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Sample records for subepicardial fiber strain

  1. Alteration in subendocardial and subepicardial myocardial strain in patients with aortic valve stenosis: an early marker of left ventricular dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Eiichi; Arai, Kotaro; Koczo, Agnes; Shimada, Yuichi J; Fujimoto, Kohei; Di Tullio, Marco R; Homma, Shunichi; Gillam, Linda D; Hahn, Rebecca T

    2012-02-01

    It has been suggested that myocardial systolic impairment may not be accurately detected by the evaluation of endocardial excursion alone. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that changes in left ventricular (LV) subendocardial and subepicardial strain are sensitive markers of severity of aortic stenosis (AS) and LV function in patients with AS. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed in 73 consecutive patients with AS who had preserved systolic function and in 20 controls. Longitudinal strain, subendocardial radial strain, subepicardial radial strain, and transmural radial strain were measured using LV apical and short-axis images. The 73 patients enrolled in this study were classified according to AS severity: mild (n = 10), moderate (n = 15), or severe (n = 48). Although transmural and subepicardial radial strain showed similar values in all groups, subendocardial radial strain and longitudinal strain could differentiate mild or moderate AS from severe AS. Only the ratio of subendocardial to subepicardial radial strain (the bilayer ratio) decreased significantly as the severity of AS increased. Bilayer ratio showed weak correlations with LV ejection fraction (r = 0.37) and E/E' ratio (r = -0.33) and moderate correlations with LV mass (r = -0.55) and aortic valve area (r = 0.71). Moreover, bilayer ratio was independently associated with AS severity (P = .001). In 21 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement, subendocardial radial strain and bilayer ratio increased 7 days after surgery, whereas other echocardiographic parameters of LV function showed no improvement. Bilayer ratio can reliably differentiate patients with varying degrees of AS severity and is a sensitive marker of LV function. These findings suggest that the evaluation of subendocardial and subepicardial radial strain might be a novel method for assessing LV mechanics in patients with AS. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  2. Heterogeneous onset of myocardial relaxation in subendocardial and subepicardial layers assessed with tissue strain imaging: comparison of normal and hypertrophied myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takuya; Nakatani, Satoshi; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Abe, Haruhiko; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2009-06-01

    We sought to investigate the existence of a time difference in myocardial relaxation between the subendocardium and subepicardium in patients with and without myocardial hypertrophy. Regional differences in mechanical and electrical properties between the subendocardium and subepicardium have been described for the left ventricle in animals. However, this difference has not been well evaluated in clinical conditions. Time-to-peak radial strain with reference to the QRS complex was measured at the subendocardium and subepicardium at the mid-posterior wall of the left ventricle in 12 normal subjects, 14 patients with hypertensive heart disease, and 27 patients with aortic stenosis (16 with and 11 without strain electrocardiogram [ECG] pattern) using tissue Doppler-based strain imaging. Time-to-peak radial strain in the subepicardium (381 +/- 60 ms) was shorter than that in the subendocardium (463 +/- 29 ms; p subendocardial relaxation. No significant difference was found between normal subjects and patients with hypertensive heart disease (388 +/- 67 ms for the subepicardium; 455 +/- 36 ms for the subendocardium in hypertensive heart disease). In cases with hypertrophied myocardium due to aortic stenosis, time-to-peak radial strain in the subendocardium was shortened and that in the subepicardium was prolonged. In 10 (63%) of 16 patients with aortic stenosis and strain ECG pattern, the timing of peak strain in the subendocardium (417 +/- 63 ms) preceded that in the subepicardium (452 +/- 62 ms). There is heterogeneous onset of myocardial relaxation in the subendocardial and subepicardial layers at the mid-posterior wall of the left ventricle. Subepicardial myocardial relaxation precedes subendocardial relaxation in normal subjects. In contrast, there is inversion of the transmural sequence of myocardial relaxation between the subendocardium and subepicardium in some patients with aortic stenosis and strain ECG pattern.

  3. Thermal strain analysis of optic fiber sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Ying

    2013-01-31

    An optical fiber sensor surface bonded onto a host structure and subjected to a temperature change is analytically studied in this work. The analysis is developed in order to assess the thermal behavior of an optical fiber sensor designed for measuring the strain in the host structure. For a surface bonded optical fiber sensor, the measuring sensitivity is strongly dependent on the bonding characteristics which include the protective coating, adhesive layer and the bonding length. Thermal stresses can be generated due to a mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure. The optical fiber thermal strain induced by the host structure is transferred via the adhesive layer and protective coating. In this investigation, an analytical expression of the thermal strain and stress in the optical fiber is presented. The theoretical predictions are validated using the finite element method. Numerical results show that the thermal strain and stress are linearly dependent on the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure and independent of the thermal expansion coefficients of the adhesive and coating.

  4. Thermal Strain Analysis of Optic Fiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ying Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An optical fiber sensor surface bonded onto a host structure and subjected to a temperature change is analytically studied in this work. The analysis is developed in order to assess the thermal behavior of an optical fiber sensor designed for measuring the strain in the host structure. For a surface bonded optical fiber sensor, the measuring sensitivity is strongly dependent on the bonding characteristics which include the protective coating, adhesive layer and the bonding length. Thermal stresses can be generated due to a mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure. The optical fiber thermal strain induced by the host structure is transferred via the adhesive layer and protective coating. In this investigation, an analytical expression of the thermal strain and stress in the optical fiber is presented. The theoretical predictions are validated using the finite element method. Numerical results show that the thermal strain and stress are linearly dependent on the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure and independent of the thermal expansion coefficients of the adhesive and coating.

  5. Fiber-Optic Strain Sensors With Linear Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    Fiber-optic modal domain strain sensors having linear characteristics over wide range of strains proposed. Conceived in effort to improve older fiber-optic strain sensors. Linearity obtained by appropriate choice of design parameters. Pattern of light and dark areas at output end of optical fiber produced by interference between electromagnetic modes in which laser beam propagates in fiber. Photodetector monitors intensity at one point in pattern.

  6. Optical fiber strain sensor using fiber resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ping; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    A novel (to our best knowledge) optical fiber strain sensor using a fiber ring resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. A passively mode-locked optical fiber laser is employed to generate a phased-locked frequency comb. Strain applied to the optical fiber...

  7. Transversely loaded fiber optic grating strain sensors for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric; Schulz, Whitten L.; Seim, John M.; Trego, Angela; Haugse, Eric D.; Johnson, Patrick E.

    2000-05-01

    Most fiber grating sensor technology that has been developed to support strain sensing involves the measurement of axial strain. Fiber grating sensors are however capable of monitoring transverse as well as axial strain. This paper reviews a series of applications of this technology that are of particular interest to aerospace applications.

  8. Long term strain behavior of PMMA based polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundalo, Ivan-Lazar; Nielsen, Kristian; Woyessa, Getinet

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting on the viscoelasticity of PMMA based Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) strain sensors when exposed to repeated sequences of long term strain and relaxation with various duty-cycles. In terms of the FBG wavelength and how it follows the strain cycle, we have shown that in the small strain...... duration, for the same relaxation time, this range will be shortened, which might influence the sensing capabilities of the fiber sensor....

  9. Photonic Crystal Fiber Sensors for Strain and Temperature Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Ju; Wei Jin

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the applications of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) for strain and temperature measurement. Long-period grating sensors and in-fiber modal interferometric sensors are described and compared with their conventional single-mode counterparts. The strain sensitivities of the air-silica PCF sensors are comparable or higher than those implemented in conventional single-mode fibers but the temperature sensitivities of the PCF sensors are much lower.

  10. Photonic Crystal Fiber Sensors for Strain and Temperature Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ju

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the applications of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs for strain and temperature measurement. Long-period grating sensors and in-fiber modal interferometric sensors are described and compared with their conventional single-mode counterparts. The strain sensitivities of the air-silica PCF sensors are comparable or higher than those implemented in conventional single-mode fibers but the temperature sensitivities of the PCF sensors are much lower.

  11. Nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor based on four-wave mixing in microstructured optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Scott Wu; Frosz, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor, which uses the shifts of four-wave mixing Stokes and anti-Stokes peaks caused by the strain-induced changes in the structure and refractive index of a microstructured optical fiber. The sensor thus uses the inherent nonlinearity of the fiber...... and does not require any advanced post-processing of the fiber. Strain sensitivity of -0.23 pm/mu epsilon is achieved experimentally and numerical simulations reveal that for the present fiber the sensitivity can be increased to -4.46 pm/mu epsilon by optimizing the pump wavelength and power....

  12. Nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor based on four-wave mixing in microstructured optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Wu; Frosz, Michael H; Zhang, A Ping; He, Sailing; Bang, Ole

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor, which uses the shifts of four-wave mixing Stokes and anti-Stokes peaks caused by the strain-induced changes in the structure and refractive index of a microstructured optical fiber. The sensor thus uses the inherent nonlinearity of the fiber and does not require any advanced postprocessing of the fiber. Strain sensitivity of -0.23 pm/με is achieved experimentally and numerical simulations reveal that for the present fiber the sensitivity can be increased to -4.46 pm/με by optimizing the pump wavelength and power. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  13. Optical Fiber Strain Instrumentation for High Temperature Aerospace Structural Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the program is the development and laboratory demonstration of sensors based on silica optical fibers for measurement of high temperature strain for aerospace materials evaluations. A complete fiber strain sensor system based on white-light interferometry was designed and implemented. An experiment set-up was constructed to permit testing of strain measurement up to 850 C. The strain is created by bending an alumina cantilever beam to which is the fiber sensor is attached. The strain calibration is provided by the application of known beam deflections. To ensure the high temperature operation capability of the sensor, gold-coated single-mode fiber is used. Moreover, a new method of sensor surface attachment which permits accurate sensor gage length determination is also developed. Excellent results were obtained at temperatures up to 800-850 C.

  14. Fiber gratings strain sensor systems for composites and adhesive joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Ingrid; Udd, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and other fiber optic based sensors have been used to sense environmental parameters for numerous applications including aerospace, oil and gas, civil structure health monitoring, mining, and medical. There are many benefits to using fiber optic based sensors over traditional electrical sensing methods. These advantages include: immunity to electromagnetic interference, high bandwidth, low loss, small, lightweight, and portability. New developments allow these physical measurements such as strain, temperature, pressure, vibration, and acoustics to be made at extremely fast speeds extending the capability of fiber optic sensor systems to monitor impacts and other rapid events.

  15. Optical fiber sensors for measurement strain and vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikel, Bretislav; Helan, Radek; Buchta, Zdenek; Holík, Milan; Jelinek, Michal; Cip, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    We present optical fiber sensors to measurement strain and vibration. The sensors are based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBG). We prepared construction of strain sensors with respect to its implementation on the outer surface of concrete structures and with compensation of potential temperature drifts. These sensors are projected with look forward to maximal elongation and strength which can be applied to the sensor. Each sensor contains two optical fibers with FBGs. One FBG is glued into the sensor in points of fixation which are in the line with mounting holes. This FBG is prestressed to half of measurement range, than the stretching and pressing can be measured simultaneously by one FBG. The second FBG is placed inside the sensor without fixation to measure temperature drifts. The sensor can be used to structure health monitoring. The sensors to measurement vibration are based on tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) with fiber taper. The sensor uses the TFBG as a cladding modes reflector and fiber taper as a bend-sensitive recoupling member. The lower cladding modes (ghost), reflected from TFBG, is recoupled back into the fiber core via tapered fiber section. We focused on optimization of TFBG tilt angle to reach maximum reflection of the ghost and taper parameters. In this article we present complete set-up, optical and mechanical parameters of both types of sensors.

  16. Transmural Differences in Mechanical Properties of Isolated Subendocardial and Subepicardial Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, A D; Iribe, G

    2016-11-01

    We studied the differences in twitch force of subendocardial and subepicardial cardiomyocytes isolated from mouse left ventricular wall at different preloads using an original single cell stretch method recently developed by us. Then, we used our mathematical models of subendocardial and subepicardial cells to predict underlying cellular mechanisms. Transmural differences in the amplitudes of active tension of subendocardial and subepicardial cardiomyocytes were revealed that could be related to the differences in cooperative end-to-end interaction between the neighboring regulatory units of the thin filament.

  17. Testing of fiber composites at high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine strain rate effects in fiber composites. Unidirectional composite specimens of boron/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy were tested at tensile strain rates of up to 27 m/m/sec. Longitudinal, transverse and in-plane shear properties, including modulus, Poisson's ratio, strength and ultimate strain, were determined by testing 0-, 90and 10-degree unidirectional coupons. Strains were measured by means of strain gages bonded on the coupons and loads were measured by means of a strain gage load cell. All specimens were loaded in an electrohydraulic loading system. The 0-degree properties which are governed by the fibers do not vary much with strain rate except for the Kevlar/epoxy material which shows an increase in both modulus and strength. The strain rate effects on 90-degree properties were small with a general trend toward higher strength with increasing strain rate. The most noticeable effect was on in-plane shear properties with shear strength values at high strain rates approximately fifteen percent higher than static values.

  18. Hybrid fiber optic interferometers for temperature and strain measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianyin; Quan, Wenwen; Shao, Laipeng; Lu, Hanglin; Du, Jing; Hu, Junhui

    2017-10-01

    The hybrid fiber optic interferometers are proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In our schemes, the hybrid fiber optic interferometers are constructed by single mode-multimode-polarization maintaining-single mode optical fiber (SMPS) structure and a Sagnac loop. The temperature and strain characteristics of the hybrid interferometers are studied in experiment, and the sensitivities depending on the length of polarization maintaining optical fiber (PMF) and multimode optical fiber (MMF) are detailedly investigated in experiment. The experimental results have demonstrated that the PMF and MMF lengths have low affect on the strain sensitivity but has great influence on the temperature sensitivity. The achieved strain sensitivity is 37.2pm/μɛ for 10cm PMF and 12cm MMF. The achieved strain sensitivity is 38.0pm/μɛ for 12cm PMF when the length of MMF is fixed at 15cm, and is 37.2 pm/μɛ for 12cm MMF when the length of PMF is fixed at 10cm. The obtained temperature sensitivities is 1.723nm/°C when the length of MPF is 8cm with the fixed length of 15cm MMF, and the obtained temperature sensitivities reach 1.848nm/℃when the length of MMF is 12cm with the fixed length of 10cm PMF.

  19. High sensitivity optical fiber strain sensor using twisted multimode fiber based on SMS structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Liu, Deming; Lu, Ping; Sun, Qizhen; Yang, Wei; Wang, Shun; Liu, Li; Ni, Wenjun

    2017-12-01

    A low-cost way of achieving a high sensitivity optical fiber strain sensor by introducing higher-order interference modes using a torsional multimode fiber (MMF) instead of normal MMF based on single-mode-multimode-single-mode (SMS) structure is proposed and the coupling mechanism of twist fiber is investigated theoretically. The sensor is fabricated by simple process of heating and twisting a small region of MMF. According to this method, the shift of multimode interference spectrum caused by an axial strain will be greatly magnified. Different strain sensitivities can be easily realized by controlling the torsional number of circles. The experimental results indicated a high strain sensitivity of 42.5 pm/ με at most.

  20. Left ventricular rotational mechanics in patients with coronary artery disease: differences in subendocardial and subepicardial layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Matteo; Delgado, Victoria; Nucifora, Gaetano; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Ng, Arnold C T; Shanks, Miriam; Antoni, M Louisa; van de Veire, Nico R L; van Bommel, Rutger J; Rapezzi, Claudio; Schalij, Martin J; Bax, Jeroen J

    2010-11-01

    Subendocardial and subepicardial layers have opposite orientation of the myofibres and they are differently affected by coronary artery disease. This study investigated the differences in subendocardial and subepicardial left ventricular (LV) twist in patients with coronary artery disease. 214 patients were included in the study: 60 with first ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), 111 with chronic ischaemic heart failure (HF) and 43 normal subjects. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography provided LV volumes and function. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography differentiating the subendocardial and subepicardial layers was used for the assessment of LV twist. Patients with STEMI were divided into two groups (small and large STEMI). Compared with normal subjects, peak subendocardial LV twist was significantly impaired in patients with STEMI (11.2 ± 6.0° vs 15.3 ± 2.7°, psubendocardial LV twist was even more impaired (4.6 ± 3.4°, psubendocardial LV twist was not statistically different between large and small STEMI, whereas peak subepicardial LV twist was significantly lower in large STEMI than in small STEMI (7.1 ± 4.8° vs 9.6 ± 3.6°, p=0.025). Subendocardial LV twist is reduced in patients with STEMI and chronic ischaemic HF whereas subepicardial LV twist is reduced only in chronic ischaemic HF. When STEMI are divided into large and small infarctions, it becomes evident that subepicardial LV twist is only reduced in large infarctions.

  1. Stress-Strain Curves for High-Performance Fiber Reinforced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) is increasingly being used day by day as a structural material for various applications. The complete stress-strain curve of this material in compression is needed for the analysis and design of structural elements. An experimental investigation was carried out to generate the complete ...

  2. Strain-based multicore fiber optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökbulut, Belkıs.; Inci, Mehmet Naci

    2017-05-01

    A four-core optical fiber is introduced as a strain based temperature sensor to investigate the phase shift based on the temperature variations. An interferometric fringe pattern is obtained by the coherent waveguides from the four cores. A small piece of a four-core fiber is winded around a solid stainless steel cylinder to form a tight circular loop, which is exposed to a temperature change from 50 °C to 92 °C. Shear strain due to the expansion of the steel rod at this temperature interval causes an optical path length difference between the inner and outer core pairs, resulting a total phase shift of 20.4+/-0.29 rad, which is monitored with a CMOS camera. Using the phase changes, two dimensional shear strain is determined.

  3. Tensile strain and temperature characterization of FBGs in preannealed Polymer Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Andresen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Our thermal and tensile strain experiments show that fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in preannealed polymer optical fibers (POFs) can offer more stable performance and extend the operating temperature and strain range without hysteresis.......Our thermal and tensile strain experiments show that fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in preannealed polymer optical fibers (POFs) can offer more stable performance and extend the operating temperature and strain range without hysteresis....

  4. Multi-fiber strains measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy: Principles and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhenkun; Wang, Yunfeng; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei; Bai, Ruixiang; Chen, Xiaogang

    2016-02-01

    Based on widely used axial strain measurement method of Kevlar single fiber, an original theoretical model and measurement principle of application of micro-Raman spectroscopy to multi-fiber strains in a fiber bundle were established. The relationship between the nominal Raman shift of fiber bundle and the multi-fiber strains was deduced. The proposed principle for multi-fiber strains measurement is consistent with two special cases: single fiber deformation and multi-fiber deformation under equal strain. It is found experimentally that the distribution of Raman scattering intensity of a Kevlar 49 fiber as a function of distance between a fiber and the laser spot center follows a Gaussian function. Combining the Raman-shift/strain relationship of the Kevlar 49 single fiber and the uniaxial tension measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy, the Raman shift as a function of strain was obtained. Then the Raman peak at 1610 cm-1 for the Kevlar 49 fiber was fitted to a Lorentzian function and the FWHM showed a quadratic increase with the fiber strain. Finally, a dual-fiber tensile experiment was performed to verify the adequacy of the Raman technique for the measurement of multi-fiber strains.

  5. Fiber Optic Strain Sensor for Planetary Gear Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiddy, Jason S.; Lewicki, David G.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Ehinger, Ryan T.; Fetty, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new sensing approach for helicopter damage detection in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission based on a fiber optic strain sensor array. Complete helicopter transmission damage detection has proven itself a difficult task due to the complex geometry of the planetary reduction stage. The crowded and complex nature of the gearbox interior does not allow for attachment of sensors within the rotating frame. Hence, traditional vibration-based diagnostics are instead based on measurements from externally mounted sensors, typically accelerometers, fixed to the gearbox exterior. However, this type of sensor is susceptible to a number of external disturbances that can corrupt the data, leading to false positives or missed detection of potentially catastrophic faults. Fiber optic strain sensors represent an appealing alternative to the accelerometer. Their small size and multiplexibility allows for potentially greater sensing resolution and accuracy, as well as redundancy, when employed as an array of sensors. The work presented in this paper is focused on the detection of gear damage in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission using a fiber optic strain sensor band. The sensor band includes an array of 13 strain sensors, and is mounted on the ring gear of a Bell Helicopter OH-58C transmission. Data collected from the sensor array is compared to accelerometer data, and the damage detection results are presented

  6. High spatial resolution distributed optical fiber dynamic strain sensor with enhanced frequency and strain resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P

    2017-01-15

    A distributed optical fiber dynamic strain sensor with high spatial and frequency resolution is demonstrated. The sensor, which uses the ϕ-OTDR interrogation technique, exhibited a higher sensitivity thanks to an improved optical arrangement and a new signal processing procedure. The proposed sensing system is capable of fully quantifying multiple dynamic perturbations along a 5 km long sensing fiber with a frequency and spatial resolution of 5 Hz and 50 cm, respectively. The strain resolution of the sensor was measured to be 40 nε.

  7. Effect of Coating on the Strain Transfer of Optical Fiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ying Huang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical fiber strain sensors with light weight, small dimensions and immunity to electromagnetic interference are widely used in structural health monitoring devices. As a sensor, it is expected that the strains between the optical fiber and host structure are the same. However, due to the shear deformation of the protective coating, the optical fiber strain is different from that of host structure. To improve the measurement accuracy, the strain measured by the optical fiber needs to be modified to reflect the influence of the coating. In this investigation, a theoretical model of the strain transferred from the host material to the optical fiber is developed to evaluate the interaction between the host material and coating. The theoretical predictions are validated with a numerical analysis using the finite element method. Experimental tests are performed to reveal the differential strains between the optical fiber strain sensor and test specimen. The Mach-Zehnder interferometric type fiber-optic sensor is adopted to measure the strain. Experimental results show that the strain measured at the optical fiber is lower than the true strain in the test specimen. The percentage of strain in the test specimen actually transferred to the optical fiber is dependent on the bonded length of the optical fiber and the protective coating. The general trend of the strain transformation obtained from both experimental tests and theoretical predictions shows that the longer the bonded length and the stiffer the coating the more strain is transferred to the optical fiber.

  8. Effect of coating on the strain transfer of optical fiber sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Optical fiber strain sensors with light weight, small dimensions and immunity to electromagnetic interference are widely used in structural health monitoring devices. As a sensor, it is expected that the strains between the optical fiber and host structure are the same. However, due to the shear deformation of the protective coating, the optical fiber strain is different from that of host structure. To improve the measurement accuracy, the strain measured by the optical fiber needs to be modified to reflect the influence of the coating. In this investigation, a theoretical model of the strain transferred from the host material to the optical fiber is developed to evaluate the interaction between the host material and coating. The theoretical predictions are validated with a numerical analysis using the finite element method. Experimental tests are performed to reveal the differential strains between the optical fiber strain sensor and test specimen. The Mach-Zehnder interferometric type fiber-optic sensor is adopted to measure the strain. Experimental results show that the strain measured at the optical fiber is lower than the true strain in the test specimen. The percentage of strain in the test specimen actually transferred to the optical fiber is dependent on the bonded length of the optical fiber and the protective coating. The general trend of the strain transformation obtained from both experimental tests and theoretical predictions shows that the longer the bonded length and the stiffer the coating the more strain is transferred to the optical fiber.

  9. Tunable Polymer Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) Inscription: Fabrication of Dual-FBG Temperature Compensated Polymer Optical Fiber Strain Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate stable wavelength tunable inscription of polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). By straining the fiber during FBG inscription, we linearly tune the center wavelength over 7 nm with less than 1% strain. Above 1% strain, the tuning curve saturates and we show a maximum tuning o...... of 12 nm with 2.25% strain. We use this inscription method to fabricate a dual-FBG strain sensor in a poly (methyl methacrylate) single-mode microstructured polymer optical fiber and demonstrate temperature compensated strain sensing around 850 nm....

  10. Strain measurements of a fiber loop rosette using high spatial resolution Rayleigh scatter distributed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Dawn K.; Sang, Alex K.; Kreger, Steven T.; Froggatt, Mark E.

    2010-09-01

    Strain is measured with high spatial resolution on fiber loops bonded to a metal test sample to form a fiber rosette. Strain measurements are made using an Optical Backscatter Reflectometer to detect changes in the phase of the Rayleigh Scatter of the fiber with 160 μm spatial resolution along the length of the fiber. Using this experimental set-up, applied strain levels as well as the axis along which the loads are applied are measured. Thermal gradients are also detected. The high spatial resolution and strain sensitivity of this technique enable highly functional fiber rosettes formed of small diameter loops of standard low-bend-loss optical fiber.

  11. Evaluation of subendocardial and subepicardial left ventricular functions using tissue Doppler imaging after complete revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sürücü, Hüseyin; Tatli, Ersan; Okudan, Selnur; Aktoz, Meryem

    2009-02-01

    We aim to evaluate subepicardial and subendocardial left ventricular (LV) functions in patient single coronary artery lesion at early stage after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Additionally, a comparison of LV functions between patients and control cases was aimed. Patients with culprit left anterior descending (LAD) lesion (n = 25) and subjects with normal coronary angiography (n = 25) were evaluated. Patients underwent PCI and at least one coronary stent was placed. After PCI, the pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging (pw-TDI) parameters taken from subepicardial and subepicardial layers were compared among the patients. Left atrium (P = 0.050), LV end-diastolic (P = 0.049), and end-systolic (P = 0.006) diameters were larger compared to the control group. LV inflow velocities were not different between the patient and the control group. But, the myocardial performance index was different (P = 0.049). The systolic and diastolic pw-TDI parameters were apparently different between the patient and the control group. While the systolic pw-TDI parameters did not change, the diastolic pw-TDI parameters taken from both subepicardial (circumferential contraction) and subendocardial layers (longitudinal contraction) improved after PCI. After PCI, it was shown that while Ea velocity (P = 0.012) taken from the subendocardial layer increased, IVRa velocity (P subendocardial and subepicardial layers. These dysfunctions can be easily presented with pw-TDI. Although systolic dysfunction persists, diastolic dysfunction improves at early stage after PCI.

  12. Strain Sharing Assessment in Woven Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, Roberto; Recupero, Antonino; De Domenico, Fabrizio; Freni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Embedded fiber Bragg grating sensors have been extensively used worldwide for health monitoring of smart structures. In civil engineering, they provide a powerful method for monitoring the performance of composite reinforcements used for concrete structure rehabilitation and retrofitting. This paper discusses the problem of investigating the strain transfer mechanism in composite strengthened concrete beams subjected to three-point bending tests. Fiber Bragg grating sensors were embedded both in the concrete tensioned surface and in the woven fiber reinforcement. It has been shown that, if interface decoupling occurs, strain in the concrete can be up to 3.8 times higher than that developed in the reinforcement. A zero friction slipping model was developed which fitted very well the experimental data. PMID:27669251

  13. Strain Sharing Assessment in Woven Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, Roberto; Recupero, Antonino; De Domenico, Fabrizio; Freni, Fabrizio

    2016-09-22

    Embedded fiber Bragg grating sensors have been extensively used worldwide for health monitoring of smart structures. In civil engineering, they provide a powerful method for monitoring the performance of composite reinforcements used for concrete structure rehabilitation and retrofitting. This paper discusses the problem of investigating the strain transfer mechanism in composite strengthened concrete beams subjected to three-point bending tests. Fiber Bragg grating sensors were embedded both in the concrete tensioned surface and in the woven fiber reinforcement. It has been shown that, if interface decoupling occurs, strain in the concrete can be up to 3.8 times higher than that developed in the reinforcement. A zero friction slipping model was developed which fitted very well the experimental data.

  14. Fiber-Optic Strain Monitoring System for DUSEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Maclaughlin, M.; Noni, N.; Turner, A.; Murdoch, L.; Fratta, D.

    2008-12-01

    The opportunity to understand the response of rock masses to stresses deep within the earth's crust as a function of spatial and temporal scale is at the center of the geomechanics research program proposed for DUSEL. Within the 10-km3 volume of the former Homestake mine, deformations are expected from effective stress changes caused by mine dewatering, seasonal water table changes, and new excavations as well as from long-term creep of drifts and shafts. Data from a whole-mine deformation monitoring and measurement system are integral to calibrating a mine-scale, mechanical and hydrological finite-element model of laboratory and detector space. A synergistic objective of a long-term, state-of-the-art monitoring system is to ensure shaft, tunnel, and cavern stability as well as occupant safety. Fiber-optic sensors are highly stable over long periods of time and they can be daisy-chained to simply significantly the logistics of data acquisition of dozens of sensors on a string. Temperature measurements over large spatial scales can delineate fluid-flow paths and serve simultaneously as a detection system for anomalous temperatures. Two types of fiber-optic sensors are available: distributed strain and temperature (DST) and Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG). DST systems can be installed over kilometers of distance with measurement resolutions of 1-to-10 microstrains and 0.1°C over intervals of one-to-two meters. FBG strain gages and displacement transducers function the same as their electrical counterparts, save for the underlying physics in that displacements are measured as a shift in the spacing of a Bragg grating embedded into the optical fiber. These systems are highly scalable as more than 50,000 points of temperature and strain measurements can be collected from a single daisy-chained fiber-optic cable. Other fiber-based sensors, e.g., acceleration, air pressure, and gases, are also available and can become part of a fiber-based monitoring infrastructure. We

  15. Strain sensitivity enhancement in suspended core fiber tapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Ricardo M.; Silva, Susana O.; Becker, Martin; Schuster, Kay; Rothardt, M.; Bartelt, H.; Marques, Manuel B.; Frazão, Orlando

    2013-06-01

    Suspended core fiber tapers with different cross sections (with diameters from 70 μm to 120 μm) are produced by filament heating. Before obtaining the taper, the spectral behavior of the suspended core fiber is a multimode interference structure. When the taper is made, an intermodal interference between a few modes is observed. This effect is clearly visible for low taper core dimensions. Since the core and cladding do not collapse, two taper regions exist, one in the core and the other in the cladding. The cladding taper does not affect the light transmission, only the core is reduced to a microtaper. The spectral response of the microtaper based-suspended core fiber is similar to a beat of two interferometers. The strain is applied to the microtaper, and with the reduction in the transverse area, an increase in sensitivity is observed. When the taper is immersed in a liquid with a different index of refraction or subjected to temperature variations, no spectral change occurs.

  16. Multiaxis fiber grating strain sensor applications for structural monitoring and process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric; Schulz, Whitten L.; Seim, John M.

    1999-01-01

    By writing one or more fiber gratings onto birefringent optical fiber a multi-axis fiber grating is created that is capable of measuring transverse as well as axial strain. In addition to the measurement of transverse gradients it is possible to identify the axis and magnitude of transverse strain gradients. This allows detailed diagnostic of the interior of parts as they are being cured and after fabrication health monitoring systems capable of supporting the measurement of multidimensional strain fields.

  17. Long-term strain response of polymer optical fiber FBG sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundalo, Ivan-Lazar; Nielsen, Kristian; Woyessa, Getinet

    2017-01-01

    We report on the viscoelastic response of PMMA microstructured polymer optical fibers (mPOFs) when exposed to long periods of strain and relaxation, with the strain period ranging from 0.5 min to 50 min. The behavior of the fibers was monitored by inscribing a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in them...... and tracking the reflection peak. We demonstrate that the fiber, when relaxing from strains of up to 0.9%, has a two-phase recovery: initially linear (elastic driven) and subsequently nonlinear (viscoelastic driven) contraction. The linear (elastic) relaxation wavelength range depends both on the strain level...

  18. Rockslide deformation monitoring with fiber optic strain sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Moore

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available With micro-strain resolution and the capability to sample at rates of 100 Hz and higher, fiber optic (FO strain sensors offer exciting new possibilities for in-situ landslide monitoring. Here we describe a new FO monitoring system based on long-gauge fiber Bragg grating sensors installed at the Randa Rockslide Laboratory in southern Switzerland. The new FO monitoring system can detect sub-micrometer scale deformations in both triggered-dynamic and continuous measurements. Two types of sensors have been installed: (1 fully embedded borehole sensors and (2 surface extensometers. Dynamic measurements are triggered by sensor deformation and recorded at 100 Hz, while continuous data are logged every 5 min. Deformation time series for all sensors show displacements consistent with previous monitoring. Accelerated shortening following installation of the borehole sensors is likely related to long-term shrinkage of the grout. A number of transient signals have been observed, which in some cases were large enough to trigger rapid sampling. The combination of short- and long-term observation offers new insight into the deformation process. Accelerated surface crack opening in spring is shown to have a diurnal trend, which we attribute to the effect of snowmelt seeping into the crack void space and freezing at night to generate pressure on the crack walls. Controlled-source tests investigated the sensor response to dynamic inputs, which compared an independent measure of ground motion against the strain measured across a surface crack. Low frequency signals were comparable but the FO record suffered from aliasing, where undersampling of higher frequency signals generated spectral peaks not related to ground motion.

  19. Large strain detection of SRM composite shell based on fiber Bragg grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Chang, Xinlong; Zhang, Youhong; Yang, Fan

    2017-12-01

    There may be more than 2% strain of carbon fiber composite material on solid rocket motor (SRM) in some extreme cases. A surface-bonded silica fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensor coated by polymer is designed to detect the large strain of composite material. The strain transfer relation of the FBG large strain sensor is deduced, and the strain transfer mechanism is verified by finite element simulation. To calibrate the sensors, the tensile test is done by using the carbon fiber composite plate specimen attached to the designed strain sensor. The results show that the designed sensor can detect the strain more than 3%, the strain sensitivity is 0.0762 pm/μɛ, the resolution is 13.13μɛ, and the fitting degree of the wavelength-strain curve fitting function is 0.9988. The accuracy and linearity of the sensor can meet the engineering requirements.

  20. Raman measurements of Kevlar-29 fiber pull-out test at different strain levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan; Lei, Zhenkun; Kang, Yilan; Qiu, Wei

    2008-11-01

    This paper adopted Kevlar-29 fiber monofilament embedding technology to prepare fiber/ epoxy resin tensile specimen. The specimen was pulled on a homemade and portable mini-loading device. At the same time micro-Raman spectroscopy is introduced to detect the distributions of stress on the embedded fiber at different strain levels. The characteristic peak shift of the 1610 cm-1 in Raman band has a linear relationship with the strain or stress. The experimental results show that the fiber axial stress decreases gradually from the embedded fiber-start to the embedded fiber-end at the same strain level. At different strain levels, the fiber axial stress increases along with the applied load. It reveals that there is a larger fiber axial stress distribution under a larger strain level. And the stress transfer is realized gradually from the embedded fiber-start to the fiber-end. Stress concentration exists in the embedded fiber-end, which is a dangerous region for interfacial debonding easily.

  1. Analyzing Fourier Transforms for NASA DFRC's Fiber Optic Strain Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechtner, Kaitlyn Leann

    2010-01-01

    This document provides a basic overview of the fiber optic technology used for sensing stress, strain, and temperature. Also, the document summarizes the research concerning speed and accuracy of the possible mathematical algorithms that can be used for NASA DFRC's Fiber Optic Strain Sensing (FOSS) system.

  2. The Effects of Adhesive and Bonding Length on the Strain Transfer of Optical Fiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiuh-Chuan Her

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical fiber sensors have been extensively adapted as structural health monitoring devices. Due to the existence of the adhesive layer, a portion of the strain is absorbed by the adhesive. As a result, the structural strain sensed by the optical fiber is underestimated and required to be corrected. An analytical solution is presented through which it is possible to establish the relationship between the strains in the host structure and the surface bonded optical fiber sensor. Experimental measurements based on the Mach–Zehnder interferometric technique were performed to validate the theoretical prediction and reveal the differential strains between the optical fiber strain sensor and test specimen. Parametric studies show that the percentage of the strain in the test specimen actually transferred to the optical fiber is dependent on the bonding length of the optical fiber and the adhesive. The strain transfer is increasing from 56% to 82% as the bonding length increases from 5 cm to 12 cm with the epoxy adhesive. The general trend of the strain transfer obtained from both experimental tests and theoretical predictions shows that the longer the bonding length and the stiffer the adhesive, the more strain is transferred to the optical fiber.

  3. Mathematical Formulation for Strain and Pressure Mapping Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey N. K.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report theoretical investigation of fiber Bragg strain and pressure mapping sensor with a novel mathematical formulation. A second order differential equation has been established showing relation between spatial periodicity along length of the fiber and effective refractive index of fiber core. Solution of this equation shows that magnitude of strain or pressure may be predicted from central wavelength shift of Bragg wavelength in the returned Bragg signal.

  4. Apparatus and Method for Measuring Strain in Optical Fibers using Rayleigh Scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, Mark E. (Inventor); Moore, Jason P. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring strain in an optical fiber using the spectral shift of Rayleigh scattered light. The interference pattern produced by an air gap reflector and backscattered radiation is measured. Using Fourier Transforms, the spectrum of any section of fiber can be extracted. Cross correlation with an unstrained measurement produces a correlation peak. The location of the correlation peak indicates the strain level in the selected portion of optical fiber.

  5. Application of a Fiber Optic Distributed Strain Sensor System to Woven E-Glass Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Lopatin, Craig

    2001-01-01

    A distributed strain sensing system utilizing a series of identically written Bragg gratings along an optical fiber is examined for potential application to Composite Armored Vehicle health monitoring. A vacuum assisted resin transfer molding process was used to fabricate a woven fabric E-glass/composite panel with an embedded fiber optic strain sensor. Test samples machined from the panel were mechanically tested in 4-point bending. Experimental results are presented that show the mechanical strain from foil strain gages comparing well to optical strain from the embedded sensors. Also, it was found that the distributed strain along the sample length was consistent with the loading configuration.

  6. Fiber optic strain monitor for an uninhabited aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Thomas; Pesavento, Philip; Ice, Robert; Knudsen, Steven; Harrison, Mary Ann

    2006-03-01

    The Institute for Scientific Research (ISR) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) will build and operate portable real-time fiber Bragg grating interrogator systems for monitoring strain in ISR's Multi-Modal Sensor (MMS) uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV). ISR's UAV is constructed of fiberglass composites with aluminum stiffeners. The cargo bay and on-board electronics are intended to accommodate a variety of compact sensors. Because of the small size of the UAV, weight and volume are restricted, necessitating considerable redesign of laboratory interrogators to meet UAV constraints. NRL will be supplying a multiplexed interrogator for monitoring structural response rates in the UAV up to about 2 kHz, while ISR will develop an optical frequency domain reflectometer (OFDR) for measuring lower frequency response of large numbers of gratings below about 100 Hz. The OFDR system will test a special differencing technique to separate strain induced signals from environmentally induced signals. A National Instruments CompactRIO system with a 3 million gate FPGA and a 200 MHz Pentium processor is being used for real-time data acquisition and onboard signal analysis. The CompactRIO system weighs about 1.6 kg, measures 18cm x 9cm x 9cm, consumes less than 5 W of power, and withstands over 50g of shock. Lithium polymer batteries will be used to power the system for flight times up to about one hour in the present configuration. While the near-term objective of this project is to overcome the challenges of applying fiber-optic strain monitors to aerial vehicles, the longer-term objective is to develop a system for detecting damage in aerial vehicles using chaotic attractor based methods. One of the key issues in damage detection by this means revolves around the ability to use the chaotic excitation of the airframe from random aerodynamic vortices to detect the onset of composite degradation. There is evidence that attractor based methods applied to these ambient chaotic

  7. Longitudinal shortening of sub-epicardial myocytes in severe ischaemic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jenny; Kyhl, Kasper; Gustafsson, Finn

    2017-01-01

    We present two patients with three-vessel disease and severely depressed left ventricular (LV) systolic function where viability analysis by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated areas of near-transmural sub-endocardial fibrosis and hence little chance of regaining systolic function as ....... The cases highlight that sub-epicardial, longitudinally oriented myocytes can contribute to overall LV systolic function and suggest taking their 'piston-function' into consideration when analysing viability....

  8. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenu Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF was finally evaluated.

  9. Distributed fiber temperature and strain sensor using coherent radio-frequency detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jihong; Staines, Sean; Blake, Mike; Jiang, Shibin

    2007-08-01

    A novel technique that enables coherent detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering in the radio-frequency (<500 MHz) region with excellent long-term stability has been demonstrated for distributed measurements of temperature and strain in long fiber. An actively stabilized single-frequency Brillouin fiber laser with extremely low phase noise and intensity noise is used as a well-defined, frequency-shifted local oscillator for the heterodyne detection, yielding measurements of spontaneous Brillouin scattering with high frequency stability. Based on this approach, a highly stable real-time fiber sensor for distributed measurements of both temperature and strain over long fiber has been developed utilizing advanced digital signal processing techniques.

  10. Piezoelectrically strained bistable laminates with macro fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew J.; Moosavian, Amin; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-04-01

    The bistability and snap through capability of an unsymmetric laminate consisting of only Macro Fiber Composites (MFC) are investigated. The non-linear analysis predicts two cylindrically stable configurations when strain anisotropy is piezoelectrically induced within a [0MFC/90MFC]T laminate. This is achieved by bonding two MFCs in their actuated states and releasing the voltage post cure to create in-plane residual stresses. The minimization of total potential energy with the Rayleigh-Ritz method are used to analytically model the resulting laminate. A finite element analysis is conducted in MSC Nastran using the piezoelectric-thermal analogy approach to verify the analytical results. The effects of adhesive properties, bonding cure cycles, MFC layup, and its geometry on the curvatures, displacements, and bifurcation voltages are characterized. Finally, the snap through and reverse snap through capabilities with piezoelectric actuation are demonstrated. This adaptive laminate functions as both the actuator and the primary structure and allows large deformations under a non-continuous energy input. Its snap through capability allows full configuration control necessary in morphing applications.

  11. DC calibration of the strain sensitivity of a single mode optical fiber interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, R. O.; Cantrell, J. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The strain sensitivity of an optical fiber interferometer developed for the detection of pulsed ultrasonic waves in solids was calibrated. Light from the output ends of both fibers was superimposed to form an interference fringe pattern that was interrogated in the far field to give a signal proportional to the differential optical fiber path length. Strain sensitivity is determined by comparing data obtained by clamping and bending the bar at different lengths to simple cantilever beam theory. A minimum theoretical detectable strain of less than 10 to the minus 10th power is indicated.

  12. A novel fiber optic distributed temperature and strain sensor for building applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregubov, A. V.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Berintsev, A. V.; Prikhodko, V. V.

    A novel fiber optic distributed sensor for temperature and strain measurements in building constructions has been developed and studied which is a composite optical element in the form of a reinforced single-mode optical fiber placed directly in the body of a fiberglass armature. The sensor has a reasonably high sensitivity to changes in external temperature and strain and a good spatial resolution. Besides, it is characterized by a high mechanical strength as compared to conventional fiber sensor elements. The experimental results obtained on a prototype show the value of the temperature sensitivity of 0.1 MHz/deg and the sensitivity to strain of 2.7 MHz/mm.

  13. Dynamic Strain Measured by Mach-Zehnder Interferometric Optical Fiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiuh-Chuan Her

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical fibers possess many advantages such as small size, light weight and immunity to electro-magnetic interference that meet the sensing requirements to a large extent. In this investigation, a Mach-Zehnder interferometric optical fiber sensor is used to measure the dynamic strain of a vibrating cantilever beam. A 3 × 3 coupler is employed to demodulate the phase shift of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The dynamic strain of a cantilever beam subjected to base excitation is determined by the optical fiber sensor. The experimental results are validated with the strain gauge.

  14. Transmural sheet strains in the lateral wall of the ovine left ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Allen; Langer, Frank; Rodriguez, Filiberto; Criscione, John C; Daughters, George T; Miller, D Craig; Ingels, Neil B

    2005-09-01

    In an attempt to provide a better understanding of our finding that regions with contracting left ventricular myofibers need not develop a significant transmural systolic wall thickening gradient, the analytic approach of Costa et al. was applied to the four-dimensional dynamic data obtained 1 and 8 wk after surgical implantation of transmural radiopaque beads in the lateral equatorial left ventricular wall in seven ovine hearts. Quantitative histology of tissue blocks demonstrated that fiber angles varied linearly across the wall in this region from -37 degrees in the subepicardium to +18 degrees in the subendocardium. Sheet angles exhibited a pleated-sheet behavior, alternating sign from subepicardium to subendocardium. From end diastole (reference configuration) to end systole (deformed configuration), fiber strain was uniformly negative, sheet extension and sheet thickening were uniformly positive, and sheet-normal shear contributed to wall thickening at all wall depths. Subepicardial radial wall thickening increased significantly from week 1 to week 8, with significant increases in the contributions from subepicardial sheet extension and sheet-normal shear. At 1 and 8 wk, the contribution of sheet-normal shear to wall thickening was substantial at all transmural depths; the contribution of sheet extension to wall thickening was greatest in the subepicardium and least in the subendocardium, and the contribution of sheet thickening to wall thickening was greatest in the subendocardium and least in the subepicardium. A mechanistic model is proposed that provides a working hypothesis that a selective decrease in subepicardial intercellular matrix stiffness is responsible for elimination of the transmural wall thickening gradient 1-8 wk after marker implantation surgery.

  15. Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Packaged Optical Fiber Bragg Grating Strain Sensors for Infrastructures under Harsh Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG has been recognized as an outstanding high-performance local monitoring sensor and is largely applied in structural health monitoring (SHM. This paper proposes a series of fiber-reinforced polymer- (FRP- packaged optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors to completely meet the requirements of rough civil engineering infrastructures, and their sensing performance under normal environment and harsh environment is experimentally investigated. It is experimentally and theoretically proved that FRP-packaged FBG strain sensors maintain excellent sensing performance as the bare FBG sensor under a harsh environment, and their durability is significantly enhanced due to the FRP materials. These FRP-packaged FBG strain sensors are successfully applied in the SHM system of Aizhai Bridge.

  16. Long term strain behavior of PMMA-based polymer optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundalo, Ivan-Lazar; Nielsen, Kristian; Woyessa, Getinet; Bang, Ole

    2015-09-01

    We are reporting on the viscoelasticity of PMMA based Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) strain sensors when exposed to repeated sequences of long term strain and relaxation with various duty-cycles. In terms of the FBG wavelength and how it follows the strain cycle, we have shown that in the small strain regime (up to 1%) an elastic-dominated fast relaxing range, which is followed by a mainly viscous relaxation, depends both on the strain level and on the strain duration. For a small ratio of the strain-relax durations, this fast relaxation range stays almost the same. However, with increasing strain duration, for the same relaxation time, this range will be shortened, which might influence the sensing capabilities of the fiber sensor.

  17. Distributed strain and temperature sensing in plastic optical fiber using Rayleigh scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreger, Stephen T.; Sang, Alex K.; Gifford, Dawn K.; Froggatt, Mark E.

    2009-05-01

    In recent years we have demonstrated the ability to analyze Rayleigh scatter in single- and multi-mode fused silica fibers to deduce strain and temperature shifts, yielding sensitivity and resolution similar to that obtained using Fiber Bragg Gratings. This technique employs scanning laser interferometry to obtain high spatial resolution Rayleigh scatter spectral information. One of the promising aspects of using Rayleigh scatter for distributed sensing is that the technique should work for any fiber that exhibits discernable Rayleigh scatter. We now demonstrate that distributed sensing with mm-range spatial resolution in off-the-shelf plastic multi-mode optical fiber is feasible. We report temperature and strain sensitivity, and comment on measurement range and hysteresis level. Distributed Rayleigh scatter sensing in plastic optical fiber may offer a valuable alternative to sensing in fused silica fibers because of plastic's low cost and differing mechanical and chemical properties.

  18. Simultaneous measurement of dynamic strain and temperature distribution using high birefringence PANDA fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengshi; Murayama, Hideaki

    2017-04-01

    New approach in simultaneous measurement of dynamic strain and temperature has been done by using a high birefringence PANDA fiber Bragg grating sensor. By this technique, we have succeeded in discriminating dynamic strain and temperature distribution at the sampling rate of 800 Hz and the spatial resolution of 1 mm. The dynamic distribution of strain and temperature were measured with the deviation of 5mm spatially. In addition, we have designed an experimental setup by which we can apply quantitative dynamic strain and temperature distribution to the fiber under testing without bounding it to a specimen.

  19. Measurement of multidimensional strain fields using fiber grating sensors for structural monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric; Schulz, Whitten L.; Seim, John M.

    1999-12-01

    For many structural applications it is highly desirable to be able to measure two or more axes of strain at a single point. In many cases one dimensional strain measurements may be insufficient to fully characterize events or lead to erroneous predictions. This paper will provide an overview of the use of multi-axis fiber grating strain sensors to perform structural diagnostics. Examples of usage of multi-axis fiber grating strain sensors in a smart bearing cell for damage assessment of bridges and for adhesive joints associated with aircraft will be given as illustrations of these methods.

  20. Characterization of the zero-dispersion wavelength variation in a strained highly nonlinear fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillieholm, Mads; Galili, Michael; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental characterization of longitudinal zero-dispersion wavelength variations in a novel, strained, highly nonlinear fiber, by simple four-wave mixing spectrum analysis, and provide new insights to the analysis supported by detailed numerical simulations.......We present an experimental characterization of longitudinal zero-dispersion wavelength variations in a novel, strained, highly nonlinear fiber, by simple four-wave mixing spectrum analysis, and provide new insights to the analysis supported by detailed numerical simulations....

  1. Compact Fiber Optic Strain Sensors (cFOSS) Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Armstrong researchers are reducing the Fiber Optic Sensing Sysme (FOSS) technology’s size, power requirement, weight, and cost to effectively extend...

  2. Sensitivity of photonic crystal fiber grating sensors: biosensing, refractive index, strain, and temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of fiber grating sensors in the applications of strain, temperature, internal label-free biosensing, and internal refractive index sensing. New analytical expressions for the sensitivities, valid for photonic crystal fibers are rigorously derived. These are generally valid...

  3. Study on the embedment of fiber Fabry-Perot strain sensor in prestressed reinforced concrete bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, WeiMin; Zhu, Yong; Fu, YuMei; Huang, Shanglian

    2004-07-01

    In order to address application problem of fiber optic sensor in concrete, characteristics of concrete was analyzed deeply. Mechanical and metrological characteristics of both bare and packed fiber Fabry-Perot strain sensor were also analyzed in details. Modulus requirement and dimensional requirement of fiber strain sensor for concrete was deduced. A special measure of sleeve was proposed to get rid of drawback of packed fiber Fabry-Perot strain sensor in concrete. Corresponding procedures was also proposed to ensure survivability of the sensors when embedding fiber sensor into a concrete structure. An application example of fiber Fabry-Perot strain sensor network system in the Dafosi Bridge of Yangtze River at Chongqing has been presented to demonstrate the validity of this technique. With help of presented technique, 45 fiber Fabry-Perot strain sensors had been successfully embedded in 5 segments of gird during 9 months construction. The system was put into operation automatically from January 2003. Some typical results recorded by the system were presented. Constructing progress, tardo distortion trend, and temperature dependent fluctuation of gird was revealed in the result.

  4. Highly sensitive fiber loop ringdown strain sensor with low temperature sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Maheshwar; Wang, Chuji

    2017-10-01

    We report a highly sensitive strain sensor with low temperature sensitivity based on the fiber loop ringdown technique. An innovative approach that employs a micro air-gap as the strain sensor head is described. The sensor has demonstrated the static strain sensitivity of 0.26 µs/µɛ, corresponding to the detection limit of 65 nɛ with the low temperature cross sensitivity of 37 nɛ/°C. This is the highest static strain sensitivity achieved without using a combination of fiber optic sensing components, such as fiber Bragg gratings or Fabry-Perot interferometers. Moreover, the sensor design allows the strain sensitivity and measuring range to be adjusted by changing the length of the sensor.

  5. Dynamic measurement of inside strain distributions in adhesively bonded joints by embedded fiber Bragg grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Ning, Xiaoguang; Kageyama, Kazuro; Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2014-05-01

    Long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with the length of about 100 mm was embedded onto the surface of a carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) substrate and two CFRP adherends were joined by adhesive to form an adhesive bonded single-lap joint. The joint was subjected to 0.5 Hz cyclic tensile load and longitudinal strain distributions along FBG were measured at 5 Hz by the fiber-optic distributed sensing system based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR). We could successfully monitor the strain distributions accurately with high spatial resolution of around 1 mm.

  6. Coaxial Thermoplastic Elastomer-Wrapped Carbon Nanotube Fibers for Deformable and Wearable Strain Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Jian

    2018-01-22

    Highly conductive and stretchable fibers are crucial components of wearable electronics systems. Excellent electrical conductivity, stretchability, and wearability are required from such fibers. Existing technologies still display limited performances in these design requirements. Here, achieving highly stretchable and sensitive strain sensors by using a coaxial structure, prepared via coaxial wet spinning of thermoplastic elastomer-wrapped carbon nanotube fibers, is proposed. The sensors attain high sensitivity (with a gauge factor of 425 at 100% strain), high stretchability, and high linearity. They are also reproducible and durable. Their use as safe sensing components on deformable cable, expandable surfaces, and wearable textiles is demonstrated.

  7. Highly Stretchable Core-Sheath Fibers via Wet-Spinning for Wearable Strain Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenhua; Jia, Shuhai; Wang, Fei; Bian, Changsheng; Chen, Yuyu; Wang, Yonglin; Li, Bo

    2018-02-12

    Lightweight, stretchable, and wearable strain sensors have recently been widely studied for the development of health monitoring systems, human-machine interfaces, and wearable devices. Herein, highly stretchable polymer elastomer-wrapped carbon nanocomposite piezoresistive core-sheath fibers are successfully prepared using a facile and scalable one-step coaxial wet-spinning assembly approach. The carbon nanotube-polymeric composite core of the stretchable fiber is surrounded by an insulating sheath, similar to conventional cables, and shows excellent electrical conductivity with a low percolation threshold (0.74 vol %). The core-sheath elastic fibers are used as wearable strain sensors, exhibiting ultra-high stretchability (above 300%), excellent stability (>10 000 cycles), fast response, low hysteresis, and good washability. Furthermore, the piezoresistive core-sheath fiber possesses bending-insensitiveness and negligible torsion-sensitive properties, and the strain sensing performance of piezoresistive fibers maintains a high degree of stability under harsh conditions. On the basis of this high level of performance, the fiber-shaped strain sensor can accurately detect both subtle and large-scale human movements by embedding it in gloves and garments or by directly attaching it to the skin. The current results indicate that the proposed stretchable strain sensor has many potential applications in health monitoring, human-machine interfaces, soft robotics, and wearable electronics.

  8. Knitted Strain Sensor Textiles of Highly Conductive All-Polymeric Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedin, Shayan; Razal, Joselito M; Innis, Peter C; Jeiranikhameneh, Ali; Beirne, Stephen; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-09-30

    A scaled-up fiber wet-spinning production of electrically conductive and highly stretchable PU/PEDOT:PSS fibers is demonstrated for the first time. The PU/PEDOT:PSS fibers possess the mechanical properties appropriate for knitting various textile structures. The knitted textiles exhibit strain sensing properties that were dependent upon the number of PU/PEDOT:PSS fibers used in knitting. The knitted textiles show sensitivity (as measured by the gauge factor) that increases with the number of PU/PEDOT:PSS fibers deployed. A highly stable sensor response was observed when four PU/PEDOT:PSS fibers were co-knitted with a commercial Spandex yarn. The knitted textile sensor can distinguish different magnitudes of applied strain with cyclically repeatable sensor responses at applied strains of up to 160%. When used in conjunction with a commercial wireless transmitter, the knitted textile responded well to the magnitude of bending deformations, demonstrating potential for remote strain sensing applications. The feasibility of an all-polymeric knitted textile wearable strain sensor was demonstrated in a knee sleeve prototype with application in personal training and rehabilitation following injury.

  9. Study of optical fibers strain-temperature sensitivities using hybrid Brillouin-Rayleigh system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kishida, Kinzo; Yamauchi, Yoshiaki; Guzik, Artur

    .... These requirements are organized and clarified in the paper. It also describes the hybrid Brillouin-Rayleigh system, which exhibits capabilities surpassing those of strain gauges. The principles of the system are illustrated considering the fiber calibration methodology. Formulas required for determining strain, temperature, and hydro-pressure are derived and discussed. Finally, the examples of applications are presented.

  10. Fiber Bragg Gratings, IT Techniques and Strain Gauge Validation for Strain Calculation on Aged Metal Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander Montero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the feasibility of calculating strains in aged F114 steel specimens with Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG sensors and infrared thermography (IT techniques. Two specimens have been conditioned under extreme temperature and relative humidity conditions making comparative tests of stress before and after aging using different adhesives. Moreover, a comparison has been made with IT techniques and conventional methods for calculating stresses in F114 steel. Implementation of Structural Health Monitoring techniques on real aircraft during their life cycle requires a study of the behaviour of FBG sensors and their wiring under real conditions, before using them for a long time. To simulate aging, specimens were stored in a climate chamber at 70 °C and 90% RH for 60 days. This study is framed within the Structural Health Monitoring (SHM and Non Destructuve Evaluation (NDE research lines, integrated into the avionics area maintained by the Aeronautical Technologies Centre (CTA and the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU.

  11. Characterization of a New Fully Recycled Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Subjected to High Strain Rate Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, H.; Tamboura, S.; Fitoussi, J.; BenDaly, H.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is the complete physicochemical characterization and strain rate effect multi-scale analysis of a new fully recycled carbon fiber reinforced composites for automotive crash application. Two composites made of 20% wt short recycled carbon fibers (CF) are obtained by injection molding. The morphology and the degree of dispersion of CF in the matrixes were examined using a new ultrasonic method and SEM. High strain tensile behavior up to 100 s-1 is investigated. In order to avoid perturbation due to inertial effect and wave propagation, the specimen geometry was optimized. The elastic properties appear to be insensitive to the strain rate. However, a high strain rate effect on the local visco-plasticity of the matrix and fiber/matrix interface visco-damageable behavior is emphasized. The predominant damage mechanisms evolve from generalized matrix local ductility at low strain rate regime to fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers pull-out at high strain rate regime.

  12. Sensing the earth crustal deformation with nano-strain resolution fiber-optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingwen; He, Zuyuan; Tokunaga, Tomochika

    2015-06-01

    Crustal deformation measurement with a high resolution on the order of nano-strains in static to low frequency region is required for geophysical research. Optical fiber sensors are very attractive in this research field due to their unique advantages including high resolution, small size and easy deployment. In this paper, a fiber optic strain sensor with nano-strain-resolution and large measurement range for sensing the earth crustal deformation is reported. With this sensor the tide induced crustal deformation and the seismic wave were successfully recorded in field experiments.

  13. Subfrequency noise signal extraction in fiber-optic strain sensors using postprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Timothy T-Y; Gray, Malcolm B; Shaddock, Daniel A; McClelland, David E; Chow, Jong H

    2012-06-01

    Laser frequency fluctuations typically limit the performance of high-resolution interferometric fiber strain sensors. Using time delay interferometry, we demonstrate a frequency noise immune fiber sensing system, where strain signals were extracted well below the noise floor normally imposed by the frequency fluctuations of the laser. Initial measurements show a reduction in the noise floor by a factor of 30, with strain sensitivities of a nanostrain/Hz at 100 mHz and reaching 100 ps/Hz at 1 Hz. Further characterization of the system indicates the potential for at least 4.5 orders of magnitude frequency fluctuation rejection.

  14. A fiber optic buckle transducer for measurement of in vitro tendon strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roriz, Paulo; Ramos, António; Marques, Manuel B.; Simões, José A.; Frazão, Orlando

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to present a prototype of a fiber optic based buckle transducer suitable for measuring strain caused by stretching of a tendon. The device has an E-shape and its central arm is instrumented with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. The tendon adjusts to the E-form in a fashion that when it is stretched the central arm bends causing a shift of the Bragg's wavelength (λB) that is proportional to the amount of strain. This prototype is presented as an alternative to conventional strain gauge (SG) buckle transducers.

  15. Dual-core fiber based strain sensor for application in extremely high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolowicz, Anna; Szostkiewicz, Lukasz; Kolakowska, Agnieszka; Bienkowska, Beata; Budnicki, Dawid; Ostrowski, Lukasz; Wysokinski, Karol; Stanczyk, Tomasz; Fidelus, Janusz; Nasilowski, Piotr; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Napierala, Marek; Mergo, Pawel; Nasilowski, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    This paper focuses on the utilization of crosstalk phenomenon to construct an innovative strain sensor. In our experiments, we take advantage of special fiber design and technology of fiber post-processing in order to receive strain sensing areas. We present results, which indicate possibility of achieving strain sensitivity at level of several mɛ/nm with negligible temperature cross-sensitivity at the same time. Furthermore after coating the sensor with the developed copper and gold coatings, it can be easily applied in extremely high temperature (e.g. 500 - 800 °C) and/or aggressive media applications.

  16. Fiber Bragg gratings inscriptions in multimode fiber using 800 nm femtosecond laser for high-temperature strain measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Bao, Weijia

    2017-08-01

    A short fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is successfully written in a multimode fiber (MMF) with core and cladding diameters of 50 μm and 125 μm using 800 nm femtosecond laser side-illumination technique. Three-type grating inscriptions can be realized at the different positions over the core of MMF by moving the focal-line position of laser beam. Both fundamental mode and higher-order modes of MMF are excited at the core-mismatch junction, resulting in two well-defined resonances in transmission. The strain measurement with a single core resonance mode is demonstrated experimentally at the ultra-high temperature. The result indicates that the strain sensitivity improved to 5.24 pm/με at the temperature of 600-900 °C, making it as a good candidate for the strain measurement at the high temperature environments.

  17. Flat-Cladding Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors for Large Strain Amplitude Fatigue Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xijia Gu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully developed a flat-cladding fiber Bragg grating sensor for large cyclic strain amplitude tests of up to ±8,000 με. The increased contact area between the flat-cladding fiber and substrate, together with the application of a new bonding process, has significantly increased the bonding strength. In the push-pull fatigue tests of an aluminum alloy, the plastic strain amplitudes measured by three optical fiber sensors differ only by 0.43% at a cyclic strain amplitude of ±7,000 με and 1.9% at a cyclic strain amplitude of ±8,000 με. We also applied the sensor on an extruded magnesium alloy for evaluating the peculiar asymmetric hysteresis loops. The results obtained were in good agreement with those measured from the extensometer, a further validation of the sensor.

  18. Ultrasonic sensitivity of strain-insensitive fiber Bragg grating sensors and evaluation of ultrasound-induced strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Hiroshi; Kumakura, Kenji; Ogihara, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    In conventional ultrasound detection in structures, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is glued on or embedded in the structure. However, application of strain to the structure can influence the sensitivity of the FBG toward ultrasound and can prevent its effective detection. An FBG can work as a strain-insensitive ultrasound sensor when it is not directly glued to the monitored structure, but is instead applied to a small thin plate to form a mobile sensor. Another possible configuration is to affix an FBG-inscribed optical fiber without the grating section attached to the monitored structure. In the present study, sensitivity to ultrasound propagated through an aluminum plate was compared for a strain-insensitive FBG sensor and an FBG sensor installed in a conventional manner. Strains induced by ultrasound from a piezoelectric transducer and by quasi-acoustic emission of a pencil lead break were also quantitatively evaluated from the response amplitude of the FBG sensor. Experimental results showed that the reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio for ultrasound detection with strain-insensitive FBG sensors, relative to traditionally-installed FBG sensors, was only 6 dB, and the ultrasound-induced strain varied within a range of sub-micron strains.

  19. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  20. Fiber Optic Strain Measurements In Filament-Wound Graphite-Epoxy Tubes Containing Embedded Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Heyman, J. S.; Holben, M. S.; Egalon, C.; Dehart, D. W.; Doederlein, T.; Koury, J.

    1989-01-01

    analysis on LSS. Advanced composite materials have been fabricated for the last seven years, consisting mostly of rocket components such as: nozzles, payload shrouds, exit cones, and nose cones. Recently, however, AFAL has been fabricating composite components such as trusses, tubes and flat panels for space applications. Research on fiber optic sensors at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) dates back to 1979. Recently an optical phase locked loop (OPLL) has been developed that can be used to make strain and temperature measurements. Static and dynamic strain measurements have been demonstrated using this device.' To address future space requirements, AFAL and NASA have initiated a program to design, fabricate, and experimentally test composite struts and panels with embedded sensors, actuators, and microprocessors that can be used to control vibration and motion in space structures.

  1. Effect of dietary fiber, genetic strain and age on the digestive metabolism of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RV Krás

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 360 male broilers, out of which 240 of a fast-growing strain (Cobb500, and 120 of a slow-growing strain (Label Rouge, were used to evaluate the effect of dietary fiber on digesta transit time and digestive metabolism during the period of 1 to 42 days of age. A completely randomized experimental design with a 3x2 factorial arrangement was applied, consisting of three groups of birds (slow-growing - SG; fast-growing fed ad libitum - FGAL; and fast-growing pair-fed with SG broilers - FGPF and two iso-protein diets (a 3100 kcal ME/kg low-fiber diet - LFD- and a 2800 kcal ME/kg high-fiber diet - HFD- with 14% wheat bran and 4% oat hulls. HFD-fed birds presented lower ME retention (p < 0.001 and lower dry matter metabolizability (DMM (p < 0.001, which is possibly related to the shorter digesta transit time observed in these birds (p < 0.001. DMM was reduced with age, whereas metabolizable energy remained almost constant (p < 0.001 independently of strain. This may be related to the increase in feed intake as birds age. The slow-growing strain did not present better utilization of the high-fiber diet as compared to the fast-growing strain in none of the analyzed ages, even though showing a significant better use of fiber and dietary energy from 31 days of age.

  2. Thermal strain of pipes composed with high strength polyethylene fiber reinforced plastics at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashima, Toshihiro; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko [Toyobo Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan); Okada, Toichi [Osaka Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    High strength polyethylene fiber(Dyneema{reg_sign} fiber; herein after abbreviated to DF) has a large negative thermal expansion coefficient. Several kinds of pipes were prepared by means of filament winding or sheet winding method. The thermal strain or residual stress of those pipes were measured at liquid nitrogen temperature. The thermal strain was also calculated and was compared with the measured values. The circumferential thermal strain of the inner surface was found to be much different from that of outer surface. The circumferential strain changed with the ratio of inner diameter to thickness of pipes. The mean thermal strain of inner and outer surface was found to agree well with that of calculated value. It was confirmed that the negative thermal expansion can be realized even in the pipes. The design methodology of the pipes with negative thermal expansion was discussed.

  3. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case.

  4. Principles and Application of Polyimide Fiber Bragg Gratings for Surface Strain Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Sun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although theoretical investigation has demonstrated that fewer strain transfer layers imply a greater strain transfer ratio, as well as increased accuracy, most researchers are still focused on investigating encapsulated Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs in surface strain measurements. This is because, in a traditional view, bare FBGs are too fragile to be mounted on the substrate for measuring surface strain. Polyimide FBGs may provide a better balance point between accuracy and protection. A new method to measure surface strain with polyimide fiber Bragg gratings is proposed. Bare polyimide FBGs have a polyimide coating, but like regular non-coated FBGs. This gives polyimide FBGs a higher strain transfer ratio and response frequency. Bare polyimide FBGs can be considered as uncoated FBGs. The coupling of the matrix material of polyimide FBGs is improved as compared to FBGs without coating. In order to verify the capacity for surface strain measurement, polyimide FBGs are mounted to obtain the surface strain of a concrete specimen with SM130-700 interrogator from Micron Optics Incorporation (MOI with a sampling frequency maximum of 2000 Hz. The experiment demonstrates that polyimide FBGs work well even in dynamic surface strain measurements such as explosion measurement. Validation experiment in this paper also proposed that fewer strain transfer layers can increase dynamic response frequency and coupling between FBG and substrate.

  5. Single- and multiaxis fiber-grating-based strain sensors for civil structure applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Whitten L.; Udd, Eric; Seim, John M.; Laylor, Harold M.; McGill, Galen E.

    1998-09-01

    There are approximately 576,000 major bridges, 3.2 billion square feet of bridge deck, and 162,000 miles of highways making up a part of the civil infrastructure system in the United States. Fiber grating strain sensors have the ability to play an important role in the health monitoring of these structures. The advantages of fiber optic sensors including EMI resistance, unobtrusive size, multiplexing/distributed capabilities, and environmental ruggedness, make them a logical choice for structural monitoring.

  6. Strain rate effects on mechanical properties of fiber composites, part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the strain rate effects in fiber composites. Unidirectional composite specimens of boron/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy were tested to determine longitudinal, transverse and intralaminar (in-plane) shear properties. In the Longitudinal direction the Kevlar/epoxy shows a definite increase in both modulus and strength with strain rate. In the transverse direction, a general trend toward higher strength with strain rate is noticed. The intralaminar shear moduli and strengths of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy show a definite rise with strain rate.

  7. High-Tg TOPAS microstructured polymer optical fiber for fiber Bragg grating strain sensing at 110 degrees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Stefani, Alessio; Nielsen, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in an endlessly single-mode microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) made of humidity-insensitive high-Tg TOPAS cyclic olefin copolymer. The mPOF is the first made from grade 5013 TOPAS with a glass transition...... temperature of Tg = 135°C and we experimentally demonstrate high strain operation (2.5%) of the FBG at 98°C and stable operation up to a record high temperature of 110°C. The Bragg wavelengths of the FBGs are around 860 nm, where the propagation loss is 5.1dB/m, close to the fiber loss minimum of 3.67d...

  8. Temperature and strain measurements in concrete using micro-structure optical fiber sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Areias, Lou [EURIDICE/SCK - CEN, Mol (Belgium); Vrije Univ. Brussels (Belgium); Geernaert, Thomas; Sulejmani, Sanne [Vrije Univ. Brussels (Belgium); and others

    2015-07-01

    A recent test carried out to evaluate the construction feasibility of the Belgian supercontainer concept incorporated several types of state-of-the-art sensors and innovative monitoring techniques, including the use of different types of optical fiber sensors. One of these is a relatively new type of sensor developed by the Brussels Photonics Team (B-PHOT) of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. The sensor uses highly birefringent microstructured optical fibers equipped with fiber Bragg gratings (MOFBGs) sensors. They were embedded in a carbon-fiber reinforced composite plate to provide protection against the concrete's highly alkaline environment, facilitate installation in the concrete mould and allow the transfer of strain onto the fiber. The double reflection spectrum of the MOFBGs allows monitoring strain and temperature simultaneously. This paper presents results of temperature and strain measurements obtained with MOFBG sensors during a {sup 1}/{sub 2}-scale test performed in 2013. The results compare well with similar measurements obtained using conventional thermocouples and vibrating wire strain gauges.

  9. High Precision Temperature Insensitive Strain Sensor Based on Fiber-Optic Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-optic delay based strain sensor with high precision and temperature insensitivity was reported, which works on detecting the delay induced by strain instead of spectrum. In order to analyze the working principle of this sensor, the elastic property of fiber-optic delay was theoretically researched and the elastic coefficient was measured as 3.78 ps/km·με. In this sensor, an extra reference path was introduced to simplify the measurement of delay and resist the cross-effect of environmental temperature. Utilizing an optical fiber stretcher driven by piezoelectric ceramics, the performance of this strain sensor was tested. The experimental results demonstrate that temperature fluctuations contribute little to the strain error and that the calculated strain sensitivity is as high as 4.75 με in the range of 350 με. As a result, this strain sensor is proved to be feasible and practical, which is appropriate for strain measurement in a simple and economical way. Furthermore, on basis of this sensor, the quasi-distributed measurement could be also easily realized by wavelength division multiplexing and wavelength addressing for long-distance structure health and security monitoring.

  10. Integration of fiber Bragg grating optic sensors for strain detection in structures composed of CFRP composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jason; Barjasteh, Ehsan

    2017-04-01

    The study focuses on the formation of artificial neural pathways for the use of structural health monitoring in prosthesis by means of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) optic sensors to detect shifts in strain. Implementation of these fibers are embedded into carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) based structures. CFRP was considered for its wide use application in ankle-foot prosthesis, which undergoes high loads of stress and wear.. This method acts as a system of early detection which could prevent the prosthesis from critical failure due to previously undetected interior defects, further improving the patient's well being.

  11. Distributed Strain Measurement along a Concrete Beam via Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Bernini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural strain measurement of tension and compression in a 4 m long concrete beam was demonstrated with a distributed fiber-optic sensor portable system based on Brillouin scattering. Strain measurements provided by the fiber-optic sensor permitted to detect the formation of a crack in the beam resulting from the external applied load. The sensor system is valuable for structural monitoring applications, enabling the long-term performance and health of structures to be efficiently monitored.

  12. Integrating Fiber Optic Strain Sensors into Metal Using Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Adam; Norfolk, Mark; Wenning, Justin; Sheridan, John; Leser, Paul; Leser, Patrick; Newman, John A.

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing, a rather new three-dimensional (3D) printing technology, uses ultrasonic energy to produce metallurgical bonds between layers of metal foils near room temperature. This low temperature attribute of the process enables integration of temperature sensitive components, such as fiber optic strain sensors, directly into metal structures. This may be an enabling technology for Digital Twin applications, i.e., virtual model interaction and feedback with live load data. This study evaluates the consolidation quality, interface robustness, and load sensing limits of commercially available fiber optic strain sensors embedded into aluminum alloy 6061. Lastly, an outlook on the technology and its applications is described.

  13. Distributed Brillouin fiber optic strain monitoring applications in advanced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianini, Filippo; Cargnelutti, Mario; Di Tommaso, Angelo; Toffanin, Massimo

    2003-08-01

    Composite materials based on glass, carbon and aramid fibers have many advantages such as fast application, lightweight and corrosion resistance, and are widely diffused for manufacturing of tanks, pipings and for restoration, upgrade and seismic retrofit of structures and historical heritage. As several questions regarding long term durability of composite strengthenings remains still unsolved, monitoring of strain and temperature is strongly recommended, respectively to assess proper load transfer and no glass phase transition of the polymeric matrix. In this research work strain and temperature distributed sensing trough Brillouin scattering in single-mode optical fibers was used in different tests in order to understand the influence of different fiber coatings and embedding techniques. Pressure tests were performed on a GFRP piping with inhomogeneous strengthening layout and Brillouin strain data were compared with conventional strain gages. A smart CFRP material has been also developed and evaluated in a seismic retrofit application on an historical building dated 1500 that was seriously damaged in the earthquake of 1997. The developed embedding technique has been demonstrated successful to obtain fiber-optic smart composites with low optical losses, and the data comparison between Brillouin and resistive strain gauges confirms Brillouin technique is very effective for composite monitoring.

  14. Fiber Strain Measurement for Wide Region Quasidistributed Sensing by Optical Correlation Sensor with Region Separation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunjian Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The useful application of optical pulse correlation sensor for wide region quasidistributed fiber strain measurement is investigated. Using region separation techniques of wavelength multiplexing with FBGs and time multiplexing with intensity partial reflectors, the sensor measures the correlations between reference pulses and monitoring pulses from several cascadable selected sensing regions. This novel sensing system can select the regions and obtain the distributed strain information in any desired sensing region.

  15. Structural health monitoring by using fiber-optic distributed strain sensors with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we review our researches on the topics of the structural health monitoring (SHM) with the fiber-optic distributed strain sensor. Highly-dense information on strains in a structure can be useful to identify some kind of existing damages or applied loads in implementation of SHM. The fiber-optic distributed sensors developed by the authors have been applied to the damage detection of a single-lap joint and load identification of a beam simply supported. We confirmed that the applicability of the distributed sensor to SHM could be improved as making the spatial resolution higher. In addition, we showed that the simulation technique considering both structural and optical effects seamlessly in strain measurement could be powerful tools to evaluate the performance of a sensing system and design it for SHM. Finally, the technique for simultaneous distributed strain and temperature measurement using the PANDA-fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is shown in this paper, because problems caused by the cross-sensitivity toward strain and temperature would be always inevitable in strain measurement for SHM.

  16. Review of the Strain Modulation Methods Used in Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber Bragg grating (FBG is inherently sensitive to temperature and strain. By modulating FBG’s strain, various FBG sensors have been developed, such as sensors with enhanced or reduced temperature sensitivity, strain/displacement sensors, inclinometers, accelerometers, pressure meters, and magnetic field meters. This paper reviews the strain modulation methods used in these FBG sensors and categorizes them according to whether the strain of an FBG is changed evenly. Then, those even-strain-change methods are subcategorized into (1 attaching/embedding an FBG throughout to a base and (2 fixing the two ends of an FBG and (2.1 changing the distance between the two ends or (2.2 bending the FBG by applying a transverse force at the middle of the FBG. This review shows that the methods of “fixing the two ends” are prominent because of the advantages of large tunability and frequency modulation.

  17. Effects of pre-strain on the intrinsic pressure sensitivity of polymer optical fiber Bragg-gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Kristian Mølgaard; Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a scheme for improving the intrinsic pressure sensitivity of fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs) inscribed in polymer optical fibers by applying pre-strain in order to suppress the pressure induced mechanical contraction of the fiber. This contraction would otherwise contrib...

  18. All-solid birefringent hybrid photonic crystal fiber based interferometric sensor for measurement of strain and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Scott Wu; Zhang, A. Ping

    2011-01-01

    A highly sensitive fiber-optic interferometric sensor based on an all-solid birefringent hybrid photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is demonstrated for measuring strain and temperature. A strain sensitivity of similar to 23.8 pm/mu epsilon and a thermal sensitivity of similar to-1.12 nm/degrees C...

  19. LIM domains target actin regulators paxillin and zyxin to sites of stress fiber strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Smith

    Full Text Available Contractile actomyosin stress fibers are critical for maintaining the force balance between the interior of the cell and its environment. Consequently, the actin cytoskeleton undergoes dynamic mechanical loading. This results in spontaneous, stochastic, highly localized strain events, characterized by thinning and elongation within a discrete region of stress fiber. Previous work showed the LIM-domain adaptor protein, zyxin, is essential for repair and stabilization of these sites. Using live imaging, we show paxillin, another LIM-domain adaptor protein, is also recruited to stress fiber strain sites. Paxillin recruitment to stress fiber strain sites precedes zyxin recruitment. Zyxin and paxillin are each recruited independently of the other. In cells lacking paxillin, actin recovery is abrogated, resulting in slowed actin recovery and increased incidence of catastrophic stress fiber breaks. For both paxillin and zyxin, the LIM domains are necessary and sufficient for recruitment. This work provides further evidence of the critical role of LIM-domain proteins in responding to mechanical stress in the actin cytoskeleton.

  20. On the Effects of the Lateral Strains on the Fiber Bragg Grating Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a combined experimental-numerical based work was undertaken to investigate the Bragg wavelength shift response of an embedded FBG sensor when subjected to different conditions of multi-axial loading (deformation. The following cases are examined: (a when an isotropic host material with no constrains on planes normal to the embedded sensor’s axis is biaxially loaded, (b when the same isotropic host material is subjected to hydrostatic pressure and (c when the hydrostatically loaded host material is an anisotropic one, as in the case of a composite material, where the optical fiber is embedded along the reinforcing fibers. The comparison of the experimental results and the finite element simulations shows that, when the axial strain on the FBG sensor is the dominant component, the standard wavelength-shift strain relation can be used even if large lateral strains apply on the sensor. However when this is not the case, large errors may be introduced in the conversion of the wavelength to axial strains on the fiber. This situation arises when the FBG is placed parallel to high modulus reinforcing fibers of a polymer composite.

  1. On the Effects of the Lateral Strains on the Fiber Bragg Grating Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Marco; Karalekas, Dimitris; Botsis, John

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a combined experimental-numerical based work was undertaken to investigate the Bragg wavelength shift response of an embedded FBG sensor when subjected to different conditions of multi-axial loading (deformation). The following cases are examined: (a) when an isotropic host material with no constrains on planes normal to the embedded sensor's axis is biaxially loaded, (b) when the same isotropic host material is subjected to hydrostatic pressure and (c) when the hydrostatically loaded host material is an anisotropic one, as in the case of a composite material, where the optical fiber is embedded along the reinforcing fibers. The comparison of the experimental results and the finite element simulations shows that, when the axial strain on the FBG sensor is the dominant component, the standard wavelength-shift strain relation can be used even if large lateral strains apply on the sensor. However when this is not the case, large errors may be introduced in the conversion of the wavelength to axial strains on the fiber. This situation arises when the FBG is placed parallel to high modulus reinforcing fibers of a polymer composite. PMID:23429580

  2. Compensation of thermal strain induced polarization nonreciprocity in dual-polarization fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rongya; Li, Yulin; Deng, Sheng; He, Dong; Peng, Chao; Li, Zhengbin

    2017-10-30

    Dual-polarization interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) is a novel scheme in which the polarization nonreciprocal (PN) phase error of the two orthogonal polarizations can be optically compensated. In this work, we investigate the effective of PN phase error compensation under varying temperature. It is proved that, the thermally induced strain deforms the fiber, and results in perturbations on the birefringence and polarization cross coupling which degrades the IFOG's stability. A wave propagation model and analytical expressions of PN phase error are derived by using coupled-wave equation and Jones matrix. We theoretically and experimentally verify that, although the single-mode (SM) and polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber coils behave different owing to their intrinsic properties of wave propagation, the thermal strain induced PN phase error can still be compensated under slow and adiabatic temperature variations. This could be a promising feature to overcome the temperature fragility of IFOG.

  3. Fiber Optic Sensor Embedment Study for Multi-Parameter Strain Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drissi-Habti, Monssef; Raman, Venkadesh; Khadour, Aghiad; Timorian, Safiullah

    2017-03-23

    The fiber optic sensors (FOSs) are commonly used for large-scale structure monitoring systems for their small size, noise free and low electrical risk characteristics. Embedded fiber optic sensors (FOSs) lead to micro-damage in composite structures. This damage generation threshold is based on the coating material of the FOSs and their diameter. In addition, embedded FOSs are aligned parallel to reinforcement fibers to avoid micro-damage creation. This linear positioning of distributed FOS fails to provide all strain parameters. We suggest novel sinusoidal sensor positioning to overcome this issue. This method tends to provide multi-parameter strains in a large surface area. The effectiveness of sinusoidal FOS positioning over linear FOS positioning is studied under both numerical and experimental methods. This study proves the advantages of the sinusoidal positioning method for FOS in composite material's bonding.

  4. Effect of Strain Rates and Pre-Twist on Tensile Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Tension. Polymer 2012, 53, 5568–5574. 9. Wilfong, R. E.; Zimmerman, J. Strength and Durability Characteristics of Kevlar Aramid Fiber . Journal of...Effect of Strain Rates and Pre-Twist on Tensile Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber by Brett D. Sanborn and Tusit T. Weerasooriya ARL-TR...6403 April 2013 Effect of Strain Rates and Pre-Twist on Tensile Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber Brett D. Sanborn Oak Ridge Institute

  5. Effect of dietary fiber and genetic strain on the performance and energy balance of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RV Krás

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary fiber on the performance and energy balance of broiler chickens of a fast-growing strain (Cobb500 and a slow-growing strain (Label Rokens during the period of 1 one to 42 days of used In total, 360 male broilers (240 fast-grorain and 120 slow-grtrainwere, housed in collective cages. A completely randomized experimental dewith in a 3x2 factorial arrangement was applied, consisting of three groups of birds (slow-growing - SG; fast-growing fed ad libitum - FGAL; and fast-growing pair-fed with SG broilers - FGPF and two iso-protein dis (a 3100 kcal ME/kg low-fiber diet and a 2800 kcal ME/kg high-fiber diet- Hwith containing 14% wheat bran and 4% oat hulls. Dietary fiber level did not affect feed intake (FI; however, it resulted in lower weight gain (WG and worse feed conversion ratio (FCR (p < 0.001 in birds fed the HFD diet due to its lower energy content. The FGPF group presented higher WG than SG and better FCR (p < 0.001, indicating that fast-growing birds present better performance than SG broilers, even under restricted feed intake. The SG group retained more energy relative to body weight (p < 0.001, which is associated to higher body fat retention in this strain (p < 0.001. The slow-growing strain did not present better use of high-fiber diet than fast-growing strain as expected.

  6. Health monitoring of an adhesive joint using a multiaxis fiber grating strain sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Whitten L.; Udd, Eric; Morrell, Mike; Seim, John M.; Perez, Ignacio M.; Trego, Angela

    1999-01-01

    The use of adhesive joints in aerospace structures is becoming increasingly important. From this, arises the problem of assessing joint integrity quickly, non- intrusively, accurately, and inexpensively. Current methods of assessing joint integrity, such as ultrasonics and x- rays, are time intensive and difficult to interpret. Blue Road Research's solution to monitoring adhesive joint integrity quickly and accurately is to embed non-intrusive, multidimensional optical fiber grating strain sensors into or adjacent to the joints. Aluminum double lap adhesive joints were instrumented with the multi-axis grating strain sensors into or adjacent to the joints. Aluminum double lap adhesive joints were instrumented with the multi-axis senors and subjected to tension and fatigue test. Each specimen contained one sensor located either near the bond, embedded at the edge of the bond, or embedded towards the inner bond area. The joints with senors embedded into the adhesive showed minimal strength degradation. Basically, the multiaxis fiber grating strain sensors were found to provide information about transverse strain, axial strain, and transverse strain gradients that can provide important information throughout the adhesive joint. By changing the orientation of the sensor, shear strain and its effects can be clearly measured.

  7. Dynamic fiber Bragg grating strain sensor interrogation with real-time measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinwoo; Kwon, Yong Seok; Ko, Myeong Ock; Jeon, Min Yong

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate a 1550 nm band resonance Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) fiber laser with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array. Using the FDML fiber laser, we successfully demonstrate real-time monitoring of dynamic FBG strain sensor interrogation for structural health monitoring. The resonance FDML fiber laser consists of six multiplexed FBGs, which are arranged in series with delay fiber lengths. It is operated by driving the fiber Fabry-Perot tunable filter (FFP-TF) with a sinusoidal waveform at a frequency corresponding to the round-trip time of the laser cavity. Each FBG forms a laser cavity independently in the FDML fiber laser because the light travels different length for each FBG. The very closely positioned two FBGs in a pair are operated simultaneously with a frequency in the FDML fiber laser. The spatial positions of the sensing pair can be distinguished from the variation of the applied frequency to the FFP-TF. One of the FBGs in the pair is used as a reference signal and the other one is fixed on the piezoelectric transducer stack to apply the dynamic strain. We successfully achieve real-time measurement of the abrupt change of the frequencies applied to the FBG without any signal processing delay. The real-time monitoring system is displayed simultaneously on the monitor for the variation of the two peaks, the modulation interval of the two peaks, and their fast Fourier transform spectrum. The frequency resolution of the dynamic variation could reach up to 0.5 Hz for 2 s integration time. It depends on the integration time to measure the dynamic variation. We believe that the real-time monitoring system will have a potential application for structural health monitoring.

  8. Strain monitoring of cement-based materials with embedded polyvinyl alcohol - carbon nanotube (PVA-CNT fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi S. Metaxa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the possibility of exploiting innovative polyvinyl alcohol fibers reinforced with carbon nanotubes (PVA-CNT fiber as a strain sensor in cement mortars used in the restoration of Cultural Heritage Monuments. Two types of PVA-CNT fibers were embedded in the matrix at a short distance from the bottom of the beam and their readings were correlated with traditional sensors, e.g. strain gauges and Fiber Optic Bragg Gratings. The Electrical Resistance Change (ERC of the embedded PVA-CNT fiber was in-situ monitored during four-point bending mechanical tests. For the case of coated PVA-CNT fiber, a linear correlation of the applied strain at the bottom surface of the specimen along with ERC values of the fiber was noticed for the low strain regime. For the case of incremental increasing loading – unloading loops, the coated and annealed PVA-CNT fiber gave the best results either as embedded or as ‘surface attached’ sensor that exhibited linear correlation of ERC with applied strain for the low applied strain regime as well as hysteresis loops during unloading. The article discusses their high potential to be exploited as strain/damage sensor in applications of civil engineering as well as in restoration of Monuments of Cultural Heritage.

  9. Drift-eliminating method of intensity demodulation on a chirped fiber grating strain sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Li, Weilai; Liu, Jie

    2014-05-01

    It is quite possible to detect the strain of a sample based on a chirped fiber grating (CFG) sensor, which has a wider bandwidth of light signal than a fiber Bragg grating. Usually, environmental factors play negative roles in the process of intensity demodulation. A drift-eliminating method of CFG intensity demodulation has been created and tested in our lab. Three CFG sensors were involved in this research. Two of them with close wavelength bands connected in series were used as a strain sensing unit; the third one was used as a referencing grating working within the reflective wavelength spectrum of the other two. It is shown that the signal ratio of the sensing unit and the referencing grating is a linear function of the loading strain. The linearity is as high as 99.79%.

  10. Fiber Optic Sensing Monitors Strain and Reduces Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In applications where stress on a structure may vary widely and have an unknown impact on integrity, a common engineering strategy has been overbuilding to ensure a sufficiently robust design. While this may be appropriate in applications where weight concerns are not paramount, space applications demand a bare minimum of mass, given astronomical per-pound launch costs. For decades, the preferred solution was the tactic of disassembly and investigation between flights. Knowing there must be a better way, Dr. Mark Froggatt, of Langley Research Center, explored alternate means of monitoring stresses and damage to the space shuttle. While a tear-it-apart-and-have-a-look strategy was effective, it was also a costly and time consuming process that risked further stresses through the very act of disassembly and reassembly. An alternate way of monitoring the condition of parts under the enormous stresses of space flight was needed. Froggatt and his colleagues at Langley built an early-warning device to provide detailed information about even minuscule cracks and deformations by etching a group of tiny lines, or grating, on a fiber optic cable five-thousandths of an inch thick with ultraviolet light. By then gluing the fiber to the side of a part, such as a fuel tank, and shining a laser beam down its length, reflected light indicated which gratings were under stress. Inferring this data from measurements in light rather than in bonded gauges saved additional weight. Various shuttle components now employ the ultrasonic dynamic vector stress sensor (UDVSS), allowing stress detection by measuring light beamed from a built-in mini-laser. By measuring changes in dynamic directional stress occurring in a material or structure, and including phase-locked loop, synchronous amplifier, and contact probe, the UDVSS proved especially useful among manufacturers of aerospace and automotive structures for stress testing and design evaluation. Engineers could ensure safety in airplanes

  11. Simultaneous strain and temperature measurement using a single fiber Bragg grating embedded in a composite laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Berggren, S.; Zhu, Y.; Han, M.; Huang, H.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a fiber Bragg gating (FBG) sensor that can be surface mounted for simultaneous strain and temperature measurements. By embedding a conventional FBG sensor in a composite laminate, local birefringence is introduced, which causes the bandwidth of the FBG spectrum to vary with strain as well as temperature. As such, temperature and strain can be simultaneously determined from two FBG spectral parameters, i.e. the spectral bandwidth and the Bragg wavelength. Techniques for improving the spectrum of the FBG-composite sensor and for inversely determining the strain and temperature from the measured FBG spectral parameters are discussed. Thermal–mechanical testing of the FBG-composite sensor was carried out to validate the sensor performance. The measurement errors, within one standard deviation, for the strain and temperature measurements were found to be ±62 με and ±1.94 °C, respectively.

  12. Assessment of subendocardial vs. subepicardial left ventricular twist using tagged MRI images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Sahba, Nima

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the normal value of 3D left ventricular (LV) twist in subendocardial, mid-wall and subepicardial layers, as well as to study the effects of aging on 3D LV twist by tagged MR motion tracking techniques. Three dimensional motion detection based on 3D tagged MR images is robust to out-of-plane motion error; while 2D motion detection is inherently unable to analyze the 3D cardiac motion and may lead to inaccurate results. The 3D LV volumetric images were acquired in 52 normal adult subjects (aged 21-82) and were analyzed by using 3D HARmonic phase (HARP) technique. HARP technique provided the 3D displacement fields and the displacements were utilized to compute the rotational values. LV twist was defined as apical rotation relative to the basal rotation, in the 3D coordinates. The LV twist values of subendocardial, mid-wall and subepicardial layers were analyzed separately. The measured parameters in this study were: peak apical rotation, peak basal rotation, and peak LV twist. Looking at the apex, the normal LV maintains a clockwise rotation in the LV basal plane and a counterclockwise rotation in the LV apical plane. In general, the apical and basal rotation values increase during the aging process, leading to an increased value of LV twist. Peak epicardial LV twist is (10.4±2.6 degrees) which is lower than the mid-wall LV twist (11.3±2.2 degrees) and endocardial LV twist (12.1±2.6 degrees) in the young group (21-35 years old). Also, peak epicardial LV twist is (12.2±2.6 degrees) which is lower than the mid-wall LV twist (14.4±2.8 degrees) and endocardial LV twist (14.7±2.5 degrees) in the middle aged group (21-35 years old). In a similar way, peak epicardial LV twist is (14.8±2.9 degrees) which is lower than the mid-wall LV twist (15.7±3.6 degrees) and endocardial LV twist (16.7±3.0 degrees) in the old group (50-65 years old). Regarding the older group (more than 65 years old), peak epicardial LV twist is (15.9±3

  13. Strain Wave Acquisition by a Fiber Optic Coherent Sensor for Impact Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Sbarufatti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber optic sensing technology for high frequency dynamics detection is proposed in this paper, specifically tailored for structural health monitoring applications based on strain wave analysis, for both passive impact identification and active Lamb wave monitoring. The sensing solution relies on a fiber optic-based interferometric architecture associated to an innovative coherent detection scheme, which retrieves in a completely passive way the high-frequency phase information of the received optical signal. The sensing fiber can be arranged into different layouts, depending on the requirement of the specific application, in order to enhance the sensor sensitivity while still ensuring a limited gauge length if punctual measures are required. For active Lamb wave monitoring, this results in a sensing fiber arranged in multiple loops glued on an aluminum thin panel in order to increase the phase signal only in correspondence to the sensing points of interest. Instead, for passive impact identification, the required sensitivity is guaranteed by simply exploiting a longer gauge length glued to the structure. The fiber optic coherent (FOC sensor is exploited to detect the strain waves emitted by a piezoelectric transducer placed on the aluminum panel or generated by an impulse hammer, respectively. The FOC sensor measurements have been compared with both a numerical model based on Finite Elements and traditional piezoelectric sensors, confirming a good agreement between experimental and simulated results for both active and passive impact monitoring scenarios.

  14. Strain Wave Acquisition by a Fiber Optic Coherent Sensor for Impact Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarufatti, Claudio; Beligni, Alessio; Gilioli, Andrea; Ferrario, Maddalena; Mattarei, Marco; Martinelli, Mario; Giglio, Marco

    2017-07-13

    A novel fiber optic sensing technology for high frequency dynamics detection is proposed in this paper, specifically tailored for structural health monitoring applications based on strain wave analysis, for both passive impact identification and active Lamb wave monitoring. The sensing solution relies on a fiber optic-based interferometric architecture associated to an innovative coherent detection scheme, which retrieves in a completely passive way the high-frequency phase information of the received optical signal. The sensing fiber can be arranged into different layouts, depending on the requirement of the specific application, in order to enhance the sensor sensitivity while still ensuring a limited gauge length if punctual measures are required. For active Lamb wave monitoring, this results in a sensing fiber arranged in multiple loops glued on an aluminum thin panel in order to increase the phase signal only in correspondence to the sensing points of interest. Instead, for passive impact identification, the required sensitivity is guaranteed by simply exploiting a longer gauge length glued to the structure. The fiber optic coherent (FOC) sensor is exploited to detect the strain waves emitted by a piezoelectric transducer placed on the aluminum panel or generated by an impulse hammer, respectively. The FOC sensor measurements have been compared with both a numerical model based on Finite Elements and traditional piezoelectric sensors, confirming a good agreement between experimental and simulated results for both active and passive impact monitoring scenarios.

  15. Optical fiber strain sensor for application in intelligent intruder detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stańczyk, Tomasz; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Szostkiewicz, Lukasz; Bienkowska, Beata; Kunicki, Daniel; Murawski, Michal; Mergo, Pawel; Nasilowski, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays technology allows to create highly effective Intruder Detection Systems (IDS), that are able to detect the presence of an intruder within a defined area. In such systems the best performance can be achieved by combining different detection techniques in one system. One group of devices that can be applied in an IDS, are devices based on Fiber Optic Sensors (FOS). The FOS benefits from numerous advantages of optical fibers like: small size, light weight or high sensitivity. In this work we present a novel Microstructured Optical Fiber (MOF) characterized by increased strain sensitivity dedicated to distributed acoustic sensing for intelligent intruder detection systems. By designing the MOF with large air holes in close proximity to a fiber core, we increased the effective refractive index sensitivity to longitudinal strain. The presented fiber can be easily integrated in a floor system in order to detect any movement in the investigated area. We believe that sensors, based on the presented MOF, due to its numerous advantages, can find application in intelligent IDS.

  16. Strain measurements by fiber Bragg grating sensors for in situ pile loading tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia; Straub, Tilmann; Naumann, Marcel; Borm, Günter; Lauerer, Robert; Beck, Christoph; Schwarz, Wolfgang

    2003-07-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor network has been installed into a large diameter concrete pile on a real construction site. The intention was to monitor its deformation behavior during several quasi-static loading cycles. The skin friction between pile and subsoil affecting the ultimate bearing capacity of the pile as well as the settlement behavior of the structure under investigation has been derived from our measurements. A comparison between the results of the fiber Bragg grating sensors and conventional concrete strain gages (CSG) has shown excellent correspondence.

  17. Embedded fiber-optic strain sensors for process monitoring of composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Craig Michael

    1997-11-01

    A new class of mechanical structures, termed 'smart' or 'adaptive' structures, has been proposed by engineers for use in aerospace, civil, and industrial applications. These structures integrate sensors and actuators directly into the materials from which they are formed, and are envisioned to have the ability to monitor themselves during manufacturing, assess their structural integrity, adapt to changing conditions, and perform self-repair. Two of the key enabling technologies for smart structures are fiber optic sensors and composite materials. Fiber optic sensors are capable of responding to a variety of environmental stimuli, such as temperature and strain. These small sensors can be embedded within polymer-matrix composite materials to form the basic building block of a smart structure. In the first part of this research, the ability of fiber optic sensors to monitor residual stresses generated during the processing of composites is investigated. A new measurement technique is described-the embedded fiber optic sensor (EFOS) method-in which residual stresses are computed from measurements of internal strain and temperature using a viscoelastic, cure- dependent process model. The EFOS method has the advantage that it is non-destructive and provides information on residual stress development during cure in real-time. Experiments were performed to test the method, and the resulting residual stress measurements compared favorably with prior theoretical predictions and measurements by a destructive technique. The EFOS method was also used to accurately predict the residual-stress induced warpage in a non-symmetric composite sample. In the second part of this work, the development of a multi-parameter fiber optic sensor is presented which is created by forming two Bragg gratings at widely spaced wavelengths in polarization-maintaining optical fiber. The spectra of the light reflected from this sensor contains four peaks which may be used, in principle, to determine

  18. Industrial Qualification Process for Optical Fibers Distributed Strain and Temperature Sensing in Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Delepine-Lesoille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and strain monitoring will be implemented in the envisioned French geological repository for high- and intermediate-level long-lived nuclear wastes. Raman and Brillouin scatterings in optical fibers are efficient industrial methods to provide distributed temperature and strain measurements. Gamma radiation and hydrogen release from nuclear wastes can however affect the measurements. An industrial qualification process is successfully proposed and implemented. Induced measurement uncertainties and their physical origins are quantified. The optical fiber composition influence is assessed. Based on radiation-hard fibers and carbon-primary coatings, we showed that the proposed system can provide accurate temperature and strain measurements up to 0.5 MGy and 100% hydrogen concentration in the atmosphere, over 200 m distance range. The selected system was successfully implemented in the Andra underground laboratory, in one-to-one scale mockup of future cells, into concrete liners. We demonstrated the efficiency of simultaneous Raman and Brillouin scattering measurements to provide both strain and temperature distributed measurements. We showed that 1.3 μm working wavelength is in favor of hazardous environment monitoring.

  19. Bragg Gratings in Polarization Maintaining Optical Fiber as Three Dimensional Strain Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Joel

    Fiber-Bragg Gratings (FBG) for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) have been studied extensively as they offer electrically passive operation, electromagnetic interference (EMI) immunity, high sensitivity and multiplexing as compared to conventional electric strain sensors. FBG sensors written within polarization maintaining (PM) optical fiber offer additional dimensions of strain measurement, greatly reducing the number of sensors needed to properly monitor a structure. This reduction however, adds complexity to the dis- crimination of the sensor's optical response to its corresponding applied strains. This dissertation defines the set of algorithms needed to measure planar strain using PM-FBGs exclusively. It defines the minimum number of sensors needed to reconstruct the full state of strain, epsilon and the maximum number of strain tensor components a single PM-FBG is capable of measuring. Two experiments were performed under the same test specifications; a single PM-FBG and 2 multiplexed PM-FBGs in a rosette pattern adhered to a test spec- imen subject to uniaxial tension. The far field strain was measured at the location of the sensor using only the optical response and PM-FBG axes orientation with respect to the specimen axes. Strains at the surface of the specimen were measured using Digital Image Correlation (DIC) analysis and an electronic extensometer. The PM-FBG measurements where then compared to the DIC/extensometer data for validation. The comparison of the strains epsilonxx, epsilon yy, and epsilonxy resulted in a high correlation, averaging .97 between the strain mea- surement techniques. The PM-FBG measured specimen surface strains with low percent error values (approximately 20%). PM-FBG sensitivity is greatly affected by the sensor's material properties and installation or embedding techniques. The algorithm for measuring a full state of planar strain at a point presented in this dissertation and is validated though experimental analysis. It can

  20. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  1. An In-Reflection Strain Sensing Head Based on a Hi-Bi Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Lopez-Amo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A photonic crystal fiber-based sensing head is proposed for strain measurements. The sensor comprises a Hi-Bi PCF sensing head to measure interferometric signals in-reflection. An experimental background study of the sensing head is conducted through an optical backscatter reflectometer confirming the theoretical predictions, also included. A cost effective setup is proposed where a laser is used as illumination source, which allows accurate high precision strain measurements. Thus, a sensitivity of ~7.96 dB/me was achieved in a linear region of 1,200 μe.

  2. Effects of fiber pre-strain on the healing efficiency of thermoset polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajisafe, Oludayo

    -tensile load. The Ultrasonic C-scan and SEM were used to examine the healed cracks. It was found that the beams with 100% pre-strained fiber were able to recover repeatedly about 50% of its peak tensile strength; the beams with 50% pre-strained fiber, 43%; and the beams with un-stretched fibers were able to recover about 21% of its original peak tensile strength. Also it was found that the higher the pre-tension the higher the recovery stress seen during the healing cycle.

  3. Time-domain multiplexed high resolution fiber optics strain sensor system based on temporal response of fiber Fabry-Perot interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiageng; Liu, Qingwen; He, Zuyuan

    2017-09-04

    We developed a multiplexed strain sensor system with high resolution using fiber Fabry-Perot interferometers (FFPI) as sensing elements. The temporal responses of the FFPIs excited by rectangular laser pulses are used to obtain the strain applied on each FFPI. The FFPIs are connected by cascaded couplers and delay fiber rolls for the time-domain multiplexing. A compact optoelectronic system performing closed-loop cyclic interrogation is employed to improve the sensing resolution and the frequency response. In the demonstration experiment, 3-channel strain sensing with resolutions better than 0.1 nε and frequency response higher than 100 Hz is realized.

  4. Temperature Compensated Strain Sensor Based on Cascaded Sagnac Interferometers and All-Solid Birefringent Hybrid Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Wu; He, Sailing

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a temperature compensated strain sensor with two cascaded Sagnac interferometers, that provide strain sensing and temperature compensation, respectively. The Sagnac interferometers use an all-solid hybrid photonic crystal fiber with stress-induced birefringence. The stress......-induced birefringent fiber is known to offer the maximum strain sensitivity, but also to suffer from temperature crosstalk. Our experimental results show that the cascaded Sagnac sensor can suppress the crosstalk to a temperature upto 0.33 με/ºC, while still providing a high strain sensitivity of ~25.6 pm}/με....

  5. Characterization of embedded fiber optic strain sensors into metallic structures via ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomer, John J.; Hehr, Adam J.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors measure deviation in a reflected wavelength of light to detect in-situ strain. These sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference, and the inclusion of multiple FBGs on the same fiber allows for a seamlessly integrated sensing network. FBGs are attractive for embedded sensing in aerospace applications due to their small noninvasive size and prospect of constant, real-time nondestructive evaluation. In this study, FBG sensors are embedded in aluminum 6061 via ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM), a rapid prototyping process that uses high power ultrasonic vibrations to weld similar and dissimilar metal foils together. UAM was chosen due to the desire to embed FBG sensors at low temperatures, a requirement that excludes other additive processes such as selective laser sintering or fusion deposition modeling. In this paper, the embedded FBGs are characterized in terms of birefringence losses, post embedding strain shifts, consolidation quality, and strain sensing performance. Sensors embedded into an ASTM test piece are compared against an exterior surface mounted foil strain gage at both room and elevated temperatures using cyclic tensile tests.

  6. Strain Transmission Characteristics of Packaged Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung In; Yoo, Seung Jae; Kim, Eun Ho; Lee, In [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Il Bum; Yoon, Dong Jin [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Fiber Bragg grating(FBG) sensor arrays can be used to monitor the mechanical behavior of the large composite structures such as wind turbine rotor blades and aircrafts. However, brittle FBG sensors, especially multiplexed FBG sensors are easily damaged when they are installed in the flexible structures. As a protection of brittle FBG sensors, epoxy packaged FBG sensors have been presented in this paper. Finite element analysis and experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of adhesives, packaging materials and the bonding layer thickness on the strain transmission. Two types of epoxy were used for packaging FBG sensors and the sensor probes were attached with various bonding layer thickness. It was observed that thin bonding layer with high elastic modulus ratio of the adhesive to packaging provided good strain transmission. However, the strain transmission was significantly decreased when elastic modulus of the adhesive was much lower than the packaged FBG sensor probe's one

  7. Ultra-High Sensitive Strain Sensor Based on Post-Processed Optical Fiber Bragg Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta S. Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An ultra-high sensitive strain sensor is proposed. The sensing head, based on the post-processing of a fiber Bragg grating, is used to perform passive and active strain measurements. Both wavelength and full width half maximum dependences with the applied strain are studied for the passive sensor, where maximum sensitivities of 104.1 pm/µε and 61.6 pm/µε are respectively obtained. When combining the high performance of this sensor with a ring laser cavity configuration, the Bragg grating will act as a filter and high resolution measurements can be performed. With the proposed sensor, a resolution of 700 nε is achieved.

  8. Application of fiber Bragg grating sensors to real-time strain measurement of cryogenic tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Nobuo; Mizutani, Tadahito; Hayashi, Kentaro; Okabe, Yoji

    2003-08-01

    Although many researches of strain measurement using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were conducted, there were few applications of FBG sensors to spacecraft in operation. It is very significant to develop an onboard system for the real-time strain measurement during the flight operation. In the present research, the real-time strain measurement of a composite liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank, which consisted of CFRP and aluminum liner, was attempted. Adhesive property of the FBG sensors was investigated first of all. As a result, UV coated FBG sensors and polyurethane adhesive were adopted. Then, reflection spectra from FBG sensors were measured through the tensile test at liquid helium (LHe) temperature. Since the center wavelength shifted in proportion to the applied strain, the FBG sensor was suitable as a precise strain sensor even at LHe temperature. Next, the development of an onboard FBG demodulator was discussed. This onboard demodulator was designed for weight saving to be mounted on a reusable rocket vehicle test (RVT) operated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). FBG sensors were bonded on the surface of the composite LH2 tank for the RVT. Then, strain measurement using the onboard demodulator was conducted through the cryogenic pressure test of the tank and compared with the result measured using the optical spectrum analyzer (OSA).

  9. Three-axial Fiber Bragg Grating Strain Sensor for Volcano Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Umberto; Beverini, Nicolò; Carbone, Daniele; Carelli, Giorgio; Francesconi, Francesco; Gambino, Salvatore; Maccioni, Enrico; Morganti, Mauro; Orazi, Massimo; Peluso, Rosario; Sorrentino, Fiodor

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic and FBGs sensors have attained a large diffusion in the last years as cost-effective monitoring and diagnostic devices in civil engineering. However, in spite of their potential impact, these instruments have found very limited application in geophysics. In order to study earthquakes and volcanoes, the measurement of crustal deformation is of crucial importance. Stress and strain behaviour is among the best indicators of changes in the activity of volcanoes .. Deep bore-hole dilatometers and strainmeters have been employed for volcano monitoring. These instruments are very sensitive and reliable, but are not cost-effective and their installation requires a large effort. Fiber optic based devices offer low cost, small size, wide frequency band, easier deployment and even the possibility of creating a local network with several sensors linked in an array. We present the realization, installation and first results of a shallow-borehole (8,5 meters depth) three-axial Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) strain sensor prototype. This sensor has been developed in the framework of the MED-SUV project and installed on Etna volcano, in the facilities of the Serra La Nave astrophysical observatory. The installation siteis about 7 Km South-West of the summit craters, at an elevation of about 1740 m. The main goal of our work is the realization of a three-axial device having a high resolution and accuracy in static and dynamic strain measurements, with special attention to the trade-off among resolution, cost and power consumption. The sensor structure and its read-out system are innovative and offer practical advantages in comparison with traditional strain meters. Here we present data collected during the first five months of operation. In particular, the very clear signals recorded in the occurrence of the Central Italy seismic event of October 30th demonstrate the performances of our device.

  10. Field Strain Measurement on the Fiber-Epoxy Scale in CFRPs

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Ran

    2015-06-08

    Laminated composites are materials with complex architecture made of continuous fibers (usually glass or carbon) embedded within a polymeric resin. The properties of the raw materials can vary from one point to another due to different local processing conditions or complex geometrical features for example. A first step towards the identification of these spatially varying material parameters is to image with precision the displacement fields in this complex microstructure when subjected to mechanical loading. Secondary electron images obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and then numerically deformed are post-processed by either local subset-based digital image correlation (DIC) or global finite-element based DIC to measure the displacement and strain fields at the fiber-matrix scale in a cross-ply composite. It is shown that when global DIC is applied with a conformal mesh, it can capture more accurate local variations in the strain fields as it takes into account the underlying microstructure. In comparison to subset DIC, global DIC is better suited for capturing gradients across the fiber-matrix interfaces.

  11. Fiber Optic Sensors for Health Monitoring of Morphing Airframes. Part 1; Bragg Grating Strain and Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Karen; Brown, Timothy; Rogowski, Robert; Jensen, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors are being developed for health monitoring of future aircraft. Aircraft health monitoring involves the use of strain, temperature, vibration and chemical sensors to infer integrity of the aircraft structure. Part 1 of this two part series describes sensors that will measure load and temperature signatures of these structures. In some cases a single fiber may be used for measuring these parameters. Part 2 will describe techniques for using optical fibers to monitor composite cure in real time during manufacture and to monitor in-service integrity of composite structures using a single fiber optic sensor capable of measuring multiple chemical and physical parameters. The facilities for fabricating optical fiber and associated sensors and the methods of demodulating Bragg gratings for strain measurement will be described.

  12. Mechanical strain-amplifying transducer for fiber Bragg grating sensors with applications in structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Urszula; Geernaert, Thomas; De Pauw, Ben; Anastasopoulos, Dimitrios; Reynders, Edwin; De Roeck, Guido; Berghmans, Francis

    2017-04-01

    A well-known structural health monitoring method used to detect and locate damage in civil engineering structures is vibration-based damage identification. It typically monitors the civil structure over time to spot slow or sudden changes in its natural frequencies, damping factors or modal displacements. This approach can prove very powerful, but the sensitivity of those properties to local damage can be rather low. In addition, their cross-sensitivity to environmental influences may completely mask the effect of damage, even of severe damage. Instead one can consider the modal strains and curvatures, which are much more sensitive to local damage, but direct (quasi-)distributed monitoring of these quantities with sufficient strain resolution as well as adequate spatial resolution is not straightforward with current measurement techniques. This stems from the small (sub-microstrain) amplitudes of the strain levels occurring following ambient or operational excitation of the structure under test. To deal with this issue we propose and demonstrate a novel mechanical transducer that amplifies the strain applied to an optical fiber Bragg grating sensor with a factor of about 36. In addition the transducer resonance frequencies are sufficiently high to ensure accurate dynamic strain monitoring of civil structures under ambient excitation.

  13. Comparison of initial cell retention and clearance kinetics after subendocardial or subepicardial injections of endothelial progenitor cells in a canine myocardial infarction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrea J; Sabondjian, Eric; Sykes, Jane; Deans, Lela; Zhu, Wendy; Lu, Xiangru; Feng, Qingping; Prato, Frank S; Wisenberg, Gerald

    2010-03-01

    Neither intravenous nor intracoronary routes provide targeted stem cell delivery to recently infarcted myocardium in sufficient quantities. Direct routes appear preferable. However, most prior studies have used epicardial injections, which are not practical for routine clinical use. The objective of this study was to compare cell retention and clearance kinetics between a subepicardial and a subendocardial technique. We evaluated 7 dogs with each technique, using (111)In-tropolone-labeled endothelial progenitor cells and serial SPECT/CT for 15 d after injection. In vivo indium imaging demonstrated comparable degrees of retention: 57% +/- 15% for the subepicardial injections and 54% +/- 26% for the subendocardial injections. Clearance half-lives were also similar at 69 +/- 26 and 60 +/- 21 h, respectively. This study demonstrates that subendocardial injections, clinically more practical, show clearance kinetics comparable to those of subepicardial injections and will facilitate the ultimate clinical use of this treatment modality.

  14. Prediction of the Elastic-Plastic Stress/Strain Response for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2009-01-26

    This paper proposes a model to predict the elastic-plastic response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber orientation was predicted using the anisotropic rotary diffusion model recently developed by Phelps and Tucker for LFTs. An incremental procedure using the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method and the Mori-Tanaka model is proposed to compute the overall stress increment resulting from an overall strain increment for an aligned fiber composite that contains the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite. The incremental response of the later is then obtained from the solution for the aligned fiber composite that is averaged over all possible fiber orientations using the orientation averaging method. Failure during incremental loading is predicted using the Van Hattum-Bernado model. The elastic-plastic and strength prediction model for LFTs was validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long glass fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  15. Prediction of the Elastic-Plastic Stress/Strain Response for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Phelps, Jay H [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; TuckerIII, Charles L. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Bapanapalli, Satish K [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a model to predict the elastic-plastic response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber orientation was predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model recently developed for LFTs. An incremental procedure using Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and the Mori-Tanaka assumption is proposed to compute the overall stress increment resulting from an overall strain increment for an aligned-fiber composite that contains the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite. The incremental response of the latter is then obtained from the solution for the aligned-fiber composite by averaging over all fiber orientations. Failure during incremental loading is predicted using the Van Hattum-Bernado model. The model is validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  16. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-15

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements.

  17. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements. PMID:26784192

  18. Optimal Control Problems in Finite-Strain Elasticity by Inner Pressure and Fiber Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eGünnel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Optimal control problems for finite-strain elasticity are considered.An inner pressure or an inner fiber tension are acting as driving forces.Such internal forces are typical, for instance, for the motion of heliotropic plants, and for muscle tissue.Non-standard objective functions relevant for elasticity problems are introduced.Optimality conditions are derived on a formal basis, and a limited-memory quasi-Newton algorithm for their solution is formulated in function space.Numerical experiments confirm the expected mesh-independent performance.

  19. A Research on Low Modulus Distributed Fiber Optical Sensor for Pavement Material Strain Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingjian; Wang, Linbing; Hou, Yue; Yan, Guannan

    2017-10-19

    The accumulated irreversible deformation in pavement under repeated vehicle loadings will cause fatigue failure of asphalt concrete. It is necessary to monitor the mechanical response of pavement under load by using sensors. Previous studies have limitations in modulus accommodation between the sensor and asphalt pavement, and it is difficult to achieve the distributed monitoring goal. To solve these problems, a new type of low modulus distributed optical fiber sensor (DOFS) for asphalt pavement strain monitoring is fabricated. Laboratory experiments have proved the applicability and accuracy of the newly-designed sensor. This paper presents the results of the development.

  20. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Ramakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements.

  1. A Novel Fiber Bragg Grating Based Sensing Methodology for Direct Measurement of Surface Strain on Body Muscles during Physical Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Arudi Subbarao, Guru; Subbaramajois Narasipur, Omkar; Kalegowda, Anand; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2012-07-01

    The present work proposes a new sensing methodology, which uses Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) to measure in vivo the surface strain and strain rate on calf muscles while performing certain exercises. Two simple exercises, namely ankle dorsi-flexion and ankle plantar-flexion, have been considered and the strain induced on the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle while performing these exercises has been monitored. The real time strain generated has been recorded and the results are compared with those obtained using a commercial Color Doppler Ultrasound (CDU) system. It is found that the proposed sensing methodology is promising for surface strain measurements in biomechanical applications.

  2. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fiber you get from the food. Fiber-rich foods offer health benefits when eaten raw or cooked. Alternative Names Diet - fiber; Roughage; Bulk; Constipation - fiber Patient Instructions Constipation - ...

  3. Simultaneous and quasi-independent strain and temperature sensor based on microstructured optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Aldaba, A.; Auguste, J.-L.; Jamier, R.; Roy, P.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a new sensor system for simultaneous and quasi-independent strain and temperature measurements is presented. The interrogation of the sensing head has been carried out by monitoring the FFT phase variations of two of the microstructured optical fiber (MOF) cavity interference frequencies. This method is independent of the signal amplitude and also avoids the need to track the wavelength evolution in the spectrum, which can be a handicap when there are multiple interference frequency components with different sensitivities. The sensor is operated within a range of temperature of 30°C-75°C, and 380μɛ of maximum strain were applied; being the sensitivities achieved of 127.5pm/°C and -19.1pm/μɛ respectively. Because the system uses an optical interrogator as unique active element, the system presents a cost-effective feature.

  4. Strain measurements using Fiber Bragg Grating sensors in Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela ENCIU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results obtained within a project of the “NUCLEU” Program financed by the Ministry of Research and Innovation-ANCS. The project supposes, among others, the design and the realization of a demonstrator for strain and stress measurements made with Fiber Bragg Gratings optical sensors. The paper details the construction of the demonstrator. The strain measurements induced in a cantilevered aluminum plate are compared with the analytical values provided by a mathematical model, and with the numerical values obtained by FEM analysis. The consistency of these comparative data indicates the achievement within the project of a level of competence necessary for later use of FBG sensors in the applicative researches involving the aerospace structures monitoring.

  5. Interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating temperature and strain sensors with a temperature-stabilized VCSEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizunami, Toru; Yamada, Taichi; Tsuchiya, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating (FBG) sensors using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is discussed. A long-wavelength (1.54 μm) VCSEL was used as a wavelength-tunable source by variation in the current. Temperature stabilization was performed with a thermoelectric device. Characteristics of temperature and strain sensing were investigated. FBGs with different reflectivities were compared. For temperature sensing, the root-mean-square error in the measurement was reduced to 1/3 that without temperature stabilization. The dependence of the measurement error on the reflectivities of the FBGs was investigated. The measurement error was larger for FBGs with lower reflectivities in both temperature and strain sensing. Improvement on the sensing with low-reflectivity FBGs is discussed.

  6. Aluminum-thin-film packaged fiber Bragg grating probes for monitoring the maximum tensile strain of composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jooeun; Kim, Mihyun; Choi, Ki-Sun; Hwang, Tae-Kyung; Kwon, Il-Bum

    2014-06-10

    In this paper, new fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor probes are designed to intermittently detect the maximum tensile strain of composite materials, so as to evaluate the structural health status. This probe is fabricated by two thin Al films bonded to an FBG optical fiber and two supporting brackets, which are fixed on the surface of composite materials. The residual strain of the Al packaged FBG sensor probe is induced by the strain of composite materials. This residual strain can indicate the maximum strain of composite materials. Two types of sensor probes are prepared-one is an FBG with 18 μm thick Al films, and the other is an FBG with 36 μm thick Al films-to compare the thickness effect on the detection sensitivity. These sensor probes are bonded on the surfaces of carbon fiber reinforced plastics composite specimens. In order to determine the strain sensitivity between the residual strain of the FBG sensor probe and the maximum strain of the composite specimen, tensile tests are performed by universal testing machine, under the loading-unloading test condition. The strain sensitivities of the probes, which have the Al thicknesses of 18 and 36 μm, are determined as 0.13 and 0.23, respectively.

  7. Enhanced bending failure strain in biological glass fibers due to internal lamellar architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monn, Michael A; Kesari, Haneesh

    2017-12-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of biological structures, like tooth and bone, are often a consequence of their architecture. The tree ring-like layers that comprise the skeletal elements of the marine sponge Euplectella aspergillum are a quintessential example of the intricate architectures prevalent in biological structures. These skeletal elements, known as spicules, are hair-like fibers that consist of a concentric array of silica cylinders separated by thin, organic layers. Thousands of spicules act like roots to anchor the sponge to the sea floor. While spicules have been the subject of several structure-property investigations, those studies have mostly focused on the relationship between the spicule's layered architecture and toughness properties. In contrast, we hypothesize that the spicule's layered architecture enhances its bending failure strain, thereby allowing it to provide a better anchorage to the sea floor. We test our hypothesis by performing three-point bending tests on E. aspergillum spicules, measuring their bending failure strains, and comparing them to those of spicules from a related sponge, Tethya aurantia. The T. aurantia spicules have a similar chemical composition to E. aspergillum spicules but have no architecture. Thus, any difference between the bending failure strains of the two types of spicules can be attributed to the E. aspergillum spicules' layered architecture. We found that the bending failure strains of the E. aspergillum spicules were roughly 2.4 times larger than those of the T. aurantia spicules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oil pipeline geohazard monitoring using optical fiber FBG strain sensors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Ferro, Andres; Mendez, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Pipelines are naturally vulnerable to operational, environmental and man-made effects such as internal erosion and corrosion; mechanical deformation due to geophysical risks and ground movements; leaks from neglect and vandalism; as well as encroachments from nearby excavations or illegal intrusions. The actual detection and localization of incipient and advanced faults in pipelines is a very difficult, expensive and inexact task. Anything that operators can do to mitigate the effects of these faults will provide increased reliability, reduced downtime and maintenance costs, as well as increased revenues. This talk will review the on-line monitoring of an extensive network of oil pipelines in service in Colombia using optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensors for the measurement of strains and bending caused by geohazard risks such as soil movements, landslides, settlements, flooding and seismic activity. The FBG sensors were mounted on the outside of the pipelines at discrete locations where geohazard risk was expected. The system has been in service for the past 3 years with over 1,000 strain sensors mounted. The technique has been reliable and effective in giving advanced warning of accumulated pipeline strains as well as possible ruptures.

  9. Fabrication of a Low Density Carbon Fiber Foam and Its Characterization as a Strain Gauge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia C. Luhrs

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Samples of carbon nano-fiber foam (CFF, essentially a 3D solid mat of intertwined nanofibers of pure carbon, were grown using the Constrained Formation of Fibrous Nanostructures (CoFFiN process in a steel mold at 550 °C from a palladium particle catalysts exposed to fuel rich mixtures of ethylene and oxygen. The resulting material was studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDX, Surface area analysis (BET, and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA. Transient and dynamic mechanical tests clearly demonstrated that the material is viscoelastic. Concomitant mechanical and electrical testing of samples revealed the material to have electrical properties appropriate for application as the sensing element of a strain gauge. The sample resistance versus strain values stabilize after a few compression cycles to show a perfectly linear relationship. Study of microstructure, mechanical and electrical properties of the low density samples confirm the uniqueness of the material: It is formed entirely of independent fibers of diverse diameters that interlock forming a tridimensional body that can be grown into different shapes and sizes at moderate temperatures. It regains its shape after loads are removed, is light weight, presents viscoelastic behavior, thermal stability up to 550 °C, hydrophobicity, and is electrically conductive.

  10. Fabrication of a Low Density Carbon Fiber Foam and Its Characterization as a Strain Gauge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhrs, Claudia C; Daskam, Chris D; Gonzalez, Edwin; Phillips, Jonathan

    2014-05-08

    Samples of carbon nano-fiber foam (CFF), essentially a 3D solid mat of intertwined nanofibers of pure carbon, were grown using the Constrained Formation of Fibrous Nanostructures (CoFFiN) process in a steel mold at 550 °C from a palladium particle catalysts exposed to fuel rich mixtures of ethylene and oxygen. The resulting material was studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDX), Surface area analysis (BET), and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Transient and dynamic mechanical tests clearly demonstrated that the material is viscoelastic. Concomitant mechanical and electrical testing of samples revealed the material to have electrical properties appropriate for application as the sensing element of a strain gauge. The sample resistance versus strain values stabilize after a few compression cycles to show a perfectly linear relationship. Study of microstructure, mechanical and electrical properties of the low density samples confirm the uniqueness of the material: It is formed entirely of independent fibers of diverse diameters that interlock forming a tridimensional body that can be grown into different shapes and sizes at moderate temperatures. It regains its shape after loads are removed, is light weight, presents viscoelastic behavior, thermal stability up to 550 °C, hydrophobicity, and is electrically conductive.

  11. Highly sensitive strain sensor based on helical structure combined with Mach-Zehnder interferometer in multicore fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hailiang; Wu, Zhifang; Shum, Perry Ping; Dinh, Xuan Quyen; Low, Chun Wah; Xu, Zhilin; Wang, Ruoxu; Shao, Xuguang; Fu, Songnian; Tong, Weijun; Tang, Ming

    2017-04-01

    Optical fiber sensors for strain measurement have been playing important roles in structural health monitoring for buildings, tunnels, pipelines, aircrafts, and so on. A highly sensitive strain sensor based on helical structures (HSs) assisted Mach-Zehnder interference in an all-solid heterogeneous multicore fiber (MCF) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Due to the HSs, a maximum strain sensitivity as high as -61.8 pm/μɛ was experimentally achieved. This is the highest sensitivity among interferometer-based strain sensors reported so far, to the best of our knowledge. Moreover, the proposed sensor has the ability to discriminate axial strain and temperature, and offers several advantages such as repeatability of fabrication, robust structure and compact size, which further benefits its practical sensing applications.

  12. Highly sensitive strain sensor based on helical structure combined with Mach-Zehnder interferometer in multicore fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hailiang; Wu, Zhifang; Shum, Perry Ping; Dinh, Xuan Quyen; Low, Chun Wah; Xu, Zhilin; Wang, Ruoxu; Shao, Xuguang; Fu, Songnian; Tong, Weijun; Tang, Ming

    2017-04-18

    Optical fiber sensors for strain measurement have been playing important roles in structural health monitoring for buildings, tunnels, pipelines, aircrafts, and so on. A highly sensitive strain sensor based on helical structures (HSs) assisted Mach-Zehnder interference in an all-solid heterogeneous multicore fiber (MCF) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Due to the HSs, a maximum strain sensitivity as high as -61.8 pm/με was experimentally achieved. This is the highest sensitivity among interferometer-based strain sensors reported so far, to the best of our knowledge. Moreover, the proposed sensor has the ability to discriminate axial strain and temperature, and offers several advantages such as repeatability of fabrication, robust structure and compact size, which further benefits its practical sensing applications.

  13. Truly Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring: From the Telecommunication Optical Fiber Drawling Tower to Water Leakage Detection in Dikes and Concrete Structure Strain Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Henault

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although optical fiber sensors have been developed for 30 years, there is a gap between lab experiments and field applications. This article focuses on specific methods developed to evaluate the whole sensing chain, with an emphasis on (i commercially-available optoelectronic instruments and (ii sensing cable. A number of additional considerations for a successful pairing of these two must be taken into account for successful field applications. These considerations are further developed within this article and illustrated with practical applications of water leakage detection in dikes and concrete structures monitoring, making use of distributed temperature and strain sensing based on Rayleigh, Raman, and Brillouin scattering in optical fibers. They include an adequate choice of working wavelengths, dedicated localization processes, choices of connector type, and further include a useful selection of traditional reference sensors to be installed nearby the optical fiber sensors, as well as temperature compensation in case of strain sensing.

  14. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope observations of defects in as-grown and pre-strained Mo-alloy fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phani, P. Sudharshan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Johanns, K. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Duscher, G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gali, A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); George, Easo P [ORNL; Pharr, George M [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2011-01-01

    Compression testing of micro-pillars has recently been of great interest to the small-scale mechanics community. Previous compression tests on single crystal Mo alloy micro-pillars produced by directional solidification of eutectic alloys showed that as-grown pillars yield at strengths close to the theoretical strength while pre-strained pillars yield at considerably lower stresses. In addition, the flow behavior changes from stochastic to deterministic with increasing pre-strain. In order to gain a microstructural insight into this behavior, an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope was used to study the defect structures in as-grown and pre-strained single crystal Mo alloy fibers. The as-grown fibers were found to be defect free over large lengths while the highly pre-strained (16%) fibers had high defect densities that were uniform throughout. Interestingly, the fibers with intermediate pre-strain (4%) exhibited an inhomogeneous defect distribution. The observed defect structures and their distributions are correlated with the previously reported stress-strain behavior. Some of the mechanistic interpretations of Bei et al. are examined in the light of new microstructural observations.

  15. Scanning transmission electron microscope observations of defects in as-grown and pre-strained Mo alloy fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phani, P. Sudharshan; Johanns, K.E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Duscher, G.; Gali, A.; George, E.P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Pharr, G.M., E-mail: pharr@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Compression testing of micro-pillars has recently been of great interest to the small-scale mechanics community. Previous compression tests on single crystal Mo alloy micro-pillars produced by directional solidification of eutectic alloys showed that as-grown pillars yield at strengths close to the theoretical strength while pre-strained pillars yield at considerably lower stresses. In addition, the flow behavior changes from stochastic to deterministic with increasing pre-strain. In order to gain a microstructural insight into this behavior, an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope was used to study the defect structures in as-grown and pre-strained single crystal Mo alloy fibers. The as-grown fibers were found to be defect free over large lengths while the highly pre-strained (16%) fibers had high defect densities that were uniform throughout. Interestingly, the fibers with intermediate pre-strain (4%) exhibited an inhomogeneous defect distribution. The observed defect structures and their distributions are correlated with the previously reported stress-strain behavior. Some of the mechanistic interpretations of Bei et al. are examined in the light of new microstructural observations.

  16. Piezoelectric fiber-composite-based cantilever sensor for electric-field-induced strain measurement in soft electroactive polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Sun, Yingying; Qin, Lifeng; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Polymeric materials have been widely used in electronic and electromechanical transducer applications. Because of their low elastic modulus, it is quite challenging to accurately characterize the electric-field-induced strain and elastic modulus by conventional contact methods. In this paper, a piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fiber-composite-based cantilever strain sensor has been investigated to accurately characterize the electric-field-induced strain response in the out-of-plane direction of soft electroactive polymer samples. By choosing appropriate substrate material and the thickness ratio of the fiber composite to the substrate, this strain sensor can be optimized to provide high sensitivity and high flexibility simultaneously. The high voltage sensitivity can be attributed to partial decoupling of the longitudinal and transverse piezoelectric responses, the improved piezoelectric coefficient and small dielectric permittivity. The high flexibility is due to the reduced flexural spring constant of the composite-based cantilever device. Both theoretical modeling of the PZT fiber-composite-based cantilever device and experimental verification are performed in this work. The results indicate that the piezoelectric PZT fiber-composite-based cantilever strain sensor can accurately characterize the electric-field-induced small strain in electroactive soft polymers with high reliability.

  17. Strain distribution and crack detection in thin unbonded concrete pavement overlays with fully distributed fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Genda

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the feasibility of strain measurement and crack detection in thin unbonded concrete pavement overlays with pulse prepump Brillouin optical time domain analysis. Single-mode optical fibers with two-layer and three-layer coatings, respectively, were applied as fully distributed sensors, their performances were compared with analytical predictions. They were successfully protected from damage during concrete casting of three full-scale concrete panels when 5 to 10-cm-thick protective mortar covers had been set for 2 h. Experimental results from three-point loading tests of the panels indicated that the strain distributions measured from the two types of sensors were in good agreement, and cracks can be detected at sharp peaks of the measured strain distributions. The two-layer and three-layer coated fibers can be used to measure strains up to 2.33% and 2.42% with a corresponding sensitivity of 5.43×10-5 and 4.66×10-5 GHz/μɛ, respectively. Two cracks as close as 7 to 9 cm can be clearly detected. The measured strains in optical fiber were lower than the analytical prediction by 10% to 25%. Their difference likely resulted from strain transfer through various coatings, idealized point loading, varying optical fiber embedment, and concrete heterogeneity.

  18. Multibeam Interferometer Using a Photonic Crystal Fiber with Two Asymmetric Cores for Torsion, Strain and Temperature Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Khurram; Kwon, Il-Bum; Chung, Youngjoo

    2017-01-11

    We present a fiber-optic multibeam Mach-Zehnder interferometer (m-MZI) for simultaneous multi-parameter measurement. The m-MZI is comprised of a section of photonic crystal fiber integrated with two independent cores of distinct construction and birefringence properties characterized for torsion, strain and temperature sensing. Due to the presence of small core geometry and use of a short fiber length, the sensing device demonstrates inter-modal interference in the small core alongside the dominant inter-core interference between the cores for each of the orthogonal polarizations. The output spectrum of the device is characterized by the three-beam interference model and is polarization-dependent. The two types of interferometers present in the fiber m-MZI exhibit distinct sensitivities to torsion, strain and temperature for different polarizations, and matrix coefficients allowing simultaneous measurement of the three sensing parameters are proposed in experiment.

  19. Multibeam Interferometer Using a Photonic Crystal Fiber with Two Asymmetric Cores for Torsion, Strain and Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurram Naeem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a fiber-optic multibeam Mach-Zehnder interferometer (m-MZI for simultaneous multi-parameter measurement. The m-MZI is comprised of a section of photonic crystal fiber integrated with two independent cores of distinct construction and birefringence properties characterized for torsion, strain and temperature sensing. Due to the presence of small core geometry and use of a short fiber length, the sensing device demonstrates inter-modal interference in the small core alongside the dominant inter-core interference between the cores for each of the orthogonal polarizations. The output spectrum of the device is characterized by the three-beam interference model and is polarization-dependent. The two types of interferometers present in the fiber m-MZI exhibit distinct sensitivities to torsion, strain and temperature for different polarizations, and matrix coefficients allowing simultaneous measurement of the three sensing parameters are proposed in experiment.

  20. Multibeam Interferometer Using a Photonic Crystal Fiber with Two Asymmetric Cores for Torsion, Strain and Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Khurram; Kwon, Il-Bum; Chung, Youngjoo

    2017-01-01

    We present a fiber-optic multibeam Mach-Zehnder interferometer (m-MZI) for simultaneous multi-parameter measurement. The m-MZI is comprised of a section of photonic crystal fiber integrated with two independent cores of distinct construction and birefringence properties characterized for torsion, strain and temperature sensing. Due to the presence of small core geometry and use of a short fiber length, the sensing device demonstrates inter-modal interference in the small core alongside the dominant inter-core interference between the cores for each of the orthogonal polarizations. The output spectrum of the device is characterized by the three-beam interference model and is polarization-dependent. The two types of interferometers present in the fiber m-MZI exhibit distinct sensitivities to torsion, strain and temperature for different polarizations, and matrix coefficients allowing simultaneous measurement of the three sensing parameters are proposed in experiment. PMID:28085046

  1. Highly Sensitive Textile Strain Sensors and Wireless User-Interface Devices Using All-Polymeric Conducting Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jimi; Jaisutti, Rawat; Lee, Hyungseok; Lee, Woobin; Heo, Jae-Sang; Lee, Jun-Young; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2017-03-22

    Emulation of diverse electronic devices on textile platform is considered as a promising approach for implementing wearable smart electronics. Of particular, the development of multifunctional polymeric fibers and their integration in common fabrics have been extensively researched for human friendly wearable platforms. Here we report a successful emulation of multifunctional body-motion sensors and user-interface (UI) devices in textile platform by using in situ polymerized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-coated fibers. With the integration of PEDOT fibers in a fabric, via an optimization of the fiber pattern design, multifunctional textile sensors such as highly sensitive and reliable strain sensors (with maximum gauge factor of ∼1), body-motion monitoring sensors, touch sensors, and multilevel strain recognition UI devices were successfully emulated. We demonstrate the facile utilization of the textile-based multifunctional sensors and UI devices by implementing in a wireless system that is capable of expressing American Sign Language through predefined hand gestures.

  2. Note: Strain sensitivity comparison between fiber Bragg gratings inscribed on 125 and 80 micron cladding diameter fibers, case study on the solidification monitoring of a photo-curable resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccioni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) sez. di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Morganti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) sez. di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Accademia Militare di Livorno, Viale Italia 72, 57100 Livorno (Italy); Brandi, F., E-mail: fernando.brandi@ino.it [Nanophysics Department, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    The influence of fiber Bragg grating diameter when measuring strain is investigated and quantified. Two fiber Bragg gratings with bare cladding diameter of 125 μm and 80 μm are produced by excimer laser irradiation through a phase mask, and are used to simultaneously monitor the Bragg wavelength shift due to the strain produced by the solidification of a photo-curable resin during light exposure. It is found that the ratio of the measured strains in the two fiber Bragg gratings is close to the inverse ratio of the fiber’s cladding diameter. These results represent a direct simultaneous comparison between 125 μm and 80 μm diameter fiber Bragg grating strain sensors, and demonstrate the feasibility of strain measurements in photo-curable resins using bare 80 μm cladding diameter fiber Bragg gratings with an increased sensitivity and spatial resolution compared with standard 125 μm diameter fiber Bragg gratings.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of polycarbonate microstructured polymer optical fibers for high-temperature-resistant fiber Bragg grating strain sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasano, Andrea; Woyessa, Getinet; Stajanca, Pavol

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the fabrication of a solid-core microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) made of polycarbonate (PC), and report the first experimental demonstration of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) written in a PC optical fiber. The PC used in this work has a glass transition temperature of 145°C...

  4. Strain Measurement Using Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors Inside an Anchored Carbon Fiber Polymer Reinforcement Prestressing Rod for Structural Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerrouche, Abdelfateh; Boyle, William J.O.; Sun, Tong

    2009-01-01

    Results are reported from a study carried out using a series of Bragg grating based optical fiber sensors written into a very short length (60mm) optical fiber net work and integrated into carbon fiber polymer reinforcement (CFPR) rod. Such rods are used as reinforcements in concrete structures...

  5. Strain measurement during stress rupture of composite over-wrapped pressure vessel with fiber Bragg gratings sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-03-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPV liner.

  6. Development of a Bridge Weigh-in-Motion Sensor: Performance Comparison Using Fiber Optic and Electrical Resistance Strain Sensor Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lydon, Myra; Taylor, Su E.; Robinson, Desmond; O'Brien, Eugene J.; et al.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the problems of effective in situ measurement of the real-time strain for bridge weigh in motion in reinforced concrete bridge structures through the use of optical fiber sensor systems. By undertaking a series of tests, coupled with dynamic loading, the performance of fiber Bragg grating-based sensor systems with various amplification techniques were investigated. In recent years, structural health monitoring (SHM) systems have been developed to monitor bridge deteriorat...

  7. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain in glass fiber/epoxy composites by embedded fiber optic sensors: II. Post-cure testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, R.; D'Acquisto, L.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper the use of fiber optic sensors embedded into GFRP laminates for structural health monitoring of thermo-mechanical loads is presented. The proposed sensing system, consisting of two coupled fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, allows the simultaneous measurement of both temperature and strain by decoupling the change in reflected wavelength induced by temperature variations from that induced by either mechanical or apparent strain, with significant advantages either for monitoring the composite cure kinetics, as described in the accompanying paper (Part I), or for assessing the structural response to thermo-mechanical loads. Both thermal ramp and mechanical static/dynamic bending tests were performed in the laboratory on instrumented GFRP samples with 12, 18 and 24 layers. It was shown that, by combining the wavelength shift outputs of the two fiber Bragg gratings, the longitudinal material CTE coefficient can be evaluated with ± 3% accuracy. This parameter can be used to discriminate mechanical and apparent strains from the FBG reflected spectrum. Static four-point bending tests showed good agreement between values measured by the embedded strain grating and those predicted by the classical lamination theory of composite materials, being the maximum deviation within 2%. Dynamic tests performed with both sinusoidal and square wave inputs have proved the effectiveness of the proposed solution to track the strain field accurately up to 10 Hz.

  8. Feasibility of subendocardial and subepicardial myocardial perfusion measurements in healthy normals with (15)O-labeled water and positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeltfoort, Ilse A; Raijmakers, Pieter G; Lubberink, Mark; Germans, Tjeerd; van Rossum, Albert C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Knaapen, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) enables robust and reproducible measurements of myocardial blood flow (MBF). However, the relatively limited resolution of PET till recently prohibited distinction between the subendocardial and the subepicardial layers in non-hypertrophied myocardium. Recent developments in hard- and software, however, have enabled to identify a transmural gradient difference in animal experiments. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of subendocardial and subepicardial MBF in normal human hearts assessed with (15)O-labeled water PET. Twenty-seven healthy subjects (mean age 41 ± 13 years; 11 men) were studied with (15)O-labeled water PET to quantify resting and hyperaemic (adenosine) MBF at a subendocardial and subepicardial level. In addition, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed to determine left ventricular (LV) volumes and function. Mean rest MBF was 1.46 ± 0.49 in the subendocardium, and 1.14 ± 0.342 mL · min(-1) · g(-1) in the subepicardium (P subendocardial level. (15)O-labeled water PET enables MBF measurements with distinction of the subendocardial and subepicardial layers in the normal human heart and correlates with LVEDVI. This PET technique may prove useful in evaluating patients with signs of ischaemia due to coronary artery disease or microvascular dysfunction.

  9. Packaging process of fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for use in high-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Alexis; Wnuk, Vincent P.; Fokine, Michael; Claesson, Åsa; Nilsson, Lars-Erik; Ferguson, Steve; Graver, Tom

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we report the development of a new bonding agent and method for the surface mounting of optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain and temperature sensors for use in high temperature environments--where there is a presence of water, moisture, dust, susceptibility to corrosion and/or elevated temperatures up to 800°C. To ensure a stable reflectivity response of FBGs and their survival at elevated temperatures, we are using chemical composition gratings (CCGs). The refractive index modulation in these gratings is caused by a chemical change, which results in a higher activation energy and stable behavior up to 1000°C. Samples of CCGs were successfully encapsulated and mounted onto metal shims. The packaged sensors were tested for strain (+/- 1000μɛ) and temperature (to +400 °C) response. The encapsulated sensors display a linear response with an increase in the temperature sensitivity of the FBG, with a factor of ~ 28.34pm/°C, and a strain gauge factor of 1.7pm/μɛ.

  10. Improved vertical optical fiber borehole strainmeter design for measuring Earth strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolf, Scott; Wyatt, Frank K.; Zumberge, Mark A.; Hatfield, William

    2015-11-01

    Fiber-based interferometers provide the means to sense very small displacements over long baselines, and have the advantage of being nearly completely passive in their operation, making them particularly well suited for geophysical applications. A new 250 m, interferometric vertical borehole strainmeter has been developed based completely on passive optical components. Details of the design and deployment at the Piñon Flat Observatory are presented. Power spectra show an intertidal noise level of -130 dB (re. 1 ɛ2/Hz), consistent within 1-3 dB between redundant components. Examination of its response to Earth tides and earthquakes relative to the areal strain recorded by an orthogonal pair of collocated, 730 m horizontal laser strainmeters yield a Poisson's ratio for local near surface material of 0.25 that is consistent with previous results.

  11. Research of three-dimensional force sensor based on multiplexed fiber Bragg grating strain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui-Chao; Wang, Su; Miao, Xin-Gang

    2017-04-01

    Most safety problems of architectural structures are caused by structural deformation, and the structures usually deform in more than one direction. So it is important and necessary to collect the safety monitoring data from all directions. Conventional fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors cannot fully meet the requirements of a modern safety monitoring system in practical application. Therefore, the research of a three-dimensional (3-D) force sensor that can expand the application range of fiber optic sensing technology is necessary and significant. A 3-D force sensor based on multiplexed FBG strain sensors is proposed, which can be used to measure 3-D force on a structure under test, force distribution, and the trend of relative microdeformation. The sensor that has an integral structure with a design has been described in detail, and its sensing principle has been investigated. The results of calibration experiments show that it can accurately and effectively realize the 3-D force measurement with good linearity, repeatability, and consistency. Experimental and analytical results both demonstrate its feasibility. It can work in harsh environments due to its good stability and anti-interference ability. The sensor proposed in this paper has great engineering application value and application prospects in the field of structure health monitoring.

  12. Experimental strain modal analysis for beam-like structure by using distributed fiber optics and its damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liangliang; Busca, Giorgio; Cigada, Alfredo

    2017-07-01

    Modal analysis is commonly considered as an effective tool to obtain the intrinsic characteristics of structures including natural frequencies, modal damping ratios, and mode shapes, which are significant indicators for monitoring the health status of engineering structures. The complex mode indicator function (CMIF) can be regarded as an effective numerical tool to perform modal analysis. In this paper, experimental strain modal analysis based on the CMIF has been introduced. Moreover, a distributed fiber-optic sensor, as a dense measuring device, has been applied to acquire strain data along a beam surface. Thanks to the dense spatial resolution of the distributed fiber optics, more detailed mode shapes could be obtained. In order to test the effectiveness of the method, a mass lump—considered as a linear damage component—has been attached to the surface of the beam, and damage detection based on strain mode shape has been carried out. The results manifest that strain modal parameters can be estimated effectively by utilizing the CMIF based on the corresponding simulations and experiments. Furthermore, damage detection based on strain mode shapes benefits from the accuracy of strain mode shape recognition and the excellent performance of the distributed fiber optics.

  13. Sensitivity-Improved Strain Sensor over a Large Range of Temperatures Using an Etched and Regenerated Fiber Bragg Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupeng Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity-improved fiber-optic strain sensor using an etched and regenerated fiber Bragg grating (ER-FBG suitable for a large range of temperature measurements has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The process of chemical etching (from 125 µm to 60 µm provides regenerated gratings (at a temperature of 680 °C with a stronger reflective intensity (from 43.7% to 69.8%, together with an improved and linear strain sensitivity (from 0.9 pm/με to 4.5 pm/με over a large temperature range (from room temperature to 800 °C, making it a useful strain sensor for high temperature environments.

  14. Composite Cure Process Modeling and Simulations using COMPRO(Registered Trademark) and Validation of Residual Strains using Fiber Optics Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Hudson, Tyler B.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Grimsley, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    Composite cure process induced residual strains and warping deformations in composite components present significant challenges in the manufacturing of advanced composite structure. As a part of the Manufacturing Process and Simulation initiative of the NASA Advanced Composite Project (ACP), research is being conducted on the composite cure process by developing an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms by which the process induced factors influence the residual responses. In this regard, analytical studies have been conducted on the cure process modeling of composite structural parts with varied physical, thermal, and resin flow process characteristics. The cure process simulation results were analyzed to interpret the cure response predictions based on the underlying physics incorporated into the modeling tool. In the cure-kinetic analysis, the model predictions on the degree of cure, resin viscosity and modulus were interpreted with reference to the temperature distribution in the composite panel part and tool setup during autoclave or hot-press curing cycles. In the fiber-bed compaction simulation, the pore pressure and resin flow velocity in the porous media models, and the compaction strain responses under applied pressure were studied to interpret the fiber volume fraction distribution predictions. In the structural simulation, the effect of temperature on the resin and ply modulus, and thermal coefficient changes during curing on predicted mechanical strains and chemical cure shrinkage strains were studied to understand the residual strains and stress response predictions. In addition to computational analysis, experimental studies were conducted to measure strains during the curing of laminated panels by means of optical fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBGs) embedded in the resin impregnated panels. The residual strain measurements from laboratory tests were then compared with the analytical model predictions. The paper describes the cure process

  15. Laser radio-frequency and cavity-enhanced interrogation techniques for strain sensing by fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, G.; Salza, M.; Ferraro, P.; De Natale, P.

    2006-02-01

    We report on the implementation of novel, highly sensitive methods for strain measurements using FBG-based sensors, Basically, the strain detection technique rely on frequency modulation of a 1560-nm pig-tailed diode laser in the radio-frequency range with phase-sensitive detection of the FBG reflected signals. In one set-up, the power directly reflected by the fiber grating is demodulated at multiples of the sideband frequency. A different approach is based instead on using as a sensor an in-fiber Fabry-Pérot cavity, made of an FBG pair with very high peak reflectivity (> 99 %). Static and dynamic deformation can be applied to the sensors in a controlled manner thanks to a piezoelectric actuator and a loud speaker. In the first case, a minimum detectable strain of the order of 100nɛ/Hz , in the quasi-static domain (0.5÷2 Hz), and 2 nɛ/Hz around 1 kHz. An FFT analysis of the output signals reveals the possibility of tracing dynamic strains up to 20 kHz, this limit being set only by the test device bandwidth. For the fiber interferometer set-up, similar tests have been performed using an electrical strain gauge as a reference probe. The diode laser, in this case, is actively frequency-locked to the FBG cavity, using the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. The resulting error signal is used as a monitor of strain suffered by the cavity fiber. We show that a sensitivity gain of at least one order of magnitude can be obtained with this scheme.

  16. Polymer optical fiber strain gauge for human-robot interaction forces assessment on an active knee orthosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Junior, Arnaldo G.; Frizera, Anselmo; Marques, Carlos; Sánchez, Manuel R. A.; Botelho, Thomaz R.; Segatto, Marcelo V.; Pontes, Maria José

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the development of a polymer optical fiber (POF) strain gauge based on the light coupling principle, which the power attenuation is created by the misalignment between two POFs. The misalignment, in this case, is proportional to the strain on the structure that the fibers are attached. This principle has the advantages of low cost, ease of implementation, temperature insensitiveness, electromagnetic fields immunity and simplicity on the sensor interrogation and signal processing. Such advantages make the proposed solution an interesting alternative to the electronic strain gauges. For this reason, an analytical model for the POF strain gauge is proposed and validated. Furthermore, the proposed POF sensor is applied on an active orthosis for knee rehabilitation exercises through flexion/extension cycles. The controller of the orthosis provides 10 different levels of robotic assistance on the flexion/extension movement. The POF strain gauge is tested at each one of these levels. Results show good correlation between the optical and electronic strain gauges with root mean squared deviation (RMSD) of 1.87 Nm when all cycles are analyzed, which represents a deviation of less than 8%. For the application, the proposed sensor presented higher stability than the electronic one, which can provide advantages on the rehabilitation exercises and on the inner controller of the device.

  17. QTL analysis of type I and type IIA fibers in soleus muscle in a cross between LG/J and SM/J mouse strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mark Carroll

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of muscle fibers, i.e. their type, number and size, are important determinants of functional characteristics of skeletal muscle, and of the quality of meat in livestock. Genetic factors play an important role in determining variation in fiber properties, however, specific genes remain largely elusive.We examined histological properties of soleus muscle fibers in two strains of mice exhibiting a 2-fold difference in muscle mass, LG/J and SM/J, and their F2 intercross. The total number of muscle fibers (555 ± 106 did not differ between the strains or between males and females. A higher percentage of type I fibers was observed in LG/J than SM/J strain (P<0.001 in both males (45±3% vs 37±4% and females (58±4% vs 41±3%. Across strains, females had a higher percentage of type I fibers than males (P<0.001, and the sex effect was greater in LG/J strain (strain-by-sex interaction, P<0.001. The cross-sectional area (CSA did not differ between type I and type IIA fibers, it was greater in LG/J than SM/J strain (1365±268 μm2 vs 825±229 μm2, P<0.001. Three significant QTL affecting CSA for type I and type IIA fibers mapped to chromosomes 1, 6 and 11 and three suggestive QTL for percentage of type I fibers to chromosomes 2, 3, and 4. Within each significant QTL, regions of conserved synteny were also implicated in variation of similar traits in pig. Our results provide the evidence that the intercross between the SM/J and LG/J strains is a promising model to search for genes affecting muscle fiber properties.

  18. PREDICTION OF MAXIMUM CREEP STRAIN OF HIGH PERFORMANCE STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishina Alexandra Vasil'evna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The strongest research potential is demonstrated by the areas of application of high performance steel fiber reinforced concrete (HPSFRC. The research of its rheological characteristics is very important for the purposes of understanding its behaviour. This article is an overview of an experimental study of UHSSFRC. The study was carried out in the form of lasting creep tests of HPSFRC prism specimen, loaded by stresses of varied intensity. The loading was performed at different ages: 7, 14, 28 and 90 days after concreting. The stress intensity was 0.3 and 0.6 Rb; it was identified on the basis of short-term crush tests of similar prism-shaped specimen, performed on the same day. As a result, values of ultimate creep strains and ultimate specific creep of HPSFRC were identified. The data was used to construct an experimental diagramme of the ultimate specific creep on the basis of the HPSFRC loading age if exposed to various stresses. The research has resulted in the identification of a theoretical relationship that may serve as the basis for the high-precision projection of the pattern of changes in the ultimate specific creep of HPSFRC, depending on the age of loading and the stress intensity.

  19. Cyclic stretch-induced stress fiber dynamics - Dependence on strain rate, Rho-kinase and MLCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chin-Fu; Haase, Candice [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station (United States); Deguchi, Shinji [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University (Japan); Kaunas, Roland, E-mail: rkaunas@tamu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station (United States)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclic stretch induces stress fiber disassembly, reassembly and fusion perpendicular to the direction of stretch. {yields} Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced at low stretch frequency. {yields} Stretch caused actin fiber formation parallel to stretch in distinct locations in cells treated with Rho-kinase and MLCK inhibitors. -- Abstract: Stress fiber realignment is an important adaptive response to cyclic stretch for nonmuscle cells, but the mechanism by which such reorganization occurs is not known. By analyzing stress fiber dynamics using live cell microscopy, we revealed that stress fiber reorientation perpendicular to the direction of cyclic uniaxial stretching at 1 Hz did not involve disassembly of the stress fiber distal ends located at focal adhesion sites. Instead, these distal ends were often used to assemble new stress fibers oriented progressively further away from the direction of stretch. Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced when the frequency of stretch was decreased to 0.01 Hz, however. Treatment with the Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y27632) reduced stress fibers to thin fibers located in the cell periphery which bundled together to form thick fibers oriented parallel to the direction of stretching at 1 Hz. In contrast, these thin fibers remained diffuse in cells subjected to stretch at 0.01 Hz. Cyclic stretch at 1 Hz also induced actin fiber formation parallel to the direction of stretch in cells treated with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, but these fibers were located centrally rather than peripherally. These results shed new light on the mechanism by which stress fibers reorient in response to cyclic stretch in different regions of the actin cytoskeleton.

  20. [Study on the axial strain sensor of birefringence photonic crystal fiber loop mirror based on the absolute integral of the monitoring peak].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Zeng, Jie; Liang, Da-Kai; Wang, Xue-Liang; Ni, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Ji-Feng; Luo, Wen-Yong

    2013-12-01

    In the present paper, the theoretical expression of the wavelength change and the axial strain of birefringence fiber loop mirror is developed. The theoretical result shows that the axial strain sensitivity of birefringence photonic crystal fiber loop mirror is much lower than conventional birefringence fiber loop mirror. It is difficult to measure the axial strain by monitoring the wavelength change of birefringence photonic crystal fiber loop mirror, and it is easy to cause the measurement error because the output spectrum is not perfectly smooth. The different strain spectrum of birefringence photonic crystal fiber loop mirror was measured experimentally by an optical spectrum analyzer. The measured spectrum was analysed. The results show that the absolute integral of the monitoring peak decreases with increasing strain and the absolute integral is linear versus strain. Based on the above results, it is proposed that the axial strain can be measured by monitoring the absolute integral of the monitoring peak in this paper. The absolute integral of the monitoring peak is a comprehensive index which can indicate the light intensity of different wavelength. This method of monitoring the absolute integral of the monitoring peak to measure the axial strain can not only overcome the difficulty of monitoring the wavelength change of birefringence photonic crystal fiber loop mirror, but also reduce the measurement error caused by the unsmooth output spectrum.

  1. Field Strain Measurement on the Fiber Scale in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers Using Global Finite-Element Based Digital Image Correlation

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Ran

    2015-05-01

    Laminated composites are materials with complex architecture made of continuous fibers embedded within a polymeric resin. The properties of the raw materials can vary from one point to another due to different local processing conditions or complex geometrical features for example. A first step towards the identification of these spatially varying material parameters is to image with precision the displacement fields in this complex microstructure when subjected to mechanical loading. This thesis is aimed to accurately measure the displacement and strain fields at the fiber-matrix scale in a cross-ply composite. First, the theories of both local subset-based digital image correlation (DIC) and global finite-element based DIC are outlined. Second, in-situ secondary electron tensile images obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are post-processed by both DIC techniques. Finally, it is shown that when global DIC is applied with a conformal mesh, it can capture more accurately sharp local variations in the strain fields as it takes into account the underlying microstructure. In comparison to subset-based local DIC, finite-element based global DIC is better suited for capturing gradients across the fiber-matrix interfaces.

  2. An Approach for the Dynamic Measurement of Ring Gear Strains of Planetary Gearboxes Using Fiber Bragg Gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hou, Chenggang

    2017-12-16

    The strain of the ring gear can reflect the dynamic characteristics of planetary gearboxes directly, which makes it an ideal signal to monitor the health condition of the gearbox. To overcome the disadvantages of traditional methods, a new approach for the dynamic measurement of ring gear strains using fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the installation of FBGs is determined according to the analysis for the strain distribution of the ring gear. Secondly, the parameters of the FBG are determined in consideration of the accuracy and sensitivity of the measurement as well as the size of the ring gear. The strain measured by the FBG is then simulated under non-uniform strain field conditions. Thirdly, a dynamic measurement system is built and tested. Finally, the strains of the ring gear are measured in a planetary gearbox under normal and faulty conditions. The experimental results showed good agreement with the theoretical results in values, trends, and the fault features can be seen from the time domain of the measured strain signal, which proves that the proposed method is feasible for the measurement of the ring gear strains of planetary gearboxes.

  3. The effects of halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane on Ca2+ current and transient outward K+ current in subendocardial and subepicardial myocytes from the rat left ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rithalia, Amber; Hopkins, Philip M; Harrison, Simon M

    2004-12-01

    Halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane abbreviate ventricular action potential duration (APD), and for halothane this effect is greater in the subendocardium than in the subepicardium. In this study we investigated mechanisms underlying the regional effects of these anesthetics on APD. The effect of 0.6 mM halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane on the action potential, L-type Ca(2+) current, transient outward K(+) current (I(to)), and steady-state current was recorded in rat left ventricular subendocardial and subepicardial myocytes. Halothane and isoflurane (but not sevoflurane) reduced APD significantly (P subendocardial than subepicardial myocytes. Peak L-type Ca(2+) current did not differ between regions and, compared with control, was reduced significantly in both regions by 40% (P subendocardial (1.12 +/- 0.05 nA) myocytes. In subepicardial myocytes, peak I(to) was reduced significantly by halothane (P subendocardial myocytes with the three anesthetics. The steady-state current was increased significantly (P subendocardial myocytes by halothane and isoflurane could underlie their transmural effects on APD.

  4. Optical Fiber Distributed Sensing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Strain Measurements Taken During Cryotank Y-Joint Test Article Load Cycling at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, Winfred S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240 C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  5. Characteristics of strain transfer and the reflected spectrum of a metal-coated fiber Bragg grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Woo

    2017-09-01

    Previous researchers have simulated strain transfer and spectrum of normal fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors with a polymer coating bonded on the structure. They only considered the shear stress in a polymer coating for the simulation. However, for metal-coated FBG sensors, not only shear stress but also axial stress in the metal coating should be reflected into the calculation because its axial stiffness is no longer negligible. Thus, the author investigated the strain transfer and reflected spectra of metal-coated FBG sensors by considering both shear stress and axial stress. The strain transfer analysis involved evaluating the strain profiles along the sensor by plotting an analytical solution, and validating the evaluated profiles with the results obtained by a finite element analysis (FEA). The solution was also verified by the experiments that used aluminum-coated FBG sensors bonded on a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite specimen. A transfer-matrix (T-matrix) formulation and coupled mode theory were used to simulate the reflected spectra of metal-coated FBG sensors for the evaluated strain profile. In addition, the effect of mechanical and geometric parameters of the sensor was examined. The findings revealed that the strain transfer characteristics and reflected spectra deteriorated with increases in the thickness and Young's modulus of the metal coating due to the consideration of axial stress. It is the opposite results for the normal FBG sensor with a polymer coating. Furthermore, the results also indicated that the decrease in bonding thickness resulted in improved strain transfer and signal characteristics. Moreover, a bonding length of 14 mm was suitable in suppressing an asymmetric shape of the reflected spectrum and in achieving an accurate measurement. The results of the parametric study are expected to contribute to improve the measurement accuracy of metal-coated FBG sensors in actual applications. The analytical methodology can be

  6. Monotonic and cyclic responses of impact polypropylene and continuous glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene composites at different strain rates

    KAUST Repository

    Yudhanto, Arief

    2016-03-08

    Impact copolymer polypropylene (IPP), a blend of isotactic polypropylene and ethylene-propylene rubber, and its continuous glass fiber composite form (glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene, GFIPP) are promising materials for impact-prone automotive structures. However, basic mechanical properties and corresponding damage of IPP and GFIPP at different rates, which are of keen interest in the material development stage and numerical tool validation, have not been reported. Here, we applied monotonic and cyclic tensile loads to IPP and GFIPP at different strain rates (0.001/s, 0.01/s and 0.1/s) to study the mechanical properties, failure modes and the damage parameters. We used monotonic and cyclic tests to obtain mechanical properties and define damage parameters, respectively. We also used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images to visualize the failure mode. We found that IPP generally exhibits brittle fracture (with relatively low failure strain of 2.69-3.74%) and viscoelastic-viscoplastic behavior. GFIPP [90]8 is generally insensitive to strain rate due to localized damage initiation mostly in the matrix phase leading to catastrophic transverse failure. In contrast, GFIPP [±45]s is sensitive to the strain rate as indicated by the change in shear modulus, shear strength and failure mode.

  7. Real-time In-Flight Strain and Deflection Monitoring with Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Dryden's efforts to develop in-flight monitoring based on Fiber Optics. One of the motivating factors for this development was the breakup of the Helios aircraft. On Ikhana the use of fiber optics for wing shape sensing is being developed. They are being used to flight validate fiber optic sensor measurements and real-time wing shape sensing predictions on NASA's Ikhana vehicle; validate fiber optic mathematical models and design tools; Assess technical viability and, if applicable, develop methodology and approach to incorporate wing shape measurements within the vehicle flight control system, and develop and flight validate advanced approaches to perform active wing shape control.

  8. Temperature dependence of the strain response of chemical composition gratings in optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoyu; Guan, Bai-ou

    2008-11-01

    Chemical composition gratings, used as strain sensing elements at high temperature environments, show a temperature dependence of their strain response. Temperature dependence of the strain response of CCGs over a range of temperatures from 24°C to 900°C has been measured. It is found that the wavelength shift of CCGs is linear with applied tensile strain at a constant temperature, and the strain sensitivity is 0.0011nm/μɛ.

  9. An Improved Metal-Packaged Strain Sensor Based on A Regenerated Fiber Bragg Grating in Hydrogen-Loaded Boron–Germanium Co-Doped Photosensitive Fiber for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Tu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Local strain measurements are considered as an effective method for structural health monitoring of high-temperature components, which require accurate, reliable and durable sensors. To develop strain sensors that can be used in higher temperature environments, an improved metal-packaged strain sensor based on a regenerated fiber Bragg grating (RFBG fabricated in hydrogen (H2-loaded boron–germanium (B–Ge co-doped photosensitive fiber is developed using the process of combining magnetron sputtering and electroplating, addressing the limitation of mechanical strength degradation of silica optical fibers after annealing at a high temperature for regeneration. The regeneration characteristics of the RFBGs and the strain characteristics of the sensor are evaluated. Numerical simulation of the sensor is conducted using a three-dimensional finite element model. Anomalous decay behavior of two regeneration regimes is observed for the FBGs written in H2-loaded B–Ge co-doped fiber. The strain sensor exhibits good linearity, stability and repeatability when exposed to constant high temperatures of up to 540 °C. A satisfactory agreement is obtained between the experimental and numerical results in strain sensitivity. The results demonstrate that the improved metal-packaged strain sensors based on RFBGs in H2-loaded B–Ge co-doped fiber provide great potential for high-temperature applications by addressing the issues of mechanical integrity and packaging.

  10. Rumen cellulosomics: divergent fiber-degrading strategies revealed by comparative genome-wide analysis of six ruminococcal strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bareket Dassa

    Full Text Available A complex community of microorganisms is responsible for efficient plant cell wall digestion by many herbivores, notably the ruminants. Understanding the different fibrolytic mechanisms utilized by these bacteria has been of great interest in agricultural and technological fields, reinforced more recently by current efforts to convert cellulosic biomass to biofuels.Here, we have used a bioinformatics-based approach to explore the cellulosome-related components of six genomes from two of the primary fiber-degrading bacteria in the rumen: Ruminococcus flavefaciens (strains FD-1, 007c and 17 and Ruminococcus albus (strains 7, 8 and SY3. The genomes of two of these strains are reported for the first time herein. The data reveal that the three R. flavefaciens strains encode for an elaborate reservoir of cohesin- and dockerin-containing proteins, whereas the three R. albus strains are cohesin-deficient and encode mainly dockerins and a unique family of cell-anchoring carbohydrate-binding modules (family 37.Our comparative genome-wide analysis pinpoints rare and novel strain-specific protein architectures and provides an exhaustive profile of their numerous lignocellulose-degrading enzymes. This work provides blueprints of the divergent cellulolytic systems in these two prominent fibrolytic rumen bacterial species, each of which reflects a distinct mechanistic model for efficient degradation of cellulosic biomass.

  11. Coherent pulse interrogation system for fiber Bragg grating sensing of strain and pressure in dynamic extremes of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, George; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor; Mielke, Chuck H; Azad, Abul; Marshall, Bruce; La Lone, Brandon M; Henson, Bryan; Smilowitz, Laura

    2015-06-01

    A 100 MHz fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogation system is described and applied to strain and pressure sensing. The approach relies on coherent pulse illumination of the FBG sensor with a broadband short pulse from a femtosecond modelocked erbium fiber laser. After interrogation of the FBG sensor, a long multi-kilometer run of single mode fiber is used for chromatic dispersion to temporally stretch the spectral components of the reflected pulse from the FBG sensor. Dynamic strain or pressure induced spectral shifts in the FBG sensor are detected as a pulsed time domain waveform shift after encoding by the chromatic dispersive line. Signals are recorded using a single 35 GHz photodetector and a 50 G Samples per second, 25 GHz bandwidth, digitizing oscilloscope. Application of this approach to high-speed strain sensing in magnetic materials in pulsed magnetic fields to ~150 T is demonstrated. The FBG wavelength shifts are used to study magnetic field driven magnetostriction effects in LaCoO3. A sub-microsecond temporal shift in the FBG sensor wavelength attached to the sample under first order phase change appears as a fractional length change (strain: ΔL/L-4) in the material. A second application used FBG sensing of pressure dynamics to nearly 2 GPa in the thermal ignition of the high explosive PBX-9501 is also demonstrated. Both applications demonstrate the use of this FBG interrogation system in dynamical extreme conditions that would otherwise not be possible using traditional FBG interrogation approaches that are deemed too slow to resolve such events.

  12. Improved thermal and strain performance of annealed polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bache, Morten

    2011-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of the inscription and characterization of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in commercial step index polymer optical fibers (POFs). Through the growth dynamics of the gratings, we identify the effect of UV-induced heating during the grating inscription. We found that FBGs...

  13. Alterations in transmural strains adjacent to ischemic myocardium during acute midcircumflex occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Filiberto; Langer, Frank; Harrington, Katherine B; Cheng, Allen; Daughters, George T; Criscione, John C; Ingels, Neil B; Miller, D Craig

    2005-04-01

    Helically oriented left ventricular fibers assemble into transmural sheets, which are important for wall-thickening mechanics: 15% fiber shortening results in 40% cross-fiber left ventricular wall thickening and a 60% ejection fraction through sheet extension, thickening, and shear. Normal cardiac microstructure and strains are optimized; deviations could result in apoptosis and deleterious matrix remodeling, which degenerates into global cardiomyopathy. We studied alterations in transmural strains adjacent to ischemic myocardium during acute midcircumflex occlusion. Nine sheep had radiopaque markers implanted to measure left ventricular systolic fractional area shortening; 3 transmural bead columns were inserted into the midlateral wall for strain analysis. Three-dimensional marker coordinates were obtained with biplane videofluoroscopy before and during 70 seconds of ischemia. Systolic strains were quantified along circumferential, longitudinal, and radial axes (n = 9) and were transformed into fiber-sheet coordinates by using quantitative microstructural measurements (n = 5). A functional border was defined in the midlateral left ventricle; ischemia decreased posterolateral fractional area shortening, and anterolateral fractional area shortening increased. In this demarcation junction, subepicardial end-systolic radial wall thickening decreased (0.16 +/- 0.08 vs 0.11 +/- 0.06) and sheet-normal shear was abolished (0.08 +/- 0.04 vs -0.01 +/- 0.03). Longitudinal shortening decreased in the subepicardium and midwall (-0.05 +/- 0.04 vs +/- -0.01 +/- 0.06), but circumferential-radial shear increased at these depths (0.04 +/- 0.04 vs 0.11 +/- 0.05). Subendocardial fiber stretch occurred during early systole (-0.01 +/- 0.03 vs 0.02 +/- 0.03), and end-systolic fiber-sheet shear increased (0.07 +/- 0.01 vs 0.11 +/- 0.04, all P < .05). Increased circumferential-radial shear and altered fiber-sheet strains reflect mechanical interactions between ischemic and nonischemic

  14. Performance of low-cost few-mode fiber Bragg grating sensor systems: polarization sensitivity and linearity of temperature and strain response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganziy, Denis; Rose, Bjarke; Bang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate whether 850 nm fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor systems can use low-cost 1550 nm telecom fibers; in other words, how detrimental the influence of higher-order modes is to the polarization stability and linearity of the strain and temperature response. We do this by comparing...... polarization sensitivity of a few-mode 850 nm FBG sensor to a strictly single-mode 850 nm FBG sensor system using 850 nm single-mode fibers. We also compare the performance of the FBGs in strain and temperature tests. Our results show that the polarization stability and the linearity of the response degrade...

  15. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... white toast. Lunch and Dinner: Make sandwiches with whole-grain breads (rye, oat, or wheat) instead of white. Make a fiber-rich sandwich with whole-grain bread, peanut butter, and bananas. Use whole-grain spaghetti ...

  16. Strain differences in pleural mesothelial cell reactions induced by potassium octatitanate fibers (TISMO) infused directly into the thoracic cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokohira, Masanao; Nakano, Yuko; Yamakawa, Keiko; Kishi, Sosuke; Ninomiya, Fumiko; Saoo, Kousuke; Imaida, Katsumi

    2013-09-01

    Although we have previously reported that the fiber-shaped TISMO, morphologically similar to asbestos, can induce a severe mesothelial reaction in A/J mice, it is important to clarify any strain differences. In the present study, female A/J, C3H/HeN, ICR and C57BL/6 mice were therefore employed as test strains. At the beginning of the experiment, all mice underwent a left thoracotomy and direct administration of 3mg of TISMO particles suspended in 0.2 ml saline into the left thorax. The experiment was terminated after 21 weeks and all groups were sacrificed and the mesothelium and main organs were examined histopathologically. To contribute to mechanistic analysis, iron staining with Berlin blue and Turnbull's blue, and immunostaining for calretinin were also performed. The present experiment demonstrated only minor strain differences in the degree of pleural reaction to TISMO. However, there was clear variation in the iron and lymphocyte accumulation in the pleura and in the liver. This difference in response to TISMO fibers in vivo is important information when considering the development of mesothelioma as an animal model and the extrapolation to human risk from such animal studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Static and dynamic testing of bridges and highways using long-gage fiber Bragg grating based strain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Whitten L.; Conte, Joel P.; Udd, Eric; Seim, John M.

    2000-12-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings packaged in long gage configurations are being used to measure static and dynamic strain in structures and structural models to monitor structural health and predict damage incurred from a seismic event. These long gage sensors are being used to experimentally verify analytical models of post-earthquake evaluation based on system identification analysis. This fiber optic deformation measurement system could play a significant role in monitoring/recording with a higher level of completeness the actual seismic response of structures and in non-destructive seismic damage assessment techniques based on dynamic signature analysis. This new sensor technology will enable field measurements of the response of real structures to real earthquakes with the same or higher level of detail/resolution as currently in structural testing under controlled laboratory conditions.

  18. Cryogenic Liquid Level-Sensing using Fiber-Optic Strain Sensor (FOSS) Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Armstrong innovators have developed a highly accurate method for measuring liquid levels using optical fibers. Unlike liquid level gauges that rely on discrete...

  19. Development of Fiber Bragg Grating Strain, Thermal, and Magnetic Sensors for Smart Structure Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Emmons, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Optical fiber Bragg gratings offer great potential for sensing pertinent phenomena in a wide range of applications. Such range is demonstrated in this dissertation with the utilization of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in two different fields of research. Both of these fields are encompassed by an overarching goal of developing smart structures capable of providing necessary feedback to enhance performance and safety. FBGs are employed in the field of structural health monitoring by measuring st...

  20. Monitoring of bolt clamping force at high temperatures using metal-packaged regenerated fiber Bragg grating strain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Kuo; Tu, Yun; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2017-10-01

    Insufficient or excessive preload has been regarded as the main issue that may endanger the safety of bolted joints operated at high temperatures. A new technique for monitoring the bolt clamping force is thus proposed using metal-packaged regenerated fiber Bragg grating (RFBG) strain sensors spot-welded onto the bolt. The measurement of the clamping force in a bolted steel-steel joint subjected to thermal loading is conducted. The experimental results show that the bolt clamping force can be monitored by the metal-packaged RFBG strain sensor at high temperatures up to 500 °C. This technique provides a new possibility for structural health monitoring of bolted joints operated at high temperatures.

  1. Creep and Stress-strain Behavior After Creep from Sic Fiber Reinforced, Melt-infiltrated Sic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (Hi-Nicalon Type S, Nippon Carbon) reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites containing melt-infiltrated Si were subjected to creep at 1315 C for a number of different stress conditions, This study is aimed at understanding the time-dependent creep behavior of CMCs for desired use-conditions, and also more importantly, how the stress-strain response changes as a result of the time-temperature-stress history of the crept material. For the specimens that did not rupture, fast fracture experiments were performed at 1315 C or at room temperature immediately following tensile creep. In many cases, the stress-strain response and the resulting matrix cracking stress of the composite change due to stress-redistribution between composite constituents during tensile creep. The paper will discuss these results and its implications on applications of these materials for turbine engine components.

  2. Tunable dual-wavelength ytterbium-doped fiber laser using a strain technique on microfiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, H; Salim, M A M; Azzuhri, Saaidal R; Jaddoa, M F; Harun, S W

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, stable dual-wavelength generation using a strain technique for a ytterbium-doped fiber laser is successfully demonstrated. A microfiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer is inserted into the laser ring cavity and stretched using the xyz translation stage. Four sets of dual-wavelength output lasing are obtained when the strain is applied onto a microfiber. The dual-wavelength output possesses spacing between 7.12 and 11.59 nm, with displacement from 2 to 190 μm from the central wavelength. The obtained side-mode suppression ratio is ∼48  dBm, while the maximum power fluctuation and wavelength shift are less than 0.6 dB and 0.01 nm, respectively. The results demonstrate that this setup generates a stable dual-wavelength laser in the 1 μm region.

  3. Multi-point strain measurement using Fabry-Perot interferometer consisting of low-reflective fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Atsushi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Takahashi, Nobuaki

    2017-11-01

    A novel simultaneous multi-point strain sensing system based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is proposed. In conventional FBG based multi-point sensing systems, the number of measurement points is limited by various factors. For example, in a method based on the wavelength division multiplexing method (WDM), there is a trade-off between the number of the points and dynamic range of measurement. And in a method based on the time division multiplexing (TDM), there is a trade-off between the number of the points and measurement time. The proposed sensing system has a capability of multi-point measurement with high dynamic range and short measurement time. A Fabry-Perot interferometer consisting of low-reflective FBG (FBG-FPI) is introduced as a sensor head. The reflection spectrum from an array of the FBG-FPIs is analyzed using Fourier transform. An experimental demonstration of multipoint strain measurement is reported.

  4. Enhanced Simultaneous Distributed Strain and Temperature Fiber Sensor Employing Spontaneous Brillouin Scattering and Optical Pulse Coding

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, M A; Bolognini, G.; Di Pasquale, F.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we propose the use of optical pulse coding techniques for simultaneous strain and temperature sensing based on spontaneous Brillouin scattering. Optical pulse coding provides a significant receiver signal-to-noise ratio enhancement, allowing for accurate Brillouin intensity and frequency shift measurements at low peak power levels. Due to the cross-sensitivity of these two parameters on both temperature and strain, optical pulse coding improves the temperature and strain resolut...

  5. Fiber Optic Rosette Strain Gauge Development and Application on a Large-Scale Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jason P.; Przekop, Adam; Juarez, Peter D.; Roth, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    A detailed description of the construction, application, and measurement of 196 FO rosette strain gauges that measured multi-axis strain across the outside upper surface of the forward bulkhead component of a multibay composite fuselage test article is presented. A background of the FO strain gauge and the FO measurement system as utilized in this application is given and results for the higher load cases of the testing sequence are shown.

  6. J-shaped stress-strain diagram of collagen fibers: Frame tension of triangulated surfaces with fixed boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yu; Koibuchi, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    We present Monte Carlo data of the stress-strain diagrams obtained using two different triangulated surface models. The first is the canonical surface model of Helfrich and Polyakov (HP), and the second is a Finsler geometry (FG) model. The shape of the experimentally observed stress-strain diagram is called J-shaped. Indeed, the diagram has a plateau for the small strain region and becomes linear in the relatively large strain region. Because of this highly nonlinear behavior, the J-shaped diagram is far beyond the scope of the ordinary theory of elasticity. Therefore, the mechanism behind the J-shaped diagram still remains to be clarified, although it is commonly believed that the collagen degrees of freedom play an essential role. We find that the FG modeling technique provides a coarse-grained picture for the interaction between the collagen and the bulk material. The role of the directional degrees of freedom of collagen molecules or fibers can be understood in the context of FG modeling. We also discuss the reason for why the J-shaped diagram cannot (can) be explained by the HP (FG) model.

  7. Experimental Method of Temperature and Strain Discrimination in Polymer Composite Material by Embedded Fiber-Optic Sensors Based on Femtosecond-Inscribed FBGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor V. Shishkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental method of temperature and strain discrimination with fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs sensors embedded in carbon fiber-reinforced plastic is proposed. The method is based on two-fiber technique, when two FBGs inscribed in different fibers with different sensitivities to strain and/or temperature are placed close to each other and act as a single sensing element. The nonlinear polynomial approximation of Bragg wavelength shift as a function of temperature and strain is presented for this method. The FBGs were inscribed with femtosecond laser by point-by-point inscription technique through polymer cladding of the fiber. The comparison of linear and nonlinear approximation accuracies for array of embedded sensors is performed. It is shown that the use of nonlinear approximation gives 1.5–2 times better accuracy. The obtained accuracies of temperature and strain measurements are 2.6–3.8°C and 50–83 με in temperature and strain range of 30–120°C and 0–400 με, respectively.

  8. Advances in Fiber Optic Sensors Technology Development for temperature and strain measurements in Superconducting magnets and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuchiolo, A.; Bajko, M.; Bottura, L.; Consales, M.; Cusano, A.; Giordano, M.; Perez, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) requires the development of a new generation of superconducting magnets based on Nb3Sn technology. In order to monitor the magnet thermo-mechanical behaviour during its service life, from the coil fabrication to the magnet operation, reliable sensing systems need to be implemented. In the framework of the FP7 European project EUCARD, Nb3Sn racetrack coils are developed as test beds for the fabrication validation, the cable characterization and the instrumentation development. Fiber optic sensors (FOS) based on Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) technology have been embedded in the coils of the Short Model Coil (SMC) magnet. The FBG sensitivity to both temperature and strain required the development of a solution able to separate the mechanical and temperature effects. This work presents the feasibility study of the implementation of embedded FBG sensors for the temperature and strain monitoring of the 11 T type conductor. We aim to monitor and register these...

  9. Fabry-Perot based strain insensitive photonic crystal fiber modal interferometer for inline sensing of refractive index and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Jitendra Narayan; Jha, Rajan

    2015-12-10

    We report a highly stable, compact, strain insensitive inline microcavity-based solid-core photonic crystal fiber (SCPCF) modal interferometer for the determination of the refractive index (RI) of an analyte and its temperature. The interferometer is fabricated by splicing one end of SCPCF with single-mode fiber (SMF) and the other end with hollow-core PCF. This is followed by cleaving the part of the solid glass portion possibly present after the microcavity. The formation of the cavities at the end faces of the SCPCF results in reduction of the period of the interference pattern that helps in achieving distinctiveness in the measurement. Three sensor heads have been fabricated, and each has a different length of the collapsed region formed by splicing SMF with SCPCF. The response of the sensors is found to be sensitive to the length of this collapsed region between SMF and SCPCF with a sensitivity of 53 nm/RI unit (RIU) and resolution of 1.8×10(-4) RIU. The temperature response of the sensor is found to be linear, having a temperature sensitivity of 12 pm/°C. In addition to these findings, the effect of strain on the proposed structure is analyzed in both wavelength and intensity interrogation.

  10. Time dependence of mesoscopic strain distribution for triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured by digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Jun; Nagayama, Hideo; Yoneyama, Satoru; Aoki, Takahira

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain of a triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured using digital image correlation (DIC). Two types of DIC techniques were employed for the measurement: conventional subset DIC and mesh DIC. Static tensile and creep tests were carried out, and the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain distribution was investigated by applying these techniques. The ultimate failure of this material is dominated by inter-bundle decohesion caused by relative rigid rotation and relating shear stress. Therefore, these were focused on in the present study. During the creep tests, the fiber directional strain, shear strain, and rotation were monitored using the DIC, and the mechanism for the increase in the specimen's macro-strain over time was investigated based on the results obtained by the DIC measurement.

  11. Health monitoring of an Oregon historical bridge with fiber grating strain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, John M.; Udd, Eric; Schulz, Whitten L.; Laylor, Harold M.

    1999-05-01

    Twenty-eight fiber-grating sensors were used to instrument two reinforced concrete beams that were externally strengthened with composites on the historic Horsetail Falls Bridge in the Columbia River Gorge. Sensor assemblies were placed in the beams and mounted on the outside of the composite to provide performance data.

  12. Use of Carbon Nano-Fiber Foams as Strain Gauges to Detect Crack Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    capacitors [18]. Another example are recent attempts to use carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes to develop sensor devices. Sida Luo created aligned... Sida Luo, “Structure-property-processing relationships of single-wall carbon nanotube thin film piezoresistive sensors,” SciVerse ScienceDirect, pp

  13. Analysis of crack and strain states of high performance reinforced fiber concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Trzepieciński

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the crack and strain states analysis of the reinforced high performance concrete beams with steel and polypropylene fibre. The beams were bent in the 4-point model. Research was carried out for three different beams with regard to the quantity and the type of reinforcement. The beam B1 was constructed conventionally with steel rods reinforcement. As regards beams B2 and B3, instead of the stirrups and the compressive rods, fibre reinforcement of variable fibre volume percentage was applied. For the analysis, a non-contact system for three-dimensional measurements of strain – ARAMIS was used. The analysis of the behaviour of the beams under static load was based on the measurements of crack and strain.[b]Keywords[/b]: reinforced concrete beams, high performance concrete, steel fibre, polypropylene fibre, ARAMIS system, crack state, strain state

  14. Dynamic 3D strain measurements with embedded micro-structured optical fiber Bragg grating sensors during impact on a CFRP coupon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Sidney; Geernaert, Thomas; De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Vanlanduit, Steve; Luyckx, Geert; Chiesura, Gabriele; Thienpont, Hugo; Berghmans, Francis

    2017-04-01

    Composite materials are increasingly used in aerospace applications, owing to their high strength-to-mass ratio. Such materials are nevertheless vulnerable to impact damage. It is therefore important to investigate the effects of impacts on composites. Here we embed specialty microstructured optical fiber Bragg grating based sensors inside a carbon fiber reinforced polymer, providing access to the 3D strain evolution within the composite during impact. We measured a maximum strain of -655 μɛ along the direction of impact, and substantially lower values in the two in-plane directions. Such in-situ characterization can trigger insight in the development of impact damage in composites.

  15. Fiber Bragg grating-based shear strain sensors for adhesive bond monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulejmani, Sanne; Sonnenfeld, Camille; Geernaert, Thomas; Van Hemelrijck, Danny; Luyckx, Geert; Mergo, Pawel; Urbanczyk, Waclaw; Chah, Karima; Caucheteur, Christophe; Mégret, Patrice; Thienpont, Hugo; Berghmans, Francis

    2014-05-01

    The application of shear stress sensors in structural health monitoring remains limited because current sensors are either difficult to implement, they feature a low measurement resolution or the interrogation of the output signal is complex. We propose to use fiber Bragg grating-based sensors fabricated in dedicated highly birefringent microstructured optical fibers. When embedded in a host material, the orientation angle of the fiber should be chosen such that their polarization axes are aligned parallel with the direction of maximum shear stress when the host is mechanically loaded. We present experimental results of sensors embedded in the adhesive layer of single lap and double lap structural joints. These tests demonstrate that when the joints are tension loaded, the embedded sensors have a shear stress sensitivity of around 60 pm/MPa. We study the influence of the adhesive material on the sensor response, as well as the influence of sensor orientation and location in the bond line. Finally, we demonstrate the minimal thermal cross-sensitivity of the shear stress sensitivity of this sensor.

  16. Alteration in left ventricular normal and shear strains evaluated by 2D-strain echocardiography in the athlete's heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottin, S; Doucende, G; Schuster-Beck, I; Dauzat, M; Obert, P

    2008-01-01

    The contraction of cardiomyocytes induces a systolic increase in left ventricular (LV) normal (radial, circumferential and longitudinal) and shear strains, whose functional consequences have not been evaluated, so far, in athletes. We used 2D ultrasound speckle tracking imaging (STI) to evaluate LV regional strain in high-level cyclists compared to sedentary controls. Sixteen male elite cyclists and 23 sedentary controls underwent conventional, tissue Doppler, and STI echocardiography at rest. We assessed LV long and short axis normal strains and shear strains. We evaluated circumferential–longitudinal shear strain from LV torsion, and circumferential–radial shear strain from the difference between subendocardial and subepicardial torsion. Apical radial strain (42.7 ± 10.5%versus 52.2 ± 14.3%, P subendocardial than in the subepicardial region in sedentary controls, but not in cyclists. Haemodynamic and tissue Doppler based indexes of global LV diastolic and systolic functions were not different between cyclists and controls. Athlete's heart is associated with specific LV adaptation including lower apical strain and lower myocardial shear strains, with no change in global LV diastolic and systolic function. These mechanical alterations could improve the cardiovascular adjustments to exercise by increasing the radial strain and torsional (and thus untwisting) response to exercise, a key element of diastolic filling and thus of cardiac performance in athletes. PMID:18687717

  17. Resonance-temperature-insensitive phase-shifted long-period fiber gratings induced by surface deformation with anomalous strain characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yinian; Shum, Ping; Chen, Xiaoyan; Tan, Ching-Hwee; Lu, Chao

    2005-07-01

    We report the fabrication of phase-shifted long-period fiber gratings by use of a CO2 laser with a surface deformation technique and a point-by-point method. Due to periodicities that are structurally induced by a heat source and refractive-index modulation caused by a perturbational photoelastic effect, the results of thermal testing show a grating temperature coefficient of 28 pm/°C at a range from 22 to 180 °C, indicating that the band rejections of the grating that is formed remain unchanged in their resonant strengths even at temperatures up to the fictive point of fiberglass. It is found for what is believed to be the first time that such a grating possesses an anomalous strain behavior of resonance with -1.52×10^-4 dB/? epsilon for the right notch and 7.05×10^-5 dB/? epsilon for the left notch.

  18. Full scale strain monitoring of a suspension bridge using high performance distributed fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinlong; Dong, Yongkang; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Shunlong; He, Shaoyang; Li, Hui

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigated field monitoring of a 1108 m suspension bridge during an assessment load test, using integrated distributed fibre-optic sensors (DFOSs). In addition to the conventional Brillouin time domain analysis system, a high spatial resolution Brillouin system using the differential pulse-width pair (DPP) technique was adopted. Temperature compensation was achieved using a Raman distributed temperature sensing system. This is the first full scale field application of DFOSs using the Brillouin time domain analysis technique in a thousand-meter-scale suspension bridge. Measured strain distributions along the whole length of the bridge were presented. The interaction between the main cables and the steel-box-girder was highlighted. The Brillouin fibre-optic monitoring systems exhibited great facility for the purposes of long distance distributed strain monitoring, with up to 0.05 m spatial resolution, and 0.01 m/point sampling interval. The performance of the Brillouin system using DPP technique was discussed. The measured data was also employed for assessing bridge design and for the assessment of structural condition. The results show that the symmetrical design assumptions were consistent with the actual bridge, and that the strain values along the whole bridge were within the safety range. This trial field study serves as an example, demonstrating the feasibility of highly dense strain and temperature measurement for large scale civil infrastructures using integrated DFOSs.

  19. Simultaneous Strain and Temperature Measurement Using a Single Fiber Bragg Grating Coated with a Thermochromic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    submitted a second journal manuscript; 7) Presented the research results at two conferences (i.e. 2016 ASME SMASIS conference and 2017 SPIE Smart...for the simultaneous measurement of strain and temperature”, the ASME 2016 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems

  20. Effects of Temperature and Axial Strain on Four-Wave Mixing Parametric Frequencies in Microstructured Optical Fibers Pumped in the Normal Dispersion Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Abreu-Afonso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of the effect of temperature and axial strain on the parametric wavelengths produced by four-wave mixing in microstructured optical fibers is presented. Degenerate four-wave mixing was generated in the fibers by pumping at normal dispersion, near the zero-dispersion wavelength, causing the appearance of two widely-spaced four-wave mixing spectral bands. Temperature changes, and/or axial strain applied to the fiber, affects the dispersion characteristics of the fiber, which can result in the shift of the parametric wavelengths. We show that the increase of temperature causes the signal and idler wavelengths to shift linearly towards shorter and longer wavelengths, respectively. For the specific fiber of the experiment, the band shift at rates ­–0.04 nm/ºC and 0.3 nm/ºC, respectively. Strain causes the parametric bands to shift in the opposite way. The signal band shifted 2.8 nm/me and the idler -5.4 nm/me. Experimental observations are backed by numerical simulations.

  1. Reconstruction of fiber Bragg grating strain profile used to monitor the stiffness degradation of the adhesive layer in carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chunsheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The adhesive-bonded joint of carbon fiber–reinforced plastic is one of the core components in aircraft structure design. It is an effective guarantee for the safety and reliability of the aerospace aircraft structure to use effective methods for monitoring and early warning of internal failure. In this article, the mapping relation model between the strain profiles of the adherend of the carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap adhesive joint and the stiffness degradation evolution of adhesive layer was achieved by finite element software ABAQUS. The fiber Bragg grating was embedded in the adherend between the first and second layers at the end of the adhesive layer to calculate the reflection spectrum of fiber Bragg grating sensor region with improved T-matrix method for reconstruction of the adherend strain profile of fiber Bragg grating sensing area with the help of genetic algorithm. According to the reconstruction results, the maximum error between the ideal and reconstructed strain profile under different tension loads did not exceed 7.43%, showing a good coincidence degree. The monitoring method of the stiffness degradation evolution of adhesive layer of the carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap joint based on the reconstruction of the adherend strain profile of fiber Bragg grating sensing area thus was figured out.

  2. Cascaded fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometers with Vernier effect for highly sensitive measurement of axial strain and magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Tang, Ming; Gao, Feng; Zhu, Benpeng; Fu, Songnian; Ouyang, Jun; Shum, Perry Ping; Liu, Deming

    2014-08-11

    We report a highly sensitive fiber-optic sensor based on two cascaded intrinsic fiber Fabry-Perot interferometers (IFFPIs). The cascaded IFFPIs have different free spectral ranges (FSRs) and are formed by a short section of hollow core photonic crystal fiber sandwiched by two single mode fibers. With the superposition of reflective spectrum with different FSRs, the Vernier effect will be generated in the proposed sensor and we found that the strain sensitivity of the proposed sensor can be improved from 1.6 pm/με for a single IFFPI sensor to 47.14 pm/με by employing the Vernier effect. The sensor embed with a metglas ribbon can be also used to measure the magnetic field according to the similar principle. The sensitivity of the magnetic field measurement is achieved to be 71.57 pm/Oe that is significantly larger than the 2.5 pm/Oe for a single IFFPI sensor.

  3. High-speed 100 MHz strain monitor using fiber Bragg grating and optical filter for magnetostriction measurements under ultrahigh magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Akihiko; Nomura, Toshihiro; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H.; Tani, Shuntaro; Kobayashi, Yohei; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Sato, Keisuke

    2017-08-01

    A high-speed 100 MHz strain monitor using a fiber Bragg grating, an optical filter, and a mode-locked optical fiber laser has been devised, whose resolution is Δ L /L ˜1 0-4. The strain monitor is sufficiently fast and robust for the magnetostriction measurements of materials under ultrahigh magnetic fields generated with destructive pulse magnets, where the sweep rate of the magnetic field is in the range of 10-100 T/μ s. As a working example, the magnetostriction of LaCoO3 was measured at room temperature, 115 K, and 7 ˜ 4.2 K up to a maximum magnetic field of 150 T. The smooth dependence on the squared magnetic field and the first-order transition were observed at 115 K and 7 ˜ 4.2 K, respectively, reflecting the field-induced spin state evolution.

  4. Fiber-optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor with pm displacement resolution using three-wavelength digital phase demodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Werther, B; Fuerstenau, N; Matthias, M; Melz, T

    2001-04-09

    A fiber-optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor (EFPI-S) of ls = 2.5 cm sensor length using three-wavelength digital phase demodulation is demonstrated to exhibit pm displacement resolution (mapping of the arctan - lookup table to the 16-Bit DA-converter range from 188.25 k /V (6 Volt range 1130 k ) to 11.7 k /Volt (range 70 k ).

  5. Qualification of a distributed optical fiber sensor bonded to the surface of a concrete structure: a methodology to obtain quantitative strain measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billon, Astrid; Hénault, Jean-Marie; Quiertant, Marc; Taillade, Frédéric; Khadour, Aghiad; Martin, Renaud-Pierre; Benzarti, Karim

    2015-11-01

    Distributed optical fiber systems (DOFSs) are an emerging and innovative technology that allows long-range and continuous strain/temperature monitoring with a high resolution. Sensing cables are either surface-mounted or embedded into civil engineering structures to ensure long-term structural monitoring and early crack detection. However, strain profiles measured in the optical fiber (OF) may differ from the actual strain in the structure due to the shear transfer through the intermediate material layers between the OF and the host material (i.e., in the protective coating of the sensing cable and in the adhesive). Therefore, OF sensors need to be qualified to provide accurate quantitative strain measurements. This study presents a methodology for the qualification of a DOFS. This qualification is achieved through the calculation of the so-called mechanical transfer function (MTF), which relates the strain profile in the OF to the actual strain profile in the structure. It is proposed to establish a numerical modeling of the system, in which the mechanical parameters are calibrated from experiments. A specific surface-mounted sensing cable connected to an optical frequency domain reflectometry interrogator is considered as a case study. It was found that (i) tensile and pull-out tests can provide detailed information about materials and interfaces of the numerical model; (ii) the calibrated model made it possible to compute strain profiles along the OF and therefore to calculate the MTF of the system; (iii) the results proved to be consistent with experimental data collected on a cracked concrete beam during a four-point bending test. This paper is organized as follows: first, the technical background related to DOFSs and interrogators is briefly recalled, the MTF is defined and the above-mentioned methodology is presented. In the second part, the methodology is applied to a specific cable. Finally, a comparison with experimental evidence validates the proposed

  6. Muscle strain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  7. Alignment of Multiple Electrospun Piezoelectric Fiber Bundles Across Serrated Gaps at an Incline: A Method to Generate Textile Strain Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Chan, Chen-Hao; Tang, William C

    2017-11-13

    In this paper, we report a new type of electrospinning collector that allows simultaneous collection and alignment of multiple poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) piezoelectric fiber bundles with a controlled separation. The key enabling feature is the serrated teeth along the edges across an inclined gap as a part of the conductive collector. As a result, the electrical field across the gap is shaped to direct the electrospun fibers to merge into multiple bundles. The sharp points on the serrated teeth provide favorable charge dissipation points and thus fibers are preferentially formed bridging two closest sharp points across the gap. To investigate the effectiveness of serrated teeth on the formation of multiple fiber bundles, three-dimensional finite element simulations are conducted. The corresponding collectors are implemented to experimentally study the resulting electrospun fibers. Both simulation and experimental results suggest that multiple fiber bundles can be formed under the condition of a low teeth pitch to gap distance ratio. Furthermore, a sharper tooth angle results in a higher preferential formation of fiber bundles. Finally, the total electrospinning time should be less than 60 seconds to maintain favorable electric field profile. We also demonstrate that these piezoelectric fiber bundles can serve as ultra-flexible textile sensors.

  8. Cross-Sectional Unification on the Stress-Strain Model of Concrete Subjected to High Passive Confinement by Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Gui Cao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The stress-strain behavior of concrete can be improved by providing a lateral passive confining pressure, such as fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP wrapping. Many axial stress-strain models have been proposed for FRP-confined concrete columns. However, few models can predict the stress-strain behavior of confined concrete columns with more than two specified cross-sections. A stress-strain model of FRP-confined concrete columns with cross-sectional unification was developed in this paper based on a database from the existing literature that includes circular, square, rectangular and elliptical concrete columns that are highly confined by FRP jackets. Using the database, the existing theoretical models were evaluated. In addition, the ultimate stress and strain models with cross-sectional unification were proposed using two parameters: the cross-sectional aspect ratio and corner radius ratio. The elliptical cross-section can be considered as a rectangular one with a special corner radius for the model calculations. A simple and accurate model of the equivalent corner radius ratio for elliptical columns was proposed. Compared to the other existing models and experimental data, the proposed models show good performance.

  9. Dynamic Strain Measurements on Automotive and Aeronautic Composite Components by Means of Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo Lamberti; Gabriele Chiesura; Geert Luyckx; Joris Degrieck; Markus Kaufmann; Steve Vanlanduit

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the internal deformations occurring in real-life composite components is a very challenging task, especially for those components that are rather difficult to access. Optical fiber sensors can overcome such a problem, since they can be embedded in the composite materials and serve as in situ sensors. In this article, embedded optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are used to analyze the vibration characteristics of two real-life composite components. The first component...

  10. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  11. Strain monitoring of a newly developed precast concrete track for high speed railway traffic using embedded fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crail, Stephanie; Reichel, D.; Schreiner, U.; Lindner, E.; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Hofmann, Detlef; Basedau, Frank; Brandes, K.; Barner, A.; Ecke, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Kerstin

    2002-07-01

    In a German slab track system (Feste Fahrbahn FF, system Boegl) for speeds up to 300 km/h and more different fiber optic sensors have been embedded in several levels and locations of the track system. The track system consists of prestressed precast panels of steel fiber concrete which are supported by a cat-in-situ concrete or asphalt base course. The sensors are to measure the bond behavior or the stress transfer in the track system. For that, tiny fiber-optic sensors - fiber Fabry-Perot and Bragg grating sensors - have been embedded very near to the interface of the layers. Measurements were taken on a full scale test sample (slab track panel of 6.45 m length) as well as on a real high speed track. The paper describes the measurement task and discusses aspects with regard to sensor design and prefabrication of the sensor frames as well as the embedding procedure into the concrete track. Results from static and dynamic full scale tests carried out in the testing laboratory of BAM and from measurements on a track are given.

  12. Dynamic Strain Measurements on Automotive and Aeronautic Composite Components by Means of Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Alfredo; Chiesura, Gabriele; Luyckx, Geert; Degrieck, Joris; Kaufmann, Markus; Vanlanduit, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the internal deformations occurring in real-life composite components is a very challenging task, especially for those components that are rather difficult to access. Optical fiber sensors can overcome such a problem, since they can be embedded in the composite materials and serve as in situ sensors. In this article, embedded optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are used to analyze the vibration characteristics of two real-life composite components. The first component is a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer automotive control arm; the second is a glass fiber-reinforced polymer aeronautic hinge arm. The modal parameters of both components were estimated by processing the FBG signals with two interrogation techniques: the maximum detection and fast phase correlation algorithms were employed for the demodulation of the FBG signals; the Peak-Picking and PolyMax techniques were instead used for the parameter estimation. To validate the FBG outcomes, reference measurements were performed by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer. The analysis of the results showed that the FBG sensing capabilities were enhanced when the recently-introduced fast phase correlation algorithm was combined with the state-of-the-art PolyMax estimator curve fitting method. In this case, the FBGs provided the most accurate results, i.e., it was possible to fully characterize the vibration behavior of both composite components. When using more traditional interrogation algorithms (maximum detection) and modal parameter estimation techniques (Peak-Picking), some of the modes were not successfully identified. PMID:26516854

  13. Fiber Bragg grating sensors for strain changes measurements at volcanic sites (MED-SUV project; WP 2; Sub-Task 2.2.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Fiodor; Beverini, Nicolò; Calamai, Massimo; Carbone, Daniele; Fotino, Nicoletta; Francesconi, Francesco; Gambino, Salvatore; Grassi, Renzo; Messin, Alfio Alex; Maccioni, Enrico; Morganti, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    Stress and strain changes at volcanic areas are recognized among the best indicators of changes in the activity of the system, and its possible evolution towards critical stages. Depending on their time evolution, stress and strain changes have been the focus of either geodetic (static changes) or seismological (dynamical changes) studies. In volcano geodesy, encouraging results have been obtained though borehole strain-meters. However, they are not easy to install and involve high costs. Therefore, the near future of strain observations at volcanoes depends on the development of broad-band sensors which are low-cost and easy to install, even in the form of dense arrays. Advancements in opto-electronics have allowed the development of low-cost sensors, reliable, rugged and compact, which are particularly suitable for on-field application. In the framework of WP 2 (New monitoring and Observing systems) of the MED-SUV project, the sub-task 2.2 involves the development of strain sensors based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology. In comparison with previous implementation of the FBG technology to study rock deformations, the system that is being developed within MED-SUV is expected to offer a significantly higher resolution and accuracy in static measurements. Moreover, a careful study is being carried out in order to obtain a smooth dynamic response up to 100 Hz, thus allowing the observation of seismic waves. Finally, the system under development will allow multi-axial strain sensing. The system performances are tailored to suit the requirements of volcano monitoring, with special attention to the trade-off between resolution and cost, and with special care to power consumption. Here we present the results of a field campaign with a preliminary, single-axis FBG strain sensor prototype on Etna, which was carried out in order to check the system performances in out-of-the-lab conditions and in the hostile volcanic environment (lack of mains electricity for

  14. Modifying the strength and strain concentration profile within collagen scaffolds using customizable arrays of poly-lactic acid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdzen, Laura C; Vucetic, Alan; Harley, Brendan A C

    2017-02-01

    The tendon-to-bone junction is a highly specialized tissue which dissipates stress concentrations between mechanically dissimilar tendon and bone. Upon injury, the local heterogeneities across this insertion are not regenerated, leading to poor functional outcomes such as formation of scar tissue at the insertion and re-failure rates exceeding 90%. Although current tissue engineering methods are moving towards the development of spatially-graded biomaterials to begin to address these injuries, significant opportunities remain to engineer the often complex local mechanical behavior of such biomaterials to enhance their bioactivity. Here, we describe the use of three-dimensional printing techniques to create customizable arrays of poly-lactic acid (PLA) fibers that can be incorporated into a collagen scaffold under development for tendon bone junction repair. Notably, we use additive manufacturing concepts to generate arrays of spatially-graded fibers from biodegradable PLA that are incorporated into collagen scaffolds to create a collagen-PLA composite. We demonstrate the ability to tune the mechanical performance of the fiber-scaffold composite at the bulk scale. We also demonstrate the incorporation of spatially-heterogeneous fiber designs to establish non-uniform local mechanical performance of the composite biomaterial under tensile load, a critical element in the design of multi-compartment biomaterials for tendon-to-bone regeneration applications. Together, this work highlights the capacity to use multi-scale composite biomaterials to control local and bulk mechanical properties, and provides key insights into design elements under consideration for mechanically competent, multi-tissue regeneration platforms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic Strain Measurements on Automotive and Aeronautic Composite Components by Means of Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Lamberti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the internal deformations occurring in real-life composite components is a very challenging task, especially for those components that are rather difficult to access. Optical fiber sensors can overcome such a problem, since they can be embedded in the composite materials and serve as in situ sensors. In this article, embedded optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors are used to analyze the vibration characteristics of two real-life composite components. The first component is a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer automotive control arm; the second is a glass fiber-reinforced polymer aeronautic hinge arm. The modal parameters of both components were estimated by processing the FBG signals with two interrogation techniques: the maximum detection and fast phase correlation algorithms were employed for the demodulation of the FBG signals; the Peak-Picking and PolyMax techniques were instead used for the parameter estimation. To validate the FBG outcomes, reference measurements were performed by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer. Sensors 2015, 15 27175 The analysis of the results showed that the FBG sensing capabilities were enhanced when the recently-introduced fast phase correlation algorithm was combined with the state-of-the-art PolyMax estimator curve fitting method. In this case, the FBGs provided the most accurate results, i.e. it was possible to fully characterize the vibration behavior of both composite components. When using more traditional interrogation algorithms (maximum detection and modal parameter estimation techniques (Peak-Picking, some of the modes were not successfully identified.

  16. Dynamic Strain Measurements on Automotive and Aeronautic Composite Components by Means of Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Alfredo; Chiesura, Gabriele; Luyckx, Geert; Degrieck, Joris; Kaufmann, Markus; Vanlanduit, Steve

    2015-10-26

    The measurement of the internal deformations occurring in real-life composite components is a very challenging task, especially for those components that are rather difficult to access. Optical fiber sensors can overcome such a problem, since they can be embedded in the composite materials and serve as in situ sensors. In this article, embedded optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are used to analyze the vibration characteristics of two real-life composite components. The first component is a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer automotive control arm; the second is a glass fiber-reinforced polymer aeronautic hinge arm. The modal parameters of both components were estimated by processing the FBG signals with two interrogation techniques: the maximum detection and fast phase correlation algorithms were employed for the demodulation of the FBG signals; the Peak-Picking and PolyMax techniques were instead used for the parameter estimation. To validate the FBG outcomes, reference measurements were performed by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer. Sensors 2015, 15 27175 The analysis of the results showed that the FBG sensing capabilities were enhanced when the recently-introduced fast phase correlation algorithm was combined with the state-of-the-art PolyMax estimator curve fitting method. In this case, the FBGs provided the most accurate results, i.e. it was possible to fully characterize the vibration behavior of both composite components. When using more traditional interrogation algorithms (maximum detection) and modal parameter estimation techniques (Peak-Picking), some of the modes were not successfully identified.

  17. Prenatal exposure to alcohol does not affect radial maze learning and hippocampal mossy fiber sizes in three inbred strains of mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertholet Jean-Yves

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on radial-maze learning and hippocampal neuroanatomy, particularly the sizes of the intra- and infrapyramidal mossy fiber (IIPMF terminal fields, in three inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, and DBA/2J. Results Although we anticipated a modification of both learning and IIPMF sizes, no such effects were detected. Prenatal alcohol exposure did, however, interfere with reproduction in C57BL/6J animals and decrease body and brain weight (in interaction with the genotype at adult age. Conclusion Prenatal alcohol exposure influenced neither radial maze performance nor the sizes of the IIPMF terminal fields. We believe that future research should be pointed either at different targets when using mouse models for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (e.g. more complicated behavioral paradigms, different hippocampal substructures, or other brain structures or involve different animal models.

  18. Performance analysis of a fiber Bragg grating filter-based strain/temperature sensing system based on a modified Gaussian function approximation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kuo-Chih; Ma, Chien-Ching; Wang, Chao-Hsiang

    2011-09-20

    This paper analyzes the performance of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filter-based strain and/or temperature sensing system based on a modified Gaussian function (MGF) approximation method. Instead of using a conventional Gaussian function, we propose the MGF, which can capture the characteristics of the sidelobes of the reflected spectrum, to model the FBG sensor and filter. We experimentally demonstrate that, by considering the contributions of the sidelobes with the MGF approximation method, behaviors of the FBG filter-based FBG displacement and/or temperature sensing system can be predicted more accurately. The predicted behaviors include the saturation, the sensitivity, the sensing range, and the optimal initial Bragg wavelengths of the FBG sensing system.

  19. Growth and fabrication of high-performance 980-nm strained InGaAs quantum-well lasers for erbium-doped fiber amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Naresh; Chu, Sung Nee George; Dutta, Niloy K.; Lopata, John; Geva, Michael; Syrbu, Alexei; Mereutza, Alexandru Z.; Yakovlev, Vladimir P.

    1994-02-01

    A 980-nm strained InGaAs quantum-well (QW) laser is the preferred pump source for an Er(3+)-doped fiber amplifier for the next generation of lightwave communication systems because of lower noise, high power conversion efficiency, and low temperature sensitivity. Obtaining long lifetime, narrow far field, high power output in the fundamental transverse mode centered at 980 +/- 5 nm, and planarity of the structure while maintaining low threshold current density (J(sub th)) and high differential quantum efficiency (eta) are the major challenges. We report work aimed at optimizing the design, growth, and fabrication of 980-nm lasers to address some of these issues. We demonstrate very low broad-area J(sub th) of 47 cm(exp -2), operation up to 200 C, and a very low linewidth enhancement factor of 0.54 of these lasers. We have also monolithically integrated 980-nm lasers with 850-nm GaAs QW lasers.

  20. Finite strain anisotropic elasto-plastic model for the simulation of the forming and testing of metal/short fiber reinforced polymer clinch joints at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, A.; Rolfes, R.; Behrens, A.; Bouguecha, A.; Hübner, S.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.

    2017-10-01

    There is a strong trend in the automotive industry to reduce car body-, chassis- and power-train mass in order to lower carbon emissions. More wide spread use of lightweight short fiber reinforced polymer (SFRP) is a promising approach to attain this goal. This poses the challenge of how to integrate new SFRP components by joining them to traditional sheet metal structures. Recently (1), the clinching technique has been successfully applied as a suitable joining method for dissimilar material such as SFRP and Aluminum. The material pairing PA6GF30 and EN AW 5754 is chosen for this purpose due to their common application in industry. The current contribution presents a verification and validation of a finite strain anisotropic material model for SFRP developed in (2) for the FE simulation of the hybrid clinching process. The finite fiber rotation during forming and separation, and thus the change of the preferential material direction, is represented in this model. Plastic deformations in SFRP are considered in this model via an invariant based non-associated plasticity formulation following the multiplicative decomposition approach of the deformation gradient where the stress-free intermediate configuration is introduced. The model allows for six independent characterization curves. The aforementioned material model allows for a detailed simulation of the forming process as well as a simulative prediction of the shear test strength of the produced joint at room temperature.

  1. Polymer optical fiber bragg grating sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Yuan, Scott Wu; Andresen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings are reported. We have written fiber Bragg gratings for 1550 nm and 850 nm operations, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  2. A combination of experimental and numerical methods to investigate the role of strain rate on the mechanical properties and collagen fiber orientations of the healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Rahmati, Seyyed Mohammadali; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2017-03-04

    Atherosclerosis enables to alter not only the microstructural but also the physical properties of the arterial walls by plaque forming. Few studies so far have been conducted to calculate the isotropic or anisotropic mechanical properties of the healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries. To date there is a paucity of knowledge on the mechanical response of the arteries under different strain rates. Therefore, the objective of the concurrent research was to comprehend whether the alteration in the strain rates of the human atherosclerotic arteries in comparison with the healthy ones contribute to the biomechanical behaviors. To do this, healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries were removed from 18 individuals during autopsy. Histological analyses by both an expert histopathologist and an imaged-based recognizer software were performed to figure out the average angle of collagen fibers in the healthy and atherosclerotic arterial walls. Thereafter, the samples were subjected to 3 diverse strain rates, i.e., 5, 20, and 50 mm/min, until the material failure occurs. The stress-strain diagrams of the arterial tissues were calculated in order to capture their linear elastic and nonlinear hyperelastic mechanical properties. In addition, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) was employed to predict the alteration of mean angle of collagen fibers during load bearing up to failure. The findings suggest that strain rate has a significant (p mechanical properties as well as the mean angle of collagen fibers of the atherosclerotic arteries, whereas no specific impact on the healthy ones. Furthermore, the mean angle of collagen fibers during the load bearing up to the failure at each strain rate was well predicted by the proposed ANNs code.

  3. High-resolution MRI for the quantitative evaluation of subendocardial and subepicardial perfusion under pharmalogical stress and at rest; Hochaufgeloeste quantitative MR-tomografische Bestimmung der subendo- und subepimyokardialen Perfusion unter Stress und in Ruhe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, C.O.; Savio, K. del; Brackertz, A.; Beer, M.; Hahn, D.; Koestler, H. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2007-09-15

    Purpose: MR stress perfusion imaging of the heart allows the quantification of myocardial perfusion and the evaluation of myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) and the ratio of subendocardial to subepicardial perfusion at rest and under adenosine stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-resolution GRAPPA sequence for quantitative MR first pass perfusion imaging in healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: First pass stress and rest perfusion studies were performed on 10 healthy volunteers using a 1.5 T MR scanner with a multislice SR-TrueFISP first pass perfusion sequence with a GRAPPA algorithm (acceleration factor 3) in prebolus technique and an image resolution of 1.8 x 1.8 mm. For the comparison group, we examined 12 different healthy volunteers with a standard first pass perfusion SR-TrueFISP sequence using a resolution of 2.7 x 3.3 mm. Myocardial contours were manually delineated followed by an automatic division of the myocardium into two rings with an equal thickness for the subendo- and subepicardial layer. Eight sectors per slice were evaluated using contamination and baseline correction. Results: Using the GRAPPA sequence, the ratio of subendo- to subepimyocardial perfusion was 1.18 {+-} 0.32 for the examination at rest. Under pharmacologically induced stress, the ratio was 1.08 {+-} 0.27. For the standard sequence the ratio was 1.15 {+-} 0.28 at rest and 1.11 {+-} 0.33 under stress. For the high resolution sequence higher mean values for the subendo- to subepimyocardial ratio were obtained with comparable standard deviations. The difference between the sequences was not significant. Conclusion: The evaluation of subendomyocardial and subepimyocardial perfusion is feasible with a high-resolution first pass perfusion sequence. The use of a higher resolution to avoid systematic error leads to increased image noise. However, no relevant reduction in the quantitative perfusion values under stress and at rest was able to be depicted. (orig.)

  4. A method for the on-site determination of prestressing forces using long-gauge fiber optic strain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Jaber, H.; Glisic, B.

    2014-07-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) consists of the continuous or periodic measurement of structural parameters and their analysis with the aim of deducing information about the performance and health condition of a structure. The significant increase in the construction of prestressed concrete bridges motivated this research on an SHM method for the on-site determination of the distribution of prestressing forces along prestressed concrete beam structures. The estimation of the distribution of forces is important as it can give information regarding the overall performance and structural integrity of the bridge. An inadequate transfer of the designed prestressing forces to the concrete cross-section can lead to a reduced capacity of the bridge and consequently malfunction or failure at lower loads than predicted by design. This paper researches a universal method for the determination of the distribution of prestressing forces along concrete beam structures at the time of transfer of the prestressing force (e.g., at the time of prestressing or post-tensioning). The method is based on the use of long-gauge fiber optic sensors, and the sensor network is similar (practically identical) to the one used for damage identification. The method encompasses the determination of prestressing forces at both healthy and cracked cross-sections, and for the latter it can yield information about the condition of the cracks. The method is validated on-site by comparison to design forces through the application to two structures: (1) a deck-stiffened arch and (2) a curved continuous girder. The uncertainty in the determination of prestressing forces was calculated and the comparison with the design forces has shown very good agreement in most of the structures’ cross-sections, but also helped identify some unusual behaviors. The method and its validation are presented in this paper.

  5. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis and High Strain-Rate Energy Absorption Characteristics of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Woven Fiber-Glass Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic mechanical behavior and energy absorption characteristics of nano-enhanced functionally graded composites, consisting of 3 layers of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT forests grown on woven fiber-glass (FG layer and embedded within 10 layers of woven FG, with polyester (PE and polyurethane (PU resin systems (FG/PE/VACNT and FG/PU/VACNT are investigated and compared with the baseline materials, FG/PE and FG/PU (i.e., without VACNT. A Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA was used for obtaining the mechanical properties. It was found that FG/PE/VACNT exhibited a significantly lower flexural stiffness at ambient temperature along with higher damping loss factor over the investigated temperature range compared to the baseline material FG/PE. For FG/PU/VACNT, a significant increase in flexural stiffness at ambient temperature along with a lower damping loss factor was observed with respect to the baseline material FG/PU. A Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB was used to evaluate the energy absorption and strength of specimens under high strain-rate compression loading. It was found that the specific energy absorption increased with VACNT layers embedded in both FG/PE and FG/PU. The compressive strength also increased with the addition of VACNT forest layers in FG/PU; however, it did not show an improvement for FG/PE.

  6. Left Ventricular Systolic Function Changes in Primary Hypertension Patients Detected by the Strain of Different Myocardium Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Yan, Zi-Ning; Rui, Yi-Fei; Fan, Li; Shen, Dan; Chen, Dong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction associated with differential strain among myocardial layers in primary hypertension (PH) patients with or without LV hypertrophy (LVH), and normal patients. In 63 PH and 42 healthy patients, two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography was used to measure the peak systolic longitudinal and circumferential strain of the myocardial subendocardial, middle and subepicardial layers, and the peak systolic radial strain. To assess LV systolic function, the apical long axis, 4- and 2-chamber views, and parasternal short axis at the basal, middle, and apical levels were acquired by cardiovascular ultrasound (Vivid E9, GE Healthcare, USA). Overall, the pattern in peak systolic longitudinal strain among myocardial layers was subendocardial > middle > subepicardial. In the peak systolic circumferential strain, this was middle > subepicardial > subendocardial. The peak systolic longitudinal strain was normal > NLVH > LVH. Among the groups, the peak systolic circumferential strain at the basal parasternal short-axis level was statistically similar, but at the middle and the apical parasternal short-axis levels were NLVH > normal > LVH. In normal and NLVH patients, the peak radial strain was middle > apical > basal, and in LVH patients was apical > middle > basal. The peak averages of the longitudinal and subendocardial circumferential strains differed significantly when LVH compared with NLVH and normal patients. The systolic function of PH patients was damaged in comparison with normal individuals, which could be detected conveniently and accurately using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography. PMID:26765428

  7. Advances on Optical Fiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mescia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review paper some recent advances on optical fiber sensors are reported. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG, long period gratings (LPGs, evanescent field and hollow core optical fiber sensors are mentioned. Examples of recent optical fiber sensors for the measurement of strain, temperature, displacement, air flow, pressure, liquid-level, magnetic field, and the determination of methadone, hydrocarbons, ethanol, and sucrose are briefly described.

  8. Fiber webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; James S. Han; Von L. Byrd

    2005-01-01

    Wood fibers can be used to produce a wide variety of low-density three-dimensional webs, mats, and fiber-molded products. Short wood fibers blended with long fibers can be formed into flexible fiber mats, which can be made by physical entanglement, nonwoven needling, or thermoplastic fiber melt matrix technologies. The most common types of flexible mats are carded, air...

  9. Dynamic mechanical analysis and high strain-rate energy absorption characteristics of vertically aligned carbon nanotube reinforced woven fiber-glass composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dynamic mechanical behavior and energy absorption characteristics of nano-enhanced functionally graded composites, consisting of 3 layers of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) forests grown on woven fiber-glass (FG) layer and embedded within 10 layers of woven FG, with polyester (PE) and...

  10. Design and proposal of dual line-of-defense perimeter watchdog incorporating optimally designed FBG based accelerometers and strain sensors using single optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd. Mansoor; Sonkar, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Paper presents Opto-Mechanical intrusion sensor fence with FBGs attached to mechanical accelerometers and strain sensors, optimized on SolidWorks 2013 for desired frequency to 35 Hz, picking up accelerations/ strains and its deployment for perimeter security. The accelerometer structure consists of inertial mass supported by an L-shaped modified cantilever beam having non-uniform cross section area connected to base by a thin neck element which acts as strain concentrated centre hence an optimum zone for FBG sensors placement. Bragg wavelength shifts were obtained on Optigrating software for the obtained strain values on mechanical assembly of fence. CFD wind analysis is performed on the assembly to obtain the spot for accelerometer's placement to avoid false alarms up to wind velocities of 20 m/s.

  11. Mechanical Properties Optimization of Fiber Reinforced Foam Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 3 factors including fiber kind, fiber content and fiber mix-ability are selected to optimizing mechanical properties of foam concrete. By orthogonal experiment design, compression and flexural stress and strain of specimens from different fiber added ways were test. Range analysis and factor levels analysis show the best fiber added way. Test shows that fiber content is the most important factor to flexural stress. Next one is fiber kind and the third is fiber mix-ability. Fiber kind is the most important factor to stress curves. Fiber is not good for compression strength but good for flexural strength.

  12. The simultaneous measurement of temperature and mean strain based on the distorted spectra of half-encapsulated fiber Bragg gratings using improved particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng-fang; Wang, Jing; Sui, Qing-mei; Jia, Lei

    2017-06-01

    A half-encapsulated FBG is capable of simultaneously measuring temperature and strain. However, spectrum distortion, which may be induced by overlapping or non-uniform strains, may hinder the adoption of this technique. In order to resolve this issue, an improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) based spectra reconstructing method has been adopted in this study to estimate the temperature and mean strain according to the distorted spectrum. Also, a dynamic adaptive inertia weight adjusting strategy based on the swarm success rate has been adopted to improve the algorithm. To validate the method, a total of 48 scenarios of distorted spectra have been simulated, and the temperature and mean strain estimated by IPSO have been compared with the genetic algorithm and linearly-declined PSO. The simulation results indicated that the IPSO based reconstructing method provided a higher accuracy. Additionally, the feasibility of the proposed method has been experimentally verified using a strain tunable apparatus within a measurable temperature environment. The experimental results demonstrated that the half-encapsulated FBG with an IPSO based spectra reconstructing method was applicable for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and mean strain, even when the spectrum was distorted.

  13. Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer.......Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  14. Natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caulfield

    2005-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and agrobased bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement. Below...

  15. Morfologia das fibras musculares esqueléticas de frangos de corte de diferentes linhagens criados em sistemas de confinamento e semiconfinamento Morphology of skeletal muscle fibers of different broiler chicken strains bred in confined and semi-confined systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Aparecida Madeira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da linhagem, do sistema de criação e do sexo sobre o peso vivo, o rendimento de carcaça e de pernas e os aspectos morfológicos das fibras musculares esqueléticas do músculo flexor longo do hálux de frangos de corte. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial 4 x 2 x 2, ou seja, quatro linhagens (Ross-308, Pescoço Pelado Label Rouge, Caipirinha e Paraíso Pedrês, dois sistemas de criação (confinamento e semiconfinamento e dois sexos, com duas repetições por tratamento, sendo que cada ave retirada ao acaso aos 56 dias de idade foi considerada uma unidade experimental, totalizando 64 aves. A linhagem Ross apresentou maior peso vivo e maiores pesos de carcaça, de pernas, de carne de penas e do músculo flexor longo do hálux e maiores rendimentos de carcaça e de carnes de pernas que as outras linhagens. A maior massa muscular das aves selecionadas para alta taxa de crescimento está relacionada ao aumento na área dos três tipos de fibras musculares (SO, FOG e FG. Machos apresentaram maior massa muscular e musculatura mais glicolítica que fêmeas. O sistema de semiconfinamento alterou a composição de fibras musculares esqueléticas dos machos, tornando-a mais oxidativa, porém, esse efeito não foi observado nas fêmeas.The effect of strain, breeding system and sex on body weight, carcass and leg yield, and morphologic aspects of skeletal muscle fibers of flexor hallucis longus muscle of broiler chickens was evaluated in this study. The experiment consisted of a 4x2x2 factorial arrangement of treatments, with four strains (Ross-308, Naked Neck Label Rouge, Caipirinha and Paraiso Pedrês, two breeding systems (confinement and semi-confinement and two sexes, with two replicates per treatment, considering each bird selected randomly at 56 days of age an experimental unit, with a total of 64 birds. Ross strain had the highest values of body weight, weights of legs and meat of legs

  16. Fiber Sensor Technology Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotate, Kazuo

    2006-08-01

    Fiber sensor technologies are overviewed. Since the early 1970s, this field has been developed, on the basis of the same devices and photonic principles as fiber communication technologies. Besides simple configurations, in which the fiber acts only as a data transmission line, sophisticated configurations have also been developed, in which the fiber is used as a device to realize unique sensing mechanisms. The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is a good example, and has been developed as an absolute rotation sensor used, for example, for navigation and/or attitude control applications. Compared with traditional spinning-mass gyroscopes, the FOG has advantages, such as a short warming-up time, a light weight, and easy handling. A Japanese satellite, which was launched in August 2005 with a mission to observe the aurora, is controlled with a FOG. The FOG has also been used in consumer applications, such as the camera stabilizer, radio-controlled (RC) helicopter navigation, and the control of humanoid robots. Recently, distributed and multiplexed sensing schemes, in particular, have been studied and developed, in which a long fiber acts like a “nerve” for feeling the strain and/or the temperature distribution along the fiber. Performances of artificial nerve systems have markedly improved within the last couple of years, in spatial resolution and measurement speed. By embedding the “fiber-optic nerve system” in aircraft wings, bridges and tall buildings, these materials and structures can sense damage to prevent disasters.

  17. Stretching single fibrin fibers hampers their lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Lucioni, Tomas; Li, Rongzhong; Bonin, Keith; Cho, Samuel S; Guthold, Martin

    2017-09-15

    Blood clots, whose main structural component is a mesh of microscopic fibrin fibers, experience mechanical strain from blood flow, clot retraction and interactions with platelets and other cells. We developed a transparent, striated and highly stretchable substrate made from fugitive glue (a styrenic block copolymer) to investigate how mechanical strain affects lysis of single, suspended fibrin fibers. In this suspended fiber assay, lysis manifested itself by fiber elongation, thickening (disassembly), fraying and collapse. Stretching single fibrin fibers significantly hampered their lysis. This effect was seen in uncrosslinked and crosslinked fibers. Crosslinking (without stretching) also hampered single fiber lysis. Our data suggest that strain is a novel mechanosensitive factor that regulates blood clot dissolution (fibrinolysis) at the single fiber level. At the molecular level of single fibrin molecules, strain may distort, or hinder access to, plasmin cleavage sites and thereby hamper lysis. Fibrin fibers are the major structural component of a blood clot. We developed a highly stretchable substrate made from fugitive glue and a suspended fibrin fiber lysis assay to investigate the effect of stretching on single fibrin fibers lysis. The key findings from our experiments are: 1) Fibers thicken and elongate upon lysis; 2) stretching strongly reduces lysis; 3) this effect is more pronounced for uncrosslinked fibers; and 4) stretching fibers has a similar effect on reducing lysis as crosslinking fibers. At the molecular level, strain may distort plasmin cleavage sites, or restrict access to those sites. Our results suggest that strain may be a novel mechanobiological factor that regulates fibrinolysis. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The dentate mossy fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Zimmer, Jens

    2007-01-01

    and taking interesting turns, the mossy fibers display a number of unique features with regard to axonal projections, terminal structures and synaptic contacts, development and variations among species and strains, as well as to normal occurring and lesion-induced plasticity and neural transplantation...

  19. Tension stiffening of steel-fiber-reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Álvaro Oliveira Júnior

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the mechanical behavior of steel-fiber-reinforced concrete was investigated to analyze the influence of steel fibers on tension stiffening. Using tension tests, the tension stiffening coefficient was evaluated through the load versus strain responses obtained from strain gages fixed to reinforcement steels. Moreover, an empirical model is proposed to estimate the tension stiffening coefficient of steel-fiber-reinforced concrete from reinforcement strains. From the test results, it was verified that the addition of steel fibers to concrete reduced the reinforcement steel strains and the crack width and increased the stiffness of cracked concrete, mainly in concretes reinforced with highvolumesof fibers.

  20. Development of a high-performance spacer for cryogenic use. Compressive property and thermal strain of hybrid composites reinforced with high-strength polyethylene and glass fiber; Kyokuteionyo koseino spacer no kaihatsu - kokyodo polyethylene sen`i/glass sen`ikei ichihoko kyoka fukugo zairyo no asshuk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, A.; Kashima, T. [Toyobo Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan). Research Institute; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Institute of Science and Industrial Reseach

    1997-07-25

    As for the unidirectional-fiber reinforced plastics (UD-FRP) of the Dyneema fiber reinforced plastics (DFRP), glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) and DF/GF mixing reinforced plastics (DGFRP) composite materials, the application of cryogenic spacer was thought, and the characteristics of compression and thermal strain are discussed comparatively. Unidirectional hybrid composites reinforced with high-strength polyethylene fiber and glass fiber were prepared to develop a spacer having a low thermal expansion coefficient for cryogenic use. The thermal expansion coefficient and compressive strength of the hybrid composites were measured together with the effect of thermal cycling between room and cryogenic temperatures. Though the hybrid composites showed anisotropy in the thermal expansion coefficient, the coefficient could be calculated simply by the law of mixtures. The thermal expansion coefficient became zero when the ratio between polyethylene and glass fiber volume was 3/7. The compressive strength and thermal expansion coefficient did not change after 5 heat cyclings. The compressive modulus of the hybrid composite was approximately 50 GPa at small strain and then decreased slightly. It was found that the compressive strength of the hybrid composite could be expressed by the law of mixtures. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  1. FIBER ORIENTATION IN INJECTION MOLDED LONG CARBON FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Costa, Franco; Jin, Xiaoshi; Tucker III, Charles L.; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2015-03-23

    A set of edge-gated and center-gated plaques were injection molded with long carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites, and the fiber orientation was measured at different locations of the plaques. Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight (ASMI) software was used to simulate the injection molding of these plaques and to predict the fiber orientation, using the anisotropic rotary diffusion and the reduced strain closure models. The phenomenological parameters of the orientation models were carefully identified by fitting to the measured orientation data. The fiber orientation predictions show very good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Fiber biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton fiber cells arising from seed epidermis is the most important agricultural textile commodity in the world. To produce fully mature fibers, approximately two months of fiber developmental process are required. The timing of four distinctive fiber development stages consisting of initiation, ...

  3. In-line fiber optic interferometric sensors in single-mode fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tao; Wu, Di; Liu, Min; Duan, De-Wen

    2012-01-01

    In-line fiber optic interferometers have attracted intensive attention for their potential sensing applications in refractive index, temperature, pressure and strain measurement, etc. Typical in-line fiber-optic interferometers are of two types: Fabry-Perot interferometers and core-cladding-mode interferometers. It's known that the in-line fiber optic interferometers based on single-mode fibers can exhibit compact structures, easy fabrication and low cost. In this paper, we review two kinds of typical in-line fiber optic interferometers formed in single-mode fibers fabricated with different post-processing techniques. Also, some recently reported specific technologies for fabricating such fiber optic interferometers are presented.

  4. Fiber Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The chapter provides a discussion of optical fiber amplifiers and through three sections provides a detailed treatment of three types of optical fiber amplifiers, erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA), Raman amplifiers, and parametric amplifiers. Each section comprises the fundamentals including...... the basic physics and relevant in-depth theoretical modeling, amplifiers characteristics and performance data as a function of specific operation parameters. Typical applications in fiber optic communication systems and the improvement achievable through the use of fiber amplifiers are illustrated....

  5. Multilayer radial systolic strain can identify subendocardial ischemia: an experimental tissue Doppler imaging study of the porcine left ventricular wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matre, Knut; Moen, Christian Arvei; Fanneløp, Tord; Dahle, Geir Olav; Grong, Ketil

    2007-12-01

    This study investigates whether subendocardial ischemia can be detected by measuring multilayer radial systolic strain from epicardial tissue Doppler imaging. In 10 anesthetized open-chest pigs an extracorporeal shunt from the proximal brachiocephalic to the left anterior descending coronary artery was constricted in steps. Color microsphere injections and short axis Tissue Velocity Imaging (TVI) recordings were performed with open shunt, with a non-significant stenosis, and with 2 steps of shunt flow reduction. With open shunt and no transmural flow gradient, there was a gradient of peak ejection strain with high values subendocardially for both 4 and 2 layer measurements. For 2 layer measurement strain was 56.0+/-10.5% subendocardially and 22.0+/-5.2% subepicardially. A non-significant stenosis, not altering transmural flow distribution, reduced strain to 40.3+/-5.4% in the endocardial half-layer. With reduced shunt flow resulting in subendocardial ischemia, peak ejection strain decreased further, primarily in inner wall layers, and postsystolic strain became evident. At severe stenosis (52.4+/-1.8% shunt flow reduction) strain was reduced to 3.8+/-3.6% in the subendocardium and 0.0+/-2.6% in the subepicardium. Evaluation of myocardial function with multilayer radial systolic strain has a potential for detecting subendocardial ischemia.

  6. Thermal Expansion Measurements in Fresh and Saline Ice Using Fiber Optic Strain Gauges and Multipoint Temperature Sensors Based on Bragg Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Marchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG sensors to investigate the thermomechanical properties of saline ice. FBG sensors allowed laboratory measurements of thermal expansion of ice samples with a range of different sizes and geometries. The high sampling frequency, accuracy, and resolution of the FBG sensors provide good quality data across a temperature range from 0°C to −20°C. Negative values of the effective coefficient of thermal expansion were observed in ice samples with salinities 6 ppt, 8 ppt, and 9.4 ppt. A model is formulated under which structural transformations in the ice, caused by temperature changes, can lead to brine transfer from closed pockets to permeable channels, and vice versa. This model is compared to experimental data. Further, in experiments with confined floating ice, heating as well as thermal expansion due to vertical migration of liquid brine, caused by under-ice water pressure, was observed.

  7. Physical Determinants of Fibrinolysis in Single Fibrin Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucay, Igal; O’Brien, E. Tim; Wulfe, Steven D.; Superfine, Richard; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Falvo, Michael R.; Hudson, Nathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin fibers form the structural backbone of blood clots; fibrinolysis is the process in which plasmin digests fibrin fibers, effectively regulating the size and duration of a clot. To understand blood clot dissolution, the influence of clot structure and fiber properties must be separated from the effects of enzyme kinetics and perfusion rates into clots. Using an inverted optical microscope and fluorescently-labeled fibers suspended between micropatterned ridges, we have directly measured the lysis of individual fibrin fibers. We found that during lysis 64 ± 6% of fibers were transected at one point, but 29 ± 3% of fibers increase in length rather than dissolving or being transected. Thrombin and plasmin dose-response experiments showed that the elongation behavior was independent of plasmin concentration, but was instead dependent on the concentration of thrombin used during fiber polymerization, which correlated inversely with fiber diameter. Thinner fibers were more likely to lyse, while fibers greater than 200 ± 30 nm in diameter were more likely to elongate. Because lysis rates were greatly reduced in elongated fibers, we hypothesize that plasmin activity depends on fiber strain. Using polymer physics- and continuum mechanics-based mathematical models, we show that fibers polymerize in a strained state and that thicker fibers lose their prestrain more rapidly than thinner fibers during lysis, which may explain why thick fibers elongate and thin fibers lyse. These results highlight how subtle differences in the diameter and prestrain of fibers could lead to dramatically different lytic susceptibilities. PMID:25714359

  8. Strength-length scaling of elementary hemp fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poriķe, E.; Andersons, J.

    2013-03-01

    The application of hemp fibers as a reinforcement of composite materials necessitates the characterization of fiber strength scatter and the effect of fiber length on its strength. With this aim, elementary hemp fibers were tested in tension at two different gage lengths. Due to the similar morphology of hemp and flax fibers, the probabilistic strength models derived and verified for the latter were applied to the former. The fiber strength was found to agree with the modified Weibull distribution. The modeling approaches developed for describing the variability of the strength and failure strain of elementary flax fibers are shown to be also applicable to hemp fibers.

  9. Strain monitoring for horsetail falls and sylvan bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Fiber optic sensors were installed on two reinforced concrete bridges that had been strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer composites. The primary objective for one of the bridges was to provide strain data to verify a computer model for the brid...

  10. Dietary Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble ... types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and ...

  11. Novel Optical Fiber Materials With Engineered Brillouin Gain Coefficients SSL 1: Novel Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-29

    Hawkins, C. Ryan, A. D. Yablon, R. Stolen, J. Ballato. Single- and few-moded lithium aluminosilicate optical fiber for athermal Brillouin strain...invited presentations 5 invited journal papers 1 journal cover 1 paper awarded "Spotlight on Optics" by the Optical Society of America 1 paper...Derived Fiber 25 G. Strontium Aluminosilicate Fiber 28 H. Lithium Aluminosilicate Fiber 30 V. Investigations Into Other Compatible

  12. Fundamentals of fiber bonding in thermally point-bonded nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Aparna

    -bond fabric strip was developed and it demonstrated the negative effect of inhomogeneous straining of fibers arising from the commonly used diamond bond shape and pervasive fiber-to-fiber elongation variability on fabric strength.

  13. Laser Brazing metallic embedding technique for fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandal, Tania; Fraga, Sergio; Castro, Gemma; Vazquez, Esteban; Zornoza, Ander

    2017-04-01

    In this paper a fiber optic metallic embedding technique is presented based on laser Brazing manufacturing process. The embedding strategy to follow by the laser Brazing, which consists in three steps, minimizes the thermal stress of the embedded fiber, relaxes microbending strains and reduces damage on the fiber. The minimum embedded fiber optic Ni coating total diameter is 237 μm for a successful process with negligible optical loss on the fiber. Fiber Bragg Gratings were successfully embedded in metallic specimens and their strain response was in accordance with their specifications.

  14. Evaluation of a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane device as a chemical surrogate for the measurements of zinc (II) bioavailability using two microalgae strains as biological references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morales, Erik A; Rodríguez de San Miguel, Eduardo; de Gyves, Josefina

    2017-03-01

    The environmental bioavailability of zinc (II), i.e., the uptake of the element by an organism, was determined using two microalgae species, Scenedesmus acutus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, and estimated using hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HF-SLM) device as the chemical surrogate. Several experimental conditions were studied including the presence of organic matter, inorganic anions and concomitant cations and pH. The results show strong positive correlation coefficients between the responses given by the HF-SLM and the microalgae species (r = 0.900 for S. acutus and r = 0.876 for P. subcapitata) in multivariate environments (changes in pH, calcium, humic and citrate concentrations). The maximum amount of zinc (II) retained by the HF-SLM (4.7 × 10 -8  mol/cm 2 ) was higher than those for P. subcapitata and S. acutus (9.4 × 10 -11  mol/cm 2 and 6.2 × 10 -11  mol/cm 2 , respectively). The variation in pH (pH 5.5-9) was the variable with the greatest effect on zinc internalization in all systems, increasing approximately 2.5 times for P. subcapitata and 5.5 times for S. acutus respect to pH = 5.5, while the presence of humic acids did not affect the response. The species' concentration analysis of the experimental design at pH = 5.5 indicated that the amount of internalized zinc (II) by the HF-SLM and both microalgae species is strongly dependent on the free zinc concentration (r = 0.910 for the HF-SLM, r = 0.922 for S. acutus and r = 0.954 for P. subcapitata); however, at pH = 9.0, the amount of internalized zinc (II) is strongly dependent on the sum of free zinc and labile species (r = 0.912 for the HF-SLM, r = 0.947 for S. acutus and r = 0.900 for P. subcapitata). The presence of inorganic ligands (chloride, sulfate, phosphate, carbonate, and nitrate) and metal ions (cobalt (II), copper (II), nickel (II), chromium (VI), lead (II) and cadmium (II)) produced different behaviors both in the chemical surrogate and the

  15. Water Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Douvidzon, Mark L; Martin, Leopoldo L; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Fibers constitute the backbone of modern communication and are used in laser surgeries; fibers also genarate coherent X-ray, guided-sound and supercontinuum. In contrast, fibers for capillary oscillations, which are unique to liquids, were rarely considered in optofluidics. Here we fabricate fibers by water bridging an optical tapered-coupler to a microlensed coupler. Our water fibers are held in air and their length can be longer than a millimeter. These hybrid fibers co-confine two important oscillations in nature: capillary- and electromagnetic-. We optically record vibrations in the water fiber, including an audio-rate fundamental and its 3 overtones in a harmonic series, that one can hear in soundtracks attached. Transforming Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems [MEMS] to Micro-Electro-Capillary-Systems [MECS], boosts the device softness by a million to accordingly improve its response to minute forces. Furthermore, MECS are compatible with water, which is a most important liquid in our world.

  16. MICROMECHANICS IN CONTINOUS GRAPHITE FIBER/EPOXY COMPOSITES DURING CREEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. ZHOU; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Micro Raman spectroscopy and classic composite shear-lag models were used to analyze the evolution with time of fiber and matrix strain/stress around fiber breaks in planar model graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composites. Impressive agreements were found between the model predictions and the experimental results. The local matrix creep leads to an increase in the load transfer length around the break under a constant load. This increases the chance of fiber breakage in the neighboring intact fibers.

  17. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows...... to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness...... of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization...

  18. Buckling of a fiber bundle embedded in epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, H. T.; Sohi, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    Buckling of a fiber bundle embedded in epoxy resin was studied to gain insight into compressive failure mechanisms in unidirectional composites. The fibers used were E-glass, T300 graphite, T700 graphite, and P75 graphite. These fibers were combined with two different resins: Epon 815/V140 and Epon 828/Z. In both resins the failure mode of the bundle was found to be microbuckling of fibers for the first three types of fibers; however, the high-modulus P75 fibers failed in shear without any sign of microbuckling. The strains at which microbuckling occurred were higher than the compressive failure strains of the corresponding unidirectional composites. In the soft resin, Epon 815/V140, fibers buckled at lower strains than in the stiff resin, Epon 828/Z. The buckling strains and the segment lengths followed the trends predicted for a single filament embedded in an infinite matrix.

  19. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  20. Triboluminescent Fiber-Optic Sensors Measure Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Triboluminescence exploited in fiber-optic sensor system for measuring changes in pressures, strains, vibrations, and acoustic emissions, in structural members. Sensors embedded in members for in situ monitoring of condition of structure. System passive in sense no source of radiation required to interrogate optical fiber. Technique has potential for wide range of applications in which detection and measurement of structural stress required.

  1. Characterization and modeling time-dependent behavior in PZT fibers and active fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, Mohamed A.; Atitallah, Hassene B.; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Muliana, Anastasia

    2015-04-01

    Active fiber composites (AFC) are comprised of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers embedded in a polymer. This paper presents an experimental characterization of the PZT fibers and a constitutive model focused on their time-dependent, nonlinear response. The experiments herein focus on characterizing time dependence of various properties by conducting creep, relaxation, mechanical and electric field-cyclic loading at different frequencies. The constitutive model is a time-dependent polarization model that predicts nonlinear polarization and electro-mechanical strain responses of the fibers. The model of PZT fibers is used in the FEM simulation of AFCs and results of the model are compared to experiments for validation.

  2. Optical Fiber Grating based Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis differenct optical fiber gratings are used for sensor purposes. If a fiber with a core concentricity error (CCE) is used, a directional dependent bend sensor can be produced. The CCE direction can be determined by means of diffraction. This makes it possible to produce long......-period gratings in a fiber with a CCE direction parallel or perpendicular to the writing direction. The maximal bending sensitivity is independent on the writing direction, but the detailed bending response is different in the two cases. A temperature and strain sensor, based on a long-period grating and two...... sampled gratings, was produced and investigated. It is based on the different temperature and strain response of these gratings. Both a transfer matrix method and an overlap calculation is performed to explain the sensor response. Another type of sensor is based on tuning and modulation of a laser...

  3. Arritmias potenciadas por isquemia sub-epicárdica en pared transmural heterogénea cardiaca: un estudio teórico de simulación Arrhythmias potentiated by sub-epicardial ischemia in transmural heterogeneous cardiac wall: theoretical simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar A Henao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available La fibrilación ventricular, la isquemia miocárdica y la muerte súbita son fisiopatologías cardiacas inseparables. La influencia de la distribución de células del medio miocardio en la formación de arritmias en la pared heterogénea cardiaca en presencia de isquemia sub-epicárdica, no está del todo dilucidada. En este estudio se modela una porción plana de la pared transmural con diferentes configuraciones de células del medio miocardio que se adjuntan a las heterogeneidades bioquímicas presentes en isquemia sub-epicárdica para cuantificar su influencia en la formación de arritmias. Se obtuvieron reentradas lobulares no sostenidas en torno de la lesión isquémica que interfieren con las células M, alterando la repolarización del tejido. La función de vulnerabilidad que cuantifica la prospección a reentradas es aproximada por una función logística, y su mayor expresión ocurre en el minuto 8,75 de isquemia modelada. La heterogeneidad bioquímica y morfológica en el tejido virtual estudiado dan como resultado una arritmia por reentrada; su secuela en la vulnerabilidad del tejido aumenta a medida que crece la severidad de la hiperkalemia. Los electrogramas obtenidos muestran depresión TQ y elevación ST con una morfología de taquicardia ventricular polimórfica.Ventricular fibrillation, myocardial ischemia and sudden cardiac death are inseparable cardiac pathophysiologies. The influence of the distribution of myocardial cells in the formation of arrhythmias in the heterogeneous cardiac wall in the presence of sub-epicardial ischemia is not entirely elucidated. This study models a flat portion of the transmural wall under different myocardial cell configurations attached to the biochemical heterogeneity present in sub-epicardial ischemia to quantify their influence on the development of arrhythmias. Lobular non-sustained reentries were obtained around the ischemic lesion that interfere with M cells, altering the tissue

  4. Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, Ajoy; Thyagarajan, K.

    With the development of extremely low-loss optical fibers and their application to communication systems, a revolution has taken fiber glass place during the last 40 years. In 2001, using glass fibers as the transmission medium and lightwaves as carrier wave waves, information was transmitted at a rate more than 1 Tbit/s (which is roughly equivalent to transmission of about 15 million simultaneous telephone conversations) through one hair thin optical fiber. Experimental demonstration of transmission at the rate of 14 Tbit/s over a 160 km long single fiber was demonstrated in 2006, which is equivalent to sending 140 digital high definition movies in 1 s. Very recently record transmission of more than 100 Tbit/s over 165 km single mode fiber has been reported. These can be considered as extremely important technological achievements. In this chapter we will discuss the propagation characteristics of optical fibers with special applications to optical communication systems and also present some of the noncommunication applications such as sensing.

  5. Interferometric fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong Ha; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwan Seob; Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Myoung Jin; Rho, Byung Sup; Choi, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG) is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  6. Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Young Choi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  7. Vacuum fiber-fiber coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrici, Axel; Bjelajac, Goran; Jonkers, Jeroen; Jakobs, Stefan; Olschok, Simon; Reisgen, Uwe

    2017-02-01

    Research and development carried out by the ISF Welding and Joining Institute of RWTH Aachen University has proven that combining high power laser and low vacuum atmosphere provides a welding performance and quality, which is comparable to electron beam welding. The developed welding machines are still using a beam forming which takes place outside the vacuum and the focusing laser beam has to be introduced to the vacuum via a suitable window. This inflexible design spoils much of the flexibility of modern laser welding. With the target to bring a compact, lightweight flying optics with flexible laser transport fibers into vacuum chambers, a high power fiber-fiber coupler has been adapted by II-VI HIGHYAG that includes a reliable vacuum interface. The vacuum-fiber-fiber coupler (V-FFC) is tested with up to 16 kW sustained laser power and the design is flexible in terms of a wide variety of laser fiber plug systems and vacuum flanges. All that is needed to implement the V-FFC towards an existing or planned vacuum chamber is an aperture of at least 100 mm (4 inch) diameter with any type of vacuum or pressure flange. The V-FFC has a state-of-the-art safety interface which allows for fast fiber breakage detection for both fibers (as supported by fibers) by electric wire breakage and short circuit detection. Moreover, the System also provides connectors for cooling and electric signals for the laser beam optics inside the vacuum. The V-FFC has all necessary adjustment options for coupling the laser radiation to the receiving fiber.

  8. Moiré phase-shifted fiber Bragg gratings in polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Rui; Marques, Carlos; Bang, Ole

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple way to fabricate phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating in polymer optical fibers as a narrowband transmission filter for a variety of applications at telecom wavelengths. The filters have been fabricated by overlapping two uniform fiber Bragg gratings with slightly different...... periods to create a Moiré grating with only two pulses (one pulse is 15 ns) of UV power. Experimental characterization of the filter is provided under different conditions where the strain and temperature sensitivities were measured....

  9. Fiber optic micro sensor for the measurement of tendon forces

    OpenAIRE

    Behrmann Gregory P; Hidler Joseph; Mirotznik Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A fiber optic sensor developed for the measurement of tendon forces was designed, numerically modeled, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated. The sensor incorporated fiber Bragg gratings and micro-fabricated stainless steel housings. A fiber Bragg grating is an optical device that is spectrally sensitive to axial strain. Stainless steel housings were designed to convert radial forces applied to the housing into axial forces that could be sensed by the fiber Bragg grating. The meta...

  10. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  11. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Yeol

    2015-03-27

    In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter). In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress-strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  12. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Cheol Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter. In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress–strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  13. Fiber architecture in remodeled myocardium revealed with a quantitative diffusion CMR tractography framework and histological validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekkaoui Choukri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of myofiber reorganization in the remote zone after myocardial infarction has been performed in 2D. Microstructural reorganization in remodeled hearts, however, can only be fully appreciated by considering myofibers as continuous 3D entities. The aim of this study was therefore to develop a technique for quantitative 3D diffusion CMR tractography of the heart, and to apply this method to quantify fiber architecture in the remote zone of remodeled hearts. Methods Diffusion Tensor CMR of normal human, sheep, and rat hearts, as well as infarcted sheep hearts was performed ex vivo. Fiber tracts were generated with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique and classified statistically by the median, mean, maximum, or minimum helix angle (HA along the tract. An index of tract coherence was derived from the relationship between these HA statistics. Histological validation was performed using phase-contrast microscopy. Results In normal hearts, the subendocardial and subepicardial myofibers had a positive and negative HA, respectively, forming a symmetric distribution around the midmyocardium. However, in the remote zone of the infarcted hearts, a significant positive shift in HA was observed. The ratio between negative and positive HA variance was reduced from 0.96 ± 0.16 in normal hearts to 0.22 ± 0.08 in the remote zone of the remodeled hearts (p Conclusions A significant reorganization of the 3D fiber continuum is observed in the remote zone of remodeled hearts. The positive (rightward shift in HA in the remote zone is greatest in the subepicardium, but involves all layers of the myocardium. Tractography-based quantification, performed here for the first time in remodeled hearts, may provide a framework for assessing regional changes in the left ventricle following infarction.

  14. Ultra Small Integrated Optical Fiber Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Van Daele

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a revolutionary way to interrogate optical fiber sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs and to integrate the necessary driving optoelectronic components with the sensor elements. Low-cost optoelectronic chips are used to interrogate the optical fibers, creating a portable dynamic sensing system as an alternative for the traditionally bulky and expensive fiber sensor interrogation units. The possibility to embed these laser and detector chips is demonstrated resulting in an ultra thin flexible optoelectronic package of only 40 μm, provided with an integrated planar fiber pigtail. The result is a fully embedded flexible sensing system with a thickness of only 1 mm, based on a single Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL, fiber sensor and photodetector chip. Temperature, strain and electrodynamic shaking tests have been performed on our system, not limited to static read-out measurements but dynamically reconstructing full spectral information datasets.

  15. In-Line Fiber Optic Interferometric Sensors in Single-Mode Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Wen Duan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In-line fiber optic interferometers have attracted intensive attention for their potential sensing applications in refractive index, temperature, pressure and strain measurement, etc. Typical in-line fiber-optic interferometers are of two types: Fabry-Perot interferometers and core-cladding-mode interferometers. It’s known that the in-line fiber optic interferometers based on single-mode fibers can exhibit compact structures, easy fabrication and low cost. In this paper, we review two kinds of typical in-line fiber optic interferometers formed in single-mode fibers fabricated with different post-processing techniques. Also, some recently reported specific technologies for fabricating such fiber optic interferometers are presented.

  16. Surface and interfacial properties of carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    Differences in the adhesion of three carbon fibers (Hercules AS1 and AS4, and Hysol-Grafil XAS) to polycarbonate (PC) have been shown to correlate with the absorptivity of PC on the three fiber types. The absorptivity (energy of absorption) was determined using retention time liquid chromatography and the adhesion was measured using the single embedded filament tensile test. A correlation was also found between adhesion strength and the O/N surface element ratio using XPS analysis. The chemical details for these correlations have not yet been determined. A study of filament fracture statistics has been initiated using single and multiple embedded filament tensile tests. Filament fracture has been measured as a function of strain and for different interfiber distances. Preliminary results indicate that fiber fracture is a discontinuous function of increasing strain and may in fact occur at discrete strain intervals. Fiber-fiber interaction effects on fiber fracture have been found for interfiber distances of up to two to three fiber diameters.

  17. Microstructured optical fiber sensors embedded in a laminate composite for smart material applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Camille; Sulejmani, Sanne; Geernaert, Thomas; Eve, Sophie; Lammens, Nicolas; Luyckx, Geert; Voet, Eli; Degrieck, Joris; Urbanczyk, Waclaw; Mergo, Pawel; Becker, Martin; Bartelt, Hartmut; Berghmans, Francis; Thienpont, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings written in highly birefringent microstructured optical fiber with a dedicated design are embedded in a composite fiber-reinforced polymer. The Bragg peak wavelength shifts are measured under controlled axial and transversal strain and during thermal cycling of the composite sample. We obtain a sensitivity to transversal strain that exceeds values reported earlier in literature by one order of magnitude. Our results evidence the relevance of using microstructured optical fibers for structural integrity monitoring of composite material structures.

  18. Low-fiber diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... residue; Low-fiber diet; Fiber restricted diet; Crohn disease - low fiber diet; Ulcerative colitis - low fiber diet; ... pulp: Yellow squash (without seeds) Spinach Pumpkin Eggplant Potatoes, without skin Green beans Wax beans Asparagus Beets ...

  19. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insoluble vs. soluble fiber; Fiber - soluble vs. insoluble ... There are 2 different types of fiber -- soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows ...

  20. Photonic crystal fiber modal interferometer based on thin-core-fiber mode exciter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinping; Ma, Xixi; Wu, Jixuan; Song, Binbin; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Bo; Yao, Jianquan

    2015-11-10

    A thin-core-fiber excited photonic crystal fiber modal interferometer has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By employing a thin-core fiber as the mode exciter, both of the core and cladding modes propagate in the photonic crystal fiber and interfere with each other. The experimental results show that the transmission dips corresponding to different-order modes have various strain responses with opposite shift directions. The strain sensitivity could be improved to 58.57  pm/με for the applied strain from 0 to 491 με by utilizing the wavelength interval between the dips with opposite shift directions. Moreover, due to the pure silica property of the employed photonic crystal fiber, the proposed fiber modal interferometer exhibits a low-temperature sensitivity of about 0.56  pm/°C within a temperature range from 26.4°C (room temperature) to 70°C. Additionally, the proposed fiber modal interferometer has several advantages, such as good stability, compact structure, and simple fabrication. Therefore, it is more applicable for strain measurement with reducing temperature cross-sensitivity.

  1. Structural monitoring of filamentary composites using embedded fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashon, John L.; Lehner, David L.; Bower, Mark V.; Gilbert, John A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring overall integrity of structural components made of filamentary composites, by embedding optical fibers between lamina of a composite beam, is investigated using a beam constructed of Kevlar/epoxy cloth with embedded optical fibers aligned with the longitudinal axis of the beam. Phase changes were monitored in three different optical fibers as the composite beam was subjected to pure bending, and the strain response of the fibers was compared to the strain gage readings taken at the surface, showing a strong correlation between the phase change and the applied deformation.

  2. Fiber resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. J. Ince

    2004-01-01

    In economics, primary inputs or factors of production define the term ‘resources.’ Resources include land resources (plants, animals, and minerals), labor, capital, and entrepreneurship. Almost all pulp and paper fiber resources are plant materials obtained from trees or agricultural crops. These resources encompass plant materials harvested directly from the land (...

  3. Strain Gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  4. A forty-year history of fiber optic smart structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric; Scheel, Ingrid U.

    2017-04-01

    In 1977 McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company began a project on using fiber optic sensors to support the Delta Rocket program. This resulted in a series of fiber sensors to support the measurement of rotation, acoustics, vibration, strain, and temperature for a variety of applications and early work on fiber optic smart structures. The work on fiber optic smart structures transitioned in part to Blue Road Research in 1993 and continued in 2006 to the present at Columbia Gorge Research. This paper summarizes some of the efforts made by these companies to implement fiber optic smart structures over this forty year period.

  5. Optical Fiber Sensing Based on Reflection Laser Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gagliardi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  6. Shape Sensing Using a Multi-Core Optical Fiber Having an Arbitrary Initial Shape in the Presence of Extrinsic Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Matthew D. (Inventor); Moore, Jason P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Shape of a multi-core optical fiber is determined by positioning the fiber in an arbitrary initial shape and measuring strain over the fiber's length using strain sensors. A three-coordinate p-vector is defined for each core as a function of the distance of the corresponding cores from a center point of the fiber and a bending angle of the cores. The method includes calculating, via a controller, an applied strain value of the fiber using the p-vector and the measured strain for each core, and calculating strain due to bending as a function of the measured and the applied strain values. Additionally, an apparent local curvature vector is defined for each core as a function of the calculated strain due to bending. Curvature and bend direction are calculated using the apparent local curvature vector, and fiber shape is determined via the controller using the calculated curvature and bend direction.

  7. Pmma fiber viscoelasticity in extremely low frequency regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundalo, Ivan-Lazar; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting on the viscoelasticity of PMMA based Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) strain sensors when exposed to repeated sequences of long term strain and relaxation with various duty-cycles and frequencies much smaller than 1 Hz. Monitoring the FBG wavelength and how it follows the applied strain......, we have shown that after being strained up to 1%, the fiber will rapidly contract elastically to a certain amount after which a viscous-dominated relaxation takes place. The amount of elastic versus viscous relaxation depends both on the level of applied strain and on the duration of the strain......%), which could, in certain applications, influence the sensitivity range of sensors based on plastic fibers....

  8. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Just Agbodjan Prince

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment’s shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object.

  9. Biophysical Mechanisms Mediating Fibrin Fiber Lysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The formation and dissolution of blood clots is both a biochemical and a biomechanical process. While much of the chemistry has been worked out for both processes, the influence of biophysical properties is less well understood. This review considers the impact of several structural and mechanical parameters on lytic rates of fibrin fibers. The influences of fiber and network architecture, fiber strain, FXIIIa cross-linking, and particle transport phenomena will be assessed. The importance of the mechanical aspects of fibrinolysis is emphasized, and future research avenues are discussed. PMID:28630861

  10. Fiber-optic pressure sensors for internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, R A; Gardner, J H; Gibler, W N; Lee, C E; Oakland, M D; Spears, M O; Swenson, V P; Taylor, H F; McCoy, J J; Beshouri, G

    1994-03-01

    Two designs incorporating embedded fiber Fabry-Perot interferometers as strain gauges were used for monitoring gas pressure in internal combustion engines. Measurements on a Diesel engine, a gasoline-fueled engine, and a natural-gas engine are reported.

  11. Advanced fiber optic sensors capable of multiparameter sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric; Schulz, Whitten L.; Seim, John M.

    1998-09-01

    This paper outlines improvements that have been made in a multiaxis fiber grating strain sensor that can also be used in certain cases to measure temperature. The current status and future prospects for these senors are outlined.

  12. Structural Health Monitoring Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor Matrix Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fiber Bragg Grating had been identified as very important elements, especially for strain measurements in smart structures. In many applications, arrays of FBG...

  13. Polarization and mode changes depending on the environmental stress in single mode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Juock; Hoke, Mike; Wilkins, Gregory; Werniki, Chris

    2009-05-01

    The research discussed below describes experiments and computer simulations involving propagation of polarized radiation in optical fiber cables designed for use in aircraft environments. The main concern of this effort is optical fiber link systems that are installed in military aircraft. Propagation of polarized radiation in a single mode fiber can be theoretically described with electromagnetic field equations for a bounded system. The state of propagation of the radiation polarization will be affected by environmental stress and strain on the fiber, by imperfections within the fiber, cracks or breaks in the fiber across the fiber optical axis, and by a variety of discontinuities at fiber connectors. The transmission, reflection, and scattering of radiation within an optical fiber affected by these various effects results in mode changing of propagating radiation within the fiber. Mode changing effects by imperfection in the fiber link system have been experimentally measured. The experimental results discussed below are preliminary results and applicable to modeling techniques in the future.

  14. Smart architecture for stable multipoint fiber Bragg grating sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Tsai, Ning; Zhuang, Yuan-Hong; Huang, Tzu-Jung; Chow, Chi-Wai; Chen, Jing-Heng; Liu, Wen-Fung

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we propose and investigate an intelligent fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based sensor system in which the proposed stabilized and wavelength-tunable single-longitudinal-mode erbium-doped fiber laser can improve the sensing accuracy of wavelength-division-multiplexing multiple FBG sensors in a longer fiber transmission distance. Moreover, we also demonstrate the proposed sensor architecture to enhance the FBG capacity for sensing strain and temperature, simultaneously.

  15. Fiber Optic Magnetometers Using Planar And Cylindrical Magnetostrictive Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholtz, F.; Yurek, A. M.; Koo, K. P.; Dandridge, A.

    1987-04-01

    Fiber optic magnetometers which require high sensitivity at low frequencies (dc-10 Hz) rely on the nonlinear magnetostriction of materials such as amorphous metallic glass alloys. Typically, fiber is bonded to a magnetostrictive sample to convert strain in the sample to phase shift in a fiber interferometer. We present the results of measurements of the frequency dependence and dc and ac magnetic field sensitivity of both planar and cylindrical transducing elements, and discuss the practical advantages and disadvan-tages of each configuration.

  16. A multicore compound glass optical fiber for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto; Hayward, Jason

    2017-04-01

    Optical fibers have been successfully utilized for point sensors targeting physical quantities (stress, strain, rotation, acceleration), chemical compounds (humidity, oil, nitrates, alcohols, DNA) or radiation fields (X-rays, β particles, γ-rays). Similarly, bundles of fibers have been extremely successful in imaging visible wavelengths for medical endoscopy and industrial boroscopy. This work presents the progress in the fabrication and experimental evaluation of multicore fiber as neutron scattering instrumentation designed to detect and image neutrons with micron level spatial resolution.

  17. Study on the fiber grating sensors in concrete safety monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hang; Li, Yang; Zhang, Yu-hong

    2014-09-01

    The concrete may be damaged because there are freeze-thaw cycles between winter and summer in cold regions. Strain is an alternative parameter which can be used to describe deformation. In this paper, the fiber bragg gratings(FBG) were used to concrete safety monitoring. The strain and temperature sensing properties have been studied. The fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) were used for the packaged techniques of FBG sensors. The neural network was applied to temperature compensation for FBG sensors.

  18. Review Of Fiber-Optic Electric-Field Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Ramon P.; Jarzynski, Jacek

    1989-01-01

    Tutorial paper reviews state of art in fiber-optic sensors of alternating electric fields. Because such sensors are made entirely of dielectric materials, they are relatively transparent to incident electric fields; they do not distort fields significantly. Paper presents equations that express relationships among stress, strain, and electric field in piezoactive plastic and equations for phase shift in terms of photoelastic coefficients and strains in optical fiber.

  19. All-optical, Three-axis Fiber Laser Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    force acting on a current carrying bridge in the presence of a magnetic field, which drives its oscillation measured with a fiber laser strain sensor... strain between two cores as a function of rotation for difference inclinations and (b) reported inclination vs. actual inclination for a bend angle of...such as those based on SQUIDS, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), scalar resonance magnetometers, and flux-gates; however, a fiber optic sensor enables

  20. Strain gradient plasticity effects in whisker-reinforced metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2002-01-01

    A metal reinforced by fibers in the micron range is studied using the strain gradient plasticity theory of Fleck and Hutchinson (2001). Cell-model analyzes are used to study the influence of the material length parameters numerically. Different higher order boundary conditions are considered...... at the fiber-matrix interface. The results are presented as overall stress-strain curves for the whisker-reinforced metal, and also contour plots of effective plastic strain are shown. The strain gradient plasticity theory predicts a significant stiffening effect when compared to conventional models...

  1. Crimped Nanofibrous Biomaterials Mimic Microstructure and Mechanics of Native Tissue and Alter Strain Transfer to Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczesny, Spencer E; Driscoll, Tristan P; Tseng, Hsiao-Yun; Liu, Pang-Ching; Heo, Su-Jin; Mauck, Robert L; Chao, Pen-Hsiu G

    2017-11-13

    To fully recapitulate tissue microstructure and mechanics, fiber crimping must exist within biomaterials used for tendon/ligament engineering. Existing crimped nanofibrous scaffolds produced via electrospinning are dense materials that prevent cellular infiltration into the scaffold interior. In this study, we used a sacrificial fiber population to increase the scaffold porosity and evaluated the effect on fiber crimping. We found that increasing scaffold porosity increased fiber crimping and ensured that the fibers properly uncrimped as the scaffolds were stretched by minimizing fiber-fiber interactions. Constitutive modeling demonstrated that the fiber uncrimping produced a nonlinear mechanical behavior similar to that of native tendon and ligament. Interestingly, fiber crimping altered strain transmission to the nuclei of cells seeded on the scaffolds, which may account for previously observed changes in gene expression. These crimped biomaterials are useful for developing functional fiber-reinforced tissues and for studying the effects of altered fiber crimping due to damage or degeneration.

  2. Helical graphene oxide fibers as a stretchable sensor and an electrocapillary sucker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chunfei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiying; Hu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xinchang; Zhang, Yingjiu; Li, Xinjian; Duan, Huiling; Cao, Anyuan

    2016-05-01

    Fibers made from carbon nanotubes or graphene are strong and conductive; encoding helical structures into these fibers may render useful properties such as high stretchability. Here, we directly spin freestanding graphene oxide (GO) films into helical fibers consisting of uniformly arranged loops with tunable diameters, under controlled environmental humidity. Reduced GO fibers with a helical shape are stretched elastically with a reversible electrical resistance change for many strain cycles. Stretchable temperature sensors built on helical fibers work at large strains (up to 50%) and high temperature (up to 300 °C), with a reliable deformation-independent response. The GO fibers also contain through-channels inside with suitable pore size, which can take up an aqueous electrolyte quickly under a low bias, resulting in a fiber-shaped, on-off switchable electrocapillary sucker. Our multifunctional helical and hollow GO fibers have potential applications in stretchable fiber-shaped sensors, actuators and nano-fluid systems.Fibers made from carbon nanotubes or graphene are strong and conductive; encoding helical structures into these fibers may render useful properties such as high stretchability. Here, we directly spin freestanding graphene oxide (GO) films into helical fibers consisting of uniformly arranged loops with tunable diameters, under controlled environmental humidity. Reduced GO fibers with a helical shape are stretched elastically with a reversible electrical resistance change for many strain cycles. Stretchable temperature sensors built on helical fibers work at large strains (up to 50%) and high temperature (up to 300 °C), with a reliable deformation-independent response. The GO fibers also contain through-channels inside with suitable pore size, which can take up an aqueous electrolyte quickly under a low bias, resulting in a fiber-shaped, on-off switchable electrocapillary sucker. Our multifunctional helical and hollow GO fibers have potential

  3. Photonic crystal fibers -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2002-01-01

    During this ph.d. work, attention has been focused on understanding and analyzing the modal behavior of micro-structured fibers. Micro-structured fibers are fibers with a complex dielectric toplogy, and offer a number of novel possibilities, compared to standard silica based optical fibers....... The thesis focuses on understanding the basic mechanisms controlling the modal properties of micro-structured fibers. One important sub-class of micro-structured fibers are fibers that guide light by index effects similar to those index effects that ensure guidance of light in standard optical fibers....... Such micro-structured fibers are the ones most often trated in literature concerning micro-structured fibers. These micro-structured fibers offer a whole range of novel wave guiding characteristics, including the possibility of fibers that guide only one mode irrespective of the frequency of light...

  4. Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkou, Stig Eigil; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1999-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fibers are describes using a new Kagomé cladding structure. These fibers may potentially guide light in low-index regions. Such fibers offer new dispersion properties, and large design flexibility.......Photonic bandgap fibers are describes using a new Kagomé cladding structure. These fibers may potentially guide light in low-index regions. Such fibers offer new dispersion properties, and large design flexibility....

  5. Chemical Modification Effect on the Mechanical Properties of Coir Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Sultana Mir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber has a vital role as a reinforcing agent due to its renewable, low cost, biodegradable, less abrasive and eco-friendly nature. Whereas synthetic fibers like glass, boron, carbon, metallic, ceramic and inorganic fibers are expensive and not eco-friendly. Coir is one of the natural fibers easily available in Bangladesh and cheap. It is derived from the husk of the coconut (Cocos nucifera. Coir has one of the highest concentrations of lignin, which makes it stronger. In recent years, wide range of research has been carried out on fiber reinforced polymer composites [4-13].The aim of the present research is to characterize brown single coir fiber for manufacturing polymer composites reinforced with characterized fibers. Adhesion between the fiber and polymer is one of factors affecting the strength of manufactured composites. In order to increase the adhesion, the coir fiber was chemically treated separately in single stage (with Cr2(SO43•12(H2O and double stages (with CrSO4 and NaHCO3. Both the raw and treated fibers were characterized by tensile testing, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic analysis, scanning electron microscopic analysis. The result showed that the Young’s modulus increased, while tensile strength and strain to failure decreased with increase in span length. Tensile properties of chemically treated coir fiber was found higher than raw coir fiber, while the double stage treated coir fiber had better mechanical properties compared to the single stage treated coir fiber. Scanning electron micrographs showed rougher surface in case of the raw coir fiber. The surface was found clean and smooth in case of the treated coir fiber. Thus the performance of coir fiber composites in industrial application can be improved by chemical treatment.

  6. Time-dependent variation of fiber Bragg grating reflectivity in PMMA-based polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saez-Rodriguez, D.; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the effects of viscoelasticity on both the strength and resonance wavelength of two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) inscribed in microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) made of undoped PMMA. Both FBGs were inscribed under a strain of 1% in order to increase...... monitored for a further 120 days, with a stable reflection response being observed beyond 50 days. (C) 2015 Optical Society of America...

  7. Recent progress in distributed fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Rayleigh, Brillouin and Raman scatterings in fibers result from the interaction of photons with local material characteristic features like density, temperature and strain. For example an acoustic/mechanical wave generates a dynamic density variation; such a variation may be affected by local temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence. By detecting changes in the amplitude, frequency and phase of light scattered along a fiber, one can realize a distributed fiber sensor for measuring localized temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence over lengths ranging from meters to one hundred kilometers. Such a measurement can be made in the time domain or frequency domain to resolve location information. With coherent detection of the scattered light one can observe changes in birefringence and beat length for fibers and devices. The progress on state of the art technology for sensing performance, in terms of spatial resolution and limitations on sensing length is reviewed. These distributed sensors can be used for disaster prevention in the civil structural monitoring of pipelines, bridges, dams and railroads. A sensor with centimeter spatial resolution and high precision measurement of temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence can find applications in aerospace smart structures, material processing, and the characterization of optical materials and devices.

  8. Effects of a 3 strain -based direct-fed microbial and dietary fiber concentration on growth performance and expression of genes related to absorption and metabolism of volatile fatty acids in weanling pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, N W; Owusu-Asiedu, A; Walsh, M C; McCann, J C; Loor, J J; Stein, H H

    2017-01-01

    Effects of a -based direct-fed microbial (DFM) on growth performance, plasma tumor necrosis factor ɑ (TNFɑ), relative gene expression, and intestinal VFA concentrations in weanling pigs fed low- or high-fiber diets were evaluated. Two hundred pigs (initial BW: 6.31 ± 0.73 kg) were allotted to 1 of 4 dietary treatments (5 pigs per pen and 10 pens per treatment). Treatments were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial design with 2 diet types [low-fiber (LF) or high-fiber (HF)] and 2 concentrations of DFM (0 or 60 g DFM/t of feed). The DFM contained 1.5 × 10 cfu/g and was obtained from Danisco Animal Nutrition-DuPont Industrial Biosciences, Marlborough, UK. Phase 1 diets were fed for 2 wk post-weaning and phase 2 diets were fed over the following 29 d. Low fiber diets contained corn and soybean meal as main ingredients and HF diets contained corn, soybean meal, corn distillers dried grains with solubles (7.5 and 15.0% in phase 1 and 2, respectively), and wheat middlings (10.0%). Pigs and feed were weighed at the start and at the end of each phase, and ADG, ADFI, and G:F were calculated. At the conclusion of phase 2, blood was collected from 1 pig per pen and 1 pig per pen was sacrificed. Cecum and rectum contents were analyzed for VFA, and tissue samples were collected from the ileum, cecum, rectum, and liver to determine expression of genes related to absorption and metabolism of VFA using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Results indicated that feeding HF diets reduced ( ≤ 0.05) ADFI and ADG of pigs compared with feeding LF diets. Pigs fed DFM diets had improved ( ≤ 0.05) G:F compared with pigs fed non-DFM diets. Pigs fed LF diets had greater ( ≤ 0.05) BW at the end of phase 2 compared with pigs fed HF diets. The concentration of VFA in rectum contents was greater ( ≤ 0.05) in pigs fed LF diets than in pigs fed HF diets. The expression of in the rectum of pigs fed HF diets was greater ( ≤ 0.05) than for pigs fed LF diets, and pigs fed DFM

  9. Optical Sensing: Fiber Structures and Interrogation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Joel Pedro

    The work described in this PhD Thesis focuses on the post-processing of optical fibers and their enhancement as sensing element. Since the majority of sensors presented are based in Fabry-Perot interferometers, an historical overview of this category of optical fiber sensors is firstly presented. This review considers the works published since the early years, in the beginning of the 1980s, until the middle of 2015. The incorporation of microcavities at the tip of a single mode fiber was extensively studied, particularly for the measurement of nitrogen and methane gas pressure. These cavities were fabricated using hollow core silica tubes and a hollow core photonic crystal fiber. Following a different approach, the microcavities were incorporated between two sections of single mode fiber. In this case, the low sensitivity to temperature makes these microcavities highly desirable for the measurement of strain at high temperatures. Competences in post-processing techniques such as the chemical etching and the writing of periodical structures in the fiber core by means of an excimer or a femtosecond laser were also acquired in the course of the PhD programme. One of the works consisted in the design and manufacturing of a double clad optical fiber. The refractive index of the inner cladding was higher than the one of the outer cladding and the core. Thus, light was guided in the inner cladding instead of propagating in the core. This situation was overcome by applying chemical etching, thus removing the inner cladding. The core, surrounded by air, was then able to guide light. Two different applications were found for this fiber, as a temperature sensor and as an optical refractometer. In the last, the optical phase changes with the liquid refractive index. Two different types of fiber Bragg gratings were characterized in strain and temperature. Sensing structures obtained through the phase mask technique at the tip of an optical fiber were subjected to chemical

  10. Fiber optic sensor technology - An opportunity for smart aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, J. S.; Rogowski, R. S.; Claus, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide the opportunity for fabricating materials with internal sensors which can serve as lifetime health monitors, analogous to a central nervous system. The embedded fiber optic sensors can be interrogated by various techniques to measure internal strain, temperature, pressure, acoustic waves and other parameters indicative of structural integrity. Experiments have been conducted with composite samples with embedded sensors to measure strain using optical time domain reflectometry, modal interference and an optical phase locked loop. Fiber optic sensors have been developed to detect acoustic emission and impact damage and have been demonstrated for cure monitoring. These sensors have the potential for lifetime monitoring of structural properties, providing real time nondestructive evaluation.

  11. Bandpass transmission filters based on phase shifted fiber Bragg gratings in microstructured polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortega, Beatriz; Min, Rui; Sáez-Rodri­guez, David

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution we report on the fabrication of novel bandpass transmission filters based on PS-FBGs in microstructured polymer fibers at telecom wavelengths. The phase mask technique is employed to fabricate several superimposed gratings with slight different periods in order to form Moir......é structures with a single or various π phase shifts along the device. Simulations and experimental results are included in order to demonstrate very narrowband transmission filters. Experimental characterization under strain and temperature variations is provided in a non-annealed fiber and time stability...... of the fabricated devices has been also measured under different pre-strain conditions....

  12. Biaxial shear/tension failure criteria of spectra single fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianzhuo

    An experimental study was conducted to develop the biaxial failure surface criteria of single Spectra 130d and 100d filaments in a torsion-tension environment. The cross-sectional profiles of single Spectra fibers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray computed tomography. A pin-gripping method to fix the ends of a polyethylene single fiber was developed. Effects of pin diameter on failure stress for both Spectra 130d and 100d were characterized. It was found that the perturbed stress field effect can be neglected when the pin diameter is larger than 0.8 mm. Additionally, the effect of the sample's gage length on fiber tensile strength was investigated. The gage length of 5.5 mm was determined as an appropriate length for single fiber samples under stress-wave loading. A twisting apparatus was built for a single fiber to achieve specific degrees of shear strains. Quasi-static experiments were conducted using an MTS servo-hydraulic system to apply tensile loads on pre-twisted Spectra fibers. A tension Kolsky bar was employed to study the biaxial shear/tensile behavior of Spectra fibers at high strain rates. A decreasing trend of tensile strength, with increasing torsional strain, for Spectra fibers was observed. Furthermore, a torsional pendulum apparatus was developed to determine the torsional shear stresses in fibers at various levels of axial loading. The relationship between apparent shear stress and axial stress was discovered. Finally, a biaxial shear/tension failure criterion envelope of each of the Spectra fibers was established. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the specific feature on the surface of twisted fibers and fracture surface of failure fibers.

  13. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  14. OTDR strain gauge for smart skins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1993-09-01

    Optical time-domain reflectometry (OTDR) is a simple and rugged technique for measuring quantities such as strain that affect the propagation of light in an optical fiber. For engineering applications of OTDR, it is important to know the repeatable limits of its performance. The author constructed an OTDR-based, submillimeter resolution strain measurement system from off-the-shelf components. The systems repeatably resolves changes in time of flight to within {plus_minus}2 ps. Using a 1-m, single-mode fiber as a gauge and observing the time of flight between Fresnel reflections, a repeatable sensitivity of 400 microstrains was observed. Using the same fiber to connect the legs of a 3-dB directional coupler to form a loop, a repeatable sensitivity of 200 microstrains was observed. Realizable changes to the system that should improve the repeatable sensitivity to 20 microstrains or less are discussed.

  15. Strain monitoring of a composite wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathman, Joseph; Watkins, Steve E.; Kaur, Amardeep; Macke, David C.

    2016-04-01

    An instrumented composite wing is described. The wing is designed to meet the load and ruggedness requirements for a fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in search-and-rescue applications. The UAV supports educational systems development and has a 2.1-m wingspan. The wing structure consists of a foam core covered by a carbon-fiber, laminate composite shell. To quantify the wing characteristics, a fiber-optic strain sensor was surface mounted to measure distributed strain. This sensor is based on Rayleigh scattering from local index variations and it is capable of high spatial resolution. The use of the Rayleigh-scattering fiber-optic sensors for distributed measurements is discussed.

  16. Fiber Optic Sensors for Health Monitoring of Morphing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Timothy; Wood, Karen; Childers, Brooks; Cano, Roberto; Jensen, Brian; Rogowski, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors are being developed for health monitoring of future aircraft. Aircraft health monitoring involves the use of strain, temperature, vibration and chemical sensors. These sensors will measure load and vibration signatures that will be used to infer structural integrity. Sine the aircraft morphing program assumes that future aircraft will be aerodynamically reconfigurable there is also a requirement for pressure, flow and shape sensors. In some cases a single fiber may be used for measuring several different parameters. The objective of the current program is to develop techniques for using optical fibers to monitor composite cure in real time during manufacture and to monitor in-service structural integrity of the composite structure. Graphite-epoxy panels were fabricated with integrated optical fibers of various types. The panels were mechanically and thermally tested to evaluate composite strength and sensor durability. Finally the performance of the fiber optic sensors was determined. Experimental results are presented evaluating the performance of embedded and surface mounted optical fibers for measuring strain, temperature and chemical composition. The performance of the fiber optic sensors was determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation. The facilities for fabricating optical fiber and associated sensors and methods of demodulating Bragg gratings for strain measurement will be described.

  17. Smart Cellulose Fibers Coated with Carbon Nanotube Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haisong Qi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Smart multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT-coated cellulose fibers with a unique sensing ability were manufactured by a simple dip coating process. The formation of electrically-conducting MWCNT networks on cellulose mono- and multi-filament fiber surfaces was confirmed by electrical resistance measurements and visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The interaction between MWCNT networks and cellulose fiber was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The piezoresistivity of these fibers for strain sensing was investigated. The MWCNT-coated cellulose fibers exhibited a unique linear strain-dependent electrical resistance change up to 18% strain, with good reversibility and repeatability. In addition, the sensing behavior of these fibers to volatile molecules (including vapors of methanol, ethanol, acetone, chloroform and tetrahydrofuran was investigated. The results revealed a rapid response, high sensitivity and good reproducibility for these chemical vapors. Besides, they showed good selectivity to different vapors. It is suggested that the intrinsic physical and chemical features of cellulose fiber, well-formed MWCNT networks and favorable MWCNT-cellulose interaction caused the unique and excellent sensing ability of the MWCNT-coated cellulose fibers, which have the potential to be used as smart materials.

  18. High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites 6 HPFRCC 6

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhardt, Hans; Naaman, A

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) represent a class of cement composites whose stress-strain response in tension undergoes strain hardening behaviour accompanied by multiple cracking, leading to a high strain prior to failure. The primary objective of this International Workshop was to provide a compendium of up-to-date information on the most recent developments and research advances in the field of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites. Approximately 65 contributions from leading world experts are assembled in these proceedings and provide an authoritative perspective on the subject. Special topics include fresh and hardening state properties; self-compacting mixtures; mechanical behavior under compressive, tensile, and shear loading; structural applications; impact, earthquake and fire resistance; durability issues; ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete; and textile reinforced concrete. Target readers: graduate students, researchers, fiber producers, desi...

  19. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  20. Sensing Features of Long Period Gratings in Hollow Core Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Iadicicco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on the investigation of the sensing features of the Long-Period fiber Gratings (LPGs fabricated in hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs by the pressure assisted Electric Arc Discharge (EAD technique. In particular, the characterization of the LPG in terms of shift in resonant wavelengths and changes in attenuation band depth to the environmental parameters: strain, temperature, curvature, refractive index and pressure is presented. The achieved results show that LPGs in HC-PCFs represent a novel high performance sensing platform for measurements of different physical parameters including strain, temperature and, especially, for measurements of environmental pressure. The pressure sensitivity enhancement is about four times greater if we compare LPGs in HC and standard fibers. Moreover, differently from LPGs in standard fibers, these LPGs realized in innovative fibers, i.e., the HC-PCFs, are not sensitive to surrounding refractive index.

  1. Fibers as carriers of microbial particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał L. Górny

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to assess the ability of natural, synthetic and semi-synthetic fibers to transport microbial particles. Material and Methods: The simultaneously settled dust and aerosol sampling was carried out in 3 industrial facilities processing natural (cotton, silk, flax, hemp, synthetic (polyamide, polyester, polyacrylonitrile, polypropylene and semi-synthetic (viscose fibrous materials; 2 stables where horses and sheep were bred; 4 homes where dogs or cats were kept and 1 zoo lion pavilion. All samples were laboratory analyzed for their microbiological purity. The isolated strains were qualitatively identified. To identify the structure and arrangement of fibers that may support transport of microbial particles, a scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed. Results: Both settled and airborne fibers transported analogous microorganisms. All synthetic, semi-synthetic and silk fibers, present as separated threads with smooth surface, were free from microbial contamination. Natural fibers with loose packing and rough surface (e.g., wool, horse hair, sheaf packing and septated surface (e.g., flax, hemp or present as twisted ribbons with corrugated surface (cotton were able to carry up to 9×105 cfu/g aerobic bacteria, 3.4×104 cfu/g anaerobic bacteria and 6.3×104 cfu/g of fungi, including pathogenic strains classified by Directive 2000/54/EC in hazard group 2. Conclusions: As plant and animal fibers are contaminated with a significant number of microorganisms, including pathogens, all of them should be mechanically eliminated from the environment. In factories, if the manufacturing process allows, they should be replaced by synthetic or semi-synthetic fibers. To avoid unwanted exposure to harmful microbial agents on fibers, the containment measures that efficiently limit their presence and dissemination in both occupational and non-occupational environments should be introduced. Med Pr 2015;66(4:511–523

  2. [Fibers as carriers of microbial particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górny, Rafał L; Ławniczek-Wałczyk, Anna; Stobnicka, Agata; Gołofit-Szymczak, Małgorzata; Cyprowski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the ability of natural, synthetic and semi-synthetic fibers to transport microbial particles. The simultaneously settled dust and aerosol sampling was carried out in 3 industrial facilities processing natural (cotton, silk, flax, hemp), synthetic (polyamide, polyester, polyacrylonitrile, polypropylene) and semi-synthetic (viscose) fibrous materials; 2 stables where horses and sheep were bred; 4 homes where dogs or cats were kept and 1 zoo lion pavilion. All samples were laboratory analyzed for their microbiological purity. The isolated strains were qualitatively identified. To identify the structure and arrangement of fibers that may support transport of microbial particles, a scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed. Both settled and airborne fibers transported analogous microorganisms. All synthetic, semi-synthetic and silk fibers, present as separated threads with smooth surface, were free from microbial contamination. Natural fibers with loose packing and rough surface (e.g., wool, horse hair), sheaf packing and septated surface (e.g., flax, hemp) or present as twisted ribbons with corrugated surface (cotton) were able to carry up to 9×10(5) cfu/g aerobic bacteria, 3.4×10(4) cfu/g anaerobic bacteria and 6.3×10(4) cfu/g of fungi, including pathogenic strains classified by Directive 2000/54/EC in hazard group 2. As plant and animal fibers are contaminated with a significant number of microorganisms, including pathogens, all of them should be mechanically eliminated from the environment. In factories, if the manufacturing process allows, they should be replaced by synthetic or semi-synthetic fibers. To avoid unwanted exposure to harmful microbial agents on fibers, the containment measures that efficiently limit their presence and dissemination in both occupational and non-occupational environments should be introduced. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  3. Study of the mechanical behavior of the optical fiber by a mark-tracking method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangleboeuf J-C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The mark-tracking method was used in the uniaxial tensile test to determine the elastic properties of optical fibers. The mark-tracking method is based on the followup of two markers on the specimen with the help of an image processing technique. It allows us to determine the true strain with respect to the small strains assumption (e 1% or the finite strains (e>1% without any impact of the rigid solid movement neither pulley fiber sliding on the measured strain. Optical fibers used in this study are commercial Verrillon single mode silica fibers, 125 µm in diameter with a two layers 62.5 µm thick epoxy-acrylate polymer coating. Both as-received optical fiber and stripped fiber were subjected to the uniaxial tensile test and the cantilever beam bending test. The stripped fiber Young’s modulus results under both tests were found to be very similar. Thus, the mark-tracking method is adaptable to the tensile test of optical fibers and the elastic behavior of both as-received optical fiber and stripped fiber is found to be linear. Their Young’s modulus are 22GPa and 83GPa, respectively. These results revealed that those coatings are playing a mechanical role in the fiber elongation.

  4. Progress on monitoring of adhesive joints using multiaxis fiber grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Whitten L.; Udd, Eric; Seim, John M.; Perez, Ignacio M.; Trego, Angela

    2000-06-01

    Previously, the results of embedding multi-axis fiber gratings into adhesively bonded joints were discussed. This paper presents more information on the testing of the adhesive joints and techniques employed to successfully embed a fiber grating sensor into such structures. These techniques include orienting the fiber, marking its orientation, and preparing it for embedment into the adhesive. Also discussed are strain relief methods for the egress of the fiber.

  5. Stenosis differentially affects subendocardial and subepicardial arterioles in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkus, D.; Vergroesen, I.; Hiramatsu, O.; Tachibana, H.; Nakamoto, H.; Toyota, E.; Goto, M.; Ogasawara, Y.; Spaan, J. A.; Kajiya, F.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a coronary stenosis results primarily in subendocardial ischemia. Apart from the decrease in coronary perfusion pressure, a stenosis also decreases coronary flow pulsations. Applying a coronary perfusion system, we compared the autoregulatory response of subendocardial (n = 10) and

  6. Methods for integrating optical fibers with advanced aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Stephen H.; May, Russell G.; Murphy, Kent A.; Claus, Richard O.; Tran, Tuan A.; Miller, Mark S.

    1993-07-01

    Optical fibers are attractive candidates for sensing applications in near-term smart materials and structures, due to their inherent immunity to electromagnetic interference and ground loops, their capability for distributed and multiplexed operation, and their high sensitivity and dynamic range. These same attributes also render optical fibers attractive for avionics busses for fly-by-light systems in advanced aircraft. The integration of such optical fibers with metal and composite aircraft and aerospace materials, however, remains a limiting factor in their successful use in such applications. This paper first details methods for the practical integration of optical fiber waveguides and cable assemblies onto and into materials and structures. Physical properties of the optical fiber and coatings which affect the survivability of the fiber are then considered. Mechanisms for the transfer of the strain from matrix to fiber for sensor and data bus fibers integrated with composite structural elements are evaluated for their influence on fiber survivability, in applications where strain or impact is imparted to the assembly.

  7. FAILURE MECHANISM OF THE SCABBING OF CONCRETE PLATES SUBJECTED TO HIGH VELOCITY IMPACT AND EFFECTS OF FIBER SHEET REINFORCEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Masuhiro; Miwa, Koji; Takahashi, Jun

    This paper presents failure mechanism of the scabbing of concrete plates subjected to high velocity impact and effects of fiber sheet reinforcement. Prior to impact tests, strain measurement method using acrylic bar with strain gauges is validated by conducting impact test to concrete bar specimen. Then, impact tests are carried out to examine the failure mechanism of scabbing of concrete plates. In the tests, the strain measurement method is applied and strain behavior inside the concrete plate is discussed. After that, impact tests of fiber sheet reinforced concrete plates are conducted. Based on failure mode and strain behavior, effects of fiber sheet reinforcement on the failure of concrete plates are examined.

  8. Optical fiber sensor-based life cycling monitoring and quality assessment of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, N.; Minakuchi, S.

    2017-04-01

    Optical fiber sensors are very useful to monitor the internal strain and temperature in composites during manufacturing and assembly as well as in practical operations. The authors have been using both multi-point and distributed strain monitoring techniques to characterize the internal state of composite structures. This paper reports some recent developments of life cycle monitoring and quality control of aerospace composite structures. Specifically, distributed sensing for large-scaled parts, through-thickness strain monitoring for complex-shaped parts, and direction-dependent cure shrinkage monitoring are described, highlighting wide applicability of embedded optical fiber sensors for intelligent process monitoring and quality assessment of composite parts.

  9. Amplitude-modulated fiber-ring laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caputo, J. G.; Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2000-01-01

    Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self-starting......Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self......-starting of stable solitonic pulses from small random noise, provided the modulation depth is small. The perturbative analysis leads to a nonlinear coupled return map for the amplitude, phase, and position of the soliton pulses circulating in the fiber-ring laser. We established the validity of this approach...

  10. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  11. Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Per

    2004-01-01

    Despite the general recession in the global economy and the collapse of the optical telecommunication market, research within specialty fibers is thriving. This is, more than anything else, due to the technology transition from standard all-glass fibers to photonic crystal fibers, which, instead...... in 1996, and are today on their way to become the dominating technology within the specialty fiber field. Whether they will replace the standard fiber in the more traditional areas like telecommunication transmission, is not yet clear, but the nonlinear photonic crystal fibers are here to stay....

  12. Reducing fiber cross-talk in mineral fiber arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Lee Stark

    2017-01-01

    Monocentric optics replace current systems with diffraction limited performance. The fiber arrays have been the issue. Commercial expensive fiber arrays are available, but enhanced mineral fiber arrays offer very inexpensive fiber arrays.

  13. Stress transfer of a Kevlar 49 fiber pullout test studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhenkun; Wang, Quan; Qiu, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The interfacial stress transfer behavior of a Kevlar 49 aramid fiber-epoxy matrix was studied with fiber pullout tests, the fibers of which were stretched by a homemade microloading device. Raman spectra on the embedded fiber were recorded by micro-Raman spectroscopy, under different strain levels. Then, the fiber axial stress was obtained by the relationship between the stress and Raman shift of the aramid fiber. Experimental results revealed that the fiber axial stress increased significantly with the load. The shear stress concentration occurred at the fiber entry to the epoxy resin. Thus, interfacial friction stages exist in the debonded fiber segment, and the interfacial friction shear stress is constant within one stage. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical model predictions.

  14. Simulation of Kinkband Formation in Fiber Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badri; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2010-01-01

    Failure of composite materials by the formation of kinkbands is a non-linear phenomenon involving interacting non-linear effects of material behavior of the matrix materials and fiber buckling. A constitutive model for unidirectional layered materials is implemented as User Material (UMAT) user...... subroutine in ABAQUS/Standard for analyzing the kinkband formation in the fiber composites under compressive loading within the framework of large deformation kinematics. This computational model analyses the effects of misalignment on elastic plastic deformation under plane strain conditions based...

  15. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  16. Experimental studies of fiber concrete creep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korneeva Irina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of two-stage experimental studies of the strength and deformation characteristics of fibrous concrete reinforced with steel fiber. In the experiments we used steel fiber with bent ends, which practically does not form "hedgehogs", which allows to achieve an even distribution of the fiber by volume. At the first stage, the cube and prismatic strength, deformability at central compression, a number of special characteristics are determined: water absorption, frost resistance, abrasion; the optimal percentage of fiber reinforcement and the maximum size of the coarse aggregate fraction were selected. Fiber reinforcement led to an increase in the strength of concrete at compression by 1,35 times and an increase in the tensile strength at bending by 3,4 times. At the second stage, the creep of fibrous concrete and plain concrete of similar composition at different stress levels was researched. Creep curves are plotted. It is shown that the use of fiber reinforcement leads to a decrease in creep strain by 21 to 30 percent, depending on the stress level.

  17. Characteristics of Ceramic Fiber Modified Asphalt Mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiuming; Wu, Shaopeng; Xiao, Yue; Liu, Quantao; Schlangen, Erik

    2016-09-21

    Ceramic fiber, with a major composition of Al₂O₃ and SiO₂, has advantages of stability at relatively high temperature, big specific surface area and resistance to external mechanical vibration. It has the potential contribution of improving the rutting resistance and temperature sensitivity of modified asphalt binder by proper modification design. In this research, ceramic fiber was introduced into both pen 60/80 and pen 80/100 asphalt binder by different weight ratios. An asphalt penetration test, softening point test, ductility test and dynamic viscoelastic behavior were conducted to characterize and predict the ceramic fiber modified asphalt mortar (CFAM). Research results indicated that the ceramic fiber has a great effect on reinforcement of asphalt, which makes the asphalt stiffer so that the asphalt can only undertake less strain under the same stress. The heat insulation effect of the ceramic fiber will improve the temperature stability. Complex modulus and phase angle results indicate that the ceramic fiber can significantly enhance the high temperature resistance of soft binder.

  18. Glass-clad single crystalline fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C. C.; Hsu, K. Y.; Huang, C. W.; Jheng, D. Y.; Wang, S. C.; Lin, S. L.; Yang, M. H.; Lee, Y. W.; Huang, D. W.; Huang, S. L.

    2012-06-01

    Yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) has been widely used as a solid-state laser host because of its superior optical, thermal, mechanical properties, as well as its plurality in hosting active ions with a wide range of ionic radii. Drawing YAG into single crystalline fiber has the potential to further scale up the attainable power level with high mode quality. The recent advancement on the codrawing laser-heated pedestal growth (CDLHPG) technique can produce glass-clad YAG crystalline fibers for laser applications. The drawing speed can reach 10 cm/min for mass production. The CDLHPG technique has shown advantages on transition-metal ion doped YAG and short-fluorescent-lifetime ion doped YAG host. Compared to silica fiber lasers, the crystalline core offers high emission cross section for transition metal ions because of the unique local matrix. The challenges on the development of glass-clad YAG fibers, including core crystallinity, diameter uniformity, dopant segregation, residual strain, post-growth thermal treatment, and the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the crystalline core and glass clad are discussed. Chromium, ytterbium, and neodymium ions doped YAG fiber lasers have been successfully achieved with high efficiency and low threshold power. Power scaling with a clad-pump/side-coupling scheme using single clad or double clad YAG fibers is also discussed.

  19. Shaped fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinnan, Mark K.; Roach, Dennis P.

    2017-12-05

    A composite article is disclosed that has non-circular fibers embedded in a polymer matrix. The composite article has improved damage tolerance, toughness, bending, and impact resistance compared to composites having traditional round fibers.

  20. High-fiber foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that have higher amounts of fiber, such as whole-wheat bread versus white bread. ... cereals, such as oatmeal and farina (Cream of Wheat) Whole-grain breads Brown rice Popcorn High-fiber cereals, such as ...

  1. Narrow Bandwidth 850-nm Fiber Bragg Gratings in Few-Mode Polymer Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Yuan, Wu; Markos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    We report on the inscription and characterization of narrow bandwidth fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) with 850-nm resonance wavelength in polymer optical fibers (POFs). We use two fibers: an in-house fabricated microstructured POF (mPOF) with relative hole size of 0.5 and a commercial step-index POF......, which supports six modes at 850 nm. The gratings have been written with the phase-mask technique and a 325-nm HeCd laser. The mPOF grating has a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) bandwidth of 0.29 nm and the step-index POF has a bandwidth of 0.17 nm. For both fibers, the static tensile strain...

  2. Superlattice Microstructured Optical Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Leung Vincent Tse

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A generic three-stage stack-and-draw method is demonstrated for the fabrication of complex-microstructured optical fibers. We report the fabrication and characterization of a silica superlattice microstructured fiber with more than 800 rhomboidally arranged air-holes. A polarization-maintaining fiber with a birefringence of 8.5 × 10−4 is demonstrated. The birefringent property of the fiber is found to be highly insensitive to external environmental effects, such as pressure.

  3. Fundamentals of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Ter-Mikirtychev, Valerii (Vartan)

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the fundamental aspects of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers, and includes a wide range of material from laser physics fundamentals to state-of-the-art topics in this rapidly growing field of quantum electronics. Emphasis is placed on the nonlinear processes taking place in fiber lasers and amplifiers, their similarities, differences to, and their advantages over other solid-state lasers. The reader will learn basic principles of solid-state physics and optical spectroscopy of laser active centers in fibers, main operational laser regimes, and practical recommendations and suggestions on fiber laser research, laser applications, and laser product development. The book will be useful for students, researchers, and professionals who work with lasers, in the optical communications, chemical and biological industries, etc.

  4. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  5. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  6. Fiber Lasers V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser ...

  7. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation...

  8. Effect of Fiber Crimp on the Elasticity of Random Fiber Networks With and Without Embedding Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Ehsan; Barocas, Victor H; Shephard, Mark S; Picu, Catalin R

    2016-04-01

    Fiber networks are assemblies of one-dimensional elements representative of materials with fibrous microstructures such as collagen networks and synthetic nonwovens. The mechanics of random fiber networks has been the focus of numerous studies. However, fiber crimp has been explicitly represented only in few cases. In the present work, the mechanics of cross-linked networks with crimped athermal fibers, with and without an embedding elastic matrix, is studied. The dependence of the effective network stiffness on the fraction of nonstraight fibers and the relative crimp amplitude (or tortuosity) is studied using finite element simulations of networks with sinusoidally curved fibers. A semi-analytic model is developed to predict the dependence of network modulus on the crimp amplitude and the bounds of the stiffness reduction associated with the presence of crimp. The transition from the linear to the nonlinear elastic response of the network is rendered more gradual by the presence of crimp, and the effect of crimp on the network tangent stiffness decreases as strain increases. If the network is embedded in an elastic matrix, the effect of crimp becomes negligible even for very small, biologically relevant matrix stiffness values. However, the distribution of the maximum principal stress in the matrix becomes broader in the presence of crimp relative to the similar system with straight fibers, which indicates an increased probability of matrix failure.

  9. Fiber Effects on Minicomposite Mechanical Properties for Several Silicon Carbide Fiber: Chemically Vapor-Infiltrated Silicon Carbide Matrix Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Martinez-Fernandez, Julian

    1999-01-01

    Several different types of SiC fiber tows were coated with BN and composited using chemically vapor-infiltrated SiC to form single-tow minicomposites. The types of SiC fiber included Nicalon(sup TM), Hi-Nicalon(sup TM), and the new Sylramic(sup TM) polycrystalline SiC fiber. The interfacial shear stresses were determined from unload-reload tensile hysteresis-loop tests. The ultimate stress and strain properties also were determined for the minicomposites. The ultimate strengths of the newer Hi-Nicalon and Sylramic fibers were superior to that of Nicalon minicomposites with similar fiber volume fractions. The Sylramic minicomposites had the lowest strain to failure and highest interfacial shear strength, respectively, because of the high modulus of the fiber and the rough surface of this fiber type. The apparent interfacial shear strength increased as the stress increased for the Sylramic minicomposites, which also was attributed to the surface roughness of this fiber.

  10. Fiber Optic Sensors for Smart Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H.; Chang, C. C.; Boyer, T.; Sirkis, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe recently developed fiber sensors which are capable of monitoring the health of smart-structures. The unobstrusive geometry of these sensors make them an excellent choice for embedding the sensor in composite materials to measure internal states of strain in structures and materials. Some of these sensors have gage lengths that can be tailored from tens of microns to many meters. We will describe various demodulation schemes (Pseudo-Heterodyne, Synthetic-Heterodyne, Homodyne, Differential-Cross Multiplier, and Single Channel Phase-Tracker) to obtain high bandwidth measurements, enabling measurement of static to high frequency impact generated strains with a dynamic response exceeding tens of thousands of microstrains. In addition, we will show that we can tailor the fiber sensor to either measure only strain and reject temperature response or measure only the temperature, or measure both temperature and strain simultaneously. We will also demonstrate the ability to measure multiple strain components inside a host simultaneously using a single fiber sensor embedded in the host using a certain sensor type and transverse strain immunity using another sensor type. Additionally we will show the ability to measure temperature up to 100 C using fiber optic sensors.

  11. Chirped polymer optical fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Carlos A. F.; Pereira, L.; Antunes, P.; Mergo, P.; Webb, D. J.; Pinto, J. L.; André, P.

    2017-05-01

    We report chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs) photo-inscribed in undoped PMMA polymer optical fibre (POF) for the first time. The chirped polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (CPOFBGs) were inscribed using an UV KrF excimer laser operating at 248 nm. The rectangular gauss laser beam was expanded to 25 mm in horizontal direction along the fiber core by a cylindrical lens, giving a total of 25 mm grating length. A 25 mm long chirped phase mask chosen for 1550 nm grating inscription was used. The laser frequency was 1 Hz with an energy of 5 mJ per exposure, exposing few pulses for each grating inscription. The reflection amplitude spectrum evolution of a CPOFBG is investigated as a function of the applied strain and temperature. Also, some results regarding to group delay are collected and discussed. These results pave the way to further developments in different fields, where POFs could present some advantages preferably replacing their silica counterparts.

  12. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... systems require specially designed fibers with large cores and good power handling capabilities - requirements that are all met by the airclad fiber technology. In the present paper we go through many of the building blocks needed to build high-power systems and we show an example of a complete airclad...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...

  13. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2011-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last 5 years. Many of the traditional manufacturers of gas and solid-state lasers are now pursuing the fiber-based systems, which are displacing the conventional technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser systems...... require reliable fibers with large cores, stable mode quality, and good power handling capabilities-requirements that are all met by the airclad fiber technology. In the present paper we go through many of the building blocks needed to build high-power systems and we show an example of a complete airclad...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 100 m single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to megawatt power levels. Furthermore, we describe the novel airclad-based pump combiners and their use in a completely...

  14. A Characteristic-Based Constitutive Law for Dispersed Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Biological tissues are typically constituted of dispersed fibers. Modeling the constitutive laws of such tissues remains a challenge. Direct integration over all fibers is considered to be accurate but requires very expensive numerical integration. A general structure tensor (GST) model was previously developed to bypass this costly numerical integration step, but there are concerns about the model's accuracy. Here we estimate the approximation error of the GST model. We further reveal that the GST model ignores strain energy induced by shearing motions. Subsequently, we propose a new characteristic-based constitutive law to better approximate the direct integration model. The new model is very cost-effective and closely approximates the “true” strain energy as calculated by the direct integration when stress–strain nonlinearity or fiber dispersion angle is small. PMID:27138358

  15. A phase mask fiber grating and sensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preecha P. Yupapin

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation of a fabricated fiber grating device characteristics and its applications, using a phase mask writing technique. The use of a most common UV phase laser (KrF eximer laser, with high intensity light source was focussed to the phase mask for writing on a fiber optic sample. The device (i.e. grating characteristic especially, in sensing application, was investigated. The possibility of using such device for temperature and strain sensors is discussed.

  16. Higher-speed demodulation of fiber grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, John M.; Schulz, Whitten L.; Udd, Eric; Morrell, Mike

    1999-05-01

    For very high-speed events, such as ballistics testing, strain measurement speed is not limited by the response of the fiber grating sensor, but rather the demodulation system used. This paper focuses on a current 10 kHz fiber grating demodulator used to support impact and ballistics testing of a composite panel. It also explores the next generation demodulator, pushing the emits of speed upwards of 3 Mhz.

  17. Highly Sensitive Sensors Based on Photonic Crystal Fiber Modal Interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Villatoro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the research on photonic crystal fiber modal interferometers with emphasis placed on the characteristics that make them attractive for different sensing applications. The fabrication of such interferometers is carried out with different post-processing techniques such as grating inscription, tapering or cleaving, and splicing. In general photonic crystal fiber interferometers exhibit low thermal sensitivity while their applications range from sensing strain or temperature to refractive index and volatile organic compounds.

  18. Static Characterization of Curvature Sensors Based on Plastic Optical Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Casalicchio, Maria Luisa; Perrone, Guido; Vallan, Alberto; Carullo, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Sensors able to measure curvature changes are emerging as an effective alternative to the more common strain gauges for structural health monitoring applications. Particularly interesting is the all-optical fiber implementation for its unique properties and the possibility of being embedded. This paper, after a brief description of curvature sensors using plastic optical fibers, focuses on their characterization in applications where high sensitivity is required, and compares their performanc...

  19. Applications of Fiber Optics in Experimental Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    reflected light intensity decreases metrology and moire interferometry. due to reduced surface reflectivity. Many workers have demonstrated the advantages oa...compact, two beam "white light"󈧩.38 speckle metrology . The)y also submersible singlemode fiber optic LDV probe fluid flow demonstrated the use of...coupling based liquid level the strain is not uniform, the gage will, of course, yield some sensors, doped coating chemical species sensors. Sagnac

  20. Thermal strains in titanium aluminide and nickel aluminide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saigal, A. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Kupperman, D.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Neutron diffraction was used to measure residual thermal strains developed during postfabrication cooling in titanium aluminide and nickel aluminide intermetallic matrix composites. Silicon carbide /Ti 14Al-21Nb, tungsten and sapphire/NiAl, and sapphire and SiC-coated sapphire/NiAl{sub 25}Fe{sub 10} composites were investigated. The thermal expansion coefficient of the matrix is usually greater than that of the fibers. As such, during cooldown, compressive residual strains are generated in the fibers and tensile residual strains are generated in the matrix, parallel to the fibers. Liquid-nitrogen dipping and thermal cycling tend to reduce the fabrication-induced residual strains in silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composites. However, matrix cracking can occur as a result of these processes. The axial residual strains in the matrix were lower in the nickel aluminide matrix than in the titanium aluminide matrix. As the matrix undergoes plastic deformation, residual thermal strains are related to the yield stress of the matrix.

  1. Thermal strains in titanium aluminide and nickel aluminide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saigal, A. (Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Kupperman, D.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Neutron diffraction was used to measure residual thermal strains developed during postfabrication cooling in titanium aluminide and nickel aluminide intermetallic matrix composites. Silicon carbide /Ti 14Al-21Nb, tungsten and sapphire/NiAl, and sapphire and SiC-coated sapphire/NiAl{sub 25}Fe{sub 10} composites were investigated. The thermal expansion coefficient of the matrix is usually greater than that of the fibers. As such, during cooldown, compressive residual strains are generated in the fibers and tensile residual strains are generated in the matrix, parallel to the fibers. Liquid-nitrogen dipping and thermal cycling tend to reduce the fabrication-induced residual strains in silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composites. However, matrix cracking can occur as a result of these processes. The axial residual strains in the matrix were lower in the nickel aluminide matrix than in the titanium aluminide matrix. As the matrix undergoes plastic deformation, residual thermal strains are related to the yield stress of the matrix.

  2. Exploring a novel multifunctional agent to improve the dispersion of short aramid fiber in polymer matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Naskar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Composites based on resorcinol formaldehyde latex (RFL coated aramid short fiber and a polyolefin based thermoplastic elastomer, namely ethylene octene copolymer (EOC were prepared by melt mixing technique. The effects of both fiber loading and its length on the mechanical and thermal characteristics of the composite under natural and sheared conditions were investigated. Both the low strain modulus and Young’s modulus were increased as a function of fiber loading and length. However, thermal stability of the composite was found to enhance with increase in fiber loading and was independent of fiber length. Due to poor interfacial interaction between the fiber and the matrix and the formation of fiber aggregation especially with 6 mm fiber at high loading, the elongation and toughness of the composite were found to decrease drastically. In order to solve this problem, a maleic anhydride adducted polybutadiene (MA-g-PB was applied on the aramid fiber. The improvements in tensile strength, elongation at break, toughness to stiffness balance and a good quality of fiber dispersion especially with 6 mm short fiber were achieved. These results indicate the potential use of maleic anhydride adducted PB as a multifunctional interface modifying coupling agent for the aramid short fiber reinforced polymers to enhance the mechanical properties as well as fiber dispersion. FTIR analyses of the treated fiber and SEM analyses of the tensile fractured surfaces of the composite strongly support and explain these results.

  3. Stress transfer in microdroplet tensile test: PVC-coated and uncoated Kevlar-29 single fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenkun, Lei; Quan, Wang; Yilan, Kang; Wei, Qiu; Xuemin, Pan

    2010-11-01

    The single fiber/microdroplet tensile test is applied for evaluating the interfacial mechanics between a fiber and a resin substrate. It is used to investigate the influence of a polymer coating on a Kevlar-29 fiber surface, specifically the stress transfer between the fiber and epoxy resin in a microdroplet. Unlike usual tests, this new test ensures a symmetrical axial stress on the embedded fiber and reduces the stress singularity that appears at the embedded fiber entry. Using a homemade loading device, symmetrical tensile tests are performed on a Kevlar-29 fiber with or without polyvinylchloride (PVC) coating, the surface of which is in contact with two epoxy resin microdroplets during curing. Raman spectra on the embedded fiber are recorded by micro-Raman Spectroscopy under different strain levels. Then they are transformed to the distributions of fiber axis stress based on the relationship between stress and Raman shift. The Raman results reveal that the fiber axial stresses increase with the applied loads, and the antisymmetric interfacial shear stresses, obtained by a straightforward balance of shear-to-axial forces argument, lead to the appearance of shear stress concentrations at a distance to the embedded fiber entry. The load is transferred from the outer fiber to the embedded fiber in the epoxy microdroplet. As is observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), the existence of a flexible polymer coating on the fiber surface reduces the stress transfer efficiency.

  4. Aspects of flexural behavior of high strength concrete elements with or without steel fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe-Alexandru Bărbos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Steel fiber reinforced high strength concrete (SFRHSC is concrete made of hydraulic cements containing fine or fine and coarse aggregate and discontinuous discrete steel fibers. In tension, SFRHSC fails only after the steel fiber breaks or is pulled out of the cement matrix. A more general and current approach to the mechanics of fiber reinforcing assumes a crack arrest mechanism based on fracture mechanics. In this model, the energy to extend a crack and debond the fibers in the matrix relates to the properties of the composite. The designers may best view SFRHSC as a concrete with increased strain capacity, impact resistance, energy absorption, fatigue endurance and tensile strength.

  5. Fiber inline Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on femtosecond laser inscribed waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W W; Chen, W P; Wang, D N; Wang, Z K; Xu, Ben

    2017-11-01

    A new type of Mach-Zehnder interferometer device based on in-fiber optical waveguides, fabricated by direct femtosecond laser pulse inscription in a single-mode fiber has been demonstrated and successfully employed for temperature and strain measurement. The in-fiber waveguide can couple the light out from the fiber core and guide it along the cladding region before directing it back into the fiber core. Such an inner structured interferometer device is compact and robust, can be constructed in a flexible and precisely controlled manner, and hence is expected to have many potential applications.

  6. Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E. Zander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional electrospun nanofibers have a myriad of applications ranging from scaffolds for tissue engineering to components of biosensors and energy harvesting devices. The generally smooth one-dimensional structure of the fibers has stood as a limitation to several interesting novel applications. Control of fiber diameter, porosity and collector geometry will be briefly discussed, as will more traditional methods for controlling fiber morphology and fiber mat architecture. The remainder of the review will focus on new techniques to prepare hierarchically structured fibers. Fibers with hierarchical primary structures—including helical, buckled, and beads-on-a-string fibers, as well as fibers with secondary structures, such as nanopores, nanopillars, nanorods, and internally structured fibers and their applications—will be discussed. These new materials with helical/buckled morphology are expected to possess unique optical and mechanical properties with possible applications for negative refractive index materials, highly stretchable/high-tensile-strength materials, and components in microelectromechanical devices. Core-shell type fibers enable a much wider variety of materials to be electrospun and are expected to be widely applied in the sensing, drug delivery/controlled release fields, and in the encapsulation of live cells for biological applications. Materials with a hierarchical secondary structure are expected to provide new superhydrophobic and self-cleaning materials.

  7. Thermal and chemical treatment of polymer optical fiber Bragg grating sensors for enhanced mechanical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pospori, Andreas; Marques, C. A. F.; Saez-Rodriguez, D.

    2017-01-01

    An investigation of the thermal annealing effects on the strain, stress, and force sensitivities of polymer optical fiber Bragg grating sensors is performed. We demonstrate for the first time that the fiber annealing can enhance both stress and force sensitivities of Bragg grating sensors......, with the possible cause being the molecular relaxation of the polymer when fiber is raised above the β-transition temperature. A simple, cost-effective, but well controlled method for fiber annealing is also presented in this work. In addition, the effects of chemical etching on the strain, stress, and force...... sensitivities have been investigated. Results show that fiber etching too can increase the force sensitivity, and it can also affect the strain and stress sensitivities of the Bragg grating sensors....

  8. Micromechanical modeling of damage in periodic composites using strain gradient plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Damage evolution at the fiber matrix interface in Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) is studied using strain gradient theory of plasticity. The study includes the rate independent formulation of energetic strain gradient plasticity for the matrix, purely elastic model for the fiber and cohesive zone...... model for the fiber–matrix interface. For the micro structure, free energy holds both elastic strains and plastic strain gradients. Due to the gradient theory, higher order boundary conditions must be considered. A unit cell with a circular elastic fiber is studied by the numerical finite element cell...... model under simple shear and transverse uniaxial tension using plane strain and periodic boundary conditions. The result of the overall response curve, effective plastic strain, effective stress and higher order stress distributions are shown. The effect of the material length scale, maximum stress...

  9. Muscle strain treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  10. Multicolor, Fluorescent Supercapacitor Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meng; Sun, Hao; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Jingxia; Xie, Songlin; Fu, Xuemei; Sun, Xuemei; Wang, Bingjie; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-10-05

    Fiber-shaped supercapacitors have attracted broad attentions from both academic and industrial communities due to the demonstrated potentials as next-generation power modules. However, it is important while remains challenging to develop dark-environment identifiable supercapacitor fibers for enhancement on operation convenience and security in nighttime applications. Herein, a novel family of colorful fluorescent supercapacitor fibers has been produced from aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets. Fluorescent dye particles are introduced and stably anchored on the surfaces of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes to prepare hybrid fiber electrodes with a broad range of colors from red to purple. The fluorescent component in the dye introduces fluorescent indication capability to the fiber, which is particularly promising for flexible and wearable devices applied in dark environment. In addition, the colorful fluorescent supercapacitor fibers also maintain high electrochemical performance under cyclic bending and charge-discharge processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Behavior of Low Grade Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Made with Fresh and Recycled Brick Aggregates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Md. Shariful Islam; Mohammad Al Amin Siddique

    2017-01-01

    .... In this paper, an experimental investigation is carried out to observe the influence of low grade steel fiber reinforcements on the stress-strain behavior of concrete made with recycled and fresh brick aggregates...

  12. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  13. Oriented Fiber Filter Media

    OpenAIRE

    R. Bharadwaj; A. Patel, S. Chokdeepanich, Ph.D.; G.G. Chase, Ph.D.

    2008-01-01

    Coalescing filters are widely used throughout industry and improved performance will reduce droplet emissions and operating costs. Experimental observations show orientation of micro fibers in filter media effect the permeability and the separation efficiency of the filter media. In this work two methods are used to align the fibers to alter the filter structure. The results show that axially aligned fiber media improve quality factor on the order of 20% and cutting media on an angle from a t...

  14. Agave Americana Leaf Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Hulle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural fibers seem to be a good alternative since they are abundantly available and there are a number of possibilities to use all the components of a fiber-yielding crop; one such fiber-yielding plant is Agave Americana. The leaves of this plant yield fibers and all the parts of this plant can be utilized in many applications. The “zero-waste” utilization of the plant would enable its production and processing to be translated into a viable and sustainable industry. Agave Americana fibers are characterized by low density, high tenacity and high moisture absorbency in comparison with other leaf fibers. These fibers are long and biodegradable. Therefore, we can look this fiber as a sustainable resource for manufacturing and technical applications. Detailed discussion is carried out on extraction, characterization and applications of Agave Americana fiber in this paper.

  15. Evaluation of ionic liquid epoxy carbon fiber composites in a cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, Christopher T.; Henry, Christopher R.; Kaukler, William F.; Grugel, R. N.

    2018-03-01

    A novel ionic liquid epoxy (ILE) was used to fabricate carbon fiber composite discs which were then subjected to biaxial strain testing in liquid nitrogen. The ILE composite showed a greater strain-to-failure at cryogenic temperatures when compared to a commercial epoxy. This result is likely an effect, as shown in micrographs, of the strong ILE bonding with the carbon fibers as well as it exhibiting plastic deformation at the fracture surface.

  16. An Elastic-Plastic and Strength Prediction Model for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper applies a recently developed model to predict the elastic-plastic stress/strain response and strength of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model combines a micro-macro constitutive modeling approach with experimental characterization and modeling of the composite microstructure to determine the composite stress/strain response and strength. Specifically, it accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length, orientation and volume fraction distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Injection-molded-long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens were prepared for mechanical characterization and testing. Fiber length, orientation, and volume fraction distributions were then measured at some selected locations for use in the computation. Fiber orientations in these specimens were also predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model developed for LFTs. The stress-strain response of the as-formed composite was computed by an incremental procedure that uses the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method, the Mori-Tanaka assumption and a fiber orientation averaging technique. The model has been validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for these long-glass-fiber/PP specimens.

  17. Characterization of the Effect of Fiber Undulation on Strength and Stiffness of Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    introduced several textile composite models, such as the fiber crimp model, to address the effect of fiber undulation for plain and harness satin weaves. The...used during image correlation. A size 5 strain filter and Lagrange tensor type were used. The area of interest was nominally 25.4 mm wide × 25.4 mm

  18. Simultaneous distributed measurements of temperature and strain using spontaneous Raman and Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahbabi, M. N.; Cho, Y. T.; Newson, Trevor P.

    2004-06-01

    We report on a novel method for simultaneous distributed measurement of the temperature and strain in an optical fiber based on spatially resolving the anti-Stokes signals of both the spontaneous Raman and Brillouin backscattered signals.

  19. Recent progress in Brillouin scattering based fiber sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Brillouin scattering in optical fiber describes the interaction of an electro-magnetic field (photon) with a characteristic density variation of the fiber. When the electric field amplitude of an optical beam (so-called pump wave), and another wave is introduced at the downshifted Brillouin frequency (namely Stokes wave), the beating between the pump and Stokes waves creates a modified density change via the electrostriction effect, resulting in so-called the stimulated Brillouin scattering. The density variation is associated with a mechanical acoustic wave; and it may be affected by local temperature, strain, and vibration which induce changes in the fiber effective refractive index and sound velocity. Through the measurement of the static or dynamic changes in Brillouin frequency along the fiber one can realize a distributed fiber sensor for local temperature, strain and vibration over tens or hundreds of kilometers. This paper reviews the progress on improving sensing performance parameters like spatial resolution, sensing length limitation and simultaneous temperature and strain measurement. These kinds of sensors can be used in civil structural monitoring of pipelines, bridges, dams, and railroads for disaster prevention. Analogous to the static Bragg grating, one can write a moving Brillouin grating in fibers, with the lifetime of the acoustic wave. The length of the Brillouin grating can be controlled by the writing pulses at any position in fibers. Such gratings can be used to measure changes in birefringence, which is an important parameter in fiber communications. Applications for this kind of sensor can be found in aerospace, material processing and fine structures.

  20. Recent Progress in Brillouin Scattering Based Fiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Brillouin scattering in optical fiber describes the interaction of an electro-magnetic field (photon with a characteristic density variation of the fiber. When the electric field amplitude of an optical beam (so-called pump wave, and another wave is introduced at the downshifted Brillouin frequency (namely Stokes wave, the beating between the pump and Stokes waves creates a modified density change via the electrostriction effect, resulting in so-called the stimulated Brillouin scattering. The density variation is associated with a mechanical acoustic wave; and it may be affected by local temperature, strain, and vibration which induce changes in the fiber effective refractive index and sound velocity. Through the measurement of the static or dynamic changes in Brillouin frequency along the fiber one can realize a distributed fiber sensor for local temperature, strain and vibration over tens or hundreds of kilometers. This paper reviews the progress on improving sensing performance parameters like spatial resolution, sensing length limitation and simultaneous temperature and strain measurement. These kinds of sensors can be used in civil structural monitoring of pipelines, bridges, dams, and railroads for disaster prevention. Analogous to the static Bragg grating, one can write a moving Brillouin grating in fibers, with the lifetime of the acoustic wave. The length of the Brillouin grating can be controlled by the writing pulses at any position in fibers. Such gratings can be used to measure changes in birefringence, which is an important parameter in fiber communications. Applications for this kind of sensor can be found in aerospace, material processing and fine structures.

  1. Add Fiber without Extra Calories

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166315.html Add Fiber Without Extra Calories How to fill up, not ... 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Are you getting enough fiber in your diet? According to the National Fiber ...

  2. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and turns to gel during ... and nutrient absorption from the stomach and intestine. Soluble fiber is found in foods such as oat ...

  3. ANALYSIS OF THE ACCURACY OF FIBRE-OPTIC STRAIN GAUGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dita Jiroutová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the field of structure monitoring has been making increasing use of systems based on fiber-optic technologies. Fiber-optic technology offers many advantages, including higher quality measurements, greater reliability, easier installation and maintenance, insensitivity to the environment (mainly to the electromagnetic field, corrosion resistance, safety in explosive and flammable environments, the possibility of long-term monitoring and lower cost per lifetime. We have used SOFO fibre-optic strain gauges to perform measurements to check the overall relative deformation of a real reinforced concrete structure. Long-term monitoring of the structure revealed that the measurement readings obtained from these fibre-optic strain gauges differed from each other. Greater attention was therefore paid to the calibration of the fibre-optic strain gauges, and to determining their measurement accuracy. The experimental results show that it is necessary to calibrate SOFO strain gauges before they are used, and to determine their calibration constant.

  4. Debonding Analyses in Anisotropic Materials with Strain-Gradient Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2012-01-01

    . A conventional cohesive law is extended such that both the average as well as the jump in plastic strain across the fiber-matrix interface are accounted for. Results are shown for both conventional isotropic and anisotropic materials as well as for higher order isotropic and anisotropic materials......A unit cell approach is adopted to numerically analyze the effect of plastic anisotropy on damage evolution in a microreinforced composite. The matrix material exhibit size effects and a visco-plastic anisotropic strain gradient plasticity model accounting for such size effects is adopted...... with and without debonding. Generally, the strain gradient enhanced material exhibits higher load carry capacity compared to the corresponding conventional material. A sudden stress drop occurs in the macroscopic stress-strain response curve due to fiber-matrix debonding and the results show that a change in yield...

  5. Debonding analyses in anisotropic materials with strain- gradient effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2012-01-01

    . A conventional cohesive law is extended such that both the average as well as the jump in plastic strain across the fiber-matrix interface are accounted for. Results are shown for both conventional isotropic and anisotropic materials as well as for higher order isotropic and anisotropic materials......A unit cell approach is adopted to numerically analyze the effect of plastic anisotropy on damage evolution in a micro-reinforced composite. The matrix material exhibit size effects and a visco-plastic anisotropic strain gradient plasticity model accounting for such size effects is adopted...... with and without debonding. Generally, the strain gradient enhanced material exhibits higher load carry capacity compared to the corresponding conventional material. A sudden stress drop occurs in the macroscopic stress-strain response curve due to fiber-matrix debonding and the results show that a change in yield...

  6. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on the Mechanical Characteristics of Carbon Fiber Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashmal, Salem; Siddiqui, Mohammed; Arif, Abul Fazal M

    2017-09-04

    Carbon fiber-based materials possess excellent mechanical properties and show linear piezoresistive behavior, which make them good candidate materials for strain measurements. They have the potential to be used as sensors for various applications such as damage detection, stress analysis and monitoring of manufacturing processes and quality. In this paper, carbon fiber sensors are prepared to perform reliable strain measurements. Both experimental and computational studies were carried out on commercially available carbon fibers in order to understand the response of the carbon fiber sensors due to changes in the axial strain. Effects of parameters such as diameter, length, and epoxy-hardener ratio are discussed. The developed numerical model was calibrated using laboratory-based experimental data. The results of the current study show that sensors with shorter lengths have relatively better sensitivity. This is due to the fact short fibers have low initial resistance, which will increase the change of resistance over initial resistance. Carbon fibers with low number of filaments exhibit linear behavior while nonlinear behavior due to transverse resistance is significant in fibers with large number of filaments. This study will allow researchers to predict the behavior of the carbon fiber sensor in real life and it will serve as a basis for designing carbon fiber sensors to be used in different applications.

  7. Characterization of new natural cellulosic fiber from Lygeum spartum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belouadah, Z; Ati, A; Rokbi, M

    2015-12-10

    Integration of new natural fibers in polymer composites field can contribute to increase the production of natural reinforcements and expand their use into new applications. In the present work, new cellulosic fibers were extracted from Lygeum spartum L. plant using an eco-friendly method. The morphological, physico-chemical, thermal and mechanical properties of L. spartum L. fibers were reported for the first time in this paper. The stem anatomy and fiber SEM micrographs showed a strong presence of fiber cells. ATR-FTIR and X-ray analysis proved that these fibers are rich in cellulose content with crystallinity index of 46.19%. The thermogravimetric analysis indicates that the L. spartum fibers are thermally stable until 220 °C with apparent activation energy of 68.77 kJ/mol. Young's modulus, tensile strength and strain at failure were determined from the single fiber tensile test as 13.2 GPa, 280 MPa, and 3.7% respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, K.A.; Gunther, M.F.; Vengsarkar, A.M.; Claus, R.O.

    1994-04-05

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer. 14 figures.

  9. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Kent A. (Roanoke, VA); Gunther, Michael F. (Blacksburg, VA); Vengsarkar, Ashish M. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Claus, Richard O. (Christiansburg, VA)

    1994-01-01

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

  10. Characterization and antibacterial properties of porous fibers containing silver ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhaoyang; Fan, Chenxu; Tang, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Jianghui; Song, Yanhua; Shao, Zhongbiao [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Engineering, Soochow University, 199 Ren-ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xu, Lan, E-mail: lanxu@suda.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Engineering, Soochow University, 199 Ren-ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Nantong Textile Institute of Soochow University, 58 Chong-chuan Road, Nantong 226018 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Antibacterial electrospun PLA porous fibers containing silver ions were prepared. • Porous structure and porosity of PLA/Ag{sup +} porous fibers were investigated. • The antibacterial effects of PLA/Ag{sup +} porous fibers were studied. • The released mechanism of silver ions in the porous fibers was illustrated. • The porous structure could improve the antibacterial properties. - Abstract: Materials prepared on the base of bioactive silver compounds have become more and more popular. In the present work, the surface morphology, structure and properties, of electrospun Polylactide Polylactic acid (PLA) porous fibers containing various ratios of silver ions were investigated by a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), universal testing machine, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and et al. The biological activities of the proposed porous fibers were discussed in view of the released silver ions concentration. Antibacterial properties of these porous fibers were studied using two bacterial strains: Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Results of the antibacterial testing suggested that PLA porous fibers containing silver ions could be used as potent antibacterial wound dressing materials in the biomedical field.

  11. Experimental study on mix proportion of fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Zhao, Renda; Liao, Ping; Li, Fuhai; Yuan, Yuan; Zhou, Shuang

    2017-10-01

    To study the mechanical property of fiber reinforced cementations composites influenced by the fiber length, quartz sand diameter, matrix of water cement ratio, volume fraction of fiber and magnesium acrylate solution. Several 40×40×160 mm standard test specimens, "8" specimens and long "8" specimens and 21 groups of fiber concrete specimens were fabricated. The flexural, compressive and uniaxial tensile strength were tested by using the bending resistance, compression resistance and electronic universal testing machine. The results show that flexural and compressive strength of fiber reinforced cementations composites increases along with the increase of quartz sand diameter, with the growth of the PVA fiber length increases; When the water-binder ratio is 0.25 and powder-binder ratio is 0.3, the PVA fiber content is 1.5% of the mass of cementations materials, there is a phenomenon of strain hardening; The addition of magnesium acrylate solution reduces the tensile strength of PVA fiber reinforced cementations composites, the tensile strength of the specimens in the curing age of 7d is decreased by about 21% and the specimens in curing age of 28d is decreased by more than 50%.

  12. A Multimodular Tensegrity Model of an Actin Stress Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yaozhi; Xu, Xian; Lele, Tanmay; Kumar, Sanjay; Ingber, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Stress fibers are contractile bundles in the cytoskeleton that stabilize cell structure by exerting traction forces on extracellular matrix. Individual stress fibers are molecular bundles composed of parallel actin and myosin filaments linked by various actin-binding proteins, which are organized end-on-end in a sarcomere-like pattern within an elongated three-dimensional network. While measurements of single stress fibers in living cells show that they behave like tensed viscoelastic fibers, precisely how this mechanical behavior arises from this complex supramolecular arrangement of protein components remains unclear. Here we show that computationally modeling a stress fiber as a multi-modular tensegrity network can predict several key behaviors of stress fibers measured in living cells, including viscoelastic retraction, fiber splaying after severing, non-uniform contraction, and elliptical strain of a puncture wound within the fiber. The tensegrity model also can explain how they simultaneously experience passive tension and generate active contraction forces; in contrast, a tensed cable net model predicts some, but not all, of these properties. Thus, tensegrity models may provide a useful link between molecular and cellular scale mechanical behaviors, and represent a new handle on multi-scale modeling of living materials. PMID:18632107

  13. Simultaneous independent distributed strain and temperature measurements over 15 km using spontaneous Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Huai H.; Lees, Gareth P.; Newson, Trevor P.

    2000-08-01

    Long range simultaneous distributed strain and temperature sensors have many applications for measurements in the power and oil industries and also for structural monitoring. We present an efficient technique to measure both the intensity and frequency shift at every point along the sensitive fiber with a low loss filtering device utilizing two in-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometers. From these two measurements, it is possible to compute accurately the strain and temperature profile.

  14. Applications of nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    2008-01-01

    * The only book describing applications of nonlinear fiber optics * Two new chapters on the latest developments: highly nonlinear fibers and quantum applications* Coverage of biomedical applications* Problems provided at the end of each chapterThe development of new highly nonlinear fibers - referred to as microstructured fibers, holey fibers and photonic crystal fibers - is the next generation technology for all-optical signal processing and biomedical applications. This new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate these key technology developments.The bo

  15. Super capacitor with fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph Collin; Kaschmitter, James

    2015-02-17

    An electrical cell apparatus includes a first current collector made of a multiplicity of fibers, a second current collector spaced from the first current collector; and a separator disposed between the first current collector and the second current collector. The fibers are contained in a foam.

  16. Fiber reinforced engineering plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Rodney E. Jacobson; Karl D. Sears; John H. Underwood

    2001-01-01

    Although natural fiber reinforced commodity thermoplastics have a wide range of nonstructural applications in the automotive and decking industries, there have been few reports of cellulosic fiber-reinforced engineering thermoplastics. The commonly held belief has been that the only thermoplastics amenable to natural-fibre reinforcement are limited to low-melting (...

  17. High-density multicore fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takenaga, K.; Matsuo, S.; Saitoh, K.

    2016-01-01

    High-density single-mode multicore fibers were designed and fabricated. A heterogeneous 30-core fiber realized a low crosstalk of −55 dB. A quasi-single-mode homogeneous 31-core fiber attained the highest core count as a single-mode multicore fiber.......High-density single-mode multicore fibers were designed and fabricated. A heterogeneous 30-core fiber realized a low crosstalk of −55 dB. A quasi-single-mode homogeneous 31-core fiber attained the highest core count as a single-mode multicore fiber....

  18. Fiber Optic Sensors for Health Monitoring of Morphing Airframes. Part 2; Chemical Sensing Using Optical Fibers with Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Karen; Brown, Timothy; Rogowski, Robert; Jensen, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Part 1 of this two part series described the fabrication and calibration of Bragg gratings written into a single mode optical fiber for use in strain and temperature monitoring. Part 2 of the series describes the use of identical fibers and additional multimode fibers, both with and without Bragg gratings, to perform near infrared spectroscopy. The demodulation system being developed at NASA Langley Research Center currently requires the use of a single mode optical fiber. Attempts to use this single mode fiber for spectroscopic analysis are problematic given its small core diameter, resulting in low signal intensity. Nonetheless, we have conducted a preliminary investigation using a single mode fiber in conjunction with an infrared spectrometer to obtain spectra of a high-performance epoxy resin system. Spectra were obtained using single mode fibers that contained Bragg gratings; however, the peaks of interest were barely discernible above the noise. The goal of this research is to provide a multipurpose sensor in a single optical fiber capable of measuring a variety of chemical and physical properties.

  19. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  20. Python fiber optic seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  1. Green insulation: hemp fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2011-09-15

    Indian hemp (Cannabis indica) is known for its psychotropic values and it is banned in most countries. However, industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa) is known for its tough fibers. Several manufactures in Europe including, small niche players, have been marketing hemp insulation products for several years. Hemp is a low environmental impact material. Neither herbicide nor pesticide is used during the growth of hemp. The fibers are extracted in a waste-free and chemical-free mechanical process. Hemp can consume CO2 during its growth. In addition, hemp fiber can be disposed of harmlessly by composting or incineration at the end of its life. Hemp fibers are processed and treated only minimally to resist rot and fungal activity. There is little health risk when producing and installing the insulation, thanks to the absence of toxic additive. Its thermal resistance is comparable to mineral wool. But the development and marketing of hemp fibers may be restricted in North America.

  2. Fiber optic hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  3. Compound Droplets on Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Floriane; Ben Said, Marouen; Hötzer, Johannes; Berghoff, Marco; Dreesen, Laurent; Nestler, Britta; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-07-21

    Droplets on fibers have been extensively studied in the recent years. Although the equilibrium shapes of simple droplets on fibers are well established, the situation becomes more complex for compound fluidic systems. Through experimental and numerical investigations, we show herein that compound droplets can be formed on fibers and that they adopt specific geometries. We focus on the various contact lines formed at the meeting of the different phases and we study their equilibrium state. It appears that, depending on the surface tensions, the triple contact lines can remain separate or merge together and form quadruple lines. The nature of the contact lines influences the behavior of the compound droplets on fibers. Indeed, both experimental and numerical results show that, during the detachment process, depending on whether the contact lines are triple or quadruple, the characteristic length is the inner droplet radius or the fiber radius.

  4. Optical fiber sensor by cascading long period fiber grating with FBG for double parameters measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Lou, Xiao-ping; Dong, Ming-li; Zhu, Lian-qing

    2017-09-01

    An optical fiber sensor for strain and temperature measurement based on long period fiber grating (LPFG) cascaded with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) structure has been proposed and realized both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical analysis shows that two microstructures with similar sensitivities cannot be used for double parameters measurement. The LPFG is micromachined by the CO2 laser, and the FBG is micromachined by the excimer laser. For the validation and comparison, two FBGs and one LPFG are cascaded with three transmission valleys, namely FBG1 valley at 1 536.3 nm, LPFG valley at 1 551.2 nm, and FBG2 valley at 1 577.3 nm. The temperature and strain characteristics of the proposed sensor are measured at 45—70 °C and 250—500 μɛ, respectively. The sensitivity matrix is determined by analyzing wavelength shifts and parameter response characterization of three different dips. The proposed optical fiber sensor based on LPFG cascaded with FBG structure can be efficiently used for double parameters measurement with promising application prospect and great research reference value.

  5. Fiber Bragg Grating-Based Performance Monitoring of Piles Fiber in a Geotechnical Centrifugal Model Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Weng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In centrifugal tests, conventional sensors can hardly capture the performance of reinforcement in small-scale models. However, recent advances in fiber optic sensing technologies enable the accurate and reliable monitoring of strain and temperature in laboratory geotechnical tests. This paper outlines a centrifugal model test, performed using a 60 g ton geocentrifuge, to investigate the performance of pipe piles used to reinforce the loess foundation below a widened embankment. Prior to the test, quasidistributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG strain sensors were attached to the surface of the pipe piles to measure the lateral friction resistance in real time. Via the centrifuge actuator, the driving of pipe piles was simulated. During testing, the variations of skin friction distribution along the pipe piles were measured automatically using an optical fiber interrogator. This paper represents the presentation and detailed analysis of monitoring results. Herein, we verify the reliability of the fiber optic sensors in monitoring the model piles without affecting the integrity of the centrifugal model. This paper, furthermore, shows that lateral friction resistance developed in stages with the pipe piles being pressed in and that this sometimes may become negative.

  6. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  7. Investigating Some Characteristics of Biocomposites Prepared from Chemically Purified Date Palm Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ghafarzade Zare

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades the use of lignocellouse fibers in reinforcing composites has attracted much research activities. In the present work, date palm fiber was used for production of composites compatible withliving environment. The fibers were pre-treated chemically to remove impurities. In order to verify and compare the effectiveness of the pretreatment methods, lignin, ash, moisture adsorption, diameter and tensile strength of the raw and treated fibers were considered in all determinations. Some chemical contents of the treated fibers were also estimated by FTIR method. The heating characteristics of the fibers were evaluated using simultaneous thermal analysis (SAT technique. The treated fibers were mixed with HDPE by mass proportions of 10, 20 and 30% of the fibers in twotypes of fine and coarse sizes. Composite flower pots were prepared from the formulations by extrusion process. The mechanical properties of the composites including tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, strain, and impact strength were measured by standard ASTM methods. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that the treated fibers had smaller diameters containing lower levels of lignin and ash though having significantly higher tensile strength, heat resistance and moisture adsorption. The results also indicated that by increase in fibre size the tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and moisture adsorption of the composites are increased and their strain and impact resistance are decreased. The composites prepared using fine fibers showed higher tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and impact strength but their moisture adsorption and elongation were significantly lower.

  8. Adaptive ultrasonic sensor using a fiber ring laser with tandem fiber Bragg gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongqing; Hu, Lingling; Han, Ming

    2014-08-01

    We propose and demonstrate an intensity-demodulated fiber-optic ultrasonic sensor system that can be self-adaptive to large quasi-static background strain perturbations. The sensor system is based on a fiber ring laser (FRL) whose laser cavity includes a pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). Self-adaptive ultrasonic detection is achieved by a tandem design where the two FBGs are engineered to have differential spectral responses to ultrasonic waves and are installed side-by-side at the same location on a structure. As a result, ultrasonic waves lead to relative spectral shifts of the FBGs and modulations to the cold-cavity loss of the FRL. Ultrasonic waves can then be detected directly from the laser intensity variations in response to the cold-cavity loss modulation. The sensor system is insensitive to quasi-static background strains because they lead to identical responses of the tandem FBGs. Based on the principle, a FRL sensor system was demonstrated and tested for adaptive ultrasonic detection when large static strains as well as dynamic sinusoidal vibrations were applied to the sensor.

  9. Models for multiple relaxation processes in collagen fiber

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Models for multiple relaxation processes in collagen fiber. Two element model suits best the dimensional relaxation processes, of which one event appears to originate from stress strain induced changes in hydrogen bond network whereas the other seems to be more ...

  10. Variable configuration fiber optic laser doppler vibrometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada-Roman, Julio E.; Jackson, David A.; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.

    2016-06-01

    A multichannel heterodyne fiber optic vibrometer is demonstrated which can be operated at ranges in excess of 50 m. The system is designed to measure periodic signals, impacts, rotation, 3D strain, and vibration mapping. The displacement resolution of each channel exceeds 1 nm. The outputs from all channels are simultaneous, and the number of channels can be increased by using optical switches.

  11. Colonization of torrefied grass fibers by plant-beneficial microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifonova, R.; Babini, V.; Postma, J.; Ketelaars, J.J.M.H.; van Elsas, J.D.

    This study aimed to assess the colonization of thermally treated (i.e. torrefied) grass fibers (TGFs), a new prospective ingredient of potting soil. Eleven bacterial strains and one fungus, Coniochaeta ligniaria F/TGF15, all isolated from TGF or its extract after inoculation with a soil microbial

  12. Colonization of torrefied grass fibers by plant beneficial microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifonova, R.D.; Babini, V.; Postma, J.; Ketelaars, J.J.M.H.; Elsas, van J.D.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the colonization of thermally treated (i.e. torrefied) grass fibers (TGFs), a new prospective ingredient of potting soil. Eleven bacterial strains and one fungus, Coniochaeta ligniaria F/TGF15, all isolated from TGF or its extract after inoculation with a soil microbial

  13. Mechanical Properties of Transgenic Silkworm Silk Under High Strain Rate Tensile Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.-M.; Claus, B.; Chen, W.

    2017-12-01

    Studies have shown that transgenic silkworm silk may be capable of having similar properties of spider silk while being mass-producible. In this research, the tensile stress-strain response of transgenic silkworm silk fiber is systematically characterized using a quasi-static load frame and a tension Kolsky bar over a range of strain-rates between 10^{-3} and 700/s. The results show that transgenic silkworm silk tends to have higher overall ultimate stress and failure strain at high strain rate (700/s) compared to quasi-static strain rates, indicating rate sensitivity of the material. The failure strain at the high strain rate is higher than that of spider silk. However, the stress levels are significantly below that of spider silk, and far below that of high-performance fiber. Failure surfaces are examined via scanning electron microscopy and reveal that the failure modes are similar to those of spider silk.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Transgenic Silkworm Silk Under High Strain Rate Tensile Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.-M.; Claus, B.; Chen, W.

    2017-09-01

    Studies have shown that transgenic silkworm silk may be capable of having similar properties of spider silk while being mass-producible. In this research, the tensile stress-strain response of transgenic silkworm silk fiber is systematically characterized using a quasi-static load frame and a tension Kolsky bar over a range of strain-rates between 10^{-3} and 700/s. The results show that transgenic silkworm silk tends to have higher overall ultimate stress and failure strain at high strain rate (700/s) compared to quasi-static strain rates, indicating rate sensitivity of the material. The failure strain at the high strain rate is higher than that of spider silk. However, the stress levels are significantly below that of spider silk, and far below that of high-performance fiber. Failure surfaces are examined via scanning electron microscopy and reveal that the failure modes are similar to those of spider silk.

  15. An embeddable optical strain gauge based on a buckled beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Chen, Yizheng; Zhu, Chen; Zhuang, Yiyang; Huang, Jie

    2017-11-01

    We report, for the first time, a low cost, compact, and novel mechanically designed extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI)-based optical fiber sensor with a strain amplification mechanism for strain measurement. The fundamental design principle includes a buckled beam with a coated gold layer, mounted on two grips. A Fabry-Perot cavity is produced between the buckled beam and the endface of a single mode fiber (SMF). A ceramic ferrule is applied for supporting and orienting the SMF. The principal sensor elements are packaged and protected by two designed metal shells. The midpoint of the buckled beam will experience a deflection vertically when the beam is subjected to a horizontally/axially compressive displacement. It has been found that the vertical deflection of the beam at midpoint can be 6-17 times larger than the horizontal/axial displacement, which forms the basis of a strain amplification mechanism. The user-configurable buckling beam geometry-based strain amplification mechanism enables the strain sensor to achieve a wide range of strain measurement sensitivities. The designed EFPI was used to monitor shrinkage of a square brick of mortar. The strain was measured during the drying/curing stage. We envision that it could be a good strain sensor to be embedded in civil materials/structures under a harsh environment for a prolonged period of time.

  16. Detection of ultrasonic waves in solids by an optical fiber interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, R. O.; Cantrell, J. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An optical fiber interferometer was developed for the detection of ultrasonic waves in solids. The optical paths in both the signal and reference arms of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer are through the cores of similar lengths of single mode fiber mode stripped at both input and output. Instantaneous translation of the pattern is proportional to the localized strain produced by ultrasonic bulk waves generated in the disc and integrated along the fiber path. By spatially filtering the moving fringe pattern and synchronously demodulating the filtered optical intensity distirbution, a signal proportional to the integrated strain is obtained.

  17. Super stretchable soft actuator made of twisted and coiled spandex fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyeong Ho; Song, Min Geun; Yang, Sang Yul; Kim, Youngeun; Jung, Hosang; Moon, Hyungpil; Koo, Ja Choon; Nam, Jae-Do; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2017-04-01

    Twist and Coiled soft Actuator (TCA) is simply fabricated by twisting a polymer fiber. In the previous researches, TCA was mainly fabricated with Nylon 6,6 fiber, and Nylon-TCA (NTCA) showed strong force outputs. However, the strain from NTCA was not much enough for practical application. This paper introduces SPX-TCA (STCA) which is fabricated with Spandex fibers. NTCA and STCA were fabricated, and their performances were compared by using the performance evaluation device. STCA showed larger strain, and it was actuated lower temperature than NTCA.

  18. Implementation of distributed feedback fiber laser sensor for acoustic measurements in hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongzhang; Yan, Aidong; Zaghloul, Mohamed A. S.; Lu, Guanyi; Bunger, Andrew P.; Miller, Gary A.; Cranch, Geoffrey A.; Chen, Kevin P.

    2016-09-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser strain sensor was implemented to measure acoustic emission induced by the hydraulic fracturing process. A study of practical sensor mounting configurations and their characteristics was carried out to find a practical solution. Combining the suitable mounting configuration and ultrahigh strain sensitivity of the DFB fiber laser, the evolution of the hydraulic fracturing process was well monitored. This study shows that fiber lasers can be useful alternatives to piezoelectric sensors in the field of hydraulic fracturing for gas and oil extraction.

  19. Fiber optic spanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bryan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-10-01

    Rotation is a fundamental function in nano/biotechnology and is being useful in a host of applications such as pumping of fluid flow in microfluidic channels for transport of micro/nano samples. Further, controlled rotation of single cell or microscopic object is useful for tomographic imaging. Though conventional microscope objective based laser spanners (based on transfer of spin or orbital angular momentum) have been used in the past, they are limited by the short working distance of the microscope objective. Here, we demonstrate development of a fiber optic spanner for rotation of microscopic objects using single-mode fiber optics. Fiber-optic trapping and simultaneous rotation of pin-wheel structure around axis perpendicular to fiber-optic axis was achieved using the fiber optic spanner. By adjusting the laser beam power, rotation speed of the trapped object and thus the microfluidic flow could be controlled. Since this method does not require special optical or structural properties of the sample to be rotated, three-dimensional rotation of a spherical cell could also be controlled. Further, using the fiber optic spanner, array of red blood cells could be assembled and actuated to generate vortex motion. Fiber optical trapping and spinning will enable physical and spectroscopic analysis of microscopic objects in solution and also find potential applications in lab- on-a-chip devices.

  20. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  1. Bacterial polyhydroxybutyrate for electrospun fiber production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Francisca; Villegas, Pamela; Urtuvia, Viviana; Hermosilla, Jeyson; Navia, Rodrigo; Seeger, Michael

    2017-08-16

    Nano- and microfibers obtained by electrospinning have attracted great attention due to its versatility and potential for applications in diverse technological fields. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biopolymers synthesized by microorganisms such as the bacterium Burkholderia xenovorans LB400. In particular, LB400 cells are capable to synthesize poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) from glucose. The aim of this study was to produce and characterize electrospun fibers obtained from bacterial PHBs. Bacterial strain LB400 was grown in M9 minimal medium using xylose and mannitol (10gL(-1)) as the sole carbon sources and NH4Cl (1gL(-1)) as the sole nitrogen source. Biopolymer-based films obtained were used to produce fibers by electrospinning. Diameter and morphology of the microfibers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their thermogravimetric properties were investigated. Bead-free fibers using both PHBs were obtained with diameters of less than 3μm. The surface morphology of the microfibers based on PHBs obtained from both carbon sources was different, even though their thermogravimetric properties are similar. The results indicate that the carbon source may determine the fiber structure and properties. Further studies should be performed to analyze the physicochemical and mechanical properties of these PHB-based microfibers, which may open up novel applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fiber Bragg grating inscription in optical multicore fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Martin; Elsmann, Tino; Lorenz, Adrian; Spittel, Ron; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Rothhardt, Manfred; Latka, Ines; Dochow, Sebastian; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2015-09-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings as key components in telecommunication, fiber lasers, and sensing systems usually rely on the Bragg condition for single mode fibers. In special applications, such as in biophotonics and astrophysics, high light coupling efficiency is of great importance and therefore, multimode fibers are often preferred. The wavelength filtering effect of Bragg gratings in multimode fibers, however is spectrally blurred over a wide modal spectrum of the fiber. With a well-designed all solid multicore microstructured fiber a good light guiding efficiency in combination with narrow spectral filtering effect by Bragg gratings becomes possible.

  3. Kinetics of stress fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; O' Shaughnessy, Ben [Department of Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)], E-mail: bo8@columbia.edu

    2008-02-15

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good

  4. Nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind P

    2001-01-01

    The Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering have awarded Govind Agrawal with an honorable mention for the Joseph W. Goodman Book Writing Award for his work on Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd edition.Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd Edition, provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the nonlinear phenomena occurring inside optical fibers. It retains most of the material that appeared in the first edition, with the exception of Chapter 6, which is now devoted to the polarization effects relevant for light propagation in optical

  5. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  6. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R.P.

    1957-09-17

    An instrument carried unobtrusively about the person such as in a finger ring to indicate when that person has been exposed to an unusual radiation hazard is described. A metallized quartz fiber is electrically charged to indicate a full scale reading on an etched glass background. The quartz fiber and the scale may be viewed through a magnifying lens for ease of reading. Incident radiation will ionize gaseous particles in the sealed structure thereby allowing the charge to leak off the quartz fiber with its resulting movement across the scale proportionally indicating the radiation exposure.

  7. Strain gradient plasticity effects in whisker-reinforced metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2003-01-01

    A metal reinforced by fibers in the micron range is studied using the strain gradient plasticity theory of Fleck and Hutchinson (J. Mech. Phys. Solids 49 (2001) 2245). Cell-model analyses are used to study the influence of the material length parameters numerically, for both a single parameter...

  8. Effect of the Volume Fraction of Jute Fiber on the Interlaminar Shear Stress and Tensile Behavior Characteristics of Hybrid Glass/Jute Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bar for Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Gi Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid glass/jute fiber reinforced polymer (HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured for concrete structures, and their interlaminar shear stress and tensile performance were evaluated. HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured using a combination of pultrusion and braiding processes. Jute fiber was surface-treated with a silane coupling agent. The mixing ratio of the fiber to the vinyl ester used in the HGJFRP composite bars was 7 : 3. Jute fiber was used to replace glass fiber in proportions of 0, 30, 50, 70, and 100%. The interlaminar shear stress decreased as the proportion of jute fiber increased. Fractures appeared due to delamination between the surface-treated component and the main part of the HGJFRP composite bar. Tensile load-strain curves with 50% jute fiber exhibited linear behavior. With a jute fiber volume fraction of 70%, some plastic deformation occurred. A jute fiber mixing ratio of 100% resulted in a display of linear elastic brittle behavior from the fiber; however, when the surface of the fiber was coated with poly(vinyl acetate, following failure, the jute fiber exhibited partial load resistance. The tensile strength decreased as the jute fiber content increased; however, the tensile strength did not vary linearly with jute fiber content.

  9. Characterization and antibacterial properties of porous fibers containing silver ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaoyang; Fan, Chenxu; Tang, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Jianghui; Song, Yanhua; Shao, Zhongbiao; Xu, Lan

    2016-11-01

    Materials prepared on the base of bioactive silver compounds have become more and more popular. In the present work, the surface morphology, structure and properties, of electrospun Polylactide Polylactic acid (PLA) porous fibers containing various ratios of silver ions were investigated by a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), universal testing machine, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and et al. The biological activities of the proposed porous fibers were discussed in view of the released silver ions concentration. Antibacterial properties of these porous fibers were studied using two bacterial strains: Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Results of the antibacterial testing suggested that PLA porous fibers containing silver ions could be used as potent antibacterial wound dressing materials in the biomedical field.

  10. Role of Inelastic Transverse Compressive Behavior and Multiaxial Loading on the Transverse Impact of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramani Sockalingam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available High-velocity transverse impact of ballistic fabrics and yarns by projectiles subject individual fibers to multi-axial dynamic loading. Single-fiber transverse impact experiments with the current state-of-the-art experimental capabilities are challenging due to the associated micron length-scale. Kevlar® KM2 fibers exhibit a nonlinear inelastic behavior in transverse compression with an elastic limit less than 1.5% strain. The effect of this transverse behavior on a single KM2 fiber subjected to a cylindrical and a fragment-simulating projectile (FSP transverse impact is studied with a 3D finite element model. The inelastic behavior results in a significant reduction of fiber bounce velocity and projectile-fiber contact forces up to 38% compared to an elastic impact response. The multiaxial stress states during impact including transverse compression, axial tension, axial compression and interlaminar shear are presented at the location of failure. In addition, the models show a strain concentration over a small length in the fiber under the projectile-fiber contact. A failure criterion, based on maximum axial tensile strain accounting for the gage length, strain rate and multiaxial loading degradation effects are applied to predict the single-fiber breaking speed. Results are compared to the elastic response to assess the importance of inelastic material behavior on failure during a transverse impact.

  11. Tunable femtosecond Cherenkov fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Svane, Ask Sebastian; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate electrically-tunable femtosecond Cherenkov fiber laser output at the visible range. Using an all-fiber, self-starting femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser as the pump source and nonlinear photonic crystal fiber link as the wave-conversion medium, ultrafast, milliwatt-level, tunable...

  12. Carbon Fiber Risk Analysis. [conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The scope and status of the effort to assess the risks associated with the accidental release of carbon/graphite fibers from civil aircraft is presented. Vulnerability of electrical and electronic equipment to carbon fibers, dispersal of carbon fibers, effectiveness of filtering systems, impact of fiber induced failures, and risk methodology are among the topics covered.

  13. Determination of the K-matrix for the multiparameter fiber grating sensor in AD072 fibercore fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Drew V.; Makino, Alberto; Lawrence, Craig M.; Seim, John M.; Schulz, Whitten L.; Udd, Eric

    1998-09-01

    A methodology is described for determining a relation (K- matrix) between wavelength shifts and (1) axial strain, (2) two transverse strains and (3) temperature change experienced by a multi-parameter Bragg grating sensor. The sensor is formed by writing gratings at two wavelengths in polarization maintaining fiber. The methodology is based on separate experimental calibrations of sensor response to transverse loading (diametral compression), axial loading and temperature changes. Strains produced in the core by the loadings or temperature changes used in the calibrations are determined by finite element analyses.

  14. Optical fiber load sensor based on a semi-auxetic structure: a proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenato, Luca; Pasuto, Alessandro; Galtarossa, Andrea; Palmieri, Luca

    2016-05-01

    In this work a quasi-distributed optical fiber load sensor based on a semi-auxetic structure is presented. By concatenating sections with positive Poisson's ratio to sections with negative one it is possible to precisely encode the distributed load into a strain exerted on a fiber. The sensor is described and a simple proof of concept is built and tested. The fiber is interrogated by means of optical frequency domain reflectometry. The proposed sensor represents just one example of the potential applications of auxetic and semi-auxetic structures and materials in optical fiber sensors development.

  15. The energy dissipative mechanisms of the particle-fiber interface in a textile composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Quinn Patrick

    deformation mechanisms of the fiber microstructure associated with a nano- to micrometer sized gouge of the fiber surface. Relationships between the observed mechanisms and the measured friction and energy were developed, resulting in new insights into the relevant energy dissipation processes of the particle-fiber interface. The level of apparent friction increased with increasing levels of strain imparted on the fiber surface, reaching values of up to ˜300% of the previously reported Kevlar yarn-yarn friction. Increased levels of friction during impact of a fabric have been shown to increase the energy required for the relative yarn translations, increasing the number of fibers strained and failed in tension. The energy of a single gouge made using probes exhibiting contact geometries similar to a particle-fiber contact was on the order of just 1% of the energy required to fail a fiber in tension (calculated based on a particle gouge and fiber tensile strain over one particle diameter). In the case of multiple particles distributed within a fabric, an impact event will involve energy dissipation from particle gouging, transverse fiber compression, and fiber tensile failure, where the ratio of the total energies associated with each of these processes was estimated to be on the order of 0.2:1:1 (assuming a limit at a transverse compressive strain of 0.3). Therefore, both the energy and the friction associated with particle gouging can increase the energy dissipative capabilities of a fabric, where the maximum contribution of the particle-fiber interface is likely related to the fabric's energy dissipative mechanisms that depend on friction.

  16. ANSYS-based birefringence property analysis of side-hole fiber induced by pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinbang; Gong, Zhenfeng

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the influences of pressure and temperature on the birefringence property of side-hole fibers with different shapes of holes using the finite element analysis method. A physical mechanism of the birefringence of the side-hole fiber is discussed with the presence of different external pressures and temperatures. The strain field distribution and birefringence values of circular-core, rectangular-core, and triangular-core side-hole fibers are presented. Our analysis shows the triangular-core side-hole fiber has low temperature sensitivity which weakens the cross sensitivity of temperature and strain. Additionally, an optimized structure design of the side-hole fiber is presented which can be used for the sensing application.

  17. Fiber bundle phase conjugate mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Benjamin G.

    2012-05-01

    An improved method and apparatus for passively conjugating the phases of a distorted wavefronts resulting from optical phase mismatch between elements of a fiber laser array are disclosed. A method for passively conjugating a distorted wavefront comprises the steps of: multiplexing a plurality of probe fibers and a bundle pump fiber in a fiber bundle array; passing the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle array through a collimating lens and into one portion of a non-linear medium; passing the output from a pump collection fiber through a focusing lens and into another portion of the non-linear medium so that the output from the pump collection fiber mixes with the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle; adjusting one or more degrees of freedom of one or more of the fiber bundle array, the collimating lens, the focusing lens, the non-linear medium, or the pump collection fiber to produce a standing wave in the non-linear medium.

  18. Wave propagation in fiber composite laminates, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the wave propagation characteristics, transient strains and residual properties in unidirectional and angle-ply boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy laminates impacted with silicone rubber projectiles at velocities up to 250 MS-1. The predominant wave is flexural, propagating at different velocities in different directions. In general, measured wave velocities were higher than theoretically predicted values. The amplitude of the in-plane wave is less than ten percent of that of the flexural wave. Peak strains and strain rates in the transverse to the (outer) fiber direction are much higher than those in the direction of the fibers. The dynamics of impact were also studied with high speed photography.

  19. Fiber optical sensors for enhanced battery safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jan; Nedjalkov, Antonio; Doering, Alexander; Angelmahr, Martin; Schade, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Over the last years, battery safety becomes more and more important due to the wide spread of high-capacity lithium ion batteries applied in e.g. consumer electronics and electrical power storages for vehicles or stationary energy storage systems. However, for these types of batteries, malfunctions could be highly dangerous and all aspects of safety issues are not sufficiently considered, yet. Therefore, the improvement of the battery safety behavior is one of the most important issues discussed in actual research projects. In this paper the application of fiber optical sensors for enhanced battery safety is presented. The temperature is one of the most critical parameters indicating a failure of the cell, but even state-to-the-art battery management systems (BMS) are not able to monitor and interpret the distributed temperature field of a total battery storage system sufficiently. Furthermore, the volume expansion of the battery cell, which could be monitored by the strain on the cells' surfaces, is one additional parameter not considered up to now. Both parameters could be simultaneous monitored by fiber optical sensor arrays, consisting of discrete fiber Bragg grating (FBG) elements. The FBG sensors are directly attached on the surface of the cell, recording the temperature as well as the strain distribution highly accurate and close-meshed. Failures and malfunction such as overcharging, gassing, and thermal runaway can be early predicted and avoided to extend the battery lifetime and enhance the operational battery safety. Moreover, battery aging effects lead to variations in the volume change behavior which can be detected additionally. Hence, a battery fully equipped with fiber optical sensor arrays in combination with an appropriate BMS enables a safe and continuous utilization of the energy storage system even under harsh conditions like rapid charging.

  20. Stretchable Triboelectric Fiber for Self-powered Kinematic Sensing Textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Hyeon Jun; Choi, Changsoon; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Kim, Kang Min; Lee, Chang Jun; Kim, Youn Tae; Lepró, Xavier; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-10-01

    Stretchable fiber and yarn triboelectric nanogenerator are sought for such applications as wearable sensing system such as cloth communication devices, electronic textiles, and robotic sensory skin. Unfortunately, previously reported triboelectric fiber and yarn are difficult to have stretchable property. We introduce here a new type of stretchable and weavable triboelectric fibers with microdiameter dimensions. The stretchable triboelectric fibers can be reversibly stretched up to 50% in tensile direction while generating voltage output proportional to the applied tensile strain. The reversible distance change induced by the Poisson’s ratio difference between the core fiber (silver-coated nylon/polyurethane) and the shell (wrinkled polyvinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene/carbon nanotube layer) during tensile deformation is the key working principle for electrical generation. Owing to exceptional structural stability, the stretchable triboelectric fibers show high performance retention after 10,000 times repeated stretching/releasing cycle. Furthermore, the stretchable triboelectric fibers are mechanically strong to be woven into a commercial textile for textile based sensors, which can detect magnitude as well as direction of the motion.

  1. Recent Developments in Micro-Structured Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in fiber-optic sensing have involved booming research in the design and manufacturing of novel micro-structured optical fiber devices. From the conventional tapered fiber architectures to the novel micro-machined devices by advanced laser systems, thousands of micro-structured fiber-optic sensors have been proposed and fabricated for applications in measuring temperature, strain, refractive index (RI, electric current, displacement, bending, acceleration, force, rotation, acoustic, and magnetic field. The renowned and unparalleled merits of sensors-based micro-machined optical fibers including small footprint, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interferences, durability to harsh environment, capability of remote control, and flexibility of directly embedding into the structured system have placed them in highly demand for practical use in diverse industries. With the rapid advancement in micro-technology, micro-structured fiber sensors have benefitted from the trends of possessing high performance, versatilities and spatial miniaturization. Here, we comprehensively review the recent progress in the micro-structured fiber-optic sensors with a variety of architectures regarding their fabrications, waveguide properties and sensing applications.

  2. Fracture of anisotropic materials with plastic strain-gradient effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2013-01-01

    A unit cell is adopted to numerically analyze the effect of plastic anisotropy on frac-ture evolution in a micro-reinforced fiber-composite. The matrix material exhibit size-effects and an anisotropic strain-gradient plasticity model accounting for such size-effects through a mate-rial length scale...... the failure strain of the composite. The effect of the two material length parameters on the failure strain of the composite is studied. For small values of the material length scale parameter conventional predictions are obtained. Larger values of the material length scale parameter result in corresponding...

  3. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  4. Ways to Boost Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workout Nutrition Timing Your Pre- and Post-Workout Nutrition weights and fruits Building Muscle on a Vegetarian Diet For Kids For Parents For Men For Women For Seniors Easy Ways to Boost Fiber in Your Daily ...

  5. Fiber optic data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreve, Steven T.

    1987-01-01

    The Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center is currently developing a fiber optic data bus transmission and reception system that could eventually replace copper cable connections in airplanes. The original form of the system will transmit information from an encoder to a transponder via a fiber optic cable. An altimeter and an altitude display are connected to a fiber optic transmitter by copper cable. The transmitter converts the altimetry data from nine bit parallel to serial form and send these data through a fiber optic cable to a receiver. The receiver converts the data using a cable similar to that used between the altimeter and display. The transmitting and receiving ends also include a display readout. After completion and ground testing of the data bus, the system will be tested in an airborne environment.

  6. Fiber optics standard dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Weik, Martin H

    1997-01-01

    Fiber Optics Vocabulary Development In 1979, the National Communications System published Technical InfonnationBulle­ tin TB 79-1, Vocabulary for Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications, written by this author. Based on a draft prepared by this author, the National Communications System published Federal Standard FED-STD-1037, Glossary of Telecommunications Terms, in 1980 with no fiber optics tenns. In 1981, the first edition of this dictionary was published under the title Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications Standard Dictionary. In 1982, the then National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, published NBS Handbook 140, Optical Waveguide Communications Glossary, which was also published by the General Services Admin­ istration as PB82-166257 under the same title. Also in 1982, Dynamic Systems, Inc. , Fiberoptic Sensor Technology Handbook, co-authored and edited by published the this author, with an extensive Fiberoptic Sensors Glossary. In 1989, the handbook w...

  7. Hybrid photonic crystal fiber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arismar Cerqueira S. Jr; F. Luan; C. M. B. Cordeiro; A. K. George; J. C. Knight

    2006-01-01

    We present a hybrid photonic crystal fiber in which a guided mode is confined simultaneously by modified total internal reflection from an array of air holes and antiresonant reflection from a line...

  8. Fiber optic gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  9. [Carbohydrates and fiber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajolo, F M; de Menezes, E W; Filisetti-Cozzi, T M

    1988-09-01

    Dietary carbohydrates comprise two fractions that may be classified as digestible, and which are useful as energy sources (simple and complex carbohydrates) and fiber, which is presumed to be of no use to the human body. There are insufficient epidemiologic data on the metabolic effects of simple carbohydrates and it is not advisable to make quantitative recommendations of intake. It is questionable to recommend in developing countries that a fixed proportion of dietary energy be derived from simple sugars, due to the high prevalence of deficient energy intake, cultural habits, and regional differences in food intake and physical activity. In relation to recommendations of complex carbohydrates, it should be considered that their absorption is influenced by many factors inherent to the individual and to the foods. Fiber is defined as a series of different substances derived from tissue structures, cellular residues and undigested chemical substances that may be partially utilized after intestinal bacteria have acted on them. There is not a clear definition of the chemical composition of fiber, but it consists mainly of polysaccharides (such as cellulose, hemicellulose and pectins), lignin and end products of the interactions of various food components. The effects of fiber, such as control of food intake, regulation of gastrointestinal transit, post-prandial blood concentrations of cholesterol, glucose and insulin, flatulence and alterations in nutrient bioavailability are due to various physical properties inherent to its chemical components. Impairment of nutrient absorption may be harmful, mainly among populations whose food intake is lower than their energy needs, and with a high fiber content. This may be particularly important in pregnant women, growing children and the elderly, and should be considered when making nutrient recommendations. A precise knowledge of fiber is also important to calculate the real energy value of foods, mainly for two reasons: 1

  10. Raman Scattering of Inorganic Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    SASAKI, Yoshiro; Sato, Mitsuhiko; OKAMURA, Kiyohito; NISHINA, Yuichiro

    1985-01-01

    We have examined evolution of Raman spectra of carbon fibers and SiC fibers through structural transformations caused by heat treatment. Raman spectra of the SiC fibers indicate that the fibers consist of amorphous or microcrystalline SiC and graphitic microcrystals. We discuss the correlation between the tensile strength of the fibers and their microscopic structure deduced from the Raman data.

  11. Health benefits of dietary fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, JW; Baird, P.; Davis, RH; Ferreri, S.; Knudtson, M.; Koraym, A; Waters, V; Williams, CL

    2009-01-01

    Dietary fiber intake provides many health benefits. However, average fiber intakes for US children and adults are less than half of the recommended levels. Individuals with high intakes of dietary fiber appear to be at significantly lower risk for developing coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and certain gastrointestinal diseases. Increasing fiber intake lowers blood pressure and serum cholesterol levels. Increased intake of soluble fiber improves glycemia and in...

  12. Radiation Damage of Quartz Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Hagopian, V

    1999-01-01

    Quartz fibers are used in high energy physics experiments as the active medium in high radiation area calorimetry. Quartz fibers are also used in the transmission of optical signals. Even though quartz does not damage by moderate amounts of irradiation, the clad of the fibers and the protective coating ( buffer) do damage reducing light transmission. Various types of quartz fibers have been irradiated and measured for light transmission. The most radiation hard quartz fibers are those with qu...

  13. Fiber optics welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  14. Brominated graphitized carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Low cost, high break elongation graphitized carbon fibers having low degree of graphitization are inert to bromine at room or higher temperatures, but are brominated at -7 to 20 C, and then debrominated at ambient. Repetition of this bromination-debromination process can bring the bromine content to 18 percent. Electrical conductivity of the brominated fibers is three times of the before-bromination value.

  15. Infrared fiber optic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  16. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A lot of research is focused on all-optical signal processing, aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for an efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods, involving high-temperature processes performed in highly pure environment, slow down the fabrication and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, ...

  17. Thermodynamics of fiber bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Pride, Steven R.; Toussaint, Renaud

    2002-01-01

    A recent theory that determines the properties of disordered solids as the solid accumulates damage is applied to the special case of fiber bundles with global load sharing and is shown to be exact in this case. The theory postulates that the probability of observing a given emergent damage state is obtained by maximizing the emergent entropy as defined by Shannon subject to energetic constraints. This theory yields the known exact results for the fiber-bundle model with global load sharing a...

  18. Graphite Fibers from Pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-09-01

    filtering it through the screen. The first filter cake usually shrinks away from the ring upon drying; the crack is filled up by a second filtration ...structures. 9 Magnetoresistance perpendicular to the axis of Type P fibers with different structures and thermal history . 10 Magnetoresistance...parallel to the axis of Type P fibers with different structures and thermal history . 11 Plot of the transverse magnetoresistance versus the resistivity

  19. Fiber optic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  20. Extending fiber resources : fiber loading recycled fiber and mechanical pulps for lightweight, high opacity paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerite Sykes; John Klungness; Freya Tan; Mathew Stroika; Said Abubakr

    1999-01-01

    Production of a lightweight, high opacity printing paper is a common goal of papermakers using virgin or recycled fibers. Fiber loading is an innovative, commercially viable process that can substantially upgrade and extend most types of wood fibers. Fiber loading, a process carried out at high consistency and high alkalinity, precipitates calcium carbonate (PCC) in...

  1. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  2. Fiber loop ringdown - a time-domain sensing technique for multi-function fiber optic sensor platforms: current status and design perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuji

    2009-01-01

    Fiber loop ringdown (FLRD) utilizes an inexpensive telecommunications light source, a photodiode, and a section of single-mode fiber to form a uniform fiber optic sensor platform for sensing various quantities, such as pressure, temperature, strain, refractive index, chemical species, biological cells, and small volume of fluids. In FLRD, optical losses of a light pulse in a fiber loop induced by changes in a quantity are measured by the light decay time constants. FLRD measures time to detect a quantity; thus, FLRD is referred to as a time-domain sensing technique. FLRD sensors have near real-time response, multi-pass enhanced high-sensitivity, and relatively low cost (i.e., without using an optical spectral analyzer). During the last eight years since the introduction of the original form of fiber ringdown spectroscopy, there has been increasing interest in the FLRD technique in fiber optic sensor developments, and new application potential is being explored. This paper first discusses the challenging issues in development of multi-function, fiber optic sensors or sensor networks using current fiber optic sensor sensing schemes, and then gives a review on current fiber optic sensor development using FLRD technique. Finally, design perspectives on new generation, multi-function, fiber optic sensor platforms using FLRD technique are particularly presented.

  3. Cellulosic fibers and nonwovens from solutions: Processing and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Atul

    Cellulose is a renewable and bio-based material source extracted from wood that has the potential to generate value added products such as composites, fibers, and nonwoven textiles. This research was focused on the potential of cellulose as the raw material for fiber spinning and melt blowing of nonwovens. The cellulose was dissolved in two different benign solvents: the amine oxide 4-N-methyl morpholine oxide monohydrate (NMMO•H2O) (lyocell process); and the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C 4MIM]Cl). The solvents have essentially no vapor pressure and are biologically degradable, making them environmentally advantageous for manufacturing processes. The objectives of this research were to: (1) characterize solutions of NMMO and [C4MIM]Cl; (2) develop processing techniques to melt blow nonwoven webs from cellulose using NMMO as a solvent; (3) electrospin cellulosic fibers from the [C4MIM]Cl solvent; (4) spin cellulosic single fibers from the [C4MIM]Cl solvent. Different concentration solutions of cellulose in NMMO and [C4MIM]Cl were initially characterized rheologically and thermally to understand their behavior under different conditions of stress, strain, and temperature. Results were used to determine processing conditions and concentrations for the melt blowing, fiber spinning, and electrospinning experiments. The cellulosic nonwoven webs and fibers were characterized for their physical and optical properties such as tensile strength, water absorbency, fiber diameter, and fiber surface. Thermal properties were also measured by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. Lyocell webs were successfully melt blown from the 14% cellulose solution. Basis weights of the webs were 27, 79, and 141 g/m2 and thicknesses ranged from 0.3-0.9 mm, depending on die temperatures and die to collector distance. The average fiber diameter achieved was 2.3 microns. The 6% lyocell solutions exhibited

  4. Research on strain and temperature measurement of OPGW based on BOTDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Anqiang; Li, Yongqian; Li, Jing

    2013-12-01

    OPGW(Optical Fiber Composite Overhead Ground Wire) is an important part of high voltage transmission lines with characteristics of wide distribution and long distance. It is difficult for routine inspection and status detection by traditional method. So, it is necessary to monitoring the status of OPGW using distributed optical fiber strain and temperature measurement device. In this paper, the strain and temperature calibration experiment of composite optical fiber in OPGW was completed using BOTDR( Brillouin Optical Time Domain Reflectometry). The difference of Brillouin frequency shift coefficients to strain and temperature and initial frequency shifts between different optical fibers were compared. The method to accurately locate connections was provided using distributed Brillouin frequency shift curves. The status monitoring for running OPGW was realized and the data was analyzed. Results indicate that, the frequency shift coefficients to strain and temperature of single mode fibers in one OPGW are almost the same, which are 0.05MHz/μɛ and 1.05MHz/°C, but the initial frequency shifts are different with 20MHz range. The Brillouin frequency shifts at fiber connections in change obviously, which can serve as locating basis for connections. The topography, span, mark-height and climate affect the strain and temperature distribution of OPGW.

  5. High-temperature Fabry-Perot-based strain sensor for ceramic barrier filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Shmuel J.; Vuppala, Veerendra B.; Gunther, Michael F.; Wang, Anbo; Murphy, Kent A.; Claus, Richard O.

    1994-02-01

    We report results from a program to develop fiber-optic sensor-based instrumentation methods to allow the in-situ analysis of ceramic barrier filters. The sensor used was an extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity created between the ends of two longitudinally aligned fibers. Filters instrumented with these fiber sensors were tested in a combustor simulator at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. These tests were performed using silica optical fibers capable of withstanding the high temperature and harsh chemical environment of the combustor. The single-ended approach of the reflective Fabry-Perot sensors is well suited for high thermal strain measurements. The results from several tests are presented.

  6. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zheng, Yan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Easton, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  7. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. G.; Hubbard, C. R.; Misture, S. T.; Wang, X. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  8. Feasibility of Fiber Bragg Grating and Long-Period Fiber Grating Sensors under Different Environmental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Neng Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the feasibility of utilizing fiber Bragg grating (FBG and long-period fiber grating (LPFG sensors for nondestructive evaluation (NDE of infrastructures using Portland cement concretes and asphalt mixtures for temperature, strain, and liquid-level monitoring. The use of hybrid FBG and LPFG sensors is aimed at utilizing the advantages of two kinds of fiber grating to implement NDE for monitoring strains or displacements, temperatures, and water-levels of infrastructures such as bridges, pavements, or reservoirs for under different environmental conditions. Temperature fluctuation and stability tests were examined using FBG and LPFG sensors bonded on the surface of asphalt and concrete specimens. Random walk coefficient (RWC and bias stability (BS were used for the first time to indicate the stability performance of fiber grating sensors. The random walk coefficients of temperature variations between FBG (or LPFG sensor and a thermocouple were found in the range of −0.7499 °C/ to −1.3548 °C/. In addition, the bias stability for temperature variations, during the fluctuation and stability tests with FBG (or LPFG sensors were within the range of 0.01 °C/h with a 15–18 h time cluster to 0.09 °C/h with a 3–4 h time cluster. This shows that the performance of FBG or LPFG sensors is comparable with that of conventional high-resolution thermocouple sensors under rugged conditions. The strain measurement for infrastructure materials was conducted using a packaged FBG sensor bonded on the surface of an asphalt specimen under indirect tensile loading conditions. A finite element modeling (FEM was applied to compare experimental results of indirect tensile FBG strain measurements. For a comparative analysis between experiment and simulation, the FEM numerical results agreed with those from FBG strain measurements. The results of the liquid-level sensing tests show the LPFG-based sensor could discriminate five stationary liquid

  9. Strains and Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... long winter off might lead to a strained calf or thigh muscle. Sprains are caused by injuries, such as twisting your ankle. This kind of injury is common in sports, but can also happen any time you trip or fall. What if I Get a Strain or Sprain? If you get a strain or ...

  10. Obturator internus muscle strains

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Caoimhe; Alkhayat, Abdullah; O'Neill, Pat; Eustace, Stephen; Kavanagh, Eoin

    2017-01-01

    We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  11. Obturator internus muscle strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Caoimhe; Alkhayat, Abdullah; O'Neill, Pat; Eustace, Stephen; Kavanagh, Eoin

    2017-03-01

    We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  12. Obturator internus muscle strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh, BAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involved in kicking sports. Case 1 details an acute obturator internus muscle strain with associated adductor longus strain. Case 2 details an overuse injury of the bilateral obturator internus muscles. In each case, magnetic resonance imaging played a crucial role in accurate diagnosis.

  13. An Elastic-Plastic Damage Model for Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil

    2009-08-11

    This article proposes an elastic-plastic damage model that combines micromechanical modeling with continuum damage mechanics to predict the stress-strain response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics. The model accounts for distributions of orientation and length of elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic matrix whose behavior is elastic-plastic and damageable. The elastic-plastic damage behavior of the matrix is described by the modified Ramberg-Osgood relation and the three-dimensional damage model in deformation assuming isotropic hardening. Fiber/matrix debonding is accounted for using a parameter that governs the fiber/matrix interface compliance. A linear relationship between this parameter and the matrix damage variable is assumed. First, the elastic-plastic damage behavior of the reference aligned-fiber composite containing the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite is computed using an incremental Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka mean field approach. The incremental response of the latter is then obtained from the solution for the aligned-fiber composite by averaging over all fiber orientations. The model is validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  14. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors for Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Mihailov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Because of their small size, passive nature, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and capability to directly measure physical parameters such as temperature and strain, fiber Bragg grating sensors have developed beyond a laboratory curiosity and are becoming a mainstream sensing technology. Recently, high temperature stable gratings based on regeneration techniques and femtosecond infrared laser processing have shown promise for use in extreme environments such as high temperature, pressure or ionizing radiation. Such gratings are ideally suited for energy production applications where there is a requirement for advanced energy system instrumentation and controls that are operable in harsh environments. This paper will present a review of some of the more recent developments.

  15. Stress and strain provide positional and directional cues in development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behruz Bozorg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphogenesis of organs necessarily involves mechanical interactions and changes in mechanical properties of a tissue. A long standing question is how such changes are directed on a cellular scale while being coordinated at a tissular scale. Growing evidence suggests that mechanical cues are participating in the control of growth and morphogenesis during development. We introduce a mechanical model that represents the deposition of cellulose fibers in primary plant walls. In the model both the degree of material anisotropy and the anisotropy direction are regulated by stress anisotropy. We show that the finite element shell model and the simpler triangular biquadratic springs approach provide equally adequate descriptions of cell mechanics in tissue pressure simulations of the epidermis. In a growing organ, where circumferentially organized fibers act as a main controller of longitudinal growth, we show that the fiber direction can be correlated with both the maximal stress direction and the direction orthogonal to the maximal strain direction. However, when dynamic updates of the fiber direction are introduced, the mechanical stress provides a robust directional cue for the circumferential organization of the fibers, whereas the orthogonal to maximal strain model leads to an unstable situation where the fibers reorient longitudinally. Our investigation of the more complex shape and growth patterns in the shoot apical meristem where new organs are initiated shows that a stress based feedback on fiber directions is capable of reproducing the main features of in vivo cellulose fiber directions, deformations and material properties in different regions of the shoot. In particular, we show that this purely mechanical model can create radially distinct regions such that cells expand slowly and isotropically in the central zone while cells at the periphery expand more quickly and in the radial direction, which is a well established growth pattern

  16. Chitosan fibers with improved biological and mechanical properties for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Mohammad Z; Bou-Akl, Therese H; Blowytsky, Oksana; Walters, Henry L; Matthew, Howard W T

    2013-04-01

    The low mechanical properties of hydrogel materials such as chitosan hinder their broad utility for tissue engineering applications. Previous research efforts improved the mechanical properties of chitosan fiber through chemical and physical modifications; however, unfavorable toxicity effects on cells were reported. In this paper, we report the preparation of chitosan fibers with improved mechanical and biocompatibility properties. The structure-property relationships of extruded chitosan fibers were explored by varying acetic acid (AA) concentration, ammonia concentration, annealing temperature and degree of heparin crosslinking. Results showed that optimizing AA concentration to 2vol% improved fiber strength and stiffness by 2-fold. Extruding chitosan solution into 25wt% of ammonia solution reduced fiber diameters and improved fiber strength by 2-fold and stiffness by 3-fold, due to an increase in crystallinity as confirmed by XRD. Fiber annealing further reduced fiber diameter and improved fiber strength and stiffness as temperature increased. Chitosan fibers crosslinked with heparin had increased diameter but lower strength and stiffness properties and higher breaking strain values. When individual parameters were combined, further improvement in fiber mechanical properties was achieved. All mechanically improved fibers and heparin crosslinked fibers promoted valvular interstitial cells (VIC) attachment and growth over 10 day cultures. Our results demonstrate the ability to substantially improve the mechanical properties of chitosan fibers without adversely affecting their biological properties. The investigated treatments offer numerous advantages over previous physical/chemical modifications and thus are expected to expand the utility of chitosan fibers with tunable mechanical properties in various tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cellulosic Fibers: Effect of Processing on Fiber Bundle Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Madsen, Bo; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2011-01-01

    A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding, and cotto......A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding...

  18. Hybrid MEFPI/FBG sensor for simultaneous measurement of strain and magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao-qing; Zhao, Yong; Lv, Ri-qing; Xia, Feng

    2017-12-01

    A hybrid fiber-optic sensor consisting of a micro extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (MEFPI) and an etched fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is proposed, which can measure strain and magnetic field simultaneously. The etched FBG is sealed in a capillary with ferrofluids to detect the surrounding magnetic field. FBG with small diameter will be more sensitive to magnetic field is confirmed by simulation results. The MEFPI sensor that is prepared through welding a short section of hollow-core fiber (HCF) with single-mode fiber (SMF) is effective for strain detection. The experiment shows that strain and magnetic field can be successfully simultaneously detected based on hybrid MEFPI/FBG sensor. The sensitivities of the strain and magnetic field intensity are measured to be up to 1.41 pm/με and 5.11 pm/mT respectively. There is a negligible effect on each other, hence simultaneously measuring strain and magnetic field is feasible. It is anticipated that such easy preparation, compact and low-cost fiber-optic sensors for simultaneous measurement of strain and magnetic field could find important applications in practice.

  19. Self-Monitoring Strengthening System Based on Carbon Fiber Laminate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Krzywon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Externally bonded composites reinforced with high-strength fibers are increasingly popular in construction, especially in structures’ strengthening, where the best possible mechanical properties are required. At the same time the ability to autodetect threats is one of the most desirable features of contemporary structures. The authors of the paper have developed an intelligent fabric, wherein the carbon fibers play the role of not only tensile reinforcement but also strain sensor. The idea is based on the construction of the strain gauge, where the thread of carbon fibers arranged in zig-zag pattern works as electrical conductor and is insulated by parallel thread of glass or acrylic fibers. Preliminary laboratory tests were designed to create effective measurement techniques and assess the effectiveness of the strengthening of selected building structures, as reinforced concrete and timber beams. Presented in the paper, selected results of these studies are very promising, although there were some noted problems to be considered in next steps. The main problem here is the control of the cross section of the fibers tow, affecting the total resistance of the fabric. One of the main deficiencies of the proposed solution is also sensitivity to moisture.

  20. Strain Rate Effects in CFRP Used For Blast Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah. L. Orton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to gain a better understanding of strain rate effects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates exposed to blast loading. The use of CFRP offers an attractive option for mitigating structures exposed to blasts. However, the effect of high strain rates in CFRP composites commonly used in the civil industry is unknown. This research conducted tensile tests of 21 CFRP coupons using a hydraulically powered dynamic loader. The strain rates ranged from 0.0015 s−1 to 7.86 s−1 and are representative of strain rates that CFRP may see in a blast when used to strengthen reinforced concrete structures. The results of the testing showed no increase in the tensile strength or stiffness of the CFRP at the higher strain rates. In addition, the results showed significant scatter in the tensile strengths possibly due to the rate of loading or manufacture of the coupon.