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Sample records for subdural medulloblastoma model

  1. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with moyamoya phenomenon after radiotherapy for medulloblastoma; A case report

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    Fuse, Takahisa; Takagi, Takuji; Fukushima, Tsuneyuki; Mizuno, Shiroh; Hashimoto, Nobukazu; Suzuki, Osamu (Nagoya City Higashi General Hospital (Japan))

    1994-04-01

    A 9-year-old boy had been diagnosed at the age of 9 months as having a cerebellar medulloblastoma and had received 40 Gy of radiation therapy to the brain after removal of the tumor. Cerebral angiography at the time of initial diagnosis did not show any evidence of occlusive disease involving the internal carotid circulation. At the age of 6 years, the patient developed generalized seizures. On examination, he was drowsy and had right hemiparesis. CT scan demonstrated a low-density area in the left frontal lobe. Cerebral angiography showed a marked narrowing of the bilateral internal carotid arteries with moyamoya vessels. The patient was treated medically with aspirin (100 mg/day) and anticonvulsants. His neurological deficits improved gradually. At the age of 8 years, there was no recurrence of the tumor although a slight left subdural hematoma was seen on CT scan. On August 10, 1993, at the age of 9 years, he was admitted for treatment of a developing subdural hematoma. MRI showed a chronic subdural hematoma with thick outer and inner membranes. Cerebral angiography showed occlusion of the left internal carotid artery which fed the right frontal lobe through moyamoya vessels, marked narrowing of the right internal carotid artery distal to the ophthalmic artery, moyamoya vessels at the base, and cortical revascularization througth the ophthalmic, posterior cerebral and middle meningeal arteries. Trepanation and aspiration of the hematoma were performed. The outer membrane of the hematoma was about 2 mm thick and the hematoma cavity was filled with a partially organized hematoma. In this case, we speculate that development of the chronic subdural hematoma involved the following factors: (1) transdural external-internal carotid anastomosis after radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy; (2) repeated mild head trauma due to gait disturbance after removal of the cerebellar tumor; and (3) administration of acetylsalicylic acid. (author).

  2. Medulloblastoma: Molecular Genetics and Animal Models

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    Corey Raffel

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a primary brain tumor found in the cerebellum of children. The tumor occurs in association with two inherited cancer syndromes: Turcot syndrome and Gorlin syndrome. Insights into the molecular biology of the tumor have come from looking at alterations in the genes altered in these syndromes, PTC and APC, respectively. Murine models of medulloblastoma have been constructed based on these alterations. Additional murine models that, while mimicking the appearance of the human tumor, seem unrelated to the human tumor's molecular alterations have been made. In this review, the clinical picture, origin, molecular biology, murine models of medulloblastoma are discussed. Although a great deal has been discovered about this tumor, the genetic alterations responsible for tumor development in a majority of patients have yet to be described.

  3. Medulloblastoma.

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    Millard, Nathan E; De Braganca, Kevin C

    2016-10-01

    Medulloblastoma accounts for nearly 10% of all childhood brain tumors. These tumors occur exclusively in the posterior fossa and have the potential for leptomeningeal spread. Treatment includes a combination of surgery, radiation therapy (in patients >3 years old). Patients >3 years old are stratified based on the volume of postoperative residual tumor and the presence or absence of metastases into "standard risk" and "high risk" categories with long-term survival rates of approximately 85% and 70%, respectively. Outcomes are inferior in infants and children younger than 3 years with exception of those patients with the medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity histologic subtype. Treatment for medulloblastoma is associated with significant morbidity, especially in the youngest patients. Recent molecular subclassification of medulloblastoma has potential prognostic and therapeutic implications. Future incorporation of molecular subgroups into treatment protocols will hopefully improve both survival outcomes and posttreatment quality of life. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Experimental models of chronic subdural hematoma.

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    D'Abbondanza, Josephine A; Loch Macdonald, R

    2014-02-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical problem. Most studies of pathogenesis and treatment involve humans. Advances in understanding of human diseases may be made using animal models. We reviewed all animal models of CSDH and report here their results, conclusions and limitations in order to set a baseline upon which further advanced experimental work related to this disease can be made. PubMed, Medline, Embase and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched with no time limits using the keyword 'chronic subdural hematoma' and MeSH term 'hematoma, subdural, chronic'. The authors reviewed all papers written related to this disease and selected all publications involving animals. There were no other restrictions. The findings and conclusions of the papers are summarized here. No formal analysis was done because of the variation in species used, methods for induction of CSDH, times of assessment and reporting of results. Attempts to create CSDH have been made in mice, rats, cats, dogs and monkeys. Methods include injection or surgical implantation of clotted blood or various other blood products and mixtures into the potential subdural space or the subcutaneous space. No intracranial model produced a progressively expanding CSDH. Transient hematoma expansion with liquification could be produced by subcutaneous injections in some models. Spontaneous subdural blood collections were found after creation of hydrocephalus in mice by systemic injection of the neurotoxin, 6-aminonicotinamide. The histology of the hematoma membranes in several models resembles the appearance in humans. None of the models has been replicated since its first description. We did not find a report of a reproducible, well-described animal model of human CSDH.

  5. Developing a model of chronic subdural hematoma.

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    Tang, Jingyang; Ai, Jinglu; Macdonald, R Loch

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition that has a high incidence in the increasing elderly population of many countries. Pathologically, it is defined as a persistent liquefied hematoma in the subdural space more than 3 weeks old that is generally encased by a membraneous capsule. CSDHs likely originate after minor head trauma, with a key factor in its development being the potential for a subdural cavity to permit its expansion within, which is usually due to craniocerebral disproportion. The pathogenesis of CSDH has been attributed to osmotic or oncotic pressure differences, although measurements of these factors in the CSDH fluid do not support this theory. Current belief is that CSDH arises from recurrent bleeding in the subdural space, caused by a cycle of local angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation and ongoing fibrinolysis. However, because of a lack of detailed knowledge about the precise mechanisms, treatment is often limited to surgical interventions that are invasive and often prone to recurrence. Thus, it is possible that an easily reproducible and representative animal model of CSDH would facilitate research in the pathogenesis of CSDH and aid with development of treatment options.

  6. Medulloblastoma

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    Millard, Nathan E.; De Braganca, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma accounts for nearly 10% of all childhood brain tumors. These tumors occur exclusively in the posterior fossa and have the potential for leptomeningeal spread. Treatment includes a combination of surgery, radiation therapy (in patients > 3 years old). Patients > 3 years old are stratified based on the volume of postoperative residual tumor and the presence or absence of metastases into “standard risk” and “high risk” categories with long term survival rates of approximately 85%...

  7. Subdural hematoma

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    Subdural hemorrhage; Traumatic brain injury - subdural hematoma; TBI - subdural hematoma; Head injury - subdural hematoma ... A subdural hematoma is most often the result of a severe head injury. This type of subdural hematoma is among ...

  8. Effective treatment of diverse medulloblastoma models with mebendazole and its impact on tumor angiogenesis.

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    Bai, Ren-Yuan; Staedtke, Verena; Rudin, Charles M; Bunz, Fred; Riggins, Gregory J

    2015-04-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Current standard treatments cure 40%-60% of patients, while the majority of survivors suffer long-term neurological sequelae. The identification of 4 molecular groups of medulloblastoma improved the clinical management with the development of targeted therapies; however, the tumor acquires resistance quickly. Mebendazole (MBZ) has a long safety record as antiparasitic in children and has been recently implicated in inhibition of various tyrosine kinases in vitro. Here, we investigated the efficacy of MBZ in various medulloblastoma subtypes and MBZ's impact on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and tumor angiogenesis. The inhibition of MBZ on VEGFR2 kinase was investigated in an autophosphorylation assay and a cell-free kinase assay. Mice bearing orthotopic PTCH1-mutant medulloblastoma allografts, a group 3 medulloblastoma xenograft, and a PTCH1-mutant medulloblastoma with acquired resistance to the smoothened inhibitor vismodegib were treated with MBZ. The survival benefit and the impact on tumor angiogenesis and VEGFR2 kinase function were analyzed. We determined that MBZ interferes with VEGFR2 kinase by competing with ATP. MBZ selectively inhibited tumor angiogenesis but not the normal brain vasculatures in orthotopic medulloblastoma models and suppressed VEGFR2 kinase in vivo. MBZ significantly extended the survival of medulloblastoma models derived from different molecular backgrounds. Our findings support testing of MBZ as a possible low-toxicity therapy for medulloblastomas of various molecular subtypes, including tumors with acquired vismodegib resistance. Its antitumor mechanism may be partially explained by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Venous or arterial blood components trigger more brain swelling, tissue death after acute subdural hematoma compared to elderly atrophic brain with subdural effusion (SDE) model rats.

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    Wajima, Daisuke; Sato, Fumiya; Kawamura, Kenya; Sugiura, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Soo; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is a frequent complication of severe head injury, whose secondary ischemic lesions are often responsible for the severity of the disease. We focused on the differences of secondary ischemic lesions caused by the components, 0.4ml venous- or arterial-blood, or saline, infused in the subdural space, evaluating the differences in vivo model, using rats. The saline infused rats are made for elderly atrophic brain with subdural effusion (SDE) model. Our data showed that subdural blood, both venous- and arterial-blood, aggravate brain edema and lesion development more than SDE. This study is the first study, in which different fluids in rats' subdural space, ASDH or SDE are compared with the extension of early and delayed brain damage by measuring brain edema and histological lesion volume. Blood constituents started to affect the degree of ischemia underneath the subdural hemorrhage, leading to more pronounced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and brain damage. This indicates that further strategies to treat blood-dependent effects more efficiently are in view for patients with ASDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Heterozygosity for Pten promotes tumorigenesis in a mouse model of medulloblastoma.

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    Robert C Castellino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent publications have described an important role for cross talk between PI-3 kinase and sonic hedgehog signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We crossed mice with constitutive activation of Smoothened, SmoA1, with Pten deficient mice. Both constitutive and conditional Pten deficiency doubled the incidence of mice with symptoms of medulloblastoma and resulted in decreased survival. Analysis revealed a clear separation of gene signatures, with up-regulation of genes in the PI-3 kinase signaling pathway, including downstream activation of angiogenesis in SmoA1+/-; Pten +/- medulloblastomas. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry confirmed reduced or absent Pten, Akt activation, and increased angiogenesis in Pten deficient tumors. Down-regulated genes included genes in the sonic hedgehog pathway and tumor suppressor genes. SmoA1+/-; Pten +/+ medulloblastomas appeared classic in histology with increased proliferation and diffuse staining for apoptosis. In contrast, Pten deficient tumors exhibited extensive nodularity with neuronal differentiation separated by focal areas of intense staining for proliferation and virtually absent apoptosis. Examination of human medulloblastomas revealed low to absent PTEN expression in over half of the tumors. Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed worse overall survival in patients whose tumor exhibited low to absent PTEN expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This suggests that PTEN expression is a marker of favorable prognosis and mouse models with activation of PI-3 kinase pathways may be important tools for preclinical evaluation of promising agents for the treatment of medulloblastoma.

  11. The Smo/Smo model: hedgehog-induced medulloblastoma with 90% incidence and leptomeningeal spread.

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    Hatton, Beryl A; Villavicencio, Elisabeth H; Tsuchiya, Karen D; Pritchard, Joel I; Ditzler, Sally; Pullar, Barbara; Hansen, Stacey; Knoblaugh, Sue E; Lee, Donghoon; Eberhart, Charles G; Hallahan, Andrew R; Olson, James M

    2008-03-15

    Toward the goal of generating a mouse medulloblastoma model with increased tumor incidence, we developed a homozygous version of our ND2:SmoA1 model. Medulloblastomas form in 94% of homozygous Smo/Smo mice by 2 months of age. Tumor formation is, thus, predictable by age, before the symptomatic appearance of larger lesions. This high incidence and early onset of tumors is ideal for preclinical studies because mice can be enrolled before symptom onset and with a greater latency period before late-stage disease. Smo/Smo tumors also display leptomeningeal dissemination of neoplastic cells to the brain and spine, which occurs in many human cases. Despite an extended proliferation of granule neuron precursors (GNP) in the postnatal external granular layer (EGL), the internal granular layer formed normally in Smo/Smo mice and tumor formation occurred only in localized foci on the superficial surface of the molecular layer. Thus, tumor formation is not simply the result of over proliferation of GNPs within the EGL. Moreover, Smo/Smo medulloblastomas were transplantable and serially passaged in vivo, demonstrating the aggressiveness of tumor cells and their transformation beyond a hyperplastic state. The Smo/Smo model is the first mouse medulloblastoma model to show leptomeningeal spread. The adherence to human pathology, high incidence, and early onset of tumors thus make Smo/Smo mice an efficient model for preclinical studies.

  12. Chronic subdural hematoma

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    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... A subdural hematoma develops when bridging veins tear and leak blood. These are the tiny veins that run between the ...

  13. In vivo bioluminescence imaging using orthotopic xenografts towards patient's derived-xenograft Medulloblastoma models.

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    Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Ferrucci, Veronica; DE Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is a cerebellar neoplasia of the central nervous system. Four molecular subgrups have been identified (MBWNT, MBSHH, MBgroup3 and MBgroup4) with distinct genetics and clinical outcome. Among these, MBgroup3-4 are highly metastatic with the worst prognosis. The current standard therapy includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Thus, specific treatments adapted to cure those different molecular subgroups are needed. The use of orthotopic xenograft models, together with the non-invasive in vivo biolumiscence imaging (BLI) technology, is emerging during preclinical studies to test novel therapeutics for medulloblastoma treatment. Orthotopic MB xenografts were performed by injection of Daoy-luc cells, that had been previously infected with lentiviral particles to stably express luciferase gene, into the fourth right ventricle of the cerebellum of ten nude mice. For the implantation, specific stereotactic coordinates were used. Seven days after the implantation the mice were imaged by acquisitions of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using IVIS 3D Illumina Imaging System (Xenogen). Tumor growth was evaluated by quantifying the bioluminescence signals using the integrated fluxes of photons within each area of interest using the Living Images Software Package 3.2 (Xenogen-Perkin Elmer). Finally, histological analysis using hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumorigenic cells into the cerebellum of the mice. We describe a method to use the in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) showing the potential to be used to investigate the potential antitumorigenic effects of a drug for in vivo medulloblastoma treatment. We also discuss other studies in which this technology has been applied to obtain a more comprehensive knowledge of medulloblastoma using orthotopic xenograft mouse models. There is a need to develop patient's derived-xenograft (PDX) model systems to test novel drugs for medulloblastoma treatment within each molecular sub

  14. A review of dosimetric and toxicity modeling of proton versus photon craniospinal irradiation for pediatrics medulloblastoma.

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    Ho, Evangeline S Q; Barrett, Sarah A; Mullaney, Laura M

    2017-08-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) is the standard radiation therapy treatment for medulloblastoma. Conventional CSI photon therapy (Photon-CSI) delivers significant dose to surrounding normal tissue (NT). Research into pediatric CSI with proton therapy (Proton-CSI) has increased, with the aim of exploiting the potential to reduce NT dose and associated post-treatment complications. This review aims to compare treatment outcomes of pediatric medulloblastoma patients between Proton- and Photon-CSI treatments. A search and review of studies published between 1990 and 2016 comparing pediatric (2-18 years) medulloblastoma Proton- and Photon-CSI in three aspects - normal organ sparing and target coverage; normal organ dysfunction and second malignancy risks - was completed. Fifteen studies were selected for review and the results were directly compared. Proton-CSI reported improved out-of-field organ sparing while target coverage improvements were inconsistent. Normal organ dysfunction risks were predicted to be lower following Proton-CSI. Secondary malignancy risks (SMRs) were generally lower with Proton-CSI based on several different risk models. Proton-CSI conferred better treatment outcomes than Photon-CSI for pediatric medulloblastoma patients. This review serves to compare the current literature in the absence of long-term data from prospective studies.

  15. Adult medulloblastoma

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    Rege S.V.; Patil Harshad; Narayan Sharadendu

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant central nervous system (CNS) tumor that arises from the cerebellum. It is the most common primary malignant intracranial childhood neoplasm. In adults, medulloblastoma are much less common, accounting for < 1% of all adult brain tumors. Herein, author has described a rare case of cerebellar medulloblastoma in adult.

  16. Subdural effusion

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001422.htm Subdural effusion To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A subdural effusion is a collection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) trapped ...

  17. Modeling freedom from progression for standard-risk medulloblastoma: a mathematical tumor control model with multiple modes of failure

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    Brodin, Nils Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bjørk-Eriksson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    As pediatric medulloblastoma (MB) is a relatively rare disease, it is important to extract the maximum information from trials and cohort studies. Here, a framework was developed for modeling tumor control with multiple modes of failure and time-to-progression for standard-risk MB, using published...

  18. Cystic medulloblastoma

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    Mahapatra, A.K.; Paul, H.K.; Sarkar, C.

    1989-01-01

    In children medulloblastoma is a commonly encountered posterior fossa midline tumour in which cystic degeneration is not uncommon. A cystic medulloblastoma without solid component has, however, not been described. We report a 12-year-old boy with a posterior fossa midline cystic lesion on CT with surgical and histological confirmation of the diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Anaplasia and grading in medulloblastomas.

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    Eberhart, Charles G; Burger, Peter C

    2003-07-01

    The variable clinical outcomes of medulloblastoma patients have prompted a search for markers with which to tailor therapies to individuals. In this review, we discuss clinical, histological and molecular features that can be used in such treatment customization, focusing on how histopathological grading can impact both patient care and research on the molecular basis of CNS embryonal tumors. Medulloblastomas span a histological spectrum ending in overtly malignant large cell/anaplastic lesions characterized by increased nuclear size, marked cytological anaplasia, and increased mitotic and apoptotic rates. These "high-grade" lesions make up approximately one quarter of medulloblastomas, and recur and metastasize more frequently than tumors lacking anaplasia. We believe anaplastic change represents a type of malignant progression common to many medulloblastoma subtypes and to other CNS embryonal lesions as well. Correlation of these histological changes with the accumulation of genetic events suggests a model for the histological and molecular progression of medulloblastoma.

  20. [Medulloblastoma. Pathology].

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    Siegfried, A; Delisle, M-B

    2018-04-24

    Medulloblastomas, embryonal neuroepithelial tumors developed in the cerebellum or brain stem, are mainly observed in childhood. The treatment of WHO-Grade IV tumors depends on stratifications that are usually based on postoperative data, histopathological subtype, tumor extension and presence of MYC or NMYC amplifications. Recently, molecular biology studies, based on new technologies (i.e. sequencing, transcriptomic, methylomic) have introduced genetic subtypes integrated into the latest WHO-2016 neuropathological classification. According to this classification, the three genetic groups WNT, SHH, with or without mutated TP53 gene, and non-WNT/non-SHH, comprising subgroups 3 and 4, are recalled in this review. The contribution of immunohistochemistry to define these groups is specified. The four histopathological groups are detailed in comparison to the WHO-2007 classification and the molecular data: classic medulloblastoma, desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma, medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity, and large cell/anaplastic medulloblastoma. The groups defined on genetic and histopathological grounds are not strictly concordant. Depending on the age of the patients, their correlations are different, as well as their role in the management and prognosis of these tumors. Other embryonal tumors, for which new classifications are in progress and gliomas may be confused with a medulloblastoma and the elements of the differential diagnosis of these entities are discussed. This evolution in classification fully justifies ongoing structuring procedures such as histopathological review (RENOCLIP) and the organization of molecular biology platforms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. BarTeL, a Genetically Versatile, Bioluminescent and Granule Neuron Precursor-Targeted Mouse Model for Medulloblastoma.

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    Gregory M Shackleford

    Full Text Available Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and have been divided into four major molecular subgroups. Animal models that mimic the principal molecular aberrations of these subgroups will be important tools for preclinical studies and allow greater understanding of medulloblastoma biology. We report a new transgenic model of medulloblastoma that possesses a unique combination of desirable characteristics including, among others, the ability to incorporate multiple and variable genes of choice and to produce bioluminescent tumors from a limited number of somatic cells within a normal cellular environment. This model, termed BarTeL, utilizes a Barhl1 homeobox gene promoter to target expression of a bicistronic transgene encoding both the avian retroviral receptor TVA and an eGFP-Luciferase fusion protein to neonatal cerebellar granule neuron precursor (cGNP cells, which are cells of origin for the sonic hedgehog (SHH subgroup of human medulloblastomas. The Barhl1 promoter-driven transgene is expressed strongly in mammalian cGNPs and weakly or not at all in mature granule neurons. We efficiently induced bioluminescent medulloblastomas expressing eGFP-luciferase in BarTeL mice by infection of a limited number of somatic cGNPs with avian retroviral vectors encoding the active N-terminal fragment of SHH and a stabilized MYCN mutant. Detection and quantification of the increasing bioluminescence of growing tumors in young BarTeL mice was facilitated by the declining bioluminescence of their uninfected maturing cGNPs. Inclusion of eGFP in the transgene allowed enriched sorting of cGNPs from neonatal cerebella. Use of a single bicistronic avian vector simultaneously expressing both Shh and Mycn oncogenes increased the medulloblastoma incidence and aggressiveness compared to mixed virus infections. Bioluminescent tumors could also be produced by ex vivo transduction of neonatal BarTeL cerebellar cells by avian retroviruses and

  2. Subdural infusion of dexamethasone inhibits leukomyelitis after acute spinal cord injury in a rat model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kwiecien, J. M.; Jarocz, B.; Urdzíková, Lucia; Rola, R.; Dabrowski, W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2015), s. 41-51 ISSN 1641-4640 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : spinal cord injury * leukomyelitis * macrophage s * subdural infusion * dexamethasone Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.233, year: 2015

  3. Primary Cilia in the Murine Cerebellum and in Mutant Models of Medulloblastoma.

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    Di Pietro, Chiara; Marazziti, Daniela; La Sala, Gina; Abbaszadeh, Zeinab; Golini, Elisabetta; Matteoni, Rafaele; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P

    2017-01-01

    Cellular primary cilia crucially sense and transduce extracellular physicochemical stimuli. Cilium-mediated developmental signaling is tissue and cell type specific. Primary cilia are required for cerebellar differentiation and sonic hedgehog (Shh)-dependent proliferation of neuronal granule precursors. The mammalian G-protein-coupled receptor 37-like 1 is specifically expressed in cerebellar Bergmann glia astrocytes and participates in regulating postnatal cerebellar granule neuron proliferation/differentiation and Bergmann glia and Purkinje neuron maturation. The mouse receptor protein interacts with the patched 1 component of the cilium-associated Shh receptor complex. Mice heterozygous for patched homolog 1 mutations, like heterozygous patched 1 humans, have a higher incidence of Shh subgroup medulloblastoma (MB) and other tumors. Cerebellar cells bearing primary cilia were identified during postnatal development and in adulthood in two mouse strains with altered Shh signaling: a G-protein-coupled receptor 37-like 1 null mutant and an MB-susceptible, heterozygous patched homolog 1 mutant. In addition to granule and Purkinje neurons, primary cilia were also expressed by Bergmann glia astrocytes in both wild-type and mutant animals, from birth to adulthood. Variations in ciliary number and length were related to the different levels of neuronal and glial cell proliferation and maturation, during postnatal cerebellar development. Primary cilia were also detected in pre-neoplastic MB lesions in heterozygous patched homolog 1 mutant mice and they could represent specific markers for the development and analysis of novel cerebellar oncogenic models.

  4. Intervention of Peiyuan Huayu Decoction on the neuron damage in model rats with acute subdural hematoma

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    Xiao-Xuan Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the intervention effect of Peiyuan Huayu Decoction on the neuron damage in model rats with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH. Methods: 160 SD rats were randomly divided into four groups, and the ASDH model rats were made by stereotactic autoblood injection, and sham operation group received craniotomy without blood injection. Sham operation group and model group were normally bred after model establishment, and 6 h after model establishment, the treatment group received intragastric administration of Peiyuan Huayu Decoction, and control group received intragastric administration of Piracetam Tablets, 1 time a day. On the 1d, 3d, 5d and 7d after model establishment, the general conditions of rats (activity, food intake and mental state were observed, blood was collected via auricula dextra, ELISA method was used to determine peripheral plasma NSE and S100毬 protein contents, routine HE staining was conducted after perfusion fixation, the neurons in blood injection side of brain tissue were counted, and the neuron damage was observed. Results: 26 rats were dead in the experiment. The general conditions of sham operation group were significantly better than those of other groups, treatment group was significantly better than model group and control group on the 5d group (P0.05; neuron count of sham operation group was basically stable, treatment group was not different from model group and control group on the 1d (P>0.05, treatment group was better than model group (P0.05 on the 3d, and treatment group was better than model group and control group on the 5d and 7d (P0.05, S100毬 protein and NSE contents decreased significantly on the 3d, and treatment group was significantly different from model group and control group (P<0.05, S100毬 protein and NSE contents increased on the 5d and 7d, the increase in treatment group was slower than that in model group and control group, and there was significant difference (P<0.05. Conclusion

  5. Cytogenetic prognostication within medulloblastoma subgroups.

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    Shih, David J H; Northcott, Paul A; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kool, Marcel; Luu, Betty; Yao, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Dubuc, Adrian M; Garzia, Livia; Peacock, John; Mack, Stephen C; Wu, Xiaochong; Rolider, Adi; Morrissy, A Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M G; Jones, David T W; Zitterbart, Karel; Faria, Claudia C; Schüller, Ulrich; Kren, Leos; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Shin Ra, Young; Garami, Miklós; Hauser, Peter; Chan, Jennifer A; Robinson, Shenandoah; Bognár, László; Klekner, Almos; Saad, Ali G; Liau, Linda M; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam; Cinalli, Giuseppe; De Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo; Cooper, Michael K; Thompson, Reid C; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Michiels, Erna M C; Scherer, Stephen W; Phillips, Joanna J; Gupta, Nalin; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Eberhart, Charles G; Fouladi, Maryam; Lach, Boleslaw; Jung, Shin; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Jouvet, Anne; Jabado, Nada; Pollack, Ian F; Weiss, William A; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Rubin, Joshua B; de Torres, Carmen; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tabori, Uri; Olson, James M; Gajjar, Amar; Packer, Roger J; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pomeroy, Scott L; French, Pim J; Kloosterhof, Nanne K; Kros, Johan M; Van Meir, Erwin G; Clifford, Steven C; Bourdeaut, Franck; Delattre, Olivier; Doz, François F; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Malkin, David; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Pfister, Stefan M; Taylor, Michael D

    2014-03-20

    Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. Current medulloblastoma protocols stratify patients based on clinical features: patient age, metastatic stage, extent of resection, and histologic variant. Stark prognostic and genetic differences among the four subgroups suggest that subgroup-specific molecular biomarkers could improve patient prognostication. Molecular biomarkers were identified from a discovery set of 673 medulloblastomas from 43 cities around the world. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical and cytogenetic biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Identified biomarkers were tested using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a nonoverlapping medulloblastoma tissue microarray (n = 453), with subsequent validation of the risk stratification models. Subgroup information improves the predictive accuracy of a multivariable survival model compared with clinical biomarkers alone. Most previously published cytogenetic biomarkers are only prognostic within a single medulloblastoma subgroup. Profiling six FISH biomarkers (GLI2, MYC, chromosome 11 [chr11], chr14, 17p, and 17q) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, we can reliably and reproducibly identify very low-risk and very high-risk patients within SHH, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas. Combining subgroup and cytogenetic biomarkers with established clinical biomarkers substantially improves patient prognostication, even in the context of heterogeneous clinical therapies. The prognostic significance of most molecular biomarkers is restricted to a specific subgroup. We have identified a small panel of cytogenetic biomarkers that reliably identifies very high-risk and very low-risk groups of patients, making it an excellent tool for selecting patients for therapy intensification and therapy de-escalation in future clinical trials.

  6. Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase Overexpression Reduces Tumor Growth in a Xenograph Medulloblastoma Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica R Cappellari

    Full Text Available Ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 (ecto-5'-NT participates in extracellular ATP catabolism by converting adenosine monophosphate (AMP into adenosine. This enzyme affects the progression and invasiveness of different tumors. Furthermore, the expression of ecto-5'-NT has also been suggested as a favorable prognostic marker, attributing to this enzyme contradictory functions in cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common brain tumor of the cerebellum and affects mainly children.The effects of ecto-5'-NT overexpression on human MB tumor growth were studied in an in vivo model. Balb/c immunodeficient (nude 6 to 14-week-old mice were used for dorsal subcutaneous xenograph tumor implant. Tumor development was evaluated by pathophysiological analysis. In addition, the expression patterns of adenosine receptors were verified.The human MB cell line D283, transfected with ecto-5'-NT (D283hCD73, revealed reduced tumor growth compared to the original cell line transfected with an empty vector. D283hCD73 generated tumors with a reduced proliferative index, lower vascularization, the presence of differentiated cells and increased active caspase-3 expression. Prominent A1 adenosine receptor expression rates were detected in MB cells overexpressing ecto-5'-NT.This work suggests that ecto-5'-NT promotes reduced tumor growth to reduce cell proliferation and vascularization, promote higher differentiation rates and initiate apoptosis, supposedly by accumulating adenosine, which then acts through A1 adenosine receptors. Therefore, ecto-5'-NT might be considered an important prognostic marker, being associated with good prognosis and used as a potential target for therapy.

  7. In vivo bioluminescence imaging for leptomeningeal dissemination of medulloblastoma in mouse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung Ah; Kwak, Pil Ae; Kim, Seung-Ki; Park, Sung-Hye; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Oh, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kyuwan; Lee, Dong Soo; Hwang, Do Won; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The primary cause of treatment failure in medulloblastomas (MB) is the development of leptomeningeal dissemination (seeding). For translational research on MB seeding, one of the major challenges is the development of reliable experimental models that simulate the seeding and growth characteristics of MBs. To overcome this obstacle, we improved an experimental mouse model by intracisternal inoculation of human MB cells and monitoring with in vivo live images. Human MB cells (UW426, D283 and MED8A) were transfected with a firefly luciferase gene and a Thy1.1 (CD90.1) marker linked with IRES under the control of the CMV promoter in a retroviral DNA backbone (effLuc). The MB-effLuc cells were injected into the cisterna magna using an intrathecal catheter, and bioluminescence images were captured. We performed histopathological analysis to confirm the extent of tumor seeding. The luciferase activity of MB-effLuc cells displayed a gradually increasing pattern, which correlated with a quantitative luminometric assay. Live imaging showed that the MB-effLuc cells were diffusely distributed in the cervical spinal cord and the lumbosacral area. All mice injected with UW426-effLuc, D283-effLuc and MED8A-effLuc died within 51 days. The median survival was 22, 41 and 12 days after injection of 1.2 × 10 6 UW426-effLuc, D283-effLuc and MED8A-effLuc cells, respectively. The histopathological studies revealed that the MB-effLuc cells spread extensively and diffusely along the leptomeninges of the brain and spinal cord, forming tumor cell-coated layers. The tumor cells in the subarachnoid space expressed a human nuclei marker and Ki-67. Compared with the intracerebellar injection method in which the subfrontal area and distal spinal cord were spared by tumor cell seeding in some mice, the intracisternal injection model more closely resembled the widespread leptomeningeal seeding observed in MB patients. The results and described method are valuable resources for further

  8. Permeability of PEGylated immunoarsonoliposomes through in vitro blood brain barrier-medulloblastoma co-culture models for brain tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shehri, Abdulghani; Favretto, Marco E; Ioannou, Panayiotis V; Romero, Ignacio A; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Weksler, Babette Barbash; Parker, Terry L; Kallinteri, Paraskevi

    2015-03-01

    Owing to restricted access of pharmacological agents into the brain due to blood brain barrier (BBB) there is a need: 1. to develop a more representative 3-D-co-culture model of tumor-BBB interaction to investigate drug and nanoparticle transport into the brain for diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation. 2. to address the lack of new alternative methods to animal testing according to replacement-reduction-refinement principles. In this work, in vitro BBB-medulloblastoma 3-D-co-culture models were established using immortalized human primary brain endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). hCMEC/D3 cells were cultured in presence and in absence of two human medulloblastoma cell lines on Transwell membranes. In vitro models were characterized for BBB formation, zonula occludens-1 expression and permeability to dextran. Transferrin receptors (Tfr) expressed on hCMEC/D3 were exploited to facilitate arsonoliposome (ARL) permeability through the BBB to the tumor by covalently attaching an antibody specific to human Tfr. The effect of anticancer ARLs on hCMEC/D3 was assessed. In vitro BBB and BBB-tumor co-culture models were established successfully. BBB permeability was affected by the presence of tumor aggregates as suggested by increased permeability of ARLs. There was a 6-fold and 8-fold increase in anti-Tfr-ARL uptake into VC312R and BBB-DAOY co-culture models, respectively, compared to plain ARLs. The three-dimensional models might be appropriate models to study the transport of various drugs and nanocarriers (liposomes and immunoarsonoliposomes) through the healthy and diseased BBB. The immunoarsonoliposomes can be potentially used as anticancer agents due to good tolerance of the in vitro BBB model to their toxic effect.

  9. Adult patient with medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, Luis Fernando; Fabian, Neira

    2005-01-01

    The medulloblastoma is the most frequent tumor in the pediatric population but is infrequent in adults. If we find a hyper dense lesion that compromises the cerebellum in an adult, first we have to think in metastasis, hemangioblastoma, astrocytoma and less frequently in the medulloblastoma. The desmoplasic subtype is the most prevalent variety in adult populations. Simple computed tomography regularly shows a medulloblastoma as a hyperattenuated lesion located in the cerebellar hemispheres

  10. CT findings of medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Tadashi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Takeda, Norio; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Ito, Jusuke.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of ten patients with medulloblastomas was evaluated. Six of them showed solid, nearly homogeneous lesions and a definite enhancement after the infusion of the contrast medium. However, 4 cases showed heterogenous mass lesions composed of areas of a low density and an iso- or slightly high density which was attenuated by contrast enhancement. Histological examinations revealed differentiated medulloblastomas in two of them, but the other two cases were typical medulloblastomas. It should be remembered that medulloblastomas can reveal heterogenous cerebellar midline mass lesions in CT scans. (author)

  11. Insights into cerebellar development and medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihannic, Laure; Ayrault, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar development is an extensive process that begins during early embryonic stages and persists more than one year after birth in human. Therefore, the cerebellum is susceptible to acquire various developmental abnormalities leading to numerous diseases such as medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor. One third of the patients with medulloblastoma are incurable and survivors have a poor quality of life due to the aggressiveness of the broad-spectrum treatments. Within the past few years, it has been highlighted that medulloblastoma is a heterogeneous disease that is divided in four molecular subgroups. This recent advance in the field, combined with the development of associated preclinical models for each subgroup, should enable, in the future, the discovery and use of targeted therapy in clinical treatments for each subtype of medulloblastoma. In this review, we first aim to show how deregulation of cerebellar development can lead to medulloblastoma formation and then to present the advances in the molecular subgrouping of medulloblastoma and the associated preclinical models. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. A piecewise probabilistic regression model to decode hand movement trajectories from epidural and subdural ECoG signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Behraz; Erfanian, Abbas

    2018-06-01

    Objective. The primary concern of this study is to develop a probabilistic regression method that would improve the decoding of the hand movement trajectories from epidural ECoG as well as from subdural ECoG signals. Approach. The model is characterized by the conditional expectation of the hand position given the ECoG signals. The conditional expectation of the hand position is then modeled by a linear combination of the conditional probability density functions defined for each segment of the movement. Moreover, a spatial linear filter is proposed for reducing the dimension of the feature space. The spatial linear filter is applied to each frequency band of the ECoG signals and extract the features with highest decoding performance. Main results. For evaluating the proposed method, a dataset including 28 ECoG recordings from four adult Japanese macaques is used. The results show that the proposed decoding method outperforms the results with respect to the state of the art methods using this dataset. The relative kinematic information of each frequency band is also investigated using mutual information and decoding performance. The decoding performance shows that the best performance was obtained for high gamma bands from 50 to 200 Hz as well as high frequency ECoG band from 200 to 400 Hz for subdural recordings. However, the decoding performance was decreased for these frequency bands using epidural recordings. The mutual information shows that, on average, the high gamma band from 50 to 200 Hz and high frequency ECoG band from 200 to 400 Hz contain significantly more information than the average of the rest of the frequency bands ≤ft( pright) for both subdural and epidural recordings. The results of high resolution time-frequency analysis show that ERD/ERS patterns in all frequency bands could reveal the dynamics of the ECoG responses during the movement. The onset and offset of the movement can be clearly identified by the ERD/ERS patterns. Significance

  13. Suction forces generated by passive bile bag drainage on a model of post-subdural hematoma evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenny, Steven O; Thorell, William E

    2018-05-05

    Passive drainage systems are commonly used after subdural hematoma evacuation but there is a dearth of published data regarding the suction forces created. We set out to quantify the suction forces generated by a passive drainage system. We created a model of passive drainage after subdural hematoma evacuation. We measured the maximum suction force generated with a bile bag drain for both empty drain tubing and fluid-filled drain tube causing a siphoning effect. We took measurements at varying heights of the bile bag to analyze if bile bag height changed suction forces generated. An empty bile bag with no fluid in the drainage tube connected to a rigid, fluid-filled model creates minimal suction force of 0.9 mmHg (95% CI 0.64-1.16 mmHg). When fluid fills the drain tubing, a siphoning effect is created and can generate suction forces ranging from 18.7 to 30.6 mmHg depending on the relative position of the bile bag and filled amount of the bile bag. The suction forces generated are statistically different if the bile bag is 50 cm below, level with or 50 cm above the experimental model. Passive bile bag drainage does not generate significant suction on a fluid-filled rigid model if the drain tubing is empty. If fluid fills the drain tubing then siphoning occurs and can increase the suction force of a passive bile bag drainage system to levels comparable to partially filled Jackson-Pratt bulb drainage.

  14. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian M; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Recent efforts at stratifying medulloblastomas based on their molecular features have revolutionized our understanding of this morbidity. Collective efforts by multiple independent groups have subdivided medulloblastoma from a single disease into four distinct molecular subgroups characterized by disparate transcriptional signatures, mutational spectra, copy number profiles and, most importantly, clinical features. We present a summary of recent studies that have contributed to our understand...

  15. Modeling Freedom From Progression for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma: A Mathematical Tumor Control Model With Multiple Modes of Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, N. Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: As pediatric medulloblastoma (MB) is a relatively rare disease, it is important to extract the maximum information from trials and cohort studies. Here, a framework was developed for modeling tumor control with multiple modes of failure and time-to-progression for standard-risk MB, using published pattern of failure data. Methods and Materials: Outcome data for standard-risk MB published after 1990 with pattern of relapse information were used to fit a tumor control dose-response model addressing failures in both the high-dose boost volume and the elective craniospinal volume. Estimates of 5-year event-free survival from 2 large randomized MB trials were used to model the time-to-progression distribution. Uncertainty in freedom from progression (FFP) was estimated by Monte Carlo sampling over the statistical uncertainty in input data. Results: The estimated 5-year FFP (95% confidence intervals [CI]) for craniospinal doses of 15, 18, 24, and 36 Gy while maintaining 54 Gy to the posterior fossa was 77% (95% CI, 70%-81%), 78% (95% CI, 73%-81%), 79% (95% CI, 76%-82%), and 80% (95% CI, 77%-84%) respectively. The uncertainty in FFP was considerably larger for craniospinal doses below 18 Gy, reflecting the lack of data in the lower dose range. Conclusions: Estimates of tumor control and time-to-progression for standard-risk MB provides a data-driven setting for hypothesis generation or power calculations for prospective trials, taking the uncertainties into account. The presented methods can also be applied to incorporate further risk-stratification for example based on molecular biomarkers, when the necessary data become available

  16. Medulloblastoma: toward biologically based management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkari, Ayman; White, Jason C; Packer, Roger J

    2015-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children and, as such, has been the focus of tremendous efforts to genomically characterize it. What was once thought to be a single disease has been divided into multiple, molecularly unique subgroups through gene expression profiling. Each subgroup is not only unique in its origin and pathogenesis but also in the prognosis and potential therapeutic options. Targeted therapy of malignancies has long been the goal of clinical oncology. The progress made in the classification of medulloblastoma should be used as a model for future studies. With the evolution of epigenetic and genomic sequencing, especially when used in tandem with high-throughput pharmacologic screening protocols, the potential for subgroup-specific targeting is closer than ever. This review focuses on the development of the molecular classification system and its potential use in developing prognostic models as well as for the advancement of targeted therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differentiation of subdural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterling, T.; Rama, B.

    1989-01-01

    Although X-ray computerized tomography facilitates the diagnosis of intracranial disorders, differentiation of the lesions like extracerebral effusions is often unsatisfactory. Epidural and acute subdural haematoma shown as hyperdensity in CT requires an emergency neurosurgical operation, so that differentiation of these hyperdense effusions may not be required. But the discrimination of the effusions shown as hypodensity in CT (chronic subdural haematoma, subdural hygroma, subdural empyema as well as arachnoid cysts) is urgent because of the different treatment of these effusions. The clinical differentiation is hampered by unspecific neurologic symptoms and the lack of adequate laboratory tests. Some aspects facilitating the diagnostic decision are presented. Recent magnetic resonance (MR) studies promise further progress in differentiating between subdural effusions. (orig.) [de

  18. Divergent clonal selection dominates medulloblastoma at recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissy, A. Sorana; Garzia, Livia; Shih, David J. H.; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Huang, Xi; Skowron, Patryk; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M. G.; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jelveh, Salomeh; Donovan, Laura K.; Wang, Xin; Luu, Betty; Zayne, Kory; Li, Yisu; Mayoh, Chelsea; Thiessen, Nina; Mercier, Eloi; Mungall, Karen L.; Ma, Yusanne; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Shumansky, Karey; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Shah, Sohrab; Farooq, Hamza; Kijima, Noriyuki; Holgado, Borja L.; Lee, John J. Y.; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Jessica; Mack, Stephen C.; Manno, Alex; Michealraj, K. A.; Nor, Carolina; Peacock, John; Qin, Lei; Reimand, Juri; Rolider, Adi; Thompson, Yuan Y.; Wu, Xiaochong; Pugh, Trevor; Ally, Adrian; Bilenky, Mikhail; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Young; Chuah, Eric; Corbett, Richard D.; Dhalla, Noreen; He, An; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Long, William; Mayo, Michael; Plettner, Patrick; Qian, Jenny Q.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Tam, Angela; Wong, Tina; Birol, Inanc; Zhao, Yongjun; Faria, Claudia C.; Pimentel, José; Nunes, Sofia; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Pollack, Ian F.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Bendel, Anne E.; Fults, Daniel W.; Walter, Andrew W.; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Collins, V. Peter; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Hoffman, Caitlin; Lyden, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H.; Garvin, James H.; Stearns, Duncan S.; Massimi, Luca; Schüller, Ulrich; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Puget, Stephanie; Ayrault, Olivier; Dunn, Sandra E.; Tirapelli, Daniela P. C.; Carlotti, Carlos G.; Wheeler, Helen; Hallahan, Andrew R.; Ingram, Wendy; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Pietsch, Torsten; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Ra, Young Shin; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Clifford, Steven C.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Cooper, Michael K.; Packer, Roger J.; Massimino, Maura; Garre, Maria Luisa; Bartels, Ute; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Dirks, Peter; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Weiss, William A.; Collier, Lara S.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T. W.; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Largaespada, David A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Jabado, Nada; Bader, Gary D.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Malkin, David; Marra, Marco A.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The development of targeted anti-cancer therapies through the study of cancer genomes is intended to increase survival rates and decrease treatment-related toxicity. We treated a transposon–driven, functional genomic mouse model of medulloblastoma with ‘humanized’ in vivo therapy (microneurosurgical tumour resection followed by multi-fractionated, image-guided radiotherapy). Genetic events in recurrent murine medulloblastoma exhibit a very poor overlap with those in matched murine diagnostic samples (sequencing of 33 pairs of human diagnostic and post-therapy medulloblastomas demonstrated substantial genetic divergence of the dominant clone after therapy (recurrence). In both mice and humans, the dominant clone at recurrence arose through clonal selection of a pre-existing minor clone present at diagnosis. Targeted therapy is unlikely to be effective in the absence of the target, therefore our results offer a simple, proximal, and remediable explanation for the failure of prior clinical trials of targeted therapy. PMID:26760213

  19. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vien, Christine; Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  20. Chronic subdural hematoma secondary to traumatic subdural hygroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Deok Hwa; Lim, Han Hyuk; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Lee, Kyeong Seok [Soonchunhyang University Chonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    Sometimes chronic subdural hematoma can be developed following posttraumatic subdural hygroma. The purpose of this study is to investigate its incidence, the duration required for their conversion, and characteristic CT and MR findings of subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hamatoma. We studied 8 patients with persistent posttraumatic subdural hygroma which consequently developed chronic subdural hamatoma. The patients were examined with CT initially and followed-up with CT in 3 and MR in 5. We analyzed the location of the lesion, the change of the density or signal intensity, the change of the size, and the degree of enhancement and mass effect. The duration required for the formation of hematoma was 48-166 days (mean, 76 days). The characteristic CT findings of subdural hygroma were a crescentric lesion with CSF density along the inner table with-out contrast enhancement. The mass effect was minimal. The CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma were higher density than that of hygroma in all cases, increase in thickness and size in 3 cases, and contrast enhancement along the inner membrane of the hematoma in 5 cases. The signal intensities of the subdural hygroma were identical to those of CSF on both T1 and T2 weighted images, whereas, those of chronic subdural hamatoma were higher. The increased signal intensity on T1 weighted MR images and increased attenuation or contrast enhancement of the lesion on CT may suggest the conversion of subdural hygroma into chronic subdural hematoma.

  1. Chronic subdural hematoma secondary to traumatic subdural hygroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Deok Hwa; Lim, Han Hyuk; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Lee, Kyeong Seok

    1994-01-01

    Sometimes chronic subdural hematoma can be developed following posttraumatic subdural hygroma. The purpose of this study is to investigate its incidence, the duration required for their conversion, and characteristic CT and MR findings of subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hamatoma. We studied 8 patients with persistent posttraumatic subdural hygroma which consequently developed chronic subdural hamatoma. The patients were examined with CT initially and followed-up with CT in 3 and MR in 5. We analyzed the location of the lesion, the change of the density or signal intensity, the change of the size, and the degree of enhancement and mass effect. The duration required for the formation of hematoma was 48-166 days (mean, 76 days). The characteristic CT findings of subdural hygroma were a crescentric lesion with CSF density along the inner table with-out contrast enhancement. The mass effect was minimal. The CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma were higher density than that of hygroma in all cases, increase in thickness and size in 3 cases, and contrast enhancement along the inner membrane of the hematoma in 5 cases. The signal intensities of the subdural hygroma were identical to those of CSF on both T1 and T2 weighted images, whereas, those of chronic subdural hamatoma were higher. The increased signal intensity on T1 weighted MR images and increased attenuation or contrast enhancement of the lesion on CT may suggest the conversion of subdural hygroma into chronic subdural hematoma

  2. IGF-1 receptor inhibition by picropodophyllin in medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshima-Hosoyama, Sachiko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Nelon, Laura D. [Greehey Children' s Cancer Research Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Keller, Charles, E-mail: keller@ohsu.edu [Greehey Children' s Cancer Research Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Igf1r is overexpressed and activated in a Sonic Hedgehog driven model of medulloblastoma. {yields} Picropodophyllin targets and abrogates IGF signaling in medulloblastoma. {yields} Picropodophyllin inhibits medulloblastoma tumor cell growth by induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (Igf1r) is a multifunctional membrane-associated tyrosine kinase associated with regulation of transformation, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Increased IGF pathway activity has been reported in human and murine medulloblastoma. Tumors from our genetically-engineered medulloblastoma mouse model over-express Igf1r, and thus this mouse model is a good platform with which to study the role of Igf1r in tumor progression. We hypothesize that inhibition of IGF pathway in medulloblastoma can slow or inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. To test our hypothesis, we tested the role of IGF in tumor growth in vitro by treatment with the tyrosine kinase small molecule inhibitor, picropodophyllin (PPP), which strongly inhibits the IGF pathway. Our results demonstrate that PPP-mediated downregulation of the IGF pathway inhibits mouse tumor cell growth and induces apoptotic cell death in vitro in primary medulloblastoma cultures that are most reflective of tumor cell behavior in vivo.

  3. IGF-1 receptor inhibition by picropodophyllin in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima-Hosoyama, Sachiko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Nelon, Laura D.; Keller, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Igf1r is overexpressed and activated in a Sonic Hedgehog driven model of medulloblastoma. → Picropodophyllin targets and abrogates IGF signaling in medulloblastoma. → Picropodophyllin inhibits medulloblastoma tumor cell growth by induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (Igf1r) is a multifunctional membrane-associated tyrosine kinase associated with regulation of transformation, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Increased IGF pathway activity has been reported in human and murine medulloblastoma. Tumors from our genetically-engineered medulloblastoma mouse model over-express Igf1r, and thus this mouse model is a good platform with which to study the role of Igf1r in tumor progression. We hypothesize that inhibition of IGF pathway in medulloblastoma can slow or inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. To test our hypothesis, we tested the role of IGF in tumor growth in vitro by treatment with the tyrosine kinase small molecule inhibitor, picropodophyllin (PPP), which strongly inhibits the IGF pathway. Our results demonstrate that PPP-mediated downregulation of the IGF pathway inhibits mouse tumor cell growth and induces apoptotic cell death in vitro in primary medulloblastoma cultures that are most reflective of tumor cell behavior in vivo.

  4. Pathogenesis of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Nakamura, Norio; Sato, Jun; Hasegawa, Yoshio.

    1982-01-01

    Ten cases of chronic subdural hematoma that were followed by a sequential study with CT from an early posttraumatic period to evolution of chronic subdural hematoma were reported. In four of these 10 cases, the initial CT showed thin subdural collections of high density suggesting acute subdural hematoma. Two weeks later, the density of subdural collections reduced, but their volumes increased. Clinical symptoms such as headache and disorientation occurred three or four weeks later. Preoperative CT showed similar huge subdural collections of low density and marked mass effect. These cases underwent surgery from 24 to 44 days after injury, and development of neomenbranes was confirmed. In the remaining six cases, the initial CT showed thin subdural collections of low density suggesting subdural hygroma. In five of the six cases, the density of the subdural collections was slightly higher than that of cerebrospinal fluid, and in one case, an area of spotted high density was shown. It was suggested that these were mixtures with blood. Follow-up CT scans revealed that the subdural collections increased in size but remained at a uniformly low density for the first month after the head injury, and then the increase in density occurred. Operations were performed 55 to 76 days after injury, and operative findings were not different from those of common chronic subdural hematoma. From these investigations, it was suggested that there were two types of evolution of chronic subdural hematoma. One is the development from acute subdural hematomas, and the other from subdural hygromas. It is supposed that blood and cerebrospinal fluid are very important factors in the evolution of subdural collections into chronic subdural hematomas. (J.P.N.)

  5. Association of Antithrombotic Drug Use With Subdural Hematoma Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Rodríguez, Luis Alberto García; Hellfritzsch, Maja

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Incidence of subdural hematoma has been reported to be increasing. To what extent this is related to increasing use of antithrombotic drugs is unknown. Objectives: To estimate the association between use of antithrombotic drugs and subdural hematoma risk and determine trends in subdural...... hematoma incidence and antithrombotic drug use in the general population. Design, Setting, and Participants: Case-control study of 10 010 patients aged 20 to 89 years with a first-ever subdural hematoma principal discharge diagnosis from 2000 to 2015 matched by age, sex, and calendar year to 400...... 380 individuals from the general population (controls). Subdural hematoma incidence and antithrombotic drug use was identified using population-based regional data (population: 484 346) and national data (population: 5.2 million) from Denmark. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds...

  6. Curcumin-induced HDAC inhibition and attenuation of medulloblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Joon; Krauthauser, Candice; Maduskuie, Victoria; Fawcett, Paul T; Olson, James M; Rajasekaran, Sigrid A

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common brain tumor in children, and its prognosis is worse than for many other common pediatric cancers. Survivors undergoing treatment suffer from serious therapy-related side effects. Thus, it is imperative to identify safer, effective treatments for medulloblastoma. In this study we evaluated the anti-cancer potential of curcumin in medulloblastoma by testing its ability to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in vitro and in vivo using established medulloblastoma models. Using cultured medulloblastoma cells, tumor xenografts, and the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model, the antitumor effects of curcumin were tested in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in medulloblastoma cells. These effects were accompanied by reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4 expression and activity and increased tubulin acetylation, ultimately leading to mitotic catastrophe. In in vivo medulloblastoma xenografts, curcumin reduced tumor growth and significantly increased survival in the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model. The in vitro and in vivo data suggest that curcumin has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for medulloblastoma

  7. Curcumin-induced HDAC inhibition and attenuation of medulloblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson James M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common brain tumor in children, and its prognosis is worse than for many other common pediatric cancers. Survivors undergoing treatment suffer from serious therapy-related side effects. Thus, it is imperative to identify safer, effective treatments for medulloblastoma. In this study we evaluated the anti-cancer potential of curcumin in medulloblastoma by testing its ability to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in vitro and in vivo using established medulloblastoma models. Methods Using cultured medulloblastoma cells, tumor xenografts, and the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model, the antitumor effects of curcumin were tested in vitro and in vivo. Results Curcumin induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in medulloblastoma cells. These effects were accompanied by reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC 4 expression and activity and increased tubulin acetylation, ultimately leading to mitotic catastrophe. In in vivo medulloblastoma xenografts, curcumin reduced tumor growth and significantly increased survival in the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model. Conclusions The in vitro and in vivo data suggest that curcumin has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for medulloblastoma.

  8. Contralateral acute subdural hematoma occurring after evacuation of subdural hematoma with coexistent contralateral subdural hygroma

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hsiao-Lun; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage is a safe and effective method for the management of chronic subdural hematoma. However, contralateral acute subdural hematoma has been reported to be a rare and devastating complication. Only 3 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we reported an 80-year-old male with chronic subdural hematoma and contralateral subdural hygroma. The burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage was initially performed to treat the chronic s...

  9. Quantitative kinetic analysis of blood vessels in the outer membranes of chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kentaro; Adachi, Keiji; Cho, Kajin; Ishimaru, Sumio; Maeda, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic biologic modeling was used to calculate the transfer rate constant for gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and capillary permeability in the outer membrane of chronic subdural hematomas and effusions. Following intravenous Gd-DTPA injection, Gd concentrations in the subdural fluid and in timed arterial blood samples were measured by ion-coupled plasma emission spectrometry in 53 chronic subdural hematomas and 18 chronic subdural effusions. The capillary surface area in outer membrane was assessed morphometrically. Transfer rate constants for subdural hematomas and subdural effusions were 12.4±1.0 and 20.6±1.7 (x 10 -4 )min -1 , respectively. Capillary permeabilities for subdural hematomas and subdural effusions were 16±1.2 and 19±3.7 ml·min -1 (mm 2 /mm 3 ) -1 , respectively. The capillary surface areas for subdural hematomas and subdural effusions were 48±3 and 77±10 mm 2 /mm 3 , respectively. The high degree of infiltration of Gd into subdural effusions reflects the high capillary surface area in the outer membrane rather than greater permeability of individual capillaries. The value of transfer rate constant was correlated inversely with the duration of the chronic subdural fluid collection. Immature outer membrane has a high transfer rate constant which allows extravasation of plasma components into the subdural space, resulting in increasing volume of the subdural effusion. Delayed magnetic resonance imaging following Gd administration may be clinically useful for estimating the age of chronic subdural fluid accumulations. (author)

  10. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    medulloblastoma by activating N1ICD and PIK3CA in cerebellar NSCs and NPCs in the developing mouse brain. N1ICD models : We previously published...Aims: 1. Validate general applicability and clinical potential of SP66 as a theragnostic agent by measuring tumor uptake in PDX GBM models and a...spontaneous mouse medulloblastoma model ; 2. Evaluate the therapeutic potential of SP66 in vitro and in vivo. Overlap: None Contracting/ Grants

  11. Foretinib is effective therapy for metastatic sonic hedgehog medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Claudia C; Golbourn, Brian J; Dubuc, Adrian M; Remke, Marc; Diaz, Roberto J; Agnihotri, Sameer; Luck, Amanda; Sabha, Nesrin; Olsen, Samantha; Wu, Xiaochong; Garzia, Livia; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mack, Stephen C; Wang, Xin; Leadley, Michael; Reynaud, Denis; Ermini, Leonardo; Post, Martin; Northcott, Paul A; Pfister, Stefan M; Croul, Sidney E; Kool, Marcel; Korshunov, Andrey; Smith, Christian A; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor, with metastases present at diagnosis conferring a poor prognosis. Mechanisms of dissemination are poorly understood and metastatic lesions are genetically divergent from the matched primary tumor. Effective and less toxic therapies that target both compartments have yet to be identified. Here, we report that the analysis of several large nonoverlapping cohorts of patients with medulloblastoma reveals MET kinase as a marker of sonic hedgehog (SHH)-driven medulloblastoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of phosphorylated, active MET kinase in an independent patient cohort confirmed its correlation with increased tumor relapse and poor survival, suggesting that patients with SHH medulloblastoma may benefit from MET-targeted therapy. In support of this hypothesis, we found that the approved MET inhibitor foretinib could suppress MET activation, decrease tumor cell proliferation, and induce apoptosis in SHH medulloblastomas in vitro and in vivo. Foretinib penetrated the blood-brain barrier and was effective in both the primary and metastatic tumor compartments. In established mouse xenograft or transgenic models of metastatic SHH medulloblastoma, foretinib administration reduced the growth of the primary tumor, decreased the incidence of metastases, and increased host survival. Taken together, our results provide a strong rationale to clinically evaluate foretinib as an effective therapy for patients with SHH-driven medulloblastoma. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Adoptive immunotherapy using PRAME-specific T cells in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Domenico; Miele, Evelina; De Angelis, Biagio; Guercio, Marika; Boffa, Iolanda; Sinibaldi, Matilde; Po, Agnese; Caruana, Ignazio; Abballe, Luana; Carai, Andrea; Caruso, Simona; Camera, Antonio; Moseley, Annemarie; Hagedoorn, Renate S; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Giangaspero, Felice; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Locatelli, Franco; Quintarelli, Concetta

    2018-04-03

    Medulloblastoma is the most frequent malignant childhood brain tumor with a high morbidity. Identification of new therapeutic targets would be instrumental in improving patient outcomes. We evaluated the expression of the tumor-associated antigen PRAME in biopsies from 60 medulloblastoma patients. PRAME expression was detectable in 82% of tissues independent of molecular and histopathologic subgroups. High PRAME expression also correlated with worse overall survival. We next investigated the relevance of PRAME as a target for immunotherapy. Medulloblastoma cells were targeted using genetically modified T cells with a PRAME-specific TCR (SLL TCR T cells). SLL TCR T cells efficiently killed medulloblastoma HLA-A*02+ DAOY cells as well as primary HLA-A*02+ medulloblastoma cells. Moreover, SLL TCR T cells controlled tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model of medulloblastoma. To prevent unexpected T cell-related toxicity,an inducible caspase 9 (iC9) gene was introduced in frame with the SLL TCR; this safety switch triggered prompt elimination of genetically-modified T cells. Altogether, these data indicate that T cells genetically modified with a high-affinity, PRAME-specific TCR and iC9 may represent a promising innovative approach for treating HLA-A*02+ medulloblastoma patients. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Extraneural metastases in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V M F Muoio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common childhood malignant tumor of central nervous system, but it may also occur in adults. It presents high invasive growth with spreading of tumor cells into the leptomeningeal space along the neuroaxis early in the course of the disease. Extraneural metastases are rare but frequently lethal, occurring only in 1 to 5% of patients, and are related, in the most of cases, to the presence of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Here we characterize the clinical profile of five cases of medulloblastoma with systemic spreading of tumor cells, also comparing them to cases already described in the literature.

  14. ID3 contributes to cerebrospinal fluid seeding and poor prognosis in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phi, Ji Hoon; Choi, Seung Ah; Lim, Sang-Hee; Lee, Joongyub; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitor of differentiation (ID) genes have been implicated as promoters of tumor progression and metastasis in many human cancers. The current study investigated the expression and functional roles of ID genes in seeding and prognosis of medulloblastoma. ID gene expression was screened in human medulloblastoma tissues. Knockdown of ID3 gene was performed in medulloblastoma cells in vitro. The expression of metastasis-related genes after ID3 knockdown was assessed. The effect of ID3 knockdown on tumor seeding was observed in an animal model in vivo. The survival of medulloblastoma patients was plotted according to the ID3 expression levels. Significantly higher ID3 expression was observed in medulloblastoma with cerebrospinal fluid seeding than tumors without seeding. Knockdown of ID3 decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and suppressed the migration of D283 medulloblastoma cells in vitro. In a seeding model of medulloblastoma, ID3 knockdown in vivo with shRNA inhibited the growth of primary tumors, prevented the development of leptomeningeal seeding, and prolonged animal survival. High ID3 expression was associated with shorter survival of medulloblastoma patients, especially in Group 4 medulloblastomas. High ID3 expression is associated with medullolbastoma seeding and is a poor prognostic factor, especially in patients with Group 4 tumors. ID3 may represent the metastatic/ aggressive phenotype of a subgroup of medulloblastoma

  15. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [de

  16. Molecular Biology of Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of diagnosis and treatment of medulloblastoma, and the influence of new biological advances in the development of more effective and less toxic therapies are reviewed by researchers at Children’s National Medical Center, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

  17. Postoperative Chemotherapy for Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The survival rate and cognitive function of 43 children, age <3 years, with medulloblastoma treated with intensive postoperative chemotherapy alone, without radiotherapy, were determined at the University of Wurzburg and other centers in Germany Chemotherapy consisted of three two-month cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, vincristine, carboplatin, and etoposide.

  18. RITA displays anti-tumor activity in medulloblastomas independent of TP53 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Aline; Althoff, Kristina; Grunewald, Laura; Thor, Theresa; Odersky, Andrea; Schulte, Marc; Deubzer, Hedwig E; Heukamp, Lukas; Eggert, Angelika; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H; Künkele, Annette

    2017-04-25

    Current therapy of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, achieves 40-70% survival. Secondary chemotherapy resistance contributes to treatment failure, where TP53 pathway dysfunction plays a key role. MDM2 interaction with TP53 leads to its degradation. Reactivating TP53 functionality using small-molecule inhibitors, such as RITA, to disrupt TP53-MDM2 binding may have therapeutic potential. We show here that RITA decreased viability of all 4 analyzed medulloblastoma cell lines, regardless of TP53 functional status. The decrease in cell viability was accompanied in 3 of the 4 medulloblastoma cell lines by accumulation of TP53 protein in the cells and increased CDKN1A expression. RITA treatment in mouse models inhibited medulloblastoma xenograft tumor growth. These data demonstrate that RITA treatment reduces medulloblastoma cell viability in both in vitro and in vivo models, and acts independently of cellular TP53 status, identifying RITA as a potential therapeutic agent to treat medulloblastoma.

  19. Intertumoral Heterogeneity within Medulloblastoma Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Florence M G; Remke, Marc; Rampasek, Ladislav; Peacock, John; Shih, David J H; Luu, Betty; Garzia, Livia; Torchia, Jonathon; Nor, Carolina; Morrissy, A Sorana; Agnihotri, Sameer; Thompson, Yuan Yao; Kuzan-Fischer, Claudia M; Farooq, Hamza; Isaev, Keren; Daniels, Craig; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Faure-Conter, Cecile; Jouvet, Anne; Giannini, Caterina; Nageswara Rao, Amulya A; Li, Kay Ka Wai; Ng, Ho-Keung; Eberhart, Charles G; Pollack, Ian F; Hamilton, Ronald L; Gillespie, G Yancey; Olson, James M; Leary, Sarah; Weiss, William A; Lach, Boleslaw; Chambless, Lola B; Thompson, Reid C; Cooper, Michael K; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Hauser, Peter; van Veelen, Marie-Lise C; Kros, Johan M; French, Pim J; Ra, Young Shin; Kumabe, Toshihiro; López-Aguilar, Enrique; Zitterbart, Karel; Sterba, Jaroslav; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Massimino, Maura; Van Meir, Erwin G; Osuka, Satoru; Shofuda, Tomoko; Klekner, Almos; Zollo, Massimo; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Rubin, Joshua B; Jabado, Nada; Albrecht, Steffen; Mora, Jaume; Van Meter, Timothy E; Jung, Shin; Moore, Andrew S; Hallahan, Andrew R; Chan, Jennifer A; Tirapelli, Daniela P C; Carlotti, Carlos G; Fouladi, Maryam; Pimentel, José; Faria, Claudia C; Saad, Ali G; Massimi, Luca; Liau, Linda M; Wheeler, Helen; Nakamura, Hideo; Elbabaa, Samer K; Perezpeña-Diazconti, Mario; Chico Ponce de León, Fernando; Robinson, Shenandoah; Zapotocky, Michal; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Huang, Annie; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Tabori, Uri; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Dirks, Peter B; Rutka, James T; Bader, Gary D; Reimand, Jüri; Goldenberg, Anna; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2017-06-12

    While molecular subgrouping has revolutionized medulloblastoma classification, the extent of heterogeneity within subgroups is unknown. Similarity network fusion (SNF) applied to genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression data across 763 primary samples identifies very homogeneous clusters of patients, supporting the presence of medulloblastoma subtypes. After integration of somatic copy-number alterations, and clinical features specific to each cluster, we identify 12 different subtypes of medulloblastoma. Integrative analysis using SNF further delineates group 3 from group 4 medulloblastoma, which is not as readily apparent through analyses of individual data types. Two clear subtypes of infants with Sonic Hedgehog medulloblastoma with disparate outcomes and biology are identified. Medulloblastoma subtypes identified through integrative clustering have important implications for stratification of future clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bifrontal acute subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryapratap Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Though, acute subdural hematoma (ASDH is one of the most common emergencies in neurological surgery practice, bilateral bifrontal ASDH is uncommon and may constitute diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have important roles in the diagnosis of ASDH. We present a case of bifrontal ASDH that was successfully managed in our institution.

  1. Metastases to bone in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieco, P.T.; Azouz, E.M.; Hoeffel, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a relatively common intracranial neoplasm in childhood. Its extraneural spread was, until recently, thought to be a rare occurrence. Metastases are most commonly to bone. Five patients with medulloblastoma metastatic to bone are presented, and findings are compared to those of previous reports. Two of the five cases showed patchy extensive osteosclerosis of the pelvis and/or proximal femora. One case had concurrent lymph node involvement. In patients with past or present medulloblastoma and bone pain, metastases to bone should be excluded. Medulloblastoma metastatic to bone is a rare cause of extensive osteosclerosis. (orig.)

  2. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Vien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  3. BET bromodomain inhibition of MYC-amplified medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Bergthold, Guillaume; Nguyen, Brian; Schubert, Simone; Gholamin, Sharareh; Tang, Yujie; Bolin, Sara; Schumacher, Steven E; Zeid, Rhamy; Masoud, Sabran; Yu, Furong; Vue, Nujsaubnusi; Gibson, William J; Paolella, Brenton R; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Cheshier, Samuel H; Qi, Jun; Liu, Kun-Wei; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Weiss, William A; Swartling, Fredrik J; Kieran, Mark W; Bradner, James E; Beroukhim, Rameen; Cho, Yoon-Jae

    2014-02-15

    MYC-amplified medulloblastomas are highly lethal tumors. Bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) bromodomain inhibition has recently been shown to suppress MYC-associated transcriptional activity in other cancers. The compound JQ1 inhibits BET bromodomain-containing proteins, including BRD4. Here, we investigate BET bromodomain targeting for the treatment of MYC-amplified medulloblastoma. We evaluated the effects of genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of BET bromodomains on proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in established and newly generated patient- and genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM)-derived medulloblastoma cell lines and xenografts that harbored amplifications of MYC or MYCN. We also assessed the effect of JQ1 on MYC expression and global MYC-associated transcriptional activity. We assessed the in vivo efficacy of JQ1 in orthotopic xenografts established in immunocompromised mice. Treatment of MYC-amplified medulloblastoma cells with JQ1 decreased cell viability associated with arrest at G1 and apoptosis. We observed downregulation of MYC expression and confirmed the inhibition of MYC-associated transcriptional targets. The exogenous expression of MYC from a retroviral promoter reduced the effect of JQ1 on cell viability, suggesting that attenuated levels of MYC contribute to the functional effects of JQ1. JQ1 significantly prolonged the survival of orthotopic xenograft models of MYC-amplified medulloblastoma (P < 0.001). Xenografts harvested from mice after five doses of JQ1 had reduced the expression of MYC mRNA and a reduced proliferative index. JQ1 suppresses MYC expression and MYC-associated transcriptional activity in medulloblastomas, resulting in an overall decrease in medulloblastoma cell viability. These preclinical findings highlight the promise of BET bromodomain inhibitors as novel agents for MYC-amplified medulloblastoma. ©2013 AACR

  4. Loss of Pin1 Suppresses Hedgehog-Driven Medulloblastoma Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Therapeutic approaches to medulloblastoma (combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have led to significant improvements, but these are achieved at a high cost to quality of life. Alternative therapeutic approaches are needed. Genetic mutations leading to the activation of the Hedgehog pathway drive tumorigenesis in ~30% of medulloblastoma. In a yeast two-hybrid proteomic screen, we discovered a novel interaction between GLI1, a key transcription factor for the mediation of Hedgehog signals, and PIN1, a peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase that regulates the postphosphorylation fate of its targets. The GLI1/PIN1 interaction was validated by reciprocal pulldowns using epitope-tagged proteins in HEK293T cells as well as by co-immunoprecipiations of the endogenous proteins in a medulloblastoma cell line. Our results support a molecular model in which PIN1 promotes GLI1 protein abundance, thus contributing to the positive regulation of Hedgehog signals. Most importantly, in vivo functional analyses of Pin1 in the GFAP-tTA;TRE-SmoA1 mouse model of Hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma demonstrate that the loss of Pin1 impairs tumor development and dramatically increases survival. In summary, the discovery of the GLI1/PIN1 interaction uncovers PIN1 as a novel therapeutic target in Hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma tumorigenesis.

  5. SnapShot: Medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Rusert, Jessica M.; Wu, Xiaochong; Eberhart, Charles G.; Taylor, Michael D.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Current treatment includes surgery, craniospinal radiation, and high-dose cytotoxic chemotherapy. Despite these aggressive therapies, one-third of patients still succumb to their disease, and survivors suffer devastating side effects, including cognitive deficits, endocrine disorders, and increased incidence of secondary cancers later in life. More effective and less toxic therapies are desperately needed for MB.

  6. Molecular Classification of Medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    KIJIMA, Noriyuki; KANEMURA, Yonehiro

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is one of the most frequent malignant brain tumors in children. The current standard treatment regimen consists of surgical resection, craniospinal irradiation, and adjuvant chemotherapy. Although these treatments have the potential to increase the survival of 70–80% of patients with MB, they are also associated with serious treatment-induced morbidity. The current risk stratification of MB is based on clinical factors, including age at presentation, metastatic status, an...

  7. Multimodality therapy for medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.R.M.; Duffner, P.K.; Cohen, M.E.; Sinks, L.F.; Tebbi, C.; Freeman, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    Eight patients with recurrent medulloblastoma were treated with a chemotherapy regimen consisting of vincristine, BCNU, dexamethasone and intrathecal and intermediate dose intravenous methotrexate (500 mg/m 2 ). Five also received local low dose radiotherapy (RT). All 8 patients responded to treatment; 6 completely and 2 partially. These latter 2 were in their second and third recurrences. Three remain in remission. The median duration of response was 18.8 months, and median time from start of chemotherapy to death was 32 months using the Kaplan-Meier technique. In addition, 9 other patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma were treated with craniospinal radiation and the same adjuvant chemotherapy as above. The first 5 patients also received intraventricular methotrexate and/or intravenous BCNU during radiotherapy. The toxicity in the 5 patients was very severe. There were three toxic deaths, one death from cancer; one patient survives disease-free, but he is demented. With the discontinuance of intraventricular methotrexate and the postponement of myelosuppressive chemotherapy until after the completion of radiotherapy, the regimen has been well tolerated. All 4 patients treated this way remain alive, well, and disease-free at intervals up to 36 months. We conclude that recurrent medulloblastomas are sensitive to multiagent chemotherapy and that prolonged remissions may occur. With primary adjuvant chemotherapy, extreme caution with myelosuppressive drugs must be exercised during the period of craniospinal radiotherapy. We also do not recommend the use of intraventricular methotrexate. When these two criteria were followed, the preliminary results with adjuvant chemotherapy appear encouraging

  8. Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen-Ranberg, Nina Christine; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Bergholt, Bo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (bCSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition frequently associated with the need for retreatment. The reason for the high rate of retreatment has not been thoroughly investigated. Thus, the authors focused on determining which independent predictors...... are associated with the retreatment of bCSDH with a focus on surgical laterality. METHODS In a national database of CSDHs (Danish Chronic Subdural Hematoma Study) the authors retrospectively identified all bCSDHs treated in the 4 Danish neurosurgical departments over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2012...... that a separated hematoma density and the absence of postoperative drainage were independent predictors of retreatment. CONCLUSIONS In bCSDHs bilateral surgical intervention significantly lowers the risk of retreatment compared with unilateral intervention and should be considered when choosing a surgical...

  9. Modeling radiation dosimetry to predict cognitive outcomes in pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors including medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Kiehna, Erin N.; Li Chenghong; Shukla, Hemant; Sengupta, Saikat; Xiong Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Model the effects of radiation dosimetry on IQ among pediatric patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors (n = 39) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before and after treatment with postoperative, risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation (CSI) and conformal primary-site irradiation, followed by chemotherapy. Differential dose-volume data for 5 brain volumes (total brain, supratentorial brain, infratentorial brain, and left and right temporal lobes) were correlated with IQ after surgery and at follow-up by use of linear regression. Results: When the dose distribution was partitioned into 2 levels, both had a significantly negative effect on longitudinal IQ across all 5 brain volumes. When the dose distribution was partitioned into 3 levels (low, medium, and high), exposure to the supratentorial brain appeared to have the most significant impact. For most models, each Gy of exposure had a similar effect on IQ decline, regardless of dose level. Conclusions: Our results suggest that radiation dosimetry data from 5 brain volumes can be used to predict decline in longitudinal IQ. Despite measures to reduce radiation dose and treatment volume, the volume that receives the highest dose continues to have the greatest effect, which supports current volume-reduction efforts

  10. Recursive grid partitioning on a cortical surface model: an optimized technique for the localization of implanted subdural electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Thomas A; Conner, Christopher R; Tandon, Nitin

    2013-05-01

    Precise localization of subdural electrodes (SDEs) is essential for the interpretation of data from intracranial electrocorticography recordings. Blood and fluid accumulation underneath the craniotomy flap leads to a nonlinear deformation of the brain surface and of the SDE array on postoperative CT scans and adversely impacts the accurate localization of electrodes located underneath the craniotomy. Older methods that localize electrodes based on their identification on a postimplantation CT scan with coregistration to a preimplantation MR image can result in significant problems with accuracy of the electrode localization. The authors report 3 novel methods that rely on the creation of a set of 3D mesh models to depict the pial surface and a smoothed pial envelope. Two of these new methods are designed to localize electrodes, and they are compared with 6 methods currently in use to determine their relative accuracy and reliability. The first method involves manually localizing each electrode using digital photographs obtained at surgery. This is highly accurate, but requires time intensive, operator-dependent input. The second uses 4 electrodes localized manually in conjunction with an automated, recursive partitioning technique to localize the entire electrode array. The authors evaluated the accuracy of previously published methods by applying the methods to their data and comparing them against the photograph-based localization. Finally, the authors further enhanced the usability of these methods by using automatic parcellation techniques to assign anatomical labels to individual electrodes as well as by generating an inflated cortical surface model while still preserving electrode locations relative to the cortical anatomy. The recursive grid partitioning had the least error compared with older methods (672 electrodes, 6.4-mm maximum electrode error, 2.0-mm mean error, p < 10(-18)). The maximum errors derived using prior methods of localization ranged from 8

  11. Clinical profile of subdural hematomas: dangerousness of subdural subacute hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kpelao, E; Beketi, K A; Moumouni, A K; Doleagbenou, A; Ntimon, B; Egbohou, P; Mouzou, T; Tomta, K; Sama, D H; Abalo, A; Walla, A; Dossim, A

    2016-04-01

    Subacute subdural hematomas are a poorly individualized nosological entity, often equated clinically to chronic subdural hematomas. Yet, their neurological deterioration which is usually rapid seems to distinguish them from chronic subdural hematomas. We wanted to show this dangerousness by establishing the clinically evolving profile of the three types of subdural hematomas. This was a prospective and retrospective study of 63 subdural hematoma (18 acute, 13 subacute, and 32 chronic) patients admitted between 2012 and 2014 in the neurosurgery unit of Lomé University Hospital. Hematomas were classified according to the elapsed time after head injury and blood density on CT. The main parameter studied was the evolution of the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) in the 3 months following the trauma, enabling to establish an evolving profile of each type of hematoma. The average age of patients was 58.1 years for chronic subdural hematomas and 47.6 years for subacute subdural hematomas. Disease duration before admission was 13.1 days for chronic against 36.6 h for subacute hematoma. The clinical profile shows acute worsening within hours during the second week for patients with subacute hematoma, while it is progressive for patients with chronic hematoma. We noted two deaths, all victims of a subacute hematoma (one operated, one patient waiting for surgery). Iso-density hematoma on CT, especially in a young person, must be considered as a predictive factor of rapid neurological aggravation suggesting an urgent care or increased monitoring by paramedics.

  12. Radiotherapy for the medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gose, Kyuhei; Imajo, Yoshinari; Imanaka, Kazufumi

    1983-01-01

    Eighteen patients with medulloblastoma, treated between 1972 and 1981, at Kobe University School of Medicine, were retrospectively studied. Of those completing post operative irradiation, 50% have survived for 2 years, 15% for 5 years and mean survival periods was 22.2 months. 13 out of 18 patients developed local recurrence and spinal dissemination. The mean time from the initial radiotherapy to recurrence was 8.5 months. It was suggested that posterior fossa should recieve 5,000 rad, the spine should 2,000 rad and recurrences should be treated by the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. (author)

  13. Outcome in Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Subdural vs. Subgaleal Drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishfaq, Asim

    2017-07-01

    To compare the outcome after surgery for chronic subdural hematoma when the drain is placed in subdural space or subgaleal space. Quasi experimental study. Combined Military Hospital, Lahore, from July 2015 to June 2016. Patients with chronic subdural hematoma of both genders and age, ranging between 55 to 85 years, were included. Patients on antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy and acute on chronic subdural hematoma were excluded. Patients were divided in two equal groups each depending on whether drain was placed in subgaleal space (Group 1), and subdual space (Group 2), (n=31 patients each). Patients were positioned flat in bed after surgery. Clinical and radiological parameters and clinical outcome were compared between the two groups. Statistical test with significance of p hematoma was 15 ±6.5 mm. Patients with subdural drain placement had more complications such as pneumocephalus 11 (35.4%) vs. 6 (19.3%), and intracerebral hemorrhage 4 (12.9%) vs. 2 (6.4%). Clinical outcome was good in both groups 27 (87%) in Group 1 and 28 (90%) in Group 2. Patients of both groups had good outcome after surgery. Complications like pneumocephalus and intracerebral hemorrhage were more common in subdural location of drain, though not reaching statistically significance level to favor one technique over another.

  14. Prognostic factors for medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, Derek; Al Shabanah, Mohamed; Al Shail, Essam; Gray, Alan; Hassounah, Maher; Khafaga, Yasser; Kofide, Amani; Mustafa, Mahmoud; Schultz, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prognostic factors for medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred and seventy-three consecutive patients with medulloblastoma, treated at King Faisal Specialist Hospital (KFSH) from 1988-1997, were reviewed. Eighty-four percent were children less than 15 years old. From 1988-1994, treatment was at the discretion of the investigator. From 1994-1998, patients entered a single-arm best practice protocol in which, in staged patients, the surgical intent was total resection, standard radiation treatment was defined, and adjuvant chemotherapy was given to a 'high-risk' subset. Results: For 150 patients who completed surgical and radiation treatment, the 5-year survival rate was 58%, compared with 0% for 16 patients who were unable to start or complete radiation treatment. For staged patients, the 5-year survival was M0 + M1, 78% and M2 + M3, 21% (p 14 years and gross cystic/necrotic features in the primary tumor. The size of the primary tumor, the degree of hydrocephalus at diagnosis, the presence of residual tumor in the post-operative CT/MRI, and the functional status of the patient prior to radiation treatment were not significant factors. Conclusions: Stage M0 + M1 was the most powerful favorable prognostic factor. In Saudi Arabia more patients present with advanced disseminated disease, 41% M2 + M3, than in the West, and this impacts adversely on overall survival. Total resection and standard radiation treatment were not sensitive prognostic factors in a treatment environment in which 78% of patients underwent at least 90% tumor resection and 60% received standard radiation treatment. In order to improve the proportion of patients able to complete radiation treatment, consideration should be given to limiting resection when the attainment of total resection is likely to be morbid, and to delaying rather than omitting radiation treatment in the patient severely compromised postoperatively

  15. ASC deficiency suppresses proliferation and prevents medulloblastoma incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, E R W; Patel, E Y; Flowers, C A; Crowther, A J; Ting, J P; Miller, C R; Gershon, T R; Deshmukh, M

    2015-01-15

    Apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) is silenced by promoter methylation in many types of tumors, yet ASC's role in most cancers remains unknown. Here, we show that ASC is highly expressed in a model of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain cancer; ASC is also expressed in human medulloblastomas. Importantly, while ASC deficiency did not affect normal cerebellar development, ASC knockout mice on the Smoothened (ND2:SmoA1) transgenic model of medulloblastoma exhibited a profound reduction in medulloblastoma incidence and a delayed tumor onset. A similar decrease in tumorigenesis with ASC deficiency was also seen in the hGFAP-Cre:SmoM2 mouse model of medulloblastoma. Interestingly, hyperproliferation of the external granule layer (EGL) was comparable at P20 in both wild-type and ASC-deficient SmoA1 mice. However, while the apoptosis and differentiation markers remained unchanged at this age, proliferation makers were decreased, and the EGL was reduced in thickness and area by P60. This reduction in proliferation with ASC deficiency was also seen in isolated SmoA1 cerebellar granule precursor cells in vitro, indicating that the effect of ASC deletion on proliferation was cell autonomous. Interestingly, ASC-deficient SmoA1 cerebella exhibited disrupted expression of genes in the transforming growth factor-β pathway and increased level of nuclear Smad3. Taken together, these results demonstrate an unexpected role for ASC in Sonic hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma tumorigenesis, thus identifying ASC as a promising novel target for antitumor therapy.

  16. Gene expression analyses of the spatio-temporal relationships of human medulloblastoma subgroups during early human neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia M Hooper

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common form of malignant paediatric brain tumour and is the leading cause of childhood cancer related mortality. The four molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma that have been identified - WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4 - have molecular and topographical characteristics suggestive of different cells of origin. Definitive identification of the cell(s of origin of the medulloblastoma subgroups, particularly the poorer prognosis Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma, is critical to understand the pathogenesis of the disease, and ultimately for the development of more effective treatment options. To address this issue, the gene expression profiles of normal human neural tissues and cell types representing a broad neuro-developmental continuum, were compared to those of two independent cohorts of primary human medulloblastoma specimens. Clustering, co-expression network, and gene expression analyses revealed that WNT and SHH medulloblastoma may be derived from distinct neural stem cell populations during early embryonic development, while the transcriptional profiles of Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma resemble cerebellar granule neuron precursors at weeks 10-15 and 20-30 of embryogenesis, respectively. Our data indicate that Group 3 medulloblastoma may arise through abnormal neuronal differentiation, whereas deregulation of synaptic pruning-associated apoptosis may be driving Group 4 tumorigenesis. Overall, these data provide significant new insight into the spatio-temporal relationships and molecular pathogenesis of the human medulloblastoma subgroups, and provide an important framework for the development of more refined model systems, and ultimately improved therapeutic strategies.

  17. Cortical herniation through compressive subdural membrane in an infant with a history of a large bihemispheric subdural hematoma and subdural-peritoneal shunt: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoco, Aleka; Emily Bennett, E; Recinos, Violette

    2017-02-01

    Cortical herniation through subdural membrane formation is a rare complication of chronic subdural fluid collections and may occur following subdural shunting. The authors present a unique case of progressive cortical herniation through a compressive subdural membrane that occurred concomitant with a functioning subdural-peritoneal shunt.

  18. Evaluation of subdural space after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odake, Genya

    1988-09-01

    Subdural low density lesions of two cases were reexplored after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma and thickening of the outer membrane was found in both cases. 1st case was a 88 year-old male, who had shown at least 7 months history of chronic subdural fluid accumulation. Reexploration of residual subdural low density space on CT after 14 days following the evacuation disclosed thickening of the outer membrane and none of fluid. 2nd case was a 71 year-old male who had a history of head injury 2 months before. Reexploration of residual low density lesion 14 days later disclosed a similar thickening of the outer membrane without fluid accumulation. The postoperative low density area in both cases was suspected to be a residual hematoma before reexploratin, but only thickening of the outer membrane of the hematoma was found. The outer membrane of 2nd case was histologically composed of layers of matured granulation, contiguous to the dura and a layer of immature granulation with microhemorrhage, facing the cavity. Thickening of the outer membrane seems to play an important role not only to develope, but to resolve the chronic subdural hematoma. It is neccessary to evaluate other factors than low density space per se to eliminate a needless reexploration.

  19. Evaluation of subdural space after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odake, Genya

    1988-01-01

    Subdural low density lesions of two cases were reexplored after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma and thickening of the outer membrane was found in both cases. 1st case was a 88 year-old male, who had shown at least 7 months history of chronic subdural fluid accumulation. Reexploration of residual subdural low density space on CT after 14 days following the evacuation disclosed thickening of the outer membrane and none of fluid. 2nd case was a 71 year-old male who had a history of head injury 2 months before. Reexploration of residual low density lesion 14 days later disclosed a similar thickening of the outer membrane without fluid accumulation. The postoperative low density area in both cases was suspected to be a residual hematoma before reexploratin, but only thickening of the outer membrane of the hematoma was found. The outer membrane of 2nd case was histologically composed of layers of matured granulation, contiguous to the dura and a layer of immature granulation with microhemorrhage, facing the cavity. Thickening of the outer membrane seems to play an important role not only to develope, but to resolve the chronic subdural hematoma. It is neccessary to evaluate other factors than low density space per se to eliminate a needless reexploration. (author)

  20. Cerebellar medulloblastoma presenting with skeletal metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barai Sukanta

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastomas are highly malignant brain tumours, but only rarely produce skeletal metastases. No case of medulloblastoma has been documented to have produced skeletal metastases prior to craniotomy or shunt surgery. A 21-year-old male presented with pain in the hip and lower back with difficulty in walking of 3 months′ duration. Signs of cerebellar dysfunction were present hence a diagnosis of cerebellar neoplasm or skeletal tuberculosis with cerebellar abscess formation was considered. MRI of brain revealed a lesion in the cerebellum suggestive of medulloblastoma. Bone scan revealed multiple sites of skeletal metastases excluding the lumbar vertebrae. MRI of lumbar spine and hip revealed metastases to all lumbar vertebrae and both hips. Computed tomography-guided biopsy was obtained from the L3 vertebra, which revealed metastatic deposits from medulloblastoma. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology showed the presence of medulloblastoma cells. A final diagnosis of cerebellar medulloblastoma with skeletal metastases was made. He underwent craniotomy and histopathology confirmed medulloblastoma.

  1. Outcome in Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Subdural vs. Subgaleal Drain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishfaq, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcome after surgery for chronic subdural hematoma when the drain is placed in subdural space or subgaleal space. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital, Lahore, from July 2015 to June 2016. Methodology: Patients with chronic subdural hematoma of both genders and age, ranging between 55 to 85 years, were included. Patients on antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy and acute on chronic subdural hematoma were excluded. Patients were divided in two equal groups each depending on whether drain was placed in subgaleal space (Group 1), and subdual space (Group 2), (n=31 patients each). Patients were positioned flat in bed after surgery. Clinical and radiological parameters and clinical outcome were compared between the two groups. Statistical test with significance of p <0.05 was utilized using Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS version 17). Results: Median age of the 62 patients was 72 +-12.5 years. Headache was the most common symptom reported in both groups, (n=47,75.8%) patients. Median thickness of hematoma was 15 +-6.5 mm. Patients with subdural drain placement had more complications such as pneumocephalus 11 (35.4%) vs. 6 (19.3%), and intracerebral hemorrhage 4 (12.9%) vs. 2 (6.4%). Clinical outcome was good in both groups 27 (87%) in Group 1 and 28 (90%) in Group 2. Conclusion: Patients of both groups had good outcome after surgery. Complications like pneumocephalus and intracerebral hemorrhage were more common in subdural location of drain, though not reaching statistically significance level to favor one technique over another. (author)

  2. Medulloblastoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.F.; Renier, D.; Czernichow, P.; Benveniste, L.; Pierre-Kahn, A.

    1979-01-01

    The authors report on a series of 57 medulloblastomas in children operated upon between 1964 and 1976. Among these children, 44 completed the treatment with radiotherapy to the whole central nervous system. The postoperative mortality rate is 10.5%. Postoperative deaths occurred mainly in infants or when a tumour involved the brain stem. The five-year survival rate is 54% in the whole series. It rose to 71% in the patients who completed the treatment with radiotherapy. The study shows that the life of survivals is frequently impaired by mental or behavioural disturbances. IQ varies from 70 to 90 in 58% of the children; it is below 70 in 31%. Behavioural disturbances are found in 93% of cases. 82% have defective spatial orientation, dysphasia, or dysgraphia. In order to evaluate the responsibility of X-ray therapy for the development of these sequelae, the results have been compared to those of a series of cerebellar astrocytomas surgically removed, but not irradiated. The comparison shows that radiotherapy is at least partially responsible for the mental and behavioural disturbances. No relation was found between these disturbances and a persistent ventricular dilatation or an endocrine dysfunction. However the endocrine assessment showed growth hormone deficiency in 65% of the children, short stature in 55%, and compensated hypothyroidism in 58%. (author)

  3. Management of Recurrent Subdural Hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Virendra R; Scranton, Robert A; Britz, Gavin W

    2017-04-01

    Subdural hematomas commonly recur after surgical evacuation, at a rate of 2% to 37%. Risk factors for recurrence can be patient related, radiologic, or surgical. Patient-related risk factors include alcoholism, seizure disorders, coagulopathy, and history of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Radiologic factors include poor brain reexpansion postoperatively, significant subdural air, greater midline shift, heterogeneous hematomas (layered or multi-loculated), and higher-density hematomas. Surgical factors include lack of or poor postoperative drainage. Most recurrent hematomas are managed successfully with burr hole craniostomies with postoperative closed-system drainage. Refractory hematomas may be managed with a variety of techniques, including craniotomy or subdural-peritoneal shunt placement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Traumatic subdural hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jenn-Yeu; Chen, Yu-Hao; Hung, Kuang-Chen; Chang, Ti-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is rare and its mechanism remains unclear. This intervention describes a patient with mental retardation who was suffering from back pain and progressive weakness of the lower limbs following a traffic accident. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a lumbar subdural lesion. Hematoma was identified in the spinal subdural space during an operation. The muscle power of both lower limbs recovered to normal after surgery. The isolated traumatic spinal subdural hematoma was not associated with intracranial subdural hemorrhage. A spinal subdural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression, especially for patients who have sustained spinal trauma. Emergency surgical decompression is usually the optimal treatment for a spinal subdural hematoma with acute deterioration and severe neurological deficits. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Subdural effusions in children under two years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothenberger, A.; Brandl, H.

    1980-01-01

    We investigated 161 children under 24 months of age by CT of the skull and reviewed the anamnestic and clinical history. 87 children showed subdural effusions, and 74 did not. There were 33 patients with other pathological findings in CT, and 41 had normal scans. Age and sex distribution as well as localization of the subdural effusions were consistent with the literature. The 87 children with subdural effusions represented 1,7% in a sample of about 5.000 CT scans. CT was the most reliable method for diagnosis of subdural effusions, compared to other techniques. There was a preponderance of small subdural effusions from 1 to 7 mm thickness (51%). Other CT abnormalities accompanying subdural effusions were found. Most frequently the interhemispheric sulcus was dilated and an internal hydrocephalus was present. Also in our group there were 7 anamnestical and 6 clinical symptoms highly diagnostic of subdural effusions. (orig.) [de

  6. Imaging Biomarkers for Adult Medulloblastomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, V C; Warmuth-Metz, M; Reh, C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The occurrence of medulloblastomas in adults is rare; nevertheless, these tumors can be subdivided into genetic and histologic entities each having distinct prognoses. This study aimed to identify MR imaging biomarkers to classify these entities and to uncover differences ...

  7. The child medulloblastoma in Tunisia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochbati, L.; Bouaouina, N.; Besbes, M.; Frikha, H.; Benna, F.; Daoud, J.; Gargouri, W.; Damak, H.; Ben Abdallah, M.; Maalej, M.

    2000-01-01

    The medulloblastoma is the first pediatric cerebral tumor in Tunisia. Its treatment relies on the surgery and radiotherapy of cerebro-spinal axis. The chemotherapy is in progress for evaluation to try a de-escalation of irradiation dose. (N.C.)

  8. MRI findings of vermian medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seung Eun; Choi, Kyu Ho; Chung, Myung Hee; Yang, Il Kwon; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Park, Young Sub

    1996-01-01

    To find characteristic MRI features of vermian medulloblastoma. Materials and methods; MRI studies and medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 12 patients with surgically proven midline medulloblastoma. The assessment concerned appearance of the mass in relation to surrounding structures: MR signal intensity; the enhancement pattern; the mass's location and size: presence of a cystic/necrotic area, calcification, or vascular void: extension through the foramen Luschka: degree of hydrocephalus: and presence of tonsillar herniation. The midline medulloblastoma commonly showed roundish moon-surface appearance, especially on the axial T2-weighted images. All tumors showed heterogeneous signal intensities mainly due to intratumoral cystic/necrotic or hemorrhagic changes. The tumors were commonly located at mid-and/or inferior vermis. Occasionally the tumors extended through the foramen Luschka, and caused obstructive hydrocephalus of moderate to severe degree. Post-contrast study showed heterogeneous, dense contrast enhancement in the majority of patients. The MR finding of the moon-surface appearance formed by both the mass and the intratumoral cystic/necrotic change as seen on axial T2-weighted images could be helpful in the diagnosis of vermian medulloblastoma

  9. MRI of medulloblastoma in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malheiros, S.M.F.; Santos, A.J.; Borges, L.R.R.; Guimaraes, I.F.; Franco, C.M.R.; Gabbai, A.A.; Carrete, H.; Stavale, J.N.; Pelaez, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    Medulloblastoma has variable appearances on MRI in both children and adults. Adults are more likely to have heterogeneous cerebellar hemisphere tumours, and this is thought to be related to the greater prevalence of desmoplastic tumours in adulthood. Few studies have addressed the MRI features of adult medulloblastoma and the specific characteristics of desmoplastic and classic tumours have not been analysed. Our aim was to analyse the imaging characteristics of desmoplastic (DM) and classic (CM) medulloblastomas in adult. We retrospectively studied preoperative MRI of six men and three women, median age 33 years, range 23-53 years, with pathologically proved medulloblastomas. There were six (67%) with DM. The tumour was in the cerebellar hemisphere in eight patients (89%), including the three with CM, one of which was bilateral. All tumours were heterogeneous, giving predominantly low or isointense signal on T1- and isointense signal on T2-weighted images. Cystic or necrotic areas in all patients were particularly visible on T2-weighted images. Contrast enhancement was absent in one DM and varied from slight to intense in eight (three CM), homogeneous in one DM and patchy in seven. All tumours extended to the surface of the cerebellum and two had well-defined margins. MRI does not allow a clear distinction between DM and CM in adults. (orig.)

  10. Medulloblastoma: progress over time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, Robert I.; Williams, Janet R.; De-loyde, Katie J.; Meagher, Nicola S.; Cohn, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common central nervous system tumour in children aged 0–4 years, with 75% of cases occurring in patients <16 years, and rare in adults. The intent of this audit is to review a single centre's experience and to compare outcomes with other centres' outcomes. This Ethics approved retrospective audit evaluates the paediatric population aged <16 years who received radiotherapy as their initial or salvage treatment at the Prince of Wales Hospital Cancer Centre between 1972 and 2007. The primary and secondary end-points were progression-free survival (PFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS), with comparisons made between patients treated before and after 1990, and the impact of high- and low-risk disease. There were 80 eligible patients, 78 who had radiotherapy at initial presentation, and 2 at the time of recurrence. Median age was 6.5 years, 52 were boys and 28 were girls. Seventy-eight patients had a surgical procedure and ultimately received craniospinal radiotherapy. Of these 78 patients, 32 (40%) had a macroscopically complete resection. The 5-year PFS was 69.7%. The 5-year PFS for patients treated pre and post 1990 was 66.1% and 71.8%, respectively. The 5-year CSS for high- and low-risk patients was 61.1% and 78.4%, respectively. Ultimately, 33% of patients were dead due to disease. This audit demonstrates those children referred to this facility for treatment have comparable survival to that of other major centres.

  11. Chronic subdural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis. PMID:27695533

  12. Chronic spinal subdural haematoma associated with intracranial subdural haematoma: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillich, M.; Kammerhuber, F.; Reittner, P.; Szolar, D.H.; Leber, K.A.

    1999-01-01

    Chronic spinal subdural haematoma is a uncommon. We describe the CT and MRI appearances of chronic spinal and intracranial subdural haematomas following minor trauma. The aetiology, pathogenesis and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Lester

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 21-year-old female with no past medical history presented to the ED after multiple tonic-clonic seizures over the previous 12 hours, the longest lasting 20 seconds. She returned to baseline after each seizure, had no obvious signs of trauma, and did not exhibit any focal neurologic deficits. She denied illicit drugs or new medications. A family member noted that she had fallen from her bed (approximately 3 feet high 2 days ago. Significant findings: Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT of the Head showed a dense extra-axial collection along the left frontal and parietal regions, extending superior to the vertex with mild mass effect, but no midline shift. Discussion: Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH is a term to describe any abnormal bleeding within the bony confines of the skull. Most commonly, subdural hemorrhages (SDH result from injury to the bridging veins that lead to bleeding between the dura and arachnoid maters. However, in 20%-30% of cases an arterial source of bleeding can be found.1 For adults, motor vehicle collisions and other unintentional head trauma are typically the provoking factors in developing SDH. Falls in the elderly are a common cause of SDH since diffuse cerebral atrophy leads to increased shear forces upon vasculature structures during the fall. The risk of SDH increases with the use of anti-thrombotic agents.2 Clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic to coma (in 50 percent of acute SDH. Chronic SDH may present with headaches, light-headedness, cognitive impairment, and seizures.1 The risk of posttraumatic epileptic seizures (PTS is higher in acute SDH. Risk factors for acute SDH PTS include low Glasgow Coma Score and craniotomy, whereas risk factors for PTS in chronic SDH include alcohol abuse, change in mental status, previous stroke, and hematoma density on CT.3 CT is the most widely used imaging modality for identifying ICH. Acute SDH (within 1-2 days are visualized as hyperdense

  14. Establishment of a novel human medulloblastoma cell line characterized by highly aggressive stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patrícia Benites Gonçalves da; Rodini, Carolina Oliveira; Kaid, Carolini; Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Pereira, Márcia Cristina Leite; Matushita, Hamilton; Costa, Silvia Souza da; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2016-08-01

    Medulloblastoma is a highly aggressive brain tumor and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality related to childhood cancer. These tumors display differential ability to metastasize and respond to treatment, which reflects their high degree of heterogeneity at the genetic and molecular levels. Such heterogeneity of medulloblastoma brings an additional challenge to the understanding of its physiopathology and impacts the development of new therapeutic strategies. This translational effort has been the focus of most pre-clinical studies which invariably employ experimental models using human tumor cell lines. Nonetheless, compared to other cancers, relatively few cell lines of human medulloblastoma are available in central repositories, partly due to the rarity of these tumors and to the intrinsic difficulties in establishing continuous cell lines from pediatric brain tumors. Here, we report the establishment of a new human medulloblastoma cell line which, in comparison with the commonly used and well-established cell line Daoy, is characterized by enhanced proliferation and invasion capabilities, stem cell properties, increased chemoresistance, tumorigenicity in an orthotopic metastatic model, replication of original medulloblastoma behavior in vivo, strong chromosome structural instability and deregulation of genes involved in neural development. These features are advantageous for designing biologically relevant experimental models in clinically oriented studies, making this novel cell line, named USP-13-Med, instrumental for the study of medulloblastoma biology and treatment.

  15. Spinal subdural hematoma following cranial subdural hematoma : a case report with a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Chung, Daeyeong; Shin, Dong Ah

    2013-12-01

    Coexistence of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas is rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas after previous head trauma. As the pathogenesis of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma yet remains unclear, we developed an alternative theory to those proposed in the literature for their coexistence, the migration of blood through the subdural space.

  16. Medulloblastoma stem cells: Promising targets in medulloblastoma therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Guo?Hao; Xu, Qing?Fu; Cui, You?Hong; Li, Ningning; Bian, Xiu?Wu; Lv, Sheng?Qing

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Despite great improvements in the therapeutic regimen, relapse and leptomeningeal dissemination still pose great challenges to the long?term survival of MB patients. Developing more effective strategies has become extremely urgent. In recent years, a number of malignancies, including MB, have been found to contain a subpopulation of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), or tumor initiating/propagating cells. Th...

  17. Treatment of medulloblastoma with oncolytic measles viruses expressing the angiogenesis inhibitors endostatin and angiostatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutzen, Brian; Bid, Hemant Kumar; Houghton, Peter J; Pierson, Christopher R; Powell, Kimerly; Bratasz, Anna; Raffel, Corey; Studebaker, Adam W

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common type of pediatric brain tumor. Although numerous factors influence patient survival rates, more than 30% of all cases will ultimately be refractory to conventional therapies. Current standards of care are also associated with significant morbidities, giving impetus for the development of new treatments. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virotherapy is effective against medulloblastoma, leading to significant prolongation of survival and even cures in mouse xenograft models of localized and metastatic disease. Because medulloblastomas are known to be highly vascularized tumors, we reasoned that the addition of angiogenesis inhibitors could further enhance the efficacy of oncolytic measles virotherapy. Toward this end, we have engineered an oncolytic measles virus that express a fusion protein of endostatin and angiostatin, two endogenous and potent inhibitors of angiogenesis. Oncolytic measles viruses encoding human and mouse variants of a secretable endostatin/angiostatin fusion protein were designed and rescued according to established protocols. These viruses, known as MV-hE:A and MV-mE:A respectively, were then evaluated for their anti-angiogenic potential and efficacy against medulloblastoma cell lines and orthotopic mouse models of localized disease. Medulloblastoma cells infected by MV-E:A readily secrete endostatin and angiostatin prior to lysis. The inclusion of the endostatin/angiostatin gene did not negatively impact the measles virus’ cytotoxicity against medulloblastoma cells or alter its growth kinetics. Conditioned media obtained from these infected cells was capable of inhibiting multiple angiogenic factors in vitro, significantly reducing endothelial cell tube formation, viability and migration compared to conditioned media derived from cells infected by a control measles virus. Mice that were given a single intratumoral injection of MV-E:A likewise showed reduced numbers of tumor-associated blood

  18. Effect of addition of clopidogrel to aspirin on subdural hematoma: meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheet, Majid F; Pearce, Lesly A; Hart, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    Clopidogrel combined with aspirin is routinely prescribed after coronary artery stenting, in patients with acute coronary syndromes, and recently to prevent stroke in patients with acute minor ischemic stroke and TIA. Subdural hematomas are an important complication of antithrombotic treatment, but the risk associated with clopidogrel plus aspirin has not been previously defined. To quantify the risk of subdural hematoma associated with dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin. Randomized clinical trials comparing clopidogrel plus aspirin with aspirin alone were identified by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1990 to 2014, and restricted to those with more than 7 days of treatment. Two reviewers independently extracted data about subdural hematomas. Of 24 randomized trials testing clopidogrel added to aspirin, results for subdural hematoma were available for 11 trials, of which eight did not identify any subdural hematomas. The three trials reporting subdural hematomas were double-blind and included patients with recent lacunar stroke, acute coronary syndromes or atrial fibrillation with a total of 23,136 patients (mean age 66 years) and reported 39 subdural hematomas during a mean follow-up 2.1 years per patient. Clopidogrel plus aspirin was associated with a significantly increased risk of subdural hematoma compared with aspirin alone (risk ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.0, 3.8; P = 0.04; fixed effects model; I2 for heterogeneity of 0%, P = 0.51). The average absolute incidence of subdural hematoma averaged 1.1 (95% CI 0.7,1.6) per 1000 patient - years among those assigned clopidogrel plus aspirin in 11 randomized trials. The absolute rate of subdural hematoma during dual antiplatelet therapy is low, averaging 1.1 per 1000 patient-years. Chronic treatment with clopidogrel plus aspirin significantly increases the risk of subdural hematoma compared with aspirin alone. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  19. MRI of subdural fluid collections in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Tsuneyuki; Takagi, Takuji; Nagai, Hajime; Banno, Tatsuo

    1988-01-01

    Twenty cases of subdural fluid collectioin in infants were examined by MRI (0.5 Tesla). The findings of MRI were classified into 3 groups as follows: Group I: Blood component is observed in the entire subdural fluid (4 cases, 20 %). Group II: Blood component is observed in a part of the subdural fluid (4 cases, 20 %). Group III: Subdural fluid consists of pure CSF (12 cases, 60 %). In general, operative treatment should be considered for cases which have blood components in the subdural space and/or symptoms and signs of increased ICP. In group I, operation was performed on 2 cases (50 %). In group II, subdural fluid collections were associated with dilated subarachnoid spaces and 2 cases were operated on in this group (50 %). In group III, only one case was operated on (8.3 %) and subdural fluid collections disappeared spontaneously in 4 cases of this group. The precise anatomical location of subdural fluid collections could not be decided in several cases even by MRI. The cases which had blood components, tended to demonstrate membranes frequently on MRI. However, the existence of blood components did not affect the DQ S significantly. The prognosis of subdural fluid collection is supposedly related to the degree of preexistent brain damage. (author)

  20. Sonic hedgehog-induced histone deacetylase activation is required for cerebellar granule precursor hyperplasia in medulloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Joon Lee

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor, is thought to arise from deregulated proliferation of cerebellar granule precursor (CGP cells. Sonic hedgehog (Shh is the primary mitogen that regulates proliferation of CGP cells during the early stages of postnatal cerebellum development. Aberrant activation of Shh signaling during this time has been associated with hyperplasia of CGP cells and eventually may lead to the development of medulloblastoma. The molecular targets of Shh signaling involved in medulloblastoma formation are still not well-understood. Here, we show that Shh regulates sustained activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs and that this activity is required for continued proliferation of CGP cells. Suppression of HDAC activity not only blocked the Shh-induced CGP proliferation in primary cell cultures, but also ameliorated aberrant CGP proliferation at the external germinal layer (EGL in a medulloblastoma mouse model. Increased levels of mRNA and protein of several HDAC family members were found in medulloblastoma compared to wild type cerebellum suggesting that HDAC activity is required for the survival/progression of tumor cells. The identification of a role of HDACs in the early steps of medulloblastoma formation suggests there may be a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors in this disease.

  1. Impact of radiation technique upon the outcome of treatment for medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, Edward C.

    1996-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) is an essential component of the therapy of medulloblastoma. Because medulloblastoma disseminates via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), CSI technique involves the irradiation of all CSF-bearing areas which are at risk for tumor seeding. Underdosing with radiation because of inadequacies in CSI technique will produce dose 'cold spots' which have the potential of serving as a nidus for tumor recurrence. A simple mathematic model of subclinical disease in medulloblastoma based on the available data concerning the radiosensitivity of medulloblastoma cell lines as well as the known clinical dose-response relationships support the hypothesis that for most cases of medulloblastoma, the radiotherapist is working in a range of doses arrayed on the steep portion of the tumor control probability curve. Underdosing of CSF-bearing areas because of technical problems at the junction of the cranial and spinal fields of irradiation, placement of shielding blocks in the cribiform plate-sub frontal region, and/or anatomic errors in the design of the caudal end of the CSI fields may lead to significant risks of tumor relapse. One may debate the necessity of a posterior fossa boost encompassing the entire anatomic posterior fossa rather than the primary tumor volume with a margin. This review critically evaluates the potential impact of CSI technique upon the outcome of treatment for medulloblastoma, and suggests future areas of inquiry

  2. The cellular and molecular biology of medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peringa, A; Fung, KM; Muragaki, Y; Trojanowski, JQ

    1995-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are prototypical of primitive neuroectodermal tumors which are some of the most frequent malignant brain tumors of childhood. The cell biology of medulloblastomas is still poorly understood, but recent studies of the expression of trophic factors and their receptors in

  3. Adult medulloblastoma with myogenic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia-ling ZHANG

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinicopathological features of adult medulloblastoma with myogenic differentiation and to discuss clinicopathological differentiations from relevant tumors, so as to improve the ability of diagnosing and differentiating this kind of tumor. Methods The clinical manifestations, imaging, pathological features and immunohistochemical features of one case of adult medulloblastoma with myogenic differentiation were analyzed, and related literatures were reviewed. Results A 32-year-old female patient presented with repeated distortion of mouth and facial numbness for over 6 years. T1WI showed a mixed-signal lesion in the cerebellar vermis and dorsal part of brainstem, and protruded toward the fourth ventricle. Enhanced T1WI showed a round strengthened nodule in the lesion. During operation, it was seen that the tumor arised in cerebellar vermis, projected into the fourth ventricle and invaded brainstem. On microscopy examination, it was found that oval nuclei tumor cells were distributed in sheet or scattered patterns, and neuroblastic rosettes were observed. Abundant and eosinophilic cytoplasm, eccentrically placed and atypical nuclei containing hyperchromatic chromatin or prominent nucleoli in the tumor could be displayed. Mitoses were frequently seen. The tumor also presented with fresh and old hemorrhage in some place. Immunohistochemical staining showed that tumor cells were diffusely positive for integrase interactor 1 (INI1, synaptophysin (Syn, chromogranin A (CgA, human internexin neuronal intermediate filament protein α (INα, neurofilament protein (NF, Nestin (Nes, β-catenin and P53, and partly positive for desmin (Des, neuronal nuclei (NeuN and S-100 protein (S-100, but negative for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, oligodendrocyte transcription factor-2 (Olig-2, CD99, pan cytokeratin (PCK, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, MyoD1, myogenin, muscle-specific actin (MSA and smooth muscle actin (SMA. Ki-67

  4. Metrizamide CT cisternography in cases of traumatic subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hematoma

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    Morimoto, Tetsuya; Takemura, Kiyoshi; Inui, Shoji; Hori, Yutaka; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Miyamoto, Seiji; Kyoi, Kikuo; Utsumi, Shozaburo

    1987-06-01

    Subdural fluid collection and some cases of chronic subdural hematoma are observed by means of a CT scan as marginal low-density areas (m-LDA) in head-injured patients. It is thought that the cerebro-spinal fluid dynamics may play an important role in the pathogenesis and clinical course of such subdural pathology. We applied metrizamide CT cisternography to these cases. According to the findings of this metrizamide CT cisternography (M-CTC), the examples of subdural pathology can be classified into four types: Type I: Metrizamide filling is seen in both the cortical subarachnoid space and the m-LDA. Type II: Metrizamide filling is seen only in the cortical subarachnoid space, not in the m-LDA. Type III: Metrizamide filling is very poor in both the cortical subarachnoid space and the m-LDA. Type IV: Metrizamide filling extends well into the m-LDA, but only partially into the cortical subarachnoid space. Many of these cases studied had been operated on and the subdural pathology had been ascertained. From a comparison between the M-CTC and subdural types of pathology, subdural pathology of Types I, II, and III can all be classified as cases of a subdural hygroma (subdural fluid collection or subdural effusion), while Type IV is a chronic subdural hematoma. The characteristics and choice of treatment of each type may be briefly shown as follows: For Type I conservative therapy is recommended because of its tendency to decrease rapidly. For Type II a subduro-peritoneal shunt is recommended, for the m-LDA is long-standing and a simple burrhole evacuation sometimes results in an aggravation of the subdural hygroma. For Type III a burrhole evacuation is recommended; also, care must be taken against the development of a chronic subdural hematoma. For Type IV a burrhole evacuation is recommended became such cases are all chronic subdural hematoma. (J.P.N.).

  5. Chronic subdural haematoma complicating spinal anaesthesia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subdural haematoma is a rare but serious complication of dural puncture. We report a case of chronic subdural haematoma, which occurred following spinal anaesthesia for elective caesarean section. A 34-year-old multiparous woman presented with a post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) following spinal anaesthesia.

  6. c-Myc Enhances Sonic Hedgehog-Induced Medulloblastoma Formation from Nestin-Expressing Neural Progenitors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Rao

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastomas are malignant brain tumors that arise in the cerebella of children. The presumed cellsof-origin are undifferentiated precursors of granule neurons that occupy the external granule layer (EGL of the developing cerebellum. The overexpression of proteins that normally stimulate proliferation of neural progenitor cells may initiate medulloblastoma formation. Two known mitogens for neural progenitors are the c-Myc oncoprotein and Sonic hedgehog (Shh, a crucial determinant of embryonic pattern formation in the central nervous system. We modeled the ability of c-Myc and Shh to induce medulloblastoma in mice using the RCAS/tv-a system, which allows postnatal gene transfer and expression in a cell type-specific manner. We targeted the expression of Shh and c-Myc to nestin-expressing neural progenitor cells by injecting replication-competent ALV splice acceptor (RCAS vectors into the cerebella of newborn mice. Following injection with RCAS-Shh alone, 3/32 (9% mice developed medulloblastomas and 5/32 showed multifocal hyperproliferation of the EGL, possibly a precursor stage of medulloblastoma. Following injection with RCAS-Shh plus RCAS-Myc, 9/39 (23% mice developed medulloblastomas. We conclude that nestin-expressing neural progenitors, present in the cerebellum at birth, can act as the cells-of-origin for medulloblastoma, and that c-Myc cooperates with Shh to enhance tumorigenicity.

  7. Postoperative course of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tsubone, Kyoji; Kyuma, Yoshikazu; Kuwabara, Takeo

    1983-01-01

    1) Fourty cases of chronic subdural hematoma were operated on by trephination, irrigation and external drainage. Postoperative neurological recovery and decrease of hematoma cavity on CT scan were followed. 2) Operation were effective for recovery of neurological grade in 28 cases, moderately effective in 7 cases and not effective in 5 cases. 3) Withinthe tenth postoperative day, more than half residual hematoma cavity existed in 53% of examined cases. After that, more than half residual cavity existed in only 17%. 4) Preoperative feature of neurologically unimproved cases were no definite history of head trauma and water like low density of hematoma cavity. Postoperative feature was persistence of more than three fourth of residual hematoma cavity on CT scan. 5) A group of unimproved cases described above are thought to have a feature of subdural hygroma rather than subdural hematoma. When possibility of subdural hygroma is high in preoperative differential diagnosis, indication of operation should be different from chronic subdural hematoma. (author)

  8. Computed tomography of isodense subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jae Won; Kim, Ock Dong; Woo, Won Hyung

    1983-01-01

    Most subdural hematomas with significant differed attenuation from that of adjacent brain tissue can be accurately diagnosed by CT. Difficulty arises when the hematoma is isodense that is exhibited similar attenuation to that of brain. Unilateral isodense subdural hematoma can be identified by indirect sign such as mass effect. Occasionally, the use of intravenous contrast material to aid in identifying isodense subdural hematomas has met with variable success. Moreover, bilateral isodense subdural hematoma may be more difficult. We therefore considered it of interest to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of CT in isodense subdural hematomas. We have analysed 13 cases surgically provened cases of isodense subdural hematoma examined at Korea General Hospital from October 1981 to April 1982. The results were as follows: 1. One hundred twenty seven cases of subdural hematomas were studied by CT, 13 cases (10.2%) of which were isodense. 2. The age distribution was from 29 years to 69 years and mean age was 52 years. The sex ratio was 11 male to 2 female. 3. Seven (53.8%) of 13 cases has a history of head trauma. 4. The time interval which subdural hematoma became isodense was from 1 week to 4 months and peak time interval was from 1 week to 3 weeks. 5. The precontrast CT scan of isodense subdural hematoma appeared shifting of midline structure, compression and deformity of the ventricles in all 13 cases, effacement of cerebral sulci in 10 cases (76.9%) and dilatation of contralateral ventricles in 4 cases (30.8%). 6. The postcontrast CT scan demonstrated enhancement of the medial margin of the lession in 4 (30.8%) of 13 cases and displacement of cortical vein away from the inner table of the skull in 3 (23.1%) of 13 cases. 7. Bilateral isodense subdural hematomas were 2 (15.4%) of 13 cases

  9. Twelve clinically significant points in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Kajiwara, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yosuke; Takayasu, Takeshi; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    Though medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor during childhood, only 80 newly-diagnosed tumors develos every year, as the annual incidence is extremely rare with an occurrence of 0.5 per 100,000 children younger than 15-year-old and of 0.7 per 100,000 for the entire population. Images obtained of medulloblastoma are characterized by a round heterogeously-enhanced mass in or adjacent to the VIth ventricle. Objectives of surgical treatment are the maximum resectioning of the main mass and the relief of the obstructive hydrocephalus. Cerebellar mutism occurs a few days after one fourth of medulloblastoma surgery, and lasts approximately for 50 days followed by subsequent dysarthria. Pathological subtypes include classic medulloblastoma, desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma, medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity, large cell/anaplastic medulloblastoma, all corresponding to World Health Organization (WHO) grade IV. According to age, residual tumor size, and disseminated staging, patients are divided into average-risk group, high-risk group, or baby-medulloblastoma after surgery. Standard treatment in average-risk group includes 23.4-Gy cranio-spinal irradiation (CSI) with posterior boost followed by chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin (CDDP), alkylating agents, and vincristine. Patients in high-risk group receive over 36-Gy CSI with boost radiotherapy to nodular lesions before, concomitantly with, or followed by dose-intensity chemotherapy. In cases with gross total removal, or desmoplastic/nodular pathology radiotherapy for patients younger than 3-year-old are often delayed until they turn 3-year-old, and are able to survive for long time by appropriate chemotherapy alone. Adolescent survivors with childhood medulloblastoma have a number of late adverse effects regarding another neoplasm, neuro-cognitive function, endocrine activity, cardiovascular organs, and skeletal system. Comprehensive follow-up and support system are mandatory. (author)

  10. Radiation therapy for pinealoma, medulloblastoma and ependymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Samon; Saito, Yasuo; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kubota, Norihiko; Ito, Hideharu

    1984-01-01

    Eight cases with pinealoma, 4 cases with medulloblastoma and 3 cases with ependymoma those recieved radiotherapy with or without operative procedures were reported. All patients were childrens or young adults. The responses to irradiation evaluated on computed tomography were very good in most of these tumors. Cerebrospinal disseminations were observed in 3 cases with pinealoma, 3 cases with medulloblastoma and 2 cases with ependymoma. Therefore, it is considered that the whole brain irradiation is necessary in patients with pinealoma and whole brain and whole spinal irradiations should be done in patients with medulloblastoma and patients with ependymoblastoma. (author)

  11. Survival in pediatric medulloblastoma: a population-based observational study to improve prognostication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Alexander G; Wang, Anthony C; Westwick, Harrison J; Ibrahim, George M; Ariani, Rojine T; Crevier, Louis; Perreault, Sebastien; Davidson, Tom; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Fallah, Aria

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common form of brain malignancy of childhood. The mainstay of epidemiological data regarding childhood medulloblastoma is derived from case series, hence population-based studies are warranted to improve the accuracy of survival estimates. To utilize a big-data approach to update survival estimates in a contemporary cohort of children with medulloblastoma. We performed a population-based retrospective observational cohort study utilizing the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database that captures all children, less than 20 years of age, between 1973 and 2012 in 18 geographical regions representing 28% of the US population. We included all participants with a presumed or histologically diagnosis of medulloblastoma. The main outcome of interest is survivors at 1, 5 and 10 years following diagnosis. A cohort of 1735 children with a median (interquartile range) age at diagnosis of 7 (4-11) years, with a diagnosis of medulloblastoma were identified. The incidence and prevalence of pediatric medulloblastoma has remained stable over the past 4 decades. There is a critical time point at 1990 when the overall survival has drastically improved. In the contemporary cohort (1990 onwards), the percentage of participants alive was 86, 70 and 63% at 1, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Multivariate Cox-Regression model demonstrated Radiation (HR 0.37; 95% CI 0.30-0.46, p < 0.001) and Surgery (HR 0.42; 95% CI 0.30-0.58, p < 0.001) independently predict survival. The probability of mortality from a neurological cause is <5% in patients who are alive 8 years following diagnosis. The SEER cohort analysis demonstrates significant improvements in pediatric medulloblastoma survival. In contrast to previous reports, the majority of patients survive in the modern era, and those alive 8 years following initial diagnosis are likely a long-term survivor. The importance of minimizing treatment-related toxicity is increasingly apparent given

  12. Convergence of BMI1 and CHD7 on ERK Signaling in Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Badodi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We describe molecular convergence between BMI1 and CHD7 in the initiation of medulloblastoma. Identified in a functional genomic screen in mouse models, a BMI1High;CHD7Low expression signature within medulloblastoma characterizes patients with poor overall survival. We show that BMI1-mediated repression of the ERK1/2 pathway leads to increased proliferation and tumor burden in primary human MB cells and in a xenograft model, respectively. We provide evidence that repression of the ERK inhibitor DUSP4 by BMI1 is dependent on a more accessible chromatin configuration in G4 MB cells with low CHD7 expression. These findings extend current knowledge of the role of BMI1 and CHD7 in medulloblastoma pathogenesis, and they raise the possibility that pharmacological targeting of BMI1 or ERK may be particularly indicated in a subgroup of MB with low expression levels of CHD7. : Badodi et al. find convergence of the chromatin modifiers BMI1 and CHD7 in medulloblastoma pathogenesis, and they show that this pathway regulates tumor proliferation and growth via ERK signaling. Keywords: BMI1, CHD7, DUSP4, ERK, medulloblastoma, PcG genes, mouse models, epigenetics, chromatin

  13. [Medulloblastoma: improved survival in recent decades. Unicentric experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igual Estellés, Lucía; Berlanga Charriel, Pablo; Cañete Nieto, Adela

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to analyse variations in the treatment of medulloblastoma, the most common childhood brain tumour, and its impact on survival over the past two decades, as well as its clinical and pathological features. Survival analysis of all patients under 14 years old diagnosed with medulloblastoma between January 1990 and December 2013 in a Paediatric Oncology Unit. Sixty-three patients were diagnosed and treated for medulloblastoma, with a median follow-up of 5.1 years (range 0.65-21.7 years). The overall survival (OS) at 3 and 5 years was 66±13% and 55±14%, respectively. The OS at 5 years was 44%±25% in patients diagnosed in the 1990's, showing an increase to 70%±23% (p=0.032) since 2000. Clinical prognosis factors were included in the logistic regression model: age (p=0.008), presence of metastases and/or residual tumour (p=0.007), and receiving chemotherapy with radiotherapy after surgery (p=0.008). Statistically significant differences were observed for all of them. In our institution there has been a significant increase in medulloblastoma survival in the last decades. Multivariate analysis showed that this improvement was not related to the date of diagnosis, but with the introduction of chemotherapy in adjuvant treatment. This study confirmed that clinical factors significantly associated with worse outcome were age and presence of metastases at diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Craniospinal radiotherapy in adult medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selek, U.; Zorlu, F.; Hurmuz, P.; Cengiz, M.; Gurkaynak, M.; Turker, A.; Soylemezoglu, F.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and prognostic factors of adult patients with medulloblastoma. Patients and Methods: 26 adult medulloblastoma patients with a median age of 27 were subjected to craniospinal radiotherapy. A dose of 30.6 Gy with 1.8 Gy/fraction/day was prescribed to M0 patients, while 36 Gy were to be applied in patients with positive cerebrospinal liquor findings. The posterior fossa was boosted to 54 Gy. While 20 patients underwent external-beam radiotherapy alone, only six received sequential adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Male/female ratio was 1.2. Preradiotherapy Karnofsky performance status was recorded as median 100%. 50% were classified as poor risk (n = 10, subtotal resection; n = 3, M+). The median follow-up time was 46.5 months. The 5-year actuarial survival rates for recurrence-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival were 82.5%, 90.8%, 73.5%, and 89.7%, respectively. Patient characteristics, treatment factors and tumor characteristics failed to show any significance in univariate analysis. Grade 3 or 4 late morbidities were not observed. Conclusion: Yet, the current standard of care seems to remain craniospinal irradiation after maximal surgical resection of the primary neoplasm without clear indications for adjuvant chemotherapy. (orig.)

  15. Comparision between Brain Atrophy and Subdural Volume to Predict Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Volumetric CT Imaging Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Min-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Choi, Seung-Won; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2015-10-01

    Brain atrophy and subdural hygroma were well known factors that enlarge the subdural space, which induced formation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Thus, we identified the subdural volume that could be used to predict the rate of future CSDH after head trauma using a computed tomography (CT) volumetric analysis. A single institution case-control study was conducted involving 1,186 patients who visited our hospital after head trauma from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2014. Fifty-one patients with delayed CSDH were identified, and 50 patients with age and sex matched for control. Intracranial volume (ICV), the brain parenchyme, and the subdural space were segmented using CT image-based software. To adjust for variations in head size, volume ratios were assessed as a percentage of ICV [brain volume index (BVI), subdural volume index (SVI)]. The maximum depth of the subdural space on both sides was used to estimate the SVI. Before adjusting for cranium size, brain volume tended to be smaller, and subdural space volume was significantly larger in the CSDH group (p=0.138, p=0.021, respectively). The BVI and SVI were significantly different (p=0.003, p=0.001, respectively). SVI [area under the curve (AUC), 77.3%; p=0.008] was a more reliable technique for predicting CSDH than BVI (AUC, 68.1%; p=0.001). Bilateral subdural depth (sum of subdural depth on both sides) increased linearly with SVI (pSubdural space volume was significantly larger in CSDH groups. SVI was a more reliable technique for predicting CSDH. Bilateral subdural depth was useful to measure SVI.

  16. Subdural Hematoma Mimickers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Dragos; Koziarz, Alex; Cenic, Aleksa; Nath, Siddharth; Singh, Sheila; Almenawer, Saleh A; Kachur, Edward

    2016-09-01

    A variety of subdural pathologies that may mimic hematomas are reported in the literature. We aimed to identify the atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of subdural masses that may mimic subdural hematomas. A systematic review of MEDLINE and Embase was conducted independently by 2 reviewers to identify articles describing subdural hematoma mimickers. We also present a patient from our institution with a subdural pathology mimicking a subdural hematoma. We analyzed patient clinical presentations, underlying pathologies, radiologic findings, and clinical outcomes. We included 43 articles totaling 48 patients. The mean ± SD patient age was 55.7 ± 16.8 years. Of the 45 cases describing patient history, 13 patients (27%) had a history of trauma. The underlying pathologies of the 48 subdural collections were 10 metastasis (21%), 14 lymphoma (29%), 7 sarcoma (15%), 4 infectious (8%), 4 autoimmune (8%), and 9 miscellaneous (19%). Findings on computed tomography (CT) scan were 18 hyperdense (41%), 11 hypodense (25%), 9 isodense (20%), 3 isodense/hyperdense (7%), and 3 hypodense/isodense (7%). Thirty-four patients (71%) were treated surgically; among these patients, 65% had symptom resolution. Neither the pathology (P = 0.337) nor the management strategy (P = 0.671) was correlated with improved functional outcomes. Identification of atypical history and radiologic features should prompt further diagnostic tests, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to elucidate the proper diagnosis, given that certain pathologies may be managed nonsurgically. A subdural collection that is hyperdense on CT scan and hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI, along with a history of progressive headache with no trauma, may raise the suspicion of an atypical subdural pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of subdural empyema with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKillop, J.H.; Holtzman, D.S.; McDougall, I.R.

    1980-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is now the standard method of confirming a diagnosis of suspected subdural empyema. We report a case in which the radionuclide brain scan was abnormal at a time when the CT scan was normal. An 111 In-labeled leukocyte scan was also performed in this patient and demonstrated abnormal uptake in the empyema. The scintigraphic findings in a second case of subdural empyema are also described. The relative roles of radionuclide studies and CT scans in the patient with suspected subdural empyema are discussed

  18. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  19. Less common CT features of medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, C.S; Segall, H.D.; Miller, C.; Ahmad, J.; McComb, J.G.; Han, J.S.; Park, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    While many medulloblastomas have characteristic features on computed tomography (CT), a significant number have atypical features, including a cystic or necrotic component, calcification, hemorrhage, lack of contrast enhancement, and eccentric location, and/or direct supratentorial extension. Of 30 consecutive untreated cases reviewed by the authors, 14 (47%) had such findings. Failure to make the proper diagnosis will result in some cases if these features are not recognized as possible signs of medulloblastoma

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging spectrum of medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia; Puchner, Stefan B.; Koelblinger, Claus [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Rossi, Andrea [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Neuroradiology, Genova (Italy); Garre, Maria L. [G. Gaslini Children' s Research Hospital (IRCCS), Neurooncology Unit, Genova (Italy); Cama, Armando [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Neurosurgery Department, Genova (Italy); Osborn, Anne G. [University of Utah, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuro- and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-06-15

    Two medulloblastoma variants were recently added to the WHO classification of CNS tumours. We retrospectively analysed the imaging findings of 37 classic and 27 cases of variant medulloblastomas to identify imaging characteristics that might suggest a particular MB subtype. Sixty-four patients from three institutions were included. Location, tumour margins, signal intensities on conventional MRI, enhancement pattern, the presence of haemorrhage, calcifications and hydrocephalus were recorded and analysed. Signal characteristics on diffusion-weighted MR images and MR spectra were evaluated when available. Thirty-seven classic type of MB (CMB), twelve cases of desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma (DMB), nine medulloblastomas with extensive nodularity (MB-EN), five cases of anaplastic and one of large-cell medulloblastoma were included. Fifty of 64 tumours were located in the 4th ventricle region. On T2WI, CMB were all hyperintense, whereas DMB and MB-EN showed isointensity in up to 66%. One third of the classic MB showed only subtle marginal or linear enhancement. All medulloblastoma variants showed marked enhancement. The results of our study suggest: (a) an age-dependent distribution of MB variants, with DMB and MB-EN more common in younger children; (b) a female predominance in DMB; (c) a more common off-midline location in DMB (50%) and MB-EN (33%) variants. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging spectrum of medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia; Puchner, Stefan B.; Koelblinger, Claus; Rossi, Andrea; Garre, Maria L.; Cama, Armando; Osborn, Anne G.; Thurnher, Majda M.

    2011-01-01

    Two medulloblastoma variants were recently added to the WHO classification of CNS tumours. We retrospectively analysed the imaging findings of 37 classic and 27 cases of variant medulloblastomas to identify imaging characteristics that might suggest a particular MB subtype. Sixty-four patients from three institutions were included. Location, tumour margins, signal intensities on conventional MRI, enhancement pattern, the presence of haemorrhage, calcifications and hydrocephalus were recorded and analysed. Signal characteristics on diffusion-weighted MR images and MR spectra were evaluated when available. Thirty-seven classic type of MB (CMB), twelve cases of desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma (DMB), nine medulloblastomas with extensive nodularity (MB-EN), five cases of anaplastic and one of large-cell medulloblastoma were included. Fifty of 64 tumours were located in the 4th ventricle region. On T2WI, CMB were all hyperintense, whereas DMB and MB-EN showed isointensity in up to 66%. One third of the classic MB showed only subtle marginal or linear enhancement. All medulloblastoma variants showed marked enhancement. The results of our study suggest: (a) an age-dependent distribution of MB variants, with DMB and MB-EN more common in younger children; (b) a female predominance in DMB; (c) a more common off-midline location in DMB (50%) and MB-EN (33%) variants. (orig.)

  2. Enhancer hijacking activates GFI1 family oncogenes in medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Northcott, Paul A.; Lee, Catherine; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M.; Erkek, Serap; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shih, David J. H.; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Sturm, Dominik; Jones, David T. W.; Kool, Marcel; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M. G.; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Bader, Gary D.; VandenBerg, Scott; Esparza, Lourdes Adriana; Ryzhova, Marina; Wang, Wei; Wittmann, Andrea; Stark, Sebastian; Sieber, Laura; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Linke, Linda; Kratochwil, Fabian; Jäger, Natalie; Buchhalter, Ivo; Imbusch, Charles D.; Zipprich, Gideon; Raeder, Benjamin; Schmidt, Sabine; Diessl, Nicolle; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Risch, Thomas; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Weber, Ursula D.; Bartholomae, Cynthia C.; von Kalle, Christof; Turányi, Eszter; Hauser, Peter; Sanden, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Sumerauer, David; van Sluis, Peter; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Schuhmann, Martin U.; Ebinger, Martin; Grimes, H. Leighton; Robinson, Giles W.; Gajjar, Amar; Mynarek, Martin; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Kulozik, Andreas E.; von Deimling, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Eils, Roland; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D.; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Pfister, Stefan M.

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoral heterogeneity of medulloblastoma,

  3. TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Remke (Marc); E.A. Ramaswamy; M. Peacock (Munro); D.J.H. Shih (David J.); C. Koelsche (Christian); P.A. Northcott (Paul A.); N. Hill (Nadia); S. Cavalli (Silvia); M. Kool (Marcel); X. Wang (Xin); S. Mack (Stephen); M. Barszczyk (Mark); A.S. Morrissy (A. Sorana); X. Wu (Xiaochong); S. Agnihotri (Sameer); P. Luu (Phan); D. Jones (David); L. Garzia (Livia); A.M. Dubuc (Adrian); N. Zhukova (Nataliya); R. Vanner (Robert); J.M. Kros (Johan); P.J. French (Pim); E.G. van Meir (Erwin); R. Vibhakar (Rajeev); K. Zitterbart (Karel); J.A. Chan (Jennifer); L. Bognár (László); A. Klekner (Almos); B. Lach (Boleslaw); S. Jung (Shin); F. Saad (Fred); L.M. Liau (Linda); S. Albrecht (Steffen); M. Zollo (Maurizio); M.K. Cooper (Michael); R.C. Thompson (Reid); O. Delattre (Olivier); F. Bourdeaut (Franck); F.F. Doz (François); M. Garami (Miklós); P. Hauser (Peter); C.G. Carlotti (Carlos); T.E. Van Meter (Timothy); L. Massimi (Luca); D. Fults (Daniel); L.W. Pomeroy (Laura); T. Kumabe (Toshiro); Y.S. Ra (Young Shin); J.R. Leonard (Jeffrey); S.K. Elbabaa (Samer); J. Mora (Jaume); J.B. Rubin (Joshua); Y.-J. Cho (Yoon-Jae); R.E. McLendon (Roger); D.D. Bigner (Darell); C.G. Eberhart (Charles); M. Fouladi (Maryam); R.J. Wechsler-Reya (Robert); R. Faria (Rui); S.E. Croul (Sidney); A. Huang (Anding); E. Bouffet (Eric); C.E. Hawkins (Cynthia); M. Dirks (Maaike); W.A. Weiss (William); U. Schüller (Ulrich); A. Pollack (Aaron); P. Rutkowski (Piotr); D. Meyronet (David); A. Jouvet (Anne); M. Fèvre-Montange (Michelle); N. Jabado (Nada); M. Perek-Polnik (Marta); W.A. Grajkowska (Wieslawa); S.-K. Kim (Seung-Ki); J.T. Rutka (James); E. Malkin (Elissa); U. Tabori (Uri); S.M. Pfister (Stefan); A. Korshunov (Andrey); A. von Deimling (Andreas); M.D. Taylor (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTelomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations were recently shown to drive telomerase activity in various cancer types, including medulloblastoma. However, the clinical and biological implications of TERT mutations in medulloblastoma have not been described. Hence, we sought

  4. Role of MXD3 in proliferation of DAOY human medulloblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A Barisone

    Full Text Available A subset of medulloblastomas, the most common brain tumor in children, is hypothesized to originate from granule neuron precursors (GNPs in which the sonic hedgehog (SHH pathway is over-activated. MXD3, a basic helix-look-helix zipper transcription factor of the MAD family, has been reported to be upregulated during postnatal cerebellar development and to promote GNP proliferation and MYCN expression. Mxd3 is upregulated in mouse models of medulloblastoma as well as in human medulloblastomas. Therefore, we hypothesize that MXD3 plays a role in the cellular events that lead to medulloblastoma biogenesis. In agreement with its proliferative role in GNPs, MXD3 knock-down in DAOY cells resulted in decreased proliferation. Sustained overexpression of MXD3 resulted in decreased cell numbers due to increased apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Structure-function analysis revealed that the Sin3 interacting domain, the basic domain, and binding to E-boxes are essential for this activity. Microarray-based expression analysis indicated up-regulation of 84 genes and down-regulation of 47 genes. Potential direct MXD3 target genes were identified by ChIP-chip. Our results suggest that MXD3 is necessary for DAOY medulloblastoma cell proliferation. However, increased level and/or duration of MXD3 expression ultimately reduces cell numbers via increased cell death and cell cycle arrest.

  5. Data on the number and frequency of scientific literature citations for established medulloblastoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.P. Ivanov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article collates information about the number of scientific articles mentioning each of the established medulloblastoma cell lines, derived through a systematic search of Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar in 2016. The data for each cell line have been presented as raw number of citations, percentage share of the total citations for each search engine and as an average percentage between the three search engines. In order to correct for the time since each cell line has been in use, the raw citation data have also been divided by the number of years since the derivation of each cell line. This is a supporting article for a review of in vitro models of medulloblastoma published in “in vitro models of medulloblastoma: choosing the right tool for the job” (D.P. Ivanov, D.A. Walker, B. Coyle, A.M. Grabowska, 2016 [1].

  6. Leptomeningeal metastasis mimicking Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Saurabh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of Leptomeningeal Metastasis varies widely. It can also present a condition very similar to Chronic Subdural Hematoma. One should have a low threshold for suspicion while diagnosing such conditions to avoid catastrophic events.

  7. Radiologic findings of acute spontaneous subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Bae, Won Kyong; Gyu, Cha Jang; Kim, Gun Woo; Cho, Won Su; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Kyung Suk [Soonchunhyang University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of). Chonan Hospital

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the characteristic CT and cerebral angiographic findings in patients with acute spontaneous subdural hematomas and correlate these imaging findings with causes of bleeding and clinical outcome. Twenty-one patients with nontraumatic acute spontaneous subdural hematoma presenting during the last five years underwent CT scanning and cerebral angiography was performed in twelve. To determine the cause of bleedings, CT and angiographic findings were retrospectively analysed. Clinical history, laboratory and operative findings, and final clinical outcome were reviewed. Acute spontaneous subdural hematoma is a rare condition, and the mortality rate is high. In patients with acute spontaneous subdural hematoma, as seen on CT, associated subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage is strongly indicative of intracerebral vascular abnormalities such as aneurysm and arteriovenous malformation, and cerebral angiography is necessary. To ensure proper treatment and thus markedly reduce mortality, the causes of bleedings should be prompty determined by means of cerebral angiography. (author). 20 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  8. Leptomeningeal metastasis mimicking Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jain Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    The presentation of Leptomeningeal Metastasis varies widely. It can also present a condition very similar to Chronic Subdural Hematoma. One should have a low threshold for suspicion while diagnosing such conditions to avoid catastrophic events.

  9. Treatment of medulloblastoma using an oncolytic measles virus encoding the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter shows enhanced efficacy with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutzen, Brian; Pierson, Christopher R; Russell, Stephen J; Galanis, Evanthia; Raffel, Corey; Studebaker, Adam W

    2012-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although the clinical outcome for medulloblastoma patients has improved significantly, children afflicted with the disease frequently suffer from debilitating side effects related to the aggressive nature of currently available therapy. Alternative means for treating medulloblastoma are desperately needed. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virus (MV) can selectively target and destroy medulloblastoma tumor cells in localized and disseminated models of the disease. MV-NIS, an oncolytic measles virus that encodes the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS), has the potential to deliver targeted radiotherapy to the tumor site and promote a localized bystander effect above and beyond that achieved by MV alone. We evaluated the efficacy of MV-NIS against medulloblastoma cells in vitro and examined their ability to incorporate radioiodine at various timepoints, finding peak uptake at 48 hours post infection. The effects of MV-NIS were also evaluated in mouse xenograft models of localized and disseminated medulloblastoma. Athymic nude mice were injected with D283med-Luc medulloblastoma cells in the caudate putamen (localized disease) or right lateral ventricle (disseminated disease) and subsequently treated with MV-NIS. Subsets of these mice were given a dose of 131 I at 24, 48 or 72 hours later. MV-NIS treatment, both by itself and in combination with 131 I, elicited tumor stabilization and regression in the treated mice and significantly extended their survival times. Mice given 131 I were found to concentrate radioiodine at the site of their tumor implantations. In addition, mice with localized tumors that were given 131 I either 24 or 48 hours after MV-NIS treatment exhibited a significant survival advantage over mice given MV-NIS alone. These data suggest MV-NIS plus radioiodine may be a potentially useful therapy for the treatment of medulloblastoma

  10. Treatment of medulloblastoma using an oncolytic measles virus encoding the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter shows enhanced efficacy with radioiodine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutzen Brian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although the clinical outcome for medulloblastoma patients has improved significantly, children afflicted with the disease frequently suffer from debilitating side effects related to the aggressive nature of currently available therapy. Alternative means for treating medulloblastoma are desperately needed. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virus (MV can selectively target and destroy medulloblastoma tumor cells in localized and disseminated models of the disease. MV-NIS, an oncolytic measles virus that encodes the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS, has the potential to deliver targeted radiotherapy to the tumor site and promote a localized bystander effect above and beyond that achieved by MV alone. Methods We evaluated the efficacy of MV-NIS against medulloblastoma cells in vitro and examined their ability to incorporate radioiodine at various timepoints, finding peak uptake at 48 hours post infection. The effects of MV-NIS were also evaluated in mouse xenograft models of localized and disseminated medulloblastoma. Athymic nude mice were injected with D283med-Luc medulloblastoma cells in the caudate putamen (localized disease or right lateral ventricle (disseminated disease and subsequently treated with MV-NIS. Subsets of these mice were given a dose of 131I at 24, 48 or 72 hours later. Results MV-NIS treatment, both by itself and in combination with 131I, elicited tumor stabilization and regression in the treated mice and significantly extended their survival times. Mice given 131I were found to concentrate radioiodine at the site of their tumor implantations. In addition, mice with localized tumors that were given 131I either 24 or 48 hours after MV-NIS treatment exhibited a significant survival advantage over mice given MV-NIS alone. Conclusions These data suggest MV-NIS plus radioiodine may be a potentially useful therapy for

  11. Parkinsonsim due to a Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosuk Park

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of parkinsonism. We present the case of a 78-year-old man with right-side dominant parkinsonism about 3 months after a minor head injury. MRI reveals a chronic subdural hematoma on the left side with mildly displaced midline structures. The parkinsonian features were almost completely disappeared after neurosurgical evacuation of the hematoma without any anti-parkinson drug.

  12. Parkinsonsim due to a Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bosuk; Song, Sook Keun; Hong, Jin Yong; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2009-01-01

    Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of parkinsonism. We present the case of a 78-year-old man with right-side dominant parkinsonism about 3 months after a minor head injury. MRI reveals a chronic subdural hematoma on the left side with mildly displaced midline structures. The parkinsonian features were almost completely disappeared after neurosurgical evacuation of the hematoma without any anti-parkinson drug. PMID:24868353

  13. Subdural abscess in infant and child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, E; Shigemori, M; Hayashi, T; Kuratomi, A; Kuramoto, S [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-02-01

    Two cases of subdural abscess in infant and child treated with irrigation via burr holes were reported. The first case was a 1.4-year-old boy with right hemiparesis and mental retardation since severe head trauma at 9 months old. The patient with manifested with an acute onset of high fever followed by disturbance of consciousness and convulsive seizures 2.5 months prior to admission to our department. During admission in the other hospital, the diagnosis of septicemia caused by E. coli was made by blood cultures when CT scan demonstrated a huge lentiform low density area over the right hemisphere and contralateral crescent low density area. The low density area on the right side was well circumscribed by high density rim which was enhanced by contrast medium. Under the diagnosis of bilateral subdural abscess secondary to septicemia caused by E. coli, irrigation of the purulent cavity was carried out. The contralateral low density area was found to be chronic subdural effusion. The second case of 3-month-old infant who complained of high fever, neck stiffness, unconsciousness and right hemiconvulsions 8 days prior to admission. CT scan showed bilateral crescent low density areas indicating subdural effusion. Subdural punctures performed via the fontanelle revealed pus in the left subdural space and xanthocromic fluid in the right side. The low density area on CT scan was changed to the lentiform high density area circumscribed smooth high density rim during the course of the patient. The subdural abscess was treated with irrigation via burr holes. In this report, the etiology of the subdural abscess and route of infection in addition to follow up study of CT findings were presented with the literature.

  14. Medulloblastoma Down Under 2013: a report from the third annual meeting of the International Medulloblastoma Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardo, Nicholas G; Hansford, Jordan R; McGlade, Jacqueline P; Alvaro, Frank; Ashley, David M; Bailey, Simon; Baker, David L; Bourdeaut, Franck; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Clay, Moira; Clifford, Steven C; Cohn, Richard J; Cole, Catherine H; Dallas, Peter B; Downie, Peter; Doz, François; Ellison, David W; Endersby, Raelene; Fisher, Paul G; Hassall, Timothy; Heath, John A; Hii, Hilary L; Jones, David T W; Junckerstorff, Reimar; Kellie, Stewart; Kool, Marcel; Kotecha, Rishi S; Lichter, Peter; Laughton, Stephen J; Lee, Sharon; McCowage, Geoff; Northcott, Paul A; Olson, James M; Packer, Roger J; Pfister, Stefan M; Pietsch, Torsten; Pizer, Barry; Pomeroy, Scott L; Remke, Marc; Robinson, Giles W; Rutkowski, Stefan; Schoep, Tobias; Shelat, Anang A; Stewart, Clinton F; Sullivan, Michael; Taylor, Michael D; Wainwright, Brandon; Walwyn, Thomas; Weiss, William A; Williamson, Dan; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-02-01

    Medulloblastoma is curable in approximately 70% of patients. Over the past decade, progress in improving survival using conventional therapies has stalled, resulting in reduced quality of life due to treatment-related side effects, which are a major concern in survivors. The vast amount of genomic and molecular data generated over the last 5-10 years encourages optimism that improved risk stratification and new molecular targets will improve outcomes. It is now clear that medulloblastoma is not a single-disease entity, but instead consists of at least four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT/Wingless, Sonic Hedgehog, Group 3, and Group 4. The Medulloblastoma Down Under 2013 meeting, which convened at Bunker Bay, Australia, brought together 50 leading clinicians and scientists. The 2-day agenda included focused sessions on pathology and molecular stratification, genomics and mouse models, high-throughput drug screening, and clinical trial design. The meeting established a global action plan to translate novel biologic insights and drug targeting into treatment regimens to improve outcomes. A consensus was reached in several key areas, with the most important being that a novel classification scheme for medulloblastoma based on the four molecular subgroups, as well as histopathologic features, should be presented for consideration in the upcoming fifth edition of the World Health Organization's classification of tumours of the central nervous system. Three other notable areas of agreement were as follows: (1) to establish a central repository of annotated mouse models that are readily accessible and freely available to the international research community; (2) to institute common eligibility criteria between the Children's Oncology Group and the International Society of Paediatric Oncology Europe and initiate joint or parallel clinical trials; (3) to share preliminary high-throughput screening data across discovery labs to hasten the development of novel therapeutics

  15. Subdural hematoma from a cavernous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anne J; Mitha, Alim P; Germain, Rasha; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    To present a case of a cavernous malformation presenting with a subdural hematoma. A 27-year-old woman was admitted with progressively worsening headache, vomiting, weakness, and word-finding difficulties 1 week after she was discharged from an outside hospital, where she was managed conservatively for a presumed traumatic subdural hematoma. Computed tomography revealed an enlarging subacute left hemispheric subdural hematoma for which she underwent drill craniostomy. Postprocedural magnetic resonance imaging showed a posterior left temporal lobe mass consistent with a cavernous malformation juxtaposed with the subdural hematoma. Craniotomy for resection of the lesion was performed. She had an uncomplicated postoperative course and experienced a good recovery. The signs and symptoms, diagnostic imaging, and intraoperative findings suggest that the subdural hematoma was caused by extralesional hemorrhage of the cavernous malformation, which is a rare finding associated with these malformations. The clinical course, radiologic, and intraoperative findings suggest that the subdural hemorrhage was caused by extralesional hemorrhage of the cavernous malformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hand1 overexpression inhibits medulloblastoma metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Guda, Maheedhara R. [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Martin, Sarah E. [Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Antony, Reuben; Fernandez, Karen [Department of Pediatrics, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Lin, Julian [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Tsung, Andrew J. [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Illinois Neurological Institute, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Velpula, Kiran K., E-mail: velpula@uic.edu [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States)

    2016-08-19

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most frequent malignant pediatric brain tumor. Current treatment includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, ongoing treatment in patients is further classified according to the presence or absence of metastasis. Since metastatic medulloblastoma are refractory to current treatments, there is need to identify novel biomarkers that could be used to reduce metastatic potential, and more importantly be targeted therapeutically. Previously, we showed that ionizing radiation-induced uPAR overexpression is associated with increased accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. We further demonstrated that uPAR protein act as cytoplasmic sequestration factor for a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Hand1. Among the histological subtypes classical and desmoplastic subtypes account for the majority while large cell/anaplastic variant is most commonly associated with metastatic disease. In this present study using immunohistochemical approach and patient data mining for the first time, we demonstrated that Hand1 expression is observed to be downregulated in all the subtypes of medulloblastoma. Previously we showed that Hand1 overexpression regulated medulloblastoma angiogenesis and here we investigated the role of Hand1 in the context of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Moreover, UW228 and D283 cells overexpressing Hand1 demonstrated decreased-expression of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, β-catenin and SOX2); metastatic marker (SMA); and increased expression of epithelial marker (E-cadherin). Strikingly, human pluripotent stem cell antibody array showed that Hand1 overexpression resulted in substantial decrease in pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct3/4, Otx2, Flk1) suggesting that Hand1 expression may be essential to attenuate the EMT and our findings underscore a novel role for Hand1 in medulloblastoma metastasis. - Highlights: • Hand1 expression is downregulated in Medulloblastoma. • Hand1 over expression reduce

  17. Hand1 overexpression inhibits medulloblastoma metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Guda, Maheedhara R.; Martin, Sarah E.; Antony, Reuben; Fernandez, Karen; Lin, Julian; Tsung, Andrew J.; Velpula, Kiran K.

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most frequent malignant pediatric brain tumor. Current treatment includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, ongoing treatment in patients is further classified according to the presence or absence of metastasis. Since metastatic medulloblastoma are refractory to current treatments, there is need to identify novel biomarkers that could be used to reduce metastatic potential, and more importantly be targeted therapeutically. Previously, we showed that ionizing radiation-induced uPAR overexpression is associated with increased accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. We further demonstrated that uPAR protein act as cytoplasmic sequestration factor for a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Hand1. Among the histological subtypes classical and desmoplastic subtypes account for the majority while large cell/anaplastic variant is most commonly associated with metastatic disease. In this present study using immunohistochemical approach and patient data mining for the first time, we demonstrated that Hand1 expression is observed to be downregulated in all the subtypes of medulloblastoma. Previously we showed that Hand1 overexpression regulated medulloblastoma angiogenesis and here we investigated the role of Hand1 in the context of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Moreover, UW228 and D283 cells overexpressing Hand1 demonstrated decreased-expression of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, β-catenin and SOX2); metastatic marker (SMA); and increased expression of epithelial marker (E-cadherin). Strikingly, human pluripotent stem cell antibody array showed that Hand1 overexpression resulted in substantial decrease in pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct3/4, Otx2, Flk1) suggesting that Hand1 expression may be essential to attenuate the EMT and our findings underscore a novel role for Hand1 in medulloblastoma metastasis. - Highlights: • Hand1 expression is downregulated in Medulloblastoma. • Hand1 over expression reduce

  18. [Transformation from chronic subdural hematoma into subdural empyema following cat bites: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takuya; Yamada, Kei; Kasahara, Sou; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man developed motor aphasia and right hemiparesis with severe headache, during the treatment of cellulitis and sepsis due to cat bites. Brain CT showed a low density, crescent-shaped lesion in the left subdural space, which was hypointense on brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). One week later, when his neurological symptoms had worsened, the signal of the subdural lesion had changed to hyperintense on DWI. The lesion was capsule-shaped when enhanced by Gadolinium. The signal changes on DWI of the lesion indicated the existing hematoma had changed to an empyema, or so-called infected subdural hematoma, due to a hematogenous bacterial infection. Pasteurella multocida, a resident microbe in the oral cavity of cats, could be the responsible pathogen in this case. The patient recovered completely after treatment with intravenous high dose antibiotics. This is an important case report describing the transformation from a chronic subdural hematoma into a subdural empyema by DWI.

  19. Overexpressed TP73 induces apoptosis in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellino, Robert C; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Lin, Linda L; Skapura, Darlene G; Rajan, Jessen A; Adesina, Adekunle M; Perlaky, Laszlo; Irwin, Meredith S; Kim, John YH

    2007-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Children who relapse usually die of their disease, which reflects resistance to radiation and/or chemotherapy. Improvements in outcome require a better understanding of the molecular basis of medulloblastoma growth and treatment response. TP73 is a member of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene family that has been found to be overexpressed in a variety of tumors and mediates apoptotic responses to genotoxic stress. In this study, we assessed expression of TP73 RNA species in patient tumor specimens and in medulloblastoma cell lines, and manipulated expression of full-length TAp73 and amino-terminal truncated ΔNp73 to assess their effects on growth. We analyzed medulloblastoma samples from thirty-four pediatric patients and the established medulloblastoma cell lines, Daoy and D283MED, for expression of TP73 RNA including the full-length transcript and the 5'-terminal variants that encode the ΔNp73 isoform, as well as TP53 RNA using quantitative real time-RTPCR. Protein expression of TAp73 and ΔNp73 was quantitated with immunoblotting methods. Clinical outcome was analyzed based on TP73 RNA and p53 protein expression. To determine effects of overexpression or knock-down of TAp73 and ΔNp73 on cell cycle and apoptosis, we analyzed transiently transfected medulloblastoma cell lines with flow cytometric and TUNEL methods. Patient medulloblastoma samples and cell lines expressed full-length and 5'-terminal variant TP73 RNA species in 100-fold excess compared to non-neoplastic brain controls. Western immunoblot analysis confirmed their elevated levels of TAp73 and amino-terminal truncated ΔNp73 proteins. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed trends toward favorable overall and progression-free survival of patients whose tumors display TAp73 RNA overexpression. Overexpression of TAp73 or ΔNp73 induced apoptosis under basal growth conditions in vitro and sensitized them to cell death in response to

  20. Overexpressed TP73 induces apoptosis in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlaky Laszlo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Children who relapse usually die of their disease, which reflects resistance to radiation and/or chemotherapy. Improvements in outcome require a better understanding of the molecular basis of medulloblastoma growth and treatment response. TP73 is a member of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene family that has been found to be overexpressed in a variety of tumors and mediates apoptotic responses to genotoxic stress. In this study, we assessed expression of TP73 RNA species in patient tumor specimens and in medulloblastoma cell lines, and manipulated expression of full-length TAp73 and amino-terminal truncated ΔNp73 to assess their effects on growth. Methods We analyzed medulloblastoma samples from thirty-four pediatric patients and the established medulloblastoma cell lines, Daoy and D283MED, for expression of TP73 RNA including the full-length transcript and the 5'-terminal variants that encode the ΔNp73 isoform, as well as TP53 RNA using quantitative real time-RTPCR. Protein expression of TAp73 and ΔNp73 was quantitated with immunoblotting methods. Clinical outcome was analyzed based on TP73 RNA and p53 protein expression. To determine effects of overexpression or knock-down of TAp73 and ΔNp73 on cell cycle and apoptosis, we analyzed transiently transfected medulloblastoma cell lines with flow cytometric and TUNEL methods. Results Patient medulloblastoma samples and cell lines expressed full-length and 5'-terminal variant TP73 RNA species in 100-fold excess compared to non-neoplastic brain controls. Western immunoblot analysis confirmed their elevated levels of TAp73 and amino-terminal truncated ΔNp73 proteins. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed trends toward favorable overall and progression-free survival of patients whose tumors display TAp73 RNA overexpression. Overexpression of TAp73 or ΔNp73 induced apoptosis under basal growth conditions in vitro and

  1. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and quantitative analysis of the microvasculature in medulloblastoma and ependymoma subtypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Pomp, J.; Kappelle, A.C.; Gijtenbeek, J.M.M.; Wesseling, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification of tumours of the nervous system, four main histopathological subtypes of medulloblastomas (classic medulloblastoma, desmoplastic medulloblastoma, medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity and advanced neuronal differentiation and large

  2. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  3. PRAME gene expression profile in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Maria Vulcani-Freitas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant tumors of central nervous system in the childhood. The treatment is severe, harmful and, thus, has a dismal prognosis. As PRAME is present in various cancers, including meduloblastoma, and has limited expression in normal tissues, this antigen can be an ideal vaccine target for tumor immunotherapy. In order to find a potential molecular target, we investigated PRAME expression in medulloblastoma fragments and we compare the results with the clinical features of each patient. Analysis of gene expression was performed by real-time quantitative PCR from 37 tumor samples. The Mann-Whitney test was used to analysis the relationship between gene expression and clinical characteristics. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate survival. PRAME was overexpressed in 84% samples. But no statistical association was found between clinical features and PRAME overexpression. Despite that PRAME gene could be a strong candidate for immunotherapy since it is highly expressed in medulloblastomas.

  4. MRI findings of traumatic spinal subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyeon Jo; Baek, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yun Suk; Jeong, Sun Ok; Park, Hyun Joo; Jo, Jin Man [Dae rim St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Tae [Inha General Hospital, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    To describe the MR imaging findings of traumatic spinal subdural hematoma. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of six patients, with symptoms of acute spinal cord or cauda equena compression after trauma, together with spinal subdural hematoma. We analyzed the extent, location, configuration and signal intensity of the lesions. In five of sex cases, hematomas were distributed extensively throughout the thoracolumbosacral or lumbosacral spinal levels. In five cases they were located in the dorsal portion of the thecal sac, and in one case, in the ventral portion. On axial images, hematomas showed a concave or convex contour, depending on the amount of loculated hematoma. A lobulated appearance was due to limitation of free extension of the hematoma within the subdural space at the lateral sites (nerve root exist zone) at whole spine levels, and at the posteromedian site under lumbar 4-5 levels. In cases of spinal subdural hematoma, the lobulated appearance of hematoma loculation in the subdural space that bounds the lateral sites at al spinal levels and at the posteromedian site under L4-5 levels is a characteristic finding. (author)

  5. Sexual dimorphism in medulloblastoma features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannoni, Gian Franco; Ciucci, Alessandra; Marucci, Gianluca; Travaglia, Daniele; Stigliano, Egidio; Foschini, Maria Pia; Scambia, Giovanni; Gallo, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Male sex is a risk factor for medulloblastoma (MB), and is also a negative predictor for clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to assess sex differences in tumour biological features and hormone receptor profiles in a cohort of MB patients. Sixty-four MBs and five normal cerebella were included in the study. Cell proliferation (Ki67), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) and microvessel density (CD31) were evaluated in tumours by immunohistochemistry. Tissues were analysed for oestrogen receptor (ER)α, ERβ1, ERβ2, ERβ5 and androgen receptor (AR) expression. The results demonstrated sex-specific features in MBs, with tumours from females showing a higher apoptosis/proliferation ratio and less tumour vascularization than tumours from males. MBs were negative for ERα and AR, but expressed ERβ isoforms at similar levels between the sexes. Altogether, these findings indicate that signalling mechanisms that control cell turnover and angiogenesis operate more efficiently in females than in males. The lack of sex differences in the hormone receptor profiles suggests that circulating oestrogens could be the major determinants of the sexual dimorphism observed in MB features. Here, we provide molecular support for epidemiological data showing sex differences in MB incidence and outcome, completely defining the hormone receptor profile of the tumours. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazuko; Sorimachi, Takatoshi; Honda, Yumie; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2017-09-01

    Sex differences in various diseases recently have been recognized as an important factor in the approach to more efficient preventive and therapeutic medicine. We clarified sex differences in the clinical characteristics of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) by comparing men and women with CSDH, as there is a well-known male predominance in the prevalence of CSDH. Clinical factors and computed tomography findings were investigated retrospectively in 490 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital between 2006 and 2015 who were diagnosed with CSDH. On univariate analysis, women were significantly older than men (P hematoma, and death as outcomes at discharge were significantly more frequent than in men (P < 0.05). In contrast, women had less frequent instances of good recovery and less alcohol intake (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated female sex as an independent predictor of consciousness disturbance at admission. Female sex also was identified as a predictor of death at discharge. We demonstrated sex differences in the clinical characteristics of CSDH. In the future, management of patients with CSDH with regard to sex differences in disease characteristics could be expected to improve the outcomes of women, which have been worse than in men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PATOBIOLOGÍA DEL HEMATOMA SUBDURAL CRÓNICO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Sabogal Barrios

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of subdural cronic hematoma in all ages is a therapeutic challenge. Chronic subdural hematoma is a disease that can be fatal without surgical treatment. A variety of treatment options like subdural tapping, endoscopic washout, shunting and craniotomy have been discussed. In chronic subdural hematoma, spontaneous resolution with conservative treatment is not an common therapeutic method because it has causes high mortality, requires long periods of time, and finally, many patients need surgical treatment. The etiology, physiopathology and surgical alternatives in the treatment of subdural chronic hematoma is discussed.

  8. Endoscopic burr hole evacuation of an acute subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codd, Patrick J; Venteicher, Andrew S; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Kahle, Kristopher T; Jho, David H

    2013-12-01

    Acute subdural hematoma evacuations frequently necessitate large craniotomies with extended operative times and high relative blood loss, which can lead to additional morbidity for the patient. While endoscopic minimally invasive approaches to chronic subdural collections have been successfully demonstrated, this technique has not previously been applied to acute subdural hematomas. The authors report their experience with an 87-year-old patient presenting with a large acute right-sided subdural hematoma successfully evacuated via an endoscopic minimally invasive technique. The operative approach is outlined, and the literature on endoscopic subdural collection evacuation reviewed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A five-gene hedgehog signature developed as a patient preselection tool for hedgehog inhibitor therapy in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Yaping; Robinson, Douglas M; Amakye, Dereck D; Rose, Kristine L; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Ligon, Keith L; Sharp, Thad; Haider, Asifa S; Bandaru, Raj; Ando, Yuichi; Geoerger, Birgit; Doz, François; Ashley, David M; Hargrave, Darren R; Casanova, Michela; Tawbi, Hussein A; Rodon, Jordi; Thomas, Anne L; Mita, Alain C; MacDonald, Tobey J; Kieran, Mark W

    2015-02-01

    Distinct molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma, including hedgehog (Hh) pathway-activated disease, have been reported. We identified and clinically validated a five-gene Hh signature assay that can be used to preselect patients with Hh pathway-activated medulloblastoma. Gene characteristics of the Hh medulloblastoma subgroup were identified through published bioinformatic analyses. Thirty-two genes shown to be differentially expressed in fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples and reproducibly analyzed by RT-PCR were measured in matched samples. These data formed the basis for building a multi-gene logistic regression model derived through elastic net methods from which the five-gene Hh signature emerged after multiple iterations. On the basis of signature gene expression levels, the model computed a propensity score to determine Hh activation using a threshold set a priori. The association between Hh activation status and tumor response to the Hh pathway inhibitor sonidegib (LDE225) was analyzed. Five differentially expressed genes in medulloblastoma (GLI1, SPHK1, SHROOM2, PDLIM3, and OTX2) were found to associate with Hh pathway activation status. In an independent validation study, Hh activation status of 25 medulloblastoma samples showed 100% concordance between the five-gene signature and Affymetrix profiling. Further, in medulloblastoma samples from 50 patients treated with sonidegib, all 6 patients who responded were found to have Hh-activated tumors. Three patients with Hh-activated tumors had stable or progressive disease. No patients with Hh-nonactivated tumors responded. This five-gene Hh signature can robustly identify Hh-activated medulloblastoma and may be used to preselect patients who might benefit from sonidegib treatment. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Case report: treatment of subdural hematoma in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfora, Wilson T; Klapper, Hendrik B

    2013-08-01

    Patients with acute or chronic subdural hematomas may present with rapidly deteriorating neurological function and are at risk for irreversible brainstem injury. In such cases, rapid surgical intervention is required to evacuate the hematoma and reverse critically elevated intracranial pressure. A variety of surgical drainage methods are in existence, none of which are clearly superior to the others. This report presents the case of a 74-year-old woman who suffered an acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma which was evacuated in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system (SEPS). The SEPS provides for a minimally invasive technique to drain subdural hematomas and is advantageous in that it can be performed at the bedside. The SEPS is relatively simple to use and may be especially useful to emergency department staff in outlying areas where there is a shortage of neurosurgical coverage.

  11. Hemispheric Chronic Subdural Hematoma Concealing Subdural Metastases: Terrible Surprise Behind Routine Emergency Department Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Riccardo; Pesce, Alessandro; Martines, Valentina

    2017-10-01

    The patient is a 79-year-old male, suffering from advanced metastatic prostate cancer, who developed a progressively worsening ideomotor slowing and was therefore referred to the emergency department of our institution. A plain axial computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a vast hemispheric subdural fluid collection, apparently a subdural hematoma. On closer inspection, and most of all, in hindsight, a tenuously isohyperdense signal irregularity at the frontal aspect of the fluid collection appears. Because of the declined general medical conditions and the paucity of the neurologic impairment, a high-dose, corticosteroid-based conservative strategy was performed. The total body CT scan for the routine oncologic follow-up of the prostate cancer scan fell at 20 days from the first CT of the emergency department. A second contrast-enhanced axial CT scan demonstrated the presence of 2 subdural metastases, presumably the initial pathogenesis of the subdural fluid collection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cross-species epigenetics identifies a critical role for VAV1 in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, J C; Kawauchi, D; Schwalbe, E C; Solecki, D J; Selby, M P; McKinnon, P J; Olson, J M; Hayden, J T; Grundy, R G; Ellison, D W; Williamson, D; Bailey, S; Roussel, M F; Clifford, S C

    2015-09-03

    The identification of key tumorigenic events in Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) subgroup medulloblastomas (MBSHH) will be essential for the development of individualized therapies and improved outcomes. However, beyond confirmation of characteristic SHH pathway mutations, recent genome-wide sequencing studies have not revealed commonly mutated genes with widespread relevance as potential therapeutic targets. We therefore examined any role for epigenetic DNA methylation events in MBSHH using a cross-species approach to candidate identification, prioritization and validation. MBSHH-associated DNA methylation events were first identified in 216 subgrouped human medulloblastomas (50 MBSHH, 28 Wnt/Wingless, 44 Group 3 and 94 Group 4) and their conservation then assessed in tumors arising from four independent murine models of Shh medulloblastoma, alongside any role in tumorigenesis using functional assessments in mouse and human models. This strategy identified widespread regional CpG hypo-methylation of VAV1, leading to its elevated expression, as a conserved aberrant epigenetic event, which characterizes the majority of MBSHH tumors in both species, and is associated with a poor outcome in MBSHH patients. Moreover, direct modulation of VAV1 in mouse and human models revealed a critical role in tumor maintenance, and its abrogation markedly reduced medulloblastoma growth. Further, Vav1 activity regulated granule neuron precursor germinal zone exit and migration initiation in an ex vivo model of early postnatal cerebellar development. These findings establish VAV1 as a critical epigenetically regulated oncogene with a key role in MBSHH maintenance, and highlight its potential as a validated therapeutic target and prognostic biomarker for the improved therapy of medulloblastoma.

  13. Membranectomy in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Mahboubi, Hossein; Tran, Peter; Roufail, John S; Chen, Jefferson W

    2017-08-01

    Initial management strategies of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) are controversial and range from bedside twist-drill or burr-hole drainage to craniotomy with membranectomy (CWM). We aim to 1) perform a meta-analysis of the available data on the outcomes of CWM for treatment of cSDH in published English-language literature and 2) evaluate collective outcomes of CWM with respect to morbidity, mortality, and recurrence rates. A search of English-language literature performed in PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane databases using key words ("subdural hematoma" or "chronic subdural hematoma") and ("membrane" or "membranectomy") from inception to December 2016 was conducted. Studies reporting outcomes of CWM in cSDH were included. Mortality, morbidity, follow-up duration, and recurrence rate data were extracted and analyzed. Pooled estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for all outcomes using a random-effects model. Of 301 articles found, 17 articles containing 5369 patients met our eligibility criteria. Mean follow-up duration ranged from 1-30.8 months. Collective mean mortality and morbidity rates were 3.7% and 6.9%, respectively (95% CI 2-5.4% and 2.1-11.6%; P < 0.001 and P = 0.004). The collective mean recurrence rate was 7.6% (95% CI: 5%-10.2%; P < 0.001). Clinical data on outcomes of CWM in cSDH are limited to single institutional analyses, with considerable variation in recurrence rates and follow-up time. The rates we reported are comparable with the 5% mortality and 3%-12% morbidity rates and lower than the 10%-21% recurrence rate in the literature for burr holes or craniotomy without membranectomy. This meta-analysis provides an in-depth analysis of available data and reviews reported outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid Spontaneously Resolving Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qi; Zhao, Hexiang; Zhang, Hanmei; You, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study reports a rare patient of a rapid spontaneously resolving acute subdural hematoma. In addition, an analysis of potential clues for the phenomenon is presented with a review of the literature. Patient Presentation: A 1-year-and-2-month-old boy fell from a height of approximately 2 m. The patient was in a superficial coma with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 when he was transferred to the authors’ hospital. Computed tomography revealed the presence of an acute subdural hematoma with a midline shift beyond 1 cm. His guardians refused invasive interventions and chose conservative treatment. Repeat imaging after 15 hours showed the evident resolution of the hematoma and midline reversion. Progressive magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the complete resolution of the hematoma, without redistribution to a remote site. Conclusions: Even though this phenomenon has a low incidence, the probability of a rapid spontaneously resolving acute subdural hematoma should be considered when patients present with the following characteristics: children or elderly individuals suffering from mild to moderate head trauma; stable or rapidly recovered consciousness; and simple acute subdural hematoma with a moderate thickness and a particularly low-density band in computed tomography scans. PMID:28468224

  15. Subdural hematoma and oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintzen, A. R.; Tijssen, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    In a retrospective study of the period 1959 to 1978, the role of anticoagulant therapy (ACT) in the development of subdural hematoma (SH) was investigated. Of 212 cases, 46 were receiving ACT, a proportion highly in excess of the frequency of ACT in the general population of the Leiden area. In this

  16. Cortical enhancement in chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Sato, Jun; Makita, Tadatoshi; Hayashi, Shigetoshi; Nakamura, Norio.

    1981-01-01

    In the CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma, brain enhancement adjacent to a subdural hematoma was seen occasionally after the injection of a contrast material. The authors called this finding ''cortical enhancement'', and 35 cases of chronic subdural hematoma were studied concerning cortical enhancement in relation to age, clinical signs and symptoms, hematoma density, and volume of the hematoma. Eight cases out of the 35 were subjected to measurements of the regional cerebral blood flow preoperatively by the method of the carotid injection of Xe-133. Cortical enhancement was apt to be seen in the cases which revealed intracranial hypertension or disturbance of consciousness, in isodensity or mixed-density hematomas, and in huge subdural hematomas. There was no specific correlation with age distribution. The pathogenesis of cortical enhancement seemed to be the result of cerebral compression with an increase in the contrast material per unit of volume and a prolonged venous outflow from the hemisphere, but no characteristic feature was detected in the average regional cerebral blood flow in our cases. (author)

  17. Bilateral Biconvex Frontal Chronic Subdural Hematoma Mimicking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common clinical entities encountered in daily neurosurgical practice.[1] CSDH is an encapsulated collection of old blood, mostly or totally liquefied and located between the dura mater and arachnoid.[2] We discuss the clinical and radiological findings in a case of ...

  18. Midline shift in relation to thickness of traumatic acute subdural hematoma predicts mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Meijer, F.J.; Hoeven, H. van der; Edwards, M.J.; Prokop, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic acute subdural hematoma has a high mortality despite intensive treatment. Despite the existence of several prediction models, it is very hard to predict an outcome. We investigated whether a specific combination of initial head CT-scan findings is a factor in predicting

  19. Comparison Between Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Tension and Energy Metabolism in Experimental Subdural Hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Engell, Susanne I; Johnsen, Rikke Aagaard

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An experimental swine model (n = 7) simulating an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) was employed (1) to explore the relation between the brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO(2)) and the regional cerebral energy metabolism as obtained by microdialysis, and (2) to define the lowest level of PbtO(2...

  20. Contrast enhanced MR imaging of postoperative medulloblastoma in childhood: emphasis on meningeal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, Ho Chul; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1993-01-01

    To differentiate the postoperative changes from the recurrence of tumor and to evaluate MR imaging of early postoperative leptomeningeal seeding in medulloblastoma, We have retrospectively analysed 34 cases of MR images of 17 patients who were confirmed as medulloblastoma by histopathology. Noncontrast and postcontrast T1 weighted MR images were obtained in all patients. In 11 patients follow-up MR was done more than once (average: 1.5 times) and average interval of MR imaging was 6 months. The timing of 34 MR images was as follow: 6 case within 2 months, 9 cases between 2 months and 1 year, 19 cases more than 1 year after surgery respectively. MR images within 2 month after surgery revealed contrast enhancement at operation site and adjacent meninges, hemorrhage, residual tumor. In patients who had no evidence of tumor recurrence, these early postoperative changes were markedly decreased within 6 month after surgery. MR images obtained more than 1 year after surgery showed no abnormal contrast enhancement or mild focal dural enhancement at operation site. Diffuse moderate dural enhancement was noted in one patient who had the history of post-surgical subdural hemorrhage. In six patients with tumor recurrences which were detected from as early as 9 months to 6 years after surgery, the findings of recurrence included leptomeningeal enhancement of brain stem and cerebellar surface at early stage, variable sized enhancing leptomeningeal nodules, linear or irregular sulcus obliterating enhancing lesions, enhancing mass at primary or metastatic site. We have concluded that leptomeningeal enhancement detected after 6 months of surgery is an important MR finding suggesting the possibility of tumor recurrence. Small nodular and linear enhancement of leptomeninges at brainstem or cerebellar surface is considered as the early manifestation of intracranial tumor seeding

  1. Contrast enhanced MR imaging of postoperative medulloblastoma in childhood: emphasis on meningeal enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, Ho Chul; Yeon, Kyung Mo [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-03-15

    To differentiate the postoperative changes from the recurrence of tumor and to evaluate MR imaging of early postoperative leptomeningeal seeding in medulloblastoma, We have retrospectively analysed 34 cases of MR images of 17 patients who were confirmed as medulloblastoma by histopathology. Noncontrast and postcontrast T1 weighted MR images were obtained in all patients. In 11 patients follow-up MR was done more than once (average: 1.5 times) and average interval of MR imaging was 6 months. The timing of 34 MR images was as follow: 6 case within 2 months, 9 cases between 2 months and 1 year, 19 cases more than 1 year after surgery respectively. MR images within 2 month after surgery revealed contrast enhancement at operation site and adjacent meninges, hemorrhage, residual tumor. In patients who had no evidence of tumor recurrence, these early postoperative changes were markedly decreased within 6 month after surgery. MR images obtained more than 1 year after surgery showed no abnormal contrast enhancement or mild focal dural enhancement at operation site. Diffuse moderate dural enhancement was noted in one patient who had the history of post-surgical subdural hemorrhage. In six patients with tumor recurrences which were detected from as early as 9 months to 6 years after surgery, the findings of recurrence included leptomeningeal enhancement of brain stem and cerebellar surface at early stage, variable sized enhancing leptomeningeal nodules, linear or irregular sulcus obliterating enhancing lesions, enhancing mass at primary or metastatic site. We have concluded that leptomeningeal enhancement detected after 6 months of surgery is an important MR finding suggesting the possibility of tumor recurrence. Small nodular and linear enhancement of leptomeninges at brainstem or cerebellar surface is considered as the early manifestation of intracranial tumor seeding.

  2. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, F A M; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C B L M; van Rijn, R R

    2014-08-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as dating subdural hematomas can lead to identification of a suspect. The aim of our study is to describe the current practice among radiologists in the Netherlands regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas in children. This is a cross-sectional study, describing the results of an online questionnaire regarding dating subdural hematomas among pediatric and neuro-radiologists in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic questions, theoretical questions and eight pediatric cases in which the participants were asked to date subdural hematomas based on imaging findings. Fifty-one out of 172 radiologists (30 %) filled out the questionnaire. The percentage of participants that reported it was possible to date the subdural hematoma varied between 58 and 90 % for the eight different cases. In four of eight cases (50 %), the age of the subdural hematoma as known from clinical history fell within the range reported by the participants. None of the participants was "very certain" of their age determination. The results demonstrate that there is a considerable practice variation among Dutch radiologists regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas. This implicates that dating of subdural hematomas is not suitable to use in court, as no uniformity among experts exists.

  3. Computed tomography of the adult traumatic subdural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, Seiji; Matsuzaki, Takayuki; Yasumura, Shuichi; Nishiya, Mikio; Nakamura, Junichi

    1979-01-01

    The present authors, since the installation of the CT scanner in Sept., 1976, have conducted an investigation of 14 adult subdural effusion cases arising from head injury which were available for a follow-up by CT scanning. These cases were examined in the first 13 months after installation. Under CT scanning, subdural effusion was recognized as a low-density area of the subdural space. Our findings indicate that, in spite of the fact that it is a subdural collection, only a limited shift of the midline structure was seen; further, the shrinking of the lateral ventricles of the effusion side was also limited. Judging from the CT findings, the neurological signs and the clinical course, the subdural effusions of the 14 cases could be classified into 2 types: (I) the minimal neurological deficit type and (II) the contusion-effusion type. Representative cases of the above are given, and, in addition, indications of surgery are also mentioned. We further state that, since the subdural effusion cases come under Type I and are characterized by the minimal neurological deficit, in many cases they are apt to be overlooked: hence, the application of CT scanning with special regard to such cases was stressed. In order to differentiate chronic subdural hematoma from subdural effusion under CT scanning, a comparative CT study was made using 20 cases of chronic subdural hematoma, and the difference in CT findings from those of subdural effusion is reported. (author)

  4. [Three cases of acute interhemispheric subdural hematoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, N; Kurihara, E; Matsuoka, H; Kose, S; Tamaki, N; Matsumoto, S

    1988-01-01

    Traumatic acute subdural hematomas over the convexity of the cerebral hemispheres are often encountered, but acute interhemispheric subdural hematomas are rare. Fourty-eight cases of acute subdural hematomas was admitted to our hospital between 1977 and 1986, and three cases of them (6%) were located in the interhemispheric subdural space. In this paper, these three cases are reported with 20 documented cases. Case 1: an 81-year-old female was admitted to our hospital because of headache, nausea and vomiting. She hit her occiput a week ago. CT scan demonstrated contusion in the right frontal lobe and a high density in the interhemispheric space of the right frontal region. Her complaints disappeared gradually by conservative therapy and she returned to her social life. Case 2: a 50-year-old male fell downstairs and hit his vertex. As he lost consciousness, he was admitted to our hospital. He was stuporous and had left-hemiparesis. Skull X-ray film showed fracture line extending from the right temporal bone to the left parietal bone across the midline. CT scan revealed intracerebral hematoma in both frontal lobe and right parietal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cistern and Sylvian fissure of the right side. And interhemispheric subdural hematoma in the right parietal region was visualized. Angiography demonstrated a lateral displacement of the right callosomarginal artery and an avascular area between the falx and the callosomarginal artery. After admission his consciousness recovered and convulsion was controlled by drug. Left-hemiparesis was improved by conservative therapy and he was discharged on foot.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Combined MYC and P53 defects emerge at medulloblastoma relapse and define rapidly progressive, therapeutically targetable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rebecca M; Kuijper, Sanne; Lindsey, Janet C; Petrie, Kevin; Schwalbe, Ed C; Barker, Karen; Boult, Jessica K R; Williamson, Daniel; Ahmad, Zai; Hallsworth, Albert; Ryan, Sarra L; Poon, Evon; Robinson, Simon P; Ruddle, Ruth; Raynaud, Florence I; Howell, Louise; Kwok, Colin; Joshi, Abhijit; Nicholson, Sarah Leigh; Crosier, Stephen; Ellison, David W; Wharton, Stephen B; Robson, Keith; Michalski, Antony; Hargrave, Darren; Jacques, Thomas S; Pizer, Barry; Bailey, Simon; Swartling, Fredrik J; Weiss, William A; Chesler, Louis; Clifford, Steven C

    2015-01-12

    We undertook a comprehensive clinical and biological investigation of serial medulloblastoma biopsies obtained at diagnosis and relapse. Combined MYC family amplifications and P53 pathway defects commonly emerged at relapse, and all patients in this group died of rapidly progressive disease postrelapse. To study this interaction, we investigated a transgenic model of MYCN-driven medulloblastoma and found spontaneous development of Trp53 inactivating mutations. Abrogation of p53 function in this model produced aggressive tumors that mimicked characteristics of relapsed human tumors with combined P53-MYC dysfunction. Restoration of p53 activity and genetic and therapeutic suppression of MYCN all reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival. Our findings identify P53-MYC interactions at medulloblastoma relapse as biomarkers of clinically aggressive disease that may be targeted therapeutically. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MR imaging of experimental subdural bleeding. Correlates of brain deformation and tissue water content, and changes in vital physiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlin, J.R.; Thuomas, K.Aa.; Ponten, U.; Bergstroem, K.; Zwetnow, N.N.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate morphological and physiological changes during acute lethal subdural bleeding in 2 models of anaesthetized dogs. Material and Methods: In model I, blood from the aorta was led into a collapsed subdural rubber balloon while in model II, the blood was directed into the subdural compartment over the left cerebral frontoparietal lobe. Eight vital physiological parameters were continuously registered. MR imaging visualized the compression and displacement of cerebral tissue, and assessed the dynamic changes in cerebral tissue water. Results: In model I, tissue herniation and compression of cerebral ventricles led to death at a haematoma volume corresponding to 8% of the intracranial volume. In model II, the extravasated blood progressed infratentorially and into the spinal sac with a volume that was 3 times larger than that of the lethal haematoma. Tissue water increased almost linearly during bleeding in both models. (orig.)

  7. CT findings of falical and tentorial subdural hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Jung, Nam Keun; Kim, Kab Tae; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography has been established as an indispensable tool in the detection of intracranial hemorrhages. Extra axial fluid collections are usually easily distinguished from intracerebral hemorrhages. However, hemorrhages in atypical locations, such as in falx and tentorial regions, can be difficult to diagnose with CT. The tentorial and falcial collection of subdural blood are rather unusual. Authors report here 84 cases of falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhages with reference data that we have encountered in the last two years. The results were as follows; 1. In 589 cases of intracranial hemorrhage, the incidence of subdural hemorrhage was 372 cases (63.2%). 2. Among 372 cases with subdural hemorrhage, 84 cases (22.6%) had falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage. In 84 cases with falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage, there were 50 cases (13.4%) of falcial subdural hemorrhages, 21 cases (5.7%) of tentorial subdural hemorrhage and 13 cases (3.5%) of combined falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhage. 3. The location of falcial subdural hemorrhage was anterior in 30 cases (60%), posterior in 15 cases (30%) and middle in 5 cases (10%). 4. The location of tentorial subdural hemorrhage was petrous edge in 7 cases (33.3%), occipital attachment in 6 cases (28.6%), tentorial hiatus in 5 cases (23.8%), and diffuse in 3 cases (14.3%). 5. In 13 cases showing combined falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhage, there was 3 cases (23.1%) of posterior falx and tentorial hiatus, 2 cases (15.4%) of anterior falx and petrous edge, 2 cases of anterior falx and tentorial hiatus, 2 cases of posterior falx and petrous edge, 2 cases of posterior falx and occipital attachment, 1 case (7.7%) of posterior falx and diffuse, and 1 case of posterior, middle falx and diffuse. 6. In the cases with falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage, the incidence of associated intracranial hemorrhage were intracrania subdural hemorrhage in 40 cases (47.6%), hemorrhagic brain

  8. Frequency of conservatively managed traumatic acute subdural haematoma changing into chronic subdural haematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.; Aurangzeb, A.; Khan, S.A.; Ali, A.; Maqbool, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury represents a significant cause of mortality and permanent disability in the adult population. Acute subdural haematoma is one of the conditions most strongly associated with severe brain injury. Knowledge on the natural history of the illness and the outcome of patients conservatively managed may help the neurosurgeon in the decision-making process. Methods: We prospectively analysed 27 patients with age ranges 15-90 years, in whom a CT scan diagnosis of acute subdural haematoma was made, and in whom craniotomy for evacuation was not initially performed, to the neurosurgery department of Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad (2008-2011). Patients with deranged bleeding profile, anticoagulant therapy, chronic liver disease, any other associated intracranial abnormalities, such as cerebral contusions, as shown on CT, were excluded from this study. All patients were followed by serial CT scans, and a neurological assessment was done. Results: There were 18 male and 9 female patients, Cerebral atrophy was present in over half of the sample. In 22 of our patients, the acute subdural haematoma resolved spontaneously, without evidence of damage to the underlying brain, as shown by CT or neurological findings. Four patients subsequently required burr hole drainage for chronic subdural haematoma. In each of these patients, haematoma thickness was greater than 10 mm. The mean delay between injury and operation in this group was 15-21 days. Among these patients 1 patient required craniotomy for haematoma removal due to neurological deterioration. Conclusion: Certain conscious patients with small acute subdural haematomas, without mass effect on CT, may be safely managed conservatively, but due to high risk of these acute subdural haematoma changing into chronic subdural haematoma these patients should be reinvestigated in case of neurological deterioration. (author)

  9. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma in a patient with multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ahad Wani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute spontaneous subdural hematoma in a patient of multiple myeloma receiving chemotherapy is an unknown event, needing an urgent neurosurgical management. We report this patient who presented with progressive neurological deterioration and a low platelet count. She was successfully managed by craniotomy and evacuation of subdural hematoma with intraoperative transfusion of platelets. The acute spontaneous subdural hematoma in her was probably related to the bleeding diathesis due to thrombocytopenia associated with chemotherapy.

  10. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Besime Utku; Uygar Utku

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma associated with neoplasm is a rare disorder. A rare case of chronic subdural hematoma associated with acute biphenotypic leukemia presented here. A 78-year-old woman who diagnosed as acute biphenotypic leukemia by hematology was complicated with a large chronic subdural hematoma. She presented to our emergency medicine service of hospital with left-sided weakness. Her non-contrast brain computerized tomography scan showed a non-traumatic right-sided, larg...

  11. CT findings in a case of neonatal acute subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshu, K.; Horie, Y.; Hirashima, Y.; Endo, S.; Takaku, A.

    1981-01-01

    The CT findings in a case of neonatal accute subdural hematoma are presented. CT demonstrated a crescentic high density area in the subdural space over the left cerebral hemisphere and an oval high density area in the left occipital region. The latter was suspected of being an intracerebral hematoma. Emergency craniotomy revealed that the high density area was due to a subdural hematoma between the occipital lobe and the tentorium cerebelli. (orig.)

  12. Metastatic Medulloblastoma in Childhood: Chang's Classification Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Dufour

    2012-01-01

    Patients and Methods. This population-based study concerned 117 newly diagnosed children with disseminated medulloblastoma treated at the Institute Gustave Roussy between 1988 and 2008. Metastatic disease was assessed using the Chang staging system, their form (positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, nodular or laminar, and their extension (positive cerebrospinal fluid, local, extensive. All patients received preirradiation chemotherapy. Results. The overall survival did not differ according to Chang M-stage. The 5-year overall survival was 59% in patients with nodular metastases compared to 35% in those with laminar metastases. The 5-year overall survival was 76% in patients without disease at the end of pre-irradiation chemotherapy compared to 34% in those without a complete response (P=0.0008. Conclusions. Radiological characteristics of metastases correlated with survival in patients with medulloblastoma. Complete response to sandwich chemotherapy was a strong predictor of survival.

  13. Calcified subdural hematoma associated with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishige, Naoki; Sunami, Kenro; Sato, Akira; Watanabe, Osamu

    1984-01-01

    A case of calcified subdural hematoma associated with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage is reported. A left frontal subdural hematoma with left putaminal hemorrhage was incidentally found when a CT scan was performed to evaluate right hemiparesis and aphasia in a 55-year-old man. The putaminal hemorrhage was not very extensive, but his clinical symptoms were rather serious. Not only the putaminal hemorrhage, but also the presence of the calcified subdural hematoma was considered to have caused his clinical deterioration. The subtotal removal of the calcified subdural hematoma brought about a good result. (author)

  14. Prevalence of subdural collections in children with macrocrania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, M V; Richards, T J; Care, M M; Leach, J L

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between enlarged subarachnoid spaces and subdural collections is poorly understood and creates challenges for clinicians investigating the etiology of subdural collections. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of subdural collections on cross sectional imaging in children with macrocephaly correlating with subarachnoid space enlargement. The radiology information system of a large pediatric medical center was reviewed for "macrocrania" and "macrocephaly" on reports of cranial MRI/CT examinations in children collection presence and subarachnoid space size. Children with prior cranial surgery, parenchymal abnormalities, hydrocephalus, or conditions predisposing to parenchymal volume loss were excluded. Chart review was performed on those with subdural collections. Imaging from 177 children with enlarged head circumference was reviewed. Nine were excluded, for a final cohort of 168 subjects (108 with enlarged subarachnoid space). Subdural collections were identified in 6 (3.6%), all with enlarged subarachnoid space (6/108, 5.6%). In 4, subdural collections were small, homogeneous, and nonhemorrhagic. In 2, the collections were complex (septations or hemorrhage). Two children were reported as victims of child abuse (both with complex collections). No definitive etiology was established in the other cases. The prevalence of subdural collections in imaged children with macrocrania was 3.6%, all occurring in children with enlarged subarachnoid space. Our results suggest that enlarged subarachnoid space can be associated with some subdural collections in this cohort. Despite this, we believe that unexpected subdural collections in children should receive close clinical evaluation for underlying causes, including abusive head trauma.

  15. [Pediatric medulloblastoma: Retrospective series of 52 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, C; Antoni, D; Coca, A; Entz-Werlé, N; Lutz, P; Spiegel, A; Jannier, S; Niederst, C; Jarnet, D; Meyer, P; Kehrli, P; Noël, G

    2016-04-01

    Retrospective analysis of the results of 52 children irradiated for a medulloblastoma. Between 1974 and 2012, 52 children with an average age of 6 years and a half (11 months-17 years and a half) were treated with surgery then with radiotherapy at the Comprehensive Cancer Centre of Strasbourg (France). For 44 children, the treatment consisted of a chemotherapy. After a mean follow-up of 106.6 months (7-446 months), 13 relapses and 24 deaths were observed. Overall survival at 5 years and 10 years were 62% and 57%, respectively. Disease-free survival at 5 years and 10 years were 80% and 63%, respectively. Univariate analysis found the following adverse prognostic factors: the existence of a postoperative residue, the positivity of the cerebrospinal fluid, the metastatic status and medulloblastoma of high-risk. Positivity of the cerebrospinal fluid remains a negative factor in multivariate analysis. These results confirm the survival rate obtained by a conventional approach (surgery then irradiation). Insufficiency of results and rarity of medulloblastoma require the establishment of international protocols. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  16. Neuropsychological sequelae of medulloblastoma in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Joel H.; Crowe, Amy Bassell; Larson, David A.; Sneed, Penny K.; Gutin, Philip H.; McDermott, Michael W.; Prados, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the neuropsychological consequences of medulloblastoma in adults. Methods: Patients 18 years of age or older who had medulloblastoma and at least 3 years of disease-free survival were eligible. A battery of tests was conducted to assess global intellectual functioning, verbal ability, visuospatial ability, memory, reasoning, and academic proficiency. For the verbal memory performance, each patient was matched with two normal controls selected on the basis of age, sex, and level of education. Results: Review of the Neuro-Oncology database revealed 24 patients eligible for the study. Of these, 10 patients (6 good-risk and 4 poor-risk) agreed to participate; 7 patients were lost to follow-up; 5 lived too far away to come to the testing site, and 2 refused testing. There were four men and six women; their mean age was 36.5 years at testing and 29.9 years at surgical diagnosis. Mean dose of whole brain radiation was 34.5 Gy. Mean interval between diagnosis and testing was 79.1 months. Test results demonstrated below average intelligence quotients (mean intelligence quotient 90.2; range 67-103) and specific deficits in memory, reasoning, visuospatial ability, and arithmetic. Conclusion: Adults with medulloblastoma in a prolonged disease-free status may suffer significant cognitive deficits. We recommend further controlled, prospective studies to evaluate cognitive outcomes in this patient population in the hope that interventional strategies could be developed, or treatment modified to minimize such toxicities

  17. Genes differentially expressed in medulloblastoma and fetal brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michiels, E. M.; Oussoren, E.; van Groenigen, M.; Pauws, E.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Voûte, P. A.; Baas, F.

    1999-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was used to identify genes that might be involved in the development or growth of medulloblastoma, a childhood brain tumor. Sequence tags from medulloblastoma (10229) and fetal brain (10692) were determined. The distributions of sequence tags in each

  18. Importance of frailty evaluation in the prediction of the prognosis of patients with chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kiyoharu; Sadatomo, Takashi; Hara, Takeshi; Onishi, Shumpei; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2018-05-17

    The present study aimed to clarify the relationship between frailty and prognosis of patients with chronic subdural hematoma. This retrospective study involved 211 patients aged ≥65 years with chronic subdural hematoma, who underwent surgery at Higashihiroshima Medical Center, Hiroshima, Japan, between July 2011 and May 2017. The study outcome was the patient's modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months after surgery. A logistic regression analysis was carried out to analyze factors that influenced the outcome. Chronic subdural hematoma patients with frailty had a poorer prognosis than those without (median modified Rankin Scale: 4 and 2, P < 0.001; proportions of patients discharged to home: 35% and 91%, P < 0.001, respectively). After adjusting for patients' background, the patients' modified Rankin Scale scores at 3 months after surgery were found to be associated with age, controlling nutritional status score and recurrence, but not with frailty. However, receiver operating characteristic curves of the model with the Clinical Frailty Scale were more accurately correlated with prognosis than those of the model without this scale (area under the curve 0.98, 95% confidence interval 0.96-0.99; and 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.82-0.91, respectively.) CONCLUSIONS: Chronic subdural hematoma patients with frailty had poorer prognosis than those without. The evaluation of the presence of frailty on admission can be an important factor in the prediction of the prognosis of chronic subdural hematoma patients. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Postoperative subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hematoma after unruptured aneurysm surgery: age, sex, and aneurysm location as independent risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaechan; Cho, Jae-Hoon; Goh, Duck-Ho; Kang, Dong-Hun; Shin, Im Hee; Hamm, In-Suk

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the incidence and risk factors for the postoperative occurrence of subdural complications, such as a subdural hygroma and resultant chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), following surgical clipping of an unruptured aneurysm. The critical age affecting such occurrences and follow-up results were also examined. The case series included 364 consecutive patients who underwent aneurysm clipping via a pterional or superciliary keyhole approach for an unruptured saccular aneurysm in the anterior cerebral circulation between 2007 and 2013. The subdural hygromas were identified based on CT scans 6-9 weeks after surgery, and the volumes were measured using volumetry studies. Until their complete resolution, all the subdural hygromas were followed using CT scans every 1-2 months. Meanwhile, the CSDHs were classified as nonoperative or operative lesions that were treated by bur-hole drainage. The age and sex of the patients, aneurysm location, history of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and surgical approach (pterional vs superciliary) were all analyzed regarding the postoperative occurrence of a subdural hygroma or CSDH. The follow-up results of the subdural complications were also investigated. Seventy patients (19.2%) developed a subdural hygroma or CSDH. The results of a multivariate analysis showed that advanced age (p = 0.003), male sex (p 60 years, which achieved a 70% sensitivity and 69% specificity with regard to predicting such subdural complications. The female patients ≤ 60 years of age showed a negligible incidence of subdural complications for all aneurysm groups, whereas the male patients > 60 years of age showed the highest incidence of subdural complications at 50%-100%, according to the aneurysm location. The subdural hygromas detected 6-9 weeks postoperatively showed different follow-up results, according to the severity. The subdural hygromas that converted to a CSDH were larger in volume than the subdural hygromas that resolved

  20. Postoperative CT appearance in chronic subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Takaaki; Nishikawa, Michio; Handa, Hajime; Iwaki, Kazuo; Sawai, Teruaki; Munaka, Masahiro

    1988-05-01

    Postoperative CT appearances in 65 cases of chronic subdural hematomas were evaluated in terms of patient's age, preoperative neurological symptoms and CT findings, final outcomes, and so on. All of the cases were treated with trepanation and irrigation. CT appearances were divided into four different types as follows; Type Ia: No abnormal findings in the subdural sapce, Type Ib: The same as above except for a linear high density suggestive of thickened outer membrane, Type II: Persistence subdural fluid collection and widened cortical sulci which indicate underlining brain atrophy, Type III: Remaining hematoma and/or density changes during follow-up period. Although the mean age of the patients in type Ib was higher than those in type Ia and reexpansion of the brain appear to delay in type Ib and preoperative CT in type Ib tended to show mixed density, final outcome in both groups were excellent. Characteristics in type II were that most of cases were in the eighth decade, preceding head injury was unclear, preoperative psychiatric symptoms and disturbance of consciousness were common and postoperative improvement of the symptoms was not satisfactory compared to other types. Aged patients as in type Ib and type II and thick hematomas of over 2 cm depth with mixed or high density tended to show type III postoperatively. All of the nine patients who required reoperation were included in this type. The present study indicates that thick hematomas with sizable mass effect and mixed or high density in the aged must be carefully treated, such as with placement of the subdural drainage or keeping the patient in the Trendelenburg position, to facilitate postoperative reexpansion of the brain.

  1. Surgery for chronic subdural hematoma in nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, J; Sjåvik, K; Ståhl, F

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is a prevalent condition often seen in the elderly, with surgery being the treatment of choice when symptomatic. So far, few have explored the surgical outcomes in patients 90 years or older. The aim of this study was to investigate outcome after c...... neurosurgical centers. In a comparative analysis, the primary end-point was difference in hematoma recurrence rates between the ≥90 y/o and

  2. A Rare Case of Medulloblastoma with Excessive Nodularity: Imagistic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tascu A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant tumor of childhood. Neuroimaging can play a role in the diagnosis of medulloblastoma, however atypical features do exist [2]. We report the case of a 1 year and 10- month-old infant diagnosed with a medulloblastoma with what we term “excessive” nodularity based on neuroimaging features and confirmed by neuropathology. CT-scan (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examination of the brain revealed a very large posterior fossa tumor attached to tentorium. On T2-weighted and post-gadolinium sequences, the tumor shows an extensive nodular grape-like appearance. Initial the patient was underwent a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. The second operative procedure was tumour resection. Histology examen revealed a diagnosis of medulloblastoma desmoplastic with extensive nodularity. The neuroradiographic features of this medulloblastoma with what we describe as “excessive” nodularity are important to recognize as these children may be cured with chemotherapy alone.

  3. The Neuroradiological Spectra of Adult and Pediatric Medulloblastoma Differ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Dagmar; Kocakaya, Selin; Hau, Peter

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Current knowledge on the spectrum of the neuroradiological appearance of adult medulloblastoma is sparse. Due to the rarity of the disease, adult patients were generally diagnosed and treated similar to children; however, pediatric and adult medulloblastomas display substantial molecular...... differences that may influence the neuroradiological phenotype. This study therefore aimed at assessment of the neuroradiological spectrum of adult medulloblastoma in comparison to pediatric tumors. METHODS: All available publications on adult medulloblastoma published until June 2013 were screened...... for imaging data on single patients. A total of 109 patients were identified and compared to 118 pediatric patients described in 4 cohorts. RESULTS: The average age of the adult patients was 34.3 years. Most adult medulloblastomas (57.6 %) were localized laterally (vs. 14.4 % in pediatric patients). On T1...

  4. Clinical implications of medulloblastoma subgroups: incidence of CSF diversion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Rutka, James T; Remke, Marc; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    While medulloblastoma was initially thought to comprise a single homogeneous entity, it is now accepted that it in fact comprises 4 discrete subgroups, each with its own distinct demographics, clinical presentation, transcriptomics, genetics, and outcome. Hydrocephalus is a common complication of medulloblastoma and not infrequently requires CSF diversion. The authors report the incidence of CSF diversion surgery in each of the subgroups of medulloblastoma (Wnt, Shh, Group 3, and Group 4). The medical and imaging records for patients who underwent surgery for medulloblastoma at The Hospital for Sick Children were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome was the requirement for CSF diversion surgery either before or within 60 days of tumor resection. The modified Canadian Preoperative Prediction Rule for Hydrocephalus (mCPPRH) was compared among subgroups. Of 143 medulloblastoma patients, treated from 1991 to 2013, sufficient data were available for 130 patients (15 with Wnt, 30 with Shh, 30 with Group 3, and 55 with Group 4 medulloblastomas). Of these, 28 patients (22%) ultimately underwent CSF diversion surgery: 0% with Wnt, 29% with Shh, 29% with Group 3, and 43% with Group 4 tumors. Patients in the Wnt subgroup had a lower incidence of CSF diversion than all other patients combined (p = 0.04). Wnt patients had a lower mCPPRH score (lower risk of CSF diversion, p = 0.045), were older, had smaller ventricles at diagnosis, and had no leptomeningeal metastases. The overall rate of CSF diversion surgery for Shh, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas is around 30%, but no patients in the present series with a Wnt medulloblastoma required shunting. The low incidence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastoma likely reflects both host factors (age) and disease factors (lack of metastases). The absence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastomas likely contributes to their excellent rate of survival and may also contribute to a higher quality

  5. Subdural Instillation of a Thrombolytic Agent for Treatment of Recurrent Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Mark B; Sarwal, Aarti; Wren, Mary Petrulis; Newey, Christopher R; Couture, Daniel E

    This study aims to report the case of a patient with recurrent subdural hemorrhage (SDH) who was administered tissue plasminogen activator through a subdural drain to enhance drainage and prevent recurrence. An 85-year-old man was treated for subacute over chronic SDH that kept on reaccumulating despite serial twist drill drainage, burr hole drainage, and craniotomy. No coagulopathy was identified with adequate blood pressure control. Treatment with tissue plasminogen activator resulted in successful drainage of the SDH, and the patient had no further recurrence at 9-month follow-up.

  6. Case report: Calcified chronic subdural haematoma in an elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcified chronic subdural haematoma [CCSDH] is a rare complication of the relatively more common condition of Chronic Subdural Haematoma (CSDH). We present the case of a 68yr old man referred with a 2 week history of sudden onset Right hemi paresis generalized tonic clonic seizures and aphasia. There was a ...

  7. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, F. A. M.; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; van Rijn, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as

  8. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons.

  9. A case with Parkinsonism secondary to bilateral subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalet Arıkanoğlu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of secondary Parkinsonism. In this study, we presented a case of Parkinsonian syndrome caused by a bilateral subdural hematoma. The patient’s Parkinsonism completely healed following successful surgical removal of the hematomas without any anti-parkinson drug.

  10. Assessment of drainage techniques for evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjåvik, Kristin; Bartek, Jiri; Sagberg, Lisa Millgård

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical procedures. The benefit of postoperative passive subdural drainage compared with no drains has been established, but other drainage techniques are common, and their effectiveness compared with passive...

  11. Spontaneous resolution of post-traumatic chronic subdural hematoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here, we present a case of spontaneously resolved post-traumatic bilateral chronic subdural hematoma within a period of one month in a 55-year-old male and we discuss the probable mechanisms of pathophysiology in the spontaneous resolution of chronic subdural hematoma. Keywords: Antiaggregation therapy, chronic ...

  12. Radiobiological risk estimates of adverse events and secondary cancer for proton and photon radiation therapy of pediatric medulloblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, N Patrik; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per Martin; Aznar, Marianne C

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this model study was to estimate and compare the risk of radiation-induced adverse late effects in pediatric patients with medulloblastoma (MB) treated with either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT), inversely-optimized arc therapy (RapidArc(®) (RA)) or spot...

  13. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Naoki; Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    "Headbanging" is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma.

  14. Extramedullary Hematopoiesis: An Unusual Finding in Subdural Hematomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 59-year-old man who was found to have clusters of hyperchromatic, small, round nucleated cells within a subdural hematoma removed after a skull fracture. Immunohistochemistry study confirmed that the cells were hematopoietic components predominantly composed of normoblasts. In this paper, we describe the clinical and pathological findings. A brief review of published information on extramedullary hematopoiesis in subdural hematoma and the mechanisms of pathogenesis are also discussed. While extramedullary hematopoiesis is seen anecdotally by neuropathologists in chronic subdural hematomas, only a few cases are documented in the literature. Furthermore, extramedullary hematopoiesis in subdural hematoma can pose a diagnostic challenge for general pathologists who encounter subdural hematoma evacuations seldom in their surgical pathology practices.

  15. Malignant Subdural Hematoma Associated with High-Grade Meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Shinichiro; Tsunoda, Akira; Kawamura, Kaito; Sugiyama, Natsuki; Saito, Rikizo; Maruki, Chikashi

    2018-01-01

    A 70-year-old man, who had previously undergone surgical resection of left parasagittal meningioma involving the middle third of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) two times, presented with recurrence of the tumor. We performed removal of the tumor combined with SSS resection as Simpson grade II. After tumor removal, since a left dominant bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) appeared, it was treated by burr hole surgery. However, because the CSDH rapidly and repeatedly recurred and eventually changed to acute subdural hematoma, elimination of the hematoma with craniotomy was accomplished. The patient unfortunately died of worsening of general condition despite aggressive treatment. Histopathology of brain autopsy showed invasion of anaplastic meningioma cells spreading to the whole outer membrane of the subdural hematoma. Subdural hematoma is less commonly associated with meningioma. Our case indicates the possibility that subdural hematoma associated with meningioma is formed by a different mechanism from those reported previously. PMID:29896565

  16. [Infected subdural hematoma having a surgery of chronic subdural hematoma 1 year ago:a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Chikao; Ando, Shunpei; Haga, Daisuke; Kuroki, Takao; Sugo, Nobuo; Nagao, Takeki

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of an infected subdural hematoma that occurred 1 year after burr-hole irrigation for chronic subdural hematoma. A 78-year-old woman who had developed left hemiparesis was admitted to our hospital. A computed tomography(CT)scan revealed the presence of a chronic subdural hematoma in the right hemisphere. Her clinical symptoms improved immediately after emergency burr-hole irrigation, which allowed her discharge from the hospital. One year after the initial surgery, she developed an infection of the urinary tract infection, which led to severe pyelonephritis and septic shock. Treatment of the urological symptoms eliminated the systemic inflammation. One month after the urinary infection, the patient was readmitted to the hospital in a comatose state. A CT scan showed regrowth of a residual subdural hematoma surrounded by a thick capsule, causing a midline shift in the brain. An emergency operation for removal of the subdural hematoma by burr-hole irrigation was performed, and pus was drained from the subdural mass. Microbiological cultures of the abscess revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. After surgery, the patient was administered an antibiotic treatment for three weeks and she was discharged with no neurological deficits. Cultures of blood from the septic shock as well as from the abscess both revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. Therefore, a diagnosis of infected subdural hematoma, which was caused by hematogenous infection, was made. We conclude that attention should be paid to the risk of infection of the hematoma capsule in subdural hematomas.

  17. Histopathologic grading of medulloblastomas: a Pediatric Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Charles G; Kepner, James L; Goldthwaite, Patricia T; Kun, Larry E; Duffner, Patricia K; Friedman, Henry S; Strother, Douglas R; Burger, Peter C

    2002-01-15

    Medulloblastomas are small cell embryonal tumors of the cerebellum found predominantly in children, only slightly more than half of whom survive. Predicting favorable outcome has been difficult, and improved stratification clearly is required to avoid both undertreatment and overtreatment. Patients currently are staged clinically, but no pathologic staging system is in use. Two rare subtypes at extreme ends of the histologic spectrum, i.e., medulloblastomas with extensive nodularity and large cell/anaplastic medulloblastomas, are associated with better and worse clinical outcomes, respectively. However, there is little data about correlations between histologic features and clinical outcome for most patients with medulloblastomas that fall between these histologic extremes of nodularity and anaplasia. Therefore, the authors evaluated the clinical effects of increasing anaplasia and nodularity in a large group of children with medulloblastomas, hypothesizing that increasing nodularity would predict better clinical outcomes and that increasing anaplasia would presage less favorable results. Medulloblastomas from 330 Pediatric Oncology Group patients were evaluated histologically with respect to extent of nodularity, presence of desmoplasia, grade of anaplasia, and extent of anaplasia. Pathologic and clinical data were then compared using Kaplan-Meier and log-rank analyses. Increasing grade of anaplasia and extent of anaplasia were associated strongly with progressively worse clinical outcomes (P anaplasia (moderate or severe) was identified in 24% of medulloblastoma specimens. Neither increasing degrees of nodularity nor desmoplasia were associated significantly with longer survival. Moderate anaplasia and severe anaplasia were associated with aggressive clinical behavior in patients with medulloblastomas and were detected in a significant number of specimens (24%). Pathologic grading of medulloblastomas with respect to anaplasia may be of clinical utility.

  18. Subdural drainage versus subperiosteal drainage in burr-hole trepanation for symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellut, David; Woernle, Christoph Michael; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Kockro, Ralf Alfons; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Krayenbühl, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (scSDH) is one of the most frequent diseases in neurosurgical practice, and its incidence is increasing. However, treatment modalities are still controversial. The aim of this retrospective single-center study is to compare for the first time two surgical methods in the treatment of subdural hematoma that have been proven to be efficient in previous studies in a direct comparison. We analyzed the data of 143 scSDHs in 113 patients undergoing surgery for subdural hematoma with placement of subperiosteal or subdural drainage after double burr-hole trepanation for hematoma evacuation. Overall, there were no statistically significant differences regarding general patient characteristics, preoperative and postoperative symptoms, postoperative hematoma remnant, rates of recurrences, mortality, complications, and outcome at discharge and at 3-month follow up between the groups. There was a close to significant tendency of lower mortality after placement of subperiosteal drainage system and a tendency towards lower rate of recurrent hematoma after placement of subdural drainage system. Our study shows for the first time a direct comparison of two mainly used surgical techniques in the treatment of scSDH. Both methods proved to be highly effective, and general patient data, complications, outcome and mortality of both groups are equal or superior compared with previously published series. Because there is a clear tendency to less mortality and fewer serious complications, treatment with double burr-hole trepanation, irrigation, and placement of subperiosteal drainage is our treatment of choice in patients with predictable high risk of complications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictors of Recurrence and Complications After Chronic Subdural Hematoma Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Kristiansson, Helena

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate predictors of recurrence and moderate to severe complications after burr-hole surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian single-center population-based cohort of 759 adult patients with cSDH operated...... regression model. RESULTS: Recurrence was observed in 85 patients (11.2%), whereas moderate to severe complications were observed in 35 patients (4.6%). Bilateral hematoma (odds ratio [OR], 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25-3.35; P hematoma diameter in millimeters (OR, 1.05; 95% CI...... to severe complications. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrence after cSDH surgery is more often encountered in patients with radiologically more extensive disease reflected by bilateral hematoma and large hematoma diameter. On the other hand, moderate to severe complications are more often seen in patients in a worse...

  20. Cerebellar Medulloblastoma in Middle-to-Late Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Aljoghaiman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a malignant brain tumor that is typically seen in children. It is classified as an embryonal tumor, classically located within the posterior fossa. When it involves the fourth ventricle, the patient commonly presents with signs and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure secondary to obstructive hydrocephalus. It is exceedingly rare for Medulloblastoma to occur in middle and late adulthood. In this paper, we present a case of a 51-year-old man who presented with a posterior fossa mass that was diagnosed later as Medulloblastoma.

  1. Multiple bone metastasis of medulloblastoma; a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Cheon; Lee, Seoung Ro; Kim, Yong Soo; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1996-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is one of the most undifferentiated primitive neuroectodermal tumors and represents about 30% of all posterior fossa tumors in children. Disseminated medulloblastoma, mainly involving cerebral surfaces, ventricles and the subarachnoid space can, in 50% of patients, be identified on intial imaging studies. One third of these lesions metastasize to an extracranial sity, primarily to bone. Osseous metastases, which occur mainly after craniectomy are typically lytic, but osteoblastic lesions also may occur. We experienced the case of a 14 year-old female patient with multiple bone metastases of medulloblastoma after craniectomy. Bone metastatic lesions were present in the right femur and thoracic spine and were osteoblastic or osteolytic

  2. Medulloblastoma with Excessive Nodularity: Radiographic Features and Pathologic Correlate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Yeh-Nayre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity is a rare subtype of the most common malignant childhood brain tumor and has been associated with more favorable prognosis. The authors report the case of a 10-month-old girl with a posterior fossa tumor of excessive nodularity with decreased diffusivity on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences and robust grape-like postgadolinium contrast enhancing features. The unique neuroradiographic features were confirmed by histopathology and a diagnosis of medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity was made. This case highlights the importance of recognizing this unique medulloblastoma subtype preoperatively, as the more favorable outcome may preclude less aggressive medical management.

  3. A method for medulloblastoma tumor differentiation based on convolutional neural networks and transfer learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Arévalo, John; Judkins, Alexander; Madabhushi, Anant; González, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Convolutional neural networks (CNN) have been very successful at addressing different computer vision tasks thanks to their ability to learn image representations directly from large amounts of labeled data. Features learned from a dataset can be used to represent images from a different dataset via an approach called transfer learning. In this paper we apply transfer learning to the challenging task of medulloblastoma tumor differentiation. We compare two different CNN models which were previously trained in two different domains (natural and histopathology images). The first CNN is a state-of-the-art approach in computer vision, a large and deep CNN with 16-layers, Visual Geometry Group (VGG) CNN. The second (IBCa-CNN) is a 2-layer CNN trained for invasive breast cancer tumor classification. Both CNNs are used as visual feature extractors of histopathology image regions of anaplastic and non-anaplastic medulloblastoma tumor from digitized whole-slide images. The features from the two models are used, separately, to train a softmax classifier to discriminate between anaplastic and non-anaplastic medulloblastoma image regions. Experimental results show that the transfer learning approach produce competitive results in comparison with the state of the art approaches for IBCa detection. Results also show that features extracted from the IBCa-CNN have better performance in comparison with features extracted from the VGG-CNN. The former obtains 89.8% while the latter obtains 76.6% in terms of average accuracy.

  4. Spontaneous subdural hematoma associated to Duret hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Alves Martins, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SH is a neurosurgical emergency, usually caused by head trauma. Non-traumatic causes include aneurysm or arterial–venous malformation rupture, coagulopathy and others. We report the case of a 66 year-old man who developed apparently unprovoked signs of increased intracranial pressure. Brain computed tomography scan showed an acute spontaneous SH, surgically treated. Throughout surgery, a ruptured cortical artery with intensive bleeding appeared and was cauterized. After surgery, patient remained comatose and a new CT demonstrated Duret hemorrhage at the brainstem. Acute spontaneous SH of arterial origin is rare and highly lethal, in which a good prognosis relies on early diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Societal preferences in the treatment of pediatric medulloblastoma: Balancing risk of death and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakban, Amir; Mohammadi, Tima; Lynd, Larry D; Mabbott, Don; Bouffet, Eric; Gastonguay, Louise; Zafari, Zafar; Malkin, David; Taylor, Michael; Marra, Carlo A

    2017-06-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most prevalent childhood brain cancer. Children with medulloblastoma typically receive a combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. The survival rate is high but survivors often have sequelae from radiotherapy of the entire developing brain and spinal cord. Ongoing genetic studies have suggested that decreasing the dose of radiation might be possible among children with favorable molecular variants; however, this may result in an increased disease recurrence. As such, there is a need to investigate the nature of trade-offs that individuals are willing to make regarding the treatment of medulloblastoma. We used best-worst scaling to estimate the importance of attributes affecting the general public's decision making around the treatment of medulloblastoma. After conducting focus groups, we selected three relevant attributes: (1) the accuracy of the genetic test; (2) the probability of serious adverse effects of the treatment(s); and (3) the survival rate. Using the paired method, we applied a conditional logit model to estimate preferences. In total, 3,006 respondents (51.3% female) with an average age of 43 years answered the questionnaires. All coefficients were statistically significantly different from zero and the attribute levels of adverse effects and the survival rate had the most impact on individuals' stated decision making. Overall, respondents showed high sensitivity to children experiencing disability particularly in the setting of a good prognosis. However, among children with poor prognostic molecular variants, participants showed tolerance about having a child with mild and partial disability compared to a low rate of survival. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Pharmacological Inhibition of the Protein Kinase MRK/ZAK Radiosensitizes Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Daniel; Powell, Caitlin; Tran, Nhan L; Berens, Michael E; Ryken, Timothy C; Vanan, Magimairajan; Rosen, Lisa; He, Mingzu; Sun, Shan; Symons, Marc; Al-Abed, Yousef; Ruggieri, Rosamaria

    2016-08-01

    Medulloblastoma is a cerebellar tumor and the most common pediatric brain malignancy. Radiotherapy is part of the standard care for this tumor, but its effectiveness is accompanied by significant neurocognitive sequelae due to the deleterious effects of radiation on the developing brain. We have previously shown that the protein kinase MRK/ZAK protects tumor cells from radiation-induced cell death by regulating cell-cycle arrest after ionizing radiation. Here, we show that siRNA-mediated MRK depletion sensitizes medulloblastoma primary cells to radiation. We have, therefore, designed and tested a specific small molecule inhibitor of MRK, M443, which binds to MRK in an irreversible fashion and inhibits its activity. We found that M443 strongly radiosensitizes UW228 medulloblastoma cells as well as UI226 patient-derived primary cells, whereas it does not affect the response to radiation of normal brain cells. M443 also inhibits radiation-induced activation of both p38 and Chk2, two proteins that act downstream of MRK and are involved in DNA damage-induced cell-cycle arrest. Importantly, in an animal model of medulloblastoma that employs orthotopic implantation of primary patient-derived UI226 cells in nude mice, M443 in combination with radiation achieved a synergistic increase in survival. We hypothesize that combining radiotherapy with M443 will allow us to lower the radiation dose while maintaining therapeutic efficacy, thereby minimizing radiation-induced side effects. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1799-808. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Evaluation of lens dose in medulloblastoma radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, F.L.; Vilela, E.C.; Sousa, S.A; Lima, F.F. de

    2007-01-01

    The improvement of the applied radiotherapy techniques in the cranial-spinal therapy, which is used in the cases of medulloblastoma, aims the reduction of the risks of future damages in enclosed critical agencies in the irradiation fields. This work aims to evaluate the lens doses due two common techniques used in medulloblastoma radiotherapy. For this, thermoluminescent dosimeters, previously calibrated, were located in an anthropomorphic phantom (ALDERSON - RANDON Laboratory), in the tumor and lens positions. The employed techniques were as following: (1) angled fields technique and (2) half-beam block technique. The phantom was irradiated five times in each technique with two lateral opposed fields in the brain with a total prescribed dose of 1.5 Gy, followed of two posterior spinal fields with the same prescribed dose, using a 6MV accelerator. The results showed that the doses in the first technique were 0.10 +- 0,04 Gy and, in second one, 0.09 +- 0,02 Gy. It was observed that, independent of the employed technique, the lens doses practically are the same. (author)

  8. [Adult medulloblastoma: Retrospective series of 21 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, C; Antoni, D; Coca, A; Niederst, C; Jarnet, D; Meyer, P; Kehrli, P; Noël, G

    2016-02-01

    Retrospective analysis of the results of 21 adults treated for medulloblastoma. Between 1978 and 2011, 21 adults with an average age of 31 years (18.3-50) were treated with surgery then with radiotherapy (n=20) at the Comprehensive Cancer Center of Strasbourg. For some (n=12), treatment consisted of chemotherapy. After a mean follow-up of 122 months (19-423), six relapses and seven deaths were observed. Overall survival at 5 years and 10 years was 89.4 ± 7.1% for both. Disease-free survival at 5 years and 10 years was 79.6 ± 9.2% and 85.7 ± 7.6% and 60.6 ± 17.7%, respectively. The rarity of medulloblastoma, especially in adults and these results confirm the necessity of international protocols. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Remote Hemorrhage after Burr Hole Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Hyeun; Song, Geun Sung; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2017-10-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and symptomatic subdural hygroma are common diseases that require neurosurgical management. Burr hole trephination is the most popular surgical treatment for CSDH and subdural hygroma because of a low recurrence rate and low morbidity compared with craniotomy with membranectomy, and twist-drill craniotomy. Many reports suggest that placing a catheter in the subdural space for drainage can further reduce the rate of recurrence; however, complications associated with this type of drainage include acute subdural hematoma, cortical injury, and infection. Remote hemorrhage due to overdrainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is another possible complication of burr hole trephination with catheter drainage that has rarely been reported. Here, we present 2 cases of remote hemorrhages following burr hole trephination with catheter drainage for the treatment of CSDH and symptomatic subdural hygroma. One patient developed intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the contralateral hemisphere, while another patient developed remote hemorrhage 3 days after the procedure due to the sudden drainage of a large amount of subdural fluid over a 24-hour period. These findings suggest that catheter drainage should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage of CSF after burr hole trephination.

  10. Subdural hematomas: an analysis of 1181 Kashmiri patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayil, Khursheed; Ramzan, Altaf; Sajad, Arif; Zahoor, Sheikh; Wani, Abrar; Nizami, Furqan; Laharwal, Masood; Kirmani, Altaf; Bhat, Rashid

    2012-01-01

    We endeavored to analyze patients of subacute and chronic subdural hematomas studied in a 4-year period at the Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Kashmir, India. The study was a retrospective analysis of 1181 patients of subdural hematomas. Demographic characteristics, clinico-radiologic features, operative modalities, and outcome were studied. Acute subdural hematomas were excluded from the study. The mean age was 60.4 ± 12.4 and males outnumbered females. Chronic subdural collections were more common than subacute subdural hematomas and left side predominated. Two burr holes with closed-system drainage was used in most patients. Incidence of postoperative seizures is very low. Overall recurrence rates were low; however, multilocular hematomas had the highest incidence of recurrence. Morbidity and mortality were 7.53% and 2.96%, respectively. Preoperative neurologic grade correlated with outcome. Subdural hematomas are common in elderly males. Preoperative neurologic grade dictates the outcome. Multilocular hematomas have a higher chance of recurrence. Craniotomy should be reserved for recurrent hematomas, and there may be a scope of craniotomy for multilocular chronic subdural hematomas at the outset. Antiepileptic prophylaxis is not routinely recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Ketogenic Diet Does Not Affect Growth of Hedgehog Pathway Medulloblastoma in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Mai T.; Wehrli, Suzanne; Dang, Chi V.; Curran, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The altered metabolism of cancer cells has long been viewed as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. In particular, brain tumors often display heightened glycolysis, even in the presence of oxygen. A subset of medulloblastoma, the most prevalent malignant brain tumor in children, arises as a consequence of activating mutations in the Hedgehog (HH) pathway, which has been shown to promote aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we hypothesized that a low carbohydrate, high fat ketogenic diet would suppress tumor growth in a genetically engineered mouse model of medulloblastoma. However, we found that the ketogenic diet did not slow the growth of spontaneous tumors or allograft flank tumors, and it did not exhibit synergy with a small molecule inhibitor of Smoothened. Serum insulin was significantly reduced in mice fed the ketogenic diet, but no alteration in PI3 kinase activity was observed. These findings indicate that while the ketogenic diet may be effective in inhibiting growth of other tumor types, it does not slow the growth of HH-medulloblastoma in mice. PMID:26192445

  12. Reprogramming Medulloblastoma-Propagating Cells by a Combined Antagonism of Sonic Hedgehog and CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Stacey A; Warrington, Nicole M; Taylor, Sara; Kfoury, Najla; Luo, Jingqin; Rubin, Joshua B

    2017-03-15

    The CXCR4 chemokine and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) morphogen pathways are well-validated therapeutic targets in cancer, including medulloblastoma. However, single-agent treatments with SHH or CXCR4 antagonists have not proven efficacious in clinical trials to date. Here, we discovered that dual inhibition of the SHH and CXCR4 pathways in a murine model of SHH-subtype medulloblastoma exerts potent antitumor effects. This therapeutic synergy resulted in the suppression of tumor-propagating cell function and correlated with increased histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation within the promoters of stem cell genes, resulting in their decreased expression. These results demonstrate that CXCR4 contributes to the epigenetic regulation of a tumor-propagating cell phenotype. Moreover, they provide a mechanistic rationale to evaluate the combination of SHH and CXCR4 inhibitors in clinical trials for the treatment of medulloblastoma, as well as other cancers driven by SHH that coexpress high levels of CXCR4. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1416-26. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. The Ketogenic Diet Does Not Affect Growth of Hedgehog Pathway Medulloblastoma in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai T Dang

    Full Text Available The altered metabolism of cancer cells has long been viewed as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. In particular, brain tumors often display heightened glycolysis, even in the presence of oxygen. A subset of medulloblastoma, the most prevalent malignant brain tumor in children, arises as a consequence of activating mutations in the Hedgehog (HH pathway, which has been shown to promote aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we hypothesized that a low carbohydrate, high fat ketogenic diet would suppress tumor growth in a genetically engineered mouse model of medulloblastoma. However, we found that the ketogenic diet did not slow the growth of spontaneous tumors or allograft flank tumors, and it did not exhibit synergy with a small molecule inhibitor of Smoothened. Serum insulin was significantly reduced in mice fed the ketogenic diet, but no alteration in PI3 kinase activity was observed. These findings indicate that while the ketogenic diet may be effective in inhibiting growth of other tumor types, it does not slow the growth of HH-medulloblastoma in mice.

  14. Decoding the regulatory landscape of medulloblastoma using DNA methylation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T. W.; Picelli, Simone; Wang, Wei; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Sultan, Marc; Stachurski, Katharina; Ryzhova, Marina; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Ralser, Meryem; Brun, Sonja; Bunt, Jens; Jäger, Natalie; Kleinheinz, Kortine; Erkek, Serap; Weber, Ursula D.; Bartholomae, Cynthia C.; von Kalle, Christof; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Milde, Till; Witt, Olaf; Schmidt, Sabine; Wolf, Stephan; Pietsch, Torsten; Rutkowski, Stefan; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Taylor, Michael D.; Brors, Benedikt; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Borkhardt, Arndt; Lehrach, Hans; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Eils, Roland; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Landgraf, Pablo; Korshunov, Andrey; Zapatka, Marc; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Pfister, Stefan M.; Lichter, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations, that is, disruption of DNA methylation and chromatin architecture, are now acknowledged as a universal feature of tumorigenesis. Medulloblastoma, a clinically challenging, malignant childhood brain tumour, is no exception. Despite much progress from recent genomics studies,

  15. Epidermal Nevus Syndrome Associated with Brain Malformations and Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at Juntendo University and Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Japan; and University of California, San Francisco, Ca, report a male infant with epidermal nevus syndrome associated with brainstem and cerebellar malformations and neonatal medulloblastoma.

  16. Predictors for Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Alexander; Tregubow, Alexander; Kerry, Ghassan; Schrey, Michael; Hammer, Christian; Steiner, Hans-Herbert

    2017-01-01

    This prospective study was designed to analyze the dependence of different factors on the recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) after surgical treatment. Seventy-three consecutive patients, who were surgically treated at our department due to cSDH between 2009 and 2012, were included. The following parameters were analyzed: patient age and gender, occurrence of trauma, time between trauma and admission, neurological symptoms, presence of minor diseases, intake of anticoagulation medication. We classified the results of diagnostic imaging and determined the space-consuming effect via the cerebral midline shift. In addition, we scrutinized intraoperative findings and the dependence of the position of subdural drainage on the recurrence rate of cSDH. In our patient group, cSDH recurrence was significantly associated with aphasia (p=0.008). Moreover an increased cSDH recurrence rate was observed in the patient group that had a separated manifestation of the cSDH in the preoperative diagnostic imaging (p=0.048) and received no drainage implant (p=0.016). Homogeneous isodense cSDH was associated with no apparent recurrence (p=0.037). Within the scope of this study, we detected aphasia and separated cSDH as predictors of cSDH recurrence. Homogeneous isodense cSDH seems to be a good prognostic sign regarding the risk of recurrence development. Furthermore, our data clearly emphasize the importance of surgically applied drainage implants to prevent a recurrence of cSDH.

  17. Acute Spontaneous Posterior Fossa Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute posterior fossa subdural hematomas are rare and most of them are trauma-related. Non-traumatic ones have been reported in patients who had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura or those who had been receiving anticoagulant therapy. We report on the case of 57-year-old Iranian man who developed sudden severe occipital headache, drowsiness, repeated vomiting, and instability of stance and gait. He was neither hypertensive nor diabetic. No history of head trauma was obtained and he denied illicit drug or alcohol ingestion. A preliminary diagnosis of acute intra-cerebellar hemorrhage was made. His CT brain scan revealed an acute right-sided, extra-axial, crescent-shaped hyperdense area at the posterior fossa. His routine blood tests, platelets count, bleeding time, and coagulation profile were unremarkable. The patient had spontaneous acute infratentorial subdural hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged home well after 5 days. Since then, we could not follow-up him, clinically and radiologically because he went back to Iran. Our patient’s presentation, clinical course, and imaging study have called for conservative management, as the overall presentation was relatively benign. Unless the diagnosis is entertained and the CT brain scan is well-interpreted, the diagnosis may easily escape detection.

  18. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0115 TITLE: Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kyuson Yun...CA130273 - Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0115 5c. PROGRAM...hypothesis, we originally proposed to transform neural stem cells (NSCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vivo by expressing an activated form

  19. Medulloblastoma in association with the Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, L; Pattisapu, J; Smith, R R; Parker, P

    1988-02-01

    An 8-year old patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome is presented, who was found to have a medulloblastoma during the evaluation of apnea and ventilator dependency. Although several cases of Dandy Walker cysts and one case of brain-stem heterotopia have been described in this rare syndrome, this is the first report of medulloblastoma in a patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms are briefly discussed.

  20. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma identification using noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüml, Stefan; Margol, Ashley S; Sposto, Richard; Kennedy, Rebekah J; Robison, Nathan J; Vali, Marzieh; Hung, Long T; Muthugounder, Sakunthala; Finlay, Jonathan L; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Gilles, Floyd H; Judkins, Alexander R; Krieger, Mark D; Dhall, Girish; Nelson, Marvin D; Asgharzadeh, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastomas in children can be categorized into 4 molecular subgroups with differing clinical characteristics, such that subgroup determination aids in prognostication and risk-adaptive treatment strategies. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a widely available, noninvasive tool that is used to determine the metabolic characteristics of tumors and provide diagnostic information without the need for tumor tissue. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that metabolite concentrations measured by MRS would differ between molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma and allow accurate subgroup determination. MRS was used to measure metabolites in medulloblastomas across molecular subgroups (SHH = 12, Groups 3/4 = 17, WNT = 1). Levels of 14 metabolites were analyzed to determine those that were the most discriminant for medulloblastoma subgroups in order to construct a multivariable classifier for distinguishing between combined Group 3/4 and SHH tumors. Medulloblastomas across molecular subgroups revealed distinct spectral features. Group 3 and Group 4 tumors demonstrated metabolic profiles with readily detectable taurine, lower levels of lipids, and high levels of creatine. SHH tumors showed prominent choline and lipid with low levels of creatine and little or no evidence of taurine. A 5-metabolite subgroup classifier inclusive of creatine, myo-inositol, taurine, aspartate, and lipid 13a was developed that could discriminate between Group 3/4 and SHH medulloblastomas with excellent accuracy (cross-validated area under the curve [AUC] = 0.88). The data show that medulloblastomas of Group 3/4 differ metabolically as measured using MRS when compared with SHH molecular subgroups. MRS is a useful and accurate tool to determine medulloblastoma molecular subgroups. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Advantages of soft subdural implants for the delivery of electrochemical neuromodulation therapies to the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capogrosso, Marco; Gandar, Jerome; Greiner, Nathan; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Wenger, Nikolaus; Shkorbatova, Polina; Musienko, Pavel; Minev, Ivan; Lacour, Stephanie; Courtine, Grégoire

    2018-04-01

    Objective. We recently developed soft neural interfaces enabling the delivery of electrical and chemical stimulation to the spinal cord. These stimulations restored locomotion in animal models of paralysis. Soft interfaces can be placed either below or above the dura mater. Theoretically, the subdural location combines many advantages, including increased selectivity of electrical stimulation, lower stimulation thresholds, and targeted chemical stimulation through local drug delivery. However, these advantages have not been documented, nor have their functional impact been studied in silico or in a relevant animal model of neurological disorders using a multimodal neural interface. Approach. We characterized the recruitment properties of subdural interfaces using a realistic computational model of the rat spinal cord that included explicit representation of the spinal roots. We then validated and complemented computer simulations with electrophysiological experiments in rats. We additionally performed behavioral experiments in rats that received a lateral spinal cord hemisection and were implanted with a soft interface. Main results. In silico and in vivo experiments showed that the subdural location decreased stimulation thresholds compared to the epidural location while retaining high specificity. This feature reduces power consumption and risks of long-term damage in the tissues, thus increasing the clinical safety profile of this approach. The hemisection induced a transient paralysis of the leg ipsilateral to the injury. During this period, the delivery of electrical stimulation restricted to the injured side combined with local chemical modulation enabled coordinated locomotor movements of the paralyzed leg without affecting the non-impaired leg in all tested rats. Electrode properties remained stable over time, while anatomical examinations revealed excellent bio-integration properties. Significance. Soft neural interfaces inserted subdurally provide the

  2. A case report and technical tip of chronic subdural hematoma treated by the placement of a subdural peritoneal shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres M. Alvarez-Pinzon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH tend to occur most commonly in the elderly population, usually resulting from minor or insignificant head trauma. The pathophysiology behind CSDH is often directly associated with cerebral atrophy, and other causes of cerebral atrophy such as alcoholism or dementia. Other predisposing factors include diabetes, coagulopathy, use of anticoagulants (including aspirin, seizure disorders, and CSF shunts. Considerable evidence supporting the use of external drainage after evacuation of primary CSDH is readily available in the literature. Case report: We report the case of a 72 year-old male with a history of recurrent left subdural hematoma presenting to the neurosurgical clinic with a two-day history of personality changes, difficulty speaking, urinary incontinence, and headaches. Burr hole evacuation was performed with the placement of a subdural peritoneal shunt. At the one-month follow-up appointment, the patient had complete resolution of symptoms and CT scan showed no new recurrence of the subdural hematoma. Conclusions: Although several treatment options are available for the management of CSDH, recurrence of hematoma is a major and very common complication that may result in re-injury due to mass effect caused by chronic hematoma. However, placement of subdural peritoneal shunt for the treatment of CSDH can reduce the recurrence rate of CSDH and therefore, reduce the risk of brain re-injury. Keywords: Chronic subdural hematoma, CSDH, Subdural peritoneal shunt, Head trauma

  3. EG-15THE METHYLATION STATUS OF MGMT IN MEDULLOBLASTOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yuzaburo; Kurimoto, Tomoko; Kondo, Akihide; Arai, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant brain tumor in childhood. Some studies reported that alkylating chemotherapeutic drugs are effective agents in the treatment of patients with medulloblastoma. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is one of the DNA repair enzymes and plays a significant role in tumor resistance to alkylating agents. Low MGMT expression or MGMT promoter methylation have been found to be associated with favorable outcomes in malignant glioma patients treated with alkylating agents such as temozolomide. However, impact of MGMT status on clinical outcomes in medulloblastoma patients is not fully evaluated. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the association between MGMT status and the response for chemotherapy in pediatric patients with medulloblastoma. METHODS: Patients with medulloblastoma treated at our institution between 1995 and 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Relevant clinical information including current disease status, tumor response to chemotherapy was obtained from the hospital charts. To evaluate the MGMT status, we performed bisulfite sequencing analysis to determine the methylation status of the MGMT promoter. RESULTS: Tumor material and detailed clinical information were available in 22 patients. Of them, 13 patients were alive (11 in CR), seven died of disease and two were lost to follow up. Five patients were with dissemination at diagnosis. We succeeded to evaluate both the MGMT status of tumors and the number of methylation sites in MGMT promoter. CONCLUSIONS: We studied the prognostic value of MGMT promoter methylation in medulloblastoma children.

  4. Complications and results of subdural grid electrode implantation in epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W S; Lee, J K; Lee, S A; Kang, J K; Ko, T S

    2000-11-01

    We assessed the risk of delayed subdural hematoma and other complications associated with subdural grid implantation. Forty-nine patients underwent subdural grid implantation with/without subdural strips or depth electrodes from January 1994 to August 1998. To identify the risk associated with subdural grid implantation, a retrospective review of all patients' medical records and radiological studies was performed. The major complications of 50 subdural grid electrode implantations were as follows: four cases (7.8%) of delayed subdural hematoma at the site of the subdural grid, requiring emergency operation; two cases (3.9%) of infection; one case (2.0%) of epidural hematoma; and one case (2.0%) of brain swelling. After subdural hematoma removal, the electrodes were left in place. CCTV monitoring and cortical stimulation studies were continued thereafter. No delayed subdural hematoma has occurred since routine placement of subdural drains was begun. In our experience the worst complication of subdural grid implantation has been delayed subdural hematoma. Placement of subdural drains and close observation may be helpful to prevent this serious complication.

  5. Expression of BARHL1 in medulloblastoma is associated with prolonged survival in mice and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pöschl, J.; Lorenz, A.; Hartmann, W.; von Bueren, A. O.; Kool, M.; Li, S.; Peraud, A.; Tonn, J.-C.; Herms, J.; Xiang, M.; Rutkowski, S.; Kretzschmar, H. A.; Schüller, U.

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in childhood, and development of targeted therapies is highly desired. Although the molecular mechanisms of malignant transformation are not fully understood, it is known that medulloblastomas may arise from cerebellar granule neuron

  6. Intracranial subdural hematomas with elevated rivaroxaban concentration and subsequently detected spinal subdural hematoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Koga, Masatoshi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hino, Tenyu; Yokota, Chiaki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    A 79-year-old lean man with a height of 157cm and weight of 42kg (body mass index, 17.2kg/m(2)) receiving rivaroxaban developed an intracranial subdural hematoma and was treated conservatively. Because he had a reduced creatinine clearance of 44mL/min, his dosage of rivaroxaban was reduced from 15 to 10mg daily according to official Japanese prescribing information. However, he developed bilateral intracranial subdural hematomas 2weeks later. Plasma rivaroxaban concentration on anti-factor Xa chromogenic assay was elevated at 301ng/mL, suggesting excessive accumulation. He underwent burr hole drainage and resumed anticoagulation with warfarin. Subsequently, he developed a lumbosacral hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged without neurological sequelae. The main cause of the increased concentration of rivaroxaban was believed to be his older age and low body weight. The etiology of the spinal hematoma was suspected to be the migration of intracranial hematoma to the spinal subdural space. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spectrophotometry of cerebrospinal fluid in subacute and chronic subdural haematomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellin, K. G.; Steiner, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectrophotometric examinations were performed on cerebrospinal and subdural fluids in subacute (five patients) and chronic (20 patients) subdural haematomas, with special reference to the diagnostic aid of CSF spectrophotometry. Spectrophotometric xanthochromia of haemorrhagic origin was found in all CSFs examined, while definite visible xanthochromia was observed in only 28% and the CSF was judged as colourless in 52% of those cases. Characteristic bleeding patterns were found spectrophotometrically in all the 20 CSFs examined within 24 hours after lumbar puncture, haematoma patterns being detected in 90-95% of the cases. In many cases the electrophoretically separated protein fractions of CSF and subdural fluids were spectrophotometrically examined. In conclusion, CSF spectrophotometry is a simple, fast, and extremely sensitive method, which in our opinion should be used routinely in the diagnosis of suspected subdural haematomas, if lumbar puncture is not contraindicated. PMID:4140892

  8. Supratentorial arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma: neuroradiologic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochi, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan); Morikawa, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)]|[Dept. of Radiology, National Nagasaki Chuo Hospital, Ohmura (Japan); Ogino, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan); Nagaoki, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)]|[Dept. of Radiology, Isahaya General Hospital (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    CT and MR images of 8 patients with supratentorial arachnoid cyst complicated by subdural hematoma were studied and compared with those of 8 patients who developed nontraumatic subdural hematoma without arachnoid cyst. Ot the 8 patients with supratentorial arachnoid cyst, CT and MR disclosed temporal bulging and/or thinning of the temporal squama in all 6 patients with middle fossa arachnoid cysts, and the thinning of the calvaria was evident in another patient with a convexity cyst. Calvarial thinning at the site corresponding to interhemispheric arachnoid cyst was clearly depicted on coronal MR images. In contrast, none of the 8 young patients with nontraumatic subdural hematoma without arachnoid cyst had abnormal calvaria. Temporal bulging and thinning of the overlying calvaria were identified as diagnostic CT and MR features of arachnoid cyst with complicating intracystic and subdural hermorrhage. Radiologists should be aware of this association and should evaluate the bony structure carefully. (orig.)

  9. Analysis of infantile subdural hematoma caused by abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young-Soo; Nishio, Kenji; Fujimoto, Takatoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    We report infantile subdural hematoma caused by abuse. Between January 2006 and December 2009, 10 cases of definite and highly suspicious abusive subdural hematoma in infants were treated at Nara Medical University Hospital. The mean age was 5.4 months. On CT examination, severe cerebral swelling was seen in 8 (80%) and wide spreading cerebral ischemia and atrophy in 9 (90%). Retinal hemorrhage was commonly seen in this series (90%). Subdural drainage and/or subdural-peritoneal shunt surgeries were performed in 6 cases, and intensive combined therapy of mild hypothermia and barbiturate was adapted in 7 cases. Favorable outcome was achieved in only 3 cases. In spite of aggressive treatment, clinical outcome are still bad. In our series, assailants were predominantly not father but mother. There were various and complex factors for child abuse. Cautious insight and suspicion are necessary to detect abusive injuries in infants. It is very important to endeavor to prevent recurrences of abusive injuries. (author)

  10. Streptococcal Subdural Empyema as a Complication of Varicella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old male infant who presented with a group A streptococcal subdural empyema on day 5 of a varicella skin rash is reported from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

  11. Analysis of chronic subdural hematoma based on CT, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Mikami, Junichi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Takahiro

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-three cases of chronic subdural hematoma were observed soon after head injury for the relationship between its CT findings and clinical symptoms. It has been found that the chronic subdural hematoma is a slowly growing and expanding intracranial disease that starts in an early period of head injury. Chronic subdural hematoma did not present any signs or symptoms initially, except for the gradual occurrence of headache, but finally it presented signs of intracranial hypertension and focal signs. Chronic subdural hematoma in the hygroma-like period did not show any signs and symptoms. In the capsulated period, when changes in CT density suggested intracapsular hemorrhage, a heavy sensation of the head was noted. It was recognized as an abnormal feeling or a full sensation of the head. When the bleeding continued in the cavity, headache became continuous and focal signs gradually appeared. (author)

  12. Independent predictors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Kyu-Hyon; Lee, Jong-Myong; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young

    2012-09-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is characterized by blood in the subdural space that evokes an inflammatory reaction. Numerous factors potentially associated with recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma have been reported, but these factors have not been sufficiently investigated. In this study, we evaluated the independent risk factors of recurrence. We analyzed data for 420 patients with chronic subdural hematoma treated by the standard surgical procedure for hematoma evacuation at our institution. Ninety-two (21.9 %) patients experienced at least one recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma during the study period. We did not identify any significant differences between chronic subdural hematoma recurrence and current antiplatelet therapy. The recurrence rate was 7 % for the homogeneous type, 21 % for the laminar type, 38 % for the separated type, and 0 % for the trabecular type. The rate of recurrence was significantly lower in the homogeneous and trabecular type than in the laminar and separated type. We performed a multivariate logistic regression analysis and found that postoperative midline shifting (OR, 3.6; 95 % CI, 1.618-7.885; p = 0.001), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.2; 95 % CI, 1.196-3.856; p = 0.010), history of seizure (OR, 2.6; 95 % CI, 1.210-5.430; p = 0.014), width of hematoma (OR, 2.1; 95 % CI, 1.287-3.538; p = 0.003), and anticoagulant therapy (OR, 2.7; 95 % CI, 1.424-6.960; p = 0.005) were independent risk factors for the recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. We have shown that postoperative midline shifting (≥5 mm), diabetes mellitus, preoperative seizure, preoperative width of hematoma (≥20 mm), and anticoagulant therapy were independent predictors of the recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. According to internal architecture of hematoma, the rate of recurrence was significantly lower in the homogeneous and the trabecular type than the laminar and separated type.

  13. Subdural haemorrhage following endoscopic third ventriculostomy. A rare complication.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, M H

    2012-02-03

    Subdural collections or hematomas are frequently observed after shunt placement [7-9, 13], but rarely after ETV [6]. A review of literature revealed 7 cases [1, 5, 6, 10, 12], of which only 1 was symptomatic [5]. We will discuss the causes, management, and methods of prevention of this complication and we will present a case of symptomatic subdural haematoma, following endoscopic third ventriculostomy for illustration.

  14. A case of subdural hematoma following lumbar puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramatharaknath Vemuri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar puncture (LP is a frequent procedure done for administration of spinal anesthesia or for obtaining cerebrospinal fluid for analysis. The common complications of LP are pain at the local site and headache. Fortunately, the serious complications such as infections of central nervous system, brain stem herniation, and subdural hematoma are rare. We present a rare case of subdural hematoma following a LP.

  15. A Rare Complication of Spinal Anesthesia: Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuldem Yıldırım Dönmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is postdural puncture headache. Any injury of the dura may cause headache. After the injury of the dura, CSF leakage may occur and due to the tension of the veins between the cortex and the dural sinuses, subdural hematoma may be seen. Herein, we present a patient with persistent headache after the spinal anesthesia given during delivery of her baby, and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma

  16. Probable Opitz trigonocephaly C syndrome with medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omran, H.; Hildebrandt, F.; Brandis, M. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany)] [and others

    1997-04-14

    We report on a patient with trigonocephaly, biparietal widening as a result of metopic synostosis, strabismus, upslanted palpebral fissures, apparently low-set ears with abnormal helices, deeply furrowed palate, postaxial polysyndactyly of the feet, ankle flexion deformities, cryptorchidism, loose skin, and severe mental retardation, findings compatible with a diagnosis of the Opitz trigonocephaly C syndrome (OTS). At the age of 12 years this patient presented with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. A biopsy showed findings diagnostic of a medulloblastoma WHO Grade IV, an unprecedented finding in OTS. The possibility of coincidence should not prevent continued surveillance of OTS patients in the future for the occurrence of malignancy. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Medulloblastoma in children: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortori-Donati, P.; Fondelli, M.P.; Rossi, A.; Cama, A.; Caputo, L.; Andreussi, L.; Garre, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine whether medulloblastoma (MB) shows specific neuroradiological features which may be employed in differential diagnosis from other common posterior cranial fossa tumours in childhood. Preoperative MRI was performed on 20 children with MB, and preoperative CT in 17 of them. All underwent surgery and histopathological diagnosis. There was a constant relationship between high density on CT and low signal on T1-weighted images. Signal behaviour on T2-weighted images and the degree of contrast enhancement were more variable. Most tumours arose in the midline, from the cerebellar vermis, involving the fourth ventricle, but hemisphere and extra-axial neoplasms were also seen. The combination of high density on CT and low signal on T1-weighted images is highly suggestive of MB and may assist preoperative differential diagnosis from other posterior cranial fossa tumours. (orig.). With 9 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Recent developments and current concepts in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, N U; Mynarek, M; von Hoff, K; Friedrich, C; Resch, A; Rutkowski, S

    2014-04-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. While prognosis has significantly improved in the last decades with multimodal therapy including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, one third of patients still succumb to their disease. Further research is needed to find more efficient treatment strategies for prognostically unfavorable patient groups and to minimize long-term sequelae of tumor treatment. This review gives a summary of the current state of treatment concepts including an outlook on the near future. We describe recent advances in the understanding of molecular mechanisms, their potential impact on risk stratification in upcoming clinical trials, and perspectives for the clinical implementation of targeted therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Contemporary issues in clinical trials for medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.

    1996-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the seminal pediatric brain tumor providing opportunities for clinical investigation to define improved treatment strategies for both disease control and ultimate functional integrity. Recent studies addressing neuraxis radiation dose provide a 'standard' for conventional therapy while establishing 5-year disease control rates for 'favorable' or 'low risk' presentations approximating 60% following surgery and irradiation. A highly visible recent report of combined post-operative irradiation and chemotherapy incorporating a platinum- and alkylator-based regimen indicates 5-year disease control approaching 90% in localized medulloblastoma. Despite unfavorable outcome with reduced-dose neuraxis irradiation in earlier trials, further data from recent studies suggest the addition of post-operative chemotherapy to similarly reduced-dose neuraxis irradiation (23.4 Gy) in 'favorable' presentations may result in progression-free survival rates at least equivalent to those achieved with full-dose neuraxis irradiation (36 Gy) absent chemotherapy. The panel will (1) provide updated information regarding the major clinical trials that form the basis for current and planned protocols and (2) debate the therapeutic modifications appropriate for contemporary clinical investigations. Critical in planning future studies in the analysis of risk factors that may identify 'favorable' patients versus 'high risk' patients. Risk-related studies appropriately address maintaining or improving current disease control rates in the context of diminishing late treatment sequelae for 'favorable' presentations. For those identified as 'high risk' (e.g., patients with disease beyond the primary site), studies are in development that increase the intensity of chemotherapy and explore modifications of radiation delivery. Study designs that permit assessment of innovations in surgical, radiotherapeutic, and chemotherapeutic approaches will be presented and debated by the panelists

  20. Intrathecal chemotherapy for refractory disseminated medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Junichi; Nishiyama, Kenichi; Mori, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2008-05-01

    To analyze the effect of intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy for disseminated medulloblastoma. Twenty-one patients received IT chemotherapy using the chemotherapeutic agents of methotrexate (MTX) and nitrosoureas (ACNU, MCNU) including nine patients for residual leptomeningeal lesions after initial surgery and radiation, and 12 for a recurrence with leptomeningeal dissemination. Of these 21 patients, 12 received a lumbar and/or ventricular bolus injection of the chemotherapeutic agents, one received the ventriculolumbar perfusion of the agents, and eight received both the perfusion and bolus injection. The doses ranged from 6-7 mg/m(2) of ACNU for perfusion and 3-3.5 mg/m(2) of ACNU, MCNU, or MTX for the bolus injection, and the cycles were administered from 3 to 12 times for perfusion and from 5 to 54 times for the bolus injection. The effects of chemotherapy were assessed by both radiological and cytological examinations, and the clinical symptoms were also assessed. Radiological and/or cytological responses were observed in 10 of 21 patients (47.6%), including seven cases demonstrating a complete remission. The 5-year overall survival rate and 5-year survival rate after dissemination were 61.5 and 46.4%, respectively. Five patients who received a lumbar bolus injection of nitrosoureas experienced paraplegia and double incontinence. One patient who received a ventricular injection of nitrosoureas experienced truncal ataxia. IT chemotherapy was found to be effective in some cases with refractory disseminated medulloblastoma and it seems to be an appropriate treatment choice for leptomeningeal recurrence. However, the frequent bolus injections of nitrosoureas should be avoided to prevent the side effects.

  1. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Infected by Propionibacterium Acnes: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shusuke; Asahi, Takashi; Akioka, Naoki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We present a very rare case of a patient with an infected subdural hematoma due to Propionibacterium acnes. A 63-year-old male complained of dizziness and was admitted to our hospital. He had a history of left chronic subdural hematoma due to a traffic accident, which had been conservatively treated. Physical, neurological and laboratory examinations revealed no definite abnormality. Plain CT scan demonstrated a hypodense crescentic fluid collection over the surface of the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient was diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma and underwent burr hole surgery three times and selective embolization of the middle meningeal artery, but the lesion easily recurred. Repeated culture examinations of white sedimentation detected P. acnes. Therefore, he underwent craniotomy surgery followed by intravenous administration of antibiotics. The infected subdural hematoma was covered with a thick, yellowish outer membrane, and the large volume of pus and hematoma was removed. However, the lesion recurred again and a low-density area developed in the left frontal lobe. Craniotomy surgery was performed a second time, and two Penrose drainages were put in both the epidural and subdural spaces. Subsequently, the lesions completely resolved and he was discharged without any neurological deficits. Infected subdural hematoma may be refractory to burr hole surgery or craniotomy alone, in which case aggressive treatment with craniotomy and continuous drainage should be indicated before the brain parenchyma suffers irreversible damage. PMID:25759659

  2. Cerebral and subdural abscess with spatio-temporal multiplicity 12 years after initial craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakui, Daisuke; Nagashima, Goro; Takada, Tatsuro; Ueda, Toshihiro; Itoh, Hidemichi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2012-01-01

    A 34-year-old man presented with a case of subdural empyema and cerebral abscess that developed 12 years after initial neurosurgical intervention for a traffic accident in 1998. Under a diagnosis of acute subdural hematoma and cerebral contusion, several neurosurgical procedures were performed at another hospital, including hematoma removal by craniotomy, external decompression, duraplasty, and cranioplasty. The patient experienced an epileptic seizure, and was referred to our hospital in March 2010. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cerebral abscess extending to the subdural space just under the previous surgical field. Surgical intervention was refused and antimicrobial treatment was initiated, but proved ineffective. Surgical removal of artificial dura and cranium with subdural empyema, and resection of a cerebral abscess were performed on May 12, 2010. No organism was recovered from the surgical samples. Meropenem and vancomycin were selected as perioperative antimicrobial agents. No recurrence of infection has been observed. Postneurosurgical subdural empyema and cerebral abscess are recently emerging problems. Infections of neurosurgical sites containing implanted materials occur in 6% of cases, usually within several months of the surgery. Subdural empyema and cerebral abscess developing 12 years after neurosurgical interventions are extremely rare. The long-term clinical course suggests less pathogenic organisms as a cause of infection, and further investigations to develop appropriate antimicrobial selection and adequate duration of antimicrobial administration for these cases are needed.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage into the subdural space: possible influence on the pathogenesis and recurrence frequency of chronic subdural hematoma and subdural hygroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristof, Rudolf A; Grimm, Jochen M; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage into the subdural space is involved in the genesis of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and subdural hygroma (SH) and to clarify whether this leakage of CSF into the subdural space influences the postoperative recurrence rate of CSDH and SH. In this prospective observational study, 75 cases involving patients treated surgically for CSDH (67 patients) or SH (8 patients) were evaluated with respect to clinical and radiological findings at presentation, the content of beta -trace protein (beta TP) in the subdural fluid (betaTPSF) and serum (betaTPSER), and the CSDH/SH recurrence rate. The betaTPSF was considered to indicate an admixture of CSF to the subdural fluid if betaTPSF/betaTPSER>2. The median beta TPSF level for the whole patient group was 4.29 mg/L (range 0.33-51 mg/L). Cerebrospinal fluid leakage, as indicated by betaTPSF/betaTPSER>2, was found to be present in 93% of the patients with CSDH and in 100% of the patients with SH (p=0.724). In patients who later had to undergo repeated surgery for recurrence of CSDH/SH, the betaTPSF concentrations (median 6.69 mg/L, range 0.59-51 mg/L) were significantly higher (p=0.04) than in patients not requiring reoperation (median 4.12 mg/L, range 0.33-26.8 mg/L). As indicated by the presence of betaTP in the subdural fluid, CSF leakage into the subdural space is present in the vast majority of patients with CSDH and SH. This leakage could be involved in the pathogenesis of CSDH and SH. Patients who experience recurrences of CSDH and SH have significantly higher concentrations of betaTPSF at initial presentation than patients not requiring reoperation for recurrence. These findings are presented in the literature for the first time and have to be confirmed and expanded upon by further studies.

  4. Targeting the Enhancer of Zeste Homologue 2 in Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, Irina; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Harris, Peter; Marquez, Victor E.; Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian; Taylor, Michael D; Foreman, Nicholas K; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2) is the catalytic subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 2 that catalyzes the trimethylation of histone H3 on Lys 27, and represses gene transcription. EZH2 enhances cancer-cell proliferation and regulates stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that EZH2 is highly expressed in medulloblastoma, a highly malignant brain tumor of childhood, and this altered expression is correlated with genomic gain of chromosome 7 in a subset of medulloblastoma. Inhibition of EZH2 by RNAi suppresses medulloblastoma tumor cell growth. We show that 3-deazaneplanocin A, a chemical inhibitor of EZH2, can suppress medulloblastoma cell growth partially by inducing apoptosis. Suppression of EZH2 expression diminishes the ability of tumor cells to form spheres in culture and strongly represses the ability of known oncogenes to transform neural stem cells. These findings establish a role of EZH2 in medulloblastoma and identify EZH2 as a potential therapeutic target especially in high-risk tumors. PMID:22287205

  5. c-myc overexpression causes anaplasia in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Duncan; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Abel, Ty W; Burger, Peter C; Dang, Chi V; Eberhart, Charles G

    2006-01-15

    Both anaplasia and increased c-myc gene expression have been shown to be negative prognostic indicators for survival in medulloblastoma patients. myc gene amplification has been identified in many large cell/anaplastic medulloblastoma, but no causative link between c-myc and anaplastic changes has been established. To address this, we stably overexpressed c-myc in two medulloblastoma cell lines, DAOY and UW228, and examined the changes in growth characteristics. When analyzed in vitro, cell lines with increased levels of c-myc had higher rates of growth and apoptosis as well as significantly improved ability to form colonies in soft agar compared with control. When injected s.c. into nu/nu mice, flank xenograft tumors with high levels of c-myc in DAOY cell line background were 75% larger than those derived from control. Overexpression of c-myc was required for tumor formation by UW228 cells. Most remarkably, the histopathology of the Myc tumors was severely anaplastic, with large areas of necrosis/apoptosis, increased nuclear size, and macronucleoli. Indices of proliferation and apoptosis were also significantly higher in Myc xenografts. Thus, c-myc seems to play a causal role in inducing anaplasia in medulloblastoma. Because anaplastic changes are often observed in recurrent medulloblastoma, we propose that c-myc dysregulation is involved in the progression of these malignant embryonal neoplasms.

  6. Medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity: US, CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Uliasz, M.; Roszkowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Medulloblastoma accounts for up to 25% of all paediatric CNS tumours. According to WHO classification (2007) medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity (MBEN) is a separate rare entity associated with younger age and better prognosis. A 9-month-old girl was admitted and examined because of macrocephaly and disturbed psychomotor development. Transfontanel ultrasound revealed dilated ventricular system and hyperechoic mass in the posterior cranial fossa. Computed tomography showed hyperdense mass in the cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass with gyriform pattern and strong contrast enhancement after gadolinium administration. Differential diagnosis included dysplastic heterotopic cortex, Lhermitte-Duclos disease, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour (AT/RT), and medulloblastoma (MB). The patient was operated on. Medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity (MBEN) was finally diagnosed. The authors present and discuss three other cases of this rare entity.Transfontanel sonografic examination is capable of detection of the posterior fossa tumour as a cause of hydrocephalus and macrocephaly. The mass in a child's posterior cranial fossa that is hyperdense on unenhanced CT and gyriform, nodular, and markedly enhancing on MRI may strongly suggest medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity (MBEN). (authors)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of medulloblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimura, Hiroshi; Uetsuhara, Koichi; Komasaku, Ryuichiro; Kasamo, Shizuya; Asakura, Tetsuhiko

    1989-01-01

    Five patients with medulloblastomas were evaluated with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and the results were compared with those of X-ray computed tomography (CT). On CT, medulloblastomas generally appeared as isodense or hyperdense masses and were enhanced uniformly with a contrast agent. On MRI, medulloblastomas appeared as low-intensity masses in T 1 -weighted images and as high-intensity masses in T 2 -weighted images. Moreover, the tumors were clearly differentiated from the surrounding tissue. In sagittal images, we could easily recognize the relation between the brainstem or the fourth ventiricle and the tumors. In spite of these merits, though, on MRI we could not detect the boundary between the tumors and the perifocal edema. In this point, we had to be dependent on CT. In one case, we could measure the T 1 value and the T 2 value both before and after irradiation. The T 2 value was markedly decreased after irradiation. Henceforth, the T 1 and T 2 values can be used to evaluate the effects of irradiation. Medulloblastomas are often disseminated through cerebrospinal fluid. We could detect this type of metastasis by means of the sagittal image on MRI. As has been mentioned above, MRI is very useful in diagnosing medulloblastomas and for the post-operative follow-up those tumors. (author)

  8. Differential Immune Microenvironments and Response to Immune Checkpoint Blockade among Molecular Subtypes of Murine Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christina D; Flores, Catherine; Yang, Changlin; Pinheiro, Elaine M; Yearley, Jennifer H; Sayour, Elias J; Pei, Yanxin; Moore, Colin; McLendon, Roger E; Huang, Jianping; Sampson, John H; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Mitchell, Duane A

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant strides in the identification and characterization of potential therapeutic targets for medulloblastoma, the role of the immune system and its interplay with the tumor microenvironment within these tumors are poorly understood. To address this, we adapted two syngeneic animal models of human Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-driven and group 3 medulloblastoma for preclinical evaluation in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were used to phenotype and characterize immune infiltrating cells within established cerebellar tumors. We observed significantly higher percentages of dendritic cells, infiltrating lymphocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and tumor-associated macrophages in murine SHH model tumors compared with group 3 tumors. However, murine group 3 tumors had higher percentages of CD8(+) PD-1(+) T cells within the CD3 population. PD-1 blockade conferred superior antitumor efficacy in animals bearing intracranial group 3 tumors compared with SHH group tumors, indicating that immunologic differences within the tumor microenvironment can be leveraged as potential targets to mediate antitumor efficacy. Further analysis of anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody localization revealed binding to PD-1(+) peripheral T cells, but not tumor infiltrating lymphocytes within the brain tumor microenvironment. Peripheral PD-1 blockade additionally resulted in a marked increase in CD3(+) T cells within the tumor microenvironment. This is the first immunologic characterization of preclinical models of molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma and demonstration that response to immune checkpoint blockade differs across subtype classification. Our findings also suggest that effective anti-PD-1 blockade does not require that systemically administered antibodies penetrate the brain tumor microenvironment. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Executive function in paediatric medulloblastoma: The role of cerebrocerebellar connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Nicole; Smith, Mary Lou; Greenberg, Mark; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D; Laughlin, Suzanne; Malkin, David; Liu, Fang; Moxon-Emre, Iska; Scantlebury, Nadia; Mabbott, Donald

    2017-06-01

    Executive functions (EFs) are involved in the attainment, maintenance, and integration of information; these functions may play a key role in cognitive and behavioural outcomes in children treated for medulloblastoma (MB). At present, it remains unclear which EFs are most sensitive to the treatment effects for MB and whether damage to cerebrocerebellar circuitry is associated with EF. We completed a comprehensive evaluation of EF in 24 children treated for MB and 20 age-matched healthy children (HC) and distilled these measures into components. Six components (C1-C6) were extracted from our model, reflecting dissociable constructs of EF: C1 = cognitive efficiency; C2 = planning/problem-solving; C3 = positive cognitive emotion regulation; C4 = working memory; C5 = negative cognitive emotion regulation; and C6 = mixed cognitive emotion regulation. Group differences were found for C1, C2, C3, and C4; the MB group showed poorer performance on EF tasks and made less use of positive cognitive emotion regulation strategies relative to HC. Compromise to cerebrocerebellar microstructure - cerebro-ponto-cerebellar and cerebello-thalamo-cerebral pathways - was evident in children treated for MB compared to HC. We found that cerebrocerebellar circuitry has a mediating effect on one component of EF following treatment for MB - working memory. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Adult cerebellar medulloblastoma: CT and MRI findings in eight cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Bertoldi, Guilherme A. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Radiologia Diagnostica]. E-mail: arnolfo.carvalho@avalon.sul.com.br; Gasparetto, Emerson L. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Secao de Radiologia Diagnostica; Ono, Sergio E. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Gomes, Andre F. [Diagnostico Avancado Por Imagem (DAPI), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2003-06-01

    Medulloblastoma is a brain tumor of neuro epithelial origin, which represents 15 to 30% of all pediatric brain tumors, and less than 1% of CNS adult neoplasms. We report the imaging findings of 8 adult patients with medulloblastoma. The mean age was 35 years, ranging from 20 to 65 years, and the male:female rate was 3:5. The tumors were predominantly lateral (63%), hyperdense on CT scans (83%), and on the MRI, hypointense on T1 (100%) and hyperintense on T2 (80%) weighted images. It was seen intratumoral necrosis and cysts in six cases and calcifications in three. Hydrocephalus was observed in 5 cases and brain stem invasion in four. The imaging findings of medulloblastomas in adults are different of those in child, and also nonspecific. Although these tumors are uncommon in adults, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses in the posterior fossa of this age group. (author)

  11. Is there a danger in delaying radiotherapy in childhood medulloblastoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attard-Montalto, S.; Plowman, N.; Saha, V.; Eden, O.B.; Breatnach, F.

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 45-50% of children with medulloblastoma are cured by conventional surgery and radiotherapy, but survivors may face severe late neuropsychological toxicity. Studies showing good partial responses to platinum-based chemotherapy in relapsed patients and the theoretical possibility of a therapeutic window immediately after surgery have prompted neoadjuvant treatment studies. However, the absolute benefit of chemotherapy for the treatment of medulloblastoma in childhood is, as yet, not proven. Chemotherapy may simply delay radiotherapy, and reduce the radiological impact of this known effective treatment. The authors report four children with medulloblastoma whose management was problematic because of either failure to respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy or their young age. These cases are discussed in the light of the current literature and future treatment strategies. (author)

  12. Protein kinase A regulatory subunit distribution in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Denaro, Luca; Redaelli, Marco; D'Avella, Domenico; Caretta, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed a differential distribution of the four regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases inside the brain, that changed in rodent gliomas: therefore, the distribution of these proteins inside the brain can give information on the functional state of the cells. Our goal was to examine human brain tumors to provide evidence for a differential distribution of protein kinase A in different tumors. The distribution of detergent insoluble regulatory (R1 and R2) and catalytic subunits of cAMP dependent kinases was examined in pediatric brain tumors by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent cAMP analogues binding. R2 is organized in large single dots in medulloblastomas, while it has a different appearance in other tumors. Fluorescent cAMP labelling was observed only in medulloblastoma. A different distribution of cAMP dependent protein kinases has been observed in medulloblastoma

  13. Adult cerebellar medulloblastoma: CT and MRI findings in eight cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Neto Arnolfo de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a brain tumor of neuroepithelial origin, which represents 15 to 30% of all pediatric brain tumors, and less than 1% of CNS adult neoplasms. We report the imaging findings of 8 adult patients with medulloblastoma. The mean age was 35 years, ranging from 20 to 65 years, and the male:female rate was 3:5. The tumors were predominantly lateral (63%, hyperdense on CT scans (83%, and on the MRI, hypointense on T1 (100% and hyperintense on T2 (80% weighted images. It was seen intratumoral necrosis and cysts in six cases and calcifications in three. Hydrocephalus was observed in 5 cases and brain stem invasion in four. The imaging findings of medulloblastomas in adults are different of those in child, and also nonspecific. Although these tumors are uncommon in adults, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses in the posterior fossa of this age group.

  14. Evasion of Cell Senescence Leads to Medulloblastoma Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Tamayo-Orrego

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available How brain tumors progress from precancerous lesions to advanced cancers is not well understood. Using Ptch1+/− mice to study medulloblastoma progression, we found that Ptch1 loss of heterozygosity (LOH is an early event that is associated with high levels of cell senescence in preneoplasia. In contrast, advanced tumors have evaded senescence. Remarkably, we discovered that the majority of advanced medulloblastomas display either spontaneous, somatic p53 mutations or Cdkn2a locus inactivation. Consistent with senescence evasion, these p53 mutations are always subsequent to Ptch1 LOH. Introduction of a p53 mutation prevents senescence, accelerates tumor formation, and increases medulloblastoma incidence. Altogether, our results show that evasion of senescence associated with Ptch1 LOH allows progression to advanced tumors.

  15. Adult cerebellar medulloblastoma: CT and MRI findings in eight cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Bertoldi, Guilherme A.

    2003-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a brain tumor of neuro epithelial origin, which represents 15 to 30% of all pediatric brain tumors, and less than 1% of CNS adult neoplasms. We report the imaging findings of 8 adult patients with medulloblastoma. The mean age was 35 years, ranging from 20 to 65 years, and the male:female rate was 3:5. The tumors were predominantly lateral (63%), hyperdense on CT scans (83%), and on the MRI, hypointense on T1 (100%) and hyperintense on T2 (80%) weighted images. It was seen intratumoral necrosis and cysts in six cases and calcifications in three. Hydrocephalus was observed in 5 cases and brain stem invasion in four. The imaging findings of medulloblastomas in adults are different of those in child, and also nonspecific. Although these tumors are uncommon in adults, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses in the posterior fossa of this age group. (author)

  16. Spectrum and prevalence of genetic predisposition in medulloblastoma: a retrospective genetic study and prospective validation in a clinical trial cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Sebastian M; Northcott, Paul A; Buchhalter, Ivo; Robinson, Giles W; Sutter, Christian; Groebner, Susanne; Grund, Kerstin B; Brugières, Laurence; Jones, David T W; Pajtler, Kristian W; Morrissy, A Sorana; Kool, Marcel; Sturm, Dominik; Chavez, Lukas; Ernst, Aurelie; Brabetz, Sebastian; Hain, Michael; Zichner, Thomas; Segura-Wang, Maia; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Rausch, Tobias; Mardin, Balca R; Zhou, Xin; Baciu, Cristina; Lawerenz, Christian; Chan, Jennifer A; Varlet, Pascale; Guerrini-Rousseau, Lea; Fults, Daniel W; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Hauser, Peter; Jabado, Nada; Ra, Young-Shin; Zitterbart, Karel; Shringarpure, Suyash S; De La Vega, Francisco M; Bustamante, Carlos D; Ng, Ho-Keung; Perry, Arie; MacDonald, Tobey J; Hernáiz Driever, Pablo; Bendel, Anne E; Bowers, Daniel C; McCowage, Geoffrey; Chintagumpala, Murali M; Cohn, Richard; Hassall, Timothy; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Eggen, Tone; Wesenberg, Finn; Feychting, Maria; Lannering, Birgitta; Schüz, Joachim; Johansen, Christoffer; Andersen, Tina V; Röösli, Martin; Kuehni, Claudia E; Grotzer, Michael; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Monoranu, Camelia M; Archer, Tenley C; Duke, Elizabeth; Pomeroy, Scott L; Shelagh, Redmond; Frank, Stephan; Sumerauer, David; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Ryzhova, Marina V; Milde, Till; Kratz, Christian P; Samuel, David; Zhang, Jinghui; Solomon, David A; Marra, Marco; Eils, Roland; Bartram, Claus R; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Gilbertson, Richard J; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter; Malkin, David; Gajjar, Amar; Korbel, Jan O; Pfister, Stefan M

    2018-06-01

    Medulloblastoma is associated with rare hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes; however, consensus medulloblastoma predisposition genes have not been defined and screening guidelines for genetic counselling and testing for paediatric patients are not available. We aimed to assess and define these genes to provide evidence for future screening guidelines. In this international, multicentre study, we analysed patients with medulloblastoma from retrospective cohorts (International Cancer Genome Consortium [ICGC] PedBrain, Medulloblastoma Advanced Genomics International Consortium [MAGIC], and the CEFALO series) and from prospective cohorts from four clinical studies (SJMB03, SJMB12, SJYC07, and I-HIT-MED). Whole-genome sequences and exome sequences from blood and tumour samples were analysed for rare damaging germline mutations in cancer predisposition genes. DNA methylation profiling was done to determine consensus molecular subgroups: WNT (MB WNT ), SHH (MB SHH ), group 3 (MB Group3 ), and group 4 (MB Group4 ). Medulloblastoma predisposition genes were predicted on the basis of rare variant burden tests against controls without a cancer diagnosis from the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). Previously defined somatic mutational signatures were used to further classify medulloblastoma genomes into two groups, a clock-like group (signatures 1 and 5) and a homologous recombination repair deficiency-like group (signatures 3 and 8), and chromothripsis was investigated using previously established criteria. Progression-free survival and overall survival were modelled for patients with a genetic predisposition to medulloblastoma. We included a total of 1022 patients with medulloblastoma from the retrospective cohorts (n=673) and the four prospective studies (n=349), from whom blood samples (n=1022) and tumour samples (n=800) were analysed for germline mutations in 110 cancer predisposition genes. In our rare variant burden analysis, we compared these against 53 105

  17. Extraneural metastases of medulloblastoma: desmoplastic variants may have prolonged survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert J; Khakoo, Yasmin; Yhu, Stephen; Wolden, Suzanne; De Braganca, Kevin C; Gilheeney, Stephen W; Dunkel, Ira J

    2015-04-01

    Extraneural metastases from CNS medulloblastoma are rare and poorly described. The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of a large single institution series of patients with medulloblastoma who developed extraneural metastases. We retrospectively reviewed a departmental database over a 20 year period for all patients with medulloblastoma who developed extraneural metastases. Chart and imaging reviews were performed, and overall survival (OS) estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. We found 14 patients with medulloblastoma and extraneural metastases. The median age at initial diagnosis was 16.3 years (range, 3.2-44.2), and the most common subtype was desmoplastic (n = 6, 42.9%). After initial gross total resection, most patients received radiation therapy alone (n = 10, 71.4%). Metastases to bone were most common (n = 11, 78.6%) followed by metastases to bone marrow (n = 6, 42.9%), usually to the spine. The median time from initial diagnosis to first extraneural metastasis was 1.5 years (range, 0.2-17.4), and the median OS from extraneural metastasis to death was 3.3 years (range, 0-18). The Kaplan-Meier estimate of 5 year OS from extraneural metastasis diagnosis was 40.0% (95% CI, 20.2-79.2). Extraneural metastases from medulloblastoma may rarely develop after initial diagnosis to involve bone and bone marrow. We found that desmoplastic variant extraneural tumors had longer survival than nondesmoplastic variants, suggesting that histopathological and more recent molecular subtyping have important roles in determining the prognosis of medulloblastoma patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The risk factors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Shigeo; Kinoshita, Yu; Nakagawa, Toru; Murakami, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease in the elderly, and the recurrence rate of CSDH is reported to range from 2.3 to 33%. We performed a retrospective review of a number of CSDH cases and the potential factors associated with CSDH recurrence. The patient population comprised 112 men and 65 women with a mean age of 74.7 years. We analyzed the following factors: age, sex, antiplatelet and anticoagulant use, hematoma laterality, hematoma thickness, degree of midline shift and internal architecture of the hematoma in the preoperative CT films, use of irrigation, direction of the drainage tube, width of the subdural space, and degree of midline shift and the presence of a massive subdural air collection in the postoperative CT films. Univariate analysis revealed that there was a trend for different rates of recurrence among the different types of hematomas. The presence of a postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with the recurrence of hematoma. Multivariate analysis revealed that separated hematomas were significantly associated with CSDH recurrence, whereas the presence of postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with hematoma recurrence. Neither univariate nor multivariate analysis could demonstrate an association between the direction of the drainage tube and the recurrence of CSDH.

  19. [A case of infected subdural hematoma accompanied by cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Norio; Naito, Yuichiro; Takanashi, Shigehiko; Ueno, Toshiaki; Nakagomi, Tadayoshi

    2013-05-01

    Infected subdural hematoma(ISH)is a rare disease caused by hematogenous infection of a preexisting subdural hematoma. We report a rare case of ISH accompanied by cerebral infarction. A 76-year-old man who had suffered a closed head injury 3 months before presented fever, headache and left hemiparesis during the medical treatment of acute cholangitis and obstructive jaundice with pancreatic cancer at the department of surgical gastroenterology. At the consultation, computed tomography(CT)scan indicated right chronic subdural hematoma. We performed a burr hole opening surgery on the same day. Abscess and hematoma was aspirated from the subdural space, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA)was detected in this specimen. Thus the diagnosis of the infected subdural hematoma was confirmed. However, despite the antibiotics therapy, follow-up CT showed a low-density area close to the residual abscess, which suggested cerebral infarction. Cerebral angiography showed a vasospasm at the cortical segment of the right middle cerebral artery near the residual abscess. Eventually we carried out a small craniotomy to evacuate the abscess. Our case showed that prompt surgical treatment is required in case of ISH and the whole hematoma and abscess should be removed as soon as possible with an image diagnosis and an additional surgical operation.

  20. Epigenetic Silencing of DKK3 in Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Oberthuer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma (MB is a malignant pediatric brain tumor arising in the cerebellum consisting of four distinct subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4, which exhibit different molecular phenotypes. We studied the expression of Dickkopf (DKK 1–4 family genes, inhibitors of the Wnt signaling cascade, in MB by screening 355 expression profiles derived from four independent datasets. Upregulation of DKK1, DKK2 and DKK4 mRNA was observed in the WNT subgroup, whereas DKK3 was downregulated in 80% MBs across subgroups with respect to the normal cerebellum (p < 0.001. Since copy number aberrations targeting the DKK3 locus (11p15.3 are rare events, we hypothesized that epigenetic factors could play a role in DKK3 regulation. Accordingly, we studied 77 miRNAs predicting to repress DKK3; however, no significant inverse correlation between miRNA/mRNA expression was observed. Moreover, the low methylation levels in the DKK3 promoters (median: 3%, 5% and 5% for promoter 1, 2 and 3, respectively excluded the downregulation of gene expression by methylation. On the other hand, the treatment of MB cells with Trichostatin A (TSA, a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDAC, was able to restore both DKK3 mRNA and protein. In conclusion, DKK3 downregulation across all MB subgroups may be due to epigenetic mechanisms, in particular, through chromatin condensation.

  1. Pembrolizumab in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory High-Grade Gliomas, Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas, Hypermutated Brain Tumors, Ependymoma or Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-06-18

    Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; Malignant Glioma; Progressive Ependymoma; Progressive Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Recurrent Medulloblastoma; Refractory Brain Neoplasm; Refractory Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Refractory Ependymoma; Refractory Medulloblastoma

  2. Endoscopic Surgery for Traumatic Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH is generally addressed by craniotomy under general anesthesia. We report a patient whose traumatic ASDH was treated under local anesthesia by one-burr-hole endoscopic surgery. This 87-year-old woman had undergone coil embolization for a ruptured right middle-cerebral artery aneurysm and placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus 5 years earlier. Upon admission, she manifested consciousness disturbance after suffering head trauma and right hemiplegia. Her Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (E2V2M4. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a thick, left-frontotemporal ASDH. Due to her advanced age and poor condition, we performed endoscopic surgery rather than craniotomy to evacuate the ASDH. Under local anesthesia, we made a burr hole in her left forehead and increased its size to 15 mm in diameter. After introducing a transparent sheath into the hematoma cavity with a rigid endoscope, the clot was evacuated with a suction tube. The arterial bleeding point was electrically coagulated. A postoperative CT scan confirmed the reduction of the hematoma. There was neither brain compression nor brain swelling. Her consciousness disturbance and right hemiplegia improved immediately. Endoscopic surgery may represent a viable method to address traumatic intracranial hematomas in some patients.

  3. Subdural Hematoma Presenting as Recurrent Syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, David I; Jamros, Christine; Cogar, William

    2015-09-01

    Syncope is a common emergency department (ED) complaint. Recurrent syncope is less common, but may be concerning for serious underlying pathology. It often requires a broad diagnostic evaluation that may include neurologic imaging. We present the case of a 75-year-old man with non-small-cell carcinoma who presented to the ED for recurrent syncope after coughing spells over the 2 weeks preceding his arrival at the ED. He had a normal cardiac evaluation, however, he had some subacute neurologic changes that prompted obtaining a computed tomography (CT) scan of the head. This led to the diagnosis of atraumatic subdural hematoma that was causing transient transtentorial herniation leading to the recurrent syncope. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians should be aware that recurrent syncope is a possible presentation of increased intracranial pressure that may be due to a mass lesion, particularly if the patient has any acute or subacute neurologic changes. Although this association with a subdual hematoma is rare, other cases of mass lesions leading to syncope after coughing spells have been reported in the literature. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Chronic subdural hematoma with persistent hiccups: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushin Takemoto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Supratentorial hiccup is a rare condition and no patients with persistent hiccups and chronic subdural hematoma have been reported. A 38-year-old man with intractable hiccups, headache, and nausea was admitted to our hospital. Computed tomography revealed a supratentorial chronic subdural hematoma on the left side. After burr hole surgery to remove the hematoma his hiccups disappeared immediately and he was discharged home on the 3rd postoperative day with no neurological deficits. Although the role of the supratentorial nervous system in hiccups is not clearly understood, supratentorial areas play an important role in the stimulation or suppression of the hiccup centers. Chronic hiccups may be a presenting symptom of chronic subdural hematoma attending headache with nausea if it has no gastrointestinal abnormality.

  5. Acute Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Vardenafil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takaaki; Watanabe, Genya; Harada, Ryuhei; Kawasaki, Emiko; Tsukita, Kenichi; Suzuki, Yasushi

    2018-05-02

    A 28-year-old healthy man was admitted to our hospital because of right-sided headache, vomiting, and lower back pain after the administration of vardenafil. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a small, right-sided, subdural hematoma. A lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed a longitudinally extended subdural hematoma. He had no history of trauma. We speculated that vardenafil might have had an association with the bleeding. Several reports have suggested a relationship between phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Our case suggested that there may also be risks of bleeding into the subdural space. Although headache and nausea are common side effects of vardenafil, hemorrhagic diseases should also be considered when symptoms are severe or prolonged. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Two cases of subdural hematoma with niveau formation on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Satoshi; Fukuda, Atsuhiro; Sato, Masaharu; Kohama, Akitsugu

    1984-01-01

    The authors report a case of a bilateral chronic subdural hematoma with niveau formation and another rare case of an acute subdural hematoma with niveau formation on plain CT. The different mechanisms of the niveau formation in these cases are speculated about. The first case was a 75-year-old male who showed a drowsy state, urinary incontinence, and muscle weakness of the bilateral lower limbs. No definite history of head trauma could be found. A plain CT scan showed a bilateral-crescent type fluid collection with niveau formation, consisting of a low-density area in the upper part and a high-density area in the lower part. An operation showed bilateral, moderately encapsulated subdural hematomas; they were evacuated. The second case was a 61-year-old male with head trauma due to a fall from a ladder. On admission, neurological examination revealed a decerebrate posture, a deep coma, and anisocoria. A plain CT scan twenty hours after the onset showed a crescent-type fluid collection with niveau formation in the left fronto-parietal region. The operation showed an acute subdural hematoma containing xanthochromic fluid and coagulated blood. No capsule of hematoma could be seen. The incidence of niveau formation in chronic subdural hematomas is not low (5 - 20%); such niveau formation is thought to be caused by rebleeding into the hematoma and the spending of considerable time in the supine position. On the other hand, no case of an acute subdural hematoma with niveau formation has previously been reported. With regard to this mechanism of niveau formation, we speculate that the hematoma is mixed with cerebrospinal fluid from the arachnoidal tear caused by the head trauma; also, a considerable time in the supine position is necessary. (author)

  7. Chronic subdural hematoma fluid and its computerized tomographic density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuzawa, Hideaki; Sato, Jinichi; Kamitani, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Midori

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory and in vivo CT analysis were performed on 19 chronic subdural hematomas and five subdural hygromas. In these 25 hematoma samples, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, and hemoglobin (Hgb) varied greatly, though, these values correlated well with the CT densities. Plasma protein content was fairly constant with an average of 7.1+-0.8g/dl. There were four hematoma samples with RBC of less than 20x10 4 μl or Hgb of less than 2.0g/dl. Their CT values ranged between 18 and 23 H.U., which were considered close to the in vivo serum level CT density. Five hygroma fluid showed no RBC and very little protein content of less than 0.4g/dl. CT density ranged between -2 and 13 H.U. The edge effect of the skull was experimentally studied using a phantom skull filled with water. This revealed a remarkable overshoot of the CT values within ten pixels from the inner wall of the skull. Visual observation of the original CT pictures revealed four low density hematomas and seven mixed density ones. When compared to the density of the ventricular cavity, all of the low density hematomas and the supernatant part of the mixed density ones were clearly higher in density. All five hygromas appeared CSF dense or lower. In conclusion, because of the edge effect by the skull, thin subdural fluids could not be diagnosed by CT alone. Thick subdural fluids could be differentiated as either hematoma or hygroma by their CT densities. Subdural hematomas had in vivo CT densities of at least serum level or approximately 20 H.U., while subdural hygromas had densities close to CSF. These characteristics were best appreciated by visual observation of the CT scan films. (J.P.N.)

  8. Computerized tomography of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the tentorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Yasuhisa; Harada, Hideaki; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi.

    1987-01-01

    A case of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the cerebellar tentorium is presented. The clinical feature of this case was gait disturbance with trankial ataxia. An axial CT scan showed only a diffuse high-density area in the cerebellar tentorium, but a coronal CT scan revealed a characteristic high-density lesion just on the cerebellar tentorium. The hematoma was evacuated by opening a burrhole at the convex; the gait disturbance disappeared after this operation. The value of a coronal CT scan in this case is stressed, and the mechanism of gait disturbance in a chronic subdural hematoma is discussed. (author)

  9. Computerized tomography of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the tentorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Yasuhisa; Harada, Hideaki; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    1987-06-01

    A case of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the cerebellar tentorium is presented. The clinical feature of this case was gait disturbance with trankial ataxia. An axial CT scan showed only a diffuse high-density area in the cerebellar tentorium, but a coronal CT scan revealed a characteristic high-density lesion just on the cerebellar tentorium. The hematoma was evacuated by opening a burrhole at the convex; the gait disturbance disappeared after this operation. The value of a coronal CT scan in this case is stressed, and the mechanism of gait disturbance in a chronic subdural hematoma is discussed.

  10. Subdural Empyema Presenting with Seizure, Confusion, and Focal Weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I Bruner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While sinusitis is a common ailment, intracranial suppurative complications of sinusitis are rare and difficult to diagnose and treat. The morbidity and mortality of intracranial complications of sinusitis have decreased significantly since the advent of antibiotics, but diseases such as subdural empyemas and intracranial abscesses still occur, and they require prompt diagnosis, treatment, and often surgical drainage to prevent death or long-term neurologic sequelae. We present a case of an immunocompetent adolescent male with a subdural empyema who presented with seizures,confusion, and focal arm weakness after a bout of sinusitis.

  11. Subdural Empyema Presenting with Seizure, Confusion, and Focal Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, David I.; Littlejohn, Lanny; Pritchard, Amy

    2012-01-01

    While sinusitis is a common ailment, intracranial suppurative complications of sinusitis are rare and difficult to diagnose and treat. The morbidity and mortality of intracranial complications of sinusitis have decreased significantly since the advent of antibiotics, but diseases such as subdural empyemas and intracranial abscesses still occur, and they require prompt diagnosis, treatment, and often surgical drainage to prevent death or long-term neurologic sequelae. We present a case of an immunocompetent adolescent male with a subdural empyema who presented with seizures, confusion, and focal arm weakness after a bout of sinusitis. PMID:23358438

  12. Dual-Energy CT in Enhancing Subdural Effusions that Masquerade as Subdural Hematomas: Diagnosis with Virtual High-Monochromatic (190-keV) Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodanapally, U K; Dreizin, D; Issa, G; Archer-Arroyo, K L; Sudini, K; Fleiter, T R

    2017-10-01

    Extravasation of iodinated contrast into subdural space following contrast-enhanced radiographic studies results in hyperdense subdural effusions, which can be mistaken as acute subdural hematomas on follow-up noncontrast head CTs. Our aim was to identify the factors associated with contrast-enhancing subdural effusion, characterize diffusion and washout kinetics of iodine in enhancing subdural effusion, and assess the utility of dual-energy CT in differentiating enhancing subdural effusion from subdural hematoma. We retrospectively analyzed follow-up head dual-energy CT studies in 423 patients with polytrauma who had undergone contrast-enhanced whole-body CT. Twenty-four patients with enhancing subdural effusion composed the study group, and 24 randomly selected patients with subdural hematoma were enrolled in the comparison group. Postprocessing with syngo.via was performed to determine the diffusion and washout kinetics of iodine. The sensitivity and specificity of dual-energy CT for the diagnosis of enhancing subdural effusion were determined with 120-kV, virtual monochromatic energy (190-keV) and virtual noncontrast images. Patients with enhancing subdural effusion were significantly older (mean, 69 years; 95% CI, 60-78 years; P subdural effusions was reached within the first 8 hours of contrast administration with a mean of 0.98 mg/mL (95% CI, 0.81-1.13 mg/mL), and complete washout was achieved at 38 hours. For the presence of a hyperdense subdural collection on 120-kV images with a loss of hyperattenuation on 190-keV and virtual noncontrast images, when considered as a true-positive for enhancing subdural effusion, the sensitivity was 100% (95% CI, 85.75%-100%) and the specificity was 91.67% (95% CI, 73%-99%). Dual-energy CT has a high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating enhancing subdural effusion from subdural hematoma. Hence, dual-energy CT has a potential to obviate follow-up studies. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. The Nelaton Catheter Guard for Safe and Effective Placement of Subdural Drain for Two-Burr-Hole Trephination in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Jens; Beck, Jürgen; Raabe, A; Stieglitz, Lennart Henning

    2015-09-01

    For chronic subdural hematoma, placement of a Blake drain with a two-burr-hole craniotomy is often preferred. However, the placement of such drains carries the risk of penetrating the brain surface or damaging superficial venous structures. To describe the use of a Nelaton catheter for the placement of a subdural drain in two-burr-hole trephination for chronic subdural hematoma. A Nelaton catheter was used to guide placement of a Blake drain into the subdural hematoma cavity and provide irrigation of the hematoma cavity. With the two-burr-hole method, the Nelaton catheter could be removed easily via the frontal burr hole after the Blake drain was in place. We used the Nelaton catheters in many surgical procedures and found it a safe and easy technique. This method allows the surgeon to safely direct the catheter into the correct position in the subdural space. This tool has two advantages. First, the use of a small and flexible Nelaton catheter is a safe method for irrigation of a chronic subdural hematoma cavity. Second, in comparison with insertion of subdural drainage alone through a burr hole, the placement of the Nelaton catheter in subdural space is easier and the risk of damaging relevant structures such as cortical tissue or bridging veins is lower. Thus this technique may help to avoid complications when placing a subdural drain. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Stratification of medulloblastoma on the basis of histopathological grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangaspero, Felice; Wellek, Stefan; Masuoka, Jun; Gessi, Marco; Kleihues, Paul; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2006-07-01

    Medulloblastoma (WHO grade IV) is an embryonal tumour of the cerebellum and the most common malignant central nervous system tumour in children. Despite significant advances in treatment, 5-year survival rates are still less than 70%, suggesting the presence of subgroups with different response to radio/chemotherapy. In the present study, we re-evaluated a series of 347 medulloblastomas from the SIOP II clinical trial of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology to identify features predictive of clinical outcome. Relapse free survival for medulloblastomas with severe anaplasia [5-year rate: S(60)=49.5%], was significantly shorter than for tumours with moderate or mild anaplasia S(60)=65.4%; P=0.001). The difference between both groups was even larger when the presence or absence of extensive apoptosis was included (46.5 vs. 66.7%; P=0.0216). Other histological features including nodularity, necrosis, vascular proliferation and the presence of beta-catenin mutations (7% of cases) were not predictive for relapse free survival. These findings indicate that degree of anaplasia is the most significant histologic feature predictive of the survival of medulloblastoma patients.

  15. Changes in Cerebral Cortex of Children Treated for Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Arthur K.; Marcus, Karen J.; Fischl, Bruce; Grant, P. Ellen; Young Poussaint, Tina; Rivkin, Michael J.; Davis, Peter; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Children with medulloblastoma undergo surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. After treatment, these children have numerous structural abnormalities. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, we measured the thickness of the cerebral cortex in a group of medulloblastoma patients and a group of normally developing children. Methods and Materials: We obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and measured the cortical thickness in 9 children after treatment of medulloblastoma. The measurements from these children were compared with the measurements from age- and gender-matched normally developing children previously scanned. For additional comparison, the pattern of thickness change was compared with the cortical thickness maps from a larger group of 65 normally developing children. Results: In the left hemisphere, relatively thinner cortex was found in the perirolandic region and the parieto-occipital lobe. In the right hemisphere, relatively thinner cortex was found in the parietal lobe, posterior superior temporal gyrus, and lateral temporal lobe. These regions of cortical thinning overlapped with the regions of cortex that undergo normal age-related thinning. Conclusion: The spatial distribution of cortical thinning suggested that the areas of cortex that are undergoing development are more sensitive to the effects of treatment of medulloblastoma. Such quantitative methods may improve our understanding of the biologic effects that treatment has on the cerebral development and their neuropsychological implications

  16. Bilateral Cerebellar Medulloblastoma in Adults: Report of Two Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerquera Cabrera, Fredy Martin; Patino Mendez, Ricardo; Mantilla Mantilla, Maria Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is considered to be part of the group of primitive neuroectodermal tumors. It is well known that medulloblastoma is the most common malignancy of the central nervous system in the pediatric population, and the most common primary tumor of the posterior fossa in children. In contrast, it has a very low prevalence in adults. Imaging signs of medulloblastoma have been described in children, consisting of mid-line masses, usually well defined and typically hyperdense on non-contrast CT images, but that show intense homogeneous enhancement with contrast medium. in adults, these characteristics vary, usually with poorly defined cerebellar hemispheric masses showing cystic degeneration or necrosis, and minor enhancement with contrast medium, when compared to the pediatric population. Both children and adults share a variable appearance on MRI, as well as secondary leptomeningeal involvement and distant metastases. This paper describes two confirmed cases of bilateral hemispheric cerebellar medulloblastomas in adult patients with an unusual and interesting imaging presentation not yet reported in the literature.

  17. Primary ovarian leiomyosarcoma in an adolescent following radiation for medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, S.G.; Das Narla, L.; Ferraro, E.

    1998-01-01

    Primary ovarian leiomyosarcomas are rare neoplasms of the ovary, particularly in the pediatric population. Their occurrence following radiation therapy for previous malignancy has important implications. We present a case of primary ovarian leiomyosarcoma in an adolescent following therapy for medulloblastoma. (orig.)

  18. Cystic Medulloblastoma in a child | Agrawal | East and Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East and Central African Journal of Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Cystic Medulloblastoma in a child. A Agrawal ...

  19. Time Perception in Children Treated for a Cerebellar Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Zelanti, Pierre S.; Dellatolas, Georges; Kieffer, Virginie; El Massioui, Nicole; Brown, Bruce L.; Doyere, Valerie; Provasi, Joelle; Grill, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate temporal abilities in children treated by surgery for a malignant tumor in the cerebellum. Children with a diagnosed medulloblastoma and age-paired control children were given a temporal discrimination task (bisection task) and a temporal reproduction task with two duration ranges, one shorter than 1…

  20. Even Cancers Want Commitment: Lineage Identity and Medulloblastoma Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Yang et al. (2008) and Schüller et al. (2008) show that Hedgehog activation in either multipotent neural stem cells or developmentally restricted progenitors causes only medulloblastomas to form. These data suggest that some stem cell-derived tumors must commit to a specific lineage in order to grow. PMID:18691544

  1. Radiation-induced motility alterations in medulloblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieken, Stefan; Rieber, Juliane; Brons, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Photon irradiation has been repeatedly suspected of increasing tumor cell motility and promoting locoregional recurrence of disease. This study was set up to analyse possible mechanisms underlying the potentially radiation-altered motility in medulloblastoma cells. Medulloblastoma cell lines D425 and Med8A were analyzed in migration and adhesion experiments with and without photon and carbon ion irradiation. Expression of integrins was determined by quantitative FACS analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase concentrations within cell culture supernatants were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test. Both photon and carbon ion irradiation significantly reduced chemotactic medulloblastoma cell transmigration through 8-μm pore size membranes, while simultaneously increasing adherence to fibronectin- and collagen I- and IV-coated surfaces. Correspondingly, both photon and carbon ion irradiation downregulate soluble MMP9 concentrations, while upregulating cell surface expression of proadhesive extracellular matrix protein-binding integrin α 5 . The observed phenotype of radiation-altered motility is more pronounced following carbon ion than photon irradiation. Both photon and (even more so) carbon ion irradiation are effective in inhibiting medulloblastoma cell migration through downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and upregulation of proadhesive cell surface integrin α 5 , which lead to increased cell adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. (author)

  2. Management of Posterior Fossa Medulloblastoma in Adults | Fouad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Medulloblastoma is a malignant tumor of the cerebellum that occurs predominantly in children. It is rare in adults and accounts for less than 1 % of all adult primary brain tumors. Objective: This study was done ... treatment died: one from distant metastasis and one from recurrent disease. Ten patients remained ...

  3. The whole-genome landscape of medulloblastoma subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Northcott, Paul A.; Buchhalter, Ivo; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Hovestadt, Volker; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Gröbner, Susanne; Segura-Wang, Maia; Zichner, Thomas; Rudneva, Vasilisa A.; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Sidiropoulos, Nikos; Phillips, Aaron H.; Schumacher, Steven; Kleinheinz, Kortine; Waszak, Sebastian M.; Erkek, Serap; Jones, David T. W.; Worst, Barbara C.; Kool, Marcel; Zapatka, Marc; Jäger, Natalie; Chavez, Lukas; Hutter, Barbara; Bieg, Matthias; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Heinold, Michael; Gu, Zuguang; Ishaque, Naveed; Jäger-Schmidt, Christina; Imbusch, Charles D.; Jugold, Alke; Hübschmann, Daniel; Risch, Thomas; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Gonzalez, Francisco German Rodriguez; Weber, Ursula D.; Wolf, Stephan; Robinson, Giles W.; Zhou, Xin; Wu, Gang; Finkelstein, David; Liu, Yanling; Cavalli, Florence M. G.; Luu, Betty; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Wu, Xiaochong; Koster, Jan; Ryzhova, Marina; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Herold-Mende, Christel; Schuhmann, Martin; Ebinger, Martin; Liau, Linda M.; Mora, Jaume; McLendon, Roger E.; Jabado, Nada; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Chuah, Eric; Ma, Yussanne; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Mungall, Karen L.; Thiessen, Nina; Tse, Kane; Wong, Tina; Jones, Steven J. M.; Witt, Olaf; Milde, Till; von Deimling, Andreas; Capper, David; Korshunov, Andrey; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Kriwacki, Richard; Gajjar, Amar; Zhang, Jinghui; Beroukhim, Rameen; Fraenkel, Ernest; Korbel, Jan O.; Brors, Benedikt; Schlesner, Matthias; Eils, Roland; Marra, Marco A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.; Lichter, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Current therapies for medulloblastoma, a highly malignant childhood brain tumour, impose debilitating effects on the developing child, and highlight the need for molecularly targeted treatments with reduced toxicity. Previous studies have been unable to identify the full spectrum of driver genes and

  4. The FDA approved PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 enhances in vitro the anti-neoplastic efficacy of Axitinib against c-myc-amplified high-risk medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Michael; Craveiro, Rogerio B; Velz, Julia; Olschewski, Martin; Casati, Anna; Schönberger, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Dilloo, Dagmar

    2018-04-01

    Aberrant receptor kinase signalling and tumour neovascularization are hallmarks of medulloblastoma development and are both considered valuable therapeutic targets. In addition to VEGFR1/2, expression of PDGFR α/β in particular has been documented as characteristic of metastatic disease correlating with poor prognosis. Therefore, we have been suggested that the clinically approved multi-kinase angiogenesis inhibitor Axitinib, which specifically targets these kinases, might constitute a promising option for medulloblastoma treatment. Indeed, our results delineate anti-neoplastic activity of Axitinib in medulloblastoma cell lines modelling the most aggressive c-myc-amplified Non-WNT/Non-SHH and SHH-TP53-mutated tumours. Exposure of medulloblastoma cell lines to Axitinib results in marked inhibition of proliferation and profound induction of cell death. The differential efficacy of Axitinib is in line with target expression of medulloblastoma cells identifying VEGFR 1/2, PDGFR α/β and c-kit as potential markers for drug application. The high specificity of Axitinib and the consequential low impact on the haematopoietic and immune system render this drug ideal multi-modal treatment approaches. In this context, we demonstrate that the clinically available PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 enhances the anti-neoplastic efficacy of Axitinib against c-myc-amplified medulloblastoma. Our findings provide a rational to further evaluate Axitinib alone and in combination with other therapeutic agents for the treatment of most aggressive medulloblastoma subtypes. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. Hematoma subdural crônico: análise de 35 casos Chronic subdural hematoma: analysis of 35 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Flavio M. Araújo

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam 35 casos com diagnóstico de hematoma subdural crônico, operados no período de janeiro-1988 a março-1995. A idade dos pacientes variou entre 19 e 80 anos. Foram eles agrupados retrospectivamente segundo a escala de Bender. Quanto ao tratamento cirúrgico, foram empregadas duas técnicas: craniotomia com membranectomia e dupla trepanação com instilação de solução salina na cavidade ocupada pelo hematoma. O índice de mortalidade entre os pacientes submetidos à craniotomia foi 16,6% e nos pacientes submetidos à trepanação foi nulo. Dentre os pacientes que faleceram, 80% encontravam-se em grau III ou IV na escala de Bender. O hematoma subdural crônico apresenta até os dias atuais alguns aspectos controversos, como quanto à sua fisiopatologia e ao tratamento cirúrgico adequado.Thirty five patients with chronic subdural hematoma were treated surgically between 1988 and 1995. The patients, aged 19 to 80 years, were graded retrospectively according to the Bender scale. The clots were removed via burr-holes with irrigation of the subdural space to ensure as complete an evacuation of subdural colletion, and craniotomy with membranectomy. The mortality rate was 16.6% with craniotomy and 0% with burr-hole. The patients who died, 80% were in grade III or IV. The pathogenesis and surgical treatment of chronic subdural hematoma has been controversial, and still remains obscure.

  6. Prognostic value of medulloblastoma extent of resection after accounting for molecular subgroup: a retrospective integrated clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Eric M; Hielscher, Thomas; Bouffet, Eric; Remke, Marc; Luu, Betty; Gururangan, Sridharan; McLendon, Roger E; Bigner, Darell D; Lipp, Eric S; Perreault, Sebastien; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Grant, Gerald; Kim, Seung-Ki; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Rao, Amulya A Nageswara; Giannini, Caterina; Li, Kay Ka Wai; Ng, Ho-Keung; Yao, Yu; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Low, David C Y; Seow, Wan Tew; Chang, Kenneth T E; Mora, Jaume; Pollack, Ian F; Hamilton, Ronald L; Leary, Sarah; Moore, Andrew S; Ingram, Wendy J; Hallahan, Andrew R; Jouvet, Anne; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Faure-Conter, Cecile; Shofuda, Tomoko; Kagawa, Naoki; Hashimoto, Naoya; Jabado, Nada; Weil, Alexander G; Gayden, Tenzin; Wataya, Takafumi; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Zitterbart, Karel; Sterba, Jaroslav; Kren, Leos; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Klekner, Almos; László, Bognár; Pócza, Tímea; Hauser, Peter; Schüller, Ulrich; Jung, Shin; Jang, Woo-Youl; French, Pim J; Kros, Johan M; van Veelen, Marie-Lise C; Massimi, Luca; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Rubin, Joshua B; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Chambless, Lola B; Cooper, Michael K; Thompson, Reid C; Faria, Claudia C; Carvalho, Alice; Nunes, Sofia; Pimentel, José; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M; López-Aguilar, Enrique; Lyden, David; Garzia, Livia; Shih, David J H; Kijima, Noriyuki; Schneider, Christian; Adamski, Jennifer; Northcott, Paul A; Kool, Marcel; Jones, David T W; Chan, Jennifer A; Nikolic, Ana; Garre, Maria Luisa; Van Meir, Erwin G; Osuka, Satoru; Olson, Jeffrey J; Jahangiri, Arman; Castro, Brandyn A; Gupta, Nalin; Weiss, William A; Moxon-Emre, Iska; Mabbott, Donald J; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Tabori, Uri; Drake, James; Kulkarni, Abhaya; Dirks, Peter; Rutka, James T; Korshunov, Andrey; Pfister, Stefan M; Packer, Roger J; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    Patients with incomplete surgical resection of medulloblastoma are controversially regarded as having a marker of high-risk disease, which leads to patients undergoing aggressive surgical resections, so-called second-look surgeries, and intensified chemoradiotherapy. All previous studies assessing the clinical importance of extent of resection have not accounted for molecular subgroup. We analysed the prognostic value of extent of resection in a subgroup-specific manner. We retrospectively identified patients who had a histological diagnosis of medulloblastoma and complete data about extent of resection and survival from centres participating in the Medulloblastoma Advanced Genomics International Consortium. We collected from resections done between April, 1997, and February, 2013, at 35 international institutions. We established medulloblastoma subgroup affiliation by gene expression profiling on frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. We classified extent of resection on the basis of postoperative imaging as gross total resection (no residual tumour), near-total resection (30 Gy vs no craniospinal irradiation). The primary analysis outcome was the effect of extent of resection by molecular subgroup and the effects of other clinical variables on overall and progression-free survival. We included 787 patients with medulloblastoma (86 with WNT tumours, 242 with SHH tumours, 163 with group 3 tumours, and 296 with group 4 tumours) in our multivariable Cox models of progression-free and overall survival. We found that the prognostic benefit of increased extent of resection for patients with medulloblastoma is attenuated after molecular subgroup affiliation is taken into account. We identified a progression-free survival benefit for gross total resection over sub-total resection (hazard ratio [HR] 1·45, 95% CI 1·07-1·96, p=0·16) but no overall survival benefit (HR 1·23, 0·87-1·72, p=0·24). We saw no progression-free survival or overall survival

  7. Acute subdural hematoma because of boxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushi, Hidehiko; Saito, Takeshi; Sakagami, Yuichiro; Ohtsuki, Jyoji; Tanjoh, Katsuhisa

    2009-02-01

    To identify factors determining the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) arising from boxing injuries by comparing with ASDH due to any nonboxing cause. Two groups were selected for this study: 10 patients with ASDH because of boxing injuries and 26 patients with nonboxer ASDH. All of the patients underwent neurologic examination by neurosurgeons. Primary resuscitation and stabilization as well as operative therapy were performed to all patients according to the European Brain Injury Consortium Guidelines. Two groups were compared in terms of age, the Glasgow Coma Scale at admission, neurologic findings, craniogram and brain computed tomography scan findings, operative findings, and prognosis. As potential prognostic indicators for boxers, the time interval until surgery, the Glasgow Outcome Scale, hematoma thickness, midline shift, and the site of bleeding were analyzed. The characteristics of patients because of boxing injuries are that patients were younger, had lucid interval, and had no cerebral contusion or contralateral brain injury. There was no significant difference in initial Glasgow Coma Scale, hematoma thickness, midline shift, and their prognosis. The most peculiar clinical presentation of boxers' ASDH was that all bleedings were limited from "bridging veins" or "cortical veins." The prognosis of boxers was most closely correlated with the site of bleeding (r2 = 0.81; p = 0.0001) and the midline shift (r2 = 0.67; p = 0.007). Our study shows that ASDH because of boxing is characterized by bleeding from bridging or cortical veins, and that the site of bleeding is a significant determinant of their prognosis.

  8. Chromosome 17 alterations identify good-risk and poor-risk tumors independently of clinical factors in medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Martin G.; Bäcklund, L. Magnus; Leong, Hui Sun; Ichimura, Koichi; Collins, V. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Current risk stratification schemas for medulloblastoma, based on combinations of clinical variables and histotype, fail to accurately identify particularly good- and poor-risk tumors. Attempts have been made to improve discriminatory power by combining clinical variables with cytogenetic data. We report here a pooled analysis of all previous reports of chromosomal copy number related to survival data in medulloblastoma. We collated data from previous reports that explicitly quoted survival data and chromosomal copy number in medulloblastoma. We analyzed the relative prognostic significance of currently used clinical risk stratifiers and the chromosomal aberrations previously reported to correlate with survival. In the pooled dataset metastatic disease, incomplete tumor resection and severe anaplasia were associated with poor outcome, while young age at presentation was not prognostically significant. Of the chromosomal variables studied, isolated 17p loss and gain of 1q correlated with poor survival. Gain of 17q without associated loss of 17p showed a trend to improved outcome. The most commonly reported alteration, isodicentric chromosome 17, was not prognostically significant. Sequential multivariate models identified isolated 17p loss, isolated 17q gain, and 1q gain as independent prognostic factors. In a historical dataset, we have identified isolated 17p loss as a marker of poor outcome and 17q gain as a novel putative marker of good prognosis. Biological markers of poor-risk and good-risk tumors will be critical in stratifying treatment in future trials. Our findings should be prospectively validated independently in future clinical studies. PMID:21292688

  9. Medulloblastoma: histopathologic and molecular markers of anaplasia and biologic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hye Sook; Lee, You Jeong; Park, Kyeongmee; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Park, Sung-Hye

    2006-07-01

    Large cell/anaplastic (LC/A) medulloblastoma (MB) is a recently recognized variant of medulloblastoma known to be associated with an advanced stage and a poor prognosis. Although Eberhart et al. suggested histopathologic grading of medulloblastoma in 2002, no consensus has been reached in terms of determining the criteria of an LC/A variant, and its biological behavior continues to be the subject of debate. We retrospectively analyzed 74 cases (range 0.25-15 years) of MB clinicopathologically using the criteria established by Eberhart et al. The LC/A variant was identified in 16 cases (22% of MB cases), five of which showed a poor outcome. Most LC/A variant cases revealed synaptophysin immunoexpression (75%), but no epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression. Expression of synaptophysin, NeuN, GFAP, p53, c-erbB2, and EGFR did not differ in LC/A and non-LC/A variants. Seven of the 74 cases of medulloblastoma showed erbB2 amplification by FISH, four of which were LC/A variants. N-myc amplification was observed in only one LC/A variant, but no c-myc amplification was found. In patients younger than 10 years, the LC/A variant showed a significantly poorer outcome than the non-LC/A variant (P = 0.02), while no difference was found in older patients. Multivariate analysis revealed only metastasis on MRI and p53 expression, but not anaplasia as unfavorable prognostic factors. Our study suggests that prognostic implications of anaplasia in medulloblastoma are uncertain, and that the reproducibility of the histopathologic criteria of the LC/A variant should be reassessed before they can be applied in practical use.

  10. MRI features of primary, secondary and metastatic medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehring, U.; Strayle-Batra, M.; Kueker, W.; Freudenstein, D.; Scheel-Walter, H.-G.

    2002-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most frequent paediatric malignant brain tumour. The purpose of this study was to define imaging characteristics and contrast uptake patterns of primary and recurrent medulloblastoma using MRI. The MRI examinations of 17 histologically proven cases of medulloblastoma diagnosed in our institution (13 males and 4 females; mean age 13 years, 7 months) were reviewed in retrospect. Only patients with pre-treatment and follow-up examinations including T2-weighted images (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery or turbo spin echo) and T1-weighted images after contrast injection (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA) were included in this study. Whereas 6 of 7 tumours (n=17) were hyperintense on T2-weighted images, contrast enhancement was detected in 13 patients. Fifteen tumours occurred in the cerebellar vermis, two were located in the cerebellar hemispheres. Mean size at the time of presentation was 30.1 mm. All patients presented with some extent of an occlusive hydrocephalus. Local recurrent tumour or metastases were seen in 6 patients (3 months to 7 years, mean age 2.5 years). Whereas the T2 signal intensity of recurrent tumour or subarachnoidal metastases resembled the primary neoplasms, the contrast uptake tended to be less pronounced (n=3) or was completely absent (n=2); thus, suggestive signs of primary medulloblastoma are location in the vermis, hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and hydrocephalus. The amount of contrast enhancement is variable and nonspecific. Secondary medulloblastoma manifestation is characterized by T2 hyperintensity but not by contrast uptake. (orig.)

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of cochlear dose reduction by proton beam therapy for medulloblastoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Emi; Kawabuchi, Koichi; Fuji, Hiroshi; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Kumar, Vinay; Shirato, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of proton beam therapy with cochlear dose reduction compared with conventional X-ray radiotherapy for medulloblastoma in childhood. We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 6-year-old children with medulloblastoma after treatment with proton or X-ray radiotherapy. The risks of hearing loss were calculated on cochlear dose for each treatment. Three types of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of EQ-5D, HUI3 and SF-6D were used for estimation of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for proton beam therapy compared with X-ray radiotherapy was calculated for each HRQOL. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. The ICER for EQ-5D, HUI3 and SF-6D were $21 716/QALY, $11 773/QALY, and $20 150/QALY, respectively. One-way sensitivity analyses found that the results were sensitive to discount rate, the risk of hearing loss after proton therapy, and costs of proton irradiation. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curve analysis revealed a 99% probability of proton therapy being cost effective at a societal willingness-to-pay value. Proton beam therapy with cochlear dose reduction improves health outcomes at a cost that is within the acceptable cost-effectiveness range from the payer's standpoint. (author)

  12. Mismatch repair deficiency: a temozolomide resistance factor in medulloblastoma cell lines that is uncommon in primary medulloblastoma tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Bueren, A. O.; Bacolod, M. D.; Hagel, C.; Heinimann, K.; Fedier, A.; Kordes, U.; Pietsch, T.; Koster, J.; Grotzer, M. A.; Friedman, H. S.; Marra, G.; Kool, M.; Rutkowski, S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumours are responsive to temozolomide (TMZ) if they are deficient in O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mismatch repair (MMR) proficient. METHODS: The effect of TMZ on medulloblastoma (MB) cell killing was analysed with clonogenic survival assays. Expression of DNA

  13. Oncolytic Herpes Virus rRp450 Shows Efficacy in Orthotopic Xenograft Group 3/4 Medulloblastomas and Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam W. Studebaker

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric brain tumors including medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor are associated with significant mortality and treatment-associated morbidity. While medulloblastoma tumors within molecular subgroups 3 and 4 have a propensity to metastasize, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors frequently afflict a very young patient population. Adjuvant treatment options for children suffering with these tumors are not only sub-optimal but also associated with many neurocognitive obstacles. A potentially novel treatment approach is oncolytic virotherapy, a developing therapeutic platform currently in early-phase clinical trials for pediatric brain tumors and recently US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved to treat melanoma in adults. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of the clinically available oncolytic herpes simplex vector rRp450 in cell lines derived from medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor. Cells of both tumor types were supportive of virus replication and virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Orthotopic xenograft models of medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors displayed significantly prolonged survival following a single, stereotactic intratumoral injection of rRp450. Furthermore, addition of the chemotherapeutic prodrug cyclophosphamide (CPA enhanced rRp450’s in vivo efficacy. In conclusion, oncolytic herpes viruses with the ability to bioactivate the prodrug CPA within the tumor microenvironment warrant further investigation as a potential therapy for pediatric brain tumors.

  14. Mechanism of subdural effusion evolves into chronic subdural hematoma: IL-8 inducing neutrophil oxidative burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiqiang; Lin, Yingying; Hu, Maotong; Ding, Shenghong; Li, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is still a mysterious disease. Though great success has been has achieved by neuro-surgery treatment, the origin and development of CSDH remains unknown. Tremendous clinical observations have found the correlation of subdural effusion (SDE) and CSDH. However, systematic elucidation of CSDH's origin and progression is lacking while almost all the current hypothesis only explained partial phenomenon. This hypothesis proposes Interleukin (IL)-8 inducing neutrophil respiratory burst is the crucial impact when SDE evolves into CSDH. IL-8 initially secreted by dural border layer cells, accumulates and the concentration of IL-8 rises in the SDE cavity. Accompanied by the formation of neo-membrane under the dura meninges, IL-8 firstly prompts to establish the neo-vasculature in it, and then attracts lymphocytes aggregation in the neo-membrane. Both the newly recruited lymphocytes and endothelial cells assist the further elevation of local IL-8 concentration. When the IL-8 concentration elevated to a particular level, it attracts neutrophils to the inner wall of neo-vessels and primes them to oxidative burst. Lysosomes and superoxide released by these neutrophils make the fragile neo-capillary became leaky, and subsequently the plasma and blood cells run into SDE. However, as long as the erythrocytes come into the cavity, they shall bind large quantity of IL-8 and decrease IL-8 concentration to a lower level relatively that reduce the neutrophils recruit. When this negative feedback is stagnancy, for example, the SDE space is so large in elder man who is experiencing brain atrophy, the neo-vessels have to release more erythrocytes to bind IL-8, the liquid cavity will expand and the high intracranial pressure symptoms appeared. Our hypothesis holds potential for the proper therapeutic intervention of CSDH. IL-8 antagonist and other anti-inflammation drugs like macrolides antibiotics, glucocorticoid and atorvastatin might be optional to resist

  15. Subperiosteal Drainage versus Subdural Drainage in the management of Chronic Subdural Hematoma (A Comparative Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chih, Adrian Ng Wei; Hieng, Albert Wong Sii; Rahman, Noor Azman A; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-03-01

    Symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) remain one of the most frequent diagnoses in current neurosurgical practice. Burr-hole craniostomy with irrigation and placement of close-system drainage is the current recommended surgery for symptomatic CSDH. The aim of this study is to perform a direct comparison between two surgical techniques in the treatment of symptomatic CSDH, which have been proven in previous studies to be efficient. Our main objective was to compare the efficacy of placement of a subperiosteal drain (SPD) and a subdural drain (SDD) following single burr-hole craniostomy and irrigation, and to demonstrate any significant differences in terms of overall surgical complications, functional outcome at three months and mortality rate. The study was carried out in two local neurosurgical centres. The SPD group was performed in Hospital Umum Sarawak (HUS) and the SDD group was performed in Hospital Sultanah Aminah Johor Bahru (HSAJB), from 1 January 2012 till 30 January 2014 with a total of 30 patients in both treatment groups. Overall, there were no statistically significant difference in terms of patient general characteristics, pre-operative and post-operative symptoms, Markwalder grades, post-operative hematoma volume and recurrence, mortality and functional outcome at discharge and at three month follow-up between both groups. Albeit not achieving statistical significance, we observed a lower rate of surgical complication especially for post-operative intracranial hematoma with placement of the SPD system. Our study concludes that both treatment methods proved to be highly effective in the treatment of CSDH. However, with a lower overall surgical complication rate, treatment with single burr-hole craniostomy, irrigation and placement of the SPD system can be considered a treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic CSDH.

  16. MR diffusion imaging and 1H spectroscopy in a child with medulloblastoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, M. [Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Muenchen (Germany). NMR Study Group; Eidenschink, A.; Mueller-Weihrich, S. [Technical Univ. of Muenchen, (Germany). Childrens' Hospital; Auer, D.P. [Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Muenchen (Germany). NMR Study Group

    2000-01-01

    We report on a child with a metastasising medulloblastoma which was assessed by MR diffusion imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS). Reduced mean apparent diffusion coefficients and a high amount of taurine could be demonstrated. This is the first reported case of high taurine in medulloblastoma in vivo and confirms earlier in vitro findings. It is suggested that the changes on diffusion imaging, possibly reflecting the small-cell histology of the tumour and high taurine in MRS, are indicative of medulloblastoma.

  17. MR diffusion imaging and 1H spectroscopy in a child with medulloblastoma: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M.; Eidenschink, A.; Mueller-Weihrich, S.; Auer, D.P.

    2000-01-01

    We report on a child with a metastasising medulloblastoma which was assessed by MR diffusion imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS). Reduced mean apparent diffusion coefficients and a high amount of taurine could be demonstrated. This is the first reported case of high taurine in medulloblastoma in vivo and confirms earlier in vitro findings. It is suggested that the changes on diffusion imaging, possibly reflecting the small-cell histology of the tumour and high taurine in MRS, are indicative of medulloblastoma

  18. The WIP1 oncogene promotes progression and invasion of aggressive medulloblastoma variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, M C; Remke, M; Lee, J; Gandhi, K; Schniederjan, M J; Kool, M; Northcott, P A; Pfister, S M; Taylor, M D; Castellino, R C

    2015-02-26

    Recent studies suggest that medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, is comprised of four disease variants. The WIP1 oncogene is overexpressed in Group 3 and 4 tumors, which contain medulloblastomas with the most aggressive clinical behavior. Our data demonstrate increased WIP1 expression in metastatic medulloblastomas, and inferior progression-free and overall survival of patients with WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma. Microarray analysis identified upregulation of genes involved in tumor metastasis, including the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4, in medulloblastoma cells with high WIP1 expression. Stimulation with the CXCR4 ligand SDF1α activated PI-3 kinase signaling, and promoted growth and invasion of WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma cells in a p53-dependent manner. When xenografted into the cerebellum of immunodeficient mice, medulloblastoma cells with stable or endogenous high WIP1 expression exhibited strong expression of CXCR4 and activated AKT in primary and invasive tumor cells. WIP1 or CXCR4 knockdown inhibited medulloblastoma growth and invasion. WIP1 knockdown also improved the survival of mice xenografted with WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma cells. WIP1 knockdown inhibited cell surface localization of CXCR4 by suppressing expression of the G protein receptor kinase 5, GRK5. Restoration of wild-type GRK5 promoted Ser339 phosphorylation of CXCR4 and inhibited the growth of WIP1-stable medulloblastoma cells. Conversely, GRK5 knockdown inhibited Ser339 phosphorylation of CXCR4, increased cell surface localization of CXCR4 and promoted the growth of medulloblastoma cells with low WIP1 expression. These results demonstrate crosstalk among WIP1, CXCR4 and GRK5, which may be important for the aggressive phenotype of a subclass of medulloblastomas in children.

  19. Accidental deposition of local anaesthetic in the subdural space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of accidental injection of local anaesthetic into the subdural space during neuraxial blockade is rare. The presentation of unexplainable clinical signs that do not match the clinical picture of subarachnoid or intravascular injection of the local anaesthetic agent should invoke high suspicion of unintentional ...

  20. Symptomatic Acute-on-Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Clinicopathological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Rudy J; Mojica-Sanchez, Gruschenka; Schwartzbauer, Gary; Hersh, David S

    2017-06-01

    The pathophysiology of acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma (ACSDH) is complex and incompletely understood. Evidence to date indicates that the overall process is initiated by rotational force with movement of the brain inside the skull, which exerts tensile strain and rupture of bridging veins, leading in turn to acute hemorrhage in the subdural potential space. This is followed by the proliferation of mesenchymal elements with angiogenesis and inflammation, which in turn becomes a substrate for repeated hemorrhage and expansion of the lesion. Given the prevalence of traumatic subdural processes in the forensic setting and the importance of proper assessment of timing, etiology, risk factors, and clinicopathological correlation, we studied 47 patients presenting to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, all of whom underwent craniotomy with resection of the outer membrane due to symptomatic ACSDH. The surgically resected tissue was examined for histopathologic features in all cases. Our findings highlight that ACSDH is a condition precipitated by trauma that affects middle-aged and older adults, is relatively indolent, is unilateral or asymmetric, and has a low in-hospital mortality rate. Pathological analysis demonstrates a substantial outer membrane in all cases with varying degrees of inflammation and organization that cannot be precisely dated as a function of clinical presentation. The extrapolation of adult ACSDH to mixed acute and chronic subdural hemorrhage in the pediatric setting is problematic due to substantial differences in clinical presentation, severity of underlying brain injury, gross and microscopic findings, and outcome.

  1. Apparently Ipsilateral Parkinsonism in a Patient with Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hwan Roh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic parkinsonism secondary to ipsilateral lesion is rarely reported. Although the contribution of the contralateral lesions was assumed in some cases, the pathomechanism remains undetermined. Herein we report a patient with a subdural hematoma, who developed parkinsonism in the ipsilateral hemibody. Structural and functional imaging suggests the contralateral dopaminergic dysfunction as the major culprit of apparently ipsilateral parkinsonism.

  2. Management of Chronic Subdural Haematoma in a Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and multilobate forms. CT scan of the brain showed a hypodense lesion at left posterior parietal and occipital region suggestive of chronic subdural haematoma with significant mass affect with effacement of ipsilateral ventricles [Figure 1]. She was given two units of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and three units of single donor.

  3. Hypothalamo-Pituitary Dysfunction in Patients With Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hána, V.; Kosák, M.; Masopust, V.; Netuka, D.; Lacinová, Z.; Kršek, M.; Marek, J.; Pecen, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2012), s. 161-167 ISSN 0862-8408 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NS9794 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : hypopituitarism * subdural hematoma * brain injury * growth hormone deficiency Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  4. Leakage of contrast into a postmeningitic subdural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Harwood-Nash, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The CT findings in a 6-month-old boy with hemophilus influenzae meningitis, complicated by the occurrence of bilateral subdural effusions, are described. The effusions were hypodense and the contents markedly enhanced (increase of 40 Hounsfield units) after contrast injection. (orig.)

  5. High expression of BAG3 predicts a poor prognosis in human medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Zhou, Ji; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yutao; Yang, Ge; Zhang, Yundong

    2016-10-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3), a co-chaperone of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 70, regulates various physiological and pathological processes. However, its role in human medulloblastoma has not been clarified. First of all, the expression of BAG3 was examined in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens by immunohistochemical staining. And then, the prognostic role of BAG3 was analyzed in 51 medulloblastoma samples. Finally, the roles of BAG3 in the proliferation, migration, and invasion of Daoy medulloblastoma cell were investigated using a specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The expression of BAG3 in medulloblastoma tissues was higher than nontumorous samples. Furthermore, BAG3 overexpression significantly correlated with poor prognosis of patients with medulloblastoma. The overall survival and tumor-free survival in patients with BAG3 low expression were higher than high expression. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that BAG3 overexpression was an independent prognostic marker for medulloblastoma. After the BAG3 knockdown, the Daoy cells exhibited decreased the ability to proliferate and form neurosphere. The preliminary mechanism study showed that overexpression of BAG3 might facilitate the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by modulating the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and cyclin E expression. Additionally, we found that BAG3 might enhance the medulloblastoma cell migratory and invasive ability. In summary, BAG3 overexpression may regulate the survival and invasive properties of medulloblastoma and may serve as a potential therapy target for medulloblastoma.

  6. EZH2-Regulated DAB2IP Is a Medulloblastoma Tumor Suppressor and a Positive Marker for Survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Michiel; van Rijn, Sjoerd; Hulleman, Esther; Biesmans, Dennis; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Kool, Marcel; Haberler, Christine; Aronica, Eleonora; Vandertop, W. Peter; Noske, David P.; Würdinger, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Despite recent improvements, the molecular mechanisms driving medulloblastoma are not fully understood and further elucidation could provide cues to improve outcome prediction and therapeutic approaches. Experimental

  7. A prospective randomised study to compare the utility and outcomes of subdural and subperiosteal drains for the treatment of chronic subdural haematoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2012-11-01

    The usage of a drain following evacuation of a chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) is known to reduce recurrence. In this study we aim to compare the clinical outcomes and recurrence rate of utilising two different types of drains (subperiosteal and subdural drain) following drainage of a CSDH.

  8. Hematoma subdural crónico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Martínez Rozo

    1981-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron 169 pacientes con diagnóstico de Hematoma Subdural Crónico (H.S.C. admitidos en el Servicio Neurocirugía del Hospital San Juan de Dios desde 1959 a 1980. Los datos clínicos y paraclínicos fueron recopilados en un formato precodificado y luego perforados en tarjetas de computador. Usando el Computador 360/40 disponible en el Centro de Cálculo de la Universidad Nacional y el Computador Intel de el DANE y utilizando el programa SPSS se clasificó, ordenó y depuró.la información. Se analizaron en cuadro y gráficas los resultados que son los siguientes: el 75% de los pacientes hospitalizados por T.C.E. tenían Hematomas Subdurales Crónicos. El mayor número de casos estaba entre 50 y 60 años. La incidencia de H.S.C. era más elevada en el grupo de los hombres. La cefalea ocurrió en el 75% de los casos, el antecedente traumático estaba presente en 83% de casos y la alteración de la conciencia en el 71%. El 90% de los pacientes consultó dentro de los primeros 4 meses. La angiografía continúa siendo el examen de elección con el 100% de positividad. En la T.A.C.la isodensidad en diferentes etapas de evolución del H.S.C. dificulta el diagnóstico. El E.E.G. tiene una positividad del 93% . La frecuencia de H.S.C. bilateral fue de 20%. La anisocoria fue un índice poco confiable para indicar el sitio del Hematoma porque hubo 11 casos de anisocoria por midriasis derecha que tenían el hematoma contralateral. El predominio parietal en la localización del H.S,C. creemos que se deba a su mecanismo de producción. Se analiza la mortalidad que fue en el estudio de 8% , las secuelas aumentaron con la edad de los pacientes. El estudio de seguimiento se hizo en el 40% de los pacientes que sobrevivieron y demostró la baja morbilidad del H.S.C.

  9. Use of Subdural Evacuating Port System Following Open Craniotomy with Excision of Native Dura and Membranes for Management of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cage, Tene; Bach, Ashley; McDermott, Michael W

    2017-04-26

    An 86-year-old woman was admitted to the intensive care unit with a chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and rapid onset of worsening neurological symptoms. She was taken to the operating room for a mini-craniotomy for evacuation of the CSDH including excision of the dura and CSDH membrane. Postoperatively, a subdural evacuation port system (SEPS) was integrated into the craniotomy site and left in place rather than a traditional subdural catheter drain to evacuate the subdural space postoperatively. The patient had a good recovery and improvement of symptoms after evacuation and remained clinically well after the SEPS was removed. We offer the technique of dura and CSDH membrane excision plus SEPS drain as an effective postoperative alternative to the standard craniotomy leaving the native dura intact with traditional subdural drain that overlies the cortical surface of the brain in treating patients with CSDH.

  10. Traumatic acute posterior fossa subdural hematoma – A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal Manish

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic subdural hematomas of the posterior fossa are rare but dangerous neurosurgical emergencies that require prompt diagnosis and management to avoid the uniformly poor outcome. We present a case of a teenager with severe TBI and acute subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa that deteriorated rapidly before surgery but eventually made a good recovery. We also the review the literature concerning traumatic posterior fossa subdural hematomas [PFSDH].

  11. Giant unusual shaped chronic subdural hematoma in a patient with untreated congenital hydrocephalus

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Arvind; Ojha, Bal. K.; Chandra, Anil; Srivastava, Chhitij; Singh, Sunil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Subdural hematoma is a well known complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion for hydrocephalus and usually spreads out over the cerebral convexity, and appears as a crescent shaped lesion on imaging. Chronic subdural hematoma in a case of untreated compensated congenital hydrocephalus has not been reported in English literature. We report the rare case of an adult with congenital hydrocephalus with a huge unusual shaped hemispheric subdural hematoma.

  12. Secondary encephalocele in infant following subdural empyema repaired endoscopically-A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Roshan K; Kaur, Navjot

    2017-09-01

    Subdural empyema (SDE) is an uncommon entity, mostly associated with meningitis and can be life threatening in infants. Rarely, a subdural empyema can lead to nasal encephalocele which can be challenging situation to manage especially in infant. We present a case of 7 month old infant who presented with subdural empyema that led to formation of nasal encaphalocele after 4 months which was managed endoscopic route. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. MEDULLOBLASTOMA IN A GRIZZLY BEAR (URSUS ARCTOS HORRIBLIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jeffrey W; Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Layton, Arthur W; Haldorson, Gary; Tucker, Russell L; Roberts, Gregory

    2015-09-01

    A 3-yr-old female spayed grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) was evaluated for seizure activity along with lethargy, inappetence, dull mentation, and aggressive behavior. Magnetic resonance (MR) examination of the brain revealed a contrast-enhanced right cerebellar mass with multifocal smaller nodules located in the left cerebellum, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebrum with resultant obstructive hydrocephalus. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed mild mononuclear pleocytosis, with differentials including inflammatory versus neoplastic processes. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid were also submitted for polymerase chain reaction and agar gel immunodiffusion to rule out infectious causes of meningitis/encephalitis. While awaiting these results, the bear was placed on steroid and antibiotic therapy. Over the next week, the bear deteriorated; she died 1 wk after MR. A complete postmortem examination, including immunohistochemisty, revealed the cerebellar mass to be a medulloblastoma. This is the only case report, to the authors' knowledge, describing a medulloblastoma in a grizzly bear.

  14. Adult medulloblastoma: review of 13 cases with emphasis on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are generally associated with childhood, but 14-30% occur in adults, accounting for 1% of adult central nervous system tumors. While approximately one third of adult medulloblastomas present as vermian tumors similar to those seen in childhood, the majority differ substantially from the childhood variety. In this series of 13 patients, 5 had lateral, seemingly extra-axial masses in the cerebellopontine angle or at the tentorium, simulating meningiomas or acoustic neuromas, but angiographic hypovascularity in 2 of the latter suggested a diagnosis other than meningioma. Of 4 paramedian tumors, 3 diffusely infiltrated the cerebellar white matter, showed little or no gadolinium enhancement and were not associated with hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus was present in less than half of our patients; in childhood the reported incidence is 85-100 %. A possible association with pregnancy was noted. (orig.)

  15. [Evolution of the management of pediatric and adult medulloblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, C; Entz-Werlé, N; Lutz, P; Spiegel, A; Jannier, S; Helfre, S; Alapetite, C; Coca, A; Kehrli, P; Noël, G

    2015-08-01

    Medulloblastoma are cerebellar tumours belonging to the group of primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNET) and are the most common malignant brain tumours of childhood. These tumours are rare and heterogeneous, requiring some multicentric prospective studies and multidisciplinary care. The classical therapeutic approaches are based on clinical, radiological and surgical data. They involve surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Some histological features were added to characterize risk. More recently, molecular knowledge has allowed to devise risk-adapted strategies and helped to define groups with good outcome and reduce long-term sequelae, improve the prognostic of high-risk medulloblastoma and develop new therapeutic tools. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolving molecular era of childhood medulloblastoma: time to revisit therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatua, Soumen

    2016-01-01

    Currently medulloblastoma is treated with a uniform therapeutic approach based on histopathology and clinico-radiological risk stratification, resulting in unpredictable treatment failure and relapses. Improved understanding of the biological, molecular and genetic make-up of these tumors now clearly identifies it as a compendium of four distinct subtypes (WNT, SHH, group 3 and 4). Advances in utilization of the genomic and epigenomic machinery have now delineated genetic aberrations and epigenetic perturbations in each subgroup as potential druggable targets. This has resulted in endeavors to profile targeted therapy. The challenge and future of medulloblastoma therapeutics will be to keep pace with the evolving novel biological insights and translating them into optimal targeted treatment regimens.

  17. Spinal metastasis of medulloblastoma in adults: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medulloblastoma is a primitive neuro-ectodermal malignant tumor most commonly seen in childhood and rarely and uncommonly in adult age. Treatment consists of surgery followed by radiotherapy. In the case of a relapse there is no overall accepted treatment. Tumor metastasis can be seen along the neural axis, lymph nodes, soft tissues, bones and distant organs. Case Outline. In this paper we present a 45-year-old female patient with a thoraco-spinal extramedullary metastatic medulloblastoma and progressive neurological deterioration seen 11 months after the first operation and description of magnetic resonance and intraoperative finding. Conclusion. Although rare, the presence of metastasis is a poor prognostic factor. The treatment options for patients with metastases are limited and their prognosis continues to remain poor.

  18. Bilateral subdural hematoma secondary to accidental dural puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Ramírez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 25-year-old woman, who received epidural analgesia for labor pain and subsequently presented post-dural puncture headache. Conservative treatment was applied and epidural blood patch was performed. In the absence of clinical improvement and due to changes in the postural component of the headache, a brain imaging test was performed showing a bilateral subdural hematoma.The post-dural puncture headache is relatively common, but the lack of response to established medical treatment as well as the change in its characteristics and the presence of neurological deficit, should raise the suspicion of a subdural hematoma, which although is rare, can be lethal if not diagnosed and treated at the right time. Resumo: Apresentamos o caso clínico de uma paciente de 25 anos de idade, na qual uma técnica peridural foi realizada durante o trabalho de parto e posteriormente apresentou cefaleia com características de cefaleia pós-punção dural. Foi iniciado tratamento conservador e tampão de sangue peridural. Devido a ausência de melhora clínica e à mudança do componente postural da cefaleia, decidiu-se realizar um exame de imagem cerebral que demostrou a presença de hematoma subdural bilateral.A cefaleia pós-punção dural é relativamente frequente, mas a falta de resposta ao tratamento médico instaurado, assim como a mudança em suas características e a presença de foco neurológico, devem levantar a suspeita de presença de um hematoma subdural que, embora infrequente, pode chegar a ser devastador se não for diagnosticado e tratado oportunamente. Keywords: Accidental dural puncture, Epidural analgesia, Post-dural puncture headache, Subdural hematoma, Epidural blood patch, Palavras chave: Dura-Máter, Analgesia epidural, Cefaleia pós-punção dural, Hematoma subdural, Placa de sangue epidural

  19. Signaling pathway deregulation and molecular alterations across pediatric medulloblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhermitte, B; Blandin, A F; Coca, A; Guerin, E; Durand, A; Entz-Werlé, N

    2018-05-15

    Medulloblastomas (MBs) account for 15% of brain tumors in children under the age of 15. To date, the overall 5-year survival rate for all children is only around 60%. Recent advances in cancer genomics have led to a fundamental change in medulloblastoma classification and is evolving along with the genomic discoveries, allowing to regularly reclassify this disease. The previous molecular classification defined 4 groups (WNT-activated MB, SHH-activated MB and the groups 3 and 4 characterized partially by NMYC and MYC driven MBs). This stratification moved forward recently to better define these groups and their correlation to outcome. This new stratification into 7 novel subgroups was helpful to lay foundations and complementary data on the understanding regarding molecular pathways and gene mutations underlying medulloblastoma biology. This review was aimed at answering the recent key questions on MB genomics and go further in the relevance of those genes in MB development as well as in their targeted therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Aberrant signaling pathways in medulloblastomas: a stem cell connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Oliveira Rodini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant primary tumor of the central nervous system. It represents the most frequent type of solid tumor and the leading cause of death related to cancer in early childhood. Current treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy which may lead to severe cognitive impairment and secondary brain tumors. New perspectives for therapeutic development have emerged with the identification of stem-like cells displaying high tumorigenic potential and increased radio- and chemo-resistance in gliomas. Under the cancer stem cell hypothesis, transformation of neural stem cells and/or granular neuron progenitors of the cerebellum are though to be involved in medulloblastoma development. Dissecting the genetic and molecular alterations associated with this process should significantly impact both basic and applied cancer research. Based on cumulative evidences in the fields of genetics and molecular biology of medulloblastomas, we discuss the possible involvement of developmental signaling pathways as critical biochemical switches determining normal neurogenesis or tumorigenesis. From the clinical viewpoint, modulation of signaling pathways such as TGFβ, regulating neural stem cell proliferation and tumor development, might be attempted as an alternative strategy for future drug development aiming at more efficient therapies and improved clinical outcome of patients with pediatric brain cancers.

  1. PTEN and DMBT1 homozygous deletion and expression in medulloblastomas and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, María Mar; Mercapide, Javier; Muñoz, Jorge; Coullin, Philippe; Danglot, Giséle; Tuñon, Teresa; Martínez-Peñuela, José María; Rivera, José María; Burgos, Juan J; Bernheim, Alain; Castresana, Javier S

    2004-12-01

    Medulloblastoma, which accounts for 20-25% of all childhood brain tumors, is defined as a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) located in the cerebellum. Supratentorial PNET are less frequent than medulloblastoma. But their clinical outcome is worse than in medulloblastomas. Chromosome 10q contains at least 2 tumor suppressor genes that might play a role in brain tumor development: PTEN and DMBT1. The aim of this study was to compare the status of homozygous deletion and expression of PTEN and DMBT1 genes in PNET primary tumor samples and cell lines. Homozygous deletions of PTEN and DMBT1 were studied in 32 paraffin-embedded PNET samples (23 medulloblastomas and 9 supratentorial PNET) and in 7 PNET cell lines, by differential PCR and by FISH. PTEN homozygous losses were demonstrated in 7 medulloblastomas (32%) and in no supratentorial PNET, while homozygous deletions of DMBT1 appeared in 1 supratentorial PNET (20%) and in 7 medulloblastomas (33%). No homozygous deletion of PTEN or DMBT1 was detected in any of the PNET cell lines either by differential PCR or by FISH. Expression study of the 2 genes was performed in the 7 PNET cell lines by RT-PCR. One PNET cell line lacked PTEN and DMBT1 expression, while 2 medulloblastoma cell lines did not express DMBT1. Our results add some positive data to the hypothesis that supratentorial PNETs and medulloblastomas might be genetically different.

  2. Bmi1 is required for hedgehog pathway-driven medulloblastoma expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michael, Lowell Evan; Westerman, Bart A.; Ermilov, Alexandre N.; Wang, Aiqin; Ferris, Jennifer; Liu, Jianhong; Blom, Marleen; Ellison, David W.; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Dlugosz, Andrzej A.

    2008-01-01

    Inappropriate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling underlies development of a subset of medulloblastomas, and tumors with elevated HH signaling activity express the stem cell self-renewal gene BMI1. To test whether Bmi1 is required for Hh-driven medulloblastoma development, we varied Bmi1 gene dosage in

  3. Abnormal diffusion-weighted MRI in medulloblastoma: does it reflect small cell histology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsenas, A.L.; Roth, T.C.; Manness, W.K.; Faerber, E.N.

    1999-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with the classic CT and MRI findings of medulloblastoma and the unusual finding of increased signal on diffusion MRI. The small-cell histology of medulloblastoma may account for the increased signal seen on diffusion MRI. Diffusion MRI with echoplanar technique may be useful in evaluation of these tumors and metastatic disease. (orig.)

  4. Genetic and Epigenetic Inactivation of Kruppel-like Factor 4 in Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Nakahara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although medulloblastoma is the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor, its molecular underpinnings are largely unknown. We have identified rare, recurrent homozygous deletions of Kruppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4 in medulloblastoma using high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, digital karyotyping, and genomic real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Furthermore, we show that there is loss of physiological KLF4 expression in more than 40% of primary medulloblastomas both at the RNA and protein levels. Medulloblastoma cell lines drastically increase the expression of KLF4 in response to the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine and demonstrate dense methylation of the promoter CpG island by bisulfite sequencing. Methylation-specific PCR targeting the KLF4 promoter demonstrates CpG methylation in approximately 16% of primary medulloblastomas. Reexpression of KLF4 in the D283 medulloblastoma cell line results in significant growth suppression both in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that KLF4 is inactivated by either genetic or epigenetic mechanisms in a large subset of medulloblastomas and that it likely functions as a tumor suppressor gene in the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma.

  5. Hippocampal sparing radiotherapy for pediatric medulloblastoma: impact of treatment margins and treatment technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, N. Patrik; af Rosenschold, Per Munck; Blomstrand, Malin

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundWe investigated how varying the treatment margin and applying hippocampal sparing and proton therapy impact the risk of neurocognitive impairment in pediatric medulloblastoma patients compared with current standard 3D conformal radiotherapy.MethodsWe included 17 pediatric medulloblastoma...

  6. Migration of an Intracranial Subdural Hematoma to the Spinal Subdural Space: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O Ik; Son, Dong Wuk; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Lee, Sang Weon; Song, Geun Sung

    2015-09-01

    A 57-year-old man complained of severe lower back pain and radicular pain in both legs for 1 week after falling from a ladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine showed a subdural hematoma (SDH), which was surgically removed. The patient had no back pain or the radicular leg pain at 2 weeks post-surgery. However, he complained of diffuse headaches upon follow-up. Brain computed tomography (CT) and MRI revealed an intracranial SDH, which was immediately removed by surgery. During his 1-year follow-up, he reported that the pain had resolved without recurrence. Simultaneous spinal and intracranial SDH are rare and no standard treatment exists for this condition. This case suggests that it is possible that an intracranial SDH can migrate into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space through an arachnoid tear. CSF circulation allows the intracranial SDH to enter subarachnoid spaces encasing the spinal cord. In order to prevent irreversible damage, surgical intervention should be considered for case of spinal SDH with progressive neurological deficits.

  7. Intracranial hypotension - a look beyond “bilateral subdural hematomas”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, B.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The intracranial hypotension (ICH) is a disorder due to spontaneous or iatrogenic CSF leak and a low intracranial pressure. The clinical presentation is characterized by drug resistant orthostatic headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, neck pain and etc. The intracranial hypotension is defined as a benign disorder and the treatment is predominantly conservative. Due to this fact it is very important to differentiate this entity from subdural hematomas and hygromas which are treated surgically. Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the diagnosis of ICH. Nowadays there are a lot of clinical and imaging features of this disorder. Regardless of clinical varieties and atypical forms, MRI gives enough information for the correct or probable diagnosis in the vast majority of the cases. The initial imaging resemblance with posttraumatic subdural hematomas and hygromas can result in giving the wrong diagnosis and therefore performing unneeded surgical interventions. the aim of this presentation is to discuss the contemporary criteria, algorithm and imaging features of ICH

  8. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  9. MR imaging evaluation of subdural hematomas in child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, T.C.; Rumack, C.M.; Horgan, J.G.; Hyden, P.; Krugman, R.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging is the most accurate modality for determining the presence, number, and aging of subdural hematomas. Based on seven patients studied with CT and MR imaging, MR imaging should be the gold standard in child abuse evaluations. Since the history of child abuse is often ambiguous, MR imaging can assist in dating when the injury occurred. MR imaging in two perpendicular planes is needed, with one plane having both T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Chronic subdural hematomas on CT often have the same density as cerebrospinal fluid and may be misdiagnosed as atrophy or unrecognized. Therefore, the child may be returned into a dangerous situation and subjected to recurrent episodes of battering

  10. Frontal recurrence of medulloblastoma five years after excision and craniospinal irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roka Y

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastomas were originally classified under gliomas of the cerebellum until Bailey and Cushing in 1925 named these tumors as medulloblastoma. At present these tumors are classified under primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Surgical excision followed by craniospinal irradiation is the treatment of choice. A 13-year-old-girl operated for posterior fossa medulloblastoma 5 years ago presented with history of headache and vomiting on and off for 4 days in late August 2008. The MRI showed left frontal tumor which on excision was reported as medulloblastoma. Even after optimal treatment reports of recurrence abound in literature. The most common location is in the posterior fossa, followed by spinal, supratentorial, and uncommonly, systemic metastases. We conclude that medulloblastomas are highly aggressive tumor with high local recurrences if the initial excision is incomplete and that recurrence in the supratentorial area although uncommon is still a possibility. This mandates regular follow up of these children till adulthood to catch early recurrences and metastatic disease.

  11. Clinico-pathological studies of CSF dissemination of glioblastoma and medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kyozo; Yoshida, Jun; Kageyama, Naoki

    1986-01-01

    Clinico-pathological findings of CSF dissemination which was diagnosed on CT scan, were studied on 13 cases of glioblastoma and 9 cases of medulloblastoma. The type of CSF dissemination and the prognosis of patients were both different between glioblastoma and medulloblastoma. In the former, the dissemination was predominantly in ventricular walls and in the latter, in basal cisterns. The mean survival time after the diagnosis of dissemination is 6 months of glioblastoma as compared with 13 months of medulloblastoma. The Pathological studies show that subependymal and/or subpial infiltration of tumor cells, and thickness of arachnoid membrane by marked mesodermal reaction were demonstrated in cases of glioblastoma. On the contrary, tumor cells of medulloblastoma grow markedly in the subarachnoid space and/or on the ependymal layers. From these pathological findings of CSF dissemination, it will be resulted that the prognosis of glioblastoma is much more poor that of medulloblastoma. (author)

  12. Analysis of chronic subdural hematoma based on CT, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Mikami, Junichi; Ueda, Mikiya; Ito, Kazunori; Sato, Hiroyuki

    1984-01-01

    Forty-nine cases of chronic subdural hematoma experienced during the past 5 years were analyzed as to the number of days elapsed following head injury, symptoms, and computerized tomography (CT) findings. As a result, the clinical course of chronic subdural hematoma was devided into the following 5 stages on the basis of the presumed pathologic processes. The initial stage corresponded to a period of about 2 weeks after the precipitating injury; symptoms were absent; plain CT showed low-density areas (LDA); and metrizamide CT revealed metrizamide penetration into the LDA. The premature stage corresponded to a period of 2-4 weeks after trauma; no symptoms were present; plain CT showed LDA; and metrizamide CT revealed that metrizamide penetrated into the LDA with difficulty. The mature stage corresponded to a period of 30-60 days after trauma; CT showed iso-density areas (IDA) or high-density areas (HDA) with occasional enhancement effect; metrizamide penetration was not detected; and symptoms such as headache may have been present. The progressive stage typified chronic subdural hematoma; headache and focal symptoms were present; plain CT showed relative LDA, IDA, HDA or mixed-density areas (MDA); and enhancement of the contents of hematoma was observed in roughly half of the cases. The resolving stage was the stage in which hematoma had disappeared; plain CT showed relative LDA or LDA without mass sign; and metrizamide penetration was not detected. This clinical staging was useful in evaluating the pathologic picture of the chronic subdural hematoma and in determining suitable treatment. (author)

  13. Follow up study and interested cases in subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Mitsumasa; Goh, Jyunto; Koomura, Eiji; Nakao, Kazutami

    1983-01-01

    1. Out of 67 patients ranging from 16 to 82 years old, 20 were followed up by CT scan after operation. 2. Five patients presented hematoma on the both sides after operation, though they had suffered from the lesion of one side before operation. In four patients, hematoma was observed on the both sides before and after operation. Neither preoperative involved side changed nor hematoma appeared on the opposite side after operation in 11 patients. Follow-up examinations lasted up almost three months. 3. The maximum width of the subdural space was divided by the maximum intracranial width. These two factors were measured on horizontal CT scan. The calculated value was expressed in percentage and then, the result was regarded as Subdural Space (SDS) Index. Dividing a difference between the largest SDS Index (before operation) and the smallest by the number of days between the two points gave us a reduction rate of SDS Index. As a result, a reduction rate of 0.4 or less was obtained in all the patients less than 65 years old. There were three patients within the range from 0.7 to 1.0 of the rate. 76-year-old patients showed 2.6 and 5.7. Except the 76-old patients, mean duration of 35.5 days was calculated in Group I and SDS Index was 0, while Group II showed mean duration of 52.4 days, resulting in SDS Index of 0. 4. Specific progresses are shown below: 1) Hemorrhage of the caudate nucleus after operation 2) Subdural effusion of the both sides 3) Appearance of abscess 4) Subtentrial hemorrhage after operation 5) Postoperative epidural hematoma 6) Traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage, resulting in chronic subdural hematoma six months afterward (author)

  14. Subdural Hematoma in Grave’s Disease Induced Thrombocytopenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, S; Diwan, S; Chandek, S; Nitey, PO; Kakani, A

    2013-01-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) usually occurs secondary to trauma, in bleeding disorders it may occur spontaneously. It is a rare complication of immune thrombocytopenia. Here we report a case of 45 years female presenting with presenting with complaints of headache, palpitation and menorrhagia and later diagnosed to be a case of Grave's disease with thrombocytopenia with sub dural hematoma. No such case reports are available in literature.

  15. Subdural Hematoma in Grave’s Disease Induced Thrombocytopenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SDH usually occurs secondary to trauma, in bleeding disorders it may occur spontaneously. It is a rare complication of immune thrombocytopenia. Here we report a case of 45 years female presenting with presenting with complaints of headache, palpitation and menorrhagia and later diagnosed to be a case of Grave's disease with thrombocytopenia with sub dural hematoma. No such case reports are available in literature.

  16. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  17. Anticonvulsants for preventing seizures in patients with chronic subdural haematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratilal, Bernardo O; Pappamikail, Lia; Costa, João; Sampaio, Cristina

    2013-06-06

    Anticonvulsant therapy is sometimes used prophylactically in patients with chronic subdural haematoma, although the benefit is unclear. To assess the effects of prophylactic anticonvulsants in patients with chronic subdural haematoma, in both the pre- and post-operative periods. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), PubMed, LILACS, and the databases clinicaltrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and Current Controlled Trials. The search was through 27th March 2013. Randomised controlled trials comparing any anticonvulsant versus placebo or no intervention. Three authors screened the search results to identify relevant studies. No studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. No randomised controlled trials were identified. No formal recommendations can be made about the use of prophylactic anticonvulsants in patients with chronic subdural haematoma based on the literature currently available. There are no randomised controlled trials on this topic, and non-controlled studies have conflicting results. There is an urgent need for well-designed randomised controlled trials.

  18. Subdural Hemorrhage after Scoliosis and Detethering of Cord Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Bhimani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intracranial hypotension may occur when CSF leaks from the subarachnoid space. Formation of intracranial, subdural, and subarachnoid hemorrhage has been observed after significant CSF leak as seen in lumbar puncture or ventricular shunt placement. However, very few cases, referring to these remote complications following spine surgery, have been described in literature. We present a case of a 10-year-old male child operated for idiopathic scoliosis with low-lying conus medullaris who postoperatively developed subdural hemorrhage. Case Report. A case of a 10-year-old male operated for idiopathic scoliosis with low-lying conus medullaris is presented. To correct this, detethering was done at the L3 level, laminectomy was done from L2 to L3 with pedicular screw fixation from T3 to L2, and bone grafting with right costoplasty was done from the 3rd to the 6th ribs. On the 5th day postoperatively, the patient developed convulsions and drowsiness and recovered subsequently by postoperative day 7. Conclusion. We report a rare case of an acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage caused by intracranial hypotension following scoliosis and detethering of cord surgery. This report highlights the potential morbidity associated with CSF leak occurring after this surgery.

  19. A novel role of HLA class I in the pathology of medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rood Brian R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC class I expression by cancer cells enables specific antigen recognition by the immune system and protection of the host. However, in some cancer types MHC class I expression is associated with an unfavorable outcome. We explored the basis of MHC class I association with unfavorable prognostic marker expression in the case of medulloblastoma. Methods We investigated expression of four essential components of MHC class I (heavy chain, β2m, TAP1 and TAP2 in 10 medulloblastoma mRNA samples, a tissue microarray containing 139 medulloblastoma tissues and 3 medulloblastoma cell lines. Further, in medulloblastoma cell lines we evaluated the effects of HLA class I engagement on activation of ERK1/2 and migration in vitro. Results The majority of specimens displayed undetectable or low levels of the heavy chains. Medulloblastomas expressing high levels of HLA class I displayed significantly higher levels of anaplasia and c-myc expression, markers of poor prognosis. Binding of β2m or a specific antibody to open forms of HLA class I promoted phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in medulloblastoma cell line with high levels, but not in the cell line with low levels of HLA heavy chain. This treatment also promoted ERK1/2 activation dependent migration of medulloblastoma cells. Conclusion MHC class I expression in medulloblastoma is associated with anaplasia and c-myc expression, markers of poor prognosis. Peptide- and/or β2m-free forms of MHC class I may contribute to a more malignant phenotype of medulloblastoma by modulating activation of signaling molecules such as ERK1/2 that stimulates cell mobility.

  20. A novel role of HLA class I in the pathology of medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Courtney; Santi, Mariarita; Rajan, Bhargavi; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Choi, Mi Rim; Rood, Brian R; Cornelison, Robert; MacDonald, Tobey J; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2009-07-12

    MHC class I expression by cancer cells enables specific antigen recognition by the immune system and protection of the host. However, in some cancer types MHC class I expression is associated with an unfavorable outcome. We explored the basis of MHC class I association with unfavorable prognostic marker expression in the case of medulloblastoma. We investigated expression of four essential components of MHC class I (heavy chain, beta2m, TAP1 and TAP2) in 10 medulloblastoma mRNA samples, a tissue microarray containing 139 medulloblastoma tissues and 3 medulloblastoma cell lines. Further, in medulloblastoma cell lines we evaluated the effects of HLA class I engagement on activation of ERK1/2 and migration in vitro. The majority of specimens displayed undetectable or low levels of the heavy chains. Medulloblastomas expressing high levels of HLA class I displayed significantly higher levels of anaplasia and c-myc expression, markers of poor prognosis. Binding of beta2m or a specific antibody to open forms of HLA class I promoted phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in medulloblastoma cell line with high levels, but not in the cell line with low levels of HLA heavy chain. This treatment also promoted ERK1/2 activation dependent migration of medulloblastoma cells. MHC class I expression in medulloblastoma is associated with anaplasia and c-myc expression, markers of poor prognosis. Peptide- and/or beta2m-free forms of MHC class I may contribute to a more malignant phenotype of medulloblastoma by modulating activation of signaling molecules such as ERK1/2 that stimulates cell mobility.

  1. Imaging Biomarkers for Adult Medulloblastomas: Genetic Entities May Be Identified by Their MR Imaging Radiophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, V C; Warmuth-Metz, M; Reh, C; Enkirch, S J; Reinert, C; Beier, D; Jones, D T W; Pietsch, T; Schild, H H; Hattingen, E; Hau, P

    2017-10-01

    The occurrence of medulloblastomas in adults is rare; nevertheless, these tumors can be subdivided into genetic and histologic entities each having distinct prognoses. This study aimed to identify MR imaging biomarkers to classify these entities and to uncover differences in MR imaging biomarkers identified in pediatric medulloblastomas. Eligible preoperative MRIs from 28 patients (11 women; 22-53 years of age) of the Multicenter Pilot-study for the Therapy of Medulloblastoma of Adults (NOA-7) cohort were assessed by 3 experienced neuroradiologists. Lesions and perifocal edema were volumetrized and multiparametrically evaluated for classic morphologic characteristics, location, hydrocephalus, and Chang criteria. To identify MR imaging biomarkers, we correlated genetic entities sonic hedgehog ( SHH ) TP53 wild type, wingless ( WNT ), and non -WNT/ non -SHH medulloblastomas (in adults, Group 4), and histologic entities were correlated with the imaging criteria. These MR imaging biomarkers were compared with corresponding data from a pediatric study. There were 19 SHH TP53 wild type (69%), 4 WNT -activated (14%), and 5 Group 4 (17%) medulloblastomas. Six potential MR imaging biomarkers were identified, 3 of which, hydrocephalus ( P = .03), intraventricular macrometastases ( P = .02), and hemorrhage ( P = .04), when combined, could identify WNT medulloblastoma with 100% sensitivity and 88.3% specificity (95% CI, 39.8%-100.0% and 62.6%-95.3%). WNT -activated nuclear β-catenin accumulating medulloblastomas were smaller than the other entities (95% CI, 5.2-22.3 cm 3 versus 35.1-47.6 cm 3 ; P = .03). Hemorrhage was exclusively present in non -WNT/ non -SHH medulloblastomas ( P = .04; n = 2/5). MR imaging biomarkers were all discordant from those identified in the pediatric cohort. Desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastomas were more rarely in contact with the fourth ventricle (4/15 versus 7/13; P = .04). MR imaging biomarkers can help distinguish histologic and genetic

  2. CT findings of subdural fluid collections and the histology of the organized neomembrane, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taichiro; Nitta, Masahiro; Fukuoka, Hidekazu; Umemura, Satoshi; Nagai, Hajime

    1981-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that, among cases of subdural fluid collection with a low CT density with several weeks after injury, some of the cases developed a chronic subdural hematoma at the same location several months later. On its pathogenesis, it is assumed that the isolated fluid collection between the dura and arachnoid forms a neomembrane and then develops a chronic subdural hematoma. Based upon our 4 cases of subdural fluid collection, we pointed out that the following conditions of subdural low-density lesions are difficult to differentiate from subdural hydroma at the early stage of injury: (1) The existence of a very old chronic subdural hematoma that might have been formed before the recent injury. (2) The occurrence of a minor hemorrhage into the subdural-fluid collection at the time of injury, which is indistinguishable on the CT scan. Therefore, the present authors considered it necessary to investigate the histology of the hematoma membrane in order to make clear the formation process of neomembrane and to compare the relation between the aging of neomembrane and the time interval of injury and CT examination. We consider the histological study very useful to reveal the pathogenesis of a chronic subdural hematoma, for it will make clear the following points: (1) Whether the neomembrane had already been formed prior to the recent head injury, (2) Whether the neomembrane was formed newly due to minor hemorrhage into the subdural fluid collection, and (3) Whether the formation of the neomembrane is possible simply from subdural-fluid collection isolated from the CSF pathway. (author)

  3. Tratamiento médico de un hematoma subdural crónico Medical treatment of a chronic subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Guevara Melcón

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una paciente portadora de un hematoma subdural crónico postraumático, que se trató médicamente y se logró su desaparición en el curso de varios meses, sin tratamiento quirúrgico y sin signos evolutivos de empeoramiento neurológico. La furosemida fue usada como medicamento básico en su tratamiento. Se adjuntan imágenes que confirman el valor de este punto de vista terapéutico.This is the case of a patient carrier of a post-traumatic chronic subdural hematoma clinically treated achieving its disappearance over some months without surgical treatment and evolutionary signs of neurologic worsening. The furosemide was used as basic drug in its treatment. The images confirming the value of this point of therapeutical view are enclosed.

  4. Initial hematoma pressure and clinical recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma in cases where percutaneous subdural tapping was performed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Akitake; Kawamoto, Yukihiko; Yoshioka, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Taro; Yonezawa, Koki

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous subdural tapping for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) can measure initial hematoma pressure, which cannot be measured using burr-hole craniotomy. Initial hematoma pressure has not been discussed as a risk factor for recurrence. We evaluated the clinical features for recurrence, which included initial hematoma pressure. The study involved 71 unilateral CSDH cases whose initial hematoma pressure was measured using percutaneous subdural tapping. Clinical recurrence was identified in 19 cases (23%). Age, sex, neurological grading, alcohol consumption, presence of head injury, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, antiplatelet, anticoagulant medication, hematoma volume on computed tomography (CT) images, and initial hematoma pressure were compared between non-recurrence and recurrence groups. The initial hematoma pressure was 12.6±4.5 cmH 2 O in the non-recurrence group, and 15.5±6.2 cmH 2 O in the recurrence group (p<0.05). The other factors did not differ significantly except hematoma volume on CT images (92±45 ml in the non-recurrence group and 123±43 ml in the recurrence group, p<0.05). Cases with high initial hematoma pressure should be closely observed. (author)

  5. Process of evolution to chronic subdural hematoma, (1); A study with MRI and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ryungchan; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Yokoyama, Masato; Sasaki, Takashi (Kanazawa Medical Univ. Uchinada (Japan)); Mun, Jhongbu; Ohi, Masayoshi

    1989-10-01

    The process of evolution to chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) was discussed on the basis of MRI and CT findings. The materials were 22 sides of 15 cases in which CSH had been diagnosed by means of MRI, CT, and/or surgery. These cases were followed by CT with/without MRI after the initial head injury. Various findings were shown in the subdural space, such as subdural hygroma (40%), acute subdural hematoma (25%), normal state (20%), and traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (15%). Regardless of the conditions of the subdural space after the head injury, however, CSH was finally present in all cases after the formation of subdural hygroma and its enlargement. The duration of the formation of hygroma after head injury ranged from 0 to 12 days (mean: 2.7 days), and its final confirmation ranged from 11 to 61 days (mean: 33.4 days). The period from the final confirmation of hygroma to the first recognition of CSH was between 8 and 36 days (mean: 17.7 days), while the period from head injury to the formation of CSH was between 27 and 75 days (mean: 51.1 days). The process of evolution to CSH may be thought to be as follows: A normal subdural space changes into a subdural hygroma by the tearing of the arachnoid membrane due to head injury. Capsule formation follows the process lasting for more than three weeks. CSH develops in consequence of bleeding from the outer membrane. (author).

  6. Primary Intracranial Sarcoma Presenting as Chronic Subdural Fluid Collections in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Chad A; Fung, Kar-Ming; Tullos, Hurtis J; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y; Gunda, Divya; Mapstone, Timothy B

    2016-02-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma in the pediatric population often results from trauma. Asymptomatic and benign-appearing subdural collections are generally managed conservatively without operative intervention. Primary intracranial sarcomas are uncommon entities. Diagnosis of sarcoma can be difficult because these lesions often manifest as apparent hematoma. Presented is the case of a primary intracranial mucoid spindle cell sarcoma that arose in a child with a history of benign-appearing bilateral subdural fluid collections in the setting of nonaccidental trauma. The patient was initially managed conservatively because her neurological examination result was normal and her subdural collections decreased in size on repeated imaging. The collections did not resolve completely. Years later, she exhibited weakness, seizure, and an increase in the size of her subdural fluid collection. Subdural drainage was attempted without significant effect. Cytologic assessment of fluid was negative for malignant cells. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple enhancing masses along the subdural collection. The patient eventually underwent craniotomy in which a diagnosis of sarcoma was obtained. Pathological and radiographic findings as well as oncological management are reviewed. The authors also review the natural history and treatment of primary intracranial sarcoma in the pediatric population. Early contrasted magnetic resonance imaging should be obtained in patients with subdural fluid collections that appear asymmetric or do not resolve in the expected time course, despite having a normal neurologic examination result. Negative cytologic assessment does not exclude sarcoma diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A case of loss of consciousness with contralateral acute subdural haematoma during awake craniotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Ozaki, Makoto; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting the case of a 56-year-old woman who developed loss of consciousness during awake craniotomy. A thin subdural haematoma in the contralateral side of the craniotomy was identified with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and subsequently removed. Our case indicates that contralateral acute subdural haematoma could be a cause of deterioration of the conscious level during awake craniotomy.

  8. A case of loss of consciousness with contralateral acute subdural haematoma during awake craniotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Ozaki, Makoto; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting the case of a 56-year-old woman who developed loss of consciousness during awake craniotomy. A thin subdural haematoma in the contralateral side of the craniotomy was identified with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and subsequently removed. Our case indicates that contralateral acute subdural haematoma could be a cause of deterioration of the conscious level during awake craniotomy. PMID:25301378

  9. Subdural haematoma complicating shunting for normal pressure hydrocephalus in the setting of concomitant antiplatelet medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Lauritsen, Jens; Poulsen, Frantz Rom

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the occurrence and management of subdural haematoma after shunt implantation for normal pressure hydrocephalus and to determine the risk of recurrence in the setting of antiplatelet medication. METHODS: From a consecutive series of 80 patients implanted with a cerebrospinal...... fluid shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus, records from 11 patients taking antiplatelet drugs, who subsequently had surgery for subdural haematoma were extracted and retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Patients were followed up for a mean of 1819 days after shunt implantation. Subdural haematomas...... reoperations done before the subdural collection disappeared. Only one patient had a late recurrence almost 11 years after shunt implantation. CONCLUSIONS: Subdural haematoma in the setting of a ventriculoperitoneal implantation for normal pressure hydrocephalus and concomitant antiplatelet medication can...

  10. Oxamate, but Not Selective Targeting of LDH-A, Inhibits Medulloblastoma Cell Glycolysis, Growth and Motility

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    Cara J. Valvona

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant paediatric brain tumour and current therapies often leave patients with severe neurological disabilities. Four major molecular groups of medulloblastoma have been identified (Wnt, Shh, Group 3 and Group 4, which include additional, recently defined subgroups with different prognosis and genetic characteristics. Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA is a key enzyme in the aerobic glycolysis pathway, an abnormal metabolic pathway commonly observed in cancers, associated with tumour progression and metastasis. Studies indicate MBs have a glycolytic phenotype; however, LDHA has not yet been explored as a therapeutic target for medulloblastoma. LDHA expression was examined in medulloblastoma subgroups and cell lines. The effects of LDHA inhibition by oxamate or LDHA siRNA on medulloblastoma cell line metabolism, migration and proliferation were examined. LDHA was significantly overexpressed in Group 3 and Wnt MBs compared to non-neoplastic cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that oxamate significantly attenuated glycolysis, proliferation and motility in medulloblastoma cell lines, but LDHA siRNA did not. We established that aerobic glycolysis is a potential therapeutic target for medulloblastoma, but broader LDH inhibition (LDHA, B, and C may be more appropriate than LDHA inhibition alone.

  11. Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, Charles G; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Daniel, Richard W; Khaki, Leila; Shah, Keerti V; Gravitt, Patti E

    2005-01-01

    p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT), and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3) was readily detected. Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein

  12. Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Keerti V

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. Methods p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT, and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3 was readily detected. Conclusion Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein.

  13. Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Charles G; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Daniel, Richard W; Khaki, Leila; Shah, Keerti V; Gravitt, Patti E

    2005-01-01

    Background p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. Methods p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT), and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3) was readily detected. Conclusion Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein. PMID:15717928

  14. Complete and sustained response of adult medulloblastoma to first-line sonic hedgehog inhibition with vismodegib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Emil; Schomaker, Matthew; Wilson, Jon D; Ahrens, Mary; Dolan, Michelle; Nelson, Andrew C

    2016-08-12

    Medulloblastoma is an aggressive primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the cerebellum that is rare in adults. Medulloblastomas fall into 4 prognostically significant molecular subgroups that are best defined by experimental gene expression profiles: the WNT pathway, sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway, and subgroups 3 and 4 (non-SHH/WNT). Medulloblastoma of adults belong primarily to the SHH category. Vismodegib, an SHH-pathway inhibitor FDA-approved in 2012 for treatment of basal cell carcinoma, has been used successfully in the setting of chemorefractory medulloblastoma, but not as a first-line therapy. In this report, we describe a sustained response of an unresectable multifocal form of adult medulloblastoma to vismodegib. Molecular analysis in this case revealed mutations in TP53 and a cytogenetic abnormality, i17q, that is prevalent and most often associated with subgroup 4 rather than the SHH-activated form of medulloblastoma. Our findings indicate that vismodegib may also block alternate, non-canonical forms of downstream SHH pathway activation. These findings provide strong impetus for further investigation of vismodegib in clinical trials in the first-line setting for pediatric and adult forms of medulloblastoma.

  15. Transitioning from genotypes to epigenotypes: why the time has come for medulloblastoma epigenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batora, N V; Sturm, D; Jones, D T W; Kool, M; Pfister, S M; Northcott, P A

    2014-04-04

    Recent advances in genomic technologies have allowed for tremendous progress in our understanding of the biology underlying medulloblastoma, a malignant childhood brain tumor. Consensus molecular subgroups have been put forth by the pediatric neuro-oncology community and next-generation genomic studies have led to an improved description of driver genes and pathways somatically altered in these subgroups. In contrast to the impressive pace at which advances have been made at the level of the medulloblastoma genome, comparable studies of the epigenome have lagged behind. Complementary data yielded from genomic sequencing and copy number profiling have verified frequent targeting of chromatin modifiers in medulloblastoma, highly suggestive of prominent epigenetic deregulation in the disease. Past studies of DNA methylation-dependent gene silencing and microRNA expression analyses further support the concept of medulloblastoma as an epigenetic disease. In this Review, we aim to summarize the key findings of past reports pertaining to medulloblastoma epigenetics as well as recent and ongoing genomic efforts linking somatic alterations of the genome with inferred deregulation of the epigenome. In addition, we predict what is on the horizon for medulloblastoma epigenetics and how aberrant changes in the medulloblastoma epigenome might serve as an attractive target for future therapies. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Preceded by High-Impact Trauma: Does the Intensity of Trauma Influence the Pathogenesis of Traumatic Chronic Subdural Hematoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Su; Lee, Chang-Heon; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the intensity of trauma influences the pathogenesis of traumatic chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Thirty-one patients treated surgically for traumatic CSDH were divided into high-impact and lowimpact groups according to the intensity of trauma. They were respectively evaluated with respect to clinical and radiological findings at presentation, and the subdural concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor, and beta-trace protein (ΒTP) [a highly specific protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)] related to the pathogenesis of CSDH. If ΒTP (subdural fluid/serum) was > 2, an admixture of CSF to the subdural fluid was indicated. The ΒTP (subdural fluid/serum) was > 2 in all patients with a traumatic CSDH. The mean concentration of subdural ΒTP in the high-impact group was higher than in the low-impact group (6.1 mg/L versus 3.9 mg/L), and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.02). In addition, mean concentrations of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF were higher in the high-impact group, as compared to the low-impact group, though the differences did not reach statistical significance. Trauma may be related to CSF leakage into the subdural space in CSDH, and the intensity of trauma may influence the amount of CSF leakage. Although there is no direct correlation between the amount of CSF leakage and other subdural molecules, the intensity of trauma may be associated with larger concentrations of molecules in traumatic CSDH.

  17. CTNNB1, AXIN1 and APC expression analysis of different medulloblastoma variants

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    Roseli da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We investigated four components of the Wnt signaling pathway in medulloblastomas. Medulloblastoma is the most common type of malignant pediatric brain tumor, and the Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be activated in this type of tumor. METHODS: Sixty-one medulloblastoma cases were analyzed for β-catenin gene (CTNNB1 mutations, β-catenin protein expression via immunostaining and Wnt signaling pathway-related gene expression. All data were correlated with histological subtypes and patient clinical information. RESULTS: CTNNB1 sequencing analysis revealed that 11 out of 61 medulloblastomas harbored missense mutations in residues 32, 33, 34 and 37, which are located in exon 3. These mutations alter the glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation sites, which participate in β-catenin degradation. No significant differences were observed between mutation status and histological medulloblastoma type, patient age and overall or progression-free survival times. Nuclear β-catenin accumulation, which was observed in 27.9% of the cases, was not associated with the histological type, CTNNB1 mutation status or tumor cell dissemination. The relative expression levels of genes that code for proteins involved in the Wnt signaling pathway (CTNNB1, APC, AXIN1 and WNT1 were also analyzed, but no significant correlations were found. In addition, large-cell variant medulloblastomas presented lower relative CTNNB1 expression as compared to the other tumor variants. CONCLUSIONS: A small subset of medulloblastomas carry CTNNB1 mutations with consequent nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. The Wnt signaling pathway plays a role in classic, desmoplastic and extensive nodularity medulloblastoma variants but not in large-cell medulloblastomas.

  18. Musashi1 modulates cell proliferation genes in the medulloblastoma cell line Daoy

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    Hung Jaclyn Y

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musashi1 (Msi1 is an RNA binding protein with a central role during nervous system development and stem cell maintenance. High levels of Msi1 have been reported in several malignancies including brain tumors thereby associating Msi1 and cancer. Methods We used the human medulloblastoma cell line Daoy as model system in this study to knock down the expression of Msi1 and determine the effects upon soft agar growth and neurophere formation. Quantitative RT-PCR was conducted to evaluate the expression of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival genes in Msi1 depleted Daoy cells. Results We observed that MSI1 expression was elevated in Daoy cells cultured as neurospheres compared to those grown as monolayer. These data indicated that Msi1 might be involved in regulating proliferation in cancer cells. Here we show that shRNA mediated Msi1 depletion in Daoy cells notably impaired their ability to form colonies in soft agar and to grow as neurospheres in culture. Moreover, differential expression of a group of Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathway related genes including MYCN, FOS, NOTCH2, SMO, CDKN1A, CCND2, CCND1, and DKK1, was also found in the Msi1 knockdown, demonstrating that Msi1 modulated the expression of a subset of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival genes in Daoy. Conclusion Our data suggested that Msi1 may promote cancer cell proliferation and survival as its loss seems to have a detrimental effect in the maintenance of medulloblastoma cancer cells. In this regard, Msi1 might be a positive regulator of tumor progression and a potential target for therapy.

  19. Hippocampal sparing radiotherapy for pediatric medulloblastoma: impact of treatment margins and treatment technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N Patrik; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Blomstrand, Malin; Kiil-Berthlesen, Anne; Hollensen, Christian; Vogelius, Ivan R; Lannering, Birgitta; Bentzen, Søren M; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    We investigated how varying the treatment margin and applying hippocampal sparing and proton therapy impact the risk of neurocognitive impairment in pediatric medulloblastoma patients compared with current standard 3D conformal radiotherapy. We included 17 pediatric medulloblastoma patients to represent the variability in tumor location relative to the hippocampal region. Treatment plans were generated using 3D conformal radiotherapy, hippocampal sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and spot-scanned proton therapy, using 3 different treatment margins for the conformal tumor boost. Neurocognitive impairment risk was estimated based on dose-response models from pediatric CNS malignancy survivors and compared among different margins and treatment techniques. Mean hippocampal dose and corresponding risk of cognitive impairment were decreased with decreasing treatment margins (P < .05). The largest risk reduction, however, was seen when applying hippocampal sparing proton therapy-the estimated risk of impaired task efficiency (95% confidence interval) was 92% (66%-98%), 81% (51%-95%), and 50% (30%-70%) for 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and proton therapy, respectively, for the smallest boost margin and 98% (78%-100%), 90% (60%-98%), and 70% (39%-90%) if boosting the whole posterior fossa. Also, the distance between the closest point of the planning target volume and the center of the hippocampus can be used to predict mean hippocampal dose for a given treatment technique. We estimate a considerable clinical benefit of hippocampal sparing radiotherapy. In choosing treatment margins, the tradeoff between margin size and risk of neurocognitive impairment quantified here should be considered.

  20. Suppression of medulloblastoma lesions by forced migration of preneoplastic precursor cells with intracerebellar administration of the chemokine Cxcl3

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    Manuela Ceccarelli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma (MB, tumor of the cerebellum, remains a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in childhood.We previously showed, in a mouse model of spontaneous MB (Ptch1+/-/Tis21-/-, that a defect of the migration of cerebellar granule neuron precursor cells (GCPs correlates with an increased frequency of MB. This occurs because GCPs, rather than migrating internally and differentiating, remain longer in the proliferative area at the cerebellar surface, becoming targets of transforming insults. Furthermore, we identified the chemokine Cxcl3 as responsible for the inward migration of GCPs. As it is known that preneoplastic GCPs (pGCPs can still migrate and differentiate like normal GCPs, thus exiting the neoplastic program, in this study we tested the hypothesis that pGCPs within a MB lesion could be induced by Cxcl3 to migrate and differentiate. We observed that the administration of Cxcl3 for 28 days within the cerebellum of one-month-old Ptch1+/-/Tis21-/- mice, i.e., when MB lesions are already formed, leads to complete disappearance of the lesions. However, a shorter treatment with Cxcl3 (two weeks was ineffective, suggesting that the suppression of MB lesions is dependent on the duration of Cxcl3 application. We verified that the treatment with Cxcl3 causes a massive migration of pGCPs from the lesion to the internal granular layer (IGL, where they differentiate.Thus, the induction of migration of pGCPs in medulloblastoma lesions may open new ways to treat MB that exploit the plasticity of the pGCPs, forcing their differentiation. It remains to be tested whether this plasticity continues at advanced stages of medulloblastoma. If so, these findings would set a potential use of the chemokine Cxcl3 as therapeutic agent against MB development in human preclinical studies.

  1. The whole-genome landscape of medulloblastoma subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Northcott, Paul A.; Buchhalter, Ivo; Morrissy, A. Sorana

    2017-01-01

    actionable targets. Driver mutations were confidently assigned to most patients belonging to Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma subgroups, greatly enhancing previous knowledge. New molecular subtypes were differentially enriched for specific driver events, including hotspot in-frame insertions that target...... KBTBD4 and 'enhancer hijacking' events that activate PRDM6. Thus, the application of integrative genomics to an extensive cohort of clinical samples derived from a single childhood cancer entity revealed a series of cancer genes and biologically relevant subtype diversity that represent attractive...

  2. Risk factors for reoperation after initial burr hole trephination in chronic subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Falko; Loos, Franz; Dünisch, Pedro; Sakr, Yasser; Safatli, Diaa Al; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The optimal management of chronic subdural hematomas remains a challenge. Twist drill craniotomy or burr hole trephination are considered optimal initial treatments, but the reoperation rate for hematoma recurrence and other complications is still high. Therefore, evaluation of possible risk factors for initial treatment failure is crucial. In this context, we performed a study to define a possible subpopulation that may benefit from a more invasive initial treatment regime. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 193 patients with 250 chronic subdural hematomas who had undergone burr hole trephination as first-line therapy in our institution between January 2005 and October 2012. To identify risk factors for reoperation, a multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed with reoperation as the dependent variable. Surgical complications, including acute rebleeding, infection and chronic hematoma recurrence, were analyzed separately using a logistic regression model. The mean age of the cohort was 71.4 years. The male/female ratio was 137:56. Reoperation was necessary in 56 cases (29%) for recurrent hematomas and surgical complications. Predictors for reoperation for surgical complications were midline shift (odds ratio [OR] (per mm) 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.29, p=0.006), arterial hypertension (OR 5.44, 95% CI: 1.45-20.41, p=0.012) and bilateral hematomas (OR 4.22, 95% CI: 1.22-14.58, p=0.023). There was a trend toward a higher risk of surgically-relevant hematoma recurrence in patients with prior treatment with vitamin K antagonists (OR 1.76, 95% CI: 0.75-4.13, p=0.191). Burr hole trephination is the therapy of choice in most chronic subdural hematomas, but the rate of recurrent hematomas is high. Every hematoma should be treated individually especially in relation to midline-shift and pre-existing conditions. Further prospective studies evaluating types of treatment and hematoma density are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  3. Efficacy of the combined treatment of medulloblastoma depending on the irradiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragajshene, V.N.; Tiknyavichus, K.P.

    1980-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the results of the combined treatment of medulloblastoma using the spatial radiation dose distribution technique. Biological tumor characteristics necessitates total prophylactic irradiation of the central nervous system (CNS) in medulloblastoma. Long-term results, i.e. the duration of life of patients treated by different methods, are used as a yardstick of therapeutic efficacy. To show statistical significance the authors used a simple and reliable mathematical method which demonstrates obvious advantages of prophylactic irradiation of the CNS in medulloblastoma

  4. Patterns of Failure After Proton Therapy in Medulloblastoma; Linear Energy Transfer Distributions and Relative Biological Effectiveness Associations for Relapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, Roshan V.; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Raiford, Michael; Malhi, Imran; Niemierko, Andrzej; Rapalino, Otto; Caruso, Paul; Yock, Torunn I.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Paganetti, Harald; MacDonald, Shannon M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The pattern of failure in medulloblastoma patients treated with proton radiation therapy is unknown. For this increasingly used modality, it is important to ensure that outcomes are comparable to those in modern photon series. It has been suggested this pattern may differ from photons because of variations in linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE). In addition, the use of matching fields for delivery of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) may influence patterns of relapse. Here we report the patterns of failure after the use of protons, compare it to that in the available photon literature, and determine the LET and RBE values in areas of recurrence. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of patients with medulloblastoma treated with proton radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) between 2002 and 2011. We documented the locations of first relapse. Discrete failures were contoured on the original planning computed tomography scan. Monte Carlo calculation methods were used to estimate the proton LET distribution. Models were used to estimate RBE values based on the LET distributions. Results: A total of 109 patients were followed for a median of 38.8 months (range, 1.4-119.2 months). Of the patients, 16 experienced relapse. Relapse involved the supratentorial compartment (n=8), spinal compartment (n=11), and posterior fossa (n=5). Eleven failures were isolated to a single compartment; 6 failures in the spine, 4 failures in the supratentorium, and 1 failure in the posterior fossa. The remaining patients had multiple sites of disease. One isolated spinal failure occurred at the spinal junction of 2 fields. None of the 70 patients treated with an involved-field-only boost failed in the posterior fossa outside of the tumor bed. We found no correlation between Monte Carlo-calculated LET distribution and regions of recurrence. Conclusions: The most common site of failure in patients treated with protons for

  5. Unilateral optic neuropathy following subdural hematoma: a case report

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    Witte Otto W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Unilateral optic neuropathy is commonly due to a prechiasmatic affliction of the anterior visual pathway, while losses in visual hemifields result from the damage to brain hemispheres. Here we report the unusual case of a patient who suffered from acute optic neuropathy following hemispherical subdural hematoma. Although confirmed up to now only through necropsy studies, our case strongly suggests a local, microcirculatory deficit identified through magnetic resonance imaging in vivo. Case presentation A 70-year-old Caucasian German who developed a massive left hemispheric subdural hematoma under oral anticoagulation presented with acute, severe visual impairment on his left eye, which was noticed after surgical decompression. Neurologic and ophthalmologic examinations indicated sinistral optic neuropathy with visual acuity reduced nearly to amaurosis. Ocular pathology such as vitreous body hemorrhage, papilledema, and central retinal artery occlusion were excluded. An orbital lesion was ruled out by means of orbital magnetic resonance imaging. However, cerebral diffusion-weighted imaging and T2 maps of magnetic resonance imaging revealed a circumscribed ischemic lesion within the edematous, slightly herniated temporomesial lobe within the immediate vicinity of the affected optic nerve. Thus, the clinical course and morphologic magnetic resonance imaging findings suggest the occurrence of pressure-induced posterior ischemic optic neuropathy due to microcirculatory compromise. Conclusion Although lesions of the second cranial nerve following subdural hematoma have been reported individually, their pathogenesis was preferentially proposed from autopsy studies. Here we discuss a dual, pressure-induced and secondarily ischemic pathomechanism on the base of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging diagnostics which may remain unconsidered by computed tomography.

  6. Rapid spontaneous resolution of an acute subdural hematoma: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won Kyong; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byoung Ho; Lee, Kyeong Seok; Bae, Hack Gun; Yun, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University, Chonan Hospital, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-10-15

    We present a case of acute subdural hematoma which was rapidly resolved without surgical intervention. This 31 year old man had a hematoma of which thickness was 9 mm and was paraplegic due to fracture-dislocation of thoracic spine at the level of TII-12 Rapid recovery of consciousness despite of sizable hematoma made to take a serial CT scanning instead of immediate surgical interventions. The hematoma was resolved within 4 hours without surgery. Possible mechanism of this rapid spontaneous resolution is discussed with brief review of the related literature.

  7. Differential diagnostic problems in elderly chronic subdural hematoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Valentin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH are recognized as common in older people (over 70 years. They are produced in minor injuries (falls on the same level. These CSDH have minor symptoms (headache, memory disorders, balance disorders, cognitive disorders, etc. and are classified as signs for the onset of dementia, circulatory failure - basilar vertebra, Alzheimer, etc. A simple brain CT scan can highlight these hematomas and a neurosurgical intervention will achieve extremely favorable prognosis. There are many pitfalls in the differential diagnosis of CSH especially with strokes being so common at this age.

  8. Subdural hematoma cases identified through a Danish patient register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Halle, Bo; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the usefulness of Danish patient registers for epidemiological studies of subdural hematoma (SDH) and to describe clinical characteristics of validated cases. METHODS: Using a patient register covering a geographically defined area in Denmark, we retrieved...... use did not vary by SDH type (OR 0.9, 95%CI 0.6-1.2). CONCLUSIONS: Danish patient registers are a useful resource for SDH studies. However, choice of International Classification of Diseases code markedly influences diagnostic validity. Distinction between cSDH and aSDH is not possible based on SDH...

  9. Positron emission tomography in the evaluation of subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, K.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Fifteen patients with 21 subdural effusions were investigated both with transmission computer assisted tomography (CAT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The tracer in the emission studies was 68 Ga-EDTA. Twelve lesions were visualized both with CAT and PET. Five lesions that were negative or doubtful on CAT were visualized with PET, whereas four lesions negative or doubtful on PET were demonstrated by CAT. The two methods complement each other due to the fact that they are based on different mechanisms: CAT mainly on attenuation of the fluid collection. PET on isotope accumulation, particularly in the hematoma membranes

  10. Automated detection of extradural and subdural hematoma for contrast-enhanced CT images in emergency medical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takeshi; Matoba, Naoto; Zhou, Xiangrong; Yokoi, Shinya; Aizawa, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Keiji; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2007-03-01

    We have been developing the CAD scheme for head and abdominal injuries for emergency medical care. In this work, we have developed an automated method to detect typical head injuries, rupture or strokes of brain. Extradural and subdural hematoma region were detected by comparing technique after the brain areas were registered using warping. We employ 5 normal and 15 stroke cases to estimate the performance after creating the brain model with 50 normal cases. Some of the hematoma regions were detected correctly in all of the stroke cases with no false positive findings on normal cases.

  11. Methods and results of radiotherapy in case of medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberg, M.; Sauerwein, W.; Scherer, E.

    1982-01-01

    The prognosis of the medulloblastoma with its marked tendency towards early formation of metastases by way of liquor circulation can be decisively improved by post-surgical homogenous irradiation. A successful radiotherapy is only possible by means of new irradiation methods which have been developed for high-voltage units during recent years and which require great experience and skill on the part of the radiotherapeutist. At the Radiological Centre of Essen, 26 patients with medulloblastoma have been submitted to such a specially developed post-surgical radiotherapy since 1974. After a follow-up period of at most seven years, 16 patients have survived (two of them with recurrences) and 10 patients died because of a local recurrence. In dependence on the patient's state of health after surgery and before irradiation, the neurologic state and physical condition of these patients seem favorable after unique post-operative radiotherapy. New therapeutic possibilities are provided by radiosensitizing substances. The actually most effective radiosensitizer Misonidazol, however, could not respond hitherto to clinical expectances. (orig.) [de

  12. Medulloblastomas - primitive neuroectodermal tumours in the adult population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, R.I.; Williams, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Medulloblastomas - primitive neuroectodermal tumours are rare in adults. This review will evaluate a single centre's experience with this malignancy. The medulloblastoma - primitive neuroectodermal tumour database was evaluated for all patients aged more than 18 years who were referred for management. Relevant information from the database was abstracted to provide a descriptive record of this malignancy. Between 1977-2004 there were 11 patients referred, 1 with persistent disease and 10 were eligible, presenting with initial diagnosis. There was increased intracranial pressure in 50% of patients. Most patients had symptoms >3 months, with three having symptoms 1-3 months before diagnosis and one patient having thoracic dural metastases at presentation. Complete resection was recorded in four patients and six had 50-90% resection. All patients completed craniospinal radiotherapy (35-36 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy fractions) barring one patient, who died of surgical complications during his radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was given in five of the nine patients postradiotherapy. There were two posterior fossa recurrences, with associated supratentorial and extra central nervous system disease. Of the 10 primary patients 7 are alive with no evidence of diease, 2 died because of disease, with 1 intercurrent death. One patient developed a second malignancy. The outcome for adults matches that of the more common paediatric patients. Radiotherapy could control local disease even where complete resection was not achieved.

  13. Comparison of posterior fossa and tumor bed boost in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, A C; Saw, C B; Wen, B C

    2000-10-01

    To quantify the difference between the area of brain irradiated using the posterior fossa boost (PFB) and tumor bed boost (TBB) in medulloblastoma, we studied 15 simulation radiographs of patients treated in our institution from 1990 and 1999. The PFB was compared with the TBB, which was defined as the tumor bed plus 2-cm margin as demonstrated by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. The PFB field treated a mean area of 9.43 cm2 more brain than the TBB. In 3 patients (20%), the area of the brain in the TBB was larger than the PFB. In 11 patients (73.3%), the PFB field had more than 10% more brain than the TBB. The cochlea was in the PFB and TBB field in all patients. In more than two thirds of patients, the area of brain irradiated with the PFB was at least 10% greater than the TBB. Future studies are needed to determine whether the TBB can replace the PFB in patients with medulloblastoma.

  14. Medulloblastoma in childhood: long-term results of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadbent, V.A.; Barnes, N.D.; Wheeler, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-one children under the age of 15 years with verified medulloblastoma were treated at Addenbrookes Hospital from 1940 to 1976. In addition to surgical treatment, all received high dose irradiation to the whole neuraxis. Nine were still alive in 1979, of whom eight were examined. All these patients showed some residual problems, but five were leading active lives and had only minor physical disability. There was evidence of disturbance in growth, with shortening of the spine in relation to the limbs, in all the children. The height centile was lower than expected from parental height in four and one was severely dwarfed. Growth hormone secretion in response to exercise was, however, normal in five of six patients tested. Three children also showed failure of growth of the jaw sufficiently severe to be a cosmetic problem. Frank mental retardation was present in three children. A raised resting TSH level was found in two children, one of whom had a multinodular goiter. Of the three children with severe problems, two had been treated when under two years of age. Long-term follow-up of children who survive medulloblastoma is clearly necessary and consideration should perhaps be given to revision of current treatment regimes in very young children

  15. An unusual complication of invasive video-EEG monitoring: subelectrode hematoma without subdural component: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Gokhan; Ayhan, Selim; Dericioglu, Nese; Saygi, Serap; Akalan, Nejat

    2010-08-01

    The potential complications of the subdural electrode implantation providing identification of the seizure focus and direct stimulation of the cerebral cortex for defining the eloquent cortical areas are epidural and subdural hematoma, cortical contusions, infection, brain edema, raised intracranial pressure, CSF leakage, and venous infarction have been previously reported in the literature. To present the first case of subelectrode hematoma without subdural component that was detected during invasive EEG monitoring after subdural electrode implantation. A 19-year-old female with drug resistant seizures was decided to undergo invasive monitoring with subdural electrodes. While good quality recordings had been initially obtained from all electrodes placed on the right parietal convexity, no cerebral cortical activity could be obtained from one electrode 2 days after the first operation. Explorative surgery revealed a circumscribed subelectrode hematoma without a subdural component. Awareness of the potential complications of subdural electrode implantation and close follow-up of the clinical findings of the patient are of highest value for early detection and successful management.

  16. Comparison of risk of radiogenic second cancer following photon and proton craniospinal irradiation for a pediatric medulloblastoma patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Howell, Rebecca M.; Giebeler, Annelise; Taddei, Phillip J.; Mahajan, Anita; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2013-02-01

    Pediatric patients who received radiation therapy are at risk of developing side effects such as radiogenic second cancer. We compared proton and photon therapies in terms of the predicted risk of second cancers for a 4 year old medulloblastoma patient receiving craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Two CSI treatment plans with 23.4 Gy or Gy (RBE) prescribed dose were computed: a three-field 6 MV photon therapy plan and a four-field proton therapy plan. The primary doses for both plans were determined using a commercial treatment planning system. Stray radiation doses for proton therapy were determined from Monte Carlo simulations, and stray radiation doses for photon therapy were determined from measured data. Dose-risk models based on the Biological Effects of Ionization Radiation VII report were used to estimate the risk of second cancer in eight tissues/organs. Baseline predictions of the relative risk for each organ were always less for proton CSI than for photon CSI at all attained ages. The total lifetime attributable risk of the incidence of second cancer considered after proton CSI was much lower than that after photon CSI, and the ratio of lifetime risk was 0.18. Uncertainty analysis revealed that the qualitative findings of this study were insensitive to any plausible changes of dose-risk models and mean radiation weighting factor for neutrons. Proton therapy confers lower predicted risk of second cancer than photon therapy for the pediatric medulloblastoma patient.

  17. Chronic subdural hematoma: Surgical management and outcome in 986 cases: A classification and regression tree approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovlias, Aristedis; Theodoropoulos, Spyridon; Papoutsakis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common clinical entities in daily neurosurgical practice which carries a most favorable prognosis. However, because of the advanced age and medical problems of patients, surgical therapy is frequently associated with various complications. This study evaluated the clinical features, radiological findings, and neurological outcome in a large series of patients with CSDH. Methods: A classification and regression tree (CART) technique was employed in the analysis of data from 986 patients who were operated at Asclepeion General Hospital of Athens from January 1986 to December 2011. Burr holes evacuation with closed system drainage has been the operative technique of first choice at our institution for 29 consecutive years. A total of 27 prognostic factors were examined to predict the outcome at 3-month postoperatively. Results: Our results indicated that neurological status on admission was the best predictor of outcome. With regard to the other data, age, brain atrophy, thickness and density of hematoma, subdural accumulation of air, and antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy were found to correlate significantly with prognosis. The overall cross-validated predictive accuracy of CART model was 85.34%, with a cross-validated relative error of 0.326. Conclusions: Methodologically, CART technique is quite different from the more commonly used methods, with the primary benefit of illustrating the important prognostic variables as related to outcome. Since, the ideal therapy for the treatment of CSDH is still under debate, this technique may prove useful in developing new therapeutic strategies and approaches for patients with CSDH. PMID:26257985

  18. SIOP PODC adapted treatment recommendations for standard-risk medulloblastoma in low and middle income settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parkes, Jeannette; Hendricks, Marc; Ssenyonga, Peter; Mugamba, John; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Fieggen, Graham; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Howard, Scott; Mitra, Dipayan; Bouffet, Eric; Davidson, Alan; Bailey, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of children with medulloblastoma requires a functioning multi-disciplinary team with adequate neurosurgical, neuroradiological, pathological, radiotherapy and chemotherapy facilities and personnel. In addition the treating centre should have the capacity to effectively screen and

  19. Clinicopathological features of medulloblastoma: an overview with an emphasis on molecular biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, T. G. K. J.; Kool, M.

    2007-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a malignant, invasive embryonal tumor of the cerebellum with preferential manifestation in children, predominantly neuronal differentiation and an inherent tendency to metastasize via CSF pathways. In this review we present an overview of the clinicopathological aspects of

  20. Percutaneous evacuation for treatment of subdural hematoma and outcome in 28 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofi, Keyvan; Marnet, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is a frequently encountered entity in neurosurgery in particular in elderly patients. There in a high variance in the treatment in literature. We report our experience of percutaneous evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma in 28 patients. From January 2007 to July 2009, 28 patients underwent percutaneous evacuation. 27 of the 28 patients (96.4%) became asymptomatic or improved clinically. Six weeks later, the scan showed the hematoma had completely disappeared in 18 of the cases. We did not have any postoperative infection. Treatment of chronic subdural hematoma using a percutaneous operative technique is a minimally invasive method with sufficient outcome and a therapeutic alternative to the craniotomy.

  1. The minimally invasive endoscopic management of septated chronic subdural hematomas: surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhouma, M; Jacquesson, T; Jouanneau, E

    2014-12-01

    Fibrin membranes and compartmentalization within the subdural space are a frequent cause of failure in the treatment of chronic subdural hematomas (CSH). This specific subtype of CSH classically requires craniotomy, which carries significant morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in elderly patients. In this work, we describe a minimally invasive endoscopic alternative. Under local scalp anesthesia, a rigid endoscope is inserted through a parietal burr hole in the subdural space to collapse fibrin septa and cut the internal membrane. It also allows cauterization of active bleedings and the placement of a drain under direct visualization. The endoscopic treatment of septated CSH represents a minimally invasive alternative to craniotomy especially for the internal membranectomy.

  2. Unoperated subdural hematomas. Long-term follow-up study by brain scan and electroencephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusins, J.; Jaffe, R.; Bender, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors report nine patients selected from over 100 patients with subdural hematomas successfully treated without surgery. These patients were followed for as long as 5 years. All had angiographically demonstrated subdural hematomas. Electroencephalograms (EEG) documented well the clinical improvement of the patient, but were poor guides to the true size of the hematoma, since EEG returns to normal early in the patient's course. Static scans are a better guide to the presence of a subdural hematoma, but they lag behind clinical improvement and usually remain abnormal for considerable periods of time after a major portion of the hematoma has been reabsorbed, and the patient is asymptomatic

  3. Quantitative estimation of hemorrhage in chronic subdural hematoma using the 51Cr erythrocyte labeling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Saito, K.; Ikeda, K.; Hisada, K.

    1987-01-01

    Red cell survival studies using an infusion of chromium-51-labeled erythrocytes were performed to quantitatively estimate hemorrhage in the chronic subdural hematoma cavity of 50 patients. The amount of hemorrhage was determined during craniotomy. Between 6 and 24 hours after infusion of the labeled red cells, hemorrhage accounted for a mean of 6.7% of the hematoma content, indicating continuous or intermittent hemorrhage into the cavity. The clinical state of the patients and the density of the chronic subdural hematoma on computerized tomography scans were related to the amount of hemorrhage. Chronic subdural hematomas with a greater amount of hemorrhage frequently consisted of clots rather than fluid

  4. α5-GABAA receptors negatively regulate MYC-amplified medulloblastoma growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Soma; Weeraratne, Shyamal Dilhan; Sun, Hongyu; Phallen, Jillian; Rallapalli, Sundari K.; Teider, Natalia; Kosaras, Bela; Amani, Vladimir; Pierre-Francois, Jessica; Tang, Yujie; Nguyen, Brian; Yu, Furong; Schubert, Simone; Balansay, Brianna; Mathios, Dimitris; Lechpammer, Mirna; Archer, Tenley C.; Tran, Phuoc; Reimer, Richard J.; Cook, James M.; Lim, Michael; Jensen, Frances E.; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Cho, Yoon-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Neural tumors often express neurotransmitter receptors as markers of their developmental lineage. Although these receptors have been well characterized in electrophysiological, developmental and pharmacological settings, their importance in the maintenance and progression of brain tumors, and importantly, the effect of their targeting in brain cancers remains obscure. Here, we demonstrate high levels of GABR5, which encodes the α-subunit of the GABAA receptor complex, in aggressive MYC-driven, “Group 3” medulloblastomas. We hypothesized that modulation of α-GABAA receptors alters medulloblastoma cell survival and monitored biological and electrophysiological responses of GABR5-expressing medulloblastoma cells upon pharmacological targeting of the GABAA receptor. While antagonists, inverse agonists and non-specific positive allosteric modulators had limited effects on medulloblastoma cells, a highly specific and potent α5-GABAA receptor agonist, QHii066, resulted in marked membrane depolarization and a significant decrease in cell survival. This effect was GABR5 dependent and mediated through the induction of apoptosis as well as accumulation of cells in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. Chemical genomic profiling of QHii066-treated medulloblastoma cells confirmed inhibition of MYC-related transcriptional activity and revealed an enrichment of HOX5 target gene expression. siRNA-mediated knockdown of HOX5 markedly blunted the response of medulloblastoma cells to QHii066. Furthermore, QHii066 sensitized GABR5 positive medulloblastoma cells to radiation and chemotherapy consistent with the role of HOX5 in directly regulating p53 expression and inducing apoptosis. Thus, our results provide novel insights into the synthetic lethal nature of α5-GABAA receptor activation in MYC-driven/Group 3 medulloblastomas and propose its targeting as a novel strategy for the management of this highly aggressive tumor. PMID:24196163

  5. WNT activation by lithium abrogates TP53 mutation associated radiation resistance in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, Nataliya; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Remke, Marc; Martin, Dianna C; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Zhang, Cindy H; Fraser, Michael; Tse, Ken; Poon, Raymond; Shih, David J H; Baskin, Berivan; Ray, Peter N; Bouffet, Eric; Dirks, Peter; von Bueren, Andre O; Pfaff, Elke; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T W; Northcott, Paul A; Kool, Marcel; Pugh, Trevor J; Pomeroy, Scott L; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pietsch, Torsten; Gessi, Marco; Rutkowski, Stefan; Bognár, Laszlo; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Eberhart, Charles G; Conter, Cecile Faure; Fouladi, Maryam; French, Pim J; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A; Gupta, Nalin; Hauser, Peter; Jabado, Nada; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Jung, Shin; Kim, Seung-Ki; Klekner, Almos; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Lach, Boleslaw; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Liau, Linda M; Massimi, Luca; Pollack, Ian F; Ra, Young Shin; Rubin, Joshua B; Van Meir, Erwin G; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Weiss, William A; Zitterbart, Karel; Bristow, Robert G; Alman, Benjamin; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Malkin, David; Clifford, Steven C; Pfister, Stefan M; Taylor, Michael D; Tabori, Uri

    2014-12-24

    TP53 mutations confer subgroup specific poor survival for children with medulloblastoma. We hypothesized that WNT activation which is associated with improved survival for such children abrogates TP53 related radioresistance and can be used to sensitize TP53 mutant tumors for radiation. We examined the subgroup-specific role of TP53 mutations in a cohort of 314 patients treated with radiation. TP53 wild-type or mutant human medulloblastoma cell-lines and normal neural stem cells were used to test radioresistance of TP53 mutations and the radiosensitizing effect of WNT activation on tumors and the developing brain. Children with WNT/TP53 mutant medulloblastoma had higher 5-year survival than those with SHH/TP53 mutant tumours (100% and 36.6%±8.7%, respectively (p<0.001)). Introduction of TP53 mutation into medulloblastoma cells induced radioresistance (survival fractions at 2Gy (SF2) of 89%±2% vs. 57.4%±1.8% (p<0.01)). In contrast, β-catenin mutation sensitized TP53 mutant cells to radiation (p<0.05). Lithium, an activator of the WNT pathway, sensitized TP53 mutant medulloblastoma to radiation (SF2 of 43.5%±1.5% in lithium treated cells vs. 56.6±3% (p<0.01)) accompanied by increased number of γH2AX foci. Normal neural stem cells were protected from lithium induced radiation damage (SF2 of 33%±8% for lithium treated cells vs. 27%±3% for untreated controls (p=0.05). Poor survival of patients with TP53 mutant medulloblastoma may be related to radiation resistance. Since constitutive activation of the WNT pathway by lithium sensitizes TP53 mutant medulloblastoma cells and protect normal neural stem cells from radiation, this oral drug may represent an attractive novel therapy for high-risk medulloblastomas.

  6. α5-GABAA receptors negatively regulate MYC-amplified medulloblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Soma; Weeraratne, Shyamal Dilhan; Sun, Hongyu; Phallen, Jillian; Rallapalli, Sundari K; Teider, Natalia; Kosaras, Bela; Amani, Vladimir; Pierre-Francois, Jessica; Tang, Yujie; Nguyen, Brian; Yu, Furong; Schubert, Simone; Balansay, Brianna; Mathios, Dimitris; Lechpammer, Mirna; Archer, Tenley C; Tran, Phuoc; Reimer, Richard J; Cook, James M; Lim, Michael; Jensen, Frances E; Pomeroy, Scott L; Cho, Yoon-Jae

    2014-04-01

    Neural tumors often express neurotransmitter receptors as markers of their developmental lineage. Although these receptors have been well characterized in electrophysiological, developmental and pharmacological settings, their importance in the maintenance and progression of brain tumors and, importantly, the effect of their targeting in brain cancers remains obscure. Here, we demonstrate high levels of GABRA5, which encodes the α5-subunit of the GABAA receptor complex, in aggressive MYC-driven, "Group 3" medulloblastomas. We hypothesized that modulation of α5-GABAA receptors alters medulloblastoma cell survival and monitored biological and electrophysiological responses of GABRA5-expressing medulloblastoma cells upon pharmacological targeting of the GABAA receptor. While antagonists, inverse agonists and non-specific positive allosteric modulators had limited effects on medulloblastoma cells, a highly specific and potent α5-GABAA receptor agonist, QHii066, resulted in marked membrane depolarization and a significant decrease in cell survival. This effect was GABRA5 dependent and mediated through the induction of apoptosis as well as accumulation of cells in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. Chemical genomic profiling of QHii066-treated medulloblastoma cells confirmed inhibition of MYC-related transcriptional activity and revealed an enrichment of HOXA5 target gene expression. siRNA-mediated knockdown of HOXA5 markedly blunted the response of medulloblastoma cells to QHii066. Furthermore, QHii066 sensitized GABRA5 positive medulloblastoma cells to radiation and chemotherapy consistent with the role of HOXA5 in directly regulating p53 expression and inducing apoptosis. Thus, our results provide novel insights into the synthetic lethal nature of α5-GABAA receptor activation in MYC-driven/Group 3 medulloblastomas and propose its targeting as a novel strategy for the management of this highly aggressive tumor.

  7. G-Protein Gαs controls medulloblastoma initiation by suppressing sonic hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuelian; Lu, Q Richard

    2015-01-01

    We identify Gαs as a novel tumor suppressor in medulloblastoma that functions principally by inhibition of sonic hedgehog signaling. Gαs not only stimulates cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling but also inhibits ciliary trafficking of hedgehog components. Elevation of cAMP inhibits medulloblastoma growth and augments inhibition of smoothened to decrease tumor cell proliferation, thus highlighting Gαs as a potential therapeutic target.

  8. Social Behavior in Medulloblastoma: Functional Analysis of Tumor-Supporting Glial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    the manuscript with inputs from all authors. All authors reviewed the manuscript. Acknowledgements We thank Chris Doe, David Rowitch, and Praveen...201–208. Goodrich, L.V., Milenković, L., Higgins , K.M., and Scott, M.P. (1997). Altered Neural Cell Fates and Medulloblastoma in Mouse patched...Genes & Development 27, 98–115. Goodrich, L.V., Milenković, L., Higgins , K.M., and Scott, M.P. (1997). Altered Neural Cell Fates and Medulloblastoma in

  9. The contribution of radiotherapy in the adult patients with a medulloblastoma: a long mono-institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, B. de; Balducci, M.; Manfrida, S.; Chiesa, S.; Frascino, V.; Valentini, V.; Anile, C.

    2009-01-01

    The medulloblastoma is rare among adults (1% of primitive cerebral tumors). currently, the surgery constitutes the initial therapy approach, followed by the radiotherapy. This summary presents the update of a retrospective analysis in a population of adult patients (>18 years) suffering of a medulloblastoma presented in 2006 at the national congress of the Italian association of oncological radiotherapy. It confirms the efficiency of radiotherapy to treat the adult patients suffering of a medulloblastoma. (N.C.)

  10. Flexible endoscope-assisted evacuation of chronic subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májovský, Martin; Masopust, Václav; Netuka, David; Beneš, Vladimír

    2016-10-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition with an increasing incidence. Standard treatment of CSDHs is surgical evacuation. The objective of this study is to present a modification of standard burr-hole hematoma evacuation using a flexible endoscope and to assess the advantages and risks. Prospectively, 34 consecutive patients diagnosed with CSDH were included in the study. Epidemiological, clinical and radiographical data were collected and reviewed. All patients underwent a burr-hole evacuation of CSDH. A flexible endoscope was inserted and subdural space inspected during surgery. The surgeon was looking specifically for the presence of septations, draining catheter position and acute bleeding. Thirty-four patients underwent 37 endoscope-assisted surgeries. Presenting symptoms were hemiparesis (79%), decreased level of consciousness (18%), gait disturbances (15%), headache (12%), aphasia (6%), cognitive disturbances (6%) and epileptic seizure (3%). Average operative time was 43 min, and the average increase in operative time due to the use of the endoscope was 6 min. Recurrence rate was 8.8%, and clinical outcome was favorable (defined as mRS ≤ 2) in 97% of the cases. To our knowledge, the present cohort of 34 patients is the largest group of patients with CSDH treated using an endoscope. This technique allows decent visualization of the hematoma cavity while retaining the advantages of a minimally invasive approach under a local anesthesia. The main advantages are correct positioning of the catheter under visual control, identification of septations and early detection of cortex or vessel injury during surgery.

  11. Spontaneous rapid reduction of a large acute subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Hee; Kang, Dong Ho; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Park, In Sung; Jung, Jin-Myung; Han, Jong Woo

    2009-12-01

    The majority of acute post-traumatic subdural hematomas (ASDH) require urgent surgical evacuation. Spontaneous resolution of ASDH has been reported in some cases. We report here on a case of a patient with a large amount of ASDH that was rapidly reduced. A 61-yr-old man was found unconscious following a high speed motor vehicle accident. On initial examination, his Glasgow Coma Score scale was 4/15. His pupils were fully dilated and non-reactive to bright light. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a massive right-sided ASDH. The decision was made to treat him conservatively because of his poor clinical condition. Another brain CT approximately 14 hr after the initial scan demonstrated a remarkable reduction of the previous ASDH and there was the new appearance of high density in the subdural space adjacent to the falx and the tentorium. Thirty days after his admission, brain CT revealed chronic SDH and the patient underwent surgery. The patient is currently able to obey simple commands. In conclusion, spontaneous rapid resolution/reduction of ASDH may occur in some patients. The mechanisms are most likely the result of dilution by cerebrospinal fluid and the redistribution of hematoma especially in patients with brain atrophy.

  12. Chronic subdural hematoma: epidemiological and prognostic analysis of 176 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAMIL FARHAT NETO

    Full Text Available Objective : To characterize patients with chronic subdural hematoma undergoing surgery and to identify prognostic indicators. Methods : We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH undergoing surgical treatment. We analyzed: age, period from trauma to diagnostic imaging, pre and postoperative Glasgow coma scale, type of surgery, associated comorbidities, use of postoperative drainage and outpatient treatment. Results : The sample consisted of 176 patients, 126 male and 50 female patients (ratio 2.5 : 1, ages ranged from six months to 97 years, with an average of 59.3 years. CSDH was caused by trauma in 52% of patients, with the time from trauma to imaging averaging 25.05 days; 37.7% were hypertensive patients and 20% had a neurological disease. Eighty-five (48.3% patients were elderly and altered consciousness was present in 63% of cases. Of the 91 (51.7% non-elderly patients, 44% presented with headache, altered consciousness occurred in 40% and motor abnormalities in 27.5%. The CSDH was located on the right in 41%, left in 43% and bilaterally in 16% of patients. Conclusion : the change of consciousness was the most common clinical alteration in the elderly and headache in non-elderly. The most associated comorbidity was the arterial hypertension and the most frequent cause, head trauma. The trepanation with two oriffices associated with a closed drainage system was the most used operating, with high efficacy and low complication rate.

  13. Clinical and computerized tomographic studies of chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Takahiro; Maegawa, Mototsugu; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Tanikake, Tatsuo

    1981-01-01

    The authors' experience is based on 84 patients with chronic subdural hematomas verified by surgery. Analysis of CT findings of the chronic subdural hematoma led to a classification of four different types: low, iso-, mixed and high density. The mixed density type was classified into two subdivisions: Type I characterized by the sharp border between two compartments and Type II characterized by high density around the hematoma capsule. There was tendency in the high density type group for the clinical course from onset to be the most rapid, the mass effect for the brain the strongest and the period from onset to surgical intervention the shortest. They were slower, weaker and longer in order of the mixed, iso- and low density types. As a result of analysis of hematoma content, there was no correlation among Ca ion concentration, total protein volume and types of hematoma, but there were some significant correlations among hemoglobin, hematocrit and types of hematoma. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were highest in hematoma content of the high density type and were lower in the order of the high density part of the mixed density type, isodensity type and low density type. However, the hematoma content in the low density type showed the highest value of LDH. (author)

  14. Reappraisal of cerebellopontine angle medulloblastomas: Report of a fatal case and lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Ranganatha Goudihalli, M.Ch. Neurosurgery

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available CPA Medulloblastomas are rare in adults. We describe a case of medulloblastoma in the right CPA in a middle aged male patient who presented with short history and was preoperatively diagnosed as vestibular schwannoma. Intra-operatively it turned out to be a highly vascular and malignant lesion. Histopathology demonstrated medulloblastoma with high ki67 index. Patient was re-explored for hematoma evacuation and remained vegetative postoperatively. This is a unique case considering the older age at presentation, short duration of symptoms with atypical presentation of only 7th, 8th and lower cranial nerve involvement. MRI showed a lobulated heterogeneous extra axial right CPA mass lesion extending in the right acoustic meatus and causing mass effect and effacement of the fourth ventricle with heterogeneous enhancement post-gadolinium, suggestive of vestibular schwannoma. The aggressive behaviour of this tumor with short history has to prompt one to keep less common lesions like medulloblastomas as differential diagnosis in the CPA region. Though medulloblastomas are rare lesions in the CPA they have to be considered in the differential diagnosis based on atypical clinical behaviour, a suspicion of such diagnosis preoperatively can alter the treatment strategy, focusing on tumor embolization, safe surgical excision and adjuvant chemoradiation, aiming towards a better quality of life, in the post-operative period. Keywords: Medulloblastoma, Cerebellopontine angle, Desmoplastic

  15. Identification of Two Protein-Signaling States Delineating Transcriptionally Heterogeneous Human Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walderik W. Zomerman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The brain cancer medulloblastoma consists of different transcriptional subgroups. To characterize medulloblastoma at the phosphoprotein-signaling level, we performed high-throughput peptide phosphorylation profiling on a large cohort of SHH (Sonic Hedgehog, group 3, and group 4 medulloblastomas. We identified two major protein-signaling profiles. One profile was associated with rapid death post-recurrence and resembled MYC-like signaling for which MYC lesions are sufficient but not necessary. The second profile showed enrichment for DNA damage, as well as apoptotic and neuronal signaling. Integrative analysis demonstrated that heterogeneous transcriptional input converges on these protein-signaling profiles: all SHH and a subset of group 3 patients exhibited the MYC-like protein-signaling profile; the majority of the other group 3 subset and group 4 patients displayed the DNA damage/apoptotic/neuronal signaling profile. Functional analysis of enriched pathways highlighted cell-cycle progression and protein synthesis as therapeutic targets for MYC-like medulloblastoma. : Using peptide phosphorylation profiling, Zomerman et al. identify two medulloblastoma phosphoprotein-signaling profiles that have prognostic value and are potentially targetable. They find that these profiles extend across transcriptome-based subgroup borders. This suggests that diverse genetic information converges on common protein-signaling pathways and highlights protein-signaling as a unique information layer. Keywords: medulloblastoma, protein-signaling, protein synthesis, MYC, TP53, proteome, phosphoproteome

  16. Epigenetic silencing of miRNA-9 is associated with HES1 oncogenic activity and poor prognosis of medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaschetti, G; Abela, L; Nonoguchi, N; Dubuc, A M; Remke, M; Boro, A; Grunder, E; Siler, U; Ohgaki, H; Taylor, M D; Baumgartner, M; Shalaby, T; Grotzer, M A

    2014-01-01

    Background: microRNA-9 is a key regulator of neuronal development aberrantly expressed in brain malignancies, including medulloblastoma. The mechanisms by which microRNA-9 contributes to medulloblastoma pathogenesis remain unclear, and factors that regulate this process have not been delineated. Methods: Expression and methylation status of microRNA-9 in medulloblastoma cell lines and primary samples were analysed. The association of microRNA-9 expression with medulloblastoma patients' clinical outcome was assessed, and the impact of microRNA-9 restoration was functionally validated in medulloblastoma cells. Results: microRNA-9 expression is repressed in a large subset of MB samples compared with normal fetal cerebellum. Low microRNA-9 expression correlates significantly with the diagnosis of unfavourable histopathological variants and with poor clinical outcome. microRNA-9 silencing occurs via cancer-specific CpG island hypermethylation. HES1 was identified as a direct target of microRNA-9 in medulloblastoma, and restoration of microRNA-9 was shown to trigger cell cycle arrest, to inhibit clonal growth and to promote medulloblastoma cell differentiation. Conclusions: microRNA-9 is a methylation-silenced tumour suppressor that could be a potential candidate predictive marker for poor prognosis of medulloblastoma. Loss of microRNA-9 may confer a proliferative advantage to tumour cells, and it could possibly contribute to disease pathogenesis. Thus, re-expression of microRNA-9 may constitute a novel epigenetic regulation strategy against medulloblastoma. PMID:24346283

  17. Epigenetic silencing of miRNA-9 is associated with HES1 oncogenic activity and poor prognosis of medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaschetti, G; Abela, L; Nonoguchi, N; Dubuc, A M; Remke, M; Boro, A; Grunder, E; Siler, U; Ohgaki, H; Taylor, M D; Baumgartner, M; Shalaby, T; Grotzer, M A

    2014-02-04

    microRNA-9 is a key regulator of neuronal development aberrantly expressed in brain malignancies, including medulloblastoma. The mechanisms by which microRNA-9 contributes to medulloblastoma pathogenesis remain unclear, and factors that regulate this process have not been delineated. Expression and methylation status of microRNA-9 in medulloblastoma cell lines and primary samples were analysed. The association of microRNA-9 expression with medulloblastoma patients' clinical outcome was assessed, and the impact of microRNA-9 restoration was functionally validated in medulloblastoma cells. microRNA-9 expression is repressed in a large subset of MB samples compared with normal fetal cerebellum. Low microRNA-9 expression correlates significantly with the diagnosis of unfavourable histopathological variants and with poor clinical outcome. microRNA-9 silencing occurs via cancer-specific CpG island hypermethylation. HES1 was identified as a direct target of microRNA-9 in medulloblastoma, and restoration of microRNA-9 was shown to trigger cell cycle arrest, to inhibit clonal growth and to promote medulloblastoma cell differentiation. microRNA-9 is a methylation-silenced tumour suppressor that could be a potential candidate predictive marker for poor prognosis of medulloblastoma. Loss of microRNA-9 may confer a proliferative advantage to tumour cells, and it could possibly contribute to disease pathogenesis. Thus, re-expression of microRNA-9 may constitute a novel epigenetic regulation strategy against medulloblastoma.

  18. Bevacizumab and Irinotecan in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma, or Low Grade Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-23

    Childhood Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma

  19. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Seo

    Full Text Available Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5 that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information.

  20. Radiotherapy of medulloblastoma combined with OK-432 (Picibanil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Yoshiro

    1986-01-01

    The OK-432 group consists of 8 Medulloblastoma patients, 5 Pinealoma patients and 1 Pons glioma patient, while the historical control group consists of 12 Medulloblastoma patients who have been treated only with radiation at NIRS. The frequency of the week when the value of white blood cell counts decreased below 2,500 was 13 weeks per 98 weeks of total observation period (13.3 %) in the OK-432 group. However, it was 37 weeks per 103 weeks (35.9 %) in the control group. The frequency of the week when the value of the platelet counts decreased below 10 x 10 4 was 5 weeks per 98 weeks (5.1 %) in the OK-432 group, while it was 21 weeks per 103 weeks (20.4 %) in the control group. The OK-432 group received 54.4 ± 3.3 Gy/ 34 ± 2 fractions/ 51 ± 4 days to the cerebellar tumor, except a one-year-old girl who received only a half of the radiation dose as the other patients who were older than 5 years, while the control group received 47.2 ± 7.3 Gy/ 34 ± 7 fractions/ 49 ± 10 days. In terms of TDF, the OK-432 group received 83.5 ± 8.7 and the control group received 63.5 ± 10.2, whereby the difference between the OK-432 group and the control group is statistically significant at 2 % level. To the spinal cord, the OK-432 group received 27.1 ± 3.1 Gy/ 27 ± 5 fractions/ 41 ± 9 days, while the control group received 25.4 ± 7.5 Gy/ 27 ± 13 fractions/ 43 ± 25 days. The survival rate of 8 Medulloblastoma patients treated with radiation combined with OK-432 is as follows : the relative survival rate is 75.1 % in one year, 62.5 % in 3 years and 62.5 % in 5 years, in contrast to the rate of 73.3 % in one year, 20.0 % in 3 years and 20.0 % in 5 years in the control group. (J.P.N.)

  1. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resolution of the hematoma was confirmed with a computed tomography (CT) scan. Headache and other symptoms not referable to spinal pathology should be regarded as a warning sign of an intracranial subdural hematoma, and a CT scan of the head should be obtained. The mechanism of the development of the hematoma may be related to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid with subsequent intracranial hypotension leading to an expanding subdural space and hemorrhage.

  2. Chronic subdural hematoma : a systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Weiming; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    Object. In this paper the authors systematically evaluate the results of different surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methods. The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other databases were scrutinized according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting

  3. 'Subarachnoid cyst' after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Low Y Y; Wai Hoe, N G

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a 'subarachnoid cyst' after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the 'cyst' is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this 'cyst' develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a 'subarachnoid cyst' post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature.

  4. Recurrence of Subdural Haematoma in a Population-Based Cohort - Risks and Predictive Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Linnea; Gørtz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risks of and identify predictors for recurrent subdural haematoma in surgically and conservatively treated patients. METHODS: The cohort comprised all individuals diagnosed with a first-time subdural hematoma in Denmark 1996-2011. Information on potential predictors...... was retrieved from the Danish health registers. Cumulative recurrence risks were estimated using the Aalen-Johansen estimator. Rate ratios (RR) were estimated using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Among 10,158 individuals with a subdural hematoma, 1,555 had a recurrent event. The cumulative risk of recurrent...... subdural hematoma was 9% at 4 weeks after the primary bleeding, increasing to and stabilising at 14% after one year. Predictors associated with recurrence were: Male sex (RR 1.60, 95% CI:1.43-1.80), older age (>70 years compared to 20-49 years; RR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21-1.65), alcohol addiction (RR 1.20, 95...

  5. Surgical options for treatment of traumatic subdural hematomas in children younger than 2 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, José Roberto Tude; Di Rocco, Federico; Bourgeois, Marie; Puget, Stephanie; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Sainte-Rose, Christian; Meyer, Philippe G; Zerah, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common finding on cranial CT in pediatric victims of abusive head trauma (AHT). The hematomas are commonly bilateral and sometimes associated with interhemispheric hyperdensity and/or convexity hemorrhages. There is no consensus regarding the best surgical treatment in such cases nor are there standardized surgical protocols. The authors report their experience and discuss the routine surgical options in the management of traumatic SDH at a Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center. In this paper, the authors describe a cross-sectional study with consecutive revision of data described in the medical records of Hôpital Universitaire Necker-Enfants Malades between January 2008 and January 2013. During this period, all children younger than 2 years of age who were admitted with a traumatic SDH identified on CT scans were included in this study. One hundred eighty-four children who had SDH and were younger than 2 years of age were included. Their median age was 5.8 months (range 5 days-23 months), and 70% of the children were male. On admission CT scans, the SDH was bilateral in 52% of cases and homogeneously hypodense in 77%. Neurosurgical treatment was undertaken in 111 children (60%) with an admission Glasgow Coma Scale score of 12 or less, bulging fontanels, or other signs suggestive of intracranial hypertension. The first surgical option was craniotomy in 1.8% (2) of these 111 cases, decompressive craniectomy in 1.8% (2), transcutaneous subdural puncture in 15% (17), external subdural drainage in 16% (18), subdural-subgaleal shunt placement in 17% (19), and subdural-peritoneal shunt placement in 48% (53). In 82% of the children initially treated with transcutaneous subdural puncture and in 50% of those treated with external subdural drainage, increase or persistence of the SDH, CSF or skin infection, or shunt system malfunction was observed and further surgical intervention was required. There was a 26% rate of complications in patients

  6. Chronic subdural hematoma: A survey of neurosurgeons’ practices in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Taopheeq B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a commonly encountered condition in neurosurgical practice. In Nigeria, a developing country, patients with CSDH are less likely to be diagnosed and treated by surgical drainage early. Aware of the reported variations in neurosurgeons’ practices regarding CSDH in many parts of the world, we sought to determine the current practices of Nigerian neurosurgeons in managing CSDH. Methods: An Internet-based survey was carried out in which all Nigerian neurosurgeons listed in the Nigerian Academy of Neurological Surgeons directory during the July–December 2012 time period were asked to participate. Questions asked in the survey were: (1) Type of treatment used in patients with CSDH, (2) Use of drains postoperatively, (3) Postoperative patient positioning, (4) Postoperative mobilization, (5) Postoperative complications, and (6) Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan monitoring. Results: Survey information was sent to the 25 practicing neurosurgeons in Nigeria who met the criteria listed above for being included in this study. Each of the 14 neurosurgeons who responded reported that CSDH is often misdiagnosed initially, usually as a stroke having occurred. Once a diagnosis of CSDH was made, the most common method of treatment reported was placement of one or two burr-holes for drainage of the hematoma. Reported, but used in only a few cases, were twist drill craniostomy, craniectomy, and craniotomy. Each neurosurgeon who responded reported irrigation of the subdural space with sterile saline, and in some cases an antibiotic had been added to the irrigation solution. Six of the 14 neurosurgeons left drains in the subdural space for 24-72 hours. Seven neurosurgeons reported positioning patients with their heads elevated 30° during the immediate postoperative period. No neurosurgeon responding reported use of steroids, and only one acknowledged routine use of anticonvulsive medication for patients with CSDH. Only 3 of

  7. Chronic subdural hematoma: A survey of neurosurgeons' practices in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Taopheeq B

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a commonly encountered condition in neurosurgical practice. In Nigeria, a developing country, patients with CSDH are less likely to be diagnosed and treated by surgical drainage early. Aware of the reported variations in neurosurgeons' practices regarding CSDH in many parts of the world, we sought to determine the current practices of Nigerian neurosurgeons in managing CSDH. An Internet-based survey was carried out in which all Nigerian neurosurgeons listed in the Nigerian Academy of Neurological Surgeons directory during the July-December 2012 time period were asked to participate. Questions asked in the survey were: (1) Type of treatment used in patients with CSDH, (2) Use of drains postoperatively, (3) Postoperative patient positioning, (4) Postoperative mobilization, (5) Postoperative complications, and (6) Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan monitoring. Survey information was sent to the 25 practicing neurosurgeons in Nigeria who met the criteria listed above for being included in this study. Each of the 14 neurosurgeons who responded reported that CSDH is often misdiagnosed initially, usually as a stroke having occurred. Once a diagnosis of CSDH was made, the most common method of treatment reported was placement of one or two burr-holes for drainage of the hematoma. Reported, but used in only a few cases, were twist drill craniostomy, craniectomy, and craniotomy. Each neurosurgeon who responded reported irrigation of the subdural space with sterile saline, and in some cases an antibiotic had been added to the irrigation solution. Six of the 14 neurosurgeons left drains in the subdural space for 24-72 hours. Seven neurosurgeons reported positioning patients with their heads elevated 30° during the immediate postoperative period. No neurosurgeon responding reported use of steroids, and only one acknowledged routine use of anticonvulsive medication for patients with CSDH. Only 3 of the 14 neurosurgeons taking part in

  8. Medulloblastoma in adults. A retrospective single institution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadi, Indrawati; Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Niyazi, Maximilian; Nachbichler, Silke Birgit [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Munich (Germany); Roeder, Falk [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Munich (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Molecular Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schueller, Ulrich [University Medical Center, Institute of Neuropathology, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Research Institute Children' s Cancer Center, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Belka, Claus [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Munich (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Munich (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    Adult medulloblastoma is a rare disease treated according to the current pediatric treatment guidelines. This retrospective analysis investigated the clinical outcomes and prognostic factors of adult medulloblastoma patients, who received multimodal therapy at our institution. Treatment charts of all patients over the age of 15 years of age with de novo medulloblastoma, who had been treated at our institution between 2001 and 2014, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients' demographic parameters, initial symptoms, treatment modalities, toxicities, and survival outcomes were investigated. In all, 21 patients with a median age of 30.2 years were identified. The most frequent histologies were desmoplastic and classic, and the most common molecular subtype was sonic hedgehog (SHH). After tumor resection, all patients received craniospinal irradiation (median dose 35.2 Gy) and a boost to the posterior fossa (median dose 19.8 Gy). Simultaneous chemotherapy with vincristine was given to 20 patients and sequential chemotherapy to 15 patients. The most common side effects were hematological toxicities. Median overall survival (OS) has not been reached after a median follow-up of 92 months. Estimated 5- and 10-year OS was 89 and 80%, respectively. Estimated 5- and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 89 and 81%, respectively. In univariate analysis, a shorter interval between tumor resection and end of irradiation was significantly associated with improved OS and PFS, anaplastic histology with worse OS and PFS. The combined modality treatment showed a good outcome in adults with medulloblastoma. Treatment time was revealed to be prognostic and should be kept as short as possible. (orig.) [German] Das Medulloblastom des Erwachsenen ist eine seltene Erkrankung, die analog paediatrischer Behandlungsprotokolle therapiert wird. Diese retrospektive Analyse untersuchte die klinischen Ergebnisse und prognostischen Faktoren von erwachsenen Medulloblastompatienten, die eine

  9. The whole-genome landscape of medulloblastoma subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A.; Buchhalter, Ivo; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Hovestadt, Volker; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Groebner, Susanne; Segura-Wang, Maia; Zichner, Thomas; Rudneva, Vasilisa; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Sidiropoulos, Nikos; Phillips, Aaron H.; Schumacher, Steven; Kleinheinz, Kortine; Waszak, Sebastian M.; Erkek, Serap; Jones, David T.W.; Worst, Barbara C.; Kool, Marcel; Zapatka, Marc; Jäger, Natalie; Chavez, Lukas; Hutter, Barbara; Bieg, Matthias; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Heinold, Michael; Gu, Zuguang; Ishaque, Naveed; Jäger-Schmidt, Christina; Imbusch, Charles D.; Jugold, Alke; Hübschmann, Daniel; Risch, Thomas; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Gonzalez, Francisco German Rodriguez; Weber, Ursula D.; Wolf, Stephan; Robinson, Giles W.; Zhou, Xin; Wu, Gang; Finkelstein, David; Liu, Yanling; Cavalli, Florence M.G.; Luu, Betty; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Wu, Xiaochong; Koster, Jan; Ryzhova, Marina; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Herold-Mende, Christel; Schuhmann, Martin; Ebinger, Martin; Liau, Linda M.; Mora, Jaume; McLendon, Roger E.; Jabado, Nada; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Chuah, Eric; Ma, Yussanne; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Mungall, Karen L.; Thiessen, Nina; Tse, Kane; Wong, Tina; Jones, Steven J.M.; Witt, Olaf; Milde, Till; Von Deimling, Andreas; Capper, David; Korshunov, Andrey; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Kriwacki, Richard; Gajjar, Amar; Zhang, Jinghui; Beroukhim, Rameen; Fraenkel, Ernest; Korbel, Jan O.; Brors, Benedikt; Schlesner, Matthias; Eils, Roland; Marra, Marco A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.; Lichter, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Summary Current therapies for medulloblastoma (MB), a highly malignant childhood brain tumor, impose debilitating effects on the developing child, warranting deployment of molecularly targeted treatments with reduced toxicities. Prior studies failed to disclose the full spectrum of driver genes and molecular processes operative in MB subgroups. Herein, we detail the somatic landscape across 491 sequenced MBs and molecular heterogeneity amongst 1,256 epigenetically analyzed cases, identifying subgroup-specific driver alterations including previously unappreciated actionable targets. Driver mutations explained the majority of Group 3 and Group 4 patients, remarkably enhancing previous knowledge. Novel molecular subtypes were differentially enriched for specific driver events, including hotspot in-frame insertions targeting KBTBD4 and ‘enhancer hijacking’ driving PRDM6 activation. Thus, application of integrative genomics to an unprecedented cohort of clinical samples derived from a single childhood cancer entity disclosed a series of new cancer genes and biologically relevant subtype diversity that represent attractive therapeutic targets for treating MB patients. PMID:28726821

  10. Middle fossa arachnoid cyst with temporal lobe agenesis accompanying isodense subdural hematoma -a case report-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Hyung Sik; Kim, Myung Joon; Yang, Seoung Oh; Kim, Chang Jin [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-12-15

    Cysts overlying the temporal lobes have been well described in literature. These are often associated with agenesis of the temporal lobes, and of major neurosurgical interest due to their frequent association with subdural hematoma, a combination that is rarely seen with cysts in other regions. Full features of plain, angiographic, and CT findings of arachnoid cyst with temporal lobe agenesis accompanying isodense subdural hematoma are presented, being very rare in radiologic literature.

  11. Kernohan-Woltman notch phenomenon and intention tremors in case of chronic subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasikala P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are atypical and rare presentation of chronic subdural hematomas. We report a case of 60 year man who presented with intention tremors and altered sensorium. The patient had Kernohan-Woltman notch phenomenon on clinical examination. CT scan brain showed a large left fronto-temporo-parietal chronic subdural hematoma with significant mass effect and midline shift. His symptoms relieved completely after surgical evacuation of the hematoma.

  12. Iatrogenic Spinal Subdural Hematoma due to Apixaban: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Colell

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the clinical relevance for developing safer oral anticoagulants prompted the development of new classes of drugs that have shown a lower risk of life-threatening bleeding events as compared to standard warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma is an uncommon urgent complication that can be associated with the use of these agents. An unusual case of spinal subdural hematoma related to apixaban treatment for nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation is reported here.

  13. Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas in the posterior cranial fossa revealed by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollo, C.; Porchet, F.; Meuli, R.

    2003-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman treated for acute myeloproliferative disease developed progressive stupor. CT showed obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from unexplained mass effect on the fourth ventricle. MRI revealed bilateral extra-axial collections in the posterior cranial fossa, giving high signal on T1- and T2-weighted images, suggesting subacute subdural haematomas. Subdural haematomas can be suspected on CT when there is unexplained mass effect. MRI may be essential to confirm the diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  14. Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections after pediatric posterior fossa tumor resection: incidence, imaging, and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harreld, J H; Mohammed, N; Goldsberry, G; Li, X; Li, Y; Boop, F; Patay, Z

    2015-05-01

    Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections in children after posterior fossa tumor resection may temporarily hinder metastasis detection by MR imaging or CSF analysis, potentially impacting therapy. We investigated the incidence, imaging and clinical features, predisposing factors, and time course of these collections after posterior fossa tumor resection. Retrospective review of postoperative spine MRI in 243 children (5.5 ± 4.6 years of age) from our clinical data base postresection of posterior fossa tumors from October 1994 to August 2010 yielded 37 (6.0 ± 4.8 years of age) subjects positive for postoperative intraspinal subdural collections. Their extent and signal properties were recorded for postoperative (37/37), preoperative (15/37), and follow-up spine (35/37) MRI. Risk factors were compared with age-matched internal controls (n = 37, 5.9 ± 4.5 years of age). Associations of histology, hydrocephalus and cerebellar tonsillar herniation, and postoperative intracranial subdural collections with postoperative intraspinal subdural collections were assessed by the Fisher exact test or χ(2) test. The association between preoperative tumor volume and postoperative intraspinal subdural collections was assessed by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The overall incidence of postoperative intraspinal subdural collections was 37/243 (15.2%), greatest ≤7 days postoperatively (36%); 97% were seen 0-41 days postoperatively (12.9 ± 11.0 days). They were T2 hyperintense and isointense to CSF on T1WI, homogeneously enhanced, and resolved on follow-up MR imaging (35/35). None were symptomatic. They were associated with intracranial subdural collections (P = .0011) and preoperative tonsillar herniation (P = .0228). Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections are infrequent and clinically silent, resolve spontaneously, and have a distinctive appearance. Preoperative tonsillar herniation appears to be a predisposing factor. In this series, repeat MR imaging by 4 weeks

  15. Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas in the posterior cranial fossa revealed by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollo, C.; Porchet, F. [Department of Neurosurgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, R. [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2003-08-01

    A 52-year-old woman treated for acute myeloproliferative disease developed progressive stupor. CT showed obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from unexplained mass effect on the fourth ventricle. MRI revealed bilateral extra-axial collections in the posterior cranial fossa, giving high signal on T1- and T2-weighted images, suggesting subacute subdural haematomas. Subdural haematomas can be suspected on CT when there is unexplained mass effect. MRI may be essential to confirm the diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  16. Anticoagulation therapy a risk factor for the development of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspegren, Oskar P.; Åstrand, Ramona; Lundgren, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy.......Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy....

  17. Evaluation of the intraspinal enhancement for medulloblastoma on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the enhancement pattern of the spinal cord for patients with medulloblastoma, and to correlate the enhancement pattern with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tumor seeding. We retrospectively reviewed 84 MR images, including the initial and follow-up studies after chemotherapy or radiation therapy, of 25 patients with medulloblastoma who were aged from 2 to 13 years. We analyzed the spinal leptomeningeal enhancement pattern on the MR images. The leptomeningeal enhancement patterns were categorized into three types: Type, I, fine or discontinuous linear enhancement, and type II, continuous linear or nodular enhancement, and type III, intradural mass formation. We correlated the enhancement pattern on MRI with the results of CSF cytology at the initial and follow-up examinations after treatment. Of total 25 patients, type I enhancement was observed for 14 patients. Twelve patients were negative on the initial CSF cytology and 2 patients were positive. On the follow-up MR studies, 14 patients showed no change or only a slight decrease of enhancement, and all were negative on the follow-up CSF cytology. Type II enhancement patterns were observed in seven patients, and all of them were positive on the initial CSF cytology. On follow-up MR study, one patient revealed an increased enhancement with the positive result on the follow-up CSF cytology, and six patients had decreased enhancement on the follow-up MR studies with negative conversion on the follow-up CSF cytology. Type III enhancement patterns were observed in four patients and all of them were positive on the initial CSF cytology. All four patients with tradural mass formations revealed progression of the lesions on follow-up MR studies, and all of them were positive on the follow-up CSF cytology. Type II and III enhancement patterns always represented CSF seeding and a type I enhancement pattern had a low probability of metastasis

  18. Further characterization of the ABR gene in medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright-White, E.C.; Haken, M.S. von; McDonald J.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Although brain tumors are the most common type of solid cancer in children, little is known about their etiology at the molecular genetic level. Using a panel of 20 chromosome 17p markers, we have previously determined that loss of distal chromosome 17p DNA sequences occurs in 14 of 35 specimens (40%) of medulloblastoma, one of the most common pediatric intracranial neoplasms. Analysis of these same tumors using a PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technique has shown only two p53 gene mutations. These results suggest that a tumor suppressor gene in addition to p53 may be located on distal chromosome 17p. Consensus deletion mapping of our specimens suggests that the smallest site of chromosomal loss in defined distally by marker 144-D6, the most telomeric probe as yet identified on chromosome 17p, and proximally by the ABR marker, a BCR homologous gene containing two highly polymorphic VNTR regions. We have used fluorescence in situ hybridization and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine that the ABR gene lies transcriptionally oriented 5{prime} to 3{prime} at a distance of 240 kb from marker 144-D6. We have also constructed a cosmid contig map spanning 120 kb of this region. Using one of these cosmids as a probe, we have detected breakpoints in three of the tumor specimens that lie between the two VNTR regions within the ABR gene. We have subsequently designed PCR primers to cover the breakpoint region which include the ABR exons which have the strongest homology to the BCR gene (Mbcr region), and are screening our tumor specimens for mutations. These results suggest that loss of ABR gene sequences may be involved in the etiology of medulloblastoma.

  19. Pre-Irradiation Chemotherapy in High Risk Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-El-Aal, H.

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: The present study evaluates the effect of pre-irradiation chemotherapy in pediatric patients with high risk medulloblastoma. Twenty-four (24) pediatric patients attended the pediatric unit of Kasr-EI-Aini Center of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine (NEMROCK) from January 2000 to January 2003. Patients and Methods: Our patients were 13 boys and II girls aged 3-12 years with a median of 6.5 years. According to Chang staging system 6 cases had T2, 14 cases had T3 A and 4 cases had T3 B, 20 cases were M0, 3 cases were M I and I case was M2. All patients were treated by initial surgery, 2 cycles of pre-irradiation chemotherapy followed by craniospinal radiation then by 4 cycles of post-radiation chemotherapy. Results: Fifteen out of the 20 patients with M0 had objective response (10CR + 5PR) and no one had disease progression after pre-irradiation chemotherapy. Among 4 patients with M0 disease, 2 patients had PR and 2 had S.D. There was no disease progression among patients who received pre-irradiation chemotherapy. The 3-year overall survival and 3-year progression-free survival; (PFS) were 50% and 51 %, respectively, Myelosuppression was the main toxic effect observed during pre-irradiation chemotherapy; however, there was no delay or interruption of craniospinal irradiation. Conclusion: Pre-irradiation chemotherapy is effective in high risk medulloblastoma and is associated with acceptable side effects. The delay in craniospinal irradiation (CSI) for about 5 weeks to receive 2 courses of chemotherapy will not significantly increase disease progression. Multiple cycles of post-irradiation chemotherapy can be given safely after C51. A larger number of patients and longer follow-up is needed to confirm the results

  20. The significance of delayed contrast-enhanced CT in chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Hideharu; Ohya, Shigeru; Ueno, Junji; Watanabe, Saburo; Mikabe, Toshio

    1983-01-01

    We have previously, reported our delayed contrast-enhanced CT (DCECT) findings in traumatic subdural hygromas and chronic subdural hematomas. The purpose of this report is to clarify the relationship between the contrast media within subdural hematomas and the delayed enhancement. The clinical subjects were 35 cases of traumatic subdural hematomas. DCECT examinations were performed in all cases. The concentrations of the contrast media within the hematoma were measured during the operations. DCECT showed that the density of the hematomas increased 3 to 6 hours after the injection of the contrast media. The contrast media were detected within the hematomas a few hours after the injection. The contrast media were still present 24 hours after the injection, but disappeared in 48 hours. These findings suggest that contrast media go in and then come out of the subdural hematomas and that the main factor related to delayed enhancement is the concentration of the contrast media within the hematomas. DCECT examination may be most helpful in evaluating the dynamic changes in subdural collections. (author)

  1. Computed tomographic evolution of post-traumatic subdural hygroma in young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuzawa, T.; Sato, F.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report on two cases of post-traumatic subdural hygroma that were encountered in young adults. Serial computed tomograms were taken immediately following trauma and for more than 4 weeks thereafter. In the case of a 28-year-old man with a skull fracture, an initial CT scan revealed a thin crescentic subdural collection in the right frontal area. A successive CT scan on the 36th postoperative day revealed developed subdural hygroma, and the CSF-like fluid was surgically evacuated. In the second case, involving an 18-year-old man, a very thin bifrontal subdural collection was found on the initial CT scan, and on the 15th post-traumatic day CT scan demonstrated a bifrontal subdural hygroma. No surgical treatment was carried out, and the follow-up CT scan on the 29th post-traumatic day demonstrated no change in size. The two young patients were slightly symptomatic during the period involved, and the repeat unenchanced CT scans showed subdural lesions of less than brain density, even in the chronic stage. (orig.)

  2. Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Historical and Clinical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Goshtasbi, Khodayar; Mahmoodi, Amin; Tran, Diem K; Chen, Jefferson W

    2017-12-01

    This review aims to highlight the clinical complexity of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) while presenting a brief historical discussion of cSDH. A thorough literature search of published English-language papers was performed in PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane databases. cSDH affects 1-5.3 per 100,000 individuals annually, with the incidence expected to rise as the U.S. population ages. The symptoms of cSDH are often nonspecific, with headaches being the most common complaint. Other symptoms include weakness, balance and gait problems, and memory problems. A variety of clinical factors must be taken into account in the treatment of cSDH, and the multifaceted treatment paradigms continue to evolve. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. MiR-34a deficiency accelerates medulloblastoma formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, Theresa; Künkele, Annette; Pajtler, Kristian W; Wefers, Annika K; Stephan, Harald; Mestdagh, Pieter; Heukamp, Lukas; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Vandesompele, Jo; Sadowski, Natalie; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Racz, Ildiko; Zimmer, Andreas; Beckers, Johannes; Neff, Frauke; Klopstock, Thomas; De Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo; Wurst, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Schüller, Ulrich; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Eggert, Angelika; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have evaluated the role of miRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. MiR-34a was found to be downregulated in several tumors, including medulloblastomas. Here we employed targeted transgenesis to analyze the function of miR-34a in vivo. We generated mice with a constitutive deletion of the miR-34a gene. These mice were devoid of mir-34a expression in all analyzed tissues, but were viable and fertile. A comprehensive standardized phenotypic analysis including more than 300 single parameters revealed no apparent phenotype. Analysis of miR-34a expression in human medulloblastomas and medulloblastoma cell lines revealed significantly lower levels than in normal human cerebellum. Re-expression of miR-34a in human medulloblastoma cells reduced cell viability and proliferation, induced apoptosis and downregulated the miR-34a target genes, MYCN and SIRT1. Activation of the Shh pathway by targeting SmoA1 transgene overexpression causes medulloblastoma in mice, which is dependent on the presence and upregulation of Mycn. Analysis of miR-34a in medulloblastomas derived from ND2:SmoA1(tg) mice revealed significant suppression of miR-34a compared to normal cerebellum. Tumor incidence was significantly increased and tumor formation was significantly accelerated in mice transgenic for SmoA1 and lacking miR-34a. Interestingly, Mycn and Sirt1 were strongly expressed in medulloblastomas derived from these mice. We here demonstrate that miR-34a is dispensable for normal development, but that its loss accelerates medulloblastomagenesis. Strategies aiming to re-express miR-34a in tumors could, therefore, represent an efficient therapeutic option. © 2014 UICC.

  4. Predictors of rapid spontaneous resolution of acute subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Kenji; Otsuka, Tadahiro; Yoshizato, Kimio; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) usually requires emergency surgical decompression, but rare cases exhibit rapid spontaneous resolution. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify factors predictive of spontaneous ASDH resolution. A total of 366 consecutive patients with ASDH treated between January 2006 and September 2012 were identified in our hospital database. Patients with ASDH clot thickness >10mm in the frontoparietotemporal region and showing a midline shift >10mm on the initial computed tomography (CT) scan were divided into two groups according to subsequent spontaneous resolution. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors predictive of rapid spontaneous ASDH resolution. Fifty-six ASDH patients met study criteria and 18 demonstrated rapid spontaneous resolution (32%). Majority of these patients were not operated because of poor prognosis/condition and in accordance to family wishes. Univariate analysis revealed significant differences in use of antiplatelet agents before head injury and in the incidence of a low-density band between the hematoma and inner wall of the skull bone on the initial CT. Use of antiplatelet agents before head injury (OR 19.6, 95% CI 1.5-260.1, p=0.02) and the low-density band on CT images (OR 40.3, 95% CI 3.1-520.2, p=0.005) were identified as independent predictive factors by multivariate analysis. Our analysis suggested that use of antiplatelet agents before head injury and a low-density band between the hematoma and inner skull bone on CT images (indicative of cerebrospinal fluid infusion into the subdural space) increase the probability of rapid spontaneous resolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Shedding new light on rapidly resolving traumatic acute subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Magdalene; Patel, Atul; Castro-Moure, Federico; Victorino, Gregory P

    2017-11-01

    Rapidly resolving acute subdural hematomas (RRASDHs) have been described in case reports and case series but are still poorly understood. We hypothesized that a cohort analysis would confirm previously reported predictors of RRASDH including coagulopathy, additional intracranial hemorrhage, and low-density band on imaging. We also hypothesized that rapid resolution would be associated with improved trauma outcomes. We reviewed all nonoperative acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) treated at our center from 2011 to 2015. Inclusion criteria were ASDH on computed tomography (CT), admission Glasgow coma score >7, and repeat CT to evaluate ASDH change. RRASDH was defined as reduced hematoma thickness by 50% within 72 h. Clinical data, CT findings, and trauma end points were analyzed for the RRASDH and nonresolving groups. There were 154 ASDH patients included, with 29 cases of RRASDH. The RRASDH group had a lower rate of comorbidities than the nonresolving group (58.6% versus 78.4%, P = 0.03) and a lower rate of prehospital anticoagulation (7.7% versus 37.1%, P = 0.004). Previously reported predictors of RRASDH did not differ between the groups, nor did any clinical outcome measures. When compared with patients who experienced rapid growth (>50% increased width in 72 h), the RRASDH group had lower mortality (3.4% versus 23.5%, P = 0.04). To our knowledge, this is the largest review of RRASDHs. We identified two previously unrecognized factors that may predict resolution; however, previously reported predictors were not associated with resolution. We also found no relationship between RRASDHs and improved standard trauma outcomes, calling into question the clinical significance of RRASDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prospects for conservative treatment of chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio

    1982-01-01

    111 In-DTPA was injected into the hematoma cavity before and after hematoma evacuation and irrigation in 12 cases of chronic subdural hematoma with comparatively mild symptoms. The radioactivity in the head was measure with time using a scintillation counter and the attenuation rate was obtained. The value measured hourly were expressed as ratios of the 1st measured value. Because of the properties of 111 In-DTPA, this attenuation rate was considered to be the absorption rate of the liqid components of the hematoma. In 8 of the preoperative cases, the average measured values, were 84.8 +- 12.6% after 3 hours, 77.3 +- 12.1% after six hours, 34.5 +- 13.8% after 24 hours and 13.3 +- 13.5% after 48 hours. In six of the postoperative cases, the values were 70.4 +- 14.3% after 3 hours, 47.8 +- 10.8% after 6 hours, 12.4 +- 6.7% after 24 hours and 3.6 +- 2.0% after 48 hours. In a comparison between the two, the postoperative cases showed clearly advanced absorption with a significant difference at a risk factor of 0.1% or less in each case. This is because the osmotic pressure is the same for the liquid in the hematoma, the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid and an explanation based on this alone is difficult; it is neccessary to consider colloid osmotic pressure. When the radioactivities in the liquid in the hematoma, blood and cerebrospinal fluid were measured, the values for the blood were always higher than those for the cerebrospinal fluid and most of the absorption of the hematoma is considered to originate in the vascular bed in the hematoma cavity (sinusoidal channel layer). Therefore, for the conservative treatment of chronic subdural hematomas, it is necessary to consider methods which promote absorption of the hematoma. (J.P.N.)

  7. Multicenter pilot study of radio-chemotherapy as first-line treatment for adults with medulloblastoma (NOA-07)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagmar, Dagmar; Proescholdt, Martin; Reinert, Christiane

    2018-01-01

    Background: Medulloblastoma in adult patients is rare, with 0.6 cases per million. Prognosis depends on clinical factors and medulloblastoma entity. No prospective data on the feasibility of radio-chemotherapy exist. The German Neuro-Oncology Working Group (NOA) performed a prospective descriptiv...

  8. Analysis of Risk Factor for the Development of Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Patients with Traumatic Subdural Hygroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jun Hyong; Jun, Hyo Sub; Kim, Ji Hee; Oh, Jae Keun; Song, Joon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although a high incidence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) following traumatic subdural hygroma (SDG) has been reported, no study has evaluated risk factors for the development of CSDH. Therefore, we analyzed the risk factors contributing to formation of CSDH in patients with traumatic SDG. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients admitted to Hallym University Hospital with traumatic head injury from January 2004 through December 2013. A total of 45 patients with these injuries in which traumatic SDG developed during the follow-up period were analyzed. All patients were divided into two groups based on the development of CSDH, and the associations between the development of CSDH and independent variables were investigated. Results Thirty-one patients suffered from bilateral SDG, whereas 14 had unilateral SDG. Follow-up computed tomography scans revealed regression of SDG in 25 of 45 patients (55.6%), but the remaining 20 patients (44.4%) suffered from transition to CSDH. Eight patients developed bilateral CSDH, and 12 patients developed unilateral CSDH. Hemorrhage-free survival rates were significantly lower in the male and bilateral SDG group (log-rank test; p=0.043 and p=0.013, respectively). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed male (OR, 7.68; 95% CI 1.18–49.78; p=0.033) and bilateral SDG (OR, 8.04; 95% CI 1.41–45.7; p=0.019) were significant risk factors for development of CSDH. Conclusion The potential to evolve into CSDH should be considered in patients with traumatic SDG, particularly male patients with bilateral SDG. PMID:27847577

  9. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-B signaling reduces growth in medulloblastoma in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deckard Lindsey A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant pediatric brain tumor that requires surgery, whole brain and spine irradiation, and intense chemotherapy for treatment. A more sophisticated understanding of the pathophysiology of medulloblastoma is needed to successfully reduce the intensity of treatment and improve outcomes. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB is a signaling pathway that controls transcriptional activation of genes important for tight regulation of many cellular processes and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer. Methods To test the importance of NFκB to medulloblastoma cell growth, the effects of multiple drugs that inhibit NFκB, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfasalazine, curcumin and bortezomib, were studied in medulloblastoma cell lines compared to a malignant glioma cell line and normal neurons. Expression of endogenous NFκB was investigated in cultured cells, xenograft flank tumors, and primary human tumor samples. A dominant negative construct for the endogenous inhibitor of NFκB, IκB, was prepared from medulloblastoma cell lines and flank tumors were established to allow specific pathway inhibition. Results We report high constitutive activity of the canonical NFκB pathway, as seen by Western analysis of the NFκB subunit p65, in medulloblastoma tumors compared to normal brain. The p65 subunit of NFκB is extremely highly expressed in xenograft tumors from human medulloblastoma cell lines; though, conversely, the same cells in culture have minimal expression without specific stimulation. We demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of NFκB in cell lines halts proliferation and leads to apoptosis. We show by immunohistochemical stain that phosphorylated p65 is found in the majority of primary tumor cells examined. Finally, expression of a dominant negative form of the endogenous inhibitor of NFκB, dnIκB, resulted in poor xenograft tumor growth, with average tumor volumes

  10. Indian Society of Neuro-Oncology consensus guidelines for the contemporary management of medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Sarkar, Chitra; Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Chatterjee, Sandip; Shirsat, Neelam; Muzumdar, Dattatreya; Pungavkar, Sona; Chinnaswamy, Girish; Jalali, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    The high success rate in the management medulloblastoma achieved in the western world is not exactly mirrored in developing countries including India. Socio-demographic differences, health-care disparity, and lack in uniformity of care with resultant widespread variations in the clinical practice are some of the reasons that may partly explain this difference in outcomes. Patients with medulloblastoma require a multi-disciplinary team approach involving but not limited to neuro-radiology, neurosurgery; neuropathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, pediatric medical oncology and rehabilitative services for optimizing outcomes. The Indian Society of Neuro-Oncology (ISNO) constituted an expert multi-disciplinary panel with adequate representation from all stakeholders to prepare national consensus guidelines for the contemporary management of medulloblastoma. Minimum desirable, as well as preferable though optional recommendations (as appropriate), were developed and adopted for the pre-surgical work-up including neuroimaging; neurosurgical management including surgical principles, techniques, and complications; neuropathology reporting and molecular testing; contemporary risk-stratification in the molecular era; appropriate adjuvant therapy (radiotherapy and chemotherapy); and follow-up schedule in medulloblastoma. The current document represents a broad consensus reached amongst various stakeholders within the neuro-oncology community involved in the contemporary curative-intent management of children with medulloblastoma. It provides both general as well as specific guidelines and recommendations to be adopted by physicians and health care providers across India to achieve uniformity of care, improve disease-related outcomes, and compare results between institutions within the country.

  11. Concurrent IDH1 and SMARCB1 Mutations in Pediatric Medulloblastoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moatasem El-Ayadi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1 is a driver gene in several cancers including brain tumors such as low-grade and high-grade gliomas. Mutations of SMARCB1 were described in atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors and to date have not been associated with the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma. We report concurrent IDH1 and SMARCB1 mutations in a medulloblastoma patient. We searched the catalog of somatic mutations in cancer (COSMIC database and other mutation databases and -to our knowledge- this is the first reported case of medulloblastoma harboring both mutations together. Our patient is a 13-year-old male presenting with headache and vomiting at diagnosis. MRI revealed left cerebellar expansive lesion with no evidence of metastasis. A histopathological diagnosis of desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma was made after complete resection of the tumor. Immunophenotypic characterization and methylation profiling suggested a medulloblastoma with SHH activation. Next generation sequencing of a panel of 400 genes revealed heterozygous somatic IDH1(p.R132C, SMARCB1(p.R201Q, and CDH11(p.L625T mutations. The patient was treated according to the HIT-SIOP PNET 4 protocol. He is in complete remission more than 2 years after diagnosis. In conclusion, increasing use of high throughput sequencing will certainly increase the frequency with which rare mutations or mutation combinations are identified. The exact frequency of this mutation combination and whether it has any particular therapeutic implications or prognostic relevance requires further investigation.

  12. Medulloblastoma in an Adult With Late Extraneural Metastases to the Mediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhimanyu Ghose MD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Medulloblastoma, although the most common brain tumor of childhood, is exceedingly rare in adults. These tumors have a propensity for local recurrence and to metastasize along the leptomeninges; however, extraneural metastases are very rare and typically occur in the bone or bone marrow. We have not come across any case in literature of medulloblastoma with mediastinal metastases in an adult. Case Presentation. We report a case of medulloblastoma in a 38-year-old lady who was treated with surgery followed by craniospinal radiation. Ten years later she presented with hoarseness from true vocal cord paralysis. She was diagnosed to have infiltrating metastases of her medulloblastoma to the mediastinum, which was confirmed by biopsy. There was no local recurrence. This was treated with chemotherapy followed by stem cell rescue, and she remained progression free for 2 years. Conclusion. Medulloblastomas are rare in adults and can present with late extraneural metastases following treatment. Although most common reported sites are bone and bone marrow, late metastases to other unexpected areas like the mediastinum are possible too and warrant awareness. This can be treated with chemotherapy followed by high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell rescue in a young patient with good performance status.

  13. Post meningitis subdural hygroma: Anatomical and functional evaluation with 99mTc-ehylene cysteine dimer single photon emission tomography/computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Punit; Mishra, Ajiv; Arora, Geetanjali; Tripathi, Madhavi; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Subdural hygroma is the collection of cerebrospinal fluid in the subdural space. Most often these resolve spontaneously. However, in cases with neurological complications surgical drainage may be needed. We here, present the case of an 8-year-old boy with post meningitis subdural hygroma. 99mTc-ehylene cysteine dimer (99mTc-ECD) hybrid single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) carried out in this patient, demonstrated the subdural hygroma as well as the associated cereb...

  14. Subdural enhancement on postoperative spinal MRI after resection of posterior cranial fossa tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmuth-Metz, M.; Solymosi, L. [Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Klinikum der Bayerischen Julius Maximilians Universitaet, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 11, 97080, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kuehl, J. [Paediatric Oncology, Klinikum der Bayerischen Julius Maximilians Universitaet, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 11, 97080, Wuerzburg (Germany); Krauss, J. [Paediatric Neurosurgery, Klinikum der Bayerischen Julius Maximilians Universitaet, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 11, 97080, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    In malignant brain tumours which may disseminate staging, usually by cranial and spinal MRI is necessary. If MRI is performed in the postoperative period pitfalls should be considered. Nonspecific subdural contrast enhancement on spinal staging MRI is rarely reported after resection of posterior fossa tumours, which may be mistaken for dissemination of malignancy. We investigated the frequency of spinal subdural enhancement after posterior cranial fossa neurosurgery in children. We reviewed 53 postoperative spinal MRI studies performed for staging of paediatric malignant brain tumours, mainly infratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours 2-40 days after surgery. There was contrast enhancement in the spinal subdural space in seven cases. This was not seen in any of eight patients who had been operated upon for a supratentorial tumour. After resection of 45 posterior cranial fossa tumours the frequency of subdural enhancement was 15.5%. MRI showing subdural enhancement was obtained up to 25 days postoperatively. No patient with subdural enhancement had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations positive for tumour cells or developed dissemination of disease in the CSF. Because the characteristic appearances of subdural contrast enhancement, appropriate interpretation is possible; diagnosis of neoplastic meningitis should rarely be impeded. Because of the striking similarity to that in patients with a low CSF-pressure syndrome and in view of the fact that only resection of tumours of the posterior cranial fossa, usually associated with obstructive hydrocephalus, was followed by this type of enhancement one might suggest that rapid changes in CSF pressure are implicated, rather the effects of blood introduced into the spinal canal at surgery. (orig.)

  15. Reversible Parkinson-Like Symptoms in Patient with Bilateral Chronic Subdural Hematomas and Cervical Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guppy, Kern H; Khandhar, Suketu M; Ochi, Calvin

    2018-01-01

    Gait abnormalities have been seen in patients with Parkinson disease or Parkinson-like (P-L) disorders and cervical spinal stenosis. Acute presentation of P-L symptoms has been reported in 24 cases caused by chronic subdural hematomas with 11 cases due to bilateral chronic subdural hematomas. When a patient also presents with cervical spinal stenosis, the correct therapeutic decision between P-L disorders and myelopathy is challenging. An 80-year-old male presented with a 2-week history of weakness in his left leg. A few days before presentation, his gait had deteriorated quite dramatically. Neurologic examination showed mild leg weakness, hyperreflexia, and a gait that was slow and wide based, at times festinating but with relatively spared arm movement. He also had masked facial features with increased tone in his extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed cervical stenosis at C5-6, and computed tomography of the head showed large bilateral subdural hematomas. The subdural hematomas were drained. Immediate improvement in his symptoms was observed with complete resolution by his third month of follow-up. The patient never had a history of Parkinson disease. This paper reports for the first time a patient who presented with acute P-L symptoms and cervical myelopathy with findings of both bilateral chronic subdural hematomas and cervical spinal stenosis. The decision to drain the subdural hematoma in our case resulted in full recovery of the patient's gait and other extrapyramidal symptoms. This paper reviews the literature on reversible P-L symptoms caused by bilateral chronic subdural hematomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Subdural enhancement on postoperative spinal MRI after resection of posterior cranial fossa tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmuth-Metz, M.; Solymosi, L.; Kuehl, J.; Krauss, J.

    2004-01-01

    In malignant brain tumours which may disseminate staging, usually by cranial and spinal MRI is necessary. If MRI is performed in the postoperative period pitfalls should be considered. Nonspecific subdural contrast enhancement on spinal staging MRI is rarely reported after resection of posterior fossa tumours, which may be mistaken for dissemination of malignancy. We investigated the frequency of spinal subdural enhancement after posterior cranial fossa neurosurgery in children. We reviewed 53 postoperative spinal MRI studies performed for staging of paediatric malignant brain tumours, mainly infratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours 2-40 days after surgery. There was contrast enhancement in the spinal subdural space in seven cases. This was not seen in any of eight patients who had been operated upon for a supratentorial tumour. After resection of 45 posterior cranial fossa tumours the frequency of subdural enhancement was 15.5%. MRI showing subdural enhancement was obtained up to 25 days postoperatively. No patient with subdural enhancement had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations positive for tumour cells or developed dissemination of disease in the CSF. Because the characteristic appearances of subdural contrast enhancement, appropriate interpretation is possible; diagnosis of neoplastic meningitis should rarely be impeded. Because of the striking similarity to that in patients with a low CSF-pressure syndrome and in view of the fact that only resection of tumours of the posterior cranial fossa, usually associated with obstructive hydrocephalus, was followed by this type of enhancement one might suggest that rapid changes in CSF pressure are implicated, rather the effects of blood introduced into the spinal canal at surgery. (orig.)

  17. Analysis on the risk factors of bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi JIANG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the risk factors of bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion.  Methods The clinical data of children with bacterial meningitis in our hospital were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the risk factors for subdural effusion.  Results A total of 128 cases were divided into control group (N = 64 and subdural effusion group (N = 64. There was no significant difference on serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and white blood cell (WBC between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. Compared with control group, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF WBC (Z = 3.126, P = 0.003, CSF protein (Z = 4.928, P = 0.000 and serum procalcitonin (PCT; Z = 2.823, P = 0.007 in subdural effusion group were significantly higher, while CSF glucose (t = 2.166, P = 0.033 was significantly lower. After treatment, CSF WBC (Z = 2.467, P = 0.012 in subdural effusion group was still significantly higher than that of control group, and CSF glucose (t = 4.938, P = 0.000 was still significantly lower. Logistic regression analysis showed that WBC in CSF (P = 0.027, CSF protein (P = 0.002 and serum PCT (P = 0.014 were independent risk factors for bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion.  Conclusions CSF examination of children with bacterial meningitis reveals significant increase of CSF WBC, CSF protein and serum PCT, suggesting concurrent subdural effusion is easily occurred. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.08.012

  18. Progressive ototoxicity after combined modality treatment of medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, S.C.; Neault, M.; Billett, A.E.; LaVally, B.; Scott, R.M.; Sallan, S.E.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Prospective study to evaluate the response rate, survival and toxicity of pre-irradiation chemotherapy in the treatment of children with seeding CNS tumors. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with medulloblastoma were enrolled on a prospective pre-irradiation chemotherapy protocol between 1984 and 1990. Patients (Median age 9.5 years; 29 males, 13 females) received post-operative chemotherapy [cisplatinum 100 mg/m2 q 3 weeks) and vincristine (1.5 mg/m2 weekly) for 9 weeks. Infants (4 patients) received nitrogen mustard (6 mg/m2), procarbazine (100 mg/m2) and vincristine (1.5 mg/m2) until age two followed by craniospinal radiation (CSI). Forty-one patients received CSI with ≥ 50 Gy to the posterior fossa (PF). The median doses to the whole brain, PF, and spine were 33.8 Gy, 55.3 Gy, 27.8 Gy, respectively. Results: Five-year overall survival was 86% and event-free survival was 65% (median follow-up for survivors, 61 months). Thirteen of 15 patients with complete surgical resection documented by post-operative imaging remained free of disease during chemotherapy (CT), and were considered unevaluable for response to CT. The response rate (complete plus partial) to pre-irradiation CT was 45% ((13(29))). Ten patients had stable disease and 6 had progressive disease (PD). Three of 6 patients with PD were long-term survivors after CSI. Thirteen patients relapsed with a median time to failure of 14.5 months. Sites of failure were PF (5 pts), spinal cord (3 pts), CNS/meninges (3 pts), PF/spinal cord (1 pt), and bone metastasis (1 pt). Ototoxicity analysis was performed using 24 patients who had normal hearing in the better ear before chemotherapy and at least one follow-up audiogram for comparison after therapy. 17 patients had an audiogram immediately after CT, and 71% of pts ((12(17))) had high frequency hearing impairment beginning in 3000-8000 Hz range. 18% ((3(17))) had hearing loss in the 500-2000 Hz range necessitating a hearing aid post-CT. 22

  19. Differential diagnosis of frontal lobe atrophy from chronic subdural hematoma or subdural hygroma on CT in aged patients. Usefulness of CT cisternogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Hideaki [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-02-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternograms (CTC) were performed in order to examine the CSF passage to subarachnoid space, cerebral sulci and Sylvian fissure. The old aged 20 patients (from 63 to 88 years old) with the layer of low density area around bilateral frontal lobe (bi-frontal LDA) in plain CT finding were selected from 2000 aged patients hospitalized in Hanwa-Senboku Hospital. In these 20 patients, it was difficult to differentiate frontal lobe atrophy from the chronic subdural hematoma and subdural hygroma. Conservative therapy was applied in 19 patients for their old age or their complicated diseases. Only 1 patient was operated for subdural hygroma. The 20 patients were investigated in EEGs, severity of dementia, disturbance of consciousness, activity of daily life, their clinical course and prognosis. Only 2 of the 11 patients with type 1 CTC findings (cerebral sulci, Sylvian fissure and bi-frontal LDA were simultaneously enhanced by metrizamide) showed disturbance of consciousness and/or delirium for their serious somatic disorders. All of 6 patients with type 3 CTC findings (only bi-frontal LDA was not enhanced by metrizamide) showed disturbance of consciousness. Three patients with type 2 CTC findings (atypical findings) were reported independently. Subdural disorder elevating intracranial pressure were clarified in the cases with type 3 CTC findings. (author).

  20. Differential diagnosis of frontal lobe atrophy from chronic subdural hematoma or subdural hygroma on CT in aged patients. Usefulness of CT cisternogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideaki

    1995-01-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternograms (CTC) were performed in order to examine the CSF passage to subarachnoid space, cerebral sulci and Sylvian fissure. The old aged 20 patients (from 63 to 88 years old) with the layer of low density area around bilateral frontal lobe (bi-frontal LDA) in plain CT finding were selected from 2000 aged patients hospitalized in Hanwa-Senboku Hospital. In these 20 patients, it was difficult to differentiate frontal lobe atrophy from the chronic subdural hematoma and subdural hygroma. Conservative therapy was applied in 19 patients for their old age or their complicated diseases. Only 1 patient was operated for subdural hygroma. The 20 patients were investigated in EEGs, severity of dementia, disturbance of consciousness, activity of daily life, their clinical course and prognosis. Only 2 of the 11 patients with type 1 CTC findings (cerebral sulci, Sylvian fissure and bi-frontal LDA were simultaneously enhanced by metrizamide) showed disturbance of consciousness and/or delirium for their serious somatic disorders. All of 6 patients with type 3 CTC findings (only bi-frontal LDA was not enhanced by metrizamide) showed disturbance of consciousness. Three patients with type 2 CTC findings (atypical findings) were reported independently. Subdural disorder elevating intracranial pressure were clarified in the cases with type 3 CTC findings. (author)

  1. Medulloblastoma in adults: treatment results and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abacioglu, Ufuk; Uzel, Omer; Sengoz, Meric; Turkan, Sedat; Ober, Ahmet

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the treatment outcome and prognostic factors of adult medulloblastoma patients who received postoperative craniospinal irradiation (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 2000, 30 adult patients (17 men and 13 women, age ≥16 years, median 27, range 16-45) underwent postoperative RT. The median duration of symptoms was 2 months (range 1-9). The tumor location was lateral in 16 (53%). A desmoplastic variant was seen in 12 (40%). Tumor resection was complete in 20 (67%) and incomplete in 10 (33%). All patients received craniospinal RT. The median dose to the whole brain was 40 Gy (range 36-51), to the posterior fossa 54 Gy (range 49-56), and to the spinal axis 36 Gy (range 24-40). The median interval between surgery and the start of RT was 31 days (range 12-69), and the median duration of RT was 45 days (range 34-89). Ten patients (33%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 51 months (range 5-215). Results: The 5- and 8-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 65% and 51% and 63% and 50%, respectively. Twelve patients (40%) developed relapse, with a median follow-up of 51 months. The posterior fossa was the most common site of relapse (6 patients). The median time to relapse was 26 months (range 4-78). Fifty percent of the relapses occurred after 2 years, 17% after 5 years. In univariate analysis, M stage and the interval between surgery and the start of RT were significant prognostic factors for disease-free survival. At 5 years, 70% of M0 patients were estimated to be disease-free, but none of the 3 M3 patients reached 5 years without recurrence (p=0.0002). The 5-year disease-free survival rate for the patients whose interval between surgery and the start of RT was 6 weeks was 0%, 85%, and 75%, respectively (p=0.002). The 5-year posterior fossa control rate for patients who received ≥54 Gy or <54 Gy to the posterior fossa was 91% and 33%, respectively (p=0.05). Conclusion: The survival results

  2. Survivin as a therapeutic target in Sonic hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, S N; Markant, S L; Esparza, L A; Garcia, G; Terry, D; Huang, J-M; Pavlyukov, M S; Li, X-N; Grant, G A; Crawford, J R; Levy, M L; Conway, E M; Smith, L H; Nakano, I; Berezov, A; Greene, M I; Wang, Q; Wechsler-Reya, R J

    2015-07-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is a highly malignant brain tumor that occurs primarily in children. Although surgery, radiation and high-dose chemotherapy have led to increased survival, many MB patients still die from their disease, and patients who survive suffer severe long-term side effects as a consequence of treatment. Thus, more effective and less toxic therapies for MB are critically important. Development of such therapies depends in part on identification of genes that are necessary for growth and survival of tumor cells. Survivin is an inhibitor of apoptosis protein that regulates cell cycle progression and resistance to apoptosis, is frequently expressed in human MB and when expressed at high levels predicts poor clinical outcome. Therefore, we hypothesized that Survivin may have a critical role in growth and survival of MB cells and that targeting it may enhance MB therapy. Here we show that Survivin is overexpressed in tumors from patched (Ptch) mutant mice, a model of Sonic hedgehog (SHH)-driven MB. Genetic deletion of survivin in Ptch mutant tumor cells significantly inhibits proliferation and causes cell cycle arrest. Treatment with small-molecule antagonists of Survivin impairs proliferation and survival of both murine and human MB cells. Finally, Survivin antagonists impede growth of MB cells in vivo. These studies highlight the importance of Survivin in SHH-driven MB, and suggest that it may represent a novel therapeutic target in patients with this disease.

  3. Deletion and aberrant CpG island methylation of Caspase 8 gene in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Pilar; Bello, M Josefa; Inda, M Mar; Alonso, M Eva; Arjona, Dolores; Amiñoso, Cinthia; Lopez-Marin, Isabel; de Campos, Jose M; Sarasa, Jose L; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2004-09-01

    Aberrant methylation of promoter CpG islands in human genes is an alternative genetic inactivation mechanism that contributes to the development of human tumors. Nevertheless, few studies have analyzed methylation in medulloblastomas. We determined the frequency of aberrant CpG island methylation for Caspase 8 (CASP8) in a group of 24 medulloblastomas arising in 8 adult and 16 pediatric patients. Complete methylation of CASP8 was found in 15 tumors (62%) and one case displayed hemimethylation. Three samples amplified neither of the two primer sets for methylated or unmethylated alleles, suggesting that genomic deletion occurred in the 5' flanking region of CASP8. Our findings suggest that methylation commonly contributes to CASP8 silencing in medulloblastomas and that homozygous deletion or severe sequence changes involving the promoter region may be another mechanism leading to CASP8 inactivation in this neoplasm.

  4. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome with medulloblastoma and meningioma. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Yutaka; Oka, Hidehiro; Utsuki, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Kazuhisa; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2004-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a rare case of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or Gorlin's syndrome, associated with both medulloblastoma and meningioma, manifesting as visual field constriction due to multiple parasellar tumors. He had undergone resection of a medulloblastoma at the age of 1 year 9 months, followed by adjunctive irradiation with a total dose of 40 Gy. He presented with multiple subcutaneous nodules on his face and neck. Histological examination of biopsy specimens established the diagnosis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Tuberculum sellae meningioma was removed through a craniotomy, and his symptoms improved. Meningioma is known to occur in the field of therapeutic irradiation, so chemotherapy may be a better option for medulloblastoma associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. (author)

  5. Dicer Is Required for Normal Cerebellar Development and to Restrain Medulloblastoma Formation.

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    Frederique Zindy

    Full Text Available Dicer, a ribonuclease III enzyme, is required for the maturation of microRNAs. To assess its role in cerebellar and medulloblastoma development, we genetically deleted Dicer in Nestin-positive neural progenitors and in mice lacking one copy for the Sonic Hedgehog receptor, Patched 1. We found that conditional loss of Dicer in mouse neural progenitors induced massive Trp53-independent apoptosis in all proliferative zones of the brain and decreased proliferation of cerebellar granule progenitors at embryonic day 15.5 leading to abnormal cerebellar development and perinatal lethality. Loss of one copy of Dicer significantly accelerated the formation of mouse medulloblastoma of the Sonic Hedgehog subgroup in Patched1-heterozygous mice. We conclude that Dicer is required for proper cerebellar development, and to restrain medulloblastoma formation.

  6. Goldenhar syndrome and medulloblastoma: a coincidental association? The first case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizenbud, Dror; Shoham, Natasha V; Constantini, Shlomi; Nevo, Neta; Ben Arush, Myriam; Raz, Michal; Rachmiel, Adi; Goldsher, Dorit

    2014-07-01

    Features of Goldenhar syndrome include several craniofacial anomalies of structures derived from the first and second pharyngeal arches, as well as vertebral, cardiac and renal systems abnormalities. In addition, Goldenhar patients were reported to manifest a variety of central nervous system anomalies and several types of neoplasias. The first case of medulloblastoma in a patient with Goldenhar syndrome is presented here. There is no clear association between these two pathologies. We speculate that aberrant events during the migration of neural crest cells in early stages of development could be the basis of an association between medulloblastoma and Goldenhar syndrome. The case history suggests other possible etiological contributing factors to the development of medulloblastoma, such as patient's history of trauma and/or early childhood exposure to ionizing radiation. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cauda equina syndrome as the initial presenting clinical feature of medulloblastoma: a case report

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    Al-Otaibi Faisal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Medulloblastoma is one of the most common pediatric brain malignancies. The usual presenting clinical features are related to posterior fossa syndrome or/and hydrocephalus. Cauda equina syndrome is a very rare presentation for this disease. Case presentation We describe the case of a three-year-old boy with cauda equina syndrome as the initial presenting clinical feature for medulloblastoma. He was initially diagnosed as having a spinal tumor by magnetic resonance imaging scan. Subsequently, a cranial magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a posterior fossa tumor with features of dissemination. He had substantial improvement after treatment. This case report is complemented by a literature review related to this unusual presentation. Conclusions Medulloblastoma primarily presenting with cauda equina syndrome is very rare. However, spinal drop metastasis should be considered in the pediatric age group to avoid suboptimal management.

  8. Chronic subdural hematoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical procedures.

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    Liu, Weiming; Bakker, Nicolaas A; Groen, Rob J M

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the authors systematically evaluate the results of different surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other databases were scrutinized according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) statement, after which only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs were included. At least 2 different neurosurgical procedures in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) had to be evaluated. Included studies were assessed for the risk of bias. Recurrence rates, complications, and outcome including mortality were taken as outcome measures. Statistical heterogeneity in each meta-analysis was assessed using the T(2) (tau-squared), I(2), and chi-square tests. The DerSimonian-Laird method was used to calculate the summary estimates using the fixed-effect model in meta-analysis. Of the 297 studies identified, 19 RCTs were included. Of them, 7 studies evaluated the use of postoperative drainage, of which the meta-analysis showed a pooled OR of 0.36 (95% CI 0.21-0.60; p < 0.001) in favor of drainage. Four studies compared twist drill and bur hole procedures. No significant differences between the 2 methods were present, but heterogeneity was considered to be significant. Three studies directly compared the use of irrigation before drainage. A fixed-effects meta-analysis showed a pooled OR of 0.49 (95% CI 0.21-1.14; p = 0.10) in favor of irrigation. Two studies evaluated postoperative posture. The available data did not reveal a significant advantage in favor of the postoperative supine posture. Regarding positioning of the catheter used for drainage, it was shown that a frontal catheter led to a better outcome. One study compared duration of drainage, showing that 48 hours of drainage was as effective as 96 hours of drainage. Postoperative drainage has the advantage of reducing recurrence without increasing complications

  9. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Turner, Ryan C.; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  10. Metabolic analysis of radioresistant medulloblastoma stem-like clones and potential therapeutic targets.

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    Lue Sun

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a fatal brain tumor in children, primarily due to the presence of treatment-resistant medulloblastoma stem cells. The energy metabolic pathway is a potential target of cancer therapy because it is often different between cancer cells and normal cells. However, the metabolic properties of medulloblastoma stem cells, and whether specific metabolic pathways are essential for sustaining their stem cell-like phenotype and radioresistance, remain unclear. We have established radioresistant medulloblastoma stem-like clones (rMSLCs by irradiation of the human medulloblastoma cell line ONS-76. Here, we assessed reactive oxygen species (ROS production, mitochondria function, oxygen consumption rate (OCR, energy state, and metabolites of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle in rMSLCs and parental cells. rMSLCs showed higher lactate production and lower oxygen consumption rate than parental cells. Additionally, rMSLCs had low mitochondria mass, low endogenous ROS production, and existed in a low-energy state. Treatment with the metabolic modifier dichloroacetate (DCA resulted in mitochondria dysfunction, glycolysis inhibition, elongated mitochondria morphology, and increased ROS production. DCA also increased radiosensitivity by suppression of the DNA repair capacity through nuclear oxidization and accelerated the generation of acetyl CoA to compensate for the lack of ATP. Moreover, treatment with DCA decreased cancer stem cell-like characters (e.g., CD133 positivity and sphere-forming ability in rMSLCs. Together, our findings provide insights into the specific metabolism of rMSLCs and illuminate potential metabolic targets that might be exploited for therapeutic benefit in medulloblastoma.

  11. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping in medulloblastoma predicts non-infiltrative surgical planes.

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    Marupudi, Neena I; Altinok, Deniz; Goncalves, Luis; Ham, Steven D; Sood, Sandeep

    2016-11-01

    An appropriate surgical approach for posterior fossa lesions is to start tumor removal from areas with a defined plane to where tumor is infiltrating the brainstem or peduncles. This surgical approach minimizes risk of damage to eloquent areas. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the current standard preoperative imaging obtained for diagnosis and surgical planning of pediatric posterior fossa tumors, it offers limited information on the infiltrative planes between tumor and normal structures in patients with medulloblastomas. Because medulloblastomas demonstrate diffusion restriction on apparent diffusion coefficient map (ADC map) sequences, we investigated the role of ADC map in predicting infiltrative and non-infiltrative planes along the brain stem and/or cerebellar peduncles by medulloblastomas prior to surgery. Thirty-four pediatric patients with pathologically confirmed medulloblastomas underwent surgical resection at our facility from 2004 to 2012. An experienced pediatric neuroradiologist reviewed the brain MRIs/ADC map, assessing the planes between the tumor and cerebellar peduncles/brain stem. An independent evaluator documented surgical findings from operative reports for comparison to the radiographic findings. The radiographic findings were statistically compared to the documented intraoperative findings to determine predictive value of the test in identifying tumor infiltration of the brain stem cerebellar peduncles. Twenty-six patients had preoperative ADC mapping completed and thereby, met inclusion criteria. Mean age at time of surgery was 8.3 ± 4.6 years. Positive predictive value of ADC maps to predict tumor invasion of the brain stem and cerebellar peduncles ranged from 69 to 88 %; negative predictive values ranged from 70 to 89 %. Sensitivity approached 93 % while specificity approached 78 %. ADC maps are valuable in predicting the infiltrative and non-infiltrative planes along the tumor and brain stem interface in

  12. Outcome and prognostic factors of desmoplastic medulloblastoma treated within a multidisciplinary treatment concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieken, Stefan; Gaiser, Timo; Mohr, Angela; Welzel, Thomas; Witt, Olaf; Kulozik, Andreas E; Wick, Wolfgang; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2010-01-01

    Desmoplasia in medulloblastoma is often diagnosed in adult patients and was repeatedly associated with improved results. Today, all medulloblastoma patients receive intensive multimodal treatment including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This study was set up to investigate treatment outcome and prognostic factors after radiation therapy in patients with desmoplastic medulloblastomas. Twenty patients treated for desmoplastic medulloblastoma in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Heidelberg between 1984 and 2007 were included. Data were collected retrospectively. Tumor resection was performed in all patients. All patients underwent postsurgical radiotherapy (RT). Two patients underwent whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), and 18 patients received craniospinal irradiation (CSI). In all patients, an additional boost was delivered to the posterior fossa. The median dose to the whole brain and the craniospinal axis was 35.2 Gray (Gy), and 54.4 Gy to the posterior fossa. Fourteen patients received chemotherapy, including seven who were treated with combined radiochemotherapy and twelve who received adjuvant chemotherapy. Statistical analysis was performed using the log-rank test and the Kaplan-Meier method. Median follow-up was 59 months. Overall (OS), local (LPFS) and distant progression-free survival (DPFS) was 80%, 71.2%, and 83.3% at 60 months. Patients who suffered from local or distant relapses had significantly worse outcome. Five patients died from recurrent medulloblastoma. Treatment-associated toxicity was acceptable. Multimodal approaches with surgical resection followed by chemoirradiation achieved high response rates with long OS in desmoplastic medulloblastoma patients. Staging parameters expected to predict for poor prognosis did not significantly influence outcome. However, success of any first line regimen had strong impact on disease control, and remission was achieved in no patient with relapsing disease. Multimodal concepts

  13. The Effectiveness of Subdural Drains Using Urokinase after Burr Hole Evacuation of Subacute Subdural Hematoma in Elderly Patients: A Prelimilary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Chang-Gi; Jeon, Woo-Yeol; Kim, Seong-Ho; Kim, Oh-Lyong

    2016-01-01

    Objective A subdural drain using urokinase after a burr hole hematoma evacuation was performed for subacute subdural hematoma (SASDH), and its effectiveness and safety in elderly patients were evaluated. Methods Between January 2013 and May 2015, subdural drains using urokinase after burr hole hematoma evacuation were performed in 19 elderly patients. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) a subdural hematoma occurring between 4 and 20 days after injury; 2) worsening neurological symptoms, from mild to moderate or severe, due to injury during the subacute stage; 3) a mix of solid clots (high-density lighter shadow) and fluid hematoma (low-density darker shadow) on the computed tomography (CT) scan; 4) a score of ≥9 on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) assessed immediately before surgery; and 5) an age of ≥65 years. When the majority of the hematoma was evacuated on the CT, we removed the catheter. Results Under local anesthesia, a catheter was inserted into the hematoma through a burr hole. The mean age of the patients was 73.7 years (range, 65-87 years). The mean preoperative GCS score was 11.2 (range, 10-13), and the mean Glasgow Outcome Scale score for all patients was 5 at discharge. No recurrences of hematomas or surgical complications were observed. Conclusion A subdural drain using urokinase after burr hole hematoma evacuation under local anesthesia is thought to be an effective and safe method of blood clot removal with low morbidity. This surgical method is less invasive for treating elderly patients with SASDH. PMID:27857916

  14. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  15. [Retrospective statistical analysis of clinical factors of recurrence in chronic subdural hematoma: correlation between univariate and multivariate analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Motoharu; Terui, Keita; Oiwa, Yoshitsugu

    2012-10-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is common in elderly individuals and surgical procedures are simple. The recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma, however, varies from 9.2 to 26.5% after surgery. The authors studied factors of the recurrence using univariate and multivariate analyses in patients with chronic subdural hematoma We retrospectively reviewed 239 consecutive cases of chronic subdural hematoma who received burr-hole surgery with irrigation and closed-system drainage. We analyzed the relationships between recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma and factors such as sex, age, laterality, bleeding tendency, other complicated diseases, density on CT, volume of the hematoma, residual air in the hematoma cavity, use of artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Twenty-one patients (8.8%) experienced a recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. Multiple logistic regression found that the recurrence rate was higher in patients with a large volume of the residual air, and was lower in patients using artificial cerebrospinal fluid. No statistical differences were found in bleeding tendency. Techniques to reduce the air in the hematoma cavity are important for good outcome in surgery of chronic subdural hematoma. Also, the use of artificial cerebrospinal fluid reduces recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. The surgical procedures can be the same for patients with bleeding tendencies.

  16. Subdural Effusions with Hydrocephalus after Severe Head Injury: Successful Treatment with Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Placement: Report of 3 Adult Cases

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    N. Tzerakis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Subdural collections of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF with associated hydrocephalus have been described by several different and sometimes inaccurate terms. It has been proposed that a subdural effusion with hydrocephalus (SDEH can be treated effectively with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (V-P shunt. In this study, we present our experience treating patients with SDEH without directly treating the subdural collection. Methods. We treated three patients with subdural effusions and hydrocephalus as a result of a head injury. All the patients were treated with a V-P shunt despite the fact that there was an extra-axial CSF collection with midline shift. Results. In all of the patients, the subdural effusions subsided and the ventricular dilatation improved in the postoperative period. The final clinical outcome remains difficult to predict and depends not only on the successful CSF diversion but also on the primary and secondary brain insult. Conclusion. Subdural effusions with hydrocephalus can be safely and effectively treated with V-P shunting, without directly treating the subdural effusion which subsides along with the treatment of hydrocephalus. However, it is extremely important to make an accurate diagnosis of an SDEH and differentiate this condition from other subdural collections which require different management.

  17. Empyema of preexisting subdural hemorrhage caused by a rare salmonella species after exposure to bearded dragons in a foster home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarani, Christy M; Bennett, Nicholas J; Kiska, Deanna L; Riddell, Scott W; Botash, Ann S; Domachowske, Joseph B

    2010-02-01

    An infant had a subdural empyema caused by the rare Salmonella species enterica subspecies houtenae (IV) serotype 44:z4,z23:- after only indirect exposure to exotic reptiles in her foster home. Infants recovering from preexisting subdural hematoma are at risk for development of empyema. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Metastasis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma to the Membrane of Chronic Subdural Hematomas:A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshita, Jumpei; Ohba, Shinji; Itou, Yoko; Yonezawa, Koki; Hosogai, Masahiro

    2017-10-01

    An 81-year-old man presented with gait disturbance. Two months previously, he suffered from hepatocellular carcinoma and transarterial chemoembolization was performed. A head computed tomography(CT)scan revealed bilateral chronic subdural hematomas. The patient's gait disturbance was improved after achievement of bilateral burr hole drainage. A head CT two months after treatment revealed no recurrence of the hematomas. However, head CT images obtained four months after treatment revealed an abnormal mass in the right parietal region attached to the internal surface of the skull. The mass was located in the same region from where the chronic subdural hematomas were previously removed via burr hole drainage, and was suspected to have originated from the dura mater. We performed craniotomy and total removal of the mass. The dura mater was intact, and macroscopically, the mass originated from the organized membrane of the chronic subdural hematoma. A pathological examination revealed metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma to the membrane of the chronic subdural hematomas. Head magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)performed 39 days after craniotomy presented a new lesion in the left parietal region attached to the internal surface of the skull. The patient subsequently died 46 days post-operation. When examining chronic subdural hematomas in cancer patients, histological examination of the dura mater, hematoma, and membrane of the hematoma are important. The possibility of metastasis to the capsule of the hematoma should be considered.

  19. A case of acoustic neurinoma associated with chronic subdural hematoma after gamma knife radiosurgery

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    Sho, Atsuko; Asaeda, Masahiro; Ohtake, Minoru [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Inst. of Neurological Sciences] [and others

    2002-09-01

    A 72-year-old female presented with a unique case of acoustic neurinoma with a cystic component followed by the chronic subdural hematoma manifesting as trigeminal neuralgia, facial palsy and trunchal ataxia 7 months after gamma knife radiosurgery. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a loss of central contrast enhancement at the postoperative residual tumor mass and a large cyst associated with a hematoma in the subdural space. A right suboccipital craniectomy was performed. A biopsy of the mass and the membrane was performed following aspiration of the brown-reddish fluid collection. The histological diagnosis was acoustic neurinoma with a hemorrhagic necrosis. The membranous tissue mimicked an outer membrane obtained from chronic subdural hematoma. The postoperative course was satisfactory and preoperative symptom have been alleviated. In this case, the chronic subdural hematoma occurred at posterior fossa during the development of cysts caused by the radiosurgery, because the subdural space had been connected with the subarachnoid space after the first operation. The development of cysts or hematoma should be taken into consideration as possible complications following treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas. (author)

  20. Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Questionnaire Survey of Management Practice in India and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanali, Raghunath; Bhadran, Biju; Krishna Kumar, P; Vijayan, Abhishek; Arun, S; Musthafa, Aneeze M; Panchal, Sunil; Gopal, Vinu V

    2016-12-01

    To identify the current management modalities practiced by neurosurgeons in India for chronic subdural hematoma. A questionnaire was prepared for the survey and sent via e-mail to neurosurgeons. It covered the following aspects of managing chronic subdural hematoma: 1) demographic and institutional details; 2) choice of surgical procedure; 3) surgical adjutants such as placing a subdural drain; 4) pre- and postoperative care; and 5) recurrences and management. Responses obtained were entered in a SPSS data sheet and analyzed. Response rate of the survey was 9.3%. The majority of neurosurgeons (75%) preferred to do burr whole drainage for primary chronic subdural hematoma and also for recurrences. Only one third of routinely placed a subdural drain. Considerable practice variations exist for medical and perioperative management. Bedside twist drill drainage, which is effective and less costly than operative room procedures, has not gained popularity in practice. The present survey points towards the importance of making management guidelines for this common neurosurgical entity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A case of acoustic neurinoma associated with chronic subdural hematoma after gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sho, Atsuko; Asaeda, Masahiro; Ohtake, Minoru

    2002-01-01

    A 72-year-old female presented with a unique case of acoustic neurinoma with a cystic component followed by the chronic subdural hematoma manifesting as trigeminal neuralgia, facial palsy and trunchal ataxia 7 months after gamma knife radiosurgery. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a loss of central contrast enhancement at the postoperative residual tumor mass and a large cyst associated with a hematoma in the subdural space. A right suboccipital craniectomy was performed. A biopsy of the mass and the membrane was performed following aspiration of the brown-reddish fluid collection. The histological diagnosis was acoustic neurinoma with a hemorrhagic necrosis. The membranous tissue mimicked an outer membrane obtained from chronic subdural hematoma. The postoperative course was satisfactory and preoperative symptom have been alleviated. In this case, the chronic subdural hematoma occurred at posterior fossa during the development of cysts caused by the radiosurgery, because the subdural space had been connected with the subarachnoid space after the first operation. The development of cysts or hematoma should be taken into consideration as possible complications following treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas. (author)

  2. Neuroendoscopic Removal of Acute Subdural Hematoma with Contusion: Advantages for Elderly Patients

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    Ryota Tamura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Large craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma is sometimes too invasive. We report good outcomes for two cases of neuroendoscopic evacuation of hematoma and contusion by 1 burr hole surgery. Case Presentation. Both patients arrived by ambulance at our hospital with disturbed consciousness after falling. Case 1 was an 81-year-old man who took antiplatelet drugs for brain infarction. Case 2 was a 73-year-old alcoholic woman. CT scanning showed acute subdural hematoma and frontal contusion in both cases. In the acute stage, glycerol was administered to reduce edema; CTs after 48 and 72 hours showed an increase of subdural hematoma and massive contusion of the frontal lobe. Disturbed consciousness steadily deteriorated. The subdural hematoma and contusion were removed as soon as possible by neuroendoscopy under local anesthesia, because neither patient was a good candidate for large craniotomy considering age and past history. 40%~70% of the hematoma was removed, and the consciousness level improved. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic removal of acute subdural hematoma and contusion has advantages and disadvantages. For patients with underlying medical issues or other risk factors, it is likely to be effective.

  3. Medulloblastoma Presenting With Pure Word Deafness: Report of One Case and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ting Chou

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Pure word deafness (PWD is a rare disorder characterized by impaired verbal comprehension sparing discrimination and recognition of nonverbal sounds with relatively normal spontaneous speech, writing, and reading comprehension. Etiologies of this syndrome are varied, and there are rare reports about brain tumor with PWD in children. We report a case of medulloblastoma presented with PWD in a 7-year-old girl. She visited our outpatient clinic because of English dictation performance deterioration. PWD was diagnosed by the otolaryngologist after examinations. Posterior fossa tumor and obstructive hydrocephalus were shown in the magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. The diagnosis of medulloblastoma was then made by pathology.

  4. New perspectives in the treatment of adult medulloblastoma in the era of molecular oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Alba A; Bartolotti, Marco; Marucci, Gianluca; Ghimenton, Claudio; Agati, Raffaele; Fioravanti, Antonio; Mascarin, Maurizio; Volpin, Lorenzo; Ammannati, Franco; Masotto, Barbara; Gardiman, Marina Paola; De Biase, Dario; Tallini, Giovanni; Crisi, Girolamo; Bartolini, Stefania; Franceschi, Enrico

    2015-06-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common central nervous system tumor in children, while it is extremely rare in adults. Multimodal treatment involving surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy can improve the prognosis of this disease, and recent advances in molecular biology have allowed the identification of molecular subgroups (WNT, SHH, Groups 3 and 4), each of which have different cytogenetic, mutational and gene expression signatures, demographics, histology and prognosis. The present review focuses on the state of the art for adult medulloblastoma treatment and on novel molecular advances and their future implications in the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Recurrent medulloblastoma: Frequency of tumor enhancement on Gd-DTPA MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, N.; Mendelsohn, D.; Mulne, A.; Barton, R.; Diehl, J.; Reyes, N.; Sklar, F.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-two children with medulloblastoma were evaluated postoperatively with conventional and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Eleven patients had abnormal cranial MR studies; nine of these had recurrent tumor. In six patients recurrent tumor enhanced with Gd, while in the other three patients recurrent tumor did not enhance. The remaining two patients had areas of abnormal Gd enhancement that were caused by radiation-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier rather than by recurrent tumor. This study shows that not all recurrent medulloblastoma enhances and that the absence of Gd enhancement does not necessarily indicate the absence of recurrent tumor

  6. SIOP PODC adapted treatment recommendations for standard-risk medulloblastoma in low and middle income settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Jeannette; Hendricks, Marc; Ssenyonga, Peter; Mugamba, John; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Fieggen, Graham; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Howard, Scott; Mitra, Dipayan; Bouffet, Eric; Davidson, Alan; Bailey, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Effective treatment of children with medulloblastoma requires a functioning multi-disciplinary team with adequate neurosurgical, neuroradiological, pathological, radiotherapy and chemotherapy facilities and personnel. In addition the treating centre should have the capacity to effectively screen and manage any tumour and treatment-associated complications. These requirements have made it difficult for many low and middle-income countries (LMIC) centres to offer curative treatment. This article provides management recommendations for children with standard-risk medulloblastoma (localised tumours in children over the age of 3-5 years) according to the level of facilities available. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Influence of Postoperative Thrombosis Prophylaxis on the Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Burr-Hole Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licci, Maria; Kamenova, Maria; Guzman, Raphael; Mariani, Luigi; Soleman, Jehuda

    2018-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is a commonly encountered disease in neurosurgic practice, whereas its increasing prevalence is compatible with the ageing population. Recommendations concerning postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis after burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematoma are lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma and postoperative application of thrombosis prophylaxis. Retrospective, consecutive sample of patients undergoing burr-hole drainage for chronic subdural hematoma over 3 years. Single, academic medical center. All patients undergoing surgical evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma with burr-hole drainage. Exclusion: patients under the age of 18 years, who presented with an acute subdural hematoma and those who underwent a craniotomy. We compared patients receiving thrombosis prophylaxis treatment after burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematoma with those who were not treated. Primary outcome measure was reoperation of chronic subdural hematoma due to recurrence. Secondary outcome measures were thromboembolic and cardiovascular events, hematologic findings, morbidity, and mortality. In addition, a subanalysis comparing recurrence rate dependent on the application time of thrombosis prophylaxis ( 48 hr) was undertaken. Overall recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma was 12.7%. Out of the 234 analyzed patients, 135 (57.3%) received postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis (low-molecular-weight heparin) applied subcutaneously. Recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma occurred in the thrombosis prophylaxis group and control group in 12 patients (8.9%) and 17 patients (17.2%), respectively, showing no significant difference (odds ratio, 0.47 [95% CI, 0.21 - 1.04]). A subanalysis comparing recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma dependent on the application time of thrombosis prophylaxis ( 48 hr) showed no significant difference either (odds ratio, 2.80 [95% CI, 0

  8. Occurrence and prognosis of the medulloblastoma in adult persons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, H.D.; Wagner, W.; Haverkamp, U.; Schadel, A.

    1983-03-01

    Between 1962 and 1981, 37 patients with histologically proved medulloblastomas have been treated at the hospitals of the University of Muenster. 17 patients died immediately after the operation or were, when admitted, in such bad condition that any therapy was impossible. Since about 1972, the therapy of choice is surgery and post-irradiation of the neurocranium with saturating irradiation of the posterior cranial fossa as well as irradiation of the complete cerebrospinal system down to the second sacral vertebra, because the tumor tends to spinal formation of metastases. Among our patients, twelve were treated in this manner. Before this time, patients were only operated on and submitted to an irradiation of the posterior cranial fossa. Eight patients were treated according to this incomplete therapy scheme, five of whom were younger than twelve and three older than forty years. The tumor was situated in one side of the cerebellum in the three adult patients. The children had a shorter survival time than the adults, except one four years old child who has survived for 228 months since treatment and has to be considered as cured. Our medical records showed at the same time that the course of this disease is considerably worse in infants up to three years than in older patients.

  9. Occurence and prognosis of the medulloblastoma in adult persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, H.D.; Wagner, W.; Haverkamp, U.; Schadel, A.

    1983-01-01

    Between 1962 and 1981, 37 patients with histologically proved medulloblastomas have been treated at the hospitals of the University of Muenster. 17 patients died immediately after operation or were, when admitted, in such a bad condition that any therapy was impossible. Since about 1972, the therapy of choice is the operation and post-irradiation of the neurocranium with saturating irradiation of the posterior cranial fossa as well as irradiation of the complete cerebrospinal system down to the second sacral vertebra, because the tumor tends to spinal formation of metastases. Among our patients, twelve were treated in this manner. Before this time, patients were only operated and submitted to an irradiation of the posterior cranial fossa. Eight patients were treated according to this incomplete therapy scheme, five of whom were younger than twelve and three older than forty years. The tumor was situated in one side of the cerebellum in the three adult patients. The children had a shorter survival time than the adults, except one four years old child who survives already 228 months after the treatment and has to be considered as cured. Our medical records showed at the same time that the course of this disease is considerably worse in infants up to three years than in older patients. (orig.) [de

  10. Childhood subdural hemorrhage, macrocephaly, and coagulopathy associated with Prader-Willi syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Robert B; Khanna, Paritosh C; Saneto, Russell P

    2012-07-01

    A 16-month-old girl with a history of Prader-Willi syndrome and progressive macrocephaly manifested large, bilateral, subdural hemorrhages of differing ages on magnetic resonance imaging. Subsequent evaluation revealed a deficiency of von Willebrand factor, but after repeated evaluations, no conclusive evidence of nonaccidental trauma became apparent. Subdural hemorrhages of varying ages are frequently associated with nonaccidental trauma during early childhood. However, several uncommon conditions may present as subdural hemorrhages and thus mimic nonaccidental trauma. Our patient demonstrates a combination of Prader-Willi syndrome, von Willebrand factor deficiency, and enlargement of the extra-axial spaces. All of these in isolation were associated with subdural hemorrhages. We review the scant literature on subdural hemorrhages in Prader-Willi syndrome and other conditions that mimic nonaccidental trauma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bmi1 overexpression in the cerebellar granule cell lineage of mice affects cell proliferation and survival without initiating medulloblastoma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourinaz Behesti

    2013-01-01

    BMI1 is a potent inducer of neural stem cell self-renewal and neural progenitor cell proliferation during development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It is overexpressed in numerous human cancers – including medulloblastomas, in which its functional role is unclear. We generated transgenic mouse lines with targeted overexpression of Bmi1 in the cerebellar granule cell lineage, a cell type that has been shown to act as a cell of origin for medulloblastomas. Overexpression of Bmi1 in granule cell progenitors (GCPs led to a decrease in cerebellar size due to decreased GCP proliferation and repression of the expression of cyclin genes, whereas Bmi1 overexpression in postmitotic granule cells improved cell survival in response to stress by altering the expression of genes in the mitochondrial cell death pathway and of Myc and Lef-1. Although no medulloblastomas developed in ageing cohorts of transgenic mice, crosses with Trp53−/− mice resulted in a low incidence of medulloblastoma formation. Furthermore, analysis of a large collection of primary human medulloblastomas revealed that tumours with a BMI1high TP53low molecular profile are significantly enriched in Group 4 human medulloblastomas. Our data suggest that different levels and timing of Bmi1 overexpression yield distinct cellular outcomes within the same cellular lineage. Importantly, Bmi1 overexpression at the GCP stage does not induce tumour formation, suggesting that BMI1 overexpression in GCP-derived human medulloblastomas probably occurs during later stages of oncogenesis and might serve to enhance tumour cell survival.

  12. Midline Shift Threshold Value for Hemiparesis in Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juković, Mirela F; Stojanović, Dejan B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) has a variety of clinical presentations, with numerous neurological symptoms and signs. Hemiparesis is one of the leading signs that potentially indicates CSDH. Purpose of this study was to determine the threshold (cut-off) value of midsagittal line (MSL) shift after which hemiparesis is likely to appear. The study evaluated 83 patients with 53 unilateral and 30 bilateral CSDHs in period of three years. Evaluated computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with CSDH were diameter of the hematoma and midsagittal line shift, measured on non-contrast CT scan in relation with occurrence of hemiparesis. Threshold values of MSL shift for both types of CSDHs were obtained as maximal (equal) sensitivity and specificity (intersection of the curves). MSL is a good predictor for hemiparesis occurrence (total sample, AUROC 0.75, p=0.0001). Unilateral and bilateral CSDHs had different threshold values of the MSL for hemiparesis development. Results suggested that in unilateral CSDH the threshold values of MSL could be at 10 mm (AUROC=0.65; p=0.07). For bilateral CSDH the threshold level of MSL shift was 4.5 mm (AUROC=0.77; p=0.01). Our study pointed on the phenomenon that midsagittal line shift can predict hemiparesis occurrence. Hemiparesis in patients with bilateral CSDH was more related to midsagittal line shift compared with unilateral CSDH. When value of midsagittal line shift exceed the threshold level, hemiparesis occurs with certain probability.

  13. MRI findings in spinal subdural and epidural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Petra [Department of Radiology, Hospital La Plana, Ctra. De Vila-real a Borriana km. 0.5, 12540 Vila-real (Castello) (Spain)], E-mail: PetraBraun@gmx.de; Kazmi, Khuram [Department of Radiology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Nogues-Melendez, Pablo; Mas-Estelles, Fernando; Aparici-Robles, Fernando [Department of Radiology, La Fe Hospital, Avenida Campanar, 21, 46009 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    Background: Spinal hematomas are rare entities that can be the cause of an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Therefore, an early diagnosis is of great importance. Patients and Methods: From 2001 to 2005 seven patients with intense back pain and/or acute progressive neurological deficit were studied via 1.5 T MRI (in axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted sequences). Follow-up MRI was obtained in six patients. Results: Four patients showed the MRI features of a hyperacute spinal hematoma (two spinal subdural hematoma [SSH] and two spinal epidural hematoma [SEH]), isointense to the spinal cord on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences. One patient had an early subacute SEH manifest as heterogeneous signal intensity with areas of high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. Another patient had a late subacute SSH with high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The final patient had a SEH in the late chronic phase being hypointense on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Discussion: MRI is valuable in diagnosing the presence, location and extent of spinal hematomas. Hyperacute spinal hematoma and the differentiation between SSH and SEH are particular diagnostic challenges. In addition, MRI is an important tool in the follow-up in patients with conservative treatment.

  14. Clinical studies on cerebral blood flow in chronic subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Atsuhiro; Akagi, Katsuhito; Horibe, Kunio; Yamasaki, Mami; Yuguchi, Takamichi

    1988-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and clinical symptoms were examined between pre- and post-operations in twenty-four patients with unilateral chronic subdural hematoma. The following results were obtained by intravenous /sup 133/Xe method : 1. There was a reducing tendency of the CBF (hemisphere) on hematoma side, in most cases. While, the groups of headache and disturbances of consciousness did not give a laterality between hematoma and opposite side without the group of hemiparesis. 2. The absolute values of the CBF in the groups of headache and disturbances of consciousness were correlated with the clinical symptoms. In the group of hemiparesis, the laterality between hematoma and opposite side was correlated with the clinical symptoms. 3. In the group of hemiparesis, the F-flow (fast-flow) had sensitive reaction more than the ISI (initial slope index) with symptomatic improvement. 4. It was found that there was not an increase in the absolute value of the CBF, which was under the normal limit between pre- and post-operations in the case without improvement. By SPECT (Method of IMP), the following results were obtained : 1. There was the area of defect at the location of hematoma and the CBF tended to reduce at the subcortical white matter and at the basal ganglia of hematoma side. 2. The CBF of the contralateral hematoma side in the hemisphere of cerebellum was also tended to reduce.

  15. MRI findings in spinal subdural and epidural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Petra; Kazmi, Khuram; Nogues-Melendez, Pablo; Mas-Estelles, Fernando; Aparici-Robles, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Background: Spinal hematomas are rare entities that can be the cause of an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Therefore, an early diagnosis is of great importance. Patients and Methods: From 2001 to 2005 seven patients with intense back pain and/or acute progressive neurological deficit were studied via 1.5 T MRI (in axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted sequences). Follow-up MRI was obtained in six patients. Results: Four patients showed the MRI features of a hyperacute spinal hematoma (two spinal subdural hematoma [SSH] and two spinal epidural hematoma [SEH]), isointense to the spinal cord on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences. One patient had an early subacute SEH manifest as heterogeneous signal intensity with areas of high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. Another patient had a late subacute SSH with high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The final patient had a SEH in the late chronic phase being hypointense on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Discussion: MRI is valuable in diagnosing the presence, location and extent of spinal hematomas. Hyperacute spinal hematoma and the differentiation between SSH and SEH are particular diagnostic challenges. In addition, MRI is an important tool in the follow-up in patients with conservative treatment

  16. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Elderly Patients: Is This Disease Benign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Masaaki; Toi, Hiroyuki; Hirai, Satoshi

    2017-08-15

    As the world population becomes progressively older, the overall incidence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is increasing. Peak age of onset for CSDH has also increased, and recently the 80-year-old level has a peak. Many patients with CSDH have had prior treatment with anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, which have an accompanying risk of CSDH. In elderly patients with CSDH, symptoms of cognitive change (memory disturbance, urinary incontinence, and decreased activity) and disturbance of consciousness at admission were more frequent compared to younger patients with CSDH. The literature actually offers conflicting advice regarding CSDH treatment; however, burr hole surgery with drainage under local anesthesia is the most common surgical procedure, even in elderly patients. The recurrence rate of CSDH has not decreased over recent decades, and it has ranged from 0.36-33.3%. Outcomes in patients over 75 years old was significantly worse than for those younger than 75. Moreover, long-term outcomes for elderly patients with CSDH are poor. CSDH in the elderly is no longer a benign disease. In the future, it will be important for us to understand the mechanisms of onset and recurrence of CSDH and to develop more effective medical treatments and noninvasive surgical techniques for elderly patients.

  17. Measurement of inflammatory cytokines and thrombomodulin in chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazono, Masatoshi; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Hidetaka; Onda, Hidetaka; Matsumoto, Gaku; Fuse, Akira; Teramoto, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and the coagulation system may influence the genesis of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The appearance of CSDH on computed tomography (CT) varies with the stage of the hematoma. This study investigated the pathogenesis and the recurrence of CSDH by comparing cytokine levels with the CT features of CSDH in 26 patients with 34 CSDHs who underwent single burr-hole surgery at our hospital between October 2004 and November 2006. The hematoma components removed during the procedure were examined, and the hematoma serum levels of cytokines measured such as thrombomodulin (TM), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Using CT, mixed density hematomas were distinguished from other homogeneous hematomas, and found that the TM level was significantly higher in mixed density hematomas than in homogeneous hematomas (p = 0.043). Mixed density hematomas were classified into three subtypes (laminar, separated, and trabecular hematomas). The TM level was significantly higher in laminar and separated hematomas than in other hematomas (p = 0.01). The levels of IL-6, TNFα, and IL-10 were extremely high, but showed no significant differences in relation to the CT features. Mixed density hematomas had high recurrence rate, as reported previously, and TM level was high in mixed density hematomas such as laminar and separated mixed density hematomas. The present findings suggest that the types of CSDH associated with high TM levels tend to have higher recurrence rate.

  18. Intrahemispheric subdural hematoma complicated with chronic neurologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakashita, Yasuo; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Fuse, Shigeru; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Toyokura, Yasuo

    1987-01-01

    Two patients had interhemispheric subdural hematoma (ISH) without clinical signs or symptoms characteristic of ISH. The first patient, a 74-year-old woman with 7 years' history of Parkinson's disease, complained of unresponsiveness and akinesia. The treatment for suspected worsening of the disease failed to improve her conditions. Computed tomography (CT) showed hyperdensity along the falx from the frontal falx over the tentorium. Subsequent CT on the 23rd hospital day showed disappearance of hyperdensity, confirming ISH. The second patient, a 76-year-old woman with multiple cerebral infarction, was referred for loss of consciousness and vomiting. Neurological examination failed to reveal additional or augmented neurological deficits. Computed tomography showed a right parasagittal thin crescent hyperdensity with a flat medial border and a convex lateral border, extending from the anterior falx to the mid-falx. The hyperdensity disappeared on the 47th hospital day. These findings suggest the usefulness of CT as the only procedure when ISH features are not seen. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Predict the Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOTO, Haruo; ISHIKAWA, Osamu; NOMURA, Masashi; TANAKA, Kentaro; NOMURA, Seiji; MAEDA, Keiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The exact predictive factors for postoperative recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) are still unknown. Based on the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), low recurrence rate of T1-hyperintensity hematoma was previously reported. We investigated the other types of radiological findings which are related to the recurrence rate of CSDH in large number of patients analyzed by multivariate logistic regression model. Preoperative MRI and postoperative computed tomography (CT) were performed and the influence of the preoperative use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs was also studied. The overall recurrence rate was 9.3% (47 of 505 hematomas). The MRI T1-iso/hypointensity group showed a significantly higher recurrence rate (18.2%, 29 of 159) compared to the other groups (5.2%, 18 of 346; p hematoma, antiplatelet or anticoagulant drug usage, residual hematoma on postoperative CT, and MRI classification (p hematoma and antiplatelet or anticoagulant drug usage did not increase the recurrence risk. The preoperative MRI findings, especially T1WI findings, have predictive value for postoperative recurrence of CSDH and the T1-iso/hypointensity group can be assumed to be a high recurrence risk group. PMID:25746312

  20. Critical role of zinc finger protein 521 in the control of growth, clonogenicity and tumorigenic potential of medulloblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Raffaella; Filocamo, Gessica; Iaccino, Enrico; Scicchitano, Stefania; Lupia, Michela; Chiarella, Emanuela; Mega, Tiziana; Bernaudo, Francesca; Pelaggi, Daniela; Mesuraca, Maria; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Semenkow, Samantha; Bar, Eli E; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan; Bond, Heather M; Eberhart, Charles G; Steinkühler, Christian; Morrone, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    The stem cell-associated transcription co-factor ZNF521 has been implicated in the control of hematopoietic, osteo-adipogenic and neural progenitor cells. ZNF521 is highly expressed in cerebellum and in particular in the neonatal external granule layer that contains candidate medulloblastoma cells-of-origin, and in the majority of human medulloblastomas. Here we have explored its involvement in the control of human and murine medulloblastoma cells. The effect of ZNF521 on growth and tumorigenic potential of human medulloblastoma cell lines as well as primary Ptc1-/+ mouse medulloblastoma cells was investigated in a variety of in vitro and in vivo assays, by modulating its expression using lentiviral vectors carrying the ZNF521 cDNA, or shRNAs that silence its expression. Enforced overexpression of ZNF521 in DAOY medulloblastoma cells significantly increased their proliferation, growth as spheroids and ability to generate clones in single-cell cultures and semisolid media, and enhanced their migratory ability in wound-healing assays. Importantly, ZNF521-expressing cells displayed a greatly enhanced tumorigenic potential in nude mice. All these activities required the ZNF521 N-terminal motif that recruits the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase complex, which might therefore represent an appealing therapeutic target. Conversely, silencing of ZNF521 in human UW228 medulloblastoma cells that display high baseline expression decreased their proliferation, clonogenicity, sphere formation and wound-healing ability. Similarly, Zfp521 silencing in mouse Ptc1-/+ medulloblastoma cells drastically reduced their growth and tumorigenic potential. Our data strongly support the notion that ZNF521, through the recruitment of the NuRD complex, contributes to the clonogenic growth, migration and tumorigenicity of medulloblastoma cells.

  1. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibition suppresses cell growth and enhances radiation sensitivity in medulloblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Peter S; Foreman, Nicholas K; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Alimova, Irina; Birks, Diane K; Donson, Andrew M; Knipstein, Jeffrey; Dubuc, Adrian; Taylor, Michael D; Handler, Michael H

    2012-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children and remains a therapeutic challenge due to its significant therapy-related morbidity. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is highly expressed in many cancers and regulates critical steps in mitotic progression. Recent studies suggest that targeting PLK1 with small molecule inhibitors is a promising approach to tumor therapy. We examined the expression of PLK1 mRNA in medulloblastoma tumor samples using microarray analysis. The impact of PLK1 on cell proliferation was evaluated by depleting expression with RNA interference (RNAi) or by inhibiting function with the small molecule inhibitor BI 2536. Colony formation studies were performed to examine the impact of BI 2536 on medulloblastoma cell radiosensitivity. In addition, the impact of depleting PLK1 mRNA on tumor-initiating cells was evaluated using tumor sphere assays. Analysis of gene expression in two independent cohorts revealed that PLK1 mRNA is overexpressed in some, but not all, medulloblastoma patient samples when compared to normal cerebellum. Inhibition of PLK1 by RNAi significantly decreased medulloblastoma cell proliferation and clonogenic potential and increased cell apoptosis. Similarly, a low nanomolar concentration of BI 2536, a small molecule inhibitor of PLK1, potently inhibited cell growth, strongly suppressed the colony-forming ability, and increased cellular apoptosis of medulloblastoma cells. Furthermore, BI 2536 pretreatment sensitized medulloblastoma cells to ionizing radiation. Inhibition of PLK1 impaired tumor sphere formation of medulloblastoma cells and decreased the expression of SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2 (SOX2) mRNA in tumor spheres indicating a possible role in targeting tumor inititiating cells. Our data suggest that targeting PLK1 with small molecule inhibitors, in combination with radiation therapy, is a novel strategy in the treatment of medulloblastoma that warrants further investigation

  2. Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    tumors were comprised of poorly differentiated, medium to large size cells which showed nuclear molding, prominent nucleoli (Fig. 2B) and numerous...this MB subtype, such as poorly differentiated, medium to large size cells with nuclear molding and prominent nucleoli , and numerous mitotic and...differentiated, medium to large size cells which showed nuclear molding, prominent  nucleoli  and numerous mitotic (Ki67+) and apoptotic (Cleaved­Caspase­3

  3. Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    performed ChIP-PCR to confirm the binding of MYC to promoters of known MYC target genes, such as Prps1, Gart and Pfas (data not shown). Progress achieved...activated genes (e.g. Prps1, Gart and Pfas ) are upregulated in response to MYC induction. We have sequenced the RNA-seq libraries from two cell contexts

  4. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Arachnoid Cyst in Young Adults: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Yeen Chan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inrracranial arachnoid cysts are believed to be congenital; they can become symptomatic in pediarric patients. Chronic subdural hematomas tend to occur in elderly patients with a history of mild head injury a few months prior to the onset of symptoms. However, these two distinct clinical entities sporadically occur together in relatively young patients. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with headache and dizziness of 2 months' duration. Brain computed tomography revealed a huge chronic subdural hematoma over the left frontoparietal lobe, with an incidental finding of an arachnoid cyst over the left sylvian fissure. In light of a literature review, we discuss arachnoid cysts as a possible risk factor for subdural hematoma, especially in young adults.

  5. Effect of inner membrane tearing in the treatment of adult chronic subdural hematoma: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaci, Selim; Kanat, Ayhan; Koksal, Vaner; Ozdemir, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    The postoperative results of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) procedures using catheterization and tearing of inner membrane (CTIM) technique have not previously been discussed in the literature. This article compares the effects of CTIM technique on brain re-expansion and re-accumulation with cases operated on with a burr-hole craniotomy and outer membrane incision (BCOMI) technique. The study involved operations on 144 patients (Group 1) using the CTIM technique and 108 patients (Group 2) using the BCOMI technique. In the operations using the CTIM technique in Group 1, the mean effusion measured in the subdural space (SDS) was 10.0 ± 0.2 mm, and for Group 2, 14.3 ± 0.6 mm in the postoperative period on the first and third days and this difference was found to be significant (p subdural effusion and pneumocephalus, and shorter hospital stays.

  6. Long-term safety of growth hormone replacement therapy after childhood medulloblastoma and PNET: it is time to set aside old concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indini, Alice; Schiavello, Elisabetta; Biassoni, Veronica; Bergamaschi, Luca; Magni, Maria Chiara; Puma, Nadia; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Pallotti, Federica; Seregni, Ettore; Diletto, Barbara; Pecori, Emilia; Gandola, Lorenza; Poggi, Geraldina; Massimino, Maura

    2017-01-01

    To assess the long-term safety of administering growth hormone (GH) in patients with GH deficiency due to treatment for childhood medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Data were retrospectively retrieved on children receiving GH supplementation, assessing their disease-free and overall survival outcomes and risk of secondary malignancies using Kaplan-Meier and Cox models. Overall 65 children were consecutively collected from May 1981 to April 2013. All patients had undergone craniospinal irradiation (total dose 18-39 Gy), and subsequently received GH for a median (interquartile range, IQR) of 81 (50.6-114.9) months. At a median (IQR) of 122.4 months (74.4-149.5) after the end of their adjuvant cancer treatment, two patients (3 %) experienced recurrent disease and 8 (12.3 %) developed secondary malignancies, all but one of them (an osteosarcoma) related to radiation exposure and occurring within the radiation fields. There was no apparent correlation between the administration of GH replacement therapy (or its duration) and primary tumor relapse or the onset of secondary malignancies [HR: 1.01 (95 % CI: 0.98, 1.03) for every additional 12 months of GH supplementation; p = 0.36). At univariate analysis, the large cell or anaplastic medulloblastoma subtype, metastases and myeloablative chemotherapy correlated with a higher risk of secondary malignancies (p < 0.1), but multivariate analysis failed to identify any factors independently associated with this risk. Our data supports once more the safety of long-term GH replacement therapy in children treated for medulloblastoma/PNET, previously reported in larger data sets. The neurooncology community now need to warrant large-scale meta-analyses or international prospective trials in order to consolidate our knowledge of factors other than GH, such as genetic predisposition, high-grade/metastatic disease, high-dose chemotherapy and era of treatment, in promoting the occurrence of

  7. Recurrence of Subdural Haematoma in a Population-Based Cohort - Risks and Predictive Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Schmidt

    Full Text Available To estimate the risks of and identify predictors for recurrent subdural haematoma in surgically and conservatively treated patients.The cohort comprised all individuals diagnosed with a first-time subdural hematoma in Denmark 1996-2011. Information on potential predictors was retrieved from the Danish health registers. Cumulative recurrence risks were estimated using the Aalen-Johansen estimator. Rate ratios (RR were estimated using Poisson regression.Among 10,158 individuals with a subdural hematoma, 1,555 had a recurrent event. The cumulative risk of recurrent subdural hematoma was 9% at 4 weeks after the primary bleeding, increasing to and stabilising at 14% after one year. Predictors associated with recurrence were: Male sex (RR 1.60, 95% CI:1.43-1.80, older age (>70 years compared to 20-49 years; RR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21-1.65, alcohol addiction (RR 1.20, 95% CI:1.04-1.37, surgical treatment (RR 1.76, 95% CI:1.58-1.96, trauma diagnoses (RR 1.14, 95% CI:1.03-1.27, and diabetes mellitus (RR 1.40, 95% CI:1.11-1.74. Out of a selected combination of risk factors, the highest cumulative 1-year recurrence risks for subdural hematoma of 25% (compared to 14% for all patients was found in surgically treated males with diabetes mellitus.The recurrence risk of subdural hematoma is largely limited to the first year. Patient characteristics including co-morbidities greatly influence the recurrence risk of SDH, suggesting that individualized prognostic guidance and follow-up is needed.

  8. Recurrence of Subdural Haematoma in a Population-Based Cohort – Risks and Predictive Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Linnea; Gørtz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads; Munch, Tina Noergaard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the risks of and identify predictors for recurrent subdural haematoma in surgically and conservatively treated patients. Methods The cohort comprised all individuals diagnosed with a first-time subdural hematoma in Denmark 1996–2011. Information on potential predictors was retrieved from the Danish health registers. Cumulative recurrence risks were estimated using the Aalen-Johansen estimator. Rate ratios (RR) were estimated using Poisson regression. Results Among 10,158 individuals with a subdural hematoma, 1,555 had a recurrent event. The cumulative risk of recurrent subdural hematoma was 9% at 4 weeks after the primary bleeding, increasing to and stabilising at 14% after one year. Predictors associated with recurrence were: Male sex (RR 1.60, 95% CI:1.43–1.80), older age (>70 years compared to 20–49 years; RR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21–1.65), alcohol addiction (RR 1.20, 95% CI:1.04–1.37), surgical treatment (RR 1.76, 95% CI:1.58–1.96), trauma diagnoses (RR 1.14, 95% CI:1.03–1.27), and diabetes mellitus (RR 1.40, 95% CI:1.11–1.74). Out of a selected combination of risk factors, the highest cumulative 1-year recurrence risks for subdural hematoma of 25% (compared to 14% for all patients) was found in surgically treated males with diabetes mellitus. Conclusions The recurrence risk of subdural hematoma is largely limited to the first year. Patient characteristics including co-morbidities greatly influence the recurrence risk of SDH, suggesting that individualized prognostic guidance and follow-up is needed. PMID:26465602

  9. Re-estimation of acute subdural hematoma in children caused by trivial household head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify characteristics of acute subdural hematoma in children caused by a trivial household head trauma from a modem neurosurgical and medicolegal standpoint. We performed a retrospective study of 25 children younger than 48 months hospitalized for acute subdural hematoma from December 1, 1993, through February 28, 2003. Inclusion criteria were as follows: acute subdural hematoma caused by trivial household trauma and a history of trauma corroborated by a caretaker, absence of physical injuries consistent with child abuse, fundoscopic examinations performed by a pediatric ophthalmologist, absence of fractures on general bone survey, and child abuse ruled out by long-term follow-up (more than 5 years). Twenty-one of the patients were boys, and 4 were girls. The patients ranged in age from 6 to 17 months, with an average age of 8.5 months. In 17 of 25 patients trauma had been caused by falls to the floor while standing with support or while sitting. Most of the patients were admitted to the hospital because of generalized convulsions or seizures that had developed soon after a trivial household trauma. Fifteen of the 25 (60%) patients had retinal or preretinal hemorrhage and 9 patients had bilateral retinal hemorrhage. Computed tomography showed fluid-type acute subdural hematomas at the frontal convexity or in the interhemispheric fissure in 18 of 25 (72%) patients. Fourteen of 25 (56%) patients had pre-existing external hydrocephalus (enlargements of the subarachnoid space). The long-term outcomes included normal mental development (IQ≥80) in 18 cases, mild mental retardation (IQ<80) in 7 cases, and epilepsy in 3 cases. Acute subdural hematoma in children caused by trivial household trauma is a clinical entity distinct from acute subdural hematoma caused by child abuse or shaken-baby syndrome. (author)

  10. Group 3 medulloblastoma in a patient with a GYS2 germline mutation and glycogen storage disease 0a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsten, Till; Tsiakas, Konstantinos; Kordes, Uwe; Bison, Brigitte; Pietsch, Torsten; Rutkowski, Stefan; Santer, René; Schüller, Ulrich

    2018-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) 0a is a rare congenital metabolic disease with symptoms in infancy and childhood caused by biallelic GYS2 germline variants. A predisposition to cancer has not been described yet. We report here a boy with GSD 0a, who developed a malignant brain tumor at the age of 4.5 years. The tumor was classified as a group 3 medulloblastoma, and the patient died from cancer 27 months after initial tumor diagnosis. This case appears interesting as group 3 medulloblastoma is so far not known to arise in hereditary syndromes and the biology of sporadic group 3 medulloblastoma is largely unknown.

  11. Correlation of hyperdense and hypodense areas in the computerized tomogram of subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clar, H.E.; Bock, W.J.; Wiechert, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    CT findings of 51 patients with acute, subacute and chronic subdural hematomas were studied. The results showed that direct signs (hyperdensity, isodensity, and hypodensity) and indirect signs (midline-shift, expansive lesion, compression of ventricles, and occlusion of the subarachnoid space) can be distinguished. The following diagnostic procedure is proposed in cases of subdural hematoma: 1. In cases with both, direct and indirect CT signs, no further diagnostic exploration is necessary. 2. In cases without direct signs, application of contrast medium may lead to diagnosis. 3. Cases without direct or indirect signs showing clinical symptoms require further investigation by angiography, or CT control. (orig.) [de

  12. The Swedish study of Irrigation-fluid temperature in the evacuation of Chronic subdural hematoma (SIC!)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartley, Andreas; Jakola, Asgeir S; Bartek, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is one of the most common conditions encountered in neurosurgical practice. Recurrence, observed in 5-30% of patients, is a major clinical problem. The temperature of the irrigation fluid used during evacuation of the hematoma might theoretically...... and health-related quality of life. DISCUSSION: Irrigation-fluid temperature might influence recurrence rates in the evacuation of chronic subdural hematomas. We present a study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial investigating our hypothesis that irrigation fluid at body temperature...

  13. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and a