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Sample records for subglacial antarctic lake

  1. Antarctic Subglacial Lake Classification Inventory, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is an Antarctic radar-based subglacial lake classification collection, which focuses on the radar reflection properties of each given lake.

  2. Geoethical Approach to Antarctic Subglacial Lakes Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talalay, Pavel; Markov, Alexey; Sysoev, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Antarctic subglacial aquatic environment have become of great interest to the science community because they may provide unique information about microbial evolution, the past climate of the Earth, and the formation of the Antarctic ice sheet. Nowadays it is generally recognized that a vast network of lakes, rivers, and streams exists thousands of meters beneath Antarctic Ice Sheets. Up to date only four boreholes accessed subglacial aquatic system but three of them were filled with high-toxic drilling fluid, and the subglacial water was contaminated. Two recent exploration programs proposed by UK and USA science communities anticipated direct access down to the lakes Ellsworth and Whillans, respectively, in the 2012/2013 Antarctic season. A team of British scientists and engineers engaged in the first attempt to drill into Lake Ellsworth but failed. US research team has successfully drilled through 800 m of Antarctic ice to reach a subglacial lake Whillans and retrieve water and sediment samples. Both activities used hot-water drilling technology to access lakes. Hot water is considered by the world science community as the most clean drilling fluid medium from the present point of view but it cannot solve environmental problems in total because hot-water even when heated to 90 °C, filtered to 0.2 μm, and UV treated at the surface could pick up microorganisms from near-surface snow and circulate them in great volume through the borehole. Another negative impact of hot-water circulation medium is thermal pollution of subglacial water. The new approach to Antarctic subglacial lakes exploration is presented by sampling technology with recoverable autonomous sonde which is equipped by two hot-points with heating elements located on the bottom and top sides of the sonde. All down-hole sonde components will be sterilized by combination of chemical wash, HPV and UV sterilization prior using. At the beginning of the summer season sonde is installed on the surface of the

  3. Antarctic Active Subglacial Lake Inventory from ICESat Altimetry, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains lake boundaries, volume changes, and gridded elevations for 124 active subglacial lakes beneath the Antarctic ice sheet. Lakes were identified...

  4. MODELING OF WATER CIRCULATION IN THE ANTARCTIC SUBGLACIAL LAKE VOSTOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Kazko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different ways of defining the characteristics of Antarctic subglacialLakeVostokcirculation are considered. The disadvantages of hydrodynamic models using the hydrostatic approximation exposed to analysis. Differential equations and boundary conditions of three-dimensional nonhydrostatic model in terms vorticity–vector potential, specially developed for the modelling of the lake circulation are presented. 3D model passed through the testing by means simulations of convective currents in the simple-form reservoirs. On the basis of the seismic data on the thickness of a glacier and bathimetry of the lake the computational domain approximating a water body ofLakeVostokis constructed. Some results of modeling of the convective processes in the lake, obtained at the initial stage of circulation evolution using finite-difference grid with a spatial resolution of 8000 × 1500 ×30 mare shown.

  5. Advances in modelling subglacial lakes and their interaction with the Antarctic ice sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Frank; Carter, Sasha P; Thoma, Malte

    2016-01-28

    Subglacial lakes have long been considered hydraulically isolated water bodies underneath ice sheets. This view changed radically with the advent of repeat-pass satellite altimetry and the discovery of multiple lake discharges and water infill, associated with water transfer over distances of more than 200 km. The presence of subglacial lakes also influences ice dynamics, leading to glacier acceleration. Furthermore, subglacial melting under the Antarctic ice sheet is more widespread than previously thought, and subglacial melt rates may explain the availability for water storage in subglacial lakes and water transport. Modelling of subglacial water discharge in subglacial lakes essentially follows hydraulics of subglacial channels on a hard bed, where ice sheet surface slope is a major control on triggering subglacial lake discharge. Recent evidence also points to the development of channels in deformable sediment in West Antarctica, with significant water exchanges between till and ice. Most active lakes drain over short time scales and respond rapidly to upstream variations. Several Antarctic subglacial lakes exhibit complex interactions with the ice sheet due to water circulation. Subglacial lakes can therefore-from a modelling point of view-be seen as confined small oceans underneath an imbedded ice shelf. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. Clean access, measurement, and sampling of Ellsworth Subglacial Lake: A method for exploring deep Antarctic subglacial lake environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Martin J.; Clarke, Rachel J.; Mowlem, Matt; Ross, Neil; Hill, Christopher S.; Tait, Andrew; Hodgson, Dominic; Parnell, John; Tranter, Martyn; Pearce, David; Bentley, Michael J.; Cockell, Charles; Tsaloglou, Maria-Nefeli; Smith, Andy; Woodward, John; Brito, Mario P.; Waugh, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Antarctic subglacial lakes are thought to be extreme habitats for microbial life and may contain important records of ice sheet history and climate change within their lake floor sediments. To find whether or not this is true, and to answer the science questions that would follow, direct measurement and sampling of these environments are required. Ever since the water depth of Vostok Subglacial Lake was shown to be >500 m, attention has been given to how these unique, ancient, and pristine environments may be entered without contamination and adverse disturbance. Several organizations have offered guidelines on the desirable cleanliness and sterility requirements for direct sampling experiments, including the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. Here we summarize the scientific protocols and methods being developed for the exploration of Ellsworth Subglacial Lake in West Antarctica, planned for 2012-2013, which we offer as a guide to future subglacial environment research missions. The proposed exploration involves accessing the lake using a hot-water drill and deploying a sampling probe and sediment corer to allow sample collection. We focus here on how this can be undertaken with minimal environmental impact while maximizing scientific return without compromising the environment for future experiments.

  7. Predicting subglacial lakes and meltwater drainage pathways beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

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    Livingstone, S. J.; Clark, C. D.; Woodward, J.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we use the Shreve hydraulic potential equation to predict subglacial lakes and meltwater drainage pathways beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. For the Antarctic Ice Sheet we are able to predict known subglacial lakes with a >70% success rate, which demonstrates the validity of this method. Despite the success in predicting known subglacial lakes the calculations produce two-orders of magnitude more lakes than are presently identified, covering 4% of the ice-sheet bed. The difference is thought to result from our poor knowledge of the bed (which has resulted in artefacts associated with the interpolation method), intrinsic errors associated with the simplified modelling approach and because thousands of subglacial lakes, particularly smaller ones, remain to be found. Applying the same modelling approach to the Greenland Ice Sheet predicts only 90 lakes under the present-day ice-sheet configuration, covering 0.2% of the bed. The paucity of subglacial lakes in Greenland is thought to be a function of steeper overall ice-surface gradients. As no lakes have currently been located under Greenland, model predictions will make suitable targets for radar surveys of Greenland to identify subglacial lakes. During deglaciation from the Last Glacial Maximum both ice sheets had more subglacial lakes at their beds, though many of these lakes have persisted to present conditions. These lakes, inherited from past ice-sheet configurations would not form under current surface conditions, suggesting a retreating ice-sheet will have many more subglacial lakes than an advancing ice sheet. This hysteresis effect has implications for ice-stream formation and flow, bed lubrication and meltwater drainage. The lake model also allows modelling of the drainage pathways of the present-day and former Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Significantly, key sectors of the ice sheets, such as the Siple Coast (Antarctica) and NE Greenland Ice Stream system, are shown to have

  8. Potential subglacial lake locations and meltwater drainage pathways beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, S. J.; Clark, C. D.; Woodward, J.; Kingslake, J.

    2013-11-01

    We use the Shreve hydraulic potential equation as a simplified approach to investigate potential subglacial lake locations and meltwater drainage pathways beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. We validate the method by demonstrating its ability to recall the locations of >60% of the known subglacial lakes beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. This is despite uncertainty in the ice-sheet bed elevation and our simplified modelling approach. However, we predict many more lakes than are observed. Hence we suggest that thousands of subglacial lakes remain to be found. Applying our technique to the Greenland Ice Sheet, where very few subglacial lakes have so far been observed, recalls 1607 potential lake locations, covering 1.2% of the bed. Our results will therefore provide suitable targets for geophysical surveys aimed at identifying lakes beneath Greenland. We also apply the technique to modelled past ice-sheet configurations and find that during deglaciation both ice sheets likely had more subglacial lakes at their beds. These lakes, inherited from past ice-sheet configurations, would not form under current surface conditions, but are able to persist, suggesting a retreating ice-sheet will have many more subglacial lakes than advancing ones. We also investigate subglacial drainage pathways of the present-day and former Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Key sectors of the ice sheets, such as the Siple Coast (Antarctica) and NE Greenland Ice Stream system, are suggested to have been susceptible to subglacial drainage switching. We discuss how our results impact our understanding of meltwater drainage, basal lubrication and ice-stream formation.

  9. Geophysical investigations of subglacial Antarctic lakes: identifying drill sites for lake access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, J.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Smith, A.; Walter, J.; Ross, N.; Fricker, H. A.; Siegert, M. J.; Pettersson, R.; Thoma, M.; Corr, H.; King, E. C.; Vaughan, D.

    2009-12-01

    Subglacial lakes are regarded as viable habitats for novel microbial life forms and may contain sedimentary palaeo-environmental records which would provide critical insights into the glacial history of Antarctica. In-situ sampling and analysis is the only way to explore these lake environments. In order to successfully plan access programs detailed geophysical investigations, in particular seismic measurements of water depth, are required to identify suitable drill sites. Prior to the austral summer of 2006/07 measurements of water depths only existed for Subglacial Lake Vostok, and spatial coverage was limited due to the size of the lake. More recently, active source seismic experiments have been carried out over three subglacial lakes, South Pole Lake, Subglacial Lake Ellsworth (SLE) and Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW). With drilling programs now funded for SLW (access planned for 2011/12) and SLE (access planned for 2012/13) we present results from the geophysical experiments at SLE and SLW to allow the identification of primary drill sites. The two lakes are very different. Geophysical results from SLE suggest that the lake is over 155 m deep and has been a stable system for much of the Holocene. We propose that in order to optimize the chances of successful access and sampling, the entry site should be located in an area with a melting interface near the centre of the lake where water depths are in the order of 100 m. This is away from the down-lake end which shows a higher possibility for basal freezing, with the consequent risk to equipment deployment and retrieval. In contrast, SLW is characterized by dynamic filling and draining over short (2-3 year periods) and most likely has a shallow water column (currently estimated to be in the order of 5-10 m). We suggest that the most suitable location for access will be the centre of the elevation change anomaly recorded over the lake. This point is near equidistant from the lake shoreline features identified from

  10. Antarctic subglacial lakes drain through sediment-floored canals: theory and model testing on real and idealized domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Sasha P.; Fricker, Helen A.; Siegfried, Matthew R.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past decade, satellite observations of ice surface height have revealed that active subglacial lake systems are widespread under the Antarctic Ice Sheet, including the ice streams. For some of these systems, additional observations of ice-stream motion have shown that lake activity can affect ice-stream dynamics. Despite all this new information, we still have insufficient understanding of the lake-drainage process to incorporate it into ice-sheet models. Process models for drainage of ice-dammed lakes based on conventional R-channels incised into the base of the ice through melting are unable to reproduce the timing and magnitude of drainage from Antarctic subglacial lakes estimated from satellite altimetry given the low hydraulic gradients along which such lakes drain. We have developed an alternative process model, in which channels are mechanically eroded into the underlying deformable subglacial sediment. When applied to the known active lakes of the Whillans-Mercer ice-stream system, the model successfully reproduced both the inferred magnitudes and recurrence intervals of lake-volume changes, derived from Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimeter data for the period 2003-2009. Water pressures in our model changed as the flood evolved: during drainage, water pressures initially increased as water flowed out of the lake primarily via a distributed system, then decreased as the channelized system grew, establishing a pressure gradient that drew water away from the distributed system. This evolution of the drainage system can result in the observed internal variability of ice flow over time. If we are correct that active subglacial lakes drain through canals in the sediment, this mechanism also implies that active lakes are typically located in regions underlain by thick subglacial sediment, which may explain why they are not readily observed using radio-echo-sounding techniques.

  11. Stable water isotopic composition of the Antarctic subglacial Lake Vostok: implications for understanding the lake's hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekaykin, Alexey A; Lipenkov, Vladimir Y; Kozachek, Anna V; Vladimirova, Diana O

    2016-01-01

    We estimated the stable isotopic composition of water from the subglacial Lake Vostok using two different sets of samples: (1) water frozen on the drill bit immediately after the first lake unsealing and (2) water frozen in the borehole after the unsealing and re-drilled one year later. The most reliable values of the water isotopic composition are: -59.0 ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18, -455 ± 1 ‰ for deuterium and 17 ± 1 ‰ for d-excess. This result is also confirmed by the modelling of isotopic transformations in the water which froze in the borehole, and by a laboratory experiment simulating this process. A comparison of the newly obtained water isotopic composition with that of the lake ice (-56.2 ‰ for oxygen-18, -442.4 ‰ for deuterium and 7.2 ‰ for d-excess) leads to the conclusion that the lake ice is very likely formed in isotopic equilibrium with water. In turn, this means that ice is formed by a slow freezing without formation of frazil ice crystals and/or water pockets. This conclusion agrees well with the observed physical and chemical properties of the lake's accreted ice. However, our estimate of the water's isotopic composition is only valid for the upper water layer and may not be representative for the deeper layers of the lake, so further investigations are required.

  12. Exploration of Subglacial Lake Ellsworth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, N.

    2012-12-01

    Antarctic subglacial lakes are thought to be extreme habitats for microbial life and may contain important records of ice sheet history within their lake-floor sediments. To find if this is true, and to answer the science questions that would follow, direct measurement and sampling of these environments is required. Ever since the water depth of Vostok Subglacial Lake in East Antarctica was shown to be >500 m, attention has been given to how these unique, ancient and pristine subglacial environments may be entered without contamination and adverse disturbance. Several organizations have offered guidelines on the desirable cleanliness and sterility requirements for direct sampling experiments, including the US National Academy of Sciences and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. The aims, design and implementation of subglacial lake access experiments have direct relevance for the exploration of extra-terrestrial ice-covered bodies (e.g. Europa) and the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System. This presentation summarizes the scientific protocols and methods being developed for the exploration of Ellsworth Subglacial Lake in West Antarctica, and provides an up-to-date summary of the status of the project. The proposed exploration, planned for December 2012, involves accessing the lake using a hot-water drill and deploying a sampling probe and sediment corer to allow in situ measurement and sample collection. Details are presented on how this can be undertaken with minimal environmental impact that maximizes scientific return without compromising the environment for future experiments. The implications of this experiment for the search for extra-terrestrial life will be discussed.

  13. Unveiling the Antarctic subglacial landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Roland; Roberts, Jason

    2010-05-01

    Better knowledge of the subglacial landscape of Antarctica is vital to reducing uncertainties regarding prediction of the evolution of the ice sheet. These uncertainties are associated with bedrock geometry for ice sheet dynamics, including possible marine ice sheet instabilities and subglacial hydrological pathways (e.g. Wright et al., 2008). Major collaborative aerogeophysics surveys motivated by the International Polar Year (e.g. ICECAP and AGAP), and continuing large scale radar echo sounding campaigns (ICECAP and NASA Ice Bridge) are significantly improving the coverage. However, the vast size of Antarctica and logistic difficulties mean that data gaps persist, and ice thickness data remains spatially inhomogeneous. The physics governing large scale ice sheet flow enables ice thickness, and hence bedrock topography, to be inferred from knowledge of ice sheet surface topography and considerations of ice sheet mass balance, even in areas with sparse ice thickness measurements (Warner and Budd, 2000). We have developed a robust physically motivated interpolation scheme, based on these methods, and used it to generate a comprehensive map of Antarctic bedrock topography, using along-track ice thickness data assembled for the BEDMAP project (Lythe et al., 2001). This approach reduces ice thickness biases, compared to traditional inverse distance interpolation schemes which ignore the information available from considerations of ice sheet flow. In addition, the use of improved balance fluxes, calculated using a Lagrangian scheme, eliminates the grid orientation biases in ice fluxes associated with finite difference methods (Budd and Warner, 1996, Le Brocq et al., 2006). The present map was generated using a recent surface DEM (Bamber et al., 2009, Griggs and Bamber, 2009) and accumulation distribution (van de Berg et al., 2006). Comparing our results with recent high resolution regional surveys gives confidence that all major subglacial topographic features are

  14. Probe technologies for clean sampling and measurement of subglacial lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowlem, Matt; Saw, Kevin; Brown, Robin; Waugh, Edward; Cardwell, Christopher L; Wyatt, James; Magiopoulos, Iordanis; Keen, Peter; Campbell, Jon; Rundle, Nicholas; Gkritzalis-Papadopoulos, Athanasios

    2016-01-28

    It is 4 years since the subglacial lake community published its plans for accessing, sampling, measuring and studying the pristine, and hitherto enigmatic and very different, Antarctic subglacial lakes, Vostok, Whillans and Ellsworth. This paper summarizes the contrasting probe technologies designed for each of these subglacial environments and briefly updates how these designs changed or were used differently when compared to previously published plans. A detailed update on the final engineering design and technical aspects of the probe for Subglacial Lake Ellsworth is presented. This probe is designed for clean access, is negatively buoyant (350 kg), 5.2 m long, 200 mm in diameter, approximately cylindrical and consists of five major units: (i) an upper power and communications unit attached to an optical and electrical conducting tether, (ii)-(iv) three water and particle samplers, and (v) a sensors, imaging and instrumentation pack tipped with a miniature sediment corer. To date, only in Subglacial Lake Whillans have instruments been successfully deployed. Probe technologies for Subglacial Lake Vostok (2014/15) and Lake Ellsworth (2012/13) were not deployed for technical reasons, in the case of Lake Ellsworth because hot-water drilling was unable to access the lake during the field season window. Lessons learned and opportunities for probe technologies in future subglacial access missions are discussed. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Physiography and tectonic setting of the subglacial lake district between Vostok and Belgica subglacial highlands (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacco, I. E.; Cianfarra, P.; Forieri, A.; Salvini, F.; Zirizotti, A.

    2006-06-01

    We present the interpretation of 11 radio echo-sounding (RES) missions carried out over the Vostok-Dome Concordia region during the Italian Antarctic expeditions in the period 1995-2001. The extension and the density of the radar data in the surveyed area allowed to reconstruct a reliable subglacial morphology and to identify four relevant morphological structures namely: the Aurora trench, the Concordia trench, the Concordia ridge and the South Hills. These structures show evidence compatible with the presence of tectonic features. Morphological considerations indicate their development in Cenozoic time. Hybrid cellular automata (HCA)-based numerical modelling allowed to justify a possible role played by the tectonics of the Aurora and Concordia trench evolution. This was accomplished by matching the bed profiles along opportunely projected sections with the modelled surfaces as derived by the activity of normal faults with variable surfaces within the continental crust. The Vostok-Dome C region is characterized by a large number of subglacial lakes. From the analysis of basal reflected power echo, we identified 14 new lakes and obtained information about their physiography as well as their possible relations with tectonics. We propose a grouping of subglacial lakes on the base of their physiography and geological setting, namely relief lakes, basin lakes and trench lakes. Relief lakes located in the Belgica subglacial highlands and are characterized by sharp and steep symmetric edges, suggesting a maximum water depth of the order of 100 m. Their origin may well relate to localized, positive geothermal flux anomalies. Basin lakes located in the Vincennes subglacial basin and are characterized by wider dimension that allow the development of well-defined, flat ice surface anomalies. Trench lakes characterize the Aurora and Concordia trenches as the possible effect of normal fault activity.

  16. PREDICTED SEDIMENTARY SECTION OF SUBGLACIAL LAKE VOSTOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Leychenkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In early February 2012, the drill hole at the Vostok Station encountered theLakeVostokwater. This step is important to study the lake composition including possible microbial life and to model subglacial environments however, the next ambitious target of the Vostok Drilling Project is sampling of bottom sediments, which contain the unique record of ice sheet evolution and environmental changes in centralAntarcticafor millions of years. In this connection, the forecast of sedimentary succession based on existing geophysical data, study of mineral inclusions in the accretion ice cores and tectonic models is important task. Interpretation of Airborne geophysical data suggests thatLakeVostokis the part of spacious rift system, which exists at least from Cretaceous. Reflection and refraction seismic experiments conducted in the southern part ofLakeVostokshow very thin (200–300 m stratified sedimentary cover overlying crystalline basement with velocity of 6.0–6.2 km/s. At present, deposition in southernLakeVostokis absent and similar conditions occurred likely at least last3 m.y. when ice sheet aboveLakeVostokchanged insignificantly. It can be also inferred that from the Late Miocene the rate of deposition inLakeVostokwas extremely low and so the most of sedimentary section is older being possibly of Oligocene to early to middle Miocene age when ice sheet oscillated and deposition was more vigorous. If so, the sampling of upper few meters of this condensed section is very informative in terms of history of Antarctic glaciation. Small thickness of sedimentary cover raises a question about existence of lake (rift depression during preglacial and early glacial times.

  17. Predictive modelling of (palaeo-)subglacial lake locations and their meltwater drainage routeways

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    Livingstone, S. J.; Clark, C.; Tarasoff, L.; Woodward, J.

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing recognition that subglacial lakes act as key components within the ice sheet system, capable of influencing ice-sheet topography, ice volume and ice flow. At present, much glaciological research is concerned with the role of modern subglacial lake systems in Antarctica. Another approach to the exploration of subglacial lakes involves identification of the geological record of subglacial lakes that once existed beneath ice sheets of the last glaciation. Investigation of such palaeo-subglacial lakes offers significant advantages because we have comprehensive information about the bed properties, they are much more accessible and we can examine and sample the sediments with ease. However, their identification in the geological record remains controversial. We therefore present a simple diagnostic approach based on the Shreve equation, for predicting and investigating likely (palaeo-)subglacial lake locations. Data on the current topography and seafloor bathymetry, and elevation models of the ice and ground surface topography from data-calibrated glaciological modelling are used to calculate the hydraulic potential surface at the ice-sheet bed. Meltwater routing algorithms and the flooding of local hydraulic minima allow us to predict subglacial routeways and lakes respectively. Discovered subglacial lakes beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet present an opportunity to verify the model using the BEDMAP2 dataset. Using a lake threshold of 5 km2 we identify 12,767 subglacial lakes occurring over 4% of the grounded bed and are able to recover >60% of the discovered subglacial lakes. Applying the same approach to the Greenland Ice Sheet produces 1,607 potential subglacial lakes, covering 1.3% of the bed. These lake localities will make suitable targets for radar surveys attempting to find subglacial lakes. Finally, we apply the Shreve equation to the North American Ice Sheet to try and predict likely palaeo-subglacial lake locations. Given that specific ice

  18. Reconstruction of a Palaeo-Subglacial Lake Network in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, S. J.; Utting, D.; Clark, C.; Ruffell, A.; Pawley, S. M.; Atkinson, N.; Mallon, G.

    2014-12-01

    Subglacial lakes have been widely documented since first being identified beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet in the 1960s and comprise a significant component of the subglacial hydrological system (Wright & Siegert, 2011). However, their investigation is largely limited to contemporary ice masses despite critical information that could be gleaned from palaeo-subglacial lake studies, including: (i) their influence on meltwater drainage, ice flow and ice streams; (ii) details about how they relate to palaeo-floods, ice dynamics and sub-Milankovitch-scale climate events; and (iii) as archives of long-term Quaternary climate change. They are also readily available, we can sample the sediments and maps the landforms with ease and we have comprehensive information on the lake-bed properties. Output from numerical ice sheet models and the simple Shreve equation approach has been used to diagnose where subglacial lakes are likely to have occurred in the geological record (Livingstone et al. 2013). However, their identification remains controversial due to the difficulty in distinguishing their signature from proglacial lake deposits (see Livingstone et al. 2012). Here, we present new geomorphological, geophysical and sedimentological evidence for the existence of a palaeo-subglacial lake network beneath the suture zone of the former Cordilleran and Laurentide ice sheets. These relatively small (~1 km diameter) palaeo-subglacial lakes manifest as flat-spots in a drumlin field and are perched in upland areas behind small ridges. The flat-spots, which comprise basins in-filled with diamicton, are associated with subglacial meltwater channels and eskers that we interpret to document lake drainage events. References: Livingstone, S.J., et al., 2012. Quaternary Science Reviews,55, 88-110. Livingstone, S.J., et al., 2013. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 375, 13-33. Wright A.P., Siegert M.J. 2011. In: Siegert, M.J., Kennicutt, C., Bindschadler, B. (Eds.). Subglacial Antarctic

  19. Microbial Community Structure of Subglacial Lake Whillans, West Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achberger, Amanda M; Christner, Brent C; Michaud, Alexander B; Priscu, John C; Skidmore, Mark L; Vick-Majors, Trista J

    2016-01-01

    Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) is located beneath ∼800 m of ice on the Whillans Ice Stream in West Antarctica and was sampled in January of 2013, providing the first opportunity to directly examine water and sediments from an Antarctic subglacial lake. To minimize the introduction of surface contaminants to SLW during its exploration, an access borehole was created using a microbiologically clean hot water drill designed to reduce the number and viability of microorganisms in the drilling water. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes (rDNA) amplified from samples of the drilling and borehole water allowed an evaluation of the efficacy of this approach and enabled a confident assessment of the SLW ecosystem inhabitants. Based on an analysis of 16S rDNA and rRNA (i.e., reverse-transcribed rRNA molecules) data, the SLW community was found to be bacterially dominated and compositionally distinct from the assemblages identified in the drill system. The abundance of bacteria (e.g., Candidatus Nitrotoga, Sideroxydans, Thiobacillus, and Albidiferax) and archaea (Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum) related to chemolithoautotrophs was consistent with the oxidation of reduced iron, sulfur, and nitrogen compounds having important roles as pathways for primary production in this permanently dark ecosystem. Further, the prevalence of Methylobacter in surficial lake sediments combined with the detection of methanogenic taxa in the deepest sediment horizons analyzed (34-36 cm) supported the hypothesis that methane cycling occurs beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Large ratios of rRNA to rDNA were observed for several operational taxonomic units abundant in the water column and sediments (e.g., Albidiferax, Methylobacter, Candidatus Nitrotoga, Sideroxydans, and Smithella), suggesting a potentially active role for these taxa in the SLW ecosystem. Our findings are consistent with chemosynthetic microorganisms serving as the ecological foundation in this dark subsurface environment, providing new

  20. Lake Vostok: From a Continental Margin to a Subglacial Lake

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    Studinger, M.; Bell, R. E.; KArner, G. D.; Tikku, A. A.; Levin, V.; Raymond, C. A.; Lerner-Lam, A.

    2002-05-01

    Subglacial ecosystems, in particular subglacial lakes, represent the most oligothrophic environments on Earth. The geologic origin of Lake Vostok is a critical boundary condition for both the stability of the lake and energy fluxes into the lake. Microbial life may use geothermal energy, similar to life discovered at deep sea hydrothermal vents. Significant geothermal anomalies are often associated with active faulting. The topographic depression which forms the craddle for Lake Vostok is part of a regional tectonic structure ranging from the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains to the Aurora Subglacial Basin. This geologic boundary was formed by emplacement of a thrust sheet from the east over a pre-existing passive continental margin beneath the present-day Lake Vostok. No data exist to directly date either the timing of passive margin formation or the subsequent crustal shortening. Minor extensional reactivation of the thrust sheet explains a simple mechanism to explain the formation of the Lake Vostok basin. The steep slopes bounding this depression are likley being fault-controlled. Our recent discovery of microseismic activity suggest that this faults might be active and could act as conduits for convecting fluids. The tectonic processes can have an important influence on the ecosystem within the lake.

  1. Physiological ecology of microorganisms in Subglacial Lake Whillans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trista J Vick-Majors

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Subglacial microbial habitats are widespread in glaciated regions of our planet. Some of these environments have been isolated from the atmosphere and from sunlight for many thousands of years. Consequently, ecosystem processes must rely on energy gained from the oxidation of inorganic substrates or detrital organic matter. Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW is one of more than 400 subglacial lakes known to exist under the Antarctic ice sheet; however, little is known about microbial physiology and energetics in these systems. When it was sampled through its 800 m thick ice cover in 2013, the SLW water column was shallow (~2 m deep, oxygenated, and possessed sufficient concentrations of C, N, and P substrates to support microbial growth. Here, we use a combination of physiological assays and models to assess the energetics of microbial life in SLW. In general, SLW microorganisms grew slowly in this energy-limited environment. Heterotrophic cellular carbon turnover times, calculated from 3H-thymidine and 3H-leucine incorporation rates, were long (60 to 500 days while cellular doubling times averaged 196 days. Inferred growth rates (average ~0.006 d-1 obtained from the same incubations were at least an order of magnitude lower than those measured in Antarctic surface lakes and oligotrophic areas of the ocean. Low growth efficiency (8% indicated that heterotrophic populations in SLW partition a majority of their carbon demand to cellular maintenance rather than growth. Chemoautotrophic CO2-fixation exceeded heterotrophic organic C-demand by a factor of ~1.5. Aerobic respiratory activity associated with heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic metabolism surpassed the estimated supply of oxygen to SLW, implying that microbial activity could deplete the oxygenated waters, resulting in anoxia. We used thermodynamic calculations to examine the biogeochemical and energetic consequences of environmentally imposed switching between aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms

  2. Physiological Ecology of Microorganisms in Subglacial Lake Whillans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick-Majors, Trista J.; Mitchell, Andrew C.; Achberger, Amanda M.; Christner, Brent C.; Dore, John E.; Michaud, Alexander B.; Mikucki, Jill A.; Purcell, Alicia M.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Priscu, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Subglacial microbial habitats are widespread in glaciated regions of our planet. Some of these environments have been isolated from the atmosphere and from sunlight for many thousands of years. Consequently, ecosystem processes must rely on energy gained from the oxidation of inorganic substrates or detrital organic matter. Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) is one of more than 400 subglacial lakes known to exist under the Antarctic ice sheet; however, little is known about microbial physiology and energetics in these systems. When it was sampled through its 800 m thick ice cover in 2013, the SLW water column was shallow (~2 m deep), oxygenated, and possessed sufficient concentrations of C, N, and P substrates to support microbial growth. Here, we use a combination of physiological assays and models to assess the energetics of microbial life in SLW. In general, SLW microorganisms grew slowly in this energy-limited environment. Heterotrophic cellular carbon turnover times, calculated from 3H-thymidine and 3H-leucine incorporation rates, were long (60 to 500 days) while cellular doubling times averaged 196 days. Inferred growth rates (average ~0.006 d−1) obtained from the same incubations were at least an order of magnitude lower than those measured in Antarctic surface lakes and oligotrophic areas of the ocean. Low growth efficiency (8%) indicated that heterotrophic populations in SLW partition a majority of their carbon demand to cellular maintenance rather than growth. Chemoautotrophic CO2-fixation exceeded heterotrophic organic C-demand by a factor of ~1.5. Aerobic respiratory activity associated with heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic metabolism surpassed the estimated supply of oxygen to SLW, implying that microbial activity could deplete the oxygenated waters, resulting in anoxia. We used thermodynamic calculations to examine the biogeochemical and energetic consequences of environmentally imposed switching between aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms in the SLW

  3. Clean hot water drilling for exploration of the Antarctic deep subglacial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinson, K.; Pearce, D.; Hodgson, D.; Bentley, M.; Smith, A.; Tranter, M.; Rose, M. C.; Ross, N.; Mowlem, M. C.; Parnell, J.; Siegert, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Overlain by several kilometres of ice, the subglacial environments deep beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet are regarded as extreme habitats for microbial life and repositories of important paleoclimate records. Of significant scientific interest, yet remaining largely unexplored, accessing and sampling these environments presents several challenges to existing drilling technologies. With over half of the ice sheet believed to be resting on a wet bed, much of it part of a hydrological drainage network, accessing of this environment must conform to international environmental contamination protocols. This makes hot water drilling the most viable option for clean, fast, access through thick ice. After two decades of planning, involving the development of drilling techniques for subglacial access, instrument design and logistics set up, significant progress has been made in attempts to directly access, measure, and sample subglacial lakes and sediments. Combining the experiences from the notable setbacks and successes, as well as recent field testing for this drilling technique, the most practical technical options and operational procedures for future clean entry into Subglacial Lake Ellsworth and other deep (>3000 m) access targets will be presented.

  4. PROSPECTS FOR LIFE IN THE SUBGLACIAL LAKE VOSTOK, EAST ANTARCTICA

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    S. A. Bulat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to estimate the genuine microbial content of ice samples from refrozen water (accretion ice from the subglacialLakeVostok(Antarctica buried beneath the 4-km thick East Antarctic ice sheet as well as surface snow nearby Vostok station. The lake ice samples were extracted by heavy deep ice drilling from3764 mbelow the surface reaching the depth3769.3 mby February 2011 (lake entering. High pressure, an ultra low carbon and chemical content, isolation, complete darkness and the probable excess of oxygen in water for millions of years characterize this extreme environment. A decontamination protocol was first applied to samples selected for the absence of cracks to remove the outer part contaminated by handling and drilling fluid. Preliminary indications showed the accretion ice samples to be almost gas free with the very low impurity content. Flow cytometry showed the very low unevenly distributed biomass in both accretion (0–19 cells per ml and glacier (0–24 cells per ml ice and surface snow (0–0.02 cells per ml as well while repeated microscopic observations were unsuccessful meaning that the whole Central East Antarctic ice sheet seems to be microbial cell-free.We used strategies of Ancient DNA research that include establishing contaminant databases and criteria to validate the amplification results. To date, positive results that passed the artifacts and contaminant databases have been obtained for a few bacterial phylotypes only in accretion ice samples featured by some bedrock sediments. Amongst them are the chemolithoautotrophic thermophile Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus of beta-Proteobacteria, the actinobacterium rather related (95% to Ilumatobacter luminis and one unclassified phylotype distantly related (92% to soil-inhabiting uncultured bacteria. Combined with geochemical and geophysical considerations, our results suggest the presence of a deep biosphere, possibly thriving within some active faults of the bedrock

  5. Preliminary Analysis of Life within a Former Subglacial Lake Sediment in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Burns

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the first descriptions of Antarctic subglacial lakes, there has been a growing interest and awareness of the possibility that life will exist and potentially thrive in these unique and little known environments. The unusual combination of selection pressures, and isolation from the rest of the biosphere, might have led to novel adaptations and physiology not seen before, or indeed to the potential discovery of relic populations that may have become extinct elsewhere. Here we report the first microbiological analysis of a sample taken from a former subglacial lake sediment in Antarctica (Lake Hodgson, on the Antarctic Peninsula. This is one of a number of subglacial lakes just emerging at the margins of the Antarctic ice sheet due to the renewed onset of deglaciation. Microbial diversity was divided into 23.8% Actinobacteria, 21.6% Proteobacteria, 20.2% Planctomycetes and 11.6% Chloroflexi, characteristic of a range of habitat types ( Overall, common sequences were neither distinctly polar, low temperature, freshwater nor marine. Twenty three percent of this diversity could only be identified to “unidentified bacterium”. Clearly these are diverse ecosystems with enormous potential.

  6. Geology and environments of subglacial Lake Vostok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitchenkov, German L; Antonov, Anton V; Luneov, Pavel I; Lipenkov, Vladimir Ya

    2016-01-28

    The reconstruction of the geological (tectonic) structure and environments of subglacial Lake Vostok is based on geophysical surveys and the study of mineral particles found in cores of accreted ice and frozen lake water (sampled after the lake was unsealed). Seismic reflection and refraction investigations conducted in the southern part of Lake Vostok show very thin (200-300 m) sedimentary cover overlying a crystalline basement. Most of this thin veneer is thought to have been deposited during temperate-glacial conditions in Oligocene to Middle Miocene time (ca 34-14 Ma). The composition of the lake-bottom sediments can be deduced from mineral inclusions found in cores of accreted ice. Inclusions are represented by soft aggregates consisting mainly of clay-mica minerals and micrometre-sized quartz grains. Some of these inclusions contain subangular to semi-rounded rock clasts (siltstones and sandstones) ranging from 0.3 to 8 mm in size. In total, 31 zircon grains have been identified in two rock clasts and dated using SHRIMP-II. The ages of the studied zircons range from 0.6 to 2.0 Ga with two distinct clusters between 0.8 and 1.15 Ga and between 1.6 and 1.8 Ga. Rock clasts obviously came from the western lake shore, which is thus composed of terrigenous strata with an age of not older than 600 Ma. The sedimentary nature of the western lake shore is also confirmed by seismic refraction data showing seismic velocities there of 5.4-5.5 km s(-1) at the bedrock surface. After Lake Vostok was unsealed, its water (frozen and sampled next season) was also studied with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microprobe analysis. This study showed the existence of calcium carbonate and silica microparticles (10-20 μm across) in frozen water. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Modeling of subglacial hydrological development following rapid supraglacial lake drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, C. F.; Kulessa, B.; Rutt, I. C.; Tsai, V. C.; Pimentel, S.; Doyle, S. H.; van As, D.; Lindbäck, K.; Pettersson, R.; Jones, G. A.; Hubbard, A.

    2015-06-01

    The rapid drainage of supraglacial lakes injects substantial volumes of water to the bed of the Greenland ice sheet over short timescales. The effect of these water pulses on the development of basal hydrological systems is largely unknown. To address this, we develop a lake drainage model incorporating both (1) a subglacial radial flux element driven by elastic hydraulic jacking and (2) downstream drainage through a linked channelized and distributed system. Here we present the model and examine whether substantial, efficient subglacial channels can form during or following lake drainage events and their effect on the water pressure in the surrounding distributed system. We force the model with field data from a lake drainage site, 70 km from the terminus of Russell Glacier in West Greenland. The model outputs suggest that efficient subglacial channels do not readily form in the vicinity of the lake during rapid drainage and instead water is evacuated primarily by a transient turbulent sheet and the distributed system. Following lake drainage, channels grow but are not large enough to reduce the water pressure in the surrounding distributed system, unless preexisting channels are present throughout the domain. Our results have implications for the analysis of subglacial hydrological systems in regions where rapid lake drainage provides the primary mechanism for surface-to-bed connections.

  8. Height changes over subglacial Lake Vostok, East Antarctica: Insights from GNSS observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richter, Andreas; Popov, Sergey V; Fritsche, Mathias; Lukin, Valery V; Matveev, Alexey Yu; Ekaykin, Alexey A; Lipenkov, Vladimir Ya; Fedorov, Denis V; Eberlein, Lutz; Schröder, Ludwig; Ewert, Heiko; Horwath, Martin; Dietrich, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Height changes of the ice surface above subglacial Lake Vostok, East Antarctica, reflect the integral effect of different processes within the subglacial environment and the ice sheet. Repeated GNSS...

  9. The influence of Antarctic subglacial volcanism on the global iron cycle during the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisia, Silvia; Weyrich, Laura S.; Hellstrom, John; Borsato, Andrea; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Bajo, Petra; Drysdale, Russell N.; Augustinus, Paul C.; Rivard, Camille; Cooper, Alan

    2017-06-01

    Marine sediment records suggest that episodes of major atmospheric CO2 drawdown during the last glacial period were linked to iron (Fe) fertilization of subantarctic surface waters. The principal source of this Fe is thought to be dust transported from southern mid-latitude deserts. However, uncertainty exists over contributions to CO2 sequestration from complementary Fe sources, such as the Antarctic ice sheet, due to the difficulty of locating and interrogating suitable archives that have the potential to preserve such information. Here we present petrographic, geochemical and microbial DNA evidence preserved in precisely dated subglacial calcites from close to the East Antarctic Ice-Sheet margin, which together suggest that volcanically-induced drainage of Fe-rich waters during the Last Glacial Maximum could have reached the Southern Ocean. Our results support a significant contribution of Antarctic volcanism to subglacial transport and delivery of nutrients with implications on ocean productivity at peak glacial conditions.

  10. Actively evolving subglacial conduits and eskers initiate ice shelf channels at an Antarctic grounding line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, R.; Pattyn, F.; Hewitt, I. J.; Ng, F. S. L.; Berger, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Helm, V.; Bergeot, N.; Favier, L.; Neckel, N.

    2017-05-01

    Ice-shelf channels are long curvilinear tracts of thin ice found on Antarctic ice shelves. Many of them originate near the grounding line, but their formation mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we use ice-penetrating radar data from Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, East Antarctica, to infer that the morphology of several ice-shelf channels is seeded upstream of the grounding line by large basal obstacles indenting the ice from below. We interpret each obstacle as an esker ridge formed from sediments deposited by subglacial water conduits, and calculate that the eskers' size grows towards the grounding line where deposition rates are maximum. Relict features on the shelf indicate that these linked systems of subglacial conduits and ice-shelf channels have been changing over the past few centuries. Because ice-shelf channels are loci where intense melting occurs to thin an ice shelf, these findings expose a novel link between subglacial drainage, sedimentation and ice-shelf stability.

  11. Actively evolving subglacial conduits and eskers initiate ice shelf channels at an Antarctic grounding line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, R; Pattyn, F; Hewitt, I J; Ng, F S L; Berger, S; Matsuoka, K; Helm, V; Bergeot, N; Favier, L; Neckel, N

    2017-05-09

    Ice-shelf channels are long curvilinear tracts of thin ice found on Antarctic ice shelves. Many of them originate near the grounding line, but their formation mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we use ice-penetrating radar data from Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, East Antarctica, to infer that the morphology of several ice-shelf channels is seeded upstream of the grounding line by large basal obstacles indenting the ice from below. We interpret each obstacle as an esker ridge formed from sediments deposited by subglacial water conduits, and calculate that the eskers' size grows towards the grounding line where deposition rates are maximum. Relict features on the shelf indicate that these linked systems of subglacial conduits and ice-shelf channels have been changing over the past few centuries. Because ice-shelf channels are loci where intense melting occurs to thin an ice shelf, these findings expose a novel link between subglacial drainage, sedimentation and ice-shelf stability.

  12. Subglacial Calcites from Northern Victoria Land: archive of Antarctic volcanism in the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisia, Silvia; Weirich, Laura; Hellstrom, John; Borsato, Andrea; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Bajo, Petra; Drysdale, Russell N.; Augustinus, Paul C.; Barbante, Carlo; Cooper, Alan

    2017-04-01

    Subglacial carbonates bear similarities to stalagmites in their fabrics and the potential to obtain precise chronologies using U-series methods. Their chemical properties also reflect those of their parent waters, which, in contrast to stalagmites, are those of subglacial meltwaters. In analogy to speleothems, stable Carbon isotope ratios and trace elements such as Uranium, Iron and Manganese provide the opportunity to investigate ancient extreme environments without the need to drill through thousands of metres of ice. Sedimentological, geochemical and microbial evidence preserved in LGM subglacial calcites from Northern Victoria Land, close to the East Antarctic Ice Sheet margin, allow us to infer that subglacial volcanism was active in the Trans Antarctic Mountain region and induced basal ice melting. We hypothesize that a meltwater reservoir was drained and injected into interconnected basal pore systems where microbial processes enhanced bedrock weathering and, thus, released micronutrients. Volcanic influence is supported by the presence of fluorine (F) and sulphur in sediment-laden calcite layers containing termophilic species. Notably, calcite δ13C points to dissolved inorganic carbon evolved from subglacial metabolic processes. Once transported to the sea, soluble iron likely contributed to fertilizing the Southern Ocean and CO2 drawdown. This is the first well-dated evidence for LGM volcanism in Antarctica, which complements the record of volcanic eruptions retrieved from Talos Dome ice core, and supports the hypothesis of large-scale volcanism as an important driver of climate change. We conclude that subglacial carbonates are equivalent to speleothems in their palaeoclimate potential and may become a most useful source of information of ecosystems and processes at peak glacials in high altitude/high latitude settings.

  13. Microbial sulfur transformations in sediments from Subglacial Lake Whillans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M Purcell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diverse microbial assemblages inhabit subglacial aquatic environments. While few of these environments have been sampled, data reveal that subglacial organisms gain energy for growth from reduced minerals containing nitrogen, iron, and sulfur. Here we investigate the role of microbially mediated sulfur transformations in sediments from Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW, Antarctica, by examining key genes involved in dissimilatory sulfur oxidation and reduction. The presence of sulfur transformation genes throughout the top 34 cm of SLW sediments changes with depth. SLW surficial sediments were dominated by genes related to known sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophs. Sequences encoding the adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate (APS reductase gene, involved in both dissimilatory sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation, were present in all samples and clustered into 16 distinct OTUs. The majority of APS reductase sequences (74% clustered with known sulfur oxidizers including those within the Sideroxydans and Thiobacillus genera. Reverse-acting dissimilatory sulfite reductase (rDSR and 16S rRNA gene sequences further support dominance of Sideroxydans and Thiobacillus phylotypes in the top 2 cm of SLW sediments. The SLW microbial community has the genetic potential for sulfate reduction which is supported by experimentally measured low rates (1.4 pmol cm-3d-1 of biologically mediated sulfate reduction and the presence of APS reductase and DSR gene sequences related to Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfotomaculum. Our results also infer the presence of sulfur oxidation, which can be a significant energetic pathway for chemosynthetic biosynthesis in SLW sediments. The water in SLW ultimately flows into the Ross Sea where intermediates from subglacial sulfur transformations can influence the flux of solutes to the Southern Ocean.

  14. Ecology of Subglacial Lake Vostok (Antarctica, Based on Metagenomic/Metatranscriptomic Analyses of Accretion Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom D'Elia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lake Vostok is the largest of the nearly 400 subglacial Antarctic lakes and has been continuously buried by glacial ice for 15 million years. Extreme cold, heat (from possible hydrothermal activity, pressure (from the overriding glacier and dissolved oxygen (delivered by melting meteoric ice, in addition to limited nutrients and complete darkness, combine to produce one of the most extreme environments on Earth. Metagenomic/metatranscriptomic analyses of ice that accreted over a shallow embayment and over the southern main lake basin indicate the presence of thousands of species of organisms (94% Bacteria, 6% Eukarya, and two Archaea. The predominant bacterial sequences were closest to those from species of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, while the predominant eukaryotic sequences were most similar to those from species of ascomycetous and basidiomycetous Fungi. Based on the sequence data, the lake appears to contain a mixture of autotrophs and heterotrophs capable of performing nitrogen fixation, nitrogen cycling, carbon fixation and nutrient recycling. Sequences closest to those of psychrophiles and thermophiles indicate a cold lake with possible hydrothermal activity. Sequences most similar to those from marine and aquatic species suggest the presence of marine and freshwater regions.

  15. NATIONAL SEISMIC, RADAR AND SEISMOLOGICAL STUDIES OF SUBGLACIAL LAKE VOSTOK

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    S. V. Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the remote sensing which carried out in the LakeVostokarea are discussed in the paper. A.P. Kapitsa and O.G. Sorokhtin started the geophysical researches in this area in 1950s. Satellite altimetry data, which analyzed in 1990s yielded to the discovering of the LakeVostok. After that, PMGE and RAE started the systematic studying of this natural phenomenon by seismic and radio-echo sounding. Total, 318 seismic soundings and 5190 kmof the radio-echo profiles has been collected by 2008. Special precise measurements which carried out in the 5G-1 borehole vicinity are resulted in the ice thickness over Vostok Station is 3760±30 mby seismic and 3775±15 mby radio-echo sounding. Thus, the error of geophysical measurements is less than 0.3%. The Russian investigations are resulted in definition the border of the lake, the discovering of 56 subglacial water caves around the lake and compilation the maps including ice thickness, ice base and bedrock topography and the depth of the lake. Average depth of the LakeVostokis about 400 m; water volume is 6100 km3. After 2008, the remote sensing works have been concentrated to the studying of the bottom sediments by refraction seismic technique. The firsts result shown that the bottom sediments thickness varies from 400 to1200 m.

  16. Subglacial lake and meltwater flow predictions of the last North American and European Ice Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, S. J.; Clark, C. D.; Tarasov, L.

    2012-04-01

    There is increasing recognition that subglacial lakes act as key components within the ice sheet system, capable of influencing ice-sheet topography, ice volume and ice flow. The subglacial water systems themselves are recognised as being both active and dynamic, with large discharges of meltwater capable of flowing down hydrological pathways both between lakes and to the ice-sheet margins. At present, much glaciological research is concerned with the role of modern subglacial lake systems in Antarctica. Another approach to the exploration of subglacial lakes involves identification of the geological record of subglacial lakes that once existed beneath ice sheets of the last glaciation. Investigation of such palaeo-subglacial lakes offers significant advantages because we have comprehensive information about the bed properties, they are much more accessible and we can examine and sample the sediments with ease. If we can find palaeo-subglacial lakes then we have the potential to advance understanding with regard to the topographic context and hydrological pathways that the phenomena form a part of; essentially we gain spatial and sedimentological information in relation to investigations of contemporary subglacial lakes and lose out on the short-time dynamics. In this work we present predictions of palaeo-subglacial lakes and meltwater drainage pathways under the former European and North American ice sheets during the last glaciation. We utilise data on the current topography and seafloor bathymetry, and elevation models of the ice and ground surface topography (interpolated to a 5 km grid) to calculate the hydraulic potential surface at the ice-sheet bed. Meltwater routing algorithms and the flooding of local hydraulic minima allow us to predict subglacial channels and lakes respectively. Given that specific ice-surface and bed topographies are only known from modelled outputs, and thus contain significant uncertainty, we utilise many such outputs to examine

  17. Automatic detection of subglacial lakes in radar sounder data acquired in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilisei, Ana-Maria; Khodadadzadeh, Mahdi; Dalsasso, Emanuele; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2017-10-01

    Subglacial lakes decouple the ice sheet from the underlying bedrock, thus facilitating the sliding of the ice masses towards the borders of the continents, consequently raising the sea level. This motivated increasing attention in the detection of subglacial lakes. So far, about 70% of the total number of subglacial lakes in Antarctica have been detected by analysing radargrams acquired by radar sounder (RS) instruments. Although the amount of radargrams is expected to drastically increase, from both airborne and possible future Earth observation RS missions, currently the main approach to the detection of subglacial lakes in radargrams is by visual interpretation. This approach is subjective and extremely time consuming, thus difficult to apply to a large amount of radargrams. In order to address the limitations of the visual interpretation and to assist glaciologists in better understanding the relationship between the subglacial environment and the climate system, in this paper, we propose a technique for the automatic detection of subglacial lakes. The main contribution of the proposed technique is the extraction of features for discriminating between lake and non-lake basal interfaces. In particular, we propose the extraction of features that locally capture the topography of the basal interface, the shape and the correlation of the basal waveforms. Then, the extracted features are given as input to a supervised binary classifier based on Support Vector Machine to perform the automatic subglacial lake detection. The effectiveness of the proposed method is proven both quantitatively and qualitatively by applying it to a large dataset acquired in East Antarctica by the MultiChannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder.

  18. Subglacial lake matters: piracy on a divide between thawed and frozen bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, S. P.; Bougamont, M. H.; Christoffersen, P.; Fricker, H. A.; Lipscomb, W. H.; Price, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    The two most populated active subglacial lake districts in Antarctica, upper Kamb Ice Stream and lower Whillans Ice Stream, occur along boundaries between where temperature models predict net basal freezing and net basal accretion. This occurs in part due to a basal traction contrast, which creates a ridge in the ice surface and creates a pressure seal; this impedes the downstream movement of water until a subglacial lake flood occurs. Here we use a model for basal water routing, which incorporates subglacial floods and a realistic term for effective pressure, to explore the ability of these floods to provide water to areas of net basal accretion and thus maintain basal lubrication. We hypothesize that these floods can distribute sufficient water to most of the regions experiencing net basal freezing; the exception being those nearest to the lakes themselves, Discharge in these regions likely occurs via narrow subglacial conduits. Over time this will cause ice downstream of the dam to thicken and pre-flood lake levels to increase until water ultimately exits the lake via an alternate route i.e. water piracy. Once piracy occurs, water is no longer supplied along the former flowpath and ice stream shutdown accelerates. We conclude that the formation and quasi-periodic flooding of lakes at the basal melt/ basal freezing boundary is a critical process in accelerating ice stream shutdown.

  19. Glacial removal of late Cenozoic subglacially emplaced volcanic edifices by the West Antarctic ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, John C.; Blankenship, D.D.; Damaske, D.; Cooper, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Local maxima of the horizontal gradient of pseudogravity from closely spaced aeromagnetic surveys over the Ross Sea, northwestern Ross Ice Shelf, and the West Antarctic ice sheet, reveal a linear magnetic rift fabric and numerous subcircular, high-amplitude anomalies. Geophysical data indicate two or three youthful volcanic edifices at widely separated areas beneath the sea and ice cover in the West Antarctic rift system. In contrast, we suggest glacial removal of edifices of volcanic sources of many more anomalies. Magnetic models, controlled by marine seismic reflection and radar ice-sounding data, allow us to infer that glacial removal of the associated late Cenozoic volcanic edifices (probably debris, comprising pillow breccias, and hyaloclastites) has occurred essentially concomitantly with their subglacial eruption. "Removal' of unconsolidated volcanic debris erupted beneath the ice is probably a more appropriate term than "erosion', given its fragmented, ice-contact origin. The exposed volcanoes may have been protected from erosion by the surrounding ice sheet because of more competent rock or high elevation above the ice sheet. -from Authors

  20. Prospects of obtaining samples of bottom sediments from subglacial lake Vostok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н. И. Васильев

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper proves the timeliness of obtaining and examining bottom sediments from subglacial Lake Vostok. Predictive geological section of Lake Vostok and information value of bottom sediments have been examined. Severe requirements towards environmental security of lake examinations and sampling of bottom sediments rule out the use of conventional drilling technologies, as they would pollute the lake with injection liquid from the borehole. In order to carry out sampling of bottom sediments from the subglacial lake, it is proposed to use a dynamically balanced tool string, which enables rotary drilling without any external support on borehole walls to transmit counter torque.     A theoretical analysis has been carried out to assess the operation of the tool string, which is a two-mass oscillatory electromechanical system of reciprocating and rotating motion (RRM with two degrees of freedom.

  1. Subglacial biochemical weathering and transport drove fertilization in the Southern Ocean during Antarctic temperature maxima and NH Heinrich events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisia, S.; Augustinus, P. M.; Hellstrom, J.; Borsato, A.; Drysdale, R.; Weyrich, L.; Cooper, A.; Johnston, V. E.; Cotte, M.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in bioproductivity in the subantarctic region have been observed to coincide with episodes of significant iceberg discharge in the North Atlantic (Heinrich events), thus linking iron delivery to the Southern Ocean (SO) with abrupt climate changes in the Northern Hemisphere. Whilst upwelling has been proposed as a likely source of bioavailable iron during Heinrich events, it is well known that, today, subglacial metabolic pathways under limited carbon supply may accumulate divalent iron, which could have been mobilized and delivered to the SO during full glacial conditions. This alternative hypothesis remains largely untested for the SO because of the difficulties in accessing palaeoenvironmental archives from beneath the Antarctic ice sheets. We present a record of the subglacial production and fate of nutrients from calcite crusts formed beneath a tributary of the Rennick outlet glacier (East Antarctic Ice Sheet, EAIS) during the Last Glacial Maximum. Chemistry, stratigraphy and preliminary ancient DNA characterization of the microbial consortium of 27- to 17-kyr-old calcites suggest that bioweathering released iron in hypoxic pools of local basal meltwater. Anaerobic methane oxidising microbes released bicarbonate and sulfuric acid in the isolated pockets, which facilitated local weathering of the amphibolite rock. During episodes of channelized flow, identified by clast-rich microsparites, and which have ages near-commensurate with Antarctic Isotope Maximum2 (AIM2) and Heinrich event 2, ferrous iron may have been mobilized and transported subglacially to the ice shelf. The calcites formed during this phase preserve evidence of microbes using sulfite dehydrogenase, which explains the accumulation of sulfate in the calcite. Our data thus indicate that subglacial processes contributed to SO productivity increases at the time of Heinrich event 2, ultimately leading to drawdawn of atmospheric carbon dioxide at millennial scale.

  2. Recharge of a subglacial lake by surface meltwater in northeast Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Michael J; Herried, Bradley G; Bevis, Michael G; Bell, Robin E

    2015-02-12

    In a warming climate, surface meltwater production on large ice sheets is expected to increase. If this water is delivered to the ice sheet base it may have important consequences for ice dynamics. For example, basal water distributed in a diffuse network can decrease basal friction and accelerate ice flow, whereas channelized basal water can move quickly to the ice margin, where it can alter fjord circulation and submarine melt rates. Less certain is whether surface meltwater can be trapped and stored in subglacial lakes beneath large ice sheets. Here we show that a subglacial lake in Greenland drained quickly, as seen in the collapse of the ice surface, and then refilled from surface meltwater input. We use digital elevation models from stereo satellite imagery and airborne measurements to resolve elevation changes during the evolution of the surface and basal hydrologic systems at the Flade Isblink ice cap in northeast Greenland. During the autumn of 2011, a collapse basin about 70 metres deep and about 0.4 cubic kilometres in volume formed near the southern summit of the ice cap as a subglacial lake drained into a nearby fjord. Over the next two years, rapid uplift of the floor of the basin (which is approximately 8.4 square kilometres in area) occurred as surface meltwater flowed into crevasses around the basin margin and refilled the subglacial lake. Our observations show that surface meltwater can be trapped and stored at the bed of an ice sheet. Sensible and latent heat released by this trapped meltwater could soften nearby colder basal ice and alter downstream ice dynamics. Heat transport associated with meltwater trapped in subglacial lakes should be considered when predicting how ice sheet behaviour will change in a warming climate.

  3. Subglacial hydrological modelling of a rapid lake drainage event on the Russell Glacier catchment, SW Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, C. F.; Pimentel, S.; Doyle, S. H.; Booth, A. D.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Jones, G. A.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, A.

    2011-12-01

    We use local-scale subglacial hydrological models to assess the development of the basal drainage system in response to a rapid lake-tapping event on the Russell Glacier catchment, SW Greenland. Water inputs to the model are constrained by in-situ records of the lake drainage rate. Subglacial conditions are estimated from active seismic line analysis including basal topography and substrate characteristics. A borehole slug test model is used to determine the radial flux of water from the drainage input point. Water flowing in the downstream direction is used to drive a 1-D flowband model, which allows development of interacting channelised and distributed drainage systems. The simulated basal water pressures are applied to an elastic beam model to assess vertical uplift at the lake drainage site. Modelled uplift outputs are compared with results from GPS stations located next to the lake. Initial modelling results suggest that channels are necessary for evacuation of water from rapid lake drainage events, even with the presence of a sediment-based bed, the latter of which is usually associated with distributed drainage.

  4. Photogrammetric recognition of subglacial drainage channels during glacier lake outburst events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Ellen; Koschitzki, Robert

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, many glaciers all over the world have been distinctly retreating and thinning. One of the consequences of this is the increase of so called glacier lake outburst flood events (GLOFs): Lakes that have been dammed by a glacier spontaneously start to drain through a subglacial channel underneath the glacier due to their outweighing hydrostatic pressure. In a short period of time, the lake water drains under the glacier and causes floods in downstream valleys. In many cases the latter become hazardous for people and their property. Due to glacier movement, the tunnel will soon collapse, and the glacier lake refills, thus starting a new GLOF cycle. The mechanisms ruling GLOF events are yet still not fully understood by glaciologists. Thus, there is a demand for data and measurement values that can help to understand and model the phenomena. In view of the above, we will show how photogrammetric image sequence analysis can be used to collect data which allows for drawing conclusions about the location and development of a subglacial channel. The work is a follow-up on earlier work on a photogrammetric GLOF early warning system (Mulsow et. al., 2013). For the purpose of detecting the subglacial tunnel, a camera has been installed in a pilot study to observe the area of the Colonia glacier (Northern Patagonian ice field) where it dams the lake Lago Cachet II. To verify the hypothesis, that the course of the subglacial tunnel is indicated by irregular surface motion patterns during its collapse, the camera acquired image sequences of the glacier surface during several GLOF events. Applying LSM-based tracking techniques to these image sequences, surface feature motion trajectories could be obtained for a dense raster of glacier points. Since only a single camera has been used for image sequence acquisition, depth information is required to scale the trajectories. Thus, for scaling and georeferencing of the measurements a GPS-supported photogrammetric network

  5. Bed Topography and Evidence of Possible new Subglacial Lakes Over the Region Vostok-Dome Concordia (East Antarctica) Inferred by Airborne Radar Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacco, I. E.; Forieri, A.; Bianchi, C.; Zirizzotti, A.; Passerini, A.; Rémy, F.

    2002-05-01

    During the 1999 and 2001 Italian Antarctic Expeditions, extensive airborne radar surveys were carried out over the region Vostok-Dome C (about 6000 km of radar tracks were acquired). The radar data allowed to determine the ice thickness and the bedrock topography over the entire area; in addition, the analysis of the shape and the amplitude of the bottom reflections, permitted to identify 30 radar tracks as sub glacial "lake" mirrors. On account of the bed topography some important features were detected: (i) a deep trench into the Aurora Subglacial Basin, oriented approximately N-S at about 119o E, (that could be considered as the extension of the Peacock Subglacial Trenc) that divides the region into two sub-areas with different morphological aspect. The first one, located between the eastern ridge of Lake Vostok and the trench, is characterized by a bedrock that dips gently with a near constant gradient of about 4.2 m/km, without relevant local irregularities. The second one, located North-East of the trench towards Dome C, is characterized by a bedrock with a steep rise up and a complex morphology typical of mountain massif; (ii) a second trench, East of Dome C summit, N-S oriented at about 124.5o E. This trench seems to divide the Dome C massif by the Belgica Subglacial Highlands. Considering that the Dome C massif is surrounded North and North-East by the depressions of the Vincennes Subglacial Basin and of the Adventure Trench we could suggest that the Dome C mountains are morphologically like an isolated massif. The comparison of the surface topography, inferred by ERS-1 data, with the bed morphology, allowed to link and to correlate the surface slope anomalies with the main bed features. The "lake" radar tracks were analysed and compared with the surface slope anomalies and with the bed morphology. All the tracks are located over narrow and local anomalies of the bedrock like trough or catchment basin; 26 of the radar tracks lie over close and evident

  6. Subglacial sediment provenance and transport in West Antarctica from micropaleontologic analysis of Subglacial Lake Whillans and the upstream sectors of the Whillans and Kamb ice streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Reed; Coenen, Jason; Warny, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    The WISSARD (Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling) project recovered sediment cores from Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) in West Antarctica. We report preliminary micropaleontological analyses of SLW sediments, augmented by analysis of sediments previously recovered from beneath the upstream camps of the Whillans Ice Stream (WIS) and Kamb Ice Stream (KIS). Microfossils in these sediments (notably diatoms, sponge spicules, and organic-walled palynomorphs), include information regarding sediment transport, subglacial physical processes and ice sheet history. Absolute abundance (particles per gram dry sediment) of identifiable diatoms and diatom fragments in different size classes were calculated to compare and contrast each environment. Sponge spicules are being analyzed for taphonomic effects from subglacial transport and shearing. Palynomorphs are analyzed for abundance, diversity, and source rock ages. In SLW the upper 30 cm is softer and more water-rich than the underlying sediments. However, no statistically significant variation in microfossil and fragment abundance or taphonomy is noted in these diamictons, which is in agreement with the stratigraphic homogeneity evident from geochemical and geological analyses performed to date. SLW contains 1.52x106 to 1.13x107 diatom fragments per gram, compared with 6.43x106 to 4.63x108 at upstream WIS and 6.13 107 to 1.58x108 at KIS. Whole diatoms are orders of magnitude lower in concentration. Low abundance and poor preservation of diatoms and spicules at SLW suggests relatively long distance transport from their marine sediment source, with evidence of high shear strain, following the subglacial shearing index of Scherer et al. (2004). Upper Miocene diatoms dominate all samples analyzed, though older and younger diatoms are noted as well. The WIS samples exhibit the highest diversity of diatoms, including Paleogene freshwater diatoms. KIS sediments have the highest abundance of whole diatoms, but they

  7. Examples of Models Fit to Magnetic Anomalies Observed Over Subaerial, Submarine, and Subglacial Volcanoes in the West Antarctic Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, J. C.; Finn, C. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2006-12-01

    Aeromagnetic and marine magnetic surveys over the volcanically active West Antarctic rift system, constrained by seismic reflection profiles over the Ross Sea continual shelf, and radar ice sounding surveys over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) allowed calculation of models fit to very high-amplitude anomalies. We present several examples: exposed 2700-m high, subaerial erupted volcano Mt Melbourne; the 750-m high source of anomaly D (Hamilton submarine volcano) in the Ross sea; and the 600-m high edifice of Mt. CASERTZ beneath the WAIS. The character of these anomalies and their sources varies greatly, and is inferred to be the result of subaerial, submarine and subglacial emplacement respectively. Mt. Melbourne erupted through the WAIS at a time when it was grounded over the Ross Sea continental shelf. Highly magnetic volcanic flows inferred to have high remanent (normal) magnetization in the present field direction produce the 600-nT positive anomaly. The flows protected the edifice above the ice from erosion. Negligible amounts of probably subglacially erupted, apparently non-magnetic hyaloclastite exist in association with Mt. Melbourne. Mt. CASERTZ is nonmagnetic and the edifice is interpreted as consisting of a transient mound of unconsolidated hyaloclastite injected into the WAIS. However Mt. CASERTZ, about 8-km diameter, overlies a 200-m high, 40-km wide highly magnetic residual edifice modeled as the top of the source (an active subglacial volcano) of a 400-nT high positive anomaly. Any former edifices comprising hyaloclastite, pillow breccia or other volcanic debris injected into the moving WAIS apparently have been removed. About 400 other high- amplitude anomalies associated with low relief (80 percent less than 200 m) edifices at the base of the ice (the tops of the sources of these steep gradient anomalies) beneath the WAIS defined by radar ice sounding have been interpreted as having former hyaloclastite edifices, which were removed by the moving

  8. Evaluating the hydrostatic equilibrium of the subglacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica, using a precise regional geoid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Joachim; Ewert, Heiko; Scheinert, Mirko; Dietrich, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    We present a study on the determination and application of a precise geoid model for the region of the subglacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica. The geoid model is derived by combining a global satellite-only geopotential model mainly based on GOCE data with dense airborne gravity data and topographic information. Ice-thickness data and lake water depths are used for a residual terrain modelling (RTM) in a remove-restore approach. In that context, special focus is given to the correct treatment of the ice sheet when computing the residual terrain effects. The use of the refined regional geoid model for glaciological and geophysical applications is exemplarily demonstrated by means of the hydrostatic equilibrium surface (HE) of the lake. It was found that the mean quadratic residual geoid signal is about two times larger than the estimated deviations of the HE surface. Thus, the significance of the refined geoid solution is proven. In this context, a comparison with the strictly computed geopotential shows that the estimated apparent lake level may be expressed as a constant metric bias w.r.t. to the quasigeoid. Furthermore, the HE condition is used to derive an adjusted estimate of the lake water density. However, in this case the theoretical latitudinal trend of the equilibrium surface needs to be taken into account. Finally, the (hypothetical) deviations from the HE state at and around the shoreline of the lake indicate candidate outflow locations in case of a possible depletion event.

  9. Regional pattern of snow characteristics around Antarctic Lake Vostok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, Diana; Ekaykin, Alexey; Popov, Sergey; Shibaev, Yuriy; Kozachek, Anna; Lipenkov, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Since 1998 Russian Antarctic Expedition has organized several scientific traverses in the region of subglacial Lake Vostok mainly devoted to the radar echo and seismic sounding of the glacier and water (the results have been published elsewhere). Along with the geophysical studies, a number of glaciological investigations have been carried out: snow pit digging, installation of accumulation stakes, snow sampling to study the stable water isotope content. Here we for the first time present a synthesis of these works and demonstrate a series of maps that characterize the snow density, isotope content and accumulation rate the studied region. A general tendency of the snow accumulation rate and isotope content is a significant increase from south (south-west) to north (north-east) from 35 to 23 mm w.e. per year and from -53,3 ‰ to -57,3 ‰ for delta oxygen-18 respectively, which likely reflects the continental-scale pattern, i.e., increase from inland to the coast. Deuterium excess varies from 11,7 ‰ to 16,3 ‰ is negatively correlated with the isotope content, which is typical for central Antarctica. The snow density demonstrate different pattern: higher values offshore the lake (up to 0,356 g/cm^3), and lower values within the lake's shoreline (lower limit is 0,328 g/cm^3). We suggest that this is related to the katabatic wind activity: very flat nearly horizontal surface of the glacier above the lake is not favorable for the strong winds, which leads to lower surface snow density. Superimposed on the main trend is the regional pattern, namely, curved contour lines in the middle part of the lake. We suggest that it may be related to the local anomalies of the snow drift by wind. Indeed, on the satellite images of the lake one can easily see a snowdrift stretching from the lake's western shore downwind in the middle part of the lake. The isolines of delta oxygen-18 and deuterium excess become perpendicular to each other in the north part of the lake which also

  10. An In-Situ Deep-UV Optical Probe for Examining Biochemical Presence in Deep Glaciers and Sub-Glacial Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, A. L.; Behar, A.; Bhartia, R.; Conrad, P. G.; Hug, W. F.

    2007-12-01

    that has recently generated spatially resolved spectral images of material inside the Vostok cores without extraction or disturbance to the material in the ice. We will describe the instrumentation we will have available for the British Antarctica Survey Lake Ellsworth Exploration field campaign, provide a possible operational scenario and show examples of the kinds of possible measurement results that might be obtained, based upon our Lake Vostok core studies. [1] Siegert, M.J., Tranter, M., Ellis-Evans, C.J., Priscu, J.C. & Lyons, W.B. (2003) The hydrochemistry of Lake Vostok and the potential for life in Antarctic subglacial lakes. Hydrological Processes, 17, 795-814. [2] Priscu, J.C. and B.C. Christner (2004). Earth's icy biosphere, pp. 130-145, In "Microbial Diversity and Bioprospecting", A. Bull (editor). Chap 13. ASM Press, Washington, D.C. [3] Siegert M.J., Hindmarsh, R., Corr H., Smith, A., Woodward, J., King, E., Payne, A.J., and Joughin, I.(2004) Subglacial Lake Ellsworth: a candidate for in situ exploration in West Antarctica. Geophysical Research Letters, 31 (23), L23403, 10.1029/2004GL021477.

  11. Investigating the hydrological origins of Blood Falls - geomicrobiological insights into a briny subglacial Antarctic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, J.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Purcell, A. M.; Dachwald, B.; Lyons, W. B.; Welch, K. A.; Auken, E.; Dugan, H. A.; Walter, J. I.; Pettit, E. C.; Doran, P. T.; Virginia, R. A.; Schamper, C.; Foley, N.; Feldmann, M.; Espe, C.; Ghosh, D.; Francke, G.

    2015-12-01

    Subglacial waters tend to accumulate solutes from extensive rock-water interactions, which, when released to the surface, can provide nutrients to surface ecosystems providing a 'hot spot' for microbial communities. Blood Falls, an iron-rich, saline feature at the terminus of Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica is a well-studied subglacial discharge. Here we present an overview of geophysical surveys, thermomechanical drilling exploration and geomicrobiological analyses of the Blood Falls system. A helicopter-borne transient electromagnetic system (SkyTEM) flown over the Taylor Glacier revealed a surprisingly extensive subglacial aquifer and indicates that Blood Falls may be the only surface manifestation of this extensive briny groundwater. Ground-based temperature sensing and GPR data combined with the helicopter-borne TEM data enabled targeted drilling into the englacial conduit that delivers brine to the surface. During the 2014-15 austral summer field season, we used a novel ice-melting drill (the IceMole) to collect englacial brine for geomicrobiological analyses. Results from previously collected outflow and more recent samples indicate that the brine harbors a metabolically active microbial community that persists, despite cold, dark isolation. Isotope geochemistry and molecular analysis of functional genes from BF suggested that a catalytic or 'cryptic' sulfur cycle was linked to iron reduction. Recent metagenomic analysis confirms the presence of numerous genes involved in oxidative and reductive sulfur transformations. Metagenomic and metabolic activity data also indicate that subglacial dark CO2 fixation occurs via various pathways. Genes encoding key steps in CO2 fixation pathways including the Calvin Benson Basham and Wood Ljungdahl pathway were present and brine samples showed measureable uptake of 14C-labeled bicarbonate. These results support the notion that, like the deep subsurface, subglacial environments are chemosynthetic

  12. Maritime antarctic lakes as sentinels of climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho, A.; Rochera, C.; Villaescusa, J. A.; Velázquez, D.; Toro, M.; Rico, E.; Fernández-Valiente, E.; Justel, Ana; Bañón García, Manuel; Quesada, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Remote lakes, such as lakes from the Maritime Antarctica, can be used as sentinels of climate change, because they are mostly free of direct anthropogenic pressures, and they experience climate change as a main stressor capable of modifying the ecosystem structure and function. In this paper, the content of a lecture that has been presented at the First Conference of Lake Sustainability, which has been centred in our studies on lakes from Byers Peninsula (Maritime Antarctic...

  13. The subglacial Lake Vostok (East Antarctica) surface snow is Earth-bound DNA (and dust)-free

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, S.; Marie, D.; Bulat, E.; Alekhina, I.; Petit, J.-R.

    2012-09-01

    came up with only contaminant bacterial phylotypes (mostly of human source). The bioexposure trials showed that even in one day of open exposure the gDNA of rather complex microbial community composition was fatally damaged in terms of long-, mid-range and short-size amplicon generation in PCR. All this testify for very harsh conditions for life to survive the climate conditions of Central East Antarctica which could be considered as a presentday 'zone mortale' or 'polar desert' for known Earthbound microbial life forms. In addition this means that no life seeds are expected to reach subglacial lakes and water reservoirs and establish indigenous lake microbiota during their transit through the thick and aged Antarctic ice sheet upon its bottom melting. In general the subglacial Lake Vostok surface (ice sheet as well) environ represents the unique test area (sterile - in fact Earth-bound DNA-free and clean - in fact Earth-bound dust-free) for advancing extraterrestrial (ET) life detection technologies and searching for ET life indices in AMMs and IDPs.

  14. Fossil Rotifers and the Early Colonization of an Antarctic Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, Kerrie M.; Dartnall, Herbert J. G.; Gibson, John A. E.; Saulnier-Talbot, Émilie; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2001-05-01

    Early Holocene sediments from a continental Antarctic lake (Ace Lake, Vestfold Hills, East Antarctica) contained abundant fossil rotifers of the genus Notholca. The fossil is similar to specimens of Notholca sp. present in modern-day Ace Lake and other fresh and brackish lakes of the Vestfold Hills. Cyanobacteria and protists (chrysophyte cysts, dinoflagellate cysts, and rhizopod tests) were also recovered from the core samples. These sediments were deposited early in the freshwater phase of Ace Lake, soon after deglaciation of the area. The occurrence of this trophically diverse assemblage of organisms at an early stage in the evolution of the lake suggests either that they were part of an endemic Antarctic flora and fauna which pre-dated the last glacial maximum and survived in glacial refugia or that efficient intercontinental dispersal had occurred.

  15. The biodiversity and ecology of Antarctic lakes: models for evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laybourn-Parry, Johanna; Pearce, David A

    2007-12-29

    Antarctic lakes are characterised by simplified, truncated food webs. The lakes range from freshwater to hypersaline with a continuum of physical and chemical conditions that offer a natural laboratory in which to study evolution. Molecular studies on Antarctic lake communities are still in their infancy, but there is clear evidence from some taxonomic groups, for example the Cyanobacteria, that there is endemicity. Moreover, many of the bacteria have considerable potential as sources of novel biochemicals such as low temperature enzymes and anti-freeze proteins. Among the eukaryotic organisms survival strategies have evolved, among which dependence on mixotrophy in phytoflagellates and some ciliates is common. There is also some evidence of evolution of new species of flagellate in the marine derived saline lakes of the Vestfold Hills. Recent work on viruses in polar lakes demonstrates high abundance and high rates of infection, implying that they may play an important role in genetic exchange in these extreme environments.

  16. Geomorphic signature of an Antarctic palaeo-ice stream: implications for understanding subglacial processes and grounding line retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, S. J.; Jamieson, S.; Vieli, A.; O'Cofaigh, C.; Stokes, C. R.; Hillenbrand, C.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to capture the complex spatial and temporal variability exhibited by ice streams in Antarctica and Greenland at short (decadal) time-scales, remains one of the key challenges in numerical modelling and underlies current uncertainties with predicting future contributions of ice sheets to sea-level rise. This has made ice streams a major focus for current glaciological research, particularly with regard to the processes occurring at the ice-bed interface. Such studies unfortunately, only provide a ‘snap-shot’ of the life-cycle of an ice stream, limited to the last few decades, and so there is a need for complementary investigations of former zones of fast flow in palaeo-ice sheets. The ability to observe directly the former beds of palaeo-ice streams has allowed important spatial and temporal information to be obtained on the processes that occurred at the ice-bed interface and on ice dynamics associated with the evolution of palaeo-ice streams. We present new glacial geomorphological evidence from a marine palaeo-ice stream in Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula (Ó Cofaigh et al. 2002, 2005). The landform assemblage of this palaeo-ice stream system has been derived from the mapping of over 16,000 glacial landforms from high-resolution multibeam swath-bathymetry and input into a GIS database. Analysis of the spatial distribution and geomorphic relationships between landforms and landform assemblages has revealed a complex basal régime, while the overall geomorphic imprint, constrained by radiocarbon dates, has been used to reconstruct the retreat style and history of the palaeo-ice stream. Mapping of relict subglacial meltwater channels has revealed an intricate hydrological system characterised by multiple network types (cf. Anderson & Oakes-Fretwell, 2008) that are strongly dependent on the underlying substrate and which show progressive organisation seaward. Grounding zone wedges (GZWs), formed by the subglacial transport and then deposition of

  17. Guidelines to Avoid Biocontamination of Antarctic Subglacial Aquatic Environments: Forward Contamination Concerns, Environmental Management and Scientific Stewardship of Icy analogue environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, M. S.; Hobbie, J.; et al.

    2007-12-01

    For more than a decade, scientists and space mission planners have recognized the importance of collaborative information exchange with the Antarctic research community to address their many shared exploration challenges, from drilling methods, remote sample collection, and data interpretation, to concerns about cross contamination that could adversely impact both the environment and interpretation of scientific data. Another shared concern exists in the regulatory realm; both the Antarctic and outer space environments are subject to separate international treaties that impose regulatory controls and oversight with serious implications for exploration planning. In recent years, both communities have faced the need to adjust their regulatory controls in light of fast-paced advances in scientific understanding of extreme environments, particularly related to potential microbial life. Both communities have sought and received advice from the National Research Council (NRC) through studies that suggested ways to update their respective oversight and regulatory systems while allowing for continued scientific exploration. A recently completed NRC study "Exploration of Antarctic Subglacial Aquatic Environments: Environmental and Scientific Stewardship" provided a suite of recommendations to address1) 'cleanliness' levels necessary for equipment and devices used in exploration of subglacial aquatic environments, as well as 2) the scientific basis for contamination standards, and 3) the steps for defining an overall exploration strategy conducive to sound environmental management and scientific stewardship. This talk will present the findings of the recent multinational NRC study, which is likely to translate into useful information for analogue studies that proceed to test techniques and capabilities for exploring an Europan ocean, other icy celestial locations, and related science targets on Earth. As the science and exploration of subglacial environments grows beyond its

  18. Rapidly changing subglacial hydrological pathways at a tidewater glacier revealed through simultaneous observations of water pressure, supraglacial lakes, meltwater plumes and surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Penelope; Benn, Douglas I.; Hulton, Nicholas R. J.; Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, Adrian; Sevestre, Heïdi; van Pelt, Ward J. J.; Lindbäck, Katrin; Kohler, Jack; Boot, Wim

    2017-11-01

    Subglacial hydrological processes at tidewater glaciers remain poorly understood due to the difficulty in obtaining direct measurements and lack of empirical verification for modelling approaches. Here, we investigate the subglacial hydrology of Kronebreen, a fast-flowing tidewater glacier in Svalbard during the 2014 melt season. We combine observations of borehole water pressure, supraglacial lake drainage, surface velocities and plume activity with modelled run-off and water routing to develop a conceptual model that thoroughly encapsulates subglacial drainage at a tidewater glacier. Simultaneous measurements suggest that an early-season episode of subglacial flushing took place during our observation period, and a stable efficient drainage system effectively transported subglacial water through the northern region of the glacier tongue. Drainage pathways through the central and southern regions of the glacier tongue were disrupted throughout the following melt season. Periodic plume activity at the terminus appears to be a signal for modulated subglacial pulsing, i.e. an internally driven storage and release of subglacial meltwater that operates independently of marine influences. This storage is a key control on ice flow in the 2014 melt season. Evidence from this work and previous studies strongly suggests that long-term changes in ice flow at Kronebreen are controlled by the location of efficient/inefficient drainage and the position of regions where water is stored and released.

  19. Rapidly changing subglacial hydrological pathways at a tidewater glacier revealed through simultaneous observations of water pressure, supraglacial lakes, meltwater plumes and surface velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. How

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Subglacial hydrological processes at tidewater glaciers remain poorly understood due to the difficulty in obtaining direct measurements and lack of empirical verification for modelling approaches. Here, we investigate the subglacial hydrology of Kronebreen, a fast-flowing tidewater glacier in Svalbard during the 2014 melt season. We combine observations of borehole water pressure, supraglacial lake drainage, surface velocities and plume activity with modelled run-off and water routing to develop a conceptual model that thoroughly encapsulates subglacial drainage at a tidewater glacier. Simultaneous measurements suggest that an early-season episode of subglacial flushing took place during our observation period, and a stable efficient drainage system effectively transported subglacial water through the northern region of the glacier tongue. Drainage pathways through the central and southern regions of the glacier tongue were disrupted throughout the following melt season. Periodic plume activity at the terminus appears to be a signal for modulated subglacial pulsing, i.e. an internally driven storage and release of subglacial meltwater that operates independently of marine influences. This storage is a key control on ice flow in the 2014 melt season. Evidence from this work and previous studies strongly suggests that long-term changes in ice flow at Kronebreen are controlled by the location of efficient/inefficient drainage and the position of regions where water is stored and released.

  20. Evolution of climate, glaciation and subglacial environments of Antarctica from the deep ice core and Lake Vostok water sample studies (Key results of implementation of the Russian Science Foundation project, 2014–2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ya. Lipenkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Work on the project focused on the following five areas: 1  field works in Antarctica at Vostok and Concordia stations; 2  experimental and theoretical studies in the field of ice core and paleoclimate research; 3 experimental and theoretical works related to the exploration of subglacial Lake Vostok; 4 development of technology and drilling equipment for deep ice coring and exploration of subglacial lakes; 5 upgrading the analytical instrumentation in the Climate and Environmental Research Laboratory (CERL of the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute. The main achievements in the field of ice core and paleoclimate research include 1 further elaboration of a new method of ice core dating, which is based on the link between air content of ice and local insolation, 2 investigation of the possible applications of the 17O-excess measurements in ice core to the paleoclimate research, 3  a better understanding of the mechanisms of the formation of relief-related variations in the isotopic content of an ice core drilled in the area of Antarctic megadunes, and 4 obtaining the first reliable data set on the variations of the 17O-excess in the Vostok core corresponding to marine isotope stage 11. As part of our studies of subglacial Lake Vostok, we have obtained a large body of new experimental data from the new ice core recovered from the 5G-3 borehole to the surface of the subglacial lake. Stacked profiles of isotopic composition, gas content and the size and orientation of the ice crystals in the lake ice have been composed from the data of three replicate cores from boreholes 5G-1, 5G-2 and 5G-3. The study reveals that the concentration of gases in the lake water beneath Vostok is unexpectedly low. A clear signature of the melt water in the surface layer of the lake, which is subject to refreezing on the icy ceiling of Lake Vostok, has been discerned in the three different properties of the accreted ice (the ice texture, the isotopic and

  1. Allelopathy-mediated competition in microbial mats from Antarctic lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Marc; Lesser, Michael P

    2017-05-01

    Microbial mats are vertically stratified communities that host a complex consortium of microorganisms, dominated by cyanobacteria, which compete for available nutrients and environmental niches, within these extreme habitats. The Antarctic Dry Valleys near McMurdo Sound include a series of lakes within the drainage basin that are bisected by glacial traverses. These lakes are traditionally independent, but recent increases in glacial melting have allowed two lakes (Chad and Hoare) to become connected by a meltwater stream. Microbial mats were collected from these lakes, and cultured under identical conditions at the McMurdo Station laboratory. Replicate pairings of the microbial mats exhibited consistent patterns of growth inhibition indicative of competitive dominance. Natural products were extracted from the microbial mats, and a disk diffusion assay was utilized to show that allelochemical compounds mediate competitive interactions. Both microscopy and 16S rRNA sequencing show that these mats contain significant populations of cyanobacteria known to produce allelochemicals. Two compounds were isolated from these microbial mats that might be important in the chemical ecology of these psychrophiles. In other disk:mat pairings, including extract versus mat of origin, the allelochemicals exhibited no effect. Taken together, these results indicate that Antarctic lake microbial mats can compete via allelopathy. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Subglacial hydrology of the lake district ice lobe during the Younger Dryas (ca. 12 500 - 11 600 years ago) in the Kylaeniemi area, SE Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunkka, J. P.; Moisio, K.; Vainio, A. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    It is essential to gain knowledge on the subglacial hydrological conditions at the glacier bed / bedrock interface when assessing how bedrock fracture zones affect subglacial melt water flow and in which subglacial zones pressurized and oxygen-rich melt water penetrates into the bedrock fracture systems. In the warm-based glacier zones, a part of subglacial melt water will penetrate deep into the fracture systems although the major part of melt water is drained to and beyond the ice margin via subglacial tunnel networks especially in the areas where ice is flowing on the crystalline bedrock. During the last deglaciation phase of the former Scandinavian Ice Sheet, glaciofluvial accumulations were deposited and these sediment accumulations are highly important when picturing the subglacial hydrology of different ice streams during deglaciation in the crystalline bedrock area. The aim of the present work was to map the bedrock fracture zones in the Kylaeniemi area and to shed light on the subglacial hydrology of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet's Lake District Ice Stream that occupied the Kylaeniemi area during the Younger Dryas between ca. 12 500 - 11 600 years ago. The special emphasis within this general aim was to study the relationship between bedrock fracture zones and the routes of subglacial drainage paths. The methods used to map and study bedrock fracture zones and subglacial drainage paths included remotes sensing methods, field observations, ground penetrating radar (GPR) investigations and GIS-based reconstructions. Conventional geological field methods aided by the GPR-method were also used to map bedrock exposures and their structures and to define the type of glaciofluvial sediments and glaciofluvial landform associations. Two main fracture zone sets occur in the study area. The most prominent bedrock fracture zone set trends NW-SE while the other, less prominent fracture zone set is aligned in NE-SW direction. The majority of the minor joint sets in

  3. Analysing aeromagnetic, airborne gravity and radar data to unveil variable basal boundary conditions for the East Antarctic Ice Sheet in the Wilkes Subglacial Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armadillo, Egidio; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Young, Duncan; Balbi, Pietro; Blankenship, Don; Jordan, Tom; Bozzo, Emanuele; Siegert, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Wilkes Subglacial Basin (WSB) extends for ca 1,400 km from George V Land into the interior of East Antarctica and hosts several major glaciers that drain a large sector of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). The region is of major significance for assessing the long-term stability of the EAIS, as it lies well below sea level and its bedrock deepens inland. This makes it potentially more prone to marine ice sheet instability, much like areas of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) that are presently experiencing significant mass loss. This sector of the EAIS has also become a focus of current research within IODP Leg 318 that aims to better comprehend the initial stages of glaciation and the history and stability of the EAIS since the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Understanding geological boundary conditions onshore is important to assess their influence on ice sheet dynamics and long-term stability and interpret the paleo-ice sheet record. Early geophysical models inferred the existence of a major extensional sedimentary basin beneath the WSB. This could in principle be similar to some areas of the WAIS, where subglacial sediments deposited within rift basins or forming thin marine sedimentary drapes have been inferred to exert a key influence on both the onset and maintenance of fast-glacial flow. However, later geophysical models indicated that the WSB contains little or no sediment, is not rift-related, and formed in response to Cenozoic flexural uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). A major joint Italian-UK aerogeophysical exploration campaign over parts of the WSB is super-seeding all these earlier geophysical views of the basin (Ferraccioli et al., 2009, Tectonophysics). Precambrian and Paleozoic basement faults can now be recognised as exerting fundamental controls on the location of both the topographic margins of the basin and it sub-basins; ii) the crust underlying the basin is thinner compared to the TAM (Jordan et al., 2013, Tectonophysics

  4. A Prediction of Increase in Subglacial Volcanism Beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) as Future Deglaciation Caused by Ocean Circulation Proceeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, J. C.; LeMasurier, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Many decades of aeromagnetic surveying (e.g. Behrendt, 1964; 2013; and others) over the West Antarctic Ice sheet (WAIS) have shown >1000 high amplitude, shallow source magnetic anomalies interpreted as as indicating subglacial volcanic centers of late Cenozoic age to presently active. Similar anomalies exist over exposed volcanic rocks bordering the WAIS in places.Recent papers (e.g. Wouters et al., 2015; Paolo, et al.; 2015 and others) based on satellite altimetry have shown dramatic thinning and retreat of ice shelves, particularly those bordering the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, caused by melting from circulation of warming sea water. Previous workers have shown that when ice shelves collapse, the ice streams previously dammed by them accelerate an order of magnitude higher velocity, and surface elevation decreases. GRACE satellite interpretations (e.g. Velicogna et al., and others) indicate mass loss of WAIS in recent years.The bed elevation beneath the WAIS deepens inland from the Amundsen and Bellingshausen coasts, although high relief volcanic topography is present in a number of areas beneath the ice.Crowley et a. (2015) have shown that glacial cycles may drive production of oceanic crust by lowering pressure in the mantle resulting in increased melting and magma production. Increased volcanism due to deglaciation in Iceland has apparently produced increased in volcanic activity there. Deglaciation of the Norwegian continental shelf has resulted in faulting of the sea floor and similar faulting has been reported of the Ross Sea shelf following deglaciation there.I suggest here that as the WAIS collapses in the future resulting from climate change, an increase in volcanic activity beneath the ice might be expected. This may provide a feedback mechanism for increase in ice melting.

  5. Subsurface imaging reveals a confined aquifer beneath an ice-sealed Antarctic lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dugan, H. A.; Doran, P. T.; Tulaczyk, S.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid water oases are rare under extreme cold desert conditions found in the Antarctic McMurdo Dry Valleys. Here we report geophysical results that indicate that Lake Vida, one of the largest lakes in the region, is nearly frozen and underlain by widespread cryoconcentrated brine. A ground penet...

  6. Archaeal and bacterial community structures in the anoxic sediment of Antarctic meromictic lake Nurume-Ike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Norio; Sato, Shota; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Imura, Satoshi; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2010-08-01

    Prokaryotic community structures in the anoxic sediment of the Antarctic meromictic Lake Nurume-Ike were revealed by sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clones. The archaeal clones obtained (205 total) consisted of only three phylotypes, and were dominantly affiliated with uncultured euryarchaeotes. Specifically, 93% of the clones were identified as marine benthic group-D archaeal phylotype. In contrast to the limited archaeal diversity, 53 phylotypes were detected within 312 bacterial clones. Major bacterial phylotypes were affiliated with α-Proteobacteria (20% of clones), d-Proteobacteria (9%), Planctmycetales (7%), and Cyanobacteria (7%). A small numbers of clones belonging to γ-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, Flavobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia were also found. A total of 53% of the bacterial clones, consisting of 13 phylotypes, could not be classified into any known group. These results indicated that the bacterial community of Lake Nurume-Ike sediment consisted of numerous phylogenetic groups and had a diversity comparable to the diversity of other Antarctic lakes communities previously reported. Interestingly, however, there were very few phylotypes shared between the communities of lakes Nurume-Ike and five other lakes located in the Vestfold Hills area. This is the first comprehensive study to analyze more than 500 16S rDNA clones for microbial community analysis of an Antarctic lake sediment sample, and the results significantly expand current views of bacterial diversity in Antarctic lakes.

  7. Subglacial Lake Vostok (Antarctica accretion ice contains a diverse set of sequences from aquatic, marine and sediment-inhabiting bacteria and eukarya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury M Shtarkman

    Full Text Available Lake Vostok, the 7(th largest (by volume and 4(th deepest lake on Earth, is covered by more than 3,700 m of ice, making it the largest subglacial lake known. The combination of cold, heat (from possible hydrothermal activity, pressure (from the overriding glacier, limited nutrients and complete darkness presents extreme challenges to life. Here, we report metagenomic/metatranscriptomic sequence analyses from four accretion ice sections from the Vostok 5G ice core. Two sections accreted in the vicinity of an embayment on the southwestern end of the lake, and the other two represented part of the southern main basin. We obtained 3,507 unique gene sequences from concentrates of 500 ml of 0.22 µm-filtered accretion ice meltwater. Taxonomic classifications (to genus and/or species were possible for 1,623 of the sequences. Species determinations in combination with mRNA gene sequence results allowed deduction of the metabolic pathways represented in the accretion ice and, by extension, in the lake. Approximately 94% of the sequences were from Bacteria and 6% were from Eukarya. Only two sequences were from Archaea. In general, the taxa were similar to organisms previously described from lakes, brackish water, marine environments, soil, glaciers, ice, lake sediments, deep-sea sediments, deep-sea thermal vents, animals and plants. Sequences from aerobic, anaerobic, psychrophilic, thermophilic, halophilic, alkaliphilic, acidophilic, desiccation-resistant, autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms were present, including a number from multicellular eukaryotes.

  8. Possible Effects on the Stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and Associated Sea-level Rise From Active-Recent Subglacial Volcanism Interpreted from Aeromagnetic and Radar Ice-sounding Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    Aeromagnetic profiles (>10,000 km) acquired in the early 1960s over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) combined with coincident aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding in 1978-79 indicated numerous high-amplitude, shallow-source, magnetic anomalies over a very extensive area of the volcanically active West Antarctic rift system interpreted as caused by subglacial volcanic rocks. These early aerogeophysical surveys defined this area as >500,000 km2. Five-kilometer spaced coincident aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding surveys since 1990 provide three dimensional characterization of the magnetic field and bed topography beneath the ice sheet. These 5-50-km width, semicircular magnetic anomalies range from 100->1000 nT as observed ~1 km over the 2-3 km thick ice. Behrendt et al, (2005, 2008) interpreted these anomalies as indicating >1000 "volcanic centers". requiring high remanent normal (and at least 10% reversed) magnetizations in the present field direction. These data have shown that >80% of the anomaly sources at the bed of the WAIS, have been modified by the moving ice into which they were injected, requiring a younger age than the WAIS (about 25 Ma). Behrendt et al., (1994; 2007) conservatively estimated >1 x 106 km3 volume of volcanic sources to account for the area of the "volcanic center" anomalies. Although exposed volcanoes surrounding the WAIS extend in age to ~34 m.y., Mt Erebus, (Melbourne, (1000 volcanic, magnetic-anomaly sources are active today, or in the recent past, in the drainage area of the WAIS, subglacial volcanism may still have a significant effect on the dynamics of the WAIS. Interpreted active subglacial volcanism is revealed by aerogeophysical data reported by Blankenship et al., (1993, Mt. Casertz), and Corr and Vaughan, (2008, near Hudson Mts.), who raised the question of possible volcanic effects on the regime of the WAIS. Wingham et al. (2009) reported an average rate of volume loss from 2.6 to 10.1 km3/yr from 1995 to 2006 for the Pine

  9. A balanced water layer concept for subglacial hydrology in large-scale ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Goeller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is currently no doubt about the existence of a widespread hydrological network under the Antarctic Ice Sheet, which lubricates the ice base and thus leads to increased ice velocities. Consequently, ice models should incorporate basal hydrology to obtain meaningful results for future ice dynamics and their contribution to global sea level rise. Here, we introduce the balanced water layer concept, covering two prominent subglacial hydrological features for ice sheet modeling on a continental scale: the evolution of subglacial lakes and balance water fluxes. We couple it to the thermomechanical ice-flow model RIMBAY and apply it to a synthetic model domain. In our experiments we demonstrate the dynamic generation of subglacial lakes and their impact on the velocity field of the overlaying ice sheet, resulting in a negative ice mass balance. Furthermore, we introduce an elementary parametrization of the water flux–basal sliding coupling and reveal the predominance of the ice loss through the resulting ice streams against the stabilizing influence of less hydrologically active areas. We point out that established balance flux schemes quantify these effects only partially as their ability to store subglacial water is lacking.

  10. A balanced water layer concept for subglacial hydrology in large scale ice sheet models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeller, S.; Thoma, M.; Grosfeld, K.; Miller, H.

    2012-12-01

    There is currently no doubt about the existence of a wide-spread hydrological network under the Antarctic ice sheet, which lubricates the ice base and thus leads to increased ice velocities. Consequently, ice models should incorporate basal hydrology to obtain meaningful results for future ice dynamics and their contribution to global sea level rise. Here, we introduce the balanced water layer concept, covering two prominent subglacial hydrological features for ice sheet modeling on a continental scale: the evolution of subglacial lakes and balance water fluxes. We couple it to the thermomechanical ice-flow model RIMBAY and apply it to a synthetic model domain inspired by the Gamburtsev Mountains, Antarctica. In our experiments we demonstrate the dynamic generation of subglacial lakes and their impact on the velocity field of the overlaying ice sheet, resulting in a negative ice mass balance. Furthermore, we introduce an elementary parametrization of the water flux-basal sliding coupling and reveal the predominance of the ice loss through the resulting ice streams against the stabilizing influence of less hydrologically active areas. We point out, that established balance flux schemes quantify these effects only partially as their ability to store subglacial water is lacking.

  11. Development and Antarctic Testing of a Maneuverable Probe for Clean In-Situ Analysis and Sampling of Subsurface Ice and Subglacial Aquatic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francke, G.; Dachwald, B.; Kowalski, J.; Digel, I.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Mikucki, J.; Feldmann, M.; Espe, C.; Schöngarth, S.; Hiecker, S.; Blandfort, D.; Schüller, K.; Plescher, E.

    2016-12-01

    There is significant interest in sampling subglacial environments for geochemical and microbiological studies, but those environments are difficult to access. Such environments exist not only on Earth but are also expected beneath the icy crusts of some outer solar system bodies, like the Jovian moon Europa and the Saturnian moon Enceladus. Existing ice drilling technologies make it cumbersome to maintain microbiologically clean access for sample acquisition and environmental stewardship of potentially fragile subglacial aquatic ecosystems. The "IceMole" is a maneuverable subsurface ice probe for clean in-situ analysis and sampling of glacial ice and subglacial materials. The design is based on combining melting and mechanical propulsion, using an ice screw at the tip of the melting head to maintain firm contact between the melting head and the ice. It can change melting direction by differential heating of the melting head and optional side wall heaters. The first two prototypes were successfully tested between 2010 and 2012 on glaciers in Switzerland and Iceland, where they demonstrated downward, horizontal and upward melting, as well as curve driving and dirt layer penetration. Hence, the IceMole allows maneuvers which may be necessary for obstacle avoidance or target selection. Maneuverability, however, necessitates a sophisticated on-board navigation system capable of autonomous operations. Therefore, between 2012 and 2014, a more advanced probe was developed as part of the "Enceladus Explorer" (EnEx) project. The EnEx-IceMole offers systems for relative positioning based on in-ice attitude determination, acoustic positioning, ultrasonic obstacle and target detection, which is all integrated through a high-level sensor fusion. In December 2014, it was used for clean access into a unique subglacial aquatic environment at Blood Falls, Antarctica, where a subglacial brine sample was successfully obtained after about 17 meters of oblique melting. Particular

  12. Chemistry of snow and lake water in Antarctic region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surface snow and lake water samples were collected at different locations around Indian station at Antarctica, Maitri, during December 2004-March 2005 and December 2006-March 2007.Samples were analyzed for major chemical ions. It is found that average pH value of snow is 6.1. Average pH value of lake water with ...

  13. Carbon dynamics modelization and biological community sensitivity to temperature in an oligotrophic freshwater Antarctic lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonio Villaescusa, Juan; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Rochera, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    conditions. Despite this assumption, the model reveals that maritime Antarctic lakes are very sensitive to temperature changes. This response can be monitored using eco-exergy, which allows a description of the system complexity. Due to this temperature sensitivity, the warming occurring in this area would...... food web. This preliminary model aims to describe part of the carbon dynamics, especially for bacterioplankton and associated factors, in this maritime Antarctic lake highly affected by temperature increase linked to regional warming. To describe the system, the effects of the variation of different...... forcing functions influencing the carbon flow within the microbial community, like temperature and irradiance, were studied. Among the studied factors, the sensitivity analysis showed the strongest response of the model to temperature changes. Consumption rates of organic matter by bacterioplankton...

  14. Lipophilic pigments from the benthos of a perennially ice-covered Antarctic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, A. C.; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Cronin, S. E.; Des Marais, D. J.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    The benthos of a perennially ice-covered Antarctic lake, Lake Hoare, contained three distinct 'signatures' of lipophilic pigments. Cyanobacterial mats found in the moat at the periphery of the lake were dominated by the carotenoid myxoxanthophyll; carotenoids: chlorophyll a ratios in this high light environment ranged from 3 to 6.8. Chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin, pigments typical of golden-brown algae, were found at 10 to 20 m depths where the benthos is aerobic. Anaerobic benthic sediments at 20 to 30 m depths were characterized by a third pigment signature dominated by a carotenoid, tentatively identified as alloxanthin from planktonic cryptomonads, and by phaeophytin b from senescent green algae. Pigments were not found associated with alternating organic and sediment layers. As microzooplankton grazers are absent from this closed system and transformation rates are reduced at low temperatures, the benthos beneath the lake ice appears to contain a record of past phytoplankton blooms undergoing decay.

  15. Occurrence and diversity of Legionellaceae in polar lakes of the Antarctic peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fábio R S; Nastasi, Fernando R; Gamba, Rosa C; Foronda, Annette S; Pellizari, Vivian H

    2008-10-01

    Legionellaceae is a family of gram-negative, mesophilic, and facultative intracellular parasitic bacteria that inhabits freshwater environments. In this article, the Legionella population of water samples from the North and South Lake, located close to the Brazilian Scientific Station on King George Island, Keller Peninsula, Antarctica has been characterized. Culture onto selective medium and a independent-culture method were applied to the samples. In our attempt to isolate Legionella species from Antarctic lakes, we were able to obtain one L. pneumophila colony by an amoebic coculture procedure followed by plate culture onto a selective medium. In addition, results obtained from phylogenetic inference showed the presence of noncharacterized specimens of Legionella spp. These findings indicated the presence of legionellae in Antarctica and suggest that these bacteria can adapt to extreme conditions and open new possibilities for understanding the survival strategies of mesophilic Legionellaceae living in Antarctic environments. Furthermore, the isolation of these symbiotic bacteria in Antarctic lakes will allow future studies on cold-resistant mechanisms of legionellae in polar environments.

  16. Plectolyngbya hodgsonii: a novel filamentous cyanobacterium from Antarctic lakes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taton, A.; Wilmotte, A.; Šmarda, J.; Elster, Josef; Komárek, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2011), 181-191 ISSN 0722-4060 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/05/0253 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Antarctica * benthos of lake * cyanobacteria Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.659, year: 2011

  17. Shallow-source aeromagnetic anomalies observed over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet compared with coincident bed topography from radar ice sounding - New evidence for glacial "removal" of subglacially erupted late Cenozoic rift-related volcanic edifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, John C.; Blankenship, D.D.; Morse, D.L.; Bell, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    Aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding results from the 1991-1997 Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey over part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and subglacial area of the volcanically active West Antarctic rift system have enabled detailed examination of specific anomaly sources. These anomalies, previously interpreted as caused by late Cenozoic subglacial volcanic centers, are compared to newly available glacial bed-elevation data from the radar ice sounding compilation of the entire area of the aeromagnetic survey to test this hypothesis in detail. We examined about 1000 shallow-source magnetic anomalies for bedrock topographic expression. Using very conservative criteria, we found over 400 specific anomalies which correlate with bed topography directly beneath each anomaly. We interpret these anomalies as indicative of the relative abundance of volcanic anomalies having shallow magnetic sources. Of course, deeper source magnetic anomalies are present, but these have longer wavelengths, lower gradients and mostly lower amplitudes from those caused by the highly magnetic late Cenozoic volcanic centers. The great bulk of these >400 (40-1200-nT) anomaly sources at the base of the ice have low bed relief (60-600 m, with about 80%10 million years ago. Eighteen of the anomalies examined, about half concentrated in the area of the WAIS divide, have high-topographic expression (as great as 400 m above sea level) and high bed relief (up to 1500 m). All of these high-topography anomaly sources at the base of the ice would isostatically rebound to elevations above sea level were the ice removed. We interpret these 18 anomaly sources as evidence of subaerial eruption of volcanoes whose topography was protected from erosion by competent volcanic flows similar to prominent volcanic peaks that are exposed above the surface of the WAIS. Further, we infer these volcanoes as possibly erupted at a time when the WAIS was absent. In contrast, at the other extreme

  18. Chemoautotrophic Bacterial Production in the Redoxycline of an Ice-Covered Antarctic Lake (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, J.; Kong, W.; Priscu, J. C.; Morgan-Kiss, R.

    2010-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic organisms obtain energy for growth from inorganic substrates and use simple inorganic carbon molecules to construct biomass. As such, chemosynthetic processes are tightly linked to biogeochemical cycles. In polar regions, winter darkness shuts down photosynthetic inputs and the contribution of chemosynthesis to total ecosystem energetics and carbon fixation may be significant. Few reports exist on chemosynthesis in polar environments and the rates of these processes remain largely unexplored. Here we present data on chemoautotrophic activity in the redoxycline (~15m depth) of the permanently ice-covered Lake Bonney in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica (MCM). Rates of radio-labeled bicarbonate incorporation were measured under light and dark conditions using whole community and bacterial sized-fraction (real time PCR from samples collected throughout the trophogenic zones of the west and east lobes of Lake Bonney confirmed that chemotrophic bacteria harboring form II RubisCO are restricted to depths at or below the redoxycline of the west lobe. These data provide insight into the structure-function relationship between the microbial consortia and carbon budget and imply that chemoautotrophic production in the MCM may provide a significant source of previously un-quantified fixed carbon to the lake system. Studies on other icy systems, including dark, isolated subglacial environments report evidence for chemolithoautotrophy suggesting that chemoautotrophic production can sustain microbial carbon requirements in subice environments and may play a significant role in net carbon-fixation in polar systems.

  19. Extensive lake sediment coring survey on Sub-Antarctic Indian Ocean Kerguelen Archipelago (French Austral and Antarctic Lands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Fabien; Fanget, Bernard; Malet, Emmanuel; Poulenard, Jérôme; Støren, Eivind; Leloup, Anouk; Bakke, Jostein; Sabatier, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Recent paleo-studies revealed climatic southern high latitude climate evolution patterns that are crucial to understand the global climate evolution(1,2). Among others the strength and north-south shifts of westerlies wind appeared to be a key parameter(3). However, virtually no lands are located south of the 45th South parallel between Southern Georgia (60°W) and New Zealand (170°E) precluding the establishment of paleoclimate records of past westerlies dynamics. Located around 50°S and 70°E, lost in the middle of the sub-Antarctic Indian Ocean, Kerguelen archipelago is a major, geomorphologically complex, land-mass that is covered by hundreds lakes of various sizes. It hence offers a unique opportunity to reconstruct past climate and environment dynamics in a region where virtually nothing is known about it, except the remarkable recent reconstructions based on a Lateglacial peatbog sequence(4). During the 2014-2015 austral summer, a French-Norwegian team led the very first extensive lake sediment coring survey on Kerguelen Archipelago under the umbrella of the PALAS program supported by the French Polar Institute (IPEV). Two main areas were investigated: i) the southwest of the mainland, so-called Golfe du Morbihan, where glaciers are currently absent and ii) the northernmost Kerguelen mainland peninsula so-called Loranchet, where cirque glaciers are still present. This double-target strategy aims at reconstructing various independent indirect records of precipitation (glacier advance, flood dynamics) and wind speed (marine spray chemical species, wind-borne terrigenous input) to tackle the Holocene climate variability. Despite particularly harsh climate conditions and difficult logistics matters, we were able to core 6 lake sediment sites: 5 in Golfe du Morbihan and one in Loranchet peninsula. Among them two sequences taken in the 4km-long Lake Armor using a UWITEC re-entry piston coring system by 20 and 100m water-depth (6 and 7m-long, respectively). One

  20. Unveiling subglacial geology and crustal architecture in the Recovery frontier of East Antarctica with recent aeromagnetic and airborne gravity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, F.; Forsberg, R.; Jordan, T. A.; Matsuoka, K.; Olsen, A.; King, O.; Ghidella, M.

    2014-12-01

    underlie the giant Recovery subglacial lakes and compare these with the rift basins of the East Antarctic Rift System, which have been proposed to host other major subglacial lakes, such as Lake Vostok, Lake 90E and Lake Sovetskaya.

  1. Diversity and pharmaceutical screening of fungi from benthic mats of Antarctic lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunati, Mara; Rojas, Jose Luis; Sponga, Federica; Ciciliato, Ismaela; Losi, Daniele; Göttlich, Elke; de Hoog, Sybren; Genilloud, Olga; Marinelli, Flavia

    2009-03-01

    During the MICROMAT project, the fungal diversity of microbial mats growing in the benthic environment of Antarctic lakes was accessed for the discovery of novel antibiotics and anticancers. In all, 160 filamentous fungi belonging to fifteen different genera and 171 yeasts were isolated from 11 lakes, classified and cultivated in different media and at different temperatures. Filamentous fungi were then screened to discover novel antimicrobial and cytotoxic compounds. A total of 1422 extracts were prepared by solid phase extraction of the culture broths or by biomass solvent extraction. 47 (29%) filamentous fungi showed antimicrobial activity; most of them inhibited the growth of gram-positive Staphyloccus aureus (14%), gram-negative E. coli (10%), and of yeasts Candida albicans (11%) and Cryptococcus neoformans (8%). Less activity was detected against representatives of enterobacteria and filamentous fungi. The most productive in terms of bioactivities were cold-tolerant cosmopolitan hyphomycetes such as Penicillium, Aspergillus, Beauveria and Cladosporium. Two bioactive bis-anthraquinones (rugulosin and skyrin) were identified by LC-MS as the main products in a strain of Penicillium chrysogenum isolated from a saline lake in the Vestfold Hills. LC-MS fractionation of extracts from two diverse species of Aspergillus, that exhibited relatively potent antimicrobial activities, evidenced a chemical novelty that was further investigated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of new antibiotics produced by fungi from benthic microbial mats from Antarctic lakes. It can be concluded that these microbial assemblages represent an extremely rich source for the isolation of new strains producing novel bioactive metabolites with the potential to be developed as drugs.

  2. Ecological studies of aquatic moss pillars in Antarctic lakes 1. Macro structure and carbon, nitrogen and Chlorophyll a contents

    OpenAIRE

    Kudoh,Sakae; Tsuchiya,Yasutaka; Ayukawa,Eri; Imura,Satoshi; Kanda,Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Structures of a typical 'moss pillar' submerged in Antarctic lakes were investigated to analyze the sizes, age distribution, and composition such as shoot density, dry weight, carbon, nitrogen and chlorophyll a using a sample collected from lake B-4 Ike in the Skarvsnes region, East Antarctica. The moss pillar was mainly composed of shoots of a moss species, Leptobryum sp. Most of the green shoots of the species were located at the top surface of the pillar, and brownish old shoots with promi...

  3. Geodetic observations of ice flow velocities over the southern part of subglacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica, and their glaciological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Jens; Dietrich, Reinhard; Fritsche, Mathias; Wendt, Anja; Yuskevich, Alexander; Kokhanov, Andrey; Senatorov, Anton; Lukin, Valery; Shibuya, Kazuo; Doi, Koichiro

    2006-09-01

    In the austral summer seasons 2001/02 and 2002/03, Global Positioning System (GPS) data were collected in the vicinity of Vostok Station to determine ice flow velocities over Lake Vostok. Ten GPS sites are located within a radius of 30km around Vostok Station on floating ice as well as on grounded ice to the east and to the west of the lake. Additionally, a local deformation network around the ice core drilling site 5G-1 was installed. The derived ice flow velocity for Vostok Station is 2.00ma-1 +/- 0.01ma-1. Along the flowline of Vostok Station an extension rate of about 10-5a-1 (equivalent to 1cm km-1 a-1) was determined. This significant velocity gradient results in a new estimate of 28700 years for the transit time of an ice particle along the Vostok flowline from the bedrock ridge in the southwest of the lake to the eastern shoreline. With these lower velocities compared to earlier studies and, hence, larger transit times the basal accretion rate is estimated to be 4mma-1 along a portion of the Vostok flowline. An assessment of the local accretion rate at Vostok Station using the observed geodetic quantities yields an accretion rate in the same order of magnitude. Furthermore, the comparison of our geodetic observations with results inferred from ice-penetrating radar data indicates that the ice flow may not have changed significantly for several thousand years.

  4. Tardigrade eggs and exuviae in Antarctic lake sediments: insights into Holocene dynamics and origins of the fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J. MCINNES

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The preservation of tardigrade eggs and exuviae in Antarctic lake sediments provided an opportunity to assess post-glacial colonisation and Holocene tardigrade dynamics on the southern continent. Tardigrade eggs were recovered from five lakes, two from the maritime Antarctic and three from continental Antarctica. Eggs were identified from the following species: Dactylobiotus cf. ambiguus, Macrobiotus furciger, Macrobiotus blocki, Minibiotus weinerorum and Acutuncus antarcticus. Other, unornamented eggs were also observed. The preservation of some of these eggs in exuviae allowed identification to at least genus. Significant variations were observed in egg abundance within the sediment of each lake, and in one lake a species (Dactylobiotus cf. ambiguus became locally extinct, probably as the result of penguin-associated eutrophication. Tardigrades generally did not become abundant for a considerable period after the lakes’ formation. The presence of an in-part endemic fauna is consistent with slow colonisation from Antarctic sources rather than wind transport from extra-continental sites. Tardigrade eggs appear to be abundant in high-latitude lake sediments, and greater use could be made of these records when evaluating tardigrade dynamics during the Holocene.

  5. Inferring the tectonic setting of the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mts by ice cap surface lineaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfarra, Paola; Salvini, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    Gamburtsev Subglacial Mts (GSM) are by far one of the most puzzling physiographic feature of the East Antactic craton. Located at the centre of the Antarctic continent and beneath the highest point of East Antarctic Ice Sheet (Dome A) they were discovered during the 1957-58 International Geophysical Year by a Soviet expedition using seismic instruments to measure the thickness of the ice sheet. This intracratonic mountain range is characterised by peaks with elevation exceeding 3500 m and covers an area bigger than the European Alps. The GSM were the target of a huge international geophysical expedition during the 2008-2009 summer season with the aim of revealing the geologic nature and origin of this mountain range, as well as to further understand the tectonic setting of two of the largest Antarctic subglacial lakes bounding to the East and to the West the GSM, namely the Vostok and Recovery lakes. Preliminary results of this international scientific campaign have been presented to the scientific community and showed that the GSM are characterised by a typical alpine landscape with a rectangular hydrographic network. These morphological features are commonly associated to recent/active tectonics. At present, four scenarios exists to explain the existence of such intracratonic mountain range: (i) a hot-spot beneath the Antarctic crust, in a Hoggar-like mantle plume scenario; (ii) a continental collision (of unknown age) similarly to the Alpine orogenic belt; (iii) a rifting process associated to flexural uplift or isostatic rebound of the rift shoulder, in a Transantarctic Mts like scenario or similarly to the mountains along the edges of the East African rift lakes; and (iv) a continental arching related to regional, continental-scale stress like the Black Hills in the North America continent or the russian platform arching located NE of Moscow. These geodynamic scenarios are characterised by different morpho-tectonic signatures that can be successfully

  6. Disclosing Precambrian Secrets of the East Antarctic Shield: An Aeromagnetic Perspective from the International Polar Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, C.; Damaske, D.; Ferraccioli, F.; Studinger, M.; Jordan, T. A.; Rose, K.; Block, A. E.; Frearson, N.; Bell, R. E.; Golynsky, A.

    2009-12-01

    Until this International Polar Year, the geology of the central East Antarctic Precambrian shield has remained largely undisclosed. New aeromagnetic data over the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains, combined with previous surveys, reveal fundamental geologic features beneath the East Antarctic Ice sheet, critical to understanding Precambrian continental growth processes. Linear magnetic anomalies in the Prince Charles Mountains region relate to ~1 Ga orthogneiss and charnockite and extend to the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains over a distance >1000 km, suggesting that these two areas were adjacent to each other by ~1 Ga. However, the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains anomalies differ from those over Lake Vostok, the central Transantarctic Mountains and the South Pole, implying the presence of multiple distinct Precambrian crustal blocks. Most of the anomalies are similar to those caused by Precambrian granite-greenstone and Proterozoic igneous belts worldwide, suggesting that many of the crustal blocks in East Antarctica have not been significantly deformed since the Precambrian except in broad regions along the perimeter of the shield. In contrast with previous ideas of a single craton, the East Antarctic shield consists of several small blocks defined by the variability in the magnetic anomalies.

  7. Anatomy of a meltwater drainage system beneath the ancestral East Antarctic ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Lauren M.; Anderson, John B.; Greenwood, Sarah L.; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Prothro, Lindsay O.; Halberstadt, Anna Ruth W.; Stearns, Leigh A.; Pollard, David; Deconto, Robert M.

    2017-09-01

    Subglacial hydrology is critical to understand the behaviour of ice sheets, yet active meltwater drainage beneath contemporary ice sheets is rarely accessible to direct observation. Using geophysical and sedimentological data from the deglaciated western Ross Sea, we identify a palaeo-subglacial hydrological system active beneath an area formerly covered by the East Antarctic ice sheet. A long channel network repeatedly delivered meltwater to an ice stream grounding line and was a persistent pathway for episodic meltwater drainage events. Embayments within grounding-line landforms coincide with the location of subglacial channels, marking reduced sedimentation and restricted landform growth. Consequently, channelized drainage at the grounding line influenced the degree to which these landforms could provide stability feedbacks to the ice stream. The channel network was connected to upstream subglacial lakes in an area of geologically recent rifting and volcanism, where elevated heat flux would have produced sufficient basal melting to fill the lakes over decades to several centuries; this timescale is consistent with our estimates of the frequency of drainage events at the retreating grounding line. Based on these data, we hypothesize that ice stream dynamics in this region were sensitive to the underlying hydrological system.

  8. High geothermal heat flux measured below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Andrew T; Mankoff, Kenneth D; Tulaczyk, Slawek M; Tyler, Scott W; Foley, Neil

    2015-07-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow, and mass balance of ice sheets, but measurements of this parameter are difficult to make in ice-covered regions. We report the first direct measurement of geothermal heat flux into the base of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), below Subglacial Lake Whillans, determined from the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of sediment under the lake. The heat flux at this site is 285 ± 80 mW/m(2), significantly higher than the continental and regional averages estimated for this site using regional geophysical and glaciological models. Independent temperature measurements in the ice indicate an upward heat flux through the WAIS of 105 ± 13 mW/m(2). The difference between these heat flux values could contribute to basal melting and/or be advected from Subglacial Lake Whillans by flowing water. The high geothermal heat flux may help to explain why ice streams and subglacial lakes are so abundant and dynamic in this region.

  9. Diversity of proteolytic microbes isolated from Antarctic freshwater lakes and characteristics of their cold-active proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mihoko; Kawamata, Akinori; Kosugi, Makiko; Imura, Satoshi; Kurosawa, Norio

    2017-09-01

    Despite being an extreme environment, the water temperature of freshwater lakes in Antarctica reaches 10 °C in summer, accelerating biological activity. In these environments, proteolytic microbial decomposers may play a large role in protein hydrolysis. We isolated 71 microbial strains showing proteolytic activity at 4 °C from three Antarctic freshwater lakes. They were classified as bacteria (63 isolates) and eukaryotes (8 isolates). The bacterial isolates were classified into the genera Flavobacterium (28 isolates), Pseudomonas (14 isolates), Arthrobacter (10 isolates), Psychrobacter (7 isolates), Cryobacterium (2 isolates), Hymenobacter (1 isolate), and Polaromonas (1 isolate). Five isolates of Flavobacterium and one of Hymenobacter seemed to belong to novel species. All eukaryotic isolates belonged to Glaciozyma antarctica, a psychrophilic yeast species originally isolated from the Weddell Sea near the Joinville Island, Antarctica. A half of representative strains were psychrophilic and did not grow at temperatures above 25 °C. The protease secreted by Pseudomonas prosekii strain ANS4-1 showed the highest activity among all proteases from representative isolates. The results of inhibitor tests indicated that nearly all the isolates secreted metalloproteases. Proteases from four representative isolates retained more than 30% maximal activity at 0 °C. These results expand our knowledge about microbial protein degradation in Antarctic freshwater lakes.

  10. Ice-dammed lateral lake and epishelf lake insights into Holocene dynamics of Marguerite Trough Ice Stream and George VI Ice Shelf, Alexander Island, Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Bethan J.; Hambrey, Michael J.; Glasser, Neil F.; Holt, Tom; Rodés, Angél; Smellie, John L.; Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Blockley, Simon P. E.

    2017-12-01

    We present new data regarding the past dynamics of Marguerite Trough Ice Stream, George VI Ice Shelf and valley glaciers from Ablation Point Massif on Alexander Island, Antarctic Peninsula. This ice-free oasis preserves a geological record of ice stream lateral moraines, ice-dammed lakes, ice-shelf moraines and valley glacier moraines, which we dated using cosmogenic nuclide ages. We provide one of the first detailed sediment-landform assemblage descriptions of epishelf lake shorelines. Marguerite Trough Ice Stream imprinted lateral moraines against eastern Alexander Island at 120 m at Ablation Point Massif. During deglaciation, lateral lakes formed in the Ablation and Moutonnée valleys, dammed against the ice stream in George VI Sound. Exposure ages from boulders on these shorelines yielded ages of 13.9 to 9.7 ka. Following recession of the ice stream, George VI Ice Shelf formed in George VI Sound. An epishelf lake formed at 15-20 m asl in Ablation and Moutonnée valleys, dated from 9.4 to 4.6 ka, suggesting that the lake was stable and persistent for some 5000 years. Lake-level lowering occurred after this, with the lake level at 12 m at 3.1 ± 0.4 ka and at 5 m asl today. A readvance of the valley glaciers on Alexander Island at 4.4 ± 0.7 ka is recorded by valley glacier moraines overlying epishelf lake sediments. We speculate that the glacier readvance, which occurred during a period of warmth, may have been caused by a dynamic response of the glaciers to a lowering in surface elevation of George VI Ice Shelf.

  11. Revealing past environmental changes on the Antarctic Peninsula by analyzing high resolution sedimentary records from Lake Esmeralda, Vega Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Píšková, Anna; Nývlt, Daniel; Roman, Matěj; Lirio, Juan Manuel; Kopalová, Kateřina

    2017-04-01

    Topographically and climatically, the environment of the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) differs significantly from Continental Antarctica. The AP forms an unbroken chain of rugged, alpine topography, which forms a climatic barrier separating the warmer Bellingshausen Sea on the western coast from the colder Weddell Sea on the east. The AP has experienced one of the highest temperature increases on Earth in the second half of the 20th century as a response to the ongoing global warming (Turner et al., 2005). However, the last decade was colder and a significant decrease in air temperature was detected especially in the north-eastern part of the AP (Turner et al., 2016; Oliva et al., 2017). The extreme sensitivity of the area to climate change represents exceptional potential for AP palaeoclimatic records either from marine, lacustrine, or ice cores. We have analysed several sedimentary cores from yet unstudied Lake Esmeralda, which was formed as a result of the last deglaciation during the Pleistocene/Holocene transition. We here focus on the longest (177 cm) core that could record environmental changes of the past millennia. In order to describe both inorganic and organic components of the sediment we used a combination of the following methods: XRF, XRD, magnetic susceptibility measurement, chemical analysis for determination of cation exchange capacity, grain size analysis, geochemical analysis (TIC, TOC, TS), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and diatom community analysis. This combination of methods gave us an insight in the past environmental changes in the lake catchment as well as in the lake body. More specifically it enabled us to define periods of enhanced weathering and to distinguish colder and warmer phases. The preliminary results will be completed with age-depth model resulting in a high resolution multi-proxy record that will contribute to a better, more detailed picture of the past climatic and environmental changes in the north-eastern AP

  12. Seismic Tremor Reveals Subglacial Discharge at Tidewater Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Larsen, C. F.; O'Neel, S.; West, M. E.; Amundson, J. M.; Walter, J. I.; Catania, G. A.; Stearns, L. A.; Walker, R. T.; Sutherland, D.; Shroyer, E.; Nash, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Subglacial discharge from the termini of tidewater glaciers drives submarine terminus melting, influences fjord circulation, erodes and redeposits subglacial sediment, and is a central component of proglacial marine ecosystems. The timing and variability of subglacial discharge can also exert a strong influence on the upstream flow of tidewater glaciers through hydrology-mediated changes in basal motion. However, a lack of observations of subglacial discharge at the ice-ocean interface hinders progress in understanding these processes and contributes to some of the largest uncertainties in sea level rise projections. Here we demonstrate that passive seismic observations collected adjacent to glaciers can meet this observational need. At tidewater and lake-terminating glaciers in Alaska and Greenland, we observe hourly to seasonal variations in low-amplitude, background seismic noise, termed glacio-hydraulic tremor. Variations in tremor amplitude correlate with discharge during the drainage of a glacially-dammed lake and reveal increases in discharge efficiency over the course of the melt season. Recordings of glacio-hydraulic tremor across a range of settings suggest widespread utility for our method. Reliable prediction of future sea level rise requires observations of subglacial discharge that elicit physical insight and can validate models. Our findings provide a platform for new understanding of ice-ocean interactions and related oceanographic, geologic, and ecological disciplines.

  13. When a habitat freezes solid: Microorganisms over-winter within the ice column of a coastal Antarctic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, C.M.; Dieser, M.; Greenwood, M.; Cory, R.M.; Laybourn-Parry, J.; Lisle, J.T.; Jaros, C.; Miller, P.L.; Chin, Y.-P.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2011-01-01

    A major impediment to understanding the biology of microorganisms inhabiting Antarctic environments is the logistical constraint of conducting field work primarily during the summer season. However, organisms that persist throughout the year encounter severe environmental changes between seasons. In an attempt to bridge this gap, we collected ice core samples from Pony Lake in early November 2004 when the lake was frozen solid to its base, providing an archive for the biological and chemical processes that occurred during winter freezeup. The ice contained bacteria and virus-like particles, while flagellated algae and ciliates over-wintered in the form of inactive cysts and spores. Both bacteria and algae were metabolically active in the ice core melt water. Bacterial production ranged from 1.8 to 37.9??gCL-1day-1. Upon encountering favorable growth conditions in the melt water, primary production ranged from 51 to 931??gCL-1day-1. Because of the strong H2S odor and the presence of closely related anaerobic organisms assigned to Pony Lake bacterial 16S rRNA gene clones, we hypothesize that the microbial assemblage was strongly affected by oxygen gradients, which ultimately restricted the majority of phylotypes to distinct strata within the ice column. This study provides evidence that the microbial community over-winters in the ice column of Pony Lake and returns to a highly active metabolic state when spring melt is initiated. ?? 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  14. Organo-mineral imprints in fossil cyanobacterial mats of an Antarctic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaux, E.; Lepot, K.; Deremiens, L.; Namsaraev, Z.; Compere, P.; Gerard, E.; Verleyen, E.; Tavernier, I.; Hodgson, D.; Vyverman, W.; Wilmotte, A.

    2010-12-01

    Lacustrine microbial mats in Antarctic ice-free oases are considered to be modern analogues of early microbial ecosystems because they are dominated by cyanobacteria that need to cope with elevated UV radiation during summer by producing protective compounds such as UV-screening pigments. These microbial consortia offer a unique opportunity to (i) identify biogeochemical signatures to study the fossil record of microorganisms, and (ii) better understand their imprint mineral record. We studied sediment cores from a meromictic brackish-water lake, Kobachi Ike, Skarvsnes Peninsula, Lützow Holm Bay, East Antarctica, where primary production is dominated by photosynthetic benthic communities. The faintly to finely laminated (stromatolitic) sediments include variable amounts of organic-rich laminae, micritic carbonate, clays and silicate sand. We studied the microstructure and chemistry of organo-mineral associations in a suite of sediments ranging in age from several tens to ca. 3500 years. We examined Os- and U- stained polished resin-embedded sediments in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). We imaged photosynthetic pigments of microorganisms in fluorescence by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). We analyzed organic matter chemistry in demineralized sediments and cultured cyanobacteria using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy. Molecular analyses of fossil cyanobacterial DNA were performed using Denaturating Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of partial 16S rRNA genes and sequencing. SEM revealed an intimate association between nanostructured Ca-carbonate peloids, fossil cell clusters resembling colonies of unicellular coccoid cyanobacteria, and cell-like imprints preserved in nanocarbonates. Diffuse organic matter (kerogen or EPS) is associated with nanoclays to form a laminae-building network around the carbonates. These organo-mineral microstructures strongly resemble those of the 2.7 Gyrs old Tumbiana stromatolites. CLSM imaging and fossil DNA

  15. Study of the Microbial Diversity of a Newly Discovered East Antarctic Freshwater Lake, L27C, and of a Perennially Ice-Covered Lake Untersee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jonathan P.; Hoover, Richard B.; Andersen, Dale; Bej, Asim K.

    2010-01-01

    The microbial communities that reside within freshwater lakes of Schirmacher and Untersee Oases in East Antarctica must cope with extreme conditions that may include cold temperature, annual freeze-thaw cycles, exposure to UV radiation, especially during the austral summer months, low light beneath thick ice-cover, followed by seasonal darkness. The objective of this study was to assess the microbial biodiversity and distribution from samples taken from two freshwater lakes (L27C and Lake Untersee) that were collected during the Tawani 2008 International Antarctic Expedition that conducted research in this region of Antarctica. L27C is a small, previously unreported lake residing 2 km WNW of Maitri Station at Schirmacher Oasis. Biodiversity and distribution of microorganisms within the lake were studied using both culture-independent and culture-dependent methodologies based upon the analysis of eubacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Lake Untersee, a perennially ice-covered, ultra-oligotrophic, lake in the Otto-von-Gruber-Gebirge (Gruber Mountains) of central Dronning Maud Land was also sampled and the microbial diversity was analyzed by eubacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences derived from pure cultures. Direct culturing of water samples from each lake on separate R2A growth medium exhibited a variety of microorganisms including: Janthinobacterium, Hymenobacter, Sphingamonas, Subtercola, Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Polaromonas, Rhodoferax and Duganella. The evaluation of samples from L27C through culture-independent methodology identified a rich microbial diversity consisting of six different phyla of bacteria. The culture-independent analysis also displayed the majority of bacteria (56%) belonged to the Class gamma-proteobacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria. Within the Class gamma-proteobacteria, Acinetobacter dominated (48%) the total microbial load. Overall, L27C exhibited 7 different phyla of bacteria and 20 different genera. Statistical analysis

  16. Stable isotopic biogeochemistry of carbon and nitrogen in a perennially ice-covered Antarctic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, R. A. Jr; Lyons, W. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Lake Hoare (77 degrees 38' S, 162 degrees 53' E) is an amictic, oligotrophic, 34-m-deep, closed-basin lake in Taylor Valley, Antarctica. Its perennial ice cover minimizes wind-generated currents and reduces light penetration, as well as restricts sediment deposition into the lake and the exchange of atmospheric gases between the water column and the atmosphere. The biological community of Lake Hoare consists solely of microorganisms -- both planktonic populations and benthic microbial mats. Lake Hoare is one of several perennially ice-covered lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys that represent the end-member conditions of cold desert and saline lakes. The dry valley lakes provide a unique opportunity to examine lacustrine processes that operate at all latitudes, but under an extreme set of environmental conditions. The dry valley lakes may also offer a valuable record of catchment and global changes in the past and present. Furthermore, these lakes are modern-day equivalents of periglacial lakes that are likely to have been common during periods of glacial maxima at temperate latitudes. We have analyzed the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of Lake Hoare for delta 13C and the organic matter of the sediments and sediment-trap material for delta 13C and delta 15N. The delta 13C of the DIC indicates that 12C is differentially removed in the shallow, oxic portions of the lake via photosynthesis. In the anoxic portions of the lake (27-34 m) a net addition of 12C to the DIC pool occurs via organic matter decomposition. The dissolution of CaCO3 at depth also contributes to the DIC pool. Except near the Canada Glacier where a substantial amount of allochthonous organic matter enters the lake, the organic carbon being deposited on the lake bottom at different sites is isotopically similar, suggesting an autochthonous source for the organic carbon. Preliminary inorganic carbon flux calculations suggest that a high percentage of the organic carbon fixed in the water column is

  17. Modeling Subglacial Permafrost Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutnik, M. R.; Marshall, S.

    2002-12-01

    Permanently frozen ground was present both beneath and peripheral to the Quaternary ice sheets. In areas where the ice sheet grew or advanced over permafrost, the ice sheet insulated the ground, leading to subglacial permafrost degradation. This has created distinct signatures of ice sheet occupation in the Canadian north and in Alaska during the last glacial period, with greatly diminished permafrost thickness in regions that were ice covered for an extended period. In contrast, areas peripheral to the ice sheet, including the Midwest United States, were cooled by the glacial climate conditions and the regional cooling influence of the ice sheet, leading to permafrost growth. We have developed a sub- and proglacial diffusion based permafrost model that utilizes a logarithmic grid transformation to more efficiently track the changing depth of permafrost with time. This model is coupled with the ice sheet thermodynamic model of Marshall and Clarke [1997a] to explore the geologic signatures of the last glacial cycle in North America. This offers the potential for new constraints on modeled ice sheet history. Preliminary model runs show that the overlying ice sheet has a significant effect on the underlying and peripheral permafrost degradation and formation. Subglacial permafrost is also important because its evolution influences the basal temperature of the ice sheet, critical for evolution of subglacial hydrology and fast flow instabilities (e.g. ice streams). We present results of permafrost conditions under the last glacial maximum ice sheet and the effect of permafrost on basal temperature evolution through the last glacial cycle in North America. Marshall, S. J. and G. K. C. Clarke, 1997a. J. Geophys. Res., 102 (B9), 20,599-20,614.

  18. Modular community structure suggests metabolic plasticity during the transition to polar night in ice-covered Antarctic lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick-Majors, Trista J; Priscu, John C; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2014-04-01

    High-latitude environments, such as the Antarctic McMurdo Dry Valley lakes, are subject to seasonally segregated light-dark cycles, which have important consequences for microbial diversity and function on an annual basis. Owing largely to the logistical difficulties of sampling polar environments during the darkness of winter, little is known about planktonic microbial community responses to the cessation of photosynthetic primary production during the austral sunset, which lingers from approximately February to April. Here, we hypothesized that changes in bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic community structure, particularly shifts in favor of chemolithotrophs and mixotrophs, would manifest during the transition to polar night. Our work represents the first concurrent molecular characterization, using 454 pyrosequencing of hypervariable regions of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene, of bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic communities in permanently ice-covered lakes Fryxell and Bonney, before and during the polar night transition. We found vertically stratified populations that varied at the community and/or operational taxonomic unit-level between lakes and seasons. Network analysis based on operational taxonomic unit level interactions revealed nonrandomly structured microbial communities organized into modules (groups of taxa) containing key metabolic potential capacities, including photoheterotrophy, mixotrophy and chemolithotrophy, which are likely to be differentially favored during the transition to polar night.

  19. Air and shipborne magnetic surveys of the Antarctic into the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golynsky, A.; Bell, R.; Blankenship, D.; Damaske, D.; Ferraccioli, F.; Finn, C.; Golynsky, D.; Ivanov, S.; Jokat, W.; Masolov, V.; Riedel, S.; von Frese, R.; Young, D.

    2013-02-01

    The Antarctic geomagnetics' community remains very active in crustal anomaly mapping. More than 1.5 million line-km of new air- and shipborne data have been acquired over the past decade by the international community in Antarctica. These new data together with surveys that previously were not in the public domain significantly upgrade the ADMAP compilation. Aeromagnetic flights over East Antarctica have been concentrated in the Transantarctic Mountains, the Prince Charles Mountains - Lambert Glacier area, and western Dronning Maud Land (DML) — Coats Land. Additionally, surveys were conducted over Lake Vostok and the western part of Marie Byrd Land by the US Support Office for Aerogeophysical Research projects and over the Amundsen Sea Embayment during the austral summer of 2004/2005 by a collaborative US/UK aerogeophysical campaign. New aeromagnetic data over the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (120,000 line-km), acquired within the IPY Antarctica's Gamburtsev Province project reveal fundamental geologic features beneath the East Antarctic Ice sheet critical to understanding Precambrian continental growth processes. Roughly 100,000 line-km of magnetic data obtained within the International Collaboration for Exploration of the Cryosphere through Aerogeophysical Profiling promises to shed light on subglacial lithology and identify crustal boundaries for the central Antarctic Plate. Since the 1996/97 season, the Alfred Wegener Institute has collected 90,000 km of aeromagnetic data along a 1200 km long segment of the East Antarctic coast over western DML. Recent cruises by Australian, German, Japanese, Russian, British, and American researchers have contributed to long-standing studies of the Antarctic continental margin. Along the continental margin of East Antarctica west of Maud Rise to the George V Coast of Victoria Land, the Russian Polar Marine Geological Research Expedition and Geoscience Australia obtained 80,000 and 20,000 line-km, respectively, of

  20.  Marine derived dinoflagellates in Antarctic saline lakes: Community composition and annual dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rengefors, K.; Layborn-Parry, L.; Logares, R.

    2008-01-01

    The saline lakes of the Vestfold Hills in Antarctica offer a remarkable natural laboratory where the adaptation of planktonic protists to a range of evolving physiochemical conditions can be investigated. This study illustrates how an ancestral marine community has undergone radical simplification...... polar dinoflagellate community, and not freshwater species. Polarella glacialis Montresor, Procaccini et Stoecker, a bipolar marine species, was for the first time described in a lake habitat and was an important phototrophic component in the higher salinity lakes. In the brackish lakes, we found a new...

  1. Paleo ice flow and subglacial meltwater dynamics in Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. O. Nitsche

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence for an elaborate subglacial drainage network underneath modern Antarctic ice sheets suggests that basal meltwater has an important influence on ice stream flow. Swath bathymetry surveys from previously glaciated continental margins display morphological features indicative of subglacial meltwater flow in inner shelf areas of some paleo ice stream troughs. Over the last few years several expeditions to the eastern Amundsen Sea embayment (West Antarctica have investigated the paleo ice streams that extended from the Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers. A compilation of high-resolution swath bathymetry data from inner Pine Island Bay reveals details of a rough seabed topography including several deep channels that connect a series of basins. This complex basin and channel network is indicative of meltwater flow beneath the paleo-Pine Island and Thwaites ice streams, along with substantial subglacial water inflow from the east. This meltwater could have enhanced ice flow over the rough bedrock topography. Meltwater features diminish with the onset of linear features north of the basins. Similar features have previously been observed in several other areas, including the Dotson-Getz Trough (western Amundsen Sea embayment and Marguerite Bay (SW Antarctic Peninsula, suggesting that these features may be widespread around the Antarctic margin and that subglacial meltwater drainage played a major role in past ice-sheet dynamics.

  2. Drumlins, subglacial meltwater floods, and ocean responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, John

    1989-09-01

    Drumlins and erosional marks in bedrock give evidence for broad, subglacial meltwater floods that have discharge-rate estimates of about 106 m3/s. Similar discharge rates are obtained for other late glacial catastrophic floods. The total volume of meltwater that is thought to have formed the Livingstone Lake, Saskatchewan, drumlin field is estimated at 8.4 x 104 km3. This volume is equivalent to a eustatic rise of 0.23 m in global sea level. Meltwater release and roughly contemporaneous formation of drumlin fields in North America and Europe could have involved several metres of sea-level rise in a few years. The implications of such floods for the generation of myths and the interpretation of the oxygen isotopic record of the oceans are discussed. High meltwater discharges are of potential importance to the generation of a lid of cold, fresh water over the North Atlantic and its effects on late glacial climate.

  3. Subglacial water drainage, storage, and piracy beneath the Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbäck, K.; Pettersson, R.; Hubbard, A. L.; Doyle, S. H.; As, D.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Fitzpatrick, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Meltwater drainage across the surface of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is well constrained by measurements and modeling, yet despite its critical role, knowledge of its transit through the subglacial environment remains limited. Here we present a subglacial hydrological analysis of a land-terminating sector of the GrIS at unprecedented resolution that predicts the routing of surface-derived meltwater once it has entered the basal drainage system. Our analysis indicates the probable existence of small subglacial lakes that remain undetectable by methods using surface elevation change or radar techniques. Furthermore, the analysis suggests transient behavior with rapid switching of subglacial drainage between competing catchments driven by seasonal changes in the basal water pressure. Our findings provide a cautionary note that should be considered in studies that attempt to relate and infer future response from surface temperature, melt, and runoff from point measurements and/or modeling with measurements of proglacial discharge and ice dynamics.

  4. Subglacial till formation: Microscale processes within the subglacial shear zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Jane K.

    2017-08-01

    This was a study of subglacial deformation till genesis from a modern temperate glacier, at Skálafellsjökull, Iceland. Detailed microscale properties of till samples (from Scanning Electron Microscope [SEM] and thin section analysis) were examined from a glacial site with in situ subglacial process monitoring and an exposed subglacial surface in the foreland. Two lithofacies were examined, a grey sandy till derived from the ash and basalt, and a silty reddish brown till derived from oxidized paleosols and/or tephra layers. These also represented a clay-content continuum from low (0.3%) to high (22.3%). The evolution from debris to subglacial till was investigated. This included a reduction in grain-size (21% for grey lithology, 13% reddish brown lithology), and reduction in rounding (RA) (32% for the grey lithology, 26% for the reddish brown lithology), and the quantification and analysis of the different grain erosion/comminution processes in the resultant till. It was shown that the microstructures within a till were dependent on shear strain and glaciological conditions (deformation history). The low clay content tills were dominated by linear structures (lineations and boudins, and anisotropic microfabric) whilst the higher clay content tills were dominated by rotational structures (turbates and plaster, and isotropic microfabric). These results are important in our understanding of the formation of both modern and Quaternary tills and informs our reconstruction of past glacial dynamics.

  5. An isotopic model for basal freeze-on associated with subglacial upward flow of pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchez, R.; Samyn, D.; Lorrain, R.; Pattyn, F.; Fitzsimons, S.

    2004-01-01

    Subglacial freezing in polar glaciers can have a significant dynamical effect. Recent studies have shown that freezing of pore water flowing upward through subglacial fine-grained sediments at the freezing interface and progression of this freezing front downward are responsible for fast ice flow stoppage in ice streams. The upward pore water flow leads to the formation of debris-bearing basal ice layers. A model for stable isotope composition, both in δD and δ18O, is developed for predicting the isotopic composition of the ice segregated by such a mechanism. The development of this isotopic model for water films present along the grains of the subglacial sediment predicts the absence of apparent fractionation for the ice formed. This prediction is tested against two East Antarctic outlet glaciers by studying the δD-δ18O relationships in the basal ice layers of these glaciers.

  6. Plankton assembly in an ultra-oligotrophic Antarctic lake over the summer transition from the ice-cover to ice-free period: A size spectra approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochera, Carlos; Quesada, Antonio; Toro, Manuel; Rico, Eugenio; Camacho, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Lakes from the Antarctic maritime region experience climate change as a main stressor capable of modifying their plankton community structure and function, essentially because summer temperatures are commonly over the freezing point and the lake's ice cap thaws. This study was conducted in such seasonally ice-covered lake (Lake Limnopolar, Byers Peninsula, Livingston Is., Antarctica), which exhibits a microbial dominated pelagic food web. An important feature is also the occurrence of benthic mosses (Drepanocladus longifolius) covering the lake bottom. Plankton dynamics were investigated during the ice-thawing transition to the summer maximum. Both bacterioplankton and viral-like particles were higher near the lake's bottom, suggesting a benthic support. When the lake was under dim conditions because of the snow-and-ice cover, autotrophic picoplankters dominated at deep layers. The taxa-specific photopigments indicated dominance of picocyanobacteria among them when the light availability was lower. By contrast, larger and less edible phytoplankton dominated at the onset of the ice melting. The plankton size spectra were fitted to the continuous model of Pareto distribution. Spectra evolved similarly at two sampled depths, in surface and near the bottom, with slopes increasing until mid-January. However, slopes were less steep (i.e., size classes more uniformly distributed) at the bottom, thus denoting a more efficient utilization of resources. These findings suggest that microbial loop pathways in the lake are efficiently channelized during some periods to the metazoan production (mainly the copepod Boeckella poppei). Our results point to that trophic interactions may still occur in these lakes despite environmental harshness. This results of interest in a framework of increasing temperatures that may reduce the climatic restrictions and therefore stimulate biotic interactions.

  7. Part 2: Sedimentary geology of the Valles, Marineris, Mars and Antarctic dry valley lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedell, Susan S.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed mapping of the layered deposits in the Valles Marineris, Mars from high-resolution Viking orbiter images revealed that they from plateaus of rhythmically layered material whose bases are in the lowest elevations of the canyon floors, and whose tops are within a few hundred meters in elevation of the surrounding plateaus. Four hypotheses for the origin of the layered deposits were considered: that they are eolian deposits; that they are remnants of the same material as the canyon walls; that they are explosive volcanic deposits; or that they were deposited in standing bodies of water. There are serious morphologic objections to each of the first three. The deposition of the layered deposits in standing bodies of water best explains their lateral continuity, horizontality, great thickness, rhythmic nature, and stratigraphic relationships with other units within the canyons. The Martian climatic history indicated that any ancient lakes were ice covered. Two methods for transporting sediment through a cover of ice on a martian lake appear to be feasible. Based on the presently available data, along with the theoretical calculations presented, it appears most likely that the layered deposits in the Valles Marineris were laid down in standing bodies of water.

  8. Lysobacter oligotrophicus sp. nov., isolated from an Antarctic freshwater lake in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Wakao; Kimura, Tomomi; Araki, Shigeo; Miyoshi, Yuki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2013-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, aerobic bacterium (strain 107-E2(T)) was isolated from freshwater samples containing microbial mats collected at a lake in Skarvsnes, Antarctica (temporary lake name, Lake Tanago Ike). Strain 107-E2(T) grew between 5 and 25 °C, with an optimum of 23 °C. Moreover, colony formation was observed on agar media even at -5 °C. The pH range for growth was between 6.0 and 9.0, with an optimum of pH 7.0-8.0. The range of NaCl concentration for growth was between 0.0 and 0.5% (w/v), with an optimum of 0.0%. No growth was observed in media containing organic compounds at high concentrations, which indicated that strain 107-E2(T) was an oligotroph. In the late stationary phase, strain 107-E2(T) produced a dark brown water-soluble pigment. Esterase, amylase and protease production was observed. Antimicrobial-lytic activities for Gram-negative bacteria and yeast were observed. Ubiquinone-8 was the major respiratory quinone. The major fatty acids were iso-C15:0, iso-C(17:1)ω9c and iso-C(15:1) at 5. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 66.1 mol%. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain 107-E2(T) belonged to the genus Lysobacter, and low DNA-DNA relatedness values with closely related species distinguished strain 107-E2(T) from recognized species of the genus Lysobacter. The phylogenetic situation and physiological characteristics indicated that strain 107-E2(T) should be classified as a representative of a novel species of the genus Lysobacter, for which the name Lysobacter oligotrophicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 107-E2(T) ( =JCM 18257(T) =ATCC BAA-2438(T)).

  9. Antarctic lakes suggest millennial reorganizations of Southern Hemisphere atmospheric and oceanic circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brenda L; Denton, George H; Fountain, Andrew G; Hendy, Chris H; Henderson, Gideon M

    2010-12-14

    The phasing of millennial-scale oscillations in Antarctica relative to those elsewhere in the world is important for discriminating among models for abrupt climate change, particularly those involving the Southern Ocean. However, records of millennial-scale variability from Antarctica dating to the last glacial maximum are rare and rely heavily on data from widely spaced ice cores, some of which show little variability through that time. Here, we present new data from closed-basin lakes in the Dry Valleys region of East Antarctica that show high-magnitude, high-frequency oscillations in surface level during the late Pleistocene synchronous with climate fluctuations elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere. These data suggest a coherent Southern Hemisphere pattern of climate change on millennial time scales, at least in the Pacific sector, and indicate that any hypothesis concerning the origin of these events must account for synchronous changes in both high and temperate latitudes.

  10. New Collaborative Aerogeophysical Survey Targets the Stability of the East Antarctic Ice sheet and its Geological Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, F.; Corr, H.; Jordan, T.; Bozzo, E.; Armadillo, E.; Caneva, G.; Frearson, N.; Robinson, C.; Smellie, J.

    2006-12-01

    At the eve of the IPY large aerogeophysical survey data gaps still remain over the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). This is due to the logistic and environmental challenges involved in exploration over these areas. During the 2005/06 Antarctic field season the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) collaborated with the University of Genoa to accomplish an extensive airborne geophysical survey over the EAIS. We explored the enigmatic Wilkes Subglacial Basin (WSB) and the adjacent Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). Over 60,000-line km of new data were collected during 70 survey flights. 270 hours of dedicated science flying and 45 hours of positioning and calibration flying were performed. The Italian Antarctic Programme provided the logistic support and aviation fuel at Mario Zucchelli Station, Mid-Point, and at two remote field camps, Talos Dome and Sitry. Additional support and fuel was provided at Dome C, as part of a separate trilateral UK/Italian and French agreement to survey some of the subglacial lakes, which characterise this region. The airborne survey platform was a BAS Twin Otter, equipped with airborne radar, aeromagnetic and airborne gravity sensors. We present key new datasets on ice surface, ice thickness, bedrock configurations, airborne gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies. These new data will assist in addressing four major open questions: 1) Are there Cenozoic marine sediments in the WSB, linked to controversial deglaciation over this part of the EAIS?; 2) What is the tectonic origin and deep structure of the WSB and TAM?; 3) Is there major segmentation of the TAM?, 4) what forcings and feedbacks were involved for the EAIS and for climate evolution?.

  11. Testing of SIR (a transformable robotic submarine) in Lake Tahoe for future deployment at West Antarctic Ice Sheet grounding lines of Siple Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, R. D.; Scherer, R. P.; Griffiths, I.; Taylor, L.; Winans, J.; Mankoff, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) has been custom-designed and built by DOER Marine to meet scientific requirements for exploring subglacial water cavities. This sub-ice rover (SIR) will explore and quantitatively document the grounding zone areas of the Ross Ice Shelf cavity using a 3km-long umbilical tether by deployment through an 800m-long ice borehole in a torpedo shape, which is also its default mode if operational failure occurs. Once in the ocean cavity it transforms via a diamond-shaped geometry into a rectangular form when all of its instruments come alive in its flight mode. Instrumentation includes 4 cameras (one forward-looking HD), a vertical scanning sonar (long-range imaging for spatial orientation and navigation), Doppler current meter (determine water current velocities), multi-beam sonar (image and swath map bottom topography), sub-bottom profiler (profile sub-sea-floor sediment for geological history), CTD (determine salinity, temperature and depth), DO meter (determine dissolved oxygen content in water), transmissometer (determine suspended particulate concentrations in water), laser particle-size analyzer (determine sizes of particles in water), triple laser-beams (determine size and volume of objects), thermistor probe (measure in situ temperatures of ice and sediment), shear vane probe (determine in situ strength of sediment), manipulator arm (deploy instrumentation packages, collect samples), shallow ice corer (collect ice samples and glacial debris), water sampler (determine sea water/freshwater composition, calibrate real-time sensors, sample microbes), shallow sediment corer (sample sea floor, in-ice and subglacial sediment for stratigraphy, facies, particle size, composition, structure, fabric, microbes). A sophisticated array of data handling, storing and displaying will allow real-time observations and environmental assessments to be made. This robotic submarine and other instruments will be tested in Lake Tahoe in September, 2011 and

  12. Landscape evolution by subglacial quarrying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Sofie Vej; Egholm, D.L.; Iverson, Neal R.

    of sliding and erosion is not well supported when considering models for quarrying of rock blocks from the bed. Iverson (2012) introduced a new subglacial quarrying model that operates from the theory of adhesive wear. The model is based on the fact that cavities, with a high level of bedrock differential...... to a model for glacial hydrology. In order to also include the effects of cavitation on the subglacial sliding rate, we use a sliding law proposed by Schoof (2005), which includes an upper limit for the stress that can be supported at the bed. Computational experiments show that the combined influence...... evolution models. Geology, v. 40, no. 8, 679-682 (2012). Schoof, C. The effect of cavitation on glacier sliding. Proc. R. Soc. A , 461, 609-627 (2005). Jaeger, J.C., and Cook, N.G.W. Fundamentals of rock mechanics: New York, Chapman and Hall, 593 p. (1979)...

  13. A subzero microbial habitat in the basal ice of an Antarctic glacier (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, B. C.; Doyle, S. M.; Montross, S. N.; Skidmore, M. L.; Samyn, D.; Lorrain, R.; Tison, J.; Fitzsimons, S.

    2010-12-01

    Expanding perspectives on the tenacity of microbial life have motivated research to determine if microbial ecosystems exist at the base of the Antarctic ice sheets that are uniquely adapted to the conditions. To date, these efforts have focused primarily on subglacial locations where there is abundant liquid water (e.g., subglacial lakes and water-saturated sediments). Recent studies of cold-adapted microorganisms indicate that metabolism remains functional under frozen conditions, supporting the notion that active biogeochemical processes occur within the frozen matrix of ice. Our investigations of debris-rich basal ice from the Taylor Glacier, Antarctic revealed trends in the entrapped gas and microbiological data that are consistent with this hypothesis. When compared to the low-debris englacial facies, debris-rich stratified facies of the Taylor Glacier basal ice exhibited elevated CO2 and depleted O2 concentrations. Cell and total dissolved solute concentrations were low in the englacial facies, increasing by an order of magnitude or greater in the debris-rich laminated sub-facies. Cells in the thawed basal ice samples respired 14C-acetate to 14CO2 at 2oC, with maximum respiration rates observed in samples with sediment contents > 1% (wt/vol). Molecular analysis of small subunit ribosomal (SSU) RNA gene diversity within the basal ice revealed a low diversity bacterial assemblage dominated by members of the phylum Firmicutes (87% of the cloned sequences), and the most abundant phylotype (38%) was affiliated with species in the genus Sporosarcina. Enrichment culturing of the basal ice on various defined and complex heterotrophic media at 4 to 15oC resulted in the growth and isolation of bacteria, nearly all of which (92% of the isolates) were closely related to the Sporosarcina-related SSU RNA gene sequences identified in the culture-independent analysis. All of the isolates characterized are cold-tolerant and experiments on selected strains have demonstrated

  14. Microbial oxidation as a methane sink beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Alexander B.; Dore, John E.; Achberger, Amanda M.; Christner, Brent C.; Mitchell, Andrew C.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Vick-Majors, Trista J.; Priscu, John C.

    2017-08-01

    Aquatic habitats beneath ice masses contain active microbial ecosystems capable of cycling important greenhouse gases, such as methane (CH4). A large methane reservoir is thought to exist beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but its quantity, source and ultimate fate are poorly understood. For instance, O2 supplied by basal melting should result in conditions favourable for aerobic methane oxidation. Here we use measurements of methane concentrations and stable isotope compositions along with genomic analyses to assess the sources and cycling of methane in Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) in West Antarctica. We show that sub-ice-sheet methane is produced through the biological reduction of CO2 using H2. This methane pool is subsequently consumed by aerobic, bacterial methane oxidation at the SLW sediment-water interface. Bacterial oxidation consumes >99% of the methane and represents a significant methane sink, and source of biomass carbon and metabolic energy to the surficial SLW sediments. We conclude that aerobic methanotrophy may mitigate the release of methane to the atmosphere upon subglacial water drainage to ice sheet margins and during periods of deglaciation.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.): in situ nondestructive detection of microbial life in the ice covers of Antarctic lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C; Sattler, Birgit

    2009-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.) images were obtained in situ following 532 nm excitation of cryoconite assemblages in the ice covers of annual and perennially frozen Antarctic lakes during the 2008 Tawani International Expedition to Schirmacher Oasis and Lake Untersee in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. Laser targeting of a single millimeter-scale cryoconite results in multiple neighboring excitation events secondary to ice/air interface reflection and refraction in the bubbles surrounding the primary target. Laser excitation at 532 nm of cyanobacteria-dominated assemblages produced red and infrared autofluorescence activity attributed to the presence of phycoerythrin photosynthetic pigments. The method avoids destruction of individual target organisms and does not require the disruption of either the structure of the microbial community or the surrounding ice matrix. L.I.F.E. survey strategies described may be of interest for orbital monitoring of photosynthetic primary productivity in polar and alpine glaciers, ice sheets, snow, and lake ice of Earth's cryosphere. The findings open up the possibility of searching from either a rover or from orbit for signs of life in the polar regions of Mars and the frozen regions of exoplanets in neighboring star systems.

  16. Geophysical models for the tectonic framework of the Lake Vostok region, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studinger, Michael; Karner, Garry D.; Bell, Robin E.; Levin, Vadim; Raymond, Carol A.; Tikku, Anahita A.

    2003-12-01

    Aerogeophysical and seismological data from a geophysical survey in the interior of East Antarctica were used to develop a conceptual tectonic model for the Lake Vostok region. The model is constrained using three independent data sets: magnetic, seismic, and gravimetric. A distinct change in the aeromagnetic anomaly character across Lake Vostok defines a crustal boundary. Depth to magnetic basement estimates image a 400-km-wide and more than 10-km-deep sedimentary basin west of the lake. Analysis of teleseismic earthquakes suggests a relatively thin crust beneath Lake Vostok consistent with predictions from kinematic and flexural gravity modelling. Magnetic, gravity, and subglacial topography data reveal a tectonic boundary within East Antarctica. Based on our kinematic and flexural gravity modelling, this tectonic boundary appears to be the result of thrust sheet emplacement onto an earlier passive continental margin. No data presently exist to date directly either the timing of passive margin formation or the subsequent shortening phase. The preserved thrust sheet thickness is related to the thickness of the passive margin crust. Because a significant amount of time is required to erode the thrust sheet topography, we suggest that these tectonic events are Proterozoic in age. Minor normal reactivation of the thrust sheet offers a simple mechanism to explain the formation of the Lake Vostok Basin. A low level of seismicity exists in the vicinity of this tectonic boundary. The existence of a crustal boundary in the Antarctic interior provides new constraints on the Proterozoic architecture of the East Antarctic craton.

  17. Regional reconstruction of subglacial hydrology and glaciodynamic behaviour along the southern margin of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet in British Columbia, Canada and northern Washington State, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesemann, Jerome-Etienne; Brennand, Tracy A.

    2009-11-01

    Subglacial landsystems in and around Okanagan Valley, British Columbia, Canada are investigated in order to evaluate landscape development, subglacial hydrology and Cordilleran Ice Sheet dynamics along its southern margin. Major landscape elements include drumlin swarms and tunnel valleys. Drumlins are composed of bedrock, diamicton and glaciofluvial sediments; their form truncates the substrate. Tunnel valleys of various scales (km to 100s km length), incised into bedrock and sediment, exhibit convex longitudinal profiles, and truncate drumlin swarms. Okanagan Valley is the largest tunnel valley in the area and is eroded >300 m below sea level. Over 600 m of Late Wisconsin-age sediments, consisting of a fining-up sequence of cobble gravel, sand and silt fill Okanagan Valley. Landform-substrate relationships, landform associations, and sedimentary sequences are incompatible with prevailing explanations of landsystem development centred mainly on deforming beds. They are best explained by meltwater erosion and deposition during ice sheet underbursts. During the Late-Wisconsin glaciation, Okanagan Valley functioned as part of a subglacial lake spanning multiple connected valleys (few 100s km) of southern British Columbia. Subglacial lake development started either as glaciers advanced over a pre-existing sub-aerial lake (catch lake) or by incremental production and storage of basal meltwater. High geothermal heat flux, geothermal springs and/or subglacial volcanic eruptions contributed to ice melt, and may have triggered, along with priming from supraglacial lakes, subglacial lake drainage. During the underburst(s), sheetflows eroded drumlins in corridors and channelized flows eroded tunnel valleys. Progressive flow channelization focused flows toward major bedrock valleys. In Okanagan Valley, most of the pre-glacial and early-glacial sediment fill was removed. A fining-up sequence of boulder gravel and sand was deposited during waning stages of the underburst(s) and

  18. Timescales of Growth Response of Microbial Mats to Environmental Change in an Ice-Covered Antarctic Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne D. Jungblut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake Vanda is a perennially ice-covered, closed-basin lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Laminated photosynthetic microbial mats cover the floor of the lake from below the ice cover to >40 m depth. In recent decades, the water level of Lake Vanda has been rising, creating a “natural experiment” on development of mat communities on newly flooded substrates and the response of deeper mats to declining irradiance. Mats in recently flooded depths accumulate one lamina (~0.3 mm per year and accrue ~0.18 µg chlorophyll-a cm−2 y−1. As they increase in thickness, vertical zonation becomes evident, with the upper 2-4 laminae forming an orange-brown zone, rich in myxoxanthophyll and dominated by intertwined Leptolyngbya trichomes. Below this, up to six phycobilin-rich green/pink-pigmented laminae form a subsurface zone, inhabited by Leptolyngbya, Oscillatoria and Phormidium morphotypes. Laminae continued to increase in thickness for several years after burial, and PAM fluorometry indicated photosynthetic potential in all pigmented laminae. At depths that have been submerged for >40 years, mats showed similar internal zonation and formed complex pinnacle structures that were only beginning to appear in shallower mats. Chlorophyll-a did not change over time and these mats appear to represent resource-limited “climax” communities. Acclimation of microbial mats to changing environmental conditions is a slow process, and our data show how legacy effects of past change persist into the modern community structure.

  19. Millennially Averaged Accumulation Rates for Lake Vostok, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of inferred accumulation rates from three radar layers (26, 35 and 41 thousand years old) in the Vostok Subglacial Lake region. Accumulation...

  20. Detrital zircons - the unique source of information on tectonics, paleogeography and denudation processes of East Antarctica (subglacial challenge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyatsky, Boris; Leitchenkov, German; Rodionov, Nickolay; Antonov, Anton; Sergeev, Sergey; Savva, Helen

    2010-05-01

    composition of hafnium in detrital zircons from two moraine samples was studied using SIMS CAMECA-4f and laser device coupled with HR-MC-ICPMS. Distribution of trace elements allows us to suggest that 70-85% zircons have been crystallized from magma of intermediate-silicic composition with temperature of crystallization of 700-800° C (65% SiO2) and about 10-15% - from low-temperature water-saturated granitoid melts. Only 5-7% zircons are formed as a result of metamorphic processes. Four zircon grains from metasandstone (Fisher Massive) have specific distribution of trace elements which are typical to high-temperature (up to 950° C) magmas of alkaline or mafic affinity. Hf isotope signatures show according to two-step evolution model that zircons from metasandstone of Fisher Massive were formed in crust protoliths of 1400-2200 m.y. old, whereas zircons from sandstone of Meridith Massive - in protolith of 1400-1600 m.y. and 3000-3400 m.y. old. Generally, Hf isotope composition of studied zircons corresponds to composition of chondrite unfractionated reservoir (CHUR). The first opportunity to obtain direct information about the bedrock geology of the central East Antarctic arose when the 3650 m deep borehole at the Vostok station, located in the southern part of Lake Vostok (largest subglacial freshwater lake in Antarctica) recovered the basal layer of the ice sheet. We studied a small (4.7 mm long) clast of siltstone extracted from the 3607 m depth ice core of the Vostok Station Borehole. This clast was entrapped from bottom sediments in the shallow area of the lake and incorporated into the accreted ice. Siltstone consists of poorly-rounded quartz and a minor amount of accessories including zircon and monazite. We infer that the bedrock upstream (northwest) of Lake Vostok from where the siltstone clast was scraped off bedrock by ice and transported to the lake is of sedimentary nature. 23 zircon and 5 monazite grains in the siltstone clast have yielded two age clusters

  1. Penicillium mycobiota in Arctic subglacial ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonjak, S.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Gunde-Cimerman, N.

    2006-01-01

    to be inhabited exclusively by heterotrophic bacteria. In this study we report on the very high occurrence (up to 9000 CFU L-1) and diversity of filamentous Penicillium spp. in the sediment-rich subglacial ice of three different polythermal Arctic glaciers (Svalbard, Norway). The dominant species was P. crustosum......, representing on the average half of all isolated strains from all three glaciers. The other most frequently isolated species were P. bialowiezense, P. chrysogenum, P. thomii, P. solitum, P. palitans, P. echinulatum, P. polonicum, P. commune, P. discolor, P. expansum, and new Penicillium species (sp. 1). Twelve...... more Penicillium species were occasionally isolated. The fungi isolated produced consistent profiles of secondary metabolites, not different from the same Penicillium species from other habitats. This is the first report on the presence of large populations of Penicillium spp. in subglacial sediment...

  2. Numerical Modeling of Subglacial Sediment Deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    may cause mass loss in the near future to exceed current best estimates. Ice flow in larger ice sheets focuses in fast-moving streams due to mechanical non-linearity of ice. These ice streams often move at velocities several magnitudes larger than surrounding ice and consequentially constitute...... glaciers move by deforming their sedimentary beds. Several modern ice streams, in particular, move as plug flows due to basal sediment deformation. An intense and long-winded discussion about the appropriate description for subglacial sediment mechanics followed this discovery, with good reason...... velocities previously associated with elastic or viscous ice deformation. If a glacier dominated by subglacial creep experiences prolonged events of strong surface melt or increased driving stresses, the plastic strength limit can cause rapid acceleration downslope due to imbalance of stresses....

  3. The Wilkes subglacial basin eastern margin electrical conductivity anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzello, Daniele; Armadillo, Egidio; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Caneva, Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    We have analyzed the deep conductivity structure at the transition between the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) and the eastern margin of the WSB in NVL, by means of the GDS (Geomagnetic Deep Sounding) technique, in order to constrain the geodynamical interpretation of this antarctic sector. The TAM form the uplifted flank of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic West Antarctic Rift System. Structure of the TAM rift flank has been partially investigated with different geophysical approaches.The Wilkes Subglacial Basin is a broad depression over 400 km wide at the George V Coast and 1200 km long. Geology, lithospheric structure and tectonics of the Basin are only partially known because the Basin is buried beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet and is located in a remote region which makes geophysical exploration logistically challenging. Different authors have proposed contrasting hypothesis regarding the origin of the WSB: it could represent a region of rifted continental crust, or it may have a flexural origin or might represent an "extended terrane". Recently aerogeophysical investigations have demonstrated a strong structural control on the margin. Magnetovariational studies carried out at high geomagnetic latitudes are often hampered by source effects, mainly due to the closeness to the Polar Electrojet currents systems (PEJ). Its presence, in fact, makes the uniform magnetic field assumption, on which the magnetovariational methods are based on, often invalid, which outcome is a bias in the GDS transfer functions and to compromise the reliability of the inverted models. Data from the aforementioned campaigns have been then processed under the ISEE project (Ice Sheet Electromagnetic Experiment), aimed at evaluate and mitigate the bias effect of the PEJ on geomagnetic an magnetotelluric transfer functions at high geomagnetic latitudes, by means of suitable processing algorithms, developed upon a statistical analysis study on PEJ effects (Rizzello et al. 2013). Recent results

  4. Subglacial discharge at tidewater glaciers revealed by seismic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomaus, Timothy C.; Amundson, Jason M.; Walter, Jacob I.; O'Neel, Shad; West, Michael E.; Larsen, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Subglacial discharge influences glacier basal motion and erodes and redeposits sediment. At tidewater glacier termini, discharge drives submarine terminus melting, affects fjord circulation, and is a central component of proglacial marine ecosystems. However, our present inability to track subglacial discharge and its variability significantly hinders our understanding of these processes. Here we report observations of hourly to seasonal variations in 1.5–10 Hz seismic tremor that strongly correlate with subglacial discharge but not with basal motion, weather, or discrete icequakes. Our data demonstrate that vigorous discharge occurs from tidewater glaciers during summer, in spite of fast basal motion that could limit the formation of subglacial conduits, and then abates during winter. Furthermore, tremor observations and a melt model demonstrate that drainage efficiency of tidewater glaciers evolves seasonally. Glaciohydraulic tremor provides a means by which to quantify subglacial discharge variations and offers a promising window into otherwise obscured glacierized environments.

  5. Antarctic Peninsula Tidewater Glacier Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, E. C.; Scambos, T. A.; Haran, T. M.; Wellner, J. S.; Domack, E. W.; Vernet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Antarctic Peninsula (nAP, north of 66°S) is a north-south trending mountain range extending transverse across the prevailing westerly winds of the Southern Ocean resulting in an extreme west-to-east precipitation gradient. Snowfall on the west side of the AP is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the east side. This gradient drives short, steep, fast-flowing glaciers into narrow fjords on the west side, while longer lower-sloping glaciers flow down the east side into broader fjord valleys. This pattern in ice dynamics affects ice-ocean interaction on timescales of decades to centuries, and shapes the subglacial topography and submarine bathymetry on timescales of glacial cycles. In our study, we calculate ice flux for the western and eastern nAP using a drainage model that incorporates the modern ice surface topography, the RACMO-2 precipitation estimate, and recent estimates of ice thinning. Our results, coupled with observed rates of ice velocity from InSAR (I. Joughin, personal communication) and Landsat 8 -derived flow rates (this study), provide an estimate of ice thickness and fjord depth in grounded-ice areas for the largest outlet glaciers. East-side glaciers either still terminate in or have recently terminated in ice shelves. Sedimentary evidence from the inner fjords of the western glaciers indicates they had ice shelves during LIA time, and may still have transient floating ice tongues (tabular berg calvings are observed). Although direct oceanographic evidence is limited, the high accumulation rate and rapid ice flux implies cold basal ice for the western nAP glaciers and therefore weak subglacial discharge relative to eastern nAP glaciers and or other tidewater fjord systems such as in Alaska. Finally, despite lower accumulation rates on the east side, the large elongate drainage basins result in a greater ice flux funneled through fewer deeper glaciers. Due to the relation between ice flux and erosion, these east-side glaciers

  6. Rock comminution as a source of hydrogen for subglacial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J.; Boyd, E. S.; Bone, N.; Jones, E. L.; Tranter, M.; Macfarlane, J. W.; Martin, P. G.; Wadham, J. L.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Skidmore, M. L.; Hamilton, T. L.; Hill, E.; Jackson, M.; Hodgson, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Substantial parts of the beds of glaciers, ice sheets and ice caps are at the pressure melting point. The resulting water harbours diverse subglacial microbial ecosystems capable of affecting global biogeochemical cycles. Such subglacial habitats may have acted as refugia during Neoproterozoic glaciations. However, it is unclear how life in subglacial environments could be supported during glaciations lasting millions of years because energy from overridden organic carbon would become increasingly depleted. Here we investigate the potential for abiogenic H2 produced during rock comminution to provide a continual source of energy to support subglacial life. We collected a range of silicate rocks representative of subglacial environments in Greenland, Canada, Norway and Antarctica and crushed them with a sledgehammer and ball mill to varying surface areas. Under an inert atmosphere in the laboratory, we added water, and measured H2 production with time. H2 was produced at 0 °C in all silicate-water experiments, probably through the reaction of water with mineral surface silica radicals formed during rock comminution. H2 production increased with increasing temperature or decreasing silicate rock grain size. Sufficient H2 was produced to support previously measured rates of methanogenesis under a Greenland glacier. We conclude that abiogenic H2 generation from glacial bedrock comminution could have supported life and biodiversity in subglacial refugia during past extended global glaciations.

  7. Antarctic Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D. Rogers

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of genomic science and its battery of technologies, polar biology stands on the threshold of a revolution, one that will enable the investigation of important questions of unprecedented scope and with extraordinary depth and precision. The exotic organisms of polar ecosystems are ideal candidates for genomic analysis. Through such analyses, it will be possible to learn not only the novel features that enable polar organisms to survive, and indeed thrive, in their extreme environments, but also fundamental biological principles that are common to most, if not all, organisms. This article aims to review recent developments in Antarctic genomics and to demonstrate the global context of such studies.

  8. Antarctic analogs for Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A. E.; Andersen, D. T.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus is a new world for Astrobiology. The Cassini discovery of the icy plume emanating from the South Polar region indicates an active world, where detection of water, organics, sodium, and nano-particle silica in the plume strongly suggests that the source is a subsurface salty ocean reservoir. Recent gravity data from Cassini confirms the presence of a regional sea extending north to 50°S. An ocean habitat under a thick ice cover is perhaps a recurring theme in the Outer Solar System, but what makes Enceladus unique is that the plume jetting out into space is carrying samples of this ocean. Therefore, through the study of Enceladus' plumes we can gain new insights not only of a possible habitable world in the Solar Systems, but also about the formation and evolution of other icy-satellites. Cassini has been able to fly through this plume - effectively sampling the ocean. It is time to plan for future missions that do more detailed analyses, possibly return samples back to Earth and search for evidence of life. To help prepare for such missions, the need for earth-based analog environments is essential for logistical, methodological (life detection) and theoretical development. We have undertaken studies of two terrestrial environments that are close analogs to Enceladus' ocean: Lake Vida and Lake Untersee - two ice-sealed Antarctic lakes that represent physical, chemical and possibly biological analogs for Enceladus. By studying the diverse biology and physical and chemical constraints to life in these two unique lakes we will begin to understand the potential habitability of Enceladus and other icy moons, including possible sources of nutrients and energy, which together with liquid water are the key ingredients for life. Analog research such as this will also enable us to develop and test new strategies to search for evidence of life on Enceladus.

  9. Geological controls on bedrock topography and ice sheet dynamics in the Wilkes Subglacial Basin sector of East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto; Armadillo, Egidio; Young, Duncan; Blankenship, Donald; Jordan, Tom; Siegert, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The Wilkes Subglacial Basin extends for 1,400 km into the interior of East Antarctica and hosts several major glaciers that drain a large sector of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The deep northern Wilkes Subglacial Basin underlies the catchments of the Matusevich, Cook, Ninnis and Mertz Glaciers, which are largely marine-based and hence potentially particularly sensitive to past and also predicted future ocean and climate warming. Sediment provenance studies suggest that the glaciers flowing in this region may have retreated significantly compared to their modern configuration, as recently as the warm mid-Pliocene interval, potentially contributing several m to global sea level rise (Cook et al.,Nature Geosci., 2013). Here we combine airborne radar, aeromagnetic and airborne gravity observations collected during the international WISE-ISODYN and ICECAP aerogeophysical campaigns with vintage datasets to help unveil subglacial geology and deeper crustal architecture and to assess its influence on bedrock topography and ice sheet dynamics in the northern Wilkes Subglacial Basin. Aeromagnetic images reveal that the Matusevich Glacier is underlain by a ca 480 Ma thrust fault system (the Exiles Thrust), which has also been inferred to have been reactivated in response to intraplate Cenozoic strike-slip faulting. Further to the west, the linear Eastern Basins are controlled by the Prince Albert Fault System. The fault system continues to the south, where it provides structural controls for both the Priestley and Reeves Glaciers. The inland Central Basins continue in the coastal area underlying the fast flowing Cook ice streams, implying that potential ocean-induced changes could propagate further into the interior of the ice sheet. We propose based on an analogy with the Rennick Graben that these deep subglacial basins are controlled by the underlying horst and graben crustal architecture. Given the interpreted subglacial distribution of Beacon sediments and Ferrar

  10. Evidence for a dynamic East Antarctic ice sheet during the mid-Miocene climate transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Elizabeth L.; van de Flierdt, Tina; Williams, Trevor; Hemming, Sidney R.; Cook, Carys P.; Passchier, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    The East Antarctic ice sheet underwent a major expansion during the Mid-Miocene Climate Transition, around 14 Ma, lowering sea level by ∼60 m. However, direct or indirect evidence of where changes in the ice sheet occurred is limited. Here we present new insights on timing and locations of ice sheet change from two drill sites offshore East Antarctica. IODP Site U1356, Wilkes Land, and ODP Site 1165, Prydz Bay are located adjacent to two major ice drainage areas, the Wilkes Subglacial Basin and the Lambert Graben. Ice-rafted detritus (IRD), including dropstones, was deposited in concentrations far exceeding those known in the rest of the Miocene succession at both sites between 14.1 and 13.8 Ma, indicating that large amounts of IRD-bearing icebergs were calved from independent drainage basins during this relatively short interval. At Site U1356, the IRD was delivered in distinct pulses, suggesting that the overall ice advance was punctuated by short periods of ice retreat in the Wilkes Subglacial Basin. Provenance analysis of the mid-Miocene IRD and fine-grained sediments provides additional insights on the movement of the ice margin and subglacial geology. At Site U1356, the dominant 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological age of the ice-rafted hornblende grains is 1400-1550 Ma, differing from the majority of recent IRD in the area, from which we infer an inland source area of this thermochronological age extending along the eastern part of the Adélie Craton, which forms the western side of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin. Neodymium isotopic compositions from the terrigenous fine fraction at Site U1356 imply that the ice margin periodically expanded from high ground well into the Wilkes Subglacial Basin during periods of MMCT ice growth. At Site 1165, MMCT pebble-sized IRD are sourced from both the local Lambert Graben and the distant Aurora Subglacial Basin drainage area. Together, the occurrence and provenance of the IRD and glacially-eroded sediment at these two marine

  11. A subglacial meltwater channel system in Marguerite Bay: observations from sediment cores, an underwater ROV and ship-mounted instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Kelly; Dowdeswell, Julian; Bartholomew, Ian; Noormets, Riko; Evans, Jeffrey; Cofaigh, Colm Ó.

    2013-04-01

    On the western Antarctic Peninsula grounded ice is known to have advanced through Marguerite Bay to a position at the shelf edge during the last glacial. Multibeam bathymetry from Marguerite Trough have revealed streamlined subglacial bedforms along the length of the trough and meltwater features (subglacial basins and channels) in the bay and on the inner to middle continental shelf. The channels are inferred to be subglacial in origin based on the fact that they have sections with negative slope gradients and areas of overdeepening along their thalwegs. We investigate the subglacial channel systems on the continental shelf in several ways. First, we investigate channel origin by analysing a series of sediment cores acquired in the channels and in the flat areas immediately in front of them. Interestingly, the cores record a relatively "normal" Late Pleistocene glacial-postglacial stratigraphy of (glacial) diamicts overlain by (post-glacial) hemipelagic muds and do not sample any waterlain sediments (bedded sands, gravels). Physical parameters from the cores allow us to correlate these facies with sediment cores further out on the continental shelf (cf. Kilfeather et al., 2011) suggesting that ice was grounded in the channel system during the last glacial. Secondly, we investigate channel morphometry using high-resolution multibeam data (gridded surfaces have cell sizes c. 0.4 m) and the medium-resolution multibeam data (grid cell sizes of c. 40 m) from ship-mounted systems; the data are complimented by seafloor photographs taken by the Isis ROV. Integration of the these data reveals that the side slopes of the channels are much steeper than originally thought, with some even being undercut, which will affect estimates of potential meltwater flux through the channel system. Given the incredibly large meltwater fluxes that would be required for continuous flow through the channel system, and the evidence for grounded ice during the last glacial, we consider it

  12. Ice thickness, volume and subglacial topography of Urumqi Glacier ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 3. Ice thickness, volume and subglacial topography of Urumqi Glacier No. 1, Tianshan mountains, central Asia, by ground penetrating radar survey. Puyu Wang Zhongqin Li Shuang Jin Ping Zhou Hongbing Yao Wenbin Wang. Volume 123 Issue 3 April ...

  13. A wireless subglacial probe for deep ice applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C.J.P.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/191522236; Boot, W.; Hubbard, A.; Pettersson, R.; Wilhelms, F.; van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; van de Wal, R.S.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101899556

    2012-01-01

    We present the design and first results from two experiments using a wireless subglacial sensor system (WiSe) that is able to transmit data through 2500m thick ice. Energy consumption of the probes is minimized, enabling the transmission of data for at least 10 years. In July 2010 the first

  14. Incorporating modelled subglacial hydrology into inversions for basal drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Koziol

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge in modelling coupled ice-flow–subglacial hydrology is initializing the state and parameters of the system. We address this problem by presenting a workflow for initializing these values at the start of a summer melt season. The workflow depends on running a subglacial hydrology model for the winter season, when the system is not forced by meltwater inputs, and ice velocities can be assumed constant. Key parameters of the winter run of the subglacial hydrology model are determined from an initial inversion for basal drag using a linear sliding law. The state of the subglacial hydrology model at the end of winter is incorporated into an inversion of basal drag using a non-linear sliding law which is a function of water pressure. We demonstrate this procedure in the Russell Glacier area and compare the output of the linear sliding law with two non-linear sliding laws. Additionally, we compare the modelled winter hydrological state to radar observations and find that it is in line with summer rather than winter observations.

  15. Microbial life in ice and subglacial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, P. B.; Bramall, N.; Tatebe, K.

    2003-04-01

    Conditions for microbial life to exist in solid ice require the presence of liquid water and sources of energy and bioelements. In ice in thermal equilibrium, liquid water will exist in a three-dimensional network of micron-sized veins and in nanometer-thick films on mineral grains in ice. Ionic impurities lower the freezing temperature in the veins to as low as -95^oC. Depending on mineral type, the film on a grain surface will remain liquid down to ˜ -40^oC. The impurities provide both energy (via microbially catalyzed redox reactions) and bioelements. The maximum sustainable microbial population depends on metabolic rate, which in turn depends on species, temperature, and type and concentration of impurities in veins and surfaces. Microbes have been imaged by epifluorescence in veins in sea and Arctic lake ice and on grains in Dry Valleys lake ice. Indirect evidence exists for metabolism of microbes in Vostok glacial ice, in Greenland basal ice, and in Sajama (Bolivia) glacial ice. We will discuss several approaches to detection of microbes: epifluorescence microscopy of glacial ice at low temperature; fluorescence spectra taken with BSL (a new borehole logging instrument); fluorescence of microbes on surfaces of silt and volcanic ash in glacial ice; and in-situ cultivation of bacterial colonies at intersections of mineral grains and liquid veins in ice held in contact with a nutrient medium at subfreezing temperature. Based on measurements in the oligotrophic Lake Tahoe, BSL is sensitive to a concentration of ˜10^3 microbes cm-3, which may be adequate to detect life in Greenland ice and in Lake Vostok. A miniaturized version could be used to search for life in Martian permafrost and in diapirs in Europan ice.

  16. Subglacial sediment mechanics investigated by computer simulation of granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, A.; Egholm, D. L.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Piotrowski, J. A.; Larsen, N. K.; Siegfried, M. R.; Beem, L.; Suckale, J.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanical properties of subglacial sediments are known to directly influence the stability of ice streams and fast-moving glaciers, but existing models of granular sediment deformation are poorly constrained. In addition, upscaling to generalized mathematical models is difficult due to the mechanical nonlinearity of the sediment, internal porosity changes during deformation, and associated structural and kinematic phase transitions. In this presentation, we introduce the Discrete Element Method (DEM) for particle-scale granular simulation. The DEM is fully coupled with fluid dynamics. The numerical method is applied to better understand the mechanical properties of the subglacial sediment and its interaction with meltwater. The computational approach allows full experimental control and offers insights into the internal kinematics, stress distribution, and mechanical stability. During confined shear with variable pore-water pressure, the sediment changes mechanical behavior, from stick, to non-linear creep, and unconstrained failure during slip. These results are contrary to more conventional models of plastic or (non-)linear viscous subglacial soft-bed sliding. Advection of sediment downstream is pressure dependent, which is consistent with theories of unstable bed bump growth. Granular mechanics prove to significantly influence the geometry and hydraulic properties of meltwater channels incised into the subglacial bed. Current models assume that channel bed erosion is balanced by linear-viscous sediment movement. We demonstrate how channel flanks are stabilized by the sediment frictional strength. Additionally, sediment liquefaction proves to be a possible mechanism for causing large and episodic sediment transport by water flow. Though computationally intense, our coupled numerical method provides a framework for quantifying a wide range of subglacial sediment-water processes, which are a key unknown in our ability to model the future evolution of ice

  17. Tectonic and erosion-driven uplift in the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains of East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom; Watts, Tony; Bell, Robin; Jamieson, Stewart; Finn, Carol; Damaske, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms leading to intraplate mountain building remains a significant challenge in Earth Sciences compared to ranges formed along plate margins. The most enigmatic intraplate mountain range on Earth is the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM) located in the middle of the Precambrian East Antarctic Craton. During the International Polar Year, the AGAP project acquired 120,000 line km of new airborne geophysical data (Bell et al., 2011, Science) and seismological observations (Hansen et al., 2010, EPSL) across central East Antarctica. Models derived from these datasets provide new geophysical perspectives on crustal architecture and possible uplift mechanisms for the enigmatic GSM (Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature). The geophysical data define a 2,500-km-long Paleozoic to Mesozoic rift system in East Antarctica surrounding the GSM. A thick high-density lower crustal root is partially preserved beneath the range and has been interpreted as formed during the Proterozoic assembly of East Antarctica. Rifting could have triggered phase/density changes at deep crustal levels, perhaps restoring some of the latent root buoyancy, as well as causing rift-flank uplift. Permian rifting is well-established in the adjacent Lambert Rift, and was followed by Cretaceous strike-slip faulting and transtension associated with Gondwana break-up; this phase may have provided a more recent tectonic trigger for the initial uplift of the modern GSM. The Cretaceous rift-flank uplift model for the Gamburtsevs is appealing because it relates the initiation of intraplate mountain-building to large-scale geodynamic processes that led to the separation of Greater India from East Antarctica. It is also consistent with several geological and geophysical interpretations within the Lambert Rift. However, recent detrital thermochrology results from Oligocene-Quaternary sediments in Prydz Bay (Tochlin et al., 2012, G3) argue against the requirement for major Cretaceous rift

  18. The last ice-sheet advance and retreat across the Antarctic continental shelf: Synchrony or diachrony?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenbrand, C.; Livingstone, S. J.; O'Cofaigh, C.; Stokes, C. R.; Vieli, A.; Jamieson, S.; Smith, J.; Kuhn, G.; Melles, M.; Graham, A. G.; Larter, R. D.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few decades, numerous studies from various sectors of the Antarctic continental shelf have reconstructed the spatial extent of grounded ice-sheet advance during the last glacial period and the timing of its retreat. Most reconstructions were based on the bathymetric mapping of subglacial bedforms on the seabed and the palaeoenvironmental interpretation and dating of sub-seafloor sediments in cores. In addition, surface exposure age dating on rocks from the hinterland using cosmogenic isotopes and ice-sheet models were used to constrain the last ice-sheet advance and retreat. Different regional reconstructions provided consistent results for several study areas. In contrast, recent circum-Antarctic reviews that compiled the spatial and temporal information about maximum ice-sheet advance and retreat from these regional studies came to conflicting conclusions regarding i) the maximum extent of grounded ice, and ii) the synchronous/diachronous behaviour of the northern and southern hemispheric ice sheets and the individual drainage sectors within the Antarctic Ice Sheet, respectively. Resolving these conflicts is essential for identifying the main drivers of Antarctic ice-sheet retreat, evaluating the contribution of Antarctic ice-sheet melting to global sea-level rise over the last ~20 ka, understanding the dynamics of individual drainage sectors within the Antarctic Ice Sheet, and locating possible glacial refuges for benthic organisms on the Antarctic shelf. Here we will present examples of circum-Antarctic reconstructions and discuss possible reasons for conflicting conclusions. In some cases, apparent discrepancies can simply be explained by the ambiguity of terms such as "Last Glacial Maximum", which can refer either to a particular time slice (e.g. 23-19 ka BP) or to the time when grounded ice reached its last maximum extent in a particular sector of the Antarctic continental shelf, and "deglaciation", which can refer either to the time of

  19. Cenozoic extension along the reactivated Aurora Fault System in the East Antarctic Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfarra, Paola; Maggi, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    The East Antarctic Craton is characterized by major intracontinental basins and highlands buried under the 34 Ma East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Their formation remains a major open question. Paleozoic to Cenozoic intraplate extensional tectonic activity has been proposed for their development and in this work the latter hypothesis is supported. Here we focus on the Aurora Trench (AT) within the Aurora Subglacial Basin (latitude 75°-77°S, longitude 117°-118°E) whose origin is still poorly constrained. The AT is an over 150-km-long, 25-km-wide subglacial trough, elongated in the NNW-SSE direction. Geophysical campaigns allowed better definition of the AT physiography showing typical half-graben geometry. The rounded morphology of the western flank of the AT was simulated through tectonic numerical modelling. We consider the subglacial landscape to primarily reflect the locally preserved relict morphology of the tectonic processes affecting the interior of East Antarctica in the Cenozoic. The bedrock morphology was replicated through the activity of the listric Aurora Trench Fault, characterized by a basal detachment at 34 km (considered the base of the crust according to available geophysical interpretations) and vertical displacements ranging between 700 and 300 m. The predicted displacement is interpreted as the (partial) reactivation of a weaker zone along a major Precambrian crustal-scale tectonic boundary. We propose that the Aurora Trench Fault is the southern continuation of the > 1000 km long Aurora Fault independently recognized by previous studies. Together they form the Aurora Fault System, a long lived tectonic boundary with poly-phased tectonic history within the EAC that bounds the eastern side of the Aurora Subglacial Basin. The younger Cenozoic reactivation of the investigated segment of the Aurora Fault System relates to the intraplate propagation of far-field stresses associated to the plate-scale kinematics in the Southern Ocean.

  20. Initiation and long-term instability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, Sean P. S.; Shevenell, Amelia E.; Montelli, Aleksandr; Fernandez, Rodrigo; Smith, Catherine; Warny, Sophie; Bohaty, Steven M.; Sjunneskog, Charlotte; Leventer, Amy; Frederick, Bruce; Blankenship, Donald D.

    2017-12-01

    Antarctica’s continental-scale ice sheets have evolved over the past 50 million years. However, the dearth of ice-proximal geological records limits our understanding of past East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) behaviour and thus our ability to evaluate its response to ongoing environmental change. The EAIS is marine-terminating and grounded below sea level within the Aurora subglacial basin, indicating that this catchment, which drains ice to the Sabrina Coast, may be sensitive to climate perturbations. Here we show, using marine geological and geophysical data from the continental shelf seaward of the Aurora subglacial basin, that marine-terminating glaciers existed at the Sabrina Coast by the early to middle Eocene epoch. This finding implies the existence of substantial ice volume in the Aurora subglacial basin before continental-scale ice sheets were established about 34 million years ago. Subsequently, ice advanced across and retreated from the Sabrina Coast continental shelf at least 11 times during the Oligocene and Miocene epochs. Tunnel valleys associated with half of these glaciations indicate that a surface-meltwater-rich sub-polar glacial system existed under climate conditions similar to those anticipated with continued anthropogenic warming. Cooling since the late Miocene resulted in an expanded polar EAIS and a limited glacial response to Pliocene warmth in the Aurora subglacial basin catchment. Geological records from the Sabrina Coast shelf indicate that, in addition to ocean temperature, atmospheric temperature and surface-derived meltwater influenced East Antarctic ice mass balance under warmer-than-present climate conditions. Our results imply a dynamic EAIS response with continued anthropogenic warming and suggest that the EAIS contribution to future global sea-level projections may be under-estimated.

  1. A confined-unconfined aquifer model for subglacial hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Sebastian; Kleiner, Thomas; Humbert, Angelika

    2017-04-01

    Modeling the evolution of subglacial channels underneath ice sheets is an urgent need for ice sheet modellers, as channels affect sliding velocities and hence ice discharge. Owing to very limited observations of the subglacial hydraulic system, the development of physical models is quite restricted. Subglacial hydrology models are currently taking two different approaches: either modeling the development of a network of individual channels or modeling an equivalent porous layer where the channels are not resolved individually but modeled as a diffusive process, adjusted to reproduce the characteristic of an efficient system. Here, we use the latter approach, improving it by using a confined-unconfined aquifer model (CUAS), that allows the system to run dry in absence of sufficient water input. This ensures physical values for the water pressure. Channels are represented by adjusting the permeability and storage of the system according to projected locations of channels. The evolution of channel positions is governed by a reduced complexity model that computes channel growths according to simple rules (weighted random walks descending the hydraulic potential). As a proof of concept we present the results of the evolution of the hydrological system over time for a simple artificial glacier geometry.

  2. Constraining local subglacial bedrock erosion rates with cosmogenic nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsig, Christian; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Christl, Marcus; Reitner, Jürgen; Reindl, Martin; Bichler, Mathias; Vockenhuber, Christof; Akcar, Naki; Schlüchter, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The constant buildup of cosmogenic nuclides, most prominently 10Be, in exposed rock surfaces is routinely employed for dating various landforms such as landslides or glacial moraines. One fundamental assumption is that no cosmogenic nuclides were initially present in the rock, before the event to be dated. In the context of glacially formed landscapes it is commonly assumed that subglacial erosion of at least a few meters of bedrock during the period of ice coverage is sufficient to remove any previously accumulated nuclides, since the production of 10Be ceases at a depth of 2-3 m. Insufficient subglacial erosion leads to overestimation of surface exposure ages. If the time since the retreat of the glacier is known, however, a discordant concentration of cosmogenic nuclides delivers information about the depth of subglacial erosion. Here we present data from proglacial bedrock at two sites in the Alps. Goldbergkees in the Hohe Tauern National Park in Austria and Gruebengletscher in the Grimsel Pass area in Switzerland. Samples were taken inside as well as outside of the glaciers' Little Ice Age extent. Measured nuclide concentrations are analyzed with the help of a MATLAB model simulating periods of exposure or glacial cover of user-definable length and erosion rates.

  3. Subglacial discharge-driven renewal of tidewater glacier fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dustin; Sutherland, David A.; Shroyer, Emily L.; Nash, Jonathan D.; Catania, Ginny A.; Stearns, Leigh A.

    2017-08-01

    The classic model of fjord renewal is complicated by tidewater glacier fjords, where submarine melt and subglacial discharge provide substantial buoyancy forcing at depth. Here we use a suite of idealized, high-resolution numerical ocean simulations to investigate how fjord circulation driven by subglacial plumes, tides, and wind stress depends on fjord width, grounding line depth, and sill height. We find that the depth of the grounding line compared to the sill is a primary control on plume-driven renewal of basin waters. In wide fjords the plume exhibits strong lateral recirculation, increasing the dilution and residence time of glacially-modified waters. Rapid drawdown of basin waters by the subglacial plume in narrow fjords allows for shelf waters to cascade deep into the basin; wide fjords result in a thin, boundary current of shelf waters that flow toward the terminus slightly below sill depth. Wind forcing amplifies the plume-driven exchange flow; however, wind-induced vertical mixing is limited to near-surface waters. Tidal mixing over the sill increases in-fjord transport of deep shelf waters and erodes basin stratification above the sill depth. These results underscore the first-order importances of fjord-glacier geometry in controlling circulation in tidewater glacier fjords and, thus, ocean heat transport to the ice.

  4. What controls the explosivity of subglacial rhyolite in Iceland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, J.; Tuffen, H.; McGarvie, D. W.

    2012-04-01

    The eruption controls of subglacial rhyolite are poorly understood but this is of key importance in mitigating hazards. In subaerial rhyolite eruptions the pre-eruptive volatile content and degassing path are considered to be the primary controls of explosivity, but is this also the case when rhyolitic eruptions occur under ice? We present the first pre-eruptive volatile content and degassing path data for subglacial rhyolite eruptions, comparing three edifices of contrasting eruption style from the Torfajökull complex in South Iceland[1]. Volatile concentrations were measured using infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). SE Rauðfossafjöll is a large volume (~1 km3) explosively erupted tuya, Dalakvísl (~0.2 km3) is an entirely subglacial edifice that has both explosive and effusive deposits and Bláhnúkur is a small volume (Bull Vol. [3] Tuffen et al. (2007) Ann Glac, 45(1): 87-94

  5. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  6. Seismic modeling study of Vostok lake East Antartica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, J. M.; Gei, D.; Camerlenghi, A.

    2003-04-01

    Vostok Lake is located in East Antarctica between 76.2oS/102oE and 78.4oS/108oE (extending about 230 km to the north of Vostok Station), beneath nearly 4 km of glacial ice. This lake, believed to be the largest subglacial lake, has been surveyed by airbone 60 MHz radio-echo soundings (Kapitsa et al., 1996) and seismic surveys (Kapitsa et al., 1996; Masolov et al., 1999). In this work, we study the seismic visibility of the lake using seismic modeling and analyze the amplitude variations with offset (AVA) characteristics of the ice/water and water/sediment interfaces by computing the corresponding reflection and refraction coefficients. There is a need of suitable models for studying the seismic response of subglacial lakes and planning seismic reflection surveys. The geological model is defined by using available seismic information and poroelastic models that take into account the in-situ conditions of the different layers versus temperature and pressure. The methodology involves rock-physics models of the shallow layer (firn), the ice sheet and the lake sediments, numerical simulation of synthetic seismograms, ray tracing, tau-p transform, and AVA analysis, based on the theoretical reflection coefficients. The reflection seismograms show a set of straight events and the two reflection events associated with the top and bottom of the lake. Theoretical AVA analysis of these reflections indicates that, at near offsets, the PP-wave anomaly is negative for the ice/water interface and constant for the water/sediment interface. This behavior is confirmed by AVA analysis of the synthetic data set. This study shows that subglacial lakes can be identified by using seismic methods. Moreover, the methodology provides a tool for designing suitable seismic surveys. largeReferences} begin{description} Carcione, J.M. and Gei, D., Seismic modeling study of a subglacial lake, submitted to Geophysical Prospecting. Kapitsa, A. P., Ridley, J. K., Robin, G. de Q., Siegert, M. J., and

  7. Structure, morphology and water flux of a subglacial drainage system, Midtdalsbreen, Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willis, I.C.; Fitzsimmons, C.D.; Melvold, K.; Andreassen, L.M.; Giesen, R.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831603

    2012-01-01

    Digital elevation models of the surface and bed of Midtdalsbreen, Norway are used to calculate subglacial hydraulic potential and infer drainage system structure for a series of subglacial water pressure assumptions ranging from atmospheric to ice overburden. A distributed degree-day model is used

  8. Crustal and lithospheric structure of the west Antarctic Rift System from geophysical investigations: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, John C.

    1999-01-01

    The active West Antarctic Rift System, which extends from the continental shelf of the Ross Sea, beneath the Ross Ice Shelf and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, is comparable in size to the Basin and Range in North America, or the East African rift systems. Geophysical surveys (primarily marine seismic and aeromagnetic combined with radar ice sounding) have extended the information provided by sparse geologic exposures and a few drill holes over the ice and sea covered area. Rift basins developed in the early Cretaceous accompanied by the major extension of the region. Tectonic activity has continued episodically in the Cenozoic to the present, including major uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains. The West Antarctic ice sheet, and the late Cenozoic volcanic activity in the West Antarctic Rift System, through which it flows, have been coeval since at least Miocene time. The rift is characterized by sparse exposures of late Cenozoic alkaline volcanic rocks extending from northern Victoria Land throughout Marie Byrd Land. The aeromagnetic interpretations indicate the presence of > 5 x 105 km2 (> 106 km3) of probable late Cenozoic volcanic rocks (and associated subvolcanic intrusions) in the West Antarctic rift. This great volume with such limited exposures is explained by glacial removal of the associated late Cenozoic volcanic edifices (probably hyaloclastite debris) concomitantly with their subglacial eruption. Large offset seismic investigations in the Ross Sea and on the Ross Ice Shelf indicate a ~ 17-24-km-thick, extended continental crust. Gravity data suggest that this extended crust of similar thickness probably underlies the Ross Ice Shelf and Byrd Subglacial Basin. Various authors have estimated maximum late Cretaceous-present crustal extension in the West Antarctic rift area from 255-350 km based on balancing crustal thickness. Plate reconstruction allowed crustal extension in late Cenozoic time is unlikely, alternate mechanisms have been proposed for the

  9. Exploring Explanations of Subglacial Bedform Sizes Using Statistical Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Hillier

    Full Text Available Sediments beneath modern ice sheets exert a key control on their flow, but are largely inaccessible except through geophysics or boreholes. In contrast, palaeo-ice sheet beds are accessible, and typically characterised by numerous bedforms. However, the interaction between bedforms and ice flow is poorly constrained and it is not clear how bedform sizes might reflect ice flow conditions. To better understand this link we present a first exploration of a variety of statistical models to explain the size distribution of some common subglacial bedforms (i.e., drumlins, ribbed moraine, MSGL. By considering a range of models, constructed to reflect key aspects of the physical processes, it is possible to infer that the size distributions are most effectively explained when the dynamics of ice-water-sediment interaction associated with bedform growth is fundamentally random. A 'stochastic instability' (SI model, which integrates random bedform growth and shrinking through time with exponential growth, is preferred and is consistent with other observations of palaeo-bedforms and geophysical surveys of active ice sheets. Furthermore, we give a proof-of-concept demonstration that our statistical approach can bridge the gap between geomorphological observations and physical models, directly linking measurable size-frequency parameters to properties of ice sheet flow (e.g., ice velocity. Moreover, statistically developing existing models as proposed allows quantitative predictions to be made about sizes, making the models testable; a first illustration of this is given for a hypothesised repeat geophysical survey of bedforms under active ice. Thus, we further demonstrate the potential of size-frequency distributions of subglacial bedforms to assist the elucidation of subglacial processes and better constrain ice sheet models.

  10. Antarctic Ice Velocity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This compilation of recent ice velocity data of the Antarctic ice sheet is intended for use by the polar scientific community. The data are presented in tabular form...

  11. Direct observations of evolving subglacial drainage beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lauren C; Catania, Ginny A; Hoffman, Matthew J; Gulley, Jason D; Lüthi, Martin P; Ryser, Claudia; Hawley, Robert L; Neumann, Thomas A

    2014-10-02

    Seasonal acceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet is influenced by the dynamic response of the subglacial hydrologic system to variability in meltwater delivery to the bed via crevasses and moulins (vertical conduits connecting supraglacial water to the bed of the ice sheet). As the melt season progresses, the subglacial hydrologic system drains supraglacial meltwater more efficiently, decreasing basal water pressure and moderating the ice velocity response to surface melting. However, limited direct observations of subglacial water pressure mean that the spatiotemporal evolution of the subglacial hydrologic system remains poorly understood. Here we show that ice velocity is well correlated with moulin hydraulic head but is out of phase with that of nearby (0.3-2 kilometres away) boreholes, indicating that moulins connect to an efficient, channelized component of the subglacial hydrologic system, which exerts the primary control on diurnal and multi-day changes in ice velocity. Our simultaneous measurements of moulin and borehole hydraulic head and ice velocity in the Paakitsoq region of western Greenland show that decreasing trends in ice velocity during the latter part of the melt season cannot be explained by changes in the ability of moulin-connected channels to convey supraglacial melt. Instead, these observations suggest that decreasing late-season ice velocity may be caused by changes in connectivity in unchannelized regions of the subglacial hydrologic system. Understanding this spatiotemporal variability in subglacial pressures is increasingly important because melt-season dynamics affect ice velocity beyond the conclusion of the melt season.

  12. Calculating the balance between atmospheric CO2 drawdown and organic carbon oxidation in subglacial hydrochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Drever, James I.; Humphrey, Neil F.

    2017-04-01

    In order to constrain CO2 fluxes from biogeochemical processes in subglacial environments, we model the evolution of pH and alkalinity over a range of subglacial weathering conditions. We show that subglacial waters reach or exceed atmospheric pCO2 levels when atmospheric gases are able to partially access the subglacial environment. Subsequently, closed system oxidation of sulfides is capable of producing pCO2 levels well in excess of atmosphere levels without any input from the decay of organic matter. We compared this model to published pH and alkalinity measurements from 21 glaciers and ice sheets. Most subglacial waters are near atmospheric pCO2 values. The assumption of an initial period of open system weathering requires substantial organic carbon oxidation in only 4 of the 21 analyzed ice bodies. If the subglacial environment is assumed to be closed from any input of atmospheric gas, large organic carbon inputs are required in nearly all cases. These closed system assumptions imply that order of 10 g m-2 y-1 of organic carbon are removed from a typical subglacial environment—a rate too high to represent soil carbon built up over previous interglacial periods and far in excess of fluxes of surface deposited organic carbon. Partial open system input of atmospheric gases is therefore likely in most subglacial environments. The decay of organic carbon is still important to subglacial inorganic chemistry where substantial reserves of ancient organic carbon are found in bedrock. In glaciers and ice sheets on silicate bedrock, substantial long-term drawdown of atmospheric CO2 occurs.

  13. Subglacial sediment mechanics investigated by computer simulation of granular material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Tulaczyk, Slawek

    to the mechanical nonlinearity of the sediment, internal porosity changes during deformation, and associated structural and kinematic phase transitions. In this presentation, we introduce the Discrete Element Method (DEM) for particle-scale granular simulation. The DEM is fully coupled with fluid dynamics....... The numerical method is applied to better understand the mechanical properties of the subglacial sediment and its interaction with meltwater. The computational approach allows full experimental control and offers insights into the internal kinematics, stress distribution, and mechanical stability. During...... by linear-viscous sediment movement. We demonstrate how channel flanks are stabilized by the sediment frictional strength. Additionally, sediment liquefaction proves to be a possible mechanism for causing large and episodic sediment transport by water flow. Though computationally intense, our coupled...

  14. Stress Redistribution Explains Anti-correlated Subglacial Pressure Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Marie Lefeuvre

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a finite element model to interpret anti-correlated pressure variations at the base of a glacier to demonstrate the importance of stress redistribution in the basal ice. We first investigated two pairs of load cells installed 20 m apart at the base of the 210 m thick Engabreen glacier in Northern Norway. The load cell data for July 2003 showed that pressurisation of a subglacial channel located over one load cell pair led to anti-correlation in pressure between the two pairs. To investigate the cause of this anti-correlation, we used a full Stokes 3D model of a 210 m thick and 25–200 m wide glacier with a pressurised subglacial channel represented as a pressure boundary condition. The model reproduced the anti-correlated pressure response at the glacier bed and variations in pressure of the same order of magnitude as the load cell observations. The anti-correlation pattern was shown to depend on the bed/surface slope. On a flat bed with laterally constrained cross-section, the resulting bridging effect diverted some of the normal forces acting on the bed to the sides. The anti-correlated pressure variations were then reproduced at a distance >10–20 m from the channel. In contrast, when the bed was inclined, the channel support of the overlying ice was vertical only, causing a reduction of the normal stress on the bed. With a bed slope of 5 degrees, the anti-correlation occurred within 10 m of the channel. The model thus showed that the effect of stress redistribution can lead to an opposite response in pressure at the same distance from the channel and that anti-correlation in pressure is reproduced without invoking cavity expansion caused by sliding.

  15. Greenland subglacial drainage evolution regulated by weakly connected regions of the bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Matthew J; Andrews, Lauren C; Price, Stephen A; Catania, Ginny A; Neumann, Thomas A; Lüthi, Martin P; Gulley, Jason; Ryser, Claudia; Hawley, Robert L; Morriss, Blaine

    2016-12-19

    Penetration of surface meltwater to the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet each summer causes an initial increase in ice speed due to elevated basal water pressure, followed by slowdown in late summer that continues into fall and winter. While this seasonal pattern is commonly explained by an evolution of the subglacial drainage system from an inefficient distributed to efficient channelized configuration, mounting evidence indicates that subglacial channels are unable to explain important aspects of hydrodynamic coupling in late summer and fall. Here we use numerical models of subglacial drainage and ice flow to show that limited, gradual leakage of water and lowering of water pressure in weakly connected regions of the bed can explain the dominant features in late and post melt season ice dynamics. These results suggest that a third weakly connected drainage component should be included in the conceptual model of subglacial hydrology.

  16. ADMAP-2: The next-generation Antarctic magnetic anomaly map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golynsky, Alexander; Golynsky, Dmitry; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom; Damaske, Detlef; Blankenship, Don; Holt, Jack; Young, Duncan; Ivanov, Sergey; Kiselev, Alexander; Jokat, Wilfried; Gohl, Karsten; Eagles, Graeme; Bell, Robin; Armadillo, Egidio; Bozzo, Emanuelle; Caneva, Giorgio; Finn, Carol; Forsberg, Rene; Aitken, Alan

    2017-04-01

    The Antarctic Digital Magnetic Anomaly Project compiled the first international magnetic anomaly map of the Antarctic region south of 60°S (ADMAP-1) some six years after its 1995 launch (Golynsky et al., 2001; Golynsky et al., 2007; von Frese et al., 2007). This magnetic anomaly compilation provided new insights into the structure and evolution of Antarctica, including its Proterozoic-Archaean cratons, Proterozoic-Palaeozoic orogens, Palaeozoic-Cenozoic magmatic arc systems, continental rift systems and rifted margins, large igneous provinces and the surrounding oceanic gateways. The international working group produced the ADMAP-1 database from more than 1.5 million line-kilometres of terrestrial, airborne, marine and satellite magnetic observations collected during the IGY 1957-58 through 1999. Since the publication of the first magnetic anomaly map, the international geomagnetic community has acquired more than 1.9 million line-km of new airborne and marine data. This implies that the amount of magnetic anomaly data over the Antarctic continent has more than doubled. These new data provide important constraints on the geology of the enigmatic Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains and Prince Charles Mountains, Wilkes Land, Dronning Maud Land, and other largely unexplored Antarctic areas (Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Aitken et al., 2014¸ Mieth & Jokat, 2014, Golynsky et al., 2013). The processing of the recently acquired data involved quality assessments by careful statistical analysis of the crossover errors. All magnetic data used in the ADMAP-2 compilation were delivered as profiles, although several of them were in raw form. Some datasets were decimated or upward continued to altitudes of 4 km or higher with the higher frequency geological signals smoothed out. The line data used for the ADMAP-1 compilation were reprocessed for obvious errors and residual corrugations. The new near-surface magnetic data were corrected for the international geomagnetic reference field

  17. Sensitivity of simulated englacial isochrones to uncertain subglacial boundary conditions in central West Antarctica: Implications for detecting changes in ice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Gail; Jackson, Charles S.; Young, Duncan A.; Quartini, Enrica; Cavitte, Marie G. P.; Blankenship, Donald D.

    2017-04-01

    Information about the extent and dynamics of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet during past glaciations is preserved inside ice sheets themselves. Ice cores are capable of retrieving information about glacial history, but they are spatially sparse. Ice-penetrating radar, on the other hand, has been used to map large areas of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and can be correlated to ice core chronologies. Englacial isochronous layers observed in ice-penetrating radar are the result of variations in ice composition, fabric, temperature and other factors. The shape of these isochronous surfaces is expected to encode information about past and present boundary conditions and ice dynamics. Dipping of englacial layers, for example, may reveal the presence of rapid ice flow through paleo ice streams or high geothermal heat flux. These layers therefore present a useful testbed for hypotheses about paleo ice sheet conditions. However, hypothesis testing requires careful consideration of the sensitivity of layer shape to the competing forces of ice sheet boundary conditions and ice dynamics over time. Controlled sensitivity tests are best completed using models, however ice sheet models generally do not have the capability of simulating layers in the presence of realistic boundary conditions. As such, modeling 3D englacial layers for comparison to observations is difficult and requires determination of a 3D ice velocity field. We present a method of post-processing simulated 3D ice sheet velocities into englacial isochronous layers using an advection scheme. We then test the sensitivity of layer geometry to uncertain boundary conditions, including heterogeneous subglacial geothermal flux and bedrock topography. By identifying areas of the ice sheet strongly influenced by boundary conditions, it may be possible to isolate the signature of paleo ice dynamics in the West Antarctic ice sheet.

  18. Regional genetic diversity patterns in Antarctic hairgrass (Deschampsia antartica Desv.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wouw, M.J.; Van Dijk, P.J.; Huiskes, A.H.L.

    2008-01-01

    Aim To determine patterns in diversity of a major Antarctic plant species, including relationships of Antarctic populations with those outside the Antarctic zone. Location Antarctic Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica, sub-Antarctic islands, Falkland Islands and South America. Methods Amplified fragment

  19. Limnology and cyanobacterial diversity of high altitude lakes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-08

    Jul 8, 2014 ... inventory of Indian Space Research Organisation (2011), a total of 272 high altitude lakes covering an area of 617 ha are present in Himachal Pradesh ...... diatoms flora of four lakes and ponds from the Windmill Islands,. East Antarctica. Antarct. Sci. 13 410–419. Sabbe K, Hodgson DA, Verleyen E, Taton A, ...

  20. East Antarctic intraplate earthquakes recorded by the AGAP/GAMSEIS temporary seismic array delineate possible ancient rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, A. C.; Wiens, D.; Nyblade, A.

    2016-12-01

    East Antarctica is primarily a stable craton and thus little deformation as is seen in geodetic observations. Although Antarctica was once thought to be aseismic, small events have been detected teleseismically. In 2009 the AGAP/GAMSEIS project operated a network of 26 broadband seismic stations that recorded 27 seismic events (ML 1.74-3.43) The majority of events are 10-30 km deep indicating a tecontic origin. Most events occur beneath subglacial topographic depressions that border the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM). 16 events follow a linear chain of depressions between the GSM and the Vostok Subglacial Highlands (VSH) that link the Polar Subglacial Basin to the Lambert Graben. This particular feature was identified as an ancient 'rift' by Ferraccioli et al. (2011). Gravity data in the 'rift' is distinct from surrounding areas with high Bouger and low free air gravity anomalies in the 'rift', in contrast to the GSM and VSH (Ferraccioli et al., 2011). The `rift' is embedded in the seismically fast East Antarctic cratonic mantle (Heeszel et al., 2013), but it shows a narrow region of lower velocities (Lloyd et al., 2013) and has thinner continental crust (Hansen et al., 2010) than surrounding regions. The feature potentially represents a terrain boundary between the Mawson and Crohn cratons (Boger, 2011) or could be a failed continental rift. One year of data cannot fully constrain the underlying cause of the seismicity. To further characterize the tectonics we calculate first motion double couple focal mechanisms for events showing impulsive body wave arrivals and good azimuthal station coverage. Preliminary results show the majority of fault plane solutions are extensional with fault planes that orient parallel or subparallel to the strike of the 'rift'. We compute synthetic waveforms to further test the robustness of our fault plane solutions. We propose the events are intraplate earthquakes located in zones of weakness associated with a failed

  1. Simulating a Dynamic Antarctic Ice Sheet in the Early to Middle Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasson, E.; DeConto, R.; Pollard, D.; Levy, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    There are a variety of sources of geological data that suggest major variations in the volume and extent of the Antarctic ice sheet during the early to middle Miocene. Simulating such variability using coupled climate-ice sheet models is problematic due to a strong hysteresis effect caused by height-mass balance feedback and albedo feedback. This results in limited retreat of the ice sheet once it has reached the continental size, as likely occurred prior to the Miocene. Proxy records suggest a relatively narrow range of atmospheric CO2 during the early to middle Miocene, which exacerbates this problem. We use a new climate forcing which accounts for ice sheet-climate feedbacks through an asynchronous GCM-RCM coupling, which is able to better resolve the narrow Antarctic ablation zone in warm climate simulations. When combined with recently suggested mechanisms for retreat into subglacial basins due to ice shelf hydrofracture and ice cliff failure, we are able to simulate large-scale variability of the Antarctic ice sheet in the Miocene. This variability is equivalent to a seawater oxygen isotope signal of ~0.5 ‰, or a sea level equivalent change of ~35 m, for a range of atmospheric CO2 between 280 - 500 ppm.

  2. Subglacial bedforms and conditions associated with the 1991 surge of Skeidarárjökull, Iceland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waller, R.I.; Dijk, T. van; Knudson, O.

    2008-01-01

    Much previous research at surge-type glaciers has sought to identify features diagnostic of surge-type behaviour. However, in comparatively little work have subglacial landform-sediment characteristics been used to reconstruct changing basal processes and conditions during surge events. Subglacial

  3. A new methodology to simulate subglacial deformation of water saturated granular material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Piotrowski, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    can cause variations in the pore-fluid pressure. The pressure variations weaken or strengthen the granular phase, and in turn influence the distribution of shear strain with depth. In permeable sediments the strain distribution is governed by the grain-size distribution and effective normal stress...... of subglacial sediment to the shear stress of an overriding glacier. In this study, we present a new methodology designed to simulate subglacial deformation using a coupled numerical model for computational experiments on grain-fluid mixtures. The granular phase is simulated on a per-grain basis by the discrete......The dynamics of glaciers are to a large degree governed by processes operating at the ice-bed interface, and one of the primary mechanisms of glacier flow over soft unconsolidated sediments is subglacial deformation. However, it has proven difficult to constrain the mechanical response...

  4. A Microbial Community in Sediments Beneath the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet, Ice Stream C (Kamb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, M.; Han, S.; Foo, W.; Bui, D.; Lanoil, B.

    2004-12-01

    In 2000, an ice-drilling project focusing on the "sticky spot" of Ice Stream C recovered cores of sub-glacial sediments from beneath the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet. We have characterized several chemical and microbiological parameters of the sole intact sediment core. Pore waters extracted from these sediments were brackish and some were supersaturated with respect to calcite. Ion chromatography demonstrated the presence of several organic acids at low, but detectable, levels in the pore water. DAPI direct cell counts were approximately 107 cells g-1. Aerobic viable plate counts were much lower than direct cell counts; however, they were two orders of magnitude higher on plates incubated at low temperature (4 ° C; 3.63 x 105 CFU ml-1) than at higher temperatures (ca. 22° C; 1.5 x 103 CFU ml-1); no colonies were detected on plates incubated anaerobically at either temperature. 16S rDNA clone library analysis indicates extremely limited bacterial diversity in these samples: six phylogenetic clades were detected. The three dominant bacterial phylogenetic clades in the clone libraries (252 clones total) were most closely related to Thiobacillus thioparus (180 clones), Polaromonas vacuolata (34 clones), and Gallionella ferruginea (35 clones) and their relatives; one clone each represented the other three phylogenetic clades (most closely related to Ralstonia pickettii, Lysobacter antibioticus, and Xylella fastidiosa, respectively). These sequences match closely with sequences previously obtained from other subglacial environments in Alaska, Ellesmere Island, Canada and New Zealand. Implications of this microbial community to subglacial chemistry and microbial biogeography will be discussed.

  5. Truce with oxygen - A naerobiosis outcompete aerobiosis in the Antarctic lacustrine bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Chandramohan, D.

    The total number of bacteria counted directly by epifluorescent microscopy showed that they ranged from 10 sup(8)-10 sup(-1) in Antarctic lake water samples. The percentages of retrievable viable counts (RVC) of anaerobic bacteria (AnB) was greater...

  6. Long-term subglacial sliding patterns based on a sliding law with cavitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Sofie Vej; Egholm, D.L.

    In ice-sheet models and glacial landscape evolution models, subglacial sliding rates are often related to basal shear stress by a power-law. However, the power-law relationship implies that the subglacial bed can provide unlimited levels of basal drag as sliding rates increases, which is recogniz...... of cavitation on glacier sliding. Proc. R. Soc. A , 461, 609-627 (2005). Egholm et al. Modeling the flow of glaciers in steep terrains: The integrated second-order shallow ice approximation (iSOSIA). Journal of Geophysical Research, 116, F02012 (2011)....

  7. Feedbacks between subglacial dynamics and long-term glacial landscape evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brædstrup, Christian; Egholm, D.L.; Ugelvig, Sofie Vej

    computational experiments with a higher-order ice sheet model (Egholm et al., 2009) capable of simulating the long-term evolution of subglacial dynamics at a high spatial resolution. The orientation and magnitude of subglacial stress components depend not only on ice thickness and ice surface gradients...... associated to the level of cavitation (Iverson, 2012). The highly non-linear computational experiments are made possible by new and very efficient GPU-accelerated multigrid algorithms. The computational experiments show that higher-order stress effects associated with local changes to the bed gradient...

  8. Antarctic Mapping Tools for MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Chad A.; Gwyther, David E.; Blankenship, Donald D.

    2017-07-01

    We present the Antarctic Mapping Tools package, an open-source MATLAB toolbox for analysis and plotting of Antarctic geospatial datasets. This toolbox is designed to streamline scientific workflow and maximize repeatability through functions which allow fully scripted data analysis and mapping. Data access is facilitated by several dataset-specific plugins which are freely available online. An open architecture has been chosen to encourage users to develop and share plugins for future Antarctic geospatial datasets. This toolbox includes functions for coordinate transformations, flight line or ship track analysis, and data mapping in georeferenced or projected coordinates. Each function is thoroughly documented with clear descriptions of function syntax alongside examples of data analysis or display using Antarctic geospatial data. The Antarctic Mapping Tools package is designed for ease of use and allows users to perform each step of data processing including raw data import, data analysis, and creation of publication-quality maps, wholly within the numerical environment of MATLAB.

  9. Modelling the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Holm, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Antarctic ice sheet is a major player in the Earth’s climate system and is by far the largest depository of fresh water on the planet. Ice stored in the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) contains enough water to raise sea level by about 58 m, and ice loss from Antarctica contributed significantly...... to sea level high stands during past interglacial periods. A number of AIS models have been developed and applied to try to understand the workings of the AIS and to form a robust basis for future projections of the AIS contribution to sea level change. The recent DCESS (Danish Center for Earth System...... Science) Antarctic Ice Sheet (DAIS) model (Shaffer 2014) is forced by reconstructed time series of Antarctic temperature, global sea level and ocean subsurface temperature over the last two glacial cycles. In this talk a modelling work of the Antarctic ice sheet over most of the Cenozoic era using...

  10. East Antarctic rifting triggers uplift of the Gamburtsev Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto; Finn, Carol A; Jordan, Tom A; Bell, Robin E; Anderson, Lester M; Damaske, Detlef

    2011-11-16

    The Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains are the least understood tectonic feature on Earth, because they are completely hidden beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Their high elevation and youthful Alpine topography, combined with their location on the East Antarctic craton, creates a paradox that has puzzled researchers since the mountains were discovered in 1958. The preservation of Alpine topography in the Gamburtsevs may reflect extremely low long-term erosion rates beneath the ice sheet, but the mountains' origin remains problematic. Here we present the first comprehensive view of the crustal architecture and uplift mechanisms for the Gamburtsevs, derived from radar, gravity and magnetic data. The geophysical data define a 2,500-km-long rift system in East Antarctica surrounding the Gamburtsevs, and a thick crustal root beneath the range. We propose that the root formed during the Proterozoic assembly of interior East Antarctica (possibly about 1 Gyr ago), was preserved as in some old orogens and was rejuvenated during much later Permian (roughly 250 Myr ago) and Cretaceous (roughly 100 Myr ago) rifting. Much like East Africa, the interior of East Antarctica is a mosaic of Precambrian provinces affected by rifting processes. Our models show that the combination of rift-flank uplift, root buoyancy and the isostatic response to fluvial and glacial erosion explains the high elevation and relief of the Gamburtsevs. The evolution of the Gamburtsevs demonstrates that rifting and preserved orogenic roots can produce broad regions of high topography in continental interiors without significantly modifying the underlying Precambrian lithosphere. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  11. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-24

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas.

  12. Refined broad-scale sub-glacial morphology of Aurora Subglacial Basin, East Antarctica derived by an ice-dynamics-based interpolation scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Roberts

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ice thickness data over much of East Antarctica are sparse and irregularly distributed. This poses difficulties for reconstructing the homogeneous coverage needed to properly assess underlying sub-glacial morphology and fundamental geometric constraints on sea level rise. Here we introduce a new physically-based ice thickness interpolation scheme and apply this to existing ice thickness data in the Aurora Subglacial Basin region. The skill and robustness of the new reconstruction is demonstrated by comparison with new data from the ICECAP project. The interpolated morphology shows an extensive marine-based ice sheet, with considerably more area below sea-level than shown by prior studies. It also shows deep features connecting the coastal grounding zone with the deepest regions in the interior. This has implications for ice sheet response to a warming ocean and underscores the importance of obtaining additional high resolution data in these marginal zones for modelling ice sheet evolution.

  13. Viable cold-tolerant iron-reducing microorganisms in geographically diverse subglacial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Sophie L.; Telling, Jon P.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2017-03-01

    Subglacial environments are known to harbour metabolically diverse microbial communities. These microbial communities drive chemical weathering of underlying bedrock and influence the geochemistry of glacial meltwater. Despite its importance in weathering reactions, the microbial cycling of iron in subglacial environments, in particular the role of microbial iron reduction, is poorly understood. In this study we address the prevalence of viable iron-reducing microorganisms in subglacial sediments from five geographically isolated glaciers. Iron-reducing enrichment cultures were established with sediment from beneath Engabreen (Norway), Finsterwalderbreen (Svalbard), Leverett and Russell glaciers (Greenland), and Lower Wright Glacier (Antarctica). Rates of iron reduction were higher at 4 °C compared with 15 °C in all but one duplicated second-generation enrichment culture, indicative of cold-tolerant and perhaps cold-adapted iron reducers. Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes indicates Desulfosporosinus were the dominant iron-reducing microorganisms in low-temperature Engabreen, Finsterwalderbreen and Lower Wright Glacier enrichments, and Geobacter dominated in Russell and Leverett enrichments. Results from this study suggest microbial iron reduction is widespread in subglacial environments and may have important implications for global biogeochemical iron cycling and export to marine ecosystems.

  14. Recent technical developments at the IMAU: A new generation of AWS and wireless subglacial measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C.J.P.P.; Boot, W.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van de Wal, R.S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Two technical developments are presented: a new generation of AWS and a wireless subglacial measurement system. Both systems build on the experience of the IMAU in developing GPS systems (Den Ouden et al., 2010). Combining methods to minimize energy consumption and wireless communication form the

  15. Archean, Paleoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic Crust of Central East Antarctica: New Insights on Subglacial Geology from Proxy Geologic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodge, J. W.; Fanning, C. M.; Vervoort, J. D.; Fisher, C. M.; Nissen, C. I.

    2013-12-01

    , the basement and clast ages indicate the presence in central East Antarctica of a large, composite Archean-Proterozoic craton that reflects crustal growth within the core of East Gondwana. Correlation with the Gawler craton of Australia is confirmed by zircon isotopic compositions at 2.02, 1.85, 1.57, and 1.21 Ga. Age and isotopic correlation of 1.85, 1.46 and 1.21 Ga East Antarctic crust with comparable provinces in Laurentia (Idaho-Medicine Hat, Yavapai-Mazatzal-granite, and Grenville-Mojave, respectively) provide direct geologic support for the SWEAT reconstruction of Rodinia. Abundant ~1.2-1.1 Ga igneous and metamorphic clasts indicate the presence of Grenvillian orogenic belts in the interior that may record Rodinia assembly and sample crust underlying the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains. In the future, a combination of high spatial resolution and direct geologic sampling will be provided by rapid sub-ice drilling to recover rock samples from multiple sites, aided by targeting with potential-field geophysical data.

  16. Modelling subglacial drainage and its role in ice-ocean interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Ian; Dallaston, Michael; Wells, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Melting at the ice-ocean interface, both beneath ice shelves and at near-vertical tidewater margins, is strongly influenced by discharge of meltwater from beneath the grounded ice. The fresh water source can help to initiate a buoyant plume that rises up the ice face, entraining heat from the ocean to melt the ice. When the subglacial discharge is spatially and temporally variable, it can cause spatial and temporal variations in the melting rate, which in turn may influence ocean circulation in the cavity and ice flow within the shelf. Recent observations of channelized ice shelf bases may have their origin in variable subglacial discharge from beneath the grounded ice. In this work, we use physically-based models of the subglacial drainage system to examine the likely mode of melt water delivery across the grounding line. We find that if subglacial channels (Rothlisberger channels) exist they can be expected to `trumpet' out as the ocean is approached, due to a lack of confining stress to counteract wall melting. This causes a reduction in horizontal momentum in the water and can lead to pronounced localized melting around channel termini. This may lead to increased propensity for calving at such locations. We also examine the effect of subglacial discharge variations on the evolution of a downstream floating ice shelf. We find that lateral variations in the flow across the grounding line can result in variations in plume-driven melting which evolve to create basal channels in the shelf aligned with the flow. The preferred spacing of the channels is controlled by a balance between buoyancy-driven acceleration and turbulent mixing in the ocean layer.

  17. Images of Antarctic Ice Shelves

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent changes in the extent and stability of ice shelves in the Antarctic Peninsula prompted NSIDC to begin a monitoring program using data from the AVHRR Polar 1...

  18. Contributions to Antarctic research II

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliot, David H

    1991-01-01

    Contents: The Antarctic research series: statement of objectives - Pedogenic linkages between the cold deserts of Antarctica and the polar deserts - Ablation rates of the ice fields in the vicinity of the Allan Hills, Victoria Land...

  19. Antarctic crabs: invasion or endurance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huw J Griffiths

    Full Text Available Recent scientific interest following the "discovery" of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This "invasion hypothesis" suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40-15 million years ago and are only now returning as "warm" enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura, and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60 °S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0 °C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW. Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day "crab invasion". We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the

  20. Seasonal speed-up of large Greenland marine-terminating outlet glacier related to surface melt-induced changes in subglacial hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, D.; Sole, A.; Nienow, P. W.; Bartholomew, I. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has experienced increased rates of mass loss over the last decade due to increased surface melt and runoff and accelerated ice discharge. Two principal links between climate and ice discharge have been proposed. The first suggests that changes at the calving front of marine-terminating glaciers reduce resistive forces resulting in glacier acceleration and thinning or ‘draw-down’, while the second postulates that increased surface melt reaches the ice sheet bed locally and causes enhanced basal sliding, again leading to draw-down. Marine-terminating GrIS outlet glaciers generally display less sensitivity to variations in surface meltwater availability. Seasonal velocity variations have previously been explained by variations in calving rates due to the break up of the seasonal ice mélange or the ungrounding of ice near the terminus. Here we present sub-daily GPS ice velocity, surface lowering and air temperature measurements spanning the 2009 melt season along a flow line of Kangiata Nunata Sermia (KNS), the largest marine-terminating outlet glacier in South West Greenland. Surface velocity was measured at four GPS sites located 32-76 km from the calving front. A timelapse camera was installed with a field of view encompassing the calving terminus of KNS. The seasonal growth and drainage of supra-glacial lakes within the catchment was identified from MODIS imagery. The GPS data show multiple 2- to 12- day speed up events, often coincident with surface uplift, superimposed on a period of generally elevated velocity lasting 2 to 3 months. Reductions in lake volume were coincident with speed-up events at the nearby GPS sites providing strong evidence that these lakes drained to the glacier bed. These large volumes of meltwater were interpreted to be input to an inefficient, distributed drainage system creating episodes of high subglacial water pressure, hydraulic jacking and enhanced basal sliding. We conclude that between 36 km and

  1. Global Catalogue of the Martian Valley Networks: Evidences for Fluvial, Sapping and Subglacial Processes on Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau Galofre, A.; Jellinek, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    We use erosion models and statistical morphometry schemes to show quantitative evidence for fluvial, glacial, groundwater sapping and subglacial erosion on the Noachian highlands, to then build a global map of valley network origin and distribution.

  2. Ice-Dammed Lake Drainage Evolution at Russell Glacier, West Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L. Carrivick

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available KEY POINTS/HIGHLIGHTSTwo rapid ice-dammed lake drainage events gauged and ice dam geometry measured.A melt enlargement model is developed to examine the evolution of drainage mechanism(s.Lake temperature dominated conduit melt enlargement and we hypothesize a flotation trigger.Glaciological and hydraulic factors that control the timing and mechanisms of glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs remain poorly understood. This study used measurements of lake level at 15 min intervals and known lake bathymetry to calculate lake outflow during two GLOF events from the northern margin of Russell Glacier, west Greenland. We used measured ice surface elevation, interpolated subglacial topography and likely conduit geometry to inform a melt enlargement model of the outburst evolution. The model was tuned to best-fit the hydrograph rising limb and timing of peak discharge in both events; it achieved Mean Absolute Errors of <5%. About one third of the way through the rising limb, conduit melt enlargement became the dominant drainage mechanism. Lake water temperature, which strongly governed the enlargement rate, preconditioned the high peak discharge and short duration of these floods. We hypothesize that both GLOFs were triggered by ice dam flotation, and localized hydraulic jacking sustained most of their early-stage outflow, explaining the particularly rapid water egress in comparison to that recorded at other ice-marginal lakes. As ice overburden pressure relative to lake water hydraulic head diminished, flow became confined to a subglacial conduit. This study has emphasized the inter-play between ice dam thickness and lake level, drainage timing, lake water temperature and consequently rising stage lake outflow and flood evolution.

  3. Antarctic climate change and the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    This volume provides a comprehensive, up-to-date account of how the physical and biological : environment of the Antarctic continent and Southern Ocean has changed from Deep Time until : the present day. It also considers how the Antarctic environmen...

  4. Rapid Submarine Melting Driven by Subglacial Discharge, LeConte Glacier, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyka, R. J.; Dryer, W. P.; Amundson, J. M.; Truffer, M.; Fahnestock, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Submarine melting impacts the stability of tidewater glaciers worldwide, but the connections between the ocean, a warming climate, and retreat of outlet glaciers are poorly known. Clearly warm seawater plays an important role, but the tremendous heat potential resident in oceans and fjords must first be brought into contact with outlet glacier termini in order to affect them. We show here that for many glaciers, the principal process driving high rates of submarine melting is subglacial discharge of freshwater. This buoyant discharge draws in warm seawater, entraining it in a turbulent upwelling convective flow along the submarine face that melts glacier ice. To capture the effect of changing subglacial discharge on submarine melting, we conducted four days of hydrographic transects during late summer 2012 at LeConte Glacier, Alaska. A major rainstorm allowed us to directly measure the influence of large changes in subglacial discharge. We found strong submarine melt rates that increased from 9.0×1.0 to 16.8×1.3 m/d (ice face equivalent frontal ablation) as subglacial discharge increased from 130 to 440 m^3/s over a four day period. This subglacial discharge drove influx of warm seawater (thermal forcing ~ 8° C) to the terminus with fluxes increasing from 1800 to 4000 m3/s. Our ice equivalent frontal ablation rates due to submarine melting are two to three times values found for Greenland glaciers, where thermal forcing is substantially lower (~ 1 - 4 °C) and termini are wider. Together, these studies confirm the importance of submarine melting at grounded glaciers. At LeConte, the total frontal ablation rate (calving flux plus submarine melting) is ~ 3.0 x10^6 m^3/d w.e., which far surpasses surface ablation. One-half to two-thirds of the frontal ablation during September 2012 can be attributed to submarine melting. A two-layer model driven by a buoyant plume of subglacial discharge has been previously invoked to describe the proglacial fjord circulation

  5. Regulating Antarctic Tourism and the Precautionary Principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastmeijer, C.J.; Roura, R.

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of an overview of the developments in Antarctic tourism since 1956, this current development note examines the issue of international regulation of Antarctic tourism. After discussing one of the main management issues in respect of Antarctic tourism ¿ the assessment and prevention of

  6. Geomorphological evidence of channelized subglacial meltwater drainage under the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Aleksander; Wysota, Wojciech; Sobiech, Marcin; Piotrowski, Jan A.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of subglacial meltwater erosion on shaping glacial landscapes is contentious and often difficult to constrain due to the lack of unequivocal diagnostic criteria. The same holds for the role of subglacial meltwater in glacier movement processes and sediment transport and deposition. Here we present new evidence of widespread channelized erosion under the southern, soft-bedded fringe of the last Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) based on high-resolution terrain analysis with LiDAR imagery. We identify several tens of sites with "glacial curvilineation" landscapes first recognized by Lesemann et al. (2010, 2014) and considered as evidence of erosion by turbulent meltwater flows at the ice/bed interface. The "glacial curvilineation" landscapes mapped here consist of sets of parallel, winding ridges typically several metres high and up to several kilometres long occupying glacial overdeepenings and tunnel valleys. The ridges are aligned approximately perpendicular to the past ice sheet margins and they are composed of various deposits often pre-dating the last ice advance. We interpret them as erosional remnants of older landscapes dissected by high-energy subglacial meltwater flows. These findings suggest that the palaeoglaciological significance of meltwater drainage under the southern portion of SIS may have been grossly underestimated. References Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J.A. and Wysota, W., 2010. „Glacial curvilineations": New glacial landforms produced by longitudinal vortices in subglacial meltwater flows. Geomorphology 120, 153-161. Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J.A. and Wysota, W., 2014. Genesis of the "glacial curvilineation" landscape by meltwater processes under the former Scandinavian Ice Sheet, Poland. Sedimentary Geology 312, 1-18.

  7. Aerobic and Anaerobic Thiosulfate Oxidation by a Cold-Adapted, Subglacial Chemoautotroph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Zoë R.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Desch, Libby; Amada, Kirina; van Gelder, Will; Glover, Kevin; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical data indicate that protons released during pyrite (FeS2) oxidation are important drivers of mineral weathering in oxic and anoxic zones of many aquatic environments, including those beneath glaciers. Oxidation of FeS2 under oxic, circumneutral conditions proceeds through the metastable intermediate thiosulfate (S2O32−), which represents an electron donor capable of supporting microbial metabolism. Subglacial meltwaters sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Canada, over a seasonal melt cycle revealed concentrations of S2O32− that were typically below the limit of detection, despite the presence of available pyrite and concentrations of the FeS2 oxidation product sulfate (SO42−) several orders of magnitude higher than those of S2O32−. Here we report on the physiological and genomic characterization of the chemolithoautotrophic facultative anaerobe Thiobacillus sp. strain RG5 isolated from the subglacial environment at RG. The RG5 genome encodes genes involved with pathways for the complete oxidation of S2O32−, CO2 fixation, and aerobic and anaerobic respiration with nitrite or nitrate. Growth experiments indicated that the energy required to synthesize a cell under oxygen- or nitrate-reducing conditions with S2O32− as the electron donor was lower at 5.1°C than 14.4°C, indicating that this organism is cold adapted. RG sediment-associated transcripts of soxB, which encodes a component of the S2O32−-oxidizing complex, were closely affiliated with soxB from RG5. Collectively, these results suggest an active sulfur cycle in the subglacial environment at RG mediated in part by populations closely affiliated with RG5. The consumption of S2O32− by RG5-like populations may accelerate abiotic FeS2 oxidation, thereby enhancing mineral weathering in the subglacial environment. PMID:26712544

  8. Subglacial discharges create fluctuating foraging hotspots for sea birds in tidewater glacier bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Jacek Andrzej; Stempniewicz, Lech; Węsławski, Jan Marcin; Dragańska-Deja, Katarzyna; Wochna, Agnieszka; Goc, Michał; Iliszko, Lech

    2017-01-01

    Although the processes occurring at the front of an ice face in tidewater glacier bays still await thorough investigation, their importance to the rapidly changing polar environment is spurring a considerable research effort. Glacier melting, sediment delivery and the formation of seabird foraging hotspots are governed by subglacial discharges of meltwater. We have combined the results of tracking black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla equipped with GPS loggers, analyses of satellite images and in situ measurements of water temperature, salinity and turbidity in order to examine the magnitude and variability of such hotspots in the context of glacier bay hydrology. Small though these hotspots are in size, foraging in them appears to be highly intensive. They come into existence only if the subglacial discharge reaches the surface, if the entrainment velocity at a conduit is high and if there is sufficient macroplankton in the entrainment layer. The position and type of subglacial discharges may fluctuate in time and space, thereby influencing glacier bay hydrology and the occurrence of foraging hotspots. PMID:28266602

  9. Self-affine subglacial roughness: consequences for radar scattering and basal water discrimination in northern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas M.; Cooper, Michael A.; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Williams, Christopher N.; Paden, John D.; Siegert, Martin J.; Bamber, Jonathan L.

    2017-05-01

    Subglacial roughness can be determined at a variety of length scales from radio-echo sounding (RES) data either via statistical analysis of topography or inferred from basal radar scattering. Past studies have demonstrated that subglacial terrain exhibits self-affine (power law) roughness scaling behaviour, but existing radar scattering models do not take this into account. Here, using RES data from northern Greenland, we introduce a self-affine statistical framework that enables a consistent integration of topographic-scale roughness with the electromagnetic theory of radar scattering. We demonstrate that the degree of radar scattering, quantified using the waveform abruptness (pulse peakiness), is topographically controlled by the Hurst (roughness power law) exponent. Notably, specular bed reflections are associated with a lower Hurst exponent, with diffuse scattering associated with a higher Hurst exponent. Abrupt waveforms (specular reflections) have previously been used as a RES diagnostic for basal water, and to test this assumption we compare our radar scattering map with a recent prediction for the basal thermal state. We demonstrate that the majority of thawed regions (above pressure melting point) exhibit a diffuse scattering signature, which is in contradiction to the prior approach. Self-affine statistics provide a generalised model for subglacial terrain and can improve our understanding of the relationship between basal properties and ice-sheet dynamics.

  10. Subglacial discharges create fluctuating foraging hotspots for sea birds in tidewater glacier bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Jacek Andrzej; Stempniewicz, Lech; Węsławski, Jan Marcin; Dragańska-Deja, Katarzyna; Wochna, Agnieszka; Goc, Michał; Iliszko, Lech

    2017-03-01

    Although the processes occurring at the front of an ice face in tidewater glacier bays still await thorough investigation, their importance to the rapidly changing polar environment is spurring a considerable research effort. Glacier melting, sediment delivery and the formation of seabird foraging hotspots are governed by subglacial discharges of meltwater. We have combined the results of tracking black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla equipped with GPS loggers, analyses of satellite images and in situ measurements of water temperature, salinity and turbidity in order to examine the magnitude and variability of such hotspots in the context of glacier bay hydrology. Small though these hotspots are in size, foraging in them appears to be highly intensive. They come into existence only if the subglacial discharge reaches the surface, if the entrainment velocity at a conduit is high and if there is sufficient macroplankton in the entrainment layer. The position and type of subglacial discharges may fluctuate in time and space, thereby influencing glacier bay hydrology and the occurrence of foraging hotspots.

  11. Potential Activity of Subglacial Microbiota Transported to Anoxic River Delta Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Karen A.; Stibal, Marek; Olsen, Nikoline S.

    2017-01-01

    The Watson River drains a portion of the SW Greenland ice sheet, transporting microbial communities from subglacial environments to a delta at the head of Søndre Strømfjord. This study investigates the potential activity and community shifts of glacial microbiota deposited and buried under layers...... shift in predominant community members and a decline in diversity and cell abundance. These results highlight the need for further investigations into the fate of subglacial microbiota within downstream environments.......The Watson River drains a portion of the SW Greenland ice sheet, transporting microbial communities from subglacial environments to a delta at the head of Søndre Strømfjord. This study investigates the potential activity and community shifts of glacial microbiota deposited and buried under layers...... of sediments within the river delta. A long-term (12-month) incubation experiment was established using Watson River delta sediment under anaerobic conditions, with and without CO2/H2 enrichment. Within CO2/H2-amended incubations, sulphate depletion and a shift in the microbial community to a 52% predominance...

  12. Preliminary report on diatoms from the deep lake terraces, Vestfold Hills, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Kellogg, D.E.; Kellogg, T.B.

    Deep lake (latitudes 68~'22' and 68~'40'S longitudes 77~'49' and 78~'33'E) is one of the two most saline lakes in the Vestfold Hills, Antarctica. During December 1974, the Antarctic Division of the Australian Department of Science and Technology...

  13. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  14. Numerical modelling of esker formation in semi-circular subglacial channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaud, Flavien; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Venditti, Jeremy G.

    2017-04-01

    Eskers hold valuable information about past subglacial hydraulic conditions in their spatial organization, geometry, and sedimentary structures. The relations between hydraulic conditions and esker properties are nevertheless intricate as the formation of eskers has been mainly inferred from descriptive theories, about which a consensus has yet to be reached. Eskers are prevalent in areas of rigid bed and thin till cover and their formation is thought to be predominantly controlled by either water or sediment availability. In this study, we develop a 1-D numerical model of sediment transport in semi-circular bedrock-floored channels to explore the physical processes leading to esker formation. The model encompasses channel evolution by melt-opening created by the viscous heat dissipated as water flows, the creep closure of the ice walls, and changes in cross-sectional area due to sediment accumulation and removal. We find that a bottleneck in sediment transport close to the terminus is an inherent characteristic of subglacial channels. Creep closure is reduced as the ice thins towards the terminus and hydraulic potential gradients decline, thus reducing shear stresses. This bottleneck is accentuated when water discharge drops in a well established channel. We find the conditions most conducive to sediment deposition are low ice-surface slopes within several kilometres of the terminus and water discharge fluctuations over a few to several weeks. The model also produces shear stresses large enough to transport boulders under typical melt-season conditions. Our results thus suggest that incipient eskers form toward the end of the melt season, provided water input and sediment supply are sufficient. Overall these findings corroborate the theory that eskers are formed progressively during the waning stage of an ice sheet, although we suggest that eskers are a natural manifestation of the subglacial hydraulic system in the presence of an adequate trade-off between

  15. Implications of sediment transport by subglacial water flow for interpreting contemporary glacial erosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaud, Flavien; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Venditti, Jeremy G.

    2017-04-01

    The role of glaciers in landscape evolution is central to the interactions between climate and tectonic forces at high latitudes and in mountainous regions. Sediment yields from glacierized basins are used to quantify contemporary erosion rates on seasonal to decadal timescales, often under the assumption that subglacial water flow is the main contributor to these yields. Two recent studies have furthermore used such sediment fluxes to calibrate a glacial erosion rule, where erosion rate scales with ice sliding speed raised to a power greater than one. Subglacial sediment transport by water flow has however seldom been studied, thus the controls on sediment yield from glacierized basins remain enigmatic. To bridge this gap, we develop a 1-D model of morphodynamics in semi-circular bedrock-floored subglacial channels. We adapt a sediment conservation law from the fluvial literature, developed for both mixed bedrock / alluvial and alluvial conditions, to subglacial channels. Channel evolution is a function of the traditional melt-opening due to viscous heat dissipation from the water flow, and creep closure of the overlying ice, to which we add the closure or enlargement due to sediment deposition or removal, respectively. Using a simple ice geometry representing a land-terminating glacier, we find that the shear stresses produced by the water flow on the bed decrease significantly near the terminus. As the ice thins, creep closure decreases and large hydraulic potential gradients cannot be sustained. The resulting gradients in sediment transport lead to a bottleneck, and sediment accumulates if the sediment supply is adequate. A similar bottleneck occurs if a channel is well established and water discharge drops. Whether such constriction happens in space of time, in the presence of a sufficiently large sediment supply sediment accumulates temporarily near the terminus, followed shortly thereafter by enhanced sediment transport. Reduction in the cross-sectional area

  16. [Distribution of bacteria of Methylobacterium genus in the terrestrial biotopes of the Antarctic region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskaia, V A; Rokitko, P V; Shilin, S O; Chernaia, N A; Tashirev, A B

    2009-01-01

    Methylotrophs distribution has been studied in the terrestrial biotopes (moss, lichen, grass, soil, sludge of lakes) on the islands of Galindez, Barkhans, Irizar, Uruguay, Jalour, Petermann, Berthelot, Cruls, King George, Corner, Skua located in the Pacific sector of the Antarctic Region, as well as in analogous biotopes on the western shore of the Antarctic peninsula Basing on a complex of diagnosis features the isolated pink-pigmented strains, which facultatively use methanol and realize the serine cycle of assimilation of one-carbon compounds, are attributed to Methylobacterium genus. Methylobacterium strains occur more often in mosses, grass Deschampsia antarctica and lichens, than in the soil and lake sludge. Some regions ofAntarctica are comparable by the number of Methylobacterium cells with the same in the regions with moderate climate. An analysis of gene sequences 16S rRNA of the Antarctic methylobacteria with those of GenBank has shown a high extent of similarity with Methylobacterium extorquens (99.4-99.7%). Notwithstanding that the strains of Methylobacterium are resistant to the broad range of extreme factors (gamma-irradiation, UV-irradiation, dehydration), the Antarctic and collection strains of the genus were sensitive to the ions of such heavy metals as Cu, Hg, Cd, Cr (10 mg/l).

  17. Feeding repellence in Antarctic bryozoans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuerola, Blanca; Núñez-Pons, Laura; Moles, Juan; Avila, Conxita

    2013-11-01

    The Antarctic sea star Odontaster validus and the amphipod Cheirimedon femoratus are important predators in benthic communities. Some bryozoans are part of the diet of the asteroid and represent both potential host biosubstrata and prey for this omnivorous lysianassid amphipod. In response to such ecological pressure, bryozoans are expected to develop strategies to deter potential predators, ranging from physical to chemical mechanisms. However, the chemical ecology of Antarctic bryozoans has been scarcely studied. In this study we evaluated the presence of defenses against predation in selected species of Antarctic bryozoans. The sympatric omnivorous consumers O. validus and C. femoratus were selected to perform feeding assays with 16 ether extracts (EE) and 16 butanol extracts (BE) obtained from 16 samples that belonged to 13 different bryozoan species. Most species (9) were active (12 EE and 1 BE) in sea star bioassays. Only 1 BE displayed repellence, indicating that repellents against the sea star are mainly lipophilic. Repellence toward C. femoratus was found in all species in different extracts (10 EE and 12 BE), suggesting that defenses against the amphipod might be both lipophilic and hydrophilic. Interspecific and intraspecific variability of bioactivity was occasionally detected, suggesting possible environmental inductive responses, symbiotic associations, and/or genetic variability. Multivariate analysis revealed similarities among species in relation to bioactivities of EE and/or BE. These findings support the hypothesis that, while in some cases alternative chemical or physical mechanisms may also provide protection, repellent compounds play an important role in Antarctic bryozoans as defenses against predators.

  18. Geochemical processes leading to the precipitation of subglacial carbonate crusts at Bossons glacier, Mont Blanc Massif (French Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomazo, Christophe; Buoncristiani, Jean-Francois; Vennin, Emmanuelle; Pellenard, Pierre; Cocquerez, Theophile; Mugnier, Jean L.; Gérard, Emmanuelle

    2017-09-01

    Cold climate carbonates can be used as paleoclimatic proxies. The mineralogy and isotopic composition of subglacially precipitated carbonate crusts provide insights into the subglacial conditions and processes occurring at the meltwater-basement rock interface of glaciers. This study documents such crusts discovered on the lee side of a gneissic roche moutonnée at the terminus of the Bossons glacier in the Mont Blanc Massif area (France). The geological context and mineralogical investigations suggest that the Ca used for the precipitation of large crystals of radial fibrous sparite observed in these crusts originated from subglacial chemical weathering of Ca-bearing minerals of the local bedrock (plagioclase and amphibole). Measurements of the carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in the crusts indicate precipitation at, or near to, equilibrium with the basal meltwater under open system conditions during refreezing processes. The homogeneous and low carbonate δ13C values (ca. -11.3‰) imply a large contribution of soil organic carbon to the Bossons subglacial meltwater carbon reservoir at the time of deposition. In addition, organic remains trapped within the subglacially precipitated carbonate crusts give an age of deposition around 6500 years cal BP suggesting that the Mid-Holocene climatic and pedological optima are archived in the Bossons glacier carbonate crusts.

  19. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE): 1. Borehole-based englacial and subglacial measurements from a rapidly-moving tidewater glacier: Store Glacier, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Doyle, Samuel; Christoffersen, Poul; Young, Tun Jan; Hofstede, Coen; Hubbard, Alun; Box, Jason; Todd, Joe; Bougamont, Marion

    2016-04-01

    As part of the Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE) pressurised hot water was used to drill four 603-616 m-long boreholes to the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet at a site located 30 km from the calving front of fast-flowing, marine-terminating Store Glacier (70 degrees N, ~1000 m elevation). Four wired sensor strings were successfully installed in three of the boreholes. These included a thermistor string to obtain the englacial temperature profile installed in the same borehole as a string of tilt sensors to measure borehole deformation, and two sets of combined water pressure, electrical conductivity and turbidity sensors installed just above the bed in separate, adjacent boreholes. The boreholes made a strong hydrological connection to the bed during drilling, draining rapidly to ~80 m below the ice surface. The connection of subsequent boreholes was observed as a perturbation in water pressure and temperature recorded in neighbouring boreholes, indicating an effective hydrological connection between them. The sensors, which were wired to data-loggers at the surface, operated for between ~30 and >80 days from late summer into autumn before the cables stretched and snapped, with the lowermost sensors failing first. The records obtained from these sensors reveal (i) subglacial water pressures that were close to overburden but which generally increased through the period of measurement and varied diurnally by ~0.3 m, (ii) a minimum englacial temperature of -21 degrees C underlain by a zone of temperate ice, some tens of m thick, located immediately above the bed, and (iii) high rates of internal deformation and strain that increased towards the bed. These borehole observations are complemented by GPS measurements of ice motion, meteorological data, and seismic and radar surveys.

  20. Links Between Acceleration, Melting, and Supraglacial Lake Drainage of the Western Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, M. J.; Catania, G. A.; Newmann, T. A.; Andrews, L. C.; Rumrill, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of increasing summer melt on the dynamics and stability of the Greenland Ice Sheet is not fully understood. Mounting evidence suggests seasonal evolution of subglacial drainage mitigates or counteracts the ability of surface runoff to increase basal sliding. Here, we compare subdaily ice velocity and uplift derived from nine Global Positioning System stations in the upper ablation zone in west Greenland to surface melt and supraglacial lake drainage during summer 2007. Starting around day 173, we observe speedups of 6-41% above spring velocity lasting approximately 40 days accompanied by sustained surface uplift at most stations, followed by a late summer slowdown. After initial speedup, we see a spatially uniform velocity response across the ablation zone and strong diurnal velocity variations during periods of melting. Most lake drainages were undetectable in the velocity record, and those that were detected only perturbed velocities for approximately 1 day, suggesting preexisting drainage systems could efficiently drain large volumes of water. The dynamic response to melt forcing appears to 1) be driven by changes in subglacial storage of water that is delivered in diurnal and episodic pulses, and 2) decrease over the course of the summer, presumably as the subglacial drainage system evolves to greater efficiency. The relationship between hydrology and ice dynamics observed is similar to that observed on mountain glaciers, suggesting that seasonally large water pressures under the ice sheet largely compensate for the greater ice thickness considered here. Thus, increases in summer melting may not guarantee faster seasonal ice flow.

  1. Coupling autotrophic sulfide mineral weathering with dolomite dissolution in a subglacial ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, E. S.; Hamilton, T. L.; Havig, J. R.; Lange, R.; Murter, E.; Skidmore, M. L.; Peters, J.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence in the rock record suggests that glaciers have been present and covered a significant portion of the Earth's surface since the putative Mozaan Glaciation (circa 2.9 Ga) and were demonstrated recently to host active microbial communities that impact local and global biogeochemical cycles. In the present study, we applied a microcosm-based radioisotopic biocarbonate tracer approach to quantify rates of inorganic carbon assimilation in sediments sampled from beneath Robertson Glacier (RG), Alberta, Canada at 4°C. Rates of inorganic carbon assimilation were stimulated by the addition of ammonium and phosphate, suggesting that these nutrients might be of limited supply in the subglacial environment or, in the case of ammonia, might be serving as a source of reductant fueling inorganic carbon fixation. Geochemical analyses were used to assess the potential redox couples that might be fueling autotrophic activity. The difference in the concentration of sulfate (2.4 mM) in unamended microcosm fluids when compared to fluids sampled from killed controls following 180 days incubation suggests that inorganic carbon assimilation in microcosms is driven by microbial populations involved in the oxidation of mineral sulfides, most likely pyrite. Amendment of microcosms with 1 mM ammonia led to near stoichiometric production of nitrate (~890 μM) and lower production of sulfate (~1.5 mM), indicating that the enhanced activity observed in ammonia treated microcosms is likely due to the stimulation of autotrophic ammonia oxidizing populations. The isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in subglacial meltwaters ranged was -24.40 ‰ versus VPDB, which is consistent with a source for this organic carbon via the activity of autotrophs that use the Calvin cycle of inorganic carbon fixation. Quantification and sequencing of transcripts of Calvin cycle biomarker genes (ribulose-1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, encoded by cbbL) suggest the presence of a ubiquitous

  2. The use of magmatic water to reconstruct palaeo-ice thicknesses during subglacial rhyolitic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jacqueline; Tuffen, Hugh; McGarvie, Dave; Pinkerton, Harry; Wilson, Lionel

    2010-05-01

    Magma degassing patterns can potentially be used to reconstruct ice thicknesses during subglacial eruptions, as the pressure dependence of water solubility in silicate melts is reasonably well constrained. The amount of water remaining in the quenched bulk glasses should record the quenching pressure, which, in a subglacial setting, will be dependent on the pressure of overlying ice and/or meltwater that was present. This reconstruction technique has been applied to several basaltic volcanoes[1]. In one study the dissolved water contents was seen to vary as a function of altitude, consistent with the presence of an ice sheet[2]. Similar techniques have been applied to a rhyolitic volcano, as described below. Bláhnúkur is a small-volume rhyolitic, subglacial volcano at Torfajökull volcano, southern Iceland[3] that erupted at ~95 ka[4]. 45 glassy lava samples were collected from a variety of elevations and lithofacies types. These samples were analysed for water content using infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), and pressure-solubility relationships were calculated using VolatileCalc[5]. The results reveal a general decrease in water concentration with elevation, consistent with the presence of an ice sheet with a surface elevation of ~1,050 m a.s.l.. This corresponds with an ice thickness of ~450 m, consistent with the field evidence from tuyas of a similar age within the same region[6]. Furthermore, the results suggest an eruptive temperature of 850°C and 0 ppm CO2. However, not all samples agree with this overall trend. We suggest that samples with anomalously low water contents could have formed in regions where there was meltwater drainage which lowered the quenching pressure[7]. By contrast, water-rich samples could reflect intrusive formation resulting in loading by rock as well as ice[8]. Crucially though, the anomalous values are all from the same locations, suggesting that there are processes that are specifically affecting certain localities. In order to use

  3. Environmental microarray analyses of Antarctic soil microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yergeau, E.; Schoondermark-Stolk, S.A.; Brodie, E.L.; Déjean, S.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Gonçalves, O.; Piceno, Y.M.; Andersen, G.L.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Antarctic ecosystems are fascinating in their limited trophic complexity, with decomposition and nutrient cycling functions being dominated by microbial activities. Not only are Antarctic habitats exposed to extreme environmental conditions, the Antarctic Peninsula is also experiencing unequalled

  4. Culturable bacteria in subglacial sediments and ice from two Southern Hemisphere glaciers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foght, J; Aislabie, J; Turner, S; Brown, C E; Ryburn, J; Saul, D J; Lawson, W

    2004-05-01

    Viable prokaryotes have been detected in basal sediments beneath the few Northern Hemisphere glaciers that have been sampled for microbial communities. However, parallel studies have not previously been conducted in the Southern Hemisphere, and subglacial environments in general are a new and underexplored niche for microbes. Unfrozen subglacial sediments and overlying glacier ice samples collected aseptically from the Fox Glacier and Franz Josef Glacier in the Southern Alps of New Zealand now have been shown to harbor viable microbial populations. Total direct counts of 2-7 x 10(6) cells g(-1) dry weight sediment were observed, whereas culturable aerobic heterotrophs ranged from 6-9 x 10(5) colony-forming units g(-1) dry weight. Viable counts in the glacier ice typically were 3-4 orders of magnitude smaller than in sediment. Nitrate-reducing and ferric iron-reducing bacteria were detected in sediment samples from both glaciers, but were few or below detection limits in the ice samples. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were detected only in the Fox Glacier sediment. Restriction fragment analysis of 16S rDNA amplified from 37 pure cultures of aerobic heterotrophs capable of growth at 4 degrees C yielded 23 distinct groups, of which 11 were identified as beta-Proteobacteria. 16S rDNA sequences from representatives of these 11 groups were analyzed phylogenetically and shown to cluster with bacteria such as Polaromonas vacuolata and Rhodoferax antarcticus, or with clones obtained from permanently cold environments. Chemical analysis of sediment and ice samples revealed a dilute environment for microbial life. Nevertheless, both the sediment samples and one ice sample demonstrated substantial aerobic mineralization of 14C-acetate at 8 degrees C, indicating that sufficient nutrients and viable psychrotolerant microbes were present to support metabolism. Unfrozen subglacial sediments may represent a significant global reservoir of biological activity with the potential to

  5. Seismicity and Subglacial Hydrological Processes During Early Melt Season, Engabreen, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P. L.; Winberry, J.; Christianson, K.; Iverson, N. R.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Jackson, M.; Cohen, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    A broad array of mechanical and seismic instrumentation was deployed during May 2011 in subglacial tunnels beneath Engabreen, an outlet glacier of the Svartisen ice cap in northern Norway. Following a warm spell, increased melt supply to the glacier bed prompted several episodes of transient ice uplift and establishment of a more efficient basal hydraulic system. In each event, hydrological adjustment was accompanied by three distinct seismic sources, two of which have not been previously documented in glacial environments. High-frequency impulsive events with dominant Rayleigh-wave energy increased their rate-of-occurrence immediately prior to an abrupt change in basal water pressure and normal stress. These events are inferred represent propagation of water-filled crevasses permitting meltwater access to the bed. Ultra-long period (ULP, hydraulic jacking. During recovery of basal water pressure, vertical ULP deflections were correlated with increases in basal water flux and doubling of local subglacial seismic noise. The increase in seismic noise may represent turbulent flow and bedload sediment transport through newly-opened subglacial meltwater passages. The vertical ULP signal therefore likely reflects meltwater-forced uplift of ice. Surprisingly, although there was direct evidence that jacking activated frictional slip at the bed, there was no clear seismic expression of slip. Thus, broadband seismometers appear to have captured the transit of meltwater through crevasses, into isolated pockets at the glacier bed and then, by promoting ice uplift, draining though newly-established meltwater passages along the bed. Similar seismic sources could be detected elsewhere with strategically-located broadband seismic instrumentation, providing a means of remotely monitoring the hydrological processes that control ice motion.

  6. Small scale high resolution LiDAR measurements of a subglacial conduit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Gulley, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present direct measurements of surface roughness in a sub-glacial conduit system underneath the Rieperbreen Glacier, Svalbard, Norway. Data was collected with a low-cost (129 USD) Microsoft Kinect video game device used as a LIDAR sensor. Surface roughness is a primary control on water flow in rivers, channels, and cave conduit systems and understanding the effects of surface roughness on water flow has been problematic due to lack of direct measurements of roughness in natural systems. We use the ice scallop dimensions to derive flow velocity and explore implications of the changing roughness parameters as the cave grows and shrinks.

  7. Aeromagnetic evidence for a volcanic caldera(?) complex beneath the divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, John C.; Finn, C.A.; Blankenship, D.; Bell, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    A 1995-96 aeromagnetic survey over part of the Sinuous Ridge (SR) beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) divide shows a 70-km diameter circular pattern of 400-1200-nT anomalies suggesting one of the largest volcanic caldera(?) complexes on earth. Radar-ice-sounding (RIS) shows the northern part of this pattern overlies the SR, and extends south over the Bentley Subglacial Trench (BST). Modeled sources of all but one the caldera(?) anomalies are at the base of <1-2-km thick ice and their volcanic edifices have been glacially removed. The exception is a 700-m high, 15-km wide 'volcano' producing an 800-nT anomaly over the BST. 'Intrusion' of this 'volcano' beneath 3 km of ice probably resulted in pillow basalt rather than easily removed hyaloclastite erupted beneath thinner ice. The background area (-300 to -500-nT) surrounding the caldera(?) is possibly caused by a shallow Curie isotherm. We suggest uplift of the SR forced the advance of the WAIS.A 1995-96 aeromagnetic survey over part of the Sinuous Ridge (SR) beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) divide shows a 70-km diameter circular pattern of 400-1200-nT anomalies suggesting one of the largest volcanic caldera(?) complexes on earth. Radar-ice-sounding (RIS) shows the northern part of this pattern overlies the SR, and extends south over the Bentley Subglacial Trench (BST). Modeled sources of all but one the caldera(?) anomalies are at the base of < 1-2-km thick ice and their volcanic edifices have been glacially removed. The exception is a 700-m high, 15-km wide 'volcano' producing an 800-nT anomaly over the BST. 'Intrusion' of this 'volcano' beneath 3 km of ice probably resulted in pillow basalt rather than easily removed hyaloclastite erupted beneath thinner ice. The background area (-300 to -500-nT) surrounding the caldera(?) is possibly caused by a shallow Curie isotherm. We suggest uplift of the SR forced the advance of the WAIS.

  8. Formation and Demise of an Icing-Dammed Proglacial Lake on Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blade, M. K.; Moorman, B.

    2016-12-01

    In Sirmilik National Park on Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada, an icing forms each winter at the terminus of Fountain Glacier. The icing is most likely fed by a spring that discharges year-round through an unfrozen talik within the proglacial permafrost. In the summer, portions of the icing melt as a result of increased solar radiation, warm air temperatures, and an influx of meltwater. In the winter, a proglacial lake often forms dammed by the upvalley glacier, underlying permafrost, and downvalley icing. The objectives of this project were to: 1) characterize water flow through the proglacial area; 2) measure degradation of the icing through July 2014 and its impact on the lake; and 3) infer the 2014 proglacial lake formation history. The methods employed were DGPS mapping of the surficial ice and lake bathymetry, time-lapse photography of the hydrological activity, and dye tracing to identify hydrological connectivity. Results indicate that: 1) water flowed into, out of, and through the proglacial lake area through pathways established during the lake area formation. Water sources feeding the lake include: a spring, supra-glacial runoff, subglacial discharge, lateral stream, terrestrial stream, and meltwater from floating lake ice. 2) Icing degradation was most rapid at the marginal stream contact with running water resulting in a 0.8 metre lowering of lake water level. 3) The proglacial lake formed due to persistence of unfrozen water upvalley of the icing from the groundwater spring continuous water supply.

  9. Heavy metals in Antarctic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, J.E.A. de; Moreno, V.J. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (Argentina); Gerpe, M.S.; Vodopivez, C. [Instituto Antartico Argentino, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-02-01

    To evaluate levels of essential (zinc and copper) and non-essential (mercury and cadmium) heavy metals, 34 species of organisms from different areas close to the Antarctic Peninsula were analysed. These included algae, filter-feeders, omnivorous invertebrates and vertebrates. Mercury was not detected, while cadmium was found in the majority of organisms analysed (detection limit was 0.05 ppm for both metals). The highest cadmium concentration was observed in the starfish Odontaster validus. Anthozoans, sipunculids and nudibranchs showed maximum levels of zinc, while the highest copper level was found in the gastropod Trophon brevispira. Mercury and cadmium levels in fishes were below the detection limit. Concentrations of essential and non-essential metals in birds were highest in liver followed by muscle and eggs. Cadmium and mercury levels in muscle of southern elephant seals were above the detection limit, whereas in Antarctic fur seals they were below it. The objective of the study was to gather baseline information for metals in Antarctic Ocean biota that may be needed to detect, measure and monitor future environmental changes. 46 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Influence of ice-sheet geometry and supraglacial lakes on seasonal ice-flow variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Joughin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Supraglacial lakes play an important role in establishing hydrological connections that allow lubricating seasonal meltwater to reach the base of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Here we use new surface velocity observations to examine the influence of supraglacial lake drainages and surface melt rate on ice flow. We find large, spatially extensive speedups concurrent with times of lake drainage, showing that lakes play a key role in modulating regional ice flow. While surface meltwater is supplied to the bed via a geographically sparse network of moulins, the observed ice-flow enhancement suggests that this meltwater spreads widely over the ice-sheet bed. We also find that the complex spatial pattern of speedup is strongly determined by the combined influence of bed and surface topography on subglacial water flow. Thus, modeling of ice-sheet basal hydrology likely will require knowledge of bed topography resolved at scales (sub-kilometer far finer than existing data (several km.

  11. Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonolla, Mauro; Storelli, Nicola; Danza, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Lake Cadagno (26 ha) is a crenogenic meromictic lake located in the Swiss Alps at 1921 m asl with a maximum depth of 21 m. The presence of crystalline rocks and a dolomite vein rich in gypsum in the catchment area makes the lake a typical “sulphuretum ” dominated by coupled carbon and sulphur cyc...

  12. In-Situ Observations of a Subglacial Outflow Plume in a Greenland Fjord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Straneo, F.; Singh, H.; Das, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    We present oceanographic observations collected in and immediately outside of a buoyant, fresh, sediment-laden subglacial outflow plume rising up the marine-terminating front of Sarqardleq Glacier, Greenland (68.9 N, 50.4 W). Subglacial outflow plumes, associated with the discharge at depth of upstream glacial surface melt, entrain the relatively warm fjord waters and are correlated with enhanced submarine melt and increased calving. Few in-situ observations exist due to the challenges of making measurements at the calving front of glaciers. Our data were collected using a small boat, a helicopter, and a JetYak (a remote-controlled jet-ski-powered kayak). Temperature and salinity profiles in, around, and far from the plume are used to described its oceanographic properties, spatial extent, and temporal variability. This plume rises vertically up the ice front expanding laterally and away from the ice, over-shoots its stable isopycnal and reaches the surface. Its surface expression is identified by colder, saltier, sediment-laden water flowing at ~5 m/s away from the ice face. Within ~300 m from the ice it submerges as it seeks buoyant stability.

  13. LIMNOLOGY, LAKE BASINS, LAKE WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre GÂŞTESCU

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Limnology is a border discipline between geography, hydrology and biology, and is also closely connected with other sciences, from it borrows research methods. Physical limnology (the geography of lakes, studies lake biotopes, and biological limnology (the biology of lakes, studies lake biocoenoses. The father of limnology is the Swiss scientist F.A. Forel, the author of a three-volume entitled Le Leman: monographie limnologique (1892-1904, which focuses on the geology physics, chemistry and biology of lakes. He was also author of the first textbook of limnology, Handbuch der Seenkunde: allgemeine Limnologie,(1901. Since both the lake biotope and its biohydrocoenosis make up a single whole, the lake and lakes, respectively, represent the most typical systems in nature. They could be called limnosystems (lacustrine ecosystems, a microcosm in itself, as the American biologist St.A. Forbes put it (1887.

  14. A lander mission to probe subglacial water on Saturn's moon Enceladus for life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Konstantinos; Flores Martinez, Claudio L.; Dachwald, Bernd; Ohndorf, Andreas; Dykta, Paul; Bowitz, Pascal; Rudolph, Martin; Digel, Ilya; Kowalski, Julia; Voigt, Konstantin; Förstner, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The plumes discovered by the Cassini mission emanating from the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus and the unique chemistry found in them have fueled speculations that Enceladus may harbor life. The presumed aquiferous fractures from which the plumes emanate would make a prime target in the search for extraterrestrial life and would be more easily accessible than the moon's subglacial ocean. A lander mission that is equipped with a subsurface maneuverable ice melting probe will be most suitable to assess the existence of life on Enceladus. A lander would have to land at a safe distance away from a plume source and melt its way to the inner wall of the fracture to analyze the plume subsurface liquids before potential biosignatures are degraded or destroyed by exposure to the vacuum of space. A possible approach for the in situ detection of biosignatures in such samples can be based on the hypothesis of universal evolutionary convergence, meaning that the independent and repeated emergence of life and certain adaptive traits is wide-spread throughout the cosmos. We thus present a hypothetical evolutionary trajectory leading towards the emergence of methanogenic chemoautotrophic microorganisms as the baseline for putative biological complexity on Enceladus. To detect their presence, several instruments are proposed that may be taken aboard a future subglacial melting probe. The "Enceladus Explorer" (EnEx) project funded by the German Space Administration (DLR), aims to develop a terrestrial navigation system for a subglacial research probe and eventually test it under realistic conditions in Antarctica using the EnEx-IceMole, a novel maneuverable subsurface ice melting probe for clean sampling and in situ analysis of ice and subglacial liquids. As part of the EnEx project, an initial concept study is foreseen for a lander mission to Enceladus to deploy the IceMole near one of the active water plumes on the moon's South-Polar Terrain, where it will search for

  15. Ice-dammed lake drainage in west Greenland: Drainage pattern and implications on ice flow and bedrock motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Bjørk, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Ice-dammed lakes drain frequently in Greenland, but the impacts of these events differ between sites. Here we study the quasi-cyclic behavior of the ~40 km2 Lake Tininnilik in west Greenland and its impact on ice flow and crustal deformation. Data reveal rapid drainage of 1.83 ± 0.17 km3 of water...... of surface loading in addition to ice mass change, when assessing glacial isostatic adjustment or elastic rebound using geodetic data. Moreover, the results illustrates a linkage between subglacial discharge and ice surface velocity, important for assessing ice flux, and thus mass balance, in a future...

  16. Microscale evidence of liquefaction and its potential triggers during soft-bed deformation within subglacial traction tills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Emrys R.; Evans, David J. A.; van der Meer, Jaap J. M.; Lee, Jonathan R.

    2018-02-01

    Published conceptual models argue that much of the forward motion of modern and ancient glaciers is accommodated by deformation of soft-sediments within the underlying bed. At a microscale this deformation results in the development of a range of ductile and brittle structures in water-saturated sediments as they accommodate the stresses being applied by the overriding glacier. Detailed micromorphological studies of subglacial traction tills reveal that these polydeformed sediments may also contain evidence of having undergone repeated phases of liquefaction followed by solid-state shear deformation. This spatially and temporally restricted liquefaction of subglacial traction tills lowers the shear strength of the sediment and promotes the formation of "transient mobile zones" within the bed, which accommodate the shear imposed by the overriding ice. This process of soft-bed sliding, alternating with bed deformation, facilitates glacier movement by way of 'stick-slip' events. The various controls on the slip events have previously been identified as: (i) the introduction of pressurised meltwater into the bed, a process limited by the porosity and permeability of the till; and (ii) pressurisation of porewater as a result of subglacial deformation; to which we include (iii) episodic liquefaction of water-saturated subglacial traction tills in response to glacier seismic activity (icequakes), which are increasingly being recognized as significant processes in modern glaciers and ice sheets. As liquefaction operates only in materials already at very low values of effective stress, its process-form signatures are likely indicative of glacier sub-marginal tills.

  17. Geochemical Processes Leading to the Precipitation of Subglacial Carbonate Crusts at Bossons Glacier, Mont Blanc Massif (French Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Thomazo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cold climate carbonates can be used as paleoclimatic proxies. The mineralogy and isotopic composition of subglacially precipitated carbonate crusts (SPCCs provide insights into the subglacial conditions and processes occurring at the meltwater-basement rock interface of glaciers. This study documents such crusts discovered on the lee side of a gneissic roche moutonnée at the terminus of the Bossons glacier in the Mont Blanc Massif area (France. The geological context and mineralogical investigations suggest that the Ca used for the precipitation of large crystals of radial fibrous sparite observed in these crusts originated from subglacial chemical weathering of Ca-bearing minerals of the local bedrock (plagioclase and amphibole. Measurements of the carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in the crusts indicate precipitation at, or near to, equilibrium with the basal meltwater under open system conditions during refreezing processes. The homogeneous and low carbonate δ13C values (ca. −11.3‰ imply a large contribution of soil organic carbon to the Bossons subglacial meltwater carbon reservoir at the time of deposition. In addition, organic remains trapped within the SPCCs give an age of deposition around 6,500 years cal BP suggesting that the Mid-Holocene climatic and pedological optima are archived in the Bossons glacier carbonate crusts.

  18. Subglacial bed conditions during Late Pleistocene glaciations and their impact on ice dynamics in the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, S.; Laban, C.; Mesdag, C.S.; Rijsdijk, K.F.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in subglacial bed conditions through multiple glaciations and their effect on ice dynamics are addressed through an analysis of glacigenic sequences in the Upper Pleistocene stratigraphy of the southern North Sea basin. During Elsterian (MIS 12) ice growth, till deposition was subdued when

  19. Carbon dioxide emissions of Antarctic tourism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farreny, R.; Oliver-Solà, J.; Lamers, M.A.J.; Amelung, B.; Gabarrell, X.; Rieradevall, J.; Boada, M.; Benayas, J.

    2011-01-01

    The increase of tourism to the Antarctic continent may entail not only local but also global environmental impacts. These latter impacts, which are mainly caused by transport, have been generally ignored. As a result, there is a lack of data on the global impacts of Antarctic tourism in terms of

  20. JCADM, new directions in Antarctic data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, H.; de Bruin, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    The Joint Committee on Antarctic Data Management (JCADM) was established by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP), to assist in the fulfilment of the data management obligations imposed by the Antarctic Treaty (section III.1.c): "Scientific observations and results from Antarctica shall be exchanged and made freely available." JCADM comprises representatives of the National Antarctic Data Centres or national points of contact. Currently 31 nations around the world are represented in JCADM. So far, JCADM has been focussing on the coordination of the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD), the internationally accessible, web-based, searchable record of Antarctic and Southern Ocean data set descriptions. The AMD is directly integrated into the international Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) to help further merge Antarctic science into global science. The AMD is a resource for scientists to advertise the data they have collected and to search for data they may need. Currently, JCADM is in a transition phase, moving forward to provide data access. Existing systems and web services technology will be used as much as possible, to increase efficiency and prevent 're-inventing the wheel' This poster will give an overview of this process, the current status and the expected results.

  1. South African antarctic biological research programme

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    SASCAR

    1981-07-01

    Full Text Available This document provides a description of the past, current and planned South African biological research activities in the sub-Antarctic and Antarctic regions. Future activities will fall under one of the five components of the research programme...

  2. Impact of climate change on Antarctic krill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentino De Souza Silva, A.P.; Atkinson, A.; Kawaguchi, S.; Bravo Rebolledo, E.; Franeker, van J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Antarctic krill Euphausia superba (hereafter ‘krill’) occur in regions undergoing rapid environmental change, particularly loss of winter sea ice. During recent years, harvesting of krill has increased, possibly enhancing stress on krill and Antarctic ecosystems. Here we review the overall impact of

  3. Analysis of subglacial hydrodynamics and ice dynamics through combined terrestrial laser scanning and ground penetrating radar survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbud, Chrystelle; Rüttimann, Sébastien; Micheletti, Natan; Irving, James; Lane, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    This study shows how high resolution surveys of subglacial channel morphology combined with high resolution terrestrial laser scanner survey of an Alpine glacier help to understand subglacial hydrological forcing of ice dynamics. The study area is the Haut Glacier d'Arolla in Switzerland, an Alpine valley glacier for which subglacial drainage system has been well studied. A new generation of terrestrial laser scanners was used to investigate glacier surface ablation and other elements of glacial hydrodynamics at exceptionally high spatial and temporal resolution. The LiDAR RIEGL VZ-6000 scanner, with a laser 3B specifically designed for measurements of snow and ice cover surfaces, was tested at seasonal and daily scales. The data revealed spatial variations in the patterns of surface melt, controlled by both aspect and differential debris cover at the seasonal scale, and controlled by ogive-related differences in ice surface debris content at the daily scale. More tentatively, intra-daily scale measurements pointed to possible hydraulic jacking of the glacier associated with short-term water pressure rises at the downstream part of the glacier. A ground-penetrating radar (GPR) field campaign was conducted a year later in the location where possible hydraulic jacking had been detected previously. The aims of this campaign were (i) to assess GPR usage for subglacial channel detection; (ii) identify more precisely the channel morphology; and (iii) investigate further the hydraulic jacking hypothesis. 100 MHz antennas were used to map a 240 x 34 m area near the glacier snout where the ice thickness did not exceed 50 m. The corresponding data, after processing, allowed reconstruction of the bed topography and the morphology of subglacial channels in 3D, showing two of the latter in this area. One channel was followed for approximately 20 m upglacier and corresponding morphology estimates were performed. These data allowed for 3D reconstructions of both the bed

  4. Tracking seasonal subglacial drainage evolution of alpine glaciers using radiogenic Nd and Sr isotope systematics: Lemon Creek Glacier, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinger, A. E.; Aciego, S.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The transport pathways of water beneath a glacier are subject to change as melt seasons progress due to variability in the balance between basal water pressure and water flux. Subglacial hydrology has been well studied, but the understanding of spatial distribution is less well constrained. Whereas radiogenic isotopic tracers have been traditionally used as proxies to track spatial variability and weathering rates in fluvial and riverine systems, these techniques have yet to be applied extensively to the subglacial environment and may help resolve ambiguity in subglacial hydrology. Research has shown the 143Nd/144Nd values can reflect variation in source provenance processes due to variations in the age of the continental crust. Correlating the 143Nd/144Nd with other radiogenic isotope systematics such as strontium (87Sr/86Sr) provides important constraints on the role of congruent and incongruent weathering processes. Our study presents the application of Nd and Sr systematics using isotopic ratios to the suspended load of subglacial meltwater collected over a single melt season at Lemon Creek Glacier, USA (LCG). The time-series data show an average ɛNd ~ -6.83, indicating a young bedrock (~60 MYA). Isotopic variation helps track the seasonal expansion of the subglacial meltwater channels and subsequent return to early season conditions due to the parabolic trend towards less radiogenic Nd in June and towards more radiogenic Nd beginning in mid-August. However, the high variability in July and early August may reflect a mixture of source as the channels diverge and derive sediment from differently aged lithologies. We find a poor correlation between 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr (R2= 0.38) along with a slight trend towards more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr values with time ((R2= 0.49). This may indicate that, even as the residence time decreases over the melt season, the LCG subglacial system is relatively stable and that the bedrock is congruently weathered. Our study

  5. Observations and modelling of subglacial discharge and heat transport in Godthåbsfjord (Greenland, 64 °N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtsen, Jørgen; Mortensen, John; Rysgaard, Søren

    2017-04-01

    Subglacial discharge from tidewater outlet glaciers forms convective bouyant freshwater plumes ascending close the glacier face, and entrainment of ambient bottom water increases the salinity of the water until the plume reaches its level of neutral buoyancy at sub-surface levels or reaches the surface. Relatively warm bottom water masses characterize many fjords around Greenland and therefore entrainment would also increase the temperature in the plumes and, thereby, impact the heat transport in the fjords. However, relatively few oceanographic measurements have been made in or near plumes from subglacial discharge and, therefore, the potential for subglacial discharge for increasing heat transport towards the tidewater outlet glaciers are poorly understood. We present the first direct hydrographic measurements in a plume from subglacial discharge in Godthåbsfjord (located on the western coast of Greenland) where a XCTD was launched from a helicopter directly into the plume. Measurements of the surface salinity showed that the plume only contained 7% of freshwater at the surface, implying a large entrainment with a mixing ratio of 1:13 between outflowing meltwater and saline fjord water. These observations are analyzed together with seasonal observations of ocean heat transport towards the tidewater outlet glaciers in Godthåbsfjord and we show that subglacial discharge only had modest effects on the overall heat budget in front of the glacier. These results were supported from a high-resolution three-dimensional model of Godthåbsfjord. The model explicitly considered subglacial freshwater discharge from three tidewater outlet glaciers where entrainment of bottom water was taken into account. Model results showed that subglacial discharge only affected the fjord circulation relatively close ( 10 km) to the glaciers. Thus, the main effect on heat transport was due to the freshwater discharge itself whereas the subsurface discharge and associated entrainment only

  6. Indicators of Antarctic ozone depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Bodeker

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An assimilated data base of total column ozone measurements from satellites has been used to generate a set of indicators describing attributes of the Antarctic ozone hole for the period 1979 to 2003, including (i daily measures of the area over Antarctica where ozone levels are below 150 DU, below 220 DU, more than 30% below 1979 to 1981 norms, and more than 50% below 1979 to 1981 norms, (ii the date of disappearance of 150 DU ozone values, 220 DU ozone values, values 30% below 1979 to 1981 norms, and values 50% below 1979 to 1981 norms, for each year, (iii daily minimum total column ozone values over Antarctica, and (iv daily values of the ozone mass deficit based on a O3<220 DU threshold. The assimilated data base combines satellite-based ozone measurements from 4 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS instruments, 3 different retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME, and data from 4 Solar Backscatter Ultra-Violet (SBUV instruments. Comparisons with the global ground-based Dobson spectrophotometer network are used to remove offsets and drifts between the different data sets to produce a global homogeneous data set that combines the advantages of good spatial coverage of satellite data with good long-term stability of ground-based measurements. One potential use of the derived indices is detection of the expected recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole. The suitability of the derived indicators to this task is discussed in the context of their variability and their susceptibility to saturation effects which makes them less responsive to decreasing stratospheric halogen loading. It is also shown that if the corrections required to match recent Earth Probe TOMS measurements to Dobson measurements are not applied, some of the indictors are affected so as to obscure detection of the recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  7. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE): 3. Englacial and subglacial conditions revealed by seismic reflection data on Store Glacier, West Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Coen; Eisen, Olaf; Young, Tun Jan; Doyle, Samuel; Hubbard, Bryn; Christoffersen, Poul; Hubbard, Alun

    2015-04-01

    Basal conditions have a profound influence on the dynamics of outlet glaciers. As part of the SAFIRE research programme, we carried out a seismic survey on Store Glacier, a tidewater glacier terminating in Uummanaq Fjord in West Greenland (see joint abstracts by Christoffersen et al. and Doyle et al. for details). At the survey site the ice moves 700m/a making the terrain crevassed and bumpy. Despite the rough terrain we collected two 1.5 km long survey lines parallel and perpendicular to the ice flow direction using a 300m snow streamer and explosives as a source. The seismic data reveal an ice thickness of about 620m and 20 to 30m of subglacial sediment on the upstream side of the area thinning in the downstream direction. From polarity reversals seen along the ice-bed contact we speculate that the sediments have varying degrees of water content. The ice itself has several englacial reflections parallel and close to the bed. At approximately 475m depth, a clear single englacial reflection is observed in the parallel survey line. Thermistor data installed at this location show a clear increase in ice temperature starting at this depth. We speculate that the observed englacial reflection is caused by a change in crystal orientation fabric allowing greater ice deformation below this depth causing increased strain heating.

  8. The lithosphere of the Antarctic continent: new insights from satellite gravity gradient data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto; Ebbing, Jorg; Pappa, Folker; Kern, Michael; Forsberg, Rene

    2017-04-01

    gravity data arguably provides one the clearest large-scale views to date of the potential extent of the Archean to Mesoproterozoic Terre Adelie Craton, and clearly shows the contrast wrt to the crust and lithosphere underlying both the Wilkes Subglacial Basin to the east and the Sabrina Subglacial Basin to the west. This finding corroborates and also augments recent independent interpretations of aeromagnetic and airborne gravity data over the region, suggesting that the Mawson Continent is a composite lithospheric-scale entity, which was affected by several Paleoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic orogenic events (Aitken et al., 2016). Thick crust is clearly imaged beneath the Transantarctic Mountains, the Terre Adelie Craton, the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains and also Eastern Dronning Maud Land, in particular beneath the recently proposed region of the Tonian Oceanic Arc Superterrane (Jacobs et al., 2015). The GIA and GIU components help delineate the edges of several of these lithospheric provinces, both in West and East Antarctica. One of the largest and previously unknown lithospheric-scale features discovered in East Antarctica from the satellite gravity gradient images is a linear feature that appears to cut across East Antarctica, potentially extending from the area of the Lutzow Holm Complex on the Indian side of East Antarctica right across the continent to South Pole. We name this feature the Trans East Antarctic Shear Zone and propose that it represents a major lithospheric scale shear zone and possibly a major suture zone that separates the Gamburtsev Province from the Eastern Dronning Maud Land Province and also appears to form the southern boundary of the composite Recovery Province. We infer based on geological data in the Lutzow Holm Complex region and formerly adjacent segments of India and Madagascar and eastern Africa that it may represent a major hitherto unrecongnised Pan-African age suture zone related to the assembly of the Gondwana supercontinent

  9. Assessing glacial lake outburst flood risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kougkoulos, Ioannis; Cook, Simon; Jomelli, Vincent; Clarke, Leon; Symeonakis, Elias

    2017-04-01

    Glaciers across the world are thinning and receding in response to atmospheric warming. Glaciers tend to erode subglacial basins and deposit eroded materials around their margins as lateral-frontal terminal moraines. Recession into these basins and behind impounding moraines causes meltwater to pond as proglacial and supraglacial lakes. Consequently, there has been a general trend of increasing number and size of these lakes associated with glacier melting in many mountainous regions around the globe, in the last 30 years. Glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) then may occur where the glacial lake dam (ice, rock, moraine, or combination thereof) is breached, or overtopped, and thousands of people have lost their lives to such events in the last few decades, especially in the Andes and in the Himalaya. Given the ongoing and arguably increasing risk posed to downstream communities, and infrastructure, there has been a proliferation of GLOF studies, with many seeking to estimate GLOF hazard or risk in specific regions, or to identify 'potentially dangerous glacial lakes'. Given the increased scientific interest in GLOFs, it is timely to evaluate critically the ways in which GLOF risk has been assessed previously, and whether there are improvements that can be made to the ways in which risk assessment is achieved. We argue that, whilst existing GLOF hazard and risk assessments have been extremely valuable they often suffer from a number of key shortcomings that can be addressed by using different techniques as multi-criteria decision analysis and hydraulic modelling borrowed from disciplines like engineering, remote sensing and operations research.

  10. Antarctic climate and ice-sheet configuration during the early Pliocene interglacial at 4.23 Ma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Golledge

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The geometry of Antarctic ice sheets during warm periods of the geological past is difficult to determine from geological evidence, but is important to know because such reconstructions enable a more complete understanding of how the ice-sheet system responds to changes in climate. Here we investigate how Antarctica evolved under orbital and greenhouse gas conditions representative of an interglacial in the early Pliocene at 4.23 Ma, when Southern Hemisphere insolation reached a maximum. Using offline-coupled climate and ice-sheet models, together with a new synthesis of high-latitude palaeoenvironmental proxy data to define a likely climate envelope, we simulate a range of ice-sheet geometries and calculate their likely contribution to sea level. In addition, we use these simulations to investigate the processes by which the West and East Antarctic ice sheets respond to environmental forcings and the timescales over which these behaviours manifest. We conclude that the Antarctic ice sheet contributed 8.6 ± 2.8 m to global sea level at this time, under an atmospheric CO2 concentration identical to present (400 ppm. Warmer-than-present ocean temperatures led to the collapse of West Antarctica over centuries, whereas higher air temperatures initiated surface melting in parts of East Antarctica that over one to two millennia led to lowering of the ice-sheet surface, flotation of grounded margins in some areas, and retreat of the ice sheet into the Wilkes Subglacial Basin. The results show that regional variations in climate, ice-sheet geometry, and topography produce long-term sea-level contributions that are non-linear with respect to the applied forcings, and which under certain conditions exhibit threshold behaviour associated with behavioural tipping points.

  11. Subglacial processes revealed by the internal structure of drumlins, Stargard drumlin field, NW Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanowski, Piotr; Piotrowski, Jan A.; Szuman-Kalita, Izabela

    2017-04-01

    Numerous studies have provided insight into processes operating under contemporary and palaeo-ice sheets. Many of these studies concerned drumlins, landforms whose formation is essential to the understanding of subglacial soft-bedded systems. Despite the interdisciplinary efforts involving sophisticated analytical and interpretative tools the "drumlin problem" remains elusive and continues to generate much controversy. In this study the geological composition of two drumlins from the Stargard drumlin field (NW Poland) in the terminal area of a major last-glacial palaeo-ice stream was examined in three excavated trenches at macro- and microscales. In each trench, sediment description and fabric analyses were conducted, and samples collected for micromorphological, AMS (anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) and grain size measurements. Both investigated drumlins are mainly composed of macroscopically homogeneous till with minor, max. 5 cm thick sand stringers and sparse silty inclusions. Distinct features are (1) a highly deformed, up to 18-cm thick till layer with clay- and pebble-sized clasts at the top, and (2) a continuous thin intra-till clay layer. Till macro-fabric measurements reveal a very high clustering strength and low isotropy index. AMS eigenvectors V1 vary significantly, but the dominant direction is consistent with the macrofabric measurements. Most of the observed microstructures indicate ductile deformation of the till. The overall observations suggest a shallow subglacial deformation not affecting the entire till thickness at any time intervening with ice/bed separation facilitating enhanced basal sliding. The intra-till clay layer of low hydraulic conductivity contributed to elevated pore-water pressure in the sediment causing its fluidization and deformation. Intervening thin-skinned sediment deformation and basal de-coupling resulted in fast ice flow that, coupled with material release from the ice sole and its accretion at the ice

  12. Melt-induced speed-up of Greenland ice sheet offset by efficient subglacial drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundal, Aud Venke; Shepherd, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Hanna, Edward; Palmer, Steven; Huybrechts, Philippe

    2011-01-27

    Fluctuations in surface melting are known to affect the speed of glaciers and ice sheets, but their impact on the Greenland ice sheet in a warming climate remains uncertain. Although some studies suggest that greater melting produces greater ice-sheet acceleration, others have identified a long-term decrease in Greenland's flow despite increased melting. Here we use satellite observations of ice motion recorded in a land-terminating sector of southwest Greenland to investigate the manner in which ice flow develops during years of markedly different melting. Although peak rates of ice speed-up are positively correlated with the degree of melting, mean summer flow rates are not, because glacier slowdown occurs, on average, when a critical run-off threshold of about 1.4 centimetres a day is exceeded. In contrast to the first half of summer, when flow is similar in all years, speed-up during the latter half is 62 ± 16 per cent less in warmer years. Consequently, in warmer years, the period of fast ice flow is three times shorter and, overall, summer ice flow is slower. This behaviour is at odds with that expected from basal lubrication alone. Instead, it mirrors that of mountain glaciers, where melt-induced acceleration of flow ceases during years of high melting once subglacial drainage becomes efficient. A model of ice-sheet flow that captures switching between cavity and channel drainage modes is consistent with the run-off threshold, fast-flow periods, and later-summer speeds we have observed. Simulations of the Greenland ice-sheet flow under climate warming scenarios should account for the dynamic evolution of subglacial drainage; a simple model of basal lubrication alone misses key aspects of the ice sheet's response to climate warming.

  13. A Unified Constitutive Model for Subglacial Till, Part I: The Disturbed State Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, J. W.; Desai, C. S.; Clark, P. U.; Contractor, D. N.; Sane, S. M.; Carlson, A. E.

    2006-12-01

    Classical plasticity models such as Mohr-Coulomb may not adequately represent the full range of possible motion and failure in tills underlying ice sheets. Such models assume that deformations are initially elastic, and that when a peak or failure stress level is reached the system experiences sudden failure, after which the stress remains constant and the deformations can tend to infinite magnitudes. However, theory suggests that the actual behavior of deforming materials, including granular materials such as glacial till, can involve plastic or irreversible strains almost from the beginning, in which localized zones of microcracking and "failure" can be distributed over the material element. As the loading increases, and with associated plastic and creep deformations, the distributed failure zones coalesce. When the extent of such coalesced zones reaches critical values of stresses and strains, the critical condition (failure) can occur in the till, which would cause associated movements of the ice sheet. Failure or collapse then may occur at much larger strain levels. Classical models (e.g., Mohr-Coulomb) may therefore not be able to fully and realistically characterize deformation behavior and the gradual developments of localized failures tending to the global failure and movements. We present and propose the application of the Disturbed State Concept (DSC), a unified model that incorporates the actual pre- and post-failure behavior, for characterizing the behavior of subglacial tills. In this presentation (Part I), we describe the DSC and propose its application to subglacial till. Part II (Desai et al.) describes our application of the DSC with laboratory testing, model calibration, and validations to evaluate the mechanical properties of two regionally significant Pleistocene tills.

  14. Underwater Optics in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Coastal Ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirjo Huovinen

    Full Text Available Understanding underwater optics in natural waters is essential in evaluating aquatic primary production and risk of UV exposure in aquatic habitats. Changing environmental conditions related with global climate change, which imply potential contrasting changes in underwater light climate further emphasize the need to gain insights into patterns related with underwater optics for more accurate future predictions. The present study evaluated penetration of solar radiation in six sub-Antarctic estuaries and fjords in Chilean North Patagonian region (39-44°S and in an Antarctic bay (62°S. Based on vertical diffuse attenuation coefficients (Kd, derived from measurements with a submersible multichannel radiometer, average summer UV penetration depth (z1% in these water bodies ranged 2-11 m for UV-B (313 nm, 4-27 m for UV-A (395 nm, and 7-30 m for PAR (euphotic zone. UV attenuation was strongest in the shallow Quempillén estuary, while Fildes Bay (Antarctica exhibited the highest transparency. Optically non-homogeneous water layers and seasonal variation in transparency (lower in winter characterized Comau Fjord and Puyuhuapi Channel. In general, multivariate analysis based on Kd values of UV and PAR wavelengths discriminated strongly Quempillén estuary and Puyuhuapi Channel from other study sites. Spatial (horizontal variation within the estuary of Valdivia river reflected stronger attenuation in zones receiving river impact, while within Fildes Bay a lower spatial variation in water transparency could in general be related to closeness of glaciers, likely due to increased turbidity through ice-driven processes. Higher transparency and deeper UV-B penetration in proportion to UV-A/visible wavelengths observed in Fildes Bay suggests a higher risk for Antarctic ecosystems reflected by e.g. altered UV-B damage vs. photorepair under UV-A/PAR. Considering that damage repair processes often slow down under cool temperatures, adverse UV impact could be

  15. How does Drake Passage Oscillation Index (DPOI) effect on variability of the Antarctic krill ecosystem in the Antarctic Peninsula region?

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba Dana, is a keystone species of the Antarctic ecosystem. Environmental and ecological change in Antarctica is one of key issues for the global climate change. An assessment of environmental processes influencing variability of Antarctic krill is important so that krill stock affects the Antarctic ecosystem (Loeb et al., 1997). Naganobu et al. (1999) assessed variability in krill recruitment and density in the Antarctic Peninsula region focusing environmental ...

  16. Microbial ecology of Antarctic aquatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    The Earth's biosphere is dominated by cold environments, and the cold biosphere is dominated by microorganisms. Microorganisms in cold Southern Ocean waters are recognized for having crucial roles in global biogeochemical cycles, including carbon sequestration, whereas microorganisms in other Antarctic aquatic biomes are not as well understood. In this Review, I consider what has been learned about Antarctic aquatic microbial ecology from 'omic' studies. I assess the factors that shape the biogeography of Antarctic microorganisms, reflect on some of the unusual biogeochemical cycles that they are associated with and discuss the important roles that viruses have in controlling ecosystem function.

  17. Molecular and morphological analysis of an Antarctic tardigrade, Acutuncus antarcticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kagoshima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We isolated a species of tardigrade from moss samples collected from Langhovde and Skarvsnes, near Syowa station, East Antarctic, from which we cultured a parthenogenetic strain in Petri dishes with co-occurring cyanobacteria or green algae. This culture was maintained at both 4 and 10ºC, though the latter proved more suitable for growth. Eggs were laid free, rather than in exuviae. We isolated the 18S rRNA sequences from this tardigrade, identical to that of Acutuncus antarcticus from King George island, South Shetland islands. Morphological analyses via both light and scanning electron microscopy also show general agreement with characteristics of A. antarcticus: dorsal and ventral apophyses for the insertion of stylet muscles and dorsal longitudinal thickening on the anterior part of buccal tube; presence of pharyngeal apophyses, two macroplacoids and absence of a microplacoid; the surface structure of egg; and claw shape. Peribuccal lamellae were absent, but six oval swellings surrounded the mouth opening. An additional study of moss pillars from lake Hotoke-ike, Skarvsnes, proved the existence of the same tardigrade taxon living at the bottom of the lake.

  18. Abundance, viability and culturability of Antarctic bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    The viability of total number of bacteria decide the mineralisation rate in any ecosystem and ultimately the fertility of the region. This study aims at establishing the extent of viability in the standing stock of the Antarctic bacterial population...

  19. Historical Arctic and Antarctic Surface Observational Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This product consists of meteorological data from 105 Arctic weather stations and 137 Antarctic stations, extracted from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC)'s...

  20. South African Antarctic earth science research programme

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    SASCAR

    1984-02-01

    Full Text Available This document describes the past, current and planned future South African earth science research programme in the Antarctic, Southern Ocean and subantarctic regions. The scientific programme comprises five components into which present and future...

  1. Is The East Antarctic Ice Sheet Stable? New Aerogeophysical Evidence from Terra Adelie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, G.; Young, D. A.; Le Meur, E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Garcia-Aznar, P.

    2011-12-01

    Recently collected ice thickness data, collected as part of NASA's Operation Ice Bridge, provide insight into the sea level rise potential of the Terra Adelie/George V Land sector of East Antarctica. We compare the bedrock geometry unveiled over Ninnis Glacier and the ice streams feeding Cook Ice Shelf in this region to that of the major glaciers of West Antarctica. We find that many aspects of the bedrock geometry are comparable between the two regions. Rapid acceleration of West Antarctic's outlet glaciers and consequent ice loss (known as dynamic thinning) has been observed since the mid nineties. As a consequence, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is out of balance and contributes increasingly to the current sea level rise. Due to West Antarctica's inward sloping bed geometry, continued and accelerating ice loss is predicted due to the effects of the Marine Ice Sheet Instability (MISI). Weertman [1974] suggested that marine terminated outlet glaciers may present an intrinsic instability when they rest over a seaward up-sloping bedrock. This principle was recently demonstrated in for the 2D flow line models and further confirmed through numerical investigations. The Amundsen sea sector of West Antarctica (more particularly Pine Island and Thwaites Glaciers) undergoes a significant increase of its grounded ice discharge along with grounding line retreats of up to tens of kilometers. Amongst the difficulties in forecasting the future ice sheet contribution to sea level is the determining whether the current shrinkage of West Antarctic glaciers can persist due to MISI. On the other hand, even if dynamical thinning has been recently observed over some outlets (particularly between 90° and 165° E), mass balance of East Antarctica seems currently to be in equilibrium. Due to that fact and to the vast scale of East Antarctica, surveys to determine bedrock elevation have received much less attention than West Antarctica, particularly in the Terra Adelie region. It is

  2. America on the Ice. Antarctic Policy Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    1989 Argentine supply ship Bahia Paraiso runs aground off Antarctic peninsula, spilling oil that seriously threatens local animal life. xxvi AMERICA ON...and sub- sequent oil discharge from the Argentine supply ship Bahia Paraiso near the Antarctic peninsula, and from the tanker E.on Valdez in Prince...initially expressed a desire to expand Australian activities on the ice; however, fiscal constraints and political realities have precluded any quick

  3. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE): 1. Programme of investigation on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Poul; Hubbard, Bryn; Bougamont, Marion; Doyle, Samuel; Young, Tun Jan; Hofstede, Coen; Nicholls, Keith; Todd, Joe; Box, Jason; Ryan, Johnny; Toberg, Nick; Walter, Jacob; Hubbard, Alun

    2015-04-01

    Marine-terminating outlet glaciers drain 90 percent of the Greenland Ice Sheet and are responsible for about half of the ice sheet's net annual mass loss, which currently raises global sea level by almost 1 mm per year. Understanding the processes that drive the fast flow of these glaciers is crucial because a growing body of evidence points to a strong, but spatially varied and often complex, response to oceanographic as well as atmospheric forcing. While the bed of glaciers elsewhere is known to strongly influence the flow of ice, no observations have ever been made at the bed of a marine-terminating glacier in Greenland. The flow of ice in numerical models of the Greenland Ice Sheet consequently rely on untested basal parameterisations, which form a likely and potentially significant source of error in the prediction of sea level rise over the coming decades and century. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE) is addressing this paucity of observational constraints by gaining access to the bed of Store Glacier, a marine-terminating outlet of the Greenland Ice Sheet which has a drainage basin of 35,000 square kilometres and terminates in Uummannaq Fjord. In 2014, the SAFIRE programme drilled four boreholes in a region where ice flows at a rate of 700 m per year and where a seismic survey revealed a bed consisting of soft sediment. (See joint abstract by Hofstede et al. for details.) The boreholes were 603-616 m deep and direct access to the bed was confirmed by a clear hydrological connectivity with a basal water system. (See joint abstract by Doyle et al. for details.) With sensors deployed englacially (temperature and tilt) and at the bed (water pressure, turbidity, electrical conductivity), the SAFIRE will inform the ratio of internal ice deformation and basal slip, vertical strain, ice temperature, and fluctuations in water pressure linked to supraglacial lake drainage as well as diurnal drainage into moulins. In 2015, we plan to

  4. Palaeogeographical And Archaeological Records Of Natural Changes Of The Jordanowo-Niesulice Subglacial Channel Near Lubrza, The Lubusz Lakeland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratajczak-Szczerba Magdalena

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The region of the Lubusz Lakeland in western Poland where there are a lot of subglacial channels provides opportunity for multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. None of them has not been the object of a specific study. The developmental history of the palaeolakes and their vicinity in the subglacial trough Jordanowo-Niesulice, spanning the Late Glacial and beginning of the Holocene, was investigated using geological research, lithological and geomorphological analysis, geochemical composition, palynological and archaeological research, OSL and AMS-radiocarbon dating. Geological research shows varied morphology of subglacial channel where at least two different reservoirs functioned in the end of the Last Glacial period and at the beginning of the Holocene. Mostly during the Bølling-Allerød interval and at the beginning of the Younger Dryas there took place melting of buried ice-blocks which preserved the analysied course of the Jordanowo-Niesulice trough. The level of water, and especially depth of reservoirs underwent also changes. Palynological analysis shows very diversified course of the Allerød interval.

  5. The SCAR Standing Committee on Antarctic Data Management - new directions in access to Antarctic research data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, T.

    2009-04-01

    The SCAR Standing Committee on Antarctic Data Management (SC-ADM) was established by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP), to assist in the fulfillment of the data management obligations imposed by the Antarctic Treaty (section III.1.c): "Scientific observations and results from Antarctica shall be exchanged and made freely available." SC-ADM comprises representatives of the National Antarctic Data Centres or national points of contact. Currently 31 nations around the world are represented in SC-ADM. So far, SC-ADM has been focussing on the coordination of the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD), the internationally accessible, web-based, searchable record of Antarctic and Southern Ocean data set descriptions. The AMD is directly integrated into the international Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) to help further merge Antarctic science into global science. The AMD is a resource for scientists to advertise the data they have collected and to search for data they may need. Currently, SC-ADM is in a transition phase, moving forward to provide data access. Existing systems and web services technology will be used as much as possible, to increase efficiency and prevent 're-inventing the wheel' This poster will give an overview of this process, the current status and the expected results.

  6. Unrest at Bárdarbunga: Preparations for possible flooding due to subglacial volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardardottir, Jorunn; Roberts, Matthew; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Einarsson, Bergur; Thorarinsdottir, Tinna; Johannesson, Tomas; Sigurdsson, Oddur; Egilson, David; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Imo hydrological-monitoring-team

    2015-04-01

    Located partly beneath northwest Vatnajökull, Iceland, the Bárdarbunga volcanic system comprises an ice-capped central volcano and a fissure swarm extending beyond the ice margin. During the last 1100 years the volcano has erupted on at least 26 occasions. Outburst floods (jökulhlaups) on a scale of >100,000 m3 s-1 are known to have occurred during major explosive eruptions. Repeated jökulhlaups from Bárdarbunga have inundated the Jökulsá á Fjöllum River, which drains over 200 km northwards from the Dyngjujökull outlet glacier to the north coast of Iceland. Depending on the location of the eruption within the 80 km2 caldera, jökulhlaups could also flow northwards along Skjálfandafljót River and towards west and southwest into present-day tributaries of the extensively hydropower-harnessed Thjórsá River. On 16 August 2014, an intense earthquake swarm began within the Bárdarbunga caldera. Seismicity propagated from the caldera, extending ~10 km northwards of the ice margin where a fissure eruption developed in late August and remains ongoing in early January 2015. In connection with the lateral migration of magma from the caldera, the ice surface of Bárdarbunga has lowered by over 60 m; also associated with increased geothermal heat on the caldera rim, as manifested by the development of ice-surface depressions. In preparation for a subglacial eruption in the Bárdarbunga volcanic system, the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) has made several assessments of likely hydrological hazards. Assessments were undertaken on Jökulsá á Fjöllum and Skjálfandafljót at key locations where preliminary evacuation plans for populated areas were made in cooperation with the local police. Floodwater extent was estimated for key infrastructures, such as bridges, telecommunication and power lines for maximum discharge levels ranging from 3,000 to 20,000 m3 s-1. The estimations were made using either simple Manning's calculations or HEC-RAS modelling

  7. CO2 assimilation strategies in stratified lakes: Diversity and distribution patterns of chemolithoautotrophs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alfreider, A.; Baumer, A.; Bogensperger, T.; Posch, T.; Salcher, Michaela M.; Summerer, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 7 (2017), s. 2754-2768 ISSN 1462-2912 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tricarboxylic-acid cycle * covered antarctic lake * fresh-water * genome sequence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.395, year: 2016

  8. Fast flow of Jakobshavn Isbræ and its subglacial drainage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werder, M. A.; Joughin, I. R.

    2013-12-01

    Jakobshavn Isbræ and many other outlet glaciers of present and past ice sheets lie in deep troughs which often have several overdeepened sections. The subglacial drainage system of such glaciers is heavily influenced by two effects caused by the pressure dependence of the melting point of water. The melting point decreases with increasing water pressure, this enhances wall-melt in downward sloping channels and diminishes wall-melt in upward sloping channels. Thus the first effect is the well known shutdown of channels on steep adverse bed slopes of overdeepenings and the associated high water pressure/low effective pressure. The second effect is a 2D effect and has not received much/any attention so far: the orientation of a channel will be deflected from the direction of the (negative) hydraulic potential gradient (which drives the water flow) towards the steepest slope of the bed. This leads to the enhanced formation of side channels dipping into the trough at about a 45° angle. This efficient connection between the margin and the trough equalizes the hydraulic potential, again leading to higher water pressure in the trough. We investigate these two effects with the 2D subglacial drainage system model GlaDS using Jakobshavn Isbræ as an example. We compare model runs with the pressure melt term disabled and enabled. With the term disabled the main channel situated in the trough is continuous and produces a large depression in the hydraulic potential and consequently high effective pressure in the trough (1-2MPa). Conversely, with the term enabled the main channel becomes discontinuous on steep adverse bed slopes and many side channels form on the margins of the trough. This leads to a hydraulic potential in the trough which is higher than in the surrounding area and consequently the effective pressure is low (0-1MPa). Low effective pressure leads to reduced basal drag and thus to more basal sliding. The modeled large decrease of effective pressure in the trough

  9. Outburst floods of glacial lakes in Patagonia: is there an increasing trend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casassa, Gino; Wendt, Jens; Wendt, Anja; López, Paulina; Schuler, Thomas; Maas, Hans-Gerd; Carrasco, Jorge; Rivera, Andrés.

    2010-05-01

    Glaciers in Patagonia are temperate and many of them are receding at an accelerated rate, with a consequent enlargement of glacial lakes. We will review the occurrence of Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFs) recorded during the last century in Patagonia (Northern and Southern Patagonia icefields), and analyse them in view of the general warming of 0.5°C affecting the region during the last 40 years. Special attention will be devoted to Lake Cachet 2 (47°12' S, 73°15' W, 422 m a.s.l.) which has experienced 6 GLOF events during the last 2 years: April 6-7 2008, October 7-8 2008, 21-22 December 2008, 5 March 2009, 16 September 2009 and 5-6 January 2010. Lake Cachet 2 has an area of 4 km2, located on the eastern margin of the Northern Patagonia Icefield, being dammed on its southern margin by Colonia Glacier. Prior to the April 2008 event there had been no historical record of catastrophic flooding of this lake. Each event resulted in a flood wave of which travelled down Colonia River to the confluence with Baker River in a period of less than 48 hours, where it reached peak flows of approximately 2,000 m3/s. Here we present airborne and ground explorations carried out in the period 2008-2009 which confirm that the Lake Cachet 2 floods drain through an englacial tunnel under Colonia Glacier for a distance of 8 km, emerging at the front of the glacier. We propose that the lake started draining in 2008 as a result of the weakening of the ice dam produced by long-term thinning of Colonia Glacier. Measurements of the empty lake bed were performed with the CECS airborne laser scanner onboard a helicopter, which show that the maximum water volume of the lake is 200 x 106 m3. Modelling of the flood events has been carried out based on the subglacial flood model of Clarke (2003), showing that a semi-circular subglacial tunnel attaining a maximum dimension of 15 m can evacuate Lake Cachet 2 in approximately 48 hours, with peak flows on the order of 4000 m3/s. Preliminary

  10. Playa Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital dataset provides information about the spatial distribution of soil units associated with playa lakes. Specific soil types have been designated by the...

  11. Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonolla, Mauro; Storelli, Nicola; Danza, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Lake Cadagno (26 ha) is a crenogenic meromictic lake located in the Swiss Alps at 1921 m asl with a maximum depth of 21 m. The presence of crystalline rocks and a dolomite vein rich in gypsum in the catchment area makes the lake a typical “sulphuretum ” dominated by coupled carbon and sulphur...... cycles. The chemocline lies at about 12 m depth, stabilized by density differences of salt-rich water supplied by sub-aquatic springs to the monimolimnion and of electrolyte-poor surface water feeding the mixolimnion. Steep sulphide and light gradients in the chemocline support the growth of a large...... in the chemocline. Small-celled PSB together with the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes sp. form stable aggregates in the lake, which represent small microenvironments with an internal sulphur cycle. Eukaryotic primary producers in the anoxic zones are dominated by Cryptomonas phaseolus...

  12. Tephra compositions from Late Quaternary volcanoes around the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, S.

    2009-12-01

    /Hf ratios lower than N-MORB, all other volcanoes including the Larsen Rift centers display Zr/Hf higher than N-MORB. It is expected that the correlation of the new data with published data from tephra layers found in ice, lake and marine sediment cores will contribute to a better constrained timing of individual climatic events identified in the northern Antarctic Peninsula area. Late Quaternary volcanoes around the northern Antarctic Peninsula.

  13. Controls and variability of solute and sedimentary fluxes in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolinski, Zbigniew

    2015-04-01

    The currently prepared SEDIBUD Book on "Source-to-Sink Fluxes in Undisturbed Cold Environments" (edited by Achim A. Beylich, John C. Dixon and Zbigniew Zwolinski and published by Cambridge University Press) is summarizing and synthesizing the achievements of the International Association of Geomorphologists` (I.A.G./A.I.G.) Working Group SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments), which has been active since 2005 (http://www.geomorph.org/wg/wgsb.html). The book comprises five parts. One of them is part about sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Environments. This part "Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Environments" describes two different environments, namely oceanic and continental ones. Each part contains results of research on environmental drivers and rates of contemporary solute and sedimentary fluxes in selected sites. Apart from describing the environmental conditions of the whole continent of Antarctica and sub-Antarctic islands (Zb.Zwolinski, M.Kejna, A.N.Lastochkin, A.Zhirov, S.Boltramovich) this part of the book characterizes terrestrial polar oases free from multi-year ice and snow covers (Zb.Zwolinski). The detailed results of geoecological and sedimentological research come from different parts of Antarctica. Antarctic continental shelf (E.Isla) is an example of sub-Antarctic oceanic environment. South Shetlands, especially King George Island (Zb.Zwolinski, M.Kejna, G.Rachlewicz, I.Sobota, J.Szpikowski), is an example of sub-Antarctic terrestrial environment. Antarctic Peninsula (G.Vieira, M.Francelino, J.C.Fernandes) and surroundings of McMurdo Dry Valleys (W.B.Lyons, K.A.Welch, J.Levy, A.Fountain, D.McKnight) are examples of Antarctic continental environments. The key goals of the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic book chapters are following: (i) identify the main environmental drivers and rates of contemporary solute and sedimentary fluxes, and (ii) model possible effects of projected climate change on solute and sedimentary fluxes in cold climate environments

  14. Health aspects of Antarctic tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prociv, P

    1998-12-01

    Increasing numbers of seaborne tourists are visiting Antarctica, with most coming from the United States (3503 in 1996-97), Germany (777), and Australia (680; cf. 356 in 1994-95 and 410 in 1995-96). The impression among travel medicine clinicians is that, each year, more prospective travelers seek advice about the health demands of this type of adventure, mostly relating to fitness for travel, exposure to extreme cold, hazards in ice and snow, and other potential health risks. This is a recent phenomenon. While a regular shipping service had been established between the Falklands and the subantarctic islands of South Georgia and the South Shetlands by 1924, the first documented tourists accompanied an Argentine expedition to the South Orkneys in 1933.1 Commercial airline flights over these islands and the Antarctic Peninsula began in 1956, from Chile, and recreational cruises to the Peninsula began in 1958. Tourist numbers subsequently grew slowly, for what was clearly an exclusive and very expensive undertaking, with few ships available for these hazardous voyages. From 1957 to 1993, 37,000 tourists visited by sea, most seeing only the Peninsula.2 The dramatic recent growth in numbers is a consequence of the collapse of the Soviet Union. The small fleet of ice-strengthened research vessels and working icebreakers, which was made redundant by withdrawal of central government support from isolated communities and military activities along the northern coast of Siberia (and from Antarctic research bases), now accounts for the bulk of charter-cruise tourism to Antarctica, at competitive prices. According to the International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators,3 7322 people traveled to Antarctica on commercially organized voyages in the 1996-97 season, and a record 10,000 shipborne visitors were expected for the 1997-98 season (November-March), traveling mainly from South America to the Peninsula on 15 ice-reinforced vessels, each carrying between 36 and 180

  15. Mapping Antarctic Crustal Thickness using Gravity Inversion and Comparison with Seismic Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusznir, Nick; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Using gravity anomaly inversion, we produce comprehensive regional maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. Crustal thicknesses derived from gravity inversion are consistent with seismic estimates. We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning (1-1/β) and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Chappell & Kusznir 2008). The gravity anomaly contribution from ice thickness is included in the gravity inversion, as is the contribution from sediments which assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. Data used in the gravity inversion are elevation and bathymetry, free-air gravity anomaly, the Bedmap 2 ice thickness and bedrock topography compilation south of 60 degrees south and relatively sparse constraints on sediment thickness. Ocean isochrons are used to define the cooling age of oceanic lithosphere. Crustal thicknesses from gravity inversion are compared with independent seismic estimates, which are still relatively sparse over Antarctica. Our gravity inversion study predicts thick crust (> 45 km) under interior East Antarctica, which is penetrated by narrow continental rifts featuring relatively thinner crust. The largest crustal thicknesses predicted from gravity inversion lie in the region of the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains, and are consistent with seismic estimates. The East Antarctic Rift System (EARS), a major Permian to Cretaceous age rift system, is imaged by our inversion and appears to extend from the continental margin at the Lambert Rift to the South Pole region, a distance of 2500 km. Offshore an extensive region of either thick oceanic crust or highly thinned continental crust lies adjacent to Oates Land and north Victoria Land, and also off West Antarctica around the Amundsen Ridges. Thin crust is

  16. Sea Ice Mass Balance in the Antarctic (SIMBA), Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides different measurements of Antarctic sea ice data collected as part of the Sea Ice Mass Balance in the Antarctic (SIMBA) program. The...

  17. White Lake AOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    White Lake is in Muskegon County along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. It was named an Area of Concern on the Great Lakes under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1987 and delisted in 2014.

  18. Near-glacier surveying of a subglacial discharge plume: Implications for plume parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. H.; Shroyer, E. L.; Nash, J. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Carroll, D.; Fried, M. J.; Catania, G. A.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Stearns, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    At tidewater glaciers, plume dynamics affect submarine melting, fjord circulation, and the mixing of meltwater. Models often rely on buoyant plume theory to parameterize plumes and submarine melting; however, these parameterizations are largely untested due to a dearth of near-glacier measurements. Here we present a high-resolution ocean survey by ship and remotely operated boat near the terminus of Kangerlussuup Sermia in west Greenland. These novel observations reveal the 3-D structure and transport of a near-surface plume, originating at a large undercut conduit in the glacier terminus, that is inconsistent with axisymmetric plume theory, the most common representation of plumes in ocean-glacier models. Instead, the observations suggest a wider upwelling plume—a "truncated" line plume of ˜200 m width—with higher entrainment and plume-driven melt compared to the typical axisymmetric representation. Our results highlight the importance of a subglacial outlet's geometry in controlling plume dynamics, with implications for parameterizing the exchange flow and submarine melt in glacial fjord models.

  19. Antarctic station life: The first 15 years of mixed expeditions to the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Aspa

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the experiences of women who lived and worked on remote and isolated Antarctic stations for up to 15 months at a time. The study employed purposeful sampling and a longitudinal - processual approach to study women's experiences over the first 15 years of mixed gender Antarctic expeditions. The retrospective analysis was based on a semi-structured interview administered to 14 women upon their return to Australia. The results showed that women referred to the natural physical Antarctic environment as one of the best aspects of their experience and the reason they would recommend the Antarctic to their friends as a good place to work. In describing the worst aspect of their experience, women referred to aspects of Antarctic station life, including: (i) the male dominated nature of station culture; (ii) the impact of interpersonal conflict, including gender based conflict and friction between scientists and trades workers; and (iii) the lack of anonymity associated with living and working with the same group of individuals, mainly men, for up to 12 months or more. The results are discussed within the context of the evolution of Antarctic station culture and recommendations are made in terms of the demography of expeditions, expeditioner selection and recruitment and the ongoing monitoring of Antarctic station culture. The study presents a framework that can be applied to groups and teams living and working in analogous isolated, confined and extreme work environments, including outer space missions.

  20. The Antarctic cryptoendolithic ecosystem: relevance to exobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, E I; Ocampo-Friedmann, R

    1984-01-01

    Cryptoendolithic microorganisms in the Antarctic desert live inside porous sandstone rocks, protected by a thin rock crust. While the rock surface is abiotic, the microclimate inside the rock is comparatively mild. These organisms may have descended from early, pre-glaciation Antarctic life forms and thus may represent the last outpost of life in a gradually deteriorating environment. Assuming that life once arose on Mars, it is conceivable that, following the loss of water, the last of surviving organisms withdrew to similar insulated microenvironments. Because such microscopic pockets have little connection with the outside environment, their detection may be difficult. The chances that the Viking lander could sample cryptoendolithic microorganisms in the Antarctic desert would be infinitesimal.

  1. Past Penguin Colony Linkages to Climate Change and Catastrophic Volcanism on the Northern Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S. J.; Monien, P.; Foster, L. C.; Loftfield, J.; Schnetger, B.; Pearson, E. J.; Hocking, E. P.; Fretwell, P.; Ireland, L.; Ochyra, R.; Haworth, A.; Allen, C. S.; Brumsack, H. J.; Bentley, M.; Hodgson, D.

    2016-12-01

    Recent warming and reductions in sea-ice in some parts of Antarctica are thought to be having a negative impact on populations of `ice-dependent' penguin species (e.g., Emperor, Adélie) that feed at the sea-ice edge because populations of `ice-avoiding'/more `adaptable' species (e.g., Gentoo, Chinstrap) have remained stable or increased, and some Adélie colonies located in areas of sea-ice expansion have increased. This hypothesis is based on short observational records and limited subfossil evidence, but has not been tested over longer, mid-late Holocene, timescales on the Antarctic Peninsula. Between 1950-1997, the northern Antarctic Peninsula was one of the most rapidly warming regions in the Southern Hemisphere and, over the last 30 years, the largest breeding population of Gentoo penguins in Antarctica on Ardley Island, north-western Antarctic Peninsula, has increased. We tracked past changes in the Ardley Island penguin colony size by comparing detailed biogeochemical analysis of an 8,500-year Ardley Lake sediment profile with past records of penguin presence, climate and sea-ice extent across the Antarctic Peninsula and found that the colony also responded positively during some local-regionally warmer parts of the late Holocene. However, at least three large volcanic eruptions from nearby Deception Island had a devastating impact on the colony between 7000-2000 years ago, with colony recovery taking up to 800 years following the most disruptive period of volcanic activity c. 5500-5000 years ago.

  2. Nitrogen isotopes in lake sediments of Tiefer See (NE Germany), from monitoring to the sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessen, Birgit; Kienel, Ulrike; Dräger, Nadine; Pinkerneil, Sylvia; Schettler, Georg; Brauer, Achim

    2017-04-01

    Lake Tiefer See (Mecklenburg/Germany) is a deep (63 m) mesotrophic hard-water lake with pronounced summer stratification formed in a NS directed subglacial channel system. To understand the lake productivity and nitrogen cycle, depending on natural variability and anthropogenic forcing, we compare the recent input and productivity, monitored in lake water and sediment traps (5, 12, 50 m water depths, 30 day increment) since 2012 with sub annually laminated (varved) lake sediments. The sedimentary record shows a continuous increase in d15N of up to +10‰ since the late 18th century corresponding with comprehensive land use changes (agriculture, constructions, deforestation). Nitrogen isotopes of recent particulate organic matter (POM) are interpreted to reflect productivity, influenced by extensive agriculture and life stock farming (manure, sewage). The monthly trapped sediment material clearly shows high d15N values ranging from +7 to +14‰. The seasonal increase of d15N of organic matter corresponds with the productivity and the decrease in dissolved inorganic nitrogen, in principal nitrate. The synchronous strong decrease in NO3- and increase in d15Norg is mainly related to seasonal lake nitrate utilization, whereas the correspondence of high d15NNO3- and low d18ONO3- suggest sewage input as a primary source. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis -ICLEA- of the Helmholtz Association; grant number VH-VI-415.

  3. Finding clouds, dunes, crevasses and subglacial valleys with surface-texture maps of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. E.; Haran, T. M.; Morin, P. J.; Porter, C. C.; Scambos, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    An experienced glaciologist can often look at a satellite image of Antarctica and quickly identify glaciers, ice streams, ice shelves, and interstream ridges, and can easily distinguish cloudy from cloud-free images. These distinctions rely on the surface texture of the ice sheet, as revealed by the interaction of sunlight with small slope variations. We present a simple scheme for mapping quantities related to surface texture that are distinct between different ice-sheet terrains. We use the statistics of windowed Fourier transforms of images to map brightness variance in different ranges of scales, and to map the anisotropy of the variations at these scales. Based on the cloud cleared, resolution-enhanced MOA mosaic of Antarctica, we derive roughness and anisotropy estimates at scales between 0.25 and 16 km. While the major distinction between different terrains at these scales is in the variance spectrum, anisotropy is a strong marker of fast-flowing ice. Superimposed on these patterns are aeolean features generated by the interaction of snowfall, wind, and surface topography. In particular, Megadune fields have a distinct spectrum, with a strong spectral peak in the 1-4 km band. This signature is evident in known megadune fields, but can also be seen elsewhere, perhaps because aeolean features in the new areas lack spatial coherence. Based on this, the spatial patterns in accumulation associated with megadunes may be more prevalent that previously identified. MOA texture also shows unusually smooth areas over subglacial valley bottoms throughout Antarctica. This mapping may help in the design of future airborne-radar surveys in areas where the subglacial topography has not previously been measured. Applied to high-resolution imagery from Worldview satellites, at scales between one and 256 meters, our analysis allows easy mapping of crevasse fields, and reveals a widespread, consistent small-scale texture on inland ice associated with sastrugi and meter

  4. Microbial community composition of transiently wetted Antarctic Dry Valley soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Neiderberger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the summer months, wet (hyporheic soils associated with ephemeral streams and lake edges in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (DV become hotspots of biological activity and are hypothesized to be an important source of carbon and nitrogen for arid DV soils. Recent research in the DV has focused on the geochemistry and microbial ecology of lakes and arid soils, with substantially less information being available on hyporheic soils. Here we determined the unique properties of hyporheic microbial communities, resolved their relationship to environmental parameters and to compared them to archetypal arid DV soils. Generally, pH increased and chlorophyll a concentrations decreased along transects from wet to arid soils (9.0 to ~7.0 for pH and ~0.8 to ~ 5 µg/cm3 for chlorophyll a, respectively. Soil water content decreased to below ~3% in the arid soils. Community fingerprinting-based principle component analyses revealed that bacterial communities formed distinct clusters specific to arid and wet soils; however, eukaryotic communities that clustered together did not have similar soil moisture content nor did they group together based on sampling location. Collectively, rRNA pyrosequencing indicated a considerably higher abundance of Cyanobacteria in wet soils and a higher abundance of Acidobacterial, Actinobacterial, Deinococcus/Thermus, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospira and Planctomycetes in arid soils. The two most significant differences at the genus level were Gillisia signatures present in arid soils and chloroplast signatures related to Streptophyta that were common in wet soils. Fungal dominance was observed in arid soils and Viridplantae were more common in wet soils. This research represents an in-depth characterization of microbial communities inhabiting wet DV soils. Results indicate that the repeated wetting of hyporheic zones has a profound impact on the bacterial and eukaryotic communities inhabiting in these areas.

  5. Semi-automated extraction of longitudinal subglacial bedforms from digital terrain models - Two new methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Marco G.; Brennand, Tracy A.

    2017-07-01

    Relict drumlin and mega-scale glacial lineation (positive relief, longitudinal subglacial bedforms - LSBs) morphometry has been used as a proxy for paleo ice-sheet dynamics. LSB morphometric inventories have relied on manual mapping, which is slow and subjective and thus potentially difficult to reproduce. Automated methods are faster and reproducible, but previous methods for LSB semi-automated mapping have not been highly successful. Here, two new object-based methods for the semi-automated extraction of LSBs (footprints) from digital terrain models are compared in a test area in the Puget Lowland, Washington, USA. As segmentation procedures to create LSB-candidate objects, the normalized closed contour method relies on the contouring of a normalized local relief model addressing LSBs on slopes, and the landform elements mask method relies on the classification of landform elements derived from the digital terrain model. For identifying which LSB-candidate objects correspond to LSBs, both methods use the same LSB operational definition: a ruleset encapsulating expert knowledge, published morphometric data, and the morphometric range of LSBs in the study area. The normalized closed contour method was separately applied to four different local relief models, two computed in moving windows and two hydrology-based. Overall, the normalized closed contour method outperformed the landform elements mask method. The normalized closed contour method performed on a hydrological relief model from a multiple direction flow routing algorithm performed best. For an assessment of its transferability, the normalized closed contour method was evaluated on a second area, the Chautauqua drumlin field, Pennsylvania and New York, USA where it performed better than in the Puget Lowland. A broad comparison to previous methods suggests that the normalized relief closed contour method may be the most capable method to date, but more development is required.

  6. Quasi-100 ky glacial-interglacial cycles triggered by subglacial burial carbon release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zeng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism is proposed in which climate, carbon cycle and icesheets interact with each other to produce a feedback that can lead to quasi-100 ky glacial-interglacial cycles. A central process is the burial and preservation of organic carbon by icesheets which contributes to the observed glacial-interglacial CO2 change (the glacial burial hypothesis, Zeng, 2003. Allowing carbon cycle to interact with physical climate, here I further hypothesize that deglaciation can be triggered by the ejection of glacial burial carbon when a major icesheet grows to sufficiently large size after a prolonged glaciation so that subglacial transport becomes significant. Glacial inception may be initiated by CO2 drawdown due to a relaxation from a high but transient interglacial CO2 value as the land-originated CO2 invades into deep ocean via thermohaline circulation and CaCO3 compensation. Also important for glacial inception may be the CO2 uptake by vegetation and soil regrowth in the previously ice-covered regions. When tested in a fully coupled Earth system model with comprehensive carbon cycle components and semi-empirical physical climate components, it produced under certain parameter regimes self-sustaining glacial-interglacial cycles with durations of 93 ky, CO2 changes of 90 ppmv, temperature changes of 6°C. Since the 100 ky cycles can not be easily explained by the Milankovitch astronomical forcing alone, this carbon-climate-icesheet mechanism provides a strong feedback that could interact with external forcings to produce the major observed Quaternary climatic variations. It is speculated that some glacial terminations may be triggered by this internal feedback while others by orbital forcing. Some observable consequences are highlighted that may support or falsify the theory.

  7. Biogeography of Antarctic sea anemones (Anthozoa, Actiniaria): What do they tell us about the origin of the Antarctic benthic fauna?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, E.; López-González, P. J.; Gili, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The present study of the biogeography of the Antarctic sea anemone fauna is based on new records and redescriptions of material collected from the Weddell Sea and Peninsula Antarctica, and on an update of the bibliographic data of the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic regions. The faunal compositions at different levels, the geographic and bathymetric distributions of the sea anemone fauna, and the affinities within the continent and with the sub-Antarctic fauna have been studied. Furthermore, the relationships of the sea anemone fauna, of the Southern Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea and Hawaii have been analysed. In this context, the origin of the Antarctic benthic fauna is discussed.

  8. Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Mac, Michael J.; Opler, Paul A.; Puckett Haecker, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    The Great Lakes region, as defined here, includes the Great Lakes and their drainage basins in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. The region also includes the portions of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the 21 northernmost counties of Illinois that lie in the Mississippi River drainage basin, outside the floodplain of the river. The region spans about 9º of latitude and 20º of longitude and lies roughly halfway between the equator and the North Pole in a lowland corridor that extends from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean.The Great Lakes are the most prominent natural feature of the region (Fig. 1). They have a combined surface area of about 245,000 square kilometers and are among the largest, deepest lakes in the world. They are the largest single aggregation of fresh water on the planet (excluding the polar ice caps) and are the only glacial feature on Earth visible from the surface of the moon (The Nature Conservancy 1994a).The Great Lakes moderate the region’s climate, which presently ranges from subarctic in the north to humid continental warm in the south (Fig. 2), reflecting the movement of major weather masses from the north and south (U.S. Department of the Interior 1970; Eichenlaub 1979). The lakes act as heat sinks in summer and heat sources in winter and are major reservoirs that help humidify much of the region. They also create local precipitation belts in areas where air masses are pushed across the lakes by prevailing winds, pick up moisture from the lake surface, and then drop that moisture over land on the other side of the lake. The mean annual frost-free period—a general measure of the growing-season length for plants and some cold-blooded animals—varies from 60 days at higher elevations in the north to 160 days in lakeshore areas in the south. The climate influences the general distribution of wild plants and animals in the region and also influences the activities and distribution of the human

  9. Seafloor geomorphology of western Antarctic Peninsula bays: a signature of ice flow behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Yuribia P.; Wellner, Julia S.

    2018-01-01

    Glacial geomorphology is used in Antarctica to reconstruct ice advance during the Last Glacial Maximum and subsequent retreat across the continental shelf. Analogous geomorphic assemblages are found in glaciated fjords and are used to interpret the glacial history and glacial dynamics in those areas. In addition, understanding the distribution of submarine landforms in bays and the local controls exerted on ice flow can help improve numerical models by providing constraints through these drainage areas. We present multibeam swath bathymetry from several bays in the South Shetland Islands and the western Antarctic Peninsula. The submarine landforms are described and interpreted in detail. A schematic model was developed showing the features found in the bays: from glacial lineations and moraines in the inner bay to grounding zone wedges and drumlinoid features in the middle bay and streamlined features and meltwater channels in the outer bay areas. In addition, we analysed local variables in the bays and observed the following: (1) the number of landforms found in the bays scales to the size of the bay, but the geometry of the bays dictates the types of features that form; specifically, we observe a correlation between the bay width and the number of transverse features present in the bays. (2) The smaller seafloor features are present only in the smaller glacial systems, indicating that short-lived atmospheric and oceanographic fluctuations, responsible for the formation of these landforms, are only recorded in these smaller systems. (3) Meltwater channels are abundant on the seafloor, but some are subglacial, carved in bedrock, and some are modern erosional features, carved on soft sediment. Lastly, based on geomorphological evidence, we propose the features found in some of the proximal bay areas were formed during a recent glacial advance, likely the Little Ice Age.

  10. Heterogeneous Heat Flow and Groundwater Effects on East Antarctic Ice Sheet Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, B. T.; Soderlund, K. M.; Young, D. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results numerical models describing the potential contributions groundwater and heterogeneous heat sources might have on ice dynamics. A two-phase, 1D hydrothermal model demonstrates the importance of groundwater flow in heat flux advection near the ice-bed interface. Typical, conservative vertical groundwater volume fluxes on the order of +/- 1-10 mm/yr can alter vertical heat flux by +/- 50-500 mW/m2 that could produce considerable volumes of meltwater depending on basin geometry and geothermal heat production. A 1D hydromechanical model demonstrates that during ice advance groundwater is mainly recharged into saturated sedimentary aquifers and during retreat groundwater discharges into the ice-bed interface, potentially contributing to subglacial water budgets on the order of 0.1-1 mm/yr during ice retreat. A map of most-likely elevated heat production provinces, estimated sedimentary basin depths, and radar-derived bed roughness are compared together to delineate areas of greatest potential to ice sheet instability in East Antarctica. Finally, a 2D numerical model of crustal fluid and heat flow typical to recently estimated sedimentary basins under the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is coupled to a 2.5D Full Stokes ice sheet model (with simple basal hydrology) to test for the sensitivity of hydrodynamic processes on ice sheet dynamics. Preliminary results show that the enhanced fluid flow can dramatically alter the basal heating of the ice and its temperature profile, as well as, the sliding rate, which heavily alter ice dynamics.

  11. Activity report of the 40th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition wintering party in 1999-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Miyaoka

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The 40th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE-40 wintering party, with 40 members, has successfully conducted the third-year project of the Vth five-year JARE program, over the period from 1st February 1999 to 31st January 2000, at Syowa Station, Antarctica.The framework of the JARE-40 wintering party program was the same as those of JARE-38 and JARE-39, comprising three routine observation programs and project/monitoring research observation programs in upper atmospheric physics, atmospheric sciences and glaciology, geophysics, and biology. In addition to many continuing projects, several new observations were started: 50MHz/112MHz aurora radars and a VLF wave receiver as part of the ionosphere program, aerosol sonde observations of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs as part of the meteorological program, HF/MF radars as part of the upper atmospheric physics program, frequent VLBI experiments as part of the geophysics program, and biological field surveys (including two dives, including monitoring of the undersea behavior of Weddell seals using bio-logging devices.In terms of inland field surveys, two parties were organized: fuel transportation and glaciological/meteorological observations along the route to Mizuho Station in August-September and to Dome Fuji/Yamato air-basecamp in November-January. These surveys involved snow sampling, precise GPS positioning, and sub-glacial surveys using three types of ice radar.Logistical activities, conducted in cooperation with the JARE-40 summer party, included the construction of a second summer lodge, the startup of a second 300 kVA generator and co-generator system, the development of a sewage plant, solar power panels, an access road to the A-heliport, and the cleanup of disused buildings. During the wintering period, efforts were directed towards the maintenance of all facilities at Syowa Station, safety management, and practical support for field operations.The Antarctic Environmental

  12. Climate sensitivity of the Antarctic ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, T.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.

    2014-12-01

    Simple box models of ocean-atmosphere carbon cycle predict that Antarctic ventilation can regulate the steady-state atmospheric CO2 through its control over the biological carbon storage in the deep ocean. A weakened upwelling would lead to a more complete nutrient utilization at the surface and an increased retention of biogenic carbon in the deep ocean. We perform a suite of numerical sensitivity experiments using a coupled seaice and global ocean circulation model to better understand what regulates the Antarctic ventilation and its link to glacial climate. The model is first spun up with a modern climatological surface forcing, which exhibits a multi-decadal oscillation, where the Southern Ocean is heated from below through the influx of warm and salty North Atlantic Deep Water, and the accumulation of heat induces intermittent convective overturning. Through the sensitivity experiments, we explore and illustrate the rich and complex behavior of the Antarctic ventilation and its response to the northern sinking, the surface wind stress, and the global mean temperature. When the northern sinking is weakened by a freshwater perturbation, the intermittent convection events are suppressed as the heat source is reduced. When the atmospheric temperature is lowered uniformly, the Antarctic seaice extent increases and the southern overturning weakens on centennial timescales. However, the convective overturning rebounds on the millennial timescale if the northern sinking is active. We will discuss implications of our results to the deep ventilation of the Southern Ocean and its impact on the ocean carbon storage.

  13. Tolerance of Antarctic soil fungi to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Kevin A.; Bridge, Paul; Clark, Melody S. [British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of hydrocarbons and fuel oil on Antarctic filamentous fungi in the terrestrial Antarctic environment. Growth of fungi and bacteria from soils around Rothera Research Station (Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula) was assessed in the presence of ten separate aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons [marine gas oil (MGO), dodecane, hexadecane, benzoic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, toluene, phenol, biphenyl, naphthalene and m- and p-xylenes with ethylbenzene]. Aromatic hydrocarbons inhibited soil microbial growth more than aliphatic hydrocarbons. Soil microorganisms from a moss patch, where little previous impact or hydrocarbon contamination had occurred, were less tolerant of hydrocarbons than those from high impact sites. Fungal growth rates of Mollisia sp., Penicillium commune, Mortierella sp., Trichoderma koningii, Trichoderma sp. and Phoma herbarum were assessed in the presence of hydrocarbons. Generally, aromatic hydrocarbons inhibited or stopped hyphal extension, though growth rates increased with some aliphatic hydrocarbons. Hyphal dry weight measurements suggested that Mortierella sp. may be able to use dodecane as sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading Antarctic fungi may have use in future hydrocarbon spill bioremediation. (author)

  14. Contrasts between Antarctic and Arctic ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Susan; Portmann, Robert W; Thompson, David W J

    2007-01-09

    This work surveys the depth and character of ozone depletion in the Antarctic and Arctic using available long balloon-borne and ground-based records that cover multiple decades from ground-based sites. Such data reveal changes in the range of ozone values including the extremes observed as polar air passes over the stations. Antarctic ozone observations reveal widespread and massive local depletion in the heart of the ozone "hole" region near 18 km, frequently exceeding 90%. Although some ozone losses are apparent in the Arctic during particular years, the depth of the ozone losses in the Arctic are considerably smaller, and their occurrence is far less frequent. Many Antarctic total integrated column ozone observations in spring since approximately the 1980s show values considerably below those ever observed in earlier decades. For the Arctic, there is evidence of some spring season depletion of total ozone at particular stations, but the changes are much less pronounced compared with the range of past data. Thus, the observations demonstrate that the widespread and deep ozone depletion that characterizes the Antarctic ozone hole is a unique feature on the planet.

  15. New Antarctic stenothoids sensu lato (Amphipoda, Crustacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traudl Krapp-Schikkel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Three stenothoid species are reported from recent Antarctic collections. Two of these are new to science (Prometopa cedrici sp. nov. and Antatelson claudei sp. nov.. A few character states of Antatelson walkeri are discussed. Keys are provided for Prometopa as well as for Antatelson.

  16. Exploring the Recovery Lakes region and interior Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica, with airborne gravity, magnetic and radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Ferraccioli, Fausto

    2017-01-01

    for major Dronning Maud Land ice stream systems, from the grounding lines up to the Recovery Lakes drainage basin, and filled in major data voids in Antarctic data compilations, such as AntGP for gravity data, ADMAP for magnetic data and BEDMAP2 for ice thickness data and the sub-ice topography. We present......Long-range airborne geophysical measurements were carried out in the ICEGRAV campaigns, covering hitherto unexplored parts of interior East Antarctica and part of the Antarctic Peninsula. The airborne surveys provided a regional coverage of gravity, magnetic and ice-penetrating radar measurements...... the first maps of gravity, magnetic and ice thickness data and bedrock topography for the region and show examples of bedrock topography and basal reflectivity patterns. The 2013 Recovery Lakes campaign was carried out with a British Antarctic Survey Twin Otter aircraft operating from the Halley...

  17. Phylogenetic position and taxonomy of three heterocytous cyanobacteria dominating the littoral of deglaciated lakes, James Ross Island, Antarctica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komárek, Jiří; Nedbalová, Linda; Hauer, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 5 (2012), s. 759-774 ISSN 0722-4060 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600050704; GA ČR GA206/08/0318 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : heterocytous cyanobacteria * Antarctic lakes * ecology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.006, year: 2012

  18. Assessing the variability of glacier lake bathymetries and potential peak discharge based on large-scale measurements in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochachin, Alejo; Huggel, Christian; Salazar, Cesar; Haeberli, Wilfried; Frey, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Over timescales of hundreds to thousands of years ice masses in mountains produced erosion in bedrock and subglacial sediment, including the formation of overdeepenings and large moraine dams that now serve as basins for glacial lakes. Satellite based studies found a total of 8355 glacial lakes in Peru, whereof 830 lakes were observed in the Cordillera Blanca. Some of them have caused major disasters due to glacial lake outburst floods in the past decades. On the other hand, in view of shrinking glaciers, changing water resources, and formation of new lakes, glacial lakes could have a function as water reservoirs in the future. Here we present unprecedented bathymetric studies of 124 glacial lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Huallanca, Huayhuash and Raura in the regions of Ancash, Huanuco and Lima. Measurements were carried out using a boat equipped with GPS, a total station and an echo sounder to measure the depth of the lakes. Autocad Civil 3D Land and ArcGIS were used to process the data and generate digital topographies of the lake bathymetries, and analyze parameters such as lake area, length and width, and depth and volume. Based on that, we calculated empirical equations for mean depth as related to (1) area, (2) maximum length, and (3) maximum width. We then applied these three equations to all 830 glacial lakes of the Cordillera Blanca to estimate their volumes. Eventually we used three relations from the literature to assess the peak discharge of potential lake outburst floods, based on lake volumes, resulting in 3 x 3 peak discharge estimates. In terms of lake topography and geomorphology results indicate that the maximum depth is located in the center part for bedrock lakes, and in the back part for lakes in moraine material. Best correlations are found for mean depth and maximum width, however, all three empirical relations show a large spread, reflecting the wide range of natural lake bathymetries. Volumes of the 124 lakes with bathymetries amount to 0

  19. A Laboratory Investigation of the Effects of Subglacial Meltwater Plumes on Submarine Ablation at the Fronts of Tidewater Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, R. C.; McConnochie, C. D.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate experimentally the effect of a basal freshwater source on the ablation of a vertical ice wall in salty water. We measure as a function of height the turbulent wall plume velocity, the ablation velocity of the ice, and the temperature at the ice wall. By systematically varying the volume flow rate of the freshwater source, we determine where the turbulent wall plume transitions from a free convection regime (controlled by the distributed buoyancy flux due to dissolution of the ice) to a forced convection regime (controlled by the buoyancy flux Bs of the basal freshwater source). In the forced convection regime, we find that the turbulent plume velocity is uniform with height and is proportional to Bs1/3, the interface temperature is independent of Bs, and the ablation velocity increases with Bs. In the two convection regimes, we find that there are fundamental differences in the wall turbulent plume, the turbulent entrainment coefficient, and the detrainment from the turbulent plume at the top of the wall. Lateral variations in subglacial discharge rates can enable these regimes to occur simultaneously along the front of a tidewater glacier, which will result in subglacial meltwater and submarine meltwater being seen at differing depths in the Greenland fjords.

  20. Estimating the Depth and Shape of Lake Vostok's Water Cavity from Aerogravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studinger, M.; Bell, R. E.; Tikku, A. A.

    2003-12-01

    The water circulation within Lake Vostok provides a viable mechanism for transporting mass and energy through the lake, enhancing the potential for the support of biota. The circulation pattern depends primarily on the geometry of the lake bathymetry. Water in shallow regions will warm more from the geothermal heat flux than in deeper parts, resulting in subtle lateral changes of water density. This temperature-induced change in water density is the primary driving force for the horizontal circulation within the lake. To date, only a few seismic soundings have provided estimates of the water depth of Lake Vostok. To determine the depth and shape of the water cavity over the entire lake we use gravity data acquired along a grid of flight lines traversing the region. The free-air gravity anomaly field reflects density variations related to both major geological and topographic structures and changes in the water depth of the lake. The gravity contribution from the deeper geological structures can be removed from the free-air anomaly by low-pass filtering of the data. The subglacial topography outside the lake and the geometry of the overlying ice sheet are well constrained from ice-penetrating radar measurements. The unknown parameter that dominates the filtered gravity anomaly is the relief of the bedrock-water interface. Assuming a constant density contrast across this boundary, the gravity data can be inverted for the bathymetry of the lake. The results show that Lake Vostok consists of two sub-basins, a northern and southern. The southern sub-basin is much deeper and approximately double the spatial area of the smaller northern sub-basin. The two sub-basins are separated by a saddle with very shallow water depths. The separation of Lake Vostok in two distinct sub-basins has important ramifications for the water circulation within the lake. The lake volume estimated from the inversion of gravity data is 5200 cubic km, three times bigger than previously thought

  1. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment - SAFIRE - on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, P.; Hubbard, B. P.; Doyle, S. H.; Young, T. J.; Hofstede, C. M.; Bougamont, M. H.; Todd, J.; Toberg, N.; Nicholls, K. W.; Box, J.; Walter, J. I.; Hubbard, A.

    2015-12-01

    Marine-terminating outlet glaciers drain 90 percent of the Greenland Ice Sheet and are responsible for about half of the ice sheet's net annual mass loss, which currently raises global sea level by 1 mm per year. The basal controls on these fast-flowing glaciers are, however, poorly understood, with the implication that numerical ice sheet models needed to predict future dynamic ice loss from Greenland relies on uncertain and often untested basal parameterizations. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment - SAFIRE - is addressing this paucity of observational constraints by drilling to the bed of Store Glacier, a fast-flowing outlet glacier terminating in Uummannaq Fjord, West Greenland. In 2014, we gained access to the bed in four boreholes drilled to depths of 603-616 m near the center of the glacier, 30 km inland from the calving terminus where ice flows at a rate of 700 m/year. A seismic survey showed the glacier bed to consist of water-saturated, soft sediment. The water level in all four boreholes nevertheless dropped rapidly to 80 m below the ice surface when the drill connected with a basal water system, indicating effective drainage over a sedimentary bed. We were able to install wired sensor strings at the bed (water pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity and turbidity) and within the glacier (temperature and tilt) in three boreholes. The sensors operated for up to 80+ days before cables stretched and ultimately snapped due to high internal strain. The data collected during this sensor deployment show ice as cold as -21 degrees Celcius; yet, temperature of water in the basal water system was persistently above the local freezing point. With diurnal variations detected in several sensor records, we hypothesise that surface water lubricates the ice flow while also warming basal ice. The fast basal motion of Store Glacier not only occurs by basal sliding, but from high rates of concentrated strain in the bottom third of the glacier

  2. Surface Features Parameterization and Equivalent Roughness Height Estimation of a Real Subglacial Conduit in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Liu, X.; Manko ff, K. D.; Gulley, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    The surfaces of subglacial conduits are very complex, coupling multi-scale roughness, large sinuosity, and cross-sectional variations together. Those features significantly affect the friction law and drainage efficiency inside the conduit by altering velocity and pressure distributions, thus posing considerable influences on the dynamic development of the conduit. Parameterizing the above surface features is a first step towards understanding their hydraulic influences. A Matlab package is developed to extract the roughness field, the conduit centerline, and associated area and curvature data from the conduit surface, acquired from 3D scanning. By using those data, the characteristic vertical and horizontal roughness scales are then estimated based on the structure functions. The centerline sinuosities, defined through three concepts, i.e., the traditional definition of a fluvial river, entropy-based sinuosity, and curvature-based sinuosity, are also calculated and compared. The cross-sectional area and equivalent circular diameter along the centerline are also calculated. Among those features, the roughness is especially important due to its pivotal role in determining the wall friction, and thus an estimation of the equivalent roughness height is of great importance. To achieve such a goal, the original conduit is firstly simplified into a straight smooth pipe with the same volume and centerline length, and the roughness field obtained above is then reconstructed into the simplified pipe. An OpenFOAM-based Large-eddy-simulation (LES) is then performed based on the reconstructed pipe. Considering that the Reynolds number is of the order 106, and the relative roughness is larger than 5% for 60% of the conduit, we test the validity of the resistance law for completely rough pipe. The friction factor is calculated based on the pressure drop and mean velocity in the simulation. Working together, the equivalent roughness height can be calculated. However, whether the

  3. Antarctic Megadunes: Characteristics and Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scambos, T.; Fahnestock, M.; Shuman, C.; Bauer, R.

    2004-12-01

    We review field geophysical, meteorological, and remote sensing data covering Antarctica's 'megadune' regions with the purpose of constraining formation models for the features. Megadunes are striped accumulation variations, oriented perpendicular to mean katabatic windflow, with hieghts ranging from 2 to 8 meters, and crest spacing from 2 to 6 km. Crest ridges have lateral extents of up to 100 km. Upwind faces are steeper than downwind faces, and are characterized by very large, eroded sastrugi. Surface 'glazes' of ice, with coarse recrystalized grains in the subsurface, are present in the lee faces. Dunes are widespread across the East Antarctic plateau, although laterally extensive dune fields occur in just a few regions. Strong variations in surface roughness and snow grain size between crest/upwind faces and trough/downwind faces are evident in albedo and radar or visible-light backscatter. Field measurements at a site 400 km southeast of Vostok station (80.78 deg S, 124.5 deg E) provide insight into dune origin, longevity and migration. Detailed surface topography from GPS confirms height and width of dunes inferred earlier using ICESat. Internal layering of megadunes (imaged using ground-penetrating radar) shows sigmoidal layers of higher accumulation along the dune crests and windward faces. Dunes accrete new layers in the upwind direction. Radar layer structures, consisting of a 6- to 15-meter-thick sequence of accumulation layers separated by erosive or very low accretion glaze layers, are visible to at least 70 meters below the surface. Given an estimated mean accumulation of 20 - 30 kg/m2 over the dune region, each dune sequence represents approximately 250 years of time. High accretion occurs over roughly 1/3 of an active dune field surface. This implies that surfaces on the lee-side dune face spend between 150 and 200 years exposed to near-surface air and temperature variations before burial by the next advancing dune face. GPS ice motion measurements

  4. Bathymetry of Lake Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Michigan has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  5. Bathymetry of Lake Huron

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  6. Bathymetry of Lake Ontario

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Ontario has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  7. Great Lakes Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lakes Michigan, Erie, Saint Clair, Ontario and Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and...

  8. Bathymetry of Lake Superior

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Superior has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  9. Impact of a localized source of subglacial discharge on the heat flux and submarine melting of a tidewater glacier : A laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cenedese, Claudia; Gatto, V.M.

    2016-01-01

    Idealized laboratory experiments have been conducted in a two-layer stratified fluid to investigate the leading-order dynamics that control submarine melting and meltwater export near a vertical ice-ocean interface as a function of subglacial discharge. In summer, the discharge of surface runoff

  10. Evidence for Subglacial Deformation and Deposition during a Complete Advance-Stagnation Cycle of Kötlujökull, Iceland – A Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    deformation and deposition from dynamically active ice, (4) subglacial deposition from stagnant ice and (5) supraglacial re-deposition in dead-ice environment during de-icing. This complete sedimentary sequence represents a single glacier advance-stagnation cycle. The melt-out till displays moderate...

  11. Diversity of culturable bacteria recovered from Pico Bolívar's glacial and subglacial environments, at 4950 m, in Venezuelan tropical Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón, Johnma; Gómez, Wileidy; Ball, María M; Melfo, Alejandra; Rengifo, Marcos; Balcázar, Wilvis; Dávila-Vera, Delsy; Balza-Quintero, Alirio; Mendoza-Briceño, Rosa Virginia; Yarzábal, Luis Andrés

    2016-11-01

    Even though tropical glaciers are retreating rapidly and many will disappear in the next few years, their microbial diversity remains to be studied in depth. In this paper we report on the biodiversity of the culturable fraction of bacteria colonizing Pico Bolívar's glacier ice and subglacial meltwaters, at ∼4950 m in the Venezuelan Andean Mountains. Microbial cells of diverse morphologies and exhibiting uncompromised membranes were present at densities ranging from 1.5 × 10(4) to 4.7 × 10(4) cells/mL in glacier ice and from 4.1 × 10(5) to 9.6 × 10(5) cells/mL in subglacial meltwater. Of 89 pure isolates recovered from the samples, the majority were eurypsychrophilic or stenopsychrophilic, according to their temperature range of growth. Following analysis of their 16S rDNA nucleotidic sequence, 54 pure isolates were assigned to 23 phylotypes distributed within 4 different phyla or classes: Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Actinobacteria dominated the culturable fraction of glacier ice samples, whereas Proteobacteria were dominant in subglacial meltwater samples. Chloramphenicol and ampicillin resistance was exhibited by 73.07% and 65.38%, respectively, of the subglacial isolates, and nearly 35% of them were multiresistant. Considering the fast rate at which tropical glaciers are melting, this study confirms the urgent need to study the microbial communities immured in such environments.

  12. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  13. The signs of Antarctic ozone hole recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttippurath, Jayanarayanan; Nair, Prijitha J

    2017-04-03

    Absorption of solar radiation by stratospheric ozone affects atmospheric dynamics and chemistry, and sustains life on Earth by preventing harmful radiation from reaching the surface. Significant ozone losses due to increases in the abundances of ozone depleting substances (ODSs) were first observed in Antarctica in the 1980s. Losses deepened in following years but became nearly flat by around 2000, reflecting changes in global ODS emissions. Here we show robust evidence that Antarctic ozone has started to recover in both spring and summer, with a recovery signal identified in springtime ozone profile and total column measurements at 99% confidence for the first time. Continuing recovery is expected to impact the future climate of that region. Our results demonstrate that the Montreal Protocol has indeed begun to save the Antarctic ozone layer.

  14. Antarctic Meteorite Classification and Petrographic Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nancy S.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Righter, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The Antarctic Meteorite collection, which is comprised of over 18,700 meteorites, is one of the largest collections of meteorites in the world. These meteorites have been collected since the late 1970's as part of a three-agency agreement between NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution [1]. Samples collected each season are analyzed at NASA s Meteorite Lab and the Smithsonian Institution and results are published twice a year in the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, which has been in publication since 1978. Each newsletter lists the samples collected and processed and provides more in-depth details on selected samples of importance to the scientific community. Data about these meteorites is also published on the NASA Curation website [2] and made available through the Meteorite Classification Database allowing scientists to search by a variety of parameters

  15. Functional biomolecules of Antarctic stromatolitic and endolithic cyanobacterial communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wynn-Williams, D. D; Edwards, H. G. M; Garcia-Pichel, F

    1999-01-01

    For activity and survival in extreme terrestrial Antarctic habitats, lithobiontic cyanobacteria depend on key biomolecules for protection against environmental stress and for optimization of growth conditions...

  16. Late Glacial and Holocene sedimentary evolution of Czechowskie Lake (Eastern Pomerania, North Central Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordowski, Jarosław; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Słowiński, Michał; Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Brauer, Achim; Ott, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Czechowskie Lake is located in north-central Poland in Tuchola Forest, about 100 kilometers SW away from Gdańsk. In the deepest parts of the lake there are preserved laminated sediments with an excellent Holocene climatic record. The lake has the area of 76,6 ha. Actual water level is at 109,9 m a.s.l. The average depth is 9,59 m, maximal 32 m. It occupies a large subglacial channel, reproduced within the glacifluvial sediments of the last glaciation. The lake has a history reaching back to Pommeranian phase which is proved by analysis of sedimentary succesions in the vicinity of present-day waterbody. Primarily it come to existence as an very variable ice dammed lake but after dead ice and permafrost desintegration it changed into a stable lake. In the terrestrialised part oft the lake and in its litoral zone there were curried out numerous boreholes within limnic and slope sediments. They have been analysed in respect to lithology and structure. Some of them were also investigated palynologically which along with radiocarbon datings allowed to reconstruct major phases of the water level fluctuations. The maximum infilling with the limnic and telmatic sediments reaches over 12 m. In the bottom of the lake there is a marked presence of many overdeepenings with the diameter of dozen or several dozen meters and the depth of up to 10 m with numerous, distinct throughs between them. They favoured the preservation of the lamination in the deepest parts of the lake due to waves hampering and stopping of the density circulation in the lake waterbody. The analysis of limnic sediments revealed considerable spatial and temporal variability mainly in dependance of the area of the water body and water level in time of deposition. In the lake are recorded three distinct phases of lake level decrease. The sedimentary evolution in the isolated minor lake basins showed gradual decrease of mineral and organic deposition in favour for carbonate one although in places separated by

  17. Evolution of the early Antarctic ice ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebrand, Diederik; de Bakker, Anouk T. M.; Beddow, Helen M.; Wilson, Paul A.; Bohaty, Steven M.; Ruessink, Gerben; Pälike, Heiko; Batenburg, Sietske J.; Hilgen, Frederik J.; Hodell, David A.; Huck, Claire E.; Kroon, Dick; Raffi, Isabella; Saes, Mischa J. M.; van Dijk, Arnold E.; Lourens, Lucas J.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the stability of the early Antarctic ice cap in the geological past is of societal interest because present-day atmospheric CO2 concentrations have reached values comparable to those estimated for the Oligocene and the Early Miocene epochs. Here we analyze a new high-resolution deep-sea oxygen isotope (δ18O) record from the South Atlantic Ocean spanning an interval between 30.1 My and 17.1 My ago. The record displays major oscillations in deep-sea temperature and Antarctic ice volume in response to the ˜110-ky eccentricity modulation of precession. Conservative minimum ice volume estimates show that waxing and waning of at least ˜85 to 110% of the volume of the present East Antarctic Ice Sheet is required to explain many of the ˜110-ky cycles. Antarctic ice sheets were typically largest during repeated glacial cycles of the mid-Oligocene (˜28.0 My to ˜26.3 My ago) and across the Oligocene-Miocene Transition (˜23.0 My ago). However, the high-amplitude glacial-interglacial cycles of the mid-Oligocene are highly symmetrical, indicating a more direct response to eccentricity modulation of precession than their Early Miocene counterparts, which are distinctly asymmetrical—indicative of prolonged ice buildup and delayed, but rapid, glacial terminations. We hypothesize that the long-term transition to a warmer climate state with sawtooth-shaped glacial cycles in the Early Miocene was brought about by subsidence and glacial erosion in West Antarctica during the Late Oligocene and/or a change in the variability of atmospheric CO2 levels on astronomical time scales that is not yet captured in existing proxy reconstructions.

  18. Structural Uncertainty in Antarctic sea ice simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    The inability of the vast majority of historical climate model simulations to reproduce the observed increase in Antarctic sea ice has motivated many studies about the quality of the observational record, the role of natural variability versus forced changes, and the possibility of missing or inadequate forcings in the models (such as freshwater discharge from thinning ice shelves or an inadequate magnitude of stratospheric ozone depletion). In this presentation I will highlight another source of uncertainty that has received comparatively little attention: Structural uncertainty, that is, the systematic uncertainty in simulated sea ice trends that arises from model physics and mean-state biases. Using two large ensembles of experiments from the Community Earth System Model (CESM), I will show that the model is predisposed towards producing negative Antarctic sea ice trends during 1979-present, and that this outcome is not simply because the model's decadal variability is out-of-synch with that in nature. In the "Tropical Pacific Pacemaker" ensemble, in which observed tropical Pacific SST anomalies are prescribed, the model produces very realistic atmospheric circulation trends over the Southern Ocean, yet the sea ice trend is negative in every ensemble member. However, if the ensemble-mean trend (commonly interpreted as the forced response) is removed, some ensemble members show a sea ice increase that is very similar to the observed. While this results does confirm the important role of natural variability, it also suggests a strong bias in the forced response. I will discuss the reasons for this systematic bias and explore possible remedies. This an important problem to solve because projections of 21st -Century changes in the Antarctic climate system (including ice sheet surface mass balance changes and related changes in the sea level budget) have a strong dependence on the mean state of and changes in the Antarctic sea ice cover. This problem is not unique to

  19. Climate processes on the antarctic plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S.G.; Harder, S.L.; Brandt, R.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Experiments on the climate processes on the antarctic plateau, begun at the South Pole in the 1990-91 summer season and carried out during the full year December 1991 to December 1992 are summarized in the article. Experiments discussed include the following: Effect of sastrugi on bidirectional reflectance of snow; temperatures in the near-surface snow; atmospheric longwave radiation spectrum; Air snow exchange processes; sampling of falling and surface snow; air sampling; blowing and drifting snow. 8 refs.

  20. A dynamic physical characterization of the receding Mendenhall Glacier lake front terminus Juneau, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C. L.; Fatland, D. R.; Heavner, M.; Korzen, N.; Galbraith, J.; Sauer, D.; Hood, E. W.

    2009-12-01

    Extrapolation of 2000-2009 GPS results from terminus position surveys of the Mendenhall Glacier near Juneau, Alaska suggests that the lake front glacier terminus will no longer be in contact with proglacial Mendenhall Lake by July 2011. Meteorologic stations located near the glacier terminus at 44m asl, on the glacier surface at 430m (Northstar Camp), and at 1569m near the Mendenhall-Taku Glacier ice divide, provide data from rainfall events and temperature variation which contribute to glacier velocity and ultimately ice mass transfer to the lower glacier. Mendenhall weather data in combination with wind direction, wind velocity, and lake water temperature profiles (0-40m) and bathymetric surveys in 2009 provide detailed information about the physical conditions of the glacier and lake which are also captured visually by hourly and 30 second image records of the glacier terminus. Cameras are located at 500m from the terminus on bedrock and at ~2km from the terminus at the USFS Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center roof. Ice berg motions and their changing positions in Mendenhall Lake can be used to create a gyre model for lake circulation. Summer 2009 lake water column temperature profiles collected at 15 minute intervals can also be linked with met station data, and USGS discharge data for the Mendenhall River to identify subglacial meltwater discharge events into the lake. We present here a synthetic view of these sensor data to evaluate what can be inferred and what remains mysterious concerning Mendenhall Glacier recession. Webcam photo Mendenhall Glacier Terminus 01-Sept-2009 10:02 am http://seamonster.jun.alaska.edu/webcam/Mendterm

  1. EVA: Evryscopes for the Arctic and Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richichi, A.; Law, N.; Tasuya, O.; Fors, O.; Dennihy, E.; Carlberg, R.; Tuthill, P.; Ashley, M.; Soonthornthum, B.

    2017-06-01

    We are planning to build Evryscopes for the Arctic and Antarctic (EVA), which will enable the first ultra-wide-field, high-cadence sky survey to be conducted from both Poles. The system is based on the successful Evryscope concept, already installed and operating since 2015 at Cerro Tololo in Chile with the following characteristics: robotic operation, 8,000 square degrees simultaneous sky coverage, 2-minute cadence, milli-mag level photometric accuracy, pipelined data processing for real-time analysis and full data storage for off-line analysis. The initial location proposed for EVA is the PEARL station on Ellesmere island; later also an antarctic location shall be selected. The science goals enabled by this unique combination of almost full-sky coverage and high temporal cadence are numerous, and include among others ground-breaking forays in the fields of exoplanets, stellar variability, asteroseismology, supernovae and other transient events. The EVA polar locations will enable uninterrupted observations lasting in principle over weeks and months. EVA will be fully robotic. We discuss the EVA science drivers and expected results, and present the logistics and the outline of the project which is expected to have first light in the winter of 2018. The cost envelope can be kept very competitive thanks to R&D already employed for the CTIO Evryscope, to our experience with both Arctic and Antarctic locations, and to the use of off-the-shelf components.

  2. Olfactory sex recognition investigated in Antarctic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bonadonna

    Full Text Available Chemical signals can yield information about an animal such as its identity, social status or sex. Such signals have rarely been considered in birds, but recent results have shown that chemical signals are actually used by different bird species to find food and to recognize their home and nest. This is particularly true in petrels whose olfactory anatomy is among the most developed in birds. Recently, we have demonstrated that Antarctic prions, Pachyptila desolata, are also able to recognize and follow the odour of their partner in a Y-maze.However, the experimental protocol left unclear whether this choice reflected an olfactory recognition of a particular individual (i.e. partner or a more general sex recognition mechanism. To test this second hypothesis, male and female birds' odours were presented simultaneously to 54 Antarctic prions in a Y-maze. Results showed random behaviour by the tested bird, independent of its sex or reproductive status. Present results do not support the possibility that Antarctic prions can distinguish the sex of a conspecific through its odour but indirectly support the hypothesis that they can distinguish individual odours.

  3. Antarctic isolation: immune and viral studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingate, T. R.; Lugg, D. J.; Muller, H. K.; Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Stressful environmental conditions are a major determinant of immune reactivity. This effect is pronounced in Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition populations exposed to prolonged periods of isolation in the Antarctic. Alterations of T cell function, including depression of cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and a peak 48.9% reduction of T cell proliferation to the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin, were documented during a 9-month period of isolation. T cell dysfunction was mediated by changes within the peripheral blood mononuclear cell compartment, including a paradoxical atypical monocytosis associated with altered production of inflammatory cytokines. There was a striking reduction in the production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the predominant pro-inflammatory monokine TNF-alpha and changes were also detected in the production of IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, IL-1ra and IL-10. Prolonged Antarctic isolation is also associated with altered latent herpesvirus homeostasis, including increased herpesvirus shedding and expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cell population. These findings have important long-term health implications.

  4. Cradles and museums of Antarctic teleost biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornburg, Alex; Federman, Sarah; Lamb, April D; Jones, Christopher D; Near, Thomas J

    2017-09-01

    Isolated in one of the most extreme marine environments on Earth, teleost fish diversity in Antarctica's Southern Ocean is dominated by one lineage: the notothenioids. Throughout the past century, the long-term persistence of this unique marine fauna has become increasingly threatened by regional atmospheric and, to a lesser extent oceanic, warming. Developing an understanding of how historical temperature shifts have shaped source-sink dynamics for Antarctica's teleost lineages provides critical insight for predicting future demographic responses to climate change. We use a combination of phylogenetic and biogeographic modelling to show that high-latitude Antarctic nearshore habitats have been an evolutionary sink for notothenioid species diversity. Contrary to expectations from island biogeographic theory, lower latitude regions of the Southern Ocean that include the northern Antarctic Peninsula and peripheral island archipelagos act as source areas to continental diversity. These peripheral areas facilitate both the generation of new species and repeated colonization of nearshore Antarctic continental regions. Our results provide historical context to contemporary trends of global climate change that threaten to invert these evolutionary dynamics.

  5. Dynamics of a vertical turbulent plume in a stratification typical of Greenland fjords: an idealized model of subglacial discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Erik; Ezhova, Ekaterina; Cenedese, Claudia; Brandt, Luca

    2017-04-01

    We the report results of large eddy simulations of a turbulent buoyant plume in a configuration providing an idealized model of subglacial discharge from a submarine glacier in stratifications typical of Greenland Fjords. We neglect a horizontal momentum of the plume and assume that its influence on the plume dynamics is small and important only close to the source. Moreover, idealized models have considered the plume adjacent to the glacier as a half-conical plume (e.g., [1]). Thus, to compare the results for such plume with the classical plume theory, developed for free plumes entraining ambient fluid from all directions, it is convenient to add the second half-conical part and consider a free plume with double the total discharge as a model. Given the estimate of the total subglacial discharge for Helheim Glacier in Sermilik Fjord [2], we perform simulations with double the total discharge in order to investigate the dynamics of the flow in typical winter and summer stratifications in Greenland fjords [3]. The plume is discharged from a round source of various diameters. In winter, when the stratification is similar to an idealised two-layers case, turbulent entrainment and generation of internal waves by the plume top are in agreement with the theoretical and numerical results obtained for turbulent jets in a two-layer stratification. In summer, instead, the stratification is more complex and turbulent entrainment is significantly reduced. The subsurface layer in summer is characterized by a strong density gradient and the oscillating plume generates non-linear internal waves which are able to mix this layer even if the plume does not penetrate to the surface. The classical theory for the integral parameters of a turbulent plume in a homogeneous fluid gives accurate predictions of the plume parameters in the weakly stratified lower layer up to the pycnocline. [1] Mankoff, K. D., F. Straneo, C. Cenedese, S. B. Das, C. D. Richards, and H. Singh, 2016: Structure

  6. Mobile Robot for Exploring Cold Liquid/Solid Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Charles; Zimmerman, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Planetary Autonomous Amphibious Robotic Vehicle (PAARV), now at the prototype stage of development, was originally intended for use in acquiring and analyzing samples of solid, liquid, and gaseous materials in cold environments on the shores and surfaces, and at shallow depths below the surfaces, of lakes and oceans on remote planets. The PAARV also could be adapted for use on Earth in similar exploration of cold environments in and near Arctic and Antarctic oceans and glacial and sub-glacial lakes.

  7. In-situ multispectral and bathymetric measurements over a supraglacial lake in western Greenland using a remotely controlled watercraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, M.; Steiner, N.

    2011-05-01

    Supraglacial lakes form from meltwater on the Greenland ice sheet in topographic depressions on the surface, affecting both surface and sub-glacial processes. As the reflectance in the visible and near-infrared regions of a column of water is modulated by its height, retrieval techniques using spaceborne remote sensing data (e.g. Landsat, MODIS) have been proposed in the literature for the detection of lakes and estimation of their volume. These techniques require basic assumptions on the spectral properties of the water as well as the bottom of the lake, among other things. In this study, we report results obtained from the analysis of concurrent in-situ multi-spectral and depth measurements collected over a supraglacial lake during early July 2010 in West Greenland (Lake Olivia, 69°36'35" N, 49°29'40" W) and aim to assess some of the underlying hypotheses in remote sensing based bathymetric approaches. In particular, we focus our attention on the analysis of the lake bottom albedo and of the water attenuation coefficient. The analysis of in-situ data (collected by means of a remotely controlled boat equipped with a GPS, a sonar and a spectrometer) highlights the exponential trend of the water-leaving reflectance with lake depth. The values of the attenuation factor obtained from in-situ data are compared with those computed using approaches proposed in the literature. Also, the values of the lake bottom albedo from in-situ measurements are compared with those obtained from the analysis of reflectance of shallow waters. Finally, we quantify the error between in-situ measured and satellite-estimated lake depth values for the lake under study.

  8. In-situ multispectral and bathymetric measurements over a supraglacial lake in western Greenland using a remotely controlled watercraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tedesco

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Supraglacial lakes form from meltwater on the Greenland ice sheet in topographic depressions on the surface, affecting both surface and sub-glacial processes. As the reflectance in the visible and near-infrared regions of a column of water is modulated by its height, retrieval techniques using spaceborne remote sensing data (e.g. Landsat, MODIS have been proposed in the literature for the detection of lakes and estimation of their volume. These techniques require basic assumptions on the spectral properties of the water as well as the bottom of the lake, among other things. In this study, we report results obtained from the analysis of concurrent in-situ multi-spectral and depth measurements collected over a supraglacial lake during early July 2010 in West Greenland (Lake Olivia, 69°36'35" N, 49°29'40" W and aim to assess some of the underlying hypotheses in remote sensing based bathymetric approaches. In particular, we focus our attention on the analysis of the lake bottom albedo and of the water attenuation coefficient. The analysis of in-situ data (collected by means of a remotely controlled boat equipped with a GPS, a sonar and a spectrometer highlights the exponential trend of the water-leaving reflectance with lake depth. The values of the attenuation factor obtained from in-situ data are compared with those computed using approaches proposed in the literature. Also, the values of the lake bottom albedo from in-situ measurements are compared with those obtained from the analysis of reflectance of shallow waters. Finally, we quantify the error between in-situ measured and satellite-estimated lake depth values for the lake under study.

  9. Negative magnetic anomaly over Mt. Resnik, a subaerially erupted volcanic peak beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, John C.; Finn, C.; Morse, D.L.; Blankenship, D.D.

    2006-01-01

    Mt. Resnik is one of the previously reported 18 subaerially erupted volcanoes (in the West Antarctic rift system), which have high elevation and high bed relief beneath the WAIS in the Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey. Mt. Resnik lies 300 m below the surface of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS); it has 1.6 km topographic relief, and a conical form defined by radar ice-sounding of bed topography. It has an associated complex negative magnetic anomaly revealed by the CWA survey. We calculated and interpreted magnetic models fit to the Mt. Resnik anomaly as a volcanic source comprising both reversely and normally magnetized (in the present field direction) volcanic flows, 0.5-2.5-km thick, erupted subaerially during a time of magnetic field reversal. The Mt. Resnik 305-nT anomaly is part of an approximately 50- by 40-km positive anomaly complex extending about 30 km to the west of the Mt. Resnik peak, associated with an underlying source complex of about the same area, whose top is at the bed of the WAIS. The bed relief of this shallow source complex has a maximum of only about 400 m, whereas the modeled source is >3 km thick. From the spatial relationship we interpret that this source and Mt Resnik are approximately contemporaneous. Any subglacially (older?) erupted edifices comprising hyaloclastite or other volcanic debris, which formerly overlaid the source to the west, were removed by the moving WAIS into which they were injected as is the general case for the ???1000 volcanic centers at the base of the WAIS. The presence of the magnetic field reversal modeled for Mt. Resnik may represent the Bruhnes-Matayama reversal at 780 ka (or an earlier reversal). There are ???100 short-wavelength, steep-gradient, negative magnetic anomalies observed over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), or about 10% of the approximately 1000 short-wavelength, shallow-source, high-amplitude (50- >1000 nT) "volcanic" magnetic anomalies in the CWA survey. These

  10. Heat sources for glacial ice melt in a West Greenland tidewater outlet glacier fjord: The role of subglacial freshwater discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jørgen; Mortensen, John; Lennert, Kunuk

    2015-01-01

    The melting of tidewater outlet glaciers from the Greenland Ice Sheet contributes significantly to global sea level rise. Accelerated mass loss is related to melt-processes in front of calving glaciers, yet the role of ocean heat transports is poorly understood. Here we present the first direct...... measurements from a subglacial plume in front of a calving tidewater outlet glacier. Surface salinity in the plume corresponded to a meltwater content of 7 %, which is indicative of significant entrainment of warm bottom water and, according to plume model calculations, significant ice melt. Energy balance...... of the area near the glacier showed that ice melt was mainly due to ocean heat transport and that direct plume-associated melt was only important in periods with high meltwater discharge rates of ~100 m3 s−1. Ocean mixing outside of the plume area was thus the primary heat source for melting glacier ice....

  11. Multiple Nonconformities in Ice-Walled Lake Successions Indicate Periods with Cold Summers (24.4 - 22.5 ka, 21.1 - 19.2 ka, 18.5 - 18.1 ka) during the Last Deglaciation in Northeastern Illinois, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Unprecedented age control on many last glacial stratigraphic units and morainal ice-margin positions are interpreted from AMS radiocarbon ages of tundra plant macrofossils archived in low-relief ice-walled lake plain (IWLP) deposits the Lake Michigan Lobe (south-central Laurentide Ice Sheet). IWLPs are periglacial features that formed on morainal dead-ice permafrost. Lacustrine sediment, and the fossils contained therein, had physical and temporal proximity to the glacier which formed the underlying moraine. In modern ice-walled lakes, as the lake's ice cover begins to melt, moats form which allows access of sloughing tundra-mantled active layer sediment (soil) into the lakes. Multiple AMS ages from two sites with proglacial sediment buried by glacial max LIS diamicton, and IWLPs reveal evidence of episodic plant growth and sedimentation including ca. 24.0 to 24.4 ka (post Shelby Phase), 22.5 to 21.1 ka (post Livingston Phase), 18.1 to 17.4 ka (post Woodstock Phase). Although presently based on negative evidence, the associated nonconformities (listed in title) indicate periods when cold conditions did not promote development of the estival moat. Although the evidence does not preclude tundra growth during the cold summers, there was little landscape modification due to limited thawing of the active layer. At approximately the onset of the 19.2-18.5 "warm" period, at least two large deglacial discharge events flooded the Fox and Kankakee tributary valleys of the Illinois River. The latter, known as the Kankakee Torrent, occurred at 19.05 - 18.85 ka (σ1 range) at the Oswego channel complex. The temporal coincidence of the torrents and sedimentation in ice-walled lakes suggests that the post-Livingston Phase nonconformity (21.1 - 19.2 ka) was a period of lessened meltwater discharge through subglacial conduits (tunnel valleys) as the frozen toe promoted formation of subglacial lakes, buildup of pore-water pressures, and the release of subglacial water as "torrents

  12. Unconsolidated sediments at the bottom of Lake Vostok from seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filina, I.; Lukin, V.; Masolov, V.; Blankenship, D.

    2007-01-01

    Seismic soundings of Lake Vostok have been performed by the Polar Marine Geological Research Expedition in collaboration with the Russian Antarctic Expedition since the early 1990s. The seismograms recorded show at least two relatively closely spaced reflections associated with the lake bottom. These were initially interpreted as boundaries of a layer of unconsolidated sediments at the bottom of the lake. A more recent interpretation suggests that the observed reflections are side echoes from the rough lake bottom, and that there are no unconsolidated sediments at the bottom of the lake. The major goal of this paper is to reveal the nature of those reflections by testing three hypotheses of their origin. The results show that some of the reflections, but not all of them, are consistent with the hypothesis of a non-flat lake bottom along the source-receiver line (2D case). The reflections were also evaluated as side echoes from an adjacent sloping interface, but these tests implied unreasonably steep slopes (at least 8 degrees) at the lake bottom. The hypothesis that is the most compatible with seismic data is the presence of a widespread layer of unconsolidated sediments at the bottom of Lake Vostok. The modeling suggests the presence of a two hundred meter thick sedimentary layer with a seismic velocity of 1700 -1900 m/sec in the southern and middle parts of the lake. The sedimentary layer thickens in the northern basin to ~350 m

  13. Test of simultaneous synthetic DNA tracer injections for the estimation of the englacial and subglacial drainage system structure of Storglaciären, northern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Leung, S.; Lyon, S. W.; Sharma, A. N.; Walter, M. T.; Williamson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Storglaciären glacier, located in the sub-arctic Tarfala catchment, in northern Sweden is one of the world's longest continuously monitored glaciers which provides a unique research platform for the long-term assessment of glacier and ice sheet processes. For example, small mountain glacier hydrological knowledge of the subglacial water distribution at the ice-bed interface has been applied to ice sheets to predict basal sliding processes. Basal sliding promoted by hydraulic jacking is an important glacial-velocity control that is dependent on the subglacial flow pathways' morphology. Thus, understanding subglacial water distribution and drainage system structure and morphology is crucial for modeling ice masses' flow. In order to estimate subglacial drainage system structure and morphology dye tracing experiments are widely employed. Tracer experiments provide quantitative parameters for any input location including tracer transit velocity, dispersivity, recovery and storage. However, spatial data coverage is limited by the finite number of tracers available for simultaneous tracing. In the presented study we test the use of synthetic DNA tracers for the assessment of the englacial and subglacial drainage system structure of Storglaciären. The synthetic DNA tracer is composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated (Sharma et al., 2012, Environmental Science & Technology). Because the DNA sequences can be randomly combined the synthetic DNA tracer provides an enormous number of unique tracers (approximately 1.61 x 1060). Thus, these synthetic tracers have the advantage that multiple (>10) experiments can be conducted simultaneously, allowing a greater information gain within a shorter measurement period. Quantities of a certain DNA strand can be detected using biotechnology tools such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR). During the 2013

  14. 77 FR 5403 - Conservation of Antarctic Animals and Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 45 CFR Part 670 Conservation of Antarctic Animals and Plants AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, The National Science...

  15. Reaching for the Horizon: Enabling 21st Century Antarctic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan-Finnemore, M.; Kennicutt, M. C., II; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs' (COMNAP) Antarctic Roadmap Challenges(ARC) project translated the 80 highest priority Antarctic and Southern Ocean scientific questionsidentified by the community via the SCAR Antarctic Science Horizon Scan into the highest prioritytechnological, access, infrastructure and logistics needs to enable the necessary research to answer thequestions. A workshop assembled expert and experienced Antarctic scientists and National AntarcticProgram operators from around the globe to discern the highest priority technological needs includingthe current status of development and availability, where the technologies will be utilized in the Antarctic area, at what temporal scales and frequencies the technologies will be employed,and how broadly applicable the technologies are for answering the highest priority scientific questions.Secondly the logistics, access, and infrastructure requirements were defined that are necessary todeliver the science in terms of feasibility including cost and benefit as determined by expected scientific return on investment. Finally, based on consideration of the science objectives and the mix oftechnologies implications for configuring National Antarctic Program logistics capabilities andinfrastructure architecture over the next 20 years were determined. In particular those elements thatwere either of a complexity, requiring long term investments to achieve and/or having an associated cost that realistically can only (or best) be achieved by international coordination, planning and partnerships were identified. Major trends (changes) in logistics, access, and infrastructure requirements were identified that allow for long-term strategic alignment of international capabilities, resources and capacity. The outcomes of this project will be reported.

  16. UV radiation and primary production in the Antarctic waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Krishnakumari, L.; Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    obtained between pp and the above parameters in the Antarctic sub-surface waters determined at discrete depths of 10, 20, 30 and 40 m. However, when the primary productivity values were normalised for PAR, a more negative effect was noticed at the Antarctic...

  17. Biological studies in the Antarctic waters: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.

    stream_size 12 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Proc_Workshop_Antarct_Stud_1990_407.pdf.txt stream_source_info Proc_Workshop_Antarct_Stud_1990_407.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO...

  18. Antarctic bacteria inhibit growth of foodborne microorganisms at low temperatures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Brien, A.C.; Sharp, R.; Russell, N.J.; Roller, S.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Antarctic microorganisms with the ability to produce cold-active antimicrobial compounds with potential for use in chilled food preservation. Colonies (4496) were isolated from 12 Antarctic soil samples and tested against Listeria innocua, Pseudomonas fragi and

  19. Revision of Eocene Antarctic carpet sharks (Elasmobranchii, Orectolobiformes) from Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Andrea; Mörs, Thomas; Reguero, Marcelo A; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, was once called the 'Rosetta Stone' of Southern Hemisphere palaeobiology, because this small island provides the most complete and richly fossiliferous Palaeogene sequence in Antarctica. Among fossil marine vertebrate remains, chondrichthyans seemingly were dominant elements in the Eocene Antarctic fish fauna. The fossiliferous sediments on Seymour Island are from the La Meseta Formation, which was originally divided into seven stratigraphical levels, TELMs 1-7 (acronym for Tertiary Eocene La Meseta) ranging from the upper Ypresian (early Eocene) to the late Priabonian (late Eocene). Bulk sampling of unconsolidated sediments from TELMs 5 and 6, which are Ypresian (early Eocene) and Lutetian (middle Eocene) in age, respectively, yielded very rich and diverse chondrichthyan assemblages including over 40 teeth of carpet sharks representing two new taxa, Notoramphoscyllium woodwardi gen. et sp. nov. and Ceolometlaouia pannucae gen. et sp. nov. Two additional teeth from TELM 5 represent two different taxa that cannot be assigned to any specific taxon and thus are left in open nomenclature. The new material not only increases the diversity of Eocene Antarctic selachian faunas but also allows two previous orectolobiform records to be re-evaluated. Accordingly, Stegostoma cf. faciatum is synonymized with Notoramphoscyllium woodwardi gen. et sp. nov., whereas Pseudoginglymostoma cf. brevicaudatum represents a nomen dubium. The two new taxa, and probably the additional two unidentified taxa, are interpreted as permanent residents, which most likely were endemic to Antarctic waters during the Eocene and adapted to shallow and estuarine environments.

  20. Limnology of Eifel maar lakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scharf, Burkhard W; Björk, Sven

    1992-01-01

    ... & morphometry - Physical & chemical characteristics - Calcite precipitation & solution in Lake Laacher See - Investigations using sediment traps in Lake Gemundener Maar - Phytoplankton of Lake Weinfelder Maar...

  1. Rise and fall of a small ice-dammed lake - Role of deglaciation processes and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehyba, Slavomír; Hanáček, Martin; Engel, Zbyněk; Stachoň, Zdeněk

    2017-10-01

    A small ice-dammed lake, which developed along the margin of Nordenskiöldbreen on the northern coast of Adolfbukta, (central Spitsbergen, Svalbard) has been studied by a combination of facies analysis, ground penetrating radar, analysis of photos and satellite imagery, and by surface mapping by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (drone). The lake existed between the years 1990-2012 and occupied two partial depressions in the bedrock, separated by a bedrock ridge for the dominant period of its history. Whereas the eastern depression was almost completely infilled due to direct fluvial input, the western depression revealed only thin sedimentary cover and was dotted from the eastern depression by an outflow of surficial waters. Gilbert delta deposits with typical tripartite zones of topset, foreset and bottomset were recognised in the eastern depression. Topset was comprised by deposits of a braided river. Foreset is formed by deposits of sediment gravity flows (turbidity currents and debris flows). Bottomset is represented by alternating suspension deposits and deposits of hyperpycnal underflows (low-density turbidity currents). The ruling factors of the evolution of the delta were glacier retreat, bedrock morphology, both affecting the relative lake level, and the rate of sediment delivery. Glacier retreat over stepped and inclined bedrock morphology led to delta prograding and downstepping. The recognised fluvio-deltaic terraces revealed four lake level falls followed by fluvial downcutting, erosion and redeposition of the older deltaic/lake deposits, the shifting of the lake's position towards the damming glacier and the transition of the sediment input in the same direction. The termination of the lake was a result of further glacier retreat and the opening of subglacial drainage.

  2. Inventorying and monitoring the recent behavior of Afghanistan's glaciers - debris-covered glaciers, supraglacial lakes, and the potential for catastrophic flooding (jökulhlaups)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnia, B. F.

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's nationwide investigation of the water resources of Afghanistan has one component focused on characterizing the behavior of the country's glaciers and their response to changing climate. A recent emphasis has been on determining the distribution and extent of debris-covered glaciers in order to understand the relationship between debris cover, supraglacial lakes, and the potential for catastrophic flooding (jökulhlaups). In glacier environments, catastrophic flooding (jökulhlaups) is usually caused by (1) drainage of ice-dammed lakes, (2) drainage of ice-marginal lakes, (3) release of water stored subglacially, englacially, or supraglacially, sometimes through surge-related processes, or (4) through melting of glaciers located around the summit craters of erupting volcanoes. All but the last are significant sources of flooding in Himalayan Mountain glacier environments. A systematic examination of two data sets: (1) VNIR (visible and near-infrared) digital images collected between 2001 and 2004 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on the Terra spacecraft, and (2) Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper (ETM+) digital images, was used to determine the distribution of glacier-related lakes. This examination of all of the glacier-covered areas of Afghanistan revealed relatively few ice-dammed and ice-marginal lakes. However, it determined that many valley glaciers have large concentrations of debris on their lower reaches, and that this debris hosts significant numbers of supraglacial lakes. Typically, supraglacial lakes develop on stagnant or slowly moving ice through thermokarst processes. Because of the ephemeral character of supraglacial water storage, these debris-covered glaciers present a high risk with respect to jökulhlaup generation. Some Afghan debris-covered glaciers support more than 30 supraglacial lakes. Among the areas that support large numbers of debris-covered glaciers with

  3. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Karen J; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D; Queste, Bastien Y; Stevens, David P; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K; Smith, Walker

    2014-07-13

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean-atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system.

  4. Emerging spatial patterns in Antarctic prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wie eChong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in knowledge of patterns of biogeography in terrestrial eukaryotic organisms have led to a fundamental paradigm shift in understanding of the controls and history of life on land in Antarctica, and its interactions over the long term with the glaciological and geological processes that have shaped the continent. However, while it has long been recognized that the terrestrial ecosystems of Antarctica are dominated by microbes and their processes, knowledge of microbial diversity and distributions has lagged far behind that of the macroscopic eukaryote organisms. Increasing human contact with and activity in the continent is leading to risks of biological contamination and change in a region whose isolation has protected it for millions of years at least; these risks may be particularly acute for microbial communities which have, as yet, received scant recognition and attention. Even a matter apparently as straightforward as Protected Area designation in Antarctica requires robust biodiversity data which, in most parts of the continent, remain almost completely unavailable. A range of important contributing factors mean that it is now timely to reconsider the state of knowledge of Antarctic terrestrial prokaryotes. Rapid advances in molecular biological approaches are increasingly demonstrating that bacterial diversity in Antarctica may be far greater than previously thought, and that there is overlap in the environmental controls affecting both Antarctic prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities. Bacterial dispersal mechanisms and colonization patterns remain largely unaddressed, although evidence for regional evolutionary differentiation is rapidly accruing and, with this, there is increasing appreciation of patterns in regional bacterial biogeography in this large part of the globe. In this review, we set out to describe the state of knowledge of Antarctic prokaryote diversity patterns, drawing analogy with those of eukaryote

  5. Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and...

  6. The 1991 Antarctic ozone hole - TOMS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Arlin; Schoeberl, Mark; Newman, Paul; Stolarski, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Antarctic springtime ozone decline, as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), was similar to those of earlier deep ozone hole years, 1987, 1989, and 1990. The minimum total ozone value was recorded on October 5, 1991 at 108 Dobson units near the South Pole. This was 8 DU lower than in any of the earlier years. Four of the last five years have exhibited an extensive, deep ozone hole. The area of the hole was about the same as in 1987, 1989, and 1990. The recovery of the low total ozone values occurred in mid-November as the polar vortex broke up.

  7. The Antarctic Ozone Hole: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Solomon, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The stratospheric ozone hole, an annual occurrence during austral spring, is caused by heterogeneous conversion of hydrogen chloride and chlorine nitrate to chlorine radicals. These reactions take place of polar stratospheric cloud particles in the cold, isolate Antarctic winter vortex. The chlorine radicals participate in chemical reactions that rapidly deplete ozone when sunlight returns at the end of polar night. International agreements eliminated production of the culprit anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons in the late 1990s, but due to their long stratospheric lifetime (50-100 years), the ozone hole will continue its annual appearance for years to come.

  8. Automatic focusing system of BSST in Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Peng-Yi; Liu, Jia-Jing; Zhang, Guang-yu; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Automatic focusing (AF) technology plays an important role in modern astronomical telescopes. Based on the focusing requirement of BSST (Bright Star Survey Telescope) in Antarctic, an AF system is set up. In this design, functions in OpenCV is used to find stars, the algorithm of area, HFD or FWHM are used to degree the focus metric by choosing. Curve fitting method is used to find focus position as the method of camera moving. All these design are suitable for unattended small telescope.

  9. Würmian deglaciation of western Lake Geneva (Switzerland) based on seismic stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Julien; Girardclos, Stéphanie; Pugin, André; Gorin, Georges; Wildi, Walter

    2011-02-01

    Western Lake Geneva (le Petit-Lac) was filled during the Quaternary over a major erosion surface truncating the cemented, folded and thrusted Tertiary sediments of the foreland Alpine basin. The carving of the lake occurred during Quaternary glaciations with ice originating from the Rhone valley catchment basin flowing in two branches oriented SW and NE over the Swiss Plateau. Lake Geneva is situated on the South-Western branch of this paleo ice-cap. For the first time, a dense grid of high-resolution seismic profiles (airgun 5-inch 3, airgun 1-inch 3 and echosounder) has imaged the whole Quaternary sequence, providing a paleoenvironmental interpretation and a detailed reconstruction of the Rhone glacier retreat stages during glacial events that led to the formation of western Lake Geneva. The Quaternary sequence filling up the bedrock valley is exceptionally thick with up to 220 m of deposits and consists of glacial, glacio-lacustrine and lacustrine sediments. Fourteen seismic units have been defined (units U1-U14). Unit U1 represents the remnants of glacial deposits older than the last glacial cycle, preserved in the deepest part of the lake and in secondary bedrock valleys. Unit U2 represents gravel and sands deposited by meltwater circulation at the bottom of the glacial valley. Unit U3 is a thick, stratified unit marking the beginning of the deglaciation, when the Rhone glacier became thinner and buoyant and allowed the formation of a subglacial lake. Younger glacial units (units U4, U5, U7, U9, U11) are acoustically chaotic sediments deposited subglacially under the water table (undermelt tills), while the glacier was thinning. These glacial units are bounded by synform erosion surfaces corresponding to readvances of the glacier. The transition from a glacial to a glacio-lacustrine environment started with the appearance of a marginal esker-fan system (unit U6). Esker formation was followed by a small advance-retreat cycle leading to the deposition of unit U7

  10. The Ice-Covered Lakes Hypothesis in Gale Crater: Implications for the Early Hesperian Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Alexandre M.; Haberle, Robert M.; McKay, Christopher P.; Bristow, Thomas F.; Rivera-Hernandez, Frances

    2017-01-01

    Recent geological discoveries from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), including stream and lake sedimentary deposits, provide evidence that Gale crater may have intermittently hosted a fluviol-acustine environment during the Hesperian, with individual lakes lasting for a period of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. Estimates of the CO2 content of the atmosphere at the time the Gale sediments formed are far less than needed by any climate model to warm early Mars, given the low solar energy input available at Mars 3.5 Gya. We have therefore explored the possibility that the lakes in Gale during the Hesperian were perennially covered with ice using the Antarctic lakes as analogs.

  11. A study of autotrophic communities in two Victoria Land lakes (Continental Antarctica using photosynthetic pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto BARGAGLI

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The composition of algal pigments and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS was determined in microbial mats from two lakes in Victoria Land (Continental Antarctica with different lithology and environmental features. The aim was to expand knowledge of benthic autotrophic communities in Antarctic lacustrine ecosystems, providing reference data for future assessment of possible changes in environmental conditions and freshwater communities. The results of chemical analyses were supported by microscopy observations. Pigment profiles showed that filamentous cyanobacteria are dominant in both lakes. Samples from the water body at Edmonson Point had greater biodiversity, fewer pigments and lower EPS ratios than those from the lake at Kar Plateau. Differences in mat composition and in pigment and EPS profile between the two lakes are discussed in terms of local environmental conditions such as lithology, ice-cover and UV radiation. The present study suggests that a chemical approach could be useful in the study of benthic communities in Antarctic lakes and their variations in space and time.

  12. New records of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic sea anemones (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia) from the Weddell Sea, Antarctic Peninsula, and Scotia Arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Estefanía

    2013-01-01

    Herein we provide new records for 22 Antarctic species of sea anemone sensu lato (Anthozoa: Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia) from the Weddell Sea, Antarctic Peninsula, and the Scotia Sea. We provided short descriptions, images of the external morphology of preserved specimens (but also of living specimens in most cases), cnida data, and distribution maps for each studied species. New records are presented for nine species in the Weddell Sea and the geographic or bathymetric distributions for 19 of the 22 studied species are extended.

  13. Distribution and characteristics of overdeepenings beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets: Implications for overdeepening origin and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, H.; Swift, D. A.; Clark, C. D.; Livingstone, S. J.; Cook, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    Glacier bed overdeepenings are ubiquitous in glacier systems and likely exert significant influence on ice dynamics, subglacial hydrology, and ice stability. Understanding of overdeepening formation and evolution has been hampered by an absence of quantitative empirical studies of their distribution and morphology, with process insights having been drawn largely from theoretical or numerical studies. To address this shortcoming, we first map the distribution of potential overdeepenings beneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets using a GIS-based algorithm that identifies closed-contours in the bed topography and then describe and analyse the characteristics and metrics of a subset of overdeepenings that pass further quality control criteria. Overdeepenings are found to be widespread, but are particularly associated with areas of topographically laterally constrained ice flow, notably near the ice sheet margins where outlet systems follow deeply incised troughs. Overdeepenings also occur in regions of topographically unconstrained ice flow (for example, beneath the Siple Coast ice streams and on the Greenland continental shelf). Metrics indicate that overdeepening growth is generally allometric and that topographic confinement of ice flow in general enhances overdeepening depth. However, overdeepening depth is skewed towards shallow values - typically 200-300 m - indicating that the rate of deepening slows with overdeepening age. This is reflected in a decline in adverse slope steepness with increasing overdeepening planform size. Finally, overdeepening long-profiles are found to support headward quarrying as the primary factor in overdeepening development. These observations support proposed negative feedbacks related to hydrology and sediment transport that stabilise overdeepening growth through sedimentation on the adverse slope but permit continued overdeepening planform enlargement by processes of headward erosion.

  14. Thin-layer effects in glaciological seismic amplitude-versus-angle (AVA analysis: implications for characterising a subglacial till unit, Russell Glacier, West Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Booth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic amplitude-versus-angle (AVA methods are a powerful means of quantifying the physical properties of subglacial material, but serious interpretative errors can arise when AVA is measured over a thinly-layered substrate. A substrate layer with a thickness less than 1/4 of the seismic wavelength, λ, is considered "thin", and reflections from its bounding interfaces superpose and appear in seismic data as a single reflection event. AVA interpretation of subglacial till can be vulnerable to such thin-layer effects, since a lodged (non-deforming till can be overlain by a thin (metre-scale cap of dilatant (deforming till. We assess the potential for misinterpretation by simulating seismic data for a stratified subglacial till unit, with an upper dilatant layer between 0.1–5.0 m thick (λ / 120 to > λ / 4, with λ = 12 m. For dilatant layers less than λ / 6 thick, conventional AVA analysis yields acoustic impedance and Poisson's ratio that indicate contradictory water saturation. A thin-layer interpretation strategy is proposed, that accurately characterises the model properties of the till unit. The method is applied to example seismic AVA data from Russell Glacier, West Greenland, in which characteristics of thin-layer responses are evident. A subglacial till deposit is interpreted, having lodged till (acoustic impedance = 4.26±0.59 × 106 kg m−2 s−1 underlying a water-saturated dilatant till layer (thickness < 2 m, Poisson's ratio ~ 0.5. Since thin-layer considerations offer a greater degree of complexity in an AVA interpretation, and potentially avoid misinterpretations, they are a valuable aspect of quantitative seismic analysis, particularly for characterising till units.

  15. Quantitative characterization of the Antarctic ozone hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, T.; Sakoda, Y.; Matsubara, K.; Takao, T.; Akagi, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Shibata, S.; Naganuma, H.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole is studied based on the TOMS data and the JMA data-set of stratospheric temperature in relation with the possible role of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's). The effective mass of depleted ozone in the ozone hole at its annual mature stage reached a historical maximum of 55 Mt in 1991, 4.3 times larger than in 1981. The ozone depletion rate during 30 days before the mature ozone hole does not show any appreciable long-term trend but the interannual fluctuations do, ranging from 0.169 to 0.689 Mt/day with the average of 0.419 Mt/day for the period of 1979 - 1991. The depleted ozone mass has the highest correlation with the region below 195 K on the 30 mb surface in June, whereas the ozone depletion rate correlates most strongly with that in August. The present result strongly suggests that the long-term evolution of the mature ozone hole is caused both by the interannual change of the latitudinal coverage of the early PSC's, which may control the latitude and date of initiation of ozone decrease, and by that of the spatial coverage of the mature PSC's which may control the ozone depletion rate in the Antarctic spring.

  16. Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve; Schauffler, Sue; Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Pawson, Steven; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS and OMI instruments. The severity of the hole has been assessed using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole), the average size during the September-October period, and the ozone mass deficit. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. We use two methods to estimate ozone hole recovery. First, we use projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates in a parametric model. Second, we use a coupled chemistry climate model to assess recovery. We find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. Furthermore, full recovery to 1980 levels will not occur until approximately 2068. We will also show some error estimates of these dates and the impact of climate change on the recovery.

  17. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early spring (late September - early October). Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average area coverage during this September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen (chlorine and bromine) catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this talk, I will show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. The ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery in about 2023, and the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels in approximately 2070. This 2070 recovery is 20 years later than recent projections. I will also discuss current assessments of mid-latitude ozone recovery.

  18. CHAMP Magnetic Anomalies of the Antarctic Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Gaya-Pique, Luis R.; vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2003-01-01

    Regional magnetic signals of the crust are strongly masked by the core field and its secular variations components and hence difficult to isolate in the satellite measurements. In particular, the un-modeled effects of the strong auroral external fields and the complicated- behavior of the core field near the geomagnetic poles conspire to greatly reduce the crustal magnetic signal-to-noise ratio in the polar regions relative to the rest of the Earth. We can, however, use spectral correlation theory to filter the static lithospheric and core field components from the dynamic external field effects. To help isolate regional lithospheric from core field components, the correlations between CHAMP magnetic anomalies and the pseudo magnetic effects inferred from gravity-derived crustal thickness variations can also be exploited.. Employing these procedures, we processed the CHAMP magnetic observations for an improved magnetic anomaly map of the Antarctic crust. Relative to the much higher altitude Orsted and noisier Magsat observations, the CHAMP magnetic anomalies at 400 km altitude reveal new details on the effects of intracrustal magnetic features and crustal thickness variations of the Antarctic.

  19. Extremophiles in an Antarctic Marine Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Dickinson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent attempts to explore marine microbial diversity and the global marine microbiome have indicated a large proportion of previously unknown diversity. However, sequencing alone does not tell the whole story, as it relies heavily upon information that is already contained within sequence databases. In addition, microorganisms have been shown to present small-to-large scale biogeographical patterns worldwide, potentially making regional combinations of selection pressures unique. Here, we focus on the extremophile community in the boundary region located between the Polar Front and the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the Southern Ocean, to explore the potential of metagenomic approaches as a tool for bioprospecting in the search for novel functional activity based on targeted sampling efforts. We assessed the microbial composition and diversity from a region north of the current limit for winter sea ice, north of the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Front (SACCF but south of the Polar Front. Although, most of the more frequently encountered sequences  were derived from common marine microorganisms, within these dominant groups, we found a proportion of genes related to secondary metabolism of potential interest in bioprospecting. Extremophiles were rare by comparison but belonged to a range of genera. Hence, they represented interesting targets from which to identify rare or novel functions. Ultimately, future shifts in environmental conditions favoring more cosmopolitan groups could have an unpredictable effect on microbial diversity and function in the Southern Ocean, perhaps excluding the rarer extremophiles.

  20. When will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the .TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average size during the September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to, both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. The ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery in about 2023, and the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels in approximately 2070. This 2070 recovery is 20 years later than recent projections.

  1. Testing the influence of subglacial erosion on the long-term evolution and stability of continental ice sheets using numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, D. A.; Egholm, D. L.; Brædstrup, C. F.; Cook, S.; Livingstone, S. J.; Clark, C.; Patton, H.; Ely, J.

    2013-12-01

    Focussed erosion beneath continental ice sheets promotes efficient evacuation of ice along fast-flowing marine outlet glacier systems. Theory indicates that bed profiles should tend toward uniformly overdeepened geometries that will reduce ice sheet stability because (a) grounding lines situated on negative slopes are vulnerable to catastrophic retreat and (b) grounding-line stability is sensitive to ice velocity, meaning grounding lines should become unstable as overdeepening causes subglacial water pressures and basal sediment thickness and continuity to increase. This suggests a conceptual model of ice-bed evolution in which ice sheets are self-destructive, because bed erosion reduces equilibrium ice sheet volume and extent. However, many outlet glacier and ice stream systems possess complex bed topographies, raising questions about the nature of subglacial landscape evolution that have major implications for our understanding of ice sheet evolution and stability. For example, a contrasting model of ice-bed evolution in which strong ice-erosion feedbacks produce multiple overdeepenings might enhance ice sheet stability, because numerous bed undulations should resist fast ice flow and impede grounding line retreat. We therefore explore the possible glaciological significance of contrasting models of subglacial landscape evolution using a higher-order ice sheet model (iSOSIA) and assess the implications for the evolution and stability of continental ice sheets. The results will also aid understanding of contemporary ice sheet stability and identify weaknesses in process understanding that will aid further development of ice-erosion models.

  2. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup: calibrations and lake test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeser, S [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Bohm, C [University Stockholm, Fysikum, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Descamps, F [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Fischer, J [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Hallgren, A [University Uppsala, Department of Radiation Sciences, Box 535, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Heller, R [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Hundertmark, S [University Stockholm, Fysikum, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Krieger, K [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Nahnhauer, R [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Pohl, M [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Price, P B [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sulanke, K [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Vandenbroucke, J [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    In order to detect the small neutrino fluxes expected at ultra-high energies, large volumes of materials have to be instrumented with inexpensive but sensitive acoustic sensors. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) will be installed in the Antarctic ice during the polar season 2006/2007 after which the collected data will be used to reveal the acoustic properties of the South Polar ice cap. The developed piezoceramic based ultrasound sensors and transmitters that are part of this system have been extensively studied during calibration measurements in water, using a commercial hydrophone as reference. Also, a SPATS system test was accomplished in Lake Tornetraesk, Abisko (Sweden). This allowed verification of the DAQ system, transmitter range and sensor performance. Here the results of the calibrations and the Abisko lake measurements are reported.

  3. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup: calibrations and lake test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böser, S.; Bohm, C.; Descamps, F.; Fischer, J.; Hallgren, A.; Heller, R.; Hundertmark, S.; Krieger, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Pohl, M.; Price, P. B.; Sulanke, K.; Vandenbroucke, J.

    2007-09-01

    In order to detect the small neutrino fluxes expected at ultra-high energies, large volumes of materials have to be instrumented with inexpensive but sensitive acoustic sensors. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) will be installed in the Antarctic ice during the polar season 2006/2007 after which the collected data will be used to reveal the acoustic properties of the South Polar ice cap. The developed piezoceramic based ultrasound sensors and transmitters that are part of this system have been extensively studied during calibration measurements in water, using a commercial hydrophone as reference. Also, a SPATS system test was accomplished in Lake Torneträsk, Abisko (Sweden). This allowed verification of the DAQ system, transmitter range and sensor performance. Here the results of the calibrations and the Abisko lake measurements are reported.

  4. Adjustment of pigment composition in Desmarestia (Desmarestiaceae species along a sub-Antarctic to Antarctic latitudinal gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Mansilla

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis at high latitudes demands efficient strategies of light utilization to maintain algal fitness and performance. The fitness, and physiological adaptation, of a plant or algae species depends in part on the abundance and efficiency of the pigments it can produce to utilize the light resource from its environment. We quantified pigment composition and concentration in six species of the brown macroalgal genus Desmarestia, collected from sub-Antarctic sites (Strait of Magellan, Beagle Channel–Cape Horn Province and sites on the Antarctic Peninsula and adjacent islands. Sub-Antarctic Desmarestia species exhibited lower concentrations of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin than endemic Antarctic species. Antarctic samples of D. menziesii and D. antarctica collected along a decreasing latitudinal gradient showed spatial and interspecific differences in light-harvesting pigment composition. Our results suggest distinct physiological adjustments in Desmarestia species in response to heterogeneous abiotic environmental conditions. The marine sub-Antarctic and Antarctic ecosystems are characterized by harsh environments (e.g., extreme irradiance, photoperiod, temperature, salinity to which the physiology of macroalgal species must adapt.

  5. National Lakes Assessment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Lakes Assessment (NLA) is a first-ever statistically-valid survey of the biological condition of lakes and reservoirs throughout the U.S. The U.S....

  6. DNR 24K Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Medium scale lake polygons derived from the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) polygons and MnDOT Basemap lake delineations. Integrated with the DNR 24K Streams...

  7. The Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Great Lakes form the largest surface freshwater system on Earth. The U.S. and Canada work together to restore and protect the environment in the Great Lakes Basin. Top issues include contaminated sediments, water quality and invasive species.

  8. Different adaptations of Chinese winter-over expeditioners during prolonged Antarctic and sub-Antarctic residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Wu, Quan; Li, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Chengli

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged residence in Antarctica is characterized by exposure to isolated, confined, and extreme (ICE) environment. Winter-over expeditioners at research stations often exhibit a complex of psychophysiological symptoms, which varied by stations and sociocultural backgrounds. To understand the different patterns of psychophysiological responses provoked by environmental stress, we conducted a longitudinal assessment of mood and endocrine function in two groups of Chinese expeditioners who were deployed to sub-Antarctic (Great Wall Station, 62°S, N = 12) and Antarctic (Zhongshan Station, 66°S, N = 16) from December 2003 to 2005. Measures of mood, thyroid function, the levels of plasma catecholamine, and circulating interleukins were obtained at departure from China, mid-winter (Antarctica), end of winter (Antarctica), and return to China, respectively. The Zhongshan Station crew experienced significant increases in fatigue, anger, tension, confusion, and decrease in free thyroxine (FT4), norepinephrine (NE), and epinephrine (E) during the winter, increase in thyrotropin (TSH) and total triiodothyronine (TT3) when returning, whereas their counterparts at Great Wall Station only experienced increased TT3 after deployment. Moreover, compared with the Great Wall Station crew, the Zhongshan Station crew exhibited greater increase in anger, greater decrease in FT4, total thyroxine (TT4), NE and E over the winter, and greater increase in TSH when returning. Chinese expeditioners who lived and worked at the Antarctic station and the sub-Antarctic station for over a year showed different change patterns in mood and endocrine hormones. Negative mood and endocrine dysfunction were positively associated with the severity of environment. The study is a supplement to scientific knowledge on psychophysiological variation under ICE environment, which has certain applied value for the development of preventive countermeasures or interventions.

  9. A reassessment of the englacial and subglacial drainage system of Storglaciären in northern Sweden - How much did climate warming change the drainage system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Rosqvist, G. N.; Jansson, P.; Lyon, S. W.

    2012-12-01

    Storglaciären glacier, located in the sub-arctic Tarfala catchment, in northern Sweden is one of the world's longest continuously monitored glaciers which provides a unique research platform for the long-term assessment of climate change impacts on mountain glacier systems. In the presented study we assess signals of climate-induced change in the englacial and subglacial drainage system of the lower ablation area of Storglaciären. Flow velocities and dispersive characteristics of the englacial and subglacial hydraulic system were re-investigated in the 2012 summer melt season using fluorescent dye-tracing tests and compared to previous assessments of from the 1980s and 1990s. Historical hydro-climatic records from Tarfala catchment indicate that there have been significant increases in the cold season air temperature (0.76 °C/decade, 1965-2009) and a doubling of summer event precipitation over the past four decades. These changes contributed to the consistently negative glacier net balance of Storglaciären and significant positive trends in both the mean summer discharge and flood magnitudes over the past 45 years. Six of the eight largest annual maximum flood events occurred during the last decade and meltwater contributions from Storglaciären to the Tarfalajokken stream increased by 15% during the same period. These hydro-climatic trends in conjunction with an isotopic hydrograph separation of present-day samplings indicate that high magnitude rainfall events receive an increasing role in the runoff generation in Tarfala catchment and the glacier systems. This shift towards a greater rainwater contribution to catchment streamflow and glacier runoff indicates fundamental changes in the pathways that water takes through the glacier. The isotopic data suggests that the transit of rainwater via the englacial drainage system is increasing. However, in contrast to the 1980s assessment, dye-tracing tests conducted in 2012 indicate that the majority of meltwater

  10. Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1984-02-01

    Feb 1, 1984 ... Salisbury. COCHRANE, K.L. 1978. Seasonal fluctuations in the catches of Lim- nothrissa miodon (Boulenger) in Lake Kariba. Lake Kariba Fish. Res. Inst. Proj. Rept. 29: 1-163 (cyclostyled). DONNELLY, B.G. 1971. The fish population changes on Lake. Kariba between 1960 and 1968. Part I Cichlidae.

  11. Assessment of evolution and risks of glacier lake outbursts in the Djungarskiy Alatau, Central Asia, using Landsat imagery and glacier bed topography modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitsa, Vassiliy; Shahgedanova, Maria; Machguth, Horst; Severskiy, Igor; Medeu, Akhmetkal

    2017-10-01

    Changes in the abundance and area of mountain lakes in the Djungarskiy (Jetysu) Alatau between 2002 and 2014 were investigated using Landsat imagery. The number of lakes increased by 6.2 % from 599 to 636 with a growth rate of 0.51 % a-1. The combined areas were 16.26 ± 0.85 to 17.35 ± 0.92 km2 respectively and the overall change was within the uncertainty of measurements. Fifty lakes, whose potential outburst can damage existing infrastructure, were identified. The glacier bed topography version 2 (GlabTop2) model was applied to simulate ice thickness and subglacial topography using glacier outlines for 2000 and SRTM DEM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model) as input data achieving realistic patterns of ice thickness. A total of 513 overdeepenings in the modelled glacier beds, presenting potential sites for the development of lakes, were identified with a combined area of 14.7 km2. Morphometric parameters of the modelled overdeepenings were close to those of the existing lakes. A comparison of locations of the overdeepenings and newly formed lakes in the areas de-glacierized in 2000-2014 showed that 67 % of the lakes developed at the sites of the overdeepenings. The rates of increase in areas of new lakes correlated with areas of modelled overdeepenings. Locations where hazardous lakes may develop in the future were identified. The GlabTop2 approach is shown to be a useful tool in hazard management providing data on the potential evolution of future lakes.

  12. Assessment of evolution and risks of glacier lake outbursts in the Djungarskiy Alatau, Central Asia, using Landsat imagery and glacier bed topography modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kapitsa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the abundance and area of mountain lakes in the Djungarskiy (Jetysu Alatau between 2002 and 2014 were investigated using Landsat imagery. The number of lakes increased by 6.2 % from 599 to 636 with a growth rate of 0.51 % a−1. The combined areas were 16.26 ± 0.85 to 17.35 ± 0.92 km2 respectively and the overall change was within the uncertainty of measurements. Fifty lakes, whose potential outburst can damage existing infrastructure, were identified. The glacier bed topography version 2 (GlabTop2 model was applied to simulate ice thickness and subglacial topography using glacier outlines for 2000 and SRTM DEM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model as input data achieving realistic patterns of ice thickness. A total of 513 overdeepenings in the modelled glacier beds, presenting potential sites for the development of lakes, were identified with a combined area of 14.7 km2. Morphometric parameters of the modelled overdeepenings were close to those of the existing lakes. A comparison of locations of the overdeepenings and newly formed lakes in the areas de-glacierized in 2000–2014 showed that 67 % of the lakes developed at the sites of the overdeepenings. The rates of increase in areas of new lakes correlated with areas of modelled overdeepenings. Locations where hazardous lakes may develop in the future were identified. The GlabTop2 approach is shown to be a useful tool in hazard management providing data on the potential evolution of future lakes.

  13. Novel in situ chemical sensing technologies for deep sub-ice exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadham, J.; Beaton, A.; Mowlem, M. C.; Liz, B.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Telling, J.; Hawkings, J.; Tranter, M.

    2015-12-01

    A dramatic development in subglacial science in recent decades has been the considerable international effort aimed at improving understanding of the hidden subglacial aquatic environments (SAEs) beneath ice sheets. These include a diverse range of lakes, rivers, shallow and deep sediments. Technology challenges associated with the exploration of these environments are substantial because of their remote nature, extreme conditions and the requirement for sterile/clean access and sampling. While two Antarctic subglacial lakes have now been penetrated (Subglacial Lakes Vostok and Whillans), significant challenges remain for a) the clean access and sampling of deeper SAEs, such as deep sediments in lakes and sedimentary basins, and also b) for in situ monitoring of physical, chemical and biological conditions in SAEs. The scientific arguments for deep drilling into subglacial environments are compelling. Data providing clues to glaciation history and past climate are likely to be locked up in these deeper sedimentary strata. They are also likely oases for microbial life, which is actively involved in biogeochemical cycling processes, such as methane hydrate formation within deep sedimentary basins. This talk aims to give an overview of the current challenges and technology solutions for the exploration of SAEs, with a particular focus on in situ sensing technologies. It also presents recent results from the NERC funded programme, DELVE (DEveLopment and Validation of in situ chemical sensors for icy Ecosystems).

  14. Photosynthesis in a sub-Antarctic shore-zone lichen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, V.; Gremmen, N.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Photosynthetic responses to moisture, light, temperature, salinity and inorganic nitrogen fertilization are reported for a shore-zone lichen Turgidiusculum complicatulum (formerly Mastodia tesselata), a possible recent introduction to sub-Antarctic Marion Island. Optimum moisture contents for net

  15. Climate Prediction Center(CPC)Monthly Antarctic Oscillation Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) is a leading teleconnection pattern in the Southern Hemisphere circulation. It is calculated as the first Empirical Orthogonal...

  16. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Daily Antarctic Oscillation Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) is a leading teleconnection pattern in the Southern Hemisphere circulation. It is calculated as the first Empirical Orthogonal...

  17. Antarctic stratospheric ozone and seasonal predictability over southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, FA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of time-varying Antarctic stratospheric ozone on southern African summer climate variability is explored through atmospheric global circulation model (AGCM) sensitivity experiments. A control experiment following the design...

  18. Climate change and trophic response of the Antarctic bottom fauna

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aronson, Richard B; Moody, Ryan M; Ivany, Linda C; Blake, Daniel B; Werner, John E; Glass, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    ...) predators that structure shallow-benthic communities elsewhere. We used the Eocene fossil record from Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, to project specifically how global warming will reorganize the nearshore benthos of Antarctica...

  19. STRATEGIES AND KINETICS OF PHOTOACCLIMATION IN 3 ANTARCTIC NANOPHYTOFLAGELLATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUMA, AGJ; NOORDELOOS, AAM; LARSEN, J

    Three Antarctic nanophytoflagellates (two cryptophyte species and a Pyramimonas sp.) were compared for their capacity to photoacclimate and for their kinetic responses in changing photic environments. Division rate, cell size, cellular fluorescence, and chlorophyll a content were measured during

  20. Joint Antarctic School Expedition - An International Collaboration for High School Students and Teachers on Antarctic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, J.; Warburton, J.; Bartholow, S.; Reed, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Joint Antarctic School Expedition (JASE) is an international collaboration program between high school students and teachers from the United States and Chile aimed at providing the skills required for establishing the scientific international collaborations that our globalized world demands, and to develop a new approach for science education. The National Antarctic Programs of Chile and the United States worked together on a pilot program that brought high school students and teachers from both countries to Punta Arenas, Chile, in February 2014. The goals of this project included strengthening the partnership between the two countries, and building relationships between future generations of scientists, while developing the students' awareness of global scientific issues and expanding their knowledge and interest in Antarctica and polar science. A big component of the project involved the sharing by students of the acquired knowledge and experiences with the general public. JASE is based on the successful Chilean Antarctic Science Fair developed by Chile´s Antarctic Research Institute. For 10 years, small groups of Chilean students, each mentored by a teacher, perform experimental or bibliographical Antarctic research. Winning teams are awarded an expedition to the Chilean research station on King George Island. In 2014, the Chileans invited US participation in this program in order to strengthen science ties for upcoming generations. On King George Island, students have hands-on experiences conducting experiments and learning about field research. While the total number of students directly involved in the program is relatively small, the sharing of the experience by students with the general public is a novel approach to science education. Research experiences for students, like JASE, are important as they influence new direction for students in science learning, science interest, and help increase science knowledge. We will share experiences with the

  1. The Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    The ozone hole is a massive loss of ozone that annually occurs over Antarctica during the Austral spring (August-November). Man-made chlorine and bromine compounds cause the ozone hole. As opposed to local urban pollution, the hole illustrates how man-made chemicals can affect the atmosphere over enormous regions remote from their release point. These chlorine and bromine gases have long lifetimes in the atmosphere; hence, the ozone hole will slowly recover into the next few decades. In this talk I will briefly cover some of the history of the Antarctic ozone hole and the theory behind the phenomena. I will then discuss the recovery of ozone over Antarctica. State-of-the-art computer models project the recovery of the ozone hole to 1980 levels by about 2050. However, this recovery may be affected by greenhouse warming.

  2. An Antarctic molluscan biomineralisation tool-kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleight, Victoria A.; Marie, Benjamin; Jackson, Daniel J.; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A.; Marie, Arul; Clark, Melody S.

    2016-11-01

    The Antarctic clam Laternula elliptica lives almost permanently below 0 °C and therefore is a valuable and tractable model to study the mechanisms of biomineralisation in cold water. The present study employed a multidisciplinary approach using histology, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, proteomics and gene expression to investigate this process. Thirty seven proteins were identified via proteomic extraction of the nacreous shell layer, including two not previously found in nacre; a novel T-rich Mucin-like protein and a Zinc-dependent metalloprotease. In situ hybridisation of seven candidate biomineralisation genes revealed discrete spatial expression patterns within the mantle tissue, hinting at modular organisation, which is also observed in the mantle tissues of other molluscs. All seven of these biomineralisation candidates displayed evidence of multifunctionality and strong association with vesicles, which are potentially involved in shell secretion in this species.

  3. LGM-extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet offshore from the Hobbs Coast, based on paleo-ice stream bed observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klages, J.; Kuhn, G.; Hillenbrand, C.; Graham, A. G.; Smith, J.; Larter, R. D.; Gohl, K.

    2012-12-01

    Paleo-ice stream beds that are exposed today on the West Antarctic continental shelf provide unique archives of conditions at the base of the past ice sheet, that are difficult to assess beneath its modern, extant counterpart. During the last decade, several of these paleo-ice stream beds have been studied in detail to reconstruct the extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the patterns of ice drainage, and the timing of grounding-line retreat during the last deglaciation. However, despite significant advances, such information still remains poorly constrained in numerous drainage sectors of the WAIS. In particular, the maximum extent of ice at the LGM remains ambiguous for key drainage basins of the ice sheet. Whether the WAIS extended to the shelf break around the continent, or advanced only partially across its sea bed, is a crucial piece of information required for reconstructing and modeling patterns of ice-sheet change from past to present. Here we present marine geological and geophysical data that we collected on R/V "Polarstern" expedition ANT-XXVI/3 in early 2010 to investigate the extent, flow, and retreat of the WAIS, from an especially poorly studied part of the West Antarctic shelf, offshore from the Hobbs Coast in the western Amundsen Sea. Here, a landward deepening paleo-ice stream trough is incised into the shelf. The seafloor within the western-central part of the trough is characterized by a large trough-wide grounding zone wedge, ~70 m thick and ~17 km long, which overlies a high of seaward dipping sedimentary strata. The back-slope of the GZW is characterized by highly elongate streamlined bedforms suggesting fast paleo-ice flow towards NW. The crest of the wedge has been cross-cutted by iceberg keels. In contrast, the outer shelf seafloor offshore the GZW is predominantly smooth and featureless, although there is some evidence locally for iceberg scouring. A radiocarbon age from calcareous microfossils

  4. Assessing the efficiency of carbide drill bits and factors influencing their application to debris-rich subglacial ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Jiang, Jianliang; Cao, Pinlu; Wang, Jinsong; Fan, Xiaopeng; Shang, Yuequan; Talalay, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    When drilling into subglacial bedrock, drill operators commonly encounter basal ice containing high concentrations of rock debris and melt water. As such conditions can easily damage conventional ice drills, researchers have experimented with carbide, diamond, and polycrystalline diamond compact drill bits, with varying degrees of success. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between drilling speed and power consumption for a carbide drill bit penetrating debris-rich ice. We also assessed drill load, rotation speed, and various performance parameters for the cutting element, as well as the physical and mechanical properties of rock and ice, to construct mathematical models. We show that our modeled results are in close agreement with the experimental data, and that both penetration speed and power consumption are positively correlated with drill speed and load. When used in ice with 30% rock content, the maximum penetration speed of the carbide bit is 3.4 mm/s with a power consumption of ≤0.5 kW, making the bit suitable for use with existing electromechanical drills. Our study also provides a guide for further research into cutting heat and equipment design.

  5. Microtubule-associated proteins from Antarctic fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrich, H W; Neighbors, B W; Sloboda, R D; Williams, R C

    1990-01-01

    Microtubules and presumptive microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) were isolated from the brain tissues of four Antarctic fishes (Notothenia gibberifrons, N. coriiceps neglecta, Chaenocephalus aceratus, and a Chionodraco sp.) by means of a taxol-dependent, microtubule-affinity procedure (cf. Vallee: Journal of Cell Biology 92:435-442, 1982). MAPs from these fishes were similar to each other in electrophoretic pattern. Prominent in each preparation were proteins in the molecular weight ranges 410,000-430,000, 220,000-280,000, 140,000-155,000, 85,000-95,000, 40,000-45,000, and 32,000-34,000. The surfaces of MAP-rich microtubules were decorated by numerous filamentous projections. Exposure to elevated ionic strength released the MAPs from the microtubules and also removed the filamentous projections. Addition of fish MAPs to subcritical concentrations of fish tubulins at 0-5 degrees C induced the assembly of microtubules. Both the rate and the extent of this assembly increased with increasing concentrations of the MAPs. Sedimentation revealed that approximately six proteins, with apparent molecular weights between 60,000 and 300,000, became incorporated into the microtubule polymer. Bovine MAPs promoted microtubule formation by fish tubulin at 2-5 degrees C, and proteins corresponding to MAPs 1 and 2 co-sedimented with the polymer. MAPs from C. aceratus also enhanced the polymerization of bovine tubulin at 33 degrees C, but the microtubules depolymerized at 0 degrees C. We conclude that MAPs are part of the microtubules of Antarctic fishes, that these proteins promote microtubule assembly in much the same way as mammalian MAPs, and that they do not possess special capacities to promote microtubule assembly at low temperatures or to prevent cold-induced microtubule depolymerization.

  6. Functional ecology of an Antarctic Dry Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuki; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pointing, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys are the largest ice-free region in Antarctica and are critically at risk from climate change. The terrestrial landscape is dominated by oligotrophic mineral soils and extensive exposed rocky surfaces where biota are largely restricted to microbial communities, although their ability to perform the majority of geobiological processes has remained largely uncharacterized. Here, we identified functional traits that drive microbial survival and community assembly, using a metagenomic approach with GeoChip-based functional gene arrays to establish metabolic capabilities in communities inhabiting soil and rock surface niches in McKelvey Valley. Major pathways in primary metabolism were identified, indicating significant plasticity in autotrophic, heterotrophic, and diazotrophic strategies supporting microbial communities. This represents a major advance beyond biodiversity surveys in that we have now identified how putative functional ecology drives microbial community assembly. Significant differences were apparent between open soil, hypolithic, chasmoendolithic, and cryptoendolithic communities. A suite of previously unappreciated Antarctic microbial stress response pathways, thermal, osmotic, and nutrient limitation responses were identified and related to environmental stressors, offering tangible clues to the mechanisms behind the enduring success of microorganisms in this seemingly inhospitable terrain. Rocky substrates exposed to larger fluctuations in environmental stress supported greater functional diversity in stress-response pathways than soils. Soils comprised a unique reservoir of genes involved in transformation of organic hydrocarbons and lignin-like degradative pathways. This has major implications for the evolutionary origin of the organisms, turnover of recalcitrant substrates in Antarctic soils, and predicting future responses to anthropogenic pollution. PMID:23671121

  7. Arctic and Antarctic sea ice and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, S.

    2014-12-01

    Principal Components Analysis in T-Mode Varimax rotated was performed on Antarctic and Arctic monthly sea ice concentration anomalies (SICA) fields for the period 1979-2014, in order to investigate which are the main spatial characteristics of sea ice and its relationship with atmospheric circulation. This analysis provides 5 patterns of sea ice for inter-spring period and 3 patterns for summer-autumn for Antarctica (69,2% of the total variance) and 3 different patterns for summer-autumn and 3 for winter-spring season for the Arctic Ocean (67,8% of the total variance).Each of these patterns has a positive and negative phase. We used the Monthly Polar Gridded Sea Ice Concentrations database derived from satellite information generated by NASA Team algorithm. To understand the links between the SICA and climate trends, we extracted the mean pressure and, temperature field patterns for the months with high loadings (positive or negative) of the sea ice patterns that gave distinct atmospheric structures associated with each one. For Antarctica, the first SICA spatial winter-spring pattern in positive phase shows a negative SICA centre over the Drake Passage and north region of Bellingshausen and Weddell Seas together with another negative SICA centre over the East Indian Ocean. Strong positive centres over the rest of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans basins and the Amundsen Sea are also presented. A strong negative pressure anomaly covers most of the Antarctic Continent centered over the Bellingshausen Sea accompanied by three positive pressure anomalies in middle-latitudes. During recent years, the Arctic showed persistent associations of sea-ice and climate patterns principally during summer. Our strongest summer-autumn pattern in negative phase showed a marked reduction on SICA over western Arctic, primarily linked to an overall increase in Arctic atmospheric temperature most pronounced over the Beaufort, Chukchi and East Siberian Seas, and a positive anomaly of

  8. Functional ecology of an Antarctic Dry Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuki; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Pointing, Stephen B; Farrell, Roberta L

    2013-05-28

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys are the largest ice-free region in Antarctica and are critically at risk from climate change. The terrestrial landscape is dominated by oligotrophic mineral soils and extensive exposed rocky surfaces where biota are largely restricted to microbial communities, although their ability to perform the majority of geobiological processes has remained largely uncharacterized. Here, we identified functional traits that drive microbial survival and community assembly, using a metagenomic approach with GeoChip-based functional gene arrays to establish metabolic capabilities in communities inhabiting soil and rock surface niches in McKelvey Valley. Major pathways in primary metabolism were identified, indicating significant plasticity in autotrophic, heterotrophic, and diazotrophic strategies supporting microbial communities. This represents a major advance beyond biodiversity surveys in that we have now identified how putative functional ecology drives microbial community assembly. Significant differences were apparent between open soil, hypolithic, chasmoendolithic, and cryptoendolithic communities. A suite of previously unappreciated Antarctic microbial stress response pathways, thermal, osmotic, and nutrient limitation responses were identified and related to environmental stressors, offering tangible clues to the mechanisms behind the enduring success of microorganisms in this seemingly inhospitable terrain. Rocky substrates exposed to larger fluctuations in environmental stress supported greater functional diversity in stress-response pathways than soils. Soils comprised a unique reservoir of genes involved in transformation of organic hydrocarbons and lignin-like degradative pathways. This has major implications for the evolutionary origin of the organisms, turnover of recalcitrant substrates in Antarctic soils, and predicting future responses to anthropogenic pollution.

  9. Fundamental differences between Arctic and Antarctic ozone depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Susan; Haskins, Jessica; Ivy, Diane J.; Min, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental differences in observed ozone depletion between the Arctic and the Antarctic are shown, clarifying distinctions between both average and extreme ozone decreases in the two hemispheres. Balloon-borne and satellite measurements in the heart of the ozone layer near 18−24 km altitude show that extreme ozone decreases often observed in the Antarctic ozone hole region have not yet been measured in the Arctic in any year, including the unusually cold Arctic spring of 2011. The data provi...

  10. Leadership in politics and science within the Antarctic Treaty

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, David W.H.; Dudeney, John R.

    2012-01-01

    For over 50 years the Antarctic has been governed through the Antarctic Treaty, an international agreement now between 49 nations of whom 28 Consultative Parties (CPs) undertake the management role. Ostensibly, these Parties have qualified for their position on scientific grounds, though diplomacy also plays a major role. This paper uses counts of policy papers and science publications to assess the political and scientific outputs of all CPs over the last 18 years. We show that a subset of t...

  11. Distribution patterns and migratory behavior of Antarctic blue whales

    OpenAIRE

    Thomisch, Karolin

    2016-01-01

    After having been one of the primary targets of commercial whaling during the 20th century, Antarctic blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) are still listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and many aspects of their distribution and migration patterns remain poorly understood to date. This dissertation investigates spatio-temporal patterns in the (acoustic) presence of Antarctic blue whales in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean and...

  12. Instantaneous movement of krill swarms in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    OpenAIRE

    Tarling, Geraint A.; Thorpe, Sally E.

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic krill are known to have strong swimming capabilities, but direct observations of the speed and direction of krill-swarm movement within their natural environment are rare. We identified and examined 4060 swarms within the main flow of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (Scotia Sea) using a combination of an EK60 echosounder, a 153.6 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler, and ground-truthing nets. Net displacement magnitude (m) and net angle of deviation (d) were determined by vector ...

  13. [Temperature range for growth of the Antarctic microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovaskaia, V A; Tashirev, A B; Gladka, G B; Tashireva, A A

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of a temperature range for growth of microorganisms isolated at various temperatures (1-5 degrees C or 30 degrees C) from biotopes of the Antarctic region (soil, grass Deschampcia antarctica, grass Colobanthus, a green moss, crustose black lichens and encrustation biofilm on vertical rocks) is made. From 40 to 70% of the investigated Antarctic microorganisms, irrespective of temperature conditions of their isolation, were capable of growing in a wide temperature range (from 1 degrees C to 30 degrees C), i.e. they are psychrotolerant. In selective conditions (1 degrees C or 5 degrees C) the psychrophilic Antarctic bacteria and yeast are isolated which grew in the range from 1 degrees C to 20 degrees C and did not grow at 30 degrees C. At the same time, among the Antarctic microorganisms isolated in nonselective conditions (at 30 degrees C), almost 50% are capable of growing at the lowest temperature (5 degrees C), and a smaller number of strains--at 1 degrees C. However with a decrease of cultivation temperature the growth lag-phase of the Antarctic bacteria increased. Thus the level of the final biomass of the investigated strains did not depend on cultivation temperature. When comparing the temperature range of growth of the mesophilic Antarctic bacteria and collection strains of the same species isolated more than 10 years ago from the region with a temperate climate, the psychrotolerant forms were also revealed among the latter. So, it is shown that the investigated Antarctic bacteria can exist in the temperature range characteristic of terrestrial biotopes of the Antarctic Region (from 1 degrees C to 10 degrees C).

  14. Constraining the recent history of the perennially ice-covered Lake Bonney, East Antarctica using He, Kr and Xe concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Chris M.; Castro, Maria Clara; Kenig, Fabien; Doran, Peter T.

    2017-07-01

    Lake Bonney is a perennially ice-covered lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDVs) that has long been studied in order to provide constraints on the paleoclimate of West Antarctica. The lake is divided into two lobes, West Lake Bonney (WLB) and East Lake Bonney (ELB) that are separated by a narrow ridge. The two lobes currently receive surface melt water during austral summers from glacier-fed ephemeral streams and this meltwater enters the lake via a narrow ring, or moat, of liquid water that forms around the lake during summer. The West Lobe also receives water from direct input of melt water from Taylor glacier and saline water from irregular subglacial discharge. Here, we combine previously published He data from Lake Bonney with new Kr and Xe concentration data to examine the signatures of water recharge via the seasonal moat and these data are used to constrain a model for He, Kr and Xe transport within both WLB and ELB over about the last 5000-6000 yrs. A detailed numerical simulation is presented that combines diffusive transport of noble gases within the stratified water column of Lake Bonney, along with ice ablation at the top of the ice cover, partitioning of noble gases between water and ice, plus exchange of noble gases between WLB and ELB. Results strongly suggest that open moats have only operated for about 2-3 centuries within the last millennium. These results are corroborated by the high concentration of He, especially within WLB, which points to a history of ice cover with no open moats operating for both lobes for at least about 5 millennia. In addition, the distribution of He, Kr and Xe suggest that a significant rise of the water level of Lake Bonney associated with a warmer period may have been interrupted by a roughly 4-5 century long cold period during which the moats were not large enough to allow air saturated water into the lake, with this cold period ending about one century ago. In addition, during this cold period, there is evidence for

  15. The genome of the Antarctic-endemic copepod, Tigriopus kingsejongensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seunghyun; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Lee, Sung Gu; Shin, Seung Chul; Lee, Jungeun; Min, Gi-Sik; Lee, Hyoungseok; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Sanghee; Park, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The Antarctic intertidal zone is continuously subjected to extremely fluctuating biotic and abiotic stressors. The West Antarctic Peninsula is the most rapidly warming region on Earth. Organisms living in Antarctic intertidal pools are therefore interesting for research into evolutionary adaptation to extreme environments and the effects of climate change. We report the whole genome sequence of the Antarctic-endemic harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus kingsejongensi . The 37 Gb raw DNA sequence was generated using the Illumina Miseq platform. Libraries were prepared with 65-fold coverage and a total length of 295 Mb. The final assembly consists of 48 368 contigs with an N50 contig length of 17.5 kb, and 27 823 scaffolds with an N50 contig length of 159.2 kb. A total of 12 772 coding genes were inferred using the MAKER annotation pipeline. Comparative genome analysis revealed that T. kingsejongensis -specific genes are enriched in transport and metabolism processes. Furthermore, rapidly evolving genes related to energy metabolism showed positive selection signatures. The T. kingsejongensis genome provides an interesting example of an evolutionary strategy for Antarctic cold adaptation, and offers new genetic insights into Antarctic intertidal biota.

  16. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  17. A Bivalve Proxy for Neogene Antarctic Shelf Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, N. A.; Williams, M.; Quilty, P. G.; Leng, M. J.; Zalasiewicz, J. A.; Smellie, J.; Dowsett, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Neogene shallow-marine successions of the Antarctic Peninsula and of the East Antarctic region preserve rich assemblages of bivalve molluscs. These bivalve molluscs provide a detailed record of palaeoseasonality in the chemical signature and morphology of their shells that can be used to assess sea temperatures and sea ice extent for the Antarctic shelf during the Pliocene. Analyses identify the following. 1) Neogene bivalves from James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula, comprise material of late Miocene through to late Pliocene age. Results identify warm (ca. 3-10 °C) early Pliocene sea temperatures, and cooler late Pliocene sea temperatures (ca. 0-4 °C), and flag a cooling trend which is consistent with the evolution of polar climate through this interval. 2) Neogene bivalves from the Larsemann Hills, East Antarctic, identify generally warmer than present sea temperatures (ca. 0-11 °C) in the early Pliocene consistent with data from other fossil groups of this age, including dolphins and silicoflagellates. The new data may provide significant ground truth for climate models assessing the Southern Ocean and Antarctic shelf climate.

  18. Muscle growth in Antarctic and Subantarctic notothenioid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alfredo Fernández

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The suborder Notothenioidei comprises 122 species divided into 8 families, with members of 6 of the families living outside Antarctic waters. The Antarctic species underwent an extensive radiation from a small demersal ancestor to occupy different ecological niches and levels in the water column. The axial muscle of Antarctic and some Subantarctic notothenioids is unusual in containing very large diameter muscle fibres and a low muscle fibre number. Maximum fibre diameters are greater than 500 mm in many species. There is no indication of systematic differences in fibre number, fibre type composition, ATPase activity, time of cessation of fibre recruitment (hyperplasia and swimming performance between Antarctic and Subantarctic species. Instead, fibre number is significantly decreased in species belonging to the most derived families relative to the more basal families (a trend that also correlates with an increase in the diameter of the fibres. The length of the cell cycle of the muscle fibres shows cold compensation in the Antarctic species H. antarcticus relative to the closely related Subantarctic one (H. bispinis. Feeding after a starvation period results in a strong stimulation of the proliferation of muscle fiber progenitors in H. bispinis. Similar studies have not yet been performed on any Antarctic species.

  19. Transcriptomics and comparative analysis of three antarctic notothenioid fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Chul Shin

    Full Text Available For the past 10 to 13 million years, Antarctic notothenioid fish have undergone extraordinary periods of evolution and have adapted to a cold and highly oxygenated Antarctic marine environment. While these species are considered an attractive model with which to study physiology and evolutionary adaptation, they are poorly characterized at the molecular level, and sequence information is lacking. The transcriptomes of the Antarctic fishes Notothenia coriiceps, Chaenocephalus aceratus, and Pleuragramma antarcticum were obtained by 454 FLX Titanium sequencing of a normalized cDNA library. More than 1,900,000 reads were assembled in a total of 71,539 contigs. Overall, 40% of the contigs were annotated based on similarity to known protein or nucleotide sequences, and more than 50% of the predicted transcripts were validated as full-length or putative full-length cDNAs. These three Antarctic fishes shared 663 genes expressed in the brain and 1,557 genes expressed in the liver. In addition, these cold-adapted fish expressed more Ub-conjugated proteins compared to temperate fish; Ub-conjugated proteins are involved in maintaining proteins in their native state in the cold and thermally stable Antarctic environments. Our transcriptome analysis of Antarctic notothenioid fish provides an archive for future studies in molecular mechanisms of fundamental genetic questions, and can be used in evolution studies comparing other fish.

  20. Effect of Antarctic solar radiation on sewage bacteria viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kevin A

    2005-06-01

    The majority of coastal Antarctic research stations discard untreated sewage waste into the near-shore marine environment. However, Antarctic solar conditions are unique, with ozone depletion increasing the proportion of potentially damaging ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the marine environment. This study assessed the influence of Antarctic solar radiation on the viability of Escherichia coli and sewage microorganisms at Rothera Research Station, Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula. Cell viability decreased with increased exposure time and with exposure to shorter wavelengths of solar radiation. Cell survival also declined with decreasing cloud cover, solar zenith angle and ozone column depth. However, particulates in sewage increased the persistence of viable bacteria. Ultraviolet radiation doses over Rothera Point were highest during the austral summer. During this time, solar radiation may act to partially reduce the number of viable sewage-derived microorganisms in the surface seawater around Antarctic outfalls. Nevertheless, this effect is not reliable and every effort should be made to fully treat sewage before release into the Antarctic marine environment.

  1. Parasites of the Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni Norman, 1937 (Perciformes, Nototheniidae in the Pacific sector of the Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya I. Gordeev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni Norman, 1937 is one of the main target species of commercial fisheries in the Antarctic. It is an endemic and is found along the shelf of Antarctica, as well as on the slopes of seamounts, underwater elevations and islands in the sub-Antarctic. It feeds on a variety of fish and cephalopods and can be an intermediate/paratenic host of some helminthes, whose final hosts are whales, seals, large rays and sharks. This article presents new data on toothfish infection in the Pacific sector of the Antarctic. Specimens were examined during commercial longline fishing in the Ross Sea and the Amundsen Sea in January–February 2013. Fourteen species of parasites were found using standard parasitological methods and genetic analysis.

  2. Some Lake Level Control Alternatives for the Great Salt Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Marvin E.; Christensen, Ronald K.; Riley, J. Paul

    1983-01-01

    Fluctuations of the level of the Great Salt Lake cause large changes in both surface area and shoreline. Developments adjacent to the lake have been damaged by both high and low lake levels; and unless measures are implemented to regulate lake level fluctuations or otherwise to protect these developments, damages will continue. Various possible managment alternatives for mitigating potential damages from lake leve...

  3. Salting our freshwater lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Sarah L.; Burke, Samantha M.; Doubek, Jonathan P.; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E.; Skaff, Nicholas K.; Summers, Jamie C.; Farrell, Kaitlin J.; McCullough, Ian M.; Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Roberts, Derek C.; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2017-01-01

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L−1), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue. PMID:28396392

  4. Novel Applications of Meteoric- and In Situ-Produced Beryllium-10 in the East Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valletta, Rachel D.

    This work comprises three novel applications of in situ- and meteoric-produced beryllium-10 (Be-10) in East Antarctica. Sampled deposits cover a wide spatiotemporal transect through the Dry Valleys, from an inland, middle elevation location of Quaternary age, to a mid-valley, high elevation location of Miocene age, and finally to an offshore, submarine location of Pliocene age. Each research chapter we present is a unique project unto itself, but all chapters utilize the cosmogenic radionuclide Be-10. In the first application, we present "Difference Dating,'' a new approach to date glacial moraines in regions where traditional exposure age dating is fraught with complications. Difference Dating allows for the construction of deglaciation chronologies in regions where they are frequently precluded by inheritance issues. We use Difference Dating to constrain the ages of Quaternary moraines in an alpine glacial cirque, Wright Valley, Dry Valleys. The second and third applications use meteoric-produced Be-10 in two different depositional settings. In marine sediments, we recast the Be-10/Be-9 ratio as a proxy for East Antarctic Ice Sheet freshwater discharge during mid-Pliocene interglacials. Using this record, we suggest that zones of deep water formation may be significant in funneling Be into the global thermohaline circulation belt. We also apply the meteoric-produced Be-10 system to paleolake sediments, where extremely low concentrations are used to construct an age model extending to 14-17.5 Ma. This range is commensurate with lake sediment deposition during the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum, a rare Antarctic terrestrial deposit of this globally significant warming event.

  5. Ice-Covered Lakes in Gale Crater Mars: The Cold and Wet Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, A. M.; Haberle, R. M.; Mckay, C. P.; Bristow, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent geological discoveries from the Mars Science Laboratory provide evidence that Gale crater may have intermittently hosted a fluvio-lacustine environment during the Hesperian, with individual lakes lasting for a period of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. (Grotzinger et al., Science, 350 (6257), 2015). Estimates of the CO2 content of the atmosphere at the time the Gale sediments formed are far less than needed by any climate model to warm early Mars (Bristow et al., Geology, submitted), given the low solar energy input available at Mars 3.5 Gya. We have therefore explored the possibility that the lakes in Gale during the Hesperian were perennially covered with ice using the Antarctic Lakes as an analog. Using our best estimate for the annual mean surface temperature at Gale at this time (approx. 230K) we computed the thickness of an ice-covered lake. These thickness range from 10-30 meters depending on the ablation rate and ice transparency and would likely inhibit sediments from entering the lake. Thus, a first conclusion is that the ice must not be too cold. Raising the mean temperature to 245K is challenging, but not quite as hard as reaching 273K. We found that a mean annual temperature of 245K ice thicknesses range from 3-10 meters. These values are comparable to the range of those for the Antarctic lakes (3-6 m), and are not implausible. And they are not so thick that sediments cannot penetrate the ice. For the ice-covered lake hypothesis to work, however, a melt water source is needed. This could come from subaqueous melting of a glacial dam in contact with the lakes (as is the case for Lake Untersee) or from seasonal melt water from nearby glaciers (as is the case for the Dry Valley lakes). More work is needed to better assess these possibilities. However, the main advantage of the ice-covered lake model (and the main reason we pursued it) is that it relaxes the requirement for a long-lived active hydrological cycle involving rainfall and runoff

  6. Mineralogical analyses of surface sediments in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: coordinated analyses of Raman spectra, reflectance spectra and elemental abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L; Englert, Peter A J; Patel, Shital; Tirsch, Daniela; Roy, Alex J; Koeberl, Christian; Böttger, Ute; Hanke, Franziska; Jaumann, Ralf

    2014-12-13

    Surface sediments at Lakes Fryxell, Vanda and Brownworth in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) were investigated as analogues for the cold, dry environment on Mars. Sediments were sampled from regions surrounding the lakes and from the ice cover on top of the lakes. The ADV sediments were studied using Raman spectra of individual grains and reflectance spectra of bulk particulate samples and compared with previous analyses of subsurface and lakebottom sediments. Elemental abundances were coordinated with the spectral data in order to assess trends in sediment alteration. The surface sediments in this study were compared with lakebottom sediments (Bishop JL et al. 2003 Int. J. Astrobiol. 2, 273-287 (doi:10.1017/S1473550403001654)) and samples from soil pits (Englert P et al. 2013 In European Planetary Science Congress, abstract no. 96; Englert P et al. 2014 In 45th Lunar and Planetary Science Conf., abstract no. 1707). Feldspar, quartz and pyroxene are common minerals found in all the sediments. Minor abundances of carbonate, chlorite, actinolite and allophane are also found in the surface sediments, and are similar to minerals found in greater abundance in the lakebottom sediments. Surface sediment formation is dominated by physical processes; a few centimetres below the surface chemical alteration sets in, whereas lakebottom sediments experience biomineralization. Characterizing the mineralogical variations in these samples provides insights into the alteration processes occurring in the ADV and supports understanding alteration in the cold and dry environment on Mars. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Western Alaska ESI: LAKES (Lake Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing lakes and land masses used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Western Alaska. The...

  8. Response of salt structures to ice-sheet loading: implications for ice-marginal and subglacial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jörg; Hampel, Andrea; Brandes, Christian; Winsemann, Jutta

    2014-10-01

    During the past decades the effect of glacioisostatic adjustment has received much attention. However, the response of salt structures to ice-sheet loading and unloading is poorly understood. Our study aims to test conceptual models of the interaction between ice-sheet loading and salt structures by finite-element modelling. The results are discussed with regard to their implications for ice-marginal and subglacial processes. Our models consist of 2D plane-strain cross-sections, which represent simplified geological cross-sections from the Central European Basin System. The model layers represent (i) sedimentary rocks of elastoplastic rheology, (ii) a viscoelastic diapir and layer of salt and (iii) an elastoplastic basement. On top of the model, a temporarily variable pressure simulates the advance and retreat of an ice sheet. The durations of the individual loading phases were defined to resemble the durations of the Pleistocene ice advances in northern central Europe. The geometry and rheology of the model layers and the magnitude, spatial distribution and timing of ice-sheet loading were systematically varied to detect the controlling factors. All simulations indicate that salt structures respond to ice-sheet loading. An ice advance towards the diapir causes salt flow from the source layer below the ice sheet towards the diapir, resulting in an uplift of up to +4 m. The diapir continues to rise as long as the load is applied to the source layer but not to the crest of the diapir. When the diapir is transgressed by the ice sheet the diapir is pushed down (up to -36 m) as long as load is applied to the crest of the diapir. During and after ice unloading large parts of the displacement are compensated by a reversal of the salt flow. Plastic deformation of the overburden is restricted to the area immediately above the salt diapir. The displacements after unloading range between -3.1 and +2.7 m. Larger displacements are observed in models with deep-rooted diapirs

  9. Pteropods and climate off the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Valerie J.; Santora, Jarrod A.

    2013-09-01

    Shelled (thecosome) and naked (gymnosome) pteropods are regular, at times abundant, members of Southern Ocean zooplankton assemblages. Regionally, shelled species can play a major role in food webs and carbon cycling. Because of their aragonite shells thecosome pteropods may be vulnerable to the impacts of ocean acidification; without shells they cannot survive and their demise would have major implications for food webs and carbon cycling in the Southern Ocean. Additionally, pteropod species in the southwest Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean inhabit a region of rapid warming and climate change, the impacts of which are predicted to be observed as poleward distribution shifts. Here we provide baseline information on intraseasonal, interannual and longer scale variability of pteropod populations off the Antarctic Peninsula between 1994 and 2009. Concentrations of the 4 dominant taxa, Limacina helicina antarctica f. antarctica, Clio pyramidata f. sulcata, Spongiobranchaea australis and Clione limacina antarctica, are similar to those monitored during the 1928-1935 Discovery Investigations and reflect generally low values but with episodic interannual abundance peaks that, except for C. pyr. sulcata, are related to basin-scale climate forcing associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate mode. Significant abundance increases of L. helicina and S. australis after 1998 were associated with a climate regime shift that initiated a period dominated by cool La Niña conditions and increased nearshore influence of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). This background information is essential to assess potential future changes in pteropod species distribution and abundance associated with ocean warming and acidification. construct maps of pteropod spatial frequency and mean abundance to assess their oceanographic associations; quantify pteropod abundance anomalies for comparing intraseasonal and interannual variability relative to m-3 environmental

  10. 78 FR 60321 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541), as amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism... Specially Protected Areas. Application Details 1. Applicant Andrew Klein, Department of Geography, Texas A&M...

  11. Shifts in soil microorganisms in response to warming are consistent across a range of Antarctic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yergeau, E.; Bokhorst, S.F.; Kang, S.; Zhou, J.; Greer, C.W.; Aerts, R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Because of severe abiotic limitations, Antarctic soils represent simplified systems, where microorganisms are the principal drivers of nutrient cycling. This relative simplicity makes these ecosystems particularly vulnerable to perturbations, like global warming, and the Antarctic Peninsula is among

  12. Size and structure of bacterial, fungal and nematode communities along an Antarctic environmental gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yergeau, E.; Bokhorst, S.F.; Huiskes, A.H.L.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Aerts, R.A.M.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The unusually harsh environmental conditions of terrestrial Antarctic habitats result in ecosystems with simplified trophic structures, where microbial processes are especially dominant as drivers of soil-borne nutrient cycling. We examined soil-borne Antarctic communities (bacteria, fungi and

  13. Temperature adaptation of soil bacterial communities along an Antarctic climate gradient: predicting responses to climate warming.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinnan, R.; Rousk, J.; Yergeau, E.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Baath, E.

    2009-01-01

    Soil microorganisms, the central drivers of terrestrial Antarctic ecosystems, are being confronted with increasing temperatures as parts of the continent experience considerable warming. Here we determined short-term temperature dependencies of Antarctic soil bacterial community growth rates, using

  14. Size and structure of microbial, fungal and nematode communities along an Antarctic environmental gradient.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yergeau, E.; Bokhorst, S.F.; Huiskes, A.H.L.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Aerts, R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The unusually harsh environmental conditions of terrestrial Antarctic habitats result in ecosystems with simplified trophic structures, where microbial processes are especially dominant as drivers of soil-borne nutrient cycling. We examined soil-borne Antarctic communities (bacteria, fungi and

  15. Temperature adaptation of soil bacterial communities along an Antarctic climate gradient: predicting responses to climate warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinnan, R.; Rousk, J.; Yergeau, E.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Baath, E.

    2009-01-01

    Soil microorganisms, the central drivers of terrestrial Antarctic ecosystems, are being confronted with increasing temperatures as parts of the continent experience considerable warming. Here we determined short-term temperature dependencies of Antarctic soil bacterial community growth rates, using

  16. 77 FR 41809 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    .... 95-541), as amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism and Conservation Act of 1996, has developed... official online publication of the U.S. Antarctic Program (USA), which is managed by the National Science...

  17. 77 FR 60477 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism and Conservation Act of 1996, has developed regulations for the... Requested Enter Antarctic Specially Protected Areas and Import into the USA. The applicant plans to enter...

  18. Antarctic Single Frames = Frame Level Records of Antarctica Photos: 1946 - 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs of Antarctica from the United States Antarctic Resource Center (USARC) and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) are maintained in this collection....

  19. US International Trans-Antarctic Scientific Expedition (US ITASE) Glaciochemical Data, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains sub-annually resolved ice core chemistry data from various sites on the Antarctic Ice Sheet during the US International Trans-Antarctic...

  20. Joint-bounded crescentic scars formed by subglacial clast-bed contact forces: Implications for bedrock failure beneath glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbendam, M.; Bradwell, T.; Everest, J. D.; Eyles, N.

    2017-08-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets are important agents of bedrock erosion, yet the precise processes of bedrock failure beneath glacier ice are incompletely known. Subglacially formed erosional crescentic markings (crescentic gouges, lunate fractures) on bedrock surfaces occur locally in glaciated areas and comprise a conchoidal fracture dipping down-ice and a steep fracture that faces up-ice. Here we report morphologically distinct crescentic scars that are closely associated with preexisting joints, termed here joint-bounded crescentic scars. These hitherto unreported features are ca. 50-200 mm deep and involve considerably more rock removal than previously described crescentic markings. The joint-bounded crescentic scars were found on abraded rhyolite surfaces recently exposed (clast-bed contact force as it is dragged over the hard (bedrock) bed. As the ice-embedded boulder approaches a preexisting joint in the bedrock, stress concentrations build up in the bed that exceed the intact rock strength, resulting in conchoidal fracturing and detachment of a crescentic wedge-shaped rock fragment. Subsequent removal of the rock fragment probably involves further fracturing or crushing (comminution) under high contact forces. Formation of joint-bounded crescentic scars is favoured by large boulders at the base of the ice, high basal melting rates, and the presence of preexisting subvertical joints in the bedrock bed. We infer that the relative scarcity of crescentic markings in general on deglaciated surfaces shows that fracturing of intact bedrock below ice is difficult, but that preexisting weaknesses such as joints greatly facilitate rock failure. This implies that models of glacial erosion need to take fracture patterns of bedrock into account.

  1. Computational study on ice growth inhibition of Antarctic bacterium antifreeze protein using coarse grained simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Hung; Le, Ly; Ho, Tu Bao

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic bacterium antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect and support the survival of cold-adapted organisms by binding and inhibiting the growth of ice crystals. The mechanism of the anti-freezing process in a water environment at low temperature of Antarctic bacterium AFPs remains unclear. In this research, we study the effects of Antarctic bacterium AFPs by coarse grained simulations solution at a temperature range from 262 to 273K. The results indicated that Antarctic bacterium AFPs were ful...

  2. Lake Mead, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Lake Mead, Nevada, (36.0N, 114.5E) where the water from the Colorado River empties after it's 273 mile journey through the Grand Canyon of Arizona is the subject of this photo. Other features of interest are Hoover Dam on the south shore of Lake Mead where cheap hydroelectric power is secondary to the water resources made available in this northern desert region and the resort city of Las Vegas, just to the west of Lake Mead.

  3. Skip spawning as a reproductive strategy in Antarctic fish species: the Antarctic silverfish (Pleuragramma antarctica case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pisano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic silverfish Pleuragramma antarctica (Notothenioidei, Nototheniidae is the most abundant pelagic fish inhabiting the frigid Antarctic coastal waters. It plays relevant roles in the local ecosystems, where it is often considered a keystone species connecting lower and upper trophic levels within the coastal marine food web. Despite its ecological relevance, and although many aspects of the Antarctic silverfish biology have already been elucidated, knowledge on important components of its life cycle, including the reproductive features, is still poor. The available data on the reproduction of the Antarctic silverfish remains fragmentary and, in particular, information on the silverfish from the Ross Sea is lacking, in spite of the intensive ecological studies on this unique region and the fact that the only known nursery ground for this species is located in Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea where hatching occurs under the sea-ice. We present the here first description of the reproductive features of Antarctic silverfish from fish sampled in late Summer (mid February 2008 in the Ross Sea. The gross reproductive traits are consistent with those reported from other Antarctic sectors but, interestingly, widespread follicular atresia has been detected in the fish examined. The intensity and prevalence of such a follicular degenerative process suggest that skip spawning (not all adults spawn every year could be a reproductive strategy of this Antarctic species. Such an hypothesis is discussed both on the short-term and on the evolutionary time-scale. Overall, the data presented also contribute to support the acknowledgment that skip-spawning is a diffuse phenomenon in fishes.

  4. Great Lakes Literacy Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Manzo, Lyndsey

    2011-03-01

    Lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, and Erie together form North America's Great Lakes, a region that contains 20% of the world's fresh surface water and is home to roughly one quarter of the U.S. population (Figure 1). Supporting a $4 billion sport fishing industry, plus $16 billion annually in boating, 1.5 million U.S. jobs, and $62 billion in annual wages directly, the Great Lakes form the backbone of a regional economy that is vital to the United States as a whole (see http://www.miseagrant.umich.edu/downloads/economy/11-708-Great-Lakes-Jobs.pdf). Yet the grandeur and importance of this freshwater resource are little understood, not only by people in the rest of the country but also by many in the region itself. To help address this lack of knowledge, the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Great Lakes, supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, developed literacy principles for the Great Lakes to serve as a guide for education of students and the public. These “Great Lakes Literacy Principles” represent an understanding of the Great Lakes' influences on society and society's influences on the Great Lakes.

  5. Motion of an Antarctic glacier by repeated tidally modulated earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoet, Lucas K.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Alley, Richard B.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2012-09-01

    Between debris-laden glacial ice and bedrock, basal seismicity can develop that yields information about bed properties, stress distribution, outburst flooding, and crevassing and calving. Basal seismicity in response to glacial motion is linked to variations in both stress and lubrication of bedrock by water and till. Here we analyse data from the Transantarctic Mountains Seismic Experiment array in 2002-2003 to investigate seismic behaviour at David Glacier, a large outlet glacier that drains 4% of East Antarctica's ice sheet into the Ross Sea. We identify about 20,000 seismic events that are larger in magnitude and duration than typical for glacial sources and repeat at regular intervals of about 25min. These events are consistent with stick-slip behaviour of debris-laden ice moving over a single obstacle of rough bedrock, modulated by relatively small stress changes from the ocean tides. In the years before and after the interval of repeating events, seismic events with irregular and generally longer intervals were detected at the same location, and are consistent with combined stick-slip and continuous sliding of the subglacial interface. We suggest that the observed transitions in seismicity patterns capture the dynamic behaviour of the ice stream, and that--despite lower ice-flow velocities--sliding in the stick-slip regime enhances subglacial erosion.

  6. Meridional displacement of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, Sarah T

    2014-07-13

    Observed long-term warming trends in the Southern Ocean have been interpreted as a sign of increased poleward eddy heat transport or of a poleward displacement of the entire Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) frontal system. The two-decade-long record from satellite altimetry is an important source of information for evaluating the mechanisms governing these trends. While several recent studies have used sea surface height contours to index ACC frontal displacements, here altimeter data are instead used to track the latitude of mean ACC transport. Altimetric height contours indicate a poleward trend, regardless of whether they are associated with ACC fronts. The zonally averaged transport latitude index shows no long-term trend, implying that ACC meridional shifts determined from sea surface height might be associated with large-scale changes in sea surface height more than with localized shifts in frontal positions. The transport latitude index is weakly sensitive to the Southern Annular Mode, but is uncorrelated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Kleptoplast Regulation by an Antarctic Dinoflagellate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, R. J.; Hehenberger, E.; Keeling, P.

    2016-02-01

    We are studying the evolutionary history and expression of plastid- targeted genes in an Antarctic dinoflagellate that steals chloroplasts from the haptophyte, Phaeocystis. Our project seeks to determine whether the kleptoplastidic dinoflagellate utilizes ancestral plastid proteins to regulate its stolen plastid, and how their transcription is related to environmental factors that are relevant to the Southern Ocean environment (temperature and light). To accomplish our goals, we have utilized high throughput transciptome analysis and RNA-Seq experiments of the dinoflagellate and Phaeocystis. Analysis of the dinoflagellate transcriptome has revealed complete mevalonic acid-independent and heme plastid-associated pathways as well as petF and petH transcripts with peridinin-plastid targeting sequences. In contrast, the proteins psaE, petJ, petC show similarity to non-Phaeocystis haptophyte homologs in their respective trees, and potentially carry haptophyte transit peptides. Anaylsis of RNA-Seq temperature and light experiments for the dinoflagellate indicate that there are significant differences in gene expression under the different environmental conditions, and we are in the process of identifying the genes associated with these changes. This work will help us to understand the environmental success of this alternative nutritional strategy.

  8. Automated detection of Antarctic blue whale calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socheleau, Francois-Xavier; Leroy, Emmanuelle; Pecci, Andres Carvallo; Samaran, Flore; Bonnel, Julien; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automated detection of Z-calls emitted by Antarctic blue whales (B. m. intermedia). The proposed solution is based on a subspace detector of sigmoidal-frequency signals with unknown time-varying amplitude. This detection strategy takes into account frequency variations of blue whale calls as well as the presence of other transient sounds that can interfere with Z-calls (such as airguns or other whale calls). The proposed method has been tested on more than 105 h of acoustic data containing about 2200 Z-calls (as found by an experienced human operator). This method is shown to have a correct-detection rate of up to more than 15% better than the extensible bioacoustic tool package, a spectrogram-based correlation detector commonly used to study blue whales. Because the proposed method relies on subspace detection, it does not suffer from some drawbacks of correlation-based detectors. In particular, it does not require the choice of an a priori fixed and subjective template. The analytic expression of the detection performance is also derived, which provides crucial information for higher level analyses such as animal density estimation from acoustic data. Finally, the detection threshold automatically adapts to the soundscape in order not to violate a user-specified false alarm rate.

  9. Antarctic Yeasts: Biodiversity and Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaji, S.; Prasad, G. S.

    This review is an attempt in cataloguing the diversity of yeasts in Antarctica, highlight their biotechnological potential and understand the basis of adaptation to low temperature. As of now several psychrophilic and psychrotolerant yeasts from Antarctic soils and marine waters have been characterized with respect to their growth characteristics, ecological distribution and taxonomic significance. Interestingly most of these species belonged to basidiomycetous yeasts which as a group are known for their ability to circumvent and survive under stress conditions. Simultaneously their possible role as work horses in the biotechnological industry was recognized due to their ability to produce novel enzymes and biomolecules such as agents for the breakdown of xenobiotics, and novel pharmaceutical chemi cals. The high activity of psychrophilic enzymes at low and moderate temperatures offers potential economic benefits. As of now lipases from Pseudozyma antarctica have been extensively studied to understand their unique thermal stability at 90°C and also because of its use in the pharmaceutical, agriculture, food, cosmetics and chemical industry. A few of the other enzymes which have been studied include extracellular alpha-amylase and glucoamylase from the yeast Pseudozyma antarctica (Candida antarctica), an extra-cellular protease from Cryptococcus humicola, an aspartyl proteinase from Cryptococcus humicola, a novel extracellular subtilase from Leucosporidium antarcticum, and a xylanase from Cryptococcus adeliensis

  10. The PLATO Antarctic site testing observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. S.; Allen, G. R.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Bonner, C.; Bradley, S.; Cui, X.; Everett, J. R.; Feng, L.; Gong, X.; Hengst, S.; Hu, J.; Jiang, Z.; Kulesa, C. A.; Li, Y.; Luong-Van, D.; Moore, A. M.; Pennypacker, C.; Qin, W.; Riddle, R.; Shang, Z.; Storey, J. W. V.; Sun, B.; Suntzeff, N.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Travouillon, T.; Walker, C. K.; Wang, L.; Yan, J.; Yang, J.; Yang, H.; York, D.; Yuan, X.; Zhang, X. G.; Zhang, Z.; Zhou, X.; Zhu, Z.

    2008-07-01

    Over a decade of site testing in Antarctica has shown that both South Pole and Dome C are exceptional sites for astronomy, with certain atmospheric conditions superior to those at existing mid-latitude sites. However, the highest point on the Antarctic plateau, Dome A, is expected to experience colder atmospheric temperatures, lower wind speeds, and a turbulent boundary layer that is confined closer to the ground. The Polar Research Institute of China, who were the first to visit the Dome A site in January 2005, plan to establish a permanently manned station there within the next decade. As part of this process they conducted a second expedition to Dome A, arriving via overland traverse in January 2008. This traverse involved the delivery and installation of the PLATeau Observatory (PLATO). PLATO is an automated self-powered astrophysical site testing observatory, developed by the University of New South Wales. A number of international institutions have contributed site testing instruments measuring turbulence, optical sky background, and sub-millimetre transparency. In addition, a set of science instruments are providing wide-field high time resolution optical photometry and terahertz imaging of the Galaxy. We present here an overview of the PLATO system design and instrumentation suite.

  11. Estimating the extent of Antarctic summer sea ice during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinburgh, Tom; Day, Jonathan J.

    2016-11-01

    In stark contrast to the sharp decline in Arctic sea ice, there has been a steady increase in ice extent around Antarctica during the last three decades, especially in the Weddell and Ross seas. In general, climate models do not to capture this trend and a lack of information about sea ice coverage in the pre-satellite period limits our ability to quantify the sensitivity of sea ice to climate change and robustly validate climate models. However, evidence of the presence and nature of sea ice was often recorded during early Antarctic exploration, though these sources have not previously been explored or exploited until now. We have analysed observations of the summer sea ice edge from the ship logbooks of explorers such as Robert Falcon Scott, Ernest Shackleton and their contemporaries during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration (1897-1917), and in this study we compare these to satellite observations from the period 1989-2014, offering insight into the ice conditions of this period, from direct observations, for the first time. This comparison shows that the summer sea ice edge was between 1.0 and 1.7° further north in the Weddell Sea during this period but that ice conditions were surprisingly comparable to the present day in other sectors.

  12. Isolation and characterization of Campylobacter spp. from Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) at Deception Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Peña, F J; Pérez-Boto, D; Jiménez, C; San Miguel, E; Echeita, A; Rengifo-Herrera, C; García-Párraga, D; Ortega-Mora, L M; Pedraza-Díaz, S

    2010-09-01

    The presence of Campylobacter spp. was investigated in 41 Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) and 9 Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) at Deception Island, Antarctica. Infections were encountered in six Antarctic fur seals. The isolates, the first reported from marine mammals in the Antarctic region, were identified as Campylobacter insulaenigrae and Campylobacter lari.

  13. Dynamic constraints on CO2 uptake by an iron-fertilized Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tsung-Hung; Broecker, Wallace S.; Oestlund, H. G.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: tracer distribution and dynamics in the Antarctic Ocean; a model of Antarctic and Non-Antarctic Oceans; effects on an anthropogenically affected atmosphere; effects of seasonal iron fertilization; and implications of the South Atlantic Ventilation Experiment C-14 results.

  14. Limnology of Eifel maar lakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scharf, Burkhard W; Björk, Sven

    1992-01-01

    ... : Species composition & seasonal periodicity - Qualitative & quantitative investigations on cladoceran zooplankton of oligotrophic maar lakes - Population dynamics of pelagic copepods in maar lakes - Population dynamics...

  15. Microbial Diversity in a Hypersaline Sulfate Lake: A Terrestrial Analog of Ancient Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Pontefract

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Life can persist under severe osmotic stress and low water activity in hypersaline environments. On Mars, evidence for the past presence of saline bodies of water is prevalent and resulted in the widespread deposition of sulfate and chloride salts. Here we investigate Spotted Lake (British Columbia, Canada, a hypersaline lake with extreme (>3 M levels of sulfate salts as an exemplar of the conditions thought to be associated with ancient Mars. We provide the first characterization of microbial structure in Spotted Lake sediments through metagenomic sequencing, and report a bacteria-dominated community with abundant Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes, as well as diverse extremophiles. Microbial abundance and functional comparisons reveal similarities to Ace Lake, a meromictic Antarctic lake with anoxic and sulfidic bottom waters. Our analysis suggests that hypersaline-associated species occupy niches characterized foremost by differential abundance of Archaea, uncharacterized Bacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Potential biosignatures in this environment are discussed, specifically the likelihood of a strong sulfur isotopic fractionation record within the sediments due to the presence of sulfate reducing bacteria. With its high sulfate levels and seasonal freeze-thaw cycles, Spotted Lake is an analog for ancient paleolakes on Mars in which sulfate salt deposits may have offered periodically habitable environments, and could have concentrated and preserved organic materials or their biomarkers over geologic time.

  16. The 1987 Antarctic ozone hole - A new record low

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Sechrist, Frank S.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 the Antarctic springtime total ozone as measured by TOMS was substantially lower than in any previous year. Polar ozone levels began decreasing significantly after a mesoscale transient minimum developed over the Weddell Sea on September 5-7. The total ozone over most of the Antarctic continent decreased to less than 200 DU on September 19, and a region where total ozone was less than 125 DU developed on September 30. The lowest level observed was 109 DU on October 5 near the South Pole, a value 29 DU less than the 1985 previous record low. Compared with previous years the 1987 October zonal mean total ozone is substantially lower poleward of 60 S. Antarctic total ozone in 1987 also showed the greatest rate of ozone decrease as well as the longest persistence of the ozone hole.

  17. Rotifers as Indicators of Climate Change in the Antarctic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pociecha, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    An important question stated in the presented paper is: Could rotifers be the indicators of climate change in the Antarctic environments? Rotifers are one of the most important components of the invertebrate fauna of the Antarctic freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. However, investigations of their distribution, diversity and an ecological role in the environment have been widely neglected, mainly due to the methodological and taxonomical difficulties. During the investigations 176 species of rotifers were found, including the endemic and cosmopolitan species. Their existence is directly proportional to microvariations of humidity factor. Scientists still have poor knowledge about the occurrence of rotifer species in recently studied habitats e.g. cryoconite holes, nunataks or soil. Probably rotifers could be the indicators of climate change in the Antarctic freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems but more investigations and monitoring studies are needed.

  18. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Chown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  19. Monitoring Antarctic ice sheet surface melting with TIMESAT algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, X.; Liang, L.

    2011-12-01

    Antarctic ice sheet contributes significantly to the global heat budget by controlling the exchange of heat, moisture, and momentum at the surface-atmosphere interface, which directly influence the global atmospheric circulation and climate change. Ice sheet melting will cause snow humidity increase, which will accelerate the disintegration and movement of ice sheet. As a result, detecting Antarctic ice sheet melting is essential for global climate change research. In the past decades, various methods have been proposed for extracting snowmelt information from multi-channel satellite passive microwave data. Some methods are based on brightness temperature values or a composite index of them, and others are based on edge detection. TIMESAT (Time-series of Satellite sensor data) is an algorithm for extracting seasonality information from time-series of satellite sensor data. With TIMESAT long-time series brightness temperature (SSM/I 19H) is simulated by Double Logistic function. Snow is classified to wet and dry snow with generalized Gaussian model. The results were compared with those from a wavelet algorithm. On this basis, Antarctic automatic weather station data were used for ground verification. It shows that this algorithm is effective in ice sheet melting detection. The spatial distribution of melting areas(Fig.1) shows that, the majority of melting areas are located on the edge of Antarctic ice shelf region. It is affected by land cover type, surface elevation and geographic location (latitude). In addition, the Antarctic ice sheet melting varies with seasons. It is particularly acute in summer, peaking at December and January, staying low in March. In summary, from 1988 to 2008, Ross Ice Shelf and Ronnie Ice Shelf have the greatest interannual variability in amount of melting, which largely determines the overall interannual variability in Antarctica. Other regions, especially Larsen Ice Shelf and Wilkins Ice Shelf, which is in the Antarctic Peninsula

  20. Unexpectedly high ultrafine aerosol concentrations above East Antarctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Humphries

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Better characterisation of aerosol processes in pristine, natural environments, such as Antarctica, have recently been shown to lead to the largest reduction in uncertainties in our understanding of radiative forcing. Our understanding of aerosols in the Antarctic region is currently based on measurements that are often limited to boundary layer air masses at spatially sparse coastal and continental research stations, with only a handful of studies in the vast sea-ice region. In this paper, the first observational study of sub-micron aerosols in the East Antarctic sea ice region is presented. Measurements were conducted aboard the icebreaker Aurora Australis in spring 2012 and found that boundary layer condensation nuclei (CN3 concentrations exhibited a five-fold increase moving across the polar front, with mean polar cell concentrations of 1130 cm−3 – higher than any observed elsewhere in the Antarctic and Southern Ocean region. The absence of evidence for aerosol growth suggested that nucleation was unlikely to be local. Air parcel trajectories indicated significant influence from the free troposphere above the Antarctic continent, implicating this as the likely nucleation region for surface aerosol, a similar conclusion to previous Antarctic aerosol studies. The highest aerosol concentrations were found to correlate with low-pressure systems, suggesting that the passage of cyclones provided an accelerated pathway, delivering air masses quickly from the free troposphere to the surface. After descent from the Antarctic free troposphere, trajectories suggest that sea-ice boundary layer air masses travelled equatorward into the low-albedo Southern Ocean region, transporting with them emissions and these aerosol nuclei which, after growth, may potentially impact on the region's radiative balance. The high aerosol concentrations and their transport pathways described here, could help reduce the discrepancy currently present between

  1. Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Rios

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The information about the sponges in this dataset is derived from the samples collected during five Spanish Antarctic expeditions: Bentart 94, Bentart 95, Gebrap 96, Ciemar 99/00 and Bentart 2003. Samples were collected in the Antarctic Peninsula and Bellingshausen Sea at depths ranging from 4 to 2044 m using va­rious sampling gears.The Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions is unique as it provides in­formation for an under-explored region of the Southern Ocean (Bellingshausen Sea. It fills an information gap on Antarctic deep-sea sponges, for which there were previously very few data.This phylum is an important part of the Antarctic biota and plays a key role in the structure of the Antarctic marine benthic community due to its considerable diversity and predominance in different areas. It is often a dominant component of Southern Ocean benthic communities.The quality of the data was controlled very thoroughly with GPS systems onboard the R/V Hesperides and by checking the data against the World Porifera Database (which is part of the World Register of Marine Species, WoRMS. The data are therefore fit for completing checklists, inclusion in biodivers­ity pattern analysis and niche modelling. The authors can be contacted if any additional information is needed before carrying out detailed biodiversity or biogeographic studies.The dataset currently contains 767 occurrence data items that have been checked for systematic reliability. This database is not yet complete and the collection is growing. Specimens are stored in the author’s collection at the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO in the city of Gijón (Spain. The data are available in GBIF.

  2. Sea ice production variability in Antarctic coastal polynyas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takeshi; Ohshima, Kay I.; Fraser, Alexander D.; Williams, Guy D.

    2016-05-01

    Enhanced sea ice production (SIP) in Antarctic coastal polynyas forms dense shelf water (DSW), leading to Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) formation that ultimately drives the lower limb of the meridional overturning circulation. Some studies suggest that the variability of SIP in Antarctic coastal polynyas is driven by the influence of atmospheric forcing, i.e., surface winds and air temperature. Our previous mapping of SIP in 13 major Antarctic coastal polynyas from 1992 to 2007, using a heat flux calculation with ice thickness data derived from satellite data, is extended here to examine the interannual and seasonal variability of SIP from 1992 to 2013. The interannual variability of total ice production correlates more strongly with polynya extent than with atmospheric forcing, with the exception of the Shackleton Polynya, which correlates well with wind. There is no coherent signal in the interannual variability between the major Antarctic coastal polynyas. We find that stochastic changes to the coastal "icescape," i.e., ice shelves, floating glaciers, fast ice, together with offshore first-year ice, are also important factors driving SIP variability on multiyear time scales. Both the Ross Ice Shelf Polynya and Mertz Glacier Polynya experienced a significant reduction in SIP due to calving events and the repositioning of icebergs and fast ice. Our results also show opposing trends between polynya-based SIP and sea ice extent in key regions of Antarctic sea ice change. Close monitoring of coastal icescape dynamics and change is essential to better understand the long-term impact of coastal polynya variability and its influence on regional AABW production.

  3. The environmental physiology of Antarctic terrestrial nematodes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, D A

    2003-11-01

    The environmental physiology of terrestrial Antarctic nematodes is reviewed with an emphasis on their cold-tolerance strategies. These nematodes are living in one of the most extreme environments on Earth and face a variety of stresses, including low temperatures and desiccation. Their diversity is low and declines with latitude. They show resistance adaptation, surviving freezing and desiccation in a dormant state but reproducing when conditions are favourable. At high freezing rates in the surrounding medium the Antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus davidi freezes by inoculative freezing but can survive intracellular freezing. At slow freezing rates this nematode does not freeze but undergoes cryoprotective dehydration. Cold tolerance may be aided by rapid freezing, the production of trehalose and by an ice-active protein that inhibits recrystallisation. P. davidi relies on slow rates of water loss from its habitat, and can survive in a state of anhydrobiosis, perhaps aided by the ability to synthesise trehalose. Teratocephalus tilbrooki and Ditylenchus parcevivens are fast-dehydration strategists. Little is known of the osmoregulatory mechanisms of Antarctic nematodes. Freezing rates are likely to vary with water content in Antarctic soils. Saturated soils may produce slow freezing rates and favour cryoprotective dehydration. As the soil dries freezing rates may become faster, favouring freezing tolerance. When the soil dries completely the nematodes survive anhydrobiotically. Terrestrial Antarctic nematodes thus have a variety of strategies that ensure their survival in a harsh and variable environment. We need to more fully understand the conditions to which they are exposed in Antarctic soils and to apply more natural rates of freezing and desiccation to our studies.

  4. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  5. Great Lakes: Great Gardening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Sea Grant Inst., Albany, NY.

    This folder contains 12 fact sheets designed to improve the quality of gardens near the Great Lakes. The titles are: (1) "Your Garden and the Great Lakes"; (2) "Organic Gardening"; (3) "Fruit and Vegetable Gardening"; (4) "Composting Yard Wastes"; (5) "Herbicides and Water Quality"; (6)…

  6. Evaporation From Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, C.; Blanken, P.; Hedstrom, N.; Leshkevich, G.; Fortin, V.; Charpentier, D.; Haywood, H.

    2009-05-01

    Evaporation is a critical component of the water balance of each of the Laurentian Great Lakes, and understanding the magnitude and physical controls of evaporative water losses are important for several reasons. Recently, low water levels in Lakes Superior and Michigan/Huron have had socioeconomic, ecological, and even meteorological impacts (e.g. water quality and quantity, transportation, invasive species, recreation, etc.). The recent low water levels may be due to increased evaporation, but this is not known as operational evaporation estimates are currently calculated as the residual of water or heat budgets. Perhaps surprisingly, almost nothing is known about evaporation dynamics from Lake Superior and few direct measurements of evaporation have been made from any of the Laurentian Great Lakes. This research is the first to attempt to directly measure evaporation from Lake Superior by deploying eddy covariance instrumentation. Results of evaporation rates, their patterns and controlling mechanisms will be presented. The direct measurements of evaporation are used with concurrent satellite and climate model data to extrapolate evaporation measurements across the entire lake. This knowledge could improve predictions of how climate change may impact the lake's water budget and subsequently how the water in the lake is managed.

  7. Afghanistan - Debris Covered Glaciers, Supraglacial Lakes, and the Potential for Catastrophic Flooding (Jökulhlaups)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnia, B. F.

    2009-12-01

    Included in the U.S. Geological Survey’s investigation of glaciers and the water resources of Afghanistan is a component focused on determining the potential for catastrophic flooding (jökulhlaups). In glacier environments, jökulhlaups are usually caused by: (1) drainage of ice-dammed lakes; (2) drainage of ice-marginal lakes (typically moraine-dammed lakes); (3) release of water stored subglacially, englacially, or supraglacially, sometimes through surge-related processes; or (4) through melting of glaciers located around the summit craters of erupting volcanoes. All but the last potential cause may lead to significant flooding from Himalayan Mountain glaciers. The primary data sets being investigated are: (1) VNIR (visible and near-infrared) digital images collected between 2001 and 2006 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on the Terra spacecraft; (2) Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper (ETM+) multispectral data collected between 1998 and 2004; and (3) Google Earth space photography subscenes imaged between 2006 and 2008. GIS analysis, an automated supervised classification, a manual visual image analysis, and a remote sensing assessment were performed on these data to determine the number, location, size, area, aspect, distribution of ice-surface and ice-marginal lakes, and many other parameters of about 1,000 glaciers in Afghanistan’s Wakhan Pamir. There, all of the glaciers analyzed are thinning and/or retreating. In this type of environment, it is not unusual for a significant amount of the meltwater thus produced to be temporarily stored within the glacier system. Many Wakhan Pamir valley glaciers are debris covered. Often significant parts of the ablation zone surface of these glaciers host supraglacial lakes. Typically, these supraglacial lakes develop on stagnant or slowly moving ice through thermokarst processes. Many of these valley glaciers are also characterized by the presence of empty thermokarst pits

  8. [Study of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate changes and plateau reaction of the Antarctic Kunlun station investigation team in different plateau environments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shun-yun; Wu, Xin-min; Guo, Ya-min; Zhang, Shu-shun; An, Yan-ming; Li, Bing; Wang, Hao

    2013-06-11

    To explore the blood oxygen saturation and heart rate changes of the Antarctic explorers. During August 2010 to April 2011, the changes in blood oxygen saturation, heart rate and plateau reaction of 16 Antarctic expedition team in different plateau environments (Tibetan plateau versus Antarctic plateau) were monitored with the noninvasive pulse oximeter MD300-C. The extent of acute mountain sickness was determined according to the Lake Louise Consensus acute mountain reaction symptom scores and judgment method. The changes of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate at different altitudes of 110, 3650, 4300 m (96.8% ± 1.2%,89.1% ± 1.2%, 86.1% ± 2.0%, (75.0 ± 5.4) times/min, (104.0 ± 4.3) times/min, (113.0 ± 5.2) times/min,F = 214.155, 240.088,both P rate at different altitudes of 2000, 2500, 3000, 3500 and 4087 m(91.9% ± 1.3%,90.5% ± 1.3%,87.6% ± 1.4%,85.0% ± 1.8%,81.5% ± 2.2%, (85.9 ± 3.2) times/min, (90.6 ± 2.8) times/min, (97.8 ± 4.1) times/min, (102.0 ± 3.4) times/min, (106.3 ± 3.9) times/min, F = 105.418, 90.174, both P rate were both correlated with the risk of altitude sickness (r = -0.446 and 0.565, both P rate of the Antarctic explorers. And with the increases of altitude, the risk of altitude sickness gradually increases.

  9. Insignificant change in Antarctic snowfall since the International Geophysical Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Andrew J; Bromwich, David H; Fogt, Ryan L; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Mayewski, Paul A; Dixon, Daniel A; Ekaykin, Alexey; Frezzotti, Massimo; Goodwin, Ian; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Kaspari, Susan D; Morgan, Vin I; Oerter, Hans; Van Ommen, Tas D; Van der Veen, Cornelius J; Wen, Jiahong

    2006-08-11

    Antarctic snowfall exhibits substantial variability over a range of time scales, with consequent impacts on global sea level and the mass balance of the ice sheets. To assess how snowfall has affected the thickness of the ice sheets in Antarctica and to provide an extended perspective, we derived a 50-year time series of snowfall accumulation over the continent by combining model simulations and observations primarily from ice cores. There has been no statistically significant change in snowfall since the 1950s, indicating that Antarctic precipitation is not mitigating global sea level rise as expected, despite recent winter warming of the overlying atmosphere.

  10. Managing Antarctic Data-A Practical Use Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Finney

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific data management is performed to ensure that data are curated in a manner that supports their qualified reuse. Curation usually involves actions that must be performed by those who capture or generate data and by a facility with the capability to sustainably archive and publish data beyond an individual project’s lifecycle. The Australian Antarctic Data Centre is such a facility. How this centre is approaching the administration of Antarctic science data is described in the following paper and serves to demonstrate key facets necessary for undertaking polar data management in an increasingly connected global data environment.

  11. Triple Isotope Water Measurements of Lake Untersee Ice using Off-Axis ICOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, E. S.; Huang, Y. W.; Andersen, D. T.; Gupta, M.; McKay, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Untersee (71.348°S, 13.458°E) is the largest surface freshwater lake in the interior of the Gruber Mountains of central Queen Maud Land in East Antarctica. The lake is permanently covered with ice, is partly bounded by glacier ice and has a mean annual air temperature of -10°C. In contrast to other Antarctic lakes the dominating physical process controlling ice-cover dynamics is low summer temperatures and high wind speeds resulting in sublimation rather than melting as the main mass-loss process. The ice-cover of the lake is composed of lake-water ice formed during freeze-up and rafted glacial ice derived from the Anuchin Glacier. The mix of these two fractions impacts the energy balance of the lake, which directly affects ice-cover thickness. Ice-cover is important if one is to understand the physical, chemical, and biological linkages within these unique, physically driven ecosystems. We have analyzed δ2H, δ18O, and δ17O from samples of lake and glacier ice collected at Lake Untersee in Dec 2014. Using these data we seek to answer two specific questions: Are we able to determine the origin and history of the lake ice, discriminating between rafted glacial ice and lake water? Can isotopic gradients in the surface ice indicate the ablation (sublimation) rate of the surface ice? The triple isotope water analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR 912-0032) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This analyzer measures δ2H, δ18O, and δ17O from water, as well as the calculated d-excess and 17O-excess. The laboratory precision in high performance mode for both δ17O and δ18O is 0.03 ‰, and for δ2H is 0.2 ‰. Methodology and isotope data from Lake Untersee samples are presented. Figure: Ice samples were collected across Lake Untersee from both glacial and lake ice regions for this study.

  12. Antarctic Ozone Hole on September 17, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Satellite data show the area of this year's Antarctic ozone hole peaked at about 26 million square kilometers-roughly the size of North America-making the hole similar in size to those of the past three years, according to scientists from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Researchers have observed a leveling-off of the hole size and predict a slow recovery. Over the past several years the annual ozone hole over Antarctica has remained about the same in both its size and in the thickness of the ozone layer. 'This is consistent with human-produced chlorine compounds that destroy ozone reaching their peak concentrations in the atmosphere, leveling off, and now beginning a very slow decline,' said Samuel Oltmans of NOAA's Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, Boulder, Colo. In the near future-barring unusual events such as explosive volcanic eruptions-the severity of the ozone hole will likely remain similar to what has been seen in recent years, with year-to-year differences associated with meteorological variability. Over the longer term (30-50 years) the severity of the ozone hole in Antarctica is expected to decrease as chlorine levels in the atmosphere decline. The image above shows ozone levels on Spetember 17, 2001-the lowest levels observed this year. Dark blue colors correspond to the thinnest ozone, while light blue, green, and yellow pixels indicate progressively thicker ozone. For more information read: 2001 Ozone Hole About the Same Size as Past Three Years. Image courtesy Greg Shirah, GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio, based on data from the TOMS science team

  13. Arctic and Antarctic Topography Measurements Using LVIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofton, M. A.; Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D.; Beckley, M.; Brooks, C.; Cornejo, H.

    2015-12-01

    Wide-swath, medium-footprint laser altimetry (lidar) is routinely used to monitor large areas of the Arctic, Antarctic and other environs. As part of NASA's Operation Icebridge and ARISE missions, NASA's LVIS and LVIS-GH systems operating on medium-high altitude platforms have collected over 350,000km2 of surface elevation and structure measurements, providing data sets to both support and enhance future space-based lidar missions such as ICESAT-2 and GEDI. Using the LVIS systems over ice surfaces, typical elevation precision and accuracy is at the 10 cm level, assessed using inter and intra-mission crossovers. An updated version of the LVIS system is under development combining the latest technology with updated and more capable approaches to operating procedures and data processing. The sensor will be available in late summer 2016 as part of a new NASA geodetic imaging lidar facility with goals of providing up to 5 times more data than present with 2 month turnaround at much reduced cost to the end user. A review of data processing approaches will be presented, along with results from the recent ARISE 2014 campaign in the Arctic. Mission highlights included a 1000 km-long transect from open water to sea ice along 140W, a 600 km-long transect along an orbit track of ESA's Cryosat-2 satellite with the satellite passing directly overhead at the start of the line, repeated passes over the Marginal Ice Zone throughout the ARISE campaign over the time of the sea ice minimum, data swaths along the Columbia, Portage, Spencer, Trail, and Wolverine glaciers in Alaska, and characterization of cloud top heights throughout each flight to interpret the ARISE radiation measurements.

  14. Antarctic volcanoes: A remote but significant hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Alex; Folch, Arnau; Giralt, Santiago

    2017-04-01

    Ash emitted during explosive volcanic eruptions can be dispersed over massive areas of the globe, posing a threat to both human health and infrastructures, such as the air traffic. Some of the last eruptions occurred during this decade (e.g. 14/04/2010 - Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland; 24/05/2011-Grímsvötn, Iceland; 05/06/2011-Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, Chile) have strongly affected the air traffic in different areas of the world, leading to economic losses of billions of euros. From the tens of volcanoes located in Antarctica, at least nine are known to be active and five of them have reported volcanic activity in historical times. However, until now, no attention has been paid to the possible social, economical and environmental consequences of an eruption that would occur on high southern latitudes, perhaps because it is considered that its impacts would be minor or local, and mainly restricted to the practically inhabited Antarctic continent. We show here, as a case study and using climate models, how volcanic ash emitted during a regular eruption of one of the most active volcanoes in Antarctica, Deception Island (South Shetland Islands), could reach the African continent as well as Australia and South America. The volcanic cloud could strongly affect the air traffic not only in the region and at high southern latitudes, but also the flights connecting Africa, South America and Oceania. Results obtained are crucial to understand the patterns of volcanic ash distribution at high southern latitudes with obvious implications for tephrostratigraphical and chronological studies that provide valuable isochrones with which to synchronize palaeoclimate records. This research was partially funded by the MINECO grants VOLCLIMA (CGL2015-72629-EXP)and POSVOLDEC(CTM2016-79617-P)(AEI/FEDER, UE), the Ramón y Cajal research program (RYC-2012-11024) and the NEMOH European project (REA grant 34 agreement n° 289976).

  15. Linking varve-formation processes to climate and lake conditions at Tiefer See (NE Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräger, Nadine; Kienel, Ulrike; Plessen, Birgit; Ott, Florian; Brademann, Brian; Pinkerneil, Sylvia; Brauer, Achim

    2017-04-01

    Annually laminated (varved) lake sediments represent unique archives in continental areas providing both, precise chronologies and seasonally resolving proxy data. Monitoring of physical, chemical and biological processes influencing lake sediment formation are a suitable approach for detailed proxy understanding of varved sediment records. Lake Tiefer See (NE Germany) indicates deposition of varved sediments today as well as millennia ago (Dräger et al., 2016; Kienel et al., 2013). Therefore, the lake provides the possibility to trace current seasonal layer formation in the lake and to pair these data to climate and lake conditions (Kienel et al., 2016). Lake Tiefer See was formed during the last glaciation and is part of the Klocksin Lake Chain, a subglacial channel system that crosses the Pomeranian terminal moraine. The lake is a mesotrophic hard water lake with a maximum depth of 63 m and a surface area of 0.75 km2. During four consecutive years (2012-2015) the particulate matter deposition was trapped at bi-weekly to monthly resolution at three different water depths (5, 12 and 50 m). The sediment trap material was analysed for sediment flux and organic matter and calcite content. In addition, we monitored limnological parameters (e.g. temperature, pH, conductivity, oxygen content) as well as the meteorological conditions (e.g. temperature, wind speed and direction, precipitation) with a monitoring and climate station installed on the lake. These data describe strength and duration of lake mixing and lake stagnation phases. Our results show distinct seasonal peaks in sediment formation, which correspond to the spring and summer productivity phases comprising of diatom blooms and calcite precipitation. This observation is in line with microfacies results from surface sediment cores. The content of biogenic calcite content decreases in the trapped material with increasing water depth indicating dissolution processes. However, the strength of calcite

  16. Lake Superior revisited 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Wayne R.; Selgeby, James H.

    1987-01-01

    The Lake Superior fish community has changed substantially since the early 1960s, when control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) became effective. Self-reproducing stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) have been reestablished in many inshore areas, although they have not yet reached pre-sea lamprey abundance; offshore lake trout are probably at or near pre-sea lamprey abundance. Stocks of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) appear to have fully recovered; commercial catches are at or above historical levels. Lake herring (Coregonus artedii) are recovering rapidly in U.S. waters and are abundant in western Canadian waters. The population of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), which declined in the 1970s, is recovering. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus) are becoming more abundant as a result of increased stocking in U.S. waters and are reproducing in most suitable tributaries; they have become significant in anglers' creels.

  17. Lake metabolism scales with lake morphometry and catchment conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter Anton; Båstrup-Spohr, Lars; Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2012-01-01

    We used a comparative data set for 25 lakes in Denmark sampled during summer to explore the influence of lake morphometry, catchment conditions, light availability and nutrient input on lake metabolism. We found that (1) gross primary production (GPP) and community respiration (R) decline with la...... in lake morphometry and catchment conditions when comparing metabolic responses of lakes to human impacts....... area, water depth and drainage ratio, and increase with algal biomass (Chl), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total phosphorus (TP); (2) all lakes, especially small with less incident light, and forest lakes with high DOC, have negative net ecosystem production (NEP

  18. Bacterial diversity is strongly associated with historical penguin activity in an Antarctic lake sediment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Renbin; Shi, Yu; Ma, Dawei; Wang, Can; Xu, Hua; Chu, Haiyan

    2015-11-25

    Current penguin activity in Antarctica affects the geochemistry of sediments and their microbial communities; the effects of historical penguin activity are less well understood. Here, bacterial diversity in ornithogenic sediment was investigated using high-throughput pyrosequencing. The relative abundances of dominant phyla were controlled by the amount of historical penguin guano deposition. Significant positive correlations were found between both the bacterial richness and diversity, and the relative penguin number (p penguin activity drove the vertical distribution of the bacterial communities. The lowest relative abundances of individual phyla corresponded to lowest number of penguin population at 1,800-2,300 yr BP during a drier and colder period; the opposite was observed during a moister and warmer climate (1,400-1,800 yr BP). This study shows that changes in the climate over millennia affected penguin populations and the outcomes of these changes affect the sediment bacterial community today.

  19. Ali Kaushar Chemistry of snow and lake water in Antarctic region ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . 75. Kumar Ratheesh R T. Assessment of flexural analysis applied to the. Sumatra–Java subduction zone. 717. Kumar Rupa K see Kothawale D R. 51. Kumar Naresh see Paul Ajay. 731. Kumar Senthil P see Reddy G K. 745. Kumar Krishna S.

  20. Bathymetric evolution of Tasman Glacier terminal lake, New Zealand, as determined by remote surveying techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, Heather; Bealing, Paul; Tidey, Emily; Gomez, Christopher; Harrison, Justin

    2016-12-01

    Processes that drive iceberg calving at the margins of freshwater terminating glaciers are still poorly understood. This knowledge-gap is in part due to the challenge of obtaining good in situ data in a highly dynamic and dangerous environment. We are using emerging remote technologies, in the form of a remote controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry, and Structure from Motion (SfM) to characterize terminus morphology, to better understand relationships between lake growth and terminus evolution. Comparison of results between the jet boat mounted dual-frequency Garmin fish-finder with an Odom Echotrac DF3200 MKII with 200/38 kHz dual-frequency transducer, showed that after a sound velocity adjustment, the remote survey obtained depth data within ± 1 m of the higher grade survey equipment. Water depths of up to 240 m were recorded only 100 m away from the terminus, and subaerial cliff height ranged from around 6 to 33 m, with the central region of the terminus more likely to experience buoyancy. Subaqueous ice ramps are ephemeral features, and in 2015 multiple ice ramps extended out into the lake from the terminus by 100-200 m. The consistent location of some of the subaqueous ramps between surveys may indicate that other processes, for example, subglacial hydrology, also influence evolving terminus morphology.

  1. Diversity of bacterial communities in the lakes of Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojib, Nazia; Huang, Jonathan; Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael; Sattler, Birgit; Andersen, Dale; Bej, Asim K.

    2009-08-01

    Extreme conditions such as low temperature, aridness, low availability of organic matter, high salinity and UV-radiation in terrestrial Antarctica are key factors limiting the habitation of biotic communities and ecosystem dynamics. In recent studies, it has been discovered that the bacterial communities are highly diverse and distributed widely in the extreme ecosystem of Antarctica. Besides available morphometric data, geology, and thermal profile, limited study on the microbial identification, phylogenetic analysis, diversity and distribution of microorganisms in different lakes of Schirmacher Oasis in East Antarctica has been reported. The objective of this study was to assess the microbial biodiversity and distribution using culture-independent and culture-dependent methodologies based upon bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis in three categories of lakes, i.e., the land-locked (L), epi-shelf (E), and pro-glacial (P) lakes in Schirmacher Oasis. The water and ice samples were collected during the 2008 Tawani International Scientific Expedition. Direct culturing of the samples on R2A agar media exhibited a wide variety of pigmented bacteria. Two of the pigmented bacteria that were cultured belong to the genera, Hymenobacter, and Flavobacterium. Cultureindependent methodology of one of the land-locked lakes L27C identified a rich microbial diversity consisting of six different phyla of bacteria. The majority of bacteria (56%) belong to the Class γ-proteobacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria. Within the Class γ-proteobacteria, Acinetobacter dominated (48%) the total microbial load. Characterization of the microbial diversity within the three different types of Antarctic lakes is important because it will help give us a better understanding of the survival mechanisms and the functionality of these bacteria in extremely cold and harsh Antarctic ecosystems.

  2. Yellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eClingenpeel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1,349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels. However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (70 pyrosequencing reads was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  3. Yellowstone lake nanoarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  4. Recent Rapid Regional Climate Warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, D. G.; Marshall, G. J.; Connolley, W. M.; Parkinson, C.; Mulvaney, R.; Hodgson, D. A.; King, J. C.; Pudsey, C. J.; Turner, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) confirmed that global warming was 0.6 ñ 0.2 degrees C during the 20th Century and cited increases in greenhouse gases as a likely contributor. But this average conceals the complexity of observed climate change, which is seasonally biased, decadally variable and geographically patchy. In particular, over the last 50 years three high-latitude areas have undergone recent rapid regional (RRR) warming ? substantially more rapid than the global mean. We discuss the spatial and temporal significance of RRR warming in one area, the Antarctic Peninsula. New analyses of station records show no ubiquitous polar amplification of global warming but significant RRR warming on the Antarctic Peninsula. We investigate the likelihood that this could be amplification of a global warming, and use climate-proxy data to indicate that this RRR warming on the Antarctic Peninsula is unprecedented over the last two millennia and unlikely to be a natural mode of variability. We can show a strong connection between RRR warming and reduced sea-ice duration in an area on the west of the Antarctic Peninsula, but here we cannot yet distinguish cause and effect. Thus for the present we cannot determine which process causes the RRR warming, and until the mechanism initiating and sustaining it is understood, and is convincingly reproduced in climate models, we lack a sound basis for predicting climate change in this region over the coming century.

  5. Microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of continental Antarctic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don A Cowan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctica Dry Valleys are regarded as the coldest hyperarid desert system on Earth. While a wide variety of environmental stressors including very low minimum temperatures, frequent freeze-thaw cycles and low water availability impose severe limitations to life, suitable niches for abundant microbial colonization exist. Antarctic desert soils contain much higher levels of microbial diversity than previously thought. Edaphic niches, including cryptic and refuge habitats, microbial mats and permafrost soils all harbour microbial communities which drive key biogeochemical cycling processes. For example, lithobionts (hypoliths and endoliths possess a genetic capacity for nitrogen and carbon cycling, polymer degradation and other system processes. Nitrogen fixation rates of hypoliths, as assessed through acetylene reduction assays, suggest that these communities are a significant input source for nitrogen into these oligotrophic soils. Here we review aspects of microbial diversity in Antarctic soils with an emphasis on functionality and capacity. We assess current knowledge regarding adaptations to Antarctic soil environments and highlight the current threats to Antarctic desert soil communities.

  6. Both the Antarctic fur seal Arctocephalus gazella and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    population size and pup production of Antarctic fur seals at Prince Edward Island. It also updates the avail- able census figures for the Subantarctic fur seal, ..... In Status, Biology and Ecology of Fur. Seals. Croxall, J. P. and R. L. Gentry (Eds). Proceedings of an International Symposium and Workshop, Cambridge,. England ...

  7. Genetics differentiation between Arctic and Antarctic monothalamous foraminiferans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Jan; Majewski, Wojciech; Longet, David

    2008-01-01

    distinct genetically. As expected, Arctic specimens were usually more closely related to those from Northern Europe than to their Antarctic representatives. The deep-sea specimens from Weddell Sea branched as a sister to the McMurdo Sound population, while those from the Arctic Ocean clustered with ones...

  8. Antarctic and Southern Ocean influences on Late Pliocene global cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKay, R.; Naish, T.; Carter, L.; Riesselman, C.; Dunbar, R.; Sjunneskog, C.; Winter, D.; Sangiorgi, F.; Warren, C.; Pagani, M.; Schouten, S.; Willmot, V.; Levy, R.; DeConto, R.; Powell, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean on Late Pliocene global climate reconstructions has remained ambiguous due to a lack of well-dated Antarctic-proximal, paleoenvironmental records. Here we present ice sheet, sea-surface temperature, and sea ice reconstructions from the ANDRILL

  9. Euphausiid population structure and grazing in the Antarctic Polar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subsurface (200m) temperature profiles indicated that an intense frontal feature, formed by the convergence of the Subantarctic Front and the Antarctic Polar Front ... The daily ration estimates of autotrophic carbon for the euphausiids suggest that phytoplankton represent a minor component in their diets, with only the ...

  10. Freshwater invertebrates of sub-Antarctic Marion Island | Dartnall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antarctic Marion Island were examined for invertebrates. Sixty-eight species were found, including 45 new records for the Island. Of these 56 were bona fide aquatic invertebrates, the rest being terrestrial or brackish interlopers that had fallen or been ...

  11. During the British Antarctic Survey's Offshore Biological Programme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    During the British Antarctic Survey's Offshore. Biological Programme (latterly Pelagic Ecosystem. Studies Programme), two specimens of a cephalopod belonging to the squid family Chiroteuthidae were caught in the Scotia Sea by rectangular midwater trawl. (Baker et al. 1973). The material closely resembles. Chiroteuthis ...

  12. Epilithic macrolichen vegetation of the Argentine Islands, Antarctic Peninsula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gremmen, N.J.M.; Huiskes, A.H.L.; Francke, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    The population trend over the last decade for subantarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus tropicalis) on Amsterdam and St. Paul islands and on Possession Island (Crozet Archipelago) and Antarctic fur seals (A. gazella) on Possession Island are analysed. At Amsterdam Island, based on pup counts, the

  13. A multivariate analysis of Antarctic sea ice since 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes Neto, Newton de; Evangelista, Heitor [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Uerj), LARAMG - Laboratorio de Radioecologia e Mudancas Globais, Maracana, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tanizaki-Fonseca, Kenny [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Uerj), LARAMG - Laboratorio de Radioecologia e Mudancas Globais, Maracana, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Dept. Analise Geoambiental, Inst. de Geociencias, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Penello Meirelles, Margareth Simoes [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ)/Geomatica, Maracana, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, Carlos Eiras [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Laboratorio de Oceanografia Fisica, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Recent satellite observations have shown an increase in the total extent of Antarctic sea ice, during periods when the atmosphere and oceans tend to be warmer surrounding a significant part of the continent. Despite an increase in total sea ice, regional analyses depict negative trends in the Bellingshausen-Amundsen Sea and positive trends in the Ross Sea. Although several climate parameters are believed to drive the formation of Antarctic sea ice and the local atmosphere, a descriptive mechanism that could trigger such differences in trends are still unknown. In this study we employed a multivariate analysis in order to identify the response of the Antarctic sea ice with respect to commonly utilized climate forcings/parameters, as follows: (1) The global air surface temperature, (2) The global sea surface temperature, (3) The atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration, (4) The South Annular Mode, (5) The Nino 3, (6) The Nino (3 + 4, 7) The Nino 4, (8) The Southern Oscillation Index, (9) The Multivariate ENSO Index, (10) the Total Solar Irradiance, (11) The maximum O{sub 3} depletion area, and (12) The minimum O{sub 3} concentration over Antarctica. Our results indicate that western Antarctic sea ice is simultaneously impacted by several parameters; and that the minimum, mean, and maximum sea ice extent may respond to a separate set of climatic/geochemical parameters. (orig.)

  14. Atmospheric science: early peak in Antarctic oscillation index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julie M; Widmann, Martin

    2004-11-18

    The principal extratropical atmospheric circulation mode in the Southern Hemisphere, the Antarctic oscillation (or Southern Hemisphere annular mode), represents fluctuations in the strength of the circumpolar vortex and has shown a trend towards a positive index in austral summer in recent decades, which has been linked to stratospheric ozone depletion and to increased atmospheric greenhouse-gas concentrations. Here we reconstruct the austral summer (December-January) Antarctic oscillation index from sea-level pressure measurements over the twentieth century and find that large positive values, and positive trends of a similar magnitude to those of past decades, also occurred around 1960, and that strong negative trends occurred afterwards. This positive Antarctic oscillation index and large positive trend during a period before ozone-depleting chemicals were released into the atmosphere and before marked anthropogenic warming, together with the later negative trend, indicate that natural forcing factors or internal mechanisms in the climate system must also strongly influence the state of the Antarctic oscillation.

  15. On the interpretation of stable isotopes in Antarctic precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helsen, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Polar ice caps contain valuable information about the earth's climate. This thesis investigates the extent to which meteorological data are stored in the composition of snow in order to improve the interpretation of deep ice cores from the Antarctic ice cap. It is demonstrated that annual

  16. Conclusions: Multiple dimensions of human engagement with the Antarctic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liggett, D.; Lamers, M.A.J.; Tin, T.; Maher, P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The future scenarios developed by the contributors to this volume communicate a strong message. They concur that existing environmental management practices and the current system of governance are insufficient to meet the obligations set out under the Madrid Protocol to protect the Antarctic

  17. Terrestrial Ages of Antarctic Meteorites: Up Date 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.

    2000-01-01

    We are continuing our ongoing study of cosmogenic nuclides in Antarctic meteorites. In addition to the studies of exposure histories of meteorites, we study terrestrial ages and pairing of Antarctic meteorites and desert meteorites. Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites provide information on meteorite accumulation mechanisms, mean weathering lifetimes, and influx rates. The determination of Cl-36 (half-life=3.01 x 10(exp 5) y) terrestrial ages is one of our long-term on-going projects, however, in many instances neither Cl-36 or C-14 (5,730 y) yields an accurate terrestrial age. Using Ca-41 (1.04 x 10(exp 5) y) for terrestrial age determinations solves this problem by filling the gap in half-life between C-14 and Cl-36 ages. We are now applying the new Ca-41 - Cl-36 terrestrial age method as well as the Cl-36 - Be-10 method to Antarctic meteorites. Our measurements and C-14 terrestrial age determinations by the University of Arizona group are always complementary.

  18. Uncertainties in the Modelled CO2 Threshold for Antarctic Glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasson, E.; Lunt, D. J.; DeConto, R.; Goldner, A.; Heinemann, M.; Huber, M.; LeGrande, A. N.; Pollard, D.; Sagoo, N.; Siddall, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    frequently cited atmospheric CO2 threshold for the onset of Antarctic glaciation of approximately780 parts per million by volume is based on the study of DeConto and Pollard (2003) using an ice sheet model and the GENESIS climate model. Proxy records suggest that atmospheric CO2 concentrations passed through this threshold across the Eocene-Oligocene transition approximately 34 million years. However, atmospheric CO2 concentrations may have been close to this threshold earlier than this transition, which is used by some to suggest the possibility of Antarctic ice sheets during the Eocene. Here we investigate the climate model dependency of the threshold for Antarctic glaciation by performing offline ice sheet model simulations using the climate from 7 different climate models with Eocene boundary conditions (HadCM3L, CCSM3, CESM1.0, GENESIS, FAMOUS, ECHAM5 and GISS_ER). These climate simulations are sourced from a number of independent studies, and as such the boundary conditions, which are poorly constrained during the Eocene, are not identical between simulations. The results of this study suggest that the atmospheric CO2 threshold for Antarctic glaciation is highly dependent on the climate model used and the climate model configuration. A large discrepancy between the climate model and ice sheet model grids for some simulations leads to a strong sensitivity to the lapse rate parameter.

  19. Modeling the Thermal Interactions of Meteorites Below the Antarctic Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, William Jared; Radebaugh, Jani; Stephens, Denise C.; Lorenz, Ralph; Harvey, Ralph; Karner, James

    2017-10-01

    Meteorites with high specific gravities, such as irons, appear to be underrepresented in Antarctic collections over the last 40 years. This underrepresentation is in comparison with observed meteorite falls, which are believed to represent the actual population of meteorites striking Earth. Meteorites on the Antarctic ice sheet absorb solar flux, possibly leading to downward tunneling into the ice, though observations of this in action are very limited. This descent is counteracted by ice sheet flow supporting the meteorites coupled with ablation near mountain margins, which helps to force meteorites towards the surface. Meteorites that both absorb adequate thermal energy and are sufficiently dense may instead reach a shallow equilibrium depth as downward melting overcomes upward forces during the Antarctic summer. Using a pyronometer, we have measured the incoming solar flux at multiple depths in two deep field sites in Antarctica, the Miller Range and Elephant Moraine. We compare these data with laboratory analogues and model the thermal and physical interactions between a variety of meteorites and their surroundings. Our Matlab code model will account for a wide range of parameters used to characterize meteorites in an Antarctic environment. We will present the results of our model along with depth estimates for several types of meteorites. The recovery of an additional population of heavy meteorites would increase our knowledge of the formation and composition of the solar system.

  20. Dynamical modes associated with the Antarctic ozone hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Weare

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Generalized Maximum Covariance Analysis (GMCA has been developed and applied to diagnosing the dynamical modes associated with variations in the Antarctic spring ozone hole. GMCA is used to identify the most important patterns of co-variability between interannual ozone mixing ratio variations in the Antarctic region and temperature, zonal, meridional and vertical velocities between 100 and 10 hPa in the same region. The most important two pairs of GMCA time coefficients show large year-to-year variations and trends, which are connected with the growth of the Antarctic Ozone Hole and the increase of ozone depleting substances. The associated spatial patterns of ozone variations may be characterized as being quasi-symmetric and asymmetric about the pole. These patterns of ozone variations are associated with comparable patterns of variations of temperature and winds through most of the vertical domain.

    The year 2000 is shown to be dominated by the asymmetric mode, whereas the adjacent year 2001 is dominated by the quasi-symmetric mode. A case study, focusing on the asymmetric differences between these two years, shows the magnitude of the ozone mixing ratio, temperature and zonal wind differences to be in the range of 2 e–6 kg/kg, 10°C and 10 m/s, respectively. Budget calculations show that transport processes contribute substantially to the ozone and temperature changes in the middle stratosphere over the Antarctic continent. However, both radiative and chemical processes also play important roles in the changes.

  1. South African Antarctic research programme 1978-1982

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    SASCAR

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available This document provides a comprehensive review of the planned South African scientific activities in Antarctica and on the sub-Antarctic islands in the five year period starting in 1978. The scientific programmes are classified under five headings...

  2. Mucilaginibacter terrae sp nov., isolated from Antarctic soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, I.; Pantůček, R.; Králová, S.; Mašlaňová, I.; Holochová, P.; Staňková, E.; Sobotka, Roman; Barták, M.; Busse, H.-J.; Švec, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 10 (2017), s. 4002-4007 ISSN 1466-5026 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Mucilaginibacter terrae sp nov. * James ross island * Antarctic Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.134, year: 2016

  3. Estimates of numbers of kelp gulls and Kerguelen and Antarctic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four species are regular breeders at the islands: Subantarctic skua Catharacta antarctica, kelp gull Larus dominicanus, Antarctic tern Sterna vittata and Kerguelen tern S. virgata. The latter three species currently each have populations of below 150 breeding pairs at the islands. Kelp gull numbers appear to be relatively ...

  4. Emplacement of Antarctic ice sheet mass affects circumpolar ocean flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rugenstein, Maria; Stocchi, Paolo; von der Heydt, Anna; Dijkstra, Hendrik; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2014-01-01

    During the Cenozoic the Antarctic continent experienced large fluctuations in ice-sheet volume. We investigate the effects of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) on Southern Ocean circulation for the first continental scale glaciation of Antarctica (~34 Myr) by combining solid Earth and ocean dynamic

  5. Emplacement of Antarctic ice sheet mass affects circumpolar ocean flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rugenstein, M.; Stocchi, P.; van der Heydt, A.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2014-01-01

    During the Cenozoic the Antarctic continent experienced large fluctuations in ice-sheet volume. We investigate the effects of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) on Southern Ocean circulation for the first continental scale glaciation of Antarctica (~ 34 Myr) by combining solid Earth and ocean

  6. Molecular evolution of hemoglobins of Antarctic fishes (Notothenioidei)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, W.T.; Beintema, J.J; D Avino, R.; Tamburrini, M.; di Prisco, G.

    1997-01-01

    Amino acid sequences of alpha- and beta-chains of human hemoglobin and of hemoglobins of coelacanth and 24 teleost fish species, including 11 antarctic and two temperate Notothenioidei, were analyzed using maximum parsimony. Trees were derived for the alpha- and beta-chains separately and for

  7. Antarctic meteorology, a study with automatic weather stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmer, C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229345956

    2001-01-01

    This thesis chiefly addresses a) the use of Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) in determining the near-surface climate and heat budget of Antarctica and, specifically, Dronning Maud Land (DML), and b) the determination of source regions of Antarctic moisture with the aid of a trajectory model and an

  8. The Antarctic is a region where the largest human- induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Antarctic is a region where the largest human- induced perturbation of the marine ecosystem in the world has taken place. Since the beginning of the. 20th century, large baleen whale species were depleted sequentially, some almost to extinction (Fig. 1). Blue whales Balaenoptera musculus were harvested legally.

  9. Dating Antarctic ice sheet collapse: Proposing a molecular genetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugnell, Jan M.; Pedro, Joel B.; Wilson, Nerida G.

    2018-01-01

    Sea levels at the end of this century are projected to be 0.26-0.98 m higher than today. The upper end of this range, and even higher estimates, cannot be ruled out because of major uncertainties in the dynamic response of polar ice sheets to a warming climate. Here, we propose an ecological genetics approach that can provide insight into the past stability and configuration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). We propose independent testing of the hypothesis that a trans-Antarctic seaway occurred at the last interglacial. Examination of the genomic signatures of bottom-dwelling marine species using the latest methods can provide an independent window into the integrity of the WAIS more than 100,000 years ago. Periods of connectivity facilitated by trans-Antarctic seaways could be revealed by dating coalescent events recorded in DNA. These methods allow alternative scenarios to be tested against a fit to genomic data. Ideal candidate taxa for this work would need to possess a circumpolar distribution, a benthic habitat, and some level of genetic structure indicated by phylogeographical investigation. The purpose of this perspective piece is to set out an ecological genetics method to help resolve when the West Antarctic Ice Shelf last collapsed.

  10. Distribution of dissolved and particulate metals in Antarctic sea ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lannuzel, D.; Bowie, A.R.; van der Merwe, P.C.; Townsend, A.T.; Schoemann, V.

    2011-01-01

    Samples were collected in East Antarctic sea ice in late winter/early austral spring 2007 to assess the distributions of Al, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, Mo. Cd and Ba. Total dissolved (<02 mu m) and particulate (>0.2 mu m) concentrations were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Sector Field Mass Spectrometry

  11. Is vertical migration in Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) influenced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is a keystone species in the southern ocean ecosystem where it is the main consumer of phytoplankton and constitutes the main food item of many higher predators. Both food and predators are most abundant at the surface, thus krill hide in the depth of the ocean during the day and ...

  12. Metagenomic analysis of a Southern Maritime Antarctic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Anthony Pearce

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of Antarctic soils is derived from direct culture on selective media, biodiversity studies based on clone library construction and analysis, quantitative PCR amplification of specific gene sequences and the application of generic microarrays for microbial community analysis. Here, we investigated the biodiversity and functional potential of a soil community at Mars Oasis on Alexander Island in the southern Maritime Antarctic, by applying 454 pyrosequencing technology to a metagenomic library constructed from soil genomic DNA. The results suggest that the commonly cited range of phylotypes used in clone library construction and analysis of 78-730 OTUs (de-replicated to 30-140 provides low coverage of the major groups present (~5%. The vast majority of functional genes (>77% were for structure, carbohydrate metabolism and DNA/RNA processing and modification. This study suggests that prokaryotic diversity in Antarctic terrestrial environments appears to be limited at the generic level, with Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria being common. Cyanobacteria were surprisingly under-represented at 2.6% of sequences, although ~1% of the genes identified were involved in CO2 fixation. At the sequence level there appeared to be much greater heterogeneity, and this might be due to high divergence within the relatively restricted lineages which have successfully colonized Antarctic terrestrial environments.

  13. TEMPERATURE REQUIREMENTS AND BIOGEOGRAPHY OF ANTARCTIC, ARCTIC AND AMPHIEQUATORIAL SEAWEEDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIENCKE, C; BARTSCH, [No Value; BISCHOFF, B; PETERS, AF; BREEMAN, AM

    The temperature requirements for growth and survival of cold water seaweeds from both Hemispheres are compared and discussed in relation to the climatic history of the various regions and in relation to the origin of amphiequatorial distribution patterns. Endemic Antarctic species are most strongly

  14. Decadal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y.; Yung, Y. L.; Zurek, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    Ozone column amounts obtained by the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) in the southern polar region are analyzed during late austral winter and spring (days 240-300) for 1980-1991 using area-mapping techniques and area-weighted vortex averages. The vortex here is defined using the -50 PVU (1 PVU = 1.0 x 10(-6) K kg-1 m2 s-1) contour on the 500 K isentropic surface. The principal results are: (1) there is a distinct change after 1985 in the vortex-averaged column ozone depletion rate during September and October, the period of maximum ozone loss, and (2) the vortex-averaged column ozone in late August (day 240) has dropped by 70 Dobson units (DU) in a decade due to the loss in the dark and the dilution effect. The mean ozone depletion rate in the vortex between day 240 and the day of minimum vortex-averaged ozone is about 1 DU d-1 at the beginning of the decade, increasing to about 1.8 DU d-1 by 1985, and then apparently saturating thereafter. The vortex-average column ozone during September and October has declined at the rate of 11.3 DU yr-1 (3.8%) from 1980 to 1987 (90 DU over 8 years) and at a smaller rate of 2 DU yr-1 (0.9%) from 1987 to 1991 (10 DU over 5 years, excluding the anomalous year 1988). We interpret the year-to-year trend in the ozone depletion rate during the earlier part of the decade as due to the rise of anthropogenic chlorine in the atmosphere. The slower trend at the end of the decade indicates saturation of ozone depletion in the vortex interior, in that chlorine amounts in the mid-1980s were already sufficiently high to deplete most of the ozone in air within the isolated regions of the lower-stratospheric polar vortex. In subsequent years, increases in stratospheric chlorine may have enhanced wintertime chemical loss of ozone in the south polar vortex even before major losses during the Antarctic spring.

  15. EBSD in Antarctic and Greenland Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikusat, Ilka; Kuiper, Ernst-Jan; Pennock, Gill; Sepp, Kipfstuhl; Drury, Martyn

    2017-04-01

    boundaries. However, an almost equal number of tilt subgrain boundaries were measured, involving dislocations gliding on non-basal planes (prism or prism slip). A few subgrain boundaries involving prism edge dislocation glide, as well as boundaries involving basal twist dislocation slip, were also identified. The finding that subgrain boundaries built up by dislocations gliding on non-basal planes are as frequent as those originating from basal plane slip is surprising and has impact on the discussion on rate-controlling processes for the ice flow descriptions of large ice masses with respect to sea-level evolution. Weikusat, I.; Miyamoto, A.; Faria, S. H.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Azuma, N. & Hondoh, T.: Subgrain boundaries in Antarctic ice quantified by X-ray Laue diffraction J. Glaciol., 2011, 57, 85-94

  16. On the origin and evolution of Antarctic Peracarida (Crustacea, Malacostraca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Brandt

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The early separation of Gondwana and the subsequent isolation of Antarctica caused a long evolutionary history of its fauna. Both, long environmental stability over millions of years and habitat heterogeneity, due to an abundance of sessile suspension feeders on the continental shelf, favoured evolutionary processes of preadapted taxa, like for example the Peracarida. This taxon performs brood protection and this might be one of the most important reasons why it is very successful (i.e. abundant and diverse in most terrestrial and aquatic environments, with some species even occupying deserts. The extinction of many decapod crustaceans in the Cenozoic might have allowed the Peracarida to find and use free ecological niches. Therefore the palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatologic, and palaeo-hydrographic changes since the Palaeocene (at least since about 60 Ma ago and the evolutionary success of some peracarid taxa (e.g. Amphipoda, Isopoda led to the evolution of many endemic species in the Antarctic. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of the Antarctic Tanaidacea, Sieg (1988 demonstrated that the tanaid fauna of the Antarctic is mainly represented by phylogenetically younger taxa, and data from other crustacean taxa led Sieg (1988 to conclude that the recent Antarctic crustacean fauna must be comparatively young. His arguments are scrutinized on the basis of more recent data on the phylogeny and biodiversity of crustacean taxa, namely the Ostracoda, Decapoda, Mysidacea, Cumacea, Amphipoda, and Isopoda. This analysis demonstrates that the origin of the Antarctic fauna probably has different roots: an adaptive radiation of descendants from old Gondwanian ancestors was hypothesized for the isopod families Serolidae and Arcturidae, an evolution and radiation of phylogenetically old taxa in Antarctica could also be shown for the Ostracoda and the amphipod family Iphimediidae. A recolonization via the Scotia Arc appears possible for some species, though it is

  17. Features of the Functioning Bacterial Ecosystems in the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushev, A. V.; Churilin, N.; Soina, V. S.; Vorobyova, E. A.; Mergelov, N. S.

    2014-10-01

    Studies of bacterial communities in the samples of Antarctic soils by different methods showed that, both in liquid soil suspensions and in situ, microbial complexes are functioning presumably by forming biofilms -- the phenomenon that is more expressed in such habitat than in soils of temperate zones. Functional (trophic) diversity and physiological state of hydrolytic bacteria was studied in the samples at the upper layer (0-2 cm) of gravel pavement with algae, in the underlying peat horizon (2-4 cm) with inclusions of dead biomass and its underlying mineral horizon (4-10 cm) with signs of fungal mycelium. The investigated samples of Antarctic soils revealed different trophic diversity and the maximum specific growth rate on mineral medium with different biopolymers as the sole carbon source (starch, chitin, pectin, xylan, dextran-500, tween-20, casein); this can testify to differences in the physiological state of hydrolytic bacteria in various soil horizons and their readiness for growth. The most remarkable characteristics of the studied Antarctic soil as compared to the soils of temperate zone, was the unusual ability of hydrolytic community to consume chitin in the mineral horizon; this can be explained by the presence of fungal mycelium. Also, an almost complete lack in consumption of tween-20 (a water-soluble analogue of fat) by bacterial community of Arctic soil horizons are not explained and needs further verification. The higher functional diversity was detected in the upper horizon of the gravel pavement, which "protects" microorganisms from exposure to extreme temperatures, UV radiation, and desiccation, but the maximum specific growth rate was higher in the lower mineral horizon; this can be explained by the specificity of bacterial colonizing processes and unique formation of Antarctic soil microprofiles in the Larsemann oasis. The obtained data indicate a specific environmental strategy in the samples of Antarctic soils: development in lower

  18. Study Of Functioning of Bacterial Complexes in East Antarctic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushev, A. V.; Churilin, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Studies of bacterial communities in the samples of Antarctic soils by different methods showed that, both in liquid soil suspensions and in situ, microbial complexes are functioning presumably by forming biofilms - the phenomenon that is more expressed in such habitat than in soils of temperate zones. Functional (trophic) diversity and physiological state of hydrolytic bacteria was studied in the samples at the upper layer (0-2 cm) of gravel pavement with algae, in the underlying peat horizon (2-4 cm) with inclusions of dead biomass and its underlying mineral horizon (4-10 cm) with signs of fungal mycelium. The investigated samples of Antarctic soils revealed different trophic diversity and the maximum specific growth rate on mineral medium with different biopolymers as the sole carbon source (starch, chitin, pectin, xylan, dextran-500, tween-20, casein); this can testify to differences in the physiological state of hydrolytic bacteria in various soil horizons and their readiness for growth. The most remarkable characteristics of the studied Antarctic soil as compared to the soils of temperate zone, was the unusual ability of hydrolytic community to consume chitin in the mineral horizon; this can be explained by the presence of fungal mycelium. Also, an almost complete lack in consumption of tween-20 (a water-soluble analogue of fat) by bacterial community of Arctic soil horizons are not explained and needs further verification. The higher functional diversity was detected in the upper horizon of the gravel pavement, which "protects" microorganisms from exposure to extreme temperatures, UV radiation, and desiccation, but the maximum specific growth rate was higher in the lower mineral horizon; this can be explained by the specificity of bacterial colonizing processes and unique formation of Antarctic soil microprofiles in the Larsemann oasis. The obtained data indicate a specific environmental strategy in the samples of Antarctic soils: development in lower mineral

  19. Climate change and trophic response of the Antarctic bottom fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Richard B; Moody, Ryan M; Ivany, Linda C; Blake, Daniel B; Werner, John E; Glass, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    As Earth warms, temperate and subpolar marine species will increasingly shift their geographic ranges poleward. The endemic shelf fauna of Antarctica is especially vulnerable to climate-mediated biological invasions because cold temperatures currently exclude the durophagous (shell-breaking) predators that structure shallow-benthic communities elsewhere. We used the Eocene fossil record from Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, to project specifically how global warming will reorganize the nearshore benthos of Antarctica. A long-term cooling trend, which began with a sharp temperature drop approximately 41 Ma (million years ago), eliminated durophagous predators-teleosts (modern bony fish), decapod crustaceans (crabs and lobsters) and almost all neoselachian elasmobranchs (modern sharks and rays)-from Antarctic nearshore waters after the Eocene. Even prior to those extinctions, durophagous predators became less active as coastal sea temperatures declined from 41 Ma to the end of the Eocene, approximately 33.5 Ma. In response, dense populations of suspension-feeding ophiuroids and crinoids abruptly appeared. Dense aggregations of brachiopods transcended the cooling event with no apparent change in predation pressure, nor were there changes in the frequency of shell-drilling predation on venerid bivalves. Rapid warming in the Southern Ocean is now removing the physiological barriers to shell-breaking predators, and crabs are returning to the Antarctic Peninsula. Over the coming decades to centuries, we predict a rapid reversal of the Eocene trends. Increasing predation will reduce or eliminate extant dense populations of suspension-feeding echinoderms from nearshore habitats along the Peninsula while brachiopods will continue to form large populations, and the intensity of shell-drilling predation on infaunal bivalves will not change appreciably. In time the ecological effects of global warming could spread to other portions of the Antarctic coast. The differential

  20. Regional Antarctic snow accumulation over the past 1000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we present Antarctic snow accumulation variability at the regional scale over the past 1000 years. A total of 79 ice core snow accumulation records were gathered and assigned to seven geographical regions, separating the high-accumulation coastal zones below 2000 m of elevation from the dry central Antarctic Plateau. The regional composites of annual snow accumulation were evaluated against modelled surface mass balance (SMB from RACMO2.3p2 and precipitation from ERA-Interim reanalysis. With the exception of the Weddell Sea coast, the low-elevation composites capture the regional precipitation and SMB variability as defined by the models. The central Antarctic sites lack coherency and either do not represent regional precipitation or indicate the model inability to capture relevant precipitation processes in the cold, dry central plateau. Our results show that SMB for the total Antarctic Ice Sheet (including ice shelves has increased at a rate of 7 ± 0.13 Gt decade−1 since 1800 AD, representing a net reduction in sea level of ∼ 0.02 mm decade−1 since 1800 and ∼ 0.04 mm decade−1 since 1900 AD. The largest contribution is from the Antarctic Peninsula (∼ 75 % where the annual average SMB during the most recent decade (2001–2010 is 123 ± 44 Gt yr−1 higher than the annual average during the first decade of the 19th century. Only four ice core records cover the full 1000 years, and they suggest a decrease in snow accumulation during this period. However, our study emphasizes the importance of low-elevation coastal zones, which have been under-represented in previous investigations of temporal snow accumulation.

  1. Fundamental differences between Arctic and Antarctic ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Susan; Haskins, Jessica; Ivy, Diane J; Min, Flora

    2014-04-29

    Antarctic ozone depletion is associated with enhanced chlorine from anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry under cold conditions. The deep Antarctic "hole" contrasts with the generally weaker depletions observed in the warmer Arctic. An unusually cold Arctic stratospheric season occurred in 2011, raising the question of how the Arctic ozone chemistry in that year compares with others. We show that the averaged depletions near 20 km across the cold part of each pole are deeper in Antarctica than in the Arctic for all years, although 2011 Arctic values do rival those seen in less-depleted years in Antarctica. We focus not only on averages but also on extremes, to address whether or not Arctic ozone depletion can be as extreme as that observed in the Antarctic. This information provides unique insights into the contrasts between Arctic and Antarctic ozone chemistry. We show that extreme Antarctic ozone minima fall to or below 0.1 parts per million by volume (ppmv) at 18 and 20 km (about 70 and 50 mbar) whereas the lowest Arctic ozone values are about 0.5 ppmv at these altitudes. At a higher altitude of 24 km (30-mbar level), no Arctic data below about 2 ppmv have been observed, including in 2011, in contrast to values more than an order of magnitude lower in Antarctica. The data show that the lowest ozone values are associated with temperatures below -80 °C to -85 °C depending upon altitude, and are closely associated with reduced gaseous nitric acid concentrations due to uptake and/or sedimentation in polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  2. Climate change and trophic response of the Antarctic bottom fauna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B Aronson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As Earth warms, temperate and subpolar marine species will increasingly shift their geographic ranges poleward. The endemic shelf fauna of Antarctica is especially vulnerable to climate-mediated biological invasions because cold temperatures currently exclude the durophagous (shell-breaking predators that structure shallow-benthic communities elsewhere. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the Eocene fossil record from Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, to project specifically how global warming will reorganize the nearshore benthos of Antarctica. A long-term cooling trend, which began with a sharp temperature drop approximately 41 Ma (million years ago, eliminated durophagous predators-teleosts (modern bony fish, decapod crustaceans (crabs and lobsters and almost all neoselachian elasmobranchs (modern sharks and rays-from Antarctic nearshore waters after the Eocene. Even prior to those extinctions, durophagous predators became less active as coastal sea temperatures declined from 41 Ma to the end of the Eocene, approximately 33.5 Ma. In response, dense populations of suspension-feeding ophiuroids and crinoids abruptly appeared. Dense aggregations of brachiopods transcended the cooling event with no apparent change in predation pressure, nor were there changes in the frequency of shell-drilling predation on venerid bivalves. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rapid warming in the Southern Ocean is now removing the physiological barriers to shell-breaking predators, and crabs are returning to the Antarctic Peninsula. Over the coming decades to centuries, we predict a rapid reversal of the Eocene trends. Increasing predation will reduce or eliminate extant dense populations of suspension-feeding echinoderms from nearshore habitats along the Peninsula while brachiopods will continue to form large populations, and the intensity of shell-drilling predation on infaunal bivalves will not change appreciably. In time the ecological effects of

  3. Subglacial conditions and Scandinavian Ice Sheet dynamics at the coarse-grained substratum of the fore-mountain area of southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Tomasz

    2016-11-01

    The fore-mountain areas of southern Poland are locally composed of the coarse-grained sediments of alluvial fans, which created unusual conditions under the advancing Scandinavian Ice Sheet during the Elsterian glaciation. This highly permeable substratum potentially enabled rapid outflow of meltwater from the ice sheet base, thereby reducing the water pressure and strongly influencing the ice sheet dynamics.