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Sample records for subgrade moisture variations

  1. Theoretical Analysis and Experimental Study of Subgrade Moisture Variation and Underground Antidrainage Technique under Groundwater Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is a main natural factor impacting the subgrade structure, and it plays a significant role in the stability of the subgrade. In this paper, the analytical solution of the subgrade moisture variations considering groundwater fluctuations is derived based on Richards’ equation. Laboratory subgrade model is built, and three working cases are performed in the model to study the capillary action of groundwater at different water tables. Two types of antidrainage materials are employed in the subgrade model, and their anti-drainage effects are discussed. Moreover, numerical calculation is conducted on the basis of subgrade model, and the calculate results are compared with the experimental measurements. The study results are shown. The agreement between the numerical and the experimental results is good. Capillary action is obvious when the groundwater table is rising. As the groundwater table is falling, the moisture decreases in the position of the subgrade near the water table and has no variations in the subgrade where far above the table. The anti-drainage effect of the sand cushion is associated with its thickness and material properties. New waterproofing and drainage material can prevent groundwater entering the subgrade effectively, and its anti-drainage effect is good.

  2. FLUCTUATION EFFECT OF EQUILIBRIUM MOISTURE CONTENT OF LOW SUBGRADE UNDER HIGH GROUNDWATER LEVEL IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATIC REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Que Yun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to reveal the fluctuation effect of equilibrium moisture content of low subgrade in hot and humid climatic regions, the effect of temperature on the fluctuation of the equilibrium moisture content of subgrade was analysed. Taking the typical climate and the subgrade soil in Fujian province as an example, three technological methods - theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and indoor simulation experiment - were adopted in the investigation of the fluctuation effect of equilibrium moisture content of subgrade. The results show that, computing results from the formula of the equilibrium moisture content of subgrade, the numerical simulation results are closer to each other in consideration of the temperature effect. The test results can not reflect the relationship between the equilibrium moisture content and the height of embankment. The maximum fluctuation range of the equilibrium moisture content of the cement concrete pavement is less than 2 percent in Fujian area, and this phenomenon presents the effect of the moist-hot climate on the equilibrium moisture content. Equilibrium moisture content presents a declining trend with the increment of the temperature and the compactness. So, if matric potential considering temperature indirectly reflects the influence of thermal potential, then the equilibrium moisture content of low subgrade under high groundwater level can be estimated approximately. The fluctuation range of equilibrium moisture content in different layers of subgrade can be reduced effectively with the increment of the roadbed compaction degree.

  3. Calibration of TDR Test Probe for Measuring Moisture in the Body of the Railway Substructure and its Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobeš Peter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the introduction of the paper there is characterized a way of monitoring the moisture in the railway substructure in the experimental stand, which is a part of the experimental workplace of the Department of Railway Engineering and Track Management. A substantial part of the paper is devoted to the calibration of TDR test probe for selected rock materials as a basic prerequisite for the determination of the actual moisture in the body of the railway substructure and subgrade.

  4. Radiation effects on moisture variation in ponderosa pine litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clive M. Countryman

    1977-01-01

    This exploratory study indicated that considerable variation in the moisture content of litter can occur within short horizontal distances. The variations ere found to be caused primarily by differences in the amount of solar radiation received by the litter and in the degree of cooling by radiation at night. Because actual fuel moisture lags behind equilibrium...

  5. Pavement Subgrade Performance Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Ullidtz, Per; Macdonald, Robin

    1998-01-01

    The report describes the second test in the Danish Road Testing Machine (RTM) under the International Pavement Subgrade Performance Study. Pavement response was measured in different layers, and compared to different theroretical values. Performance in terms of plastic strains, rutting...

  6. Real-time measurement of quality during the compaction of subgrade soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Conventional quality control of subgrade soils during their compaction is usually performed by monitoring moisture content and dry density at a few discrete locations. However, randomly selected points do not adequately represent the entire compacted...

  7. Subgrade design models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theyse, HL

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available procedure commonly used in South Africa, namely the South African Mechanistic-Empirical Design Method (SAMDM). This was achieved through the development of a new design approach and permanent deformation model for the pavement subgrade. The new distress...

  8. Effect of Root-Zone Moisture Variations on Growth of Lettuce and Pea Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, Iliana; Ivanova, Tania

    2008-06-01

    Variations in substrate moisture lead to changes in water and oxygen availability to plant roots. Ground experiments were carried out in the laboratory prototype of SVET-2 Space Greenhouse to study the effect of variation of root-zone moisture conditions on growth of lettuce and pea plants. The effect of transient increase (for 1 day) and drastic increase (waterlogging for 10 days) of substrate moisture was studied with 16-day old pea and 21-day old lettuce plants respectively. Pea height and fresh biomass accumulation were not affected by transient substrate moisture increase. Net photosynthetic rate (Pn) of pea plants showed fast response to substrate moisture variation, while chlorophyll content did not change. Drastic change of substrate moisture suppressed lettuce Pn, chlorophyll biosynthesis and plant growth. These parameters slowly recovered after termination of waterlogging treatment but lettuce yield was greatly affected. The results showed that the most sensitive physiological parameter to substrate moisture variations is photosynthesis.

  9. Arctic moisture source for Eurasian snow cover variations in autumn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Martin; Orsolini, Yvan; Vázquez Dominguez, Marta; Gimeno Presa, Luis; Nieto, Raquel; Buligyna, Olga; Jaiser, Ralf; Handorf, Dörthe; Rinke, Anette; Dethloff, Klaus; Sterin, Alexander; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Global warming is enhanced at high northern latitudes where the Arctic surface air temperature has risen at twice the rate of the global average in recent decades - a feature called Arctic amplification. This recent Arctic warming signal likely results from several factors such as the albedo feedback due to a diminishing cryosphere, enhanced poleward atmospheric and oceanic transport, and change in humidity. The reduction in Arctic sea ice is without doubt substantial and a key factor. Arctic summer sea-ice extent has declined by more than 10% per decade since the start of the satellite era (e.g. Stroeve et al., 2012), culminating in a new record low in September 2012, with the long-term trend largely attributed to anthropogenic global warming. Eurasian snow cover changes have been suggested as a driver for changes in the Arctic Oscillation and might provide a link between sea ice decline in the Arctic during summer and atmospheric circulation in the following winter. However, the mechanism connecting snow cover in Eurasia to sea ice decline in autumn is still under debate. Our analysis focuses at sea ice decline in the Barents-Kara Sea region, which allows us to specify regions of interest for FLEXPART forward and backwards moisture trajectories. Based on Eularian and Lagrangian diagnostics from ERA-INTERIM, we can address the origin and cause of late autumn snow depth variations in a dense (snow observations from 820 land stations), unutilized observational datasets over the Commonwealth of Independent States. Open waters in the Barents and Kara Sea have been shown to increase the diabatic heating of the atmosphere, which amplifies baroclinic cyclones and might induce a remote atmospheric response by triggering stationary Rossby waves (Honda et al. 2009). In agreement with these studies, our results show enhanced storm activity originating at the Barents and Kara with disturbances entering the continent through a small sector from the Barents and Kara Seas

  10. Seasonal variation of moisture transport in polar regions and the relation with annular modes

    OpenAIRE

    Oshima, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Koji

    2004-01-01

    Climatological seasonal variations of moisture transport and the interannual variations associated with the annular modes in the Arctic and Antarctic regions are investigated using 15-year ECMWF reanalysis data. Over the Arctic, there are strong moisture inflows from the Atlantic and Pacific in all seasons. Over the Antarctic, a strong moisture inflow exists around the Antarctic Peninsula in all seasons and another strong inflow exists over the Bellingshausen Sea and the Amundsen Sea in austr...

  11. Instability improvement of the subgrade soils by lime addition at Borg El-Arab, Alexandria, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shinawi, A.

    2017-06-01

    Subgrade soils can affect the stability of any construction elsewhere, instability problems were found at Borg El-Arab, Alexandria, Egypt. This paper investigates geoengineering properties of lime treated subgrade soils at Borg El-Arab. Basic laboratory tests, such as water content, wet and dry density, grain size, specific gravity and Atterberg limits, were performed for twenty-five samples. Moisture-density (compaction); California Bearing Ratio (CBR) and Unconfined Compression Strength (UCS) were conducted on treated and natural soils. The measured geotechnical parameters of the treated soil shows that 6% lime is good enough to stabilize the subgrade soils. It was found that by adding lime, samples shifted to coarser side, Atterberg limits values of the treated soil samples decreased and this will improve the soil to be more stable. On the other hand, Subgrade soils improved as a result of the bonding fine particles, cemented together to form larger size and reduce the plastiCity index which increase soils strength. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) is point to the presence of innovative aggregated cement materials which reduce the porosity and increase the strength as a long-term curing. Consequently, the mixture of soil with the lime has acceptable mechanical characteristics where, it composed of a high strength base or sub-base materials and this mixture considered as subgrade soil for stabilizations and mitigation the instability problems that found at Borg Al-Arab, Egypt.

  12. Variation in nutrient composition and structure of high-moisture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The morphological structure of maize observed under a scanning electron microscope showed some shrinkage of starch granules as a consequence of artificial drying temperature. In vitro digestibility of DM was improved as a result of artificial drying of high moisture maize but starch digestibility was reduced. It may be ...

  13. Resilient Modulus Characterization of Compacted Cohesive Subgrade Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Sas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil investigations concerning cyclic loading focus on the evaluation, in particular, of design parameters, such as elastic modulus, Poisson’s ratio, or resilient modulus. Structures subjected to repeated loading are vulnerable to high deformations, especially when subgrade soils are composed of cohesive, fully-saturated soils. Such subgrade soils in the eastern part of Europe have a glacial genesis and are a mix of sand, silt, and clay fractions. The characteristic of, e.g., Young modulus variation and resilient modulus from repeated loading tests, is presented. Based on performed resonant column and cyclic triaxial tests, an analytical model is proposed. The model takes into consideration actual values of effective stress p′, as well as loading characteristics and the position of the effective stress path. This approach results in better characterization of pavement or industrial foundation systems based on the subgrade soil in undrained conditions. The recoverable strains characterized by the resilient modulus Mr value in the first cycle of loading was between 44 MPa and 59 MPa for confining pressure σ’3 equal to 45 kPa, and between 48 MPa and 78 MPa for σ’3 equal to 90 kPa. During cyclic loading, cohesive soil, at first, degrades. When pore pressure reaches equilibrium, the resilient modulus value starts to increase. The above-described phenomena indicate that, after the plastic deformation caused by excessive load and excess pore water pressure dissipation, the soil becomes resilient.

  14. On the influence of moisture and load variations on the strength behavior of wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: It is demonstrated in this paper that the influence of moisture- and load variations on lifetime and residual strength (re-cycle strength) of wood can be considered by theories previously developed by the author. The common, controlling factor is creep, which can be modified very easily...... by introducing a special moisture dependent relaxation time in the well-known Power-Law creep expression. Because basic failure mechanisms in wood are invariant with respect to loading modes, it is suggested that a number of methods used in design of wood structures can be generalized/simplified to apply...... irrespective of loading modes and moisture conditions. Reliability studies may become more ‘reliable’ as the result of recognizing property distributions to be related. Keywords: Moisture variation, load variation, Power-Law creep, lifetime, fatigue, residual strength (re-cycle strength)....

  15. Effects of soil moisture variations on deposition velocities above vegetation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesely, M. L.; Song, J.; McMillen, R. T.; Meyers, T. P.; Environmental Research; Northern Illinois Univ.; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    2001-01-01

    The parameterized subgrid-scale surface flux (PASS) model provides a simplified means of using remote sensing data from satellites and limited surface meteorological information to estimate the influence of soil moisture on bulk canopy stomatal resistances to the uptake of gases over extended areas. PASS-generated estimates of bulk canopy stomatal resistance were used in a dry deposition module to compute gas deposition velocities with a horizontal resolution of 200 m for approximately 5000 km{sup 2} of agricultural crops and rangeland. Results were compared with measurements of O{sub 3} flux and concentrations made during April and May 1997 at two surface stations and from an aircraft. The trend in simulated O{sub 3} deposition velocity during soil moisture drydown over a period of a few days matched the trend observed at the two surface stations. For areas under the aircraft flight paths, the variability in simulated O{sub 3} deposition velocity was substantially smaller than the observed variability, while the averages over tens of kilometers were usually in agreement within 0.1 cm s{sup -1}. Model results indicated that soil moisture can have a major role in deposition of O{sub 3} and other substances strongly affected by canopy stomatal resistance.

  16. Effects of Density and Moisture Variation on Dynamic Deformation Properties of Compacted Lateritic Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizheng Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of repeated load triaxial tests were conducted in this study to investigate the influences of compaction density and postcompaction moisture variation on the dynamic elastic modulus (Ed and plastic permanent strain (PPS of compacted lateritic soil. Specimens were compacted at optimum moisture content (OMC and three degrees of compaction (90%, 93%, and 96%. Then the specimens were dried or wetted to different moisture contents (OMC, OMC±3%, OMC±6%, and OMC+9% prior to testing for Ed and PPS. Results show that moisture content has greater influence on the Ed and PSS than compaction degree, and the increase in moisture content leads to a decrease of Ed and an increase of PPS. Furthermore, an empirical relationship between Ed and applied cyclic stress (σd is developed that incorporates density and moisture variations. Three different evolution types of PPS with number of load cycles, plastic stable, plastic creep, and incremental collapse, are identified as the increase of moisture content. In addition, the critical dynamic stress (σdc separating stable and unstable deformation is determined based on the shakedown concept. The envelope curves of σdc-moisture of lateritic soil with different degrees of compaction are also determined to provide reference for the pavement design.

  17. Subgrade stabilization alternatives to lime and cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    This project involved four distinct research activities, (1) the influence of temperature on lime-stabilized soils, (2) the influence of temperature on cement-stabilized soils (3) temperature modeling of stabilized subgrade and (4) use of calcium chl...

  18. Dielectric Characteristics of Unsaturated Loess and the Safety Detection of the Road Subgrade Based on GPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Lv

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a moisture content and permittivity model to simultaneously detect and estimate defects in loess subgrade. Based on the ground-penetrating radar (GPR method, the dielectric properties of loess in the northwest of China and the imaging feature of the moisture content of different strata were studied. The relative permittivity of loess with different moisture contents was experimented in the laboratory. It was found that the relative permittivity of unsaturated loess was positively related to moisture content. The relationship between relative permittivity and moisture content in different antenna frequencies of GPR was analyzed. Electromagnetic wave reflection rules in the loess interface were studied using the numerical method with different moisture contents. With the increase in moisture content, the amplitude of GPR was increased. When the above conclusions were applied in the engineering practices, there are good effects to detect the defects of the road subgrade. It is a significant guidance for determining the qualitative research of defects in the roadbed.

  19. Variation of nanostructures, molecular interactions, and anisotropic elastic moduli of lignocellulosic cell walls with moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Youssefian; J. E. Jakes; N. Rahbar

    2017-01-01

    A combination of experimental, theoretical and numerical studies is used to investigate the variation of elastic moduli of lignocellulosic (bamboo) fiber cell walls with moisture content (MC). Our Nanoindentation results show that the longitudinal elastic modulus initially increased to a maximum value at about 3% MC and then decreased linearly with increasing MC. In...

  20. Single Plant Root System Modeling under Soil Moisture Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Chen, X.; Scheibe, T. D.

    2016-12-01

    A prognostic Virtual Plant-Atmosphere-Soil System (vPASS) model is being developed that integrates comprehensively detailed mechanistic single plant modeling with microbial, atmospheric, and soil system processes in its immediate environment. Three broad areas of process module development are targeted: Incorporating models for root growth and function, rhizosphere interactions with bacteria and other organisms, litter decomposition and soil respiration into established porous media flow and reactive transport models Incorporating root/shoot transport, growth, photosynthesis and carbon allocation process models into an integrated plant physiology model Incorporating transpiration, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) emission, particulate deposition and local atmospheric processes into a coupled plant/atmosphere model. The integrated plant ecosystem simulation capability is being developed as open source process modules and associated interfaces under a modeling framework. The initial focus addresses the coupling of root growth, vascular transport system, and soil under drought scenarios. Two types of root water uptake modeling approaches are tested: continuous root distribution and constitutive root system architecture. The continuous root distribution models are based on spatially averaged root development process parameters, which are relatively straightforward to accommodate in the continuum soil flow and reactive transport module. Conversely, the constitutive root system architecture models use root growth rates, root growth direction, and root branching to evolve explicit root geometries. The branching topologies require more complex data structures and additional input parameters. Preliminary results are presented for root model development and the vascular response to temporal and spatial variations in soil conditions.

  1. Cement improved highly weathered phyllite for highway subgrades: A case study in Shaanxi province

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    Xuesong Mao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In a cost-saving move, the soft rocks composed of highly-weathered phyllites available on-site were used to fill the subgrade in the eastern Ankang section of the expressway of Shiyan to Tianshui, China. Cement admixture was used to improve the performance of the weathered phyllites. In order to determine the best mix ratio, values corresponding to compaction performance, unconfined compressive strength, and the California bearing ratio (CBR were analyzed for variable cement content weight percentages (3%, 4%, 5%, and 6% using test subgrade plots in the field. Field measurements of resilience modulus and deflection confirmed that the strength of the subgrade increased as the cement ratio increased. In order to further evaluate the cement/phyllite mixture, the performance of the 3% cement ratio sample was evaluated under saturated conditions (with various levels of moisture addition and soaking time using both the wetting deformation and resilient modulus values. Results suggest that moisture added and soaking time are key factors that affect the seepage depth, water content, and resilient modulus. The recommend values for the cement addition and for the water content are given out. This study can aid in prevention of highway damage by improving the foundation capacity and lengthening the lifecycle of the highway in phyllite distributed region at home and abroad.

  2. Soil moisture variations in remotely sensed and reanalysis datasets during weak monsoon conditions over central India and central Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Sourabh; Kar, Sarat C.; Sharma, Anu Rani

    2017-07-01

    Variation of soil moisture during active and weak phases of summer monsoon JJAS (June, July, August, and September) is very important for sustenance of the crop and subsequent crop yield. As in situ observations of soil moisture are few or not available, researchers use data derived from remote sensing satellites or global reanalysis. This study documents the intercomparison of soil moisture from remotely sensed and reanalyses during dry spells within monsoon seasons in central India and central Myanmar. Soil moisture data from the European Space Agency (ESA)—Climate Change Initiative (CCI) has been treated as observed data and was compared against soil moisture data from the ECMWF reanalysis-Interim (ERA-I) and the climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) for the period of 2002-2011. The ESA soil moisture correlates rather well with observed gridded rainfall. The ESA data indicates that soil moisture increases over India from west to east and from north to south during monsoon season. The ERA-I overestimates the soil moisture over India, while the CFSR soil moisture agrees well with the remotely sensed observation (ESA). Over Myanmar, both the reanalysis overestimate soil moisture values and the ERA-I soil moisture does not show much variability from year to year. Day-to-day variations of soil moisture in central India and central Myanmar during weak monsoon conditions indicate that, because of the rainfall deficiency, the observed (ESA) and the CFSR soil moisture values are reduced up to 0.1 m3/m3 compared to climatological values of more than 0.35 m3/m3. This reduction is not seen in the ERA-I data. Therefore, soil moisture from the CFSR is closer to the ESA observed soil moisture than that from the ERA-I during weak phases of monsoon in the study region.

  3. WINKLER'S SINGLE-PARAMETER SUBGRADE MODEL FROM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    analysis and design of beams and plates on elastic foundations. A number of both analytical and empirical relationships have been suggested in the past for estimating ...... A. New Variants of Continuum- based Models for an Elastic Subgrade. Submitted for publication in Zede, Journal of Ethiopian Engineers and Architects.

  4. Integrating Real-time and Manual Monitored Soil Moisture Data to Predict Hillslope Soil Moisture Variations with High Temporal Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing; Lv, Ligang; Zhou, Zhiwen; Liao, Kaihua

    2016-04-01

    Spatial-temporal variability of soil moisture 15 has been remaining an challenge to be better understood. A trade-off exists between spatial coverage and temporal resolution when using the manual and real-time soil moisture monitoring methods. This restricted the comprehensive and intensive examination of soil moisture dynamics. In this study, we aimed to integrate the manual and real-time monitored soil moisture to depict the hillslope dynamics of soil moisture with good spatial coverage and temporal resolution. Linear (stepwise multiple linear regression-SMLR) and non-linear models (support vector machines-SVM) were used to predict soil moisture at 38 manual sites (collected 1-2 times per month) with soil moisture automatically collected at three real-time monitoring sites (collected every 5 mins). By comparing the accuracies of SMLR and SVM for each manual site, optimal soil moisture prediction model of this site was then determined. Results show that soil moisture at these 38 manual sites can be reliably predicted (root mean square errorsindex, profile curvature, and relative difference of soil moisture and its standard deviation influenced the selection of prediction model since they related to the dynamics of soil water distribution and movement. By using this approach, hillslope soil moisture spatial distributions at un-sampled times and dates were predicted after a typical rainfall event. Missing information of hillslope soil moisture dynamics was then acquired successfully. This can be benefit for determining the hot spots and moments of soil water movement, as well as designing the proper soil moisture monitoring plan at the field scale.

  5. SIMULATION OF SUBGRADE EMBANKMENT ON WEAK BASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Petrenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This article provides: the question of the sustainability of the subgrade on a weak base is considered in the paper. It is proposed to use the method of jet grouting. Investigation of the possibility of a weak base has an effect on the overall deformation of the subgrade; the identification and optimization of the parameters of subgrade based on studies using numerical simulation. Methodology. The theoretical studies of the stress-strain state of the base and subgrade embankment by modeling in the software package LIRA have been conducted to achieve this goal. Findings. After making the necessary calculations perform building fields of a subsidence, borders cramped thickness, bed’s coefficients of Pasternak and Winkler. The diagrams construction of vertical stress performs at any point of load application. Also, using the software system may perform peer review subsidence, rolls railroad tracks in natural and consolidated basis. Originality. For weak soils is the most appropriate nonlinear model of the base with the existing areas of both elastic and limit equilibrium, mixed problem of the theory of elasticity and plasticity. Practical value. By increasing the load on the weak base as a result of the second track construction, adds embankment or increasing axial load when changing the rolling stock process of sedimentation and consolidation may continue again. Therefore, one of the feasible and promising options for the design and reconstruction of embankments on weak bases is to strengthen the bases with the help of jet grouting. With the expansion of the railway infrastructure, increasing speed and weight of the rolling stock is necessary to ensure the stability of the subgrade on weak bases. LIRA software package allows you to perform all the necessary calculations for the selection of a proper way of strengthening weak bases.

  6. Comparing Stable Water Isotope Variation in Atmospheric Moisture Observed over Coastal Water and Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C. T.; Rambo, J. P.; Welp, L. R.; Bible, K.; Hollinger, D. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Stable oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopologues of atmospheric moisture are strongly influenced by large-scale synoptic weather cycles, surface evapotranspiration and boundary layer mixing. Atmospheric water isotope variation has been shown to empirically relate to relative humidity (Rh) of near surface moisture, and to a less degree, air temperature. Continuous δ18O and δD measurements are becoming more available, providing new opportunities to investigate processes that control isotope variability. This study shows the comparison of δ18O and δD measured at a continental location and over coastal waters for 3 seasons (spring to fall, 2014). The surface moisture isotope measurements were made using two LGR spectroscopy water vapor isotope analyzers (Los Gatos Research Inc.), one operated in an old-growth coniferous forest at Wind River field station, WA (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W), and another sampling marine air over seawater at the Scripps Pier in San Diego, CA (32.8654°N, 117.2536°W), USA. Isotope variations were measured at 1Hz and data were reported as hourly averages with an overall accuracy of ±0.1‰ for δ18O, ±0.5‰ for δ2H. Day-to-day variations in δ18O and δD are shown strongly influenced by synoptic weather events at both locations. Boundary layer mixing between surface moisture and the dry air entrained from the free troposphere exerts a midday maximum and a consistent diel pattern in deuterium excess (dx). At the forest site, surface moisture also interacts with leaf water through transpiration during the day and re-equilibration at night. The latter occurs by retro-diffusion of atmospheric H2O molecules into leaf intercellular space, which becomes intensified as Rh increaes after nightfall, and continues until sunrise, to counter-balance the evaporative isotopic enrichment in leaf water on a daily basis. These vegetation effects lead to negative dx values consistently observed at nighttime in this continental location that were not

  7. Influence of Subgrade and Unbound Granular Layers Stiffness on Fatigue Life of Hot Mix Asphalts - HMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo A. Rondón-Quintana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The mainly factors studied to predict fatigue life of hot mix asphalt-HMA in flexible pavements are the loading effect, type of test, compaction methods, design parameters of HMA (e.g., particle size and size distribution curve, fine content, type of bitumen and the variables associated with the environment (mainly moisture, temperature, aging. This study evaluated through a computer simulation, the influence of the granular layers and subgrade on the fatigue life of asphalt layers in flexible pavement structures. Mechanics parameters of granular layers of subgrade, base and subbase were obtained using the mathematical equations currently used for this purpose in the world. The emphasis of the study was the city of Bogotá, where the average annual temperature is 14°C and soils predominantly clay, generally experience CBR magnitudes between 1% and 4%. General conclusion: stiffness of the granular layers and subgrade significantly affect the fatigue resistance of HMA mixtures. Likewise, the use of different equations reported in reference literature in order to characterize granular layers may vary the fatigue life between 4.6 and 48.5 times, varying the thickness of the pavement layers in the design.

  8. Pavement Subgrade Performance Study: Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    of profile variance (rough- ness), and the depth of the ruts formed in the wheel track . The current subgrade failure criteria, used in mechanistic...10). The pad (4 m long by 16 m wide) was constructed with crushed gravel and capped with a 125-mm-thick concrete slab . The second modification was...to 100% crushed. Influence of FERF test section walls A finite element study using ABAQUS was conducted on the FERF test sec- tion to study the

  9. Modulus of Subgrade Reaction and Deflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Potts

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential equations govern the bending and deflection of roads under a concentrated load. Identifying critical parameters, such as the maximum deflection and maximum bending moments of a street supported by an elastic subgrade, is key to designing safe and reliable roadways. This project solves the underlying differential equation in pavement deflection and tests various parameters to highlight the importance in selecting proper foundation materials.

  10. [Spatial variation of soil moisture/salinity and the relationship with vegetation under natural conditions in Yancheng coastal wetland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-Bing; Liu, Hong-Yu; Li, Yu-Feng; An, Jing; Xue, Xing-Yu; Hou, Ming-Hang

    2013-02-01

    Taking the core part of Yancheng national nature reserve as the study area, according to soil sampling analysis of coastal wetlands in April and May 2011 land the 2011 ETM + remote sensing image, the spatial difference characteristic of coastal wetlands soil moisture and salinity, and the relationship with vegetation under natural conditions, were investigated with the model of correspondence analysis (CCA), linear regression simulation and geo-statistical method. The results showed: Firstly, the average level of the soil moisture was fluctuating between 36.820% and 46.333% , and the soil salinity was between 0.347% and 1.328% , in a more detailed sense, the Spartina swamp was the highest, followed by the mudflats swamp, the Suaeda salsa swamp, and the Reed marsh. Secondly, the spatial variation of soil moisture was consistent with that of the salinity, and the degree of variation in the east-west direction was greater than that in the north-south. The maximum soil moisture and salinity were found in the southwest Spartina swamp. The minimum was in the Reed swamp. The soil moisture and salinity were divided into 5 levels, from I to V. Level IV occupied the highest proportion, which were 36.156% and 28.531% , respectively. Finally, different landscape types with the combination of soil moisture and salinity showed a common feature that the moisture and salinity were from both high to low. The soil moisture value of Reed marshes was lower than 40.116% and the salinity value was lower than 0. 676% . The soil moisture value of Suaeda salsa marshes was between 38. 162% and 46. 403% and the salinity value was between 0.417% and 1.295%. The soil moisture value of Spartina swamp was higher than 43.214% and the salinity was higher than 1.090%. The soil moisture value of beach was higher than 43.214% and the salinity was higher than 0.677%.

  11. Evaluation of Subgrade Soils using California Bearing Ratio (Cbr) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The greater the resistance to deformation a subgrade is the more load it can support before reaching a critical deformation value. ... The plasticity index (PI) of the samples fall within 10 – 20%. The study has ... Keywords: Subgrade soils, California Bearing Ratio (CBR) test, Plasticity Index (PI), Rivers State, Nigeria.

  12. Effect of soil moisture on seasonal variation in indoor radon concentration: modelling and measurements in 326 Finnish houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvela, H.; Holmgren, O.; Hänninen, P.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of soil moisture on seasonal variation in soil air and indoor radon is studied. A brief review of the theory of the effect of soil moisture on soil air radon has been presented. The theoretical estimates, together with soil moisture measurements over a period of 10 y, indicate that variation in soil moisture evidently is an important factor affecting the seasonal variation in soil air radon concentration. Partitioning of radon gas between the water and air fractions of soil pores is the main factor increasing soil air radon concentration. On two example test sites, the relative standard deviation of the calculated monthly average soil air radon concentration was 17 and 26 %. Increased soil moisture in autumn and spring, after the snowmelt, increases soil gas radon concentrations by 10–20 %. In February and March, the soil gas radon concentration is in its minimum. Soil temperature is also an important factor. High soil temperature in summer increased the calculated soil gas radon concentration by 14 %, compared with winter values. The monthly indoor radon measurements over period of 1 y in 326 Finnish houses are presented and compared with the modelling results. The model takes into account radon entry, climate and air exchange. The measured radon concentrations in autumn and spring were higher than expected and it can be explained by the seasonal variation in the soil moisture. The variation in soil moisture is a potential factor affecting markedly to the high year-to-year variation in the annual or seasonal average radon concentrations, observed in many radon studies. PMID:25899611

  13. Retrieving moisture profiles from precipitable water measurements using a variational data assimilation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y.R.; Zou, X.; Kuo, Y.H. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Atmospheric moisture distribution is directly related to the formation of clouds and precipitation and affects the atmospheric radiation and climate. Currently, several remote sensing systems can measure precipitable water (PW) with fairly high accuracy. As part of the development of an Integrated Data Assimilation and Sounding System in support of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, retrieving the 3-D water vapor fields from PW measurements is an important problem. A new four dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system based on the Penn State/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) mesoscale model (MM5) has been developed by Zou et al. (1995) with the adjoint technique. In this study, we used this 4DVAR system to retrieve the moisture profiles. Because we do not have a set of real observed PW measurements now, the special soundings collected during the Severe Environmental Storm and Mesoscale Experiment (SESAME) in 1979 were used to simulate a set of PW measurements, which were then assimilated into the 4DVAR system. The accuracy of the derived water vapor fields was assessed by direct comparison with the detailed specific humidity soundings. The impact of PW assimilation on precipitation forecast was examined by conducting a series of model forecast experiments started from the different initial conditions with or without data assimilation.

  14. [The relationship between the variation rate of MODIS land surface temperature and AMSR-E soil moisture and its application to downscaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, An-Qi; Xie, Chao; Shi, Jian-Cheng; Gong, Hui-Li

    2013-03-01

    Using AMSR-E soil moisture, MODIS land surface temperature (Ts) and vegetation index product, the authors discuss the relationship between the variation rate of land surface temperature and surface soil moisture. Selecting the plains region of central United States as the study area, the authors propose the distribution triangle of the variation rate of land surface temperature and soil moisture. In the present paper, temperature variation and vegetation index (TVVI), a new index containing the information of temperature variation and vegetation, is introduced. The authors prove that TVVI and soil moisture show a steady relationship of exponential function; and build a quantitative model of soil moisture(SM) and instantaneous surface temperature variation (VTs). The authors later achieve downscaling of AMSR-E soil moisture data, through the above stated functional relationships and high-resolution MODIS data. Comparison with measured data on ground surface indicates that this method of downscaling is of high precision

  15. Effects of land preparation and artificial vegetation on soil moisture variation in a loess hilly catchment of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tianjiao; Wei, Wei; Chen, Liding; Yu, Yang

    2017-04-01

    In the dryland regions, soil moisture is the main factor to determine vegetation growth and ecosystem restoration. Land preparation and vegetation restoration are the principal means for improving soil water content(SWC). Thus, it is important to analyze the coupling role of these two means on soil moisture. In this study, soil moisture were monitored at a semi-arid loess hilly catchment of China, during the growing season of 2014 and 2015. Four different land preparation methods (level ditches, fish-scale pits, adverse grade tablelands and level benches)and vegetation types(Prunus armeniaca, Platycladus orientalis, Platycladus orientalis and Caragana microphylla) were included in the experimental design. Our results showed that: (1)Soil moisture content differed across land preparation types, which is higher for fish-scale pits and decreased in the order of level ditches and adverse grade tablelands.(2) Rainwater harvesting capacity of fish-scale pits is greater than adverse grade tablelands. However the water holding capacity is much higher at soils prepared with the adverse grade tablelands method than the ones prepared by fish-scale pits methods. (3) When land preparation method is similar, vegetation play a key role in soil moisture variation. For example, the mean soil moisture under a Platycladus orientalis field is 26.72% higher than a Pinus tabulaeformis field, with the same land preparation methods. (4)Soil moisture in deeper soil layers is more affected by changes in the vegetation cover while soil moisture in the shallower layers is more affected by the variation in the land preparation methods. Therefore, we suggest that vegetation types such as: Platycladus orientalisor as well as soil preparation methods such as level ditch and fish-scale pit are the most appropriate vegetation cover and land preparation methods for landscape restoration in semi-arid loess hilly area. This conclusion was made based on the vegetation type and land preparation with the

  16. Drying shrinkage problems in high PI subgrade soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the longitudinal cracking in pavements due to drying : shrinkage of high PI subgrade soils. The study involved laboartory soil testing and modeling. The : shrinkage cracks usually occur within the v...

  17. Analysis of aggregate pier systems for stabilization of subgrade settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Every year, ODOT undertakes numerous pavement patching/resurfacing projects to repair pavement : distress and structural failure due to soft and/or organic soils constituting the subgrade. Other than the : temporary solution of patching/resurfacing, ...

  18. Pavement Subgrade Performance Study in the Danish Road Testing Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullidtz, Per; Ertman Larsen, Hans Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    Most existing pavement subgrade criteria are based on the AASHO Road Test, where only one material was tested and for only one climatic condition. To study the validity of these criteria and to refine the criteria a co-operative research program entitled the "International Pavement Subgrade...... Performance Study" was sponsored by the FHWA with American, Finnish and Danish partners. This paper describes the first test series which was carried out in the Danish Road Testing Machine (RTM).The first step in this program is a full scale test on an instrumented pavement in the Danish Road Testing Machine...... deformation of the pavement surface. A simple model describing the plastic strain has been developed.The test showed that currently used subgrade strain criteria are conservative if used with the measured strains in the subgrade. If used with strains calculated from FWD tests using linear elastic theory...

  19. Variation of moisture content of some varnished woods in indoor climatic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Üçüncü

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, moisture change of varnished wood of black poplar (Populus nigra and yellow pine (Pinus silvestris L. used in indoor climate conditions with central heating in Trabzon (Turkey were investigated. 300 mm length wood specimens, with cross section of 12.5 mm in tangential and in radial and with the square sections of 25mm and 50 mm, were obtained from two species grown in Kanuni Campus of the Karadeniz Technical University. In this research, un-varnished wood samples were also used for reference. The wood moisture content was determined by the weighing method, the wood equilibrium moisture content by the Hailwood-Horrobin equation, and the relative humidity in the indoor climatic conditions by humid air thermodynamic principles. As a result; it was observed that the moisture content of varnished wood samples has a strong relationship with equilibrium moisture content, temperature and relative humidity. It was found that the moisture content of varnished woods was higher than the moisture content of un-varnished woods in the same climatic conditions. It was observed that the difference between the monthly average moisture content was lower in varnished woods in proportion to un-varnished woods. According to these results, it can be indicated that it would be more appropriate to select higher moisture content in the drying of wood than the equilibrium moisture content. Such an application would also reduce drying costs. Further, it can be recommended to use varnished wood in various applications because the low change range of average moisture content can affect the swelling or shrinking of wood.

  20. Variation in herbaceous vegetation and soil moisture under treated and untreated oneseed juniper trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector Ramirez; Alexander Fernald; Andres Cibils; Michelle Morris; Shad Cox; Michael Rubio

    2008-01-01

    Clearing oneseed juniper (Juniperus monosperma) may make more water available for aquifer recharge or herbaceous vegetation growth, but the effects of tree treatment on soil moisture dynamics are not fully understood. This study investigated juniper treatment effects on understory herbaceous vegetation concurrently with soil moisture dynamics using vegetation sampling...

  1. Stemflow variation in Mexico's northeastern forest communities: Its contribution to soil moisture content and aquifer recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Návar, José

    2011-09-01

    SummaryStemflow hydro-ecological importance was measured in trees and assessed in Mexico's northeast forest stands by answering three basic questions: (a) what are the intra and inter-specific stemflow variations; (b) is the stemflow coefficient constant from tree level to stand scales? and (c) what is the stemflow area and wetted soil volume in individual trees and the stemflow volume discharged at the stand scale in two plant communities of northeastern Mexico? Gross rainfall and stemflow flux measurements were conducted on 78 trees of semi-arid, sub-tropical (31 Diospyros texana; 14 Acacia rigidula; four Bumelia celastrina; five Condalia hookeri; three Cordia bioissieri; three Pithecellobium pallens) and temperate forest communities (six Pinus pseudostrobus Lindl. and 12 Quercus spp.). Stemflow was extrapolated from individual trees to the stand scale using 98 inventory plots (1600 m 2 ha -1 each) placed in oak-pine forests and 37 quadrats (5 m × 5 m each) distributed across the Tamaulipan thornscrub forest range. Stemflow infiltration flux and infiltration area measurements assessed the wetted soil volume. Daily measurements were conducted from May of 1997 to November of 1998. Results showed that stemflow coefficients varied between plant communities since they averaged (confidence intervals, α = 0.05) 2.49% (0.57), 0.30% (0.09), and 0.77% (0.27) of the bulk precipitation for Tamaulipan thornscrub, pine, and oak forests, respectively. Intra-specific stemflow variations could not be identified in Tamaulipan although in temperate tree species. Basal diameter explained intra-specific stemflow variation in both plant communities. Stemflow increased threefold since it accounted for by 6.38% and 2.19% of the total bulk rainfall for Tamaulipan thornscrub quadrats and temperate oak-pine inventory plots, respectively. Small shrubs growing underneath large trees, in combination with the presence of small-diameter trees that recorded the largest stemflow coefficients

  2. Spatial variation of soil physical properties in adjacent alluvial and colluvial soils under Ustic moisture regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, M.; Öztürk, H. S.; Erşahin, S.; Özkan, A. I.

    2011-04-01

    Soils vary spatially due to differences in soil management and soil formation factors. The soil spatial variability is an important determinant of efficiency of farm inputs and yield. This study was carried out to identify and compare spatial variation of some soil physical properties by geostatistics in alluvial and adjacent colluvial soils formed under ustic moisture regime at Gökhöyük State Farm (1750 ha), Amasya, Turkey. Seventy four soil samples were collected on a regular grid (500 × 500-m) and additional 224 samples were collected on 28 500-m fine-transects, randomly superimposed between the nodes of grids. Semivariograms and corresponding kriging maps for soil texture, soil organic matter (SOM), bulk density (BD), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), and available water content (AWC) were prepared. Statistical analyses were conducted separately for colluvial and alluvial sites as well as whole area. The soils in alluvial site is rich in clay with high BD and SOM, and low in Ks and AWC; and the soils in colluvial site was designated as low in Ks, SOM, and AWC and high in BD. All variables, except SOM, showed a strong spatial dependency. In general, nugget, sill and range values of most of the studied soil variables decreased from alluvial site to colluvial site. When local (alluvial and colluvial sites separately) and global (alluvial + colluvial) kriged maps for BD, AWC, and soil textural separates, use of global semivariograms (one semivariogram for entire study area) resulted in lost of some details in colluvial sites, suggesting that local semivariograms for alluvial and colluvial soils should be used in kriging predictions at the farm. The results had significant implications for water management as AWC was spatially associated to clay content in alluvial site and to clay and sand contents in colluvial site.

  3. Comparative analysis of calculation models of railway subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Sviatko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In transport engineering structures design, the primary task is to determine the parameters of foundation soil and nuances of its work under loads. It is very important to determine the parameters of shear resistance and the parameters, determining the development of deep deformations in foundation soils, while calculating the soil subgrade - upper track structure interaction. Search for generalized numerical modeling methods of embankment foundation soil work that include not only the analysis of the foundation stress state but also of its deformed one. Methodology. The analysis of existing modern and classical methods of numerical simulation of soil samples under static load was made. Findings. According to traditional methods of analysis of ground masses work, limitation and the qualitative estimation of subgrade deformations is possible only indirectly, through the estimation of stress and comparison of received values with the boundary ones. Originality. A new computational model was proposed in which it will be applied not only classical approach analysis of the soil subgrade stress state, but deformed state will be also taken into account. Practical value. The analysis showed that for accurate analysis of ground masses work it is necessary to develop a generalized methodology for analyzing of the rolling stock - railway subgrade interaction, which will use not only the classical approach of analyzing the soil subgrade stress state, but also take into account its deformed one.

  4. Variation in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon and water exchange in a California grassland experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. Clair, S.B.; Sudderth, E.; Fischer, M.L.; Torn, M.S.; Stuart, S.; Salve, R.; Eggett, D.; Ackerly, D.

    2009-03-15

    Variability in the magnitude and timing of precipitation is predicted to change under future climate scenarios. The primary objective of this study was to understand how variation in precipitation patterns consisting of soil moisture pulses mixed with intermittent dry down events influence ecosystem gas fluxes. We characterized the effects of precipitation amount and timing, N availability, and plant community composition on whole ecosystem and leaf gas exchange in a California annual grassland mesocosm study system that allowed precise control of soil moisture conditions. Ecosystem CO2 and fluxes increased significantly with greater precipitation and were positively correlated with soil moisture. A repeated 10 day dry down period following 11 days of variable precipitation inputs strongly depressed net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) across a range of season precipitation totals, and plant community types. Ecosystem respiration (Re), evapotranspiration (ET) and leaf level photosynthesis (Amax) showed greatest sensitivity to dry down periods in low precipitation plots. Nitrogen additions significantly increased NEE, Re and Amax, particularly as water availability was increased. These results demonstrate that N availability and intermittent periods of soil moisture deficit (across a wide range of cumulative season precipitation totals) strongly modulate ecosystem gas exchange.

  5. Water repellency and soil moisture variations under Rosmarinus officinalis in a burned soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno-García, E.; Pascual-Aguilar, J. A.; Llovet, J.

    2009-04-01

    Mediterranean semi-arid landscapes are characterised by the patchiness of the vegetation cover, in which variations in the distribution pattern of soil water repellency (SWR) can be of major importance for their hydrological and geomorphological effects in burned areas, and also for their ecological implications concerning to the re-establishment of their plant cover. Within a broader research framework, the present work studies the influence of Rosmarinus officinalis vegetated patches on SWR in burned and unburned soils and its relationship with the field soil moisture content (SMC). The results presented here are the first step analysing the spatial pattern of sink and source runoff areas in a burned hillslope. The study area is located in the municipality of Les Useres, 40 km from Castellón city (E Spain), where a wildfire occurred in August 2007. We selected a burned SSE facing hillslope, located at 570 m a.s.l., with 12 ° slope angle, in which it was possible to identify the presence of two unique shrub species: Quercus coccifera L. and Rosmarinus officinalis L., which were distributed in a patchy mosaic. Twenty microsites with burned R. officinalis and eight at the nearest unburned area were selected. At the burned microsites, it was possible to distinguish three concentric zones (I, II and III) around the stumps showing differences on their soil surface appearance, which indicate a gradient of fire severity. Those differences were considered for soil sampling (1 sample per zone at each microsite, n= 84, form the first 2 cm of the mineral A horizon) and field soil moisture measurements determined by means of the moisture meter HH2 with ThetaProbe sensor type ML2x (5 measurements per zone at each microsite, n= 420), which were taken one day after the first rainfall event after fire, when 11 mm were registered in the study area. Results showed that the largest repellency persistence (measured by means of the Water Drop Penetration Time test, WDPT) was found

  6. Soil microbial responses to temporal variations of moisture and temperature in a chihuahuan desert grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Colin; McIntyre, Nancy; Cox, Stephen; Tissue, David; Zak, John

    2008-07-01

    Global climate change models indicate that storm magnitudes will increase in many areas throughout southwest North America, which could result in up to a 25% increase in seasonal precipitation in the Big Bend region of the Chihuahuan Desert over the next 50 years. Seasonal precipitation is a key limiting factor regulating primary productivity, soil microbial activity, and ecosystem dynamics in arid and semiarid regions. As decomposers, soil microbial communities mediate critical ecosystem processes that ultimately affect the success of all trophic levels, and the activity of these microbial communities is primarily regulated by moisture availability. This research is focused on elucidating soil microbial responses to seasonal and yearly changes in soil moisture, temperature, and selected soil nutrient and edaphic properties in a Sotol Grassland in the Chihuahuan Desert at Big Bend National Park. Soil samples were collected over a 3-year period in March and September (2004-2006) at 0-15 cm soil depth from 12 3 x 3 m community plots. Bacterial and fungal carbon usage (quantified using Biolog 96-well micro-plates) was related to soil moisture patterns (ranging between 3.0 and 14%). In addition to soil moisture, the seasonal and yearly variability of soil bacterial activity was most closely associated with levels of soil organic matter, extractable NH(4)-N, and soil pH. Variability in fungal activity was related to soil temperatures ranging between 13 and 26 degrees C. These findings indicate that changes in soil moisture, coupled with soil temperatures and resource availability, drive the functioning of soil-microbial dynamics in these desert grasslands. Temporal patterns in microbial activity may reflect the differences in the ability of bacteria and fungi to respond to seasonal patterns of moisture and temperature. Bacteria were more able to respond to moisture pulses regardless of temperature, while fungi only responded to moisture pulses during cooler seasons with

  7. Seasonal variation in surface fuel moisture between unthinned and thinned mixed conifer forest, northern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becky L. Estes; Eric E. Knapp; Carl N. Skinner; Fabian C. C. Uzoh

    2012-01-01

    Reducing stand density is often used as a tool for mitigating the risk of high-intensity crown fires. However, concern has been expressed that opening stands might lead to greater drying of surface fuels, contributing to increased fire risk. The objective of this study was to determine whether woody fuel moisture differed between unthinned and thinned mixed-conifer...

  8. Factors affecting temporal and spatial soil moisture variation in and adjacent to group selection openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.H. McNab

    1991-01-01

    Soil moisture content was intensively sampled in three, 1-acre blocks containing an opening and surrounding mature upland hardwoods. Openings covering 0.19-0.26 ac were created by group-selection cutting, and they were occupied by 1-year-old trees and shrubs.

  9. Engineering properties of common subgrade soils below pavement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports findings of laboratory testing of common sub-grade soils in pavement structures in Kenya. The materials were collected from different parts of the country. The results are intended to form a database for use by practicing engineers and researchers in the field of pavement engineering. The investigated ...

  10. potentials of cement kiln dust in sub-grade improvement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Assessment of Road Failure in the Abakalike Area,. Southeastern Nigeria, International Journal of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vol II, No. 2, 2011, pp, 12-24. 3. Parson, R. L. and Kneebone, E. Use of Cement Kiln. Dust For Subgrade Stabilization. Kansas Department of Transportation, Final Report ...

  11. Improvement of strength characteristics of lateritic sub-grade soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the results of investigation of the behavior of pavement subgrade soil stabilized with shredded polyethylene waste. Shredded high density polyethylene High Density Polyethylene Waste of maximum size 20 × 25mm was used for the improvement of lateritic soil at various percentages which are; 1%, 2%, ...

  12. Improvement of poor subgrade soils using cement kiln dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mancy Mosa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Construction of pavements layers on subgrade with excellent to good properties reduces the thickness of the layers and consequently reduces the initial and maintenance cost of highways and vice versa. However, construction of pavements on poor subgrade is unavoidable due to several constrains. Improvement of subgrade properties using traditional additives such as lime and Portland cement adds supplementary costs. Therefore, using by-products in this domain involves technical, economic, and environmental advantages. Cement kiln dust (CKD is generated in huge quantities as a by-product material in Portland cement plants. Therefore, it can be considered as an excellent alternative in this domain. In Iraq, Portland cement plants generate about 350000 tons of CKD annually which is available for free. Therefore, Iraq can be adopted as a case study. This paper covers using CKD to improve the properties of poor subgrade soils based on series of California Bearing Ration (CBR tests on sets of untreated samples and samples treated with different doses of CKD in combination with different curing periods to investigate their effects on soil properties. The results exhibited that adding 20% of CKD with curing for 14 days increases the CBR value from 3.4% for untreated soil to 48% for treated soil; it, also, decreases the swelling ratio. To determine the effects of using this dose under the mentioned curing period on the designed thicknesses of pavements layers, a case study was adopted. The case study results exhibited that treatment of the subgrade soil by 20% of CKD with curing for 14 days reduces the cost of the pavements by $25.875 per square meter.

  13. Changes in regional boreal climate due to historic and future structural vegetation changes and variations in soil moisture memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydsaa, Johanne H.; Stordal, Frode; Tallaksen, Lena M.

    2014-05-01

    Amplified warming at high latitudes over the past decades already has led to, and will continue to lead to, changes in the boreal and arctic part of the climate system. Climate change induced alterations include structural shifts in high latitude ecosystems such as boreal forest expansion towards higher latitudes and altitudes, and shrub-ecosystems replacing tundra in large areas of the arctic. These shifts affect surface physical qualities such as albedo, roughness length, and soil properties. Shifts in vegetation species may also lead to alterations in soil- and boundary layer moisture. Resultant changes in land surface properties and processes provide important feedbacks to regional climate by changes in radiation, and water and energy fluxes. Structural vegetation changes that appear on local scale may through these feedback mechanisms also propagate to affect large scale climatic features. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) with the Noah Land surface model is used in a series of experiments in order to investigate the influence of observed and anticipated structural changes in the boreal ecosystem on changes in the land-atmosphere feedbacks. MODIS land surface data are used together with observational data and dynamical vegetation model output from the CMIP5 database, to simulate the influence of historical and future structural vegetation changes over the Northern European Boreal domain. In a series of three experiments the MODIS dataset is manually altered in order to reflect observed and anticipated changes in Boreal forest geography on summer water and energy fluxes at the surface, including Bowen ratio changes. As results are highly sensitive to soil moisture variations, experiments are conducted under wet and dry soil moisture regimes, to take into account uncertainties in future soil state projections and to estimate sensitivity to soil moisture memory in surface flux estimates.

  14. ESTIMATION OF SUBGRADE STRENGTHENING INFLUENCE USING SOILCEMENT ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Petrenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this work is to identify dependencies and options to strengthen the roadbed and a weak base by grouting piles. Analysis of software package SCAD to assess the effect of the selected option of strengthening the construction of spatial subgrade models. Methodology. In this paper the method of calculation of the soil mass in the software package SCAD is considered, which is a universal accounting system of finite-element analysis of structures and is focused on solving problems of designing buildings and structures rather complex structure. The finite element method is among the most modern and effective methods for the calculation of structures for various purposes. In the simulation, we get a complete picture of the stress-strain state of the study area, as well as the value of the limit load, rainfall, and so on. The spatial model based on the finite element volume, to better address the real characteristics of the soil mass, meets all the geometric characteristics of size and natural subgrade and the top structure the path that has been adopted in Ukraine. Findings. It was found that the most effective option to strengthen the roadbed, when applying grouting piles at the base of the subgrade and body, is to strengthen the five piles. At the same time there is even strengthen the soil mass at the level of 25 … 30% of the entire depth. However, even with the strengthening of the only two piles at the base of the effect of the strengthening of 14.1%. Established equation is linear and describes the decrease in strain. Taking into account the results of the research can be concluded that the consolidation is proportional to the depth with any number of piles. The dependence of the strain on the number of piles adheres to a polynomial function. Strengthening the bases of the subgrade and body depth also occurs in proportion with any number of piles. Originality. Design scheme generation algorithm for the calculation of the

  15. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Z; Terry, N; Hubbard, S S; Csatho, B

    2013-02-12

    In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability distribution functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSim) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes

  16. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Terry, Neil C.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2013-02-22

    In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability density functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSIM) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes advantage of

  17. Comparison of Terrestrial Water Storage Variations from GRACE With In-Situ Soil Moisture and Groundwater Level Measurements in Semiarid Irrigated Systems: Case Study High Plains Aquifer, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberg, G.; Scanlon, B. R.; Chambers, D.

    2007-12-01

    Depletion of groundwater storage in semiarid regions as a result of intensive irrigation is a critical water resource issue. Many of these systems are poorly monitored, such as the North China Plain and western India. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to quantify changes in groundwater storage using detailed monitoring records available for the High Plains aquifer (450,000 km2 area). This study presents a comparison of terrestrial water storage changes derived from GRACE gravity measurements between 2003 and 2006 with in-situ soil moisture and groundwater level measurements covering the High Plains aquifer. Soil moisture measurements from 80 shallow (~1 m depth) mesonet stations from Texas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska, were combined with data from deeper (up to 7 m) monitoring sites to estimate temporal and spatial variations in soil moisture over the High Plains. Anomalies in soil moisture were compared with soil moisture changes simulated by the Noah Land surface model. Groundwater storage variations over the aquifer were estimated by assimilating groundwater level measurements from multiple state and federal agencies. Good correspondence between soil moisture storage from the ground based networks and the Noah land surface model increased confidence in the soil moisture storage variations. Terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes from GRACE compared favorably with TWS (approximated as changes in soil moisture + groundwater storage) from the monitoring networks. Results from this study demonstrate the potential for the GRACE satellites to monitor water storage variations in semiarid irrigated systems, where mining of groundwater resources is a critical issue.

  18. The effects of moisture and temperature variations on the long term durability of polymer concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Ricardo; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Grelk, Bent

    2013-01-01

    The use of polymer concrete to precast products in construction presents normally many advantages compared to traditional concrete. Higher strength, lower permeability, shorter curing periods, better chemical resistances and a better durability is normally predicated, however this is a research...... field where published data are scarce. Durability and constantly high and good physical properties are some of the most important properties of the materials used in the building industry. Thermal durability, i.e. the ability of a material to retain its original physical-mechanical properties during...... and after exposure to different thermal conditions is very important. In this paper, an experimental study concerning the influence of temperature and moisture in cyclic conditions on the durability of polymer concrete based on an unsaturated polyester resin is described and the results are presented...

  19. Analysis of Embedded Retaining Wall Using the Subgrade Reaction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasik Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the distribution of internal forces and displacements of embedded retaining wall in Quaternary deposits and Tertiary clays. Calculations have been based on the Subgrade Reaction Method (SRM for two different types of earth pressure behind the wall (active, at-rest in order to show the differences resulting from adopting the limit values. An algorithm for calculation of “cantilever wall” using the Mathematica program was proposed.

  20. Laboratory Evaluation of the Effects of 3-Chloride Compounds on the Geotechnical Properties of an Expansive Subgrade Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Anjan Kumar, M.; Raju, G. V. R. Prasada

    2017-12-01

    Expansive soils are known to be problematic due to their nature and behavior. These soils show volume changes due to changes in moisture content, which cause distortions to structures constructed on them. Relentless efforts are being made all over the world to find solution to the problems of expansive soils. In the case of flexible pavements, unless the subgrade is appropriately treated during the construction stage, the maintenance cost will increase substantially due to deterioration. There are many methods of stabilising expansive subgrade soils. Chemical stabilisation is one such technique employed in improving the engineering properties of the expansive soil. Investigations on chemical stabilization of expansive soils revealed that conventionally used lime could be replaced by the chloride compound chemicals because of their ready dissolvability in water, ease of mixing with soil and supply of sufficient cations for ready cation exchange. The main objective of this work is to study the effectiveness of three chloride compound chemicals, ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), magnesium chloride (MgCl2) and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) on the geotechnical properties of an expansive soil. The chemicals content up to 2% were added to the soil and its effect on the index limits, swell pressure, compaction characteristics as well as California bearing ratio are studied. It was observed that aluminum chloride chemical content has a significantly higher influence than the other two chemicals and it could be recognized as an effective chemical stabilizer.

  1. Laboratory Evaluation of the Effects of 3-Chloride Compounds on the Geotechnical Properties of an Expansive Subgrade Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Anjan Kumar, M.; Raju, G. V. R. Prasada

    2017-10-01

    Expansive soils are known to be problematic due to their nature and behavior. These soils show volume changes due to changes in moisture content, which cause distortions to structures constructed on them. Relentless efforts are being made all over the world to find solution to the problems of expansive soils. In the case of flexible pavements, unless the subgrade is appropriately treated during the construction stage, the maintenance cost will increase substantially due to deterioration. There are many methods of stabilising expansive subgrade soils. Chemical stabilisation is one such technique employed in improving the engineering properties of the expansive soil. Investigations on chemical stabilization of expansive soils revealed that conventionally used lime could be replaced by the chloride compound chemicals because of their ready dissolvability in water, ease of mixing with soil and supply of sufficient cations for ready cation exchange. The main objective of this work is to study the effectiveness of three chloride compound chemicals, ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), magnesium chloride (MgCl2) and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) on the geotechnical properties of an expansive soil. The chemicals content up to 2% were added to the soil and its effect on the index limits, swell pressure, compaction characteristics as well as California bearing ratio are studied. It was observed that aluminum chloride chemical content has a significantly higher influence than the other two chemicals and it could be recognized as an effective chemical stabilizer.

  2. Assessment of the variation of the moisture content in the Pinus pinaster Ait. using the non destructive GPR technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díez Barra, R.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The moisture content variations in wood have a significant influence in wood’s physicochemical properties, as well as in its electromagnetic properties and to specific effects upon waves’ characteristics. In particular, this paper focuses on the analysis of the Ground-penetrating Radar’s (GPR using an antenna of 1.6GHz central frequency capacity to register the velocity and the amplitude of the electromagnetic waves’ variation during the drying process of Pinus pinaster Ait timber joists. The results showed that when timber MC descends, the propagation velocity and amplitude of both the direct and the reflected wave increased. The high correlation found between the variables studied demonstrates GPR efficiency and the innovative application of this technique as a non-destructive evaluation tool for timber structures, particularly when studying its moisture content.La variación en el contenido de humedad (CH tiene una influencia significativa tanto en las propiedades físico- químicas de la madera, como en sus propiedades electromagnéticas y por tanto afecta a las características de la propagación de las ondas. En concreto, en este trabajo se estudia la capacidad del georradar (GR empleando una antena de 1.6GHz de frecuencia central para registrar las variaciones que se producen en la velocidad y en la amplitud de las ondas electromagnéticas cuando se propagan en unas viguetas de madera de Pinus pinaster Ait de uso estructural cuyo CH va disminuyendo. Se ha comprobado como cuando el CH descendía la velocidad de propagación y las amplitudes, tanto de la onda directa como de la reflejada aumentaba. Los altos factores de correlación encontrados demuestran que el GR es una técnica capaz de evaluar, de forma no destructiva, el CH de la madera de uso estructural.

  3. Measurement and Analysis of High-speed Railway Subgrade Settlement in China: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qulin TAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Subgrade is an important component of railway engineering construction, which supports the upper loads of tracks and trains. Subgrade stability directly affects the high- speed train safety and passenger comfort. With the rapid development of China’s high-speed railway, it put a very high requirement for track smoothness, and thus the requirements of subgrade stability and deformation control become very stringent. In the paper, we studied the measurement methods, instruments, observation point set, observation frequency, precision and data prediction analysis etc. Using the subgrade settlement measured data of Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway as a case study; we analyzed the relationship between the subgrade settlement and time, and applied hyperbolic model, exponential model and Poisson model to predict subgrade post-construction settlement. The results show that cumulative settlement of subgrade measuring point is 6.4 mm from the beginning to 118th day after roadbed filling construction, and the sedimentation rate becomes steady at 0.001 mm/d. Comparative analysis shows that the hyperbolic model has the best fitting performance among the three curve regression models. And the predicted roadbed post-construction settlement of 3.22 mm has met the subgrade requirements for ballastless-track laying.

  4. Mechanistic-empirical subgrade design model based on heavy vehicle simulator test results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theyse, HL

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available -empirical design models. This paper presents a study on subgrade permanent deformation based on the data generated from a series of Heavy Vehicle Simulator (HVS) tests done at the Richmond Field Station in California. The total subgrade deflection was found to be a...

  5. Variations in annual water-energy balance and their correlations with vegetation and soil moisture dynamics: A case study in the Wei River Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengzhi; Huang, Qiang; Leng, Guoyong; Zhao, Menglong; Meng, Erhao

    2017-03-01

    It is of importance to investigate watershed water-energy balance variations and to explore their correlations with vegetation and soil moisture dynamics, which helps better understand the interplays between underlying surface dynamics and the terrestrial water cycle. The heuristic segmentation method was adopted to identify change points in the parameter ω series in Fu's equation belonging to the Budyko framework in the Wei River Basin (WRB) and its sub-basins aiming to examine the validity of stationary assumptions. Additionally, the cross wavelet analysis was applied to explore the correlations between vegetation and soil moisture dynamics and ω variations. Results indicated that (1) the ω variations in the WRB are significant, with some change points identified except for the sub-basin above Zhangjiashan, implying that the stationarity of ω series in the WRB is invalid except for the sub-basin above Zhangjiashan; (2) the correlations between soil moisture series and ω series are weaker than those between Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) series and ω series; (3) vegetation dynamics show significantly negative correlations with ω variations in 1983-2003 with a 4-8 year signal in the whole WRB, and both vegetation and soil moisture dynamics exert strong impacts on the parameter ω changes. This study helps understanding the interactions between underlying land surface dynamics and watershed water-energy balance.

  6. Variations in annual water-energy balance and their correlations with vegetation and soil moisture dynamics: A case study in the Wei River Basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shengzhi; Huang, Qiang; Leng, Guoyong; Zhao, Menglong; Meng, Erhao

    2017-03-01

    It is of importance to investigate watershed water-energy balance variations and to explore their correlations with vegetation and soil moisture dynamics, which helps better understand the interplays between underlying surface dynamics and the terrestrial water cycle. The heuristic segmentation method was adopted to identify change points in the parameter to series in Fu's equation belonging to the Budyko framework in the Wei River Basin (WRB) and its sub-basins aiming to examine the validity of stationary assumptions. Additionally, the cross wavelet analysis was applied to explore the correlations between vegetation and soil moisture dynamics and to variations. Results indicated that (1) the omega variations in the WRB are significant, with some change points identified except for the sub-basin above Zhangjiashan, implying that the stationarity of omega series in the WRB is invalid except for the sub-basin above Zhangjiashan; (2) the correlations between soil moisture series and to series are weaker than those between Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) series and omega series; (3) vegetation dynamics show significantly negative correlations with omega variations in 1983-2003 with a 4-8 year signal in the whole WRB, and both vegetation and soil moisture dynamics exert strong impacts on the parameter omega changes. This study helps understanding the interactions between underlying land surface dynamics and watershed water-energy balance. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Research on filling scheme and deformation properties of wide subgrade of foamed lightweight soil on soft ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Faru; Yang, Deguang; Zhang, Liujun

    2018-01-01

    The wide subgrade on soft soil ground has the significantly different transverse settlement curve characteristics and the lacation of the maximum asymmetrical transverse settlement compared with ordinary subgrade. Especially when the subgrade filled with materials of different densities, the synergism deformation of ground-subgrade-pavement and the pavement structure stress become more complex. Combining with the engineering example, the settlement deformation characteristics of wide subgrade adopting the different filling scheme and the stress distribution of pavement structure are analyzed. Results show that the settlement curve of wide subgrade has a shape of flat middle with steep sides, and the maximum transverse asymmetrical settlement locates in close to the shoulder position. The maximum stress within the pavement structure is also in close to the shoulder position. Regarding the wide subgrade composed of main road and relief road, the post-construction settlement can be greatly reduced when both roads are filled with foamed lightweight soil.

  8. Novel railway-subgrade vibration monitoring technology using phase-sensitive OTDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoyong; Lu, Bin; Zheng, Hanrong; Ye, Qing; Pan, Zhengqing; Cai, Haiwen; Qu, Ronghui; Fang, Zujie; Zhao, Howell

    2017-04-01

    High-speed railway is being developed rapidly; its safety, including infrastructure and train operation, is vital. This paper presents a railway-subgrade vibration monitoring scheme based on phase-sensitive OTDR for railway safety. The subgrade vibration is detected and rebuilt. Multi-dimension comprehensive analysis (MDCA) is proposed to identify the running train signals and illegal constructions along railway. To our best knowledge, it is the first time that a railway-subgrade vibration monitoring scheme is proposed. This scheme is proved effective by field tests for real-time train tracking and activities monitoring along railway. It provides a new passive distributed way for all-weather railway-subgrade vibration monitoring.

  9. Measurement and Analysis of High-speed Railway Subgrade Settlement in China: A Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qulin Tan; Leijuan Li; Senlin Wang

    2014-01-01

    .... With the rapid development of China's high-speed railway, it puts a very high requirement for track smoothness, and thus the requirements of subgrade stability and deformation control become very stringent...

  10. Evaluating Use of Sub-Grade Drains with PFC for Stormwater Drainage : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The overarching objective of this project is to evaluate the effectiveness of incorporated subgrade drain (usually called underdrain) in the permeable friction course (PFC) pavement to facilitate drainage of stormwater within and on the pavemen...

  11. An Analysis on Spatiotemporal Variations of Soil and Vegetation Moisture from a 29 year Satellite Derived Dataset over Mainland Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; van Dijk, A.I.J.M.; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Holmes, T.R.H.

    2009-01-01

    The spatiotemporal behavior of soil and vegetation moisture over mainland Australia was analyzed using passive microwave observations by four satellites going back to late 1978. Differences in measurement specifications prevented merging the data directly. A continuous product was developed for

  12. Functional traits variation explains the distribution of Aextoxicon punctatum (Aextoxicaceae in pronounced moisture gradients within fog-dependent forest fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz eSalgado-Negret

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and fragmentation are major threats to world forests. Understanding how functional traits related to drought tolerance change across small-scale, pronounced moisture gradients in fragmented forests is important to predict species’ responses to these threats. In the case of Aextoxicon punctatum, a dominant canopy tree in fog-dependent rain forest patches in semiarid Chile, we explored how the magnitude, variability and correlation patterns of leaf and xylem vessel traits and hydraulic conductivity varied across soil moisture gradients established within and among forest patches of different size, which are associated with differences in tree establishment and mortality patterns. Leaf traits varied across soil-moisture gradients produced by fog interception. Trees growing at drier leeward edges showed higher LMA (leaf mass per area, trichome and stomatal density than trees from the wetter core and windward zones. In contrast, xylem vessel traits (vessels diameter and density did not vary producing loss of hydraulic conductivity at drier leeward edges. We also detected higher levels of phenotypic integration and variability at leeward edges. The ability of A. punctatum to modify leaf traits in response to differences in soil moisture availability established over short distances (<500 m facilitates its persistence in contrasting microhabitats within forest patches. However, xylem anatomy showed limited plasticity, which increases cavitation risk at leeward edges. Greater patch fragmentation, together with fluctuations in irradiance and soil moisture in small patches, could result in higher risk of drought-related tree mortality, with profound impacts on hydrological balances at the ecosystem scale.

  13. Holocene moisture variations over the arid central Asia revealed by a comprehensive sand-dune record from the central Tian Shan, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hao; Shen, Ji; Chen, Jianhui; Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Yang, Linhai; Cheng, Hongyi; Frechen, Manfred

    2017-10-01

    Arid central Asia (ACA) is one of the largest arid (desert) areas in the world, and its climate is dominated by the westerlies. In this study, we examined sand dune evolution from the Bayanbulak Basin in the Tian Shan (Xinjiang, NW China), aiming to infer the Holocene moisture history of the ACA. Combined with stratigraphic observation and environmental proxies analysis (grain size, magnetic susceptibility and total organic content), large numbers of luminescence ages from multiple sites (eight sections, 79 samples) were applied to reconstruct the evolution of the sand dune accumulation in the study basin. The overall results imply very dry conditions characterized by sand dune accumulation at ∼12-6.5 ka, a wet interval between ∼6.5 and 0.8 ka when soil formation occurred, and decreased moisture during the last 0.8 ka. This moisture variation pattern is generally consistent with that inferred from many lacustrine records in the core zone of ACA, suggesting a widespread dry period in the early-to-middle Holocene and relatively wet middle-to-late Holocene. Thus, the moisture history derived from the current sand dune system contrasts with that in Asian monsoon areas, which are characterized by a strong monsoon (high precipitation) in the early and mid-Holocene and a weak monsoon (low precipitation and dry climate) during the late Holocene. Our results strongly suggest that the winter solar insolation and the external boundary conditions such as atmospheric CO2 concentration, ice sheets, and meltwater fluxes, have been major influential factors triggering the Holocene moisture evolution in the core zone of ACA.

  14. Effects of soil moisture retention on ice distribution and active layer thickness subject to seasonal ground temperature variations in a dry loess terrace in Adventdalen, Svalbard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Carina; Frampton, Andrew; Christiansen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    The active layer constitutes an important part of permafrost environments. Thermal and hydrological processes in the active layer determine local phenomena such as erosion and hydrological and ecosystem changes, and can have important implications for the global carbon-climate feedback. Permafrost degradation usually starts with a deepening of the active layer, followed by the formation of a talik and the subsequent thawing of permafrost. An increasing active layer thickness is therefore regarded as an indicator of permafrost degradation. The importance of hydrology for active layer processes is generally well acknowledged on a conceptual level, however the in general non-linear physical interdependencies between soil moisture, subsurface water and heat fluxes and active layer thaw progression are not fully understood. In this study, high resolution field data for the period 2000-2014 consisting of active layer and permafrost temperature, active layer soil moisture, and thaw depth progression from the UNISCALM research site in Adventdalen, Svalbard, is combined with a physically-based coupled cryotic and hydrogeological model to investigate active layer dynamics. The site is a loess-covered river terrace characterized by dry conditions with little to no summer infiltration and an unsaturated active layer. A range of soil moisture characteristic curves consistent with loess sediments is considered and their effects on ice and moisture redistribution, heat flux, energy storage through latent heat transfer, and active layer thickness is investigated and quantified based on hydro-climatic site conditions. Results show that soil moisture retention characteristics exhibit notable control on ice distribution and circulation within the active layer through cryosuction and are subject to seasonal variability and site-specific surface temperature variations. The retention characteristics also impact unfrozen water and ice content in the permafrost. Although these effects

  15. Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations of Temperature and Moisture in Highway Engineering Using a Frequency Domain Reflectometry Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yong-Sheng; Zheng, Jian-Long; Chen, Zeng-Shun; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic pioneering study on the use of agricultural-purpose frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) sensors to monitor temperature and moisture of a subgrade in highway extension and reconstruction engineering. The principle of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors and the process for embedding this kind of sensors for subgrade engineering purposes are introduced. Based on field measured weather data, a numerical analysis model for temperature and moisture content in the subgrade’s soil is built. Comparisons of the temperature and moisture data obtained from numerical simulation and FDR-based measurements are conducted. The results show that: (1) the embedding method and process, data acquisition, and remote transmission presented are reasonable; (2) the temperature and moisture changes are coordinated with the atmospheric environment and they are also in close agreement with numerical calculations; (3) the change laws of both are consistent at positions where the subgrade is compacted uniformly. These results suggest that the data measured by the agricultural-purpose FDR sensors are reliable. The findings of this paper enable a new and effective real-time monitoring method for a subgrade’s temperature and moisture changes, and thus broaden the application of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors. PMID:27294935

  16. Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations of Temperature and Moisture in Highway Engineering Using a Frequency Domain Reflectometry Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Sheng Yao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a systematic pioneering study on the use of agricultural-purpose frequency domain reflectometry (FDR sensors to monitor temperature and moisture of a subgrade in highway extension and reconstruction engineering. The principle of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors and the process for embedding this kind of sensors for subgrade engineering purposes are introduced. Based on field measured weather data, a numerical analysis model for temperature and moisture content in the subgrade’s soil is built. Comparisons of the temperature and moisture data obtained from numerical simulation and FDR-based measurements are conducted. The results show that: (1 the embedding method and process, data acquisition, and remote transmission presented are reasonable; (2 the temperature and moisture changes are coordinated with the atmospheric environment and they are also in close agreement with numerical calculations; (3 the change laws of both are consistent at positions where the subgrade is compacted uniformly. These results suggest that the data measured by the agricultural-purpose FDR sensors are reliable. The findings of this paper enable a new and effective real-time monitoring method for a subgrade’s temperature and moisture changes, and thus broaden the application of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors.

  17. Leaf shrinkage: a predictive indicator of the potential variation of the surface area-to-volume ratio according to the leaf moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaghi, Salaheddine; Hachmi, M'hamed; Yessef, Mohammed; Dehhaoui, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Leaf shrinkage provides insights into the potential variation of foliar SVR, within the same species, when leaf moisture content is changing in response to water deficit. Since SVR is among the most significant plant flammability features, leaf shrinkage would be a relevant component of fuel hazard assessment through its influence on SVR, enhancing-if it is taken into account-thereby the wildfire prediction accuracy. The purpose of this work is, first, to consider the leaf shrinkage by characterizing the plant species towards the shrinkability of their leaves, taking account the possible site effect, to characterize the behavior of shrinkage as a function of moisture content and finally to perform a classification for some dominant Mediterranean species based on the shrinkage levels. The assessment of the hierarchical relationships between the dimensional shrinkages is also aimed. Leaves and needles of thirteen tree and shrub species were harvested from six different sites in western Rif Mountains. Leaves dimensions and moisture content were measured regularly during a gradual drying at the laboratory. Dimensional shrinkages were calculated at each moisture content level. Dimensional shrinkages behaved similarly whether in leaf or timber and kept the same reporting relationships between each other. Among the species sampled in different sites, site effect is significant only in Pinus canariensis and Pistacia lentiscus. A classification of the plant species was carried out in three separate classes. Generally, shrinkage class of the plant species studied gave an idea on its flammability ranking reported in the literature, implying thus a cause-and-effect relationship between both parameters.

  18. Study on Mud Pumping Mechanism of Subgrade Surface Layer in Slab Ballastless Track Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopei CAI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mud pumping has a significant impact on dynamic behavior of high-speed railway. An elaborate study focused on the structure characteristics of CRTS I (China Railway Track System slab ballastless track was made to explain the mechanism of mud pumping from the aspects of displacement between the base plate and subgrade, gap growing, disfunction of drainage system and dynamic load of the train. Finite element software ABAQUS was applied to simulate the dynamic responses between the base plate and the subgrade surface layer in different conditions of gap length and gap size. It has been found that the dynamic force between the base plate and the surface layer of subgrade is up to 4,576.29 kN. Suggestions have been given to the related department such as slip-casting, white-out, sealing plug to solve the problem.

  19. Study on the subgrade deformation under high-speed train loading and water-soil interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Zhao, Guo-Tang; Sheng, Xiao-Zhen; Jin, Xue-Song

    2016-04-01

    It is important to study the subgrade characteristics of high-speed railways in consideration of the water-soil coupling dynamic problem, especially when high-speed trains operate in rainy regions. This study develops a nonlinear water-soil interaction dynamic model of slab track coupling with subgrade under high-speed train loading based on vehicle-track coupling dynamics. By using this model, the basic dynamic characteristics, including water-soil interaction and without water induced by the high-speed train loading, are studied. The main factors-the permeability coefficient and the porosity-influencing the subgrade deformation are investigated. The developed model can characterize the soil dynamic behaviour more realistically, especially when considering the influence of water-rich soil.

  20. Effect of Cement Replacement with Carbide Waste on the Strength of Stabilized Clay Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntohar A.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cement is commonly used for soil stabilization and many other ground improvement techniques. Cement is believed to be very good to improve the compressive and split-tensile strength of clay subgrades. In some application cement could be partly or fully replaced with carbide waste. This research is to study the effectiveness of the cement replacement and to find the maximum carbide waste content to be allowed for a clay subgrade. The quantities of cement replaced with the carbide waste were 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% by its mass. The results show that replacing the cement with carbide waste decreased both the compressive and split tensile strength. Replacing cement content with carbide waste reduced its ability for stabilization. The carbide waste content should be less than 70% of the cement to provide a sufficient stabilizing effect on a clay subgrade.

  1. GPR measurements and estimation for road subgrade damage caused by neighboring train vibration load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonghui; Lu, Gang; Ge, Shuangcheng

    2015-04-01

    Generally, road can be simplified as a three-layer structure, including subgrade, subbase and pavement. Subgrade is the native material underneath a constructed road. It is commonly compacted before the road construction, and sometimes stabilized by the addition of asphalt, lime or other modifiers. As the mainly supporting structure, subgrade damage would lead in pavement settlement, displacement and crack. Assessment and monitoring of the subgrade condition currently involves trial pitting and subgrade sampling. However there is a practical limit on spatial density at which trail pits and cores can be taken. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been widely used to characterize highway pavement profiling, concrete structure inspection and railroad track ballast estimation. GPR can improve the economics of road maintenance. Long-term train vibration load might seriously influence the stability of the subgrade of neighboring road. Pavement settlement and obvious cracks have been found at a municipal road cross-under a railway with culvert box method. GPR test was conducted to estimate the subgrade and soil within 2.0 m depth for the further road maintenance. Two survey lines were designed in each lane, and total 12 GPR sections have been implemented. Considering both the penetrating range and the resolution, a antenna with a 500 MHz central frequency was chosen for on-site GPR data collection. For data acquisition, we used the default operating environment and scanning parameters for the RAMAC system: 60kHz transmission rate, 50 ns time window, 1024 samples per scan and 0.1 m step-size. Continuous operation was used; the antenna was placed on the road surface and slowly moved along the road. The strong surrounding disturbance related to railroad and attachments, might decrease the reliability of interpretation results. Some routine process methods (including the background removing, filtering) have been applied to suppress the background noise. Additionally, attribute

  2. Spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture under Rosmarinus officinalis and Quercus coccifera in a burned soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno-García, E.; Pascual-Aguilar, J. A.; Llovet, J.

    2009-04-01

    When studying surface runoff processes, measurement of the soil moisture content (SMC) at the surface could be used to identify sinks and sources areas of runoff. Surface soil moisture patterns variability have been studied in a burned Mediterranean semi-arid area. Since surface SMC and soil water repellency (SWR) are influenced by fire and vegetation (see previous abstract), and soil water dynamics and vegetation dynamics are functionally related, it could be expected to find some changes during the following months after fire when vegetation starts to recover. The identification of these changes is the main goal of this research. The study area is located at the municipality of Les Useres, 40 km from Castellón city (E Spain), where a wildfire occured in August 2007. We selected a burned SSE facing hillslope, located at 570 m a.s.l., with 12° slope angle, in which it was possible to identify the presence of two unique shrub species: Quercus coccifera L. and Rosmarinus officinalis L., which were distributed in a patchy mosaic. Twenty microsites with burned R. officinalis and eight microsites with burned Q. coccifera were selected in an area of 7 m wide by 14 m long. At the burned microsites, it was possible to distinguish three concentric zones (I, II and III) around the stumps showing differences on their soil surface appearance, which indicate a gradient of fire severity. Those differences were considered for field soil moisture measurements. Five measurements of SMC separated approximately 10 cm per zone at each microsite (n= 420) were carried out after different rainfall events. Volumetric soil moisture was measured by means of the moisture meter HH2 with ThetaProbe sensor type ML2x, 6 cm long. SMC was monitored on three occasions, always one day after the following rainfall events: (1) the first rainfall event after fire, when 11 mm were registered (Oct-07); (2) four months later than fire (Dec-07), after six consecutive raining days with a total rain volume

  3. Temporal variation of soil moisture over the Wuding River basin assessed with an eco-hydrological model, in-situ observations and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Mo, X.; Zhao, W.; Naeimi, V.; Dai, D.; Shu, C.; Mao, L.

    2009-07-01

    The change pattern and trend of soil moisture (SM) in the Wuding River basin, Loess Plateau, China is explored based on the simulated long-term SM data from 1956 to 2004 using an eco-hydrological process-based model, Vegetation Interface Processes model, VIP. In-situ SM observations together with a remotely sensed SM dataset retrieved by the Vienna University of Technology are used to validate the model. In the VIP model, climate-eco-hydrological (CEH) variables such as precipitation, air temperature and runoff observations and also simulated evapotranspiration (ET), leaf area index (LAI), and vegetation production are used to analyze the soil moisture evolution mechanism. The results show that the model is able to capture seasonal SM variations. The seasonal pattern, multi-year variation, standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CV) of SM at the daily, monthly and annual scale are well explained by CEH variables. The annual and inter-annual variability of SM is the lowest compared with that of other CEH variables. The trend analysis shows that SM is in decreasing tendency at α=0.01 level of significance, confirming the Northern Drying phenomenon. This trend can be well explained by the decreasing tendency of precipitation (α=0.1) and increasing tendency of temperature (α=0.01). The decreasing tendency of runoff has higher significance level (α=0.001). Because of SM's decreasing tendency, soil evaporation (ES) is also decreasing (α=0.05). The tendency of net radiation (Rn), evapotranspiration (ET), transpiration (EC), canopy intercept (EI) is not obvious. Net primary productivity (NPP), of which the significance level is lower than α=0.1, and gross primary productivity (GPP) at α=0.01 are in increasing tendency.

  4. Satellite-observed changes in vegetation sensitivities to surface soil moisture and total water storage variations since the 2011 Texas drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Geruo; Velicogna, Isabella; Kimball, John S.; Du, Jinyang; Kim, Youngwook; Colliander, Andreas; Njoku, Eni

    2017-05-01

    We combine soil moisture (SM) data from AMSR-E and AMSR-2, and changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS) from time-variable gravity data from GRACE to delineate and characterize the evolution of drought and its impact on vegetation growth. GRACE-derived TWS provides spatially continuous observations of changes in overall water supply and regional drought extent, persistence and severity, while satellite-derived SM provides enhanced delineation of shallow-depth soil water supply. Together these data provide complementary metrics quantifying available plant water supply. We use these data to investigate the supply changes from water components at different depths in relation to satellite-based enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and gross primary productivity (GPP) from MODIS and solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) from GOME-2, during and following major drought events observed in the state of Texas, USA and its surrounding semiarid area for the past decade. We find that in normal years the spatial pattern of the vegetation-moisture relationship follows the gradient in mean annual precipitation. However since the 2011 hydrological drought, vegetation growth shows enhanced sensitivity to surface SM variations in the grassland area located in central Texas, implying that the grassland, although susceptible to drought, has the capacity for a speedy recovery. Vegetation dependency on TWS weakens in the shrub-dominated west and strengthens in the grassland and forest area spanning from central to eastern Texas, consistent with changes in water supply pattern. We find that in normal years GRACE TWS shows strong coupling and similar characteristic time scale to surface SM, while in drier years GRACE TWS manifests stronger persistence, implying longer recovery time and prolonged water supply constraint on vegetation growth. The synergistic combination of GRACE TWS and surface SM, along with remote-sensing vegetation observations provides new insights into drought impact on

  5. Moisture penetration in a chair seat as a response to daily RH variations in the indoor air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svennberg, Kaisa; Claesson, Johan; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2005-01-01

    was measured using small temperature and relative humidity sensors. A numerical calculation model describing the step-response as well as the response to ramp variations is described. A comparison between measurements and theoretical calculations was performed. The difficulties with determination of material...

  6. Temporal variation of soil moisture over the Wuding River basin assessed with an eco-hydrological model, in-situ observations and remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The change pattern and trend of soil moisture (SM in the Wuding River basin, Loess Plateau, China is explored based on the simulated long-term SM data from 1956 to 2004 using an eco-hydrological process-based model, Vegetation Interface Processes model, VIP. In-situ SM observations together with a remotely sensed SM dataset retrieved by the Vienna University of Technology are used to validate the model. In the VIP model, climate-eco-hydrological (CEH variables such as precipitation, air temperature and runoff observations and also simulated evapotranspiration (ET, leaf area index (LAI, and vegetation production are used to analyze the soil moisture evolution mechanism. The results show that the model is able to capture seasonal SM variations. The seasonal pattern, multi-year variation, standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CV of SM at the daily, monthly and annual scale are well explained by CEH variables. The annual and inter-annual variability of SM is the lowest compared with that of other CEH variables. The trend analysis shows that SM is in decreasing tendency at α=0.01 level of significance, confirming the Northern Drying phenomenon. This trend can be well explained by the decreasing tendency of precipitation (α=0.1 and increasing tendency of temperature (α=0.01. The decreasing tendency of runoff has higher significance level (α=0.001. Because of SM's decreasing tendency, soil evaporation (ES is also decreasing (α=0.05. The tendency of net radiation (Rn, evapotranspiration (ET, transpiration (EC, canopy intercept (EI is not obvious. Net primary productivity (NPP, of which the significance level is lower than α=0.1, and gross primary productivity (GPP at α=0.01 are in increasing tendency.

  7. Vertical Random Vibration Analysis of Track-Subgrade Coupled System in High Speed Railway with Pseudoexcitation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwen Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the ground-borne vibration caused by wheel/rail interaction in the ballastless track of high speed railways, viscoelastic asphalt concrete materials are filled between the track and the subgrade to attenuate wheel/rail force. A high speed train-track-subgrade vertical coupled dynamic model is developed in the frequency domain. In this model, coupling effects between the vehicle and the track and between the track and the subgrade are considered. The full vehicle is represented by some rigid body models of one body, two bogies, and four wheelsets connected to each other with springs and dampers. The track and subgrade system is considered as a multilayer beam model in which layers are connected to each other with springs and damping elements. The vertical receptance of the rail is discussed and the receptance contribution of the wheel/rail interaction is investigated. Combined with the pseudoexcitation method, a solution of the random dynamic response is presented. The random vibration responses and transfer characteristics of the ballastless track and subgrade system are obtained under track random irregularity when a high speed vehicle runs through. The influences of asphalt concrete layer’s stiffness and vehicle speed on track and subgrade coupling vibration are analyzed.

  8. Feasibility of Using Unbound Mixed Recycled Aggregates from CDW over Expansive Clay Subgrade in Unpaved Rural Roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Del Rey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social awareness aims to increase practical skills, such as sustainable development, which seeks to increase the use of different types of waste in construction activities. Although insufficient attention is sometimes given to these actions, it is essential to spread information regarding new studies in the field of waste recycling, which encourages and promotes waste use. Reusing and recycling construction waste in the creation of buildings and infrastructure are fundamental strategies to achieving sustainability in the construction and engineering sectors. In this context, the concept of waste would no longer exist, as waste would become a material resource. Therefore, this study analyses the behaviours of two unbound mixed recycled aggregates (MRA in the structural layers of an unpaved rural road with low traffic (category T43. The sections were built on inappropriate soil (A-7-6 with a high degree of free swelling. The experimental road consisted of three sections: the first was made with natural aggregates (NA that were used as a control, the second was composed of MRA in the subbase and NA in the base, and the third section was completely composed of MRA. The materials were characterised in the laboratory. The behaviours of the structural layers in the experimental road were determined by controlling compaction (“in situ” density and moisture and measuring the deflections and load capacity (deflectometer during the 18 months after construction. The results show that the sections made with recycled aggregates meet the technical specifications required by General Technical Specifications for Road and Bridge Works (PG-3. Therefore, the water-soluble sulphate content and Los Angeles abrasion coefficient limits can be increased for recycled aggregates without compromising the quality of this type of road with low traffic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study regarding the use of unbound MRA made from construction and

  9. Feasibility of Using Unbound Mixed Recycled Aggregates from CDW over Expansive Clay Subgrade in Unpaved Rural Roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rey, Isaac; Ayuso, Jesús; Galvín, Adela P; Jiménez, José R; Barbudo, Auxi

    2016-11-17

    Social awareness aims to increase practical skills, such as sustainable development, which seeks to increase the use of different types of waste in construction activities. Although insufficient attention is sometimes given to these actions, it is essential to spread information regarding new studies in the field of waste recycling, which encourages and promotes waste use. Reusing and recycling construction waste in the creation of buildings and infrastructure are fundamental strategies to achieving sustainability in the construction and engineering sectors. In this context, the concept of waste would no longer exist, as waste would become a material resource. Therefore, this study analyses the behaviours of two unbound mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) in the structural layers of an unpaved rural road with low traffic (category T43). The sections were built on inappropriate soil (A-7-6) with a high degree of free swelling. The experimental road consisted of three sections: the first was made with natural aggregates (NA) that were used as a control, the second was composed of MRA in the subbase and NA in the base, and the third section was completely composed of MRA. The materials were characterised in the laboratory. The behaviours of the structural layers in the experimental road were determined by controlling compaction ("in situ" density and moisture) and measuring the deflections and load capacity (deflectometer) during the 18 months after construction. The results show that the sections made with recycled aggregates meet the technical specifications required by General Technical Specifications for Road and Bridge Works (PG-3). Therefore, the water-soluble sulphate content and Los Angeles abrasion coefficient limits can be increased for recycled aggregates without compromising the quality of this type of road with low traffic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study regarding the use of unbound MRA made from construction and demolition waste (CDW

  10. [Temporal variation of soil respiration on sloping pasture of Heihe River basin and effects of temperature and soil moisture on it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zongqiang; Shi, Zuomin; Feng, Qi; Su, Yonghong

    2005-09-01

    Employing LiCor 6400 gas exchange analyzer and soil respiration chamber attachment (LiCor Inc., Lincoln, NE, USA), this paper continuously measured the soil surface CO2 effluxes on the sloping pasture of Heihe River basin from early April to late October 2003 to investigate the soil CO2 efflux rate and its feedback to the changes of climate and land use. The results showed that from May to October, the diurnal variation of soil respiration was low at night, the lowest at 7:00, 6:30, 5:30, 6:00 and 7:00, raised rapidly at 7:00 - 8:30, and then descended at 16:00 - 18:30. The maximum soil CO2 efflux appeared at 15:00, 14:30, 14:30, 13:30, 14:00 and 15:00. The mean daily soil respiration rate was 0.31 - 6.98 micromol m(-2) s(-1), with the maximum in July and August, the second in May and September, and nearly consistent in April and October. Soil respiration rate had an exponential and power correlation with temperature and soil moisture, respectively.

  11. Pembuatan Makanan Ringan Produk Ekstrusi Dari Subgrade Ubi Jalar Goreng Beku Sebagai Bahan Substitusi Serta Analisis Kelayakan Finansial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betha Ika Wilistien

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to determine the influential proportion of sweet potato Subgrade frozen usage as the substitution material toward the production of an extract product snack by using corn grits and rice. The parameters examined were organoleptic characteristic and proper analysis of financial. The organoleptic analysis comprises taste, crispiness, appearance, color, and aroma. The chemical analysis includes sucrose, water, and essence, as well as protein content. The result of this research shows that organoleptic testing toward the taste of an extract product snack by using Beni azzuma sweet potato subgrade indicates that the combination treatments give a positive influence toward organoleptic characteristics of the product. An extract product of snack product from Beni azzuma sweet potato Subgrade as the substitution material with 95% rice formula and 5% Beni azzuma sweet potato Subgrade is chosen as the best product for having the highest weight or quality, 0.970. Proper analysis from the snack processing is shown by NPV score, Rp. 2.,016,418,748 (bigger than zero, the IRR score is 50.00% (bigger than deposit interest, 12.56%. The investment expense needed for constructing the unit of an extract product snack processing with Beni azzuma sweet potato Subgrade as the substitution material is Rp. 330,978,230. The investment will be back after 3 years 5 months, and every year the project can give the profit of 50% from the investment expense.

  12. An Optimized Elasto-Plastic Subgrade Reaction For Modeling The Response Of A Nonlinear Foundation For A Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Richard Paul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Geotechnical and structural engineers are faced with a difficult task when their designs interact with each other. For complex projects, this is more the norm than the exception. In order to help bridge that gap, a method for modeling the behavior of a foundation using a simple elasto-plastic subgrade reaction was developed. The method uses an optimization technique to position 4-6 springs along a pile foundation to produce similar load deflection characteristics that were modeled by more sophisticated geotechnical finite element software. The methodology uses an Excel spreadsheet for accepting user input and delivering an optimized subgrade spring stiffness, yield, and position along the pile. In this way, the behavior developed from the geotechnical software can be transferred to the structural analysis software. The optimization is achieved through the solver add-in within Excel. Additionally, a beam on a nonlinear elastic foundation model is used to compute deflections of the optimized subgrade reaction configuration.

  13. Multi-channel ground-penetrating radar to explore spatial variations in thaw depth and moisture content in the active layer of a permafrost site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Wollschläger

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-channel ground-penetrating radar (GPR was applied at a permafrost site on the Tibetan Plateau to investigate the influence of surface properties and soil texture on the late-summer thaw depth and average soil moisture content of the active layer. Measurements were conducted on an approximately 85 × 60 m2 sized area with surface and soil textural properties that ranged from medium to coarse textured bare soil to finer textured, sparsely vegetated areas covered with fine, wind blown sand, and it included the bed of a gravel road. The survey allowed a clear differentiation of the various units. It showed (i a shallow thaw depth and low average soil moisture content below the sand-covered, vegetated area, (ii an intermediate thaw depth and high average soil moisture content along the gravel road, and (iii an intermediate to deep thaw depth and low to intermediate average soil moisture content in the bare soil terrain. From our measurements, we found hypotheses for the permafrost processes at this site leading to the observed late-summer thaw depth and soil moisture conditions. The study clearly indicates the complicated interactions between surface and subsurface state variables and processes in this environment. Multi-channel GPR is an operational technology to efficiently study such a system at scales varying from a few meters to a few kilometers.

  14. Moisture-induced stresses in glulam frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Gislason, Oskar V

    2016-01-01

    Wood is a hygroscopic and moisture-sensitive material that seeks to achieve equilibrium moisture content (EMC) with its surrounding environment. For softwood timber structures exposed to variations in climate throughout their service life, this behaviour results in variable moisture-content gradi......Wood is a hygroscopic and moisture-sensitive material that seeks to achieve equilibrium moisture content (EMC) with its surrounding environment. For softwood timber structures exposed to variations in climate throughout their service life, this behaviour results in variable moisture...... is presented. A two-dimensional transient, non-linear moisture transport model for wood is also developed and linked with this beam model. The combined models are used to study the long-term deformations and stresses in a curved frame structure exposed to both mechanical loading and cyclic climate conditions...

  15. Early Soil Moisture Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T.

    2008-12-01

    Before the large scale field experiments described in the call for papers, there were a number of experiments devoted to a single parameter, e.g. soil moisture. In the early 1970's, before the launch of the first microwave radiometer by NASA, there were a number of aircraft experiments to determine utility of these sensors for land observations. For soil moisture, these experiments were conducted in southwestern United States over irrigated agricultural areas which could provide a wide range of moisture conditions on a given day. The radiometers covered the wavelength range from 0.8 to 21 cm. These experiments demonstrated that it is possible to observe soil moisture variations remotely using a microwave radiometer with a sensitivity of about 3 K / unit of soil moisture. The results also showed that the longer wavelengths were better, with a radiometer at the 21 cm wavelength giving the best results. These positive results led to the development of Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) and the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instruments at the 21-cm wavelength. They have been used extensively in the large-scale experiments such as HAPEX-MOBILHY, FIFE, Monsoon90, SMEX, etc. The multi-beam nature of these instruments makes it possible to obtain more extensive coverage and thus to map spatial variations of surface soil moisture. Examples of the early results along with the more recent soil moisture maps will be presented.

  16. Effect of suction hysteresis on resilient modulus of fine-grained cohesionless soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    The mechanical behavior of subgrade soil is influenced by the seasonal variations in moisture content. To better understand this behavior, it is crucial to study the relationship between soil moisture content and matric suction known as the Soil Wate...

  17. Resilient modulus characteristics of soil subgrade with geopolymer additive in peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Nasuhi; Hadiwardoyo, Sigit Pranowo; Rahayu, Wiwik

    2017-06-01

    Resilient modulus characteristics of peat soil are generally very low with high potential of deformation and low bearing capacity. The efforts to improve the peat subgrade resilient modulus characteristics is required, one among them is by adding the geopolymer additive. Geopolymer was made as an alternative to replace portland cement binder in the concrete mix in order to promote environmentally friendly, low shrinkage value, low creep value, and fire resistant material. The use of geopolymer to improve the mechanical properties of peat as a road construction subgrade, hence it becomes important to identify the effect of geopolymer addition on the resilient modulus characteristics of peat soil. This study investigated the addition of 0% - 20% geopolymer content on peat soil derived from Ogan Komering Ilir, South Sumatera Province. Resilient modulus measurement was performed by using cyclic triaxial test to determine the resilience modulus model as a function of deviator stresses and radial stresses. The test results showed that an increase in radial stresses did not necessarily lead to an increase in modulus resilient, and on the contrary, an increase in deviator stresses led to a decrease in modulus resilient. The addition of geopolymer in peat soil provided an insignificant effect on the increase of resilient modulus value.

  18. Evaluation of Carbonation Effects on Cement-Solidified Contaminated Soil Used in Road Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yundong Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement solidification/stabilization is widely used towards contaminated soil since it has a low price and significant improvement for the structural capacity of soil. To increase the usage of the solidified matrix, cement-solidified contaminated soil was used as road subgrade material. In this study, carbonation effect that reflected the durability on strength characteristics of cement-solidified contaminated soil and the settlement of pavement were evaluated through experimental and numerical analysis, respectively. According to results, compressive strengths of specimens with 1% Pb(II under carbonation and standard curing range from 0.44 MPa to 1.17 MPa and 0.14 MPa to 2.67 MPa, respectively. The relatively low strengths were attributed to immobilization of heavy metal, which consumed part of SiO2, Al2O3, and CaO components in the cement or kaolin and reduced the hydration and pozzolanic reaction materials. This phenomenon further decreased the strength of solidified soils. The carbonation depth of 1% Cu(II or Zn(II contaminated soils was 18 mm, which significantly increased with the increase of curing time and contamination concentration. Furthermore, the finite element calculation results showed that surface settlements decreased with the increase of modulus of subgrade and the distance away from the center. At the center, the pavement settlement was proportional to the level of traffic load.

  19. Experimental Study on the Utilization of Fine Steel Slag on Stabilizing High Plastic Subgrade Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussien Aldeeky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The three major steel manufacturing factories in Jordan dump their byproduct, steel slag, randomly in open areas, which causes many environmental hazardous problems. This study intended to explore the effectiveness of using fine steel slag aggregate (FSSA in improving the geotechnical properties of high plastic subgrade soil. First soil and fine steel slag mechanical and engineering properties were evaluating. Then 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% dry weight of soil of fine steel slag (FSSA were added and mixed into the prepared soil samples. The effectiveness of the FSSA was judged by the improvement in consistency limits, compaction, free swell, unconfined compression strength, and California bearing ratio (CBR. From the test results, it is observed that 20% FSSA additives will reduce plasticity index and free swell by 26.3% and 58.3%, respectively. Furthermore, 20% FSSA additives will increase the unconfined compressive strength, maximum dry density, and CBR value by 100%, 6.9%, and 154%. By conclusion FSSA had a positive effect on the geotechnical properties of the soil and it can be used as admixture in proving geotechnical characteristics of subgrade soil, not only solving the waste disposal problem.

  20. Toxicity of a metal(loid)-polluted agricultural soil to Enchytraeus crypticus changes under a global warming perspective: Variations in air temperature and soil moisture content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Alcaraz, M.N.; van Gestel, C.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess how the current global warming perspective, with increasing air temperature (20 °C vs. 25 °C) and decreasing soil moisture content (50% vs. 30% of the soil water holding capacity, WHC), affected the toxicity of a metal(loid)-polluted agricultural soil to Enchytraeus

  1. Compact RFID Enabled Moisture Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. H. Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research proposes a novel, low-cost RFID tag sensor antenna implemented using commercially available Kodak photo-paper. The aim of this paper is to investigate the possibility of stable, RFID centric communication under varying moisture levels. Variation in the frequency response of the RFID tag in presence of moisture is used to detect different moisture levels. Combination of unique jaw shaped contours and T-matching network is used for impedance matching which results in compact size and minimal ink consumption. Proposed tag is 1.4 × 9.4 cm2 in size and shows optimum results for various moisture levels upto 45% in FCC band with a bore sight read range of 12.1 m.

  2. Resilient modulus for unbound granular materials and subgrade soils in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Rabah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanistic Empirical (ME pavement design methods started to gain attention especially the last couple of years in Egypt and the Middle East. One of the challenges facing the spread of these methods in Egypt is lack of advanced properties of local soil and asphalt, which are needed as input data in ME design. Resilient modulus (Mr for example is an important engineering property that expresses the elastic behavior of soil/unbound granular materials (UGMs under cyclic traffic loading for ME design. In order to overcome the scarcity of the resilient modulus data for soil/UGMs in Egypt, a comprehensive laboratory testing program was conducted to measure resilient modulus of typical UGMs and subgrade soils typically used in pavement construction in Egypt. The factors that affect the resilient modulus of soil/UGMs were reviewed, studied and discussed. Finally, the prediction accuracy of the most well-known Mr Prediction models for the locally investigated materials was investigated.

  3. Deflection profile analysis of beams on two-parameter elastic subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Omolofe

    Full Text Available A procedure involving spectral Galerkin and integral transformation methods has been developed and applied to treat the problem of the dynamic deflections of beam structure resting on bi-parametric elastic subgrade and subjected to travelling loads. The case of the response to moving constant loads of this slender member is first investigated and a closed form solution in series form describing the motion of the beam while under the actions of the travelling load is obtained. The response under a variable magnitude moving load with constant velocity is finally treated and the effects of prestressed, foundation stiffness, shear modulus and damping coefficients are investigated. Results in plotted curves indicate that these structural parameters produce significant effects on the dynamic stability of the load-beam system. Conditions under which the beam-load system may experience resonance phenomenon are also established some of these findings are quite useful in practical applications.

  4. AN APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING & EVALUATING ALTERNATIVES FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF SUB-GRADE STRUCTURES AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-25

    In 2002, the Richland Operations Office (RL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) developed milestones for transitioning the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. These milestones required developing an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EF/CA) for the facility's sub-grade structures and installations as part of a series of evaluations intended to provide for the transition of the facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. In addition to supporting decisions for interim actions, the analyses of sub-grade structures and installations performed through this EE/CA will contribute to the remedial investigation feasibility study(ies) and subsequently to the final records of decision for the relevant operable units responsible for site closure in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site.

  5. A Compact L-band Radiometer for High Resolution sUAS-based Imaging of Soil Moisture and Surface Salinity Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Stachura, M.; Dai, E.; Elston, J.; McIntyre, E.; Leuski, V.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the long electrical wavelengths required along with practical aperture size limitations the scaling of passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture and salinity from spaceborne low-resolution (~10-100 km) applications to high resolution (~10-1000 m) applications requires use of low flying aerial vehicles. This presentation summarizes the status of a project to develop a commercial small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) hosting a microwave radiometer for mapping of soil moisture in precision agriculture and sea surface salinity studies. The project is based on the Tempest electric-powered UAS and a compact L-band (1400-1427 MHz) radiometer developed specifically for extremely small and lightweight aerial platforms or man-portable, tractor, or tower-based applications. Notable in this combination are a highly integrated sUAS/radiometer antenna design and use of both the upwelling emitted signal from the surface and downwelling cold space signal for precise calibration using a unique lobe-differencing correlating radiometer architecture. The system achieves a spatial resolution comparable to the altitude of the UAS above the surface while referencing upwelling measurements to the constant and well-known background temperature of cold space. The radiometer has been tested using analog correlation detection, although future builds will include infrared, near-infrared, and visible (red) sensors for surface temperature and vegetation biomass correction and digital sampling for radio frequency interference mitigation. This NASA-sponsored project is being developed for commercial application in cropland water management (for example, high-value shallow root-zone crops), landslide risk assessment, NASA SMAP satellite validation, and NASA Aquarius salinity stratification studies. The system will ultimately be capable of observing salinity events caused by coastal glacier and estuary fresh water outflow plumes and open ocean rainfall events.

  6. MOISTURE-BUFFERING CHARACTERISTICS OF BUILDING MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Cheol Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The humidity level of indoor air is an important factor influencing the air quality and energy consumption of buildings, as well as the durability of building components. Indoor humidity levels depend on several factors, such as moisture sources, air flow, and the adsorption/desorption properties of materials. The moisture-buffering characteristics of building materials that are in contact with indoor air may help moderate the variations of indoor humidity, especially in the summer and winter. In this study, the moisture adsorption/desorption properties of building materials were investigated experimentally and numerically. These properties can be used to characterize the ability of building materials to exchange moisture with the indoor environment. This study indicates that a building material surface resistivity was the main factor creating variations of moisture buffering.

  7. Moisture conditions in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Growth of mould requires the presence of moisture at a certain high level. In a heated indoor environment such moisture levels occur only if there is a reason for the moisture supply. Such moisture can come from the use of the building, because of malfunctioning constructions, or it can...

  8. Toxicity of a metal(loid)-polluted agricultural soil to Enchytraeus crypticus changes under a global warming perspective: Variations in air temperature and soil moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alcaraz, M Nazaret; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2016-12-15

    This study aimed to assess how the current global warming perspective, with increasing air temperature (20°C vs. 25°C) and decreasing soil moisture content (50% vs. 30% of the soil water holding capacity, WHC), affected the toxicity of a metal(loid)-polluted agricultural soil to Enchytraeus crypticus. Enchytraeids were exposed for 21d to a dilution series of the agricultural soil with Lufa 2.2 control soil under four climate situations: 20°C+50% WHC (standard conditions), 20°C+30% WHC, 25°C+50% WHC, and 25°C+30% WHC. Survival, reproduction and bioaccumulation of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were obtained as endpoints. Reproduction was more sensitive to both climate factors and metal(loid) pollution. High soil salinity (electrical conductivity~3dSm(-1)) and clay texture, even without the presence of high metal(loid) concentrations, affected enchytraeid performance especially at drier conditions (≥80% reduction in reproduction). The toxicity of the agricultural soil increased at drier conditions (10% reduction in EC10 and EC50 values for the effect on enchytraeid reproduction). Changes in enchytraeid performance were accompanied by changes in As, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn bioaccumulation, with lower body concentrations at drier conditions probably due to greater competition with soluble salts in the case of Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn. This study shows that apart from high metal(loid) concentrations other soil properties (e.g. salinity and texture) may be partially responsible for the toxicity of metal(loid)-polluted soils to soil invertebrates, especially under changing climate conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effect of Temperature on Moisture Transport in Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Xi, Yunping

    2017-08-09

    Most concrete structures and buildings are under temperature and moisture variations simultaneously. Thus, the moisture transport in concrete is driven by the moisture gradient as well as the temperature gradient. This paper presents an experimental approach for determining the effect of different temperature gradients on moisture distribution profiles in concrete. The effect of elevated temperatures under isothermal conditions on the moisture transport was also evaluated, and found not to be significant. The non-isothermal tests show that the temperature gradient accelerates the moisture transport in concrete. The part of increased moisture transfer due to the temperature gradient can be quantified by a coupling parameter DHT, which can be determined by the present test data. The test results indicated that DHT is not a constant but increases linearly with the temperature variation. A material model was developed for DHT based on the experimental results obtained in this study.

  10. Estimation of soil moisture using multispectral and FTIR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Muhammad Zubair Younis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is a key capricious in hydrological process, the accessibility of moisture content in soil reins the mechanism amid the land surface and atmospheric progression. Precise soil moisture determination is influential in the weather forecast, drought monitoring, hydrological modeling, agriculture management and policy making. The aims of the study were to estimate soil moisture through remotely sensed data (FTIR & optical and establishment of the results with field measured soil moisture data. The ground measurements were carried out in 0–15 cm depth. Permutation of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and land surface temperature (LST were taken to derive temperature vegetation dryness index (TVDI for assessment of surface soil moisture. Correlation and regression analysis was conceded to narrate the TVDI with in situ calculated soil moisture. The spatial pattern of TVDI shows that generally low moisture distribution over study area. A significant (p < 0.05 negative correlation of r = 0.79 was found between TVDI and in situ soil moisture. The TVDI was also found adequate in temporal variation of surface soil moisture. The triangle method (TVDI confers consistent appraisal of moisture situation and consequently can be used to evaluate the wet conditions. Furthermore, the appraisal of soil moisture using the triangular method (TVDI was possible at medium spatial resolutions because the relationship of soil moisture with LST and NDVI lends an eloquent number of representative pixels for developing a triangular scatter plot.

  11. Soil moisture variability across different scales in an Indian watershed for satellite soil moisture product validation

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Gurjeet

    2016-05-05

    Strategic ground-based sampling of soil moisture across multiple scales is necessary to validate remotely sensed quantities such as NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) product. In the present study, in-situ soil moisture data were collected at two nested scale extents (0.5 km and 3 km) to understand the trend of soil moisture variability across these scales. This ground-based soil moisture sampling was conducted in the 500 km2 Rana watershed situated in eastern India. The study area is characterized as sub-humid, sub-tropical climate with average annual rainfall of about 1456 mm. Three 3x3 km square grids were sampled intensively once a day at 49 locations each, at a spacing of 0.5 km. These intensive sampling locations were selected on the basis of different topography, soil properties and vegetation characteristics. In addition, measurements were also made at 9 locations around each intensive sampling grid at 3 km spacing to cover a 9x9 km square grid. Intensive fine scale soil moisture sampling as well as coarser scale samplings were made using both impedance probes and gravimetric analyses in the study watershed. The ground-based soil moisture samplings were conducted during the day, concurrent with the SMAP descending overpass. Analysis of soil moisture spatial variability in terms of areal mean soil moisture and the statistics of higher-order moments, i.e., the standard deviation, and the coefficient of variation are presented. Results showed that the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of measured soil moisture decreased with extent scale by increasing mean soil moisture. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  12. Moisture Transport in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, T.; Hansen, K. K.; Hoffmeyer, P.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of moisture transport in wood is of great importance as most mechanical and physical properties of wood depend on moisture content. Moisture transport in porous materials is often described by Ficks second law, but several observations indicate that this does not apply very well to wood....... Recently at the Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering, a new model for moisture transport in wood has been developed. The model divides the transport into two phases, namely water vapour in the cell lumens and bound water in the cell walls....

  13. Moisture Buffer Value of Building Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut; Time, Berit

    2007-01-01

    When building materials are in contact with indoor air they have some effect to moderate the variations of indoor humidity in occupied buildings. But so far there has been a lack of a standardized quantity to characterize the moisture buffering capability of materials. It has been the objective...... of a recent Nordic project to define such a quantity, and to declare it in the form of a NORDTEST method. The Moisture Buffer Value is the figure that has been developed in the project as a way to appraise the moisture buffer effect of materials, and the value is described in the paper. Also explained...... is a test protocol which expresses how materials should be tested for determination of their Moisture Buffer Value. Finally, the paper presents some of the results of a Round Robin Test on various typical building materials that has been carried out in the project....

  14. Evaluation of gravimetric ground truth soil moisture data collected for the agricultural soil moisture experiment, 1978 Colby, Kansas, aircraft mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, L. M.; Phinney, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Soil moisture data acquired to support the development of algorithms for estimating surface soil moisture from remotely sensed backscattering of microwaves from ground surfaces are presented. Aspects of field uniformity and variability of gravimetric soil moisture measurements are discussed. Moisture distribution patterns are illustrated by frequency distributions and contour plots. Standard deviations and coefficients of variation relative to degree of wetness and agronomic features of the fields are examined. Influence of sampling depth on observed moisture content an variability are indicated. For the various sets of measurements, soil moisture values that appear as outliers are flagged. The distribution and legal descriptions of the test fields are included along with examinations of soil types, agronomic features, and sampling plan. Bulk density data for experimental fields are appended, should analyses involving volumetric moisture content be of interest to the users of data in this report.

  15. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Continuous observation data collected over the year 2008 at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram in south Kerala (76° 59′E longitude and 8° 30′N latitude) are used to study the diurnal, monthly and seasonal soil moisture variations. The effect of rainfall on diurnal and seasonal soil moisture is discussed.

  16. Influence of moisture absorption on the flexural properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It was found that during the processof moisture absorption there exists a variation of the flexural properties closely related to the degradation of the mechanicalbehaviour of the composite, as well as the percentage amount of moisture absorbed. Experiments were carried out withcomposite made of epoxy resin reinforced ...

  17. Characterizing bulk modulus of fine-grained subgrade soils under large capacity construction equipment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available correlation models for the soil sample tested. These models can be used for evaluating the impact of moisture on bulk modulus of fine-grained soils with similar characteristics for their sustainable use in foundation applications under off-road construction...

  18. Characterizing shear properties of fine-grained subgrade soils under large capacity construction equipment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available properties including friction angle and cohesion for strength properties and shear modulus of the soil at three moisture states. Mohr-Coulomb failure models were developed together with shear modulus correlations for the soil sample. These models can be used...

  19. Approaching Moisture Recycling Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Patrick; Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Gordon, Line; Galaz, Victor; Ebbesson, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of water resources are a continuous challenge for effective and sustainable national and international governance. Despite the surface watershed being the typical unit of water management, recent advances in hydrology have revealed 'atmospheric watersheds' - otherwise known as precipitationsheds. Also, recent research has demonstrated that water flowing within a precipitationshed may be modified by land-use change in one location, while the effect of this modification could be felt in a different province, nation, or continent. Notwithstanding these insights, the major legal and institutional implications of modifying moisture recycling have remained unexplored. In this presentation, we examine potential approaches to moisture recycling governance. We first identify a set of international study regions, and then develop a typology of moisture recycling relationships within these regions ranging from bilateral moisture exchange to more complex networks. This enables us to classify different types of legal and institutional governance principles. Likewise, we relate the moisture recycling types to existing land and water governance frameworks and management practices. The complexity of moisture recycling means institutional fit will be difficult to generalize for all moisture recycling relationships, but our typology allows the identification of characteristics that make effective governance of these normally ignored water flows more tenable.

  20. Space-time modeling of soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijuan; Mohanty, Binayak P.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2017-11-01

    A physically derived space-time mathematical representation of the soil moisture field is carried out via the soil moisture balance equation driven by stochastic rainfall forcing. The model incorporates spatial diffusion and in its original version, it is shown to be unable to reproduce the relative fast decay in the spatial correlation functions observed in empirical data. This decay resulting from variations in local topography as well as in local soil and vegetation conditions is well reproduced via a jitter process acting multiplicatively over the space-time soil moisture field. The jitter is a multiplicative noise acting on the soil moisture dynamics with the objective to deflate its correlation structure at small spatial scales which are not embedded in the probabilistic structure of the rainfall process that drives the dynamics. These scales of order of several meters to several hundred meters are of great importance in ecohydrologic dynamics. Properties of space-time correlation functions and spectral densities of the model with jitter are explored analytically, and the influence of the jitter parameters, reflecting variabilities of soil moisture at different spatial and temporal scales, is investigated. A case study fitting the derived model to a soil moisture dataset is presented in detail.

  1. Variação da temperatura e umidade de grãos armazenados em silos com aeração Variations of temperature and moisture content of grains stored in bins with aeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivano A. Devilla

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, estudou-se a variação de temperatura e de umidade em uma massa de grãos de milho armazenada em um silo, durante a aeração do produto, determinando-se o tempo de aeração requerido para se obter uma diferença de temperatura de 3 ºC entre a massa de grãos e o ambiente externo do silo. Inicialmente, os grãos de milho armazenados foram aquecidos utilizando-se equipamentos para aquecimento e umidificação do ar insuflado na massa. O processo de aeração foi realizado com fluxo de ar de 0,0157 m³ s-1 m-2 e, com o auxílio de um sistema de aquisição de dados e termopares, registraram-se as temperaturas em diversos pontos da massa de grãos, localizados radialmente a diferentes distâncias horizontais e verticais nas direções norte, sul, leste, oeste. Amostras do produto foram retiradas periodicamente, durante o resfriamento, para determinação da umidade. A redução de temperatura na massa de grãos dependeu da localização do produto no interior do silo, enquanto as maiores reduções de temperatura foram detectadas no produto localizado nas regiões sul e leste, e as menores, nas regiões norte e oeste que, de início, continham o produto em temperaturas mais baixas. A maior redução na temperatura da massa de grãos ocorreu entre 24 e 48 h de aeração. Um tempo de aeração de aproximadamente 70 h, foi necessário para que a diferença de temperatura entre a massa de grãos e o ambiente externo ao silo fosse igual a 3 ºC.The temperature and moisture content variations in corn kernels stored in a bin during an aeration process are presented in this work. The aeration time requirements were determined to obtain a temperature difference of 3 ºC between the mass of grains and the external environment. The temperature of the stored grains was increased by submitting the product to a forced flow of moist and pre-heated air before the aeration. Airflow of 0.0157 m³ s-1 m-2 was used in the aeration process

  2. CPC Soil Moisture

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The monthly data set consists of a file containing 1/2 degree monthly averaged soil moisture water height equivalents for the globe from 1948 onwards. Values are...

  3. Moisture Transport Through Sprayed Concrete Tunnel Linings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Karl Gunnar; Geving, Stig

    2016-01-01

    Waterproofing of permanent sprayed concrete tunnel linings with sprayed membranes in a continuous sandwich structure has been attempted since 2000 and has seen increased use in some countries. The main function of a sprayed membrane from a waterproofing perspective is to provide crack bridging and hence prevent flow of liquid water into the tunnel through cracks and imperfections in the concrete material. However, moisture can migrate through the concrete and EVA-based membrane materials by capillary and vapor diffusion mechanisms. These moisture transport mechanisms can have an influence on the degree of saturation, and may influence the pore pressures in the concrete material as well as risk of freeze-thaw damage of the concrete and membrane. The paper describes a detailed study of moisture transport material parameters, moisture condition in tunnel linings and climatic conditions tunnels in hard rock in Norway. These data have been included in a hygrothermal simulation model in the software WUFI for moisture transport to substantiate moisture transport and long-term effects on saturation of the concrete and membrane material. The findings suggest that EVA-based membranes exhibit significant water absorption and vapor transport properties although they are impermeable to liquid water flow. State-of-the-art sprayed concrete material applied with the wet mix method exhibits very low hydraulic conductivities, lower than 10-14 m/s, thus saturated conductive water flow is a very unlikely dominant transport mechanism. Moisture transport through the lining structure by capillary flow and vapor diffusion are calculated to approximately 3 cm3/m2 per day for lining thicknesses in the range of 25-35 cm and seasonal Nordic climate variations. The calculated moisture contents in the tunnel linings from the hygrothermal simulations are largely in agreement with the measured moisture contents in the tunnel linings. The findings also indicate that the concrete material exhibits

  4. Moisture sorption in naturally coloured cotton fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Ö.; De Clerck, K.

    2017-10-01

    Increasing environmental concerns have stimulated an interest in naturally coloured cottons. As many commercial and technical performance aspects of cotton fibres are influenced by their response towards atmospheric humidity, an in-depth research on moisture sorption behaviour of these fibres using dynamic vapour sorption is carried out. Significant differences were observed in sorption capacity and hysteresis behaviour of brown and green cotton fibres. These differences are mainly attributed to the variations in maturity and crystallinity index of the fibres. This study provides valuable insights into the moisture sorption behaviour of naturally coloured cotton fibres.

  5. Plan of research for integrated soil moisture studies. Recommendations of the Soil Moisture Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Soil moisture information is a potentially powerful tool for applications in agriculture, water resources, and climate. At present, it is difficult for users of this information to clearly define their needs in terms of accuracy, resolution and frequency because of the current sparsity of data. A plan is described for defining and conducting an integrated and coordinated research effort to develop and refine remote sensing techniques which will determine spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture and to utilize soil moisture information in support of agricultural, water resources, and climate applications. The soil moisture requirements of these three different application areas were reviewed in relation to each other so that one plan covering the three areas could be formulated. Four subgroups were established to write and compile the plan, namely models, ground-based studies, aircraft experiments, and spacecraft missions.

  6. Variação do teor de umidade e da densidade básica na madeira de sete espécies de eucalipto Variation of the moisture content and specific gravity in the wood of seven eucalypt species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tarcísio da Silva Oliveira

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available As variações de umidade e da densidade do lenho das árvores são as principais causas dos defeitos de secagem, como o empenamento e fendilhamento das peças de madeira. Os tipos de madeira presentes em um tronco estão relacionados com as variações dessas duas importantes propriedades físicas. Os gradientes de umidade e da densidade da madeira de sete espécies de eucalipto foram avaliados nas direções radial e longitudinal do tronco de árvores recém-abatidas. Os resultados apontaram uma maior homogeneidade de distribuição de umidade dentro das árvores de E. paniculata e E. citriodora, indicada pelos coeficientes de variação e desvio-padrão. O diferencial de umidade da madeira nas regiões internas do tronco de E. paniculata e E. citriodora foi de 20% e de E. urophylla e E. grandis, de 80%. A densidade básica da madeira aumentou na direção radial do tronco, e cada espécie de eucalipto apresentou um modelo de variação.The occurrence of high moisture and density gradients inside of the tree is related with drying defects, especially those characterized by warp and split of the wood. The unequal behavior of wood pieces due to variation of these two properties can be attributed to differences within the wood that constitutes the log. Considering the importance of knowing the moisture and density gradients in eucalyptus trees, this work had as objective evaluating the variations of the moisture content and specific gravity in the radial and longitudinal directions of the trees of seven eucalypts species. Based on the results concerning the moisture distribution inside the tree, there was a great homogeneity in the species of E. paniculata and E. citriodora, sustained by the low values of variation coefficient and standard deviation. In these species, the moisture differential among the inner and outer parts of the log rarely reached 20%, while for the logs of E. urophylla and E. grandis, this diferencial reached 80%. In spite of

  7. A low cost field usable portable digital grain moisture meter with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have developed a grain moisture meter, which due to its novel design, eliminates this problem and gives moisture (%) directly on a LCD display. The novelty of this instrument is that it is compact, easy-to-use, portable, and field usable. The moisture meter is based on the principle of dielectric constant variations due to ...

  8. Moisturizers: The slippery road

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha Sethi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisturizers are an important part of a dermatologist's armamentarium although little is written and well, a less is truly known about them. There is a cornucopia of projected skin products in the market whose real scientific role is not proven. These products although at times are regarded as mere cosmetics but have a well-known role in many skin disorders. Adequate knowledge about their mechanism of action, dosage, usage, and adverse effects is must for a dermatologist in this era. This article aims to bring forth the ever hidden facts of the much-hyped moisturizers. It is probably the first of its kind covering all aspects of moisturizers ranging from basic science to clinical usage, a subject that receives a short shrift in the current dermatological text.

  9. Moisture Adsorption Isotherms and Thermodynamic Characteristics of Tannic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, L.; Cacková, L.

    2016-09-01

    Moisture adsorption isotherms of tannic acid were determined at 5, 15, and 35°C with the use of the static gravimetric method in the range 0.113-0.980 aw (aw is the water activity). It was shown that tannic acid adsorbed more water at 5°C. The experimental data fitted well to the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer and Yanniotis-Blahovec equations, giving the corresponding parameters by nonlinear regression. The monolayer moisture content, number of monolayers, and the surface area of sorption were demonstrated to decrease with increasing temperature. Mesopores dominated below the monolayer moisture content followed by the formation of macropores. The variation of the differential enthalpy and entropy with the moisture content showed that water was strongly bound to the surface of tannic acid below the moisture content 5.0 g water/100 g dry basis. The adsorption process was found to be enthalpy-driven; however, it was not spontaneous at a low moisture content, as follows from the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory. The variation of the net integral enthalpy and entropy (at a constant spreading pressure) with the moisture content exhibited maximum and minimum values, respectively. This behavior indicated that water molecules were strongly bound to the tannic acid surface at the moisture content up to its monolayer values.

  10. Soil Moisture Monitoring at Watershed Scale in Eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the spatio-temporal variation of soil moisture on time scales that range from minute to decades on the watershed scale is important for the hydrological, meteorological and agricultural communities. Lack of reliable, longterm soil moisture datasets in developing countries like India, is a bottleneck for soil moisture analysis and prediction. Recognizing the need of continuous, automated in-situ soil moisture observations, three in-situ soil moisture test-beds have been established in an agricultural watershed of the Eastern India. Test-beds have been specifically designed to capture the root zone soil moisture dynamic at different crop fields under both surplus and water deficit conditions in low, medium and up-lands of the study region. Both volumetric and tensiometric method based sensors, Campbell Scientific soil water content reflectometer (CS650) and matric potential sensor (CS229) are installed at depths of 5, 15, 30, 60 and 100 cm below the surface. GPRS communication modems were installed at each station for remote communication from the data loggers (Campbell Scientific, CR1000) for automatic data collection. To achieve a better understanding of the spatial variation of the soil moisture on watershed scale, the strategic ground-based surface measurements were made in diverse landscape using portable impedance probe. The primary aim of spatial and temporal scale soil moisture measurement is to validate current remote sensing products of Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP). In order to improve validation procedure, the soil texture and soil hydraulic parameters are also estimated across the spatial scales to develop dynamic relationship between these parameters. Herein, the strategies for the site selection, calibration of the soil moisture sensors, ground-based soil moisture monitoring, hydraulic properties estimation at spatial scale and the quality assurance techniques applied to the observations are provided.

  11. The urban moisture climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas L. Sisterson

    1977-01-01

    Data collected on 26 July 1974 as a part of project METROMEX in St. Louis show the three-dimensional structure of the urban moisture field. Mesoscale dry regions at the urban surface, corresponding to large residential and light industrial land-use characterization, were responsible for a reduction in specific humidity in the urban mixing layer. Anthropogenic sources...

  12. Workshop on moisture buffer capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Summary report of a Nordtest workshop on moisture buffer capacity held at Copenhagen August 21-22 2003......Summary report of a Nordtest workshop on moisture buffer capacity held at Copenhagen August 21-22 2003...

  13. Moisture ingress into electronics enclosures under isothermal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staliulionis, Ž.; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H. [Process Modelling Group, Department of Mechanical engineering, Technical university of Denmark, Nils Koppels Allé, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-06-08

    The number of electronics used in outdoor environment is constantly growing. The humidity causes about 19 % of all electronics failures and, especially, moisture increases these problems due to the ongoing process of miniaturization and lower power consumption of electronic components. Moisture loads are still not understood well by design engineers, therefore this field has become one of the bottlenecks in the electronics system design. The objective of this paper is to model moisture ingress into an electronics enclosure under isothermal conditions. The moisture diffusion model is based on a 1D quasi-steady state (QSS) approximation for Fick’s second law. This QSS approach is also described with an electrical analogy which gives a fast tool in modelling of the moisture response. The same QSS method is applied to ambient water vapour variations. The obtained results are compared to an analytical solution and very good agreement is found.

  14. Moisture Buffer Performance of a Fully Furnished Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svennberg, Kaisa; Hedegaard, Lone Grønbæk; Rode, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    The moisture buffer capacity of hygroscopic materials can be used to moderate the relative humidity of indoor air as well as moisture content variations in building materials and furnishing. Since moisture plays a significant role in the development of many processes that affect the quality...... of the indoor air, such as growth of house dust mites, emissions from materials and mould growth it is anticipated that the moisture buffer effect can help to ensure healthier indoor environments. The building materials as well as furniture and other furnishing materials exposed to the indoor air...... will contribute to the moisture buffer capacity of the room. There is few studies made on the impact of furnishing materials in comparison with traditional building materials this paper will present such a study conducted in a full scale climate test cell. A series of experiments have been carried out...

  15. Moisture Metrics Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchmann, Mark

    2011-08-31

    the goal of this project was to determine the optimum moisture levels for biomass processing for pellets commercially, by correlating data taken from numerous points in the process, and across several different feedstock materials produced and harvested using a variety of different management practices. This was to be done by correlating energy consumption and material through put rates with the moisture content of incoming biomass ( corn & wheat stubble, native grasses, weeds, & grass straws), and the quality of the final pellet product.This project disseminated the data through a public website, and answering questions form universities across Missouri that are engaged in biomass conversion technologies. Student interns from a local university were employed to help collect data, which enabled them to learn firsthand about biomass processing.

  16. Soil moisture content estimation from passive temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, Landon JS; Roshan, Hamid; Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Andersen, Martin S.; Acworth, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Natural temperature variations have increasingly been used to study shallow groundwater; however, the vast majority of studies are limited to saturated conditions. Despite the greater complexity of the unsaturated zone due to the non-linear relationships between moisture content and other physical properties (such as effective thermal conductivity and heat capacity), estimating soil moisture from measurements of natural temperature variations is possible. We have developed fundamental relationships between soil moisture and the diel temperature amplitude ratio and phase-shift. Additionally, we have developed fully coupled thermodynamic and hydraulic finite element (FE) models of temperature and soil moisture response to various boundary conditions. The performance of novel inversion techniques based on existing empirical thermal conductivity models has been evaluated with these results. Two significant empirical models of thermal conductivity of unsaturated sediments were integrated into the approach and compared. We performed a sensitivity analysis of our soil moisture model and determined the feasibility of deriving moisture estimates from temperature data by analysing the required measurement precision for the involved parameters. Inversion of the temperature output from the FE models demonstrates the factors, such as homogeneity and rapidly changing boundary conditions, which may limit the performance of unsaturated zone heat tracing, as well as the benefits of the approach. The use of heat to determine soil moisture content offers the advantages of lower cost; applicability to zones of high pore-water salinity, where inductive electromagnetic measurement methods fail; and the option of high spatial resolution or wide coverage when combined with fibre optic temperature sensing.

  17. Soil moisture retrival from Sentinel-1 and Modis synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Zribi, Mehrez; Escorihuela, Maria Jose; Baghdadi, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    This study presents two methodologies retrieving soil moisture from SAR remote sensing data. The study is based on Sentinel-1 data in the VV polarization, over a site in Urgell, Catalunya (Spain). In the two methodologies using change detection techniques, preprocessed radar data are combined with normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) auxiliary data to estimate the mean soil moisture with a resolution of 1km. By modeling the relationship between the backscatter difference and NDVI, the soil moisture at a specific NDVI value is retrieved. The first algorithm is already developed on West Africa(Zribi et al., 2014) from ERS scatterometer data to estimate soil water status. In this study, it is adapted to Sentinel-1 data and take into account the high repetitiveness of data in optimizing the inversion approach. Another new method is developed based on the backscatter difference between two adjacent days of Sentinel-1 data w.r.t. NDVI, with smaller vegetation change, the backscatter difference is more sensitive to soil moisture. The proposed methodologies have been validated with the ground measurement in two demonstrative fields with RMS error about 0.05 (in volumetric moisture), and the coherence between soil moisture variations and rainfall events is observed. Soil moisture maps at 1km resolution are generated for the study area. The results demonstrate the potential of Sentinel-1 data for the retrieval of soil moisture at 1km or even better resolution.

  18. Gravity changes, soil moisture and data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J.; Grayson, R.; Rodell, M.; Ellet, K.

    2003-04-01

    Remote sensing holds promise for near-surface soil moisture and snow mapping, but current techniques do not directly resolve the deeper soil moisture or groundwater. The benefits that would arise from improved monitoring of variations in terrestrial water storage are numerous. The year 2002 saw the launch of NASA's Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, which are mapping the Earth's gravity field at such a high level of precision that we expect to be able to infer changes in terrestrial water storage (soil moisture, groundwater, snow, ice, lake, river and vegetation). The project described here has three distinct yet inter-linked components that all leverage off the same ground-based monitoring and land surface modelling framework. These components are: (i) field validation of a relationship between soil moisture and changes in the Earth's gravity field, from ground- and satellite-based measurements of changes in gravity; (ii) development of a modelling framework for the assimilation of gravity data to constrain land surface model predictions of soil moisture content (such a framework enables the downscaling and disaggregation of low spatial (500 km) and temporal (monthly) resolution measurements of gravity change to finer spatial and temporal resolutions); and (iii) further refining the downscaling and disaggregation of space-borne gravity measurements by making use of other remotely sensed information, such as the higher spatial (25 km) and temporal (daily) resolution remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture measurements from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) instruments on Aqua and ADEOS II. The important field work required by this project will be in the Murrumbidgee Catchment, Australia, where an extensive soil moisture monitoring program by the University of Melbourne is already in place. We will further enhance the current monitoring network by the addition of groundwater wells and additional soil moisture sites. Ground

  19. On-line moisture analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cutmore, N G

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of the moisture content of iron ore has become a key issue for controlling moisture additions for dust suppression. In most cases moisture content is still determined by manual or automatic sampling of the ore stream, followed by conventional laboratory analysis by oven drying. Although this procedure enables the moisture content to be routinely monitored, it is too slow for control purposes. This has generated renewed interest in on-line techniques for the accurate and rapid measurement of moisture in iron ore on conveyors. Microwave transmission techniques have emerged over the past 40 years as the dominant technology for on-line measurement of moisture in bulk materials, including iron ores. Alternative technologies have their limitations. Infra-red analysers are used in a variety of process industries, but rely on the measurement of absorption by moisture in a very thin surface layer. Consequently such probes may be compromised by particle size effects and biased presentation of the bulk mater...

  20. Precision moisture generation and measurement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Irwin, Adriane Nadine

    2010-03-01

    In many industrial processes, gaseous moisture is undesirable as it can lead to metal corrosion, polymer degradation, and other materials aging processes. However, generating and measuring precise moisture concentrations is challenging due to the need to cover a broad concentration range (parts-per-billion to percent) and the affinity of moisture to a wide range surfaces and materials. This document will discuss the techniques employed by the Mass Spectrometry Laboratory of the Materials Reliability Department at Sandia National Laboratories to generate and measure known gaseous moisture concentrations. This document highlights the use of a chilled mirror and primary standard humidity generator for the characterization of aluminum oxide moisture sensors. The data presented shows an excellent correlation in frost point measured between the two instruments, and thus provides an accurate and reliable platform for characterizing moisture sensors and performing other moisture related experiments.

  1. Assessment of Errors in AMSR-E Derived Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, C.; McNairn, H.; Berg, A.; de Jeu, R. A.

    2009-05-01

    Soil moisture derived from passive microwave satellites provides information at a coarse spatial scale, but with temporally frequent, global coverage that can be used for monitoring applications over agricultural regions. Passive microwave satellites measure surface brightness temperature, which is largely a function of vegetation water content (which is directly related to the vegetation optical depth), surface temperature and surface soil moisture at low frequencies. Retrieval algorithms for global soil moisture data sets by necessity require limited site-specific information to derive these parameters, and as such may show variations in local accuracy. The objective of this study is to examine the errors in passive microwave soil moisture data over agricultural sites in Canada to provide guidelines on data quality assessment for using these data sets in monitoring applications. Global gridded soil moisture was acquired from the AMSR-E satellite using the Land Parameter Retrieval Model, LPRM (Owe et al., 2008). The LPRM model derives surface soil moisture through an iterative optimization procedure using a polarization difference index to estimate vegetation optical depth and surface dielectric constant using frequencies at 6.9 and 10.7 GHz. The LPRM model requires no a-priori information on surface conditions, but retrieval errors are expected to increase as the amount of open water and dense vegetation within each pixel increases (Owe et al., 2008) Satellite-derived LPRM soil moisture values were used to assess changes in soil moisture retrieval accuracy over the 2007 growing season for a largely agricultural site near Guelph (Ontario), Canada. Accuracy was determined by validating LPRM soil moisture against a network of 16 in-situ monitoring sites distributed at the pixel scale for AMSR-E. Changes in squared error, and pairwise correlation coefficient between satellite and in-situ surface soil moisture were assessed against changes in satellite orbit and

  2. Moisture content measurement in paddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomklao, P.; Kuntinugunetanon, S.; Wongkokua, W.

    2017-09-01

    Moisture content is an important quantity for agriculture product, especially in paddy. In principle, the moisture content can be measured by a gravimetric method which is a direct method. However, the gravimetric method is time-consuming. There are indirect methods such as resistance and capacitance methods. In this work, we developed an indirect method based on a 555 integrated circuit timer. The moisture content sensor was capacitive parallel plates using the dielectric constant property of the moisture. The instrument generated the output frequency that depended on the capacitance of the sensor. We fitted a linear relation between periods and moisture contents. The measurement results have a standard uncertainty of 1.23 % of the moisture content in the range of 14 % to 20 %.

  3. Moisture relationships in composting processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, T.L.; Veeken, A.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Moisture is a key environmental factor that affects many aspects of the composting process. Biodegradation kinetics are affected by moisture through changes in oxygen diffusion, water potential and water activity, and microbial growth rates. These relationships are made more complex by the dynamic

  4. Upscaling In Situ Soil Moisture Observations to Pixel Averages with Spatio-Temporal Geostatistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghao Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Validation of satellite-based soil moisture products is necessary to provide users with an assessment of their accuracy and reliability and to ensure quality of information. A key step in the validation process is to upscale point-scale, ground-based soil moisture observations to satellite-scale pixel averages. When soil moisture shows high spatial heterogeneity within pixels, a strategy which captures the spatial characteristics is essential for the upscaling process. In addition, temporal variation in soil moisture must be taken into account when measurement times of ground-based and satellite-based observations are not the same. We applied spatio-temporal regression block kriging (STRBK to upscale in situ soil moisture observations collected as time series at multiple locations to pixel averages. STRBK incorporates auxiliary information such as maps of vegetation and land surface temperature to improve predictions and exploits the spatio-temporal correlation structure of the point-scale soil moisture observations. In addition, STRBK also quantifies the uncertainty associated with the upscaled soil moisture which allows bias detection and significance testing of satellite-based soil moisture products. The approach is illustrated with a real-world application for upscaling in situ soil moisture observations for validating the Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR retrieved soil moisture product in the Heihe Water Allied Telemetry Experimental Research experiment (HiWATER. The results show that STRBK yields upscaled soil moisture predictions that are sufficiently accurate for validation purposes. Comparison of the upscaled predictions with PLMR soil moisture observations shows that the root-mean-squared error of the PLMR soil moisture product is about 0.03 m3·m−3 and can be used as a high-resolution soil moisture product for watershed-scale soil moisture monitoring.

  5. Evaluation of the free volume theory to predict moisture transport and quality changes during broccoli drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, X.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Moisture diffusion in porous broccoli florets and stalks is modeled by using the free volume and Maxwell-Eucken theories. These theories are based on the mobility of water and show the variation of the effective diffusion coefficient for a wide range of temperatures and moisture content of

  6. Evaluation of the Free Volume Theory to Predict Moisture Transport and Quality Changes During Broccoli Drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, X.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Moisture diffusion in porous broccoli florets and stalks is modeled using the free volume and Maxwell-Eucken theories. These theories are based on the mobility of water and concern the variation of the effective diffusion coefficient for a wide range of temperature and moisture content during

  7. Review of in-service moisture and temperature conditions in wood-frame buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel V. Glass; Anton TenWolde

    2007-01-01

    This literature review reports in-service moisture and temperature conditions of floor, wall, and roof members of wood-frame buildings and exposed wood decks and permanent wood foundations. A wide variation exists in reported wood moisture content, spanning a range from as low as 2% to well above 30%. Relevant studies are summarized, and measured values of wood...

  8. Sampling procedure in a willow plantation for estimation of moisture content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Kofoed; Lærke, Poul Erik; Liu, Na

    2015-01-01

    Heating value and fuel quality of wood is closely connected to moisture content. In this work the variation of moisture content (MC) of short rotation coppice (SRC) willow shoots is described for five clones during one harvesting season. Subsequently an appropriate sampling procedure minimising l...

  9. A new Model Applicable for Finite Element Simulations of Moisture Transport in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan; Damkilde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The moisture content in wood near the surface depends not only on the current relative humidity in the ambient air but also on preceeding variations. This hysteresis phenomenon of sorption implies in worst case that the moisture content for a given relative humidity may deviate 30-35%. Current...

  10. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    α. Surface albedo. Su. Reflected solar radiation (W/m. 2. ) Sd. Total downward solar radiation. (W/m. 2. ) T. Soil temperature (. ◦. C) k. Soil thermal diffusivity (m. 2 s. −1. ) ... Soil moisture; rainfall; surface albedo; solar elevation angle; thermal diffusivity; atmospheric sciences; ... the diurnal, monthly and seasonal variations of.

  11. Moisture ingress into electronics enclosures under isothermal conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Zygimantas; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    on a 1D quasi-steady state (QSS) approximation for Fick's second law. This QSS approach is also described with an electrical analogy which gives a fast tool in modelling of the moisture response. The same QSS method is applied to ambient water vapour variations. The obtained results are compared...

  12. Moisture buffering capacity of highly absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerolini, S.; D' Orazio, M.; Stazi, A. [Department of Architecture, Construction and Structures (DACS), Faculty of Engineering, Polytechnic University of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60100 Ancona (Italy); Di Perna, C. [Department of Energetics, Faculty of Engineering, Polytechnic University of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60100 Ancona (Italy)

    2009-02-15

    This research investigates the possibility to use highly absorbing materials to dampen indoor RH% variations. The practical MBV of sodium polyacrylate, cellulose-based material, perlite and gypsum is evaluated for a daily cyclic exposure that alternates high (75%) and low (33%) RH% levels for 8 h and 16 h, respectively. The adjustment velocity to RH% variations and the presence of hysteretic phenomena are also presented. The cellulose-based material proves to be the most suitable for moisture buffering applications. Starting from this material's properties, the effect of thickness, vapour resistance factor ({mu}) and mass surface exchange coefficient (Z{sub v}) on sorption capacity is evaluated by the use of a numerical model. (author)

  13. Error characterisation of global active and passive microwave soil moisture data sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorigo, W.; Scipal, K.; Parinussa, R.M.; Liu, Y.Y.; Wagner, W.; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Naeimi, V.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the error structures of remotely sensed soil moisture observations is essential for correctly interpreting observed variations and trends in the data or assimilating them in hydrological or numerical weather prediction models. Nevertheless, a spatially coherent assessment of the

  14. Moisturizers: Options for Softer Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... producing glands become less active. To keep your skin soft and well-hydrated, choose an oil-based moisturizer that contains petrolatum as the base, along with antioxidants or alpha hydroxy acids to combat wrinkles. These ...

  15. A time series based method for estimating relative soil moisture with ERS wind scatterometer data

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, J.; Su, Z.

    2003-01-01

    The radar backscattering coefficient is mainly determined by surface soil moisture, vegetation and land surface roughness under a given configuration of the satellite sensor. It is observed that the temporal variations of the three variables are different, the variation of vegetation and roughness are at the longer temporal scales corresponding to climate and cultivation practices, while soil moisture varies at a shorter temporal scale in response to weather forcing. Based on this hypothesis,...

  16. Experience of Implementing Moisture Sorption Control in Historical Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zítek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a novel approach to inhibiting the harmful impact of moisture sorption in old art works and historical exhibits preserved in remote historic buildings that are in use as depositories or exhibition rooms for cultural heritage collections. It is a sequel to the previous work presented in [2], where the principle of moisture sorption stabilization was explained. Sorption isotherm investigations and EMC control implementation in historical buildings not provided with heating are the main concern in this paper. The proposed microclimate adjustment consists in leaving the interior temperature to run almost its spontaneous yearly cycle, while the air humidity is maintained in a specific relationship to the current interior temperature. The interior air humidity is modestly adjusted to protect historical exhibits and art works from harmful variations in the content of absorbed moisture, which would otherwise arise owing to the interior temperature drifts. Since direct measurements of moisture content are not feasible, the air humidity is controlled via a model-based principle. Two long-term implementations of the proposed microclimate control have already proved that it can permanently maintain a constant moisture content in the preserved exhibits. 

  17. Development and evaluation of the MTVDI for soil moisture monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Lv, Aifeng; Jia, Shaofeng; Sun, Liang

    2017-06-01

    Several parameterization schemes have been developed to retrieve the soil moisture information involved in the remotely sensed surface temperature-vegetation index (Ts - VI) space. However, most of them are performed with the constraint of the dry edge of the Ts - VI space to define the maximum water stressed conditions. In view of the subjectivity and uncertainty involved in the determination of the dry edge, a new index termed as the Modified Temperature-Vegetation Dryness Index (MTVDI) was developed in this paper to reduce the reliance of the parameterization scheme on the dry edge. In the parameterization scheme of MTVDI, isopleth lines of soil moisture involved in the feature space were retrieved by the temperature-vegetation index method, and only the maximum surface temperature of bare soil (Tsmax) was indispensable in the definition of maximum water stressed conditions. For evaluation purpose, the MTVDI was demonstrated in the Southern Great Plains region of the U.S. and was compared with two other traditional soil moisture indexes developed under the constraint of dry edge. The comparison confirmed the effectivity of the MTVDI in monitoring the spatial pattern and seasonal variation of soil moisture. Our analyses also suggest that Tsmax, the only parameter needed in the definition of maximum water stressed conditions, can be retrieved directly from the parameterization scheme itself. Therefore, the retrieval of MTVDI can be performed independent of the dry edge, which is a significant improvement to the traditional parameterization schemes of soil moisture from the Ts - VI feature space.

  18. Soil moisture gradients and controls on a southern Appalachian hillslope from drought through recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Yeakley

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture gradients along hillslopes in humid watersheds, although indicated by vegetation gradients and by studies using models, have been difficult to confirm empirically. While soil properties and topographic features are the two general physio-graphic factors controlling soil moisture on hillslopes, studies have shown conflicting results regarding which factor is more important. The relative importance of topographic and soil property controls was examined in an upland forested watershed at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in the southern Appalachian mountains. Soil moisture was measured along a hillslope transect with a mesic-to-xeric forest vegetation gradient over a period spanning precipitation extremes. The hillslope was transect instrumented with a time domain reflectometry (TDR network at two depths. Soil moisture was measured during a severe autumn drought and subsequent winter precipitation recharge. In the upper soil depth (0-30 cm, moisture gradients persisted throughout the measurement period, and topography exerted dominant control. For the entire root zone (0-90 cm, soil moisture gradients were found only during drought. Control on soil moisture was due to both topography and storage before drought. During and after recharge, variations in soil texture and horizon distribution exerted dominant control on soil moisture content in the root zone (0-90 cm. These results indicate that topographic factors assert more control over hillslope soil moisture during drier periods as drainage progresses, while variations in soil water storage properties are more important during wetter periods. Hillslope soil moisture gradients in southern Appalachian watersheds appear to be restricted to upper soil layers, with deeper hillslope soil moisture gradients occurring only with sufficient drought.

  19. The moisture and MSE budget of developing tropical convection: Vertical modes and free-tropospheric moisture convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, H.; Sumi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that vigorous tropical convection is fed largely by moisture convergence, producing heavy rainfall overwhelming the local moisture supply through surface evaporation. During such convective events, a substantial portion of moisture convergence often occurs above the lifting condensation level (LCL) and hence the condensation from any cumulus clouds rooted in the sub-cloud layer would seemingly account only for a minor fraction of the total precipitation even at the intensifying stage of convective organization. In this paper, DYNAMO/CINDY2011/AMIE sounding array data are analyzed to study the moisture and thermal budget to address this question. To quantify the behavior of large-scale dynamics, vertical mode decomposition is applied to the soundings. As expected, the variation of vertical motion is primarily governed by the first baroclinic mode. The second and higher modes, although minor in amplitude, also exhibit familiar features from time to time: a buildup of the "congestus mode" as convective intensifies, which gives way to the "stratiform mode" as convection dissipates. The MSE import by the congestus mode, while frequently observed prior to convection, does not always lead to a subsequent burst of convection. A key element leading to the development of vigorous convection appears to be the presence of a layer of moisture convergence thickening to far beyond LCL, which is assisted by a buildup of the deep (first) mode. The environmental factors facilitating the condensation of free-tropospheric vapor will be also discussed.

  20. Measurement of soil moisture using gypsum blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Dela, B.

    For the past 50 years, gypsum blocks have been used to determine soil moisture content. This report describes a method for calibrating gypsum blocks for soil moisture measurements. Moisture conditions inside a building are strongly influenced by the moisture conditions in the soil surrounding...... the building. Consequently, measuring the moisture of the surrounding soil is of great importance for detecting the source of moisture in a building. Up till now, information has been needed to carry out individual calibrations for the different types of gypsum blocks available on the market and to account...

  1. Moisture Dynamics in Building Envelopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2003-01-01

    The overall scope of this Thesis "Moisture dynamics in building envelopes" has been to characterise how the various porous insulation materials investigated performed hygrothermally under conditions similar to those in a typical building envelope. As a result of the changing temperature...

  2. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  3. Soil Moisture and Agromet Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    decade of each month also produces monthly summaries. The Soil Moisture program covers two geographical areas. Area 1, the " Europea |," or "Soviet...American Geophysical Union , 25, 683-693. Thornthwaite, C. W. and J. R. Mather, 1955: The Water Balance. Publicatiuns in Climatology, Drexel Inst. of

  4. Moisture transport in coated plaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, E.L.J.; Van der Spoel, W.H.; Bancken, E.L.J.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project: 'Water balance of water-borne paint systems on plaster substrates in relation to fungal growth', a study is carried out to moisture transport mechanisms in coated gypsum plaster. In this contribution, the set-up of the study is described. Besides a

  5. Nondestructive Moisture Measurement in Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    moisture, bias voltage and defects in the glassivation layer. As a response to these problems most manufacturers started to improve the quality of their...package. The first experiment consisted of looking at the response of a sensor exposed to the room dew-point ( contrIled in flow conditions ’yaI

  6. Soil Moisture Retrieval from Aquarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquarius observations over land offer an unprecedented opportunity to provide a value-added product, land surface soil moisture, which will contribute to a better understanding of the Earth’s climate and water cycle. Additionally, Aquarius will provide the first spaceborne data that can be used to a...

  7. Moisture Sorption in Porous Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Information on pore geometry is very important in any study of the mechanical and physical behavior of porous materials. Unfortunately pores are not very accessible for direct measurements. Indirect methods have to be used which involve impregnation (sorption) experiments from which...... in the subject considered this software is available on request to the author. Keywords: Porous materials, moisture, adsorption, desorption, BET-parameters....

  8. A microfabricated amperometric moisture sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao-Li; Xingguo, Xiong; Dallas, Tim; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra; Temkin, Henryk; Wang, Xuejun; Walulu, Richard; Li, Jianzhong; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2002-02-11

    We describe a microfabricated moisture sensor with interdigitated Au or Pt electrodes on a silicon substrate. The sensor active area is covered with a spin-coated, baked-on layer of Nafion(R) perfluorosulfonate ionomer of submicron thickness. The sensor responds to moisture with a 10-90% rise time of 50-100 ms and a 90-10% fall time of 20-30 ms, faster than any other presently available sensor. The logarithm of the sensor current is related to the cube root of the moisture level at a given temperature. At 23 degrees C, the sensor easily measures relative humidities as low as 10%. The sensor response at a given absolute humidity level decreases exponentially with increasing temperature. The film is stable up to a temperature of 150 degrees C, permitting elevated temperature moisture measurement. Since sorbed water is actively decomposed electrolytically, the sensors exhibit negligible hysteresis. Response reproducibility of an individual sensor is <1%, that between identically made sensors is <5%, suggesting mass production techniques without individual calibration will be acceptable for all but the most demanding situation.

  9. SoilNet - A Zigbee based soil moisture sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogena, H. R.; Weuthen, A.; Rosenbaum, U.; Huisman, J. A.; Vereecken, H.

    2007-12-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role in partitioning water and energy fluxes, in providing moisture to the atmosphere for precipitation, and controlling the pattern of groundwater recharge. Large-scale soil moisture variability is driven by variation of precipitation and radiation in space and time. At local scales, land cover, soil conditions, and topography act to redistribute soil moisture. Despite the importance of soil moisture, it is not yet measured in an operational way, e.g. for a better prediction of hydrological and surface energy fluxes (e.g. runoff, latent heat) at larger scales and in the framework of the development of early warning systems (e.g. flood forecasting) and the management of irrigation systems. The SoilNet project aims to develop a sensor network for the near real-time monitoring of soil moisture changes at high spatial and temporal resolution on the basis of the new low-cost ZigBee radio network that operates on top of the IEEE 802.15.4 standard. The sensor network consists of soil moisture sensors attached to end devices by cables, router devices and a coordinator device. The end devices are buried in the soil and linked wirelessly with nearby aboveground router devices. This ZigBee wireless sensor network design considers channel errors, delays, packet losses, and power and topology constraints. In order to conserve battery power, a reactive routing protocol is used that determines a new route only when it is required. The sensor network is also able to react to external influences, e.g. such as rainfall occurrences. The SoilNet communicator, routing and end devices have been developed by the Forschungszentrum Juelich and will be marketed through external companies. We will present first results of experiments to verify network stability and the accuracy of the soil moisture sensors. Simultaneously, we have developed a data management and visualisation system. We tested the wireless network on a 100 by 100 meter forest plot equipped with 25

  10. Evaluation of SMAP, SMOS, and AMSR2 soil moisture retrievals against observations from two networks on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Yang, Kun; Qin, Jun; Cui, Qian; Lu, Hui; La, Zhu; Han, Menglei; Tang, Wenjun

    2017-06-01

    Two soil moisture and temperature monitoring networks were established in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) during recent years. One is located in a semihumid area (Naqu) of central TP and consists of 56 soil moisture and temperature measurement (SMTM) stations, the other is located in a semiarid area (Pali) of southern TP and consists of 21 SMTM stations. In this study, the station data are used to evaluate soil moisture retrievals from three microwave satellites, i.e., the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) of NASA, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) of European Space Agency, and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. It is found that the SMAP retrievals tend to underestimate soil moisture in the two TP networks, mainly due to the negative biases in the effective soil temperature that is derived from a climate model. However, the SMAP product well captures the amplitude and temporal variation of the soil moisture. The SMOS product performs well in Naqu network with acceptable error metrics but fails to capture the temporal variation of soil moisture in Pali network. The AMSR2 products evidently exaggerate the temporal variation of soil moisture in Naqu network but dampen it in Pali network, suggesting its retrieval algorithm needs further improvements for the TP.

  11. Crop yield monitoring in the Sahel using root zone soil moisture anomalies derived from SMOS soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibon, François; Pellarin, Thierry; Alhassane, Agali; Traoré, Seydou; Baron, Christian

    2017-04-01

    West Africa is greatly vulnerable, especially in terms of food sustainability. Mainly based on rainfed agriculture, the high variability of the rainy season strongly impacts the crop production driven by the soil water availability in the soil. To monitor this water availability, classical methods are based on daily precipitation measurements. However, the raingauge network suffers from the poor network density in Africa (1/10000km2). Alternatively, real-time satellite-derived precipitations can be used, but they are known to suffer from large uncertainties which produce significant error on crop yield estimations. The present study proposes to use root soil moisture rather than precipitation to evaluate crop yield variations. First, a local analysis of the spatiotemporal impact of water deficit on millet crop production in Niger was done, from in-situ soil moisture measurements (AMMA-CATCH/OZCAR (French Critical Zone exploration network)) and in-situ millet yield survey. Crop yield measurements were obtained for 10 villages located in the Niamey region from 2005 to 2012. The mean production (over 8 years) is 690 kg/ha, and ranges from 381 to 872 kg/ha during this period. Various statistical relationships based on soil moisture estimates were tested, and the most promising one (R>0.9) linked the 30-cm soil moisture anomalies from mid-August to mid-September (grain filling period) to the crop yield anomalies. Based on this local study, it was proposed to derive regional statistical relationships using 30-cm soil moisture maps over West Africa. The selected approach was to use a simple hydrological model, the Antecedent Precipitation Index (API), forced by real-time satellite-based precipitation (CMORPH, PERSIANN, TRMM3B42). To reduce uncertainties related to the quality of real-time rainfall satellite products, SMOS soil moisture measurements were assimilated into the API model through a Particular Filter algorithm. Then, obtained soil moisture anomalies were

  12. Numerical and experimental study of moisture-induced stress and strain field developments in timber logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2013-01-01

    When solid wood dries from a green condition to a moisture content used for further processing, moisture-induced fracture and stresses can occur. The drying stresses arise because of internal deformation constraints that are strongly affected by the cross-sectional moisture gradient differential...... shrinkage and the inhomogeneity of the material. To obtain a better understanding of how stresses develop during climatic variations, the field histories of stresses (and strains) in cross sections in their entirety need to be studied. The present paper reports on experiments and numerical simulations...... concerned with analysing the development of strains and stresses during the drying of 15-mm-thick discs of Norway spruce timber log. The samples were dried at 23 °C and relative humidity of 64 % from a green condition to equilibrium moisture content. The moisture gradient in the longitudinal direction...

  13. An algorithm for temperature correcting substrate moisture measurements: aligning substrate moisture responses with environmental drivers in polytunnel-grown strawberry plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Martin; Janes, Stuart; Jenkins, Malcolm; Nicholl, Chris; Kühn, Karl

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the use of temperature corrected substrate moisture data to improve the relationship between environmental drivers and the measurement of substrate moisture content in high porosity soil-free growing environments such as coir. Substrate moisture sensor data collected from strawberry plants grown in coir bags installed in a table-top system under a polytunnel illustrates the impact of temperature on capacitance-based moisture measurements. Substrate moisture measurements made in our coir arrangement possess the negative temperature coefficient of the permittivity of water where diurnal changes in moisture content oppose those of substrate temperature. The diurnal substrate temperature variation was seen to range from 7° C to 25° C resulting in a clearly observable temperature effect in substrate moisture content measurements during the 23 day test period. In the laboratory we measured the ML3 soil moisture sensor (ThetaProbe) response to temperature in Air, dry glass beads and water saturated glass beads and used a three-phase alpha (α) mixing model, also known as the Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM), to derive the permittivity temperature coefficients for glass and water. We derived the α value and estimated the temperature coefficient for water - for sensors operating at 100MHz. Both results are good agreement with published data. By applying the CRIM equation with the temperature coefficients of glass and water the moisture temperature coefficient of saturated glass beads has been reduced by more than an order of magnitude to a moisture temperature coefficient of

  14. Controls on vegetation – soil moisture coupling in arid shrublands during drought elicited through long-term data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal was to quantify variation in ecological responses to sustained period of moisture limitation (ecological drought) across a semiarid ecological landscape in northern Chihuahuan Desert, USA. We obtained long-term meteorological, ecological site, soil moisture and aboveground net primary prod...

  15. Effects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan wetland complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric S. Kasischke; Laura L. Bourgeau-Chavez; Allison R. Rober; Kevin H. Wyatt; James M. Waddington; Merritt R. Turetsky

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a preliminary investigation of the response of ERS C-band SAR backscatter to variations in soil moisture and surface inundation in wetlands of interior Alaska. Data were collected from 5 wetlands over a three-week period in 2007. Results showed a positive correlation between backscatter and soil moisture in sites dominated by herbaceous vegetation cover (r...

  16. A time series based method for estimating relative soil moisture with ERS wind scatterometer data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wen, J.; Su, Z.

    2003-01-01

    The radar backscattering coefficient is mainly determined by surface soil moisture, vegetation and land surface roughness under a given configuration of the satellite sensor. It is observed that the temporal variations of the three variables are different, the variation of vegetation and roughness

  17. Moisture relations and physical properties of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel V. Glass; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2010-01-01

    Wood, like many natural materials, is hygroscopic; it takes on moisture from the surrounding environment. Moisture exchange between wood and air depends on the relative humidity and temperature of the air and the current amount of water in the wood. This moisture relationship has an important influence on wood properties and performance. Many of the challenges of using...

  18. Nematode survival in relation to soil moisture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, W.R.

    1973-01-01

    Established nematode populations are very persistent in the soil. It is known that they need sufficient soil moisture for movement, feeding and reproduction (fig. 5), and that there are adverse soil moisture conditions which they cannot survive. The influence of soil moisture on survival

  19. Interior moisture design loads for residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton TenWolde; Iain S. Walker

    2001-01-01

    This paper outlines a methodology to obtain design values for indoor boundary conditions for moisture design calculations for residences. This is part of a larger effort by ASHRAE Standard Project Committee 160P, Design Criteria for Moisture Control in Buildings, to formulate criteria for moisture design loads, analysis techniques, and material and building performance...

  20. Absolute moisture sensing for cotton bales

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the recent prevalence of moisture restoration systems in cotton gins, more and more gins are putting moisture back into the bales immediately before the packaging operation. There are two main reasons for this recent trend, the first is that it has been found that added moisture at the bale pre...

  1. Effects of soil moisture on the temperature sensitivity of soil heterotrophic respiration: a laboratory incubation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Zhou

    Full Text Available The temperature sensitivity (Q10 of soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh is an important ecological model parameter and may vary with temperature and moisture. While Q10 generally decreases with increasing temperature, the moisture effects on Q10 have been controversial. To address this, we conducted a 90-day laboratory incubation experiment using a subtropical forest soil with a full factorial combination of five moisture levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% water holding capacity--WHC and five temperature levels (10, 17, 24, 31, and 38°C. Under each moisture treatment, Rh was measured several times for each temperature treatment to derive Q10 based on the exponential relationships between Rh and temperature. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC, microbial community structure and soil nutrients were also measured several times to detect their potential contributions to the moisture-induced Q10 variation. We found that Q10 was significantly lower at lower moisture levels (60%, 40% and 20% WHC than at higher moisture level (80% WHC during the early stage of the incubation, but became significantly higher at 20%WHC than at 60% WHC and not significantly different from the other three moisture levels during the late stage of incubation. In contrast, soil Rh had the highest value at 60% WHC and the lowest at 20% WHC throughout the whole incubation period. Variations of Q10 were significantly associated with MBC during the early stages of incubation, but with the fungi-to-bacteria ratio during the later stages, suggesting that changes in microbial biomass and community structure are related to the moisture-induced Q10 changes. This study implies that global warming's impacts on soil CO2 emission may depend upon soil moisture conditions. With the same temperature rise, wetter soils may emit more CO2 into the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration.

  2. Variation in nutrient composition and structure of high-moisture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %) from the field in northern New South Wales, Australia. The cobs were divided into four categories and dried in the sun or artificially in a forced draft oven at 80, 90 or 100 °C for 24 h. The samples were subjected to proximate and detailed ...

  3. Experimental Study on the Feasibility of Using Water Glass and Aluminum Sulfate to Treat Complications in High Liquid Limit Soil Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-hui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of using water glass and aluminum sulfate to treat high liquid limit soil subgrade diseases is studied through laboratory experiments, and the following results were observed. After improving the high liquid limit clay with water glass and aluminum sulfate, the liquid limit decreases, the plastic limit increases, and the plasticity index decreases. Compared with untreated soil, the clay content of the improved soil decreases, while the silt and coarse contents increase. The absolute and relative expansion rates of the improved soil are both lower than those of the untreated soil. With the same number of dry and wet cycles, the decreased degrees of cohesion and internal friction angle of the improved soil are, respectively, one-half and one-third of those of the untreated soil. After three dry and wet cycles, the California bearing ratio (CBR of the untreated soil does not meet the requirements of specifications. However, after being cured for seven days and being subjected to three dry and wet cycles, the CBR of the improved soil, with 4% water glass solution and 0.4% aluminum sulfate, meets the requirements of specifications.

  4. The soil moisture velocity equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Fred L.; Allen, Myron B.; Lai, Wencong; Zhu, Jianting; Seo, Mookwon; Douglas, Craig C.; Talbot, Cary A.

    2017-06-01

    Numerical solution of the one-dimensional Richards' equation is the recommended method for coupling groundwater to the atmosphere through the vadose zone in hyperresolution Earth system models, but requires fine spatial discretization, is computationally expensive, and may not converge due to mathematical degeneracy or when sharp wetting fronts occur. We transformed the one-dimensional Richards' equation into a new equation that describes the velocity of moisture content values in an unsaturated soil under the actions of capillarity and gravity. We call this new equation the Soil Moisture Velocity Equation (SMVE). The SMVE consists of two terms: an advection-like term that accounts for gravity and the integrated capillary drive of the wetting front, and a diffusion-like term that describes the flux due to the shape of the wetting front capillarity profile divided by the vertical gradient of the capillary pressure head. The SMVE advection-like term can be converted to a relatively easy to solve ordinary differential equation (ODE) using the method of lines and solved using a finite moisture-content discretization. Comparing against analytical solutions of Richards' equation shows that the SMVE advection-like term is >99% accurate for calculating infiltration fluxes neglecting the diffusion-like term. The ODE solution of the SMVE advection-like term is accurate, computationally efficient and reliable for calculating one-dimensional vadose zone fluxes in Earth system and large-scale coupled models of land-atmosphere interaction. It is also well suited for use in inverse problems such as when repeat remote sensing observations are used to infer soil hydraulic properties or soil moisture.Plain Language SummarySince its original publication in 1922, the so-called Richards' equation has been the only rigorous way to couple groundwater to the land surface through the unsaturated zone that lies between the water table and land surface. The soil moisture distribution and

  5. Evaluation of Assimilated SMOS Soil Moisture Data for US Cropland Soil Moisture Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengwei; Sherstha, Ranjay; Crow, Wade; Bolten, John; Mladenova, Iva; Yu, Genong; Di, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensed soil moisture data can provide timely, objective and quantitative crop soil moisture information with broad geospatial coverage and sufficiently high resolution observations collected throughout the growing season. This paper evaluates the feasibility of using the assimilated ESA Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS)Mission L-band passive microwave data for operational US cropland soil surface moisture monitoring. The assimilated SMOS soil moisture data are first categorized to match with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) survey based weekly soil moisture observation data, which are ordinal. The categorized assimilated SMOS soil moisture data are compared with NASSs survey-based weekly soil moisture data for consistency and robustness using visual assessment and rank correlation. Preliminary results indicate that the assimilated SMOS soil moisture data highly co-vary with NASS field observations across a large geographic area. Therefore, SMOS data have great potential for US operational cropland soil moisture monitoring.

  6. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  7. Moisture development behaviour and models applicable for pulpwood and round energywood assortments in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautamaeki, S.; Kilpelaeinen, H.; Sirkiae, S.; Verkasalo, E. (Finnish Forest Research Inst., Joensuu (Finland)), e-mail: erkki.verkasalo@metla.fi

    2010-07-01

    95775 truck loads of Scots pine, Norway spruce and birch pulpwood and round energywood from Finland were scaled for green density. For 27595 observations the storage time in the roadside was known. Fourth degree polynomial function was estimated to describe well the annual variation in moisture content. Later, partial linear regression analysis was applied to predict the annual variation in moisture content behaviour of zero to eight weeks stored Scots pine wood, the coefficient of determination being 0,52. The drying begins in March with a fast rate, and the moisture content reaches the bottom in June. Thereafter occurs a less steep rise in moisture content. This continues until November, when the moisture content is at ats highest level. The difference in green density between fresh and stored wood continues until November, when they reach a similar level. The models can be used in estimating the moisture content development of pulpwood and round energy wood, and developed further with more empirical data on energy wood assortments. In further research, predictor variables based on local weather data will be included into the models to estimate more efficiently the moisture content change during the storage. (orig.)

  8. Soil moisture and evapotranspiration of different land cover types in the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Fu, B. J.; Gao, G. Y.; Yao, X. L.; Zhou, J.

    2012-08-01

    We studied the impacts of re-vegetation on soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration (ET) of five land cover types in the Loess Plateau in northern China. Soil moisture and temperature variations under grass (Andropogon), subshrub (Artemisia scoparia), shrub (Spiraea pubescens), plantation forest (Robinia pseudoacacia), and crop (Zea mays) vegetation were continuously monitored during the growing season of 2011. There were more than 10 soil moisture pulses during the period of data collection. Surface soil moisture of all of the land cover types showed an increasing trend in the rainy season. Soil moisture under the corn crop was consistently higher than the other surfaces. Grass and subshrubs showed an intermediate moisture level. Grass had slightly higher readings than those of subshrub most of the time. Shrubs and plantation forests were characterized by lower soil moisture readings, with the shrub levels consistently being slightly higher than those of the forests. Despite the greater post-rainfall loss of moisture under subshrub and grass vegetation than forests and shrubs, subshrub and grass sites exhibit a higher soil moisture content due to their greater soil retention capacity in the dry period. The daily ET trends of the forests and shrub sites were similar and were more stable than those of the other types. Soils under subshrubs acquired and retained soil moisture resources more efficiently than the other cover types, with a competitive advantage in the long term, representing an adaptive vegetation type in the study watershed. The interactions between vegetation and soil moisture dynamics contribute to structure and function of the ecosystems studied.

  9. Soil moisture and evapotranspiration of different land cover types in the Loess Plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied the impacts of re-vegetation on soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration (ET of five land cover types in the Loess Plateau in northern China. Soil moisture and temperature variations under grass (Andropogon, subshrub (Artemisia scoparia, shrub (Spiraea pubescens, plantation forest (Robinia pseudoacacia, and crop (Zea mays vegetation were continuously monitored during the growing season of 2011. There were more than 10 soil moisture pulses during the period of data collection. Surface soil moisture of all of the land cover types showed an increasing trend in the rainy season. Soil moisture under the corn crop was consistently higher than the other surfaces. Grass and subshrubs showed an intermediate moisture level. Grass had slightly higher readings than those of subshrub most of the time. Shrubs and plantation forests were characterized by lower soil moisture readings, with the shrub levels consistently being slightly higher than those of the forests. Despite the greater post-rainfall loss of moisture under subshrub and grass vegetation than forests and shrubs, subshrub and grass sites exhibit a higher soil moisture content due to their greater soil retention capacity in the dry period. The daily ET trends of the forests and shrub sites were similar and were more stable than those of the other types. Soils under subshrubs acquired and retained soil moisture resources more efficiently than the other cover types, with a competitive advantage in the long term, representing an adaptive vegetation type in the study watershed. The interactions between vegetation and soil moisture dynamics contribute to structure and function of the ecosystems studied.

  10. The modulation of oceanic moisture transport by the hemispheric annular modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel eNieto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Leaving aside the contribution made by recycling, it is the main oceanic moisture sources that are responsible for most of the precipitation that falls on the continents. The transport of moisture from these sources can be affected by large-scale variability according to the hemispheric annular modes. The influence of the two dominant modes of extratropical winter climate: the Northern and the Southern Annular Modes (NAM and SAM are herein investigated to assess how they affect the transport of moisture from the major oceanic moisture sources. A Lagrangian model was used, together with ERA-Interim reanalysis data (1979-2012, and differences between the composites of the six strongest higher and lower events observed for both phases of the two modes for the period were analysed. The method is able to reproduce the general pattern of known variations for both annular patterns. Lower values of the NAM Index are associated with the displacement of the storm track towards tropical latitudes. Thus, moisture transport is enhanced from the Northern Pacific towards the northeastern basin and from the Northern Atlantic and Mediterranean towards southern Europe. On the other hand, during higher values of NAM, moisture transport is favoured from the Northern Pacific towards eastern Asia, and moisture transport is enhanced from the Northern Atlantic towards the Caribbean Sea. In the Southern Hemisphere, during higher values of SAM more moisture is transported from the Atlantic and Indian oceanic sources southwards and eastwards than during the opposite phase. In this SAM phase it is also noted by an enhancement of moisture transport from the Coral Sea and Southern Pacific sources towards the Indian Ocean/West Pacific Warm Pool. Southeastern South America received more moisture from the Pacific and Atlantic sources during years with a lower SAM, episodes which also favoured the influx of moisture from the Southern Atlantic towards Africa, causing monsoon

  11. Reliability-Based Modeling of Moisture and Load-Duration Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Svensson, Staffan

    2005-01-01

    and moisture processes. Permanent and snow load sand moisture variations are considered and stochastic models are formulated in accordance with the load models in the Danish structural codes. A damage accumulation model based on fracture mechanics that accounts for both load duration and moisture effects...... is derived. The parameters in the model are fitted to data relevant for Nordic structural timber using the Maximum Likelihood method. The probability of failure as function of time is estimated for representative limit states based on: a) short term strength and b) long term damage accumulation...

  12. Hemp-Lime Performance in Danish Climatic Context. Thermal Conductivity as a Function of Moisture Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonov, Yovko Ivanov; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    thermal properties and, high air and moisture permeability. The properties vary with binder composition, mixing and casting techniques, as well as intended application. This research presents preliminary heat and moisture building simulations of single family house made out of hemp-lime composite....... To evaluate the performance of hemp-lime, it is compared to models with common external walls, upon defined parameters. The article also determines the variation of thermal conductivity for hemp-lime commercial plaster and wall mix, as a function of moisture content. The most promising binder composition...

  13. Moisture Diffusivity and Shrinkage of Fruit and Cladode of Opuntia ficus-indica during Infrared Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Touil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drying behaviour of prickly pear cladodes and fruits was studied with an Infrared dryer. The volume shrinkage for Opuntia ficus-indica products is calculated and a linear relation was established to describe the experimental variation of shrinkage of the product versus its moisture content. Effective diffusion coefficient of moisture transfer was determined using the Fick law at three drying temperatures (40, 50, and 60°C. Shrinkage was also included into the diffusion model for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient. The obtained results of the effective moisture diffusivity, for the cladode and the fruit, were evaluated in the range of 1.77 × 10−10–5.07 × 10−10 m2/s and 2.53 × 10−10–7.6 × 10−10 m2/s, respectively. The values of the activation energies for cladode and fruit were estimated to be 45.39 and 47.79 kJ/mol, respectively. However, these values of moisture diffusivity were estimated independently of the evolution of moisture content during drying process. Therefore, a correlation (full quadratic equation for moisture diffusivity as a function of moisture content and temperature was developed. The parameters are obtained by a multilinear regression method. This equation was found satisfactory to describe the diffusivity evolution function of moisture content and temperature with correlation coefficients of 91.5 and 95%.

  14. Evaluation of Two Methods for Determining Surface Soil Moisture from Radar Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, D.; Moran, M.; Bryant, R.; Holifield, C.; Skirvin, S.; Rahman, M.; Kershner, C.; Watts, J.; Slocum, K.

    2003-12-01

    Distributed soil moisture data are useful for determining cross-country mobility, irrigation scheduling, pest management strategy, biomass production and potential for soil erosion and infiltration. Large area monitoring of surface soil moisture (to depths of 5 cm) is possible with radar remote sensing techniques, but accuracy must be assessed before it can be implemented operationally. Two methods for predicting surface soil moisture from radar satellite imagery were tested in sparsely vegetated, semi-arid Arizona rangelands. In the first approach, the Integral Equation Method (IEM) model was run in the forward direction to generate a Look-Up-Table (LUT) of radar backscatter for the expected range of surface roughness and moisture content in the study area. The LUT was used to derive surface soil moisture estimates from radar images acquired at the study site. In the second approach, a difference index was made from time series differences in radar backscatter signals from wet and dry soils. The difference index minimized variations in surface roughness and resulted in a direct relation between difference and surface soil moisture. For both approaches, results were validated against in situ measurements of surface soil moisture at 46 sites with dielectric probes at the time of satellite overpass. The modeling approach requires surface roughness inputs which may be difficult to obtain, whereas the difference technique requires only a dry surface reference backscatter for comparison with wetter surface backscatter to determine moisture content.

  15. Relationship between seed moisture content and acquisition of impermeability in Nelumbo nucifera (Nelumbonaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh K. Jaganathan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seeds of Nelumbo nucifera do not imbibe water, and thus have physical dormancy (PY. However, a proportion of seeds are permeable to water, and so we hypothesized that variation in moisture content is a reason for the development of both permeable and impermeable seeds. The permeable proportion of seeds present in a lot collected from Suzhou, China, was separated using an imbibition test. The permeable proportion had an average moisture content of 15.6 %, compared with 8.5 % for impermeable seeds. Drying permeable seeds above silica gel to 10 % and 8 % f. wb., resulted in 77 and 100 % impermeable seeds, respectively, compared with no impermeable seeds at 15 % moisture content. Dried to 10 % moisture content, and incubated above water in an airtight container, 46 % of the seeds reverse impermeability. Permeable seeds with 15 % moisture content maintained above LiCl2 (RH=70 % did not develop impermeability after three months of storage. The seeds dried to 6 % moisture content and stored above water in an airtight container showed no increase in moisture. Based on these results, we conclude that there is a strong relationship between moisture content and the onset of impermeability in this species.

  16. Retrieval of Both Soil Moisture and Texture Using TerraSAR-X Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza Gorrab

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology combing multi-temporal X-band SAR images (TerraSAR-X with continuous ground thetaprobe measurements, for the retrieval of surface soil moisture and texture at a high spatial resolution. Our analysis is based on seven radar images acquired at a 36° incidence angle in the HH polarization, over a semi-arid site in Tunisia (North Africa. The soil moisture estimations are based on an empirical change detection approach using TerraSAR-X data and ground auxiliary thetaprobe network measurements. Two assumptions were tested: (1 roughness variations during the three-month radar acquisition campaigns were not accounted for; (2 a simple correction for temporal variations in roughness was included. The results reveal a small improvement in the estimation of soil moisture when a correction for temporal variations in roughness is introduced. By considering the estimated temporal dynamics of soil moisture, a methodology is proposed for the retrieval of clay and sand content (expressed as percentages in soil. Two empirical relationships were established between the mean moisture values retrieved from the seven acquired radar images and the two soil texture components over 36 test fields. Validation of the proposed approach was carried out over a second set of 34 fields, showing that highly accurate clay estimations can be achieved. Maps of soil moisture, clay and sand percentages at the studied site are derived.

  17. Soil Moisture and Turgidity of Selected Robusta Coffee Clones on Alluvial Plain with Seasonal Rainfall Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Erwiyono

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Observation on the seasonal variations of hydrological condition and turgidity of selected Robusta coffee clones has been carried out in Kaliwining Experimental Station, Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute in Jember. The aim was to evaluate the effect of hydrological variation on the coffee plants and the degree of soil moisture effect on plant performance. Experimental site overlays on alluvial plain, + 45 m a.s.l., 8o 15’ South with D rainfall type. Observation was conducted by survey method at the experimental plots of organic fertilizer and nitogen treatments on selected Robusta coffee clones derived from rooted cuttings, i.e. BP 436, BP 42, BP 936 and BP 358. Observation was only conducted at the experimental blocks of organic matter trials of 20 l/tree/year at nitrogen (Urea application of locally recommanded rate during the subsequent years of 1999 to 2001. Parameters observed included plant turgidity and soil moisture content of three different depths, i.e. 0—20, 20—40 and 40—60 cm and the weather. Observation was carried out in five replicates designed as blocks of barn manure treatment and N-fertilizer of recommended rate as basal fertilizer. The results showed that meteorological condition and soil moisture of experimental site through the years have seasonal patterns following the seasonal pattern of rainfall. Compared to other meteorological characteristics, relative humidity dominantly determined evaporation and plant turgidity. Plant turgi-dity was not only determined by soil moisture condition, but also atmospheric demand. When relative humidity (RH was relatively high, plant turgidity was relatively stable although soil moisture of surface layers was very low, and the reversal when soil moisture content was high plant turgidity was controlled by atmospheric demand (relative humidity. With a 3—4 dry month period, relative turgidity of the coffee plants was relatively stable above 82%, except when soil

  18. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  19. Propagation of soil moisture memory to streamflow and evapotranspiration in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Orth

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available As a key variable of the land-climate system soil moisture is a main driver of streamflow and evapotranspiration under certain conditions. Soil moisture furthermore exhibits outstanding memory (persistence characteristics. Many studies also report distinct low frequency variations for streamflow, which are likely related to soil moisture memory. Using data from over 100 near-natural catchments located across Europe, we investigate in this study the connection between soil moisture memory and the respective memory of streamflow and evapotranspiration on different time scales. For this purpose we use a simple water balance model in which dependencies of runoff (normalised by precipitation and evapotranspiration (normalised by radiation on soil moisture are fitted using streamflow observations. The model therefore allows us to compute the memory characteristics of soil moisture, streamflow and evapotranspiration on the catchment scale. We find considerable memory in soil moisture and streamflow in many parts of the continent, and evapotranspiration also displays some memory at monthly time scale in some catchments. We show that the memory of streamflow and evapotranspiration jointly depend on soil moisture memory and on the strength of the coupling of streamflow and evapotranspiration to soil moisture. Furthermore, we find that the coupling strengths of streamflow and evapotranspiration to soil moisture depend on the shape of the fitted dependencies and on the variance of the meteorological forcing. To better interpret the magnitude of the respective memories across Europe, we finally provide a new perspective on hydrological memory by relating it to the mean duration required to recover from anomalies exceeding a certain threshold.

  20. Moisture Conditions in Passive House Wall Constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Gullbrekken, Lars; Geving, Stig; Time, Berit; Andresen, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Buildings for the future, i.e zero emission buildings and passive houses, will need well insulated building envelopes, which includes increased insulation thicknesses for roof, wall and floor constructions. Increased insulation thicknesses may cause an increase in moisture levels and thereby increased risk of mold growth. There is need for increased knowledge about moisture levels in wood constructions of well insulated houses, to ensure robust and moisture safe solutions. Monitoring of w...

  1. Moisture Conditions in Passive House Wall Constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Gullbrekken, Lars; Geving, Stig; Time, Berit; Andresen, Inger

    2015-01-01

    - Buildings for the future, i.e zero emission buildings and passive houses, will need well insulated building envelopes, which includes increased insulation thicknesses for roof, wall and floor constructions. Increased insulation thicknesses may cause an increase in moisture levels and thereby increased risk of mold growth. There is need for increased knowledge about moisture levels in wood constructions of well insulated houses, to ensure robust and moisture safe solutions.

  2. Regional moisture budget associated with drought/flood events over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shuang; Zhou, Wen; Leung, Marco Yu-Ting; Li, Xiuzhen

    2017-12-01

    In this study, long-term (1961-2011) variations in the moisture budget and drought/flood events in six subregions of China are analyzed. Water vapor is mainly transported zonally during winter, while meridional transport is much stronger during summer. During winter, both the input moisture from the western boundary and the output moisture from the eastern boundary are slightly weakened; thus, the total amount of regional moisture in these subregions does not change much in eastern China. During summer, the decline in input moisture from the south is slightly weaker than the decrease in output moisture via the northern boundary; therefore, the net moisture budget is slightly increased in eastern China, resulting in more flood events during recent decades in this region. Generally, China tends to suffer much less drought risk and higher flood risk in the mature winter and decaying summer of El Niño; the opposite impact appears during a La Niña event, but with lower intensity. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Equilibrium moisture content of OSB panels produced with veneer inclusion and different types of adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourival Marin Mendes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate different statistical models to estimate the equilibrium moisture content of OSB panels exposed to different conditions of air temperature and relative humidity, And also to evaluate the influence of the adhesive and veneer inclusion in the equilibrium moisture content. The panels were produced with three different adhesive types (phenol-formaldehyde - FF, melamine-urea-formaldehyde - MUF, and phenol-melamine-urea-formaldehyde - PMUF and with and without veneer inclusion. The evaluation of the equilibrium moisture content of the panels was carried out at temperatures of 30, 40 and 50°C and relative humidity of 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90%. The modeling of equilibrium moisture content was performed using the statistical non-linear and polynomial models. In general, the polynomial models are most indicated for determining the equilibrium moisture content of OSB. The models adjusted only with air relative humidity presented the best precision measurements. The type of adhesive affected the equilibrium moisture content of the panels, being observed for adhesives PMUF and FF the same trend of variation, and the highest values obtained for the panels produced with adhesive MUF. The veneer inclusion decreased the equilibrium moisture content only in the panels with MUF adhesive.

  4. Can we quantify the variability of soil moisture across scales using Electromagnetic Induction ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinet, Jérémy; von Hebel, Christian; van der Kruk, Jan; Govers, Gerard; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in many natural processes. Therefore, technological and methodological advancements are of primary importance to provide accurate measurements of spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture. In that context, ElectroMagnetic Induction (EMI) instruments are often cited as a hydrogeophysical method with a large potential, through the measurement of the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated the potential of EMI to characterize variability of soil moisture on both agricultural and forested land covers in a (sub-) tropical environment. These differences in land use could be critical as differences in temperature, transpiration and root water uptake can have significant effect, notably on the electrical conductivity of the pore water. In this study, we used an EMI instrument to carry out a first assessment of the impact of deforestation and agriculture on soil moisture in a subtropical region in the south of Brazil. We selected slopes of different topographies (gentle vs. steep) and contrasting land uses (natural forest vs. agriculture) within two nearby catchments. At selected locations on the slopes, we measured simultaneously ECa using EMI and a depth-weighted average of the soil moisture using TDR probes installed within soil pits. We found that the temporal variability of the soil moisture could not be measured accurately with EMI, probably because of important temporal variations of the pore water electrical conductivity and the relatively small temporal variations in soil moisture content. However, we found that its spatial variability could be effectively quantified using a non-linear relationship, for both intra- and inter-slopes variations. Within slopes, the ECa could explained between 67 and 90% of the variability of the soil moisture, while a single non-linear model for all the slopes could explain 55% of the soil moisture variability. We eventually showed that combining

  5. [Soil moisture content and fine root biomass of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations at different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xi-Hao; Chen, Qiu-Bo; Hua, Yuan-Gang; Yang, Li-Fu; Wang, Zhen-Hui

    2011-02-01

    By using soil core sampling method, this paper studied the soil moisture regime of rubber plantations and the fine root biomass of Hevea brasiliensis in immature period (5 a), early yielding period (9 a), and peak yielding period (16 a). With the increasing age of rubber trees, the soil moisture content of rubber plantations increased but the fine root biomass decreased. The soil moisture content at the depth of 0-60 cm in test rubber plantations increased with soil depth, and presented a double-peak pattern over the period of one year. The fine root biomass of rubber trees at different ages had the maximum value in the top 10 cm soil layers and decreased with soil depth, its seasonal variation also showed a double-peak pattern, but the peak values appeared at different time. Soil moisture content and soil depth were the main factors affecting the fine root biomass of H. brasiliensis.

  6. The effect of changing ambient humidity on moisture condition in timber elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hozjan, Tomaẑ; Turk, Goran; Srpĉiĉ, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the changing ambient humidity on moisture conditions in timber elements. The naturally varying humidity is possible to model as a relative combination of different harmonic cycles, with different periods and amplitudes. For the determination of the moisture field...... a fully coupled transport model including a model for the influential sorption hysteresis of wood is used. The coupled model accounts for both vapor transport in pores and bound water transport in wood tissue. Moisture state history influences relationship between moisture state of wood and air humidity......, it must therefore be taken into account. In order to include history dependency, a hysteresis model is used here. Results from numerical calculations for timber specimen exposed to combined daily and annually cyclic variation of outside humidity are presented. Copyright © (2012) by WCTE 2012 Committee....

  7. Highly Efficient Moisture-Triggered Nanogenerator Based on Graphene Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaxin; Cheng, Huhu; Shi, Gaoquan; Qu, Liangti

    2017-11-08

    A high-performance moisture triggered nanogenerator is fabricated by using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as the active material. GQDs are prepared by direct oxidation and etching of natural graphite powder, which have small sizes of 2-5 nm and abundant oxygen-containing functional groups. After the treatment by electrochemical polarization, the GQDs-based moisture triggered nanogenerator can deliver a high voltage up to 0.27 V under 70% relative humidity variation, and a power density of 1.86 mW cm-2 with an optimized load resistor. The latter value is much higher than the moisture-electric power generators reported previously. The GQD moisture triggered nanogenerator is promising for self-power electronics and miniature sensors.

  8. Downscaling near-surface soil moisture from field to plot scale: A comparative analysis under different environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasta, Paolo; Penna, Daniele; Brocca, Luca; Zuecco, Giulia; Romano, Nunzio

    2018-02-01

    Indirect measurements of field-scale (hectometer grid-size) spatial-average near-surface soil moisture are becoming increasingly available by exploiting new-generation ground-based and satellite sensors. Nonetheless, modeling applications for water resources management require knowledge of plot-scale (1-5 m grid-size) soil moisture by using measurements through spatially-distributed sensor network systems. Since efforts to fulfill such requirements are not always possible due to time and budget constraints, alternative approaches are desirable. In this study, we explore the feasibility of determining spatial-average soil moisture and soil moisture patterns given the knowledge of long-term records of climate forcing data and topographic attributes. A downscaling approach is proposed that couples two different models: the Eco-Hydrological Bucket and Equilibrium Moisture from Topography. This approach helps identify the relative importance of two compound topographic indexes in explaining the spatial variation of soil moisture patterns, indicating valley- and hillslope-dependence controlled by lateral flow and radiative processes, respectively. The integrated model also detects temporal instability if the dominant type of topographic dependence changes with spatial-average soil moisture. Model application was carried out at three sites in different parts of Italy, each characterized by different environmental conditions. Prior calibration was performed by using sparse and sporadic soil moisture values measured by portable time domain reflectometry devices. Cross-site comparisons offer different interpretations in the explained spatial variation of soil moisture patterns, with time-invariant valley-dependence (site in northern Italy) and hillslope-dependence (site in southern Italy). The sources of soil moisture spatial variation at the site in central Italy are time-variant within the year and the seasonal change of topographic dependence can be conveniently

  9. The international soil moisture network: A data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land co...

  10. Probing bias reduction to improve comparability of lint cotton water and moisture contents at moisture equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Karl Fischer Titration (KFT) reference method is specific for water in lint cotton and was designed for samples conditioned to moisture equilibrium, thus limiting its biases. There is a standard method for moisture content – weight loss – by oven drying (OD), just not for equilibrium moisture c...

  11. Potential soil moisture products from the aquarius radiometer and scatterometer using an observing system simulation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Luo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE, we investigate the potential soil moisture retrieval capability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA Aquarius radiometer (L-band 1.413 GHz and scatterometer (L-band, 1.260 GHz. We estimate potential errors in soil moisture retrievals and identify the sources that could cause those errors. The OSSE system includes (i a land surface model in the NASA Land Information System, (ii a radiative transfer and backscatter model, (iii a realistic orbital sampling model, and (iv an inverse soil moisture retrieval model. We execute the OSSE over a 1000 × 2200 km2 region in the central United States, including the Red and Arkansas river basins. Spatial distributions of soil moisture retrieved from the radiometer and scatterometer are close to the synthetic truth. High root mean square errors (RMSEs of radiometer retrievals are found over the heavily vegetated regions, while large RMSEs of scatterometer retrievals are scattered over the entire domain. The temporal variations of soil moisture are realistically captured over a sparely vegetated region with correlations 0.98 and 0.63, and RMSEs 1.28% and 8.23% vol/vol for radiometer and scatterometer, respectively. Over the densely vegetated region, soil moisture exhibits larger temporal variation than the truth, leading to correlation 0.70 and 0.67, respectively, and RMSEs 9.49% and 6.09% vol/vol respectively. The domain-averaged correlations and RMSEs suggest that radiometer is more accurate than scatterometer in retrieving soil moisture. The analysis also demonstrates that the accuracy of the retrieved soil moisture is affected by vegetation coverage and spatial aggregation.

  12. Potential Soil Moisture Products from the Aquarius Radiometer and Scatterometer Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yan [I.M. Systems Group at NOAA/NCEP/EMC; Feng, Xia [George Mason University; Houser, Paul [George Mason University; Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Fan, Xingang [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green; De Lannoy, Gabrielle [Ghent University, Belgium; Zhan, Xiwu [NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research; Dabbiru, Lalitha [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2013-01-01

    Using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE), we investigate the potential soil moisture retrieval capability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aquarius radiometer (L-band 1.413 GHz) and scatterometer (L-band, 1.260 GHz). We estimate potential errors in soil moisture retrievals and identify the sources that could cause those errors. The OSSE system includes (i) a land surface model in the NASA Land Information System, (ii) a radiative transfer and backscatter model, (iii) a realistic orbital sampling model, and (iv) an inverse soil moisture retrieval model. We execute the OSSE over a 1000 2200 km2 region in the central United States, including the Red and Arkansas river basins. Spatial distributions of soil moisture retrieved from the radiometer and scatterometer are close to the synthetic truth. High root mean square errors (RMSEs) of radiometer retrievals are found over the heavily vegetated regions, while large RMSEs of scatterometer retrievals are scattered over the entire domain. The temporal variations of soil moisture are realistically captured over a sparely vegetated region with correlations 0.98 and 0.63, and RMSEs 1.28% and 8.23% vol/vol for radiometer and scatterometer, respectively. Over the densely vegetated region, soil moisture exhibits larger temporal variation than the truth, leading to correlation 0.70 and 0.67, respectively, and RMSEs 9.49% and 6.09% vol/vol respectively. The domain-averaged correlations and RMSEs suggest that radiometer is more accurate than scatterometer in retrieving soil moisture. The analysis also demonstrates that the accuracy of the retrieved soil moisture is affected by vegetation coverage and spatial aggregation.

  13. Estimation of soil moisture and its effect on soil thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil moisture is an important parameter of the earth's climate system. Regression model for estimation of soil moisture at various depths has been developed using the amount of moisture near the surface layer. The estimated values of soil moisture are tested with the measured moisture values and it is found that the ...

  14. Moisture detection in composites by terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Paweł; Pałka, Norbert; Opoka, Szymon; Wandowski, Tomasz; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2015-07-01

    The application of Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymers (GFRP) in many branches of industry has been increasing steadily. Many research works focus on damage identification for structures made out of such materials. However, not only delaminations, cracks or other damage can have a negative influence of GFRP parts performance. Previous research proved that fluid absorption influences the mechanical performance of composites. GFRP parts can be contaminated by moisture or release agent during manufacturing, while fuel, hydraulic fluid and moisture ingression into the composite can be the in-service treats. In the reported research authors focus on moisture detection. There are numerous sources of moisture such as post manufacturing NDT inspection with ultrasonics coupled by water or exposition to moisture during transportation and in service. An NDT tool used for the research is a terahertz (THz) spectrometer. The device uses an electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range (0.1-3 THz) and allows for reflection and transmission measurements. The spectrometer is equipped with moving table that allows for XY scanning of large objects such as GFRP panels. In the conducted research refractive indices were experimentally extracted from the materials of interest (water and GFRP). Time signals as well as C-scans were analysed for samples with moisture contamination. In order to be sure that the observed effects are related to moisture contamination reference measurements were conducted. The obtained results showed that the THz NDT technique can detect moisture hidden under a GFRP with multiple layers.

  15. Comparison of moisture management methods for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different moisture management methods were compared for biodegradation efficiency in sandy and organic soils. The conventional method consisted in maintaining the soil moisture at approximately 50 to 75% field capacity accompanied by daily aeration and mixing. In the test method, the soil was allowed to dry out ...

  16. 46 CFR 154.1715 - Moisture control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Moisture control. 154.1715 Section 154.1715 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... § 154.1715 Moisture control. When a vessel is carrying sulfur dioxide, the master shall ensure that: (a...

  17. Microwave bale moisture sensing: Field trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    A microwave moisture measurement technique was developed for moisture sensing of cotton bales after the bale press. The technique measures the propagation delay of a microwave signal that is transmitted through the cotton bale. This research conducted a field trial to test the sensor in a commercial...

  18. Microwave moisture sensing of wet bales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensing of moisture in very wet lint bales is unique due to the fact that moisture distribution is typically non-uniform and can in some instances be highly localized. This issue is even further complicated by the use of a sensor that reads only a portion of the bale and/or with a sensor that provid...

  19. Microwave bale moisture sensing: Field trial continued

    Science.gov (United States)

    A microwave moisture measurement technique was developed at the USDA, ARS Cotton Production and Processing Research Unit for moisture sensing of cotton bales after the bale press. The technique measures the propagation delay of a microwave signal that is transmitted through the cotton bale. This res...

  20. Soil moisture from operational meteorological satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, W; Naeimi, V.; Scipal, K.; De Jeu, R.A.M.; Fernandez, M.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, unforeseen advances in monitoring soil moisture from operational satellite platforms have been made, mainly due to improved geophysical retrieval methods. In this study, four recently published soil-moisture datasets are compared with in-situ observations from the REMEDHUS

  1. Soil moisture from Operational Meteorological Satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, W.; Naeimi, V.; Scipal, K.; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, unforeseen advances in monitoring soil moisture from operational satellite platforms have been made, mainly due to improved geophysical retrieval methods. In this study, four recently published soil-moisture datasets are compared with in-situ observations from the REMEDHUS

  2. Multiscale soil moisture estimates using static and roving cosmic-ray soil moisture sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJannet, David; Hawdon, Aaron; Baker, Brett; Renzullo, Luigi; Searle, Ross

    2017-12-01

    Soil moisture plays a critical role in land surface processes and as such there has been a recent increase in the number and resolution of satellite soil moisture observations and the development of land surface process models with ever increasing resolution. Despite these developments, validation and calibration of these products has been limited because of a lack of observations on corresponding scales. A recently developed mobile soil moisture monitoring platform, known as the rover, offers opportunities to overcome this scale issue. This paper describes methods, results and testing of soil moisture estimates produced using rover surveys on a range of scales that are commensurate with model and satellite retrievals. Our investigation involved static cosmic-ray neutron sensors and rover surveys across both broad (36 × 36 km at 9 km resolution) and intensive (10 × 10 km at 1 km resolution) scales in a cropping district in the Mallee region of Victoria, Australia. We describe approaches for converting rover survey neutron counts to soil moisture and discuss the factors controlling soil moisture variability. We use independent gravimetric and modelled soil moisture estimates collected across both space and time to validate rover soil moisture products. Measurements revealed that temporal patterns in soil moisture were preserved through time and regression modelling approaches were utilised to produce time series of property-scale soil moisture which may also have applications in calibration and validation studies or local farm management. Intensive-scale rover surveys produced reliable soil moisture estimates at 1 km resolution while broad-scale surveys produced soil moisture estimates at 9 km resolution. We conclude that the multiscale soil moisture products produced in this study are well suited to future analysis of satellite soil moisture retrievals and finer-scale soil moisture models.

  3. MONITORING SOIL MOISTURE IN A COAL MINING AREA WITH MULTI-PHASE LANDSAT IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Kong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The coal development zone of Northern Shaanxi, China is one of the eight largest coal mines in the world, also the national energy and chemical bases. However, the coal mining leads to ground surface deformation and previous studies show that in collapse fissure zone soil water losses almost 50% compared with non-fissure zone. The main objective of this study is to develop a retrieval model that is reliable and sensitive to soil moisture in the whole coal mining zone of Northern Shaanxi based upon the soil sample parameters collected from in situ site investigation, spectral data gathered simultaneously and the images of Landsat7 ETM. The model uses different phases of Landsat data to retrieve soil moisture and analyze the patterns of spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture caused by ground deformation in the coal mining areas. The study indicated that band4 of Landsat7 ETM is the most sensitive band for soil moisture retrieval using the spectrum method. The quadratic model developed by remote sensing reflectance (Rrs4 (corresponding to the band4 is the best pattern with the correlation coefficient of 0.858 between the observed and the estimated soil moisture. Two-phase Landsat7 ETM data of 2002 and 2009 and one phase Landsat8 OLI data of 2015 for the study area were selected to retrieve soil moisture information. The result showed that the mean relative error was 35.16% and the root-mean-squared error (RMSE was 0.58%. The changes of the spatial distribution of inversed soil moisture revealed that the trend of soil moisture contents of the study area was in general being gradually reduced from 2002 to 2015. The study results can serve as the baseline for monitoring environmental impacts on soil moisture in the regions due to coal mining.

  4. Soil Moisture Monitorization Using GNSS Reflected Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Egido, Alejandro; Caparrini, Marco; Martin, Cristina; Farres, Esteve; Banque, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    The use of GNSS signals as a source of opportunity for remote sensing applications, GNSS-R, has been a research area of interest for more than a decade. One of the possible applications of this technique is soil moisture monitoring. The retrieval of soil moisture with GNSS-R systems is based on the variability of the ground dielectric properties associated to soil moisture. Higher concentrations of water in the soil yield a higher dielectric constant and reflectivity, which incurs in signals that reflect from the Earth surface with higher peak power. Previous investigations have demonstrated the capability of GPS bistatic scatterometers to obtain high enough signal to noise ratios in order to sense small changes in surface reflectivity. Furthermore, these systems present some advantages with respect to others currently used to retrieve soil moisture. Upcoming satellite navigation systems, such as the European Galileo, will represent an excellent source of opportunity for soil moisture remote sensing for vario...

  5. Moisture management properties of Cupro knitted fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durur, G.; Oner, E.; Gunduz, G.

    2017-10-01

    On the purpose of analysing the moisture management behaviour of Cupro blend knitted fabrics made of Ne 40/1 and Ne 56/1 cotton/Cupro blend yarns, which have single jersey, 1x1 rib and interlock knitting types were systematically produced. Multi-dimensional liquid transport properties of the produced fabric were measured on the Moisture Management Tester (MMT). The air permeability and some structural properties of the fabrics were also measured, and the results were evaluated taking into account moisture management properties. According to results, it is observed that moisture management capacity and permeability of Cupro blends produced from finer yarns were higher than those of fabrics from coarse count yarns. Generally, Cupro blend knitted fabrics showed good moisture management properties.

  6. Calibration of Soil Moisture Measurement Using Pr2 Moisture Meter and Gravimetric-Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olotu Yahaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The research study strongly focused on creating strong mechanism for measuring and evaluating soil moisture content comparing PR2 capacitance moisture meter and gravimetric approach. PR2 moisture meter shows a better performance accuracy of ± 6%; 0.06 m 3 /m 3 and intercept a0 =1.8; indicating the field is heavy clay. It measures to 1000 mm depth with high precision; while realistic result could not be obtained from gravimetric method at this measuring depth. Therefore, effective soil moisture measuring, monitoring and evaluation can be achieved with PR2 moisture meter.

  7. Effect of Initial Moisture on the Adsorption and Desorption Equilibrium Moisture Contents of Polished Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Murata, Satoshi; Amaratunga, K.S.P.; Tanaka, Fumihiko; Hori, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    The moisture adsorption and desorption properties for polished rice have been measured using a dynamic ventilatory method. Air temperatures of 10,20,30 and 40℃, relative humidities of 50,60,70,80 and 90%, and five levels of initial moisture contents ranging approximately from 8% to 19% d.b. were used to obtain moisture content data. The value of equilibrium moisture content for each initial moisture content at the range of air condition was determined by a method of nonlinear least squares. R...

  8. Experimental study on moisture transfer through firefighters' protective fabrics in radiant heat exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Meng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of absorbed moisture on thermal protective performance of fire-fighters’ clothing materials under radiant heat flux conditions were analyzed in this paper. A thermal protective performance tester and temperature sensor were used to measure the temperature variations for the facecloth side of four kinds of commonly used flame retardant fabrics in several radiant heat exposures, which varied in moisture content. Experimental results showed that, all of the temperature profiles of these four kinds of moistened fabrics under different radiant heat flux conditions presented the same variation trend. The addition of moisture had a positive influence on the thermal protective performance during the constant temperature period when heat radiation time was more than 60 seconds. As the heat radiation time increased beyond 500 seconds, the thermal protective performance of moistened fabrics became worse than that of dried fabrics in general.

  9. Impacts of soil moisture content on visual soil evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmet-Booth, Jeremy; Forristal, Dermot; Fenton, Owen; Bondi, Giulia; Creamer, Rachel; Holden, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Visual Soil Examination and Evaluation (VSE) techniques offer tools for soil quality assessment. They involve the visual and tactile assessment of soil properties such as aggregate size and shape, porosity, redox morphology, soil colour and smell. An increasing body of research has demonstrated the reliability and utility of VSE techniques. However a number of limitations have been identified, including the potential impact of soil moisture variation during sampling. As part of a national survey of grassland soil quality in Ireland, an evaluation of the impact of soil moisture on two widely used VSE techniques was conducted. The techniques were Visual Evaluation of Soil Structure (VESS) (Guimarães et al., 2011) and Visual Soil Assessment (VSA) (Shepherd, 2009). Both generate summarising numeric scores that indicate soil structural quality, though employ different scoring mechanisms. The former requires the assessment of properties concurrently and the latter separately. Both methods were deployed on 20 sites across Ireland representing a range of soils. Additional samples were taken for soil volumetric water (θ) determination at 5-10 and 10-20 cm depth. No significant correlation was observed between θ 5-10 cm and either VSE technique. However, VESS scores were significantly related to θ 10-20 cm (rs = 0.40, sig = 0.02) while VSA scores were not (rs = -0.33, sig = 0.06). VESS and VSA scores can be grouped into quality classifications (good, moderate and poor). No significant mean difference was observed between θ 5-10 cm or θ 10-20 cm according to quality classification by either method. It was concluded that VESS scores may be affected by soil moisture variation while VSA appear unaffected. The different scoring mechanisms, where the separate assessment and scoring of individual properties employed by VSA, may limit soil moisture effects. However, moisture content appears not to affect overall structural quality classification by either method. References

  10. Effect of temperature and relative humidity during transportation on green coffee bean moisture content and ochratoxin A production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Cabrera, Hector A; Menezes, Hilary C; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Canepa, Frederico; Teixeira, Aldir A; Carvalhaes, Nelson; Santi, Domenico; Leme, Plinio T Z; Yotsuyanagi, Katumi; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2007-01-01

    Changes in temperature, relative humidity, and moisture content of green coffee beans were monitored during transportation of coffee from Brazil to Italy. Six containers (three conventional and three prototype) were stowed in three different places (hold, first floor, and deck) on the ship. Each prototype was located next to a conventional container. The moisture content of the coffee in the container located on the first floor was less affected by environmental variations (0.7%) than that in the hold and on the deck. Coffee located in the hold showed the highest variation in moisture content (3%); in addition, the container showed visible condensation. Coffee transported on the deck showed an intermediary variation in moisture (2%), and there was no visible condensation. The variation in coffee moisture content of the prototype containers was similar to that of the conventional ones, especially in the top layers of coffee bags (2 to 3%), while the increase in water activity was 0.70. This suggests that diffusion of moisture occurs very slowly inside the cargo and that there are thus sufficient time and conditions for fungal growth. The regions of the container near the wall and ceiling are susceptible to condensation since they are close to the headspace with its high relative humidity. Ochratoxin A production occurred in coffee located at the top of the container on the deck and in the wet bags from the hold (those found to be wet on opening the containers at the final destination).

  11. Spectroscopic analysis of seasonal changes in live fuel moisture content and leaf dry mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi Qi; Philip E. Dennison; W. Matt Jolly; Rachael C. Kropp; Simon C. Brewer

    2014-01-01

    Live fuel moisture content (LFMC), the ratio of water mass to dry mass contained in live plant material, is an important fuel property for determining fire danger and for modeling fire behavior. Remote sensing estimation of LFMC often relies on an assumption of changing water and stable dry mass over time. Fundamental understanding of seasonal variation in plant water...

  12. Modeling topographic influences on fuel moisture and fire danger in complex terrain to improve wildland fire management decision support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary A. Holden; W. Matt Jolly

    2011-01-01

    Fire danger rating systems commonly ignore fine scale, topographically-induced weather variations. These variations will likely create heterogeneous, landscape-scale fire danger conditions that have never been examined in detail. We modeled the evolution of fuel moistures and the Energy Release Component (ERC) from the US National Fire Danger Rating System across the...

  13. SMEX03 Little Washita Micronet Soil Moisture Data: Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains volumetric soil moisture, soil temperature, soil conductivity, soil salinity, and surface temperature data collected during the Soil Moisture...

  14. Moisture-driven fracture in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Olesen, John Forbes

    2011-01-01

    process, suggesting that sealing the ends of timber logs while in the green moisture state could considerably reduce the development of end-cracks. The initial moisture content and the shrinkage properties of the wood varied markedly from pith to bark. The importance of taking material inhomogeneities......Moisture-induced fractures in solid timber create considerable problems for both building industries and sawmills. Cracks caused by kiln-drying of solid timber are extremely difficult to predict. This paper reports on experiments concerned with methods of reducing cracks in wood...... into account when modelling crack propagation in solid wood is emphasized. © 2011 Taylor & Francis....

  15. Coal Moisture Estimation in Power Plant Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Palle; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Pedersen, Tom S.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of moisture content in raw coal feed to a power plant coal mill is of importance for efficient operation of the mill. The moisture is commonly measured approximately once a day using offline chemical analysis methods; however, it would be advantageous for the dynamic operation...... of the plant if an on-line estimate were available. In this paper we such propose an on-line estimator (an extended Kalman filter) that uses only existing measurements. The scheme is tested on actual coal mill data collected during a one-month operating period, and it is found that the daily measured moisture...

  16. Residual moisture reduction of coarse coal using air purging. 2. Pilot scale studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davy, R.; Johnston, B.; Nicol, S.; Stapleton, L.; Veal, C. [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Division of Energy Technology

    2001-06-01

    A process using air purging to reduce the moisture content of coarse coal product from vibrating basket centrifuges has been developed. The process involves injecting a turbulent stream of high velocity air through the coal bed as it traverses the centrifuge basket. This paper describes the results obtained when the process was trailed at pilot scale, following a successful bench-scale study. The feedstock was a -6+0.5 mm coal, chosen so that the statistical variations that are inevitably encountered when sampling conventional coarse coal (top size 50 mm) could be minimised. Moisture reduction by air purging was a function of air speed, within the boundaries of the other process parameters (eg coal feed rate, feed solids content, manifold geometry) which were kept constant. At the highest air speed tested, which was about 60 m/s exiting the manifold, moisture reductions close to 1 wt% were achieved. Halving the air speed to about 30 m/s more than halved the moisture reduction to 0.4 wt%. Doubling the airflow rate but keeping the air speed constant by inserting another manifold into the centrifuge did not enhance moisture reduction. The encouraging moisture reductions were thought to warrant a full scale trial of air purging, which will be described in a future paper.

  17. Residual moisture reduction of coarse coal using air purging. 2 Pilot scale studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davy, R.; Johnston, B.; Nicol, S.; Stapleton, L.; Veal, C. [CSIRO Division of Energy Technology, North Ryde, NSW (Australia)

    2001-06-01

    Air purging is being developed for reducing the moisture content of coarse coal product from vibrating basket centrifuges. The process involves injecting a turbulent stream of high velocity air through the coal bed as it traverses the centrifuge basket. This paper describes the results obtained when the process was trialed at pilot scale, following a successful bench-scale study. The feedstock was a -6+0.5 mm coal, chosen so that the statistical variations that are inevitably encountered when sampling conventional coarse coal (top size 50 mm) could be minimised. Moisture reduction by air purging was a function of air speed, within the boundaries of the other process parameters (e.g. coal feed rate, feed solids content, manifold geometry) which were kept constant. At the highest air speed tested, which was ca.60 m/s exiting the manifold, moisture reductions close to 1 wt% were achieved. Halving the air speed to ca. 30 m/s more than halved the moisture reduction to 0.4 wt%. Doubling the air flow rate but keeping the air speed constant by inserting another manifold into the centrifuge did not enhance moisture reduction. The encouraging moisture reductions were thought to warrant a full scale trial of air purging.

  18. SMAP Soil Moisture Disaggregation using Land Surface Temperature and Vegetation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) is a key parameter in agriculture, hydrology and ecology studies. The global SM retrievals have been providing by microwave remote sensing technology since late 1970s and many SM retrieval algorithms have been developed, calibrated and applied on satellite sensors such as AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System), AMSR-2 (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2) and SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity). Particularly, SMAP (Soil Moisture Active/Passive) satellite, which was developed by NASA, was launched in January 2015. SMAP provides soil moisture products of 9 km and 36 km spatial resolutions which are not capable for research and applications of finer scale. Toward this issue, this study applied a SM disaggregation algorithm to disaggregate SMAP passive microwave soil moisture 36 km product. This algorithm was developed based on the thermal inertial relationship between daily surface temperature variation and daily average soil moisture which is modulated by vegetation condition, by using remote sensing retrievals from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), SPOT (Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre), as well as Land Surface Model (LSM) output from NLDAS (North American Land Data Assimilation System). The disaggregation model was built at 1/8o spatial resolution on monthly basis and was implemented to calculate and disaggregate SMAP 36 km SM retrievals to 1 km resolution in Oklahoma. The SM disaggregation results were also validated using MESONET (Mesoscale Network) and MICRONET (Microscale Network) ground SM measurements.

  19. Soil Moisture Estimations Based on Airborne CAROLS L-Band Microwave Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Mialon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The SMOS satellite mission, launched in 2009, allows global soil moisture estimations to be made using the L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB model, which simulates the L-band microwave emissions produced by the soil–vegetation layer. This model was calibrated using various sources of in situ and airborne data. In the present study, we propose to evaluate the L-MEB model on the basis of a large set of airborne data, recorded by the CAROLS radiometer during the course of 20 flights made over South West France (the SMOSMANIA site, and supported by simultaneous soil moisture measurements, made in 2009 and 2010. In terms of volumetric soil moisture, the retrieval accuracy achieved with the L-MEB model, with two default roughness parameters, ranges between 8% and 13%. Local calibrations of the roughness parameter, using data from the 2009 flights for different areas of the site, allowed an accuracy of approximately 5.3% to be achieved with the 2010 CAROLS data. Simultaneously we estimated the vegetation optical thickness (t and we showed that, when roughness is locally adjusted, MODIS NDVI values are correlated (R2 = 0.36 to t. Finally, as a consequence of the significant influence of the roughness parameter on the estimated absolute values of soil moisture, we propose to evaluate the relative variability of the soil moisture, using a default soil roughness parameter. The soil moisture variations are estimated with an uncertainty of approximately 6%.

  20. Topsoil moisture mapping using geostatistical techniques under different Mediterranean climatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Murillo, J F; Hueso-González, P; Ruiz-Sinoga, J D

    2017-10-01

    Soil mapping has been considered as an important factor in the widening of Soil Science and giving response to many different environmental questions. Geostatistical techniques, through kriging and co-kriging techniques, have made possible to improve the understanding of eco-geomorphologic variables, e.g., soil moisture. This study is focused on mapping of topsoil moisture using geostatistical techniques under different Mediterranean climatic conditions (humid, dry and semiarid) in three small watersheds and considering topography and soil properties as key factors. A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with a resolution of 1×1m was derived from a topographical survey as well as soils were sampled to analyzed soil properties controlling topsoil moisture, which was measured during 4-years. Afterwards, some topography attributes were derived from the DEM, the soil properties analyzed in laboratory, and the topsoil moisture was modeled for the entire watersheds applying three geostatistical techniques: i) ordinary kriging; ii) co-kriging considering as co-variate topography attributes; and iii) co-kriging ta considering as co-variates topography attributes and gravel content. The results indicated topsoil moisture was more accurately mapped in the dry and semiarid watersheds when co-kriging procedure was performed. The study is a contribution to improve the efficiency and accuracy of studies about the Mediterranean eco-geomorphologic system and soil hydrology in field conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Using Plant Temperature to Evaluate the Response of Stomatal Conductance to Soil Moisture Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Han Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant temperature is an indicator of stomatal conductance, which reflects soil moisture stresses. We explored the relationship between plant temperature and soil moisture to optimize irrigation schedules in a water-stress experiment using Firmiana platanifolia (L. f. Marsili in an incubator. Canopy temperature, leaf temperature, and stomatal conductance were measured using thermal imaging and a porometer. The results indicated that (1 stomatal conductance decreased with declines in soil moisture, and reflected average canopy temperature; (2 the variation of the leaf temperature distribution was a reliable indicator of soil moisture stress, and the temperature distribution in severely water-stressed leaves exhibited greater spatial variation than that in the presence of sufficient irrigation; (3 thermal indices (Ig and crop water stress index (CWSI were theoretically proportional to stomatal conductance (gs, Ig was certified to have linearity relationship with gs and CWSI have a logarithmic relationship with gs, and both of the two indices can be used to estimate soil moisture; and (4 thermal imaging data can reflect water status irrespective of long-term water scarcity or lack of sudden rainfall. This study applied thermal imaging methods to monitor plants and develop adaptable irrigation scheduling, which are important for the formulation of effective and economical agriculture and forestry policy.

  2. Comparison of Eulerian and Lagrangian moisture source diagnostics – the flood event in eastern Europe in May 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Winschall

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Moisture convergence from different sources is an important prerequisite for a heavy-precipitation event. The contributions from different source regions can, however, hardly be quantified from observations, and their assessment based on model results is complex. Two conceptually different numerical methods are widely used for the quantification of moisture sources: Lagrangian approaches based on the analysis of humidity variations along backward trajectories and Eulerian methods based on the implementation of moisture tracers into a numerical model. In this study the moisture sources for a high-impact, heavy-precipitation event that affected eastern Europe in May 2010 are studied with both Eulerian and Lagrangian moisture source diagnostics. The precipitation event was connected to a cyclone that developed over northern Africa, moved over the Mediterranean towards eastern Europe and induced transport of moist air towards the Carpathian Mountains. Heavy precipitation and major flooding occurred in Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia between 16 and 18 May 2010. The Lagrangian and Eulerian diagnostics consistently indicate a wide spatial and temporal range of moisture sources contributing to the event. The source with the largest share is local evapotranspiration from the European land surface, followed by moisture from the North Atlantic. Further contributions come from tropical western Africa (10–20° N and the Mediterranean Sea. Contrary to what could be expected, the Mediterranean contribution of about 10% is relatively small. A detailed analysis of exemplary trajectories corroborates the general consistency of the two approaches, and underlines their complementarity. The Lagrangian method allows for mapping out moisture source regions with computational efficiency, whereas the more elaborate Eulerian model requires predefined moisture sources, but includes also processes such as precipitation, evaporation and turbulent mixing. However

  3. Relation between seasonally detrended shortwave infrared reflectance data and land surface moisture in semi-arid Sahel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jørgen Lundegaard; Ceccato, Pietro; Proud, Simon Richard

    2013-01-01

    . In this study we explored the potential of using reflectance data in the Red, Near Infrared (NIR), and Shortwave Infrared (SWIR) spectral regions for detecting short term variations in land surface moisture in the Sahel, by analyzing data from three test sites and observations from the geostationary Meteosat......In the Sudano-Sahelian areas of Africa droughts can have serious impacts on natural resources, and therefore land surface moisture is an important factor. Insufficient conventional sites for monitoring land surface moisture make the use of Earth Observation data for this purpose a key issue...

  4. Regional scale spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture and its relationship with meteorological factors over the Korean peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunsang; Choi, Minha

    2014-08-01

    An understanding soil moisture spatio-temporal variability is essential for hydrological and meteorological research. This work aims at evaluating the spatio-temporal variability of near surface soil moisture and assessing dominant meteorological factors that influence spatial variability over the Korean peninsula from May 1 to September 29, 2011. The results of Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests for goodness of fit showed that all applied distributions (normal, log-normal and generalized extreme value: GEV) were appropriate for the datasets and the GEV distribution described best spatial soil moisture patterns. The relationship between the standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CV) of soil moisture with mean soil moisture contents showed an upper convex shape and an exponentially negative pattern, respectively. Skewness exhibited a decreasing pattern with increasing mean soil moisture contents and kurtosis exhibited the U-shaped relationship. In this regional scale (99,720 km2), we found that precipitation indicated temporally stable features through an ANOVA test considering the meteorological (i.e. precipitation, insolation, air temperature, ground temperature and wind speed) and physical (i.e. soil texture, elevation, topography, and land use) factors. Spatial variability of soil moisture affected by the meteorological forcing is shown as result of the relationship between the meteorological factors (precipitation, insolation, air temperature and ground temperature) and the standard deviation of relative difference of soil moisture contents (SDRDt) which implied the spatial variability of soil moisture. The SDRDt showed a positive relationship with the daily mean precipitation, while a negative relationship with insolation, air temperature and ground temperature. The variation of spatial soil moisture pattern is more sensitive to change in ground temperature rather than air temperature changes. Therefore, spatial variability of soil moisture is greatly affected

  5. [Controlling effects of dual mulching on soil moisture in an apple orchard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fei; Xie, Yong-Sheng; Suo, Gai-Di; Ding, Ya-Dong

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the controlling effects of dual mulching on soil moisture in an apple orchard on the Weibei rainfed highland, soil moisture in the 0-600 cm soil profile of the apple orchard was measured under four mulching treatments (plastic film plus straw, plastic film and straw mulches, as well as a non-mulching control) , and meanwhile the apple yield and branch growth increment were analyzed statistically. Results showed that the dual mulching treatment had the best effect on soil moisture conservation, and the soil water storage in such a soil profile was 6.7% higher than the control treatment. Long-term dual mulching could effectively alleviate soil desiccation occurring in deep soil layer in the region, and the monthly averaged soil water storage in stable layer (240-600 cm) was 64.22 mm higher than that of the control treatment. Both plastic film plus straw and plastic film mulches were able to reduce the temporal fluctuation of soil moisture in shallow soil (0-60 cm) and enhance the temporal stability of soil moisture in the layer. Compared with the single mulching treatments, the dual mulching treatment could effectively decrease the vertical variation of soil moisture in the profile and improve the stability of the vertical soil moisture distribution. The apple yield under the dual mulching treatment was evidently increased by 48.2%, as compared with the control treatment. All the analyses showed that dual mulching had more advantages in controlling soil moisture and improving apple yield than single mulching.

  6. A study on gelatin capsule brittleness: moisture tranfer between the capsule shell and its content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, R K; Raghavan, K S; Hussain, M A

    1998-05-01

    Variation in moisture content of the capsule shells either due to the change of storage conditions or the moisture transfer between the capsule shell and its contents may lead to undesired physical properties, such as capsule brittleness and stickiness. DMP 504, a developmental bile-acid sequestrant, is a strongly basic anion-exchange polymer which contains randomly distributed primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary amine groups in their hydrochoride salt form. The alkylammonium groups which comprise this polymer form a random network containing a high level of branching and a low level of cross-linking. DMP 504 is very hygroscopic and has a tendency to gain or lose moisture with ease. The transfer of moisture from the capsule shell to DMP 504 powder contained in a hard gelatin capsule can be expected, and if a low water content of the capsule shell is achieved, the capsules become brittle and fracture easily. The sorption isotherm for DMP 504 was generated by storing the drug substance under various relative humidity conditions. After equilibrium, the moisture contents for the samples of individual isotherm points were measured by thermogravimetric analyses. This report applies the sorption-desorption moisture transfer (SDMT) model to predict the equilibrium relative humidity in a system containing DMP 504 in hard gelatin capsules and to establish target loss on drying values for DMP 504 and the capsule shell. Application of this SDMT model resulted in finding a solution to the brittleness problem. The moisture levels of capsule shells and contents for two formulations in a 12-month stability program are also reported here. Results of this study further demonstrate that the SDMT model can be used as a tool to guide the formulator to select optimal initial moisture contents for the empty capsule shell and the formulation to avoid the incidence of brittle capsule problems.

  7. Spatiotemporal Variability of Hillslope Soil Moisture Across Steep, Highly Dissected Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarecke, K. M.; Wondzell, S. M.; Bladon, K. D.

    2016-12-01

    Hillslope ecohydrological processes, including subsurface water flow and plant water uptake, are strongly influenced by soil moisture. However, the factors controlling spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture in steep, mountainous terrain are poorly understood. We asked: How do topography and soils interact to control the spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture in steep, Douglas-fir dominated hillslopes in the western Cascades? We will present a preliminary analysis of bimonthly soil moisture variability from July-November 2016 at 0-30 and 0-60 cm depth across spatially extensive convergent and divergent topographic positions in Watershed 1 of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in central Oregon. Soil moisture monitoring locations were selected following a 5 m LIDAR analysis of topographic position, aspect, and slope. Topographic position index (TPI) was calculated as the difference in elevation to the mean elevation within a 30 m radius. Convergent (negative TPI values) and divergent (positive TPI values) monitoring locations were established along northwest to northeast-facing aspects and within 25-55 degree slopes. We hypothesized that topographic position (convergent vs. divergent), as well as soil physical properties (e.g., texture, bulk density), control variation in hillslope soil moisture at the sub-watershed scale. In addition, we expected the relative importance of hillslope topography to the spatial variability in soil moisture to differ seasonally. By comparing the spatiotemporal variability of hillslope soil moisture across topographic positions, our research provides a foundation for additional understanding of subsurface flow processes and plant-available soil-water in forests with steep, highly dissected terrain.

  8. CLPX-Ground: ISA Soil Moisture Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of in-situ point measurements of soil moisture within three 25-km by 25-km Meso-cell Study Areas (MSAs) in northern Colorado (Fraser, North...

  9. Site Averaged Neutron Soil Moisture: 1988 (Betts)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Site averaged product of the neutron probe soil moisture collected during the 1987-1989 FIFE experiment. Samples were averaged for each site, then averaged...

  10. Heat and Moisture transport of socks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komárková, P.; Glombíková, V.; Havelka, A.

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the liquid moisture transport and thermal properties is essential for understanding physiological comfort of clothes. This study reports on an experimental investigation of moisture management transport and thermal transport on the physiological comfort of commercially available socks. There are subjective evaluation and objective measurements. Subjective evaluation of the physiological comfort of socks is based on individual sensory perception of probands during and after physical exertion. Objective measurements were performed according to standardized methods using Moisture Management tester for measuring the humidity parameters and C-term TCi analyzer for thermal conductivity and thermal effusivity. The obtained values of liquid moisture transport and thermal properties were related to the material composition and structure of the tested socks. In summary, these results show that objective measurement corresponds with probands feelings.

  11. NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Kent; Thurman, Sam; Edelstein, Wendy; Spencer, Michael; Chen, Gun-Shing; Underwood, Mark; Njoku, Eni; Goodman, Shawn; Jai, Benhan

    2013-01-01

    The SMAP mission will produce high-resolution and accurate global maps of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state using data from a non-imaging synthetic aperture radar and a radiometer, both operating at L-band.

  12. Effect of Pyrodextrinization, Crosslinking and Heat- Moisture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Pyrodextrinization, Crosslinking and Heat- Moisture Treatment on In vitro Formation and Digestibility of Resistant Starch from African Locust Bean (Parkia biglobosa). A Sankhon, W-R Yao, I Amadou, H Wang, H Qian, M Sangare ...

  13. Site Averaged Gravimetric Soil Moisture: 1989 (Betts)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Site averaged product of the gravimetric soil moisture collected during the 1987-1989 FIFE experiment. Samples were averaged for each site, then averaged for each...

  14. Site Averaged Gravimetric Soil Moisture: 1988 (Betts)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Site averaged product of the gravimetric soil moisture collected during the 1987-1989 FIFE experiment. Samples were averaged for each site, then averaged for each...

  15. Site Averaged Gravimetric Soil Moisture: 1987 (Betts)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Site averaged product of the gravimetric soil moisture collected during the 1987-1989 FIFE experiment. Samples were averaged for each site, then averaged...

  16. Site Averaged Gravimetric Soil Moisture: 1987 (Betts)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Site averaged product of the gravimetric soil moisture collected during the 1987-1989 FIFE experiment. Samples were averaged for each site, then averaged for each...

  17. Advanced moisture modeling of polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Long term moisture exposure has been shown to affect the mechanical performance of polymeric composite structures. This reduction : in mechanical performance must be considered during product design in order to ensure long term structure survival. In...

  18. Moisture related test protocols for HVS testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide guidance on the possible methodologies for evaluating specifically moisture related pavement response using the Heavy Vehicle Simulator (HVS), this paper describes the objectives, potential effects and available methods...

  19. Soil moisture determinations using capacitance probe methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atkins, Ronald T

    1998-01-01

    ...) systems is a relatively new approach to soil moisture measurements. A unique probe assembly and a readout device that measures voltage drop and phase shift were developed and used for direct capacitance measurements...

  20. Global characterization of surface soil moisture drydowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Kaighin A.; Wang, Wei; Peng, Bin; Akbar, Ruzbeh; Short Gianotti, Daniel J.; Lu, Hui; Pan, Ming; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-04-01

    Loss terms in the land water budget (including drainage, runoff, and evapotranspiration) are encoded in the shape of soil moisture "drydowns": the soil moisture time series directly following a precipitation event, during which the infiltration input is zero. The rate at which drydowns occur—here characterized by the exponential decay time scale τ—is directly related to the shape of the loss function and is a key characteristic of global weather and climate models. In this study, we use 1 year of surface soil moisture observations from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission to characterize τ globally. Consistent with physical reasoning, the observations show that τ is lower in regions with sandier soils, and in regions that are more arid. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of τ—based on observations alone—at scales relevant to weather and climate models.

  1. Moisture buffer capacity of different insulation materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2004-01-01

    lead to more durable constructions. In this paper, a large range of very different thermal insulation materials have been tested in specially constructed laboratory facilities to determine their moisture buffer capacity. Both isothermal and nonisothermal experimental set-ups have been used...... are discussed, and different ways are presented how to determine the moisture buffer capacity of the materials using partly standard material parameters and partly parameters determined from the actual measurements. The results so far show that the determination of moisture buffer capacity is very sensitive...... to the used analysis method and therefore great care has to be taken when comparing results of different experiments. This paper discusses this issue and will come with a recommendation of a simple and consistent way to present the moisture buffer capacity of the materials in contact with the indoor air...

  2. Moisture sorption isotherms of dehydrated whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Rimac Brnčić

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption isotherms describe the relation between the moisture content of the dry material (food and relative humidity of the surrounding environment. The data obtained are important in modelling of drying process conditions, packaging and shelf-life stability of food that will provide maximum retaining of aroma, colour and texture as well as nutritive and biological value. The objective of this research was to establish the equilibrium moisture content and water activity, as well as monolayer value of two commercial powdered whey protein isolates before and after tribomechanical micronisation and enzymatic hydrolysis, respectively. At the same time it was necessary to evaluate the best moisture sorption isotherm equation to fit the experimental data. The equilibrium moisture contents in investigated samples were determined using standard gravimetric method at 20 °C. The range of water activities was 0.11 to 0.75. The monolayer moisture content was estimated from sorption data using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET and Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB models. The results have shown that tribomechanically treated whey protein isolates as well as protein hydrolizates had lower monolayer moisture content values as well as higher corresponding water activity. Therefore, in spite of the fact that they have lower moisture content, they can be storage at higher relative humidity compared to untreated samples. BET model gave better fit to experimental sorption data for a water activity range from 0.11-0.54, while GAB model gave the closest fit for a water activity to 0.75.

  3. Dampness and Moisture Problems in Norwegian Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Becher

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of dampness and mold in the indoor environment is associated with respiratory-related disease outcomes. Thus, it is pertinent to know the magnitude of such indoor environment problems to be able to estimate the potential health impact in the population. In the present study, the moisture damage in 10,112 Norwegian dwellings was recorded based on building inspection reports. The levels of moisture damage were graded based on a condition class (CC, where CC0 is immaculate and CC1 acceptable (actions not required, while CC2 and CC3 indicate increased levels of damage that requires action. Of the 10,112 dwellings investigated, 3125 had verified moisture or mold damage. This amounts to 31% of the surveyed dwellings. Of these, 27% had CC2 as the worst grade, whereas 4% had CC3 as the worst grade level. The room types and building structures most prone to moisture damage were (in rank order crawl spaces, basements, un-insulated attics, cooling rooms, and bathrooms. The high proportion of homes with moisture damage indicate a possible risk for respiratory diseases in a relatively large number of individuals, even if only the more extensive moisture damages and those located in rooms where occupants spend the majority of their time would have a significant influence on adverse health effects.

  4. Measurement of heat and moisture exchanger efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M

    2013-09-01

    Deciding between a passive heat and moisture exchanger or active humidification depends upon the level of humidification that either will deliver. Published international standards dictate that active humidifiers should deliver a minimum humidity of 33 mg.l(-1); however, no such requirement exists, for heat and moisture exchangers. Anaesthetists instead have to rely on information provided by manufacturers, which may not allow comparison of different devices and their clinical effectiveness. I suggest that measurement of humidification efficiency, being the percentage moisture returned and determined by measuring the temperature of the respired gases, should be mandated, and report a modification of the standard method that will allow this to be easily measured. In this study, different types of heat and moisture exchangers for adults, children and patients with a tracheostomy were tested. Adult and paediatric models lost between 6.5 mg.l(-1) and 8.5 mg.l(-1) moisture (corresponding to an efficiency of around 80%); however, the models designed for patients with a tracheostomy lost between 16 mg.l(-1) and 18 mg.l(-1) (60% efficiency). I propose that all heat and moisture exchangers should be tested in this manner and percentage efficiency reported to allow an informed choice between different types and models. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Dampness and Moisture Problems in Norwegian Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Rune; Høie, Anja Hortemo; Bakke, Jan Vilhelm; Holøs, Sverre Bjørn; Øvrevik, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of dampness and mold in the indoor environment is associated with respiratory-related disease outcomes. Thus, it is pertinent to know the magnitude of such indoor environment problems to be able to estimate the potential health impact in the population. In the present study, the moisture damage in 10,112 Norwegian dwellings was recorded based on building inspection reports. The levels of moisture damage were graded based on a condition class (CC), where CC0 is immaculate and CC1 acceptable (actions not required), while CC2 and CC3 indicate increased levels of damage that requires action. Of the 10,112 dwellings investigated, 3125 had verified moisture or mold damage. This amounts to 31% of the surveyed dwellings. Of these, 27% had CC2 as the worst grade, whereas 4% had CC3 as the worst grade level. The room types and building structures most prone to moisture damage were (in rank order) crawl spaces, basements, un-insulated attics, cooling rooms, and bathrooms. The high proportion of homes with moisture damage indicate a possible risk for respiratory diseases in a relatively large number of individuals, even if only the more extensive moisture damages and those located in rooms where occupants spend the majority of their time would have a significant influence on adverse health effects. PMID:29039816

  6. Understanding moisture recycling for atmospheric river management in Amazonian communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wei; Luedeke, Matthias; Zemp, Delphine-Clara; Lakes, Tobia; Pradhan, Prajal; Kropp, Juergen

    2017-04-01

    The invisible atmospheric transports of moisture have recently attracted more research efforts into understanding their structures, processes involved and their function as an ecosystem service. Current attention has been focused on larger scale analysis such as studying global or continental level moisture recycling. Here we applied a water balance model to backtrack the flying river that sustains two local communities in the Colombian and Peruvian Amazon where vulnerable communities rely highly on the rainfall for agricultural practices. By utilising global precipitation (TRMM Multisatillite Precipitation Analysis; TMPA) and evapotranspiration products (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer MODIS, MOD16ET) as input data in the present modelling experiments to compensate the sparse ground observation data in these regions, the moisture recycling process targeting the two amazonian communities which has not yet been explored quantitatively has been shown. The TMPA was selected because of its proved comparativeness with observation data in its precipitation estimations over Amazon regions while the MOD16ET data was chosen for being validated by previous studies in the Amazon basin and for reported good performance. In average, 45.5 % of the precipitation occurring to Caquetá region in Colombia is of terrestrial origin from the South American continent while 48.2% of the total rainfall received by Peruvian Yurimaguas is also from the South American land sources. The spatial distribution of the precipitationsheds (defined previously as the upwind contribution of evapotranspiration to a specific location's precipitation) shows transboundary and transnational shares in the moisture contributors of the precipitation for both regions. An interesting reversed upstream-downstream roles can be observed when the upstream regions in traditional watershed thinking become downstream areas considering precipitationsheds and flying rivers. Strong seasonal variations are

  7. Moisture supply in Danish single-family houses – the influence of building style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Møller, Eva B.

    2017-01-01

    are important as well. Further it was investigated whether snapshot measurements in materials could replace logging of relative humidity and temperature. Building type has only a limited effect on the moisture supply. Geographical location has an effect; however variations are not systematic. It is not possible......According to ISO 13788 internal moisture supply in dwellings can be described by humidity classes defined by outdoor temperature, occupancy and ventilation. Hygrothermal measurements in 500 Danish single-family houses were made to investigate if building style and geographical location...

  8. Moisture and shelf life in sugar confections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, R; Lietha, R; Hartel, R W

    2010-02-01

    From hardening of marshmallow to graining of hard candies, moisture plays a critical role in determining the quality and shelf life of sugar-based confections. Water is important during the manufacturing of confections, is an important factor in governing texture, and is often the limiting parameter during storage that controls shelf life. Thus, an understanding of water relations in confections is critical to controlling quality. Water content, which is controlled during candy manufacturing through an understanding of boiling point elevation, is one of the most important parameters that governs the texture of candies. For example, the texture of caramel progresses from soft and runny to hard and brittle as the moisture content decreases. However, knowledge of water content by itself is insufficient to controlling stability and shelf life. Understanding water activity, or the ratio of vapor pressures, is necessary to control shelf life. A difference in water activity, either between candy and air or between two domains within the candy, is the driving force for moisture migration in confections. When the difference in water activity is large, moisture migration is rapid, although the rate of moisture migration depends on the nature of resistances to water diffusion. Barrier packaging films protect the candy from air whereas edible films inhibit moisture migration between different moisture domains within a confection. More recently, the concept of glass transition, or the polymer science approach, has supplemented water activity as a critical parameter related to candy stability. Confections with low moisture content, such as hard candy, cotton candy, and some caramels and toffees, may contain sugars in the amorphous or glassy state. As long as these products remain below their glass transition temperature, they remain stable for very long times. However, certain glassy sugars tend to be hygroscopic, rapidly picking up moisture from the air, which causes

  9. Drying and control of moisture content and dimensional changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Bergman

    2010-01-01

    The discussion in this chapter is concerned with moisture content determination, recommended moisture content values, drying methods, methods of calculating dimensional changes, design factors affecting such changes in structures, and moisture content control during transit, storage, and construction. Data on green moisture content, fiber saturation point, shrinkage,...

  10. development and testing of a capacitive digital soil moisture metre

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The digital soil moisture meter developed was compared with gravimetric method for soil moisture determination on fifteen soil samples added different level of water during calibration process. The results revealed a relatively linear relationship between the moisture content process and the digital soil moisture meter.

  11. development and testing of a capacitive digital soil moisture metre

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    moisture meter developed was compared with gravimetric method for soil moisture determination on fifteen soil samples added different level of water during calibration process. The results revealed a relatively linear relationship between the moisture content process and the digital soil moisture meter. The regression ...

  12. Effects of rainfall intensity and intermittency on woody vegetation cover and deep soil moisture in dryland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ding-Hai; Li, Xin-Rong; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Chen, Yong-Le

    2016-12-01

    Identifying the relationship between the stochastic daily rainfall regime and the dynamics of plants and soil moisture is fundamental for the sustainable management of dryland ecosystems in a context of global climate change. An eco-hydrological model that couples the dynamics of woody vegetation cover and deep soil moisture (typically with a depth interval of 30-150 cm) was used to investigate the effect of stochastic intensity and the intermittency of precipitation on soil moisture in this deep interval, which affects woody vegetation cover. Our results suggest that the precipitation intensity and intermittency play an important role in the dynamics of wood vegetation cover and deep soil moisture. In arid and semiarid regions, as the annual precipitation increased, the rate of woody vegetation cover increased as a power-law function, and the deep soil moisture increased exponentially. For a given annual rainfall, there were positive correlations between the rainfall intensity (or rainfall intermittency) and both the woody vegetation cover and deep soil moisture. The positive correlations between wood vegetation cover and both rainfall intensity and intermittency may decrease with increases in the precipitation intensity or precipitation intermittency. The positive correlations between deep soil moisture and both rainfall intensity and rainfall intermittency increase as the precipitation intensity or precipitation intermittency increases. Moreover, these positive correlations may increase with increases in the mean annual rainfall. Our results emphasize the importance of daily precipitation variations in controlling the responses of woody vegetation cover and deep soil moisture to climate variations in arid and semiarid regions. Our model can aid the understanding of rainfall processes and indicates that increases in rainfall intensity or rainfall intermittency may lead to an increase in woody vegetation cover and deep soil moisture given an invariable annual

  13. Relative Roles of Soil Moisture, Nutrient Supply, Depth, and Mechanical Impedance in Determining Composition and Structure of Wisconsin Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernerehl, Robert W; Givnish, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Ecologists have long classified Midwestern prairies based on compositional variation assumed to reflect local gradients in moisture availability. The best known classification is based on Curtis' continuum index (CI), calculated using the presence of indicator species thought centered on different portions of an underlying moisture gradient. Direct evidence of the extent to which CI reflects differences in moisture availability has been lacking, however. Many factors that increase moisture availability (e.g., soil depth, silt content) also increase nutrient supply and decrease soil mechanical impedance; the ecological effects of the last have rarely been considered in any ecosystem. Decreased soil mechanical impedance should increase the availability of soil moisture and nutrients by reducing the root costs of retrieving both. Here we assess the relative importance of soil moisture, nutrient supply, and mechanical impedance in determining prairie composition and structure. We used leaf δ13C of C3 plants as a measure of growing-season moisture availability, cation exchange capacity (CEC) x soil depth as a measure of mineral nutrient availability, and penetrometer data as a measure of soil mechanical impedance. Community composition and structure were assessed in 17 remnant prairies in Wisconsin which vary little in annual precipitation. Ordination and regression analyses showed that δ13C increased with CI toward "drier" sites, and decreased with soil depth and % silt content. Variation in δ13C among remnants was 2.0‰, comparable to that along continental gradients from ca. 500-1500 mm annual rainfall. As predicted, LAI and average leaf height increased significantly toward "wetter" sites. CI accounted for 54% of compositional variance but δ13C accounted for only 6.2%, despite the strong relationships of δ13C to CI and CI to composition. Compositional variation reflects soil fertility and mechanical impedance more than moisture availability. This study is the

  14. Field testing a microwave moisture sensor for real-time kernel moisture content monitoring during peanut drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present peanut drying process lacks the capability of kernel moisture content determination in real-time. A microwave moisture sensor, developed within USDA ARS, affords the capability of in-shell kernel moisture content determination; thus, providing a means for monitoring kernel moisture conte...

  15. MARKETING OF WHEAT ON A CONSTANT AND NIL MOISTURE BASIS

    OpenAIRE

    William W. WILSON; Dahl, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined moisture specification practices in the United States and for major exporters and assessed impacts of changes to a nil or constant moisture basis on prices and revenue. These were examined under scenarios where information on moisture in current prices is limited and under a scenario where current prices reflect Full Knowledge of moisture advantages. Results indicate that changing to a nil moisture basis (which requires a subsequent adjustment in volumes to reflect the sub...

  16. Thermal Conductivity of High Performance Concrete in Wide Temperature and Moisture Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of two types of high performance concrete was measured in the temperature range from 100 °C to 800 °C and in the moisture range from dry material to saturation water content. A transient measuring method based on analysis of the measured temperature fields was chosen for the high temperature measurements, and a commercial hot wire device was employed in room temperature measurements of the effect of moisture on thermal conductivity. The measured results reveal that both temperature and moisture exhibit significant effects on the values of thermal conductivity, and these effects are quite comparable from the point of view of the magnitude of the observed variations.

  17. Thermodynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation in a Regional Model with Constrained Moisture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Dudhia, Jimy

    2011-09-01

    In order to identify the main thermodynamic processes that sustain the Madden Julian Oscillation, an eddy available potential energy budget analysis is performed on a WRF simulation with moisture constrained by observations. The model realistically simulates the two MJO episodes observed during the winter of 2007-2008. The analysis shows that instabilities and damping associated with variations in diabatic heating and energy transport work in concert to provide the MJO with its observed characteristics. The results are used to construct a simplified paradigm of MJO thermodynamics. Furthermore, the effect of moisture nudging on the simulation is analyzed to understand the limitations of the model cumulus parameterization. Without moisture nudging, the parameterization fails to provide adequate low-level (upper-level) moistening during the early (late) stage of the MJO active phase. The moistening plays a critical role in providing stratiform heating variability that is an important source of eddy available potential energy for the model MJO.

  18. Moisture buffer capacity of cement-lime plasters with enhanced thermal storage capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fořt, Jan; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Indoor air temperature and relative humidity represent important parameters for health and working efficiency of buildings occupants. Beside the moderation of temperature, investigation of hygric properties of building materials with connection to indoor relative humidity variation became recognized as a relevant factor for energy efficient building maintenance. The moisture buffer value introduced in the Nordtest protocol can be used for estimation of moisture buffer capacity of building materials or their multi-layered systems. In this paper, both the ideal and real moisture buffer values are examined on the basis of simulation of diurnal relative humidity fluctuations in plasters with incorporated PCM admixture. Retrieved data points to a complex effect of the tested plasters on possible moderation of buildings interior climate.

  19. Temporal transferability of soil moisture calibration equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlandson, Tracy L.; Berg, Aaron A.; Bullock, Paul R.; Hanis-Gervais, Krista; Ojo, E. RoTimi; Cosh, Michael H.; Powers, Jarrett; McNairn, Heather

    2018-01-01

    Several large-scale field campaigns have been conducted over the last 20 years that require accurate measurements of soil moisture conditions. These measurements are manually conducted using soil moisture probes which require calibration. The calibration process involves the collection of hundreds of soil moisture cores, which is extremely labor intensive. In 2012, a field campaign was conducted in southern Manitoba in which 55 fields were sampled and calibration equations were derived for each field. The Soil Moisture Active Passive Experiment 2016 (SMAPVEX16) was conducted in this same region, and 21 of the same fields were resampled. This study examines the temporal transferability of calibration equations between these two field campaigns. It was found that the larger range in soil moisture over which samples were collected in 2012 (average range 0.11-0.41 m3 m-3) generally resulted in lower errors when used in 2016 (average range 0.24-0.44 m3 m-3) than the equations derived in 2016 when used with data collected in 2012. Combining the data collected in 2012 and 2016 did not improve the errors, overall. These results suggest that the transfer of calibration equations from one year to the next is not recommended.

  20. Moisture sorption of Thai red curry powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudathip Inchuen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption study was conducted on Thai red curry powder prepared by two different drying methods, viz. microwave and hot-air drying. Moisture sorption isotherms of the red curry powder at 30 C and water activity in the range of 0.113-0.970 were determined by a static gravimetric method. The isotherms exhibited Type III behaviour. The moisture sorption data were fitted to several sorption models and a non-linear regression analysis method was used to evaluate the constants of the sorption equations. The fit was evaluated using the coefficient of determination (R2, the reduced chi-square (2 and the root mean square error (RMSE. The GAB model followed by the Lewiski-3 model gave the best fit to the experimental data. The monolayer moisture content, taken as the safe minimum moisture level in the red curry powder, was determined using the BET equation and was found to range between 0.080 - 0.085 gram water per gram dry matter.

  1. Collective Impacts of Orography and Soil Moisture on the Soil Moisture-Precipitation Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamovic, Adel; Schlemmer, Linda; Schär, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    Ensembles of convection-resolving simulations with a simplified land surface are conducted to dissect the isolated and combined impacts of soil moisture and orography on deep-convective precipitation under weak synoptic forcing. In particular, the deep-convective precipitation response to a uniform and a nonuniform soil moisture perturbation is investigated both in settings with and without orography. In the case of horizontally uniform perturbations, we find a consistently positive soil moisture-precipitation feedback, irrespective of the presence of low orography. On the other hand, a negative feedback emerges with localized perturbations: a dry soil heterogeneity substantially enhances rain amounts that scale linearly with the dryness of the soil, while a moist heterogeneity suppresses rain amounts. If the heterogeneity is located in a mountainous region, the relative importance of soil moisture heterogeneity decreases with increasing mountain height: A mountain 500 m in height is sufficient to neutralize the local soil moisture-precipitation feedback.

  2. Correlation Between Soil Moisture and Dust Emissions: An Investigation for Global Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, Carley; Tan, Qian

    2017-01-01

    This work is using the newly available NASA SMAP soil moisture measurement data to evaluate its impact on the atmospheric dust emissions. Dust is an important component of atmospheric aerosols, which affects both climate and air quality. In this work, we focused on semi-desert regions, where dust emissions show seasonal variations due to soil moisture changes, i.e. in Sahel of Africa. We first identified three Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites in the Sahel (IER_Cinzana, Banizoumbou, and Zinder_Airport). We then utilized measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine mode fraction, size distribution, and single-scattering albedo and its wave-length dependence to select dust plumes from the available measurements We matched the latitude and longitude of the AERONET station to the corresponding SMAP data cell in the years 2015 and 2016, and calculated their correlation coefficient. Additionally, we looked at the correlation coefficient with a three-day and a five-day shift to check the impact of soil moisture on dust plumes with some time delay. Due to the arid nature of Banizoumbou and Zinder_Airport, no correlation was found to exist between local soil moisture and dust aerosol load. While IER_Cinzana had soil moisture levels above the satellite threshold of 0.02cm3/cm3, R-value approaching zero indicated no presence of a correlation. On the other hand, Ilorin demonstrated a significant negative correlation between aerosol optical depth and soil moisture. When isolating the analysis to Ilorin's dry season, a negative correlation of -0.593 was the largest dust-isolated R-value recorded, suggesting that soil moisture is driven the dust emission in this semi-desert region during transitional season.

  3. Evaluation of different approaches for identifying optimal sites to predict mean hillslope soil moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kaihua; Zhou, Zhiwen; Lai, Xiaoming; Zhu, Qing; Feng, Huihui

    2017-04-01

    The identification of representative soil moisture sampling sites is important for the validation of remotely sensed mean soil moisture in a certain area and ground-based soil moisture measurements in catchment or hillslope hydrological studies. Numerous approaches have been developed to identify optimal sites for predicting mean soil moisture. Each method has certain advantages and disadvantages, but they have rarely been evaluated and compared. In our study, surface (0-20 cm) soil moisture data from January 2013 to March 2016 (a total of 43 sampling days) were collected at 77 sampling sites on a mixed land-use (tea and bamboo) hillslope in the hilly area of Taihu Lake Basin, China. A total of 10 methods (temporal stability (TS) analyses based on 2 indices, K-means clustering based on 6 kinds of inputs and 2 random sampling strategies) were evaluated for determining optimal sampling sites for mean soil moisture estimation. They were TS analyses based on the smallest index of temporal stability (ITS, a combination of the mean relative difference and standard deviation of relative difference (SDRD)) and based on the smallest SDRD, K-means clustering based on soil properties and terrain indices (EFs), repeated soil moisture measurements (Theta), EFs plus one-time soil moisture data (EFsTheta), and the principal components derived from EFs (EFs-PCA), Theta (Theta-PCA), and EFsTheta (EFsTheta-PCA), and global and stratified random sampling strategies. Results showed that the TS based on the smallest ITS was better (RMSE = 0.023 m3 m-3) than that based on the smallest SDRD (RMSE = 0.034 m3 m-3). The K-means clustering based on EFsTheta (-PCA) was better (RMSE soil and terrain information is necessary when using this method. The stratified sampling strategy can only be used if no pre-knowledge about soil moisture variation is available. This information will help in selecting the optimal methods for estimation the area mean soil moisture.

  4. [Relationships between soil moisture and needle-fall in Masson pine forests in acid rain region of Chongqing, Southwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Hao; Wang, Yan-Hui; Li, Zhen-Hua; Yu, Peng-Tao; Xiong, Wei; Hao, Jia; Duan, Jian

    2012-10-01

    From March 2009 to November 2011, an investigation was conducted on the spatiotemporal variation of soil moisture and its effects on the needle-fall in Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forests in acid rain region of Chongqing, Southeast China, with the corresponding soil moisture thresholds determined. No matter the annual precipitation was abundant, normal or less than average, the seasonal variation of soil moisture in the forests could be obviously divided into four periods, i.e., sufficient (before May), descending (from June to July), drought (from August to September), and recovering (from October to November). With increasing soil depth, the soil moisture content increased after an initial decrease, but the difference of the soil moisture content among different soil layers decreased with decreasing annual precipitation. The amount of monthly needle-fall in the forests in growth season was significantly correlated with the water storage in root zone (0-60 cm soil layer), especially in the main root zone (20-50 cm soil layer). Soil field capacity (or capillary porosity) and 82% of field capacity (or 80% of capillary porosity) were the main soil moisture thresholds affecting the litter-fall. It was suggested that in acid rain region, Masson pine forest was easily to suffer from water deficit stress, especially in dry-summer period. The water deficit stress, together with already existed acid rain stress, would further threaten the health of the Masson forest.

  5. Soil moisture needs in earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engman, Edwin T.

    1992-01-01

    The author reviews the development of passive and active microwave techniques for measuring soil moisture with respect to how the data may be used. New science programs such as the EOS, the GEWEX Continental-Scale International Project (GCIP) and STORM, a mesoscale meteorology and hydrology project, will have to account for soil moisture either as a storage in water balance computations or as a state variable in-process modeling. The author discusses future soil moisture needs such as frequency of measurement, accuracy, depth, and spatial resolution, as well as the concomitant model development that must proceed concurrently if the development in microwave technology is to have a major impact in these areas.

  6. Control of Moisture Ingress into Photovoltaic Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempe, M. D.

    2005-02-01

    During long-term exposure of photovoltaic modules to environmental stress, the ingress of water into the module is correlated with decreased performance. By using diffusivity measurements for water through encapsulants such as ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), we have modeled moisture ingress using a finite-element analysis with atmospheric data from various locations such as Miami, Florida. This analysis shows that because of the high diffusivity of EVA, even an impermeable glass back-sheet alone is incapable of preventing significant moisture ingress from the edges for a 20-year lifecycle. This result has led us to investigate ways to protect modules from moisture through the use of different encapsulating chemistries and materials.

  7. Distributed fiber optic moisture intrusion sensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2003-06-24

    Method and system for monitoring and identifying moisture intrusion in soil such as is contained in landfills housing radioactive and/or hazardous waste. The invention utilizes the principle that moist or wet soil has a higher thermal conductance than dry soil. The invention employs optical time delay reflectometry in connection with a distributed temperature sensing system together with heating means in order to identify discrete areas within a volume of soil wherein temperature is lower. According to the invention an optical element and, optionally, a heating element may be included in a cable or other similar structure and arranged in a serpentine fashion within a volume of soil to achieve efficient temperature detection across a large area or three dimensional volume of soil. Remediation, moisture countermeasures, or other responsive action may then be coordinated based on the assumption that cooler regions within a soil volume may signal moisture intrusion where those regions are located.

  8. Moisture content effect in the relationship between apparent electrical conductivity and soil attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Marques Costa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To map the spatial variability of a field to define the variable rate application, an intensive sampling of the soil-plant system is necessary. The apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa has been used for soil mapping because it correlates well with soil attributes, allows for dense sampling and can be obtained at low cost. However, ECa is influenced by soil moisture content, and the variability of this attribute can reduce the reliability of the ECa maps to explain the physical and chemical soil attributes. The objective of this study was to identify conditions that maximize the correlations between the ECa and the soil attributes. The results show that the mean soil moisture content of soil sampled on different dates was correlated with the mean of the ECa. The ideal time for measuring ECa occurred when the mean moisture content of the soil was higher. In this condition, the coefficient of variation for the soil moisture content was lower, there was no correlation between ECa and soil moisture content, and ECa was more correlated with other soil attributes evaluated in this work.

  9. Measurement of Moisture in Wood for Application in the Restoration of Old Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Moron

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There are many historic buildings whose construction is based on timber frame walls. Most buildings built during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were based on timber frame walls with vertical support elements. These timber frame elements are affected by their moisture content and by the passage of time. If the interaction of the timber frame walls with hygrothermal fluctuations were known, the maintenance of these buildings could be improved significantly. To determine the moisture content of wood there are two types of meters on the market: on the one hand, capacitance meters which consist of two side ends and where the moisture content is measured locally between two peaks. On the other hand, there are meters based on the variation of electromagnetic transmittance of timber, which depends on the moisture of timber. The second ones are very expensive and difficult to handle. This work presents a new non-intrusive capacitive sensor that measures the global moisture content in a section of the timber frame walls and therefore its accuracy is similar to the accuracy that can be obtained with electromagnetic transmittance meters. Additionally, as it is a capacitive sensor, it is low cost and easy to operate.

  10. [New index for soil moisture monitoring based on deltaT(s)-albedo spectral information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yun-Jun; Qin, Qi-Ming; Zhao, Shao-Hua; Shen, Xin-Yi; Sui, Xin-Xin

    2011-06-01

    Monitoring soil moisture by remote sensing has been an important problem for both agricultural drought monitoring and water resources management. In the present paper, we acquire the land surface temperature difference (deltaT(s)) and broadband albedo using MODIS Terra reflectance and land surface temperature products to construct the deltaT(s)-albedo spectral feature space. According to the soil moisture variation in spectral feature space, we put forward a simple and practical temperature difference albedo drought index (TDADI) and validate it using ground-measured 0-10 cm averaged soil moisture of Ningxia plain The results show that the coefficient of determination (R2) of both them varies from 0.36 to 0.52, and TDADI has higher accuracy than temperature albedo drought index (TADI) for soil moisture retrieval. The good agreement of TDADI, Albedo/LST, LST/ NDVI and TVDI for analyzing the trends of soil moisture change supports the reliability of TDADI. However, TDADI has been designed only at Ningxia plain and still needs further validation in other regions.

  11. Physical Properties of two Acha varieties as a function of Moisture Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Aviara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available "Acha" is a cereal crop of West African origin belonging to the family graminaea. There are many varieties of Acha, but the most prominent two are the white Acha (Digitaria exillis and brown Acha (Digitaria iburua. Acha is used in the production of food and beverages, and manufacture of medicines. The grain therefore, has immense economic values. However, the mechanization of Acha processing has been limited by shortage of data on its physical properties that would aid the design of equipment for its post-harvest operations. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the variation of bulk density, particle size distribution, porosity, solid density, angle of repose and one thousand grain mass of the two varieties of the crop with moisture content. The moisture content range within which the study was conducted was 5 - 30% (d.b for both white and brown variety. Results showed that as the moisture content of the two varieties of Acha increased, there was decrease in bulk density, porosity and solid density. However, increase in moisture content increased the 1000-grain mass and angle of repose of both varieties, with the values for white Acha being higher than those of brown Acha. The operation and adjustment of any Acha processing and storage equipment would therefore require a consideration of the variety and moisture content to obtain good performance.

  12. Microwave DENSITY—INDEPENDENT Permittivity Functions as Spring Oats Kernels' Moisture Calibrators: a New Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Priyanka; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Singh, P. N.; Prasad, Ashutosh

    2011-11-01

    The present work makes use of experimental data for real part of microwave complex permittivity of spring oats (Avena sativa L.) at 2.45 GHz and 24 °C as a function of moisture content, as extracted from the literature. These permittivity data were individually converted to those for solid materials using seven independent mixture equations for effective permittivity of random media. Moisture dependent quadratic models for complex permittivity of spring oats (Avena sativa L.), as developed by the present group, were used to evaluate the dielectric loss factor of spring oats kernels. Using these data, seven density—independent permittivity functions were evaluated and plotted as a function of moisture content of the samples. Second and third order polynomial regression equations were used for curve fittings with these data and their performances are reported. Coefficients of determination (r2) approaching unity (˜ 0.95-0.9999) and very small Standard Deviation (SD) ˜0.001-8.87 show good acceptability for these models. The regularity in the nature of these variations revealed the usefulness of the density—independent permittivity functions as indicators/calibrators of moisture content of spring oats kernels. Keeping in view the fact that moisture content of grains and seeds is an important factor determining quality and affecting the storage, transportation, and milling of grains and seeds, the work has the potentiality of its practical applications.

  13. Soil moisture under contrasted atmospheric conditions in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorin-Molina, César; Cerdà, Artemi; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2014-05-01

    (10), 2069-2085. Azorin-Molina, C., Vicente-Serrano, S. M., Cerdà, A. 2013. Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming. EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU2013-13286. Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S.H. & Cerdà, A. 2011. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. 10.1016/j.geoderma.2010.11.009 Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Water Resources Research, 35 (1) 319-328. Cerdà, A. 2002. The effect of season and parent material on water erosion on highly eroded soils in eastern Spain. Journal of Arid Environments, 52, 319-337. García-Fayos, P. García-Ventoso, B. Cerdà, A. 2000. Limitations to Plant establishment on eroded slopes in Southeastern Spain. Journal of Vegetation Science, 11- 77- 86. Ghafoor, A., Murtaza, G., Rehman, M. Z., Saifullah Sabir, M. 2012. Reclamation and salt leaching efficiency for tile drained saline-sodic soil using marginal quality water for irrigating rice and wheat crops. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 1 -9. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1033 Johnston, C. R., Vance, G. F., Ganjegunte, G. K. 2013. Soil properties changes following irrigation with coalbed natural gas water: role of water treatments, soil amendments and land suitability. Land Degradation & Development, 24: 350- 362. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1132 Qadir, M., Noble, A. D., Chartres, C. 2013. Adapting to climate change by improving water productivity of soil in dry areas. Land Degradation & Development, 24: 12- 21. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1091 Ziadat, F. M., and Taimeh, A. Y. 2013. Effect of rainfall intensity, slope

  14. Soil moisture in sessile oak forest gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagyvainé Kiss, Katalin Anita; Vastag, Viktor; Gribovszki, Zoltán; Kalicz, Péter

    2015-04-01

    By social demands are being promoted the aspects of the natural forest management. In forestry the concept of continuous forest has been an accepted principle also in Hungary since the last decades. The first step from even-aged stand to continuous forest can be the forest regeneration based on gap cutting, so small openings are formed in a forest due to forestry interventions. This new stand structure modifies the hydrological conditions for the regrowth. Without canopy and due to the decreasing amounts of forest litter the interception is less significant so higher amount of precipitation reaching the soil. This research focuses on soil moisture patterns caused by gaps. The spatio-temporal variability of soil water content is measured in gaps and in surrounding sessile oak (Quercus petraea) forest stand. Soil moisture was determined with manual soil moisture meter which use Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) technology. The three different sizes gaps (G1: 10m, G2: 20m, G3: 30m) was opened next to Sopron on the Dalos Hill in Hungary. First, it was determined that there is difference in soil moisture between forest stand and gaps. Second, it was defined that how the gap size influences the soil moisture content. To explore the short term variability of soil moisture, two 24-hour (in growing season) and a 48-hour (in dormant season) field campaign were also performed in case of the medium-sized G2 gap along two/four transects. Subdaily changes of soil moisture were performed. The measured soil moisture pattern was compared with the radiation pattern. It was found that the non-illuminated areas were wetter and in the dormant season the subdaily changes cease. According to our measurements, in the gap there is more available water than under the forest stand due to the less evaporation and interception loss. Acknowledgements: The research was supported by TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0004 and AGRARKLIMA.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034.

  15. Calculate the moisture content of steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Water droplets in steam can create serious problems. For example, if the steam is being used to drive turbines, droplets can damage the turbine blades. It is important, therefore, for an engineer to know if steam contains moisture, especially if the steam is generated in low-pressure boilers (under 500 psia). Unlike larger boilers, these units don't have internal separation devices such as cyclones. Calculating the steam's moisture content, or quality, can be complicated procedure. Now, a simple chart can be used to get the data from one temperature reading. The paper explains the procedure.

  16. Clustering of soil moisture time series pattern for selecting representative point on mountainous hillslopes in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E.; Cho, M.; Kim, S.

    2016-12-01

    A method was proposed to find the representative soil moisture measurement points for a steep hillslope located on northeastern part of South Korea. We had analyzed time series data of soil moisture for 49 points between May and November 2013 in the study area to characterize temporal and spatial variation pattern characteristics. The factor analysis showed monthly characteristics of Index of temporal stability (ITS) which can be classified into 3 distinct characteristics. Dendrogram was useful to characterize spatial and topographic patterns of soil moisture. The performance of the proposed method was compared with existing ITS approach in terms of the coefficient of determination showing better representing potential for soil moisture measurements. The results of this pattern approach can be used to interpolate the missing data with high accuracy which was made it possible through addressing characteristics of topography and rainfall events depending on seasonal classification.

  17. Multivariate analysis of soil moisture and runoff dynamics for better understanding of catchment moisture state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, Thomas; Bronstert, Axel; Cunha Costa, Alexandre; Zehe, Erwin

    2010-05-01

    Soil moisture is a key state that controls runoff formation, infiltration and portioning of radiation into latent and sensible heat flux. The experimental characterisation of near surface soil moisture patterns and their controls on runoff formation is, however, still largely untapped. Using an intelligent sampling strategy of two TDR clusters installed in the head water of the Wilde Weißeritz catchment (Eastern Ore Mountains, Germany), we investigated how well "the catchment state" may be characterised by means of distributed soil moisture data observed at the field scale. A grassland site and a forested site both located on gentle slopes were instrumented with two Spatial TDR clusters (STDR) that consist of 39 and 32 coated TDR probes of 60 cm length. The interplay of soil moisture and runoff formation was interrogated using discharge data from three nested catchments: the Becherbach with a size of 2 km², the Rehefeld catchment (17 km²) and the superordinate Ammelsdorf catchment (49 km²). Multiple regression analysis and information theory including observations of groundwater levels, soil moisture and rainfall intensity were employed to predict stream flow. On the small scale we found a strong correlation between the average soil moisture and the runoff coefficients of rainfall-runoff events, which almost explains as much variability as the pre-event runoff. There was, furthermore, a strong correlation between surface soil moisture and subsurface wetness. With increasing catchment size, the explanatory power of soil moisture reduced, but it was still in a good accordance to the former results. Combining those results with a recession analysis of soil moisture and discharge we derived a first conceptual model of the dominant runoff mechanisms operating in these catchments, namely subsurface flow, but also by groundwater. The multivariate analysis indicated that the proposed sampling strategy of clustering TDR probes in typical functional units is a promising

  18. The International Soil Moisture Network: a data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorigo, W. A.; Wagner, W.; Hohensinn, R.; Hahn, S.; Paulik, C.; Xaver, A.; Gruber, A.; Drusch, M.; Mecklenburg, S.; van Oevelen, P.; Robock, A.; Jackson, T.

    2011-05-01

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land cover change. Nevertheless, on a worldwide basis the number of meteorological networks and stations measuring soil moisture, in particular on a continuous basis, is still limited and the data they provide lack standardization of technique and protocol. To overcome many of these limitations, the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN; http://www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/insitu) was initiated to serve as a centralized data hosting facility where globally available in situ soil moisture measurements from operational networks and validation campaigns are collected, harmonized, and made available to users. Data collecting networks share their soil moisture datasets with the ISMN on a voluntary and no-cost basis. Incoming soil moisture data are automatically transformed into common volumetric soil moisture units and checked for outliers and implausible values. Apart from soil water measurements from different depths, important metadata and meteorological variables (e.g., precipitation and soil temperature) are stored in the database. These will assist the user in correctly interpreting the soil moisture data. The database is queried through a graphical user interface while output of data selected for download is provided according to common standards for data and metadata. Currently (status May 2011), the ISMN contains data of 19 networks and more than 500 stations located in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. The time period spanned by the entire database runs from 1952 until the present, although most datasets have originated during the last decade. The database is rapidly expanding, which means that both the number of stations and the time period covered by the existing

  19. Moisture diffusion parameter characteristics for epoxy composites and neat resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The moisture absorption characteristics of two graphite/epoxy composites and their corresponding cured neat resins were studied in high humidity and water immersion environments at elevated temperatures. Moisture absorption parameters, such as equilibrium moisture content and diffusion coefficient derived from data taken on samples exposed to high humidity and water soak environments, were compared. Composite swelling in a water immersion environment was measured. Tensile strengths of cured neat resin were measured as a function of their equilibrium moisture content after exposure to different moisture environments. The effects of intermittent moderate tensile loads on the moisture absorption parameters of composite and cured neat resin samples were determined.

  20. Disaggregation of remotely sensed soil moisture under all sky condition using machine learning approach in Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Kim, H.; Choi, M.; Kim, K.

    2016-12-01

    Estimating spatiotemporal variation of soil moisture is crucial to hydrological applications such as flood, drought, and near real-time climate forecasting. Recent advances in space-based passive microwave measurements allow the frequent monitoring of the surface soil moisture at a global scale and downscaling approaches have been applied to improve the spatial resolution of passive microwave products available at local scale applications. However, most downscaling methods using optical and thermal dataset, are valid only in cloud-free conditions; thus renewed downscaling method under all sky condition is necessary for the establishment of spatiotemporal continuity of datasets at fine resolution. In present study Support Vector Machine (SVM) technique was utilized to downscale a satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. The 0.1 and 0.25-degree resolution of daily Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM) L3 soil moisture datasets from Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) were disaggregated over Northeast Asia in 2015. Optically derived estimates of surface temperature (LST), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and its cloud products were obtained from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the purpose of downscaling soil moisture in finer resolution under all sky condition. Furthermore, a comparison analysis between in situ and downscaled soil moisture products was also conducted for quantitatively assessing its accuracy. Results showed that downscaled soil moisture under all sky condition not only preserves the quality of AMSR2 LPRM soil moisture at 1km resolution, but also attains higher spatial data coverage. From this research we expect that time continuous monitoring of soil moisture at fine scale regardless of weather conditions would be available.

  1. Analysis of Joint Masonry Moisture Content Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Kohta [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Adding insulation to the interior side of walls of masonry buildings in cold (and wet) climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns, such as condensation and freeze-thaw, have known solutions, but wood members embedded in the masonry structure will be colder (and potentially wetter) after an interior insulation retrofit. Moisture content & relative humidity were monitored at joist ends in historic mass brick masonry walls retrofitted with interior insulation in a cold climate (Zone 5A); data were collected from 2012-2015. Eleven joist ends were monitored in all four orientations. One limitation of these results is that the renovation is still ongoing, with limited wintertime construction heating and no permanent occupancy to date. Measurements show that many joists ends remain at high moisture contents, especially at north- and east-facing orientations, with constant 100% RH conditions at the worst cases. These high moisture levels are not conducive for wood durability, but no evidence for actual structural damage has been observed. Insulated versus non-insulated joist pockets do not show large differences. South facing joists have safe (10-15%) moisture contents. Given the uncertainty pointed out by research, definitive guidance on the vulnerability of embedded wood members is difficult to formulate. In high-risk situations, or when a very conservative approach is warranted, the embedded wood member condition can be eliminated entirely, supporting the joist ends outside of the masonry pocket.

  2. Assessment of NGNP Moisture Ingress Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Landman

    2011-04-01

    An assessment of modular HTGR moisture ingress events, making use of a phenomena identification and ranking process, was conducted by a panel of experts in the related areas for the U.S. next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) design. Consideration was given mainly to the prismatic core gas-cooled reactor configurations incorporating a steam generator within the primary circuit.

  3. Moisture barrier properties of xylan composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit Saxena; Thomas J. Elder; Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2011-01-01

    Moisture barrier properties of films based on xylan reinforced with several cellulosic resources including nanocrystalline cellulose, acacia bleached kraft pulp fibers and softwood kraft fibers have been evaluated. Measurements of water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) were performed by a modification of the wet cup method described by ASTM E 96-95, indicating that...

  4. Moisture in organic coatings - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, G.K. van der; Adan, O.C.G.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on transport and equilibrium sorption of moisture in polymer films and organic coatings. Polymeric material forms the continuous phase of a coating and is therefore important for transport properties. Besides polymer, coatings consist of pigments and fillers and various additives,

  5. SOME MOISTURE DEPENDENT THERMAL PROPERTIES AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thermal heat conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal heat diffusivity and bulk density of Prosopis africana seeds were determined as a function of moisture content. Specific heat capacity was measured by the method of mixture while the thermal heat conductivity was measured by the guarded hot plate method.

  6. Seedling quality tests: plant moisture stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary Ritchie; Thomas D. Landis

    2005-01-01

    This is the fifth installment in our review of seedling quality tests. Here we focus on what is commonly known as "plant moisture stress" or PMS. Although PMS is not routinely used for seedling quality testing per se, it is nevertheless the most common physiological measurement made on reforestation stock. This is because the measurement itself is simple and...

  7. Model of moisture absorption by adhesive joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla Mora, Veronica; Mieloszyk, Magdalena; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2018-01-01

    Adhesive joints offer many advantages over traditional mechanical joining systems. Nonetheless, their use is limited since they can be adversely affected by extreme temperatures and humidity conditions. Moisture contamination (even 1-3% of the sample weight) in an adhesive can alter its tensile strength and compromise the structural integrity of the joint. Moisture absorption processes can be monitored using methods based on fibre Bragg grating sensors embedded in the adhesive material. In the present paper, a finite element model of an adhesive joint between composite elements was analysed using the commercial code Abaqus™. The investigation contains two main parts: a thermal analysis and a hygro-mechanical analysis. The achieved results were verified using experimental investigation results for a sample with embedded fibre Bragg grating sensors that were applied to monitor the moisture-induced strains in the adhesive joint. The achieved numerical results show good agreement with the experimental ones for all considered analyses. The presented models can also be used for the determination of moisture content in an adhesive layer especially in a range of 1.5-2.5% of the water content.

  8. Soil Moisture Remote Sensing: Status and Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellite-based passive microwave sensors have been available for thirty years and provide the basis for soil moisture monitoring and mapping. The approach has reached a level of maturity that is now limited primarily by technology and funding. This is a result of extensive research and development ...

  9. Moisture Retention Characteristics of Soils of Different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Least total available water was found in soils over alluvium (4.03). Total available water had a significant relationship with total sand (R2 = 0.56, P=0.01). Soil moisture retention characteristic dependent variable was highly predicted by independent variables of total sand, clay content and organic carbon at various tension ...

  10. Effect of Pyrodextrinization, Crosslinking and Heat- Moisture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    starch prior to modification by pyrodextrinization, cross-linking and heat-moisture treatment. Solubility, swelling power, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal properties of the native and modified starches were ... the chemical and nutritional composition of P. biglobosa seeds revealed that it is rich ...

  11. Lagrangian tracing of Sahelian Sudan moisture sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Abubakr A. M.; Zhang, Qiong; Tjernström, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The Sahelian Sudan is an arid to semiarid region that depends on the seasonal rainfall as the main source of water, but its rainfall has large interannual variability. Such dry regions usually have their main moisture sources elsewhere; thus, the rainfall variability is directly related to the moisture transport. This study seeks to identify source regions of water vapor for Sahelian Sudan during the monsoon period, from July to September. We have used the Lagrangian trajectory model FLEXPART driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis for the time period 1998 to 2008. The results show that most of the air masses that reach this region during the monsoon period have their major origins over the Arabian Peninsula, Central Africa, or are associated with the tropical easterly jet. Flow associated with Intertropical Convergence Zone contributes almost half of the total precipitated water; most of it comes from Central Africa. This suggests that moisture recycling is the major contributor, compared to Oceanic sources. The flows from the northeast (Arabian Peninsula and north Asia) and east (Horn of Africa and north Indian Ocean) contribute about one third of the precipitated water. The rest of precipitated water comes from the Mediterranean, subtropical Atlantic, and western Sahel, all with smaller contribution. Our results also indicate that different subregions of Sahelian Sudan have different moisture sources. Such result needs to be taken into account in seasonal forecasting practices.

  12. AMSR2 Soil Moisture Product Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T.; Cosh, M.; Koike, T.; Fuiji, X.; de Jeu, R.; Chan, S.; Asanuma, J.; Berg, A.; Bosch, D.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is part of the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) mission. AMSR2 fills the void left by the loss of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) after almost 10 years. Both missions provide brightness temperature observations that are used to retrieve soil moisture. Merging AMSR-E and AMSR2 will help build a consistent long-term dataset. Before tackling the integration of AMSR-E and AMSR2 it is necessary to conduct a thorough validation and assessment of the AMSR2 soil moisture products. This study focuses on validation of the AMSR2 soil moisture products by comparison with in situ reference data from a set of core validation sites. Three products that rely on different algorithms were evaluated; the JAXA Soil Moisture Algorithm (JAXA), the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM), and the Single Channel Algorithm (SCA). Results indicate that overall the SCA has the best performance based upon the metrics considered.

  13. Reconstruction of FY-3B/MWRI soil moisture using an artificial neural network based on reconstructed MODIS optical products over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Long, D.; Hong, Y.; Zeng, C.; Han, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Reconstruction of FY-3B/MWRI soil moisture using an artificial neural network based on reconstructed MODIS optical products over the Tibetan Plateau Yaokui Cui, Di Long, Yang Hong, Chao Zeng, and Zhongying Han State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China Abstract: Soil moisture is a key variable in the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere, especially over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) which is climatically and hydrologically sensitive as the world's third pole. Large-scale consistent and continuous soil moisture datasets are of importance to meteorological and hydrological applications, such as weather forecasting and drought monitoring. The Fengyun-3B Microwave Radiation Imager (FY-3B/MWRI) soil moisture product is one of relatively new passive microwave products. The FY-3B/MWRI soil moisture product is reconstructed using the back-propagation neural network (BP-NN) based on reconstructed MODIS products, i.e., LST, NDVI, and albedo using different gap-filling methods. The reconstruction method of generating the soil moisture product not only considers the relationship between the soil moisture and the NDVI, LST, and albedo, but also the relationship between the soil moisture and the four-dimensional variation using the longitude, latitude, DEM and day of year (DOY). Results show that the soil moisture could be well reconstructed with R2 larger than 0.63, and RMSE less than 0.1 cm3 cm-3 and bias less than 0.07 cm3 cm-3 for both frozen and unfrozen periods, compared with in-situ measurements in the central TP. The reconstruction method is subsequently applied to generate spatially consistent and temporally continuous surface soil moisture over the TP. The reconstructed FY-3B/MWRI soil moisture product could be valuable in studying meteorology, hydrology, and agriculture over the TP. Keywords: FY-3B/MWRI; Soil moisture; Reconstruction; Tibetan

  14. Variability in Soil Moisture in a Temperate Deciduous Forest Using Electrical Resistivity and Throughfall Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y.; Van Dam, R. L.; Jayawickreme, D.

    2013-12-01

    In deciduous forests, soil moisture is an important driver of energy and carbon cycling, as well as ecosystem dynamics. The amount and distribution of soil moisture also influences soil microbial activity, nutrient fluxes, and groundwater recharge. Consequently, accurate characterization of interactions and interdependencies between vegetation and soil moisture is critical to forecast water resources and ecosystem health in a changing climate. Such relationships and processes are nevertheless difficult to measure, both in time and space because of our limited ability to monitor the subsurface at necessary scales and frequencies. Several recent studies have shown that electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), using an array of minimally invasive surface electrodes, is a promising method for in-situ soil moisture monitoring. To this point, however, only few studies have used ERT to investigate spatial variability of soil moisture in temperate deciduous forests and to explore any links between soil water and above ground ecosystem variables. In our study in a central Michigan (USA) maple forest during the 2012 growing season, we combined ERT with detailed vegetation surveys and throughfall measurements to obtain better insight into spatial variations in rainwater input and soil water patterns. Resistivity data were collected on a weekly basis along an array of 84 electrodes with a spacing of 1.5 m. The inversion results were temperature corrected, converted to soil moisture, and differenced to obtain 2D images of soil moisture changes. The throughfall data were obtained using a novel method based on dissolution of plaster-of-paris tablets that were positioned below funnels, at 19 locations in the forest. Our results show that: 1) resistivity changes spatially with vegetation distribution, 2) in-season temporal changes in resistivity are related to plant characteristics, in particular to tree count and basal area, and 3) our low-budget throughfall method was capable of

  15. A two-phase moisture transport model accounting for sorption hysteresis in layered porous building constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn; Janz, Mårten

    2009-01-01

    Building constructions most commonly consists of layered porous materials such as masonry on bricks. The moisture distribution and its variations due to change in surrounding environment is of special interest in such layered construction since materials adsorb different amounts of water and exhi......Building constructions most commonly consists of layered porous materials such as masonry on bricks. The moisture distribution and its variations due to change in surrounding environment is of special interest in such layered construction since materials adsorb different amounts of water...... and exhibits different transport properties. A successful model of such a case may shred light on the performance of different constructions with regards to, for example, mould growth and freeze thaw damages. For this purpose a model has been developed which is based on a two phase flow, vapor and liquid water...

  16. Mode Decomposition Methods for Soil Moisture Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, R. B.; Efendiev, Y. R.; Mohanty, B.

    2014-12-01

    Lack of reliable, well-distributed, long-term datasets for model validation is a bottle-neck for most exercises in soil moisture analysis and prediction. Understanding what factors drive soil hydrological processes at different scales and their variability is very critical to further our ability to model the various components of the hydrologic cycle more accurately. For this, a comprehensive dataset with measurements across scales is very necessary. Intensive fine-resolution sampling of soil moisture over extended periods of time is financially and logistically prohibitive. Installation of a few long term monitoring stations is also expensive, and needs to be situated at critical locations. The concept of Time Stable Locations has been in use for some time now to find locations that reflect the mean values for the soil moisture across the watershed under all wetness conditions. However, the soil moisture variability across the watershed is lost when measuring at only time stable locations. We present here a study using techniques such as Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) and Discrete Empirical Interpolation Method (DEIM) that extends the concept of time stable locations to arrive at locations that provide not simply the average soil moisture values for the watershed, but also those that can help re-capture the dynamics across all locations in the watershed. As with the time stability, the initial analysis is dependent on an intensive sampling history. The DMD/DEIM method is an application of model reduction techniques for non-linearly related measurements. Using this technique, we are able to determine the number of sampling points that would be required for a given accuracy of prediction across the watershed, and the location of those points. Locations with higher energetics in the basis domain are chosen first. We present case studies across watersheds in the US and India. The technique can be applied to other hydro-climates easily.

  17. Evaluation of uncertainty in field soil moisture estimations by cosmic-ray neutron sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiffele, Lena Maria; Baroni, Gabriele; Schrön, Martin; Ingwersen, Joachim; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2017-04-01

    Cosmic-ray neutron sensing (CRNS) has developed into a valuable, indirect and non-invasive method to estimate soil moisture at the field scale. It provides continuous temporal data (hours to days), relatively large depth (10-70 cm), and intermediate spatial scale measurements (hundreds of meters), thereby overcoming some of the limitations in point measurements (e.g., TDR/FDR) and of remote sensing products. All these characteristics make CRNS a favorable approach for soil moisture estimation, especially for applications in cropped fields and agricultural water management. Various studies compare CRNS measurements to soil sensor networks and show a good agreement. However, CRNS is sensitive to more characteristics of the land-surface, e.g. additional hydrogen pools, soil bulk density, and biomass. Prior to calibration the standard atmospheric corrections are accounting for the effects of air pressure, humidity and variations in incoming neutrons. In addition, the standard calibration approach was further extended to account for hydrogen in lattice water and soil organic material. Some corrections were also proposed to account for water in biomass. Moreover, the sensitivity of the probe was found to decrease with distance and a weighting procedure for the calibration datasets was introduced to account for the sensors' radial sensitivity. On the one hand, all the mentioned corrections showed to improve the accuracy in estimated soil moisture values. On the other hand, they require substantial additional efforts in monitoring activities and they could inherently contribute to the overall uncertainty of the CRNS product. In this study we aim (i) to quantify the uncertainty in the field soil moisture estimated by CRNS and (ii) to understand the role of the different sources of uncertainty. To this end, two experimental sites in Germany were equipped with a CRNS probe and compared to values of a soil moisture network. The agricultural fields were cropped with winter

  18. Stemflow affects spatial soil moisture fields differently in summer and winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Anke; Friesen, Jan; Kögler, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Stemflow is only a minor component of net precipitation, but because it acts as a point input, it has the potential to strongly shape the soil moisture patterns below trees and induce vertical fluxes as well as groundwater recharge. However, there is little research on the evolution of soil moisture patterns around trees over prolonged periods of time. In this paper we investigate in a beech dominated forest in central Germany the dynamics of surface soil moisture in proximal (Harz/Central German Lowland Observatory. We measured soil water content using a wireless sensor network (SoilNet) at over 130 locations. The measurement points were arranged in circles of increasing radius around the tree trunks. Data were collected over a nine months period, including 10 weeks of intensive event based throughfall and stemflow monitoring. During the growing season, water content near the tree trunks was almost always lower compared to greater distance from the tree, which may be related to both lower root water uptake and higher throughfall in regions with thinner crowns at mid-distance between trees. During the growing season, soil water content near the beech trees only exceeded levels at greater distance during few rain events with substantial stemflow (15-20% of rain). However, during the wintertime, soil moisture near the trees was higher than at greater distances, in particular in response to rain events after leaf senescence. The variance of soil moisture at tree-distant locations is highest at intermediate mean moisture levels, while variance is low at both very high and very low mean soil water content. No such pattern is evident for the region near the trees, where both the highest and lowest variances occur at intermediate soil water contents. Our results indicate that the areas near tree trunks are a source of substantial spatial variation in the soil moisture field below trees. The elevated soil moisture in fall and early winter suggests a strong role of stemflow

  19. Observing and modeling links between soil moisture, microbes and CH4 fluxes from forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Jesper; Levy-Booth, David; Barker, Jason; Prescott, Cindy; Grayston, Sue

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key driver of methane (CH4) fluxes in forest soils, both of the net uptake of atmospheric CH4 and emission from the soil. Climate and land use change will alter spatial patterns of soil moisture as well as temporal variability impacting the net CH4 exchange. The impact on the resultant net CH4 exchange however is linked to the underlying spatial and temporal distribution of the soil microbial communities involved in CH4 cycling as well as the response of the soil microbial community to environmental changes. Significant progress has been made to target specific CH4 consuming and producing soil organisms, which is invaluable in order to understand the microbial regulation of the CH4 cycle in forest soils. However, it is not clear as to which extent soil moisture shapes the structure, function and abundance of CH4 specific microorganisms and how this is linked to observed net CH4 exchange under contrasting soil moisture regimes. Here we report on the results from a research project aiming to understand how the CH4 net exchange is shaped by the interactive effects soil moisture and the spatial distribution CH4 consuming (methanotrophs) and producing (methanogens). We studied the growing season variations of in situ CH4 fluxes, microbial gene abundances of methanotrophs and methanogens, soil hydrology, and nutrient availability in three typical forest types across a soil moisture gradient in a temperate rainforest on the Canadian Pacific coast. Furthermore, we conducted laboratory experiments to determine whether the net CH4 exchange from hydrologically contrasting forest soils responded differently to changes in soil moisture. Lastly, we modelled the microbial mediation of net CH4 exchange along the soil moisture gradient using structural equation modeling. Our study shows that it is possible to link spatial patterns of in situ net exchange of CH4 to microbial abundance of CH4 consuming and producing organisms. We also show that the microbial

  20. Modelling of hydrous and thermal transfers in tropical climates and buffering moisture with hygroscopic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Franck; Miranville, Frédéric; Bastide, Alain

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Controlling humidity to prevent moisture and condensation phenomena is a growing problem for building designers nowadays. Ventilation and air conditioning are common solutions to avoid mold and condensation. However, to promote low cost energy buildings, an alternate solution may be to decrease the daily variation of humidity with anti fungi treated absorbing material. In this case, a very accurate evaluation of room humidity is necessary to determine material ability ...

  1. SMEX03 Regional Ground Soil Moisture Data: Georgia, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The parameters for this data set include gravimetric soil moisture, volumetric soil moisture, bulk density, and surface and soil temperature for the Georgia study...

  2. SMEX02 Iowa Regional Ground Soil Moisture Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The parameters for this data set include gravimetric and volumetric soil moisture, bulk density, and soil temperature. This data set is part of the Soil Moisture...

  3. SMEX03 Regional Ground Soil Moisture Data: Alabama, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set comprises gravimetric soil moisture and soil bulk density data collected during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03), which was conducted during...

  4. SMEX03 Regional Ground Soil Moisture Data: Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set comprises gravimetric soil moisture and soil bulk density data collected during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03), which was conducted during...

  5. SMEX03 Regional Ground Soil Moisture Data: Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The parameters for this data set include gravimetric soil moisture, volumetric soil moisture, bulk density, and surface and soil temperature for the Oklahoma study...

  6. SMEX03 Regional Ground Soil Moisture Data: Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The parameters for this data set include gravimetric soil moisture, volumetric soil moisture, bulk density, and surface and soil temperature for the Georgia study...

  7. Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Soil and Moisture Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Soil and Moisture Plan for Benton Lake NWR explains how the Soil and Moisture Program relates to Refuge objectives, outlines Program policies, and presents...

  8. Terrestrial Ecosystems - Topographic Moisture Potential of the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has generated topographic moisture potential classes for the contiguous United States. These topographic moisture potential classes...

  9. SMEX02 Soil Moisture and Temperature Profiles, Walnut Creek, Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains rainfall, soil moisture, and soil temperature data collected for the Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX02). The parameters measured are soil...

  10. SMEX03 ThetaProbe Soil Moisture Data: Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes soil moisture data measured with Delta-T Devices’ ThetaProbe ML2 sensors for the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03), conducted during June...

  11. Influence of Initial Moisture Content on Heat and Moisture Transfer in Firefighters’ Protective Clothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for heat and moisture transfer through firefighters’ protective clothing (FPC during radiation exposure. The model, which accounts for air gaps in the FPC as well as heat transfer through human skin, investigates the effect of different initial moisture contents on the thermal insulation performance of FPC. Temperature, water vapor density, and the volume fraction of liquid water profiles were monitored during the simulation, and the heat quantity absorbed by water evaporation was calculated. Then the maximum durations of heat before the wearer acquires first- and second-degree burns were calculated based on the bioheat transfer equation and the Henriques equation. The results show that both the moisture weight in each layer and the total moisture weight increase linearly within a given environmental humidity level. The initial moisture content in FPC samples significantly influenced the maximum water vapor density. The first- and second-degree burn injury time increase 16 sec and 18 sec when the RH increases from 0% to 90%. The total quantity of heat accounted for by water evaporation was about 10% when the relative humidity (RH is 80%. Finally, a linear relationship was identified between initial moisture content and the human skin burn injury time before suffering first- and second-degree burn injuries.

  12. Influence of Initial Moisture Content on Heat and Moisture Transfer in Firefighters' Protective Clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongmei; He, Song

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a model for heat and moisture transfer through firefighters' protective clothing (FPC) during radiation exposure. The model, which accounts for air gaps in the FPC as well as heat transfer through human skin, investigates the effect of different initial moisture contents on the thermal insulation performance of FPC. Temperature, water vapor density, and the volume fraction of liquid water profiles were monitored during the simulation, and the heat quantity absorbed by water evaporation was calculated. Then the maximum durations of heat before the wearer acquires first- and second-degree burns were calculated based on the bioheat transfer equation and the Henriques equation. The results show that both the moisture weight in each layer and the total moisture weight increase linearly within a given environmental humidity level. The initial moisture content in FPC samples significantly influenced the maximum water vapor density. The first- and second-degree burn injury time increase 16 sec and 18 sec when the RH increases from 0% to 90%. The total quantity of heat accounted for by water evaporation was about 10% when the relative humidity (RH) is 80%. Finally, a linear relationship was identified between initial moisture content and the human skin burn injury time before suffering first- and second-degree burn injuries.

  13. Surface Soil Moisture Estimates Across China Based on Multi-satellite Observations and A Soil Moisture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Yang, Tao; Ye, Jinyin; Li, Zhijia; Yu, Zhongbo

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable that regulates exchanges of water and energy between land surface and atmosphere. Soil moisture retrievals based on microwave satellite remote sensing have made it possible to estimate global surface (up to about 10 cm in depth) soil moisture routinely. Although there are many satellites operating, including NASA's Soil Moisture Acitive Passive mission (SMAP), ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission (SMOS), JAXA's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 mission (AMSR2), and China's Fengyun (FY) missions, key differences exist between different satellite-based soil moisture products. In this study, we applied a single-channel soil moisture retrieval model forced by multiple sources of satellite brightness temperature observations to estimate consistent daily surface soil moisture across China at a spatial resolution of 25 km. By utilizing observations from multiple satellites, we are able to estimate daily soil moisture across the whole domain of China. We further developed a daily soil moisture accounting model and applied it to downscale the 25-km satellite-based soil moisture to 5 km. By comparing our estimated soil moisture with observations from a dense observation network implemented in Anhui Province, China, our estimated soil moisture results show a reasonably good agreement with the observations (RMSE 0.8).

  14. A biomimic thermal fabric with high moisture permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Fan Jie; Cheng Qian; Zhao Lian-Ying; Liu Yong; Ma Chong-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Moisture comfort is an essential factor for functional property of thermal cloth, especially for thick thermal cloth, since thick cloth may hinder effective moisture permeation, and high moisture concentration in the micro-climate between skin and fabric would cause cold feeling. Here, we report a biomimic thermal fabric with excellent warm retention and moisture management properties. In this fabric, the warp yarn system constructs many tree-shaped channel...

  15. Data Assimilation to Extract Soil Moisture Information from SMAP Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Kolassa; Rolf H. Reichle; Qing Liu; Michael Cosh; David D. Bosch; Todd G. Caldwell; Andreas Colliander; Chandra Holifield Collins; Thomas J. Jackson; Stan J. Livingston; Mahta Moghaddam; Patrick J. Starks

    2017-01-01

    This study compares different methods to extract soil moisture information through the assimilation of Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observations. Neural network (NN) and physically-based SMAP soil moisture retrievals were assimilated into the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Catchment model over the contiguous United States for April 2015 to March 2017. By construction, the NN retrievals are consistent with the global climatology of the Catchment model soil moisture...

  16. Disaggregation of SMOS soil moisture in southeastern Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Merlin, Olivier; Rüdiger, Christoph; Al Bitar, Ahmad; Richaume, Philippe; Walker, Jeffrey,; Kerr, Yann

    2012-01-01

    DisPATCh (Disaggregation based on Physical And Theoretical scale Change) is an algorithm dedicated to the disaggregation of soil moisture observations using high-resolution soil temperature data. DisPATCh converts soil temperature fields into soil moisture fields given a semi-empirical soil evaporative efficiency model, and a first order Taylor series expansion around the field-mean soil moisture. In this study, the disaggregation approach is applied to SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity)...

  17. Evaluation of Soil Moisture Retrieval from the ERS and Metop Scatterometers in the Lower Mekong Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Apel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The natural environment and livelihoods in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB are significantly affected by the annual hydrological cycle. Monitoring of soil moisture as a key variable in the hydrological cycle is of great interest in a number of Hydrological and agricultural applications. In this study we evaluated the quality and spatiotemporal variability of the soil moisture product retrieved from C-band scatterometers data across the LMB sub-catchments. The soil moisture retrieval algorithm showed reasonable performance in most areas of the LMB with the exception of a few sub-catchments in the eastern parts of Laos, where the land cover is characterized by dense vegetation. The best performance of the retrieval algorithm was obtained in agricultural regions. Comparison of the available in situ evaporation data in the LMB and the Basin Water Index (BWI, an indicator of the basin soil moisture condition, showed significant negative correlations up to R = −0.85. The inter-annual variation of the calculated BWI was also found corresponding to the reported extreme hydro-meteorological events in the Mekong region. The retrieved soil moisture data show high correlation (up to R = 0.92 with monthly anomalies of precipitation in non-irrigated regions. In general, the seasonal variability of soil moisture in the LMB was well captured by the retrieval method. The results of analysis also showed significant correlation between El Niño events and the monthly BWI anomaly measurements particularly for the month May with the maximum correlation of R = 0.88.

  18. De-coupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Matt Jolly; Ann M. Hadlow; Kathleen Huguet

    2014-01-01

    Live foliar moisture content (LFMC) significantly influences wildland fire behaviour. However, characterising variations in LFMC is difficult because both foliar mass and dry mass can change throughout the season. Here we quantify the seasonal changes in both plant water status and dry matter partitioning. We collected new and old foliar samples from Pinus contorta for...

  19. Simply obtained global radiation, soil temperature and soil moisture in an alley cropping system in semi-arid Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mungai, D.N.; Stigter, C.J.; Coulson, C.L.; Ng'ang'a, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    Global radiation, soil temperature and soil moisture data were obtained from a 4-6 year old Cassia siamea/maize (CM) alley cropping (or hedgerow intercropping) system, at a semi-arid site at Machakos, Kenya, in the late eighties. With the growing need to explore and manage variations in

  20. Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval Under Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, P.; Lang, R.; Kurum, M.; Joseph, A.; Jackson, T.; Cosh, M.

    2008-01-01

    Soil moisture is recognized as an important component of the water, energy, and carbon cycles at the interface between the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Current baseline soil moisture retrieval algorithms for microwave space missions have been developed and validated only over grasslands, agricultural crops, and generally light to moderate vegetation. Tree areas have commonly been excluded from operational soil moisture retrieval plans due to the large expected impact of trees on masking the microwave response to the underlying soil moisture. Our understanding of the microwave properties of trees of various sizes and their effect on soil moisture retrieval algorithms at L band is presently limited, although research efforts are ongoing in Europe, the United States, and elsewhere to remedy this situation. As part of this research, a coordinated sequence of field measurements involving the ComRAD (for Combined Radar/Radiometer) active/passive microwave truck instrument system has been undertaken. Jointly developed and operated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and George Washington University, ComRAD consists of dual-polarized 1.4 GHz total-power radiometers (LH, LV) and a quad-polarized 1.25 GHz L band radar sharing a single parabolic dish antenna with a novel broadband stacked patch dual-polarized feed, a quad-polarized 4.75 GHz C band radar, and a single channel 10 GHz XHH radar. The instruments are deployed on a mobile truck with an 19-m hydraulic boom and share common control software; real-time calibrated signals, and the capability for automated data collection for unattended operation. Most microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms developed for use at L band frequencies are based on the tau-omega model, a simplified zero-order radiative transfer approach where scattering is largely ignored and vegetation canopies are generally treated as a bulk attenuating layer. In this approach, vegetation effects are parameterized by tau and omega, the microwave

  1. Dry-end surface soil moisture variability during NAFE'06

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuling, A.J.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Hurkmans, R.T.W.L.; Merlin, O.; Panciera, R.; Walker, J.P.; Troch, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of the space-time variability of soil moisture is important for land surface and climate studies. Here we develop an analytical model to investigate how, at the dry-end of the soil moisture range, the main characteristics of the soil moisture field (spatial mean and variability,

  2. Moisture dependence of radon transport in concrete : Measurements and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozmuta, [No Value; van der Graaf, ER; de Meijer, RJ

    2003-01-01

    The moisture dependence of the radon-release rate of concrete was measured under well controlled conditions. It was found that the radon-release rate almost linearly increases up to moisture contents of 50 to 60%. At 70 to 80% a maximum was found and for higher moisture contents the radon-release

  3. 21 CFR 133.154 - High-moisture jack cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false High-moisture jack cheese. 133.154 Section 133.154... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.154 High-moisture jack cheese. High-moisture jack cheese conforms to...

  4. CFD modelling of moisture interactions between air and constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Woloszyn, Monika; Hohota, Raluca

    2005-01-01

    There is a strong demand for accurate moisture modelling since moisture poses a risk for both the constructions and the indoor climate. Thus, in this investigation there is special focus on moisture modelling. The paper describes a new model based on a CFD tool that is enhanced to include both...

  5. Dielectric properties for prediction of moisture content in Vidalia onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microwave Sensing provides a means for nondestructively determining the amount of moisture in materials by sensing the dielectric properties of the material. In this study, dielectric properties of Vidalia onions were analyzed for moisture dependence at 13.36 GHz and 23°C for moisture content betwee...

  6. Foundation products have a measureable impact on moisturization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley-Bowles, Tricia; Liguori, Jillian; Razuri, Farrah; Hubschmitt, Amber; Litchauer, Jill; Aucar, Betty; De Mul, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Multifunctional products are becoming more prevalent in the color cosmetics market. We evaluated four foundation products for in vivo moisturizing benefits using the mini-regression test method. We found that statistically significant long-lasting moisturization was provided by the foundations tested, but only if hygroscopic moisturizing ingredients were present.

  7. Measurement of the moisture content of the granulated sugar by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2007-01-18

    Jan 18, 2007 ... p=5%) with other known classical, but laborious and expensive methods of moisture determination. Key words: Sugar ... Darkness. Day light. Moisture content (%). Output signal. (Volt). Figure 1. Response of the IR transphotometer in function of the moisture content (ultrafiltered water) of sugar: influence of.

  8. Origin and fate of atmospheric moisture over continents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Ent, R.J.; Savenije, H.H.G.; Schaefli, B.; Steele-Dunne, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    There has been a long debate on the extent to which precipitation relies on terrestrial evaporation (moisture recycling). In the past, most research focused on moisture recycling within a certain region only. This study makes use of new definitions of moisture recycling to study the complete process

  9. [Prediction of litter moisture content in Tahe Forestry Bureau of Northeast China based on FWI moisture codes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Jin, Sen; Di, Xue-Ying

    2014-07-01

    Canadian fire weather index system (FWI) is the most widely used fire weather index system in the world. Its fuel moisture prediction is also a very important research method. In this paper, litter moisture contents of typical forest types in Tahe Forestry Bureau of Northeast China were successively observed and the relationships between FWI codes (fine fuel moisture code FFMC, duff moisture code DMC and drought code DC) and fuel moisture were analyzed. Results showed that the mean absolute error and the mean relative error of models.established using FWI moisture code FFMC was 14.9% and 70.7%, respectively, being lower than those of meteorological elements regression model, which indicated that FWI codes had some advantage in predicting litter moisture contents and could be used to predict fuel moisture contents. But the advantage was limited, and further calibration was still needed, especially in modification of FWI codes after rainfall.

  10. The effects of soil moisture and plant morphology on the radar backscatter from vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bush, T. F.; Batlivala, P. P.; Cihlar, J.

    1974-01-01

    The results of experimental studies on the backscattering properties of corn, milo, soybeans and alfalfa are presented. The measurements were made during the summer of 1973 over the 8 to 18 GHz frequency band. The data indicate that soil moisture estimation is best accomplished at incidence angles near nadir with lower frequencies, while crop discrimination is best accomplished using two frequencies at incidence angles ranging from 30 deg to 65 deg. It is also shown that temporal plant morphology variations can cause extreme variations in the values of the scattering coefficients. These morphological changes can be caused by growth, heavy rain and in the case of alfalfa, harvesting.

  11. Quality Assessment of the CCI ECV Soil Moisture Product Using ENVISAT ASAR Wide Swath Data over Spain, Ireland and Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Pratola

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, great progress has been made by the scientific community in generating satellite-derived global surface soil moisture products, as a valuable source of information to be used in a variety of applications, such as hydrology, meteorology and climatic modeling. Through the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA CCI, the most complete and consistent global soil moisture (SM data record based on active and passive microwaves sensors is being developed. However, the coarse spatial resolution characterizing such data may be not sufficient to accurately represent the moisture conditions. The objective of this work is to assess the quality of the CCI Essential Climate Variable (ECV SM product by using finer spatial resolution Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR Wide Swath and in situ soil moisture data taken over three regions in Europe. Ireland, Spain, and Finland have been selected with the aim of assessing the spatial and temporal representativeness of the ECV SM product over areas that differ in climate, topography, land cover and soil type. This approach facilitated an understanding of the extent to which geophysical factors, such as soil texture, terrain composition and altitude, affect the retrieved ECV SM product values. A good temporal and spatial agreement has been observed between the three soil moisture datasets for the Irish and Spanish sites, while poorer results have been found at the Finnish sites. Overall, the two different satellite derived products capture the soil moisture temporal variations well and are in good agreement with each other.

  12. Soil moisture and its role in growth-climate relationships across an aridity gradient in semiarid Pinus halepensis forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique-Alba, Àngela; Ruiz-Yanetti, Samantha; Moutahir, Hassane; Novak, Klemen; De Luis, Martin; Bellot, Juan

    2017-01-01

    In Mediterranean areas with limited availability of water, an accurate knowledge of growth response to hydrological variables could contribute to improving management and stability of forest resources. The main goal of this study is to assess the temporal dynamic of soil moisture to better understand the water-growth relationship of Pinus halepensis forests in semiarid areas. The estimates of modelled soil moisture and measured tree growth were used at four sites dominated by afforested Pinus halepensis Mill. in south-eastern Spain with 300 to 609mm mean annual precipitation. Firstly, dendrochronological samples were extracted and the widths of annual tree rings were measured to compute basal area increments (BAI). Secondly, soil moisture was estimated over 20 hydrological years (1992-2012) by means of the HYDROBAL ecohydrological model. Finally, the tree growth was linked, to mean monthly and seasonal temperature, precipitation and soil moisture. Results depict the effect of soil moisture on growth (BAI) and explain 69-73% of the variance in semiarid forests, but only 51% in the subhumid forests. This highlights the fact that that soil moisture is a suitable and promising variable to explain growth variations of afforested Pinus halepensis in semiarid conditions and useful for guiding adaptation plans to respond pro-actively to water-related global challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Downscaling SMAP and SMOS soil moisture with moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer visible and infrared products over southern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, Kyle R.; Hogue, Terri S.; Franz, Kristie J.; Scott, Russell L.

    2017-04-01

    This current study explores satellite-based soil moisture downscaling approaches and applies them to common passive microwave retrievals. Three variations of a second-order polynomial regression were tested based on the surface temperature/greenness index concept and merged information from higher spatial resolution moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer with soil moisture active passive (SMAP) and soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) products to obtain soil moisture estimates at higher resolutions (1 km). Downscaled products were evaluated at the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona. Results show slight differences in performance among the three downscaling methods and little improvement between original low-resolution products and downscaled (1 km) products. Spatial analysis over WGEW demonstrates downscaled products were able to decipher small-scale heterogeneities in surface soil moisture, though spatial variability remains low compared to observations with a difference of only 0.06 m3/m3 in spatial standard deviation between observations and the mean between downscaling techniques. Results demonstrate the ability of both SMOS and SMAP to represent soil moisture accurately on the point scale without applying downscaling techniques in the region under study.

  14. Space-time soil moisture variability for two different land use types: analysis at the plot scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuecco, Giulia; Borga, Marco; Penna, Daniele; Canone, Davide; Ferraris, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    vegetation cover during the growing season. An exponential equation fits well the relationship between the spatial coefficient of variation and the mean soil moisture. An increasing variability of the coefficient of variation is observed during periods with high potential evapotranspiration rates (June-August). This is more evident for the grass site at 0-30 cm depth, highlighting again the important shading effect performed by the grapevine leaves. The application of a simple soil moisture dynamic model reveals a general good capability to capture soil moisture temporal dynamics at the plot scale. Moreover, the model reproduces consistently the observed relationships between soil moisture spatial mean and variability. Thus, the model provides a preliminary link between physical processes and statistical variability patterns. Keywords: soil moisture, plot scale, space-time variability, land use.

  15. Analysis of Joist Masonry Moisture Content Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Kohta [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-10-08

    There are many existing buildings with load-bearing mass masonry walls, whose energy performance could be improved with the retrofit of insulation. However, adding insulation to the interior side of walls of such masonry buildings in cold (and wet) climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns, such as condensation and freeze-thaw have known solutions. But wood members embedded in the masonry structure will be colder (and potentially wetter) after an interior insulation retrofit. Moisture content & relative humidity were monitored at joist ends in historic mass brick masonry walls retrofitted with interior insulation in a cold climate (Zone 5A); data were collected from 2012-2015. Eleven joist ends were monitored in all four orientations. One limitation of these results is that the renovation is still ongoing, with limited wintertime construction heating and no permanent occupancy to date. Measurements show that many joists ends remain at high moisture contents, especially at north- and east-facing orientations, with constant 100% RH conditions at the worst cases. These high moisture levels are not conducive for wood durability, but no evidence for actual structural damage has been observed. Insulated vs. non-insulated joist pockets do not show large differences. South facing joists have safe (10-15%) moisture contents. Given the uncertainty pointed out by research, definitive guidance on the vulnerability of embedded wood members is difficult to formulate. In high-risk situations, or when a very conservative approach is warranted, the embedded wood member condition can be eliminated entirely, supporting the joist ends outside of the masonry pocket.

  16. Does Saffron Have Antisolar and Moisturizing Effects?

    OpenAIRE

    Golmohammadzadeh, Shiva; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of saffron as a natural sunscreen and moisturizer. The pollens of the saffron were dried and powdered in a grinder. The experimental formulations included a homosalate (8%) lotion reference, lotions with 2, 4 and 8% of grinded saffron, and the control lotion base without saffron. The lotions containing saffron were prepared like homosalate lotion reference according to FDA. The sun protection factors (SPFs) of the formulations were de...

  17. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Barron; Moran, M. Susan; Escobar, Vanessa; Brown, Molly E.

    2014-05-01

    The launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission in 2014 will provide global soil moisture and freeze-thaw measurements at moderate resolution (9 km) with latency as short as 24 hours. The resolution, latency and global coverage of SMAP products will enable new applications in the fields of weather, climate, drought, flood, agricultural production, human health and national security. To prepare for launch, the SMAP mission has engaged more than 25 Early Adopters. Early Adopters are users who have a need for SMAP-like soil moisture or freeze-thaw data, and who agreed to apply their own resources to demonstrate the utility of SMAP data for their particular system or model. In turn, the SMAP mission agreed to provide Early Adopters with simulated SMAP data products and pre-launch calibration and validation data from SMAP field campaigns, modeling, and synergistic studies. The applied research underway by Early Adopters has provided fundamental knowledge of how SMAP data products can be scaled and integrated into users' policy, business and management activities to improve decision-making efforts. This presentation will cover SMAP applications including weather and climate forecasting, vehicle mobility estimation, quantification of greenhouse gas emissions, management of urban potable water supply, and prediction of crop yield. The presentation will end with a discussion of potential international applications with focus on the ESA/CEOS TIGER Initiative entitled "looking for water in Africa", the United Nations (UN) Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) which carries a specific mandate focused on Africa, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) which lists soil moisture as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV), and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which reported a food and nutrition crisis in the Sahel.

  18. Soil moisture sensors based on metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Kitić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper novel miniature metamaterial-based soil moisture sensors are presented. The sensors are based on resonant-type metamaterials and employ split-ring resonators (SRR, spiral resonators and fractal SRRs to achieve small dimensions, high sensitivity, and compatibility with standard planar fabrication technologies. All these features make the proposedsensors suitable for deployment in agriculture for precise mapping of soil humidity.

  19. Characterizing the toughness of an epoxy resin after wet aging using compact tension specimens with non-uniform moisture content

    KAUST Repository

    Quino, Gustavo

    2014-11-01

    Characterizing the change in toughness of polymers subjected to wet aging is challenging because of the heterogeneity of the testing samples. Indeed, as wet aging is guided by a diffusion/reaction process, compact tension samples (defined by the ASTM D5045 standard), which are relevant for toughness characterization but are somewhat thick, display a non-uniform moisture content over the bulk material. We define here a rigorous procedure to extract meaningful data from such tests. Our results showed that the relation between the moisture uptake of the whole sample and the measured toughness was not a meaningful material property. In fact, we found that the measured toughness depended on the locally varying moisture uptake over the cracking path. Here, we propose a post-processing technique that relies on a validated reaction/diffusion model to predict the three-dimensional moisture state of the epoxy. This makes identification of the variation in toughness with respect to the local moisture content possible. In addition, we analyze the fracture surface using micrography and roughness measurements. The observed variations in toughness are correlated with the roughness in the vicinity of the crack tip. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights rese.

  20. High moisture airtight storage of barley and triticale: Effect of moisture level and grain processing on nitrogen and phosphorus solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ton Nu, Mai Anh; Blaabjerg, Karoline; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    moisture levels (20, 23, 26 and 29% moisture) and to compare HMA storage of cereals with dry storage for 49 days. Dry stored barley and triticale (10 and 13% moisture, respectively) were kept in 10 L plastic buckets for 0 and 49 days. HMA stored cereals were kept in airtight bags (400 g per bag) at 15 °C...

  1. Evaluation of in-shell kernel moisture content monitoring with a microwave moisture meter during peanut drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Present peanut drying processes lack the capability of kernel moisture content determination in real-time. Samples of peanut pods have to be taken from the drying trailer, cleaned and shelled in order to test for the kernel moisture content. By using a microwave moisture meter, developed within USDA...

  2. Effect of foreign material in peanuts on in-shell nondestructive moisture sensing with a microwave moisture meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effect of foreign material on peanut kernel moisture content prediction from microwave dielectric measurements on peanut pods was investigated. A low-cost microwave moisture meter operating at 5.8 GHz was calibrated in the laboratory with clean samples of pods and kernels. Resulting moisture calibra...

  3. Moisture-triggered physically transient electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xu; Sim, Kyoseung; Liu, Jingshen; Chen, Ji; Feng, Xue; Xu, Hangxun; Yu, Cunjiang

    2017-09-01

    Physically transient electronics, a form of electronics that can physically disappear in a controllable manner, is very promising for emerging applications. Most of the transient processes reported so far only occur in aqueous solutions or biofluids, offering limited control over the triggering and degradation processes. We report novel moisture-triggered physically transient electronics, which exempt the needs of resorption solutions and can completely disappear within well-controlled time frames. The triggered transient process starts with the hydrolysis of the polyanhydride substrate in the presence of trace amounts of moisture in the air, a process that can generate products of corrosive organic acids to digest various inorganic electronic materials and components. Polyanhydride is the only example of polymer that undergoes surface erosion, a distinct feature that enables stable operation of the functional devices over a predefined time frame. Clear advantages of this novel triggered transience mode include that the lifetime of the devices can be precisely controlled by varying the moisture levels and changing the composition of the polymer substrate. The transience time scale can be tuned from days to weeks. Various transient devices, ranging from passive electronics (such as antenna, resistor, and capacitor) to active electronics (such as transistor, diodes, optoelectronics, and memories), and an integrated system as a platform demonstration have been developed to illustrate the concept and verify the feasibility of this design strategy.

  4. Soil Moisture Sensing via Swept Frequency Based Microwave Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg A. Holt

    2012-01-01

    SFI instrument over a range of soil types, at varying levels of moisture. This testing protocol was developed to provide the best possible comparison between SFI to TDT than would otherwise be possible by using soil moisture as the bench mark, due to variations in soil density between soil water content levels which are known to impact the calibration between TDR’s estimate of soil water content from the measured propagation delay which is converted to an apparent permittivity measurement. This experimental decision, to compare propagation delay of TDT to FDT, effectively removes the errors due to variations in packing density from the evaluation and provides a direct comparison between the SFI instrument and the time domain technique of TDT. The tests utilized three soils (a sand, an Acuff loam and an Olton clay-loam that were packed to varying bulk densities and prepared to provide a range of water contents and electrical conductivities by which to compare the performance of the SFI technology to TDT measurements of propagation delay. For each sample tested, the SFI instrument and the TDT both performed the measurements on the exact same probe, thereby both instruments were measuring the exact same soil/soil-probe response to ensure the most accurate means to compare the SFI instrument to a high-end TDT instrument. Test results provided an estimated instrumental accuracy for the SFI of +/−0.98% of full scale, RMSE basis, for the precision delay lines and +/−1.32% when the SFI was evaluated on loam and clay loam soils, in comparison to TDT as the bench-mark. Results from both experiments provide evidence that the low-cost SFI approach is a viable alternative to conventional TDR/TDT for high accuracy applications.

  5. A Literature Review on the Study of Moisture in Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautschold, Olivia Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-25

    This literature review covers the main chemical and physical interactions between moisture and the polymer matrix. Fickian versus Non-Fickian diffusion behaviors are discussed in approximating the characteristics of moisture sorption. Also, bound water and free water sorbed in polymers are distinguished. Methods to distinguish between bound and free water include differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, and time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The difference between moisture sorption and water sorption is considered, as well as the difficulties associated with preventing moisture sorption. Furthermore, specific examples of how moisture sorption influences polymers include natural fiber-polymer composites, starch-based biodegradable thermoplastics, and thermoset polyurethane and epoxies.

  6. Improvment of the Trapezoid Method Using Raw Landsat Image Digital Count Data for Soil Moisture Estimation in the Texas (usa) High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafian, S.; Maas, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in soil moisture strongly affect surface energy balances, regional runoff, land erosion and vegetation productivity (i.e., potential crop yield). Hence, the estimation of soil moisture is very valuable in the social, economic, humanitarian (food security) and environmental segments of society. Extensive efforts to exploit the potential of remotely sensed observations to help quantify this complex variable are ongoing. This study aims at developing a new index, the Thermal Ground cover Moisture Index (TGMI), for estimating soil moisture content. This index is based on empirical parameterization of the relationship between raw image digital count (DC) data in the thermal infrared spectral band and ground cover (determined from raw image digital count data in the red and near-infrared spectral bands).The index uses satellite-derived information only, and the potential for its operational application is therefore great. This study was conducted in 18 commercial agricultural fields near Lubbock, TX (USA). Soil moisture was measured in these fields over two years and statistically compared to corresponding values of TGMI determined from Landsat image data. Results indicate statistically significant correlations between TGMI and field measurements of soil moisture (R2 = 0.73, RMSE = 0.05, MBE = 0.17 and AAE = 0.049), suggesting that soil moisture can be estimated using this index. It was further demonstrated that maps of TGMI developed from Landsat imagery could be constructed to show the relative spatial distribution of soil moisture across a region.

  7. Significance of the air moisture source on the stable isotope composition of the precipitation in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuppon, György; Bottyán, Emese; Krisztina, Krisztina; Weidinger, Tamás; Haszpra, László

    2017-04-01

    In the last few years, the analysis of backward trajectories has become a common use for identifying moisture uptake regions for the precipitation of various regions. Hungary is influenced by meteorological (climatological) conditions of Atlantic, Mediterranean and North/East regions therefore this area is sensitive to detect changes in the atmospheric circulation. In this study we present the result of the investigation about the determination of air moisture source regions for six localities in Hungary for more than four years. To reconstruct the path of the air moisture from the source region, we ran the NOAA HYSPLIT trajectory model using the GDAS database with 1° spatial and 6 hours temporal resolution for every precipitation event, for heights of 500, 1500 and 3000 m. We determined the location where water vapour entered into the atmosphere by calculating specific humidity along the trajectories. Five possible moisture source regions for precipitation were defined: Atlantic, North European, East European, Mediterranean and continental (local/convective). Additionally, this study evaluates the regional differences in stable isotope compositions of precipitation based on hydrogen and oxygen isotope analyses of daily rainwater samples. Stable isotope variations show systematic and significant differences between the regions. The variability of moisture source shows also systematic seasonal and spatial distribution. Interestingly, the most dominant among the identified source regions in all stations is the Mediterranean area; while the second is the Atlantic region. The ratio of the precipitations originated in Eastern and Northern Europe seem to correlate with the geographic position of the meteorological station. Furthermore, the ratios of the different moisture sources show intra annual variability. In each location, the amount weighted d-excess values were calculated for the identified moisture sources. The precipitation originated in the Mediterranean

  8. Contributions of soil moisture interactions to future precipitation changes in the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Wilhelm; Rummukainen, Markku; Chéruy, Frederique; Hagemann, Stefan; Meier, Arndt

    2017-09-01

    Changes in soil moisture are likely to contribute to future changes in latent heat flux and various characteristics of daily precipitation. Such contributions during the second half of the twenty-first century are assessed using the simulations from the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment, applying a linear regression analysis to determine the magnitude of these contributions. As characteristics of daily precipitation, mean daily precipitation, the frequency of wet days and the intensity of precipitation on wet days are considered. Also, the frequency and length of extended wet and dry spells are studied. Particular focus is on the regional (for nine selected regions) as well as seasonal variations in the magnitude of the contributions of the projected differences in soil moisture to the future changes in latent heat flux and in the characteristics of daily precipitation. The results reveal the overall tendency that the projected differences in soil moisture contribute to the future changes in response to the anthropogenic climate forcing for all the meteorological variables considered here. These contributions are stronger and more robust (i.e., there are smaller deviations between individual climate models) for the latent heat flux than for the characteristics of daily precipitation. It is also found that the contributions of the differences in soil moisture to the future changes are generally stronger and more robust for the frequency of wet days than for the intensity of daily precipitation. Consistent with the contributions of the projected differences in soil moisture to the future changes in the frequency of wet days, soil moisture generally contributes to the future changes in the characteristics of wet and dry spells. The magnitude of these contributions does not differ systematically between the frequency and the length of such extended spells, but the contributions are generally slightly stronger for dry spells than for wet spells. Distinguishing between the nine

  9. Groundwater influence on soil moisture memory and land-atmosphere interactions over the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-de la Torre, Alberto; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the memory introduced in soil moisture fields by groundwater long timescales of variation in the semi-arid regions of the Iberian Peninsula with the LEAFHYDRO soil-vegetation-hydrology model, which includes a dynamic water table fully coupled to soil moisture and river flow via 2-way fluxes. We select a 10-year period (1989-1998) with transitions from wet to dry to again wet long lasting conditions and we carry out simulations at 2.5 km spatial resolution forced by ERA-Interim and a high-resolution precipitation analysis over Spain and Portugal. The model produces a realistic water table that we validate with hundreds of water table depth observation time series (ranging from 4 to 10 years) over the Iberian Peninsula. Modeled river flow is also compared to observations. Over shallow water table regions, results highlight the groundwater buffering effect on soil moisture fields over dry spells and long-term droughts, as well as the slow recovery of pre-drought soil wetness once climatic conditions turn wetter. Groundwater sustains river flow during dry summer periods. The longer lasting wet conditions in the soil when groundwater is considered increase summer evapotranspiration, that is mostly water-limited. Our results suggest that groundwater interaction with soil moisture should be considered for climate seasonal forecasting and climate studies in general over water-limited regions where shallow water tables are significantly present and connected to land surface hydrology.

  10. Soil Moisture Limitations on Monitoring Boreal Forest Regrowth Using Spaceborne L-Band SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasischke, Eric S.; Tanase, Mihai A.; Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura L.; Borr, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the utility of L-band SAR data for estimating aboveground biomass in sites with low levels of vegetation regrowth. Data to estimate biomass were collected from 59 sites located in fire-disturbed black spruce forests in interior Alaska. PALSAR L-band data (HH and HV polarizations) collected on two dates in the summer/fall of 2007 and one date in the summer of 2009 were used. Significant linear correlations were found between the log of aboveground biomass (range of 0.02 to 22.2 t ha-1) and (L-HH) and (L-HV) for the data collected on each of the three dates, with the highest correlation found using the LHV data collected when soil moisture was highest. Soil moisture, however, did change the correlations between L-band and aboveground biomass, and the analyses suggest that the influence of soil moisture is biomass dependent. The results indicate that to use L-band SAR data for mapping aboveground biomass and monitoring forest regrowth will require development of approaches to account for the influence that variations in soil moisture have on L-band microwave backscatter, which can be particularly strong when low levels of aboveground biomass occur

  11. Runoff generation in relation to soil moisture patterns in a small Dartmoor catchment, Southwest England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyles, Erik; Williams, Andrew; Ternan, Les; Dowd, John

    2003-02-01

    A hydrological experiment was conducted in a small headwater catchment in southeast Dartmoor, UK, to monitor the temporal and spatial variations in soil moisture content at the hillslope scale in order to determine how the spatial organization affected runoff generation. Two distinctly different types of rainfall response were found. During the dry state the soil moisture pattern was very patchy and the increase in stream discharge was relatively small for most rainstorms. The catchment response was limited to about 10% of the area, a figure that is similar in extent to the saturated area identified in the valley bottom. During the wet state, however, modest to large storms resulted in significantly higher discharge rates. The area generating the runoff increased up to 65% of the area. The division between the two preferred states occurred at a catchment wetness of about 0·60 cm3 cm-3. This figure was based firstly on the exceptional increase in range, as determined by geostatistical analyses, for the soil moisture content measured associated with very high stream discharges. Secondly, it was consistent with a steep rise in gradient noted for the soil moisture characteristic curves at about 0·60 cm3 cm-3. The greater catchment responses were therefore dependent on the pore size distribution plus other soil characteristics and the connectivity between the wet areas.

  12. Modelling of coupled heat and moisture flows around a buried electrical cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The admissible current within a buried electrical power cable is limited by the maximum allowed temperature of the cable (Joule effect. The thermal properties of the surrounding soil controls heat dissipation around the cable. The main focus of the study was to evaluate the coupled heat and moisture flow around such buried electrical cables. The heat dissipation of a buried power cable was simulated in the surrounding soil at unsteady conditions. The hydro-thermal coupling was modelled by taking into account the moisture flow of liquid water and vapour, and the heat flow in the soil by convection and advection. As the thermal vapour diffusion enhancement factor (η appears to be a key parameter, the sensitivity study of the coupled heat and moisture flow in the ground regarding this parameter was performed. The variations of the degree of saturation and the temperature of the surrounding soil were studied over 180 days of heating. The results showed that the moisture flow was mainly caused by the vapour transport under temperature gradients. These results emphasized the significant effect of the hydrothermal characteristics of surrounding soil. The radius of influence of the power cable was also evaluated.

  13. Nondestructive Measurement of Water Content and Moisture Migration of Unsaturated Red Clays in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To reveal the moisture migration mechanism of the unsaturated red clays, which are sensitive to water content change and widely distributed in South China, and then rationally use them as a filling material for highway embankments, a method to measure the water content of red clay cylinders using X-ray computed tomography (CT was proposed and verified. Then, studies on the moisture migrations in the red clays under the rainfall and ground water level were performed at different degrees of compaction. The results show that the relationship between dry density, water content, and CT value determined from X-ray CT tests can be used to nondestructively measure the water content of red clay cylinders at different migration time, which avoids the error reduced by the sample-to-sample variation. The rainfall, ground water level, and degree of compaction are factors that can significantly affect the moisture migration distance and migration rate. Some techniques, such as lowering groundwater table and increasing degree of compaction of the red clays, can be used to prevent or delay the moisture migration in highway embankments filled with red clays.

  14. Spatial distribution of moisture and its relation with soil texture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Largaespada

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available At Esmeralda Farm (Guácimo, Limón Province, C.R., planted to banana cv. Valery, the spatial distribution of soil humidity, and its relationship to some physical properties, were analyzed to determine the variability between the traditional method and use of TDR (Time Domain Reflectrometer in the determination of soil humidity. Sampling was done in a quadricuar pattern, with 36 measurement points georeferenced by GPS at 2 soil depths. At each point the volumetric soil water was measured with 3 different TDR equipments (300, MP and MT, and compared with the traditional method of volumetric humidity (VHM determination. Soil samples were also collected, for texture analysis; with these data, a geostatistical analysis was performed and the corresponding maps were drafted. The soils, of Loam to clayey Loam texture, showed variability between TDR and these determinations regarding the MHV, regardless of depth. On the surface, the highest correlation was found between the values of MHV and TDR-300 (r=0.69, followed by TDRMT (r=0.63 and finally the TDR-MP (r=0.59. At 30 to 60 cm depth, a positive but lower ratio values was found compared MHV with TRD- 300 and TDR-MP (0.47 and 0.38, respectively; no relationship was found with TDR-MT at this depth. In terms of field moisture map, a good representation between methods was found and it can be said that this method was effective in representing the spatial variation of soil moisture.

  15. Soil Moisture Monitoring using Surface Electrical Resistivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamita, Giuseppe; Perrone, Angela; Brocca, Luca; Straface, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    The relevant role played by the soil moisture (SM) for global and local natural processes results in an explicit interest for its spatial and temporal estimation in the vadose zone coming from different scientific areas - i.e. eco-hydrology, hydrogeology, atmospheric research, soil and plant sciences, etc... A deeper understanding of natural processes requires the collection of data on a higher number of points at increasingly higher spatial scales in order to validate hydrological numerical simulations. In order to take the best advantage of the Electrical Resistivity (ER) data with their non-invasive and cost-effective properties, sequential Gaussian geostatistical simulations (sGs) can be applied to monitor the SM distribution into the soil by means of a few SM measurements and a densely regular ER grid of monitoring. With this aim, co-located SM measurements using mobile TDR probes (MiniTrase), and ER measurements, obtained by using a four-electrode device coupled with a geo-resistivimeter (Syscal Junior), were collected during two surveys carried out on a 200 × 60 m2 area. Two time surveys were carried out during which Data were collected at a depth of around 20 cm for more than 800 points adopting a regular grid sampling scheme with steps (5 m) varying according to logistic and soil compaction constrains. The results of this study are robust due to the high number of measurements available for either variables which strengthen the confidence in the covariance function estimated. Moreover, the findings obtained using sGs show that it is possible to estimate soil moisture variations in the pedological zone by means of time-lapse electrical resistivity and a few SM measurements.

  16. Moisture sorption isotherms and thermodynamic properties of bovine leather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhfakh, Rihab; Mihoubi, Daoued; Kechaou, Nabil

    2017-11-01

    This study was aimed at the determination of bovine leather moisture sorption characteristics using a static gravimetric method at 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C. The curves exhibit type II behaviour according to the BET classification. The sorption isotherms fitting by seven equations shows that GAB model is able to reproduce the equilibrium moisture content evolution with water activity for moisture range varying from 0.02 to 0.83 kg/kg d.b (0.9898 content, and then decrease sharply with rising moisture content. Adsorption enthalpy decreases with increasing moisture content. Whereas, adsorption entropy increases smoothly with increasing moisture content to a maximum of 6.29 J/K.mol. Spreading pressure increases with rising water activity. The net integral enthalpy seemed to decrease and then increase to become asymptotic. The net integral entropy decreased with moisture content increase.

  17. DETERMINING SOIL MOISTURE REGIMES FOR VITICULTURAL ZONING PURPOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Poch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyse the suitability of Soil Taxonomy to characterize the soil moisture regime for viticultural zoning studies, comparing the soil moisture parameters used in the Soil Taxonomy classification with soil moisture parameters relevant to the grapevine phenological stages. The results show that Soil Taxonomy does not adequately reflect the variability of soil moisture dynamics during vineyard growing. Then, a proposal for soil moisture regime classification is realised by means of a cluster analysis. This classification is based on determining dry days, as indicated by Soil Taxonomy, in different vine phenological periods, and grouping the cases according to their variability. The soil moisture regime classes, resulting from cluster analysis, show significant differences in soil moisture status in all phenological periods, and therefore present different implications for viticulture, related to potential for vegetative growth, grape production and the grape ripening process.

  18. [Moisture sorption of gelatin powder and collagen fibers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boki, K; Kawasaki, N; Minami, K

    1994-09-01

    Moisture sorption properties of gelatin powder and collagen fibers were investigated on the basis of the moisture sorption isotherm, the differential heat of moisture sorption, the decrease in entropy of moisture sorption and the parameter constants of the applicable isotherm equation. The amount of moisture sorbed on collagen fibers was larger than that on gelatin powder. The water molecules were absorbed on gelatin itself rather than on the active sites of gelatin. They were adsorbed on the polar groups of constitutive amino acids at amounts of moisture sorbed up to one or two monolayers and then were absorbed into collagen fibers at higher monolayers. They were kept loosely in gelatin and tightly in collagen. The structural stability of collagen to moisture was higher than that of gelatin.

  19. Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Cerdà, Artemi

    2013-04-01

    data. These complementary atmospheric measurements will serve to explain the intraannual and vertical variations observed in the soil moisture content in both experimental landscapes. This kind of study is aimed to understand the soil moisture content in two different environments such as irrigated rainfed orchards in a semi-arid region. For instance, these measurements have a direct impact on water availability for crops, plant transpiration and could have practical applications to schedule irrigation. Additionally, soil water content has also implications for erosion processes. Key Words: Water, Agriculture, Irrigation, Eastern Spain, Citrus. Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE and LEDDRA 243857 supported this research. References Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1997. Seasonal Changes of the Infiltration Rates in a Typical Mediterranean Scrubland on Limestone in Southeast Spain. Journal of Hydrology, 198 (1-4) 198-209 Cerdà, A. 1998. Effect of climate on surface flow along a climatological gradient in Israel. A field rainfall simulation approach. Journal of Arid Environments, 38, 145-159. Levin, I., Assaf, R., and Bravdo, B. 1979. Soil moisture and root distribution in an apple orchard irrigated by tricklers. Plant and Soil, 52, 31-40. Schneider, G. W. And Childers, N.F. 1941. Influence of soil moisture on photosynthesis, respiration and transpiration of apples leaves. Plant Physiol., 16, 565-583. Valerie, A. and Orchard, F.J. Cook. 1983. Relationship between soil respiration and soil moisture. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 15, 447-453. Veihmeyer, F. J. and Hendrickson, A. H. 1950. Soil Moisture in Relation to Plant Growth. Annual Review of Plant Physiology, 1, 285-304.

  20. Variation in size, morphology and chemical composition of polymetallic nodules from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Parthiban, G.

    Chemical composition of 613 polymetallic nodules from 150 stations in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) are determined and variations in Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Zn and moisture content are studied with respect to their size and surface texture...

  1. Validation and reconstruction of FY-3B/MWRI soil moisture using an artificial neural network based on reconstructed MODIS optical products over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yaokui; Long, Di; Hong, Yang; Zeng, Chao; Zhou, Jie; Han, Zhongying; Liu, Ronghua; Wan, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere, especially over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) which is climatically and hydrologically sensitive as the Earth's 'third pole'. Large-scale spatially consistent and temporally continuous soil moisture datasets are of great importance to meteorological and hydrological applications, such as weather forecasting and drought monitoring. The Fengyun-3B Microwave Radiation Imager (FY-3B/MWRI) soil moisture product is a relatively new passive microwave product, with the satellite being launched on November 5, 2010. This study validates and reconstructs FY-3B/MWRI soil moisture across the TP. First, the validation is performed using in situ measurements within two in situ soil moisture measurement networks (1° × 1° and 0.25° × 0.25°), and also compared with the Essential Climate Variable (ECV) soil moisture product from multiple active and passive satellite soil moisture products using new merging procedures. Results show that the ascending FY-3B/MWRI product outperforms the descending product. The ascending FY-3B/MWRI product has almost the same correlation as the ECV product with the in situ measurements. The ascending FY-3B/MWRI product has better performance than the ECV product in the frozen season and under the lower NDVI condition. When the NDVI is higher in the unfrozen season, uncertainty in the ascending FY-3B/MWRI product increases with increasing NDVI, but it could still capture the variability in soil moisture. Second, the FY-3B/MWRI soil moisture product is subsequently reconstructed using the back-propagation neural network (BP-NN) based on reconstructed MODIS products, i.e., LST, NDVI, and albedo. The reconstruction method of generating the soil moisture product not only considers the relationship between the soil moisture and NDVI, LST, and albedo, but also the relationship between the soil moisture and four-dimensional variations using the

  2. Local Versus Remote Contributions of Soil Moisture to Near-Surface Temperature Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, R.; Schubert, S.; Wang, H.; Chang, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Soil moisture variations have a straightforward impact on overlying air temperatures, wetter soils can induce higher evaporative cooling of the soil and thus, locally, cooler temperatures overall. Not known, however, is the degree to which soil moisture variations can affect remote air temperatures through their impact on the atmospheric circulation. In this talk we describe a two-pronged analysis that addresses this question. In the first segment, an extensive ensemble of NASA/GSFC GEOS-5 atmospheric model simulations is analyzed statistically to isolate and quantify the contributions of various soil moisture states, both local and remote, to the variability of air temperature at a given local site. In the second segment, the relevance of the derived statistical relationships is evaluated by applying them to observations-based data. Results from the second segment suggest that the GEOS-5-based relationships do, at least to first order, hold in nature and thus may provide some skill to forecasts of air temperature at subseasonal time scales, at least in certain regions.

  3. Predicting cation exchange capacity from hygroscopic moisture in agricultural soils of Western Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, J.; Campillo, M.C. del; Barrón, V.

    2015-07-01

    Soil cation exchange capacity (CEC) depends on the extent and negative charge density of surfaces of soil mineral and organic components. Soil water sorption also depends on the extent of such surfaces, giving thus way to significant relationships between CEC and hygroscopic moisture (HM) in many soils. In this work, we explored whether CEC could be accurately predicted from HM in agricultural soils of Mediterranean and humid temperate areas in Western Europe. For this purpose, we examined 243 soils across a wide variation range of their intrinsic properties. Soil CEC was determined using 1 M ammonium acetate at pH 7 and HM at an equilibrium air relative humidity (RH) of 43% (HM43). Most of the variation of soil CEC was explained by HM43 through a linear function (CEC = 1.4 + 0.78HM43; R2 = 0.962; standard deviation = 2.30 cmolc/kg). Coefficients of the regression equation were similar for subgroups of soils differing in moisture regime, clay mineralogy, carbonate content and organic carbon content. Therefore, soil hygroscopic moisture measurements at a fixed RH level provided a simple, robust, inexpensive method for predicting soil CEC. (Author)

  4. Short communication: Predicting cation exchange capacity from hygroscopic moisture in agricultural soils of Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Torrent

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil cation exchange capacity (CEC depends on the extent and negative charge density of surfaces of soil mineral and organic components. Soil water sorption also depends on the extent of such surfaces, giving thus way to significant relationships between CEC and hygroscopic moisture (HM in many soils. In this work, we explored whether CEC could be accurately predicted from HM in agricultural soils of Mediterranean and humid temperate areas in Western Europe. For this purpose, we examined 243 soils across a wide variation range of their intrinsic properties. Soil CEC was determined using 1 M ammonium acetate at pH 7 and HM at an equilibrium air relative humidity (RH of 43% (HM43. Most of the variation of soil CEC was explained by HM43 through a linear function (CEC = 1.4 + 0.78HM43; R2 = 0.962; standard deviation = 2.30 cmolc/kg. Coefficients of the regression equation were similar for subgroups of soils differing in moisture regime, clay mineralogy, carbonate content and organic carbon content. Therefore, soil hygroscopic moisture measurements at a fixed RH level provided a simple, robust, inexpensive method for predicting soil CEC.

  5. Sensing soil moisture and vegetation using GNSS-R polarimetric measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yan; Savi, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry is an efficient tool for remote sensing and plays a key role in several applications. The estimation of soil moisture and vegetation in the land field is attracting widespread interest in hydrology, climatology and carbon cycles. In order to investigate the scattering polarization properties from different types of surface environments, an airborne measurement was performed, equipped with a new 4-channel prototype for collecting the direct, reflected left-hand circular polarization (LHCP) and right-hand circular polarization (RHCP) signals. Both the reflected LHCP and RHCP signals were acquired at the same time by a dual polarization antenna. A data averaging procedure was used to reduce the incoherent part of the received power and two reflected signals were normalized by direct signals obtained from each front-end (FE). Then three polarimetric observables were used to analyze vegetation biomass and soil moisture fluctuations. It was concluded that the polarimetric ratio (PR) is sensitive to soil moisture content (SMC) and considerably independent of roughness and vegetation biomass. The trunk component is confirmed to be the most important factor affecting the amplitude of scattering polarizations. Furthermore, the measurement results showed that the PR variation between different elevation angles was affected by roughness and biomass. The PR variation in forests with big biomass shows the least amount of changes when compared to other geographical environments. The results show another possibility of further geophysical parameter evaluations employing polarimetric applications in GNSS-R.

  6. Leachate recirculation: moisture content assessment by means of a geophysical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Roger; Munoz, Marie Laure; Aran, Christophe; Laperrelle, Claire; Hidra, Mustapha; Drouart, Eric; Grellier, Solenne

    2004-01-01

    Bioreactor technology is a waste treatment concept consisting in speeding up the biodegradation of landfilled waste by optimizing its moisture content through leachate recirculation. The measurement of variations in waste moisture content is critical in the design and control of bioreactors. Conventional methods such as direct physical sampling of waste reach their limits due to the interference with the waste matrix. This paper reviews geophysical measurements such as electrical direct current and electromagnetic slingram methods for measuring the electrical conductivity. Electrical conductivity is a property, which is linked to both moisture and temperature and can provide useful indications on the biodegradation environment in the waste mass. The study reviews three site experiments: a first experimentation shows the advantages (correlation between conductive anomaly and water seepage) but also the limits of geophysical interpretation; the two other sites allow the leachate recirculation to be tracked by studying the relative resistivity variation versus time from electrical 2D imaging. Even if some improvements are necessary to consider geophysical measurements as a real bioreactor monitoring tool, results are promising and could lead to the use of electrical 2D imaging in bioreactor designing.

  7. Contributions of Precipitation and Soil Moisture Observations to the Skill of Soil Moisture Estimates in a Land Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Liu, Qing; Bindlish, Rajat; Cosh, Michael H.; Crow, Wade T.; deJeu, Richard; DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Huffman, George J.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of precipitation and soil moisture observations to the skill of soil moisture estimates from a land data assimilation system are assessed. Relative to baseline estimates from the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), the study investigates soil moisture skill derived from (i) model forcing corrections based on large-scale, gauge- and satellite-based precipitation observations and (ii) assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E). Soil moisture skill is measured against in situ observations in the continental United States at 44 single-profile sites within the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) for which skillful AMSR-E retrievals are available and at four CalVal watersheds with high-quality distributed sensor networks that measure soil moisture at the scale of land model and satellite estimates. The average skill (in terms of the anomaly time series correlation coefficient R) of AMSR-E retrievals is R=0.39 versus SCAN and R=0.53 versus CalVal measurements. The skill of MERRA surface and root-zone soil moisture is R=0.42 and R=0.46, respectively, versus SCAN measurements, and MERRA surface moisture skill is R=0.56 versus CalVal measurements. Adding information from either precipitation observations or soil moisture retrievals increases surface soil moisture skill levels by IDDeltaR=0.06-0.08, and root zone soil moisture skill levels by DeltaR=0.05-0.07. Adding information from both sources increases surface soil moisture skill levels by DeltaR=0.13, and root zone soil moisture skill by DeltaR=0.11, demonstrating that precipitation corrections and assimilation of satellite soil moisture retrievals contribute similar and largely independent amounts of information.

  8. Silagem de sorgo de porte baixo com diferentes teores de tanino e de umidade no colmo. II - Alterações nos carboidratos durante a fermentação Forage sorghum silage with different tannin concentration and moisture in the stem. II - Variation on carbohydrates during fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L.C.C. Borges

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudadas silagens de quatro híbridos de sorgo, com diferentes teores de umidade no colmo combinados com teor alto ou baixo de tanino, feitas em silos de laboratório de tubos "PVC", lacrados com fita crepe e dotados de uma válvula tipo "Bunsen". Usaram-se 24 tratamentos com quatro repetições cada, sendo quatro híbridos (T1=colmo suculento e baixo tanino, T2=colmo seco e baixo tanino, T3=colmo seco e alto tanino, T4= colmo suculento e alto tanino combinados com seis tempos para abertura do silo, sendo o primeiro tempo antes de ensilar (P1, seguido de 1, 7, 14, 28 e 56 dias de ensilagem. Foram determinados os teores de carboidratos solúveis em álcool, de amido e de carboidratos estruturais. Adotou-se um esquema fatorial 4×6 e utilizou-se o teste de Tukey para comparação entre médias. A maior parte dos carboidratos solúveis foi consumida até P3. Foi verificada queda nos valores de amido ao longo da fermentação, assim como de FDN e hemicelulose. Os híbridos de colmo suculento apresentaram maiores teores de FDA. Os híbridos com alto tanino apresentaram maiores concentrações de lignina.Four hybrid forage sorghums with different tannin concentrations and moisture in the stem were ensiled in laboratory silos made of "PVC" tubes. The silos were opened 1 (P2, 7 (P3, 14 (P4, 28 (P5 e 56 (P6 days after ensiling, in order to evaluate fermentation patterns and other silage characteristics. Twenty-four treatments were used, with four repetitions each: four hybrids (T1=moist stem/low tannin, T2=not moist stem/low tannin, T3=not moist stem/high tannin, T4= moist stem/high tannin and with six periods, since the forages before ensiling (P1 were also studied. Alcohol soluble carbohydrates (ASC, starch and structural carbohydrates were determined. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance, with mean separation achieved using Tukey statistical test. The ASC were highly consumed from P1 to P3. The FDA was higher in moist stem hybrids than

  9. Spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture and its effect on vegetation in a desertified aeolian riparian ecotone on the Tibetan Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haidong; Shen, Weishou; Zou, Changxin; Jiang, Jiang; Fu, Lina; She, Guanghui

    2013-02-01

    SummarySoil moisture content is one of the limiting factors for natural vegetation succession in alpine river valleys on the Tibetan Plateau. However, its spatio-temporal variability and effect on artificial vegetation restoration has rarely been reported. In this paper, we conducted a case study to examine the spatio-temporal variability and vertical characteristics of soil moisture by setting up a 100 × 120 m experimental plot on aeolian sandy land in a riparian ecotone and analyzing the result data using a geo-statistical approach. The soil moisture contents at different depths all showed strong temporal variability, with the mean soil moisture ranging from 4% to 6% in spring, from 6% to 14% in summer and from 9% to 12% in autumn. The Gaussian semi-variogram model was the best fitted theoretical model for the spatial structure of soil moisture contents in different seasons, and soil moisture at the field scale showed strong spatial dependence. The spatial patterns of soil moisture all demonstrated strong similarity between depths with the strongest between 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm depths in autumn. The soil moisture content over the upper 60 cm was the key factor that restricted the seed germination and seedling growth, and it affected vegetation coverage and density. The precipitation, variations of river water level, elevation as well as landform types were the main factors determining the variations of soil moisture content in different seasons. The results have important implications for the ongoing vegetation restoration in the study area.

  10. Experiencing variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Berge, Maria; Grout, Brian William Wilson

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes towards a better understanding of learning dynamics in doctoral supervision by analysing how learning opportunities are created in the interaction between supervisors and PhD students, using the notion of experiencing variation as a key to learning. Empirically, we have bas...... were discussed, created more complex patterns of variation. Both PhD students and supervisors can learn from this. Understanding of this mechanism that creates learning opportunities can help supervisors develop their competences in supervisory pedagogy....

  11. Moisture Control Handbook: New, low-rise, residential construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corp., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States); Carmody, J. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). Underground Space Center

    1991-10-01

    Moisture problems are prevalent all over North America, almost independent of climate. They are viewed as one of the single largest factors limiting the useful service life of a building. Elevated levels of moisture in buildings also can lead to serious health effects for occupants. Until recently, very little consensus on moisture control existed in the building community. The information available was typically incomplete, contradictory, usually limited to specific regions, and in many cases misleading. A need to develop a document which presented the issues relating to moisture from a building science or ``systems`` approach existed. This handbook attempts to fill that need and illustrates that energy-efficient, tight envelope design is clearly part of the solution to healthy buildings when interior relative humidity, temperature, and pressure are controlled simultaneously. The first three chapters of the handbook present the basic principles of moisture problems and solutions in buildings. Chapter 1 -- Mold, Mildew, and Condensation, examines surface moisture problems. Chapter 2 -- Moisture Movement, examines how building assemblies get wet from both the exterior and interior. Chapter 3 -- Wetting and Drying of Building Assemblies, introduces the concepts of acceptable performance, moisture balance, and the redistribution of moisture within building assemblies. Chapters 4 through 6 apply the concepts outlined in the previous chapters and present specific moisture control practices for three basic US climate zones. The advantages and disadvantages of several wall, foundation, and roof assemblies are discussed for each climate zone.

  12. Modeling moisture absorption kinetics of barley grain using viscoelastic model and neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kamali

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Barley is one of the most important grains with high digestible starch making it a main source of energy in human nutrition as well as in livestock rations formulation and feeding. Starch is the main part of barley grain and it has an inverse relation with its protein. It has a digestible foodstuff of 80 to 84 percent of its dry matter content. Barley as livestock foodstuff should be processed and it is done in several ways. A customary method for processing barley in dairy farms is its size reduction by milling (Hunt, 1996. An alternative method of barley processing is steam rolling. However, because of the high cost of steam generators a method of soaking with heating has been considered as an alternative method for steam rolling (Yang et al., 2000. The rate of moisture absorption by grains during the soaking process varies considerably and depends on the size of the grain, water temperature and the length of soaking. High temperature water soaking is an ordinary way to reduce the time duration for reaching a high rate of moisture absorption during the soaking process (Kashaninejad et al., 2009. Various studies have shown that these models have adequate accuracy in analyzing drying and moisture absorption processes for most agricultural products (Abu-Ghannam and McKenna, 1997. Some researchers have modeled beans moisture absorption behavior using 14 mathematical models and found that the Weibull model had the most conformity with variations in experimental data (Shafaei and Masoumi, 2014c. Observations made by researchers indicate that the moisture absorption process in various materials encompasses a primary phase with a fast rate and a second phase with a lower rate. The second phase in moisture absorption is called the relaxation phase. The main problem with all the mathematical and experimental models is the lack of the model’s ability to evaluate the rate of moisture absorption in the secondary phase. Artificial Neural

  13. Moisture Sensitivity of Contrail Forecast Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Special care must be taken to select a representative first guess for all values of the array or MATHCAD will not converge to the proper root. Profile 2A T...air must reach saturation in the wake for a contrail to form. Therefore, the saturation process within the wake is dependent on the amount of heat and...combustion would be added to the wake so contrail factor was a constant. He also believed the heat and moisture liberated by the combustion process was

  14. Drought-adaptation potential in Fagus sylvatica: linking moisture availability with genetic diversity and dendrochronology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R Pluess

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microevolution is essential for species persistence especially under anticipated climate change scenarios. Species distribution projection models suggested that the dominant tree species of lowland forests in Switzerland, European beech (Fagus sylvatica L., might disappear from most areas due to expected longer dry periods. However, if genotypes at the moisture boundary of the species climatic envelope are adapted to lower moisture availability, they can serve as seed source for the continuation of beech forests under changing climates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With an AFLP genome scan approach, we studied neutral and potentially adaptive genetic variation in Fagus sylvatica in three regions containing a dry and a mesic site each (n(ind. = 241, n(markers = 517. We linked this dataset with dendrochronological growth measures and local moisture availabilities based on precipitation and soil characteristics. Genetic diversity decreased slightly at dry sites. Overall genetic differentiation was low (F(st = 0.028 and Bayesian cluster analysis grouped all populations together suggesting high (historical gene flow. The Bayesian outlier analyses indicated 13 markers with three markers differing between all dry and mesic sites and the others between the contrasting sites within individual regions. A total of 41 markers, including seven outlier loci, changed their frequency with local moisture availability. Tree height and median basal growth increments were reduced at dry sites, but marker presence/absence was not related to dendrochronological characteristics. CONCLUSION AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE: The outlier alleles and the makers with changing frequencies in relation to moisture availability indicate microevolutionary processes occurring within short geographic distances. The general genetic similarity among sites suggests that 'preadaptive' genes can easily spread across the landscape. Yet, due to the long live span of

  15. Drought-adaptation potential in Fagus sylvatica: linking moisture availability with genetic diversity and dendrochronology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluess, Andrea R; Weber, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Microevolution is essential for species persistence especially under anticipated climate change scenarios. Species distribution projection models suggested that the dominant tree species of lowland forests in Switzerland, European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), might disappear from most areas due to expected longer dry periods. However, if genotypes at the moisture boundary of the species climatic envelope are adapted to lower moisture availability, they can serve as seed source for the continuation of beech forests under changing climates. With an AFLP genome scan approach, we studied neutral and potentially adaptive genetic variation in Fagus sylvatica in three regions containing a dry and a mesic site each (n(ind.) = 241, n(markers) = 517). We linked this dataset with dendrochronological growth measures and local moisture availabilities based on precipitation and soil characteristics. Genetic diversity decreased slightly at dry sites. Overall genetic differentiation was low (F(st) = 0.028) and Bayesian cluster analysis grouped all populations together suggesting high (historical) gene flow. The Bayesian outlier analyses indicated 13 markers with three markers differing between all dry and mesic sites and the others between the contrasting sites within individual regions. A total of 41 markers, including seven outlier loci, changed their frequency with local moisture availability. Tree height and median basal growth increments were reduced at dry sites, but marker presence/absence was not related to dendrochronological characteristics. CONCLUSION AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE: The outlier alleles and the makers with changing frequencies in relation to moisture availability indicate microevolutionary processes occurring within short geographic distances. The general genetic similarity among sites suggests that 'preadaptive' genes can easily spread across the landscape. Yet, due to the long live span of trees, fostering saplings originating from dry sites and

  16. Stability and anti-glycation properties of intermediate moisture apple products fortified with green tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelli, Vera; Corey, Mark; Kerr, William; Vantaggi, Claudia

    2011-07-15

    Intermediate moisture products made from blanched apple flesh and green tea extract (about 6mg of monomeric flavan 3-ols added per g of dry apple) or blanched apple flesh (control) were produced, and their quality attributes were investigated over storage for two months at water activity (a(w)) levels of 0.55 and 0.75, at 30°C. Products were evaluated for colour (L(∗), a(∗), and b(∗) Hunter's parameters), phytochemical contents (flavan 3-ols, chlorogenic acid, dihydrochalcones, ascorbic acid and total polyphenols), ferric reducing antioxidant potential, 2,2-diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)hydrazyl radical-scavenging activity and ability to inhibit formation of fructose-induced advanced glycation end-products. During storage of the fortified and unfortified intermediate moisture apples, water availability was sufficient to support various chemical reactions involving phytochemicals, which degraded at different rates: ascorbic acid>flavan 3-ols>dihydrochalcones and chlorogenic acid. Colour variations occurred at slightly slower rates after green tea addition. In the intermediate moisture apple, antioxidant and anti-glycoxidative properties decreased at similar rates (half-life was about 80d at a(w) of 0.75, 30°C). In the green tea-fortified intermediate moisture apple, the antioxidant activity decreased at a slow rate (half-life was 165d at a(w) of 0.75, 30°C) and the anti-glycoxidative properties did not change, indicating that flavan 3-ol degradation involved the formation of derivatives that retained the properties of their parent compounds. Since these properties are linked to oxidative- and advanced glycation end-product-related diseases, these results suggest that green tea fortification of intermediate moisture apple products could be a valuable means of product innovation, to address consumers' nutritional needs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of moisture and pressure cycling on sorption capacity of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, V.N.; Goodman, A.L.; Soong, Yee

    2005-09-01

    Variability of the data for CO2 absorption on coal reported by different research groups suggests that it strongly depends on experimental conditions. We investigated the effects of moisture content and pressure cycling history on temporal changes in the coal sorptive capacity for Pocahontas #3, Illinois #6, and Beulah Zap powders of Argonne premium coals. The samples were tested as received and moisture equilibrated at 96-97% RH and 55°C for 48 hours. It was demonstrated that the magnitude and dynamics of the changes are affected by the coal type (maceral) and rank. Correlation between the sample volume change (swelling/shrinkage) and the variations in absorption-desorption patterns may indicate the relationship between coal structural relaxation and kinetics of CO2 absorption. Experimental and theoretical methods are proposed to study these effects.

  18. A Hysteresis Model Suitable For Numerical Simulation Of Moisture Content in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan; Damkilde, Lars

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium moisture content in wood depends not only on the current relative humidity in the ambient air but also on the history of the relative humidity variations. This hysteresis dependency of sorption in wood implies that in the worst case the moisture content for a given relative humidi...... temperatures. These features make the model relatively easy to implement into a numerical method, e.g. the Finite Element Method....... may deviate by 30-35%. While researchers seem to have reached a general agreement on the hypothesis for the sorption hysteresis phenomenon, only a few models describing the phenomenon are available. Current models as the independent domain model have numerical deficiencies and drawbacks. This paper...

  19. Use of microwave remote sensing data to monitor spatio temporal characteristics of surface soil moisture at local and regional scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Löw

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrologic processes, such as runoff production or evapotranspiration, largely depend on the variation of soil moisture and its spatial pattern. The interaction of electromagnetic waves with the land surface can be dependant on the water content of the uppermost soil layer. Especially in the microwave domain of the electromagnetic spectrum, this is the case. New sensors as e.g. ENVISAT ASAR, allow for frequent, synoptically and homogeneous image acquisitions over larger areas. Parameter inversion models are therefore developed to derive bio- and geophysical parameters from the image products. The paper presents a soil moisture inversion model for ENVISAT ASAR data for local and regional scale applications. The model is validated against in situ soil moisture measurements. The various sources of uncertainties, being related to the inversion process are assessed and quantified.

  20. Differences between conventional and glyphosate tolerant soybeans and moisture effect in their discrimination by near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve Agelet, Lidia; Armstrong, Paul R; Tallada, Jasper G; Hurburgh, Charles R

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies showed that Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) could distinguish between Roundup Ready® (RR) and conventional soybeans at the bulk and single seed sample level, but it was not clear which compounds drove the classification. In this research the varieties used did not show significant differences in major compounds between RR and conventional beans, but moisture content had a big impact on classification accuracies. Four of the five RR samples had slightly higher moistures and had a higher water uptake than their conventional counterparts. This could be linked with differences in their hulls, being either compositional or morphological. Because water absorption occurs in the same region as main compounds in hulls (mainly carbohydrates) and water causes physical changes from swelling, variations in moisture cause a complex interaction resulting in a large impact on discrimination accuracies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Novel Bias Correction Method for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Soil Moisture: Retrieval Ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hyoung Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bias correction is a very important pre-processing step in satellite data assimilation analysis, as data assimilation itself cannot circumvent satellite biases. We introduce a retrieval algorithm-specific and spatially heterogeneous Instantaneous Field of View (IFOV bias correction method for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS soil moisture. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to present the probabilistic presentation of SMOS soil moisture using retrieval ensembles. We illustrate that retrieval ensembles effectively mitigated the overestimation problem of SMOS soil moisture arising from brightness temperature errors over West Africa in a computationally efficient way (ensemble size: 12, no time-integration. In contrast, the existing method of Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF matching considerably increased the SMOS biases, due to the limitations of relying on the imperfect reference data. From the validation at two semi-arid sites, Benin (moderately wet and vegetated area and Niger (dry and sandy bare soils, it was shown that the SMOS errors arising from rain and vegetation attenuation were appropriately corrected by ensemble approaches. In Benin, the Root Mean Square Errors (RMSEs decreased from 0.1248 m3/m3 for CDF matching to 0.0678 m3/m3 for the proposed ensemble approach. In Niger, the RMSEs decreased from 0.14 m3/m3 for CDF matching to 0.045 m3/m3 for the ensemble approach.

  2. Soil Moisture Estimation Using MODIS Images (Case Study: Mashhad Plain Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fashaee

    2016-09-01

    stress in the study area in the six-month period of observation is moderate. To validate the results, changes in precipitation, relative humidity and WDI values were compared. As expected, after the occurrence of any significant rainfall, water stress is decreased and decreasing in relative humidity, coincided with increase in water stress. In the next step, the linear relationship between measured values of soil moisture and WDI values were fitted in 2 depth of 5 and 10 cm. It should be noted that the average values of WDI of four pixels surrounding the Golmakan station was used in calculation of the regression coefficients Similar research has shown that Ts~VI trapezoid based WDI can accurately capture temporal variation in surface soil moisture, but the capability of detecting spatial variation is poor for such a semi-arid region like Mashhad. The high correlation coefficient (93% obtained from soil moisture (5 cm and WDI regression showed the good mutual impacts of these two parameters on each other. The correlation coefficient between WDI index and soil moisture at a depth of 10 cm was equal to 83%. Reducing the value of the correlation coefficient was probably due to the delay in transferring the soil moisture changes to underlying depth. Conclusion: The similarity of the mean values of rainfall and relative humidity of the air showed good compliance with the WDI. Good correlation coefficient (93% between WDI and soil moisture (measured at depth of 5cm in the station certifies the accuracy of the results obtained from WDI. The results showed that Ts~VI trapezoid based WDI can well capture temporal variation in surface soil moisture, while in this study, spatial zoning was avoided because of the lack of soil moisture data within the study area.

  3. Using lamb waves tomonitor moisture absorption thermally fatigues composite laminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sun; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Nondestructive evaluation for material health monitoring is important in aerospace industries. Composite laminates are exposed to heat cyclic loading and humid environment depending on flight conditions. Cyclic heat loading and moisture absorption may lead to material degradation such as matrix breaking, debonding, and delamination. In this paper, the moisture absorption ratio was investigated by measuring the Lamb wave velocity. The composite laminates were manufactured and subjected to different thermal aging cycles and moisture absorption. For various conditions of these cycles, not only changes in weight and also ultrasonic wave velocity were measured, and the Lamb wave velocity at various levels of moisture on a carbon-epoxy plate was investigated. Results from the experiment show a linear correlation between moisture absorption ratio and Lamb wave velocity at different thermal fatigue stages. The presented method can be applied as an alternative solution in the online monitoring of composite laminate moisture levels in commercial flights.

  4. Effects of moisture on ultrasound propagation in cement mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Taeho; Li, Shuaili; Achenbach, Jan; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    In concrete structures, moisture is often a major cause of chemically related degradations such as alkaline-silica reaction. To develop ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques for monitoring such chemical degradations, it is necessary to understand how moisture affects the propagation of ultrasound in concrete. To this end, the objective of this paper is to experimentally determine the correlation between the moisture content in cement mortar and ultrasonic wave propagation. Specifically, effects of moisture on the ultrasonic phase velocity and attenuation are examined. It is found that, for the cement mortar samples considered in this study, moisture has negligible effect on the ultrasonic phase velocity. However, moisture can significantly increase the attenuation of ultrasound in cement mortar even in the sub-MHz frequency range.

  5. Formulation and evaluation of herbal anti-acne moisturizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Arun; Shama, Shaik Neelufar; Joy, Jyothi Mulanjananiyil; Reddy, Bobbu Sravya; Roja, Chirra

    2012-10-01

    The moisture content present in human skin makes it look young and the use of moisturizer results in fastening the moisture with a surface film of oil. Acne vulgaris is one of the most commonly seen diseases among the youth. The present study is focused on the use of herbs as moisturizer for acne treatment. The anti-acne moisturizer was formulated from herbal crude extracts and investigated the physico-chemical parameters as well as antibacterial activity of the formulation. The study revealed that ethanol extract of Andrographis paniculata, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Ocimum sanctum, Azadiracta indica and Green tea possessed the potential for inhibiting acne. It was observed that the optimal formula of anti-acne moisturizer was satisfactorily effective to control acne inducing bacteria i.e., Staphylococcus epidermis and Propionibacterium. The physico-chemical parameters of the formulation were also optimal with no signs of irritation.

  6. Estimation of Moisture Content in Coal in Coal Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Mataji, Babak

    2006-01-01

    For coal-fired power plants information of the moisture content in the coal is important to determine and control the dynamical behavior of the power plants. E.g. a high moisture content in the coal can result in a decreased maximum load gradient of the plant. In this paper a method for estimating...... the moisture content of the coal is proposed based on a simple dynamic energy model of a coal mill, which pulverizes and dries the coal before it is burned in the boiler. An optimal unknown input observer is designed to estimate the moisture content based on an energy balance model. The designed moisture...... estimator is verified on a couple of sets of measurement data, from which it is concluded that the designed estimator estimates the real coal moisture content....

  7. A soil moisture network for SMOS validation in Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone; Skou, N.; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2012-01-01

    pixel (44 × 44 km), which is representative of the land surface conditions of the catchment and with minimal impact from open water (2) arrangement of three network clusters along the precipitation gradient, and (3) distribution of the stations according to respective fractions of classes representing......The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity Mission (SMOS) acquires surface soil moisture data of global coverage every three days. Product validation for a range of climate and environmental conditions across continents is a crucial step. For this purpose, a soil moisture and soil temperature sensor...... the prevailing environmental conditions. Overall, measured moisture and temperature patterns could be related to the respective land cover and soil conditions. Texture-dependency of the 0–5 cm soil moisture measurements was demonstrated. Regional differences in 0–5 cm soil moisture, temperature and precipitation...

  8. Australian Soil Moisture Field Experiments in Support of Soil Moisture Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Walker, Jeff; Rudiger, Christopher; Panciera, Rocco

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale field campaigns provide the critical fink between our understanding retrieval algorithms developed at the point scale, and algorithms suitable for satellite applications at vastly larger pixel scales. Retrievals of land parameters must deal with the substantial sub-pixel heterogeneity that is present in most regions. This is particularly the case for soil moisture remote sensing, because of the long microwave wavelengths (L-band) that are optimal. Yet, airborne L-band imagers have generally been large, heavy, and required heavy-lift aircraft resources that are expensive and difficult to schedule. Indeed, US soil moisture campaigns, have been constrained by these factors, and European campaigns have used non-imagers due to instrument and aircraft size constraints. Despite these factors, these campaigns established that large-scale soil moisture remote sensing was possible, laying the groundwork for satellite missions. Starting in 2005, a series of airborne field campaigns have been conducted in Australia: to improve our understanding of soil moisture remote sensing at large scales over heterogeneous areas. These field data have been used to test and refine retrieval algorithms for soil moisture satellite missions, and most recently with the launch of the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, to provide validation measurements over a multi-pixel area. The campaigns to date have included a preparatory campaign in 2005, two National Airborne Field Experiments (NAFE), (2005 and 2006), two campaigns to the Simpson Desert (2008 and 2009), and one Australian Airborne Cal/val Experiment for SMOS (AACES), just concluded in the austral spring of 2010. The primary airborne sensor for each campaign has been the Polarimetric L-band Microwave Radiometer (PLMR), a 6-beam pushbroom imager that is small enough to be compatible with light aircraft, greatly facilitating the execution of the series of campaigns, and a key to their success. An

  9. Summer moisture availability across North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schrier, G.; Briffa, K. R.; Osborn, T. J.; Cook, E. R.

    2006-06-01

    Maps of the monthly self-calibrating Palmer drought severity index (SCPDSI) have been calculated for the period 1901-2002 for the contiguous United States (20°-50°N and 130°-60°W) with a spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5°. The recently introduced SCPDSI improves upon the more common Palmer drought severity index by maintaining a more consistent behavior of the index and hence comparability over diverse climatological regions. Although the self-calibrating PDSI and the "traditional" PDSI averaged over the contiguous United States correlate well, large differences were found for extensive areas. Over the area as whole the 1930s and 1950s stand out as times of persistent and exceptionally dry conditions, whereas the 1970s and the 1990s were generally wet. Over 55% of the Untied States saw moderate to extreme drought in 1934 and over 40% of the area was affected during the 1954-1956 drought. The wettest year, 1983, saw over 45% of the contiguous United States affected by moderate to extreme wet conditions. Three leading modes of coherent summer moisture variability are identified, and they have their largest loading over the northwestern United States, the southern plains, and the southwestern United States, respectively. No evidence is found for a statistically significant trend in the percentage area of the contiguous United States experiencing either moderate or extreme moisture availability conditions for the 1901-2002 period.

  10. Sources of glacial moisture in Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Paleoclimatic records from Mesoamerica document the interplay between Atlantic and Pacific sources of precipitation during the last glacial stage and Holocene. Today, and throughout much of the Holocene, the entire region receives its principal moisture in the summer from an interaction of easterly trade winds with the equatorial calms. Glacial records from sites east of 95?? W in Guatemala, Florida, northern Venezuela and Colombia record dry conditions before 12 ka, however. West of 95?? W, glacial conditions were moister than in the Holocene. For example, pollen and diatom data show that Lake Pa??tzcuaro in the central Mexican highlands was cool, deep and fresh during this time and fossil pinyon needles in packrat middens in Chihuahua, Sonora, Arizona, and Texas indicate cooler glacial climates with increased winter precipitation. Cold Gulf of Mexico sea-surface temperatures and reduced strength of the equatorial calms can explain arid full and late glacial environments east of 95?? W whereas an intensified pattern of winter, westerly air flow dominated hydrologic balances as far south as 20?? N. Overall cooler temperatures may have increased effective moisture levels during dry summer months in both areas. ?? 1997 INQUA/ Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. Moisture sorption characteristics of microalgae Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Oliveira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, the microalgae Spirulina platensis has been used as a functional ingredient in several food applications; its process involving drying and storage steps. Moisture equilibrium data for adsorption isotherms of microalgae Spirulina were investigated at 10, 20 and 30ºC and for desorption, at 40, 50 and 60ºC, using the gravimetric static method. The experimental data were analyzed by GAB and BET models. The GAB equation showed the best fitting to the experimental data with R² ≈ 99% and MRE < 10%. The water surface area values calculated by GAB and BET models were very similar. The isosteric heats were determined by application of Clausius-Clapeyron equation to sorption isotherms obtained from the best-fitting equation. The isosteric heat and the entropy of desorption isotherm presented similar behavior, with a sharp change in an equilibrium moisture content of 10%. The enthalpy-entropy compensation theory was applied to the isotherms, indicating that they are enthalpy-controlled.

  12. Insulation Materials of Transformer Using Chemical Mechanism of Moisture Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Hussian Abbasi

    2014-01-01

    The composite insulation system of power transformers consisting of two insulation materials (cellulose and mineral oil) are the main insulation material of power transformer, the increase of moisture will reduce their insulation strength. Moisture equilibrium curves are the basis of power transformer moisture detection, however, the service data and theory analysis both indicate the present curves are not fit for old transformer. Therefore this research work is focused the law and mechanism ...

  13. The Development of Moisture Sensitivity Test for Compacted Asphalt

    OpenAIRE

    M.K. Shamshuddin; M.E. Abdullah; Rhasbudin Shah, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Moisture damage is one of the major issues in asphalt distress. It is due to the adhesive and cohesive failure of asphalt mixture and it will shorten pavement life. Moisture-sensitive mixtures need to be identified during the course of the mixture design process which fulfills the specified minimum standard. The laboratory testing procedures currently available for compacted Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) to test the moisture sensitivity were primarily developed to determine the degree ...

  14. Effects of moisture content on some physical properties of red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physical properties of red pepper seed were evaluated as a function of moisture content. The average length, width and thickness were 4.46, 3.66 and 0.79 mm, respectively, at 7.27% d.b. moisture content. In the moisture range of 7.27 to 20.69% dry basis (d.b.), studies on rewetted red pepper seed showed that the ...

  15. Effects of drought season length on live moisture content dynamic in Mediterranean shrubs: 8 years of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzaro, Grazia; Ventura, Andrea; Bortolu, Sara; Duce, Pierpaolo

    2017-04-01

    Mediterranean shrubs are an important component of Mediterranean vegetation communities. In this kind of vegetation, live fuel is a relevant component of the available fuel which catches fire and, consequently, its water content plays an important role in determining fire occurrence and spread. In live plant, water content patterns are related to both environmental conditions (e.g. meteorological variables, soil water availability) and ecophysiological characteristics of the plant species. According to projections on future climate, an increase in risk of summer droughts is likely to take place in Southern Europe. More prolonged drought seasons induced by climatic changes are likely to influence general flammability characteristics of fuel. In addition, variations in precipitation and mean temperature could directly affect fuel water status and length of critical periods of high ignition danger for Mediterranean ecosystems. The aims of this work were to analyse the influence of both weather seasonality and inter-annual weather variability on live fuel moisture content within and among some common Mediterranean species, and to investigate the effects of prolonged drought season on live moisture content dynamic. The study was carried out in North Sardinia (Italy). Measurements of LFMC seasonal pattern of two really common and flammable Mediterranean shrub species (Cistus monspeliensis and Rosmarinus officinalis) were performed periodically for 8 years. Meteorological variables were also recorded. Relationships between live fuel moisture content and environmental conditions (i.e. rainfall, air temperature and soil moisture) were investigated and effects of different lengths of drought season on LFMC pattern were analysed. Results showed that distribution and amount of rainfall affected seasonal variation of live fuel moisture content. In particular more prolonged drought seasons caused a longer period in which LFMC was below 95 -100% that is commonly considered as

  16. Soil moisture sensitivity of autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration in boreal xeric pine and mesic spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ťupek, Boris; Launiainen, Samuli; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Heikkinen, Jukka; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-04-01

    Litter decomposition rates of the most process based soil carbon models affected by environmental conditions are linked with soil heterotrophic CO2 emissions and serve for estimating soil carbon sequestration; thus due to the mass balance equation the variation in measured litter inputs and measured heterotrophic soil CO2 effluxes should indicate soil carbon stock changes, needed by soil carbon management for mitigation of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, if sensitivity functions of the applied model suit to the environmental conditions e.g. soil temperature and moisture. We evaluated the response forms of autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration to soil temperature and moisture in four boreal forest sites of the International Cooperative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP Forests) by a soil trenching experiment during year 2015 in southern Finland. As expected both autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration components were primarily controlled by soil temperature and exponential regression models generally explained more than 90% of the variance. Soil moisture regression models on average explained less than 10% of the variance and the response forms varied between Gaussian for the autotrophic forest floor respiration component and linear for the heterotrophic forest floor respiration component. Although the percentage of explained variance of soil heterotrophic respiration by the soil moisture was small, the observed reduction of CO2 emissions with higher moisture levels suggested that soil moisture response of soil carbon models not accounting for the reduction due to excessive moisture should be re-evaluated in order to estimate right levels of soil carbon stock changes. Our further study will include evaluation of process based soil carbon models by the annual heterotrophic respiration and soil carbon stocks.

  17. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann Y.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quad-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well- managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. Prior to its application for soil moisture inversion, a good agreement was found between the single-scattering IEM simulations and the L band measurements of SIR-C and AIRSAR over a wide range of soil moisture and surface roughness conditions. The sensitivity of soil moisture variation to the co-polarized signals were then examined under the consideration of the calibration accuracy of various components of SAR measurements. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  18. Variational analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rockafellar, R Tyrrell

    1998-01-01

    From its origins in the minimization of integral functionals, the notion of 'variations' has evolved greatly in connection with applications in optimization, equilibrium, and control. It refers not only to constrained movement away from a point, but also to modes of perturbation and approximation that are best describable by 'set convergence', variational convergence of functions and the like. This book develops a unified framework and, in finite dimension, provides a detailed exposition of variational geometry and subdifferential calculus in their current forms beyond classical and convex analysis. Also covered are set-convergence, set-valued mappings, epi-convergence, duality, maximal monotone mappings, second-order subderivatives, measurable selections and normal integrands. The changes in this 3rd printing mainly concern various typographical corrections, and reference omissions that came to light in the previous printings. Many of these reached the authors' notice through their own re-reading, that of th...

  19. Application of Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Sensing to Understand Land-atmosphere Interactions in Three North American Monsoon Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner-McGraw, A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Franz, T. E.; Anderson, C.

    2013-12-01

    increasing errors for higher soil moisture content. We also examined the effects of sub-footprint variability in soil moisture on the neutron readings by comparing two of the sites with large variations in topographically-mediated surface flows. Our work also synthesizes seasonal soil moisture dynamics across the desert ecosystems and attempts to tease out differences due to land cover alterations, including the seasonal greening in each study site occurring during the North American monsoon.

  20. Moisture origin and transport processes in Colombia, northern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, I.; Dominguez, F.; Cañón-Barriga, J.; Martínez, J. A.; Nieto, R.; Gimeno, L.; Dirmeyer, P. A.

    2017-04-01

    We assess the spatial structure of moisture flux divergence, regional moisture sources and transport processes over Colombia, in northern South America. Using three independent methods the dynamic recycling model (DRM), FLEXPART and the Quasi-isentropic back-trajectory (QIBT) models we quantify the moisture sources that contribute to precipitation over the region. We find that moisture from the Atlantic Ocean and terrestrial recycling are the most important sources of moisture for Colombia, highlighting the importance of the Orinoco and Amazon basins as regional providers of atmospheric moisture. The results show the influence of long-range cross-equatorial flow from the Atlantic Ocean into the target region and the role of the study area as a passage of moisture into South America. We also describe the seasonal moisture transport mechanisms of the well-known low-level westerly and Caribbean jets that originate in the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea, respectively. We find that these dynamical systems play an important role in the convergence of moisture over western Colombia.

  1. [Moisture and mold damages of buildings in relation to health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkanen, Juha; Lampi, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Moisture damages of buildings increase respiratory symptoms and the risk of development of new cases of asthma. Scientific evidence of possible other health effects of moisture damages is scanty but they cause plenty of concern. The management of indoor air problems is further hampered by the lack of health-based limit values. Patients having symptoms from indoor air present a challenge to the doctor, because our ability to apply scientific data to an individual building or patient is very limited Although the factors increasing asthma and respiratory symptoms in buildings with moisture damage are not known in detail, every attempt should be made to prevent and correct the moisture damages.

  2. A biomimic thermal fabric with high moisture permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisture comfort is an essential factor for functional property of thermal cloth, especially for thick thermal cloth, since thick cloth may hinder effective moisture permeation, and high moisture concentration in the micro-climate between skin and fabric would cause cold feeling. Here, we report a biomimic thermal fabric with excellent warm retention and moisture management properties. In this fabric, the warp yarn system constructs many tree-shaped channel nets in the thickness direction of the fabric. Experimental result indicates that the special hierarchic configuration of warp yarns endows the biomimic thermal fabric with a better warm retention and water vapor management properties compared with the traditional fabrics.

  3. Measurement of Moisture Storage Parameters of Building Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jiřičková

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The moisture storage parameters of three different building materials: calcium silicate, ceramic brick and autoclaved aerated concrete, are determined in the hygroscopic range and overhygroscopic range. Measured sorption isotherms and moisture retention curves are then combined into moisture storage functions using the Kelvin equation. A comparison of measured results with global characteristics of the pore space obtained by mercury intrusion porosimetry shows a reasonable agreement; the median pore radii by volume are well within the interval given by the beginning and the end of the characteristic steep parts of the moisture retention curves.

  4. Numerical Investigation of a Moisture Evaporation Model in Building Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Amirkhanov, I V; Pavlish, M; Puzynina, T P; Puzynin, I V; Sarhadov, I

    2005-01-01

    The properties of a model of moisture evaporation in a porous building material of a rectangular form proposed in [1] are investigated. Algorithms of solving a nonlinear diffusion equation with initial and boundary conditions simulating the dynamic distribution of moisture concentration, calculation of coefficients of a polynomial describing transport of moisture with usage of experimental measurement of moisture concentration in a sample are developed and investigated. Research on the properties of the model is carried out depending on the degree of the polynomial, a set of its coefficients, and the quantity of the used experimental data.

  5. SMEX03 Little River Micronet Soil Moisture Data: Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Parameters for this data set include precipitation, soil temperature, volumetric soil moisture, soil conductivity, and soil salinity measured in the Little River...

  6. Preservative activity of lavender hydrosols in moisturizing body gels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunicka‐Styczyńska, A; Śmigielski, K; Prusinowska, R; Rajkowska, K; Kuśmider, B; Sikora, M

    2015-01-01

    Significance and Impact of the Study: The presented research proved antimicrobial activity of hydrosols obtained from fresh or dried Lavandula angustifolia herbs or flowers in moisturizing body gel...

  7. Moisture adsorption and desorption behavior of sludge powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, F B; Bentes Freire, F; Pires, E C; Freire, J T

    2007-11-01

    In this work, the moisture adsorption and desorption isotherms were determined with the aim of defining the range of moisture content for storage of sludge powder. Equilibrium moisture content provides the basis for information not only on how much water has been taken out of a system but also on how fast drying is taking place (drying rate). Once the drying process is accomplished, the main concern rests on the storage of the dried final product. Still, the equilibrium moisture content is valuable information in that it has a major effect on the product physical and chemical properties. The present work also addresses the problem of selecting the best fit for equilibrium moisture content of sludge powder out of six well-known correlations for moisture sorption isotherms of solids: Henderson, Henderson-Thompson, Chung-Pfost, Chen-Clayton, Modified Halsey and Oswin. The equilibrium moisture content was determined by the static method (saturated salt solutions), in which the atmosphere surrounding the product is in equilibrium with the product without mechanical movement of the air or the product. Experiments were carried out under isothermal conditions at 20 and 40 degrees C. By calculating the regression coefficient, the residuals and the bias measure of Box for the equilibrium moisture content, the study showed that the Oswin Model was the most suitable. The range enclosed within the adsorption isotherm at 40 degrees C and the desorption isotherm at 20 degrees C defines the moisture extremes for storage in most tropical areas of the world.

  8. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Schumacher, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lukachko, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report explains the moisture-related concerns for high R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. In this project, hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones. The modeling program assessed the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage; the report presents results of the study.

  9. Variational principles

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2004-01-01

    This graduate-level text's primary objective is to demonstrate the expression of the equations of the various branches of mathematical physics in the succinct and elegant form of variational principles (and thereby illuminate their interrelationship). Its related intentions are to show how variational principles may be employed to determine the discrete eigenvalues for stationary state problems and to illustrate how to find the values of quantities (such as the phase shifts) that arise in the theory of scattering. Chapter-by-chapter treatment consists of analytical dynamics; optics, wave mecha

  10. [Effects of inter-row economic crop planting on soil moisture in a rain-fed jujube orchard in loess hilly region, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Qiang; Zhao, Xi-ning; Gao, Xiao-dong; Li, Lu-sheng; Li, Hong-chen; Sun, Wen-hao

    2016-02-01

    Soil moisture variation in dryland sloping jujube. orchard was investigated after introducing two economic crops, i.e., feed Brassica napus (JR) and Hemerocallis fulva (JH) planted between jujube rows. Jujube tree without inter-row crop was set as control (CK). The results showed that mean soil moisture for JR and JH in the 0-180 cm soil layer increased by 6.2% and 10.1% compared with CK, respectively. Soil moisture changed mainly in the 0-60 cm soil layer in growth stage of Jujube trees. Soil moisture in JR and JH treatments significantly increased in the 0-60 cm soil layer, which could meet the demand in water resource of jujube plantation. The water consumption of jujube trees also mainly concentrated in the 0-60 cm soil layer. There was a significant decay exponential relationship between the soil moisture in the 0-20 cm layer and the drought duration after rainfall. During the 18-day dry period after rain, the soil moisture contents of JR and JH were apparently higher than that of CK. In conclusion, the jujube-crop intercropping system improved the soil moisture condition. It was an effective measure to overcome the seasonal drought in jujube orchards on the loess hilly region.

  11. Empirical Modeling of Planetary Boundary Layer Dynamics Under Multiple Precipitation Scenarios Using a Two-Layer Soil Moisture Approach: An Example From a Semiarid Shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Zulia Mayari; Papuga, Shirley A.

    2017-11-01

    In semiarid regions, where water resources are limited and precipitation dynamics are changing, understanding land surface-atmosphere interactions that regulate the coupled soil moisture-precipitation system is key for resource management and planning. We present a modeling approach to study soil moisture and albedo controls on planetary boundary layer height (PBLh). We used Santa Rita Creosote Ameriflux and Tucson Airport atmospheric sounding data to generate empirical relationships between soil moisture, albedo, and PBLh. Empirical relationships showed that ˜50% of the variation in PBLh can be explained by soil moisture and albedo with additional knowledge gained by dividing the soil profile into two layers. Therefore, we coupled these empirical relationships with soil moisture estimated using a two-layer bucket approach to model PBLh under six precipitation scenarios. Overall we observed that decreases in precipitation tend to limit the recovery of the PBL at the end of the wet season. However, increases in winter precipitation despite decreases in summer precipitation may provide opportunities for positive feedbacks that may further generate more winter precipitation. Our results highlight that the response of soil moisture, albedo, and the PBLh will depend not only on changes in annual precipitation, but also on the frequency and intensity of this change. We argue that because albedo and soil moisture data are readily available at multiple temporal and spatial scales, developing empirical relationships that can be used in land surface-atmosphere applications have great potential for exploring the consequences of climate change.

  12. Dependence of ecosystem respiration on soil temperature, moisture and plant biomass in a semi-arid grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, T.; Shinoda, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Mongolian steppe zone is one of the main components of central-Asian grasslands. Ecosystem respiration rates between the atmosphere and the steppe ecosystem were measured in a Mongolian semi- arid grassland in July 2004, May 2005, July 2005, September 2005, and June 2006 by using a closed- chamber technique. The study area is dominated by Poaceous grasses and was enclosed by a fence (300 m x 300 m) in June 2004 to prevent livestock from grazing. Along with the respiration measurements, soil temperature, precipitation, and soil volumetric water content were continuously measured. Aboveground plant biomass (AGB) was also determined by clipping vegetation for each observation period. From the measured data of ecosystem respiration and environmental variables, their quantitative relationships were examined. Individual rates of respiration showed the highest rank correlation coefficient with AGB. The correlation between respiration rate and soil moisture was higher at 3 cm depth than at 10 cm depth, which suggested that soil moisture near the soil surface was better proxy than that at deeper layer for accounting for variations in respiration rate. The respiration rate was exponentially related to the soil temperature and the relationship modified by soil moisture. The amount of respiration rate and its temperature sensitivity (Q10) declined with decreasing soil moisture. Standardized rates of respiration at 20°C were expressed well as a bivariate function of AGB and soil moisture at 3 cm depth. Approximately 88% of the fluctuation in standardized respiration rate was explained by the interaction of these two factors.

  13. Validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite soil moisture retrieval in an Arctic tundra environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrona, Elizabeth; Rowlandson, Tracy L.; Nambiar, Manoj; Berg, Aaron A.; Colliander, Andreas; Marsh, Philip

    2017-05-01

    This study examines the Soil Moisture Active Passive soil moisture product on the Equal Area Scalable Earth-2 (EASE-2) 36 km Global cylindrical and North Polar azimuthal grids relative to two in situ soil moisture monitoring networks that were installed in 2015 and 2016. Results indicate that there is no relationship between the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Level-2 passive soil moisture product and the upscaled in situ measurements. Additionally, there is very low correlation between modeled brightness temperature using the Community Microwave Emission Model and the Level-1 C SMAP brightness temperature interpolated to the EASE-2 Global grid; however, there is a much stronger relationship to the brightness temperature measurements interpolated to the North Polar grid, suggesting that the soil moisture product could be improved with interpolation on the North Polar grid.

  14. Large-scale vegetation responses to terrestrial moisture storage changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Robert L.; Guan, Huade; Batelaan, Okke

    2017-09-01

    The normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) is a useful tool for studying vegetation activity and ecosystem performance at a large spatial scale. In this study we use the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) total water storage (TWS) estimates to examine temporal variability of the NDVI across Australia. We aim to demonstrate a new method that reveals the moisture dependence of vegetation cover at different temporal resolutions. Time series of monthly GRACE TWS anomalies are decomposed into different temporal frequencies using a discrete wavelet transform and analysed against time series of the NDVI anomalies in a stepwise regression. The results show that combinations of different frequencies of decomposed GRACE TWS data explain NDVI temporal variations better than raw GRACE TWS alone. Generally, the NDVI appears to be more sensitive to interannual changes in water storage than shorter changes, though grassland-dominated areas are sensitive to higher-frequencies of water-storage changes. Different types of vegetation, defined by areas of land use type, show distinct differences in how they respond to the changes in water storage, which is generally consistent with our physical understanding. This unique method provides useful insight into how the NDVI is affected by changes in water storage at different temporal scales across land use types.

  15. Long-term evaluation of on-line sensors for determination of moisture in biomass; Laangtidsutvaerdering av nya on-line fukthaltsmaetare foer biobraensle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, Jenny; Axrup, Lars; Dahlquist, Erik

    2002-02-01

    The tests have shown, that it is possible to measure wood moisture at a conveyor with a resolution of approximately 0. 1 %, and an 'absolute' measurement of approximately 0.5 %, with the NIR method. This was for varying wood compositions. Also data from frozen biomass was included in model building. For the Radio frequency scan method the bulk moisture has been measured with a resolution around 0.2% in a container and with an absolute moisture measurement of approximately 0.5 %. This was achieved during a time period in January to March, when the wood mix was relatively constant, and using the model made from the container tests. For the on-line measurement the accuracy was lower, as it was difficult to vary the moisture content and to separate the effect of wood mix from the moisture content. When the dried wood content was increased in April-May, wood mix and moisture varied together. As they were correlated, the model became poor. The uncertainty of the lab samples is in the range of 0.35 %. The moisture content in the wood/bark mixture varied only between 50 and 53 percent in January - March, with just a few values outside this range. This is too little to produce a good model. To get a larger moisture variation, the content of dried wood was increased successively during April-May. Unfortunately we could not achieve any independent variation of biomass mix and moisture in this way, and the model did not improve. Because of this tests were also performed in a 25-30 m{sup 3} container as a complement. Here the variation in moisture content was 38- 58 percent, and with independently varied wood mixtures (moist wood, dried wood and bark) as well. This model then was used to make moisture calculations from the on-line radio frequency spectra. It is interesting to notice, that a calibration model from the container tests could be transferred directly to the fuel tower, although a very different geometry for the radio frequency scan method, and to the

  16. A study on moisture isotherms of formulations: the Use of polynomial equations to predict the moisture isotherms of tablet products

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yanxia; Sanzgiri, Yeshwant D.; Chen, Yisheng

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of manufacturing parameters on the moisture sorption isotherms of some tablet formulations and to predict the moisture isotherms of the final formulations using polynomial equations. Three tablet formulations including a placebo and 2 drug products were prepared through wet granulation, drying, compression, and coating processes. Equilibrium moisture content of excipients and granules at 25°C with different relative humidities were ...

  17. Effect of Vegetation Patterns on SAR derived Surface Soil Moisture Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, C. N.; Schneider, K.

    2012-12-01

    Soil moisture can be regarded as one of the important life sustaining entities on our planet. Among its various functions, the first is probably to enable the growth of vegetation on the land surface. Apart from this, water stored in soils plays many other important roles in the global water (and energy) cycle. In the past decades, radar imaging has proven its potential to quantitatively estimate the near surface water content of soils at high spatial resolutions. The use of active microwave data to measure surface soil moisture requires the consideration of several factors like e.g. soil texture, surface roughness, and vegetation. Among these factors, the presence of a vegetation cover is perhaps the major impediment to accurate quantitative retrievals of soil moisture. On the one hand, the vegetation has a disturbing effect on the radar reflectivity and thus causes errors in the soil moisture retrieval which is generally based on theoretical or experimental relationships between the dielectric properties of the soil surface and the radar backscattering coefficient. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of vegetation with e.g. different crop types with different transpiration coefficients and different phenological development, etc, can cause large variations in the plant water consumption and thus has a significant impact on the soil moisture patterns. We have developed methods to estimate the amount of biomass for different crop types and the underlying surface soil water content directly from polarimetric L-band SAR images. While the horizontally-transmit horizontally-receive co-polarization (hh) is most sensitive towards the dielectric soil properties, the horizontally-transmit vertically-receive cross-polarization (hv) is much more sensitive towards the backscattering from the vegetation canopy. In addition the polarimetric observables entropy (H), alpha angle (α), and the total reflected power (span), all of which are highly affected by the canopy

  18. Validation of SMOS Satellite Soil Moisture Products over Tropical Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniah, Kasturi; Siang, Kang Chuen

    2016-07-01

    Calibration and validation (cal/val) activities on Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite derived soil moisture products has been conducted worldwide since the data has become available but not over the tropical region . This study focuses on the installation of a soil moisture data collection network over an agricultural site in a tropical region in Peninsular Malaysia, and the validation of SMOS soil moisture products. The in-situ data over one year period was analysed and validation of SMOS Soil Moisture products with these in-situ data was conducted.Bias and root mean square errors (RMSE) were computed between SMOS soil moisture products and the in-situ surface soil moisture collected at the satellite passing time (6 am and 6 pm local time). Due to the known limitations of SMOS soil moisture retrieval over vegetated areas with vegetation water content higher than 5 kgm-2, overestimation of SMOS soil moisture products to in-situ data was noticed in this study. The bias is ranging from 0.064 to 0.119 m3m-3 and the RMSE is from 0.090 to 0.158 m3m-3, when both ascending and descending data were validated. This RMSE was found to be similar to a number of studies conducted previously at different regions. However a wet bias was found during the validation, while previous validation activities at other regions showed dry biases. The result of this study is useful to support the continuous development and improvement of SMOS soil moisture retrieval model, aims to produce soil moisture products with higher accuracy, especially in the tropical region.

  19. Assimilating soil moisture into an Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacke, Tobias; Hagemann, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Several modelling studies reported potential impacts of soil moisture anomalies on regional climate. In particular for short prediction periods, perturbations of the soil moisture state may result in significant alteration of surface temperature in the following season. However, it is not clear yet whether or not soil moisture anomalies affect climate also on larger temporal and spatial scales. In an earlier study, we showed that soil moisture anomalies can persist for several seasons in the deeper soil layers of a land surface model. Additionally, those anomalies can influence root zone moisture, in particular during explicitly dry or wet periods. Thus, one prerequisite for predictability, namely the existence of long term memory, is evident for simulated soil moisture and might be exploited to improve climate predictions. The second prerequisite is the sensitivity of the climate system to soil moisture. In order to investigate this sensitivity for decadal simulations, we implemented a soil moisture assimilation scheme into the Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). The assimilation scheme is based on a simple nudging algorithm and updates the surface soil moisture state once per day. In our experiments, the MPI-ESM is used which includes model components for the interactive simulation of atmosphere, land and ocean. Artificial assimilation data is created from a control simulation to nudge the MPI-ESM towards predominantly dry and wet states. First analyses are focused on the impact of the assimilation on land surface variables and reveal distinct differences in the long-term mean values between wet and dry state simulations. Precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff are larger in the wet state compared to the dry state, resulting in an increased moisture transport from the land to atmosphere and ocean. Consequently, surface temperatures are lower in the wet state simulations by more than one Kelvin. In terms of spatial pattern

  20. Moisture movements in render on brick wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Munch, Thomas Astrup; Thorsen, Peter Schjørmann

    2003-01-01

    A three-layer render on brick wall used for building facades is studied in the laboratory. The vertical render surface is held in contact with water for 24 hours simulating driving rain while it is measured with non-destructive X-ray equipment every hour in order to follow the moisture front...... through the render and into the brick. The test specimen is placed between the source and the detector. The test specimens are all scanned before they are exposed to water. In that way the loss of counts from the dry scan to the wet scan qualitatively shows the presence of water. The results show nearly...... no penetration of water through the render and into the brick, and the results are independent of the start condition of the test specimens. Also drying experiments are performed. The results show a small difference in the rate of drying, in favour of the bricks without render....

  1. Moisture-induced caking of beverage powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez Montes, Edgar; Santamaría, Nadia Ardila; Gumy, Jean-Claude; Marchal, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    Beverage powders can exhibit caking during storage due to high temperature and moisture conditions, leading to consumer dissatisfaction. Caking problems can be aggravated by the presence of sensitive ingredients. The caking behaviour of cocoa beverage powders, with varying amounts of a carbohydrate sensitive ingredient, as affected by climate conditions was studied in this work. Sorption isotherms of beverage powders were determined at water activities (a(w) ) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 in a moisture sorption analyser by gravimetry and fitted to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) or the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) equation. Glass transition temperatures (T(g) ) at several a(w) were analysed by differential scanning calorimetry and fitted to the Gordon-Taylor equation. Deduced T(g) = f(a(w) ) functions helped to identify stability or caking zones. Specific experimental methods, based on the analysis of mechanical properties of powder cakes formed under compression, were used to quantify the degree of caking. Pantry tests complemented this study to put in evidence the visual perception of powder caking with increasing a(w) . The glass transition approach was useful to predict the risks of caking but was limited to products where T(g) can be measured. On the other hand, quantification of the caking degree by analysis of mechanical properties allowed estimation of the extent of degradation for each product. This work demonstrated that increasing amounts of a carbohydrate sensitive ingredient in cocoa beverages negatively affected their storage stability. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Evaluation of canola chlorophyll index and leaf nitrogen under wide range of soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskini-Vishkaee, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hosein; Neyshabouri, Mohammad Reza; Shekari, Farid

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a study on the effect of soil matric suction on the variation of leaf chlorophyll index and nitrogen concentration of canola. Results showed that chlorophyll index increases exponentially with soil matric suction, especially at the late season of canola growing time. At moderate matric suction (200 and 300 kPa soil suction heads), chlorophyll index remains nearly constant, but in drier soil (matric suction >300 kPa), chlorophyll index increases gradually with time. Despite the variation of the total leaf nitrogen with the soil matric suction, it is similar to the variation of the chlorophyll index, but the results showed that the chlorophyll index - nitrogen concentration curve has a demarcated bi-modal shape. We suggest that 2.7% of nitrogen and 69.8 of the chlorophyll index value represent the upper limit of the chlorophyll meter reliability for estimation of canola nitrogen under a wide range of soil moisture levels. These results confirm that the chlorophyll meter can be used as an effective tool for rapid and non-destructive estimation of the relative chlorophyll and nitrogen content in canola leaves at a wide range of soil moisture content, except for nearly wilting coefficient or extremely high drought stress

  3. Effect of Moisture Sorption State on Vibrational Properties of Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianxiong Lu; Jiali Jiang; Yiqiang Wu; Xianjun Li; Zhiyong Cai

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vibrational properties and corresponding anisotropicity in wood during different states of moisture sorption. Samples of maple (Acer spp.) and red oak (Quercus rubra Michx.f.) were moisture conditioned by the adsorption process from an ovendried state and by the desorption process...

  4. Hysteresis of soil temperature under different soil moisture and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in a solar greenhouse. The objective of this study was to find a simple method to estimate the hysteresis of soil temperature under three soil moisture and two fertilizer levels in solar greenhouse conditions with tomato crop (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill). The results show that the soil moisture had no significant effects on ...

  5. Determination of moisture and low temperature volatiles in solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenke, D.R.; Hannifan, M.R.

    1983-09-01

    The reaction of calcium carbide with moisture in a closed reactor to form acetylene, when combined with gas chromatographic analysis of the products and measurement of pressure change during reaction, provides an accurate and rapid determination method for moisture and volatile content of solid fuels.

  6. response of three forage legumes to soil moisture stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MR PRINCE

    The mean P content of the plants decreased with decreasing soil moisture content while, that of K increased as moisture stress increased. The overall plant performance pointed to Centrosema as a more favoured for- age plant for dry environments . Keywords: Crop productivity, legumes, food security, water use efficiency.

  7. Equilibrium relative humidity as a tool to monitor seed moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Karrfalt

    2010-01-01

    The importance of seed moisture in maintaining high seed viability is well known. The seed storage chapters in the Tropical Tree Seed Manual (Hong and Ellis 2003) and the Woody Plant Seed Manual (Bonner 2008a) give a detailed discussion and many references on this point. Working with seeds in an operational setting requires a test of seed moisture status. It is...

  8. Determination of Optimum Moisture Content of Palm Nut Cracking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ABSTRACT: After processing the palm fruit for oil, the nut is usually dried in order to loosen the kernel from the shell. The ... cracked nuts yielding whole kernels after impact cracking was used to determine the optimum moisture content the average ... At this moisture content the proportion of evaporable water retained in.

  9. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  10. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  11. Soil moisture and groundwater recharge under a mixed conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1978-01-01

    The depletion of soil moisture within the surface 7 m by a mixed conifer forest in the Sierra Nevada was measured by the neutron method every 2 weeks during 5 consecutive summers. Soil moisture recharge was measured periodically during the intervening winters. Groundwater fluctuations within the surface 17 m were continuously recorded during the same period.

  12. ALOS PALSAR and UAVSAR Soil Moisture in Field Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of our ongoing analysis of L-band radar mapping of soil moisture we are evaluating the role that ALOS PALSAR data can play in the development of radar retrieval algorithms for the future NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite. Differences in configurations must be assessed to det...

  13. Effect of Variety and Initial Moisture Content on Physical Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The static coefficients of friction (an important parameter in predicting the lateral pressure on a retaining wall in storage bins or design of bins and hoppers for gravity flow) were found to increase as the moisture content increased. The study showed that variety and initial moisture content had significant effect (P<0.05) on the ...

  14. Impact of nitrogen nutrition and moisture deficits on growth, yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crop production in arid and semi arid areas is restricted by soil deficiencies in moisture and plant nutrients, especially nitrogen. In order to evaluate the impact of nitrogen nutrition and moisture deficits on growth, yield and radiation use efficiency of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), a field experiment was conducted at Agronomic ...

  15. Evaluating ESA CCI soil moisture in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Amy; Shukla, Shraddhanand; Arsenault, Kristi R.; Wang, Shugong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Verdin, James P.

    2016-06-01

    To assess growing season conditions where ground based observations are limited or unavailable, food security and agricultural drought monitoring analysts rely on publicly available remotely sensed rainfall and vegetation greenness. There are also remotely sensed soil moisture observations from missions like the European Space Agency (ESA), Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP); however, these time series are still too short to conduct studies that demonstrate the utility of these data for operational applications, or to provide historical context for extreme wet or dry events. To promote the use of remotely sensed soil moisture in agricultural drought and food security monitoring, we evaluate the quality of a 30+ year time series of merged active-passive microwave soil moisture from the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI-SM) over East Africa. Compared to the Normalized Difference Vegetation index (NDVI) and modeled soil moisture products, we find substantial spatial and temporal gaps in the early part of the CCI-SM record, with adequate data coverage beginning in 1992. From this point forward, growing season CCI-SM anomalies are well correlated (R > 0.5) with modeled soil moisture, and in some regions, NDVI. We use pixel-wise correlation analysis and qualitative comparisons of seasonal maps and time series to show that remotely sensed soil moisture can inform remote drought monitoring that has traditionally relied on rainfall and NDVI in moderately vegetated regions.

  16. Moisture Diffusivity of Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Denarié, E.; Houst, Y.F.

    1995-01-01

    The moisture diffusivity is of considerable importance for quantitative assessments of creep and shrinkage as well as durability of cementitious material. For this reason, the influence of the composition of repair mortars on their effective moisture diffusivity as a function of the relative humidity of the surrounding air has been investigated. Silica fume,

  17. The global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Kaighin A.; Alemohammad, Seyed Hamed; Akbar, Ruzbeh; Konings, Alexandra G.; Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-01-01

    Surface soil moisture has a direct impact on food security, human health and ecosystem function. It also plays a key role in the climate system, and the development and persistence of extreme weather events such as droughts, floods and heatwaves. However, sparse and uneven observations have made it difficult to quantify the global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture. Here we introduce a metric of soil moisture memory and use a full year of global observations from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission to show that surface soil moisture--a storage believed to make up less than 0.001% of the global freshwater budget by volume, and equivalent to an, on average, 8-mm thin layer of water covering all land surfaces--plays a significant role in the water cycle. Specifically, we find that surface soil moisture retains a median 14% of precipitation falling on land after three days. Furthermore, the retained fraction of the surface soil moisture storage after three days is highest over arid regions, and in regions where drainage to groundwater storage is lowest. We conclude that lower groundwater storage in these regions is due not only to lower precipitation, but also to the complex partitioning of the water cycle by the surface soil moisture storage layer at the land surface.

  18. Microwave moisture meter for in-shell peanut kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    . A microwave moisture meter built with off-the-shelf components was developed, calibrated and tested in the laboratory and in the field for nondestructive and instantaneous in-shell peanut kernel moisture content determination from dielectric measurements on unshelled peanut pod samples. The meter ...

  19. Microwave moisture meter for in-shell almonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining almond kernel moisture content while still in the shell is important for both almond growers and processors. A dielectric method was developed for almond kernel moisture determination from dielectric measurements on in-shell almonds at a single microwave frequency. A sample holder was fi...

  20. Estimating runoff and soil moisture deficit in guinea savannah region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimating runoff and soil moisture deficit in guinea savannah region of Nigeria using water balance method. ... The estimation ofrunoff and soil moisture deficit in Guinea Savannah region using semi arid model based on soil water balance technique (SAMBA) was carried out. The input to the SAMBA model are daily rainfall ...

  1. Moisture preferences, growth and reproduction of the African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-10-13

    Oct 13, 1989 ... vermicomposting species, especially since they more closely resemble aquatic than truly terrestrial animals. (Lee 1985). extensive survey of the literature on this subject. They did not, however, cover the moisture preferences of E. eugeniae. The present study was undertaken to deter- mine the moisture ...

  2. Technology Solutions Case Study: Moisture Management of High-Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-12-01

    Moisture management of high-R walls is important to ensure optimal performance. This case study, developed by Building America team Building Science Corporation, focuses on how eight high-R walls handle the three main sources of moisture—construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leaks.

  3. Evaluating ESA CCI Soil Moisture in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Amy; Shukla, Shraddhanand; Arsenault, Kristi R.; Wang, Shugong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Verdin, James P.

    2016-01-01

    To assess growing season conditions where ground based observations are limited or unavailable, food security and agricultural drought monitoring analysts rely on publicly available remotely sensed rainfall and vegetation greenness. There are also remotely sensed soil moisture observations from missions like the European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASAs Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), however these time series are still too short to conduct studies that demonstrate the utility of these data for operational applications, or to provide historical context for extreme wet or dry events. To promote the use of remotely sensed soil moisture in agricultural drought and food security monitoring, we use East Africa as a case study to evaluate the quality of a 30+ year time series of merged active-passive microwave soil moisture from the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI-SM). Compared to the Normalized Difference Vegetation index (NDVI) and modeled soil moisture products, we found substantial spatial and temporal gaps in the early part of the CCI-SM record, with adequate data coverage beginning in 1992. From this point forward, growing season CCI-SM anomalies were well correlated (R greater than 0.5) with modeled, seasonal soil moisture, and in some regions, NDVI. We use correlation analysis and qualitative comparisons at seasonal time scales to show that remotely sensed soil moisture can add information to a convergence of evidence framework that traditionally relies on rainfall and NDVI in moderately vegetated regions.

  4. Effect of processing methods and storage environment on moisture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of processing methods and storage parameters on moisture adsorption characteristics of dry matured yellow ginger (Zingiber officianale) to provide information for the prediction of shelf life and selection of packaging materials. Moisture adsorption was determined ...

  5. Estimation of Moisture Content in Coal in Coal Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Mataji, Babak

    2006-01-01

    For coal-fired power plants information of the moisture content in the coal is important to determine and control the dynamical behavior of the power plants. E.g. a high moisture content in the coal can result in a decreased maximum load gradient of the plant. In this paper a method for estimating...

  6. Estimation of Moisture Content in Coal in Coal Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Mataji, B.

    For coal-fired power plants information of the moisture content in the coal is important to determine and control the dynamical behavior of the power plants. E.g. a high moisture content in the coal can result in a decreased maximum load gradient of the plant. In this paper a method for estimating...

  7. Moisture resistance of SU-8 and KMPR as structural material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco Carballo, V.M.; Melai, J.; Salm, Cora; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2009-01-01

    This paper treats the moisture resistance of SU-8 and KMPR, two photoresists considered as structural material in microsystems. Our experiments focus on the moisture resistance of newly developed radiation imaging detectors containing these resists. Since these microsystems will be used unpackaged,

  8. Effects of moisture content on some physical properties of red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... The physical properties of red pepper seed were evaluated as a function of moisture content. The average length, width and ... In the moisture range of 7.27 to 20.69% dry basis (d.b.), studies on rewetted red pepper seed showed that the ... dressing, sauces, pizza and confectionary products, among others ...

  9. Influence of moisture stress on growth, dry matter yield and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moisture stress significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the total leaf area of I. amorphoides at moderate levels and that of I. vicioides at the most severe moisture stress level. The relative growth rate was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in I. amorphoides but not in I. arrecta, I. coerulea or I. vicioides plants subjected to moisturedeficit ...

  10. Soil Moisture Retrieval Using the Aquarius/SAC-D Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquarius/SAC-D will share common elements with several current and future satellite missions that provide soil moisture. Passive microwave soil moisture retrieval using low frequencies is currently performed using Aqua Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E (AMSR-E) (C/X-band). This will extended ...

  11. Feasibility of soil moisture estimation using passive distributed temperature sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steele-Dunne, S.C.; Rutten, M.M.; Krzeminska, D.M.; Hausner, M.; Tyler, S.W.; Selker, J.; Bogaard, T.A.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2010-01-01

    Through its role in the energy and water balances at the land surface, soil moisture is a key state variable in surface hydrology and land?atmosphere interactions. Point observations of soil moisture are easy to make using established methods such as time domain reflectometry and gravimetric

  12. Soil moisture remote sensing: State of the science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellites (e.g., SMAP, SMOS) using passive microwave techniques, in particular at L band frequency, have shown good promise for global mapping of near-surface (0-5 cm) soil moisture at a spatial resolution of 25-40 km and temporal resolution of 2-3 days. C- and X-band soil moisture records date bac...

  13. Moisture index for Iran: Spatial and temporal analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabari, Hossein; Hosseinzadeh Talaee, P.

    2013-01-01

    Moisture indices, which account the balance between inputs and outputs of water, are typically used to determine the moisture conditions and the magnitude of water deficiency in a given area. This work studies the moisture conditions of Iran using the revised Thornthwaite moisture index, a ratio of evapotranspiration to precipitation, over the period of 1966-2005. Long-term trends in the moisture index were assessed by the Mann-Kendall test, the Sen's slope estimator and the Mann-Kendall rank statistic. According to the moisture index, arid and semiarid environmental conditions where the demand for water exceeds the water supply are dominant over the country. The results conclusively show that the significant trends in the moisture index are infrequent and found only at 8 out of the 41 study stations. The significant downward trends of the moisture index at Gorgan, Kermanshah, Khorram-Abad, Khoy, Sanandaj, Tabriz and Zanjan stations located in the north, northwest and west regions of Iran began in 1995, 1996, 1996, 1989, 1997, 1988 and 1986, respectively. Contrary to that, the significant upward trend at Dezful station started in 1973.

  14. What does moisture-related durability of wood bonds mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Daniel J. Yelle; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2008-01-01

    The accelerated test methods that distinguish between acceptable and unacceptable wood adhesives generally involve subjecting the bonded assembly to abnormally rapid and extreme moisture exposure or cycling. In the United States and Canada, these tests for moisture durability have been established, but selection of the appropriate test methods for the different service...

  15. Effect of moisture sorption on the performance of crospovidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiew, Tze Ning; Johan, Nur Atiqah Binte; Desai, Parind Mahendrakumar; Chua, Siang Meng; Loh, Zhi Hui; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2016-11-30

    Crospovidone is a commonly used tablet disintegrant. However, the synthetic disintegrant has been known to be hygroscopic and high moisture content in crospovidone used could exert deleterious effects on tablets formulated with it. The objective of this study was to elicit a better understanding between crospovidone-water interaction and its effect on disintegrant performance. Moisture sorption and desorption isotherms were obtained together with the enthalpy of immersion. Crospovidone samples stored at four relative humidities were used to formulate tablets and the resultant tablets were evaluated for their mechanical, dimensional and disintegratability attributes. Analyses of the moisture sorption isotherms indicated that externally adsorbed moisture accounted for the bulk of the total moisture content in crospovidone, with minimal amount of moisture absorbed intramolecularly. Enthalpy of immersion became less exothermic with crospovidone samples stored at increasing storage humidity. Correspondingly, improvement in disintegration time became less pronounced. This was postulated to be a consequence of premature wetting of the particle surfaces by externally adsorbed moisture. High humidity was also detrimental to tablet hardness and thickness. In conclusion, the impact of moisture sorption during storage by excipients such as crospovidone could be better understood by the appreciation of crospovidone-water interaction and its consequence on tablet quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  17. Response Of Three Forage Legumes To Soil Moisture Stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean P content of the plants decreased with decreasing soil moisture content while, that of K increased as moisture stress increased. The overall plant performance pointed to Centrosema as a more favoured for-age plant for dry environments . Keywords: Crop productivity, legumes, food security, water use efficiency ...

  18. Moisture preferences, growth and reproduction of the African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of a comprehensive study of the biology of the economically important earthworm species Eudrilus eugeniae, the water relations of this species were studied. Moisture preferences were studied with the aid of cylindrical moisture towers filled with cattle manure. The cattle manure was dried, ground to a particle size of ...

  19. MOISTURE IN COTTON BY THE KARL FISCHER TITRATION REFERENCE METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisture is a critical parameter that influences many aspects of cotton fiber from harvesting and ginning to various fiber properties. Because of their importance, reference moisture methods that are more accurate than the existing oven-drying techniques and relatively easy to generate results are ...

  20. Effect of gamma irradiation on moisture sorption isotherms of cowpeas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of gamma irradiation on moisture sorption isotherms of cowpeas was investigated The nonirradiated and irradiated cowpeas exhibited the typical three stage sigmoidal curve found in most foods. There was also a concomitant increase in the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) as relative humidity increased for ...

  1. Electromagnetic induction moisture measurement system acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, G.J.

    1996-10-07

    This document presents the results of the acceptance test for the hardware and software that was developed to operate the ElectroMagnetic Induction (EMI) moisture measurement system to be used for in-tank moisture measurements. This document satisfies EP 4.1, ``Design Verification Requirements``.

  2. Predicting moisture state of timber members in a continuously varying climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Staffan; Turk, Goran; Hozjan, Tomaz

    2011-01-01

    . The naturally varying humidity is possible to describe as harmonic cycles, with different periods, superimposed. This work presents realizations of envelop curves over the possible moisture states in a timber member for some carefully chosen harmonic humidity variations. The calculations, on which...... the realizations were made, are based on a fully coupled transport model including a model for the influential sorption hysteresis of wood. A format containing required information suitable for assessing the “moisture” action on timber members is proposed. In addition it is illustrated how a model of high...

  3. Spatial Variability of Soil Properties and its Impact on Simulated Surface Soil Moisture Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korres, W.; Bothe, T.; Reichenau, T. G.; Schneider, K.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial variability of soil properties (particle size distribution, PSD, and bulk density, BD) has large effects on the spatial variability of soil moisture and therefore on plant growth and surface exchange processes. In model studies, soil properties from soil maps are considered homogeneous over mapping units, which neglects the small scale variability of soil properties and leads to underestimated small scale variability of simulated soil moisture. This study focuses on the validation of spatial variability of simulated surface soil moisture (SSM) in a winter wheat field in Western Germany using the eco-hydrological simulation system DANUBIA. SSM measurements were conducted at 20 different sampling points and nine different dates in 2008. Frequency distributions of BD and PSD were derived from an independent dataset (n = 486) of soil physical properties from Germany and the USA. In the simulations, BD and PSD were parameterized according to these frequency distributions. Mean values, coefficients of variation and frequency distributions of simulated SSM were compared to the field measurements. Using the heterogeneous model parameterization, up to 76 % of the frequency distribution of the measured SSM can be explained. Furthermore, the results show that BD has a larger impact on the variability of SSM than PSD. The introduced approach can be used for simulating mean SSM and SSM variability more accurately and can form the basis for a spatially heterogeneous parameterization of soil properties in mesoscale models.

  4. Wood chip moisture on-line measurement system based on the combination of the different methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervinen, T. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)); Teppola, P.; Siikanen, S. (VTT Technical Research Centreof Finland, Kuopio (Finland)); Malinen, J.; Hietala, E. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Oulu (Finland)); Tiitta, M.; Tomppo, L. (Univ. of Kuopio, Dept. of Physics (Finland)), email: markku.tiitta@uku.fi

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the project is to develop wood chip moisture on-line measurement system based on the combination of different methods based on use of nir-, impedance- and radiometric devices. All the measurements were installed in PDU-scale conveyor facility, which can be used for development and testing fuel and bulk material quality and property measurement technology and devices. The system enables to achieve accurate reference moisture content data within sufficient wide range of moisture content variation in full-scale. The usability and accuracy of the separate measurement methods were studied by testing in variable conditions. As a result, the best combination of different methods for each purpose is proposed. The actual system will be implemented in a separate new project under preparation. Good usability and wide range of applicability is prerequisite for the combination system to be used in variable ambient conditions for different types of wood chip like chips for pulping and logging residue chips and even to other biomass materials. (orig.)

  5. [Humidification assessment of four heat and moisture exchanger filters according to ISO 9360: 2000 standard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannoy, D; Décaudin, B; Resibois, J-P; Barrier, F; Wierre, L; Horrent, S; Batt, C; Moulront, S; Odou, P

    2008-02-01

    This work consisted of the assessment of humidification parameters and flow resistance for different heat and moisture exchanger filters (HMEF) used in intensive care unit. Four electrostatic HMEF were assessed: Hygrobac S (Tyco); Humidvent compact S (Teleflex); Hygrovent S/HME (Medisize-Dräger); Clear-Therm+HMEF (Intersurgical). Humidification parameters (loss of water weight, average absolute moisture [AAM], absolute variation of moisture) have been evaluated on a bench-test in conformity with the ISO 9360: 2000 standard, for 24h with the following ventilatory settings: tidal volume at 500 ml, respiratory rate at 15 c/min, and inspiration/expiration ratio at 1:1. The flow resistance of HMEFs assessed using the pressure drop method was measured before and after 24h of humidification for three increasing air flows of 30, 60, and 90 l/min. All the HMEFs allowed satisfactory level of humidification exceeding 30 mgH(2)O/l. The less powerful remained the Clear-Therm. Concerning HMEFs flow resistance, results showed a pressure drop slightly more important for the Hygrobac S filter as compared with other filters. This test showed differences between the HMEFs for both humidification and resistance parameters. When compared to the new version of the standards, HMEFs demonstrated their reliability. However, evolution of humidification and flow resistance characteristics over 24h showed a structural degradation of HMEFs, limiting their use over a longer period.

  6. Precipitation extreme changes exceeding moisture content increases in MIROC and IPCC climate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Masahiro; Shiogama, Hideo; Emori, Seita

    2010-01-12

    Precipitation extreme changes are often assumed to scale with, or are constrained by, the change in atmospheric moisture content. Studies have generally confirmed the scaling based on moisture content for the midlatitudes but identified deviations for the tropics. In fact half of the twelve selected Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) models exhibit increases faster than the climatological-mean precipitable water change for high percentiles of tropical daily precipitation, albeit with significant intermodel scatter. Decomposition of the precipitation extreme changes reveals that the variations among models can be attributed primarily to the differences in the upward velocity. Both the amplitude and vertical profile of vertical motion are found to affect precipitation extremes. A recently proposed scaling that incorporates these dynamical effects can capture the basic features of precipitation changes in both the tropics and midlatitudes. In particular, the increases in tropical precipitation extremes significantly exceed the precipitable water change in Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC), a coupled general circulation model with the highest resolution among IPCC climate models whose precipitation characteristics have been shown to reasonably match those of observations. The expected intensification of tropical disturbances points to the possibility of precipitation extreme increases beyond the moisture content increase as is found in MIROC and some of IPCC models.

  7. Moisture transport across Central America as a positive feedback on abrupt climatic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Guillaume; Vidal, Laurence; Tachikawa, Kazuyo; Rostek, Frauke; Sonzogni, Corinne; Beaufort, Luc; Bard, Edouard

    2007-02-22

    Moisture transport from the Atlantic to the Pacific ocean across Central America leads to relatively high salinities in the North Atlantic Ocean and contributes to the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water. This deep water formation varied strongly between Dansgaard/Oeschger interstadials and Heinrich events-millennial-scale abrupt warm and cold events, respectively, during the last glacial period. Increases in the moisture transport across Central America have been proposed to coincide with northerly shifts of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and with Dansgaard/Oeschger interstadials, with opposite changes for Heinrich events. Here we reconstruct sea surface salinities in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean over the past 90,000 years by comparing palaeotemperature estimates from alkenones and Mg/Ca ratios with foraminiferal oxygen isotope ratios that vary with both temperature and salinity. We detect millennial-scale fluctuations of sea surface salinities in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean of up to two to four practical salinity units. High salinities are associated with the southward migration of the tropical Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone, coinciding with Heinrich events and with Greenland stadials. The amplitudes of these salinity variations are significantly larger on the Pacific side of the Panama isthmus, as inferred from a comparison of our data with a palaeoclimate record from the Caribbean basin. We conclude that millennial-scale fluctuations of moisture transport constitute an important feedback mechanism for abrupt climate changes, modulating the North Atlantic freshwater budget and hence North Atlantic Deep Water formation.

  8. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in Southwestern Saudi Arabian Dune Sand

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2013-05-01

    In arid lands, a major contribution to water loss is by soil water evaporation. Desert sand dunes in arid regions are devoid of runoff and have high rates of infiltration. Rainwater is commonly stored within them because of the low permeability soils in the underlying desert pavement. In such cases, moisture is confined in the sand dune below a depth, termed as the “extinction depth”, where it is protected from evaporation during long dry periods. Moreover, desert sand dunes have sparse vegetation, which results in low transpiration losses from the stored water. The water accumulated below the extinction depth of the sand dunes can be utilized for various purposes such as in irrigation to support desert agriculture. In this study, field experiments were conducted in Western Saudi Arabia to monitor the soil moisture gradients and determine the diffusive extinction depth of dune sand. The dune sand was saturated with water and was exposed to natural conditions (evaporation and precipitation). The decline of the water level in the sand column was continuously recorded using transducers and sensors installed at different depths monitored the temporal variation of temperature and moisture content within the sand. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS-1D was used to construct the vertical profiles of soil water content and temperature and the results obtained from HYDRUS-1D were compared to the gradients monitored by the sensors.

  9. Divergent surface and total soil moisture projections under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Alexis; Sheffield, Justin; Milly, Paul C.D.

    2017-01-01

    Land aridity has been projected to increase with global warming. Such projections are mostly based on off-line aridity and drought metrics applied to climate model outputs but also are supported by climate-model projections of decreased surface soil moisture. Here we comprehensively analyze soil moisture projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5, including surface, total, and layer-by-layer soil moisture. We identify a robust vertical gradient of projected mean soil moisture changes, with more negative changes near the surface. Some regions of the northern middle to high latitudes exhibit negative annual surface changes but positive total changes. We interpret this behavior in the context of seasonal changes in the surface water budget. This vertical pattern implies that the extensive drying predicted by off-line drought metrics, while consistent with the projected decline in surface soil moisture, will tend to overestimate (negatively) changes in total soil water availability.

  10. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of interior moisture buffering by enclosures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Hans; Roels, Staf

    2009-01-01

    The significance of interior humidity in attaining sustainable, durable, healthy and comfortable buildings is increasingly recognised. Given their significant interaction, interior humidity appraisals need a qualitative and/or quantitative assessment of interior moisture buffering. While...... the effective moisture penetration depth and effective capacitance models allow quantified assessment, their reliance on the ‘moisture penetration depth’ necessitates comprehensive material properties and hampers their application to multi-dimensional interior objects. On the other hand, while various recently...... suggested protocols for the simple and fast measurement of the moisture buffer potential of interior elements allow qualitative assessment, none of these are currently dependable for a wide range of moisture production regimes. In response to these flaws, this paper introduces the production...

  11. Evaluation of Crops Moisture Provision by Space Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilienko, Tetiana

    2016-08-01

    The article is focused on theoretical and experimental rationale for the use of space data to determine the moisture provision of agricultural landscapes and agricultural plants. The improvement of space remote sensing methods to evaluate plant moisture availability is the aim of this research.It was proved the possibility of replacement of satellite imagery of high spatial resolution on medium spatial resolution which are freely available to determine crop moisture content at the local level. The mathematical models to determine the moisture content of winter wheat plants by spectral indices were developed based on the results of experimental field research and satellite (Landsat, MODIS/Terra, RapidEye, SICH-2) data. The maps of the moisture content in winter wheat plants in test sites by obtained models were constructed using modern GIS technology.

  12. Moisture Absorption Model of Composites Considering Water Temperature Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUI Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of water temperature on composite moisture absorption parameters was investigated in temperature-controlled water bath. Experiments of carbon fiber/bismaleimide resin composites immersed in water of 60℃, 70℃and 80℃ were developed respectively. According to the moisture content-time curves obtained from the experimental results, the diffusion coefficient and the balanced moisture content of the composites immersed in different water temperature could be calculated. What's more, the effect of water temperature on the diffusion coefficient and the balanced moisture content were discussed too. According to the Arrhenius equation and the law of Fick, a moisture absorption model was proposed to simulate the hygroscopic behaviour of the composite laminates immersed in different water temperature which can predict the absorption rate of water of the composites immersed in distilled water of 95℃ at any time precisely and can calculate how long it will take to reach the specific absorption rate.

  13. Impact strength of Luehea divaricata wood on different moisture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Roberto Haselein

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the impact strength of Luehea divaricata wood tested under conditions of equilibrium at 12% and saturated moisture content. Trees from two different physiographic regions of Rio Grande do Sul state were used. The specimens were submitted to the impact using a pendulum of Charpy and evaluated with relationship to the resistance offered to the application of the load in the radial and tangential plans and with the positions in the log (pith - bark for the two physiographic regions at each moisture condition. Also the specific gravity at 12% moisture content and in saturated conditions, the moisture content, the work absorbed, the impact strength, coefficient of resilience and dynamic quota were determined. The results showed that the Luehea divaricata in saturated wood, presented greater strength, indicating that the specie is more resistant to the impact when it is green than when it is at 12% moisture content.

  14. Moisture content effect on ultrasonic velocity in Goupia glabra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Goia Rosa de Oliveira

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of ultrasound waves on a Brazilian hardwood, Goupia glabra, to evaluate the sensitivity of the ultrasonic technique to the moisture content in wood. The velocity of ultrasonic wave is sensitive to the material's quality-determining factors; hence, this technique is an important industrial tool to improve the quality control of processes. The nature of the response of velocity of sound to changes in moisture content led us to conclude that moisture gradients during drying exert a dominating effect. The ultrasonic velocity was measured both parallel and perpendicular to the fibers of Goupia glabra during drying from green to 6% moisture content. The results of this study showed that velocity of ultrasonic waves is sensitive to changes in moisture content of lumber during drying. The velocity under dry conditions was always higher than the velocity under more humid conditions, in both directions of propagation.

  15. Implementation of sorption hysteresis in multi-Fickian moisture transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    In the cellular structure of wood, bound-water diffusion and water-vapor diffusion interact via sorption in a complex moisture-transportation system. At low relative humidities, moisture transport may be modeled by a Fickian diffusion equation with a good approximation. At higher relative...... represent this behavior. The multi-Fickian model describes the combined transport of bound water and vapor and their interaction through sorption. The bound-water concentration is also influenced by sorption hysteresis. In the worst case, sorption hysteresis may result in deviations of up to 30......-35% in moisture content. Hence, for a precise moisture content computation, sorption hysteresis must be taken into account. The present paper explains the relation between sorption hysteresis and multi-Fickian moisture transport, and clarifies how models for the two phenomena are coupled. To illustrate...

  16. Implementation of sorption hysteresis in multi-Fickian moisture transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    In the cellular structure of wood, bound-water diffusion and water-vapor diffusion interact via sorption in a complex moisture-transportation system. At low relative humidity, moisture transport may be modeled by a Fickian diffusion equation to a good approximation. At higher relative humidity...... this behavior. The multi-Fickian model describes the combined transport of bound water and vapor and their interaction through sorption. The bound-water concentration is also influenced by sorption hysteresis. In the worst case, sorption hysteresis may result in deviations of up to 30-35% in moisture content....... Hence, for a precise moisture content computation, sorption hysteresis must be taken into account. The present paper explains the relation between sorption hysteresis and multi-Fickian moisture transport, and clarifies how models for the two phenomena are coupled. To illustrate the effects, a finite...

  17. Drought monitoring with soil moisture active passive (SMAP) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashok; Vu, Tue; Veettil, Anoop Valiya; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-09-01

    Recent launch of space-borne systems to estimate surface soil moisture may expand the capability to map soil moisture deficit and drought with global coverage. In this study, we use Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil moisture geophysical retrieval products from passive L-band radiometer to evaluate its applicability to forming agricultural drought indices. Agricultural drought is quantified using the Soil Water Deficit Index (SWDI) based on SMAP and soil properties (field capacity and available water content) information. The soil properties are computed using pedo-transfer function with soil characteristics derived from Harmonized World Soil Database. The SMAP soil moisture product needs to be rescaled to be compatible with the soil parameters derived from the in situ stations. In most locations, the rescaled SMAP information captured the dynamics of in situ soil moisture well and shows the expected lag between accumulations of precipitation and delayed increased in surface soil moisture. However, the SMAP soil moisture itself does not reveal the drought information. Therefore, the SMAP based SWDI (SMAP_SWDI) was computed to improve agriculture drought monitoring by using the latest soil moisture retrieval satellite technology. The formulation of SWDI does not depend on longer data and it will overcome the limited (short) length of SMAP data for agricultural drought studies. The SMAP_SWDI is further compared with in situ Atmospheric Water Deficit (AWD) Index. The comparison shows close agreement between SMAP_SWDI and AWD in drought monitoring over Contiguous United States (CONUS), especially in terms of drought characteristics. The SMAP_SWDI was used to construct drought maps for CONUS and compared with well-known drought indices, such as, AWD, Palmer Z-Index, sc-PDSI and SPEI. Overall the SMAP_SWDI is an effective agricultural drought indicator and it provides continuity and introduces new spatial mapping capability for drought monitoring. As an

  18. Free-Tropospheric Moisture Convergence and Tropical Convective Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, H.

    2014-12-01

    It is known that quiescent periods with only shallow cumuli prevalent are frequently observed even in the deep Tropics, which is considered from the climatological perspectives as an area harboring vigorous deep convection. It is argued in this work that the free-tropospheric (FT) moisture convergence is a crucial factor for separating the stable maintenance of isolated shallow cumuli in the quiescent periods from the self-sustaining growth of organized convective systems in the dynamic periods over tropical oceans. The analysis is based on a variety of satellite measurements including Aqua AIRS T and q soundings and QuikSCAT surface wind, composited with reference to the time before or after the occurrence of precipitating clouds detected by TRMM PR. The FT moisture convergence and updraft moisture flux at cloud base are then derived from this dataset under large-scale moisture budget constraint (see Figure). Free-tropospheric precipitation efficiency (FTPE), or the ratio of precipitation to updraft moisture flux at cloud base, is introduced as a measure of convective intensity (rather than the population) over the large-scale domain. The following hypothesis is discussed in light of the analysis results. Isolated shallow cumuli would stay shallow when large-scale FT moisture is diverging (although moisture is weakly converging when integrated over the whole troposphere) since an increase in cumulus population would be counteracted by an additional moisture divergence in the FT. When large-scale FT convergence is positive, in contrast, developing clouds would induce a more moisture input and allow an unstable growth to a highly organized convective system. Zero FT moisture convergence may serve as the neutrality separating the negative feedback acting in the quiescent regime from the positive feedback instrumental for the dynamic regime.

  19. Assessment of real-time, in-shell kernel moisture content monitoring with a microwave moisture meter during peanut drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present-day peanut drying process lacks the capability of kernel moisture content determination in real-time. Samples of peanut pods have to be taken from the drying trailer, cleaned and shelled by an operator to test for the kernel moisture content. The frequency with which the operator samples...

  20. Understanding the bias between moisture content by oven drying and water content by Karl Fischer titration at moisture equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple causes of the difference between equilibrium moisture and water content have been found. The errors or biases were traced to the oven drying procedure to determine moisture content. The present paper explains the nature of the biases in oven drying and how it is possible to suppress one ...