroups of Adolescents Who Self-Harm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, Emily; Hawton, Keith; Rodham, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The differences in factors associated with subgroups of adolescents in the continuum of deliberate self-harm (DSH) phenomena were investigated. In an anonymous self-report survey of 6,020 adolescents aged 15 and 16 years, 3.2% of adolescents (5.3% females, 1.3% males) reported DSH with intent to die, 2.8% (4.3% females; 1.5% males) reported DSH…

  4. Microscopic colitis: clinical findings, topography and persistence of histopathological subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnbak, C; Engel, P J H; Nielsen, P L; Munck, L K

    2011-11-01

    Uncertainty remains on topography and persistence of histological subgroups of microscopic colitis (MC). To assess longitudinal clinical, endoscopic, histological, and therapeutic description of MC subgroups including patients with incomplete findings of MC (MCi). Retrospective review of a consecutive cohort with MC and histological reassessment of MCi. Clinical characteristics of 168 patients with lymphocytic colitis (LC), 270 with collagenous colitis (CC) and 101 with MCi were similar. At colonoscopy 95% (95% CI: 91-98%) of CC and 98% (93-100%) of LC cases had diagnostic histopathology of MC in both left and right colon. Eight and three patients had characteristics of MC only in the left and right colon, respectively. Histology findings resembling coexistence of the other MC subtype was present in 48% (40-55%) with CC and 24% (18-31%) with LC. A first diagnosis of MC was made in 49 (30%) of 164 patients only at repeat endoscopy. Another 34 of 115 (30%) with MC in the first endoscopy did not fulfil the MC criteria at repeat endoscopy. Only seven cases had a primary endoscopy without histopathological abnormalities. Fifteen percentage of MCi were reclassified as MC. Ileal inflammation was present in 33 of 81 patients. Budesonide was efficacious in all MC subgroups irrespective of bile acid malabsorption. Clinical characteristics of microscopic colitis subgroups are indistinguishable. Biopsies from the left colon suffice to exclude microscopic colitis, and the histological diagnosis of microscopic colitis is inconsistent over time. Ileal inflammation is common. The term microscopic colitis should perhaps be considered one clinical entity and include lymphocytic colitis, collagenous colitis, and incomplete findings of microscopic colitis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Pain and Fatigue Variability Patterns Distinguish Subgroups of Fibromyalgia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Emily J; Robinson, Michael E; Staud, Roland

    2017-12-15

    The current study examined between- and within-subject variability in pain-related symptoms as predictors of pain and fatigue, and identified patient subgroups based upon symptom variability characteristics. Two hundred and fifty-six fibromyalgia (FM) patients completed daily diaries up to a period of 154 days and reported on symptoms of pain intensity, pain unpleasantness, fatigue, anxiety, and depressed mood. Measures of health status, quality of life, and somatic symptoms were obtained at baseline, and hierarchical linear modeling and cluster analyses were employed. Significant intra- and inter-individual variability in daily FM symptoms was observed. Higher levels of pain were associated with greater fluctuations in pain unpleasantness, fatigue, and depressed mood. Similar effects were observed for fatigue and individual variability in anxiety also emerged as a robust predictor. Three FM subgroups were revealed: low variability in symptoms (Cluster 1), high symptom variability (Cluster 2), and a mixed variability group characterized by low fluctuation in pain unpleasantness; moderate pain, fatigue, and depressed mood variability; and high anxiety variability (Cluster 3). Cluster 3 exhibited lower social functioning and higher levels of pain, compared to Cluster 1. These findings support the dynamic nature of FM pain and suggest the presence of FM subgroups based upon variation in mood and pain symptomatology. Fibromyalgia patients display significant intra- and inter-individual variability in pain, mood, and fatigue. Subgroups in mood and pain-related variability emerged, with phenotypic clusters differing across levels of pain intensity and social functioning. Better understanding of the processes impacting pain variability may facilitate targeted treatments for the control of pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Irreducible almost simple subgroups of classical algebraic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Burness, Timothy C; Marion, Claude; Testerman, Donna M

    2015-01-01

    Let G be a simple classical algebraic group over an algebraically closed field K of characteristic p\\geq 0 with natural module W. Let H be a closed subgroup of G and let V be a nontrivial p-restricted irreducible tensor indecomposable rational KG-module such that the restriction of V to H is irreducible. In this paper the authors classify the triples (G,H,V) of this form, where V \

  7. Distinct Histomorphology in Molecular Subgroups of Glioblastomas in Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Julia E; Dorostkar, Mario M; Korshunov, Andrey; Mawrin, Christian; Koch, Arend; Giese, Armin; Schüller, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are malignant brain tumors that can be divided into different molecular subtypes based on genetics, global gene expression, and methylation patterns. Among these subgroups, "IDH" GBMs carry mutations within IDH1 or IDH2 The "K27" and "G34" subgroups are characterized by distinct mutations within Histone 3 (H3). These subtypes can be identified by sequencing methods and are particularly found in younger patients. To determine whether the molecular subtypes correlate with distinct histological features among the diverse histologic patterns of GBM, we performed a blinded assessment of the histology of GBMs of 77 patients ≤30 years old at the time of biopsy. The tumors were of the following molecular subtypes: IDH (n = 12), H3 K27M (n = 25), H3 G34R (n = 12), or no IDH/H3 mutations (n = 28). Of IDH-mutated cases, 75% had microcystic features or gemistocytic tumor cells. K27 GBMs had higher cell densities and pronounced nuclear pleomorphism, with 28% harboring tumor giant cells. All G34 GBMs had variable extents of a poorly differentiated/primitive neuroectodermal tumor-like morphology. GBMs without IDH/H3 mutations had foci of epitheliod-appearing cells. Thus, molecular GBM subgroups are associated with distinct histological patterns, suggesting that morphological features reflect the specific underlying molecular genetic abnormalities. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gambaran Populasi Golongan Darah Subgroup A (A1, A2 di PMI Kulon Progo

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    Hieronymus Rayi Prasetya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Subgroup A1 and A2 are the most important in the blood group A. Subgroup A1 has the A antigen more than A2 subgroup, the A2 subgroup can cause misidentification of blood group due to poor A antigen and genetic variation possessed. Misidentification of the blood group will increase the risk of transfusion reactions. This research aims to describe the A1 and A2 subgroup population in Kulon Progo district. This study was conducted with a cross sectional sampling technique. The sample in this study were taken from donors of blood group A in Kulon Progo Red Cross. Identification of A1 and A2 subgroup is done by using lectin (Dolichos biflorus extract. The result of the examination of 53 samples showed that 96,2% was A1 subgroup and 3,8% was A2 subgroup. Key words : Subgroup A1, Subgroup A2, Population, Kulon Progo

  9. Informant discrepancy defines discrete, clinically useful autism spectrum disorder subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Matthew D; De Los Reyes, Andres; Drabick, Deborah A G; Gerber, Alan H; Gadow, Kenneth D

    2017-07-01

    Discrepancy between informants (parents and teachers) in severity ratings of core symptoms commonly arise when assessing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Whether such discrepancy yields unique information about the ASD phenotype and its clinical correlates has not been examined. We examined whether degree of discrepancy between parent and teacher ASD symptom ratings defines discrete, clinically meaningful subgroups of youth with ASD using an efficient, cost-effective procedure. Children with ASD (N = 283; 82% boys; M age  = 10.5 years) were drawn from a specialty ASD clinic. Parents and teachers provided ratings of the three core DSM-IV-TR domains of ASD symptoms (communication, social, and perseverative behavior) with the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-4R (CASI-4R). External validators included child psychotropic medication status, frequency of ASD-relevant school-based services, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS-2). Four distinct subgroups emerged that ranged from large between-informant discrepancy (informant-specific) to relative lack of discrepancy (i.e. informant agreement; cross-situational): Moderate Parent/Low Teacher or Low Parent/Moderate Teacher Severity (Discrepancy), and Moderate or High Symptom Severity (Agreement). Subgroups were highly distinct (mean probability of group assignment = 94%). Relative to Discrepancy subgroups, Agreement subgroups were more likely to receive psychotropic medication, school-based special education services, and an ADOS-2 diagnosis. These differential associations would not have been identified based solely on CASI-4R scores from one informant. The degree of parent-teacher discrepancy about ASD symptom severity appears to provide more clinically useful information than reliance on a specific symptom domain or informant, and thus yields an innovative, cost-effective approach to assessing functional impairment. This conclusion stands in contrast to existing symptom clustering approaches in

  10. Subgroup Analysis of Trials Is Rarely Easy (SATIRE: a study protocol for a systematic review to characterize the analysis, reporting, and claim of subgroup effects in randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaga German

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subgroup analyses in randomized trials examine whether effects of interventions differ between subgroups of study populations according to characteristics of patients or interventions. However, findings from subgroup analyses may be misleading, potentially resulting in suboptimal clinical and health decision making. Few studies have investigated the reporting and conduct of subgroup analyses and a number of important questions remain unanswered. The objectives of this study are: 1 to describe the reporting of subgroup analyses and claims of subgroup effects in randomized controlled trials, 2 to assess study characteristics associated with reporting of subgroup analyses and with claims of subgroup effects, and 3 to examine the analysis, and interpretation of subgroup effects for each study's primary outcome. Methods We will conduct a systematic review of 464 randomized controlled human trials published in 2007 in the 118 Core Clinical Journals defined by the National Library of Medicine. We will randomly select journal articles, stratified in a 1:1 ratio by higher impact versus lower impact journals. According to 2007 ISI total citations, we consider the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, and BMJ as higher impact journals. Teams of two reviewers will independently screen full texts of reports for eligibility, and abstract data, using standardized, pilot-tested extraction forms. We will conduct univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses to examine the association of pre-specified study characteristics with reporting of subgroup analyses and with claims of subgroup effects for the primary and any other outcomes. Discussion A clear understanding of subgroup analyses, as currently conducted and reported in published randomized controlled trials, will reveal both strengths and weaknesses of this practice. Our findings will contribute to a set of recommendations to optimize

  11. A Danish nationwide questionnaire study of hepatitis B virus screening before immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyoz, Kristine Ifigenia; Krarup, Henrik; Weis, Nina

    2017-03-01

    Difficulty in identifying patients who are at risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation makes it import-ant to screen for HBV before initiating immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate screening procedures for HBV infection before initiation of immunosuppressive therapy and to explore HBV treatment strategies. All Danish units of haematology, oncology, dermatology, rheumatology and gastroenterology using immunosuppressive agents were invited to fill out a questionnaire for The Danish Database for Hepatitis B and C. A total of 28 (53%) of the 53 included units answered the questionnaire, of which 25 (89.3%) had a guideline regarding screening for HBV serological markers prior to immunosuppressive therapy, but only ten (37%) had a guideline that is in line with the joint guidelines from the national Danish Societies of Infectious Diseases and Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Nineteen (76%) units had a strategy regarding treatment for reactivation before initiating immunosuppressive therapy in case of positive HBV serology. It was not possible to determine the number of HBV reactivations as this was not registered in the ICD-10 system. The Danish Medicines Agency had one report of reactivation. A minority of the units had screening guidelines for HBV reactivation that were in line with the guidelines of the national scientific societies. Screening in accordance with these recommendations should be a goal for all Danish units in order to prevent HBV reactivation. none. not relevant.

  12. The metabolic and toxicological considerations for immunosuppressive drugs used during pancreas transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Erika B

    2012-12-01

    Pancreas-kidney transplant is an effective treatment for patients with insulin-dependent dabetes and chronic renal failure. Reduction in technical failure loss and early acute rejection rates contributed to prolong pancreas graft survival. However, drug toxicity affects negatively both short- and long-term follow-ups. This article reviews the existing literature and knowledge of the immunosuppressive drugs that are frequently used in pancreas transplant, including calcineurin inhibitors, sirolimus, corticosteroids, and mycophenolate. The article also discusses the short- and long-term adverse effects of these drugs. The article also reports and discusses the most relevant in vitro studies, providing additional information to in vivo findings. Some clinically relevant drug interactions with immunosuppressive drugs are also highlighted. Over- and underimmunosuppression effects will not be addressed. Immunosuppressive regimen after pancreas transplant is very effective and contributed to pancreas allograft survival. However, they present several side effects that are potentiated when drugs are combined. Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors can aggravate metabolic and toxicological effects of immunosuppressive drugs. It is important to critically analyze the results of clinical studies and investigate new immunosuppressive drugs and/or novel drug combinations. It is equally important to comprehend and interpret experimental data. Therefore, minimization of side effects, based on safe approaches, can prolong pancreas allograft survival.

  13. Oral nicotinamide protects against ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiasemides, Eleni; Sivapirabu, Geetha; Halliday, Gary M; Park, Joohong; Damian, Diona L

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous immunity, which is a key defence against the development of skin cancers, is suppressed by even small doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Preventing this UV-induced immunosuppression may therefore reduce the incidence of skin cancer. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) has immune-protective and cancer-preventive effects against UV radiation in mice, and we have shown previously that topical nicotinamide is immune protective in humans. Using the Mantoux model of skin immunity in healthy volunteers, we compared oral nicotinamide to placebo (both administered for 1 week) in a randomized, double-blinded, crossover design against the effects of solar-simulated ultraviolet (ssUV) radiation on delayed-type hypersensitivity to tuberculin purified protein derivative. Discrete areas of the back were irradiated with low doses of ssUV daily for three consecutive days. Immunosuppression, calculated as the difference in Mantoux-induced erythema of irradiated sites compared with unirradiated control sites, was determined in volunteers taking oral nicotinamide and placebo. Significant immunosuppression occurred in an UV dose-dependent manner in the presence of placebo. Oral nicotinamide, at doses of either 1500 or 500 mg daily, was well tolerated and significantly reduced UV immunosuppression with no immune effects in unirradiated skin. Oral nicotinamide is safe and inexpensive and looks promising as a chemopreventive supplement for reducing the immunosuppressive effects of sunlight.

  14. Dynamic immune cell recruitment after murine pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus infection under different immunosuppressive regimens

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    Natarajaswamy Kalleda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans are continuously exposed to airborne spores of the saprophytic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. However, in healthy individuals pulmonary host defense mechanisms efficiently eliminate the fungus. In contrast, A. fumigatus causes devastating infections in immunocompromised patients. Host immune responses against A. fumigatus lung infections in immunocompromised conditions have remained largely elusive. Given the dynamic changes in immune cell subsets within tissues upon immunosuppressive therapy, we dissected the spatiotemporal pulmonary immune response after A. fumigatus infection to reveal basic immunological events that fail to effectively control invasive fungal disease. In different immunocompromised murine models, myeloid, notably neutrophils and macrophages, but not lymphoid cells were strongly recruited to the lungs upon infection. Other myeloid cells, particularly dendritic cells and monocytes, were only recruited to lungs of corticosteroid treated mice, which developed a strong pulmonary inflammation after infection. Lymphoid cells, particularly CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells and NK cells were highly reduced upon immunosuppression and not recruited after A. fumigatus infection. Moreover, adoptive CD11b+ myeloid cell transfer rescued cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice from lethal A. fumigatus infection but not cortisone and cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice. Our findings illustrate that CD11b+ myeloid cells are critical for anti-A. fumigatus defense under cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed conditions.

  15. Real-World Multicenter Experience of Immunosuppression Minimization Among 661 Liver Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Diego; Martínez-Urbistondo, Diego; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; de la Mata, Manuel; Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; Rubín, Angel; Puchades, Lorena; Serrano, Trinidad; Montero, Jessica; Cuadrado, Antonio; Casafont, Fernando; Salcedo, Magdalena; Rincón, Diego; Pons, Jose A; Herrero, Jose I

    2017-05-02

    BACKGROUND Long-term morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients is frequently secondary to immunosuppression toxicity. However, data are scarce regarding immunosuppression minimization in clinical practice. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this cross-sectional, multicenter study, we reviewed the indications of immunosuppression minimization (defined as tacrolimus levels below 5 ng/mL or cyclosporine levels below 50 ng/mL) among 661 liver transplant recipients, as well as associated factors and the effect on renal function. RESULTS Fifty-three percent of the patients received minimized immunosuppression. The median time from transplantation to minimization was 32 months. The most frequent indications were renal insufficiency (49%), cardiovascular risk (19%), de novo malignancy (8%), and cardiovascular disease (7%). The factors associated with minimization were older age at transplantation, longer post-transplant follow-up, pre-transplant diabetes mellitus and renal dysfunction, and the hospital where the patients were being followed. The patients who were minimized because of renal insufficiency had a significant improvement in renal function (decrease of the median serum creatinine level, from 1.50 to 1.34 mg/dL; P=0.004). Renal function significantly improved in patients minimized for other indications, too. In the long term, glomerular filtration rate significantly decreased in non-minimized patients and remained stable in minimized patients. CONCLUSIONS Immunosuppression minimization is frequently undertaken in long-term liver transplant recipients, mainly for renal insufficiency. Substantial variability exists regarding the use of IS minimization among centers.

  16. Effect of immunosuppressive drug regimens on acute and chronic murine toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumyuen, M H; Garin, Y J; Derouin, F

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the potential risk of dissemination or reactivation of toxoplasmosis following the administration of immunosuppressive therapy we examined the effect of corticoids, azathioprine, and cyclosporine given alone or in combination on the course of murine acute and chronic toxoplasmic infection. Swiss Webster mice were infected perorally with a high-level inoculum of cysts of the C strain of Toxoplasma gondii. The evolution of the kinetics of parasite loads in the blood, brain, and lungs of infected and immunosuppressed mice was then sequentially followed. In mice with orally acquired infections initiated 2 days after the beginning of drug treatment, immunosuppression led to the persistence of parasites, especially in the lungs, which was most marked in mice treated with azathioprine and/or cortisol acetate. Administration of immunosuppressive therapy in mice previously infected with T. gondii resulted in a brief resurgence of parasite loads when treatment was started early after infection. Finally, under our experimental conditions we found that the immunosuppressive drugs that were given altered the natural course of infection with a prolonged persistence of parasites in the lungs but did not significantly affect parasite loads in the brain or lead to disseminated infection with detectable parasitemia.

  17. Hair Follicle Dermal Sheath Derived Cells Improve Islet Allograft Survival without Systemic Immunosuppression

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    Xiaojie Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressive drugs successfully prevent rejection of islet allografts in the treatment of type I diabetes. However, the drugs also suppress systemic immunity increasing the risk of opportunistic infection and cancer development in allograft recipients. In this study, we investigated a new treatment for autoimmune diabetes using naturally immune privileged, hair follicle derived, autologous cells to provide localized immune protection of islet allotransplants. Islets from Balb/c mouse donors were cotransplanted with syngeneic hair follicle dermal sheath cup cells (DSCC, group 1 or fibroblasts (FB, group 2 under the kidney capsule of immune-competent, streptozotocin induced, diabetic C57BL/6 recipients. Group 1 allografts survived significantly longer than group 2 (32.2 ± 12.2 versus 14.1 ± 3.3 days, P<0.001 without administration of any systemic immunosuppressive agents. DSCC reduced T cell activation in the renal lymph node, prevented graft infiltrates, modulated inflammatory chemokine and cytokine profiles, and preserved better beta cell function in the islet allografts, but no systemic immunosuppression was observed. In summary, DSCC prolong islet allograft survival without systemic immunosuppression by local modulation of alloimmune responses, enhancing of beta cell survival, and promoting of graft revascularization. This novel finding demonstrates the capacity of easily accessible hair follicle cells to be used as local immunosuppression agents in islet transplantation.

  18. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abel, Frida

    2011-04-14

    Abstract Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB); Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA) and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linked to NB pathogenesis. Results The present study explores subgroup discrimination by gene expression profiling using three published microarray studies on NB (47 samples). Four distinct clusters were identified by Principal Components Analysis (PCA) in two separate data sets, which could be verified by an unsupervised hierarchical clustering in a third independent data set (101 NB samples) using a set of 74 discriminative genes. The expression signature of six NB-associated genes ALK, BIRC5, CCND1, MYCN, NTRK1, and PHOX2B, significantly discriminated the four clusters (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA test). PCA clusters p1, p2, and p3 were found to correspond well to the postulated subtypes 1, 2A, and 2B, respectively. Remarkably, a fourth novel cluster was detected in all three independent data sets. This cluster comprised mainly 11q-deleted MNA-negative tumours with low expression of ALK, BIRC5, and PHOX2B, and was significantly associated with higher tumour stage, poor outcome and poor survival compared to the Type 1-corresponding favourable group (INSS stage 4 and\\/or dead of disease, p < 0.05, Fisher\\'s exact test). Conclusions Based on expression profiling we have identified four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma, which can be distinguished by a 6-gene signature. The fourth subgroup has not been described elsewhere, and efforts are currently made to further investigate this group\\'s specific characteristics.

  19. Potent immunosuppressive principles, dimeric sesquiterpene thioalkaloids, isolated from nupharis rhizoma, the rhizoma of Nuphar pumilum (nymphaeaceae): structure-requirement of nuphar-alkaloid for immunosuppressive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamahara, J; Shimoda, H; Matsuda, H; Yoshikawa, M

    1996-09-01

    Potent immunosuppressants, the dimeric sesquiterpene thioalkaloids, 6-hydroxythiobinupharidine (2), 6,6'-dihydroxythiobinupharidine (3), 6-hydroxythionuphlutine B (5) and 6'-hydroxythionuphlutine B (6), were isolated from a natural medicine, Nupharis Rhizoma, the rhizoma of Nuphar pumilum (TIMM.) DC., through bioassay-guided separation together with five quinolizidine alkaloids (8, 9, 10, 11, 12). Dimeric sesquiterpene thioalkaloids (2, 3, 5, 6) were found to significantly inhibit anti-sheep erythrocyte plaque forming cell formation in mice spleen cells at 10(-6) M concentration. At this concentration, 2, 5 and 6 were found to exhibit no cytotoxicity to mice spleen cells, and 3 also showed only a little cytotoxicity. In addition, the inhibitory activity of several Nuphar alkaloids, dimeric sesquiterpene thioalkaloids (1, 4, 7, 8), and monomeric sesquiterpene alkaloids (9, 10, 11, 12) on anti-sheep erythrocyte plaque forming cell formation was examined and some structural requirement of Nuphar alkaloid for immunosuppressive activity was determined.

  20. Demodex canis regulates cholinergic system mediated immunosuppressive pathways in canine demodicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, P; Nigam, R; Singh, A; Nakade, U P; Sharma, A; Garg, S K; Singh, S K

    2017-09-01

    Demodex canis infestation in dogs remains one of the main challenges in veterinary dermatology. The exact pathogenesis of canine demodicosis is unknown but an aberration in immune status is considered very significant. No studies have underpinned the nexus between induction of demodicosis and neural immunosuppressive pathways so far. We have evaluated the involvement of cholinergic pathways in association with cytokines regulation as an insight into the immuno-pathogenesis of canine demodicosis in the present study. Remarkable elevations in circulatory immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 and cholinesterase activity were observed in dogs with demodicosis. Simultaneously, remarkable reduction in circulatory pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha level was observed in dogs with demodicosis. Findings of the present study evidently suggest that Demodex mites might be affecting the cholinergic pathways to induce immunosuppression in their host and then proliferate incessantly in skin microenvironment to cause demodicosis.

  1. Modified Aloe Polysaccharide Restores Chronic Stress-Induced Immunosuppression in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjoo; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Jiyeon; Lee, Sungwon; Kwon, Junghak; Lee, Heetae; Kong, Hyunseok; Song, Youngcheon; Shin, Eunju; Do, Seon-Gil; Lee, Chong-Kil; Kim, Kyungjae

    2016-09-30

    Chronic stress generally experienced in our daily lives; is known to augment disease vulnerability by suppressing the host immune system. In the present study; the effect of modified Aloe polysaccharide (MAP) on chronic stress-induced immunosuppression was studied; this Aloe compound was characterized in our earlier study. Mice were orally administered with MAP for 24 days and exposed to electric foot shock (EFS; duration; 3 min; interval; 10 s; intensity; 2 mA) for 17 days. The stress-related immunosuppression and restorative effect of MAP were then analyzed by measuring various immunological parameters. MAP treatment alleviated lymphoid atrophy and body weight loss. The numbers of lymphocyte subsets were significantly normalized in MAP-treated mice. Oral administration of MAP also restored the proliferative activities of lymphocytes; ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell proliferation; antibody production; and the cell killing activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In summary; oral administration of MAP ameliorated chronic EFS stress-induced immunosuppression.

  2. Improvement of Radiation-Mediated Immunosuppression of Human NSCLC Tumour Xenografts in a Nude Rat Model

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    Sergey V. Tokalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model have consistently been used as an essential part of preclinical studies for anticancer drugs activity in human. Commonly, these animals receive whole body irradiation to assure immunosuppression. But whole body dose delivery might be inhomogeneous and the resulting incomplete bone marrow depletion may modify tumour behaviour. To improve irradiation-mediated immunosuppression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model irradiation (2 + 2 Gy from opposite sides of animals has been performed using a conventional X-ray tube. The described modification of whole body irradiation improves growth properties of human NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model. The design of the whole body irradiation mediated immunosuppression described here for NSCLC xenografts may be useful for research applications involving other types of human tumours.

  3. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases and.......5 × 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry....... and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according...

  4. Cell-mediated immune response to Leishmania chagasi experimental infection of BALB/c immunosuppressed mice

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    JG Machado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, presents a significant impact on immunosupressed patients. This study aimed to evaluate Leishmania chagasi infection in BALB/c mice immunosuppressed with dexamethasone. Spleen cells stimulated or not with L. chagasi were cultured for cytokine quantification (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 by sandwich ELISA. Parasite loads in the spleen and liver were determined by means of culture microtitration. Immunosuppressed groups showed statistically lower spleen weight and CD4-cell percentage in blood on the day of infection and produced Th1 and Th2 cytokines on other days of the study. The other infected groups, weather immunosupressed or not, also produced Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Parasite loads in the spleen and liver were not statistically different among the groups. It was concluded that L. chagasi infection was not affected by dexamethasone-induced immunosuppression, probably due the reversible effect of the treatment.

  5. Beta-cell replacement in immunosuppressed recipients: old and new clinical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Federico; Ricordi, Camillo

    2007-12-01

    Islet transplantation is an appealing procedure able to improve glycemic control in type 1 diabetic patients. However, the possible side effects that may be induced by immunosuppressive therapy limit its application to a select number of patients for whom the risk of immunosuppressants' side effects can be justified. For patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus-who will take immunosuppressants regardless, as they require a solid organ transplant-islet infusion can be an interesting therapeutic option for improving metabolic compensation, whenever pancreas transplant is not possible. Hence, islet infusion can be an important therapeutic option for patients with secondary diabetes mellitus even when a minor pancreatic endocrine function remains. For these patients, results may be better than those obtained with islet infusion for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus thanks to the lack of autoimmune reaction to the infused islets. The final result is the improvement of the glycemic compensation and most likely also an extension of the graft survival.

  6. Sunlight-induced immunosuppression in humans is initially because of UVB, then UVA, followed by interactive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Terence S C; Barnetson, Ross St C; Halliday, Gary M

    2005-10-01

    Solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation (ssUV) suppresses immunity in humans. The ultraviolet B (UVB) waveband is recognized as immunosuppressive; however the relative significance of UVA to ssUV immunosuppression is unknown. We created dose and time-response curves for UVB-, UVA-, and ssUV-induced suppression of memory immunity to nickel in humans. UVB caused immunosuppression within 24 h. UVA immunosuppression required 48 h and was normalized by 72 h. UVB alone accounts for ssUV immunosuppression at 24 h, but both UVB and UVA contributed at 48 h. By 72 h neither waveband accounted for ssUV immunosuppression. An interaction between these wavebands was therefore the major contributor. To confirm this dose-response curves were used to determine immune protection factors (IPF) for sunscreens with nickel challenge 72 h following ssUV. A sunscreen with good UVA protection had an IPF twice that of a poor UVA protector, despite providing similar protection from sunburn. Thus UVA was a major contributor to ssUV-induced immunosuppression at 72 h but only with the cooperation of UVB. Hence, UVB initiates immunosuppressive signals within 24 h, followed by UVA at 48 h, then an interaction between UVB and UVA. By 72 h following ssUV exposure, neither UVB nor UVA, but an interaction between them is the major cause of sunlight-induced immunosuppression.

  7. AKT pathway genes define 5 prognostic subgroups in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Joy

    Full Text Available Activity of GFR/PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in glioblastoma clinical trials has not been robust. We hypothesized variations in the pathway between tumors contribute to poor response. We clustered GBM based on AKT pathway genes and discovered new subtypes then characterized their clinical and molecular features. There are at least 5 GBM AKT subtypes having distinct DNA copy number alterations, enrichment in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and patterns of expression for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling components. Gene Ontology terms indicate a different cell of origin or dominant phenotype for each subgroup. Evidence suggests one subtype is very sensitive to BCNU or CCNU (median survival 5.8 vs. 1.5 years; BCNU/CCNU vs other treatments; respectively. AKT subtyping advances previous approaches by revealing additional subgroups with unique clinical and molecular features. Evidence indicates it is a predictive marker for response to BCNU or CCNU and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors. We anticipate Akt subtyping may help stratify patients for clinical trials and augment discovery of class-specific therapeutic targets.

  8. AKT Pathway Genes Define 5 Prognostic Subgroups in Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Ivan; Reiser, Mark; Misra, Anjan; Shapiro, William R.; Mills, Gordon B.; Kim, Seungchan; Feuerstein, Burt G.

    2014-01-01

    Activity of GFR/PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in glioblastoma clinical trials has not been robust. We hypothesized variations in the pathway between tumors contribute to poor response. We clustered GBM based on AKT pathway genes and discovered new subtypes then characterized their clinical and molecular features. There are at least 5 GBM AKT subtypes having distinct DNA copy number alterations, enrichment in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and patterns of expression for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling components. Gene Ontology terms indicate a different cell of origin or dominant phenotype for each subgroup. Evidence suggests one subtype is very sensitive to BCNU or CCNU (median survival 5.8 vs. 1.5 years; BCNU/CCNU vs other treatments; respectively). AKT subtyping advances previous approaches by revealing additional subgroups with unique clinical and molecular features. Evidence indicates it is a predictive marker for response to BCNU or CCNU and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors. We anticipate Akt subtyping may help stratify patients for clinical trials and augment discovery of class-specific therapeutic targets. PMID:24984002

  9. Evaluation of Lymphocyte Subgroups in Children With Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Cahide; Doğan, Murat; Başarslan, Fatmagül; Yılmaz, Nebi; Yuca, Sevil; Bulan, Keziban; Kaya, Avni; Çaksen, Hüseyin

    2015-09-01

    In this study, lymphocyte subgroups including blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, CD19, and CD16.56 values were analyzed in children with Down syndrome (DS). The study includes 85 children with DS, followed at Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Yüzüncü Yil University and 64 healthy age-matched control participants. Blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, CD19, and CD16.56 values were examined in both the groups. Significantly decreased blood CD3, CD4, and CD19 values were found in the study group (P < .05) when compared with the control group. In conclusion, we would like to emphasize that blood CD3, CD4, and CD19 levels were found to be decreased in children with DS. Based on these finding, we think that these decreased lymphocyte subgroups might be responsible for increased susceptibility to infections in children with DS. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. AKT pathway genes define 5 prognostic subgroups in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Anna; Ramesh, Archana; Smirnov, Ivan; Reiser, Mark; Misra, Anjan; Shapiro, William R; Mills, Gordon B; Kim, Seungchan; Feuerstein, Burt G

    2014-01-01

    Activity of GFR/PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in glioblastoma clinical trials has not been robust. We hypothesized variations in the pathway between tumors contribute to poor response. We clustered GBM based on AKT pathway genes and discovered new subtypes then characterized their clinical and molecular features. There are at least 5 GBM AKT subtypes having distinct DNA copy number alterations, enrichment in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and patterns of expression for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling components. Gene Ontology terms indicate a different cell of origin or dominant phenotype for each subgroup. Evidence suggests one subtype is very sensitive to BCNU or CCNU (median survival 5.8 vs. 1.5 years; BCNU/CCNU vs other treatments; respectively). AKT subtyping advances previous approaches by revealing additional subgroups with unique clinical and molecular features. Evidence indicates it is a predictive marker for response to BCNU or CCNU and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors. We anticipate Akt subtyping may help stratify patients for clinical trials and augment discovery of class-specific therapeutic targets.

  11. HBV-Associated Acute Liver Failure After Immunosuppression and Risk of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvellas, Constantine J; Cardoso, Filipe S; Gottfried, Michelle; Reddy, K Rajender; Hanje, A James; Ganger, Daniel; Lee, William M

    2017-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection can occur after immunosuppressive treatment and be fatal, although it might be preventable. We aimed to characterize the causes, clinical course, and short-term outcomes of HBV-associated ALF after immune-suppressive therapy, compared with patients with HBV-associated ALF without immunosuppression (control subjects). We performed a retrospective multicenter study of 156 consecutive patients diagnosed with HBV-associated ALF (22 with a solid or blood malignancy) enrolled in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group registry from January 1998 through April 2015. We collected data on results of serologic and hepatic biochemistry analyses, grade of hepatic encephalopathy, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, and King's College criteria. We also collected data on clinical features, medical therapies, and complications in the first 7 days following study enrollment. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with transplant-free survival at 21 days in HBV-associated ALF (the primary outcome). Among patients with HBV-associated ALF, 28 cases (18%) occurred after immunosuppressive therapy (15 patients received systemic corticosteroids and 21 received chemotherapy); and 128 cases did not (control subjects, 82%). Significantly greater proportions of patients with HBV-associated ALF after immunosuppression were nonwhite persons, and had anemia or thrombocytopenia than controls (P failure (based on MELD score), and complications (hepatic encephalopathy or need for mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, or renal replacement therapy) were similar between the groups (P > .17 for all). Factors associated with 21 day transplant-free survival were increased MELD score (odds ratio ∼OR, 0.894 (95% confidence interval 0.842-0.949 per increment), requirement for mechanical ventilation (OR 0.111(0.041-0.300), and immunosuppressive therapy (OR 0.274(0.082-0.923)). Within a cohort study of patients with

  12. Intestinal strongyloidiasis in a psoriatic patient following immunosuppressive therapy: Seeing the unforeseen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poongodi Lakshmi Santhana Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis , an intestinal nematode, has a complicated life cycle. Mostly asymptomatic, if symptomatic it has nonspecific, transient clinical manifestations. The two aggressive forms of the disease are: Hyperinfection syndrome (HS or disseminated syndrome (DS. Several risk factors have been associated with strongyloidiasis including immunosuppressive therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, diabetes, alcoholism, tuberculosis, impaired bowel motility, surgically created intestinal blind loops, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and chronic renal failure. We describe a case of intestinal strongyloidiasis in a psoriatic patient treated with immunosuppressive therapy.

  13. A Case of Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection Occurring with Anti-IgE Immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman, Daniel; Hahn, William; Moss, Steven

    2013-10-01

    The increasingly widespread use of novel immunosuppressive drugs may lead to unexpected infectious complications. We report a case of persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection that failed to respond to antimicrobial therapy in a patient receiving omalizumab (Xolair™, Genentech USA Inc., San Francisco, CA and Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Basel, Switzerland), an anti-IgE monoclonal antibody approved by the FDA for treatment of severe persistent asthma. To our knowledge, this is the first case report linking an immunosuppressive regimen containing anti-IgE biologic therapy to persistent H. pylori infection.

  14. Cytomegalovirus Pneumonia in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases After Immunosuppressive Therapy: A Single Center Study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xue

    2016-01-01

    Results: One hundred and forty-two patients had positive CMV viral load tests. Of these 142 patients, 73 patients with CMV pneumonia were regarded as symptomatic, and the other 69 were asymptomatic. The symptomatic group received higher doses of prednisolone (PSL and more frequently immunosuppressants than the asymptomatic group (P 1.75 × 104 copies/ml. Lymphopenia (especially CD4+ T-cells, presence of symptoms, and other infections, especially fungal infection, are significant risk factors for poor outcome, and a higher PSL dosage combined with immunosuppressants may predict CMV pneumonia.

  15. Cat scratch disease in an immunosuppressed patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hitos, J A; Sabio, J M; Navarrete-Navarrete, N; Arenas-Miras, M del M; Zamora-Pasadas, M; Jiménez-Alonso, J

    2016-03-01

    Cat scratch disease is an infectious disorder transmitted by cats that typically affects children and young adults. Immunosuppression is a well-known risk factor for the development of severe and atypical forms of the disease; hence it is under-diagnosed in patients with compromised immunity. We are reporting the first case of cat scratch disease, which presented as fever and fatigue, in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus while receiving immunosuppressant therapy after a kidney transplant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. [Neurectodermal malignant tumor of the soft tissues after treatment with immunosuppressive agents of lipoid nephrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlier, G; Bensman, A; Leverger, G; Boccon-Gibod, L; Gruner, M

    1992-02-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are known to increase the risk of inducing neoplasia, especially acute leukaemia when high doses are used. A case of nephrosis in a 10 year-old boy treated with chlormethine (cumulative dose: 0.8 mg/kg) and chlorambucil (cumulative dose: 10 mg/kg) is reported. Four years after the beginning of the treatment an extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma occurred. Since the review of literature failed to find any malignancy induced by such an immunosuppressive treatment for nephrosis, the question whether or not this extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma was attributable to this treatment remains unanswered.

  17. From Tumor Immunosuppression to Eradication: Targeting Homing and Activity of Immune Effector Cells to Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Draghiciu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unraveling the mechanisms used by the immune system to fight cancer development is one of the most ambitious undertakings in immunology. Detailed knowledge regarding the mechanisms of induction of tolerance and immunosuppression within the tumor microenvironment will contribute to the development of highly effective tumor eradication strategies. Research within the last few decades has shed more light on the matter. This paper aims to give an overview on the current knowledge of the main tolerance and immunosuppression mechanisms elicited within the tumor microenvironment, with the focus on development of effective immunotherapeutic strategies to improve homing and activity of immune effector cells to tumors.

  18. Discovery-based protein expression profiling identifies distinct subgroups and pathways in leiomyosarcomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirik, Ufuk; Hansson, Karin; Krogh, Morten

    2014-01-01

    subgroups within the leiomyosarcomas with distinct protein expression patterns. Pathways analysis indicates that key biologic nodes like apoptosis, cytoskeleton remodeling, and telomere regulation are differentially regulated among these subgroups. Finally, investigating the similarities between protein...

  19. An overview of statistical planning to address subgroups in confirmatory clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Gary G; Schwartz, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    The effects of treatments within demographic and clinical subgroups of patients are of major interest in most confirmatory clinical trials. Potential factors for defining subgroups include gender, age, disease severity, and geographic region. A major statistical issue for the interpretation of treatment comparisons for subgroups is whether the role of a subgroup is inferential, supportive, or exploratory through respectively corresponding to a primary, key secondary, or hypothesis-generating assessment. This article discusses statistical planning to control type 1 error for the multiple comparisons that correspond to the scope of prespecified inferential subgroups, and it provides some suggestions for addressing the type 2 error that can pertain to prespecified supportive subgroups. Treatment comparisons for exploratory subgroups without a priori specification should always have a very cautious interpretation that accounts for how random variation can influence their pattern of results, although the suggested methods for supportive subgroups can be helpful in this light.

  20. Cumulative subgroup analysis to reduce waste in clinical research for individualised medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fujian; Bachmann, Max O

    2016-12-15

    Although subgroup analyses in clinical trials may provide evidence for individualised medicine, their conduct and interpretation remain controversial. Subgroup effect can be defined as the difference in treatment effect across patient subgroups. Cumulative subgroup analysis refers to a series of repeated pooling of subgroup effects after adding data from each of related trials chronologically, to investigate the accumulating evidence for subgroup effects. We illustrated the clinical relevance of cumulative subgroup analysis in two case studies using data from published individual patient data (IPD) meta-analyses. Computer simulations were also conducted to examine the statistical properties of cumulative subgroup analysis. In case study 1, an IPD meta-analysis of 10 randomised trials (RCTs) on beta blockers for heart failure reported significant interaction of treatment effects with baseline rhythm. Cumulative subgroup analysis could have detected the subgroup effect 15 years earlier, with five fewer trials and 71% less patients, than the IPD meta-analysis which first reported it. Case study 2 involved an IPD meta-analysis of 11 RCTs on treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension that reported significant subgroup effect by aetiology. Cumulative subgroup analysis could have detected the subgroup effect 6 years earlier, with three fewer trials and 40% less patients than the IPD meta-analysis. Computer simulations have indicated that cumulative subgroup analysis increases the statistical power and is not associated with inflated false positives. To reduce waste of research data, subgroup analyses in clinical trials should be more widely conducted and adequately reported so that cumulative subgroup analyses could be timely performed to inform clinical practice and further research.

  1. Does a subgroup of postpolio patients need different management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgens, Ruth

    2015-07-01

    Throughout the 30 years of postpolio syndrome (PPS) research, there have been many puzzling anomalies in the data and not enough information to make sense of them. It is therefore welcome that Winberg et al have examined physical activity in relation to life satisfaction, sex and age. They hypothesized that activity would decrease with age and found the opposite. This result is not so surprising as Ostlund et al found that vitality was associated with older age and that younger age was associated with more pain, increasing physical fatigue, decreasing sleep quality and reducing activity. This commentary will examine past postpolio research with unexpected results in order to describe a subgroup of patients who may be more susceptible to overusing muscles and have particular exercise and activity needs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vanadium air-pollution - a cause of malabsorption and immunosuppression in cattle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gummow, B

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available and immunosuppression were the basis of the pathogenesis in affected animals. Eight months after the commencement of the investigation, adult cows began showing evidence of emaciation, reduced milk production and an apparent increase in the number of abortions...

  3. Early combined immunosuppression for the management of Crohn's disease (REACT): a cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanna, Reena; Bressler, Brian; Levesque, Barrett G.; Zou, Guangyong; Stitt, Larry W.; Greenberg, Gordon R.; Panaccione, Remo; Bitton, Alain; Paré, Pierre; Vermeire, Séverine; D'Haens, Geert; MacIntosh, Donald; Sandborn, William J.; Donner, Allan; Vandervoort, Margaret K.; Morris, Joan C.; Feagan, Brian G.; Anderson, Frank; Atkinson, Kenneth; Bacchus, Rahman; Berezny, Gary; Borthistle, Bruce; Buckley, Alan; Chiba, Naoki; Cockeram, Alan; Elkashab, Magdy; Fashir, Baroudi; Gray, James; Hemphill, Douglas; Hoare, Connie; Holland, Stephen; Hurowitz, Eric; Kaal, Nuri; Laflamme, Pierre; Borromee, Saint-Charles; Lau, Helena; McMullen, William; Memiche, Reshat; Menon, Krishna; Miller, D. Alexander; O'Hara, William; Oravec, Michael; Penner, Robert; Petrunia, Denis; Pluta, Henryk; Prabhu, Umesh; Prest, Marcia; Shaaban, Hani; Sheppard, Duane; Shulman, Scott; Somerton, Stephen; Wiesinger, Holly; Zandieh, Iman; Caenepeel, Philip; Claessens, Christophe; de Suray, Nicolas; andre, Jacques Defl; Holvoet, Jan; Vergauwe, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Conventional management of Crohn's disease features incremental use of therapies. However, early combined immunosuppression (ECI), with a TNF antagonist and antimetabolite might be a more effective strategy. We compared the efficacy of ECI with that of conventional management for treatment of

  4. Current Biochemical Monitoring and Risk Management of Immunosuppressive Therapy after Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catić-Đorđević Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressive drugs play a crucial role in the inhibition of immune reaction and prevention of graft rejection as well as in the pharmacotherapy of autoimmune disorders. Effective immunosuppression should provide an adequate safety profile and improve treatment outcomes and the patients’ quality of life. High-risk transplant recipients may be identified, but a definitive prediction model has still not been recognized. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM for immunosuppressive drugs is an essential, but at the same time insufficient tool due to low predictability of drug exposition and marked pharmacokinetic variability. Parallel therapeutic, biochemical and clinical monitoring may successfully optimize and individualize therapy for transplanted recipients, providing optimal medical outcomes. Modern pharmacotherapy management should include new biomarkers with better sensitivity and specificity that can identify early cell damage. The aim of this study was to point out the importance of finding new biomarkers that would enable early detection of adverse drug events and cell damage in organ transplant recipients. We wanted to confirm the importance of routine biochemical monitoring in improving the safety of immunosuppressive treatment.

  5. Cancer Screening of Renal Transplant Patients Undergoing Long-Term Immunosuppressive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, T; Ozel, L; Gökçe, A M; Ata, P; Kara, M; Eriş, C; Özdemir, E; Titiz, M I

    2015-06-01

    With this study we aimed to research the effects of immunosuppressive drugs, their cumulative doses, and viral infections on development of malign tumors in patients who have undergone treatment for 5 years. We examined 100 patients who underwent renal transplantation from 2004 to 2009. Patients had mycophenolate mofetil and steroid in addition to cyclosporine, sirolimus, or tacrolimus as immunosuppressive treatment. For malignancy screening, physical examination, radiologic and endoscopic screening were done, and immunosuppressive drugs and their cumulative doses, age, sex, body mass index (BMI), dialysis history, and viral infection history were investigated. The mean age of patients was 42.03 ± 11.30 years. There were 1 colon cancer patient, 1 retroperitoneal liposarcoma, 1 renal oncocytoma, 3 Kaposi sarcoma patients treated with cyclosporine; in those treated with Tac there were 1 basal cell carcinoma, 1 Kaposi sarcoma, 2 thyroid carcinoma, 1 breast carcinoma, 1 bladder carcinoma, 1 renal cell carcinoma, and 1 colon carcinoma patients. The mean age of patients having carcinoma was statistically significant compared with those without cancer (P cancer. The risk of carcinoma increases with increasing drug dose and time period of the immunosuppressive drug. There was not a negative effect on cancer prevalence in patients with cyclosporine or tacrolimus. But the cumulative dose of steroids significantly increased malignancy occurence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of horse and rabbit antithymocyte globulin in immunosuppressive therapy for refractory cytopenia of childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Yoshimi (Ayami); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); I. Baumann (Irith); S. Schwarz (Stephan); I. Simonitsch-Klupp (Ingrid); P. de Paepe (Pascale); V. Campr (Vit); G. Kerndrup (Gitte); M.J. O'Sullivan (Maureen); R. Devito (Rita); P. Leguit; M. Hernandez (Manuel); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); J. Stary (Jan); H. Hasle (Henrik); O.P. Smith (Owen Patrick); M. Zecca (Marco); F. Catala; M. Schmugge; F. Locatelli (Franco); M. Führer (Monika); A. Fischer (Alexandra); A. Guderle (Anne); P. Nöllke (Peter); B. Strahm (Brigitte); C.M. Niemeyer (Charlotte)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRefractory cytopenia of childhood is the most common subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome in children. In this study, we compared the outcome of immunosuppressive therapy using horse antithymocyte globulin (n=46) with that using rabbit antithymocyte globulin (n=49) in 95 patients with

  7. Dexamethasone immunosuppression results in turkey clostridial dermatitis: A retrospective analysis of 7 studies, 1998 - 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have been studying the etiology of turkey osteomyelitis complex (TOC) for the past 20 years and have determined that this syndrome is caused by the inability of some fast-growing male turkeys to cope with production stressors. While immunosuppressive viruses have often been associated with suscep...

  8. [Etiopathogenesis of aplastic anemia and of the severe form treated with immunosuppression and bone marrow transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulley, F L; Lotério, H A; Massumoto, C M; Llacer, P E; Chamone, D de A

    1989-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a condition characterized by bone marrow hipoplasia and pancytopenia. Various etiologic agents are related to the acquired form of this disease but in many cases the causative agents remain obscure. Severe aplastic anemia has been treated by immunosuppression and allogeneic marrow transplantation.

  9. Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide ameliorates ROS generation and apoptosis in spleen and thymus of immunosuppressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Juan; Li, Lu; Zhen, Weng-Ya; Wang, Le-Feng; Pan, Meng; Lv, Jia-Qian; Wang, Fan; Yao, Yu-Fei; Nie, Shao-Ping; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide (PSG-1) is a bioactive compound with antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of PSG-1 on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in spleen and thymus of cyclophosphamide (CTX)-induced immunosuppressed mice. The results showed that PSG-1 protected mice against CTX-mediated immunosuppression, as evidenced by enhancing the ratios of thymus and spleen weights to body weight, promoting T cell and B cell survival, and increasing levels of TNF-α and IL-2. Apoptosis, ROS generation and lipid peroxidation in the immune organs of the immunosuppressed animals were ameliorated by PSG-1. The immune benefits of PSG-1 were associated with the enhancement of the activities of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in the immune organs, implying that antioxidant activities of PSG-1 may play an important role in PSG-1-evoked immune protection. Taken together, these findings have demonstrated that PSG-1 may ameliorate CTX-induced immunosuppression through reducing apoptosis and oxidative damage in immunological system. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Look Different: Effect of Radiation Hormesis on the Survival Rate of Immunosuppressed Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, M; Taeb, S; Okhovat, M A; Atefi, M; Negahdari, F

    2016-09-01

    Hormesis is defined as the bio-positive response of something which is bio-negative in high doses. In the present study, the effect of radiation hormesis was evaluated on the survival rate of immunosuppressed BALB/c mice by Cyclosporine A. We used 75 consanguine, male, BALB/c mice in this experiment. The first group received Technetium-99m and the second group was placed on a sample radioactive soil of Ramsar region (800Bq) for 20 days. The third group was exposed to X-rays and the fourth group was placed on the radioactive soil and then injected Technetium-99m. The last group was the sham irradiated control group. Finally, 30mg Cyclosporine A as the immunosuppressive agent was orally administered to all mice 48 hours after receiving X-rays and Technetium-99m. The mean survival rate of mice in each group was estimated during time. A log rank test was run to determine if there were differences in the survival distribution for different groups and related treatments. According to the results, the survival rate of all pre-irradiated groups was more than the sham irradiated control group (p Ramsar region for 20 days and then injected Technetium-99m. This study confirmed the presence of hormetic models and the enhancement of survival rate in immunosuppressed BALB/c mice as a consequence of low-dose irradiation. It is also revealed the positive synergetic radioadaptive response on survival rate of immunosuppressed animals.

  11. Steroid-free immunosuppression after renal transplantation-long-term experience from a single centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Faramawi, Mohamad; Rohr, Nils; Jespersen, Bente

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A steroid-free immunosuppressive protocol may improve the general well-being of patients, but long-term renal graft survival has been a concern. METHODS: In a retrospective clinical study, 329 consecutive transplantations with renal grafts at our centre during the period 1995-2004, we...

  12. Response of transplant recipients to influenza vaccination based on type of immunosuppression: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Karbasi-Afshar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccination is widely used in transplant recipients, but there is little known about the significance and correlating factors of its effectiveness. In the current study, we reviewed the existing literature on clinical trials performed in transplant recipients on the effectiveness of influenza vaccination and to evaluate the relevance of the type of immunosuppression employed in these patients on the humoral reaction to the vaccine. A comprehensive search of the literature was performed through Pubmed and Google Scholar to find reports indicating immunogenicity of influenza vaccination in transplant patients. Finally, data from 15 published clinical trials were included in the meta-analysis. Data of 947 transplant recipients retrieved from 15 clinical trials investigating the immunogenicity of influenza vaccination were analyzed in this meta-analysis. Analysis showed significantly lower rates of sero-conversion among transplant recipients receiving mycophenolate mofetil (MMF than other immunosuppressive agents (relative risk: 0.724; 95% confidence interval: 0.596-0.880; P = 0.001. No significant correlation was found with tacrolimus, sirolimus, cyclosporine and azathioprine. Different immunosuppressive agents seem to have different effects on the humoral response rate to influenza vaccination, with MMF having the most significant deleterious effect. The limited and controversial data available in the literature do not support any differential effect for other immunosuppressive agents.

  13. Clinical Challenges of Tacrolimus for Maintenance Immunosuppression Post-Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivulich, S; Dooley, M; Kirkpatrick, C; Snell, G

    2017-11-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is a successful treatment option for end-stage lung disease, and immunosuppressant regimens, utilized to prevent rejection of the transplanted graft, are paramount to maintaining long-term graft survival. Immunosuppression can be classified as induction, maintenance, and antirejection therapy. This article focuses on maintenance immunosuppression that includes a combination of a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI), cell cycle inhibitor, and corticosteroid. CNIs remain the cornerstone of immunosuppression following LTx, and tacrolimus is now the preferred CNI, based on a better adverse effect profile and some limited evidence for enhanced efficacy. Tacrolimus is associated with a number of unique challenges post-LTx, with erratic and highly variable absorption making it difficult to achieve and maintain therapeutic levels. Current methods of therapeutic drug monitoring are extrapolated from models in liver and kidney transplants and are not validated in the LTx population. Alternative methods of delivering tacrolimus can address some of the issues associated with their use and can be utilized in particular clinical scenarios. Long-term toxicities attributed to tacrolimus, such as nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity, can limit the long-term success of tacrolimus in preventing allograft rejection. This article emphasizes the current clinical challenges faced when managing LTx recipients with tacrolimus, offers strategies to manage these issues, and highlights the areas that need further research. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pain Drawings Improve Subgrouping of Low Back Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüllemann, Philipp; Keller, Thomas; Kabelitz, Maria; Freynhagen, Rainer; Tölle, Thomas; Baron, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    Subgrouping of low back pain (LBP) patients may be improved when pain drawings are combined with the painDETECT (PD-Q) questionnaire. We hypothesized that (1) different LBP subgroups determined by their pain radiation show different clinical patterns and (2) the occurrence of neuropathic symptoms depends on pain radiation. A total of 19,263 acute ( 3 months) LBP patients were allocated prospectively into 4 groups based on the location of pain drawings on a manikin and compared regarding neuropathic pain components, functionality, depression, pain intensity, and surgical interventions. All items were investigated at baseline and follow-up visits. Group I was composed of patients with axial LBP without radiating pain; group II, LBP with radiation into the thigh; group III, LBP with radiation into the shank; and group IV, LBP with radiation into the feet. Side-dependent pain radiation was assessed additionally. Depression, functionality, and pain intensity showed no clinically relevant differences, whereas PD-Q scores and the probability to rate positive for neuropathic pain increased with more distally radiating pain. Surgery and medication intake were most frequent in group IV. Follow-up analyses showed that only axial LBP became more neuropathic, whereas pain intensity decreased over time. Radicular patterns of pain drawings in LBP patients indicate severe pain conditions with the most neuropathic components, while axial LBP has the fewest. For the categorization of LBP, pain drawings help explain the underlying mechanism of pain, which might further improve mechanism-based treatment when used in clinical routines and research. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  15. Immunosuppressive therapy for kidney transplantation in adults: a systematic review and economic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Snowsill, Tristan; Haasova, Marcela; Coelho, Helen; Crathorne, Louise; Cooper, Chris; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Peters, Jaime; Varley-Campbell, Jo; Huxley, Nicola; Moore, Jason; Allwood, Matt; Lowe, Jenny; Hyde, Chris; Hoyle, Martin; Bond, Mary; Anderson, Rob

    2016-08-01

    End-stage renal disease is a long-term irreversible decline in kidney function requiring renal replacement therapy: kidney transplantation, haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The preferred option is kidney transplantation, followed by immunosuppressive therapy (induction and maintenance therapy) to reduce the risk of kidney rejection and prolong graft survival. To review and update the evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of basiliximab (BAS) (Simulect(®), Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd) and rabbit anti-human thymocyte immunoglobulin (rATG) (Thymoglobulin(®), Sanofi) as induction therapy, and immediate-release tacrolimus (TAC) (Adoport(®), Sandoz; Capexion(®), Mylan; Modigraf(®), Astellas Pharma; Perixis(®), Accord Healthcare; Prograf(®), Astellas Pharma; Tacni(®), Teva; Vivadex(®), Dexcel Pharma), prolonged-release tacrolimus (Advagraf(®) Astellas Pharma), belatacept (BEL) (Nulojix(®), Bristol-Myers Squibb), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (Arzip(®), Zentiva; CellCept(®), Roche Products; Myfenax(®), Teva), mycophenolate sodium (MPS) (Myfortic(®), Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd), sirolimus (SRL) (Rapamune(®), Pfizer) and everolimus (EVL) (Certican(®), Novartis) as maintenance therapy in adult renal transplantation. Clinical effectiveness searches were conducted until 18 November 2014 in MEDLINE (via Ovid), EMBASE (via Ovid), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (via Wiley Online Library) and Web of Science (via ISI), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects and Health Technology Assessment (The Cochrane Library via Wiley Online Library) and Health Management Information Consortium (via Ovid). Cost-effectiveness searches were conducted until 18 November 2014 using a costs or economic literature search filter in MEDLINE (via Ovid), EMBASE (via Ovid), NHS Economic Evaluation Database (via Wiley Online Library), Web of Science (via ISI), Health Economic Evaluations

  16. Dysexecutive versus amnestic Alzheimer disease subgroups: analysis of demographic, genetic, and vascular factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mez, Jesse; Cosentino, Stephanie; Brickman, Adam M; Huey, Edward D; Manly, Jennifer J; Mayeux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the demographic and vascular characteristics and APOE genotypes of a dysexecutive subgroup of Alzheimer disease (AD) with an amnestic subgroup of AD early in the disease course. A total of 2224 participants from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database who carried a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (n=1188) or mild AD (clinical dementia rating ≤1) (n=1036) were included in this study. A subset of the mild cognitive impairment (n=61) and mild AD (n=79) participants underwent an autopsy. A dysexecutive subgroup (n=587) was defined as having executive performance >1 SD worse than memory performance, and an amnestic subgroup (n=549) was defined conversely. Among the autopsy subset, the odds of an AD pathologic diagnosis were compared in the 2 subgroups. The demographics, APOE[Latin Small Letter Open E]4 status, and vascular risk factors were compared in the 2 subgroups. Among the autopsy subset, the odds of having an AD pathologic diagnosis did not differ between the dysexecutive and amnestic subgroups. Under an additive model, participants in the dysexecutive subgroup possessed the APOE[Latin Small Letter Open E]4 allele less frequently compared with those in the amnestic subgroup. The dysexecutive subgroup had a history of hypertension less frequently compared with the amnestic subgroup. These distinct characteristics add to accumulating evidence that a dysexecutive subgroup of AD may have a unique underlying pathophysiology.

  17. Immunosuppressive drugs impairs antibody response of the polysaccharide and conjugated pneumococcal vaccines in patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam; Thomsen, Ole Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    with and without immunosuppressive treatment four weeks post vaccination. METHODS: In a randomized trial of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV13), a group of CD patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs (IS) alone or in combination...

  18. Testosterone treatment is immunosuppressive in superb fairy-wrens, yet free-living males with high testosterone are more immunocompetent.

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, A

    2000-01-01

    The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis proposes that the immunosuppressive effect of testosterone enforces honesty of sexual signalling via a physiological trade-off between signal intensity and immunocompetence. However, evidence that testosterone is immunosuppressive is scant, particularly in birds. I studied the correlation between immunocompetence and testosterone in superb fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus), a species with intense intersexual selection. Males are seasonally dichromatic and ...

  19. Risk of cervical cancer in women with autoimmune diseases, in relation with their use of immunosuppressants and screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Rebolj, Matejka; Hallas, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Severely immunosuppressed individuals have a strongly increased risk of cervical cancer. In patients with autoimmune diseases (AID), who have defects in their immune system and receive immunosuppressants, the risk of cervical cancer is less clear. We conducted a cohort study, using Danish...

  20. Varicella-zoster virus immunity in dermatological patients on systemic immunosuppressant treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hackett, C B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary varicella infection is caused by varicella-zoster virus (VZV). It is a common childhood infection, which is usually benign but can occasionally cause morbidity and mortality. In immunosuppressed adults, atypical presentation and disseminated disease can occur with significant morbidity and mortality. A VZV vaccine is available. OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to measure the prevalence of immunity to VZV and to determine the predictive value of a self-reported history of varicella infection in a population of dermatological patients receiving systemic immunosuppressant therapy. We sought to assess the need for routine serological testing for varicella-zoster immunity in this cohort. METHODS: Serological testing for VZV immunity was done on 228 patients receiving systemic immunosuppressive treatment for a dermatological condition. Information regarding a history of previous primary VZV infection was obtained from each patient. RESULTS: Two hundred and twenty-eight patients had VZV serology performed. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 years. The prevalence of VZV seropositivity in this cohort was 98.7%. One hundred and two patients (44.7%) reported having a definite history of primary VZV. The sensitivity of a self-reported history of VZV infection was 45.3% with a specificity of 100%. The positive and negative predictive values of a self-reported history of VZV for serologically confirmed immunity were 100% and 2.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of VZV IgG antibodies in our cohort of Irish dermatology patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy is 98.7%. A recalled history of varicella infection is a good predictor of serological immunity. This study has shown that there are VZV-susceptible individuals within our cohort. These patients did not have a clear history of previous infection. We recommend serological testing of patients without a clear history of infection prior to the commencement of immunosuppressive therapy and

  1. Naltrexone antagonizes the analgesic and immunosuppressive effects of morphine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, D J; Gerak, L R; France, C P

    1994-05-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between morphine-induced analgesia and immunosuppression after acute administration. In male CD1 mice, morphine (10.0-100.0 mg/kg s.c.) produced a U-shaped immunosuppressive dose-effect curve on splenic natural killer (NK) activity. Morphine also induced dose-related analgesia, as measured by an increase in tail-flick latency during thermal application; these analgesic effects were antagonized by naltrexone (1.0-10.0 mg/kg). In addition, morphine-induced suppression of splenic NK activity was antagonized in a dose-dependent manner and, at one dose of naltrexone (10.0 mg/kg), splenic NK activity was augmented. To investigate further the relationship between naltrexone antagonism of morphine-induced analgesia and immunomodulation, single doses of morphine (10.0-100.0 mg/kg) were administered to mice pretreated with naltrexone (0.01-10.0 mg/kg) or saline. A dose of 10.0 mg/kg of morphine produced 35% of the maximal possible effect in the analgesia study and no immunosuppression, whereas a dose of 32.0 mg/kg produced a maximal analgesic effect and significant suppression of NK activity. Naltrexone blocked morphine-induced analgesia and immunosuppression in a dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, the combination of 1.0 mg/kg of naltrexone and 32.0 mg/kg of morphine elevated splenic NK activity. A large dose of morphine (100.0 mg/kg) elicited full analgesia and had no effect on splenic NK activity in saline- or naltrexone-pretreated mice. Collectively, these results support the view that, in mice, morphine-induced analgesia and immunosuppression are mediated through a common opioid receptor type.

  2. Outcomes of cataract surgery with/without vitrectomy in patients with pars planitis and immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albavera-Giles, Tania; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Jimenez-Corona, Aida; Pedroza-Seres, Miguel

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of cataract surgery with/without vitrectomy in patients with pars planitis who received immunosuppressive therapy. This was a retrospective case series, single-center study. Twenty-two patients with pars planitis who received immunosuppressive therapy were included, with a median age at presentation of 9.5 years, having had cataract surgery. The following data was collected: age at presentation and at cataract surgery, time of follow-up, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) before the surgery and at 1 week, 1 and 6 months after the procedure, immunosuppressive therapy, complications and causes for failed visual improvement. The variables associated with an improvement in visual acuity were evaluated. All patients had phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation. The most common immunosuppressive therapy used for the patients was methotrexate in nine patients (40.9%). The BCVA improved from a median of 20/400 to 20/100 after 6 months of follow-up (p = 0.0005); 14 patients (63.6%) improved two lines of vision or more. No significant risk factors were found for the association with improvement in visual acuity after the surgery. No improvement in visual acuity was attributed to posterior segment manifestations or amblyopia; the most common complication was posterior capsule opacification in 11 eyes (50%). The median follow-up after the surgery was 32 months. Phacoemulsification was the procedure for all the patients. Visual acuity improved in patients with pars planitis treated with immunosuppressive drugs who underwent cataract surgery, except for the patients with posterior segment complications or amblyopia.

  3. Immunosuppressive Treatment of Non-infectious Uveitis: History and Current Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chan; Zhang, Meifen

    2017-04-10

    Non-infectious uveitis is one of the leading causes of preventable blindness worldwide. Long-term immunosuppressive treatment is generally required to achieve durable control of inflammation in posterior and panuveitis. Although systemic corticosteroids have been the gold standard of immunosup- pressive treatment for uveitis since first introduced in 1950s, its side effects of long-term use often warrant an adjuvant treatment to reduce the dosage/duration of corticosteroids needed to maintain disease control. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs, classified into alkylating agent, antimetabolites and T cell inhibitors, have been widely used as corticosteroid-sparing agents, each with characteristic safety/tolerance profiles on different uveitis entities. Recently, biologic agents, which target specific molecules in immunopathogenesis of uveitis, have gained great interest as alternative treatments for refractory uveitis based on their favorable safety and effectiveness in a variety of uveitis entities. However, lack of large randomized controlled clinical trials, concerns about efficacy and safety of long-term usage, and economic burden are limiting the use of biologics in non-infectious uveitis. Local administration of immunosuppressive drugs (from corticosteroids to biologics) through intraocular drug delivery systems represent another direction for drug development and is now under intense investigation, but more evidences are needed to support their use as regular alternative treatments for uveitis. With the numerous choices belonging to different treatment modalities (conventional immunosuppressive agents, biologics and local drug delivery systems) on hand, the practice patterns have been reported to vary greatly from center to center. Factors influence uveitis specialists' choices of immunosuppressive agents may be complex and may include personal familiarity, treatment availability, safety/tolerability, effectiveness, patient compliance, cost concerns and

  4. Sepsis Pathophysiology, Chronic Critical Illness, and Persistent Inflammation-Immunosuppression and Catabolism Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Juan C; Gentile, Lori F; Mathias, Brittany J; Efron, Philip A; Brakenridge, Scott C; Mohr, Alicia M; Moore, Frederick A; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2017-02-01

    To provide an appraisal of the evolving paradigms in the pathophysiology of sepsis and propose the evolution of a new phenotype of critically ill patients, its potential underlying mechanism, and its implications for the future of sepsis management and research. Literature search using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. Sepsis remains one of the most debilitating and expensive illnesses, and its prevalence is not declining. What is changing is our definition(s), its clinical course, and how we manage the septic patient. Once thought to be predominantly a syndrome of over exuberant inflammation, sepsis is now recognized as a syndrome of aberrant host protective immunity. Earlier recognition and compliance with treatment bundles has fortunately led to a decline in multiple organ failure and in-hospital mortality. Unfortunately, more and more sepsis patients, especially the aged, are suffering chronic critical illness, rarely fully recover, and often experience an indolent death. Patients with chronic critical illness often exhibit "a persistent inflammation-immunosuppression and catabolism syndrome," and it is proposed here that this state of persisting inflammation, immunosuppression and catabolism contributes to many of these adverse clinical outcomes. The underlying cause of inflammation-immunosuppression and catabolism syndrome is currently unknown, but there is increasing evidence that altered myelopoiesis, reduced effector T-cell function, and expansion of immature myeloid-derived suppressor cells are all contributory. Although newer therapeutic interventions are targeting the inflammatory, the immunosuppressive, and the protein catabolic responses individually, successful treatment of the septic patient with chronic critical illness and persistent inflammation-immunosuppression and catabolism syndrome may require a more complementary approach.

  5. Criteria for phytoplasma 16Sr group/subgroup delineation and the need of a platform for proper registration of new groups and subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    As more phytoplasmas are discovered in emerging and re-emerging plant diseases worldwide, the scheme for classification of phytoplasmas into 16S rRNA gene RFLP (16Sr) groups and subgroups is experiencing an ongoing rapid expansion. Improper delineation or designation of new groups and subgroups can...

  6. How can latent trajectories of back pain be translated into defined subgroups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Hestbæk, Lise; Kent, Peter

    2017-01-01

    descriptive definitions, as a way to apply the same definitions of mutually exclusive subgroups across populations. In this study, we investigated if the course trajectories of two LBP cohorts fitted with previously suggested trajectory subgroup definitions, how distinctly different these subgroups were......BACKGROUND: Similar types of trajectory patterns have been identified by Latent Class Analyses (LCA) across multiple low back pain (LBP) cohorts, but these patterns are impractical to apply to new cohorts or individual patients. It would be useful to be able to identify trajectory subgroups from......, and if the subgroup definitions matched with LCA-derived patterns. METHODS: Weekly measures of LBP intensity and frequency during 1 year were available from two clinical cohorts. We applied definitions of 16 possible trajectory subgroups to these observations and calculated the prevalence of the subgroups...

  7. Topography and Volcanology of the Huangtsuishan Volcano Subgroup, Northern Taiwan

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    Yu-Ming Lai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining the shaded relief topography model and the slope map from the Digital Terrain Model (DTM images, toporaphical map, field occurrences and petrography, the volcanic sequences of the Huangtsuishan Volcano Subgroup (HVS can be constructed. Two types of volcanic centers can be identified in this area. One is the Tachienhou volcanic dome, which may be located in the center of an older caldera. The other is the Huangtsui composite volcano, which is composed of interbedding lava flows and pyroclastic deposits with a volcanic crater named the Huangtsui pond at the summit. Eight lava plateaus radiated from Mts. Huangtsui and Tachienhou to the north and the east can be distinguished based on the DTM images. The volcanic deposits are comprised of four lithofacies, the lava flows, pyroclastic breccias, tuffs and lahars on the base of field occurrences. At least thirteen layers of lava flow, named the H1 to H13 can be recognized in the HVS and can be reconstructed and categorized into four stages. An old and large volcano erupted lava flows to form the products of stages one and two, then collapsed to form a caldera with a dome for the third stage. The latest stage of lava flow was poured out from the Huangtsui volcano, which formed a crater at the summit.

  8. Personality style and impulsivity as determinants of suicidal subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazaa, Norman; Page, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Studies on suicide have often been inadequate in the sense of failing to understand or conceptualize the dynamics of suicidal behavior from a comprehensive theoretical basis. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine Blatt's theory of Dependent and Self-critical personality dimensions (Blatt, 1974, Blatt & Shichman, 1983) in the context of actual suicidal behavior, and also to utilize these dimensions to facilitate our understanding of suicidal action. Ninety-six undergraduate students who had attempted suicide in the past were administered a series of measures related to suicidal behavior, involving impulsivity, intent, and lethality. Participants were also identified as Dependent or Self-critical in their basic personality orientation. Dependents and Self-critics engaged in contrasting suicidal behaviors along several parameters, with Self-critical individuals generally posing greater risk. These differences were congruent with Blatt's theoretical framework. Implications for suicide risk assessment, management, and treatment are discussed, with special reference to the importance of identifying distinctive suicidal subgroups identified by Dependent and Self-critical personality dimensions.

  9. Evidence of separate subgroups of juvenile southern bluefin tuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Mark S; Sidhu, Leesa A; O'Neill, Ben; Sibanda, Nokuthaba

    2017-11-01

    Archival tagging studies of southern bluefin tuna (SBT , Thunnus maccoyii) have revealed that juveniles residing in the Great Australian Bight (GAB) over the austral summer undertake seasonal cyclic migrations to the southeast Indian Ocean and the Tasman Sea during winter. However, there remains disagreement about the extent of mixing between juvenile SBT regularly caught by longline fleets south of Africa and those observed in the GAB. Some researchers have argued that archival tag recoveries indicate most juveniles reside in the GAB over the austral summer. Others have suggested that recoveries of conventional and archival tags are better explained by a juvenile population consisting of separate groups on the eastern and western sides of the Indian Ocean with limited intermixing. We present analyses of catch and tag recovery data and re-examine archival tagging studies. The evidence provided strongly favors the hypothesis of separate juvenile subgroups, or contingents, with limited intermixing. We draw some tentative conclusions about the nature of the putative contingents and discuss some implications of these findings for the interpretation of existing datasets and future research priorities. We also provide the first evidence that the migration choices of juveniles that summer in the GAB are influenced by fidelity to winter feeding grounds and suggest this helps explain the collapse of the surface fishery off New South Wales in the 1980s.

  10. Resonance Elastic Scattering and Interference Effects Treatments in Subgroup Method

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    Yunzhao Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the resonance integral (RI tables produced by the NJOY program, the conventional subgroup method usually ignores both the resonance elastic scattering and the resonance interference effects. In this paper, on one hand, to correct the resonance elastic scattering effect, RI tables are regenerated by using the Monte Carlo code, OpenMC, which employs the Doppler broadening rejection correction method for the resonance elastic scattering. On the other hand, a fast resonance interference factor method is proposed to efficiently handle the resonance interference effect. Encouraging conclusions have been indicated by the numerical results. (1 For a hot full power pressurized water reactor fuel pin-cell, an error of about +200 percent mille could be introduced by neglecting the resonance elastic scattering effect. By contrast, the approach employed in this paper can eliminate the error. (2 The fast resonance interference factor method possesses higher precision and higher efficiency than the conventional Bondarenko iteration method. Correspondingly, if the fast resonance interference factor method proposed in this paper is employed, the kinf can be improved by ∼100 percent mille with a speedup of about 4.56.

  11. Matching mice to malignancy: molecular subgroups and models of medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jasmine; Schmidt, Christin; Markant, Shirley L.; Taylor, Michael D.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medulloblastoma, the largest group of embryonal brain tumors, has historically been classified into five variants based on histopathology. More recently, epigenetic and transcriptional analyses of primary tumors have sub-classified medulloblastoma into four to six subgroups, most of which are incongruous with histopathological classification. Discussion Improved stratification is required for prognosis and development of targeted treatment strategies, to maximize cure and minimize adverse effects. Several mouse models of medulloblastoma have contributed both to an improved understanding of progression and to developmental therapeutics. In this review, we summarize the classification of human medulloblastoma subtypes based on histopathology and molecular features. We describe existing genetically engineered mouse models, compare these to human disease, and discuss the utility of mouse models for developmental therapeutics. Just as accurate knowledge of the correct molecular subtype of medulloblastoma is critical to the development of targeted therapy in patients, we propose that accurate modeling of each subtype of medulloblastoma in mice will be necessary for preclinical evaluation and optimization of those targeted therapies. PMID:22315164

  12. Challenges in identifying asthma subgroups using unsupervised statistical learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperi, Mattia C F; Sahiner, Umit M; Belgrave, Danielle; Sackesen, Cansin; Buchan, Iain E; Simpson, Angela; Yavuz, Tolga S; Kalayci, Omer; Custovic, Adnan

    2013-12-01

    Unsupervised statistical learning techniques, such as exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and hierarchical clustering (HC), have been used to identify asthma phenotypes, with partly consistent results. Some of the inconsistency is caused by the variable selection and demographic and clinical differences among study populations. To investigate the effects of the choice of statistical method and different preparations of data on the clustering results; and to relate these to disease severity. Several variants of EFA and HC were applied and compared using various sets of variables and different encodings and transformations within a dataset of 383 children with asthma. Variables included lung function, inflammatory and allergy markers, family history, environmental exposures, and medications. Clusters and original variables were related to asthma severity (logistic regression and Bayesian network analysis). EFA identified five components (eigenvalues ≥ 1) explaining 35% of the overall variance. Variations of the HC (as linkage-distance functions) did not affect the cluster inference; however, using different variable encodings and transformations did. The derived clusters predicted asthma severity less than the original variables. Prognostic factors of severity were medication usage, current symptoms, lung function, paternal asthma, body mass index, and age of asthma onset. Bayesian networks indicated conditional dependence among variables. The use of different unsupervised statistical learning methods and different variable sets and encodings can lead to multiple and inconsistent subgroupings of asthma, not necessarily correlated with severity. The search for asthma phenotypes needs more careful selection of markers, consistent across different study populations, and more cautious interpretation of results from unsupervised learning.

  13. Risk of high-grade cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer in women with systemic lupus erythematosus receiving immunosuppressive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, C H; Liu, J; Feldman, S; Solomon, D H; Kim, S C

    2017-06-01

    Objective Prior studies suggest an increased risk of cervical cancer among women with systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the relationship with immunosuppressive drugs is not well studied in US nationwide cohorts. We compared the risk of high-grade cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer among women with systemic lupus erythematosus who started immunosuppressive drugs versus hydroxychloroquine. Methods We identified systemic lupus erythematosus patients initiating immunosuppressive drugs or hydroxychloroquine using claims data from two US commercial health plans and Medicaid (2000-2012). We used a validated claims-based algorithm to identify high-grade cervical dysplasia or cervical cancer. To account for potential confounders, including demographic factors, comorbidities, medication use, HPV vaccination status, and health care utilization, immunosuppressive drugs and hydroxychloroquine initiators were 1:1 matched on the propensity score. We used inverse variance-weighted, fixed effect models to pool hazard ratios from the propensity score-matched Medicaid and commercial cohorts. Results We included 2451 matched pairs of immunosuppressive drugs and hydroxychloroquine new users in the commercial cohort and 7690 matched pairs in Medicaid. In the commercial cohort, there were 14 cases of cervical dysplasia or cervical cancer among immunosuppressive drugs users and five cases among hydroxychloroquine users (hazard ratio 2.47, 95% CI 0.89-6.85, hydroxychloroquine = ref). In Medicaid, there were 46 cases among immunosuppressive drugs users and 29 cases in hydroxychloroquine users (hazard ratio 1.24, 95% CI 0.78-1.98, hydroxychloroquine = ref). The pooled hazard ratio of immunosuppressive drugs was 1.40 (95% CI 0.92-2.12). Conclusion Among women with systemic lupus erythematosus, immunosuppressive drugs may be associated with a greater, albeit not statistically significant, risk of high-grade cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer compared to patients receiving

  14. Subgroup analyses in cost-effectiveness analyses to support health technology assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Christine; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Paget, Marie-Ange; Reid, Carol; Hawkins, Neil

    2014-01-01

    'Success' in drug development is bringing to patients a new medicine that has an acceptable benefit-risk profile and that is also cost-effective. Cost-effectiveness means that the incremental clinical benefit is deemed worth paying for by a healthcare system, and it has an important role in enabling manufacturers to obtain new medicines to patients as soon as possible following regulatory approval. Subgroup analyses are increasingly being utilised by decision-makers in the determination of the cost-effectiveness of new medicines when making recommendations. This paper highlights the statistical considerations when using subgroup analyses to support cost-effectiveness for a health technology assessment. The key principles recommended for subgroup analyses supporting clinical effectiveness published by Paget et al. are evaluated with respect to subgroup analyses supporting cost-effectiveness. A health technology assessment case study is included to highlight the importance of subgroup analyses when incorporated into cost-effectiveness analyses. In summary, we recommend planning subgroup analyses for cost-effectiveness analyses early in the drug development process and adhering to good statistical principles when using subgroup analyses in this context. In particular, we consider it important to provide transparency in how subgroups are defined, be able to demonstrate the robustness of the subgroup results and be able to quantify the uncertainty in the subgroup analyses of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Stratification of randomization is not required for a pre-specified subgroup analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lee D

    2013-01-01

    Published literature and regulatory agency guidance documents provide conflicting recommendations as to whether a pre-specified subgroup analysis also requires for its validity that the study employ randomization that is stratified on subgroup membership. This is an important issue, as subgroup analyses are often required to demonstrate efficacy in the development of drugs with a companion diagnostic. Here, it is shown, for typical randomization methods, that the fraction of patients in the subgroup given experimental treatment matches, on average, the target fraction in the entire study. Also, mean covariate values are balanced, on average, between treatment arms in the subgroup, and it is argued that the variance in covariate imbalance between treatment arms in the subgroup is at worst only slightly increased versus a subgroup-stratified randomization method. Finally, in an analysis of variance setting, a least-squares treatment effect estimator within the subgroup is shown to be unbiased whether or not the randomization is stratified on subgroup membership. Thus, a requirement that a study be stratified on subgroup membership would place an artificial roadblock to innovation and the goals of personalized healthcare. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Low Back Pain Subgroups using Fear-Avoidance Model Measures: Results of a Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneciuk, Jason M.; Robinson, Michael E.; George, Steven Z.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this secondary analysis was to test the hypothesis that an empirically derived psychological subgrouping scheme based on multiple Fear-Avoidance Model (FAM) constructs would provide additional capabilities for clinical outcomes in comparison to a single FAM construct. Methods Patients (n = 108) with acute or sub-acute low back pain (LBP) enrolled in a clinical trial comparing behavioral physical therapy interventions to classification based physical therapy completed baseline questionnaires for pain catastrophizing (PCS), fear-avoidance beliefs (FABQ-PA, FABQ-W), and patient-specific fear (FDAQ). Clinical outcomes were pain intensity and disability measured at baseline, 4-weeks, and 6-months. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was used to create distinct cluster profiles among FAM measures and discriminant analysis was used to interpret clusters. Changes in clinical outcomes were investigated with repeated measures ANOVA and differences in results based on cluster membership were compared to FABQ-PA subgrouping used in the original trial. Results Three distinct FAM subgroups (Low Risk, High Specific Fear, and High Fear & Catastrophizing) emerged from cluster analysis. Subgroups differed on baseline pain and disability (p’s<.01) with the High Fear & Catastrophizing subgroup associated with greater pain than the Low Risk subgroup (p<.01) and the greatest disability (p’s<.05). Subgroup × time interactions were detected for both pain and disability (p’s<.05) with the High Fear & Catastrophizing subgroup reporting greater changes in pain and disability than other subgroups (p’s<.05). In contrast, FABQ-PA subgroups used in the original trial were not associated with interactions for clinical outcomes. Discussion These data suggest that subgrouping based on multiple FAM measures may provide additional information on clinical outcomes in comparison to determining subgroup status by FABQ-PA alone. Subgrouping methods for

  17. Synthesis and characterization of an epimer of tacrolimus, an immunosuppressive drug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Dorthe Mondrup; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Hansen, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    8-Epitacrolimus (2), a new l-pipecolic acid macrolide lactone, was obtained by base-catalyzed epimerization of tacrolimus (FK-506, 1), an important immunosuppressive drug, and its structure determined by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction method. The compound was fully characterized by spectrosco......8-Epitacrolimus (2), a new l-pipecolic acid macrolide lactone, was obtained by base-catalyzed epimerization of tacrolimus (FK-506, 1), an important immunosuppressive drug, and its structure determined by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction method. The compound was fully characterized...... by spectroscopic techniques. The epimer is of importance due to its potential biological effects as well as because of its possible formation during formulation, handling, and use of tacrolimus products....

  18. Severe diarrhoea due to Cystoisospora belli in renal transplant patient on Immunosuppressive drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marathe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystoisospora belli , formerly known as Isospora belli, protozoal parasite endemic to many regions of the world including the Caribbean, Central and South America, Africa, and South-East Asia. It is frequently encountered in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS and is considered to be an AIDS-defining illness. Chronic severe watery diarrhoea due to C. belli has also been reported in other immunodeficiency states. C. belli infection in immunosuppressed patients has rarely been described. We describe severe diarrhoea due to C. belli in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative renal transplant recipient on immunosuppressive drugs. Oocysts of C. belli were detected in direct smear preparation of the diarrheic stool sample of the patient. The patient responded to combination treatment with Bactrim-double-strength (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and Nitazoxanide.

  19. A 27-Year-Old Severely Immunosuppressed Female with Misleading Clinical Features of Disseminated Cutaneous Sporotrichosis

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    Atiyah Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic granulomatous mycosis caused by fungus of the Sporothrix schenckii complex. It is considered to be a rare condition in most parts of the world. It mostly causes cutaneous infection but can also cause multisystemic disease. Unlike most deep cutaneous mycoses which have a primary pulmonary focus, it is usually caused by direct inoculation of the fungus into the skin causing a classical linear, lymphocutaneous nodular eruption. However, atypical presentations of the condition can occur especially in immunosuppressed individuals. We report the case of a severely immunosuppressed female who presented with disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis which was initially diagnosed and treated as disseminated cutaneous Kaposi’s sarcoma.

  20. Pharmacodynamics of T cell function for monitoring pharmacologic immunosuppression after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carmen; Millán, Olga; Rovira, Montserrat; Fernández-Avilés, Francesc; López, Anna; Suárez-Lledó, María; Carreras, Enric; Urbano-Ispízua, Álvaro; Brunet, Mercè

    2017-04-01

    Information on pharmacodynamic monitoring after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-SCT) to evaluate individual responses to immunosuppressive drugs is scarce. We studied the relationship between a panel of pharmacodynamic markers monitored during the first 3 months after transplant and the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Lymphocyte activation assessed by intracellular ATP concentration in CD4(+) T cells, a high percentage of CD8(+) effector T cells, and a low percentage of CD4(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells correlated significantly with GVHD. A cutoff value of 0.5 for the CD8(+) effector T/Treg ratio provided the most accurate diagnosis of GVHD (sensitivity 58.8%, specificity 91%). These pharmacodynamic markers may provide an efficient complement to standard pharmacokinetic monitoring of immunosuppressive drugs after allo-SCT.

  1. Chronic inflammation drives glioma growth: cellular and molecular factors responsible for an immunosuppressive microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P Antonios

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review examines glioma disease initiation, promotion, and progression with a focus on the cell types present within the tumor mass and the molecules responsible for the immunosuppressive microenvironment that are present at each step of the disease. The cell types and molecules present also correlate with the grade of malignancy. An overall "type 2" chronic inflammatory microenvironment develops that facilitates glioma promotion and contributes to the neo-vascularization characteristic of gliomas. An immunosuppressive microenvironment shields the tumor mass from clearance by the patient's own immune system. Here, we provide suggestions to deal with a chronically-inflamed tumor microenvironment and provide recommendations to help optimize adjuvant immune- and gene therapies currently offered to glioma patients.

  2. Food safety for the solid organ transplant patient: preventing foodborne illness while on chronic immunosuppressive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Patricia A C

    2012-12-01

    Issues regarding food safety are seen increasingly in the news; outbreaks of foodborne illness have been associated with public health concerns ranging from mild illness to death. For the solid organ transplant patient, immunosuppressive and antibacterial drugs, which maintain transplant organ function, can expose the transplant patient to increased risk of foodborne illness from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This review article describes the clinical consequences, sources of foodborne illness, and food safety practices needed to minimize risks to the solid organ transplant patient who must take lifelong immunosuppressive drugs. All members of the transplant team share responsibility for education of the solid organ transplant patient in preventing infections. The registered dietitian, as part of the transplant team, is the recognized expert in providing food safety education in the context of medical nutrition therapy to solid organ transplant patients, the patients' caregivers, and other healthcare providers.

  3. Collagenase enzymatic fasciotomy for Dupuytren contracture in patients on chronic immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Michael J; Belsky, Mark R; Blazar, Philip E; Leibman, Matthew I; Ruchelsman, David E

    2015-11-01

    Collagenase enzymatic fasciotomy is an accepted nonsurgical treatment for disabling hand contractures caused by Dupuytren disease. We conducted a study to investigate use of collagenase in an immunosuppressed population. We retrospectively reviewed data from 2 academic hand surgical practices. Eight patients on chronic immunosuppressive therapies were treated with collagenase for digital contractures between 2010 and 2011. Thirteen collagenase enzymatic fasciotomies were performed in these 8 patients. Mean preinjection contracture was 53.0°. At mean follow-up of 6.7 months, mean magnitude of contracture improved to 12.9°. Mean metacarpophalangeal joint contracture improved from 42.0° to 4.2°. Mean proximal interphalangeal joint contracture improved from 65.8° to 21.7°. Three of the enzymatic fasciotomies were complicated by skin tears. There were no infections. As more patients seek nonsurgical treatment for Dupuytren disease, its safety and efficacy in select cohorts of patients should continue to be evaluated prospectively.

  4. A case of necrotising fasciitis caused by Serratia marsescens: extreme age as functional immunosuppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Thomas Edmund; Cope, Wei; Beaumont, David Martin

    2013-03-01

    We report the case of a 97-year-old woman who had a prolonged hospital admission for the treatment of right-sided heart failure. During her stay she experienced a rapid deterioration, characterised by shortness of breath, cardiovascular compromise and a hot, red, swollen calf. Post-mortem examination demonstrated that this was caused by necrotising fasciitis due to Serratia marcescens as a single pathogen. This is only the second reported case of this condition in the absence of diabetes or immunosuppression, and clinical deterioration was much more rapid. The case underlines the importance of circumspection and regular review in the diagnosis of the elderly patient. It reminds us that these patients should be viewed as functionally immunosuppressed, and that some or all of the haematological markers of infection can be absent even in severe disease.

  5. Immunosuppression abrogates resistance of young rabbits to Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) is caused by a calicivirus (RHDV) that kills 90% of infected adult European rabbits within 3 days. Remarkably, young rabbits are resistant to RHD. We induced immunosuppression in young rabbits by treatment with methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) and challenged the animals with RHDV by intramuscular injection. All of these young rabbits died within 3 days of infection due to fulminant hepatitis, presenting a large number of RHDV-positive dead or apoptotic hepatocytes, and a significant seric increase in cytokines, features that are similar to those of naïve adult rabbits infected by RHDV. We conclude that MPA-induced immunosuppression abrogates the resistance of young rabbits to RHD, indicating that there are differences in the innate immune system between young and adult rabbits that contribute to their distinct resistance/susceptibility to RHDV infection. PMID:24490832

  6. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis: culmination of management using immunosuppression, surgical and prosthetic therapy over quarter century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shilpa; Pasari, Anand S; Sangwan, Virender S

    2016-11-23

    A 22-year-old male patient presented in 1988 with active vernal keratoconjunctivitis. He was treated with topical mast cell stabilisers and corticosteroids. Chronic inflammation despite topical treatment necessitated oral immunosuppressants. Active disease came under control with this; however, the patient gradually developed limbal stem cell deficiency. He underwent bilateral pannus resection with amniotic membrane transplantation that resulted in improved ocular surface. In 2007, patient was found to have significant bilateral posterior subcapsular cataracts and underwent bilateral cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation with good visual outcome. In 2016, he was provided with scleral lens prosthetic device, which further improved vision. At last follow-up, more than 25 years after his initial visit, his visual acuity was 20/25 in both eyes with a stable surface. With a comprehensive approach using immunosuppression, surgical therapy and scleral lens prosthetic device, chronic vernal keratoconjunctivitis can be well managed as illustrated in this case. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Nocardia brasiliensis induces an immunosuppressive microenvironment that favors chronic infection in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G; Perez-Liñan, Amira R; Bocanegra-Ibarias, Paola; Perez-Rivera, Luz I; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C

    2012-07-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is an intracellular microorganism and the most common etiologic agent of actinomycetoma in the Americas. Several intracellular pathogens induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment through increases in CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), thus downregulating other T-cell subpopulations and assuring survival in the host. In this study, we determined whether N. brasiliensis modulates T-lymphocyte responses and their related cytokine profiles in a murine experimental model. We also examined the relationship between N. brasiliensis immunomodulation and pathogenesis and bacterial survival. In early infection, Th17/Tc17 cells were increased at day 3 (P 1 log) was also observed (P brasiliensis modulates the immune system to induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment that benefits its survival during the chronic stage of infection.

  8. Nocardia brasiliensis Induces an Immunosuppressive Microenvironment That Favors Chronic Infection in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G.; Perez-Liñan, Amira R.; Bocanegra-Ibarias, Paola; Perez-Rivera, Luz I.

    2012-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is an intracellular microorganism and the most common etiologic agent of actinomycetoma in the Americas. Several intracellular pathogens induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment through increases in CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), thus downregulating other T-cell subpopulations and assuring survival in the host. In this study, we determined whether N. brasiliensis modulates T-lymphocyte responses and their related cytokine profiles in a murine experimental model. We also examined the relationship between N. brasiliensis immunomodulation and pathogenesis and bacterial survival. In early infection, Th17/Tc17 cells were increased at day 3 (P 1 log) was also observed (P brasiliensis modulates the immune system to induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment that benefits its survival during the chronic stage of infection. PMID:22547544

  9. Perioperative use of immunosuppressive medications in patients with Crohn's disease in the new "biological era"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Crohn’s disease (CD) is characterized by transmural inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract leading to inflammatory, stricturing and/or and fistulizing disease. Once a patient develops medically refractory disease, mechanical obstruction, fistulizing disease or perforation, surgery is indicated. Unfortunately, surgery is not curative in most cases, underscoring the importance of bowel preservation and adequate perioperative medical management. As many of the medications used to treat CD are immunosuppressive, the concern for postoperative infectious complications and anastomotic healing are particularly concerning; these concerns have to be balanced with preventing and treating residual or recurrent disease. We herein review the available literature and make recommendations regarding the preoperative, perioperative and postoperative administration of immunosuppressive medications in the current era of biological therapy for CD. Standardized algorithms for perioperative medical management would greatly assist future research for optimizing surgical outcomes and preventing disease recurrence in the future. PMID:28852521

  10. Total lymphoid irradiation assessed for possible enhancement of immunosuppression in hyperimmunized dogs receiving renal allografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko (Yamato Seiwa Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan)); Rapaport, F.T.

    1992-12-01

    With performed antibodies to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) appearing in an increasing number of patients today, hyperimmunization constitutes a major problem in clinical transplantation. In adult beagle dogs hyperimmunized with skin allografts and buffy coat injection, we performed renal allograft transplantation to assess the efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) employed as a preoperative measure in combination with cyclosporine (CyA) and methyl-prednisolone (MPL) in effecting immunosuppression. The mean survival period were 6.5 days in dogs withheld preliminary treatment, 9.0 days in the dogs receiving CyA and MPL, 26.7 days in those administered one-stage TLI, and 68 days (terminated by euthanasia) of the dogs given two-stage TLI. TLI administered two stages is considered an effective method of enhancing immunosuppression sufficiently to enable the attenuation of adverse reaction to renal allograft in hyperimmunized recipients. (author).

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation of α,β-unsaturated lactones as potent immunosuppressive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Lee, Won-Gil; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Yong-Chul; Ko, Hyojin

    2011-10-01

    Compounds having α,β-unsaturated lactones display a variety of biological activities. Many research groups have tested both natural and unnatural α,β-unsaturated lactones for as-yet undiscovered biological properties. We synthesized α,β-unsaturated lactones with various substituents at the δ-position and studied their immunosuppressive effects, that is, the inhibition of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. Among the compounds synthesized, the benzofuran-substituted α,β-unsaturated lactone 4h showed the best inhibitory activity toward IL-2 production in Jurkat e6-1 T lymphocytes (IC(50)=66.9 nM) without cytotoxicity at 10 μM. The results indicated that 4h may be useful as a potent immunosuppressive agent, as well as in IL-2-related studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pancolitis with Ischemic Injury as a Complication of Immunosuppressive Treatment in a Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dalbeni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic colitis is a serious drug-induced adverse event. There are only few cases of immunosuppression-associated ischemic colitis described in the literature, but none with a pancolitis-like manifestation. We report the case of a 72-year-old female patient who developed a pancolitis with ischemic injury on immunosuppressive treatment with steroids and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. The patient presented with massive rectal bleeding. Colonoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of pancolitis. The results of histological examination indicated drug-induced ischemic colitis involving the entire colon. This is the first case of ischemic pancolitis mimicking an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in a patient with immunosuppressive therapy.

  13. Immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid cells compromise neonatal host defence against infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Ertelt, James M.; Kinder, Jeremy M.; Jiang, Tony T.; Zhang, Xuzhe; Xin, Lijun; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Strong, Beverly S.; Qualls, Joseph E.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Kalfa, Theodosia A.; Shaaban, Aimen F.; Way, Sing Sing

    2013-12-01

    Newborn infants are highly susceptible to infection. This defect in host defence has generally been ascribed to the immaturity of neonatal immune cells; however, the degree of hyporesponsiveness is highly variable and depends on the stimulation conditions. These discordant responses illustrate the need for a more unified explanation for why immunity is compromised in neonates. Here we show that physiologically enriched CD71+ erythroid cells in neonatal mice and human cord blood have distinctive immunosuppressive properties. The production of innate immune protective cytokines by adult cells is diminished after transfer to neonatal mice or after co-culture with neonatal splenocytes. Neonatal CD71+ cells express the enzyme arginase-2, and arginase activity is essential for the immunosuppressive properties of these cells because molecular inhibition of this enzyme or supplementation with L-arginine overrides immunosuppression. In addition, the ablation of CD71+ cells in neonatal mice, or the decline in number of these cells as postnatal development progresses parallels the loss of suppression, and restored resistance to the perinatal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. However, CD71+ cell-mediated susceptibility to infection is counterbalanced by CD71+ cell-mediated protection against aberrant immune cell activation in the intestine, where colonization with commensal microorganisms occurs swiftly after parturition. Conversely, circumventing such colonization by using antimicrobials or gnotobiotic germ-free mice overrides these protective benefits. Thus, CD71+ cells quench the excessive inflammation induced by abrupt colonization with commensal microorganisms after parturition. This finding challenges the idea that the susceptibility of neonates to infection reflects immune-cell-intrinsic defects and instead highlights processes that are developmentally more essential and inadvertently mitigate innate immune protection. We anticipate that these

  14. Genipin attenuates sepsis-induced immunosuppression through inhibition of T lymphocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, So-Jin; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2015-07-01

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, initiates a complex immune response consisting of an early hyperinflammatory response and a subsequent hypoinflammatory response that impairs the removal of infectious organisms. The importance of sepsis-induced immunosuppression and its contribution to mortality has recently emerged. Apoptotic depletion of T lymphocytes is a critical cause of immunosuppression in the late phase of sepsis. Genipin is a major active compound of gardenia fruit that has anti-apoptotic and anti-microbial properties. This study investigated the mechanisms of action of genipin on immunosuppression in the late phase of sepsis. Mice received genipin (1, 2.5 and 5mg/kg, i.v.) at 0 (immediately) and 24h after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Twenty-six hours after CLP, the spleen and blood were collected. Genipin improved the survival rate compared to controls. CLP increased the levels of FADD, caspase-8 and caspase-3 protein expression, which were attenuated by genipin. Genipin increased the level of anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 protein expression, while it decreased the level of pro-apoptotic phosphorylated-Bim protein expression in CLP. CLP decreased the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell population, while it increased the regulatory T cell (Treg) population and the level of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 protein expression on Treg. These changes were attenuated by genipin. The splenic levels of interferon-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 were reduced, while the levels of IL-4 and IL-10 increased after CLP. Genipin attenuated these alterations. These findings suggest that genipin reduces immunosuppression by inhibiting T lymphocyte apoptosis in the late phase of sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biliary diseases in heart transplanted patients: a comparison between cyclosporine a versus tacrolimus-based immunosuppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stief J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A cyclosporine (CsA-based immunosuppression is associated with an increased incidence of cholelithiasis after heart transplantation. It is not known if tacrolimus (Tac has comparable biliary side effects in humans. We evaluated the incidence of gallbladder sludge and cholelithiasis under Tac-based immunosuppression by ultrasound examinations in 31 cardiac transplants (25 male, 6 female, mean age: 59 ± 11 years. Data were compared to 57 patients (47 male, 10 female, mean age: 58 ± 11 years who received CsA-based immunosuppression. 6 patients receiving Tac and 6 patients receiving CsA had already gallstones prior to transplantation so that finally 25 patients of the Tac group and 51 patients of the CsA group could be evaluated. In the Tac group the incidence of biliary sludge was 4% (1 of 25, of gallstones 28% (7 of 25. In comparison, patients receiving CsA developed biliary sludge in also 4% (2 of 51 and gallstones in 25% (13 of 51. Nine of 42 males in the CsA group (21% and eight of 20 males in the Tac group (40% developed either gallstones or sludge (n.s. Six of nine females in the CsA group (67%, but none of five females in the Tac group (0% developed either gallstones or sludge (p = 0.01. In summary, the incidence of biliary disease in patients with Tac is comparable with CsA-based immunosuppression. We recommend regular sonographical examinations to detect biliary diseases as early as possible. In cases of clinically, laboratory and sonographical signs of cholecystitis cholecystectomy is indicated. It seems that towards lithogenicity female patients benefit more from a Tac-based treatment because the occurrence of gallstones is rare.

  16. A Case of Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection Occurring with Anti-IgE Immunosuppression

    OpenAIRE

    Zandman, Daniel; Hahn, William; Moss, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The increasingly widespread use of novel immunosuppressive drugs may lead to unexpected infectious complications. We report a case of persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection that failed to respond to antimicrobial therapy in a patient receiving omalizumab (Xolair?, Genentech USA Inc., San Francisco, CA and Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Basel, Switzerland), an anti-IgE monoclonal antibody approved by the FDA for treatment of severe persistent asthma. To our knowledge, this is the firs...

  17. Post-transplant aspergillosis and the role of combined neurosurgical and antifungal therapies under belatacept immunosuppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekkehard, Kasper; Bartek, Jiri; Johnson, Jesper Scott

    2011-01-01

    Opportunistic CNS-infection represent a major threat to patients after organ transplantation due to the need for ongoing immunosuppression and belatacept is a novel CTL4A inhibitor, which is increasingly used for patients following cadaveric kidney transplantation. Among the CNS infections, intra...... with intraoperative image guidance was performed for a gross total resection of the lesion. Twenty-four months from resection, she remains on voriconazole with no evidence of recurrence and complete neurologic recovery and preserved renal function....

  18. Treatment with immunosuppressive therapy in patients with pars planitis: experience of a reference centre in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Pedroza-Seres, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical course of the patients with pars planitis that received immunosuppressive drugs. We retrospectively analysed the data of 10 years from 374 patients with pars planitis in a large reference centre in Mexico City and included 49 patients (92 eyes). Median age at presentation was 8 years. 35 patients (71.4%) were male and 43 patients (87.7%) had bilateral disease. Diverse immunosuppressive medications were used, mainly methotrexate (69.4%) and azathioprine (63.3%) with 18 patients requiring more than one drug. The main indications for starting immunosuppressive therapy were lack of response to initial treatment and advance disease at presentation. The results showed good response with steroid reduction (69.3% of patients), visual acuity improvement (51% of patients) and inflammatory disease reduction (59.1% of patients). In 25 patients (51%), steroids were started previous to immunosuppressors and in 24 (49%) at the same time without significant difference in clinical improvement (p=0.210) or visual outcome (p=0.498). Thirteen patients (26.5%) presented mild adverse effects. The median of the final visual acuity was 20/40. The median follow-up time was 44 months (range 13-115 months). Immunosuppressive therapy allows an adequate control of inflammatory disease in pars planitis, with clinical and visual improvement and steroid dose reduction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia: a single-center retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Jalaeikhoo

    Full Text Available Aplastic anemia (AA is a rare disease in which hematopoietic stem cells are severely diminished resulting in hypocellular bone marrow and pancytopenia. Etiology of AA includes auto immunity, toxins, infection, ionizing radiation, drugs and rare genetic disorders, but in the majority of cases no cause can be identified. In the present study we assessed response rate, survival, relapse and clonal evolution in patients with AA treated with immunosuppressive therapy.Patients with AA who received immunosuppressive therapy between May 1998 and September 2013 were included in this study. Patients with non-severe AA (NSAA were treated with cyclosporine (CsA and danazol while patients with severe AA (SAA as well as patients with NSAA who progressed to SAA after beginning of the treatment, were candidates for receiving antithymocyte globulin in addition to CsA and danazol.Among the 63 studied patients, 29 (46% had NSAA and 34 (54% had SAA. Three months after treatment, overall response was 58.6% in NSAA and 12.9% in patients with SAA. Survival of all patients at 5, 10 and 15 years were 73%, 55% and 49%, respectively. Survival rates were significantly higher in patients with NSAA compared to patients with SAA as well as in patients who responded at 6 months compared to non-responders. The relapse risk was 39.7% at 10 years. Relapse occurred in patients who discontinued the therapy more than those who continued taking CsA (p value<0.01. The risk of clonal evolution was 9.9% at 10 years and 22.8% at 15 years after treatment.This long-term retrospective study indicated that immunosuppressive therapy should be recommended to patients with AA. Also, our experience indicated that immunosuppressive therapy should not be discontinued after response to therapy in patients with both NSAA and SAA due to high risk of relapse. Low dose of CsA should be continued indefinitely.

  20. Trial of complete weaning from immunosuppression for liver transplant recipients: factors predictive of tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Rocío García; Sarobe, Pablo; Merino, Juana; Lasarte, Juan J; D'Avola, Delia; Belsue, Virginia; Delgado, José A; Silva, Leyre; Iñarrairaegui, Mercedes; Sangro, Bruno; Sola, Jesus J; Pardo, Fernando; Quiroga, Jorge; Herrero, J Ignacio

    2013-09-01

    Recipients of liver transplantation (LT) may develop immunological tolerance. Factors predictive of tolerance are not clearly understood. Transplant recipients with normal liver function tests and without active viral hepatitis or autoimmune disease who presented with side effects of immunosuppression or a high risk of de novo malignancies were selected to participate in this prospective study. Twenty-four patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and, therefore, underwent a gradual reduction of immunosuppression. Tolerance was defined as normal liver function tests after immunosuppression withdrawal. Basal clinical and immunological characteristics, including lymphocyte counts and subpopulations (T, B, natural killer, CD4(+) , CD8(+) , and regulatory T cells) and the phytohemagglutinin stimulation index (SI), were compared for tolerant and nontolerant patients. Fifteen of the 24 patients (62.5%) were tolerant at a median of 14 months (interquartile range = 8.5-22.5 months) after complete immunosuppression withdrawal. Tolerant patients had a longer median interval between transplantation and inclusion in the study (156 for tolerant patients versus 71 months for nontolerant patients, P = 0.003) and a lower median SI (7.49 for tolerant patients versus 41.73 for nontolerant patients, P = 0.01). We identified 3 groups of patients with different probabilities of tolerance: in the first group (n = 7 for an interval > 10 years and an SI  10 years and an SI > 20 or an interval  20), 29% reached tolerance. In conclusion, a high proportion of select LT recipients can reach tolerance over the long term. Two simple basal variables-the time from transplantation and the SI-may help to identify these patients. © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  1. Effects of Immunosuppressants on Immune Response to Vaccine in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan Cao; Di Zhao; An-Tao Xu; Jun Shen; Zhi-Hua Ran

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the response rate to vaccination in different treatment groups (nonimmunosuppressants and immunosuppressants). Data Sources: We completed an online systematic search using PubMed to identify all articles published in English between January 1990 and December 2013 assessing the effect of the response rate to vaccination in different treatment groups (with and without immunomodulators). The following terms were used: "inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)" OR "Crohn′s dise...

  2. Immunosuppression and Chagas disease; experience from a non-endemic country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, F; Sánchez-Montalvá, A; Valerio, L; Serre, N; Roure, S; Treviño, B; Pou, D; Sulleiro, E; Bocanegra, C; Molina, I

    2015-09-01

    Reactivation of Chagas disease in the chronic phase may occur when immunosuppression is established, sometimes resulting in high parasitaemia and severe clinical manifestations such as meningitis and meningoencephalitis. Although this situation is being increasingly described, there is still scarce information. This retrospective observational study was performed in three Tropical Medicine Units of Barcelona (Spain) included in the International Health Programme of the Catalan Health Institute (PROSICS). The objective of the study was to describe epidemiological, clinical, microbiological, prognostic and therapeutic data from patients with Chagas disease and any kind of immunosuppressive condition attended in these three institutions from January 2007 to October 2014. From 1823 patients with Chagas disease attending these three centres during the study period, 38 (2%) had some kind of immunosuppressive condition: 12 patients had human immunodeficiency virus infection, 8 patients had neoplasia, 4 patients underwent organ transplantation and 14 patients had an autoimmune disease. Eight (21.1%) patients had cardiac involvement, and six (15.8%) patients had gastrointestinal involvement. Acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection was detected in two Spanish patients. Thirty-one (81.6%) patients received treatment with benznidazole, of whom 17 (54.8%) had some kind of adverse event. No patient had a severe manifestation or reactivation of Chagas disease. Patients with Chagas disease under immunosuppressive conditions are being increasingly described, especially in non-endemic countries. More information about this topic is required and international consensus in the diagnosis, treatment and follow up of these patients must be established to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biliary diseases in heart transplanted patients: a comparison between cyclosporine a versus tacrolimus-based immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A cyclosporine (CsA)-based immunosuppression is associated with an increased incidence of cholelithiasis after heart transplantation. It is not known if tacrolimus (Tac) has comparable biliary side effects in humans. We evaluated the incidence of gallbladder sludge and cholelithiasis under Tac-based immunosuppression by ultrasound examinations in 31 cardiac transplants (25 male, 6 female, mean age: 59 ± 11 years). Data were compared to 57 patients (47 male, 10 female, mean age: 58 ± 11 years) who received CsA-based immunosuppression. 6 patients receiving Tac and 6 patients receiving CsA had already gallstones prior to transplantation so that finally 25 patients of the Tac group and 51 patients of the CsA group could be evaluated. In the Tac group the incidence of biliary sludge was 4% (1 of 25), of gallstones 28% (7 of 25). In comparison, patients receiving CsA developed biliary sludge in also 4% (2 of 51) and gallstones in 25% (13 of 51). Nine of 42 males in the CsA group (21%) and eight of 20 males in the Tac group (40%) developed either gallstones or sludge (n.s). Six of nine females in the CsA group (67%), but none of five females in the Tac group (0%) developed either gallstones or sludge (p = 0.01). In summary, the incidence of biliary disease in patients with Tac is comparable with CsA-based immunosuppression. We recommend regular sonographical examinations to detect biliary diseases as early as possible. In cases of clinically, laboratory and sonographical signs of cholecystitis cholecystectomy is indicated. It seems that towards lithogenicity female patients benefit more from a Tac-based treatment because the occurrence of gallstones is rare. PMID:19541577

  4. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ice, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barbee, T.; Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Howells, M.; Thompson, A.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Yun, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E{>=}5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called {open_quotes}jelly roll{close_quotes} or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes.

  5. Balance Impairments in Different Subgroups of Patients With Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Gabriela F; Bonato, Paolo; Florencio, Lidiane L; Pinheiro, Carina F; Dach, Fabiola; Bigal, Marcelo E; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Debora

    2017-03-01

    Patients with migraine often experience balance impairments. However, the relationship between clinical features - like aura and chronicity - and the severity of balance impairments is not well established. The objective of this study was to assess balance impairments in different subgroups of migraine patients. One hundred five subjects diagnosed according to the ICHD-III were recruited in the study. They were uniformly distributed among three groups: migraine with aura, migraine without aura, and chronic migraine. Thirty-five controls were also recruited in the study. Balance impairments were assessed in all subjects via the modified Sensory Organization test and the Limits of Stability test. The results in the four groups were compared using ANCOVA tests with age, BMI, presence of dizziness, level of physical activity, time of migraine onset, and medication intake as covariates. Subjects in the migraine with aura and the chronic migraine groups showed poorer balance control than control subjects in three of the four conditions tested using the modified Sensory Organization test: FirmCE: CG: 1.5 cm2 , 95%CI 1.3 to 1.7; M: 2.1 cm2 , 95%CI 1.6 to 2.6; MA: 4.5 cm2 , 95%CI 3.2 to 5.8; CM: 4.5 cm2 , 95%CI 3.0 to 6.0; P migraine without aura group (P migraine groups were found in the reaction time, movement velocity, endpoint excursion, and maximal excursion parameters (P  .05). There is evidence of balance control impairments in subjects with all subtypes of migraine compared to control subjects. The presence of aura and frequent migraine attacks reflect negatively in the postural control performance and may have a significant clinical impact in patients with migraine that should be addressed with appropriate clinical interventions. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  6. Personalization of the immunosuppressive treatment in renal transplant recipients: the great challenge in "omics" medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaza, Gianluigi; Granata, Simona; Tomei, Paola; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Lupo, Antonio

    2015-02-17

    Renal transplantation represents the most favorable treatment for patients with advanced renal failure and it is followed, in most cases, by a significant enhancement in patients' quality of life. Significant improvements in one-year renal allograft and patients' survival rates have been achieved over the last 10 years primarily as a result of newer immunosuppressive regimens. Despite these notable achievements in the short-term outcome, long-term graft function and survival rates remain less than optimal. Death with a functioning graft and chronic allograft dysfunction result in an annual rate of 3%-5%. In this context, drug toxicity and long-term chronic adverse effects of immunosuppressive medications have a pivotal role. Unfortunately, at the moment, except for the evaluation of trough drug levels, no clinically useful tools are available to correctly manage immunosuppressive therapy. The proper use of these drugs could potentiate therapeutic effects minimizing adverse drug reactions. For this purpose, in the future, "omics" techniques could represent powerful tools that may be employed in clinical practice to routinely aid the personalization of drug treatment according to each patient's genetic makeup. However, it is unquestionable that additional studies and technological advances are needed to standardize and simplify these methodologies.

  7. Immunosuppressant-driven de novo malignant neoplasms after solid-organ transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billups, Kelsey; Neal, Jennifer; Salyer, Jeanne

    2015-06-01

    Solid-organ transplant recipients are at a 3- to 5-fold increased risk of a de novo malignant neoplasm developing compared with the general population. The most frequently developed virus-associated malignant neoplasms are Kaposi sarcoma (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 208.0), nonmelanoma skin cancer (SIR, 28.6), and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, primarily non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SIR, 8.1). Immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids, antimetabolites, calcineurin inhibitors, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors play a key role in either causing or preventing this complication. It is hypothesized that some of these regimens can impair cancer surveillance, facilitate the action of oncogenic viruses, and promote direct oncogenic activity. Evolving research has shown promising dual antitumor and immunosuppressive properties of the mTOR inhibitor class. The effective management of posttransplant neoplasms most likely involves the use of these medications among other preventative options. These measures include monitoring certain viral loads as well as immunosuppressant drug levels. Reducing these levels to as low as possible for healthy engraftment and altering regimens when appropriate are management strategies that could lessen this complication of solid-organ transplant. More studies examining the effects of therapeutic drug monitoring are needed to determine specific plasma drug concentrations that will ensure organ engraftment without the development of de novo malignant neoplasms.

  8. Immunosuppression is an independent prognostic factor associated with aggressive tumor behavior in cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Tracy; Lee, Christina Y; Sanghvi, Asmi; Obregon, Roxana; Sidiropoulos, Michael; Cooper, Chelsea; Merkel, Emily A; Yélamos, Oriol; Ferris, Laura; Gerami, Pedram

    2015-09-01

    A number of factors other than those identified by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) may have prognostic significance in the evaluation of melanoma. We sought to evaluate commonly recorded clinical features potentially associated with aggressive melanoma. We conducted a retrospective case-control study. We included patients given a diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma with at least 5 years of follow-up or documented metastases. Patients were divided into nonaggressive and aggressive groups. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the association of multiple clinical and histologic parameters and metastases. We included 141 patients. Significant prognostic factors in univariate analysis associated with nonaggressive disease included history of dysplastic nevus syndrome and ABCDE criteria. Significant factors in univariate analysis associated with aggressive disease included age and immunosuppression. Only age and immunosuppression remained significant in multivariate analysis when controlled across statistically significant histologic variables from AJCC. The study is retrospective and has a small sample size. Older patients and those with a history of immunosuppression may be at higher risk for aggressive disease and should be closely monitored after an initial diagnosis of melanoma. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A lethal disease model for New World hantaviruses using immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergote, Valentijn; Laenen, Lies; Vanmechelen, Bert; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeken, Erik; Hooper, Jay W; Maes, Piet

    2017-10-01

    Hantavirus, the hemorrhagic causative agent of two clinical diseases, is found worldwide with variation in severity, incidence and mortality. The most lethal hantaviruses are found on the American continent where the most prevalent viruses like Andes virus and Sin Nombre virus are known to cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. New World hantavirus infection of immunocompetent hamsters results in an asymptomatic infection except for Andes virus and Maporal virus; the only hantaviruses causing a lethal disease in immunocompetent Syrian hamsters mimicking hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in humans. Hamsters, immunosuppressed with dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide, were infected intramuscularly with different New World hantavirus strains (Bayou virus, Black Creek Canal virus, Caño Delgadito virus, Choclo virus, Laguna Negra virus, and Maporal virus). In the present study, we show that immunosuppression of hamsters followed by infection with a New World hantavirus results in an acute disease that precisely mimics both hantavirus disease in humans and Andes virus infection of hamsters. Infected hamsters showed specific clinical signs of disease and moreover, histological analysis of lung tissue showed signs of pulmonary edema and inflammation within alveolar septa. In this study, we were able to infect immunosuppressed hamsters with different New World hantaviruses reaching a lethal outcome with signs of disease mimicking human disease.

  10. Long-term outcome of intensive initial immunosuppression protocol in pediatric deceased donor renal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olaitan, Oyedolamu K

    2010-02-01

    To report the long-term outcome of deceased donor kidney transplantation in children with emphasis on the use of an intensive initial immunosuppression protocol using R-ATG as antibody induction. Between January 1991 and December 1997, 82 deceased donor kidney transplantations were performed in 75 pediatric recipients. Mean recipient age at transplantation was 12.9 yr and the mean follow-up period was 12.6 yr. All patients received quadruple immunosuppression with steroid, cyclosporine, azathioprine, and antibody induction using R-ATG-Fresenius. Actual one, five, and 10 yr patient survival rates were 99%, 97%, and 94%, respectively; only one patient (1.2%) developed PTLD. Actual one, five, and 10 yr overall graft survival rates were 84%, 71%, and 50%, respectively; there were five cases (6%) of graft thrombosis and the actual immunological graft survival rates were 91%, 78%, and 63% at one, five, and 10 yr, respectively. The use of an intensive initial immunosuppression protocol with R-ATG as antibody induction is safe and effective in pediatric recipients of deceased donor kidneys with excellent immunological graft survival without an increase in PTLD or other neoplasms over a minimum 10-yr follow up.

  11. Immunosuppressive and antiparasitic effects of cyclosporin A on Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, K; Nakamura, F; Abe, M; Okamoto, K

    1998-04-01

    The effect of cyclosporin A, which is known to act both as immunosuppressant and as an antiparasitic drug in many host-parasite systems, was examined in a mouse-Hymenolepis nana system. When BDF1 mice were injected s.c. with cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) every 48 h from 11 days p.i. with eggs, expulsion of the adult worms from the intestines of mice was prevented completely until at least 30 days p.i. Worm burden, dry weight and the number of gravid proglottids were not significantly reduced. By contrast, in untreated mice most of the worms were eliminated by 19 days p.i. The drug also completely abolished acquired resistance to a challenge infection with eggs when mice were injected s.c. with cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) around the time of challenge infection (Days -2, -1, 0, 1 and 2 relative to challenge). Such immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporin A on worm expulsion and protective immunity to reinfection were similar to those of another immunosuppressant, cyclophosphamide. As for the antiparasitic action of cyclosporin A against H. nana, a smaller number of cysticercoids developed from eggs in mice given cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) for 5 days beginning 1 day before infection, than in untreated controls.

  12. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive regimen is unclear; therefore, data from 331 patients entered into the prospective EACH2 registry were analyzed. Steroids combined with cyclophosphamide resulted in more stable complete remission (70%), defined as inhibitor undetectable, factor VIII more than 70 IU/dL and immunosuppression stopped, than steroids alone (48%) or rituximab-based regimens (59%). Propensity score-matched analysis controlling for age, sex, factor VIII level, inhibitor titer, and underlying etiology confirmed that stable remission was more likely with steroids and cyclophosphamide than steroids alone (odds ratio = 3.25; 95% CI, 1.51-6.96; P < .003). The median time to complete remission was approximately 5 weeks for steroids with or without cyclophosphamide; rituximab-based regimens required approximately twice as long. Immunoglobulin administration did not improve outcome. Second-line therapy was successful in approximately 60% of cases that failed first-line therapy. Outcome was not affected by the choice of first-line therapy. The likelihood of achieving stable remission was not affected by underlying etiology but was influenced by the presenting inhibitor titer and FVIII level.

  13. Multiple myeloma exosomes establish a favourable bone marrow microenvironment with enhanced angiogenesis and immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinheng; De Veirman, Kim; Faict, Sylvia; Frassanito, Maria Antonia; Ribatti, Domenico; Vacca, Angelo; Menu, Eline

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis and progression largely rely on the cells and extracellular factors in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. Compelling studies have identified tumour exosomes as key regulators in the maintenance and education of the BM microenvironment by targeting stromal cells, immune cells, and vascular cells. However, the role of MM exosomes in the modification of the BM microenvironment and MM progression remains unclear. Here, we explored the functions of MM exosomes in angiogenesis and immunosuppression in vitro and in vivo. Murine MM exosomes carrying multiple angiogenesis-related proteins enhanced angiogenesis and directly promoted endothelial cell growth. Several pathways such as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p53 were modulated by the exosomes in endothelial and BM stromal cells. These exosomes promoted the growth of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in naive mice through activation of the STAT3 pathway and changed their subsets to similar phenotypes to those seen in MM-bearing mice. Moreover, MM exosomes up-regulated inducible nitric oxide synthase and enhanced the immunosuppressive capacity of BM MDSCs in vivo. Our data show that MM exosomes modulate the BM microenvironment through enhancement of angiogenesis and immunosuppression, which will further facilitate MM progression. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. To immunosuppress or not: Behcet's syndrome presenting as an eosinophilic pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakti Kumar Bal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Etiologic diagnosis of an eosinophilic pleural effusion (EPE presents a diagnostic challenge when intrapleural air and blood have been ruled out as its proximate causes. Among the causes of EPE, those that require immunosuppression for the underlying disease include connective tissue diseases, sarcoidosis, vasculitis, and eosinophilic pneumonia. We present a case of clinically suspected Behcet's syndrome based on a 10-year history of recurrent multiple oral ulcers and human leukocyte antigen-B51 positivity who presented with only an EPE. Computed tomography pulmonary angiogram ruled out central thoracic vein thrombosis but was inconclusive in ruling out a subsegmental pulmonary embolism. The patient declined immunosuppressants and while on follow-up developed bilateral extensive acute lower limb deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Upper infrarenal inferior vena cava demonstrated chronic thrombosis suggestive of its antecedent role in pulmonary embolism-related EPE during the first instance. Behcet's syndrome-related EPE can be associated with venous thromboembolism, and immunosuppressive therapy prevents the subsequent thrombotic episodes.

  15. Immunosuppression reactivates viral replication long after resolution of woodchuck hepatitis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menne, Stephan; Cote, Paul J; Butler, Scott D; Toshkov, Ilia A; Gerin, John L; Tennant, Bud C

    2007-03-01

    Resolution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by coordinated humoral and cellular immune responses. Immunity is durable over decades, protecting the host from reinfection and potential activation of residual HBV. Woodchucks infected at birth with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) cleared viremia and developed antibodies to surface antigen (anti-WHs). Woodchucks became seronegative for anti-WHs 3-6 years later, but in some, WHV DNA was detected in serum, liver, and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Those with WHV DNA had increased in vitro cellular immune responses to viral antigens, CD4 and CD8 markers, and Th1-type cytokines, suggesting active WHV-specific T lymphocytes. Immunosuppression for 12 weeks using cyclosporine A in such woodchucks resulted in transient reactivation of WHV replication. Serum of 1 woodchuck that became positive for WHV DNA during immunosuppression was inoculated into WHV-susceptible woodchucks, and a productive infection was demonstrated. The results indicate that after infection durable cellular immunity to WHV is essential for the long-term control of viral replication and is probably maintained by continuous priming from residual virus. These experimental observations demonstrate the potential of immunosuppression to reactivate HBV after resolution of infection.

  16. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J; Long-Boyle, Janel

    2016-05-01

    Part I of this article included a pertinent review of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), the role of postgraft immunosuppression in alloHCT, and the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of the calcineurin inhibitors and methotrexate. In this article (Part II), we review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of mycophenolic acid (MPA), sirolimus, and the antithymocyte globulins (ATG). We then discuss target concentration intervention (TCI) of these postgraft immunosuppressants in alloHCT patients, with a focus on current evidence for TCI and on how TCI may improve clinical management in these patients. Currently, TCI using trough concentrations is conducted for sirolimus in alloHCT patients. Several studies demonstrate that MPA plasma exposure is associated with clinical outcomes, with an increasing number of alloHCT patients needing TCI of MPA. Compared with MPA, there are fewer pharmacokinetic/dynamic studies of rabbit ATG and horse ATG in alloHCT patients. Future pharmacokinetic/dynamic research of postgraft immunosuppressants should include '-omics'-based tools: pharmacogenomics may be used to gain an improved understanding of the covariates influencing pharmacokinetics as well as proteomics and metabolomics as novel methods to elucidate pharmacodynamic responses.

  17. Systemic increased immune response to Nocardia brasiliensis co-exists with local immunosuppressive microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian Geovanni; Welsh, Oliverio

    2012-10-01

    Human diseases produced by pathogenic actinomycetes are increasing because they may be present as opportunistic infections. Some of these microbes cause systemic infections associated with immunosuppressive conditions, such as chemotherapy for cancer, immunosuppressive therapy for transplant, autoimmune conditions, and AIDS; while others usually cause localized infection in immunocompetent individuals. Other factors related to this increase in incidence are: antibiotic resistance, not well defined taxonomy, and a delay in isolation and identification of the offending microbe. Examples of these infections are systemic disease and brain abscesses produced by Nocardia asteroides or the located disease by Nocardia brasiliensis, named actinomycetoma. During the Pathogenic Actinomycetes Symposium of the 16th International Symposium on Biology of Actinomycetes (ISBA), held in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, several authors presented recent research on the mechanisms by which N. brasiliensis modulates the immune system to survive in the host and advances in medical treatment of human actinomycetoma. Antibiotics and antimicrobials that are effective against severe actinomycetoma infections with an excellent therapeutic outcome and experimental studies of drugs that show promising bacterial inhibition in vivo and in vitro were presented. Here we demonstrate a systemic strong acquired immune response in humans and experimental mice at the same time of a local dominance of anti inflammatory cytokines environment. The pathogenic mechanisms of some actinomycetes include generation of an immunosuppressive micro environment to evade the protective immune response. This information will be helpful in understanding pathogenesis and to design new drugs for treatment of actinomycetoma.

  18. Immunosuppressive Effects of A-Type Procyanidin Oligomers from Cinnamomum tamala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Yang, Yang; Yuan, Pulong; Yang, Yifu; Chen, Kaixian; Jia, Qi; Li, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamon barks extracts have been reported to regulate immune function; however, the component(s) in cinnamon barks responsible for this effect is/are not yet clear. The aim of this study is to find out the possible component(s) that can be used as therapeutic agents for immune-related diseases from cinnamon bark. In this study, the immunosuppressive effects of fraction (named CT-F) and five procyanidin oligomers compounds, cinnamtannin B1, cinnamtannin D1 (CTD-1), parameritannin A1, procyanidin B2, and procyanidin C1, from Cinnamomum tamala or Cinnamomum cassia bark were examined on splenocytes proliferation model induced by ConA or LPS. Then, the effects of activated compound CTD-1 on cytokine production and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response were detected to evaluate the immunosuppressive activity of CTD-1. It was found that CT-F and CTD-1 significantly inhibited the splenocyte proliferation induced by ConA or LPS. CTD-1 dose-dependently reduced the level of IFN-γ and IL-2 and intensively suppressed DNFB-induced DTH responses. These findings suggest that the immunosuppressive activities of cinnamon bark are in part due to procyanidin oligomers. CTD-1 may be a potential therapeutic agent for immune-related diseases. PMID:25530780

  19. Immunosuppressive Effects of A-Type Procyanidin Oligomers from Cinnamomum tamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamon barks extracts have been reported to regulate immune function; however, the component(s in cinnamon barks responsible for this effect is/are not yet clear. The aim of this study is to find out the possible component(s that can be used as therapeutic agents for immune-related diseases from cinnamon bark. In this study, the immunosuppressive effects of fraction (named CT-F and five procyanidin oligomers compounds, cinnamtannin B1, cinnamtannin D1 (CTD-1, parameritannin A1, procyanidin B2, and procyanidin C1, from Cinnamomum tamala or Cinnamomum cassia bark were examined on splenocytes proliferation model induced by ConA or LPS. Then, the effects of activated compound CTD-1 on cytokine production and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH response were detected to evaluate the immunosuppressive activity of CTD-1. It was found that CT-F and CTD-1 significantly inhibited the splenocyte proliferation induced by ConA or LPS. CTD-1 dose-dependently reduced the level of IFN-γ and IL-2 and intensively suppressed DNFB-induced DTH responses. These findings suggest that the immunosuppressive activities of cinnamon bark are in part due to procyanidin oligomers. CTD-1 may be a potential therapeutic agent for immune-related diseases.

  20. [Treatment with immunosuppressive and biologic drugs of pregnant women with systemic rheumatic or autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Esteve-Valverde, Enrique; Ferrer-Oliveras, Raquel

    2016-10-21

    Rheumatic and systemic autoimmune diseases occur in women and, to a lesser degree, men of reproductive age. These disorders have to be clinically nonactive before conception, which is usually only possible after anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive treatment. We must be alert since 50% of pregnancies are unplanned. Physicians should know the embryo-foetal toxicity of these drugs during pregnancy and lactation. This January 2016-updated review allows us to conclude that the majority of immunosuppressives available -anti-TNF inhibitors included- can be used before and during pregnancy, with the exception of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate and leflunomide. Lactation is permitted with all drugs except methotrexate, leflunomide, mycophenolate and cyclophosphamide. Although data on abatacept, belimumab, rituximab, tocilizumab and anakinra are scant, preliminary reports agree on their safety during pregnancy and, probably, lactation. Cyclophosphamide and sulfasalazine apart, no negative effects on sperm quality, or embryo-foetal anomalies in men treated with immunosuppressives have been described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The influence of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skardelly, Marco, E-mail: Marco.Skardelly@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Glien, Anja; Groba, Claudia; Schlichting, Nadine [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Kamprad, Manja [Institute of Clinical Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Meixensberger, Juergen [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Milosevic, Javorina [Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-12-10

    In allogenic and xenogenic transplantation, adequate immunosuppression plays a major role in graft survival, especially over the long term. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate has not been sufficiently explored. The focus of this study is to systematically investigate the effects of the following four different immunotherapeutic strategies on human neural progenitor cell survival/death, proliferation, metabolic activity, differentiation and migration in vitro: (1) cyclosporine A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor; (2) everolimus (RAD001), an mTOR-inhibitor; (3) mycophenolic acid (MPA, mycophenolate), an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and (4) prednisolone, a steroid. At the minimum effective concentration (MEC), we found a prominent decrease in hNPCs' proliferative capacity (BrdU incorporation), especially for CsA and MPA, and an alteration of the NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity. Cell death rate, neurogenesis, gliogenesis and cell migration remained mostly unaffected under these conditions for all four immunosuppressants, except for apoptotic cell death, which was significantly increased by MPA treatment. - Highlights: • Four immunosuppresants (ISs) were tested in human neural progenitor cells in vitro. • Cyclosporine A and mycophenolic acid showed a prominent anti-proliferative activity • Mycophenolic acid exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect. • NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity was occasionally induced by ISs. • Neuronal differentiation and migration potential remained unaffected by ISs treatment.

  2. Advances in the understanding and treatment of sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venet, Fabienne; Monneret, Guillaume

    2018-02-01

    Sepsis is defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction that is caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. Sepsis can induce acute kidney injury and multiple organ failures and represents the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit. Sepsis initiates a complex immune response that varies over time, with the concomitant occurrence of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. As a result, most patients with sepsis rapidly display signs of profound immunosuppression, which is associated with deleterious consequences. Scientific advances have highlighted the role of metabolic failure, epigenetic reprogramming, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, immature suppressive neutrophils and immune alterations in primary lymphoid organs (the thymus and bone marrow) in sepsis. An improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying this immunosuppression as well as of the similarities between sepsis-induced immunosuppression and immune defects in cancer or immunosenescence has led to novel therapeutic strategies aimed at stimulating immune function in patients with sepsis. Trials assessing the therapeutic benefit of IL-7, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and antibodies against programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) and programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) for the treatment of sepsis are in progress. The reappraisal of sepsis pathophysiology has also resulted in a novel approach to the design of clinical trials evaluating sepsis treatments, based on an evaluation of the immune status and biomarker-based stratification of patients.

  3. Impact of Laboratory Practices on Interlaboratory Variability in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Immunosuppressive Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christians, Uwe; Vinks, Alexander A; Langman, Loralie J; Clarke, William; Wallemacq, Pierre; van Gelder, Teun; Renjen, Varun; Marquet, Pierre; Meyer, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    The immunosuppressants cyclosporine, tacrolimus, sirolimus, everolimus, and probably also mycophenolic acid require therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM)-guided dosing to ensure that blood concentrations are kept within the target range in transplant patients. Reliable, accurate, and precise test methods are therefore essential to effectively monitor levels and to make proper dose adjustments. Data from proficiency testing programs have shown substantial interlaboratory variability. Only few attempts have been made to study the underlying causes. The aim of this study was to systematically document current practices used for immunosuppressant drug TDM in clinical laboratories and identify methodological and practice differences, which may cause the variability observed among laboratories. Data collection was primarily conducted by a structured Web-based survey. Invitations to participate in the survey were distributed to clinical laboratories providing immunosuppressant drug TDM. Surveys were completed by 76 laboratories in 14 countries. The results of our survey suggest that there are 3 main reasons for interlaboratory variability: (1) lack of standardization of laboratory procedures and workflows starting with sample collection and handling, (2) lack of use of appropriate reference materials (eg, isotope-labeled internal standards for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy), and (3) poor compliance with internationally accepted good laboratory practice guidelines (eg, related to quality control, quality assurance, validation, training of personnel). The results of the survey also suggest that interlaboratory variability is a multifactorial problem. Technical-level consensus on laboratory operational procedures, quality systems, and personnel training will be of great importance to improve quality and interlaboratory comparability.

  4. Non-specific aortoarteritis: long-term follow-up on immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, K K; Vasan, R S; Sharma, S; Chopra, P; Shrivastava, S; Malhotra, A

    1993-04-01

    Thirteen patients with non-specific aortoarteritis and endomyocardial biopsy evidence of myocarditis were followed-up on immunosuppressive therapy comprising of prednisolone and cyclophosphamide in addition to conventional treatment for hypertension and/or congestive heart failure. Serial determinations of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, chest roentgenogram, radionuclide ventriculogram and hemodynamic study including endomyocardial biopsy were carried out at 12, 24 and 52 weeks of therapy. Arterial lesions were also assessed by digital subtraction angiography at 0 and 52 weeks of immunosuppressive therapy. At the end of a year of treatment all patients with congestive heart failure (10/13) showed symptomatic improvement by at least one New York Heart Association (NYHA) class. There was a significant fall in erythrocyte sedimentation rate (48 +/- 12 mm/1st h to 31 +/- 12 mm/1st h, P < 0.05), pulmonary artery pressure (32 +/- 14 mmHg to 20 +/- 9 mmHg, P < 0.05), left ventricular filling pressure (20 +/- 11 mmHg to 11 +/- 7 mmHg, P < 0.05) and increase in left ventricle ejection fraction (39 +/- 16% to 51 +/- 14%, P < 0.05) associated with resolution of morphological changes on endomyocardial biopsy. Arterial lesions remained static with neither progression nor appearance of new lesions. No significant complications of therapy were noticed in any patient. Our uncontrolled observations suggest that immunosuppressive therapy is safe and results in clinical, hemodynamic and myocardial morphological improvement in a subset of patients with non-specific aortoarteritis and associated myocarditis.

  5. [Persistent inflammation immunosuppression catabolism syndrome: a special type of chronic critical illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Renyu; Ma, Xiaochun

    2016-07-01

    After the concept of "chronic critical illness (CCI)" was proposed, the new concept persistent inflammation immunosuppression catabolism syndrome (PICS) is present recently. Patients with PICS are manifested by fast decreasing body weight, poor nutritional status, long-term immunosuppression and repeated nosocomial infections. These patients are faced with great challenges of persistent inflammation, acquired immunosuppression and high catabolism, which finally results in repeated nosocomial infections, prolonged hospital stay and increased mortality. At present, main problems of PICS diagnosis standard include varying length of ICU stay, difference in normal C reactive protein value, poor value of nutrition indexes, absence of clinical verification. Though associated pathophysiology mechanism is not clear, PICS is preventable and magageable with certain therapy, including early comprehensive prevention and treatment focused on infection control for CCI patients to stop the progression of PICS, application of immune modulator to improve immune function and prognosis of patients, and reasonable nutritional support and treatment. Besides, through the analysis of the association between PICS and CCI, authors draw a conclusion that PICS is a new phenotype of CCI, and immune paralysis is its main feature.

  6. Viscum album neutralizes tumor-induced immunosuppression in a human in vitro cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinborn, Carmen; Klemd, Amy Marisa; Sanchez-Campillo, Ann-Sophie; Rieger, Sophie; Scheffen, Marieke; Sauer, Barbara; Garcia-Käufer, Manuel; Urech, Konrad; Follo, Marie; Ücker, Annekathrin; Kienle, Gunver Sophia; Huber, Roman; Gründemann, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells have the capacity to secrete immunosuppressive substances in order to diminish dendritic cell (DC) activity and thereby escape from immune responses. The impact of mistletoe (Viscum album) extracts (VAE), which are frequently used as an additive anti-cancer therapy to stimulate the immune response, is still unknown. Using a human cellular system, the impact of two different VAE (VAEA + VAEI) on the maturation of human dendritic cells and on T cell function has been investigated using flow cytometry, automated fluorescence microscopy and cytokine bead array assays. Furthermore, we examined whether VAEI was able to counteract tumor-induced immunosuppression within this cellular system using a renal cancer cell model. The role of mistletoe lectin (ML) was analyzed using ML-specific antibodies and ML-depleted VAEI. VAEI and VAEA augmented the maturation of dendritic cells. VAEI abrogated tumor-induced immunosuppression of dendritic cells and both processes were partially mediated by ML since ML-depleted VAEI and ML-specific antibodies almost neutralized the rehabilitative effects of VAEI on DC maturation. Using these settings, co-culture experiments with purified CD4+ T cells had no influence on T cell proliferation and activation but did have an impact on IFN-γ secretion. The study provides a potential mode-of-action of VAE as an additive cancer therapy based on immunomodulatory effects. However, the impact on the in vivo situation has to be evaluated in further studies.

  7. Viscum album neutralizes tumor-induced immunosuppression in a human in vitro cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Steinborn

    Full Text Available Tumor cells have the capacity to secrete immunosuppressive substances in order to diminish dendritic cell (DC activity and thereby escape from immune responses. The impact of mistletoe (Viscum album extracts (VAE, which are frequently used as an additive anti-cancer therapy to stimulate the immune response, is still unknown. Using a human cellular system, the impact of two different VAE (VAEA + VAEI on the maturation of human dendritic cells and on T cell function has been investigated using flow cytometry, automated fluorescence microscopy and cytokine bead array assays. Furthermore, we examined whether VAEI was able to counteract tumor-induced immunosuppression within this cellular system using a renal cancer cell model. The role of mistletoe lectin (ML was analyzed using ML-specific antibodies and ML-depleted VAEI. VAEI and VAEA augmented the maturation of dendritic cells. VAEI abrogated tumor-induced immunosuppression of dendritic cells and both processes were partially mediated by ML since ML-depleted VAEI and ML-specific antibodies almost neutralized the rehabilitative effects of VAEI on DC maturation. Using these settings, co-culture experiments with purified CD4+ T cells had no influence on T cell proliferation and activation but did have an impact on IFN-γ secretion. The study provides a potential mode-of-action of VAE as an additive cancer therapy based on immunomodulatory effects. However, the impact on the in vivo situation has to be evaluated in further studies.

  8. Clinical and epidemiological features of acute infantile gastroenteritis associated with human rotavirus subgroups 1 and 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Uhnoo, I; Svensson, L

    1986-01-01

    During a prospective 1-year study rotavirus isolates from 169 children with gastroenteritis were investigated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of 118 (70%) of the strains analyzed contained sufficient viral nucleic acid to give visible electrophoretic patterns; 36% were identified as strains belonging to subgroup 1 (short patterns), and 64% were identified as strains belonging to subgroup 2 (long patterns). The two subgroups cocirculated at equal frequencies during the first 7 m...

  9. Impact of preoperative immunosuppressive agents on postoperative outcomes in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Martin, Sean T; Rao, Abhishek D; Kiran, Ravi P

    2014-05-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are essential in the management of Crohn's disease. Their safety before surgery, however, is still controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the preoperative use of immunosuppressive agents is associated with increased postoperative complications in Crohn's disease. A literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library was undertaken in February 2013. All studies describing postoperative outcomes of patients undergoing bowel resections for Crohn's disease were included if they reported data comparing patients on preoperative immunosuppressive agents with an appropriate control group. All immunosuppressive agents used to manage Crohn's disease were studied. The main outcomes measured were total overall complications and total infectious complications. Twenty-one eligible studies (20 retrospective and 1 prospective) with 6899 patients were included. When individual studies were examined, only 2/14 (14%), 4/13 (31%), and 1/8 (13%) studies found an association between postoperative complications and preoperative anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, corticosteroids, and thiopurines. In meta-analyses, patients on anti-tumor necrosis factor agents (risk ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.07-1.55), and corticosteroids (risk ratio, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.23-1.95) were found to have a higher risk of postoperative infectious complications. The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor agents was also significantly associated with wound infection (risk ratio, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.12-2.34) and septic shock (risk ratio, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.03-3.17). There was no association between the use of thiopurines or combined immunomodulator drugs and postoperative complications. Most studies were retrospectively designed, and there were large variations in the patient populations and outcome definitions. Patients with Crohn's disease on preoperative immunosuppressive agents are at higher risk for complications. Both corticosteroids and anti-tumor necrosis factor agents may

  10. Histological spectrum of pulmonary manifestations in kidney transplant recipients on sirolimus inclusive immunosuppressive regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirby Sean

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After the introduction of novel effective immunosuppressive therapies, kidney transplantation became the treatment of choice for end stage renal disease. While these new therapies lead to better graft survival, they can also cause a variety of complications. Only small series or case reports describe pulmonary pathology in renal allograft recipients on mTOR inhibitor inclusive therapies. The goal of this study was to provide a systematic review of thoracic biopsies in kidney transplant recipients for possible association between a type of immunosuppressive regimen and pulmonary complications. Methods A laboratory database search revealed 28 of 2140 renal allograft recipients (18 males and 10 females, 25 to 77 years old, mean age 53 years who required a biopsy for respiratory symptoms. The histological features were correlated with clinical findings including immunosuppressive medications. Results The incidence of neoplasia on lung biopsy was 0.4% (9 cases, which included 3 squamous cell carcinomas, 2 adenocarcinomas, 1 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 1 lymphomatoid granulomatosis, and 2 post transplant B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Diffuse parenchymal lung disease was identified in 0.4% (9 cases, and included 5 cases of pulmonary hemorrhage, 3 cases of organizing pneumonia and 1 case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Five (0.2% cases showed histological features indicative of a localized infectious process. Patients on sirolimus had neoplasia less frequently than patients on other immunosuppressive combinations (12.5% vs. 58.3%, p = 0.03. Lung biopsies in 4 of 5 patients with clinically suspected sirolimus toxicity revealed pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole histological finding or in combination with other patterns. Conclusions Our study documents a spectrum of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions in renal allograft recipients on current immunosuppressive therapies. Sirolimus inclusive regimens are associated with

  11. Developing the group mind through functional subgrouping: linking systems-centered training (SCT) and interpersonal neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Susan P; Agazarian, Yvonne M

    2010-10-01

    This article introduces the systems-centered concept of the "group mind" by linking systems-centered thinking and interpersonal neurobiology, building on Siegel's definition of mind as the process of regulating the flow of energy and information. Functional subgrouping, the systems-centered group method for resolving conflicts, discriminates and integrates the flow of energy and information within and between group members, subgroups, and the group-as-a-whole, thus potentiating survival, development, and transformation. This article uses the interpersonal neurobiological framework to discuss functional subgrouping as a tool for developing the group mind: considering how functional subgrouping facilitates emotional regulation, creates a secure relational context, and potentiates neural integration.

  12. Maintenance immunosuppression for adults undergoing liver transplantation: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; Guerrero-Misas, Marta; Thorburn, Douglas; Davidson, Brian R; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan

    2017-03-31

    As part of liver transplantation, immunosuppression (suppressing the host immunity) is given to prevent graft rejections resulting from the immune response of the body against transplanted organ or tissues from a different person whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient. The optimal maintenance immunosuppressive regimen after liver transplantation remains uncertain. To assess the comparative benefits and harms of different maintenance immunosuppressive regimens in adults undergoing liver transplantation through a network meta-analysis and to generate rankings of the different immunosuppressive regimens according to their safety and efficacy. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and trials registers until October 2016 to identify randomised clinical trials on immunosuppression for liver transplantation. We included only randomised clinical trials (irrespective of language, blinding, or publication status) in adult participants undergoing liver transplantation (or liver retransplantation) for any reason. We excluded trials in which participants had undergone multivisceral transplantation or participants with established graft rejections. We considered any of the various maintenance immunosuppressive regimens compared with each other. We performed a network meta-analysis with OpenBUGS using Bayesian methods and calculated the odds ratio, rate ratio, and hazard ratio (HR) with 95% credible intervals (CrI) based on an available-case analysis, according to National Institute of Health and Care Excellence Decision Support Unit guidance. We included a total of 26 trials (3842 participants) in the review, and 23 trials (3693 participants) were included in one or more outcomes in the review. The vast majority of the participants underwent primary liver transplantation. All of the trials were at high risk of bias, and all of the evidence was

  13. Differential effects of immunosuppressive drugs on COX-2 activity in vitro and in kidney transplant patients in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Bente; Thiesson, Helle C; Henriksen, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It was hypothesized that calcineurin inhibitors suppress vascular cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and exert a reciprocal influence on in vivo prostacyclin and thromboxane. This could contribute to cardiovascular morbidity in transplanted patients. METHODS: The ability of immunosuppressives to ...

  14. Outcomes of Liver Transplant Recipients With Autoimmune Liver Disease Using Long-Term Dual Immunosuppression Regimen Without Corticosteroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjaya K. Satapathy, MBBS, MD, DM

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions. Dual immunosuppression protocol in LT recipients with autoimmune liver disease without corticosteroid maintenance had acceptable rates of survival and ACR without predisposing patients to the adverse effects of long-term steroid therapy.

  15. Interferon alpha and Tat involvement in the immunosuppression of uninfected T cells and C-C chemokine decline in AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagury, D; Lachgar, A; Chams, V; Fall, L S; Bernard, J; Zagury, J F; Bizzini, B; Gringeri, A; Santagostino, E; Rappaport, J; Feldman, M; Burny, A; Gallo, R C

    1998-03-31

    HIV type 1 (HIV-1) not only directly kills infected CD4(+) T cells but also induces immunosuppression of uninfected T cells. Two immunosuppressive proteins, interferon alpha (IFNalpha) and extracellular Tat, mediate this process because specific antibodies against these proteins prevent generation of suppressor cells in HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. Furthermore, the production of C-C chemokines in response to immune cell activation, initially enhanced by IFNalpha and Tat, ultimately is inhibited by these proteins in parallel with their induction of immunosuppression. The clinical corollary is the immunosuppression of uninfected T cells and the decline in C-C chemokine release found at advanced stages of HIV-1 infection paralleling rising levels of IFNalpha and extracellular Tat. We, therefore, suggest that IFNalpha and Tat may be critical targets for anti-AIDS strategies.

  16. CHANGES IN MOUSE CIRULATING LEUKOCYTE NUMBERS IN C57BL/6 MICE IMMUNOSUPPRESSED FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST PRODUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Iowa strain of Cryptosporidium parvum will not propagate in immunocompetent mice, but will successfully infect genetically immunocompromised Nude or SCID mice as well as immunocompetent mice which have been immunosuppressed with glucocorticoids. Using dexamethasone - tetracy...

  17. Effect of Calcineurin Inhibitor-Free Everolimus-Based Immunosuppressive Regimen on Albuminuria and Glomerular Filtration Rate after Heart Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Laerke M; Andreassen, Arne K; Andersson, Bert

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Albuminuria in maintenance heart transplantation (HTx) is associated with poor renal response when switching to a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-lowered or CNI-free immunosuppressive regimen using everolimus (EVR), but the significance of albuminuria associated with EVR treatment after....... CONCLUSIONS: The effects of EVR with early CNI withdrawal after HTx on albuminuria and renal function seem dissociated; hence, the clinical significance of albuminuria in this setting is uncertain and should not necessarily rule out EVR-based immunosuppression....

  18. Halo naevi and café au lait macule regression in a renal transplant patient on immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolatgis, Helena; Varigos, George; Braue, Anna; Scardamaglia, Laura; Boyapati, Ann; Winship, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    A case of halo naevi and café au lait macule regression in a renal transplant patient receiving long-term immunosuppressive therapy is described. We propose the direct transfer of an auto-reactive antibody, CD8 T-cells or tumour necrosis factor α from the transplant donor to the recipient as a possible cause. We have also considered insufficient immunosuppressive therapy as a possible mechanism. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  19. Antigenicity of peptides comprising the immunosuppressive domain of the retroviral envelope glycoprotein [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony Jenkins

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To achieve persistent infection of the host, viruses often subvert or suppress host immunity through mechanisms that are not entirely understood. The envelope glycoprotein of several retroviruses is thought to possess potent immunosuppressive activity, mapped to a 17-amino acid residue conserved domain. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this immunosuppressive domain can inhibit lymphocyte activation, whereas mutation of key domain residues can increase the lymphocyte response to linked antigenic epitopes. Using three T cell receptors (TCRs of defined specificity, we examine the effect of the immunosuppressive domain on the T cell response to their respective antigenic peptides. We find that fusion of a T cell epitope to the immunosuppressive domain can greatly modulate its potency. However, the effects heavily depend on the particular combination of TCR and peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II (pMHC II, and are mimicked by sequence-scrambled peptides of similar length, suggesting they operate at the level of TCR-pMHC interaction. These results offer an alternative explanation for the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes comprising the putative immunosuppressive domain, which is more consistent with an effect on peptide antigenicity than true immunosuppressive activity.

  20. Antigenicity of peptides comprising the immunosuppressive domain of the retroviral envelope glycoprotein [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony Jenkins

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To achieve persistent infection of the host, viruses often subvert or suppress host immunity through mechanisms that are not entirely understood. The envelope glycoprotein of several retroviruses is thought to possess potent immunosuppressive activity, mapped to a 17-amino acid residue conserved domain. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this immunosuppressive domain can inhibit lymphocyte activation, whereas mutation of key domain residues can increase the lymphocyte response to linked antigenic epitopes. Using three T cell receptors (TCRs of defined specificity, we examine the effect of the immunosuppressive domain on the T cell response to their respective antigenic peptides. We find that fusion of a T cell epitope to the immunosuppressive domain can greatly modulate its potency. However, the effects heavily depend on the particular combination of TCR and peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II (pMHC II, and are mimicked by sequence-scrambled peptides of similar length, suggesting they operate at the level of pMHC formation or TCR-pMHC interaction. These results offer an alternative explanation for the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes comprising the putative immunosuppressive domain, which is more consistent with an effect on peptide antigenicity than true immunosuppressive activity.

  1. Immunoblotting using Strongyloides venezuelensis larvae, parthenogenetic females or eggs extracts for the diagnosis of experimentally infected immunosuppressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart de Carvalho, Edson Fernando; Neto de Sousa, José Eduardo; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia Ribeiro; da Cunha-Junior, Jair Pereira; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2015-10-01

    The nematode Strongyloides stercoralis is responsible for strongyloidiasis in humans. Diagnosis of infection occurs through detection of larvae in feces, but low elimination of larvae often hampers the detection of disease, particularly in cases of patient immunosuppression. Immunodiagnostic tests have been developed; however obtaining S. stercoralis larvae for the production of homologous antigen extract is technically difficult. Thus, the use different developmental forms of Strongyloides venezuelensis has become an alternative method for the production of antigen extracts. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunoblotting using alkaline extracts from S. venezuelensis L3 larvae, parthenogenetic females or eggs to test detection of experimental strongyloidiasis associated with immunosuppression. Immunocompetent and immunosuppressed male rats were experimentally infected, and serum sample from all animals were obtained at 0, 5, 8 13, and 21 days post infection (d.p.i.). Immunoblotting was evaluated for use in detection of anti-S. venezuelensis IgG in both experimental rat groups. The larval extract immunoblotting profile had the most immunoreactive fractions in the immunosuppressed group beginning at 5 d.p.i., while the immunocompetent group reactivity began on 8 d.p.i. Immunoreactive protein fractions of 17 kDa present in larval alkaline extract presented as possible markers of infection in immunosuppressed rats. It is concluded that all extracts using immunoblotting have diagnostic potential in experimental strongyloidiasis, particularly larval extract in immunosuppressed individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Competition between immune function and lipid transport for the protein apolipophorin III leads to stress-induced immunosuppression in crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, S A; Roberts, J L; Easy, R H; Ross, N W

    2008-02-01

    Intense physical activity results in transient immunosuppression in a wide range of animals. We tested the hypothesis that competition between immune function and lipid transport for the protein apolipophorin III (apoLpIII) can cause transient immunosuppression in crickets. Both flying, an energetically demanding behavior, and an immune challenge reduced the amount of monomeric (free) apoLpIII in the hemolymph of crickets. Because both immune function and flying depleted free apoLpIII, these two phenomena could be in competition for this protein. We showed that immune function was sensitive to the amount of free apoLpIII in the hemolymph. Reducing the amount of free apoLpIII in the hemolymph using adipokinetic hormone produced immunosuppression. Increasing apoLpIII levels after flight by pre-loading animals with trehalose reduced immunosuppression. Increasing post-flight apoLpIII levels by injecting purified apoLpIII also reduced flight-induced immunosuppression. These results show that competition between lipid transport and immune function for the same protein can produce transient immunosuppression after flight-or-fight behavior. Intertwined physiological systems can produce unexpected trade-offs.

  3. Etiological Subgroups of Small-for-Gestational-Age: Differential Neurodevelopmental Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuhong Li

    Full Text Available It remains unclear why substantial variations in neurodevelopmental outcomes exist within small-for-gestational-age (SGA children. We prospectively compared 5-y neurodevelopmental outcomes across SGA etiological subgroups.Children born SGA (N = 1050 from U.S. Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (2001-2007 was divided into etiological subgroups by each of 7 well-established prenatal risk factors. We fit linear regression models to compare 5-y reading, math, gross motor and fine motor scores across SGA subgroups, adjusting for socio-demographic confounders.Compared to singleton SGA subgroup, multiple-birth SGA subgroup had lower mean reading (adjusted mean difference, -4.08 [95% confidence interval, -6.10, -2.06] and math (-2.22 [-3.61, -0.84] scores. These disadvantages in reading and math existed only among multiple-birth SGA subgroup without ovulation stimulation (reading, -4.50 [-6.64, -2.36]; math, -2.91 [-4.37, -1.44], but not among those with ovulation stimulation (reading, -2.33 [-6.24, 1.57]; math 0.63 [-1.86, 3.12]. Compared to singleton SGA subgroup without maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain, singleton SGA subgroup with co-occurrence of maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG had lower mean reading (-4.81 [-8.50, -1.12] and math (-2.95 [-5.51, -0.38] scores. These differences were not mediated by Apgar score.Multiple-birth SGA subgroups (vs. singleton SGA or singleton SGA subgroup with co-occurrence of smoking and inadequate GWG (vs. singleton SGA subgroup without maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain have poorer cognitive development up to 5 y.

  4. Rapid, reliable, and reproducible molecular sub-grouping of clinical medulloblastoma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Shih, David J H; Remke, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Kool, Marcel; Hawkins, Cynthia; Eberhart, Charles G; Dubuc, Adrian; Guettouche, Toumy; Cardentey, Yoslayma; Bouffet, Eric; Pomeroy, Scott L; Marra, Marco; Malkin, David; Rutka, James T; Korshunov, Andrey; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of medulloblastoma likely encompasses several distinct entities, with recent evidence for the existence of at least four unique molecular subgroups that exhibit distinct genetic, transcriptional, demographic, and clinical features. Assignment of molecular subgroup through routine profiling of high-quality RNA on expression microarrays is likely impractical in the clinical setting. The planning and execution of medulloblastoma clinical trials that stratify by subgroup, or which are targeted to a specific subgroup requires technologies that can be economically, rapidly, reliably, and reproducibly applied to formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens. In the current study, we have developed an assay that accurately measures the expression level of 22 medulloblastoma subgroup-specific signature genes (CodeSet) using nanoString nCounter Technology. Comparison of the nanoString assay with Affymetrix expression array data on a training series of 101 medulloblastomas of known subgroup demonstrated a high concordance (Pearson correlation r = 0.86). The assay was validated on a second set of 130 non-overlapping medulloblastomas of known subgroup, correctly assigning 98% (127/130) of tumors to the appropriate subgroup. Reproducibility was demonstrated by repeating the assay in three independent laboratories in Canada, the United States, and Switzerland. Finally, the nanoString assay could confidently predict subgroup in 88% of recent FFPE cases, of which 100% had accurate subgroup assignment. We present an assay based on nanoString technology that is capable of rapidly, reliably, and reproducibly assigning clinical FFPE medulloblastoma samples to their molecular subgroup, and which is highly suited for future medulloblastoma clinical trials.

  5. Identifying Changes in Youth's Subgroup Membership over Time Based on Their Targeted Communication about Substance Use with Parents and Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Using latent class/transition analyses, this study: (a) identified subgroups of youth based on their targeted communication about substance use with parents and friends, (b) examined subgroup differences in substance use, and (c) considered changes in subgroup membership over four years. Among 5,874 youth, five subgroups emerged, with parents-only…

  6. Heterogeneity in chronic fatigue syndrome - empirically defined subgroups from the PACE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T E; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; White, P D

    2017-06-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is likely to be a heterogeneous condition. Previous studies have empirically defined subgroups using combinations of clinical and biological variables. We aimed to explore the heterogeneity of chronic fatigue syndrome. We used baseline data from the PACE trial, which included 640 participants with chronic fatigue syndrome. Variable reduction, using a combination of clinical knowledge and principal component analyses, produced a final dataset of 26 variables for 541 patients. Latent class analysis was then used to empirically define subgroups. The most statistically significant and clinically recognizable model comprised five subgroups. The largest, 'core' subgroup (33% of participants), had relatively low scores across all domains and good self-efficacy. A further three subgroups were defined by: the presence of mood disorders (21%); the presence of features of other functional somatic syndromes (such as fibromyalgia or irritable bowel syndrome) (21%); or by many symptoms - a group which combined features of both of the above (14%). The smallest 'avoidant-inactive' subgroup was characterized by physical inactivity, belief that symptoms were entirely physical in nature, and fear that they indicated harm (11%). Differences in the severity of fatigue and disability provided some discriminative validation of the subgroups. In addition to providing further evidence for the heterogeneity of chronic fatigue syndrome, the subgroups identified may aid future research into the important aetiological factors of specific subtypes of chronic fatigue syndrome and the development of more personalized treatment approaches.

  7. Quality-of-Life Differences among Diagnostic Subgroups of Children Receiving Ventilating Tubes for Otitis Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Christian Hamilton; Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathological picture may differ considerably between diagnostic subgroups of children with otitis media receiving ventilating tubes. The aims of this study are to investigate differences in quality of life among diagnostic subgroups of children treated with ventilating tubes and to...

  8. Orienting Schools toward Equity: Subgroup Accountability Pressure and School-Level Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    This article examines school-level responses to subgroup accountability pressure through an ethnographic case study of a school cited for failing to make adequate yearly progress for student subgroups. Concerns about the calculations and measures used to derive the citation and reservations about acting on accountability data delegitimized the…

  9. Level of evidence for promising subgroup findings in an overall non-significant trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanniou, Julien; van der Tweel, Ingeborg|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/262684438; Teerenstra, S.; Roes, Kit C.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/115147020

    2016-01-01

    In drug development and drug licensing, it sometimes occurs that a new drug does not demonstrate effectiveness for the full study population, but there appears to be benefit in a relevant, pre-defined subgroup. This raises the question, how strong the evidence from such a subgroup is, and which

  10. Measuring English Language Workplace Proficiency across Subgroups: Using CFA Models to Validate Test Score Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hanwook; Manna, Venessa F.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the factor structure of the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC®) Listening and Reading test, and its invariance across subgroups of test-takers. The subgroups were defined by (a) gender, (b) age, (c) employment status, (d) time spent studying English, and (e) having lived in a country where English is the…

  11. Latent class analysis derived subgroups of low back pain patients - do they have prognostic capacity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard Nielsen, Anne; Hestbaek, Lise; Vach, Werner

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in patients with low back pain is well recognised and different approaches to subgrouping have been proposed. One statistical technique that is increasingly being used is Latent Class Analysis as it performs subgrouping based on pattern recognition with high accuracy. Pr...

  12. Affiliative Subgroups in Preschool Classrooms: Integrating Constructs and Methods from Social Ethology and Sociometric Traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, António J; Daniel, João R; Fernandes, Carla; Vaughn, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of school-age children and adolescents have used social network analyses to characterize selection and socialization aspects of peer groups. Fewer network studies have been reported for preschool classrooms and many of those have focused on structural descriptions of peer networks, and/or, on selection processes rather than on social functions of subgroup membership. In this study we started by identifying and describing different types of affiliative subgroups (HMP- high mutual proximity, LMP- low mutual proximity, and ungrouped children) in a sample of 240 Portuguese preschool children using nearest neighbor observations. Next, we used additional behavioral observations and sociometric data to show that HMP and LMP subgroups are functionally distinct: HMP subgroups appear to reflect friendship relations, whereas LMP subgroups appear to reflect common social goals, but without strong, within-subgroup dyadic ties. Finally, we examined the longitudinal implications of subgroup membership and show that children classified as HMP in consecutive years had more reciprocated friendships than did children whose subgroup classification changed from LMP or ungrouped to HMP. These results extend previous findings reported for North American peer groups.

  13. Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity trial: benefits may vary in subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Peter G.; Schmidt, Barbara; Roberts, Robin S.; Doyle, Lex W.; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Haslam, Ross; Sinha, Sunil; Tin, Win; Schmidt, B.; D'Ilario, J.; Cairnie, J.; Dix, J.; Adams, B.; Faber, B.; Callanan, K.; Davis, N.; Duff, J.; Ford, G.; Golec, L.; Lacy, M.; Hohn, D.; Barnett, C.; Goodchildt, L.; Lontis, R.; Fraser, S.; Keng, J.; Saunders, K.; Opie, G.; Kelly, E.; Bairam, A.; Ferland, S.; Laperriere, L.; Bélanger, S.; St Amand, P.; Blayney, M.; Davis, D.; Frank, J.; Lemyre, L.; Solimano, A.; Singh, A.; Chalmers, M.; Ramsay, K.; Synnes, A.; Whitfield, M.; Rogers, M.; Tomlinson, J.; Offringa, M.; Nuytemans, D.; Vermeulen, E.; Kok, J.; van Wassenaer, A.; Arnon, S.; Chalaf, A.; Regev, R.; Netter, I.; Ohlsson, A.; Nesbitt, K.; O'Brien, K.; Hamilton, A. M.; Sankaran, K.; Morgan, S.; Proctor, P.; LaCorte, M.; LeBlanc, P.; Braithwaite, A.; Golan, A.; Barabi, T.; Goldstein, E.; Reynolds, G.; Dromgool, B.; Meskell, S.; McMillan, D.; Schaab, D.; Spellen, L.; Sauve, R.; Christianson, H.; Anseeuw-Deeks, D.; Alvaro, R.; Chiu, A.; Porter, C.; Turner, G.; Moddemann, D.; Granke, N.; Penner, K.; Mulder, T.; Ghys, A.; van der Hoeven, M.; Clarke, M.; Parfitt, J.; MacLean, H.; Nwaesei, C.; Kuhn, L.; Ryan, H.; Saunders, C.; Schulze, A.; Pudenz, P.; Muller, M.; Lagercrantz, H.; Bhiladvala, M.; Legneval, L.; Herlenius, E.; Matthew, D.; Amos, W.; Tulsiani, S.; Tan-Dy, C.; Turner, M.; Shinwell, E.; Levine, R.; Juster-Reicher, A.; Barrington, K.; Kokkotis, T.; Khairy, M.; Grier, P.; Vachon, J.; Tin, W.; Fritz, S.; Walti, H.; Royer, D.; Halliday, H.; Millar, D.; Berry, A.; Mayes, C.; Cummings, C.; Fahnenstich, H.; Philipp, K.; Tillmann, B.; Weber, P.; Canning, R.; Wariyar, U.; Embleton, N.; Bucher, H.-U.; Fauchere, J.-C.; Pfister, R.; Launoy, V.; Huppi, P.; Poets, C.; Urschitz-Duprat, P.; Davis, P.; Doyle, L. W.; Gent, M.; Fraser, W.; Hey, E.; Perlman, M.; Thorpe, K.; Gray, S.; Roberts, R. S.; Chambers, C.; Costantini, L.; McGean, L.; Scapinello, L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the benefits of caffeine vary in three subgroups of 2006 participants in the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity (CAP) trial. STUDY DESIGN: Post-hoc subgroup analyses were performed on the basis of: (1) indication for commencement of study drug: treat apnea, prevent

  14. Nilpotency and Theory of L-Subgroups of an L-Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Ajmal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the notion of commutator is modified and extended to L-setting. Also, the notion of descending central series is introduced which is used to formulate the important notion of nilpotent L-subgroup of an L-group. Moreover, the level subset characterization for the notion of nilpotent L-subgroup is provided.

  15. Subgrouping of Readers Based on Performance Measures: A Latent Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2010-01-01

    By using latent profile analysis eight stable and interpretable subgroups of readers were identified. The basis for subgrouping was different performance measures with four aspects of reading in focus: reading of continuous texts, reading of document texts, word reading and reading speed. Participants were 9-year-old Swedish students included in…

  16. Safety of live vaccines on immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapy-a retrospective study in three Swiss Travel Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Fabienne; Ehrensperger, Benoît; Hatz, Christoph; Chappuis, François; Bühler, Silja; Eperon, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    Patients increasingly benefit from immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory medications for a range of conditions allowing them a lifestyle similar to healthy individuals, including travel. However, the administration of live vaccines to immunodeficient patients bears the risk of replication of the attenuated vaccine microorganism. Therefore, live vaccines are generally contraindicated on immunosuppression. Data on live vaccinations on immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory medication are scarce. We identified all travellers seeking pre-travel advice in three Swiss travel clinics with a live vaccine during immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy to ascertain experienced side effects. A retrospective and multi-centre study design was chosen to increase the sample size. This study was conducted in the travel clinics of the University of Zurich; the Swiss TPH, Basel; and Geneva University Hospitals. Travellers on immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy who received live vaccines [yellow fever vaccination (YFV), measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), varicella and/ or oral typhoid vaccination (OTV)] between 2008 and 2015 were identified and interviewed. A total of 60 age- and sex-matched controls (matched to Basel/Zurich travel clinics travellers) were included. Overall, 197 patients were identified. And 116 patients (59%) and 60 controls were interviewed. YFV was administered 92 times, MMR 21 times, varicella 4 times and OTV 6 times to patients on immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy. Most common medications were corticosteroids (n = 45), mesalazine (n = 28) and methotrexate (n = 19). Live vaccines were also administered on biological treatment, e.g. TNF-alpha inhibitors (n = 8). Systemic reactions were observed in 12.2% of the immunosuppressed vs 13.3% of controls; local reactions in 7.8% of the immunosuppressed vs 11.7% of controls. In controls, all reactions were mild/moderate. In the immunosuppressed, 2/21 severe reactions occurred: severe local pain on interferon

  17. Identification of subgroups of patients with low back pain using Latent Class Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Mølgaard

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major global health problem but the evidence base available to inform clinical decision making and to provide prognostic information to patients, is less than ideal. Therefore, there is a need for further knowledge about this largely non‐specific condition. Within...... questionnaire and the clinicians’ findings on a standardised examination of the low back. By using pattern recognition, subgroups of patients were identified within which their responses and scores are similar, and therefore the patients are more alike within the subgroups than across the subgroups. Latent...... in the outcomes, their prognostic capacity was as high or higher than two existing subgrouping tools (STarT Back Tool and Quebec Task Force Classification), and three baseline characteristics (LBP intensity, leg pain intensity and pain‐related disability). In contrast, the novel subgroupings had a lower...

  18. Valid randomization-based p-values for partially post hoc subgroup analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph J; Rubin, Donald B

    2015-10-30

    By 'partially post-hoc' subgroup analyses, we mean analyses that compare existing data from a randomized experiment-from which a subgroup specification is derived-to new, subgroup-only experimental data. We describe a motivating example in which partially post hoc subgroup analyses instigated statistical debate about a medical device's efficacy. We clarify the source of such analyses' invalidity and then propose a randomization-based approach for generating valid posterior predictive p-values for such partially post hoc subgroups. Lastly, we investigate the approach's operating characteristics in a simple illustrative setting through a series of simulations, showing that it can have desirable properties under both null and alternative hypotheses. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A method for identifying genetic heterogeneity within phenotypically defined disease subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liley, James; Todd, John A; Wallace, Chris

    2017-02-01

    Many common diseases show wide phenotypic variation. We present a statistical method for determining whether phenotypically defined subgroups of disease cases represent different genetic architectures, in which disease-associated variants have different effect sizes in two subgroups. Our method models the genome-wide distributions of genetic association statistics with mixture Gaussians. We apply a global test without requiring explicit identification of disease-associated variants, thus maximizing power in comparison to standard variant-by-variant subgroup analysis. Where evidence for genetic subgrouping is found, we present methods for post hoc identification of the contributing genetic variants. We demonstrate the method on a range of simulated and test data sets, for which expected results are already known. We investigate subgroups of individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) defined by autoantibody positivity, establishing evidence for differential genetic architecture with positivity for thyroid-peroxidase-specific antibody, driven generally by variants in known T1D-associated genomic regions.

  20. Effects of Immunosuppressants on Immune Response to Vaccine in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the response rate to vaccination in different treatment groups (nonimmunosuppressants and immunosuppressants. Data Sources: We completed an online systematic search using PubMed to identify all articles published in English between January 1990 and December 2013 assessing the effect of the response rate to vaccination in different treatment groups (with and without immunomodulators. The following terms were used: "inflammatory bowel disease (IBD" OR "Crohn′s disease" OR "ulcerative colitis" AND ("vaccination" OR "vaccine" AND ("corticosteroids" OR "mercaptopurine" OR "azathioprine" OR "methotrexate [MTX]" AND "immunomodulators." Study Selection: The inclusion criteria of articles were that the studies: (1 Randomized controlled trials which included patients with a diagnosis of IBD (established by standard clinical, radiographic, endoscopic, and histologic criteria; (2 exposed patients received immunomodulators for maintenance (weight-appropriate doses of 6-mercaptopurine/azathioprine or within 3 months of stopping, 15 mg or more MTX per week or within 3 months of stopping; (3 exposed patients received nonimmunomodulators (no therapy, antibiotics only, mesalazine only, biological agent only such as infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab or natalizumab or within 3 months of stopping one of these agents. The exclusion criteria of articles were that the studies: (1 History of hepatitis B virus (HBV, influenza or streptococcus pneumoniae infection; (2 patients who had previously been vaccinated against HBV, influenza or streptococcus pneumoniae; (3 any medical condition known to cause immunosuppression (e.g. chronic renal failure and human immunodeficiency virus infection; (4 individuals with positive hepatitis markers or liver cirrhosis; (5 patients with a known allergy to eggs or other components of the vaccines and (6 pregnancy. Results: Patients treated with immunomodulators were associated with lower response rates to

  1. Surveillance of polyomavirus BK in relation to immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reactivation of polyomavirus BK in kidney transplant recipients has been associated to the development of nephropathy (polyomavirus-associated nephropathy, PVAN, possibly leading to the loss of the transplanted organ. Immunosuppression is the condicio sine qua non for the onset of PVAN; however, a lower incidence of BK viremia has been reported with low-level tacrolimus based immunosuppressive protocols in comparison to cyclosporine A.Aim of this study was to compare the two immunosuppressive protocols. Methods. Virological monitoring of BK was performed in 468 consecutive renal transplant patients over a period of 3 years (2370 urine e 2370 serum specimens: in particular, 1780 specimens from 362 patients treated with tacrolimus and 590 from 106 treated with cyclosporine A. Results. BK viremia was evidenced in 124 (7.0% and 12 (2.0% specimens from 40 (11.0% and 11 (10.4% patients treated with tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, respectively; similarly, BK viruria in 289 (16.2% and 58 (9.8% specimens from 67 (18.5% and 27 (25.5% patients, being the difference of incidence highly significant (p <0.0001 for both viremia and viruria at comparison between specimens and not significant for patients. No case of PVAN was diagnosed at histophatology evaluation. Conclusions. The incidence of viremia and viruria was similar to that previously reported. Our results evidenced that with low-level tacrolimus-based protocols the overall incidence of reactivation in renal transplant patients is not significantly different and there is no increased risk of PVAN, nevertheless the higher incidence of episodes of reactivation.

  2. Renoprotective immunosuppression by pioglitazone with low-dose cyclosporine in rat heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Hasegawa, Tomomi; Chen, Zhi; Okita, Yutaka; Okada, Kenji

    2009-09-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activator pioglitazone has recently been reported to possess pleiotropic cardioprotective and renoprotective actions. We hypothesized that pioglitazone would reduce a dose of the immunosuppressant cyclosporine after heart transplantation, resulting in beneficial protective effects for both cardiac allografts and recipient kidneys. Experiments were performed by using an allomismatched rat heterotopic heart transplantation model. Recipients were treated with cyclosporine with or without pioglitazone and were divided into one of 4 groups: group I, no treatment; group II, low-dose cyclosporine (2 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)); group III, high-dose cyclosporine (5 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)); and group IV, low-dose cyclosporine with pioglitazone (3 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)). Cyclosporine-treated rats showed significantly longer graft survival and less graft rejection but severe renal damage in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with group II, treatment with pioglitazone with low-dose cyclosporine (group IV) significantly suppressed graft infiltration of CD4/CD8 T lymphocytes and serum concentrations of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma, leading to extended graft survival up to 60 days. These immunosuppressive effects in group IV were equivalent to those in group III. In addition, recipient kidneys in group IV had few apoptotic cells, possibly through upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and downregulation of transforming growth factor beta1, and maintained stable renal functions, as evidenced by a normalization of blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and creatinine clearance values. In vitro experiments also confirmed the renoprotective effects of pioglitazone on cyclosporine-induced toxicity. Collectively, pioglitazone can reduce a dose of cyclosporine with sufficient immunosuppressive effects. Pioglitazone treatment with low-dose cyclosporine has synergistic protective effects for cardiac allografts and recipient

  3. Global LC/MS Metabolomics Profiling of Calcium Stressed and Immunosuppressant Drug Treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Jenkins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that calcium stressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae, challenged with immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and Cyclosporin A, responds with comprehensive gene expression changes and attenuation of the generalized calcium stress response. Here, we describe a global metabolomics workflow for investigating the utility of tracking corresponding phenotypic changes. This was achieved by efficiently analyzing relative abundance differences between intracellular metabolite pools from wild-type and calcium stressed cultures, with and without prior immunosuppressant drugs exposure. We used pathway database content from WikiPathways and YeastCyc to facilitate the projection of our metabolomics profiling results onto biological pathways. A key challenge was to increase the coverage of the detected metabolites. This was achieved by applying both reverse phase (RP and aqueous normal phase (ANP chromatographic separations, as well as electrospray ionization (ESI and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI sources for detection in both ion polarities. Unsupervised principle component analysis (PCA and ANOVA results revealed differentiation between wild-type controls, calcium stressed and immunosuppressant/calcium challenged cells. Untargeted data mining resulted in 247 differentially expressed, annotated metabolites, across at least one pair of conditions. A separate, targeted data mining strategy identified 187 differential, annotated metabolites. All annotated metabolites were subsequently mapped onto curated pathways from YeastCyc and WikiPathways for interactive pathway analysis and visualization. Dozens of pathways showed differential responses to stress conditions based on one or more matches to the list of annotated metabolites or to metabolites that had been identified further by MS/MS. The purine salvage, pantothenate and sulfur amino acid pathways were flagged as being enriched, which is consistent with previously published

  4. Effects of immunosuppressants on immune response to vaccine in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan; Zhao, Di; Xu, An-Tao; Shen, Jun; Ran, Zhi-Hua

    2015-03-20

    To evaluate the response rate to vaccination in different treatment groups (nonimmunosuppressants and immunosuppressants). We completed an online systematic search using PubMed to identify all articles published in English between January 1990 and December 2013 assessing the effect of the response rate to vaccination in different treatment groups (with and without immunomodulators). The following terms were used: "inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)" OR "Crohn's disease" OR "ulcerative colitis" AND ("vaccination" OR "vaccine") AND ("corticosteroids" OR "mercaptopurine" OR "azathioprine" OR "methotrexate [MTX]") AND "immunomodulators." The inclusion criteria of articles were that the studies: (1) Randomized controlled trials which included patients with a diagnosis of IBD (established by standard clinical, radiographic, endoscopic, and histologic criteria); (2) exposed patients received immunomodulators for maintenance (weight-appropriate doses of 6-mercaptopurine/azathioprine or within 3 months of stopping, 15 mg or more MTX per week or within 3 months of stopping; (3) exposed patients received nonimmunomodulators (no therapy, antibiotics only, mesalazine only, biological agent only such as infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab or natalizumab or within 3 months of stopping one of these agents). The exclusion criteria of articles were that the studies: (1) History of hepatitis B virus (HBV), influenza or streptococcus pneumoniae infection; (2) patients who had previously been vaccinated against HBV, influenza or streptococcus pneumoniae; (3) any medical condition known to cause immunosuppression (e.g. chronic renal failure and human immunodeficiency virus infection); (4) individuals with positive hepatitis markers or liver cirrhosis; (5) patients with a known allergy to eggs or other components of the vaccines and (6) pregnancy. Patients treated with immunomodulators were associated with lower response rates to vaccination. Immunomodulators may impair the immune

  5. Metastatic Thymoma-Associated Myasthenia Gravis: Favorable Response to Steroid Pulse Therapy Plus Immunosuppressive Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyan; Liu, Peng; Dong, Huimin; Gu, Shanshan; Yang, Hongxia; Xue, Yinping

    2017-03-09

    BACKGROUND Our study retrospectively reviewed the therapeutic effect of steroid pulse therapy in combination with an immunosuppressive agent in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with metastatic thymoma. MATERIAL AND METHODS MG patients with metastatic thymoma that underwent methylprednisolone pulse therapy plus cyclophosphamide were retrospectively analyzed. Patients initially received methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral methylprednisolone. Cyclophosphamide was prescribed simultaneously at the beginning of treatment. Clinical outcomes, including therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects of MG and thymoma, were assessed. RESULTS Twelve patients were recruited. According to histological classification, 4 cases were type B2 thymoma, 3 were type B3, 2 were type B1, and 1 was type AB. After combined treatment for 15 days, both the thymoma and MG responded dramatically to high-dose methylprednisolone plus cyclophosphamide. The symptoms of MG were improved in all patients, with marked improvement in 6 patients and basic remission in 4. Interestingly, complete remission of thymoma was achieved in 5 patients and partial remission in 7 patients. Myasthenic crisis was observed in 1 patient and was relieved after intubation and ventilation. Adverse reactions were observed in 7 patients (58.3%), most commonly infections, and all were resolved without discontinuation of therapy. During the follow-up, all patients were stabilized except for 1 with pleural metastasis who received further treatment and another 1 who died from myasthenic crisis. CONCLUSIONS The present study in a series of MG patients with metastatic thymoma indicated that steroid pulse therapy in combination with immunosuppressive agents was an effective and well-tolerated for treatment of both metastatic thymoma and MG. Glucocorticoid pulse therapy plus immunosuppressive agents should therefore be considered in MG patients with metastatic thymoma.

  6. [Correlation of the manifestations of tuberculosis and the degree of immunosuppression in patients with HIV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, B; N'Gom, A; Horo, K; Godé, C; Ahui, B; Emvoudou, N M L; Koffi, N; Anon, J C; Konaté, K F; Itchi, M; Koffi, M O; Ano, A; Manewa, S F; Gro Bi, A; Aka-Danguy, E; Gnazé, A; Touré, K

    2013-09-01

    Correlation of the manifestations of tuberculosis and the degree of immunosuppression in patients with HIV. The advent of HIV has contributed to the increase in the number of people with tuberculosis. The clinical and paraclinical of TB/HIV co-infected are polymorphic and function of immune status. To determines the clinical and paraclinical characteristics of TB related to different levels of CD4 lymphocytes. A retrospective case series based on analysis of 450 patients with both TB/HIV co-infections. It focused on the records of patients with pulmonary smear-positive (TPM +) with a positive HIV status. The effect of immunosuppression was analyzed in groups based on the CD4 count (350/mm(3)), in a chronological fashion from April to September 2010 until there were 150 patients in each CD4 group. Among the 450 patients, 71.1% were between 25 and 45years old. The clinical signs were more significant as the level of CD4 fell. The clinical signs were predominantly fever (93%) and weight loss (62.7%). Pulmonary cavitation (59.3%), infiltrates (38.7%) and the location of the lesions at the lung apex (72%) were more common in the third group patients. By contrast, extra pulmonary lesions (mediastinal lymphadenopathy, pleurisy) and normal x-ray (9.3%) were more frequent in patients of the first group. The scarcity of cavitations (22.3% compared to 59.3% CD4>350) and the increase in associated lesions became more marked if patients were immunocompromised. Hematologic, hepatic, renal disorders were more frequent and severe in the most immunocompromised patient group. HIV-associated tuberculosis has an atypical clinical, radiological, biological presentation and is more severe when there is significant immunosuppression. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Duration of postoperative immunosuppression assessed by repeated delayed type hypersensitivity skin tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, J H; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Moesgaard, F

    1992-01-01

    The duration of postoperative impairment in cell-mediated immunity was assessed by repeated skin testing with seven delayed type common antigens in 15 patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery compared to a similar testing regimen in 10 healthy volunteers. All were skin tested four tim....... In contrast, the skin test area in the volunteers increased from test to test (p less than 0.001) during the study, confirming a previous finding of a vaccination effect. These results suggest that the postoperative immunosuppression is maintained for about 6-9 days....

  8. Inflammatory myositis complicating hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis despite on-going immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Gary Y J; Gatenby, Paul A

    2007-08-01

    We present a patient with previously diagnosed hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, with skin, lung, and renal involvement, who presented with congestive cardiac failure. During the course of her hospitalization, she was also found to have profound proximal muscle weakness in both upper and lower limbs associated with raised creatinine kinase levels. A muscle biopsy was performed, which demonstrated evidence of an inflammatory myositis with vasculitis, which had returned despite on-going immunosuppression. This occurrence of a new autoimmune disease may well be an example of the "waste disposal" hypothesis.

  9. VT-1161 Protects Immunosuppressed Mice from Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Fothergill, Annette W; Garvey, Edward P; Hoekstra, William J; Schotzinger, Robert J; Patterson, Thomas F; Filler, Scott G; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2015-12-01

    We studied the efficacy of the investigational drug VT-1161 against mucormycosis. VT-1161 had more potent in vitro activity against Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus than against R. arrhizus var. delemar. VT-1161 treatment demonstrated dose-dependent plasma drug levels with prolonged survival time and lowered tissue fungal burden in immunosuppressed mice infected with R. arrhizus var. arrhizus and was as effective as high-dose liposomal amphotericin B treatment. These results support further development of VT-1161 against mucormycosis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Individualizing antipsychotic treatment selection in schizophrenia: characteristics of empirically derived patient subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, C U; Cañas, F; Larmo, I; Levy, P; Montes, J-M; Fagiolini, A; Papageorgiou, G; Rossi, A; Sturlason, R; Zink, M

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotic drugs is frequently sub-optimal. One reason for this may be heterogeneity between patients with schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to identify patient, disease and treatment attributes that are important for physicians in choosing an antipsychotic drug, and to identify empirically subgroups of patients who may respond differentially to antipsychotic drugs. The survey was conducted by structured interview of 744 randomly-selected psychiatrists in four European countries who recruited 3996 patients with schizophrenia. Information on 39 variables was collected. Multiple component analysis was used to identify dimensions that explained the variance between patients. Three axes, accounting for 99% of the variance, were associated with disease severity (64%), socioeconomic status (27%) and patient autonomy (8%). These dimensions discriminated between six discrete patient subgroups, identified using ascending hierarchical classification analysis. The six subgroups differed regarding educational level, illness severity, autonomy, symptom presentation, addictive behaviors, comorbidities and cardiometabolic risk factors. Subgroup 1 patients had moderately severe physician-rated disease and addictive behaviours (23.2%); Subgroup 2 patients were well-integrated and autonomous with mild to moderate disease (6.7%); Subgroup 3 patients were less well-integrated with mild to moderate disease, living alone (11.2%); Subgroup 4 patients were women with low education levels (5.4%), Subgroup 5 patients were young men with severe disease (36.8%); and Subgroup 6 patients were poorly-integrated with moderately severe disease, needing caregiver support (16.7%). The presence of these subgroups, which require confirmation and extension regarding potentially identifiable biological markers, may help individualizing treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment effect heterogeneity for univariate subgroups in clinical trials: Shrinkage, standardization, or else.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Treatment effect heterogeneity is a well-recognized phenomenon in randomized controlled clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss subgroup analyses with prespecified subgroups of clinical or biological importance. We explore various alternatives to the naive (the traditional univariate) subgroup analyses to address the issues of multiplicity and confounding. Specifically, we consider a model-based Bayesian shrinkage (Bayes-DS) and a nonparametric, empirical Bayes shrinkage approach (Emp-Bayes) to temper the optimism of traditional univariate subgroup analyses; a standardization approach (standardization) that accounts for correlation between baseline covariates; and a model-based maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach. The Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes methods model the variation in subgroup-specific treatment effect rather than testing the null hypothesis of no difference between subgroups. The standardization approach addresses the issue of confounding in subgroup analyses. The MLE approach is considered only for comparison in simulation studies as the "truth" since the data were generated from the same model. Using the characteristics of a hypothetical large outcome trial, we perform simulation studies and articulate the utilities and potential limitations of these estimators. Simulation results indicate that Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes can protect against optimism present in the naïve approach. Due to its simplicity, the naïve approach should be the reference for reporting univariate subgroup-specific treatment effect estimates from exploratory subgroup analyses. Standardization, although it tends to have a larger variance, is suggested when it is important to address the confounding of univariate subgroup effects due to correlation between baseline covariates. The Bayes-DS approach is available as an R package (DSBayes). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Treatment effect heterogeneity for univariate subgroups in clinical trials: Shrinkage, standardization, or else

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Treatment effect heterogeneity is a well-recognized phenomenon in randomized controlled clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss subgroup analyses with prespecified subgroups of clinical or biological importance. We explore various alternatives to the naive (the traditional univariate) subgroup analyses to address the issues of multiplicity and confounding. Specifically, we consider a model-based Bayesian shrinkage (Bayes-DS) and a nonparametric, empirical Bayes shrinkage approach (Emp-Bayes) to temper the optimism of traditional univariate subgroup analyses; a standardization approach (standardization) that accounts for correlation between baseline covariates; and a model-based maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach. The Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes methods model the variation in subgroup-specific treatment effect rather than testing the null hypothesis of no difference between subgroups. The standardization approach addresses the issue of confounding in subgroup analyses. The MLE approach is considered only for comparison in simulation studies as the “truth” since the data were generated from the same model. Using the characteristics of a hypothetical large outcome trial, we perform simulation studies and articulate the utilities and potential limitations of these estimators. Simulation results indicate that Bayes-DS and Emp-Bayes can protect against optimism present in the naïve approach. Due to its simplicity, the naïve approach should be the reference for reporting univariate subgroup-specific treatment effect estimates from exploratory subgroup analyses. Standardization, although it tends to have a larger variance, is suggested when it is important to address the confounding of univariate subgroup effects due to correlation between baseline covariates. The Bayes-DS approach is available as an R package (DSBayes). PMID:26485117

  13. Survival of transplanted human neural stem cell line (ReNcell VM) into the rat brain with and without immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovakimyan, M; Müller, J; Wree, A; Ortinau, S; Rolfs, A; Schmitt, O

    2012-09-01

    Functional replacement of specific neuronal populations through transplantation of neural tissue represents an attractive therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD). Even though the brain is a partially immune privileged site, immunosuppression is still needed for the prevention of host immune response, and thus, xenograft rejection. Here, we investigated the fate of human ventral mesencephalon derived immortalized cell line ReNcell VM upon unilateral transplantation into the intact rat striatum with or without immunosuppression with cyclosporine A (CsA). The status of xenografted human ReNcell VM cells was analysed by immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence 4 and 6weeks after transplantation. Four weeks after transplantation, ReNcell VM cells could be detected in both groups, although the number of survived cells was significantly higher in brains of immunosuppressed rats. In contrast, only 2 out of 6 brains grafted without immunosuppression revealed human ReNcell VM cells 6weeks post grafting, whereas a considerable number of human cells could still be found in all the brains of immunosuppressed rats. Immunohistochemical analysis of grafted cells showed almost no evidence of neuronal differentiation, but rather astroglial development. In summary, we have shown that the immunosuppression is needed for the survival of human VM derived progenitor cells in the rat striatum. CsA affected cell survival, but not differentiation capacity: in both groups, grafted either with or without immunosuppression, the ReNcell VM cells lacked neuronal phenotype and developed preferentially into astroglia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Therapeutic applications of nanomedicine in autoimmune diseases: from immunosuppression to tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, Marjan; Majewski, Slawomir; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic, destructive diseases that can cause functional disability and multiple organ failure. Despite significant advances in the range of therapeutic agents, especially biologicals, limitations of the routes of administration, requirement for frequent long-term dosing and inadequate targeting options often lead to suboptimal effects, systemic adverse reactions and patient non-compliance. Nanotechnology offers promising strategies to improve and optimize autoimmune disease treatment with the ability to overcome many of the limitations common to the current immunosuppressive and biological therapies. Here we focus on nanomedicine-based delivery strategies of biological immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of autoimmune disorders including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous, scleroderma, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes. This comprehensive review details the concepts and clinical potential of novel nanomedicine approaches for inducing immunosuppression and immunological tolerance in autoimmune diseases in order to modulate aberrant and pathologic immune responses. The treatment of autoimmune diseases remains a significant challenge. The authors here provided a comprehensive review, focusing on the current status and potential of nanomedicine-based delivery strategies of immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of autoimmune disorders including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous, scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Urinary tract infections in the era of newer immunosuppressant agents : A tertiary care center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna Pallavi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the incidence and the risk factors predisposing to post transplantation urinary tract infection (UTI and the association with use of different immunosuppressive regimens. We performed a retrospective analysis of 152 recipients of renal transplantation over a period of two years. Seventy one (46.71% patients had culture positive UTI, Escherichia coli (45.1% being the commonest. Thirty four (22.39% patients had acute rejection and 14.4% of those had suffered UTI in the early post transplant period. Immunosuppression included induction with various anti-bodies and maintenance on antirejection medications. Trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole was given as prophylaxis throughout the period. The UTI was treated according to microbiological sensitivity. 2.8% died due to urosepsis. In our retrospective analysis renal transplant recipients under the age of 45, female gender and diabetics suffered more UTI. Combination therapy with micro-emulsion form of cyclosporine A, prednisolone and azathioprine developed more UTI (P= 0.0418.

  16. Medical history of chemotherapy or immunosuppressive drug treatment and risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczmarski, Thomas; Stommel, Elijah W; Riley, Kristen; Tandan, Rup; Chaudhry, Vinay; Clawson, Lora; Caller, Tracie A; Henegan, Patricia L; Facciponte, Dominic N; Bradley, Walter G; Andrew, Angeline S

    2017-08-01

    A recent population-based analysis demonstrated lower risk of the lethal degenerative neuromuscular disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) associated with history of the use of 'antineoplastic agents' and 'immunosuppressants'. To see if this finding was generalizable to other ALS cohorts, we examined associations between use of these agents and ALS risk in an independent case-control study of n = 414 ALS patients and n = 361 controls in an Eastern US population. Controls were sampled from the general population and among non-neurodegenerative disease patients. A history of chemotherapy treatment was significantly associated with a decreased ALS risk (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.22-0.89, P = 0.026). We did not observe an association between risk of ALS and immunosuppressant therapy use (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.50-1.02, P = 0.23). Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, and smoking. Our results support the prior report for chemotherapy treatment and lead to further discussion of the underlying mechanism.

  17. Immunosuppressive Effect of Litsea cubeba L. Essential Oil on Dendritic Cell and Contact Hypersensitivity Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chun Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Litsea cubeba L., also named as Makauy, is a traditional herb and has been used as cooking condiment or tea brewing to treat diseases for aborigines. The present study was undertaken to explore the chemical compositions of the fruit essential oil of L. cubeba (LCEO and the immunomodulatory effect of LCEO on dendritic cells and mice. The LCEO was analyzed using gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS with direct injection (DI/GC or headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME/GC. In total, 56 components were identified, of which 48 were detected by DI/GC and 49 were detected by HS-SPME/GC. The principal compounds were citral (neral and geranial. An immunosuppressive activity of LCEO was investigated with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs which have a critical role to trigger the adaptive immunity. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of LCEO on immune response was elucidated by performing the contact hypersensitivity (CHS responses in mice. Our results clearly showed that LCEO decreases the production of TNF-α and cytokine IL-12 in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated DCs. CHS response and the infiltrative T cells were inhibited in the tested ears of the mice co-treated with LCEO. We demonstrate, for the first time, that the LCEO mainly containing citral exhibits an immunosuppressive effect on DCs and mice, indicating that LCEO can potentially be applied in the treatment of CHS, inflammatory diseases, and autoimmune diseases.

  18. Hidden Sources of Grapefruit in Beverages: Potential Interactions with Immunosuppressant Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auten, Ashley A.; Beauchamp, Lauren N.; Joshua Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The interaction between grapefruit-containing beverages and immunosuppressants is not well defined in the literature. This study was conducted to investigate possible sources of grapefruit juice or grapefruit extract in common US-manufactured beverages. The goal was to identify those products that might serve as hidden sources of dietary grapefruit intake, increasing a transplant patient’s risk for drug interactions. Methods: A careful review of the ingredients of the 3 largest US beverage manufacturer’s product lines was conducted through manufacturer correspondence, product labeling examination, and online nutrition database research. Focus was placed on citrus-flavored soft drinks, teas, and juice products and their impact on a patient’s immunosuppressant regimens. Results: Twenty-three beverages were identified that contained grapefruit. Five did not contain the word “grapefruit” in the product name. In addition to the confirmed grapefruit-containing products, 17 products were identified as possibly containing grapefruit juice or grapefruit extract. Conclusion: A greater emphasis should be placed upon properly educating patients regarding hidden sources of grapefruit in popular US beverages and the potential for food-drug interactions. PMID:24421511

  19. T cell-independent B cell activation induces immunosuppressive sialylated IgG antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Constanze; Winkler, André; Lorenz, Alexandra K; Holecska, Vivien; Blanchard, Véronique; Eiglmeier, Susanne; Schoen, Anna-Lena; Bitterling, Josephine; Stoehr, Alexander D; Petzold, Dominique; Schommartz, Tim; Mertes, Maria M M; Schoen, Carolin T; Tiburzy, Ben; Herrmann, Anne; Köhl, Jörg; Manz, Rudolf A; Madaio, Michael P; Berger, Markus; Wardemann, Hedda; Ehlers, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Antigen-specific Abs are able to enhance or suppress immune responses depending on the receptors that they bind on immune cells. Recent studies have shown that pro- or antiinflammatory effector functions of IgG Abs are also regulated through their Fc N-linked glycosylation patterns. IgG Abs that are agalactosylated (non-galactosylated) and asialylated are proinflammatory and induced by the combination of T cell-dependent (TD) protein antigens and proinflammatory costimulation. Sialylated IgG Abs, which are immunosuppressive, and Tregs are produced in the presence of TD antigens under tolerance conditions. T cell-independent (TI) B cell activation via B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking through polysaccharides or via BCR and TLR costimulation also induces IgG Abs, but the Fc glycosylation state of these Abs is unknown. We found in mouse experiments that TI immune responses induced suppressive sialylated IgGs, in contrast to TD proinflammatory Th1 and Th17 immune responses, which induced agalactosylated and asialylated IgGs. Transfer of low amounts of antigen-specific sialylated IgG Abs was sufficient to inhibit B cell activation and pathogenic immune reactions. These findings suggest an immune regulatory function for TI immune responses through the generation of immunosuppressive sialylated IgGs and may provide insight on the role of TI immune responses during infection, vaccination, and autoimmunity.

  20. Radiographic assessment of photodynamic therapy as an adjunctive treatment on induced periodontitis in immunosuppressed rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    FERNANDES, Leandro Araújo; MARTINS, Thiago Marchi; de ALMEIDA, Juliano Milanezi; THEODORO, Letícia Helena; GARCIA, Valdir Gouveia

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess radiographically the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an adjunctive treatment to scaling and root planing (SRP) on induced periodontitis in dexamethasone-induced immunosuppressed rats. Material and Methods The animals were divided into 2 groups: ND group (n=60): saline treatment; D group (n=60): dexamethasone treatment. In both ND and D groups, periodontal disease was induced by the placement of a ligature in the left first mandibular molar. After 7 days, ligature was removed and all animals received SRP, being divided according to the following treatments: SRP: saline and PDT: phenothiazinium dye (TBO) plus laser irradiation. Ten animals per treatment were killed at 7, 15 and 30 days. The distance between the cementoenamel junction and the height of the alveolar bone crest in the mesial surface of the mandibular left first molars was determined in millimeters in each radiograph. The radiographic values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at a p value periodontitis in dexamethasone-induced immunosuppressed rats. PMID:20857000

  1. Expression of C/EBPβ in myeloid progenitors during sepsis promotes immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Kumbhare, Ajinkya; Youssef, Dima; Yao, Zhi Q; McCall, Charles E; El Gazzar, Mohamed

    2017-11-01

    Sepsis-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) contribute to immunosuppression associated with sepsis. We reported that the CCAAT enhancer-binding protein C/EBPβ activates microRNA (miR)-21 and miR-181b expressions, which induce transcription factor NFI-A to support the generation and expansion of MDSCs in the bone marrow and spleens of septic mice. Here, using a conditional knockout mouse model lacking C/EBPβ in the myeloid lineage, we find that without C/EBPβ, myeloid progenitor cells could not express miR-21 or miR-181b, and ectopic expression of C/EBPβ in the C/EBPβ-deficient myeloid progenitors activated the expression of the two miRNAs. Moreover, C/EBPβ-reconstituted myeloid cells expressed IL-10 and reduced T cell proliferation and function, similar to control MDSCs that express C/EBPβ. Exogenous expression of miR-21 and miR-181b in the C/EBPβ-deficient myeloid progenitors from septic mice produced similar results. Notably, NFI-A-dependent transactivation of NF-kB MDSC generating pathway was reversed in the C/EBPβ-deficient myeloid progenitors from septic mice. Together, these results support that decreasing C/EBPβ expression prevents MDSC generation and decreases immunosuppression in septic mice, providing a target for sepsis treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis: Is Immunosuppression the Main Underlying Etiology?

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    Masab, Muhammad; Saif, Muhammad W

    2017-11-15

    Patients who are immunocompromised by diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are more prone to develop some malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma and central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas. Historically, anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was also included on the list as an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDs)-defining cancer.  Similarly, compromised immune disorders including severe immunosuppression, haematologic malignancies, and solid organ transplantation have been identified as important risk factors for the development of anal SCC. Review of the medical literature showed only sporadic cases of anal SCC in patients with pre-existing myasthenia gravis (MG), with or without thymoma.  We present here a case of anal SCC in a patient with several years history of MG who was receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG).  We believe this association is explained by the autoimmune nature of the disease and the use of immunosuppressive medications to treat it. To further support our case, we also present a review of the literature associating anal SCC with MG.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell infusion on skin wound healing of dexamethasone immunosuppressed wistar rats

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    Betânia Souza Monteiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: To evaluate the therapeutic contribution of MSC intravenous infusion to surgical wound healing in dexamethasone-immunosuppressed rats, thirty-five rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: in the Control Group (CG, five rats received normal saline as 0.2ml subcutaneous (SC injections every 24 hours, for 30 consecutive days and, in the Dexamethasone Group (DG, 30 rats were given 0.2mL subcutaneous dexamethasone (0.1mg kg-1 every 24 hours, for 30 consecutive days. After 30 days, all rats underwent surgery to create an experimental skin wound. The 30 animals of the DG group were divided into two equal groups, which received different treatments: the dexamethasone group (DG received a single application of 0.5ml normal saline, via the intravenous route (IV, 48 hours after wound creation; and the Mesenchymal Stem Cells Dexamethasone group (MSCDG received MSC transplantation at a concentration of 9x106 cells in a single IV application, 48 hours after wound creation. The surgical wounds of CG rats closed on average 14.75 days after creation and DG rats had wounds closed within 22 days; whereas, the surgical wounds of MSCDG rats were closed in 14 days. MSC infusion in dexamethasone-immunosuppressed patients contributed positively to epithelial healing in less time.

  4. The central effect of biological Amines on immunosuppressive effect of restraint stress in rat

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    Zeraati F

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of some histaminergic agents were evaluated on stress- induced immunosuppression in immunized nale rats. In rat immunized with sheep red blood cells ( SRBCs. Restraint stress (RS prevented the booster-induced rise in anti-SRBC antibody titre and cell immunity response. Intracerebroventicular (I.C>V injection of histamine (150 µg/rat induced a similar effect with RS. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine (50 µg/rat reduced the inhibitory effect of Ras on immune function. Also histamine could inhibit the effect of RS on immune function. Also histamine could inhibitory the effect of chlorpheniramine when injected simultaneously. Pretreatment with ranidine (10 µg/rat had not a significant effect. Serotonin (3 µg/rat and dopamine (0.2 µg/rat could reverse the effects of chlorpheniromine when injected with chlorpheniramine (P<0.05. Epinephrine (0.2 µg/rat had not a significant effect. The results indicate that histamine mediates the immunosuppression of restraint stress by influencing the histamine H1 receptor in the brain and this effects of histamine may be modulated by serotoninergic and dopaminergic system.

  5. Dietary Chlorella vulgaris Ameliorates Altered Immunomodulatory Functions in Cyclophosphamide-Induced Immunosuppressive Mice

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    Dai Cheng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the well-known toxicity of cyclophosphamide (CYP on the immune system, this research investigated the modulating effects of the long-term dietary Chlorella vulgaris (CV supplementation on the immunosuppression induced by CYP in mice, in order to provide a novel dietary design to mitigate the side effects of CYP therapy. Control, CYP-treated, CYP + CV (6%, CYP + CV (12% and CYP + CV (24% were used for 6 weeks, CV supplement in diet recovered the significantly reduced immunological function in CYP treated mice. As CV may have a modulating function through the inducible expression of cytokines, we assayed the expressions of interleukin-2 (IL-2, interleukin-12 (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ. Our results suggested that CYP significantly reduced the lymphocytes proliferation and phagocytic activities of macrophages, and stimulated the production of IL-2, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ and that this impairment has been successfully adjusted by CV supplementation. Treatment with the algae also enhanced the natural killer (NK cells cytotoxicity, and ameliorate histological changes of the spleen in CYP-treated mice. Therefore, as we found in this study, a diet supplemented with whole CV has beneficial effects on CVP-induced immunosuppression, through its immunomodulatory potential.

  6. Low-volume toolbox for the discovery of immunosuppressive fungal secondary metabolites.

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    Erwin Berthier

    Full Text Available The secondary metabolome provides pathogenic fungi with a plethoric and versatile panel of molecules that can be deployed during host ingress. While powerful genetic and analytical chemistry methods have been developed to identify fungal secondary metabolites (SMs, discovering the biological activity of SMs remains an elusive yet critical task. Here, we describe a process for identifying the immunosuppressive properties of Aspergillus SMs developed by coupling a cost-effective microfluidic neutrophil chemotaxis assay with an in vivo zebrafish assay. The microfluidic platform allows the identification of metabolites inhibiting neutrophil recruitment with as little as several nano-grams of compound in microliters of fluid. The zebrafish assay demonstrates a simple and accessible approach for performing in vivo studies without requiring any manipulation of the fish. Using this methodology we identify the immunosuppressive properties of a fungal SM, endocrocin. We find that endocrocin is localized in Aspergillus fumigatus spores and its biosynthesis is temperature-dependent. Finally, using the Drosophila toll deficient model, we find that deletion of encA, encoding the polyketide synthase required for endocrocin production, yields a less pathogenic strain of A. fumigatus when spores are harvested from endocrocin permissive but not when harvested from endocrocin restrictive conditions. The tools developed here will open new "function-omic" avenues downstream of the metabolomics, identification, and purification phases.

  7. Intensive Pharmacological Immunosuppression Allows for Repetitive Liver Gene Transfer With Recombinant Adenovirus in Nonhuman Primates

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    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector–mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell–mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector. PMID:20087317

  8. T cell–independent B cell activation induces immunosuppressive sialylated IgG antibodies

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    Hess, Constanze; Winkler, André; Lorenz, Alexandra K.; Holecska, Vivien; Blanchard, Véronique; Eiglmeier, Susanne; Schoen, Anna-Lena; Bitterling, Josephine; Stoehr, Alexander D.; Petzold, Dominique; Schommartz, Tim; Mertes, Maria M.M.; Schoen, Carolin T.; Tiburzy, Ben; Herrmann, Anne; Köhl, Jörg; Manz, Rudolf A.; Madaio, Michael P.; Berger, Markus; Wardemann, Hedda; Ehlers, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-specific Abs are able to enhance or suppress immune responses depending on the receptors that they bind on immune cells. Recent studies have shown that pro- or antiinflammatory effector functions of IgG Abs are also regulated through their Fc N-linked glycosylation patterns. IgG Abs that are agalactosylated (non-galactosylated) and asialylated are proinflammatory and induced by the combination of T cell–dependent (TD) protein antigens and proinflammatory costimulation. Sialylated IgG Abs, which are immunosuppressive, and Tregs are produced in the presence of TD antigens under tolerance conditions. T cell–independent (TI) B cell activation via B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking through polysaccharides or via BCR and TLR costimulation also induces IgG Abs, but the Fc glycosylation state of these Abs is unknown. We found in mouse experiments that TI immune responses induced suppressive sialylated IgGs, in contrast to TD proinflammatory Th1 and Th17 immune responses, which induced agalactosylated and asialylated IgGs. Transfer of low amounts of antigen-specific sialylated IgG Abs was sufficient to inhibit B cell activation and pathogenic immune reactions. These findings suggest an immune regulatory function for TI immune responses through the generation of immunosuppressive sialylated IgGs and may provide insight on the role of TI immune responses during infection, vaccination, and autoimmunity. PMID:23979161

  9. Valganciclovir Inhibits Human Adenovirus Replication and Pathology in Permissive Immunosuppressed Female and Male Syrian Hamsters

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    Karoly Toth

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients can develop into serious and often deadly multi-organ disease. There are no drugs approved for adenovirus infections. Cidofovir (an analog of 2-deoxycytidine monophosphate is used at times but it can be nephrotoxic and its efficacy has not been proven in clinical trials. Brincidofovir, a promising lipid-linked derivative of cidofovir, is in clinical trials. Ganciclovir, an analog of 2-deoxyguanosine, has been employed occasionally but with unknown efficacy in the clinic. In this study, we evaluated valganciclovir against disseminated adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 infection in our permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamster model. We administered valganciclovir prophylactically, beginning 12 h pre-infection or therapeutically starting at Day 1, 2, 3, or 4 post-infection. Valganciclovir significantly increased survival, reduced viral replication in the liver, and mitigated the pathology associated with Ad5 infection. In cultured cells, valganciclovir inhibited Ad5 DNA replication and blocked the transition from early to late stage of infection. Valganciclovir directly inhibited Ad5 DNA polymerase in vitro, which may explain, at least in part, its mechanism of action. Ganciclovir and valganciclovir are approved to treat infections by certain herpesviruses. Our results support the use of valganciclovir to treat disseminated adenovirus infections in immunosuppressed patients.

  10. Coffea arabica Seed Extract Stimulate the Cellular Immune Function and Cyclophosphamide-induced Immunosuppression in Mice

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    Rafiul Haque, Mohammad; Ansari, Shahid Hussain; Rashikh, Azhar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the immunostimulatory effects of alcoholic extract of the coffee seed on cell-mediated immune response and cyclophosphamide-induced (CP) immunosuppressed mice. The assessment of cellular immune function was carried out by the measurement of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. According to the literature survey, cyclophosphamide has only suppressing effect on the lymphoid organ, white blood cell (WBC) and other parts of humoral immunity. Humoral immunity was assessed by the hemagglutination antibody titre. Mice were treated with three doses of extract (50, 150 and 250 mg/Kg body weight per os). Relative organ weight and WBC counts were also studied in these animals. At doses of 50 and 150, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in relative organ weight of spleen and thymus was observed but there was no effect on kidney and liver weights. WBC counts was also increased significantly (p < 0.001) in all doses of the plant extract. Coffea arabica extract elicited a significant (p < 0.001) increase in the DTH response at doses of 50 and 150 mg/Kg, but the change at higher dose of 250 mg/Kg was not statistically significant. In the HT test, plant extract also showed modulatory effect at all doses groups. Over all, coffee seed showed the stimulatory effect on cellular immune function and cyclophosphamide induced immunosuppression in mice. PMID:24250577

  11. Stress, coping and adherence to immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplantation: a comparative study

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    Daniela Cristina Sampaio de Brito

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE : Adherence to medication is a key issue relating to outcomes from transplantation and it is influenced by several factors, such as stress and coping strategies. However, these factors have been poorly explored. We aimed to compare stress and coping strategies between adherent and nonadherent renal transplant recipients who were receiving immunosuppression. DESIGN AND SETTING : We conducted a comparative, cross-sectional and observational study at a university-based transplantation clinic in Juiz de Fora, Brazil. METHODS :Fifty patients were recruited and classified as adherent or nonadherent following administration of the Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medications Scale. Stress was evaluated using the Lipp Stress Symptom Inventory for Adults and coping strategies were assessed using the Ways of Coping Scale. RESULTS : The study included 25 nonadherent patients and 25 controls with a mean age of 44.1 ± 12.8 years and median post-transplantation time of 71.8 months. Stress was present in 50% of the patients. Through simple logistic regression, nonadherence was correlated with palliative coping (OR 3.4; CI: 1.02-11.47; P < 0.05 and had a marginal trend toward significance with more advanced phases of stress (OR 4.7; CI: 0.99-22.51; P = 0.053. CONCLUSION :Stress and coping strategies may have implications for understanding and managing nonadherent behavior among transplantation patients and should be considered among the strategies for reducing nonadherence.

  12. Effects of prophylactic administration of bacteriophages to immunosuppressed mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus

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    Borysowski Jan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophages can be successfully applied to treat infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Until now no attempts have been undertaken to treat infections in immunosuppressed patients with phages. In this work we investigated the prophylactic efficacy of specific bacteriophages in CBA mice treated with cyclophosphamide (CP and infected with Staphylococcus aureus. Results High numbers of bacterial colony-forming units in the organs as well as elevated tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 serum concentrations in CP-treated and S. aureus-infected mice were significantly lowered upon application of phages. The phages markedly increased the percentage of circulating neutrophils and immature cells from the myelocytic and lymphocytic lineages in CP-treated, S. aureus-infected mice as well as of myelocytes and immature neutrophils in the bone marrow. In addition, phages stimulated in such mice generation of specific agglutinins against S. aureus. Conclusion Application of specific phages to immunosuppressed mice prior to infection with S. aureus proved very effective, suggesting a potential benefit of phage therapy in immunocompromised patients experiencing bacterial infections.

  13. Effects of prophylactic administration of bacteriophages to immunosuppressed mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta; Kocieba, Maja; Weber-Dabrowska, Beata; Borysowski, Jan; Górski, Andrzej

    2009-08-17

    Bacteriophages can be successfully applied to treat infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Until now no attempts have been undertaken to treat infections in immunosuppressed patients with phages. In this work we investigated the prophylactic efficacy of specific bacteriophages in CBA mice treated with cyclophosphamide (CP) and infected with Staphylococcus aureus. High numbers of bacterial colony-forming units in the organs as well as elevated tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 serum concentrations in CP-treated and S. aureus-infected mice were significantly lowered upon application of phages. The phages markedly increased the percentage of circulating neutrophils and immature cells from the myelocytic and lymphocytic lineages in CP-treated, S. aureus-infected mice as well as of myelocytes and immature neutrophils in the bone marrow. In addition, phages stimulated in such mice generation of specific agglutinins against S. aureus. Application of specific phages to immunosuppressed mice prior to infection with S. aureus proved very effective, suggesting a potential benefit of phage therapy in immunocompromised patients experiencing bacterial infections.

  14. Immunosuppression and Multiple Primary Malignancies in Kidney-Transplanted Patients: A Single-Institute Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Michele L; Criscitiello, Carmen; Renda, Andrea; Federico, Stefano; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Dodaro, Concetta; Scotti, Alessandro; Tammaro, Vincenzo; Calogero, Armando; Riccio, Eleonora; Pisani, Antonio; Carlomagno, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Immunodeficiency is associated with higher cancer incidence. However, it is unknown whether there is a link between immunodeficiency and development of multiple primary malignancies. In the present study we analyse this link focusing on kidney-transplanted patients, as they are at higher risk of developing cancer due to the chronic assumption of immunosuppressants. We followed up 1200 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between 1980 and 2012. A total of 77/1200 kidney-transplanted patients developed cancer and 24 of them developed multiple cancers. Most multiple cancers were synchronous with a nonsignificant association between cancer and rejection episodes. In the general cancer population, one-ninth of patients are at higher risk of developing a second tumor over a lifetime; hence it would be reasonable to conclude that, from a merely theoretical and statistical viewpoint, long-term transplanted patients potentially have a higher risk of developing MPMs. However, data did not confirm this assumption, probably because these patients die before a second primary malignancy appears. Despite many observations on the increased incidence of different tumor types in immunodeficient patients and despite immunosuppression certainly being a predisposing factor for the multicancer syndrome, data so far are not robust enough to justify a correlation between immunodeficiency and multiple primary malignancies in transplanted patients.

  15. Immunosuppression and Multiple Primary Malignancies in Kidney-Transplanted Patients: A Single-Institute Study

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    Michele L. Santangelo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency is associated with higher cancer incidence. However, it is unknown whether there is a link between immunodeficiency and development of multiple primary malignancies. In the present study we analyse this link focusing on kidney-transplanted patients, as they are at higher risk of developing cancer due to the chronic assumption of immunosuppressants. We followed up 1200 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between 1980 and 2012. A total of 77/1200 kidney-transplanted patients developed cancer and 24 of them developed multiple cancers. Most multiple cancers were synchronous with a nonsignificant association between cancer and rejection episodes. In the general cancer population, one-ninth of patients are at higher risk of developing a second tumor over a lifetime; hence it would be reasonable to conclude that, from a merely theoretical and statistical viewpoint, long-term transplanted patients potentially have a higher risk of developing MPMs. However, data did not confirm this assumption, probably because these patients die before a second primary malignancy appears. Despite many observations on the increased incidence of different tumor types in immunodeficient patients and despite immunosuppression certainly being a predisposing factor for the multicancer syndrome, data so far are not robust enough to justify a correlation between immunodeficiency and multiple primary malignancies in transplanted patients.

  16. CEFTRIAXONE EFFICIENCY AMONG PATIENTS, SUFFERING FROM JUVENILE ARTHRITIS AND RECEIVING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY

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    A.M. Chomakhidze

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to diagnostics and treatment of infectious complications among children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, receiving immunosuppressive therapy. The research involves 92 children with different variants of the illness run, who received immunosuppressive therapy. All the patients showed development of the systemic inflammatory response manifestations. The researchers used the definition of the procalcytonine levels as a marker for the bacterial infectiondevelopment. All the patients showed it higher than 0,5 ng/ml, while 7 patients — higher than 10 ng/ml. keeping in mind several courses of the antibacterial therapy in the anamnesis and presence of the combined bacterial infection, ceftriaxone was prescribed to all the children. As a result of the ceftriaxone based therapy, reduction of the clinical and laboratory manifestations of the bacterial infection was noted among more than 90% of patients. The development of the allergic reaction was noted in 1 case, and leukopenia was also found in 1 patient.Key words: children, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, ceftriaxone.

  17. Combined long-term steroid and immunosuppressive treatment regimen in granulomatous mastitis.

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    Konan, Ali; Kalyoncu, Umut; Dogan, Ismail; Kiliç, Yusuf A; Karakoç, Derya; Akdogan, Ali; Kiraz, Sedat; Kaynaro Lu, Volkan; Onat, Demirali

    2012-08-01

    Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) is a rare benign inflammatory disease of the breast. It is related to various etiological factors. The treatment of IGM is challenging as there is a lack of consensus in the literature and treatment options vary widely. Conservative treatment with antibiotics, glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive drugs, and surgery are used in the management of the disease. In this article we report our experience with IGM patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment. The medical records of patients with IGM receiving systemic therapy at the Hacettepe University Hospital between October 2007 and May 2010 were reviewed. 15 cases of histopathologically proven IGM were identified. The data was examined for risk factors and success of treatment. 14 patients were given prednisolone together with azathioprine, and 1 patient who was pregnant at the time of diagnosis received only prednisolone (30 mg/day). 11 (73%) patients had a complete response to systemic therapy. 2 patients had a relapse, of whom 1 required surgical drainage and 1 was treated with a higher dose of glucocorticoids. Systemic therapy is a safe and effective treatment for IGM. The addition of azathioprine to glucocorticoid therapy permits quick tapering of the steroid doses and increases the treatment success.

  18. Effects of an immunosuppressive treatment in the GRMD dog model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Barthélémy, Inès; Uriarte, Ane; Drougard, Carole; Unterfinger, Yves; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Blot, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The GRMD (Golden retriever muscular dystrophy) dog has been widely used in pre-clinical trials targeting DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy), using in many cases a concurrent immune-suppressive treatment. The aim of this study is to assess if such a treatment could have an effect on the disease course of these animals. Seven GRMD dogs were treated with an association of cyclosporine A (immunosuppressive dosage) and prednisolone (2 mg/kg/d) during 7 months, from 2 to 9 months of age. A multi-parametric evaluation was performed during this period which allowed us to demonstrate that this treatment had several significant effects on the disease progression. The gait quality as assessed by 3D-accelerometry was dramatically improved. This was consistent with the evolution of other parameters towards a significant improvement, such as the clinical motor score, the post-tetanic relaxation and the serum CK levels. In contrast the isometric force measurement as well as the histological evaluation argued in favor of a more severe disease progression. In view of the disease modifying effects which have been observed in this study it should be concluded that immunosuppressive treatments should be used with caution when carrying out pre-clinical studies in this canine model of DMD. They also highlight the importance of using a large range of multi-parametric evaluation tools to reliably draw any conclusion from trials involving dystrophin-deficient dogs, which reproduce the complexity of the human disease.

  19. Effects of an immunosuppressive treatment in the GRMD dog model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Inès Barthélémy

    Full Text Available The GRMD (Golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog has been widely used in pre-clinical trials targeting DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy, using in many cases a concurrent immune-suppressive treatment. The aim of this study is to assess if such a treatment could have an effect on the disease course of these animals. Seven GRMD dogs were treated with an association of cyclosporine A (immunosuppressive dosage and prednisolone (2 mg/kg/d during 7 months, from 2 to 9 months of age. A multi-parametric evaluation was performed during this period which allowed us to demonstrate that this treatment had several significant effects on the disease progression. The gait quality as assessed by 3D-accelerometry was dramatically improved. This was consistent with the evolution of other parameters towards a significant improvement, such as the clinical motor score, the post-tetanic relaxation and the serum CK levels. In contrast the isometric force measurement as well as the histological evaluation argued in favor of a more severe disease progression. In view of the disease modifying effects which have been observed in this study it should be concluded that immunosuppressive treatments should be used with caution when carrying out pre-clinical studies in this canine model of DMD. They also highlight the importance of using a large range of multi-parametric evaluation tools to reliably draw any conclusion from trials involving dystrophin-deficient dogs, which reproduce the complexity of the human disease.

  20. From Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms to Constant Immunosuppression: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, Jacques; Nooka, Ajay K.

    2013-01-01

    The regenerative abilities and the immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) make them potentially the ideal cellular product of choice for treatment of autoimmune and other immune mediated disorders. Although the usefulness of MSCs for therapeutic applications is in early phases, their potential clinical use remains of great interest. Current clinical evidence of use of MSCs from both autologous and allogeneic sources to treat autoimmune disorders confers conflicting clinical benefit outcomes. These varied results may possibly be due to MSC use across wide range of autoimmune disorders with clinical heterogeneity or due to variability of the cellular product. In the light of recent genome wide association studies (GWAS), linking predisposition of autoimmune diseases to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the susceptible genetic loci, the clinical relevance of MSCs possessing SNPs in the critical effector molecules of immunosuppression is largely undiscussed. It is of further interest in the allogeneic setting, where SNPs in the target pathway of MSC's intervention may also modulate clinical outcome. In the present review, we have discussed the known critical SNPs predisposing to disease susceptibility in various autoimmune diseases and their significance in the immunomodulatory properties of MSCs. PMID:24350294

  1. Sirolimus Versus Tacrolimus as Primary Immunosuppressant After Renal Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis and Economics Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Yu; Song, Ming; Guo, Min; Huang, Feng; Ma, Bing-Jun; Zhu, Lan; Xu, Gang; Li, Juan; You, Ru-Xu

    Sirolimus and tacrolimus are the major immunosuppressants for renal transplantation. Several studies have compared these 2 drugs, but the outcomes were not consistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacoeconomics of sirolimus and tacrolimus in the treatment of renal transplantation and provide evidence for the selection of essential drugs. Trials were identified through a computerized literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane controlled trials register, Cochrane Renal Group Specialized Register of randomized controlled trials, and Chinese Biomedical database. Two independent reviewers assessed trials for eligibility and quality and then extracted data. Data were extracted for patient and graft mortality, acute rejection (AR), and adverse events. Dichotomous outcomes were reported as relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. A decision tree model was populated with data from a literature review and used to estimate costs and QALYs gained and incremental cost-effectiveness. Altogether, 1189 patients from 8 randomized controlled trials were included. The results of our analysis were that tacrolimus reduced the risks after renal transplantation of AR and patient withdrawn. Nevertheless, tacrolimus increased the risk of infection. Pharmacoeconomic analysis showed that tacrolimus represented a more cost-effective treatment than does cyclosporine for the prevention of adverse events after renal transplant. Tacrolimus is an effective and safe immunosuppressive agent, and it may be more cost-effective than cyclosporine for the primary prevention of AR in renal transplant recipients. However, it should be noted that such superiority was reversal when the cost of sirolimus and tacrolimus changed.

  2. Immunophilins interact with calcineurin in the absence of exogenous immunosuppressive ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, M E; Hemenway, C; Muir, R S; Ye, R; Fiorentino, D; Heitman, J

    1994-01-01

    The peptidyl-prolyl isomerases FKBP12 and cyclophilin A (immunophilins) form complexes with the immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A that inhibit the phosphatase calcineurin. With the yeast two hybrid system, we detect complexes between FKBP12 and the calcineurin A catalytic subunit in both the presence and absence of FK506. Mutations in FKBP12 surface residues or the absence of the calcineurin B regulatory subunit perturb the FK506-dependent, but not the ligand-independent, FKBP12-calcineurin complex. By affinity chromatography, both FKBP12 and cyclophilin A bind calcineurin A in the absence of ligand, and FK506 and cyclosporin A respectively potentiate these interactions. Both in vivo and in vitro, the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase active sites are dispensable for ligand-independent immunophilin-calcineurin complexes. Lastly, by genetic analyses we demonstrate that FKBP12 modulates calcineurin functions in vivo. These findings reveal that immunophilins interact with calcineurin in the absence of exogenous ligands and suggest that immunosuppressants may take advantage of the inherent ability of immunophilins to interact with calcineurin. Images PMID:7529175

  3. From Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms to Constant Immunosuppression: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Autoimmune Diseases

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    Raghavan Chinnadurai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The regenerative abilities and the immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs make them potentially the ideal cellular product of choice for treatment of autoimmune and other immune mediated disorders. Although the usefulness of MSCs for therapeutic applications is in early phases, their potential clinical use remains of great interest. Current clinical evidence of use of MSCs from both autologous and allogeneic sources to treat autoimmune disorders confers conflicting clinical benefit outcomes. These varied results may possibly be due to MSC use across wide range of autoimmune disorders with clinical heterogeneity or due to variability of the cellular product. In the light of recent genome wide association studies (GWAS, linking predisposition of autoimmune diseases to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the susceptible genetic loci, the clinical relevance of MSCs possessing SNPs in the critical effector molecules of immunosuppression is largely undiscussed. It is of further interest in the allogeneic setting, where SNPs in the target pathway of MSC's intervention may also modulate clinical outcome. In the present review, we have discussed the known critical SNPs predisposing to disease susceptibility in various autoimmune diseases and their significance in the immunomodulatory properties of MSCs.

  4. Stress, coping and adherence to immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplantation: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Daniela Cristina Sampaio de; Marsicano, Elisa Oliveira; Grincenkov, Fabiane Rossi Dos Santos; Colugnati, Fernando Antônio Basile; Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Sanders-Pinheiro, Helady

    2016-01-01

    : Adherence to medication is a key issue relating to outcomes from transplantation and it is influenced by several factors, such as stress and coping strategies. However, these factors have been poorly explored. We aimed to compare stress and coping strategies between adherent and nonadherent renal transplant recipients who were receiving immunosuppression. : We conducted a comparative, cross-sectional and observational study at a university-based transplantation clinic in Juiz de Fora, Brazil. :Fifty patients were recruited and classified as adherent or nonadherent following administration of the Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medications Scale. Stress was evaluated using the Lipp Stress Symptom Inventory for Adults and coping strategies were assessed using the Ways of Coping Scale. : The study included 25 nonadherent patients and 25 controls with a mean age of 44.1 ± 12.8 years and median post-transplantation time of 71.8 months. Stress was present in 50% of the patients. Through simple logistic regression, nonadherence was correlated with palliative coping (OR 3.4; CI: 1.02-11.47; P coping strategies may have implications for understanding and managing nonadherent behavior among transplantation patients and should be considered among the strategies for reducing nonadherence.

  5. Chromosomal phylogeny of the Drosophila fasciola species subgroup revisited (Diptera, Drosophilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilda Maria Diniz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of polytene chromosomes in 26 strains of seven species in the Drosophila fasciola subgroup, from several locations in Brazil, in addition to strains of two species belonging to the Drosophila mulleri subgroup (D. aldrichi and D. mulleri, enabled us to determine that the 3c inversion found in the latter species differ in one of its break points from that present in the species of the fasciola subgroup. Therefore, a change in the mulleri complex denomination from inversion 3c to inversion 3u is proposed. Accordingly, the fasciola subgroup is no longer a lesser phylogenetic part within the mulleri subgroup. Rather, it is directly related to the likely ancestor of the repleta group, called Primitive I. This information removes the main obstacle to considering the Drosophila fasciola subgroup as an ancestral group within the Drosophila repleta species group, according to the hypothesis of Throckmorton. Our data also support the conclusion that D. onca and D. carolinae are closely related species based on one new inversion in chromosome 4 (4f², in both species. D. fascioloides and D. ellisoni also form a pair of sister species based on the presence of fusions of chromosomes 2-4 and 3-5. D. rosinae is related only to the likely ancestor of the fasciola subgroup, where the 3c inversion was fixed.

  6. Patterns of subgrouping and spatial affiliation in a community of mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezanson, Michelle; Garber, Paul A; Murphy, John T; Premo, L S

    2008-03-01

    Studies of social affiliation and social spacing offer important insight into the dynamics of subgroup formation and social strategies in living primates. Among the 11 species in the genus Alouatta, mantled howlers (A. palliata) are the only species to consistently form large, stable social groups composed of several adult males and several adult females. In this study, we examine patterns of subgrouping, activity, and partner preferences in a troop of 26-29 wild mantled howling monkeys (including 12-13 marked individuals) inhabiting Isla de Ometepe, Nicaragua. During two study seasons in 2000 and 2001, we simultaneously monitored the size, composition, and activities of individuals in two to three different subgroups. A half-weight association index was used to calculate partner preferences and patterns of spatial association. Results indicate that our howler study troop fragmented into subgroups of 1-20 with subgroups averaging five and six individuals. Subgroup size and membership reflected individual patterns of social affiliation and social tolerance, and in general remained consistent across activities and from year to year. We also found evidence of cliques or social networks of three to four individuals embedded within larger subgroups. A small number of adult males appeared to play an important social role as the nucleus of clique formation. We argue that the persistence of strong male-male and male-female partner preferences in mantled howlers helps to explain the stability of relatively large multimale-multifemale groups.

  7. Circulating and thymic CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells in myasthenia gravis: effect of immunosuppressive treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorossi, Andrea; Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Ciaraffa, Francesca; Scambia, Giovanni; Evoli, Amelia

    2005-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates an immunosuppressive role of the thymus-derived CD4+ T-cell population constitutively expressing high level of CD25, T regulatory (Treg) cells, in autoimmune diseases. Here we show that the number of Treg cells in the blood is significantly lower in untreated myasthenia gravis patients than in age-matched healthy subjects, whereas it is normal or elevated in patients on immunosuppressive therapy (prednisone frequently associated with azathioprine). Therapeutic thymectomy (Tx) for either the thymoma or non-neoplastic thymic alterations that are often associated with myasthenia gravis provided unique material for studying intrathymic Treg cells and correlating them with their peripheral counterparts. We observed that Tx prevents the increase of Treg cells in the circulation that follows immunosuppressive therapy (particularly evident if the thymus is not neoplastic), indicating that the thymus contributes to Treg-cell normalization. However, thymic Treg cells are not modulated by immunosuppressive therapy and even in thymectomized patients Treg-cell numbers in the blood eventually recover. The present findings suggest that a deficiency in Treg cells favours the development of myasthenia gravis and that their normalization is an important clinical benefit of immunosuppressive therapy. Treg normalization appears to be largely thymus independent and possibly reflects the reported capacity of corticosteroids to promote Treg-cell development. PMID:16108825

  8. Circulating and thymic CD4 CD25 T regulatory cells in myasthenia gravis: effect of immunosuppressive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorossi, Andrea; Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Ciaraffa, Francesca; Scambia, Giovanni; Evoli, Amelia

    2005-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates an immunosuppressive role of the thymus-derived CD4+ T-cell population constitutively expressing high level of CD25, T regulatory (Treg) cells, in autoimmune diseases. Here we show that the number of Treg cells in the blood is significantly lower in untreated myasthenia gravis patients than in age-matched healthy subjects, whereas it is normal or elevated in patients on immunosuppressive therapy (prednisone frequently associated with azathioprine). Therapeutic thymectomy (Tx) for either the thymoma or non-neoplastic thymic alterations that are often associated with myasthenia gravis provided unique material for studying intrathymic Treg cells and correlating them with their peripheral counterparts. We observed that Tx prevents the increase of Treg cells in the circulation that follows immunosuppressive therapy (particularly evident if the thymus is not neoplastic), indicating that the thymus contributes to Treg-cell normalization. However, thymic Treg cells are not modulated by immunosuppressive therapy and even in thymectomized patients Treg-cell numbers in the blood eventually recover. The present findings suggest that a deficiency in Treg cells favours the development of myasthenia gravis and that their normalization is an important clinical benefit of immunosuppressive therapy. Treg normalization appears to be largely thymus independent and possibly reflects the reported capacity of corticosteroids to promote Treg-cell development.

  9. Immunosuppression of allogenic mesenchymal stem cells transplantation after spinal cord injury improves graft survival and beneficial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Espín, Abel; Redondo-Castro, Elena; Hernandez, Joaquim; Navarro, Xavier

    2015-03-15

    Cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) is a promising strategy for clinical application. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have demonstrated beneficial effects following transplantation in animal models of SCI. However, despite the immunoprivilege properties of the MSC, their survival in the injured spinal cord is reduced due to the detrimental milieu in the damaged tissue and immune rejection of the cells. The limited survival of the engrafted cells may determine the therapy success. Therefore, we compared two strategies to increase the presence of the cells in the injured spinal cord in rats: increasing the amount of MSC transplants and using immunosuppressive treatment with FK506 after transplantation. Functional outcomes for locomotion and electrophysiological responses were assessed. The grafted cells survival and the amount of cavity and spared tissue were studied. The findings indicate that immunosuppression improved grafted cells survival. A cell-dose effect was found regarding locomotion recovery and tissue protection independent of immunosuppression. Nevertheless, immunosuppression enhanced the electrophysiological outcomes and allowed filling of the cavity formed after injury by new regenerative tissue and axons. These results indicate that MSC transplantation combined with immunosuppression prolongs the survival of engrafted cells and improves functional and morphological outcomes after SCI.

  10. Long-Term Impact of Different Immunosuppressive Drugs on QT and PR Intervals in Renal Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikitimur, Baris; Cosansu, Kahraman; Karadag, Bilgehan; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Avci, Burcak Kilickiran; Erturk, Emre; Seyahi, Nurhan; Ongen, Zeki

    2015-09-01

    Sudden cardiac deaths due to arrhythmias are thought to be an important cause of mortality in patients with renal transplants. Exposure to immunosuppressive drugs may lead to QT or PR interval abnormalities which may consequently cause arrhythmias. Our study investigated the long term impact of four different immunosuppressive drugs on PR and corrected QT intervals (QTc) in renal transplant patients The study population consisted of 98 kidney transplant recipients. Study patients were receiving immunosuppressive management with tacrolimus, cyclosporine A, everolimus or azathioprine according to the local protocols. QTc and PR intervals obtained from the most recent post-transplant electrocardiograms were compared with the pre-transplant intervals dated before the transplantation procedure. Post-transplant QTc intervals had prolonged significantly in comparison to the pre-transplant QTc intervals in all groups. However, there were no significant differences between the immunosuppressive agents with regard to post-transplant QTc interval prolongation (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to the pre and post-transplant PR interval changes (p > 0.05). QT interval prolongation, a marker of risk for arrhythmias and sudden death, is highly prevalent among kidney transplant patients receiving different classes of immunosuppressive drugs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Generators for the l-torsion subgroup of Jacobians of Genus Two Curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnshøj, Christian Robenhagen

    2008-01-01

    We give an explicit description of the matrix representation of the Frobenius endomorphism on the Jacobian of a genus two curve on the subgroup of l-torsion points. By using this description, we can describe the matrix representation of the Weil-pairing on the subgroup of l-torsion points...... explicitly. Finally, the explicit description of the Weil-pairing provides us with an efficient, probabilistic algorithm to find generators of the subgroup of l-torsion points on the Jacobian of a genus two curve....

  12. Debate: Subgroup analyses in clinical trials: fun to look at - but don't believe them!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sleight Peter

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysis of subgroup results in a clinical trial is surprisingly unreliable, even in a large trial. This is the result of a combination of reduced statistical power, increased variance and the play of chance. Reliance on such analyses is likely to be more erroneous, and hence harmful, than application of the overall proportional (or relative result in the whole trial to the estimate of absolute risk in that subgroup. Plausible explanations can usually be found for effects that are, in reality, simply due to the play of chance. When clinicians believe such subgroup analyses, there is a real danger of harm to the individual patient.

  13. ULTRASOUND MONITORING IN THE EVALUATION OF THE FUNCTIONAL STATE OF A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT AT DIFFERENT IMMUNOSUPPRESSION THERAPIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.E. Belyaeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers one of the most important spheres in medicine — transplantation of a kidney from a live relative donor. The appearance of new generation immunosuppressive medicines has made it possible to boost the survivability of both the kidney and the recipient. The present research has allowed the authors to evaluate the functional state of a kidney transplant at the use of different immuno-suppression protocols (induction therapy with alemtuzumab in the first group and with daclizumab in the second one by means of a non invasive examination method. Moreover, the authors have defined ultrasound signs of transplant rejection depending on the type (interstitial or vascular.Key words: kidney transplantation, transplant dysfunction, evaluation of the transplant function, immunosuppression.

  14. Resveratrol promotes recovery of immune function of immunosuppressive mice by activating JNK/NF-κB pathway in splenic lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xin; Cao, Mei; Song, Xu; Jia, Renyong; Zou, Yuanfeng; Li, Lixia; Liang, Xiaoxia; He, Changliang; Yin, Lizi; Yue, Guizhou; Ye, Gang; Yin, Zhongqiong

    2017-06-01

    Resveratrol, a natural compound found in over 70 plants, is known to possess immunoregulatory effects and anti-inflammatory activity. It has been shown that resveratrol has regulatory effects on different signaling pathways in different diseases. However, few reports have evaluated the effects of resveratrol on reinforcing immunity recovery via activating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway and Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) pathway. The present study aimed to assess immune-enhancing activity and underlying mechanism of resveratrol in immunosuppressive mice. Previously, we reported that resveratrol could promote mouse spleen lymphocyte functions to recover the immune system effectively. In the present study, we show that resveratrol could upregulate the expressions of NF-κB, IκB kinase, JNK, and c-jun in splenic lymphocytes of immunosuppressive mice. Taken together, our results indicate that resveratrol could promote recovery of immunologic function in immunosuppressive mice by activating JNK/NF-κB pathway.

  15. On the use of genetic programming for mining comprehensible rules in subgroup discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, José María; Romero, José Raúl; Romero, Cristóbal; Ventura, Sebastián

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel grammar-guided genetic programming algorithm for subgroup discovery. This algorithm, called comprehensible grammar-based algorithm for subgroup discovery (CGBA-SD), combines the requirements of discovering comprehensible rules with the ability to mine expressive and flexible solutions owing to the use of a context-free grammar. Each rule is represented as a derivation tree that shows a solution described using the language denoted by the grammar. The algorithm includes mechanisms to adapt the diversity of the population by self-adapting the probabilities of recombination and mutation. We compare the approach with existing evolutionary and classic subgroup discovery algorithms. CGBA-SD appears to be a very promising algorithm that discovers comprehensible subgroups and behaves better than other algorithms as measures by complexity, interest, and precision indicate. The results obtained were validated by means of a series of nonparametric tests.

  16. Team negotiation: social, epistemic, economic, and psychological consequences of subgroup conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Nir

    2008-12-01

    Large collectives (e.g., organizations, political parties, nations) are seldom unitary players. Rather, they consist of different subgroups that often have conflicting interests. Nonetheless, negotiation research consistently regards negotiating teams, who represent these collectives, as monolithic parties with uniform interests. This article integrates concepts from social psychology, management, political science, and behavioral game theory to explore the effects of subgroup conflict on team negotiation. Specifically, the present research introduced a conflict of interests within negotiating teams and investigated how this internal conflict affects the outcome of the negotiation between teams. An experiment with 80 four-person teams found that conflict between subgroups had a detrimental effect on the performance of negotiating teams. This research also employed a recent model of motivated information processing in groups to investigate possible processes underlying the effect of subgroup conflict on team negotiation.

  17. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in subgroups of patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoeksma, H.L; Dekker, J; Ronday, H.K; Breedveld, F.C; Ende, van den, C.H.M

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. METHODS...

  18. Effects of hydroxyethyl starch in subgroups of patients with severe sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Rasmus G; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    It has been speculated that certain subgroups of sepsis patients may benefit from treatment with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.42, specifically in the earlier resuscitation of patients with more severely impaired circulation....

  19. Twelve-year trends in health insurance coverage among Latinos, by subgroup and immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N Sarita; Carrasquillo, Olveen

    2006-01-01

    We examine twelve-year trends in the Latino uninsured population by ethnic subgroup and immigration status. From 1993 to 1999, most Latino subgroups, particularly Puerto Ricans, had large decreases in Medicaid coverage. For some subgroups these were offset by increases in employer coverage, but not for Mexicans, resulting in a four-percentage-point increase in their uninsured population. During 2000-2004, Medicaid/SCHIP expansions benefited most subgroups and mitigated smaller losses in employer coverage. However, during 1993-2004, the percentage of noncitizen Latinos lacking coverage increased by several percentage points. This was attributable to Medicaid losses during 1993-1999 and losses in employer coverage during 2000-2004.

  20. Identification of atopic dermatitis subgroups in children from two longitudinal birth cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Savenije, Olga E M; Heron, Jon; Evans, David M; Vonk, Judith M; Brunekreef, Bert; Wijga, Alet H; Henderson, A John; Koppelman, Gerard H; Brown, Sara J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a prevalent disease with variable natural history. Longitudinal birth cohort studies provide an opportunity to define subgroups based on disease trajectories, which may represent different genetic and environmental pathomechanisms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the

  1. Novel molecular subgroups for clinical classification and outcome prediction in childhood medulloblastoma: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Edward C; Lindsey, Janet C; Nakjang, Sirintra; Crosier, Stephen; Smith, Amanda J; Hicks, Debbie; Rafiee, Gholamreza; Hill, Rebecca M; Iliasova, Alice; Stone, Thomas; Pizer, Barry; Michalski, Antony; Joshi, Abhijit; Wharton, Stephen B; Jacques, Thomas S; Bailey, Simon; Williamson, Daniel; Clifford, Steven C

    2017-07-01

    International consensus recognises four medulloblastoma molecular subgroups: WNT (MBWNT), SHH (MBSHH), group 3 (MBGrp3), and group 4 (MBGrp4), each defined by their characteristic genome-wide transcriptomic and DNA methylomic profiles. These subgroups have distinct clinicopathological and molecular features, and underpin current disease subclassification and initial subgroup-directed therapies that are underway in clinical trials. However, substantial biological heterogeneity and differences in survival are apparent within each subgroup, which remain to be resolved. We aimed to investigate whether additional molecular subgroups exist within childhood medulloblastoma and whether these could be used to improve disease subclassification and prognosis predictions. In this retrospective cohort study, we assessed 428 primary medulloblastoma samples collected from UK Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group (CCLG) treatment centres (UK), collaborating European institutions, and the UKCCSG-SIOP-PNET3 European clinical trial. An independent validation cohort (n=276) of archival tumour samples was also analysed. We analysed samples from patients with childhood medulloblastoma who were aged 0-16 years at diagnosis, and had central review of pathology and comprehensive clinical data. We did comprehensive molecular profiling, including DNA methylation microarray analysis, and did unsupervised class discovery of test and validation cohorts to identify consensus primary molecular subgroups and characterise their clinical and biological significance. We modelled survival of patients aged 3-16 years in patients (n=215) who had craniospinal irradiation and had been treated with a curative intent. Seven robust and reproducible primary molecular subgroups of childhood medulloblastoma were identified. MBWNT remained unchanged and each remaining consensus subgroup was split in two. MBSHH was split into age-dependent subgroups corresponding to infant (<4·3 years; MBSHH-Infant; n=65) and

  2. Discrete subgroups of adolescents diagnosed with borderline personality disorder: a latent class analysis of personality features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Vera; Canta, Guilherme; de Castro, Filipa; Leal, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    Research suggests that borderline personality disorder (BPD) can be diagnosed in adolescents and is marked by considerable heterogeneity. This study aimed to identify personality features characterizing adolescents with BPD and possible meaningful patterns of heterogeneity that could lead to personality subgroups. The authors analyzed data on 60 adolescents, ages 15 to 18 years, who met DSM criteria for a BPD diagnosis. The authors used latent class analysis (LCA) to identify subgroups based on the personality pattern scales from the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI). LCA indicated that the best-fitting solution was a two-class model, identifying two discrete subgroups of BPD adolescents that were described as internalizing and externalizing. The subgroups were then compared on clinical and sociodemographic variables, measures of personality dimensions, DSM BPD criteria, and perception of attachment styles. Adolescents with a BPD diagnosis constitute a heterogeneous group and vary meaningfully on personality features that can have clinical implications for treatment.

  3. TEST PREPARATION FOR THE GRE ANALYTICAL ABILITY MEASURE: DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS FOR SUBGROUPS OF GRE TEST TAKERS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Powers, Donald E

    1986-01-01

    ... on other sections of the GRE General Test. The results suggested little, if any, difference among subgroups of examinees with respect to their response to the particular kind of test preparation considered in the study...

  4. Incidence and follow-up of Braunwald subgroups in unstable angina pectoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. van Miltenburg-van Zijl (Addy); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); R.J. Veerhoek (Rinus); P.M.M. Bossuyt (Patrick)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractObjectives. This study was performed to establish the prognosis of patients with unstable angina within the subgroups of the Braunwald classification. Background. Among many classifications of unstable angina, the Braunwald classification is frequently used. However, the incidence

  5. Ultraviolet radiation-induced murine tumors produced in the absence of ultraviolet radiation-induced systemic tumor immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, S W; Greenoak, G E; Reeve, V E; Gallagher, C H

    1991-06-01

    Using micro-UV-irradiation versus whole-dorsal irradiation for inducing cutaneous carcinomas in Skh:HRI mice and an assay for UV radiation (UVR)-induced systemic tumor immunosuppression, the dependence upon systemic immunosuppression for the growth of UVR-induced carcinomas was examined. Squamous cell carcinomas were produced by repeated microirradiation of 0.8-cm2 middorsal skin with xenon are solar-simulated UVR. These tumors were excised from tumor-bearing animals who 7 days later were inoculated ventrally with a cloned UVR-induced squamous cell carcinoma cell line, the T51/6. This cell line only grows in UVR-induced immunosuppressed Skh:HRI mice. In two separate experiments T51/6 inocula failed to grow significantly in the previously tumor-bearing animals (1 of 13) and in unirradiated mice (0 of 19), whereas it grew in 100% (15 of 15) of animals given a whole-dorsal subcarcinogenic UVR dose from a filtered fluorescent tube solar simulator. No sinecomitant immune response to the T51/6 was found in previously UVR-induced tumor-bearing animals. In contrast to whole-dorsal UVR-induced tumors, microirradiation-induced squamous cell carcinomas, whose original growth environment lacked UVR-induced systemic tumor immunosuppression, did not grow preferentially in mice given an immunosuppressive dose of UVR. However both the whole-dorsal and microirradiation-induced tumors were shown to be poorly antigenic, since they lacked preferential growth in athymic nude mice. These observations provide evidence that UVR-induced systemic tumor immunosuppression is not necessary for the production of UVR-induced tumors. However, it does cause a positive selection pressure during tumor formation, independent of the carcinogenic effect of UVR, which affects the transplantation biology of a tumor.

  6. On s-semipermutable subgroups of finite groups and p-nilpotency

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. All groups considered in this paper are finite groups. Most of the notations are standard and can be found in [4] and [3]. Recall that a group H is said to be s-permutable (s-quasinormal) [6] in G if HP = PH for all Sylow subgroups P of G. A subgroup H of a group G is called s-semipermutable [2]. inGif it is ...

  7. Finite groups with the set of the number of subgroups of possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, Chen et al. [3] determined the groups in which the number of subgroups of possible order is less than or equal to 3, but there exist some gaps in the proof of their theorem. If we denote by n(G) the set of the number of subgroups of possible order of a group G, then we can investigate the structure of G by n(G).

  8. A recursive formula for the number of intuitionistic fuzzy subgroups of a finite cyclic group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandni, Sharma, P. K.; Singh, Pushpinder; Singh, Manreet

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we have given an explicit recursive formula for the number of intuitionistic fuzzy subgroups of a finite cyclic group G = Zp1 × Zp ×………..×Zpm, where p1, p2, ….., pm are distinct prime numbers. A method for constructing an intuitionistic fuzzy subgroup of a given group in terms of double pinned flags is also proposed.

  9. Resolution and Characterization of Distinct cpn60-Based Subgroups of Gardnerella vaginalis in the Vaginal Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramel Jayaprakash, Teenus; Schellenberg, John J.; Hill, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), characterized by a shift of the vaginal microbiota from a Lactobacillus-dominated community to a dense biofilm containing a complex mixture of organisms, is an important risk factor in poor reproductive health outcomes. The Nugent score, based on Gram stain, is used to diagnose BV and Gardnerella vaginalis abundance in the sample is one factor determining Nugent score. A high Nugent score is indicative of BV but does not always correspond to the presence of clinical symptoms. G. vaginalis is recognized as a heterogeneous group of organisms, which can also be part of the normal, healthy vaginal microbiome. In addition, asymptomatic BV and non-Gardnerella types of BV are being recognized. In an attempt to resolve the heterogeneous group of G. vaginalis, a phylogenetic tree of cpn60 universal target sequences from G. vaginalis isolates was constructed that indicates the existence of four subgroups of G. vaginalis. This subdivision, supported by whole genome similarity calculation of representative strains using JSpecies, demonstrates that these subgroups may represent different species. The cpn60 subgroupings did not correspond with the Piot biotyping scheme, but did show consistency with ARDRA genotyping and sialidase gene presence. Isolates from all four subgroups produced biofilm in vitro. We also investigated the distribution of G. vaginalis subgroups in vaginal samples from Kenyan women with Nugent scores consistent with BV, Intermediate and Normal microbiota (n = 44). All subgroups of G. vaginalis were detected in these women, with a significant difference (z = −3.372, n = 39, p = 0.001) in frequency of G. vaginalis subgroup B between BV and Normal groups. Establishment of a quantifiable relationship between G. vaginalis subgroup distribution and clinical status could have significant diagnostic implications. PMID:22900080

  10. Resolution and characterization of distinct cpn60-based subgroups of Gardnerella vaginalis in the vaginal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teenus Paramel Jayaprakash

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV, characterized by a shift of the vaginal microbiota from a Lactobacillus-dominated community to a dense biofilm containing a complex mixture of organisms, is an important risk factor in poor reproductive health outcomes. The Nugent score, based on Gram stain, is used to diagnose BV and Gardnerella vaginalis abundance in the sample is one factor determining Nugent score. A high Nugent score is indicative of BV but does not always correspond to the presence of clinical symptoms. G. vaginalis is recognized as a heterogeneous group of organisms, which can also be part of the normal, healthy vaginal microbiome. In addition, asymptomatic BV and non-Gardnerella types of BV are being recognized. In an attempt to resolve the heterogeneous group of G. vaginalis, a phylogenetic tree of cpn60 universal target sequences from G. vaginalis isolates was constructed that indicates the existence of four subgroups of G. vaginalis. This subdivision, supported by whole genome similarity calculation of representative strains using JSpecies, demonstrates that these subgroups may represent different species. The cpn60 subgroupings did not correspond with the Piot biotyping scheme, but did show consistency with ARDRA genotyping and sialidase gene presence. Isolates from all four subgroups produced biofilm in vitro. We also investigated the distribution of G. vaginalis subgroups in vaginal samples from Kenyan women with Nugent scores consistent with BV, Intermediate and Normal microbiota (n = 44. All subgroups of G. vaginalis were detected in these women, with a significant difference (z = -3.372, n = 39, p = 0.001 in frequency of G. vaginalis subgroup B between BV and Normal groups. Establishment of a quantifiable relationship between G. vaginalis subgroup distribution and clinical status could have significant diagnostic implications.

  11. Comparative review of some properties of fuzzy and anti fuzzy subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    B. O. ONASANYA

    2010-01-01

    This paper is to comparatively review some works in fuzzy and anti fuzzy group theory. The aim is to provide anti fuzzy versions of some existing theorems in fuzzy group theory and see how much similar they are to their fuzzy versions. The research therefore focuses on the properties of fuzzy subgroup, fuzzy cosets, fuzzy conjugacy and fuzzy normal subgroups of a group which are mimicked in anti fuzzy group theory.

  12. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Che Ngwa, Emmanuel; Zeeh, Christina; Messoudi, Ahmed; Büttner-Ennever, Jean A.; Horn, Anja K. E.

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior, and superior recti (MR, IR, and SR), inferior oblique (IO), and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems ...

  13. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel eChe-Ngwa; Christina eZeeh; Christina eZeeh; Ahmed eMessoudi; Jean Alice Büttner-Ennever; Anja Kerstin Ellen Horn; Anja Kerstin Ellen Horn

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior and superior recti (MR, IR, SR), inferior oblique (IO) and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems were i...

  14. Are there distinct cognitive and motivational sub-groups of children with ADHD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambek, Rikke; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Tannock, Rosemary; Sørensen, Anne Virring; Damm, Dorte; Thomsen, Per Hove

    2017-11-16

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is proposed to be a neuropsychologically heterogeneous disorder that encompasses two distinct sub-groups, one with executive function (EF) deficits and one with delay aversion (DA). However, such claims have often been based on studies that have operationalized neuropsychological deficits using a categorical approach - using intuitive but rather arbitrary, clinical cut-offs. The current study applied an alternative empirical approach to sub-grouping in ADHD, latent profile analysis (LPA), and attempted to validate emerging subgroups through clinically relevant correlates. One-hundred medication-naïve children with ADHD and 96 typically developing children (6-14 years) completed nine EF and three DA tasks as well as an odor identification test. Parents and teachers provided reports of the children's behavior (ADHD and EF). Models of the latent structure of scores on EF and DA tests were contrasted using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). LPA was carried out based on factor scores from the CFA and sub-groups were compared in terms of odor identification and behavior. A model with one DA and two EF factors best fit the data. LPA resulted in four sub-groups that differed in terms of general level of neuropsychological performance (ranging from high to very low), odor identification, and behavior. The sub-groups did not differ in terms of the relative EF and DA performance. Results in the ADHD group were replicated in the control group. While EF and DA appear to be dissociable constructs; they do not yield distinct sub-groups when sub-grouping is based on a statistical approach such as LPA.

  15. Reactivation of tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment in a patient with a positive QuantiFERON-RD1 test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Munk, Martin E; Andersen, Ase Bengaard

    2004-01-01

    A patient with polymyositis developed tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment. Tuberculin Skin Test and chest X-ray failed to demonstrate latent tuberculosis, whereas a blood sample that was tested with a modified QuantiFERON-TB-assay, using the recombinant ESAT-6 and CFP-10, was positive...... indicating that this patient was latently infected before immunosuppressive therapy. This case indicates the risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis given that the subject is RD1 responsive, and we believe that preventive anti-tuberculous treatment could have prevented this case...... of tuberculosis. We suggest that RD1 based tests are evaluated further in immunocompromised patients....

  16. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode...... revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis...... and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine....

  17. Presentation of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis due to a novel MUNC 13–4 mutation masked by partial therapeutic immunosuppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett Jackie P-D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a potentially fatal disease characterized by excessive macrophage and lymphocyte activity. Patients can be affected following immune activation after an oncologic, autoimmune or infectious trigger. An associated gene mutation may be found which impairs cytolytic lymphocyte function. We describe a pediatric case of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with a novel mutation of MUNC 13–4 whose diagnosis was confounded by concurrent immunosuppression. Clinical reassessment for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is necessary in persistently febrile patients with laboratory derangements in the setting of immunosuppressive agent exposure.

  18. Reactivation of tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment in a patient with a positive QuantiFERON-RD1 test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Munk, Martin E; Andersen, Ase Bengaard

    2004-01-01

    A patient with polymyositis developed tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment. Tuberculin Skin Test and chest X-ray failed to demonstrate latent tuberculosis, whereas a blood sample that was tested with a modified QuantiFERON-TB-assay, using the recombinant ESAT-6 and CFP-10, was positive...... indicating that this patient was latently infected before immunosuppressive therapy. This case indicates the risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis given that the subject is RD1 responsive, and we believe that preventive anti-tuberculous treatment could have prevented this case...

  19. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode re...... and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine....... revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis...

  20. Classification of low back-related leg pain: do subgroups differ in disability and psychosocial factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeremy; Hall, Toby

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that patients with low back-related leg pain can be classified according to pain mechanisms into four distinct subgroups: Central Sensitization (CS), Denervation (D), Peripheral Nerve Sensitization (PNS), and Musculoskeletal (M). The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were any differences in terms of disability and psychosocial factors between these four subgroups. Forty-five subjects with low back-related leg pain completed the Oswestry Disability Index, the hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. Subsequently, an examiner blinded to the questionnaire results classified the subjects into one of the four subgroups, according to the findings of the self-administered Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms questionnaire and a physical examination. It was found that the PNS subgroup had significantly greater disability compared to all other subgroups and significantly greater fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity compared to the CS and D subgroups. This highlights the importance of sub-classification but also the need to take into account disability and psychosocial factors in the management of low back-related leg pain.

  1. IGHV1, IGHV5 and IGHV7 subgroup genes in the rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jon M; Howard, Wendy; Robbins, Helena; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K

    2003-03-01

    The diversity of the antibody response is achieved, in part, by rearrangement of different immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. The Ig heavy chain is made up of a variable region (IGHV), a diversity region (IGHD) and a joining region (IGHJ). Human germline IGHV genes have been grouped into seven multigene subgroups. Size and usage of these subgroups is not equal, the IGHV3 subgroup is the most commonly used (36%), followed by IGHV1/7 (26%), then IGHV4, IGHV5, IGHV2, IGHV6 (15%, 12%, 4%, 3% respectively). The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is a useful non-human primate model for studies of infection and the database of germline Ig genes for the macaque is gradually growing to become a useful tool in the study of B-cell responses. The proportions of IGHV subgroup usage in the macaque are similar to those in man. Representatives from IGHV3 and IGHV4 subgroups for the macaque have been published, as have germline sequences of the IGHD and IGHJ genes. However, to date there have been no sequences published from the second largest IGHV subgroup, IGHV1. We report the isolation and sequencing of a genomic fragment containing an IGHV1 gene from the macaque. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers designed from this sequence enabled us to amplify and sequence 25 new IGHV1 germline genes. We also isolated two IGHV7 genes, using the same primers, and two IGHV5 genes, using human IGHV5 primers.

  2. Interaction with Intestinal Epithelial Cells Promotes an Immunosuppressive Phenotype in Lactobacillus casei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiittanen, Minna; Keto, Joni; Haiko, Johanna; Mättö, Jaana; Partanen, Jukka; Lähteenmäki, Kaarina

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of the immunological tolerance and homeostasis in the gut is associated with the composition of the intestinal microbiota. We here report that cultivation of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 in the presence of human intestinal epithelial cells promotes functional changes in bacteria. In particular, the interaction enhanced the immunosuppressive phenotype of L. casei as demonstrated by the ability of L. casei to generate functional regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) and production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results indicate microbe-host cross-talk that changes features of microbes, and suggest that in vitro simulation of epithelial cell interaction can reveal functional properties of gut microbes more accurately than conventional cultivation. PMID:24244309

  3. Immunosuppressive activity of ethanolic extract of seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam. in experimental immune inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Shailaja G; Mehta, Anita A

    2010-07-06

    Traditionally, the plant Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) is used for the treatment of ascites and rheumatism, while the dried seeds of the plant are used as an 'anti-allergic' agent. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of ethanolic extract of seeds from Moringa oleifera Lam. in experimental immune inflammation. Circulatory and splenic leukocyte counts, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and humoral antibody responses were measured in mice using SRBC as the antigen. In addition, macrophage phagocytosis was measured by the carbon clearance test. The extract dose-dependently (50, 100 and 200mg/kg) inhibited spleen weight as well as circulatory leukocyte and splenocyte counts. The delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction was significantly inhibited (PMoringa oleifera have immunosuppressive activity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genital Tuberculosis as the Cause of Tuboovarian Abscess in an Immunosuppressed Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ilmer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although tuberculosis (TB is a major health problem worldwide, primary extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB, and in particular female genital tract infection, remains a rare event. Case Report. A 35-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (HIV seropositive woman of African descent with lower abdominal pain and fever of two days duration underwent surgery due to left adnexal mass suggesting pelvic inflammatory disease. The surgical situs showed a four quadrant peritonitis, consistent with the clinical symptoms of the patient, provoked by a tuboovarian abscess (TOA on the left side. All routine diagnostic procedures failed to determine the causative organism/pathogen of the infection. Histopathological evaluation identified a necrotic granulomatous salpingitis and specific PCR analysis corroborated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. Tb. Consequently, antituberculotic therapy was provided. Conclusion. In the differential diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease, internal genital tuberculosis should be considered. Moreover, physicians should consider tuberculous infections early in the work-up of patients when immunosuppressive conditions are present.

  5. Longitudinal analysis of the associations between antiretroviral therapy, viraemia and immunosuppression with lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamara, David A; Smith, Colette; Ryom, Lene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral (ART) drugs have been associated with higher triglycerides (TG), higher total cholesterol (TC) and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Associations between lipid levels with HIV viraemia and immunosuppression in the presence of ART remain unclear....... METHODS: Participants from the D:A:D study with at least one TG/TC/HDL-C measurement were included. Linear mixed effect models were used to determine the association of ART, viral load (VL), nadir and current CD4(+) T-cell count and previous AIDS diagnosis with lipids. RESULTS: Of 49,717 participants, 90...... with the worst TG profile, (27.2% higher levels compared to atazanavir; 95% CI 25.2%, 29.2%), and darunavir had a similar profile as atazanavir. The nucleoside pair lamivudine/tenofovir was associated with the most favourable TG profile (-2.8%; -3.5%, -2.0%) compared with emtricitabine/tenofovir, whereas...

  6. Oral cancer after prolonged immunosuppression for multiorgan chronic graft-versus-host disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Lins Fuentes de Araujo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term survivors of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are recognized as a risk group for malignization. Malignant oral neoplasms are increasingly being reported in the literature as a consequence of lesions of chronic graft-versus-host disease, and prolonged multidrug treatment to control its manifestations. This report describes a 43-year-old patient who, after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, developed an oral squamous cell carcinoma secondary to the use of azathioprine, cyclosporine, prednisone, and tacrolimus, associated with multiorgan chronic graft-versus-host disease involving the oral mucosa, skin, eyes, and liver. This report aims to discuss the possible role of immunosuppressant therapy for chronic graft-versus-host disease on the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma, and the relevance of a close oral follow-up of patients to detect dysplastic or malignant alterations at an early stage.

  7. Extramedullary plasmacytoma presenting as a nasal mass in an immunosuppressed patient: treatment after failed primary radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempewolf, Ryan; Lee, John H

    2008-04-01

    Most of the recent evidence suggests that extramedullary plasmacytoma should be treated initially with radiation, as response rates have exceeded 90% in many studies. Surgery is not considered a primary treatment modality for such tumors. We report the case of a chronically immunosuppressed 43-year-old man with bilateral extramedullary plasmacytomas of the nasal cavities. The right-sided mass was surgically excised, while the left-sided mass was initially treated with radiation. However, the left mass proved to be radioresistant, and it was subsequently excised surgically The patient showed no evidence of recurrence of either mass at 42 months of follow-up. We believe that the particulars of this case, combined with the results of some recent studies, provide good evidence that surgery should be considered in the treatment of certain cases of extramedullary plasmacytoma.

  8. Poor response to tuberculosis treatment with regimens without rifampicin in immunosuppressed AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donnel M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was conducted on 79 advanced immunosuppressed AIDS patients from 1997 to 1999, during which nine cases of tuberculosis (TB were diagnosed. The main clinical and laboratory characteristics and the response to TB treatment were reviewed. The clinical manifestations of TB were: pulmonary (six cases, extrapulmonary (two cases and disseminated (one case. These patients were being treated with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART and were not responding. In three cases an optional regimen without rifampicin (RMP was indicated to maintain HAART during TB treatment. A clinical response to TB treatment (disappearance of fever was observed in 6/9 patients during a mean of 73 days (SD = 96. The three unresponsive patients were those treated without RMP. A switch to TB regimens containing RMP was proposed and successful. In our study, though it was limited by a small sample size, the response to TB regimens without rifampin was poor in immunossupressed patients failing HAART.

  9. Poor response to tuberculosis treatment with regimens without rifampicin in immunosuppressed AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. O'Donnel

    Full Text Available A prospective study was conducted on 79 advanced immunosuppressed AIDS patients from 1997 to 1999, during which nine cases of tuberculosis (TB were diagnosed. The main clinical and laboratory characteristics and the response to TB treatment were reviewed. The clinical manifestations of TB were: pulmonary (six cases, extrapulmonary (two cases and disseminated (one case. These patients were being treated with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART and were not responding. In three cases an optional regimen without rifampicin (RMP was indicated to maintain HAART during TB treatment. A clinical response to TB treatment (disappearance of fever was observed in 6/9 patients during a mean of 73 days (SD = 96. The three unresponsive patients were those treated without RMP. A switch to TB regimens containing RMP was proposed and successful. In our study, though it was limited by a small sample size, the response to TB regimens without rifampin was poor in immunossupressed patients failing HAART.

  10. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells with immunosuppressive activity can be easily isolated from dental pulp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierdomenico, Laura; Bonsi, Laura; Calvitti, Mario

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being investigated in preclinical and clinical settings because of their multipotent differentiative capacity or, alternatively, their immunosuppressive function. The aim of this study was to evaluate dental pulp (DP...... characteristics of DP-MSCs may prompt future studies aimed at using these cells in the treatment or prevention of T-cell alloreactivity in hematopoietic or solid organ allogeneic transplantation....... was then tested by coculturing PHA-stimulated allogeneic T cells with or without MSCs for 3 days. RESULTS: BM-MSCs could be differentiated in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic lineages. DP-MSCs showed osteogenic and adipocytic differentiation, but did not differentiate into chondrocytes. Although...

  11. Pediatric RSV Infection During Two Winter Seasons in British Columbia: A Role for Subgroup Analysis in Young Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wilson

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies directed against the G, F and NP proteins of respiratory syncytial virus, 167 virus isolates from nasopharyngeal washing cultures at British Columbia Children’s Hospital during two consecutive epidemics were subgrouped. Slides made and frozen at the time of virus isolation or prepared from recovered frozen passage material, were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. Of 85 strains tested in 1987–88, 54 (64% were subgroup A, and 31 (36% subgroup B. By contrast, of 82 strains tested in 1988–89 five (6% were subgroup A and 77 (94% subgroup B. Review of patient charts did not reveal significant differences in clinical course of patients infected with the two subgroups, but the risk of infection with subgroup A was significantly greater than the risk of subgroup B infection in younger patients.

  12. Immunosuppressive treatment for nephrotic idiopathic membranous nephropathy: a meta-analysis based on Chinese adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Xie

    Full Text Available Idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN is the most common pathological type for nephrotic syndrome in adults in western countries and China. The benefits and harms of immunosuppressive treatment in IMN remain controversial.To assess the efficacy and safety of different immunosuppressive agents in the treatment of nephrotic syndrome caused by IMN.PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and wanfang, weipu, qinghuatongfang, were searched for relevant studies published before December 2011. Reference lists of nephrology textbooks, review articles were checked. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs meeting the criteria was performed using Review Manager.17 studies were included, involving 696 patients. Calcineurin inhibitors had a better effect when compared to alkylating agents, on complete remission (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.13, to 2.30 P = 0.008, partial or complete remission (effective (CR/PR, RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.52 P = 0.003, and fewer side effects. Among calcineurin inhibitors, tacrolimus (TAC was shown statistical significance in inducing more remissions. When compared to cyclophosphamide (CTX, leflunomide (LET showed no beneficial effect, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF showed significant beneficial on effectiveness (CR/PR, RR: 1.41, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.72 P = 0.0006 but not significant on complete remission (CR, RR: 1.38, 95% CI 0.89 to 2.13 P = 0.15.This analysis based on Chinese adults and short duration RCTs suggested calcineurin inhibitors, especially TAC, were more effective in proteinuria reduction in IMN with acceptable side effects. Long duration RCTs were needed to confirm the long-term effects of those agents in nephrotic IMN.

  13. Protective effects of Picrorhiza kurroa on cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Arshad; Shadma, Wahab; Maksood, Ali; Ansari, Shahid Hussain

    2013-01-01

    To study the immunomodulatory effect of ethanolic and aqueous extract of the rhizomes of Picrorrhiza kurroa (Scrophulariaceae) in normal and immunosuppressed mice models. The rhizomes extract of Picrorrhiza kurroa was administered orally according to their body weight in mice. The study was carried out by various hematological and serological tests. The assessment of immunomodulatory activity on specific and non-specific immunity was studied by administration of test extract. The method of cyclophasphamide-induced immunosuppression was employed with slight modification to study the immunomodulatory potential of the extract. Plant extracts were administered by oral feeding canula to the test groups (groups III-VI), group I (control animals) and group II (model control animals) received same volume of normal saline (0.2 ml). Humoral antibody response to SRBC measurement of antibody titer by hemagglutination reaction was done. The mice belonging to the all groups were antigenically challenged with SRBC (0.5×10(9) cells/ml/100 g) on 10(th) day intraparitoneally. Cellular immune response (Foot pad reaction test) the edema was induced by injecting SRBC (0.025×10(9) cells) in left paw, and 0.025 ml of saline was injected in right paw. The plant extract showed protective effects on humoral immunity. The change in percentage deduction in footpad volume was also found significant (P<0.001). Administration of extract remarkably ameliorated both cellular and humoral antibody response. It is concluded that the test extracts possessed promising immunostimulant properties. But, the alcoholic extract is more potent than aqueous extract in producing delayed type hypersensitivity response.

  14. A decade (1982 to 1992) of pediatric cardiac transplantation and the impact of FK 506 immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, John M.; Fricker, Frederick J.; Nido, Pedro del; Starzl, Thomas E.; Hardesty, Robert L.; Griffith, Bartley P.

    2010-01-01

    The decade from 1982 through 1992 witnessed tremendous growth in pediatric cardiac transplantation. At Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh 66 cardiac transplants were performed during this period (age range 7 hours to 18 years). The cause of cardiomyopathy was congenital (n = 30), cardiomyopathy (n = 29), myocarditis (n = 2), doxorubicin toxicity (n = 2), ischemic (n = 1), valvular (n = 1), and cardiac angiosarcoma (n = 1). Nine children (14 %) required mechanical circulatory support before transplantation: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (n = 8) and Novacor left ventricular assist system (n = 1) (Baxter Healthcare Corp., Novacor Div., Oakland, Calif.). The mean follow-up time was 2 years (range 4 months to 8 years). The overall survival in the group was 67%. In children with congenital heart disease (>6 months of age) the perioperative (30 day) mortality was 66% before mid-1988 (n = 10) and 0% since mid-1988 (n = 11). The late mortality (>30 days) in children with cardiomyopathy transplanted prior to mid-1988 was 66% (n = 14) and 7% since mid-1988 (n = 15). Since mid-1988 1- and 3-year survival was 82% in children with congenital heart disease and 90% in children with cardiomyopathy. Twenty-six children have had FK 506 as their primary immunosuppressive therapy since November 1989. Survival in this group was 82% at 1 and 3 years. The actuarial freedom from grade 3A rejection in the FK group was 60% at 3 and 6 months after transplantation versus 20% and 12%, respectively, in the 15 children operated on before the advent of FK 506, who were treated with cyclosporine-based triple-drug therapy (p cyclosporine group (p cardiac transplantation and a future wedded to immunosuppression. PMID:7680396

  15. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Tacrolimus versus Ciclosporin as Primary Immunosuppression After Liver Transplant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorden Muduma

    Full Text Available Several meta-analyses comparing ciclosporin with tacrolimus have been conducted since the 1994 publication of the tacrolimus registration trials, but most captured data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs predating recent improvements in waiting list prioritization, induction protocols and concomitant medications. The present study comprised a systematic review and meta-analysis of ciclosporin and tacrolimus in liver transplant recipients using studies published since January 2000.Searches of PubMed, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE identified RCTs of tacrolimus and ciclosporin as the immunosuppressant in adult primary liver transplant recipients, published between January 2000 and August 6, 2014. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the relative risk of death, graft loss, acute rejection (AR, new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT and hypertension with tacrolimus relative to ciclosporin at 12 months.The literature search identified 11 RCTs comparing ciclosporin with tacrolimus. Relative to ciclosporin, tacrolimus was associated with significantly improved outcomes in terms of patient mortality (risk ratio [RR] with ciclosporin of 1.26; 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.01-1.58. Tacrolimus was superior to ciclosporin in terms of hypertension (RR with ciclosporin 1.26; 95%CI 1.07-1.47, but inferior in terms of NODAT (RR with ciclosporin 0.60; 95%CI 0.47-0.77. There were no significant differences between ciclosporin and tacrolimus in terms of graft loss or AR.Meta-analysis of RCTs published since 2000 showed tacrolimus to be superior to ciclosporin in terms of patient mortality and hypertension, while ciclosporin was superior in terms of NODAT. No significant differences were identified in terms of graft loss or AR. These findings provide further evidence supporting the use of tacrolimus as the cornerstone of immunosuppressive therapy in liver transplant recipients.

  16. Antigenic and immunosuppressive properties of a trimeric recombinant transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mühle

    Full Text Available The transmembrane envelope (TM protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 plays an important role during virus infection inducing the fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. In addition, there are indications that the TM protein plays a role in the immunopathogenesis leading to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Inactivated virus particles and recombinant gp41 have been reported to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, as well as to alter cytokine release and gene expression. The same was shown for a peptide corresponding to a highly conserved domain of all retroviral TM proteins, the immunosuppressive domain. Due to its propensity to aggregate and to be expressed at low levels, studies comprising authentic gp41 produced in eukaryotic cells are extremely rare. Here we describe the production of a secreted, soluble recombinant gp41 in 293 cells. The antigen was purified to homogeneity and characterised thoroughly by various biochemical and immunological methods. It was shown that the protein was glycosylated and assembled into trimers. Binding studies by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies implied a six-helix bundle conformation. The low binding of broadly neutralising antibodies (bnAb directed against the membrane proximal external region (MPER suggested that this gp41 is probably not suited as vaccine to induce such bnAb. Purified gp41 bound to monocytes and to a lesser extent to lymphocytes and triggered the production of specific cytokines when added to normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, gp41 expressed on target cells inhibited the antigen-specific response of murine CD8+ T cells by drastically impairing their IFNγ production. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of a gp41 produced in eukaryotic cells including its immunosuppressive properties. Our data provide another line of evidence that gp41 might be directly involved in

  17. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic analysis of immunosuppressive agents after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Tayyab S; Lichvar, Alicia B; Leino, Abbie D; Vinks, Alexander A; Christians, Uwe; Shields, Adele R; Cardi, Michael A; Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Kaiser, Tiffany; Woodle, E Steve; Alloway, Rita R

    2017-06-01

    Severe obesity has been shown to limit access to renal transplantation in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has been performed in the ESRD population to assist in achieving waitlist and transplant eligibility. Little is known about how LSG impacts the bioequivalence of tacrolimus products and immunosuppression pharmacokinetics. This was a prospective, open-label, single-dose, crossover, two-period pharmacokinetic (PK) study. The purpose of this study was to assess single-dose PK of immediate-release tacrolimus (IR-TAC), extended-release tacrolimus (ER-TAC), and mycophenolic acid (MPA) in adult ESRD patients post-LSG. Twenty-three subjects were included in the 24-hour PK assessments. The ratio of geometric means between ER-TAC and IR-TAC was 103.5% (90% CI; 89.6%-119.6%) for AUC0-24 and 92.5% (90% CI; 80.4%-106.4%) for Cmax . PK parameters were similar between ER-TAC and IR-TAC, except for Cmin (P=.004) and Cmax (P=.04). MPA AUC0-24 was similar when given with either ER-TAC or IR-TAC (P=.32). Patients expressing CYP3A5*1 genotypes had lower tacrolimus AUC0-24 values vs those with CYP3A5*3/*3 (IR-TACPTACP=.008). Genotype did not impact MPA PK. Dose modification of immunosuppressants post-LSG may not be necessary aside from standard therapeutic drug monitoring. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Reduction of immunosuppression in UV-irradiated mice by dietary retinyl palmitate plus canthaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensler, H L

    1989-01-01

    The ability of dietary retinyl palmitate, canthaxanthin or the combination of both, to prevent induction of immunosuppression by UVB irradiation was tested by passive transfer of splenocytes. The basal diet was the American Institute of Nutrition diet 76A, containing 4 IU retinyl palmitate/g diet. Groups of 55 mice were fed this basal diet alone, or supplemented with 120 IU retinyl palmitate/g diet, 1% canthaxanthin or the combination of both. After 18 weeks of these diets, UVB radiation treatments began. The UVB radiation source was a bank of six unfiltered Westinghouse FS40 lamps which delivered an average dose of 4.6 J/m2/s over the wavelength range of 280-340 nm. After 27.5 weeks of UV treatments, and approximately 1.14 X 10(6) J/m2, spleens were removed from mice and used as sources of splenocytes for passive transfer into naive recipients. These recipients were then challenged with an immunogenic, syngeneic UV-induced tumor (UV20). Approximately twice as many tumor challenges grew in recipients of splenocytes from UV-irradiated (19/20), as compared with unirradiated (11/20) donors fed the basal diet. Transfer of splenocytes from UV-irradiated donors fed the basal diet admixed with 1% canthaxanthin, 120 IU retinyl palmitate/g diet or the combination, resulted in 16/20, 13/20 and 10/20 growing tumors, respectively. These values were insignificantly (P = 0.25), marginally (P = 0.054) or significantly (P less than 0.02) different from the positive control value, respectively. Thus, dietary supplementation with retinyl palmitate plus canthaxanthin prevented the transfer of UV-induced immunosuppression with splenocytes from UV-irradiated mice.

  19. Immunosuppressive effects of ginsenoside-Rd on skin allograft rejection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Yunxin; Chen, Jiajia; Li, Sijia; Wang, Yanhong; Hu, Lamei; Wang, Lihua; Wu, Yongjie

    2012-07-01

    Organ transplantation is a life-saving procedure for patients with organ failure. However, the side effects of long-term application of classic immunosuppressant remain major obstacles for successful transplantation. Therefore, new and safe immunosuppressive drugs against acute and chronic rejection are eagerly awaited. In the present study, we detected the effect of ginsenoside-Rd on mitogen-induced mouse spleen lymphocytes proliferation in vitro and observed the effect of ginsenoside-Rd on allograft rejection in a rat skin transplantation model. Th1/Th2 type cytokines secretion and T-cell subsets were also detected. The results showed that ginsenoside-Rd could markedly inhibit Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced mouse spleen T lymphocytes proliferation. Also, ginsenoside-Rd could significantly prolong the mean survival time of skin allograft and improve the skin allograft pathological damage. Furthermore, ginsenoside-Rd could markedly suppress alloantigen-specific production of Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ as well as proinflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-12. In parallel, Th2 cytokine IL-10 production in serum of rat recipients was markedly up-regulated. Ginsenoside-Rd at a dose of 25 mg/kg could significantly reduce the percentages of CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells in peripheral blood of rat recipients. Our results suggest that ginsenoside-Rd can effectively antagonize transplant rejection, which might qualify ginsenoside-Rd as a putative, therapeutic drug for the treatment of Th1-driven diseases, including transplant rejection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Citalopram enhances B cell numbers in a murine model of morphine-induced immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao; Kramer, Jeffery; Vallejo, Ricardo; Stanton, George; Heidenreich, Byron A; Benyamin, Ramsin; Vogel, Laura A

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain are often challenged with depression stemming from the long-term psychophysiological effects of their condition. Consequently, patients with chronic pain are often treated with morphine, which can induce immunosuppression, along with an antidepressant. The antidepressant citalopram (CTP; Sigma-Aldrich Chemical, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.) is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is reported to have immunomodulatory effects. Thus, we investigated whether CTP administration impacted immunity in morphine-treated animals. Adult mice were pretreated for 7 days with either saline or CTP (10 or 30 mg/kg intraperitoneal injections twice daily), followed by subcutaneous implantation of a 25 mg morphine pellet for 48 hours. Spleen, thymus, and lymph nodes were harvested to analyze total cell numbers, relative lymphocyte populations, and lymphocyte function. In this study, CTP had no effect on either total cell counts or lymphocyte populations in the thymus. However, in the spleen, total splenocyte numbers in all CTP-treated animals displayed an increasing trend over saline-treated animals. Interestingly, although more cells were found in the spleen, distribution of splenic lymphocyte populations did not differ between treatments. Despite no increase in total cell number, a high dose of CTP (30 mg/kg) resulted in a significantly higher B cell population in the lymph nodes, while T cell and NK cell numbers were not different. CTP did not significantly reverse morphine-induced weight loss or splenic B cell antibody secretion in vitro. Additionally, CTP treatment demonstrated a slight but not significant increase in both splenic B and T cell mitogen-induced proliferation in vitro. In summary, CTP may have a specific potential in the attenuation of morphine's immunosuppressive effect by enhancing splenocyte numbers and lymph node B cell populations.

  1. Felis Catus Gammaherpesvirus 1 DNAemia in Whole Blood from Therapeutically Immunosuppressed or Retrovirus-Infected Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia J. McLuckie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesviruses are major co-pathogens of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, making the interactions between feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV and Felis catus gammaherpesvirus 1 (FcaGHV1 pertinent to both human and veterinary medical research. FIV-infected cats are at increased risk of FcaGHV1 DNAemia and consistently harbor higher FcaGHV1 loads than FIV-uninfected cats. Whether immune deficiencies unrelated to FIV are associated with similar risks is unknown. Using whole blood FcaGHV1 qPCR, we found no difference in the frequency of DNAemia or DNA load in therapeutically immunosuppressed (P1, n = 18 or feline leukemia virus (FeLV-infected (P2, n = 57 patients compared with age- and sex-matched controls (C1, n = 58; C2, n = 57. In contrast, FIV/FeLV-co-infected cats (P3, n = 5 were at increased risk of FcaGHV1 DNAemia compared to retrovirus uninfected controls (C3, n = 39; p = 0.0068, and had a higher median FcaGHV1 DNA load, although the latter was not significant. FIV/FeLV-co-infected cats (P3 had a similar frequency of FcaGHV1 DNAemia reported compared to FIV-infected controls (C4. In conclusion, we found no evidence that cats with therapeutic immunosuppression or FeLV infection were at greater risk of FcaGHV1 DNAemia or had higher FcaGHV1 DNA load in whole blood. The risk of DNAemia in FIV/FeLV-co-infected cats was similar to that documented previously in cats infected with FIV alone.

  2. Blockade of immunosuppressive cytokines restores NK cell antiviral function in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Peppa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are enriched in the liver, constituting around a third of intrahepatic lymphocytes. We have previously demonstrated that they upregulate the death ligand TRAIL in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB, allowing them to kill hepatocytes bearing TRAIL receptors. In this study we investigated whether, in addition to their pathogenic role, NK cells have antiviral potential in CHB. We characterised NK cell subsets and effector function in 64 patients with CHB compared to 31 healthy controls. We found that, in contrast to their upregulated TRAIL expression and maintenance of cytolytic function, NK cells had a markedly impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ in CHB. This functional dichotomy of NK cells could be recapitulated in vitro by exposure to the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, which was induced in patients with active CHB. IL-10 selectively suppressed NK cell IFN-γ production without altering cytotoxicity or death ligand expression. Potent antiviral therapy reduced TRAIL-expressing CD56(bright NK cells, consistent with the reduction in liver inflammation it induced; however, it was not able to normalise IL-10 levels or the capacity of NK cells to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ. Blockade of IL-10 +/- TGF-β restored the capacity of NK cells from both the periphery and liver of patients with CHB to produce IFN-γ, thereby enhancing their non-cytolytic antiviral capacity. In conclusion, NK cells may be driven to a state of partial functional tolerance by the immunosuppressive cytokine environment in CHB. Their defective capacity to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ persists in patients on antiviral therapy but can be corrected in vitro by IL-10+/- TGF-β blockade.

  3. Designer Thiopurine-analogues for Optimised Immunosuppression in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Imke; Diall, Alexandra; Dvorsky, Radovan; Atreya, Raja; Henninger, Christian; Grün, Mathias; Hofmann, Ute; Schaeffeler, Elke; López-Posadas, Rocío; Daehn, Ilse; Zenker, Stefanie; Döbrönti, Michael; Neufert, Clemens; Billmeier, Ulrike; Zundler, Sebastian; Fritz, Gerhard; Schwab, Matthias; Neurath, Markus F

    2016-10-01

    The clinical use of azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine is limited by their delayed onset of action and potential side effects such as myelosuppression and hepatotoxicity. As these drugs specifically target the Vav1/Rac1 signalling pathway in T lamina propria lymphocytes via their metabolite 6-thio-GTP, we studied expression and optimised suppression of this pathway in inflammatory bowel diseases [IBD]. Rac1 and Vav1 expressions were analysed in mucosal immune cells in IBD patients. Targeted molecular modelling of the 6-thio-GTP molecule was performed to optimise Rac1 blockade; 44 modified designer thiopurine-analogues were tested for apoptosis induction, potential toxicity, and immunosuppression. Activation of the Vav1/Rac1 pathway in lymphocytes was studied in IBD patients and in lamina propria immune cells in the presence or absence of thiopurine-analogues. Several thiopurine-analogues induced significantly higher T cell apoptosis than 6-mercaptopurine. We identified a compound, denoted B-0N, based on its capacity to mediate earlier and stronger induction of T cell apoptosis than 6-mercaptopurine. B-0N-treatment resulted in accelerated inhibition of Rac1 activity in primary peripheral blood T cells as well as in intestinal lamina propria immune cells. Compared with 6-thio-GTP and 6-mercaptopurine, B-0N-treatment was associated with decreased myelo- and hepatotoxicity. The Vav1/Rac1 pathway is activated in mucosal immune cells in IBD. The designer thiopurine-analogue B-0N induces immunosuppression more potently than 6-mercaptopurine. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Herpes viruses and tumours in kidney transplant recipients. The role of immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio

    2011-06-01

    Herpes virus infections are frequent in renal transplant recipients. Some herpes viruses are not only responsible for life-threatening infections and renal graft injury but can also increase the risk of malignancy. Three herpes viruses, namely cytomegalovirus (CMV) or human herpes virus 5, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) or herpes virus 4 and human herpes virus 8 (HHV8), may play an oncogenic role. The oncogenic role of CMV is controversial. However, there is growing evidence showing that CMV can infect cancer cells and favour their resistance to the immune system and chemotherapy. B cells infected by EBV can have uncontrolled proliferation eventually resulting in polyclonal polymorphic or monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (PTLD), which are particularly frequent in children and in EBV-negative recipients. In some ethnicities, the carriers of HHV8 are susceptible to develop Kaposi's sarcoma after transplantation. The intensity of immunosuppression therapy plays a critical role in mediating infections from oncogenic herpes viruses. However, the type of immunosuppressive drugs can also influence the risk of virus-mediated neoplasias. An aggressive induction therapy aimed at depleting lymphocytes may favour the reactivation and dissemination of oncogenic herpes viruses, while anti-CD25 monoclonal antibodies have little impact on virus reactivation. Calcineurin inhibitors can increase the risk of viral infections and malignancy. Mycofenolate salts may perhaps protect from EBV-related PTLD. Finally, the inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycine may reduce the risk of viral disease by inhibiting the cascade of kinases that govern the proliferation and replication of oncogenic herpes viruses.

  5. Vascular normalizing doses of antiangiogenic treatment reprogram the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and enhance immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhui; Yuan, Jianping; Righi, Elda; Kamoun, Walid S; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Nezivar, Jean; Santosuosso, Michael; Martin, John D; Martin, Margaret R; Vianello, Fabrizio; Leblanc, Pierre; Munn, Lance L; Huang, Peigen; Duda, Dan G; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Poznansky, Mark C

    2012-10-23

    The recent approval of a prostate cancer vaccine has renewed hope for anticancer immunotherapies. However, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment may limit the effectiveness of current immunotherapies. Antiangiogenic agents have the potential to modulate the tumor microenvironment and improve immunotherapy, but they often are used at high doses in the clinic to prune tumor vessels and paradoxically may compromise various therapies. Here, we demonstrate that targeting tumor vasculature with lower vascular-normalizing doses, but not high antivascular/antiangiogenic doses, of an anti-VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) antibody results in a more homogeneous distribution of functional tumor vessels. Furthermore, lower doses are superior to the high doses in polarizing tumor-associated macrophages from an immune inhibitory M2-like phenotype toward an immune stimulatory M1-like phenotype and in facilitating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell tumor infiltration. Based on this mechanism, scheduling lower-dose anti-VEGFR2 therapy with T-cell activation induced by a whole cancer cell vaccine therapy enhanced anticancer efficacy in a CD8(+) T-cell-dependent manner in both immune-tolerant and immunogenic murine breast cancer models. These findings indicate that vascular-normalizing lower doses of anti-VEGFR2 antibody can reprogram the tumor microenvironment away from immunosuppression toward potentiation of cancer vaccine therapies. Given that the combinations of high doses of bevacizumab with chemotherapy have not improved overall survival of breast cancer patients, our study suggests a strategy to use antiangiogenic agents in breast cancer more effectively with active immunotherapy and potentially other anticancer therapies.

  6. Resistance of a lizard (the green anole, Anolis carolinensis; Polychridae) to ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, R.B.; Fabacher, D.L.; Lieske, C.; Miller, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    The green anole (Anolis carolinensis) is the most northerly distributed of its Neotropical genus. This lizard avoids a winter hibernation phase by the use of sun basking behaviors. Inevitably, this species is exposed to high doses of ambient solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Increases in terrestrial ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation secondary to stratospheric ozone depletion and habitat perturbation potentially place this species at risk of UVR-induced immunosuppression. Daily exposure to subinflammatory UVR (8 kJ/m2/day UV-B, 85 kJ/m2/day ultraviolet A [UV-A]), 6 days per week for 4 weeks (total cumulative doses of 192 kJ/m2 UV-B, 2.04 × 103 kJ/m2 UV-A) did not suppress the anole's acute or delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to horseshoe crab hemocyanin. In comparison with the available literature UV-B doses as low as 0.1 and 15.9 kJ/m2 induced suppression of DTH responses in mice and humans, respectively. Exposure of anoles to UVR did not result in the inhibition of ex vivo splenocyte phagocytosis of fluorescein labeled Escherichia coli or ex vivo splenocyte nitric oxide production. Doses of UV-B ranging from 0.35 to 45 kJ/m2 have been reported to suppress murine splenic/peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis and nitric oxide production. These preliminary studies demonstrate the resistance of green anoles to UVR-induced immunosuppression. Methanol extracts of anole skin contained two peaks in the ultraviolet wavelength range that could be indicative of photoprotective substances. However, the resistance of green anoles to UVR is probably not completely attributable to absorption by UVR photoprotective substances in the skin but more likely results from a combination of other factors including absorption by the cutis and absorption and reflectance by various components of the dermis.

  7. Tacrolimus Versus Cyclosporine as Primary Immunosuppressant After Renal Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis and Economics Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Yu; You, Ru-Xu; Guo, Min; Zeng, Lu; Zhou, Pu; Zhu, Lan; Xu, Gang; Li, Juan; Liu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tacrolimus and cyclosporine are the major immunosuppressants for renal transplantation. Several studies have compared these 2 drugs, but the outcomes were not consistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacoeconomics of cyclosporine and tacrolimus in the treatment of renal transplantation and provide evidence for the selection of essential drugs. Trials were identified through a computerized literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Renal Group Specialized Register of randomized controlled trials, and Chinese Biomedical database. Two independent reviewers assessed trials for eligibility and quality and then extracted data. Data were extracted for patient and graft mortality, acute rejection, and adverse events. Dichotomous outcomes were reported as relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. A decision tree model was populated with data from a literature review and used to estimate costs and quality-adjusted life years gained and incremental cost-effectiveness. Altogether, 6137 patients from 27 randomized controlled trials were included. The results of our analysis were that tacrolimus reduced the risks after renal transplantation of patient mortality, graft loss, acute rejection, and hypercholesterolemia. Nevertheless, tacrolimus increased the risk of new-onset diabetes. Pharmacoeconomic analysis showed that tacrolimus represented a more cost-effective treatment than does cyclosporine for the prevention of adverse events following renal transplant. Tacrolimus is an effective and safe immunosuppressive agent and it may be more cost-effective than cyclosporine for the primary prevention of graft rejection in renal transplant recipients. However, new-onset diabetes should be closely monitored during the medication period.

  8. Gardnerella vaginalis Subgroups Defined by cpn60 Sequencing and Sialidase Activity in Isolates from Canada, Belgium and Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Schellenberg

    Full Text Available Increased abundance of Gardnerella vaginalis and sialidase activity in vaginal fluid is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV, a common but poorly understood clinical entity associated with poor reproductive health outcomes. Since most women are colonized with G. vaginalis, its status as a normal member of the vaginal microbiota or pathogen causing BV remains controversial, and numerous classification schemes have been described. Since 2005, sequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target (cpn60 UT has distinguished four subgroups in isolate collections, clone libraries and deep sequencing datasets. To clarify potential clinical and diagnostic significance of cpn60 subgroups, we undertook phenotypic and molecular characterization of 112 G. vaginalis isolates from three continents. A total of 36 subgroup A, 33 B, 35 C and 8 D isolates were identified through phylogenetic analysis of cpn60 sequences as corresponding to four "clades" identified in a recently published study, based on sequencing 473 genes across 17 isolates. cpn60 subgroups were compared with other previously described molecular methods for classification of Gardnerella subgroups, including amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA and real-time PCR assays designed to quantify subgroups in vaginal samples. Although two ARDRA patterns were observed in isolates, each was observed in three cpn60 subgroups (A/B/D and B/C/D. Real-time PCR assays corroborated cpn60 subgroups overall, but 13 isolates from subgroups A, B and D were negative in all assays. A putative sialidase gene was detected in all subgroup B, C and D isolates, but only in a single subgroup A isolate. In contrast, sialidase activity was observed in all subgroup B isolates, 3 (9% subgroup C isolates and no subgroup A or D isolates. These observations suggest distinct roles for G. vaginalis subgroups in BV pathogenesis. We conclude that cpn60 UT sequencing is a robust approach for defining G. vaginalis

  9. Gardnerella vaginalis Subgroups Defined by cpn60 Sequencing and Sialidase Activity in Isolates from Canada, Belgium and Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, John J; Paramel Jayaprakash, Teenus; Withana Gamage, Niradha; Patterson, Mo H; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Hill, Janet E

    2016-01-01

    Increased abundance of Gardnerella vaginalis and sialidase activity in vaginal fluid is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), a common but poorly understood clinical entity associated with poor reproductive health outcomes. Since most women are colonized with G. vaginalis, its status as a normal member of the vaginal microbiota or pathogen causing BV remains controversial, and numerous classification schemes have been described. Since 2005, sequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target (cpn60 UT) has distinguished four subgroups in isolate collections, clone libraries and deep sequencing datasets. To clarify potential clinical and diagnostic significance of cpn60 subgroups, we undertook phenotypic and molecular characterization of 112 G. vaginalis isolates from three continents. A total of 36 subgroup A, 33 B, 35 C and 8 D isolates were identified through phylogenetic analysis of cpn60 sequences as corresponding to four "clades" identified in a recently published study, based on sequencing 473 genes across 17 isolates. cpn60 subgroups were compared with other previously described molecular methods for classification of Gardnerella subgroups, including amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and real-time PCR assays designed to quantify subgroups in vaginal samples. Although two ARDRA patterns were observed in isolates, each was observed in three cpn60 subgroups (A/B/D and B/C/D). Real-time PCR assays corroborated cpn60 subgroups overall, but 13 isolates from subgroups A, B and D were negative in all assays. A putative sialidase gene was detected in all subgroup B, C and D isolates, but only in a single subgroup A isolate. In contrast, sialidase activity was observed in all subgroup B isolates, 3 (9%) subgroup C isolates and no subgroup A or D isolates. These observations suggest distinct roles for G. vaginalis subgroups in BV pathogenesis. We conclude that cpn60 UT sequencing is a robust approach for defining G. vaginalis subgroups within the

  10. On the same side of the faultline: Inclusion in the leader’s subgroup and employee performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, B.; Shemla, M.; Li, J.; Wegge, J.

    Extending theory on faultlines and subgroups, we argue that faultlines splitting a team into homogeneous subgroups can have different effects on team members' individual performance, depending on different intra-subgroup processes. Specifically, we propose that the effect of faultline strength on

  11. Functional dyspepsia: relationship between clinical subgroups and Helicobacter pylori status in Western Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saruc

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of functional dyspepsia is not known. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristics of functional dyspepsia in Western Turkey. We divided 900 patients with functional dyspepsia into three subgroups according to symptoms: ulcer-like (UL, 321 (35.6%, motility disorder-like (ML, 281 (31.2%, and the combination (C of these symptoms, 298 (33.1%. All patients were submitted to endoscopic evaluation, with two biopsies taken from the cardia and corpus, and four from the antrum of the stomach. All biopsy samples were studied for Helicobacter pylori (Hp density, chronic inflammation, activity, intestinal metaplasia, atrophy, and the presence of lymphoid aggregates by histological examination. One antral biopsy was used for the rapid urease test. Tissue cagA status was determined by PCR from an antral biopsy specimen by a random sampling method. We also determined the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and gastrin by the same method. Data were analyzed statistically by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and by analysis of variance. Hp and cagA positivity was significantly higher in the UL subgroup than in the others. The patients in the ML subgroup had the lowest Hp and cagA positivity and Hp density. The ML subgroup also showed the lowest level of Hp-induced inflammation among all subgroups. The serum levels of TNF-alpha and gastrin did not reveal any difference between groups. Our findings show a poor association of Hp with the ML subgroup of functional dyspepsia, but a stronger association with the UL and C subgroups.

  12. Divide and Conquer: Sub-Grouping of ASD Improves ASD Detection Based on Brain Morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katuwal, Gajendra J; Baum, Stefi A; Cahill, Nathan D; Michael, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Low success (ASD) classification using brain morphometry from the large multi-site ABIDE dataset and inconsistent findings on brain morphometric abnormalities in ASD can be attributed to the ASD heterogeneity. In this study, we show that ASD brain morphometry is highly heterogeneous, and demonstrate that the heterogeneity can be mitigated and classification improved if autism severity (AS), verbal IQ (VIQ) and age are used with morphometric features. Morphometric features from structural MRIs (sMRIs) of 734 males (ASD: 361, controls: 373) of ABIDE were derived using FreeSurfer. Applying the Random Forest classifier, an AUC of 0.61 was achieved. Adding VIQ and age to morphometric features, AUC improved to 0.68. Sub-grouping the subjects by AS, VIQ and age improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.8 in the moderate-AS sub-group (AS = 7-8). Matching subjects on age and/or VIQ in each sub-group further improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.92 in the low AS sub-group (AS = 4-5). AUC decreased with AS and VIQ, and was the lowest in the mid-age sub-group (13-18 years). The important features were mainly from the frontal, temporal, ventricular, right hippocampal and left amygdala regions. However, they highly varied with AS, VIQ and age. The curvature and folding index features from frontal, temporal, lingual and insular regions were dominant in younger subjects suggesting their importance for early detection. When the experiments were repeated using the Gradient Boosting classifier similar results were obtained. Our findings suggest that identifying brain biomarkers in sub-groups of ASD can yield more robust and insightful results than searching across the whole spectrum. Further, it may allow identification of sub-group specific brain biomarkers that are optimized for early detection and monitoring, increasing the utility of sMRI as an important tool for early detection of ASD.

  13. The effect of infectious bursal disease virus induced immunosuppression on vaccination against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor efficacy of avian influenza virus (AIV) vaccines in chickens has been documented in the field in spite of good results in experimental settings. Although the causes are multi-factorial and complex, one contributing factor may be prior infection with immunosuppressive viruses. In an effort to ...

  14. Assessment of variation in immunosuppressive pathway genes reveals TGFBR2 to be associated with risk of clear cell ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hampras, S.S.; Sucheston-Campbell, L.E.; Cannioto, R.; Chang-Claude, J.; Modugno, F.; Dork, T.; Hillemanns, P.; Preus, L.; Knutson, K.L.; Wallace, P.K.; Hong, C.C.; Friel, G.; Davis, W.; Nesline, M.; Pearce, C.L.; Kelemen, L.E.; Goodman, M.T.; Bandera, E.V.; Terry, K.L.; Schoof, N.; Eng, K.H.; Clay, A.; Singh, P.K.; Joseph, J.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Anton-Culver, H.; Antonenkova, N.; Baker, H.; Bean, Y.; Beckmann, M.W.; Bisogna, M.; Bjorge, L.; Bogdanova, N.; Brinton, L.A.; Brooks-Wilson, A.; Bruinsma, F.; Butzow, R.; Campbell, I.G.; Carty, K.; Cook, L.S.; Cramer, D.W; Cybulski, C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, A.; Dennis, J.; Despierre, E.; Dicks, E.; Doherty, J.A.; Bois, A. du; Durst, M.; Easton, D.; Eccles, D.; Edwards, R.P.; Ekici, A.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Fridley, B.L.; Gao, Y.T.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Giles, G.G.; Glasspool, R.; Gronwald, J.; Harrington, P.; Harter, P.; Hasmad, H.N.; Hein, A.; Heitz, F.; Hildebrandt, M.A.T.; Hogdall, C.; Hogdall, E.; Hosono, S.; Iversen, E.S.; Jakubowska, A.; Jensen, A.; Ji, B.T.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kellar, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Klapdor, R.; Kolomeyevskaya, N.; Krakstad, C.; Kjaer, S.K.; Kruszka, B.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Lambrechts, D.; Lambrechts, S.; Le, N.D.; Lee, A.W.; Lele, S.; Leminen, A.; Lester, J.; Levine, D.A.; Liang, D.; Lissowska, J.; Liu, S.; Lu, K.; Lubinski, J.; Lundvall, L.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Matsuo, K.; McGuire, V.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regulatory T (Treg) cells, a subset of CD4+ T lymphocytes, are mediators of immunosuppression in cancer, and, thus, variants in genes encoding Treg cell immune molecules could be associated with ovarian cancer. METHODS: In a population of 15,596 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cases and

  15. Symptom experience associated with immunosuppressive drugs after liver transplantation in adults : possible relationship with medication non-compliance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, Gerda; Moons, P.; De Geest, S.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Haagsma, E. B.

    2008-01-01

    Symptom experience (occurrence and perceived distress) associated with side effects of immunosuppressive medications in organ transplant patients may well be associated with poorer quality of life and medication non-compliance. The aims of this study were: first, to assess symptom experience in

  16. Risk of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Treated with Oral Immunosuppressive Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, Floor M.; Van der Schaft, Jorien; Van den Reek, Juul M.; Politiek, Klaziena; Van Osmedendorp, Harmieke; Van Dijk, Marijke; Hijnen, Dirk J.; De Graaf, Marlies; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A.; De Jong, Elke M.; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A.; De Bruin-Weller, Marjolein S.

    There is uncertainty about the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs. A total of 557 patients with AD treated with these drugs in the

  17. Risk of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Treated with Oral Immunosuppressive Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, F.M.; Schaft, J. van der; Reek, J.M.P.A. van den; Politiek, K.; Os-Medendorp, H. van; Dijk, M.; Hijnen, D.J.; Graaf, M de; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Schuttelaar, M.A.; Bruin-Weller, M.S. de

    2017-01-01

    There is uncertainty about the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs. A total of 557 patients with AD treated with these drugs in the

  18. Neurological complications after liver transplantation as a consequence of immunosuppression: univariate and multivariate analysis of risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompianesi, Gianluca; Montalti, Roberto; Cautero, Nicola; De Ruvo, Nicola; Stafford, Anthony; Bronzoni, Carolina; Ballarin, Roberto; De Pietri, Lesley; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Gerunda, Giorgio E

    2015-07-01

    Neurological complications (NCs) can frequently and significantly affect morbidity and mortality of liver transplant (LT) recipients. We analysed incidence, risk factors, outcome and impact of the immunosuppressive therapy on NC development after LT. We analysed 478 LT in 440 patients, and 93 (19.5%) were followed by NCs. The average LOS was longer in patients experiencing NCs. The 1-, 3- and 5-year graft survival and patient survival were similar in patients with or without a NC. Multivariate analysis showed the following as independent risk factors for NC: a MELD score ≥20 (OR = 1.934, CI = 1.186-3.153) and an immunosuppressive regimen based on calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) (OR = 1.669, CI = 1.009-2.760). Among patients receiving an everolimus-based immunosuppression, the 7.1% developed NCs, vs. the 16.9% in those receiving a CNI (P = 0.039). There was a 1-, 3- and 5-year NC-free survival of 81.7%, 81.1% and 77.7% in patients receiving a CNI-based regimen and 95.1%, 93.6% and 92.7% in those not receiving a CNI-based regimen (P < 0.001). In patients undergoing a LT and presenting with nonmodifiable risk factors for developing NCs, an immunosuppressive regimen based on CNIs is likely to result in a higher rate of NCs compared to mTOR inhibitors. © 2015 Steunstichting ESOT.

  19. Efficacy of a second course of immunosuppressive therapy in patients with membranous nephropathy and persistent or relapsing disease activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buf-Vereijken, P.W.G. du; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A single course of immunosuppressive treatment improves renal survival in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN) and renal insufficiency. However, not all patients respond and relapses occur within 5 years in 30% of patients. It is unknown if a second course of

  20. The impact of pancreas and kidney transplant on cardiovascular risk factors (analyzed by mode of immunosuppression and exocrine drainage).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2011-04-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the cardiovascular (CV) risk factor response in Irish patients with type 1 diabetes following simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation (SPK), analyzing response based on mode of immunosuppression and surgical drainage in a uniquely homogenous population.