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Sample records for subduction thrust faults

  1. Numerical simulation of earthquake rupture sequences on the Manila thrust fault: Effects of seamount subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Liu, Y.; Ning, J.; He, C.; Zhang, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Manila subduction zone is located at the convergent boundary between the Philippine Sea Plate and the Sunda/Eurasian Plate from offshore Taiwan to northern Luzon of Philippines, where only infrequent M7 earthquakes were observed in modern seismological instrumentation history. The lack of great events (M8+) indicates the subduction fault is either aseismically slipping or is accumulating strain energy toward rapid release in a great earthquake. Here we conduct numerical simulations of earthquake rupture sequences in the framework of rate-state-friction along the 15-19.5ºN segment of the 3D plate boundary with subducted seamounts. Rate-state frictional properties are constrained by laboratory friction experiments conducted on IODP Expedition 349, South China Sea (SCS), drilling samples from the basaltic basement rock under 100ºC - 600ºC, effective normal stress of 50 MPa and pore pressure of 100 MPa. During the modeled 2000-year period, the maximum magnitude of earthquakes is Mw7. Each sequence repeats every ~200 years and is consisted of three sub-events, event 1 (Mw7) that can overcome the barrier, where dip angle changes most rapidly along the strike, to rupture the entire fault. Events 2 (Mw 6.4) and 3 (Mw 5.7) are of smaller magnitudes and result in north-south segmented rupture pattern. We further quantify the potential of earthquake nucleation by the S-ratio (lower S ratio means the initial stress is closer to peak strength, hence more likely to nucleate an earthquake). The subducted seamount shows higher S-ratios than its surroundings mostly, implying an unlikely nucleate area. Our results are qualitatively similar to 2D subduction earthquake modeling by Herrendörfer et al. (2015, 2-3 events per supercycle and median long-term S is 0.5-1). Finally, we plan to use our coseismic rupture model results as inputs for a tsunami propagation model in SCS. Compared to the kinematic seafloor deformation input, our physics-based earthquake source model and its

  2. Core-Log-Seismic Integrative Study of a Subduction Zone Megasplay Fault -An Example from the Nobeoka Thrust, Shimanto Belt, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamahashi, M.; Tsuji, T.; Saito, S.; Tanikawa, W.; Hamada, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Kimura, G.

    2016-12-01

    Investigating the mechanical properties and deformation patterns of megathrusts in subduction zones is important to understand the generation of large earthquakes. The Nobeoka Thrust, a fossilized megasplay fault in Kyushu Shimanto Belt, southwest Japan, exposes foliated fault rocks that were formed under the temperature range of 180-350° (Kondo et al., 2005). During the Nobeoka Thrust Drilling Project (2011), core samples and geophysical logging data were obtained recovering a continuous distribution of multiple fault zones, which provide the opportunity to examine their structure and physical properties in various scales (Hamahashi et al., 2013; 2015). By performing logging data analysis, discrete sample physical property measurements, and synthetic modeling of seismic reflections along the Nobeoka Thrust, we conducted core-log-seismic integrative study to characterize the effects of damage zone architecture and structural anisotropy towards the physical properties of the megasplay. A clear contrast in physical properties across the main fault core and surrounding damage zones were identified, where the fault rocks preserve the porosity of 4.8% in the hanging wall and 7.6% in the footwall, and P-wave velocity of 4.8 km/s and 4.2 km/s, respectively. Multiple sandstone-rich- and shale-rich damage zones were found from the drilled cores, in which velocity decreases significantly in the brecciated zones. The internal structure of these foliated fault rocks consist of heterogeneous lithology and texture, and velocity anisotropy ranges 1-18% (P-wave) and 1.5-80% (S-wave), affected by structural dip angle, foliation density, and sandstone/mudstone ratio. To evaluate the fault properties at the seismogenic depth, we developed velocity/earth models and synthetic modeling of seismic reflection using acoustic logs across the thrust and parameterized lithological and structural elements in the identified multiple damage zones.

  3. Fluid accumulation along the Costa Rica subduction thrust and development of the seismogenic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangs, Nathan L.; McIntosh, Kirk D.; Silver, Eli A.; Kluesner, Jared W.; Ranero, César R.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011 we acquired an 11 × 55 km, 3-D seismic reflection volume across the Costa Rica margin, NW of the Osa Peninsula, to accurately image the subduction thrust in 3-D, to examine fault zone properties, and to infer the hydrogeology that controls fluid accumulation along the thrust. Following processing to remove water column multiples, noise, and acquisition artifacts, we constructed a 3-D seismic velocity model for Kirchhoff prestack depth migration imaging. Images of the plate boundary thrust show high-reflection amplitudes underneath the middle to lower slope that we attribute to fluid-rich, poorly drained portions of the subduction thrust. At 5 km subseafloor, beneath the upper slope, the plate interface abruptly becomes weakly reflective, which we interpret as a transition to a well-drained subduction thrust. Mineral dehydration during diagenesis may also diminish at 5 km subseafloor to reduce fluid production and contribute to the downdip change from high to low amplitude. There is also a layered fabric and systems of both thrust and normal faults within the overriding plate that form a "plumbing system." Faults commonly have fault plane reflections and are presumably fluid charged. The faults and layered fabric form three compartmentalized hydrogeologic zones: (1) a shallow NE dipping zone beneath the slope, (2) a steeply SW dipping zone beneath the shelf slope break, and (3) a NE dipping zone beneath the shelf. The more direct pathway in the middle zone drains the subduction thrust more efficiently and contributes to reduced fluid pressure, elevates effective stress, and creates greater potential for unstable coseismic slip.

  4. Tensile overpressure compartments on low-angle thrust faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2017-08-01

    Hydrothermal extension veins form by hydraulic fracturing under triaxial stress (principal compressive stresses, σ 1 > σ 2 > σ 3) when the pore-fluid pressure, P f, exceeds the least compressive stress by the rock's tensile strength. Such veins form perpendicular to σ 3, their incremental precipitation from hydrothermal fluid often reflected in `crack-seal' textures, demonstrating that the tensile overpressure state, σ 3' = ( σ 3 - P f) time P f > σ 3. In compressional regimes ( σ v = σ 3), subhorizontal extension veins may develop over vertical intervals dilatant fault-fracture mesh structures may develop throughout a tabular rock volume. Evidence for the existence of fault-fracture meshes around low-angle thrusts comes from exhumed ancient structures and from active structures. In the case of megathrust ruptures along subduction interfaces, force balance analyses, lack of evidence for shear heating, and evidence of total shear stress release during earthquakes suggest the interfaces are extremely weak ( τ < 40 MPa), consistent with weakening by near-lithostatically overpressured fluids. Portions of the subduction interface, especially towards the down-dip termination of the seismogenic megathrust, are prone to episodes of slow-slip, non-volcanic tremor, low-frequency earthquakes, very-low-frequency earthquakes, etc., attributable to the activation of tabular fault-fracture meshes at low σ 3' around the thrust interface. Containment of near-lithostatic overpressures in such settings is precarious, fluid loss curtailing mesh activity.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Cascadia subduction tremor muted by crustal faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Ray; Blakely, Richard J.; Wech, Aaron G.; McCrory, Patricia A.; Michael, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Deep, episodic slow slip on the Cascadia subduction megathrust of western North America is accompanied by low-frequency tremor in a zone of high fluid pressure between 30 and 40 km depth. Tremor density (tremor epicenters per square kilometer) varies along strike, and lower tremor density statistically correlates with upper plate faults that accommodate northward motion and rotation of forearc blocks. Upper plate earthquakes occur to 35 km depth beneath the faults. We suggest that the faults extend to the overpressured megathrust, where they provide fracture pathways for fluid escape into the upper plate. This locally reduces megathrust fluid pressure and tremor occurrence beneath the faults. Damping of tremor and related slow slip caused by fluid escape could affect fault properties of the megathrust, possibly influencing the behavior of great earthquakes.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Thrust Fault Rupture Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabuchian, Vahe

    Thrust fault earthquakes are investigated in the laboratory by generating dynamic shear ruptures along pre-existing frictional faults in rectangular plates. A considerable body of evidence suggests that dip-slip earthquakes exhibit enhanced ground motions in the acute hanging wall wedge as an outcome of broken symmetry between hanging and foot wall plates with respect to the earth surface. To understand the physical behavior of thrust fault earthquakes, particularly ground motions near the earth surface, ruptures are nucleated in analog laboratory experiments and guided up-dip towards the simulated earth surface. The transient slip event and emitted radiation mimic a natural thrust earthquake. High-speed photography and laser velocimeters capture the rupture evolution, outputting a full-field view of photo-elastic fringe contours proportional to maximum shearing stresses as well as continuous ground motion velocity records at discrete points on the specimen. Earth surface-normal measurements validate selective enhancement of hanging wall ground motions for both sub-Rayleigh and super-shear rupture speeds. The earth surface breaks upon rupture tip arrival to the fault trace, generating prominent Rayleigh surface waves. A rupture wave is sensed in the hanging wall but is, however, absent from the foot wall plate: a direct consequence of proximity from fault to seismometer. Signatures in earth surface-normal records attenuate with distance from the fault trace. Super-shear earthquakes feature greater amplitudes of ground shaking profiles, as expected from the increased tectonic pressures required to induce super-shear transition. Paired stations measure fault parallel and fault normal ground motions at various depths, which yield slip and opening rates through direct subtraction of like components. Peak fault slip and opening rates associated with the rupture tip increase with proximity to the fault trace, a result of selective ground motion amplification in the

  7. Extensional reactivation of the Chocolate Mountains subduction thrust in the Gavilan Hills of southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzabal, F.R.; Jacobson, C.E.; Haxel, G.B.

    1997-01-01

    The NE vergent Chocolate Mountains fault of south-eastern California has been interpreted as either a subduction thrust responsible for burial and prograde metamorphism of the ensimatic Orocopia Schist or as a normal fault involved in the exhumation of the schist. Our detailed structural analysis in the Gavilan Hills area provides new evidence to confirm the latter view. A zone of deformation is present at the top of the Orocopia Schist in which lineations are parallel to those in the upper plate of the Chocolate Mountains fault but oblique to ones at relatively deep levels in the schist. Both the Orocopia Schist and upper plate contain several generations of shear zones that show a transition from crystalloblastic through mylonitic to cataclastic textures. These structures formed during retrograde metamorphism and are considered to record the exhumation of the Orocopia Schist during early Tertiary time as a result of subduction return flow. The Gatuna fault, which places low-grade, supracrustal metasediments of the Winterhaven Formation above the gneisses of the upper plate, also seems to have been active at this time. Final unroofing of the Orocopia Schist occurred during early to middle Miocene regional extension and may have involved a second phase of movement on the Gatuna fault. Formation of the Chocolate Mountains fault during exhumation indicates that its top-to-the-NE sense of movement provides no constraint on the polarity of the Orocopia Schist subduction zone. This weakens the case for a previous model involving SW dipping subduction, while providing support for the view that the Orocopia Schist is a correlative of the Franciscan Complex.

  8. Global correlations between maximum magnitudes of subduction zone interface thrust earthquakes and physical parameters of subduction zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Rawlinson, N.

    2013-01-01

    The maximum earthquake magnitude recorded for subduction zone plate boundaries varies considerably on Earth, with some subduction zone segments producing giant subduction zone thrust earthquakes (e.g. Chile, Alaska, Sumatra-Andaman, Japan) and others producing relatively small earthquakes (e.g.

  9. Evolution of the Puente Hills Thrust Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, K. J.; Shaw, J. H.; Dolan, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to assess the evolution of the blind Puente Hills thrust fault system (PHT) by determining its age of initiation, lateral propagation history, and changes in slip rate over time. The PHT presents one of the largest seismic hazards in the United States, given its location beneath downtown Los Angeles. The PHT is comprised of three fault segments: the Los Angeles (LA), Santa Fe Springs (SFS), and Coyote Hills (CH). The LA and SFS segments are characterized by growth stratigraphy where folds formed by uplift on the fault segments have been continually buried by sediment from the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers. The CH segment has developed topography and is characterized by onlapping growth stratigraphy. This depositional setting gives us the unique opportunity to measure uplift on the LA and SFS fault segments, and minimum uplift on the CH fault segment, as the difference in sediment thicknesses across the buried folds. We utilize depth converted oil industry seismic reflection data to image the fold geometries. Identifying time-correlative stratigraphic markers for slip rate determination in the basin has been a problem for researchers in the past, however, as the faunal assemblages observed in wells are time-transgressive by nature. To overcome this, we utilize the sequence stratigraphic model and well picks of Ponti et al. (2007) as a basis for mapping time-correlative sequence boundaries throughout our industry seismic reflection data from the present to the Pleistocene. From the Pleistocene to Miocene we identify additional sequence boundaries in our seismic reflection data from imaged sequence geometries and by correlating industry well formation tops. The sequence and formation top picks are then used to build 3-dimensional surfaces in the modeling program Gocad. From these surfaces we measure the change in thicknesses across the folds to obtain uplift rates between each sequence boundary. Our results show three distinct phases of

  10. Stress orientations in subduction zones and the strength of subduction megathrust faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L

    2015-09-11

    Subduction zone megathrust faults produce most of the world's largest earthquakes. Although the physical properties of these faults are difficult to observe directly, their frictional strength can be estimated indirectly by constraining the orientations of the stresses that act on them. A global investigation of stress orientations in subduction zones finds that the maximum compressive stress axis plunges systematically trenchward, consistently making an angle of 45° to 60° with respect to the subduction megathrust fault. These angles indicate that the megathrust fault is not substantially weaker than its surroundings. Together with several other lines of evidence, this implies that subduction zone megathrusts are weak faults in a low-stress environment. The deforming outer accretionary wedge may decouple the stress state along the megathrust from the constraints of the free surface. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Stress orientations in subduction zones and the strength of subduction megathrust faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Subduction zone megathrust faults produce most of the world’s largest earthquakes. Although the physical properties of these faults are difficult to observe directly, their frictional strength can be estimated indirectly by constraining the orientations of the stresses that act on them. A global investigation of stress orientations in subduction zones finds that the maximum compressive stress axis plunges systematically trenchward, consistently making a 45°-60° angle to the subduction megathrust fault. These angles indicate that the megathrust fault is not substantially weaker than its surroundings. Together with several other lines of evidence, this implies that subduction zone megathrusts are weak faults in a low-stress environment. The deforming outer accretionary wedge may decouple the stress state along the megathrust from the constraints of the free surface.

  12. Evolving seismogenic plate boundary megathrust and mega-splay faults in subduction zone (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, G.; Hamahashi, M.; Fukuchi, R.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kameda, J.; Kitamura, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Hamada, Y.; Saito, S.; Kawasaki, R.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the fault mechanism and its relationship to the sesimo-tsunamigenesis is a key of the scientific targets of subduction zone and therefore NantroSEIZE project of IODP and future new drilling project of International Ocean Discovery Program keeps focusing on that. Mega-splay fault branched from plate boundary megathrust in subduction zone is located around the border between outer and inner wedges and is considered to cause great earthquake and tsunami such as 1960 Alaska earthquake, 1944 and 1946 Nankai-Tonankai earthquakes, and 2004 Sumatra earthquakes. Seismic reflection studies for the mega-splay fault in 2D and 3D in the Nankai forearc present the reflector with negative or positive polarities with various amplitudes and suggest complicated petrophysical properties and condition of the fault and its surroundings. The Nankai mega-splay fault at a depth of ~5km is going to be drilled and cored by NantroSEIZE experiments and is expected for great progress of understanding of the fault mechanics. Before drilling the really targeted seismogenic fault, we are conducting many exercises of geophysical and geological observations. The core-log-seismic integrated exercise for the exhumed mega-splay fault by drilling was operated for the Nobeoka thrust in the Shimanto Belt, Kyushu, Japan. The Nobeoka thrust was once buried in the depth >~10km and suffered maximum temperature >~300 dgree C. As the core recovery is ~99%, perfect correlation between the core and logging data is possible. Thickness of the fault zone is >200 m with a ~50 cm thick central fault core dividing the phyllitic hanging wall and the footwall of broken-melange like cataclasite. A-few-meter-thick discrete damage zones with fault cores are recognized by difference in physical properties and visual deformation textures at several horizons in the fault zone. Host rocks for those damaged zones are completely lithified cataclasites with abundant mineral veins, which record the older and deeper

  13. The role of thrust faulting in the formation of the eastern Alaska Range: Thermochronological constraints from the Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault region of the intracontinental strike-slip Denali Fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Steven J.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Benowitz, Jeff A.; Roeske, Sarah M.

    2014-11-01

    Horizontal-slip along restraining bends of strike-slip faults is often partitioned into a vertical component via splay faults. The active Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault (SGTF), as shown by its initiation of the 2002 M7.9 Denali Fault earthquake, lies south of, and intersects the dextral strike-slip Denali Fault. Geochronology and thermochronology data from samples across the SGTF constrain the region's tectonic history and the role of thrusting in the formation of the eastern Alaska Range south of the Denali fault. U-Pb zircon ages indicate intrusion of plutons in the footwall (~57 Ma) and hanging wall (~98 Ma). These U-Pb zircon ages correlate to those from the Ruby Batholith/Kluane Terrane ~400 km east along the Denali Fault, supporting geologic correlations and hence constraints on long-term slip rates. 40Ar/39Ar mica and K-feldspar data from footwall and hanging wall samples (~54 to ~46 Ma) reflect cooling following magmatism and/or regional Eocene metamorphism related to ridge subduction. Combined with apatite fission track data (ages 43-28 Ma) and thermal models, both sides of the SGTF acted as a coherent block during the Eocene and early Oligocene. Contrasting apatite (U-Th)/He ages across the Susitna Glacier (~25 Ma footwall, ~15 Ma hanging wall) suggest initiation of faulting during the middle Miocene. Episodic cooling and exhumation is related to thrusting on known or hypothesized faults that progressively activate due to varying partition of strain along the Denali Fault associated with changing kinematics and plate interaction (Yakutat microplate collision, flat-slab subduction and relative plate motion change) at the southern Alaskan plate margin.

  14. Splay fault branching along the Nankai subduction zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Oh; Tsuru, Tetsuro; Kodaira, Shuichi; Cummins, Phil R; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2002-08-16

    Seismic reflection profiles reveal steeply landward-dipping splay faults in the rupture area of the magnitude (M) 8.1 Tonankai earthquake in the Nankai subduction zone. These splay faults branch upward from the plate-boundary interface (that is, the subduction zone) at a depth of approximately 10 kilometers, approximately 50 to 55 kilometers landward of the trough axis, breaking through the upper crustal plate. Slip on the active splay fault may be an important mechanism that accommodates the elastic strain caused by relative plate motion.

  15. Lower Miocene coeval thrusting and strike-slip faulting in the Western Betics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, Gianluca; Gueydan, Frédéric; Brun, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the Africa-Europe convergence, the Mediterranean system presents a complex interaction between subduction rollback and upper subduction plate deformation since 30 Ma. The western end of the system shows an arcuate geometry across the Gibraltar arc, the Betico-Rifean belt, in which the relationship between slab dynamics and onshore tectonics is poorly constrained. The present study focuses on the Western Betics, which is characterized by two major thrusts: 1/ the Alboran Front limits the metamorphic domain (Alboran Domain) from the fold-and-thrust belts involving the Mesozoic cover of the Iberian margin (Subbetics Domain); 2/ the Alboran Internal Thrust allows the juxtaposition of a strongly attenuated lithosphere section, containing the large Ronda subcontinental mantle bodies, on top of crustal rocks. New structural data show that two major E-W strike-slip corridors controlled the deformation pattern of the Alboran Domain, in which E-W dextral strike-slip faults, N60° thrusts and N140° normal faults developed simultaneously during dextral strike-slip simple shear. The Alozaina piggy-back Basin, mainly formed by olistotromic deposits of Lower Miocene age, provides an age estimate for the continuous westward translation of the Alboran Domain, with reference to Iberia, that is accommodated mainly by an E-W lateral strike-slip ramp and a N60° frontal thrust ramp. In this context, a thrust sequence led to the piling up of thrust units in the Western Betics and to the crustal emplacement of the Ronda Peridotites bodies.

  16. The Role of Proto-Thrusts in Frontal Accretion and Accommodation of Plate Convergence, Hikurangi Subduction Margin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, P.; Ghisetti, F.; Ellis, S. M.; Morgan, J.

    2016-12-01

    Proto-thrusts are an enigmatic structural feature at the toe of many subduction accretionary wedges. They are commonly recognised in seismic reflection sections as relatively small-displacement (tens of metres) faults seaward of the primary deformation front. Although widely assumed to reflect incipient accretionary deformation and to mark the location of future thrusts, proto-thrusts have received relatively little attention. Few studies have attempted to characterise their displacement properties, evolution, and kinematic role in frontal accretion processes associated with propagation of the interface décollement. In this study, we make use of excellent quality geophysical and bathymetric imaging of the spectacular 25 km-wide Hikurangi margin proto-thrust zone (PTZ), the structure of which varies significantly along strike. From a detailed structural analysis, we provide the first substantial quantitative dataset on proto-thrust geometry, displacement profiles, fault scaling relationships, and fault population characteristics. These analyses provide new insights into the role of inferred stratigraphic inhomogeneity in proto-thrust development, and the role of proto-thrust arrays in frontal accretion. Our observations, combined with our own recently published reconstructions of the wedge, and ongoing numerical simulations, indicate a migrating wave of proto-thrust activity in association with forward-advancement of the décollement. Calculation of tectonic shortening accommodated by the active PTZ east of the present deformation front, from measurements of seismically-imaged fault displacements and estimates of sub-seismic faulting derived from power law relationships, reveal their surprisingly significant role in accommodating regional plate convergence. South of the colliding Bennett Knoll Seamount, the predominantly seaward-vergent PTZ has accommodated 3.3 km of tectonic shortening, of which 70% is at sub-seismic scale. In comparison, north of Bennett Knoll

  17. The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: Insights from seismo-thermo-mechanical models

    KAUST Repository

    van Dinther, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The underestimation of the size of recent megathrust earthquakes illustrates our limited understanding of their spatiotemporal occurrence and governing physics. To unravel their relation to associated subduction dynamics and long-term deformation, we developed a 2-D continuum viscoelastoplastic model that uses an Eulerian-Lagrangian finite difference framework with similar on- and off-fault physics. We extend the validation of this numerical tool to a realistic subduction zone setting that resembles Southern Chile. The resulting quasi-periodic pattern of quasi-characteristic M8–M9 megathrust events compares quantitatively with observed recurrence and earthquake source parameters, albeit at very slow coseismic speeds. Without any data fitting, surface displacements agree with GPS data recorded before and during the 2010 M8.8 Maule earthquake, including the presence of a second-order flexural bulge. These surface displacements show cycle-to-cycle variations of slip deficits, which overall accommodate ∼5% of permanent internal shortening. We find that thermally (and stress) driven creep governs a spontaneous conditionally stable downdip transition zone between temperatures of ∼350°C and ∼450°C. Ruptures initiate above it (and below the forearc Moho), propagate within it, interspersed by small intermittent events, and arrest below it as ductile shearing relaxes stresses. Ruptures typically propagate upward along lithological boundaries and widen as pressures drop. The main thrust is constrained to be weak due to fluid-induced weakening required to sustain regular subduction and to generate events with natural characteristics (fluid pressures of ∼75–99% of solid pressures). The agreement with a range of seismological, geodetic, and geological observations demonstrates the validity and strength of this physically consistent seismo-thermo-mechanical approach.

  18. Architecture of thrust faults with alongstrike variations in fault-plane dip: anatomy of the Lusatian Fault, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coubal, Miroslav; Adamovič, Jiří; Málek, Jiří; Prouza, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 3 (2014), s. 183-208 ISSN 1802-6222 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985891 Keywords : fault architecture * fault plane geometry * drag structures * thrust fault * sandstone * Lusatian Fault Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2014

  19. Dynamics of intraoceanic subduction initiation : 1. Oceanic detachment fault inversion and the formation of supra-subduction zone ophiolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maffione, Marco; Thieulot, Cedric|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270177493; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269263624; Morris, Antony; Plümper, Oliver|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/37155960X; Spakman, Wim|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074103164

    Subduction initiation is a critical link in the plate tectonic cycle. Intraoceanic subduction zones can form along transform faults and fracture zones, but how subduction nucleates parallel to mid-ocean ridges, as in e.g., the Neotethys Ocean during the Jurassic, remains a matter of debate. In

  20. Stress and Strength of Seismogenic and Creeping Subduction Faults (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Bilek, S. L.; Wada, I.; Gao, X.; Brown, L.

    2013-12-01

    Force balance studies of subduction zone forearcs constrained by earthquake focal mechanisms, active faulting, and topography suggest very weak subduction megathrusts. If represented by an effective coefficient of friction μ', the ratio of shear to normal stress at failure, the average μ' value of most megathrusts is about 0.03, seldom exceeding 0.06, an order of magnitude lower than fault strengths predicted by the Byerlee's law with hydrostatic pore fluid pressure. The μ' value required to explain heat flow observations using megathrust frictional heating modeling is usually also about 0.03, regardless of whether the megathrust is seismogenic or creeping. The mechanism for the weakness is not fully understood, although it must be a combined consequence of fault zone material, fault zone fabric, and pore fluid pressure. Prior to March 11, 2011, the Japan Trench was a rare exception where pervasive margin-normal compression of the upper plate made it difficult to infer megathrust strength. But wholesale stress reversal in much of the forearc due to the M 9 Tohoku earthquake dramatically verified the low-strength (μ' = 0.03) prediction of Wang and Suyehiro (1999, GRL 26(35), 2307-2310). This value translates to depth-dependant shear strength of roughly 10 MPa at 10 km and 30 MPa at 30 km. With regard to how fault strength and stress affect earthquake processes, several issues deserve special attention. (1) There is little doubt that no megathrust is 'strongly' locked, but creeping megathrusts can be either weaker or stronger than locked faults. In fact, subduction of extremely rugged seafloor causes creeping, despite strong resistance caused by geometrical incompatibilities. Physical meanings of regarding locked and creeping faults as 'strongly coupled' and 'weakly coupled', respectively, are in serious question. (2) A μ' value of 0.03-0.05 is a spatial average. For a smooth fault, even small changes in pore fluid pressure alone can cause local deviations from

  1. Dating of movements along thrusts and faults in the Himalaya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, H.S.

    1982-11-01

    Radiometric dating of movements along the MCT (Vaikrita Thrust), two local but deep seated thrust and the Sumdoh Fault Zone bordering the Kinnar Kailas Granite in the Baspa and Satluj valleys, NE Himachal Himalaya, has been attempted for the first time by fission track method. Garnet and apatite fission track ages suggest the age of the latest phase of movements around 14 and 7 m.y. respectively along the MCT and Sumdoh Fault. The vertical uplift rates along them were 1.1mm/year from 14 to 7 m.y. and 0.6 mm/year from 7 m.y. to recent geologic past respectively, as against the value 0.036 mm/year during the period from 210 to 17 m.y. in the undisturbed area. (author). 11 refs.

  2. The 2016 Kaikōura earthquake: Simultaneous rupture of the subduction interface and overlying faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Teng; Wei, Shengji; Shi, Xuhua; Qiu, Qiang; Li, Linlin; Peng, Dongju; Weldon, Ray J.; Barbot, Sylvain

    2018-01-01

    The distribution of slip during an earthquake and how it propagates among faults in the subduction system play a major role in seismic and tsunami hazards, yet they are poorly understood because offshore observations are often lacking. Here we derive the slip distribution and rupture evolution during the 2016 Mw 7.9 Kaikōura (New Zealand) earthquake that reconcile the surface rupture, space geodetic measurements, seismological and tsunami waveform records. We use twelve fault segments, with eleven in the crust and one on the megathrust interface, to model the geodetic data and match the major features of the complex surface ruptures. Our modeling result indicates that a large portion of the moment is distributed on the subduction interface, making a significant contribution to the far field surface deformation and teleseismic body waves. The inclusion of local strong motion and teleseismic waveform data in the joint inversion reveals a unilateral rupture towards northeast with a relatively low averaged rupture speed of ∼1.5 km/s. The first 30 s of the rupture took place on the crustal faults with oblique slip motion and jumped between fault segments that have large differences in strike and dip. The peak moment release occurred at ∼65 s, corresponding to simultaneous rupture of both plate interface and the overlying splay faults with rake angle changes progressively from thrust to strike-slip. The slip on the Papatea fault produced more than 2 m of offshore uplift, making a major contribution to the tsunami at the Kaikōura station, while the northeastern end of the rupture can explain the main features at the Wellington station. Our inversions and simulations illuminate complex up-dip rupture behavior that should be taken into consideration in both seismic and tsunami hazard assessment. The extreme complex rupture behavior also brings new challenges to the earthquake dynamic simulations and understanding the physics of earthquakes.

  3. Blueschist-facies metamorphism related to regional thrust faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, M.C.; Irwin, W.P.; Coleman, R.G.

    1969-01-01

    Rocks of the blueschist (glaucophane schist) facies occur throughout the world in narrow tectonic belts associated with ultramafic rocks. In the Coast Range province of California, blueschist rocks are devloped in the eugeosynclinal Franciscan Formation of Late Mesozoic age. The blueschist rocks form a narrow belt for more than 800 km along the eastern margin of this province and commonly are separated from rocks of an overlying thrust plate by serpentinite. Increasing metamorphism upward toward the thrust fault is indicated mineralogically by a transition from pumpellyite to lawsonite and texturally by a transition from metagraywacke to schist. The blueschist metamorphism probably occurred during thrusting in a zone of anomalously high water pressure in the lower plate along the sole of the thrust fault. This tectonic mode of origin for blueschist differs from the generally accepted hypothesis involving extreme depth of burial. Other belts of blueschist-facies rocks, including the Sanbagawa belt of Japan, the marginal synclinal belt of New Zealand, and the blueschist-ultramafic belts of Venezuela, Kamchatka, Ural mountains, and New Caledonia have similar geologic relations and might be explained in the same manner. ?? 1969.

  4. Counter-intuitive Behavior of Subduction Zones: Weak Faults Rupture, Strong Faults Creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Gao, X.; Bilek, S. L.; Brown, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction interfaces that produce great earthquakes are often said to be "strongly coupled", and those that creep are said to be "weakly coupled". However, the relation between the strength and seismogenic behavior of subduction faults is far from clear. Seismological and geodetic observations of earthquake rupture usually provide information only on stress change, not fault strength. In this study, we infer fault strength by calculating frictional heating along megathrusts and comparing results with heat flow measurements. We find that stick-slip megathrusts that have produced great earthquakes such as at Japan Trench and northern Sumatra have very low apparent friction coefficients (~ 0.02 - 0.03), but megathrusts that creep such as at Northern Hikurangi and Manila Trench have higher values (up to ~0.13). The differnce cannot be explained by coseismic dynamic weakening of the stick-slip megathrusts, because the average stress drop in great earthquakes is usually less than 5 MPa, equivalent to a coseismic reduction of apparent friction coefficient by less than ~0.01. Therefore our results indicate differences in the static strength of different subduction faults. Why are the creeping faults stronger? We think it is related to their creeping mechanism. Very rugged subducting seafloor tends to cause creep and hinder great earthquake rupture (Wang and Bilek, 2014). In contrast, all giant earthquakes have occurred at subduction zones with relatively smooth subducting seafloor. Large geometrical irregularities such as seamounts generate heterogeneous structure and stresses that promote numerous small and medium size earthquakes and aseismic creep. The creeping is a process of breaking and wearing of geometrical irregularities in a deformation zone and is expected to be against relatively large resistance (strong creep). This is different from the creeping of smooth faults due to the presence of weak fault gouge (weak creep) such as along the creeping segment of the

  5. Analogue modelling of different angle thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosas, F.M.; Duarte, João C.; Schellart, W. P.; Tomás, R.; Grigorova, V.; Terrinha, P.

    2015-01-01

    Analogue modelling experiments of thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium are presented and discussed. Simultaneous reactivation of confining strike-slip and thrust faults bounding a (corner) zone of interference defined by the angle between the two fault systems is simulated, instead

  6. Flat-slab subduction, whole crustal faulting, and geohazards in Alaska: Targets for Earthscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, S. P.; Pavlis, T. L.; Bruhn, R. L.; Christeson, G. L.; Freymueller, J. T.; Hansen, R. A.; Koons, P. O.; Pavlis, G. L.; Roeske, S.; Reece, R.; van Avendonk, H. J.; Worthington, L. L.

    2010-12-01

    Crustal structure and evolution illuminated by the Continental Dynamics ST. Elias Erosion and tectonics Project (STEEP) highlights some fundamental questions about active tectonics processes in Alaska including: 1) what are the controls on far field deformation and lithospheric stabilization, 2) do strike slip faults extend through the entire crust and upper mantle and how does this influence mantle flow, and 3) how does the transition from “normal” subduction of the Pacific along the Aleutians to flat slab subduction of the Yakutat Terrane beneath southeast and central Alaska to translation of the Yakutat Terrane past North American in eastern Alaska affect geohazard assessment for the north Pacific? Active and passive seismic studies and geologic fieldwork focusing on the Yakutat Terrane show that the Terrane ranges from 15-35 km thick and is underthrusting the North American plate from the St. Elias Mountains to the Alaska Range (~500 km). Deformation of the upper plate occurs within the offshore Pamplona Zone fold and thrust belt, and onshore throughout the Robinson Mountains. Deformation patterns, structural evolution, and the sedimentary products of orogenesis are fundamentally influenced by feedbacks with glacial erosion. The Yakutat megathrust extends beneath Prince William Sound such that the 1964 Mw 9.2 great earthquake epicenter was on this plate boundary and jumped to the adjacent Aleutian megathrust coseismically; this event illuminates the potential for transitional tectonic systems to enhance geohazards. The northern, southern, and eastern limits of the Yakutat microplate are strike-slip faults that, where imaged, appear to cut the entire crustal section and may allow for crustal extrusion towards the Bering Sea. Yakutat Terrane effects on mantle flow, however, have been suggested to cross these crustal features to allow for far-field deformation in the Yukon, Brooks Range, and Amerasia Basin. From the STEEP results it is clear that the Yakutat

  7. Imaging the Ionian Sea subducting slab panels and faults to control present day motion in the Hellenic-Aegean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpazi, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The Hellenic-Mediterranean subduction system characterized by its fast overriding upper plate, fast trench retreat and its most rapidly extending Corinth Rift has been the target of several conceptual models on slab dynamics and lithosphere extension. Using teleseismic waves conversions on a dense 2-D seismic array -installed in the frame of Thales Was Right project- from Crete to the North Aegean coast through central Greece, a high-resolution imaging of the Hellenic slab and the overlying Aegean plate lithospheric mantle has been acquired. The subducting slab top appears segmented into panels 30- 50km wide by SW-NE along dip faults to at least 100km depth. Intermediate-depth Mw>6 earthquakes are located on those faults which implies that they are seismically active at 70 km depth. Smaller magnitude earthquakes of the upper Benioff zone commonly related to dehydration processes of the descending slab, are also resolved to be clustered along these faults. These faults are likely inherited structures of the oceanic lithosphere and sites of preferred hydration. Their revealed relation with this specific seismicity provides high-resolution insight validating dehydration embrittlement. RF imaging on 4 OBS sites has allowed to resolve the depth and geometry of the updip offshore part of the slab, the thrust interplate boundary. The observations support a trenchward continuation of the slab faults and correlation with the similarly segmented thrusting contact of the Mediterranean Ridge accretionary wedge over the upper plate. The slab faults may control the location and size of major historical megathrust earthquakes a hypothesis that has been strengthened by the study of the Mw 6.8 14.02.2008 earthquake, the first large instrumental interplate earthquake offshore SW Peloponnesus. New high-resolution imaging resolves the Aegean plate lithospheric mantle and shows the presence of a significant heterogeneity on top of the presently subducting slab, never imaged before. It

  8. Evaluation of thrusting and folding of the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault, Sangre de Cristo range, Saguache County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Jacob F., II

    The Deadman Creek Thrust Fault was mapped in a structural window on the west side of the Sangre de Cristo Range. The study area, located in southern Colorado, is a two square mile area halfway between the town of Crestone and the Great Sand Dunes National Park. The Deadman Creek Thrust Fault is the center of this study because it delineates the fold structure in the structural window. The fault is a northeast-directed low-angle thrust folded by subsequent additional compression. This study was directed at understanding the motion of the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault as affected by subsequent folding, and the driving mechanism behind the folding of the Pole Creek Anticline as part of a broader study of Laramide thrust faulting in the range. This study aids in the interpretation of the geologic structure of the San Luis Valley, which is being studied by staff of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), to understand Rio Grande Rift basin evolution by focusing on rift and pre-rift tectonic activity. It also provides a geologic interpretation for the Saguache County Forest Service, Great Sand Dunes National Park, and its visitors. The Sangre de Cristo Mountain Range has undergone tectonic events in the Proterozoic, Pennsylvanian (Ancestral Rocky Mountains), Cretaceous-Tertiary (Laramide Orogeny) and mid-Tertiary (Rio Grande Rift). During the Laramide Orogeny the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault emplaced Proterozoic gneiss over Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and Proterozoic granodiorite in the area. Continued deformation resulted in folding of the fault to form the Pole Creek Anticline. The direction of motion of both the fault and fold is northeastward. A self-consistent net of cross-sections and stereonet plots generated from existing and new field data show that the anticline is an overturned isoclinal fold in Pole Creek Canyon, which shows an increasing inter-limb angle and a more vertical axial surface northwestward toward Deadman Creek Canyon. Southwest-directed apparent

  9. Frictional behaviour of megathrust fault gouges under in-situ subduction zone conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, S.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Subduction zone megathrusts generate the largest earthquakes and tsunamis known. Understanding and modelling “seismogenesis” on such faults requires an understanding of the frictional processes that control nucleation and propagation of seismic slip. However, experimental data on the frictional

  10. The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: 1. Insights from laboratory models

    KAUST Repository

    Corbi, F.

    2013-04-01

    Subduction megathrust earthquakes occur at the interface between the subducting and overriding plates. These hazardous phenomena are only partially understood because of the absence of direct observations, the restriction of the instrumental seismic record to the past century, and the limited resolution/completeness of historical to geological archives. To overcome these restrictions, modeling has become a key-tool to study megathrust earthquakes. We present a novel model to investigate the seismic cycle at subduction thrusts using complementary analog (paper 1) and numerical (paper 2) approaches. Here we introduce a simple scaled gelatin-on-sandpaper setup including realistic tectonic loading, spontaneous rupture nucleation, and viscoelastic response of the lithosphere. Particle image velocimetry allows to derive model deformation and earthquake source parameters. Analog earthquakes are characterized by “quasi-periodic” recurrence. Consistent with elastic theory, the interseismic stage shows rearward motion, subsidence in the outer wedge and uplift of the “coastal area” as a response of locked plate interface at shallow depth. The coseismic stage exhibits order of magnitude higher velocities and reversal of the interseismic deformation pattern in the seaward direction, subsidence of the coastal area, and uplift in the outer wedge. Like natural earthquakes, analog earthquakes generally nucleate in the deeper portion of the rupture area and preferentially propagate upward in a crack-like fashion. Scaled rupture width-slip proportionality and seismic moment-duration scaling verifies dynamic similarities with earthquakes. Experimental repeatability is statistically verified. Comparing analog results with natural observations, we conclude that this technique is suitable for investigating the parameter space influencing the subduction interplate seismic cycle.

  11. Application of three fault growth criteria to the Puente Hills thrust system, Los Angeles, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erik L.; Cooke, Michele L.

    2005-10-01

    Three-dimensional mechanical models are used to evaluate the performance of different fault growth criteria in predicting successive growth of three échelon thrust faults similar to the segments of the Puente Hills thrust system of the Los Angeles basin, California. Four sequential Boundary Element Method models explore the growth of successive échelon faults within the system by simulating snapshots of deformation at different stages of development. These models use three criteria, (1) energy release rate, (2) strain energy density, and (3) Navier-Coulomb stress, to characterize the lateral growth of the fault system. We simulate the growth of an échelon thrust fault system to evaluate the suitability of each of these criteria for assessing fault growth. Each of these three factors predicts a portion of the incipient fault geometry (i.e. location or orientation); however, each provides different information. In each model, energy release rate along the westernmost (leading) tip of the Puente Hills thrust drops with growth of the next neighboring fault; this result supports the overall lateral development of successive échelon segments. Within each model, regions of high strain energy density and Navier-Coulomb stress envelope at least a portion of the next fault to develop, although the strain energy density has stronger correlation than Navier-Coulomb stress to the location of incipient faulting. In each model, one of the two predicted planes of maximum Navier-Coulomb stress ahead of the leading fault tip matches the strike but not the dip of the incipient fault plane recreating part of the fault orientation. The incipient fault dip is best predicted by the orientation of the strain energy density envelopes around the leading fault tip. Furthermore, the energy release rate and pattern of strain energy density can be used to characterize potential soft linkage (overlap) or hard linkage (connection) of échelon faults within the system.

  12. Friction on subduction megathrust faults: Beyond the illite-muscovite transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, S.A.M.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Spiers, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous experimental studies addressing subduction megathrust friction have focused on shallow fault gouges, dominated by smectite, illite and quartz. Here, we aim to determine the effect of the transition to muscovite-rich fault rock at depths beyond the illite-dominated region of the seismogenic

  13. The long-term seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: benchmarking geodynamic numerical simulations and analogue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dinther, Y.; Gerya, T.; Corbi, F.; Funiciello, F.; Mai, P. M.; Dalguer, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    The physics governing the long-term seismic cycle in subduction zones remains elusive, largely due to its spatial inaccessibility, complex tectonic and geometric setting, and the short observational time span. To improve our understanding of the physics governing this seismic cycle, we benchmark a geodynamic numerical approach with a novel laboratory model. In this work we quantify and compare periodicity and source parameters of slip events (earth-quakes and gel-quakes) as a function of fault rheology (i.e. frictional properties), subduction velocity, slab dip, and seismogenic zone width. Our fluid-dynamic numerical method involves a plane-strain finite-difference scheme with marker-in-cell technique to solve the conservation of momentum, mass, and energy for a visco-elasto-plastic rheology. The simulated gelatin laboratory setup constitutes a triangular, visco-elastic crustal wedge on top of a straight subducting slab that includes a seismogenic zone. Numerical and analogue results show a regular and roughly comparable periodicity of short, rapid wedge velocity reversals. Ruptures nucleating mainly around the bottom of the seismogenic zone, and propagating upward, cause a distinct and rapid drop in stress within the wedge. To mimic the short duration, high speed and regularity of the analogue results, the numerical method requires a form of steady-state velocity-weakening friction for acceleration, and healing. The necessity of including a variable state component into the numerical simulations is subject of ongoing work. Finally, we extend this analysis by observing the role of different friction laws in large-scale, geometrically more realistic models.

  14. Thrust faults and extensional detachment faults in Cretan tectono-stratigraphy: Implications for Middle Miocene extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Vassilakis, Emmanuel

    2010-06-01

    The revised tectono-stratigraphy of Crete and especially of the "Phyllites-Quartzites" complex demonstrated the distinction of the probable Paleozoic low-medium grade metamorphic rocks of the Arna unit from the underlying Permo-Triassic phyllites and associated carbonate sediments (Trypali facies) of Western Crete unit as well as the overlying Permo-Triassic phyllites and associated sediments of the Tyros/Ravdoucha Beds at the base of the Tripolis unit. The pre-existing mixture of the above tectono-stratigaphic units in a single complex created a number of misinterpretations as far as stratigraphy, metamorphism and interpretation of low angle faults as thrusts or detachments. Especially in cases where the inferred tectonic contact concerns the transition between the Tyros Beds and the base of the Tripolis carbonate platform there is no structural omission and therefore the contact represents a minor disharmonic sliding surface and not a detachment. Based on the revised tectono-stratigraphic analysis the determination of the structural omission for each tectonic contact was possible and several detachments were described for the first time. Footwall rocks of the detachments comprised several tectonic units usually from the lower nappes and hanging wall rocks comprised several tectonic units usually from the upper nappes. The detachment may separate not only metamorphosed units in the footwall (Mani, Western Crete, Arna) from non metamorphosed units in the hanging wall (Tripolis, Pindos and higher nappes) but also all other possible combinations from the Cretan nappe pile. Extension in Crete started in the Middle-Late Miocene with the formation of extensional detachment faults. The reported extensional structures of Oligocene to Early Miocene age do not correspond to crustal extension of Crete but to localized shear zones related to nappe stacking and the exhumation of metamorphic rocks. Extensional detachments in Crete form a tectonic horst through two oppositely

  15. On the initiation of subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Steve; Phillips, Roger J.

    1991-01-01

    Estimates of shear resistance associated with lithospheric thrusting and convergence represent lower bounds on the force necessary to promote trench formation. Three environments proposed as preferential sites of incipient subduction are investigated: passive continental margins, transform faults/fracture zones, and extinct ridges. None of these are predicted to convert into subduction zones simply by the accumulation of local gravitational stresses. Subduction cannot initiate through the foundering of dense oceanic lithosphere immediately adjacent to passive continental margins. The attempted subduction of buoyant material at a mature trench can result in large compressional forces in both subducting and overriding plates. This is the only tectonic force sufficient to trigger the nucleation of a new subduction zone. The ubiquitous distribution of transform faults and fracture zones, combined with the common proximity of these features to mature subduction complexes, suggests that they may represent the most likely sites of trench formation if they are even marginally weaker than normal oceanic lithosphere.

  16. Shallow seismic imaging of folds above the Puente Hills blind-thrust fault, Los Angeles, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Thomas L.; Shaw, John H.; Dolan, James F.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Williams, Robert A.; Odum, Jack K.; Plesch, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles image discrete folds in the shallow subsurface (Puente Hills blind-thrust fault system, Los Angeles basin, California. The profiles demonstrate late Quaternary activity at the fault tip, precisely locate the axial surfaces of folds within the upper 100 m, and constrain the geometry and kinematics of recent folding. The Santa Fe Springs segment of the Puente Hills fault zone shows an upward-narrowing kink band with an active anticlinal axial surface, consistent with fault-bend folding above an active thrust ramp. The Coyote Hills segment shows an active synclinal axial surface that coincides with the base of a 9-m-high scarp, consistent with tip-line folding or the presence of a backthrust. The seismic profiles pinpoint targets for future geologic work to constrain slip rates and ages of past events on this important fault system.

  17. Thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium: new insights from analogue modelling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Filipe; Duarte, Joao; Schellart, Wouter; Tomas, Ricardo; Grigorova, Vili; Terrinha, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    We present analogue modelling experimental results concerning thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium, to try to evaluate the influence exerted by different prescribed interference angles in the formation of morpho-structural interference fault patterns. All the experiments were conceived to simulate simultaneous reactivation of confining strike-slip and thrust faults defining a (corner) zone of interference, contrasting with previously reported discrete (time and space) superposition of alternating thrust and strike-slip events. Different interference angles of 60°, 90° and 120° were experimentally investigated by comparing the specific structural configurations obtained in each case. Results show that a deltoid-shaped morpho-structural pattern is consistently formed in the fault interference (corner) zone, exhibiting a specific geometry that is fundamentally determined by the different prescribed fault interference angle. Such angle determines the orientation of the displacement vector shear component along the main frontal thrust direction, determining different fault confinement conditions in each case, and imposing a complying geometry and kinematics of the interference deltoid structure. Model comparison with natural examples worldwide shows good geometric and kinematic similarity, pointing to the existence of matching underlying dynamic process. Acknowledgments This work was sponsored by the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) through project MODELINK EXPL/GEO-GEO/0714/2013.

  18. Comparison of fault-related folding algorithms to restore a fold-and-thrust-belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Christian; Tanner, David

    2017-04-01

    Fault-related folding means the contemporaneous evolution of folds as a consequence of fault movement. It is a common deformation process in the upper crust that occurs worldwide in accretionary wedges, fold-and-thrust belts, and intra-plate settings, in either strike-slip, compressional, or extensional regimes. Over the last 30 years different algorithms have been developed to simulate the kinematic evolution of fault-related folds. All these models of fault-related folding include similar simplifications and limitations and use the same kinematic behaviour throughout the model (Brandes & Tanner, 2014). We used a natural example of fault-related folding from the Limón fold-and-thrust belt in eastern Costa Rica to test two different algorithms and to compare the resulting geometries. A thrust fault and its hanging-wall anticline were restored using both the trishear method (Allmendinger, 1998; Zehnder & Allmendinger, 2000) and the fault-parallel flow approach (Ziesch et al. 2014); both methods are widely used in academia and industry. The resulting hanging-wall folds above the thrust fault are restored in substantially different fashions. This is largely a function of the propagation-to-slip ratio of the thrust, which controls the geometry of the related anticline. Understanding the controlling factors for anticline evolution is important for the evaluation of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and the characterization of fault processes. References: Allmendinger, R.W., 1998. Inverse and forward numerical modeling of trishear fault propagation folds. Tectonics, 17, 640-656. Brandes, C., Tanner, D.C. 2014. Fault-related folding: a review of kinematic models and their application. Earth Science Reviews, 138, 352-370. Zehnder, A.T., Allmendinger, R.W., 2000. Velocity field for the trishear model. Journal of Structural Geology, 22, 1009-1014. Ziesch, J., Tanner, D.C., Krawczyk, C.M. 2014. Strain associated with the fault-parallel flow algorithm during kinematic fault

  19. Influence of subduction zone conditions and gouge composition on frictional slip stability of megathrust faults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, S.A.M.; Spiers, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the temperature/depth distribution of destructive earthquakes in subduction megathrusts, and the mechanisms of nucleation of these events, data on the frictional behaviour of phyllosilicate/quartz-rich megathrust fault gouges under in-situ conditions are needed. We performed rotary

  20. Examining the links between Slow Slip Events, crustal faults and subduction interface in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, A.; Manighetti, I.; Vergnolle, M.; Campillo, M.

    2012-12-01

    We have analyzed the tectonic structures, active and more ancient, that dissect the upper plate, the subducting plate and the trench in Central Mexico, and examined the links between these structures, the historical and instrumental seismicity, and the SSEs and tremors (as described in Radiguet et al., 2012). We show that the tectonic architecture of the upper plate controls the location of the SSEs and of a large part of the instrumental seismicity. The large historical subduction ruptures do not extend further below than ≈ 30 km depth. The broken areas are underlined by a zone of dense instrumental seismicity that extends confined between the broken patches and a vertical WSW-trending fault that cuts across the upper plate down to the interface, with its trace halfway between Acapulco and Chilpancingo (AC fault). This fault shows no morphological evidence of recent activity. Another similar, parallel WNW-trending fault exists north of Chilpancingo (NC fault). Though it shows no morphological evidence of recent activity, it is underlined by a dense instrumental seismicity confined in the range 40-70 km of depth, whose focal mechanisms are all extensional. No instrumental seismicity is recorded between the two faults. By contrast, the slip zones of the 2002, 2006 and 2010 major SSEs appear confined exactly in between the two vertical fault planes, while the major zone of reported tremors extend immediately north of the NC fault plane. The occurrence of each SSE induces a slight increase in the density of instrumental seismicity related to the NC fault, and a marked increase in the density of instrumental seismicity recorded south of the AC fault. In details, the seismicity increases at the northern tips of the NE-trending faults that dissect the trench and hence also likely the down-going oceanic plate below. Simple static Coulomb stress transfer models confirm that each SSE likely increased the static stresses by ≈ 0.1 bars on both the shallower portion of the

  1. Earthquake hazards of active blind-thrust faults under the central Los Angeles basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, John H.; Suppe, John

    1996-04-01

    We document several blind-thrust faults under the Los Angeles basin that, if active and seismogenic, are capable of generating large earthquakes (M = 6.3 to 7.3). Pliocene to Quaternary growth folds imaged in seismic reflection profiles record the existence, size, and slip rates of these blind faults. The growth structures have shapes characteristic of fault-bend folds above blind thrusts, as demonstrated by balanced kinematic models, geologic cross sections, and axial-surface maps. We interpret the Compton-Los Alamitos trend as a growth fold above the Compton ramp, which extends along strike from west Los Angeles to at least the Santa Ana River. The Compton thrust is part of a larger fault system, including a decollement and ramps beneath the Elysian Park and Palos Verdes trends. The Cienegas and Coyote Hills growth folds overlie additional blind thrusts in the Elysian Park trend that are not closely linked to the Compton ramp. Analysis of folded Pliocene to Quaternary strata yields slip rates of 1.4 ± 0.4 mm/yr on the Compton thrust and 1.7 ± 0.4 mm/yr on a ramp beneath the Elysian Park trend. Assuming that slip is released in large earthquakes, we estimate magnitudes of 6.3 to 6.8 for earthquakes on individual ramp segments based on geometric segment sizes derived from axial surface maps. Multiple-segment ruptures could yield larger earthquakes (M = 6.9 to 7.3). Relations among magnitude, coseismic displacement, and slip rate yield an average recurrence interval of 380 years for single-segment earthquakes and a range of 400 to 1300 years for multiple-segment events. If these newly documented blind thrust faults are active, they will contribute substantially to the seismic hazards in Los Angeles because of their locations directly beneath the metropolitan area.

  2. Width of surface rupture zone for thrust earthquakes: implications for earthquake fault zoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Boncio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The criteria for zoning the surface fault rupture hazard (SFRH along thrust faults are defined by analysing the characteristics of the areas of coseismic surface faulting in thrust earthquakes. Normal and strike–slip faults have been deeply studied by other authors concerning the SFRH, while thrust faults have not been studied with comparable attention. Surface faulting data were compiled for 11 well-studied historic thrust earthquakes occurred globally (5.4 ≤ M ≤ 7.9. Several different types of coseismic fault scarps characterize the analysed earthquakes, depending on the topography, fault geometry and near-surface materials (simple and hanging wall collapse scarps, pressure ridges, fold scarps and thrust or pressure ridges with bending-moment or flexural-slip fault ruptures due to large-scale folding. For all the earthquakes, the distance of distributed ruptures from the principal fault rupture (r and the width of the rupture zone (WRZ were compiled directly from the literature or measured systematically in GIS-georeferenced published maps. Overall, surface ruptures can occur up to large distances from the main fault ( ∼ 2150 m on the footwall and  ∼  3100 m on the hanging wall. Most of the ruptures occur on the hanging wall, preferentially in the vicinity of the principal fault trace ( >   ∼  50 % at distances  <   ∼  250 m. The widest WRZ are recorded where sympathetic slip (Sy on distant faults occurs, and/or where bending-moment (B-M or flexural-slip (F-S fault ruptures, associated with large-scale folds (hundreds of metres to kilometres in wavelength, are present. A positive relation between the earthquake magnitude and the total WRZ is evident, while a clear correlation between the vertical displacement on the principal fault and the total WRZ is not found. The distribution of surface ruptures is fitted with probability density functions, in order to define a criterion to

  3. Thrust geometries in unconsolidated Quaternary sediments around the Eupchon fault, SE Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. Y.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, J. H.; Shin, H. C.

    2003-04-01

    It had been considered that Korean Peninsula is located in a relatively stable continental platform. Over ten Quaternary faults have recently been discovered, however, in the south-eastern part of the Korean Peninsula. The Eupchon Fault was discovered at the construction site of a primary school, close to a nuclear power plant. In order to understand the characteristics of the Eupchon fault, we carried out two trench surveys near the first finding site. The orientations of trench sites are 150o and 170o, the widths are 1.3 m and 1.5 m, and the maximum depths are 2.8 m and 5.5 m, respectively. The trenches are in Quaternary unconsolidated marine terrace sediments, which have horizontal bedding planes, are well sorted, and range from pebbles to muds The fault system includes one main reverse fault (N20o E/40o SE) with about 4m displacement and a series of branches. Structures in the fault system include synthetic and antithetic faults, hanging wall anticlines, drag folds, back thrusts, pop-up structures, flat-ramp geometries and duplexes, i.e. very similar to thrust systems in consolidated rocks. In the upper part of the fault system, several tip damage zone patterns are observed, indicating that the fault system terminates in the upper part of the section. Pebbles along the main fault plane show preferred orientation of long axes indicating the fault trace. The orientation of the slickenside striea is E-W, indicating the movement direction. The unconformity between the Quaternary deposits and the underlying Tertiary andesites and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks is displaced in a reverse sense. A normal displacement was reported lower in the section, indicating the fault had a normal displacement and was reverse reactivated during the Quaternary.

  4. Normal faulting in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin: Paleoearthquake history and kinematics of the Spili Fault, Crete, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Moraetis, Daniel; Benedetti, Lucilla; Guillou, Valery; Bellier, Olivier; Hristopulos, Dionisis

    2014-09-01

    The late-Cenozoic kinematic and late-Pleistocene paleoearthquake history of the Spili Fault is examined using slip-vector measurements and in situ cosmogenic (36Cl) dating, respectively. The Spili Fault appears to have undergone at least three successive but distinct phases of extension since Messinian (˜7 Ma), with the most recent faulting resulting in the exhumation of its carbonate plane for a fault-length of ˜20 km. Earthquake-slip and age data show that the lower 9 m of the Spili Fault plane were exhumed during the last ˜16,500 years through a minimum of five large-magnitude (Mw > 6) earthquakes. The timing between successive paleoearthquakes varied by more than one order of magnitude (from 800 to 9000 years), suggesting a highly variable earthquake recurrence interval during late Pleistocene (CV = 1). This variability resulted to significant fluctuations in the displacement rate of the Spili Fault, with the millennium rate (3.5 mm/yr) being about six times faster than its late-Pleistocene rate (0.6 mm/yr). The observed variability in the slip-size of the paleoearthquakes is, however, significantly smaller (CV = 0.3). These data collectively suggest that the Spili Fault is one of the fastest moving faults in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin.

  5. Recognition of Paleoearthquakes on the Puente Hills Blind Thrust Fault, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James F.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Shaw, John H.

    2003-04-01

    Borehole data from young sediments folded above the Puente Hills blind thrust fault beneath Los Angeles reveal that the folding extends to the surface as a discrete zone (-145 meters wide). Buried fold scarps within an upward- narrowing zone of deformation, which extends from the upward termination of the thrust ramp at 3 kilometers depth to the surface, document the occurrence of at least four large (moment-magnitude 7.2 to 7.5) earthquakes on this fault during the past 11,000 years. Future events of this type pose a seismic hazard to metropolitan Los Angeles. Moreover, the methods developed in this study can be used to refine seismic hazard assessments of blind thrusts in other metropolitan regions.

  6. Mechanical analysis of fault activation in southern Longmen Shan fold-and- thrust belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Huai; Wang, Liangshu; Shi, Yaolin; Leroy, Yves M.

    2017-04-01

    A mixed fault activation mode with obvious hinterland rupture in the southern Longmen Shan, the eastern margin of Tibetan Plateau, is revealed by recent 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan and 2013 Mw6.6 Lushan earthquakes together with GPS measurements. How to systematically understand the coexistence and competition mechanisms of fault activation, especially the principal-subordinate relationship on deformation absorption, in essence, involves mechanical onset analysis of this fold- and-thrust belt. However, due to the two-décollement- level thrust system with active 'flat-ramp- flat' geometry décollement, the predication of fault activation in the LMS has beyond the scope of Critical Coulomb wedge theory, not to mention the synchronous listric-type splay fault rupturing in the Beichuan fault (BCF) and Pengguan fault (PGF). For that purpose, we adopted maximum strength theorem, the kinematic approach of limit analysis, to deal with mechanical analysis of fault activation. Four end-member failure modes, or collapse mechanisms (CMs) in classical limit analysis, are proposed corresponding to the rupture of BCF, PGF, Range Frontal Blind Fault (RFBF) and the rupture of the flat-ramp- flat décollement into Sichuan Basin via RFBF. By selecting the available CMs via finite element limit analysis, the listric geometry of BCF and PGF is demonstrated to the dominant factor in trapping deformation in the hinterland. To activate the high-angle Beichuan splay fault, low cohesion and low friction angle on the BCF are combined effects on the rupturing of BCF. The change in cohesion and friction on BCF eventually forms the transition state between high angle BCF and low-angle PGF. Besides, due to the existence of low frictional upper décollement layer in Sichuan Basin (the Triassic evaporate layer), small amount of deformation is attracted into the Sichuan Basin forming small-scale thrusting folding. Moreover, favorable deformation migration toward Sichuan Basin is jointly influenced by

  7. Incremental Slip Along Dilatant Faults in Ancient Fluid-Rich Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remitti, F.; Fagereng, A.; Sibson, R. H.; Vannucchi, P.; Bettelli, G.

    2012-12-01

    At a variety of depths in subduction zones a proportion of relative plate motion is accommodated by episodic tremor and slow slip events. These events are accompanied by distinct low frequency seismic signals and/or high levels of micro-seismic activity. Based on theoretical studies and seismic attributes of the source region, fluids overpressured to near-lithostatic values seem likely to be involved in the mechanism behind episodic tremor. Ancient crust surrounding paleoseismic zones, especially if rich in overpressured fluids, should contain widespread relics of this kind of activity. Here we present microstructural observations from two ancient subduction thrust analogues where brittle deformation was accommodated by repeating micro-movements along dilatant faults. The first example is a mélange formed during Triassic-Jurassic tectonic accretion of ocean floor sediments now exposed in the Chrystalls Beach Complex, South Island, NZ. The mélange comprises competent sandstone and chert lenses set in a cleaved mudstone matrix deformed in a continuous-discontinuous style under subgreenschist conditions. Deformation is characterized by a pervasive anastomosing fault-fracture mesh of multiple shearing surfaces, subparallel to cleavage and coated with incrementally developed quartz-calcite slickenfibres. Microstructural observations reveal that slickenfibres grew by 'crack-seal' increments of 10-100 μm. Incremental slip transfer was constant over a single slickenfiber and accommodated by opening of extension fractures that link en echelon slip surfaces. The characteristic spacing of inclusion bands indicates relatively constant growth increments, possibly occurring into regular size cracks. Increments of non-constant growth and, instead, fractures significantly wider than 100 μm, are represented by local veins of euhedral quartz and carbonate. Similar structures are present in the shallow part of an ancient plate interface, now exposed in the Northern Apennines of

  8. Origin of active blind-thrust faults in the southern Inner California Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Ramirez, Carlos Alberto

    This dissertation describes the origins, three-dimensional geometry, slip history and present activity of a regional system of blind-thrust faults located in the Inner California Borderlands, and analyses the new earthquake scenarios they imply for the nearby coastal region of southern California. Chapter 1 is an overview of the main observations and inferences derived from geophysical data (seismic reflection profiles, well information, and seismicity) and coastal tectonics studies that are used to document the reactivation of two regional, low-angle Miocene detachments---the Oceanside and the Thirtymile faults. These active blind-thrusts comprise the Inner California Blind-Thrust System. The paper is co-authored by Prof. John H. Shaw (Harvard University) and Prof. Karl Muller (University of Colorado), and was published in the journal Geology. In this paper we associate the 1986 (ML 5.3) Oceanside earthquake and uplift of coastal marine terraces with activity on these blind-thrust faults, demonstrating their current activity and earthquake potential. We also describe the structural interactions of the blind-thrust system with regional strike-slip fault zones, and propose new earthquake hazards scenarios for the Inner California Borderlands based on these interactions. Chapter 2 presents a methodology used to generate regional 3D velocity models that allows converting seismic reflection data and derived geological surfaces into the depth domain. This chapter is co-authored with Dr. Peter Suss (University of Tubingen) and Prof. John H. Shaw (Harvard University), who developed aspects of the methodology used here in their velocity modeling of the Los Angeles basin. In our study, geologic constraints are employed to guide the interpolation of velocity structure in the Inner California Borderlands, yielding a comprehensive 3D velocity model that is consistent with the structural and stratigraphic architectures of the offshore basins. The need to properly scale time

  9. Length-Displacement Scaling of Lunar Thrust Faults and the Formation of Uphill-Facing Scarps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Roggon, Lars; Hetzel, Ralf; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hampel, Andrea; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.

    2017-04-01

    Lobate scarps are straight to curvilinear positive-relief landforms that occur on all terrestrial bodies [e.g., 1-3]. They are the surface manifestation of thrust faults that cut through and offset the upper part of the crust. Fault scarps on planetary surfaces provide the opportunity to study the growth of faults under a wide range of environmental conditions (e.g., gravity, temperature, pore pressure) [4]. We studied four lunar thrust-fault scarps (Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler, Racah X-1) ranging in length from 1.3 km to 15.4 km [5] and found that their maximum total displacements are linearly correlated with length over one order of magnitude. We propose that during the progressive accumulation of slip, lunar faults propagate laterally and increase in length. On the basis of our measurements, the ratio of maximum displacement, D, to fault length, L, ranges from 0.017 to 0.028 with a mean value of 0.023 (or 2.3%). This is an order of magnitude higher than the value of 0.1% derived by theoretical considerations [4], and about twice as large as the value of 0.012-0.013 estimated by [6,7]. Our results, in addition to recently published findings for other lunar scarps [2,8], indicate that the D/L ratios of lunar thrust faults are similar to those of faults on Mercury and Mars (e.g., 1, 9-11], and almost as high as the average D/L ratio of 3% for faults on Earth [16,23]. Three of the investigated thrust fault scarps (Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler) are uphill-facing scarps generated by slip on faults that dip in the same direction as the local topography. Thrust faults with such a geometry are common ( 60% of 97 studied scarps) on the Moon [e.g., 2,5,7]. To test our hypothesis that the surface topography plays an important role in the formation of uphill-facing fault scarps by controlling the vertical load on a fault plane, we simulated thrust faulting and its relation to topography with two-dimensional finite-element models using the commercial code ABAQUS

  10. Fluid-Fault rock interaction during progressive deformation in Pelling-Munsiari thrust fault zone: A preliminary study from Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalayan fold thrust belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akanksha; Ghosh, Pritam; Bhattacharyya, Kathakali

    2017-04-01

    In a fold thrust belt,the dominant thrust fault rocks generally record strong overprinting of dislocation-controlled deformation mechanisms by frictional mechanisms during progressive deformation. Fluids play an integral role during evolution of such fault zones by opening channels by fracturing or by sealing existing fractures by forming veins, or by a combination of both. In the Sikkim Himalayan fold thrust belt (FTB), the Pelling-Munsiari thrust (PT) is one of the dominant thrusts that is the roof thrust of the Lesser Himalayan Duplex. Growth of the duplex has folded the overlying PT sheet, exposing it at various structural positions. We focus this study along the hinterlandmost (Mangan) and forelandmost (Suntaleykhola) exposures of the PT zone. We attempt to develop a temporal sequence of fracture growth by studying offsets recorded along fractures of different orientations, and also quantifing the variation in fracture population from hinterland to foreland. Additionally, we probe the role of fluids during the different stages of progressive deformation by studying fractures versus filled in fractures (veins). We examine the sources and temperature of the fluids as a function of the structural position of the exposed PT zones. The PT fault rocks are dominantly quartz-mica mylonite. At the hinterlandmost exposure, three dominant fracture orientations are recorded at 0°-30° ( 46%), 30°-70° ( 37%), and 70°-90° ( 17%) with respect to the mylonitic foliation. Low-angle fractures are offset by the younger, high-angle fractures. Vein population study reveals that the early-formed fractures are filled in by fluids while the later ones are independent of it.The same fault zone records a higher fracture population in the forelandmost exposure with orientations of 0°-30° ( 16%), 30°-70° ( 47%) and 70°-90° ( 37%) with respect to the mylonitic foliation. In this outcrop, fluids are present in both low-angle and high-angle fractures. Based on recrystallized

  11. POTENTIAL OF TSUNAMI GENERATION ALONG THE COLOMBIA/ECUADOR SUBDUCTION MARGIN AND THE DOLORES-GUAYAQUIL MEGA-THRUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Colombia/Ecuador subduction zone is a region where high seismic stress is presently accumulating. Statistical probability studies and GPS measurements of crustal deformation indicate that the region has an increased potential to generate in the near future a major or great tsunamigenic earthquake similar to the 1979 or 1906. Although most of the major earthquakes along this margin usually generate local tsunamis, the recurrence of a great mega-thrust, inter-plate earthquake, similar in magnitude and rupture to the 1906 event (Mw=8.8, rupture 600 km., can generate a tsunami with destructive near and far-field impacts. To understand the potential for such destructive tsunami generation in this region, the present study examines and evaluates: a the controlling inter-plate coupling mechanisms of the tectonic regime of the margin – including lithospheric structure deformation, sea-floor relief and the subduction or accretion of highly folded, hydrated sediments along the seismogenic zone of southern Colombia/North Ecuador; b the seismo-dynamics and role in tsunami generation as affected by the Carnegie Ridge’s oblique subduction beneath the South American continent; and c the seismotectonic extensional processes in the vicinity of the Gulf of Guayaquil-Tumbes Basin and how the northwestward movement of the North Andes block away from the South American continent along the Dolores Guayaquil mega-thrust and the resulting strain rotation may cause sudden detachment, décollement and deformation, with the potential for local tsunami generation that may affect the Gulf of Guayaquil and other coastal areas along southern Ecuador.

  12. Ore-controlling thrust faults at the Bazovskoe gold-ore deposit (Eastern Yakutia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridovsky, V. Yu.; Polufuntikova, L. I.; Goryachev, N. A.; Kudrin, M. V.

    2017-06-01

    This work presents results of structural analysis of the orogenic Bazovskoe gold-ore deposit, the structure of which is controlled by an imbricate fan with frontal succession of ore-controlling thrust faults and conjugated thrust ramps. It was established that linear and stratified stockworks and their combinations are formed by several systems of quartz veins and veinlets, regularly related to thrusting along the ore-controlling zones and interlayer shears. In addition, superimposed shear deformations are widely distributed. The features revealed of the geological structure of the Bazovskoe gold-ore deposit allow us to refine the prospecting and searching pattern developed for gold-ore deposits of the Verkhoyansk-Kolyma fold belt.

  13. The January 25th, 2014 Kebumen earthquake: A normal faulting in subduction zone of Southern Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serhalawan, Yopi Ruben; Sianipar, Dimas; Suardi, Iman

    2017-07-01

    Normal faulting mechanism of earthquake in subduction zone is quite interested to study further. We investigated the Kebumen, January 25, 2014 earthquake sequences by retrieving focal mechanisms using full moment tensor inversion. We used BMKG seismic data from stations in the vicinity of Central Java region for these inversions. Then we correlated the static coulomb stress change by the mainshock to the aftershocks. We found that mainshock is a normal faulting earthquake with nodal plane 1; strike 283, dip 22 and rake -100; nodal plane 2 with strike 113, dip 68 and rake -86. Using distribution analysis of high precision aftershocks after relocated; we considered that the reliable fault plane was nodal plane 1 with strike trending SE-NW. The focal mechanisms provide an estimate of the local stress field in the Wadati-Beniof Zone of Southern Java subduction zone. There is also conclution stating that the mainshock may trigger the aftershocks mainly in three zones, i.e. in continental crustal, upper mantle and on the oceanic slab. This is visually showed that the high quality aftershocks located in positive zones of static coulomb stress change.

  14. Is the Vincent fault in southern California the Laramide subduction zone megathrust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, H.; Platt, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Vincent fault (VF) in the San Gabriel Mountains, southern California separates a Meso-Proterozoic gneiss complex and Mesozoic granitoid rocks in the upper plate from the ocean-affiliated Late Cretaceous Pelona schist in the lower plate, and it has been widely interpreted as the original Laramide subduction megathrust. A 500 to 1000 m thick mylonite zone, consisting of a low-stress (LS) section at the bottom, a high-stress (HS) section at the top, and a weakly deformed section in between, is developed above the VF. Our kinematic, thermobarometric and geochronological analysis of the mylonite zone indicates that the VF is a normal fault. Shear sense indicators including asymmetric porphyroblasts, quartz new grain fabric, mineral fish, and quartz CPO from the HS and the LS sections exhibit a top-to-SE sense of shear on the SW-dipping mylonitic foliation, which is contrary to what one would expect for the Laramide subduction megathrust. A few samples from the LS section were overprinted by HS microstructure, implying that the LS mylonites predate the HS mylonites. TitaniQ thermometer and Si-in-muscovite barometer show that the P-T conditions are 389 ± 6 °C, 5 kbar for the LS mylonites and 329 ± 6 °C, 2.4 kbar for HS mylonites. Considering the temporal sequence of HS and LS mylonites, they are likely to be formed during exhumation. A comparison with the lower plate leads to the same conclusion. The top 80-100 m of the Pelona schist underneath the VF is folded and also mylonitized, forming the Narrows synform and S3 simultaneously. Our previous study found that S3 of the Pelona schist has a top-to-SE sense of shear and similar P-T conditions as the LS mylonite in the upper plate, so S3 of the Pelona schist is likely to be formed together with the LS mylonites in the upper plate. While mylonitization of Pelona schist (S3) overprinted both the subduction-related S1 fabric and the return-flow-related S2 fabric, it is reasonable to argue that the mylonite zone above

  15. The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: 2. Dynamic implications of geodynamic simulations validated with laboratory models

    KAUST Repository

    van Dinther, Y.

    2013-04-01

    The physics governing the seismic cycle at seismically active subduction zones remains poorly understood due to restricted direct observations in time and space. To investigate subduction zone dynamics and associated interplate seismicity, we validate a continuum, visco-elasto-plastic numerical model with a new laboratory approach (Paper 1). The analogous laboratory setup includes a visco-elastic gelatin wedge underthrusted by a rigid plate with defined velocity-weakening and -strengthening regions. Our geodynamic simulation approach includes velocity-weakening friction to spontaneously generate a series of fast frictional instabilities that correspond to analog earthquakes. A match between numerical and laboratory source parameters is obtained when velocity-strengthening is applied in the aseismic regions to stabilize the rupture. Spontaneous evolution of absolute stresses leads to nucleation by coalescence of neighboring patches, mainly occurring at evolving asperities near the seismogenic zone limits. Consequently, a crack-, or occasionally even pulse-like, rupture propagates toward the opposite side of the seismogenic zone by increasing stresses ahead of its rupture front, until it arrests on a barrier. The resulting surface displacements qualitatively agree with geodetic observations and show landward and, from near the downdip limit, upward interseismic motions. These are rebound and reversed coseismically. This slip increases adjacent stresses, which are relaxed postseismically by afterslip and thereby produce persistent seaward motions. The wide range of observed physical phenomena, including back-propagation and repeated slip, and the agreement with laboratory results demonstrate that visco-elasto-plastic geodynamic models with rate-dependent friction form a new tool that can greatly contribute to our understanding of the seismic cycle at subduction zones.

  16. Viscoelastic-gravitational deformation by a rectangular thrust fault in a layered Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, John B.

    1982-09-01

    Previous papers in this series have been concerned with developing the numerical techniques required for the evaluation of vertical displacements which are the result of thrust faulting in a layered, elastic-gravitational earth model. This paper extends these methods to the calculation of fully time-dependent vertical surface deformation from a rectangular, dipping thrust fault in an elastic-gravitational layer over a viscoelastic-gravitational half space. The elastic-gravitational solutions are used together with the correspondence principle of linear viscoelasticity to give the solution in the Laplace transform domain. The technique used here to invert the displacements into the time domain is the Prony series technique, wherein the transformed solution is fit to the transformed representation of a truncated series of decaying exponentials. Purely viscoelastic results obtained are checked against results found previously using a different inverse transform method, and agreement is excellent. The major advantage in using the Prony series technique is that deformations can be computed for arbitrary time intervals. A series of results are obtained for a rectangular, 30° dipping thrust fault in an elastic-gravitational layer over viscoelastic-gravitational half space. Time-dependent displacements are calculated out to 50 half space relaxation times τa, or 100 Maxwell times 2τm = τa. Significant effects due to gravity are shown to exist in the solutions as early as several τa. The difference between the purely viscoelastic solution and the viscoelastic-gravitational solutions grows as time progresses. Typically, the solutions with gravity reach an equilibrium value after 10-20 relaxation times, when the purely viscoelastic solutions are still changing significantly. Additionally, the length scaling which was apparent in the purely viscoelastic problem breaks down in the viscoelastic-gravitational problem. Two independent length scales, one of which changes with

  17. Deep postseismic viscoelastic relaxation excited by an intraslab normal fault earthquake in the Chile subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bie, Lidong; Ryder, Isabelle; Métois, Marianne

    2017-08-01

    The 2005 Mw 7.8 Tarapaca earthquake was the result of normal faulting on a west-dipping plane at a depth of 90 km within the subducting slab down-dip of the North Chilean gap that partially ruptured in the 2014 M 8.2 Iquique earthquake. We use Envisat observations of nearly four years of postseismic deformation following the earthquake, together with some survey GPS measurements, to investigate the viscoelastic relaxation response of the surrounding upper mantle to the coseismic stress. We constrain the rheological structure by testing various 3D models, taking into account the vertical and lateral heterogeneities in viscosity that one would expect in a subduction zone environment. A viscosity of 4-8 × 1018 Pa s for the continental mantle asthenosphere fits both InSAR line-of-sight (LOS) and GPS horizontal displacements reasonably well. In order to test whether the Tarapaca earthquake and associated postseismic relaxation could have triggered the 2014 Iquique sequence, we computed the Coulomb stress change induced by the co- and postseismic deformation following the Tarapaca earthquake on the megathrust interface and nodal planes of its M 6.7 foreshock. These static stress calculations show that the Tarapaca earthquake may have an indirect influence on the Iquique earthquake, via loading of the M 6.7 preshock positively. We demonstrate the feasibility of using deep intraslab earthquakes to constrain subduction zone rheology. Continuing geodetic observation following the 2014 Iquique earthquake may further validate the rheological parameters obtained here.

  18. Dating Tectonic Activity on Mercury’s Large-Scale Lobate-Scarp Thrust Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Nadine G.; E Banks, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Mercury’s widespread large-scale lobate-scarp thrust faults reveal that the planet’s tectonic history has been dominated by global contraction, primarily due to cooling of its interior. Constraining the timing and duration of this contraction provides key insight into Mercury’s thermal and geologic evolution. We combine two techniques to enhance the statistical validity of size-frequency distribution crater analyses and constrain timing of the 1) earliest and 2) most recent detectable activity on several of Mercury’s largest lobate-scarp thrust faults. We use the sizes of craters directly transected by or superposed on the edge of the scarp face to define a count area around the scarp, a method we call the Modified Buffered Crater Counting Technique (MBCCT). We developed the MBCCT to avoid the issue of a near-zero scarp width since feature widths are included in area calculations of the commonly used Buffered Crater Counting Technique (BCCT). Since only craters directly intersecting the scarp face edge conclusively show evidence of crosscutting relations, we increase the number of craters in our analysis (and reduce uncertainties) by using the morphologic degradation state (i.e. relative age) of these intersecting craters to classify other similarly degraded craters within the count area (i.e., those with the same relative age) as superposing or transected. The resulting crater counts are divided into two categories: transected craters constrain the earliest possible activity and superposed craters constrain the most recent detectable activity. Absolute ages are computed for each population using the Marchi et al. [2009] model production function. A test of the Blossom lobate scarp indicates the MBCCT gives statistically equivalent results to the BCCT. We find that all scarps in this study crosscut surfaces Tolstojan or older in age (>~3.7 Ga). The most recent detectable activity along lobate-scarp thrust faults ranges from Calorian to Kuiperian (~3.7 Ga to

  19. Late Quaternary slip rates of two active thrust faults at the front of the Andean Precordillera, Mendoza, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, R.; Schmidt, S.; Ramos, V. A.; Mingorance, F.

    2010-12-01

    Several destructive earthquakes occurred in the last several hundred years along the active mountain front of the Andean Precordillera between 30°S and 33°S (Siame et al., 2002). However, slip rates of active reverse faults remain largely unknown and the seismic hazard related to these faults is still poorly constrained. Here we report slip rates for two active thrusts located north of Mendoza, the Penas and Cal thrusts, which offset Late Pleistocene to Holocene terraces and form well preserved fault scarps. At the Penas thrust three terraces (T1, T2 and T3) are displaced vertically by 0.9, 2 and 11 m, respectively. 10Be and 14C age constraints yield a vertical slip rate of ~0.9 mm/a for the Penas thrust fault. Combined with the dip angle of the fault of ~25°, this leads to a horizontal shortening rate of about 2 mm/a. At the Cal thrust the highest terrace, which has a maximum 10Be age of 12 ka, is displaced by ~7.5 m. This translates into a minimum horizontal shortening rate of about 1 mm/a. Comparison with short-term GPS data (Brooks et al., 2003) suggests that both the Penas and Cal thrusts accomodate a significant portion of the present-day E-W shortening rate in the eastern Andes. The vertical surface displacements derived from the smallest scarps is 0.9 m for both thrusts. Hence, given their length (Penas thrust: 40 km, Cal thrust: 31 km), these faults are capable of producing magnitude 7 earthquakes (Wells & Coppersmith, 1994), which is confirmed by a Ms = 7.0 earthquake on the Cal thrust that destroyed the city of Mendoza in 1861. Assuming characteristic earthquakes for both faults suggests average reccurence intervals of 1000 to 1500 years during the Holocene. References Brooks, B.A., Bevis, M., Smalley, R., Kendrick, E., Manceda, R., Lauria, E., Maturana, R., Araujo, M., 2003. Crustal motion in the Southern Andes (26°-36°S): Do the Andes behave like a microplate? Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems 4, doi: 10.1029/2003GC000505. Siame, L.L., Bellier, O

  20. Permian magmatism, Permian detachment faulting, and Alpine thrusting in the Orobic Anticline, southern Alps, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Florian; Froitzheim, Niko; Geisler-Wierwille, Thorsten; Schlöder, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    Lombardo. It is therefore an Alpine structure. (4) Several south-directed Alpine thrusts duplicate the lithostratigraphy, including the detachment, and are related to the Orobic thrust further north. They also offset the Biandino Fault. U-Pb zircon ages measured with LA-ICP-MS (work in progress) will further clarify the temporal relations between the intrusions, volcanics, and the shear zones. Froitzheim, N., Derks, J.F., Walter, J.M. & Sciunnach, D. 2008. Evolution of an Early Permian extensional detachment fault from synintrusive, mylonitic flow to brittle faulting (Grassi Detachment Fault, Orobic Anticline, southern Alps, Italy) Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 298; 69-82. doi:10.1144/SP298.4 Thöni, M., Mottana, A., Delitala, M. C., De Capitani, L. & Liborio, G. 1992. The Val Biandino composite pluton: A late Hercynian intrusion into the South-Alpine metamorphic basement of the Alps (Italy). Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie-Monatshefte, 12, 545-554. Sciunnach, D. 2001. Early Permian palaeofaults at the western boundary of the Collio Basin (Valsassina, Lombardy). Natura Bresciana. Annuario del Museo Civico di Scienze Naturali, Brescia, Monografia, 25, 37-43.

  1. Low-angle normal faults in the south-central Brooks Range fold and thrust belt, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, R.R.; Oldow, J.S.

    1988-05-01

    A north-south structural transect through the south-central Brooks Range, Alaska, exposes three lithologically distinct, fault-bounded packages of rock, all regionally metamorphosed during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous contractional deformation that formed much of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. These are, from south to north and structurally highest to lowest, (1) the prehnite-pumpellyite facies ophiolitic rocks of the Angayucham terrane, (2) the low-grade metasedimentary rocks of the Rosie Creek allochthon, and (3) pumpellyite-actinolite to glaucophane-epidote facies metamorphic rocks of the schist belt. The presence of rocks metamorphosed and deformed at shallow levels of the fold and thrust belt (the Angayucham terrane and Rosie Creek allochthon) lying structurally above rocks representing the deepest exposed levels of the fold and thrust belt (the schist belt) indicates that the imbricate stack is disrupted by south-dipping, low-angle normal faults along the southern margin of the Brooks Range. The authors propose that normal faults developed in response to the uplift of the schist belt and the overlying metasedimentary and ophiolitic allochthons by north-directed thrusting in the late Early Cretaceous. Thrusting resulting in the oversteepening of the imbricate stack, causing compensatory normal faulting along the southern flank of the ramp structure. Normal faults may have provided at least local structural control of the locus of Albian and younger sedimentation in the Koyukuk basin. 34 references.

  2. A microphysical model for fault gouge friction applied to subduction megathrusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Sabine A. M.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2014-02-01

    A microphysical model is developed for the steady state frictional behavior of illite-quartz fault gouge and applied to subduction megathrust P-T conditions. The model assumes a foliated, phyllosilicate-supported microstructure which shears by rate-independent frictional slip on the aligned phyllosilicates plus thermally activated deformation of the intervening quartz clasts. At low slip rates or high temperatures, the deformation of the clasts is easy, accommodating slip on the foliation without dilatation. With increasing velocity or decreasing temperature, the shear of the clasts becomes more difficult, increasing bulk shear strength, until slip is activated on inclined portions of the phyllosilicate foliation, where it anastomoses around the clasts. Slip at these sites leads to dilation involving clast/matrix debonding, balanced, at steady state, by compaction through thermally activated clast deformation. Model predictions, taking pressure solution as the thermally activated mechanism, show three regimes of velocity-dependent frictional behavior at temperatures in the range of 200-500°C, with velocity weakening occurring at 300-400°C, in broad agreement with previous experiments on illite-quartz gouge. Effects of slip rate, normal stress, and quartz fraction predicted by the model also resemble those seen experimentally. Extrapolation of the model to earthquake nucleation slip rates successfully predicts the onset of velocity-weakening behavior at the updip seismogenic limit on subduction megathrusts. The model further implies that the onset of seismogenesis is controlled by the thermally activated initiation of fault rock compaction through pressure solution of quartz, which counteracts dilatation due to slip on the fault rock foliation.

  3. Interaction Behavior between Thrust Faulting and the National Highway No. 3 - Tianliao III bridge as Determined using Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. H.; Wu, L. C.; Chan, P. C.; Lin, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    The National Highway No. 3 - Tianliao III Bridge is located in the southwestern Taiwan mudstone area and crosses the Chekualin fault. Since the bridge was opened to traffic, it has been repaired 11 times. To understand the interaction behavior between thrust faulting and the bridge, a discrete element method-based software program, PFC, was applied to conduct a numerical analysis. A 3D model for simulating the thrust faulting and bridge was established, as shown in Fig. 1. In this conceptual model, the length and width were 50 and 10 m, respectively. Part of the box bottom was moveable, simulating the displacement of the thrust fault. The overburden stratum had a height of 5 m with fault dip angles of 20° (Fig. 2). The bottom-up strata were mudstone, clay, and sand, separately. The uplift was 1 m, which was 20% of the stratum thickness. In accordance with the investigation, the position of the fault tip was set, depending on the fault zone, and the bridge deformation was observed (Fig. 3). By setting "Monitoring Balls" in the numerical model to analyzes bridge displacement, we determined that the bridge deck deflection increased as the uplift distance increased. Furthermore, the force caused by the loading of the bridge deck and fault dislocation was determined to cause a down deflection of the P1 and P2 bridge piers. Finally, the fault deflection trajectory of the P4 pier displayed the maximum displacement (Fig. 4). Similar behavior has been observed through numerical simulation as well as field monitoring data. Usage of the discrete element model (PFC3D) to simulate the deformation behavior between thrust faulting and the bridge provided feedback for the design and improved planning of the bridge.

  4. Paleo-asperities frozen along a major fault zone in Alpine Corsica ophiolites: Implications on present-day subduction zone intermediate-depth seismicity

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    Fabbri, Olivier; Magott, Rémi; Fournier, Marc

    2017-04-01

    In an ophiolitic thrust sheet of Alpine Corsica, a major fault zone called PHI2 separates oceanic gabbros from variably serpentinized peridotites. Along and near PHI2, abundant pseudotachylytes testify to ancient seismic ruptures. A mineralogical and structural analysis of the pseudotachylyte veins shows that seismic ruptures occurred at various stages before, during or after the subduction process. Due to the lack of index minerals, P-T conditions of formation of peridotite-hosted pseudotachylyte remain undetermined. Conversely, two populations of gabbro-hosted pseudotachylyte veins can be distinguished: veins formed under blueschist to eclogite facies conditions (containing glaucophane and omphacite) and veins formed under greenschist facies conditions (containing tremolite, clinochlore and clinozoisite). Various kinematic indicators show that the blueschist to eclogite facies pseudotachylyte veins formed within the subducting Piemonte-Liguria oceanic lithosphere at depths of about 60 km, while the greenschist facies veins formed during syn- to post-collisional crustal extension. Detailed mapping indicates that the internal structure of PHI2 fault zone is spatially heterogeneous. A-type damage zones, which are located between gabbro and fresh (not serpentinized) peridotite, are characterized by pseudotachylyte accumulations and are interpreted as ancient fully locked asperities. To the opposite, type C damage zones, observed between gabbro and fully serpentinized peridotites, are characterized by the lack of pseudotachylytes and the presence of cataclasite and mineralized veins, and are regarded as creeping, aseismic, domains. B type damage zones, found between gabbro and moderately serpentinized peridotites, are outlined by pseudotachylytes, but in significantly less amounts than along A-type zones. These zones, intermediate between the other two types, could correspond to partially locked (conditionally stable) portions of the fault zone. The distribution of

  5. Unstable fault slip induced by lawsonite dehydration in blueschist: Implication for the seismicity in the subducting oceanic crusts

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    Okazaki, K.; Hirth, G.

    2015-12-01

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes in cold subduction zones are observed within the subducting oceanic crust, as well as the subducting mantle In contrast, intermediate-depth earthquakes in hot subduction zones predominantly occur just below the Moho. These observations have stimulated interest in potential relationships between blueschist-facies metamorphism and seismicity, particularly through the dehydration reactions involving lawsonite. The rheology of these high-pressure and low-temperature metamorphic minerals is largely unknown. We conducted experiments on lawsonite accompanied by monitoring of acoustic emission (AE) in a Griggs-type deformation apparatus. Deformation was started at the confining pressure of 1.0 GPa, the temperature of 300 ˚C, and constant displacement rates of 0.16 to 0.016 μm/s, that correspond to equivalent strain rates (ɛ) of 9 × 10-5 to 9 × 10-6 1/s. In these experiments, temperature was increased at the temperature ramp rate of 0.5 to 0.05˚C/s above the thermal stability of lawsonite (600˚C) while the sample was deforming to test whether the dehydration reaction induces unstable fault slip. In contrast to similar tests on antigorite, unstable fault slip (i.e., stick-slip) occurred during dehydration reactions in the lawsonite gouge layer, and AE signals were continuously observed. Microstructural observations indicate that strain is highly localized along the fault (R1 and B shear), and the fault surface shows mirror-like slickensides. The unloading slope (i.e., rate of stress drop as a function of slip) during the unstable slip follows the stiffness of the apparatus at all experimental conditions regardless of the strain rate and temperature ramping rate. A thermal-mechanical scaling factor in the experiments covers the range estimated for natural subduction zones, indicating the potential for unstable frictional sliding within natural lawsonite layers to induce seismicity in cold subduction zones.

  6. Modifications to risk-targeted seismic design maps for subduction and near-fault hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liel, Abbie B.; Luco, Nicolas; Raghunandan, Meera; Champion, C.; Haukaas, Terje

    2015-01-01

    ASCE 7-10 introduced new seismic design maps that define risk-targeted ground motions such that buildings designed according to these maps will have 1% chance of collapse in 50 years. These maps were developed by iterative risk calculation, wherein a generic building collapse fragility curve is convolved with the U.S. Geological Survey hazard curve until target risk criteria are met. Recent research shows that this current approach may be unconservative at locations where the tectonic environment is much different than that used to develop the generic fragility curve. This study illustrates how risk-targeted ground motions at selected sites would change if generic building fragility curve and hazard assessment were modified to account for seismic risk from subduction earthquakes and near-fault pulses. The paper also explores the difficulties in implementing these changes.

  7. Megathrust splay faults, forearc basins, and segment boundaries related to the Kodiak Islands segment of the Alaska subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M. D.; Liberty, L. M.

    2016-12-01

    We have compiled and interpreted a comprehensive upper-crustal seismic reflection dataset revealing spatiotemporal Cenozoic deformation across the Kodiak forearc and accretionary prism. Pervasive splay faults and forearc basin growth and positioning with respect to the prism record both accreting and eroding margin episodes through time. Seafloor bathymetry, in conjunction with seismic reflection data, show that post-glacial splay fault motion can exceed 40 meters offshore Kodiak Island. We observe considerable differences in splay fault uplift rates and activation spanning the near-shore region to the continental shelf, with significant tsunamigenic fault motion from the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake concentrated along the Kodiak Island shelf fault zone system. We utilize potential fields data to highlight the continuity of megathrust splay faults that span the southern Gulf of Alaska and to identify geophysical signatures of segment boundaries that represent subducting Pacific plate morphology which may define megathrust rupture limits. Constraints on interseismic deformation from compiled geodetic GPS, focal mechanism, and earthquake datasets reveal the seismotectonic character of the Kodiak segment and are consistent with the structural heterogeneity at both the plate interface and upper plate. Upper plate geometry of the Kodiak segment shows Holocene fault motion has been accommodated along distinct fault zone segments. This knowledge informs tsunami risk modelers to allow for different alternatives of coseismic splay fault uplift during megathrust rupture. Our results suggest growth of forearc structures is contemporaneous with the subduction of major Pacific plate morphologies and provide clear geophysical evidence that can explain the persistence of the Kodiak segment, which is a major step towards a composite Alaska subduction zone deformation model.

  8. Length-displacement scaling of thrust faults on the Moon and the formation of uphill-facing scarps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggon, Lars; Hetzel, Ralf; Hiesinger, Harald; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hampel, Andrea; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.

    2017-08-01

    Fault populations on terrestrial planets exhibit a linear relationship between their length, L, and the maximum displacement, D, which implies a constant D/L ratio during fault growth. Although it is known that D/L ratios of faults are typically a few percent on Earth and 0.2-0.8% on Mars and Mercury, the D/L ratios of lunar faults are not well characterized. Quantifying the D/L ratios of faults on the Moon is, however, crucial for a better understanding of lunar tectonics, including for studies of the amount of global lunar contraction. Here, we use high-resolution digital terrain models to perform a topographic analysis of four lunar thrust faults - Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler, and Racah X-1 - that range in length from 1.3 km to 15.4 km. First, we determine the along-strike variation of the vertical displacement from ≥ 20 topographic profiles across each fault. For measuring the vertical displacements, we use a method that is commonly applied to fault scarps on Earth and that does not require detrending of the profiles. The resulting profiles show that the displacement changes gradually along these faults' strike, with maximum vertical displacements ranging from 17 ± 2 m for Simpelius-1 to 192 ± 30 m for Racah X-1. Assuming a fault dip of 30° yields maximum total displacements (D) that are twice as large as the vertical displacements. The linear relationship between D and L supports the inference that lunar faults gradually accumulate displacement as they propagate laterally. For the faults we investigated, the D/L ratio is ∼2.3%, an order of magnitude higher than theoretical predictions for the Moon, but a value similar for faults on Earth. We also employ finite-element modeling and a Mohr circle stress analysis to investigate why many lunar thrust faults, including three of those studied here, form uphill-facing scarps. Our analysis shows that fault slip is preferentially initiated on planes that dip in the same direction as the topography, because

  9. Physical (centrifuge) modelling of localization of fold-thrust structures by normal faults, and implications for hydrocarbon exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, J.M. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1997-09-01

    A study was conducted in which laboratory scale models of faults were constructed. The laminae was composed of plasticine to represent competent rock such as carbonates and coarse clastics, and of silicone putty to represent incompetent rock such as shale. The objective of the study was to determine the factors that affect the location and timing of nucleation of foreland fold-thrust structures as well as the amount of thrust displacement. It was suggested that folds and thrusts which were nucleated due to reactivation of normal faults could be prospective exploration targets because associated structural traps could have formed sufficiently early in the generation-migration sequence to have retained an early hydrocarbon charge.

  10. Extraction faulting and out-of-sequence thrusting in collisional orogeny - An example from the Swiss-Italian Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, F.; Froitzheim, N.; Nagel, T.; Leiss, B.; Pleuger, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the Pennine Alps of Switzerland and Italy a stack of nappes derived from oceanic and continental units of the Piemont-Ligurian paleogeographic domain is exposed. From bottom to top these are the oceanic Zermatt-Saas and Combin zones and the continental Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe. Different Alpine peak pressures have been estimated for these units with the highest pressures of ca. 3.2 GPa in the Zermatt-Saas zone (Groppo et al., 2009), lower pressures of ca. 1.3 GPa in the Combin zone (Bousquet et al, 2008) and intermediate pressures of up to 2.0 GPa in the Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe (Lardeaux & Spalla, 1991). Therefore, a pressure gap of 1.9 GPa exists along the Combin Fault, the contact between the Zermatt-Saas and Combin zones, and a gap of 0.7 GPa along the Dent Blanche Basal Thrust which separates the Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe from the underlying Combin zone. Due to the difference in peak pressures, the Combin Fault has often been interpreted as a large top-SE normal fault accommodating exhumation of the underlying (ultra)high-pressure rocks (e.g. Reddy et al., 1999). However, there is structural evidence that the Combin Fault is in fact an extraction fault (Froitzheim et al., 2006) and that exhumation of Zermatt-Saas (ultra)high-pressure rocks was due to SE-directed extraction of the Sesia/Dent Blanche block originally located between the Zermatt-Saas and Combin zones. Therefore, the Dent Blanche Basal Thrust would represent a top-NW out-of-sequence thrust along which high-pressure rocks of the Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe were thrust over greenschist-facies rocks of the Combin zone. On the basis of the above-mentioned peak pressure estimates and our own structural observations we propose the following tectonic scenario: Initial nappe stacking resulted in a configuration with the Zermatt-Saas zone in the footwall of the Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe and the Combin zone as the structurally highest unit which was thrust over the Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe in the SE and the

  11. Recurrent Holocene movement on the Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault: The structure that initiated the Mw 7.9 Denali Fault earthquake, central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personius, Stephen; Crone, Anthony J.; Burns, Patricia A.; Reitman, Nadine G.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a trench investigation and analyzed pre‐ and postearthquake topography to determine the timing and size of prehistoric surface ruptures on the Susitna Glacier fault (SGF), the thrust fault that initiated the 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake sequence in central Alaska. In two of our three hand‐excavated trenches, we found clear evidence for a single pre‐2002 earthquake (penultimate earthquake [PE]) and determined an age of 2210±420  cal. B.P. (2σ) for this event. We used structure‐from‐motion software to create a pre‐2002‐earthquake digital surface model (DSM) from 1:62,800‐scale aerial photography taken in 1980 and compared this DSM with postearthquake 5‐m/pixel Interferometric Synthetic Aperature Radar topography taken in 2010. Topographic profiles measured from the pre‐earthquake DSM show features that we interpret as fault and fold scarps. These landforms were about the same size as those formed in 2002, so we infer that the PE was similar in size to the initial (Mw 7.2) subevent of the 2002 sequence. A recurrence interval of 2270 yrs and dip slip of ∼4.8  m yield a single‐interval slip rate of ∼1.8  mm/yr. The lack of evidence for pre‐PE deformation indicates probable episodic (clustering) behavior on the SGF that may be related to strain migration among other similarly oriented thrust faults that together accommodate shortening south of the Denali fault. We suspect that slip‐partitioned thrust‐triggered earthquakes may be a common occurrence on the Denali fault system, but documenting the frequency of such events will be very difficult, given the lack of long‐term paleoseismic records, the number of potential thrust‐earthquake sources, and the pervasive glacial erosion in the region.

  12. Geomorphic evidence of recent activity along the Vodice thrust fault in the Ljubljana Basin (Slovenia – a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Jamšek Rupnik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated two prominent, ~E-W trending scarps in Quaternary sediments, located close to the town of Vodice in the Ljubljana Basin (central Slovenia. By using detailed geomorphological analysis of the scarps, field surveying, and structural observations of deformed Quaternary sediments, we conclude that the scarps are the surface expression of a N-dipping thrust fault that has been active during the Quaternary. From Optically Stimulated Luminescence and Infrared Stimulated Luminescence dating of deformed Quaternary sediments we estimate a slip rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mm a-1 in the last 133 ka. Using the published empirical fault-scaling relationships, we estimate that an earthquake of magnitude 5.9 to 6.5 may be expected on the Vodice thrust fault. The fault may, therefore, present a major seismic hazard for the densely populated and urbanised region of central Slovenia.

  13. Determination of a Holocene Slip Rate on the Puente Hills Blind-Thrust Fault, Los Angeles Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, S. A.; Dolan, J. F.; Shaw, J. H.; Pratt, T. L.

    2001-12-01

    Paleoseismologic observations of slip histories and slip rates of faults that break the surface are available at an ever-increasing rate, but the nature of blind-thrust faults has kept paleoearthquake information on these faults out of reach. The complex network of blind thrust faults beneath the Los Angeles metropolitan region includes the Puente Hills thrust fault (PHT), which extends southeastward for >35 km from beneath downtown Los Angeles into northern Orange County. This thrust is active, as demonstrated by the occurrence of the 1987 Mw 6.0 Whittier Narrows earthquake (Shaw and Shearer 1999). Despite our awareness of the hazard posed by this fault, we do not know its current slip rate or its earthquake history prior to the 1987 event. To determine these critical data, we have begun a two-phase project in which we will acquire high-resolution seismic reflection data and excavate paleoseismologic boreholes and trenches across the zone of active folding associated with major earthquakes on the PHT. We have acquired high-resolution seismic reflection profiles along two transects across the zone of active folding. In our eastern most profile, along Trojan Way in La Mirada, the seismic reflection data show that the locus of active folding extends to 1.5- 2-m-thick reddish-brown argillic horizon. This soil indicates that the geomorphic surface atop the scarp is late Pleistocene in age. The 9 m height of the scarp provides a minimum estimate of total structural relief since stabilization of the ground surface. These observations yield an approximate uplift rate on the order of a few tenths of a mm/yr. Assuming simple hangingwall block translation and given the 19° -22° N dip of the PHT beneath the site, we calculate a minimum average late Pleistocene-Recent dip-slip rate of \\sim 0.2 to 1.1 mm/yr. This slip-rate range is based on our crude age estimates of the late Pleistocene soil. 14C dating of detrital charcoal recovered from the borehole will allow us to

  14. Tectonic Significance of Intraoceanic Thrusts in the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, T.; Kodaira, S.; Park, J.; Ashi, J.; Fukao, Y.; Moore, G. F.; Matsuoka, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Nankai Trough is a convergent margin where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath southwest Japan. Because this subduction zone has repeatedly generated great earthquakes with Mw>8, seismic reflection studies have been intensively carried out in the whole Nankai Trough region. However, the role of oceanic crust in plate convergent margins was not well understood. Recently, Tsuji et al. [2009] identified intraoceanic thrusts developed as imbricate structures within the subducting Philippine Sea plate off the Kii Peninsula in central Japan manifesting as strong-amplitude reflections observed in an industry-standard 3D seismic reflection data set. In this study, we use other 2D and 3D seismic reflection data acquired in the whole Nankai Trough region and extract geometries of (1) intraoceanic thrusts, (2) surface of oceanic crust and (3) Moho in order to discuss characteristics of intraoceanic thrusts distributed in the whole Nankai Trough region. We mainly use seismic reflection data acquired by JAMSTEC. Seismic profiles demonstrate that intraoceanic faults are densely distributed eastern side of the Cape Shionomisaki (southern edge of the Kii Peninsula). Large displacements of a few major intraoceanic thrusts elevate the crust surface, and the offset due to cumulative displacements reaches >1 km at the sediment-igneous crust interface. A part of Kashinozaki-Knoll is also uplifted by the thrust displacement. These imbricate intraoceanic thrusts cut through the oceanic crust as a discontinuous thrust plane. The intraoceanic thrusts strike nearly parallel to the trend of the trough axis. However the fault traces are bending at the western termination; the fault planes extend upward from side edges of the underlying intraoceanic thrusts and work as lateral faults. The deformation within oceanic crust may have continued until recently with subduction, because the shallow sediment as well as the seafloor is deformed due to the thrust displacement [Kodaira et

  15. Active faulting within a megacity: the geometry and slip rate of the Pardisan thrust in central Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebian, M.; Copley, A. C.; Fattahi, M.; Ghorashi, M.; Jackson, J. A.; Nazari, H.; Sloan, R. A.; Walker, R. T.

    2016-12-01

    Tehran, the capital city of Iran with a population of over 12 million, is one of the largest urban centres within the seismically active Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. Although several historic earthquakes have affected Tehran, their relation to individual faults is ambiguous for most. This ambiguity is partly due to a lack of knowledge about the locations, geometries and seismic potential of structures that have been obscured by dramatic urban growth over the past three decades, and which have covered most of the young geomorphic markers and natural exposures. Here we use aerial photographs from 1956, combined with an ˜1 m DEM derived from stereo Pleiades satellite imagery to investigate the geomorphology of a growing anticline above a thrust fault-the Pardisan thrust-within central Tehran. The topography across the ridge is consistent with a steep ramp extending from close to the surface to a depth of ˜2 km, where it presumably connects with a shallow-dipping detachment. No primary fault is visible at the surface, and it is possible that the faulting dissipates in the near surface as distributed shearing. We use optically stimulated luminescence to date remnants of uplifted and warped alluvial deposits that are offset vertically across the Pardisan fault, providing minimum uplift and slip-rates of at least 1 mm yr-1. Our study shows that the faults within the Tehran urban region have relatively rapid rates of slip, are important in the regional tectonics, and have a great impact on earthquake hazard assessment of the city and surrounding region.

  16. Field imaging spectroscopy and inferring a blind thrust earthquake history from secondary faulting: 1944 San Juan Earthquake, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragona, Daniel Eduardo

    The studies presented in this dissertation provide new approaches to extract paleo-earthquake information from the geological record. The first chapter describes the development of Field Imaging Spectroscopy, a new methodology for data acquisition and analysis in paleoseismology. The study shows the steps followed from data acquisition, pre-processing, processing and analysis of high spatial and spectral resolution images obtained from cores and a large sample from a fault zone collected at Hog Lake, San Jacinto Fault, Southern California. The study demonstrate that hyperspectral data can be obtained in the field using portable scanners and that high spatial and spectral resolution in the visible to short wave infrared provide a way to enhance subtle or invisible stratigraphic and structural features. The second chapter focuses on the use of neural networks and naive Bayesian classifiers to automatically classify hyperspectral image data, providing an objective mapping of the structure of cores, samples and field exposures. The results of this study show that a system integrated by a hyperspectral scanner and pattern recognition algorithms can work as an enhanced eye and an objective classifier to provide the geologist with additional information that facilitates the final description, interpretation and correlation of the geology in paleoseismic exposures and cores. The hyperspectral dataset collected together with a spectral library of the materials observed in the excavation provide a new way to archive paleoseismological data for future analysis. Finally, in chapter 3, an innovative approach to study blind thrust faults is presented. The study of the secondary La Laja fault near San Juan, Argentina shows that the earthquake history recorded in a minor fault provides an indirect way to study the occurrence of large M˜7 earthquakes at depth. This investigation also provides the first and perhaps the longest record of the earthquake activity of a blind thrust

  17. Fault fluid evolution at the outermost edges of the southern Apennines fold-and-thrust belt, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; Belviso, Claudia; Cavalcante, Francesco; Vita Petrullo, Angela

    2017-04-01

    This work focuses on the structural architecture and mineralization of a high-angle, extensional fault zone that crosscuts the Middle Pleistocene tuffs and pyroclastites of the Vulture Volcano, southern Italy. This fault zone is topped by a few m-thick travertine deposit formed by precipitation, in a typical lacustrine depositional environment, from a fault fluid that included a mixed, biogenic- and mantle-derived CO2. The detailed analysis of its different mineralization can shed new lights into the shallow crustal fluid flow that took place during deformation of the outer edge of the southern Apennines fold-and-thrust belt. In fact, the study fault zone is interpreted as a shallow-seated, tear fault associated with a shallow thrust fault displacing the most inner portion of the Bradano foredeep basin infill, and was thus active during the latest stages of contractional deformation. Far from the fault zone, the fracture network is made up of three high-angle joint sets striking N-S, E-W and NW-SE, respectively. The former two sets can be interpreted as the older structural elements that pre-dated the latter one, which is likely due to the current stress state that affects the whole Italian peninsula. In the vicinity of the fault zone, a fourth joint high-angle set striking NE-SW is also present, which becomes the most dominant fracture set within the study footwall fault damage zone. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis of the powder obtained from hand specimens representative of the multiple mineralization present within the fault zone, and in the surrounding volcanites, are consistent with circulation of a fault fluid that modified its composition with time during the latest stages of volcanic activity and contractional deformation. Specifically, veins infilled with and slickenside coated by jarosite, Opal A and/or goethite are found in the footwall fault damage zone. Based upon the relative timing of formation of the aforementioned joint sets, deciphered after

  18. Study of blind thrust faults underlying Tokyo and Osaka urban areas using a combination of high-resolution seismic reflection profiling and continuous coring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Miura

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We acquired high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and continuously cored boreholes to evaluate active flexures produced by major blind thrust fault systems within two densely populated Neogene-Quaternary sedimentary basins in Japan: the Fukaya Fault System near Tokyo in the Kanto Basin and the Uemachi Fault System in the Osaka Basin. The high-resolution seismic reflection survey made clear the length, geometry and growth history of fault-related folds, or flexures formed above the two blind thrusts. Continuously cored boreholes linked with high-resolution seismic profiles enabled us to estimate the uplift rate as defined by shallow stratigraphic horizons and constrain the age of the most recent growth of the flexures during earthquakes on the Fukaya and Uemachi fault systems. Even with the high quality of the data we collected, it is still not possible to exactly constrain the age of the most recent blind thrust earthquake recorded by flexure of these fault-related folds. Data presented in this paper form the basis for future efforts aimed at mechanical and kinematic models for fault growth to evaluate the activity of blind thrusts underlying urban areas.

  19. Multidisciplinary approach to constrain kinematics of fault zones at shallow depths: a case study from the Cameros-Demanda thrust (North Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-Sainz, A. M.; Román-Berdiel, T.; Oliva-Urcia, B.; García-Lasanta, C.; Villalaín, J. J.; Aldega, L.; Corrado, S.; Caricchi, C.; Invernizzi, C.; Osácar, M. C.

    2017-04-01

    Thrusting at shallow depths often precludes analysis by means of structural indicators effective in other geological contexts (e.g., mylonites, sheath folds, shear bands). In this paper, a combination of techniques (including structural analysis, magnetic methods, as anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and paleomagnetism, and paleothermometry) is used to define thrusting conditions, deformation, and transport directions in the Cameros-Demanda thrust (North Spain). Three outcrops were analyzed along this intraplate, large-scale major structure having 150 km of outcropping length, 30 km of maximum horizontal displacement, and 5 km of vertical throw. Results obtained by means of the different techniques are compared with data derived from cross sections and stratigraphic analysis. Mixed-layer illite-smectite and vitrinite reflectance indicating deep diagenetic conditions and mature stage of hydrocarbon generation suggests shallow depths during deformation, thus confirming that the protolith for most of the fault rocks is the footwall of the main thrust. Kinematic indicators (foliation, S/C structures, and slickenside striations) indicate altogether a dominant NNW movement of the hanging wall in the western zone and NE in the eastern zone of the thrust, thus implying strain partitioning between different branches of the main thrust. The study of AMS in fault rocks (nearly 400 samples of fault gouge, breccia, and microbreccia) indicates that the strike of magnetic foliation is oblique to the transport direction and that the magnetic lineation parallelizes the projection of the transport direction onto the k max/ k int plane in sites with strong shear deformation. Paleomagnetism applied to fault rocks indicates the existence of remagnetizations linked to thrusting, in spite of the shallow depth for deformation, and a strong deformation or scattering of the magnetic remanence vectors in the fault zone. The application of the described techniques and consistency of

  20. Pinpoint core sampling at active faults in the Nankai subduction zone by new ROV "NSS"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashi, J.; Shirai, M.; Tokuyama, H.; Soh, W.; Kinoshita, M.; Machiyama, H.; Kanamatsu, T.; Hirono, T.; Ikehara, K.; Arai, K.; Omura, A.

    2004-12-01

    Piston coring across active faults in shallow water depth, as well as drilling or trenching of fault zone on land, provides us with information about earthquake timing, recurrence of fault activity and fault displacement. In contrast, it is not easy to take samples from deep-sea with pinpoint accuracy. In order to identify the position of the core sampler and approach the target for sampling, a transponder is recently installed on the cable just above the sampler. The pilot vehicle of new ROV "NSS" (Navigable Sampling System) can move by four thrusters, observe seafloor by video cameras, release samplers and measurement tools by command from a mother ship, and real time geophysical or geochemical monitoring through an armored cable. The whole system including winches is removal. The ship with large deck can be equipped with NSS system. Depth capability of the pilot vehicle is 4000m and maximum payload weight is 1.5 Tons. First cruise using NSS was conducted in the Nankai Trough and the Sagami Trough using JAMSTEC R/V "Kaiyo" in 2003. Piston cores were taken from active faults off the Central Japan in the Nankai Trough, and the cold seep sites along the blind fault off Hatsushima, Sagami Bay. NSS using seafloor video camera and thrusters has accuracy of pinpoint sampling within 2m, and allows us to take samples from narrow fault zone or small clam colony. Core samples derived from active fault zones show different sedimentation histories; lack of strata and differences of layer thickness across dip-slip faults and lithological changes with time across strike-slip faults near submarine canyon, and provide information about recurrence time and fault displacement. NSS is one of tools that break through difficulties of pinpoint sampling in deep-sea and will proceed studies of active submarine faults.

  1. Early history and reactivation of the rand thrust, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlethwaite, Clay E.; Jacobson, Carl E.

    The Rand thrust of the Rand Mountains in the northwestern Mojave Desert separates an upper plate of quartz monzonite and quartzofeldspathic to amphibolitic gneiss from a lower plate of metagraywacke and mafic schist (Rand Schist). The Rand thrust is considered part of the regionally extensive Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust system, which is commonly believed to represent a Late Cretaceous subduction zone. The initial direction of dip and sense of movement along the Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust are controversial. Microfabrics of mylonites and quartzites from the Rand Mountains were analyzed in an attempt to determine transport direction for this region, but the results are ambiguous. In addition, the southwestern portion of the Rand thrust was found to have been reactivated as a low-angle normal fault after subduction. Reactivation might have occurred shortly after subduction, in which case it could account for the preservation of high-pressure mineral assemblages in the Rand Schist, or it could be related to mid-Tertiary extension in the western United States. In either event, the reactivation might be responsible for the complicated nature of the microfabrics. The Rand Schist exhibits an inverted metamorphic zonation. Isograds in the schist are not significantly truncated by the reactivated segment of the Rand thrust. This indicates that other segments of the Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust should be re-evaluated for the possibility of late movement, even if they show an apparently undisturbed inverted metamorphic zonation.

  2. Stress transfer among en echelon and opposing thrusts and tear faults: Triggering caused by the 2003 Mw = 6.9 Zemmouri, Algeria, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Stein, R.S.; Meghraoui, M.; Toda, S.; Ayadi, A.; Dorbath, C.; Belabbes, S.

    2011-01-01

    The essential features of stress interaction among earthquakes on en echelon thrusts and tear faults were investigated, first through idealized examples and then by study of thrust faulting in Algeria. We calculated coseismic stress changes caused by the 2003 Mw = 6.9 Zemmouri earthquake, finding that a large majority of the Zemmouri afterslip sites were brought several bars closer to Coulomb failure by the coseismic stresses, while the majority of aftershock nodal planes were brought closer to failure by an average of ~2 bars. Further, we calculated that the shallow portions of the adjacent Thenia tear fault, which sustained ~0.25 m slip, were brought >2 bars closer to failure. We calculated that the Coulomb stress increased by 1.5 bars on the deeper portions of the adjacent Boumerdes thrust, which lies just 10–20 km from the city of Algiers; both the Boumerdes and Thenia faults were illuminated by aftershocks. Over the next 6 years, the entire south dipping thrust system extending 80 km to the southwest experienced an increased rate of seismicity. The stress also increased by 0.4 bar on the east Sahel thrust fault west of the Zemmouri rupture. Algiers suffered large damaging earthquakes in A.D. 1365 and 1716 and is today home to 3 million people. If these shocks occurred on the east Sahel fault and if it has a ~2 mm/yr tectonic loading rate, then enough loading has accumulated to produce a Mw = 6.6–6.9 shock today. Thus, these potentially lethal faults need better understanding of their slip rate and earthquake history.

  3. Neotectonics of a subduction/strike-slip transition: the northeastern Dominican Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winslow, M.A.; McCann, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Septentrional fault system in the northeastern Dominican Republic marks the zone where the North American-Carribean plate boundary is evolving from subduction to strike-slip motion, and where terranes appear to be forming and migrating laterally in a subduction complex/forearc region. On the Island of Hispaniola, slip vectors are oblique to the strike of the Puerto Rico trench, and oblique subduction thrusts the upper plate over normal seafloor. The offshore geology and seismicity of the northern Caribbean suggest that uplift, broad crustal warping, thrusting, and strike-slip faulting (ie. collisional tectonics) should be present in the northern part of the Dominican Republic. The high topography (>1000m), high levels of seismicity, and large earthquakes support the hypothesis of contemporary deformation in Hispaniola. In this region, the subduction regime dies out toward the west, and deformation is transferred to onshore, oblique-slip faults. As this change in tectonic style has occurred in Neogene to Recent times, we are investigating the modern evolution of a plate boundary. We have already documented: (1) the presence of a strike-slip faulting in the northeastern Dominican Republic; (2) an anomalous push-up structure; and (3) a region of numerous splay faults. In conclusion, recent seismicity suggest a wide zone of deformation and variations in interplate motions near Hispaniola. This island lies at the western limit of active underthrusting and at the eastern limit of onshore faulting, i.e., at an important transition from a subduction to strike-slip regime.

  4. Pliocene transpressional modification of depositional basins by convergent thrusting adjacent to the "Big Bend" of the San Andreas fault: An example from Lockwood Valley, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, K.S.; Minor, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The "Big Bend" of the San Andreas fault in the western Transverse Ranges of southern California is a left stepping flexure in the dextral fault system and has long been recognized as a zone of relatively high transpression compared to adjacent regions. The Lockwood Valley region, just south of the Big Bend, underwent a profound change in early Pliocene time (???5 Ma) from basin deposition to contraction, accompanied by widespread folding and thrusting. This change followed the recently determined initiation of opening of the northern Gulf of California and movement along the southern San Andreas fault at about 6.1 Ma, with the concomitant formation of the Big Bend. Lockwood Valley occupies a 6-km-wide, fault-bounded structural basin in which converging blocks of Paleoproterozoic and Cretaceous crystalline basement and upper Oligocene and lower Miocene sedimentary rocks (Plush Ranch Formation) were thrust over Miocene and Pliocene basin-fill sedimentary rocks (in ascending order, Caliente Formation, Lockwood Clay, and Quatal Formation). All the pre-Quatal sedimentary rocks and most of the Pliocene Quatal Formation were deposited during a mid-Tertiary period of regional transtension in a crustal block that underwent little clockwise vertical-axis rotation as compared to crustal blocks to the south. Ensuing Pliocene and Quaternary transpression in the Big Bend region began during deposition of the poorly dated Quatal Formation and was marked by four converging thrust systems, which decreased the areal extent of the sedimentary basin and formed the present Lockwood Valley structural basin. None of the thrusts appears presently active. Estimated shortening across the center of the basin was about 30 percent. The fortnerly defined eastern Big Pine fault, now interpreted to be two separate, oppositely directed, contractional reverse or thrust faults, marks the northwestern structural boundary of Lockwood Valley. The complex geometry of the Lockwood Valley basin is similar

  5. Pliocene transpressional modification of depositional basins by convergent thrusting adjacent to the ``Big Bend'' of the San Andreas fault: An example from Lockwood Valley, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Karl S.; Minor, Scott A.

    2005-02-01

    The "Big Bend" of the San Andreas fault in the western Transverse Ranges of southern California is a left stepping flexure in the dextral fault system and has long been recognized as a zone of relatively high transpression compared to adjacent regions. The Lockwood Valley region, just south of the Big Bend, underwent a profound change in early Pliocene time (˜5 Ma) from basin deposition to contraction, accompanied by widespread folding and thrusting. This change followed the recently determined initiation of opening of the northern Gulf of California and movement along the southern San Andreas fault at about 6.1 Ma, with the concomitant formation of the Big Bend. Lockwood Valley occupies a 6-km-wide, fault-bounded structural basin in which converging blocks of Paleoproterozoic and Cretaceous crystalline basement and upper Oligocene and lower Miocene sedimentary rocks (Plush Ranch Formation) were thrust over Miocene and Pliocene basin-fill sedimentary rocks (in ascending order, Caliente Formation, Lockwood Clay, and Quatal Formation). All the pre-Quatal sedimentary rocks and most of the Pliocene Quatal Formation were deposited during a mid-Tertiary period of regional transtension in a crustal block that underwent little clockwise vertical-axis rotation as compared to crustal blocks to the south. Ensuing Pliocene and Quaternary transpression in the Big Bend region began during deposition of the poorly dated Quatal Formation and was marked by four converging thrust systems, which decreased the areal extent of the sedimentary basin and formed the present Lockwood Valley structural basin. None of the thrusts appears presently active. Estimated shortening across the center of the basin was about 30 percent. The formerly defined eastern Big Pine fault, now interpreted to be two separate, oppositely directed, contractional reverse or thrust faults, marks the northwestern structural boundary of Lockwood Valley. The complex geometry of the Lockwood Valley basin is similar

  6. Fold style inversion: Placing probabilistic constraints on the predicted shape of blind thrust faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Benjamin A.; Sandvol, Eric; Ross, Andrew

    2000-06-01

    We develop a new methodology which compares quantitatively styles of folding from seismic reflection data. The goal of the "fold style inversion" (FSI) method is to provide an objective choice of the most appropriate model used when solving for the shape of an unimaged blind fault from folded layer geometry. FSI is a discretization of the dip isogon fold classification scheme reformulated as simple vector transformations. A data set's goodness of fit to parallel (class 1c) or similar (class 2) fold geometry is assessed by calculating misfit between the predicted and observed bed geometries through a grid search of the parameter space specific to each transformation; the two fold types correspond to the constant bed length and arbitrarily inclined simple shear (AISS) fault solution routines, respectively. For seismic reflection data, confidence estimates may be placed on the preference of fold style and its corresponding fault solution by Monte Carlo simulations of depth correlative, spatially limited depth conversion errors. For synthetic geometric examples FSI determines fold style preference and parameters exactly. At low fold limb dips (Barrancas/Lunlunta-Carrizal anticlinal complex in Mendoza, Argentina, FSI analysis determines 71% and 54% probability of similar preference for two seismic lines on separate structures. The corresponding fault solutions for the first example are well constrained, whereas for the second example the solutions are widely variant. This analysis helps to quantify the relationship between the predicted sub surface fault trajectories and hypocenter and aftershock data of the 1985 Mw 5.9 Mendoza earthquake, showing that the earthquake and the fault causing the Barrancas/Lunlunta-Carrizal anticlinorium are most likely unrelated.

  7. Three-dimensional Geometry of Buried Fold Scarps Associated With Ancient Earthquakes on the Puente Hills Blind Thrust Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, L. A.; Dolan, J. F.; Hoeft, J. S.; Shaw, J. H.; Hartleb, R. D.

    2003-12-01

    The Puente Hills thrust fault (PHT) is a large blind thrust fault that extends east-west beneath the heart of the metropolitan Los Angeles region (Shaw and Shearer, 1999; Shaw et al., 2003). Christofferson (2002; in prep.) and Dolan et al. (2003) identified four buried fold scarps associated with large (Mw greater than or equal to 7), ancient earthquakes on the PHT beneath the City of Bellflower, in northern Orange County. One of the major outstanding questions regarding this research concerns the subsurface, three-dimensional geometry of these buried scarps. Specifically, we want to determine the extent to which the subsurface geometry of these scarps is controlled by tectonic versus fluvial processes. In order to begin addressing these questions, we drilled a north-south transect of hollow-stem, continuously cored boreholes across the buried fold scarps. This new borehole transect, which comprises six, 20-m-deep boreholes, was drilled parallel to, and ˜ 100 m west of, the original Carfax Avenue transect of Christofferson (2002) and Dolan et al. (2003). The overall pattern of progressive southward thickening of sedimentary units observed in the Carfax borehole transect extends westward to the new transect. Moreover, several key sedimentary contacts that are traceable laterally between the two transects occur at approximately the same depths at all locations along both transects. This three-dimensional data set thus defines several buried fold scarps that extend east-west beneath the study site. These observations confirm that the buried scarps are primarily tectonic, rather than fluvial features.

  8. Structures of Active Blind Thrusts Beneath Tokyo Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, T.; Sato, H.; Kato, N.; Nakayama, T.; Iwasaki, T.; Abe, S.

    2011-12-01

    We show structural models of active blind thrust faults beneath Tokyo metropolitan area, based on actively deforming landforms, Quaternary stratigraphy, and deep to shallow high-resolution seismic reflection data tied with these stratigraphic constraints, resolving seismic hazards from otherwise elusive active structures beneath highly urbanized areas. At the leading edge of the subducting Philippine Sea plate beneath the Kanto region, most significant active structures are recognized as folding and/or faulting of late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial and marine deposits. Newly obtained seismic reflection profile and reprocessed sections indicate that these active structures are surface manifestations of emergent splay thrust faults extending from a subduction megathrust that generated the A.D.1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9). Much slower rates of slip along these structures (~ 4.2 mm/yr) than slip deficits (~ 30 mm/yr) indicate that slip partitioning might have occurred between the subduction megathrust and splay faults. In contrast to these megathrust-related structures, steeply dipping blind thrusts are distributed beneath the Kanto plain underlain by several thousand meters thick Neogene forearc basin and shallow marine to terrestrial sediments (Kazusa and Shimousa Group). Deep seismic reflection profiles corroborate that these blind thrusts are reactivated normal faults originally formed due to early to middle Miocene extensional tectonics. While rates of slip along these structures are commonly slow (~0.1 mm/yr) based on offsets of late Pleistocene terrace deposits, their proximity to the metropolitan area urges more intense efforts to identify their potential seismic hazards including locations, sizes, rates of slip, and geometries of blind thrusts.

  9. Role of low angle normal faulting and basement thrusting on the structural architecture of the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molli, Giancarlo; Carlini, Mirko; Vescovi, Paolo; Artoni, Andrea; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Camurri, Francesca; Clemenzi, Luca; Storti, Fabrizio; Torelli, Luigi

    2017-04-01

    The Northern Apennines of Italy are a classical site for studying fundamental issues in thrust wedges, such as ophiolite formation and emplacement, interplay between tectonics and sedimentation, role of out-of-sequence thrusting, syn-orogenic versus post-orogenic extension, along strike segmentation, etc. Accordingly, the Northern Apennines have been extensively studied since more than two centuries ago. Despite the huge amount of available data with different resolution, a 3D comprehensive regional view combining in a modern framework all available surface and subsurface information for contiguous sectors of the chain is still lacking. We performed such an attempt in the area framed between the Taro valley to the north and the northern termination of the Alpi Apuane to the south. The region includes the main morphostructural zones of the North-West Apennines from the Tyrrhenian coast West-Northwest of La Spezia, through the main topographic divide of the Apennines, to the external frontal part of the chain. The area has been investigated through a multidisciplinary approach that integrated: 1) surface geological data collected during the last two decades of structural and stratigraphic field works in the internal as well as external sectors of the chain; 2) subsurface geological data including: a) interpretation of 1200 Km of seismic reflection profiles tied to surface geology and b) analysis of 39 boreholes stratigraphies. The construction of two regional NE-SW trending cross-sections (the Levanto-Pontremoli-Parma to the North and the La Spezia-Sarzana-North Apuane-Cerreto to the South), connected by the NW-SE trending Taro River-Lunigiana Area-Alpi Apuane composite section, allowed us to illustrate (i) the role of out-of-sequence blind thrusting in the basement, (ii) the presence of low angle normal faulting and its relationships with recent to active high angle normal faulting. Both extensional and contractional systems have relevant implications for the

  10. Kinematics and paleoseismology of the Vernon Fault, Marlborough Fault System, New Zealand: Implications for contractional fault bend deformation, earthquake triggering, and the record of Hikurangi subduction earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Timothy D.; Little, Timothy A.; Clark, Kate J.; Van Dissen, Russ; Barnes, Philip M.

    2014-07-01

    The ~40 km long Vernon Fault, in the Marlborough Fault System of New Zealand, is characterized by dextral slip with subordinate reverse slip and exhibits abrupt variations in strike of up to 90°. Onshore fieldwork, paleoseismic trenching, and offshore high-frequency seismic reflection data are integrated together to identify the kinematics and paleoseismic history of three sections of the fault: (1) the NNE striking Vernon Hills section which branches off from the Awatere Fault; (2) the NE striking Big Lagoon section which borders Big Lagoon to the south and extends ~9 km offshore to the east; and (3) the E-W striking Wairau Basin section, which is entirely submarine. The Vernon Fault can be shown to have a dextral slip rate of 0.8-4.9 mm/yr with a preferred estimate of 0.9 mm/yr (on the Big Lagoon section). We infer that a further unrecognized 3-4 mm/yr of dextral slip has been accommodated off fault as a result of accumulated slip on small and/or blind reverse faults adjacent to a 6 km wide restraining bend in the main fault. The onshore and offshore paleoseismic records are in good agreement. These indicate three to five events at eight sites and a mean recurrence interval of 3.9 ± 1.2 ka over the past ~16 kyr, with the last event taking place at ~3.3 ka. Earthquakes on the Vernon Fault are responsible for Holocene subsidence rate of Big Lagoon over the last ~13 ka. Most of the subsidence of this lagoon has been the result of surface deformation related with southern Hikurangi megathrust earthquakes.

  11. Bivergent thrust wedges surrounding oceanic island arcs: Insight from observations and sandbox models of the northeastern caribbean plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Marshak, S.; Granja, Bruna J. L.

    2009-01-01

    At several localities around the world, thrust belts have developed on both sides of oceanic island arcs (e.g., Java-Timor, Panama, Vanuatu, and the northeastern Caribbean). In these localities, the overall vergence of the backarc thrust belt is opposite to that of the forearc thrust belt. For example, in the northeastern Caribbean, a north-verging accretionary prism lies to the north of the Eastern Greater Antilles arc (Hispaniola and Puerto Rico), whereas a south-verging thrust belt called the Muertos thrust belt lies to the south. Researchers have attributed such bivergent geometry to several processes, including: reversal of subduction polarity; subduction-driven mantle flow; stress transmission across the arc; gravitational spreading of the arc; and magmatic inflation within the arc. New observations of deformational features in the Muertos thrust belt and of fault geometries produced in sandbox kinematic models, along with examination of published studies of island arcs, lead to the conclusion that the bivergence of thrusting in island arcs can develop without reversal of subduction polarity, without subarc mantle flow, and without magmatic inflation. We suggest that the Eastern Greater Antilles arc and comparable arcs are simply crustalscale bivergent (or "doubly vergent") thrust wedges formed during unidirectional subduction. Sandbox kinematic modeling suggests, in addition, that a broad retrowedge containing an imbricate fan of thrusts develops only where the arc behaves relatively rigidly. In such cases, the arc acts as a backstop that transmits compressive stress into the backarc region. Further, modeling shows that when arcs behave as rigid blocks, the strike-slip component of oblique convergence is accommodated entirely within the prowedge and the arc-the retrowedge hosts only dip-slip faulting ("frontal thrusting"). The existence of large retrowedges and the distribution of faulting in an island arc may, therefore, be evidence that the arc is

  12. Thrust fault modeling and Late-Noachian lithospheric structure of the circum-Hellas region, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea-Gonzalez, Isabel; Jiménez-Díaz, Alberto; Parro, Laura M.; López, Valle; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Ruiz, Javier

    2017-05-01

    The circum-Hellas area of Mars borders Hellas Planitia, a giant impact ∼4.0-4.2 Ga old making the deepest and broadest depression on Mars, and is characterized by a complex pattern of fracture sets, lobate scarps, grabens, and volcanic plains. The numerous lobate scarps in the circum-Hellas region mainly formed in the Late Noachian and, except Amenthes Rupes, have been scarcely studied. In this work, we study the mechanical behavior and thermal structure of the crust in the circum-Hellas region at the time of lobate scarp formation, through the modeling of the depth of faulting beneath several prominent lobate scarps. We obtain faulting depths between ∼13 and 38 km, depending on the lobate scarp and accounting for uncertainty. These results indicate low surface and mantle heat flows in Noachian to Early Hesperian times, in agreement with heat flow estimates derived from lithospheric strength for several regions of similar age on Mars. Also, faulting depth and associate heat flows are not dependent of the local crustal thickness, which supports a stratified crust in the circum-Hellas region, with heat-producing elements concentrated in an upper layer that is thinner than the whole crust.

  13. Age and source of water in springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex, Calhoun County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Water from wells and springs accounts for more than 90 percent of the public water supply in Calhoun County, Alabama. Springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex are used for public water supply for the cities of Anniston and Jacksonville. The largest ground-water supply is Coldwater Spring, the primary source of water for Anniston, Alabama. The average discharge of Coldwater Spring is about 32 million gallons per day, and the variability of discharge is about 75 percent. Water-quality samples were collected from 6 springs and 15 wells in Calhoun County from November 2001 to January 2003. The pH of the ground water typically was greater than 6.0, and specific conductance was less than 300 microsiemens per centimeter. The water chemistry was dominated by calcium, carbonate, and bicarbonate ions. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of the water samples indicates the occurrence of a low-temperature, water-rock weathering reaction known as silicate hydrolysis. The residence time of the ground water, or ground-water age, was estimated by using analysis of chlorofluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride, and regression modeling. Estimated ground-water ages ranged from less than 10 to approximately 40 years, with a median age of about 18 years. The Spearman rho test was used to identify statistically significant covariance among selected physical properties and constituents in the ground water. The alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved solids increased as age increased; these correlations reflect common changes in ground-water quality that occur with increasing residence time and support the accuracy of the age estimates. The concentration of sodium and chloride increased as age increased; the correlation of these constituents is interpreted to indicate natural sources for chloride and sodium. The concentration of silica increased as the concentration of potassium increased; this correlation, in addition to the isotopic data, is evidence that

  14. Control of Cambrian evaporites on fracturing in fault-related anticlines in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carminati, Eugenio; Aldega, Luca; Bigi, Sabina; Corrado, Sveva; D'Ambrogi, Chiara; Mohammadi, Peyman; Shaban, Ali; Sherkati, Shahram

    2013-07-01

    Orientation and distribution of fractures in the Oligocene-Early Miocene Asmari Formation (a major reservoir rock of the Zagros petroleum system) were investigated in two anticlines of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt. The Sim and Kuh-e-Asmari anticlines developed in the areas of the Zagros characterized by the occurrence and absence of Cambrian evaporites at the bottom of the stratigraphic pile, respectively. The aim was to outline major differences in terms of fracture spacing and saturation. Organic matter maturity and clay minerals-based geothermometers suggest that the depth of deformation for the top of the Asmari Formation in the Kuh-e-Asmari anticline was in the range of 1.5-2.7 km assuming a geothermal gradient of 22.5 °C/km. The Asmari Formation in the Sim anticline probably experienced a slightly deeper sedimentary burial (maximum 3 km) with a geothermal gradient of 20 °C/km. The spacing of fractures is generally 2-3 times larger (i.e., strain accommodated by fracturing is smaller) in the Sim anticline than in the Kuh-e-Asmari anticline. This is consistent with regional geological studies, analogue, and numerical models that suggest that thrust faults geometry and related folds are markedly different in the absence or presence of a weak decòllement (evaporites). The larger spacing in the Sim anticline is also consistent with higher temperature predicted for the Asmari Formation in this area. By contrast, the orientation of fractures with respect to the fold axes is the same in both anticlines. The fracture systems are rather immature in both anticlines. The amount and density of fractures in the twofolds are controlled by regional (occurrence/absence of salt and probably different burial), rather than local features (fold geometry).

  15. Carbonates in thrust faults: High temperature investigations into deformation processes in calcite-dolomite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, A.; Kennedy, L.; Misra, S.; Benson, P.

    2012-04-01

    The role of dolomite on the strength and evolution of calcite-dolomite fold and thrust belts and nappes (as observed in the Canadian Rockies, the Swiss Alps, the Italian Apennines, and the Naukluft Nappe Complex) is largely unknown. Field investigations indicate that strain in natural systems is localized in calcite, resulting in a ductile response, while dolomite deforms in a dominantly brittle manner. To date, experimental studies on polymineralic carbonate systems are limited to homogeneous, fine-grained, calcite-dolomite composites of relatively low dolomite content. The effect of dolomite on limestone rheology, the onset of crystal-plastic deformation in dolomite in composites, and the potential for strain localization in composites have not yet been fully quantified. Constant displacement rate (3x10-4 s-1and 10-4 s-1), high confining pressure (300 MPa) and high temperature (750° C and 800° C) torsion experiments were conducted to address the role of dolomite on the strength of calcite-dolomite composites. Experiments were performed on samples produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) amalgams of a natural, pure dolomite and a reagent, pure calcite. We performed experiments on the following mixtures (given as dolomite%): 25%, 35%, 50%, and 75%. These synthetic HIP products eliminated concerns of mineralogical impurities and textural anomalies due to porosity, structural fabrics (e.g., foliation) and fossil content. The samples were deformed up to a maximum finite shear strain of 5.0 and the experimental set up was unvented to inhibit sample decarbonation. Mechanical data shows a considerable increase in sample yield strength with increasing dolomite content. Experimental products with low starting dolomite content (dol%: 25% and 35%) display macroscopic strain localization along compositionally defined foliation. Experimental products with high dolomite content (dol%: 50% and 75%) demonstrate no macroscopic foliation. Post-deformation microstructure analysis

  16. Gravity and Magnetic Anomaly Interpretations and 2.5D Cross-Section Models over the Border Ranges Fault System and Aleutian Subduction Zone, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankhemthong, N.; Doser, D. I.; Baker, M. R.; Kaip, G.; Jones, S.; Eslick, B. E.; Budhathoki, P.

    2011-12-01

    Quaternary glacial covers and lack of dense geophysical data on the Kenai Peninsula cause a location and geometry of the Border Ranges fault system (BRFS) within a recent forearc-accretionary boundary of Aleutian subduction zone in southern Alaska are unclear. Using new ~1,300 gravity collections within the Anchorage and Kenai Peninsula regions complied with prior 1997 gravity and aeromagnetic data help us better imaging these fault and the subduction structures. Cook Inlet forearc basin is corresponded by deep gravity anomaly lows; basin boundaries are characterized by a strong gravity gradient, where are considered to be traces of Border Ranges fault system on the east and Castle Mountain and Bruin Bay fault system on the west and northwest of the forearc basin respectively. Gravity anomaly highs over accreted rocks generally increase southeastward to the Aleutian trench, but show a gravity depression over the Kenai Mountains region. The lineament between gravity high and low in the same terrenes over the Kenai Peninsula is may be another evidence to determine the Southern Edge of the Yakutat Microplate (SEY) as inferred by Eberhart-Phillips et al. (2006). Our 2.5-D models illustrate the main fault of the BRFS dips steeply toward the west with a downslip displacement. Gravity and Magnetic anomaly highs, on the east of the BRFS, probably present a slice of the ultramafic complex emplaced by faults along the boundary of the forearc basin and accretionary wedge terranes. Another magnetic high beneath the basin in the southern forearc basin support a serpentiznied body inferred by Saltus et al. (2001), with a decreasing size toward the north. Regional density-gravity models show the Pacific subducting slab beneath the foreacre-arc teranes with a gentle and flatted dip where the subducting plate is located in north of SEY and dips more steeply where it is located on the south of SEY. The gravity depression over the accreted terrene can be explained by a density low

  17. Fault and fluid systems in supra-subduction zones: The Troodos ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, Dennis; Micheuz, Peter; Kurz, Walter; Krenn, Kurt

    2017-04-01

    The Troodos massif on the island of Cyprus represents a well-preserved and complete supra-subduction zone (SSZ) ophiolite. It includes an extrusive sequence that is subdivided into Upper (UPL) and Lower Pillow Lavas (LPL). These volcanic rocks contain mineralized fractures (veins) and vesicles that record fluid availability probably related to slab dehydration and deformation subsequent to a period of subduction initiation in the framework of a SSZ setting. Here, we present electron microprobe element mappings and cathodoluminescence studies of vein minerals as well as analyses of fluid inclusions entrapped in zeolite, calcite and quartz from veins and vesicles of the Pillow Lavas of the Troodos ophiolite. Two different zeolite type assemblages, interpreted as alteration products of compositional varying volcanic glasses, occur: (1) Na-zeolites analcime and natrolite from the UPL that require lower formation temperatures, higher Na/Ca ratios and pH values than (2) Ca-zeolites heulandite and mordenite from the LPL which indicate temporal or spatial varying fluid compositions and conditions. Calcite represents a late stage phase in incompletely sealed blocky type (1) assemblage and in syntaxial quartz veins. Additionally, calcite occurs as major phase in syntaxial and blocky veins of UPL and LPL. These syntaxial quartz and calcite veins are assumed to be related to tectonic extension. Chalcedony is associated with quartz and occurs in typical veins and vesicles of the LPL. In addition, the presence of neptunian dykes in veins suggests that seawater penetrated fractures throughout the extrusive sequence. Thus, circulation in an open system via advective transport is favored while diffusion in a closed system is a subordinate, local and late stage phenomenon. Calcite veins and quartz vesicles contain primary, partly re-equilibrated two phase (liquid, vapor) fluid inclusions. The chemical system of all studied inclusions in both host minerals is restricted to aqueous

  18. Slip rates of active thrusts at the front of the Precordillera revealed by exposure dating and fault scarp profiles, Mendoza, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Silke; Hetzel, Ralf; Kuhlmann, Jan; Mingorance, Francisco; Ramos, Victor

    2010-05-01

    Although large historical earthquakes occurred in the Andean back-arc region between 28° and 34°S, the slip rates of active reverse faults remain unknown; hence the seismic hazard related to these faults is poorly constrained. Here we report long-term slip rates for two faults - the Peñas and the Cal thrust - which define the front of the Andean Precordillera north of Mendoza. Both thrusts displace several Late Pleistocene to Holocene river terraces and form well-preserved fault scarps. At the Peñas thrust three terraces (T1, T2, and T3) are displaced vertically by ~0.9, ~1.9 and ~11 m, respectively. 10Be exposure dating constrains the age of T2 and T3 as 2.9 ± 0.8 ka and 11.1 ± 1.7 ka, which yields an uplift rate of 0.9 ± 0.1 mm/a. The horizontal shortening rate of the Peñas thrust - calculated by using the age of T3 and the dip angle of 25° - is 1.9 ± 0.2 mm/a. At the Cal thrust a fault scarp has displaced a terrace with a maximum age of 12 ka by 7 m. As the Cal thrust dips ~25°, this yields a shortening rate of ≥ 1.3 mm/a. Our results demonstrate that the two thrusts accomodate about half of the present-day shortening rate in the back-arc region of the Andes, which is constrained as 4.5 ± 1.7 mm/a (Brooks et al., 2003). Using the compilation of Well & Coppersmith (1994), the 50-km-long Peñas and the 31-km-long Cal thrusts are capable of producing earthquakes with a magnitude of Mw 6.7 to 7.0. This is supported by a magnitude Ms ~ 7.0 earthquake on the Cal fault, which devastated Mendoza in 1861 and killed two thirds of its population. Earthquakes of this magnitude have presumably generated the smallest fault scarps (~0.9 m vertical offset) present at both thrusts. The higher scarps are interpreted to record multiple offsets generated during several Holocene earthquakes. References Brooks, B.A., Bevis, M., Smalley, R., Kendrick, E., Manceda, R., Lauria, E., Maturana, R. & Araujo, M. (2003): Crustal motion in the Southern Andes (26° - 36°S): Do

  19. New high-resolution seismic imaging of the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) in Bardibas (central Nepal) reveals blind fault strands and buried strath surfaces: implications for paleoseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, R. V.; Hubbard, J.; Liberty, L. M.; Foster, A. E.; Sapkota, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    The MFT is thought to accommodate most of the shortening across the Nepal Himalaya. In order to understand the geometry and kinematics of this fault, we acquired ten high resolution seismic profiles using Vibroseis in 2014 and 2015 around the town of Bardibas (Fig. 1), where the M8.4 1934 earthquake ruptured to the surface (Sapkota et al., 2012). The profiles follow dry riverbeds in the area and data were processed using standard CMP processing methods. In this region, two fault strands overlap (Bollinger et al., 2014). Our data show that the southern strand (Bardibas thrust) is blind. The fault tip is buried several hundred meters below the surface and projects to the surface 1 km south of the topographic break. In contrast, the Patu thrust to the north is surface-emergent. A few km west, we observe a beveling surface in the hanging wall of the Bardibas thrust that underlies alluvial fan deposits. This suggests that while tectonic uplift may raise strath terraces above present river level, they can also be buried due to changes in local base level and sediment supply. The relative rates of these processes determine the morphology we observe at present. Because of the long recurrence intervals on these faults ( 700 yrs), trenching and terraces are the main tools available to understand their slip history. However, blind fault strands cannot be studied by trenching. The observed unconformity also raises concerns about how uplifted terraces are interpreted. We propose that these techniques be complemented with subsurface imaging, combined with shallow drilling to date deformed surfaces. Such efforts have successfully improved our understanding of the blind Ventura fault in southern California (Hubbard et al., 2015; McAuliffe et al., 2015). It should not be surprising that parts of the MFT are blind: many strands preserve asymmetrical anticlines, characteristic of fault propagation folding, in their hanging walls. As the fault system evolves, we expect some fault

  20. Continuity of slip rates over various time scales on the Puente Hills Blind-thrust Fault, Los Angeles, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Kristian J.; Shaw, John H.; Leon, Lorraine A.; Dolan, James F.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Barrera, Wendy; Rhodes, Edward J.; Murari, Madhav K.; Owen, Lewis A.

    2014-05-01

    Our study seeks to assess the history of slip on the Los Angeles segment of the Puente Hills blind-thrust fault system (PHT) from its inception through the Holocene by integrating a suite of geological and geophysical datasets. The PHT presents one of the largest seismic hazards in the United States, given its location beneath downtown Los Angeles. It is also well suited to slip rate studies, as fold scarps formed by slip on the PHT at depth have been continually buried by flood deposits from the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Rivers, preserving a record of uplift in the form of growth stratigraphy. We determined uplift from the growth stratigraphy by measuring the difference in sediment thickness across the folded layers. At our study site above the western segment of the PHT, the fold structure was imaged by industry seismic reflection data and a pair of high-resolution (100 to 700 m depth) seismic reflection profiles acquired by the authors for this study using weight drop and small vibrator sources. The industry and high-resolution profiles were stacked, migrated and depth converted using a velocity model based on the stacking velocities and the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Velocity Model. The shallowest layers of growth stratigraphy were geometrically constrained by lithological correlations across a series of cone penetration tests and continuously cored boreholes. Age control was provided by radiocarbon dating, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating, and sequence-stratigraphic boundaries. Radiocarbon dating was used to constrain individual earthquake event ages in the borehole transect. Using a novel coring procedure, light-protected samples for quartz OSL and feldspar IRSL dating were acquired from a 171-m-deep borehole that we drilled within the growth fold. These samples provided age constraints on growth strata that were tied to prominent seismic reflections and were combined with

  1. Structural evidence for northeastward movement on the Chocolate Mountains Thrust, southeasternmost California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, J.T.; Haxel, G.B.; Tosdal, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous Chocolate Mountains Thrust of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona places a block of Proterozoic and Mesozoic continental crust over the late Mesozoic continental margin oceanic sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the Orocopia Schist. The Chocolate Mountains Thrust is interpreted as a thrust (burial, subduction) fault rather than a low-angle normal fault. An important parameter required to understand the tectonic significance of the Chocolate Mountains and related thrusts is their sense of movement. The only sense of movement consistent with collective asymmetry of the thrust zone folds is top to the northeast. Asymmetric microstructures studied at several localities also indicate top to the northeast movement. Paleomagnetic data suggest that the original sense of thrusting, prior to Neogene vertical axis tectonic rotation related to the San Andreas fault system, was northward. Movement of the upper plate of the chocolate Mountains thrust evidently was continentward. Continentward thrusting suggests a tectonic scenario in which an insular or peninsular microcontinental fragment collided with mainland southern California. -from Authors

  2. The story of a Yakima fold and how it informs Late Neogene and Quaternary backarc deformation in the Cascadia subduction zone, Manastash anticline, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Ladinsky, Tyler C.; Staisch, Lydia; Sherrod, Brian; Blakely, Richard J.; Pratt, Thomas; Stephenson, William; Odum, Jackson K.; Wan, Elmira

    2017-01-01

    The Yakima folds of central Washington, USA, are prominent anticlines that are the primary tectonic features of the backarc of the northern Cascadia subduction zone. What accounts for their topographic expression and how much strain do they accommodate and over what time period? We investigate Manastash anticline, a north vergent fault propagation fold typical of structures in the fold province. From retrodeformation of line- and area-balanced cross sections, the crust has horizontally shortened by 11% (0.8–0.9 km). The fold, and by inference all other folds in the fold province, formed no earlier than 15.6 Ma as they developed on a landscape that was reset to negligible relief following voluminous outpouring of Grande Ronde Basalt. Deformation is accommodated on two fault sets including west-northwest striking frontal thrust faults and shorter north to northeast striking faults. The frontal thrust fault system is active with late Quaternary scarps at the base of the range front. The fault-cored Manastash anticline terminates to the east at the Naneum anticline and fault; activity on the north trending Naneum structures predates emplacement of the Grande Ronde Basalt. The west trending Yakima folds and west striking thrust faults, the shorter north to northeast striking faults, and the Naneum fault together constitute the tectonic structures that accommodate deformation in the low strain rate environment in the backarc of the Cascadia Subduction Zone.

  3. Analogue modelling of thrust systems : Passive vs. active hanging wall strain accommodation and sharp vs. smooth fault-ramp geometries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosas, F.M.; Duarte, J.C.; Almeida, P.; Schellart, W. P.; van Riel, N.A.W.; Terrinha, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present new analogue modelling results of crustal thrust-systems in which a deformable (brittle) hanging wall is assumed to endure passive internal deformation during thrusting, i.e. exclusively as a consequence of having to adapt its shape to the variable geometry of a rigid footwall. Building

  4. Imaging deformation in submarine thrust belts using seismic attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Robert W. H.

    2011-02-01

    Uncertainty exists as to the patterns of deformation that develop within submarine thrust belts. This case study uses a large-scale gravity-driven fold-thrust structure as an analogue for submarine fold thrust systems in general. Seismic attribute analysis and mapping provide ways of identifying complex fault patterns and associated deformation that are otherwise unresolved in conventional amplitude displays. These methods are developed and applied to a 3D dataset and used to investigate the geometry, internal architecture and the nature of the low signal/noise incoherency and discontinuities observed on the km-scale. Semblance (coherency), curvatures and spectral decomposition were all computed and used as attributes. Collectively these define volumes within the seismic data where the signal is greatly reduced — features termed here "disturbance geobodies". The study shows that thrust faults that, on conventional amplitude displays appear to be simple and continuous, are likely to consist of complex arrays of anastamosing fault strands. Adjacent to these composite fault zones are greater volumes of deformed rocks (disturbance geobodies) across which there are only minor stratal offsets. Similarly volumes of high stratal curvature coincide with disturbance geobodies, again interpreted as zones of weak, distributed deformation. These relationships between narrow thrust faults and broader zones of deformation are broadly comparable to those observed in outcrops within exhumed thrust systems. Application of the seismic imaging techniques developed here will improve the understanding of the localization of deformation in sedimentary successions with important implications for predicting fluid flow within other deep water structures such as subduction accretion complexes.

  5. Great earthquakes hazard in slow subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaillou, B.; Gutscher, M.; Westbrook, G. K.

    2008-12-01

    Research on the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 2004 has challenged two popular paradigms; that the strongest subduction earthquakes strike in regions of rapid plate convergence and that rupture occurs primarily along the contact between the basement of the overriding plate and the downgoing plate. Subduction zones presenting similar structural and geodynamic characteristics (slow convergence and thick wedges of accreted sediment) may be capable of generating great megathrust earthquakes (M>8.5) despite an absence of thrust type earthquakes over the past 40 years. Existing deep seismic sounding data and hypocenters are used to constrain the geometry of several key slow subduction zones (Antilles, Hellenic, Sumatra). This geometry forms the basis for numerical modelling of fore-arc thermal structure, which is applied to calculate the estimated width of the seismogenic portion of the subduction fault plane. The margins with the thickest accretionary wedges are commonly found to have the widest (predicted) seismogenic zone. Furthermore, for these margins there exists a substantial (20-60 km wide) region above the up-dip limit for which the contribution to tsunami generation is poorly understood. As the rigidity (mu) of these high-porosity sediments is low, co-seismic slip here can be expected to be slow. Accordingly, the contribution to seismic moment will be low, but the contribution to tsunami generation may be very high. Indeed, recent seismological data from Nankai indicate very low frequency shallow-thrust earthquakes beneath this portion of the accretionary wedge, long-considered to be "aseismic". We propose that thick accumulations of sediment on the downgoing plate and the presence of a thick accretionary wedge can increase the maximum size of the potential rupture fault plane in two ways; 1) by thermally insulating the downgoing plate and thereby increasing the total downdip length of the fault which can rupture seismically and 2) by "smoothing out" the

  6. Rock magnetic expression of fluid infiltration in the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (Longmen Shan thrust belt, China)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, T.; Yang, Xiaosong; Duan, Qingbao; Chen, J.; Dekkers, M.J.

    Fluid infiltration within fault zones is an important process in earthquake rupture. Magnetic properties of fault rocks convey essential clues pertaining to physicochemical processes in fault zones. In 2011, two shallow holes (134 and 54 m depth, respectively) were drilled into the Yingxiu-Beichuan

  7. Thermochronology of a convergent orogen: Constraints on the timing of thrust faulting and subsequent exhumation of the Maladeta Pluton in the Central Pyrenean Axial Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, James R.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Baldwin, Suzanne L.; Muñoz, Josep-Anton

    2009-10-01

    The Pyrenees Mountains of Spain and France are a collisional orogen cored by a south-vergent antiformal stack of Paleozoic basement thrust sheets (the Axial Zone). Thrusting accommodated shortening due to convergence between Iberia and Europe. Granitic plutons, intruded during the Hercynian orogeny, form an important component of the basement units. Thermochronology of granodioritic samples collected from a vertical [age-elevation] profile from the south-central Maladeta pluton provide new constraints on the timing of thrust faulting and rock exhumation of the Pyrenean orogen. The Maladeta massif lies within the Orri thrust sheet, presently occupying the immediate footwall of the Gavarnie thrust, a major Axial Zone Alpine-age thrust fault. New biotite and K-feldspar 40Ar/ 39Ar and apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) data combined with previous apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology and structural studies of the Maladeta pluton constrain the thermal evolution of this massif. Biotite weighted mean plateau and K-feldspar maximum 40Ar/ 39Ar ages from the highest elevations of the Maladeta pluton (2850 m) are ˜ 280 Ma, close to the age of intrusion, and are interpreted to date the timing of rapid cooling in the Hercynian. Subsequently the Maladeta massif remained close to the surface as indicated by the presence of unconformable Triassic continental sediments. K-feldspar 40Ar/ 39Ar multiple diffusion domain thermal models from two samples at lower elevations (1780 m and 1400 m) indicate heating initiated at ˜ 65 Ma, reaching maximum temperatures of 270 to 280 °C. These data are interpreted to record thrust burial of the Maladeta pluton to depths of ˜ 6-10 km in the footwall of the Gavarnie thrust. Burial and heating were followed by a period of relatively rapid cooling beginning at ˜ 50 Ma, recorded in three K-feldspar thermal models from samples at different elevations (2850 m, 1780 m, and 1400 m). AFT thermal models, in conjunction with the AFT and apatite AHe age

  8. Exhuming retroarc fold-and-thrust belts: a comparison between the southern Patagonian Andes and the Argentine Precordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosdick, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed constraints on erosional flux are critical for understanding how exhumational processes control and respond to tectonic events in orogenic belts. This work compares the thermochronologic record and erosional behavior of retroarc thrust belts at two latitudes in the Andes with contrasting Cenozoic climate and deformational records: the glaciated southern Patagonian Andes and the semiarid Argentine Precordillera of the Central Andes. Both regions have undergone crustal shortening during Andean growth and have been affected by thermotectonic processes associated with subduction of oceanic ridges; the Chile Ridge spreading center and Juan Fernández Ridge, respectively. In Patagonia, deep erosion occurred during Miocene retroarc deformation. Zircon He thermochronology documents regional cooling and unroofing of the thrust belt ~22-17 Ma. This behavior likely reflects an upper plate manifestation of incipient subduction of the Chile Ridge spreading center and enhanced unroofing during thermally driven regional uplift. Late Cenozoic expansion of the Patagonian icesheet led to further excavation of the thrust belt, indicating a strong climatic overprinting on thrust belt erosional behavior. In contrast, less overall Cenozoic exhumation is observed in the Argentine Precordillera, despite high strain and crustal thickening. Pre-Jurassic zircon He dates from the Paleozoic strata within thrust sheets suggest Cenozoic Andean deformation was insufficient to exhume rocks from beneath the zircon He closure depth. The apatite He record shows a close correlation between thrust faulting and locus of erosion, and document eastward in-sequence rock cooling from 16 to 2 Ma across the Precordillera tracking with the progressive faulting of the Blanca, San Roque, and Niquivil thrust faults during this time. Pliocene apatite He dates located along the external margins of the Precordillera suggest that the most recent cooling and unroofing is associated with both out

  9. Thrust Faulting, Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs and Poisson's Ratios Beneath the Santa Clara Valley, California as Determined from the Santa Clara Seismic Investigation (SCSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R. D.; Goldman, M. R.; Kiger, L.; Saulter, D.; Wentworth, C.

    2001-12-01

    In December 2000, we conducted an ~20-km-long, southwest-northeast-trending seismic reflection and refraction seismic imaging survey extending from the central Santa Cruz Mountains to the central Santa Clara Valley. The Santa Clara Seismic investigation (SCSI) originated within 0.5 km of the surface trace of the San Andreas fault zone and terminated in downtown San Jose. Between its origin and terminus, the profile crossed the Cupertino Basin and numerous mapped faults, including the Monte Vista thrust fault. Seismic sources were generated by 11 explosions ranging in size from about 12 to 23 kg (25 to 50 lbs.) and were spaced approximately 1 km apart in the central part of the profile. The seismic data were recorded with approximately 400 PASSCAL Texan seismographs, spaced approximately 50 m apart. We inverted first-arrival refractions to determine the P- and S-wave velocity structure of the upper 3.5 km of the crust, and we stacked the seismic reflection data to develop reflection images the upper 10 km of the crust. Our data indicate that P-wave velocities range from about 1.3 km/s near the surface to about 6.0 km/s at varying depths along the profile. Measured S-wave velocities range from about 0.6 km/s near the surface to about 2.6 km/s at varying depths along the profile. Vp/Vs and Poisson's ratios vary from about 1.57 to about 2.10 and from 0.16 to about 0.37, respectively. All velocities and ratios vary laterally and vertically along the profile, but there is an appreciable difference on either side of the Monte Vista fault. Beneath the central Cupertino Basin, the velocity data suggest that sediments (3 km/s) are about 1.2 km deep, thinning to about 600 m deep beneath downtown San Jose and to 0 km deep in the Santa Cruz Mountains. These data show that the Santa Clara Valley and Cupertino Basin sediments are shallower beneath our profile than previously believed. The velocity image also shows a clear low-velocity zone that is most prominent beneath the town

  10. Touhuanping Fault, an active wrench fault within fold-and-thrust belt in northwestern Taiwan, documented by spatial analysis of fluvial terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Yoko; Lin, Yu-Nung Nina; Chen, Yue-Gau; Matsuta, Nobuhisa; Watanuki, Takuya; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2009-09-01

    This study aims at the recent activity and development of an active wrench fault, the Touhuanping Fault in northwestern Taiwan. Northwestern Taiwan has been proposed in a current situation between the mature to waning collision in terms of tectonic evolution. The main drainage in this area, the Chungkang River, flows close to the trace of the fault mentioned above. We examined various types of deformation of fluvial terraces along the Chungkang River as a key to understanding the nature and rate of the late Quaternary tectonics. The E-W trending Touhuanping Fault has long been mapped as a geological boundary fault, but its recent activity was suspected. Field survey revealed that its late Quaternary activity is recorded in the offset fluvial terraces. Our result shows dextral slip and vertical offset with upthrown side on the south, and activated at least twice since the emergence of terrace 4 (older terrace 3 with OSL date of ca. 80 ka). Total amount of offset recorded in the Touhuanping terrace sequence is 15 m for dextral and 10 m for vertical offset. Estimated recurrence time of earthquake rupture may be a few tens of thousand years. Uplift on the upthrown side of the Touhuanping Fault also resulted in the formation of drowned valleys which were graded to terrace 4. Other deformation features, such as back-tilting, westward warping, and a range-facing straight scarp, were also identified. A second-order anticline roughly parallel to the Touhuanping Fault is suggested to be the origin of the northward tilting on terrace 3; it could have resulted from a flower structure on the Touhuanping Fault at shallow depth. This may demonstrate that the buried segment of the Touhuanping Fault has also been active since 80 ka. In the northern study area, the westward warping at terrace 2 probably represents late Quaternary activity of another NE-SW trending Hsincheng Fault.

  11. Earthquake-by-earthquake fold growth above the Puente Hills blind thrust fault, Los Angeles, California: Implications for fold kinematics and seismic hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Lorraine A.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Dolan, James F.; Shaw, John H.; Pratt, Thomas L.

    2007-03-01

    Boreholes and high-resolution seismic reflection data collected across the forelimb growth triangle above the central segment of the Puente Hills thrust fault (PHT) beneath Los Angeles, California, provide a detailed record of incremental fold growth during large earthquakes on this major blind thrust fault. These data document fold growth within a discrete kink band that narrows upward from ˜460 m at the base of the Quaternary section (200-250 m depth) to 82% at 250 m depth) folding and uplift occur within discrete kink bands, thereby enabling us to develop a paleoseismic history of the underlying blind thrust fault. The borehole data reveal that the youngest part of the growth triangle in the uppermost 20 m comprises three stratigraphically discrete growth intervals marked by southward thickening sedimentary strata that are separated by intervals in which sediments do not change thickness across the site. We interpret the intervals of growth as occurring after the formation of now-buried paleofold scarps during three large PHT earthquakes in the past 8 kyr. The intervening intervals of no growth record periods of structural quiescence and deposition at the regional, near-horizontal stream gradient at the study site. Minimum uplift in each of the scarp-forming events, which occurred at 0.2-2.2 ka (event Y), 3.0-6.3 ka (event X), and 6.6-8.1 ka (event W), ranged from ˜1.1 to ˜1.6 m, indicating minimum thrust displacements of ≥2.5 to 4.5 m. Such large displacements are consistent with the occurrence of large-magnitude earthquakes (Mw > 7). Cumulative, minimum uplift in the past three events was 3.3 to 4.7 m, suggesting cumulative thrust displacement of ≥7 to 10.5 m. These values yield a minimum Holocene slip rate for the PHT of ≥0.9 to 1.6 mm/yr. The borehole and seismic reflection data demonstrate that dip within the kink band is acquired incrementally, such that older strata that have been deformed by more earthquakes dip more steeply than younger strata

  12. Stress rotation across the Cascadia megathrust requires a weak subduction plate boundary at seismogenic depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Liu, Yajing; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2018-01-01

    The Mendocino Triple Junction region is the most seismically active part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The northward moving Pacific plate collides with the subducting Gorda plate causing intense internal deformation within it. Here we show that the stress field rotates rapidly with depth across the thrust interface from a strike-slip regime within the subducting plate, reflecting the Pacific plate collision, to a thrust regime in the overriding plate. We utilize a dense focal mechanism dataset, including observations from the Cascadia Initiative ocean bottom seismograph experiment, to constrain the stress orientations. To quantify the implications of this rotation for the strength of the plate boundary, we designed an inversion that solves for the absolute stress tensors in a three-layer model subject to assumptions about the strength of the subducting mantle. Our results indicate that the shear stress on the plate boundary fault is likely no more than about ∼50 MPa at ∼20 km depth. Regardless of the assumed mantle strength, we infer a relatively weak megathrust fault with an effective friction coefficient of ∼0 to 0.2 at seismogenic depths. Such a low value for the effective friction coefficient requires a combination of high fluid pressures and/or fault-zone minerals with low inherent friction in the region where a great earthquake is expected in Cascadia.

  13. Stress rotation across the Cascadia megathrust requires a weak subduction plate boundary at seismogenic depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Liu, Yajing; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2018-03-01

    The Mendocino Triple Junction region is the most seismically active part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The northward moving Pacific plate collides with the subducting Gorda plate causing intense internal deformation within it. Here we show that the stress field rotates rapidly with depth across the thrust interface from a strike-slip regime within the subducting plate, reflecting the Pacific plate collision, to a thrust regime in the overriding plate. We utilize a dense focal mechanism dataset, including observations from the Cascadia Initiative ocean bottom seismograph experiment, to constrain the stress orientations. To quantify the implications of this rotation for the strength of the plate boundary, we designed an inversion that solves for the absolute stress tensors in a three-layer model subject to assumptions about the strength of the subducting mantle. Our results indicate that the shear stress on the plate boundary fault is likely no more than about ∼50 MPa at ∼20 km depth. Regardless of the assumed mantle strength, we infer a relatively weak megathrust fault with an effective friction coefficient of ∼0 to 0.2 at seismogenic depths. Such a low value for the effective friction coefficient requires a combination of high fluid pressures and/or fault-zone minerals with low inherent friction in the region where a great earthquake is expected in Cascadia.

  14. Breaking the shell: Initiating plate tectonic-like subduction on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael T.; McKinnon, William B.

    2017-10-01

    Europa’s prominent bands have been proposed to form by a seafloor-spreading-like mechanism involving complete separation of Europa’s lithosphere and the emplacement of fresh ice from below [Prockter et al. 2002]. This formation mechanism poses a challenge for Europa’s strain balance: extensional rifting at bands must be offset by lithospheric shortening elsewhere, yet few obvious contractional features have been observed. Kattenhorn and Prockter [2014] suggested that extension on Europa is accommodated by subduction of the lithosphere at linear, tabular zones termed subsumption bands. Subduction of Europa’s lithosphere implicitly requires that lithospheric-scale thrust faults can develop. This contrasts with previous numerical modeling, which found that lithospheric shortening is instead primarily accommodated by folding or passive thickening [Bland and McKinnon 2012, 2013]. Here we reevaluate the conditions required to form large-scale thrust faults using a numerical model of lithospheric shortening on Europa that includes realistic localization of brittle failure (non-associated plasticity). In the absence of strain weakening (wherein brittle failure decreases the subsequent yield strength) essentially all shortening results in folding or thickening, consistent with previous results. With moderate strain weakening, deformation becomes localized within fault-like zones for surface temperatures ≤100 K; however, the resulting surface deformation suggests a complex interplay between folding and faulting. Only if the ice shell weakens very easily does faulting dominate. Large-scale faults preferentially form at cold surface temperatures and high heat fluxes. Cold temperatures promote faulting (as opposed to folding), and high heat fluxes result in a thinner lithosphere, which is more easily subducted. The subsumption bands identified by Kattenhorn and Prockter [2014] are at a relatively high latitude (cold temperature), and are associated with putative

  15. Cenozoic tectono-thermal history of the Tordrillo Mountains, Alaska: Paleocene-Eocene ridge subduction, decreasing relief, and late Neogene faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Jeff A.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Layer, Paul W.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Wallace, Wes K.; Gillis, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic development inboard of the continental margin is a predicted response to ridge subduction. New thermochronology results from the western Alaska Range document ridge subduction related orogenesis. K-feldspar thermochronology (KFAT) of bedrock samples from the Tordrillo Mountains in the western Alaska Range complement existing U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar and AFT (apatite fission track) data to provide constraints on Paleocene pluton emplacement, and cooling as well as Late Eocene to Miocene vertical movements and exhumation along fault-bounded blocks. Based on the KFAT analysis we infer rapid exhumation-related cooling during the Eocene in the Tordrillo Mountains. Our KFAT cooling ages are coeval with deposition of clastic sediments in the Cook Inlet, Matanuska Valley and Tanana basins, which reflect high-energy depositional environments. The Tordrillo Mountains KFAT cooling ages are also the same as cooling ages in the Iliamna Lake region, the Kichatna Mountains of the western Alaska Range, and Mt. Logan in the Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains, thus rapid cooling at this time encompasses a broad region inboard of, and parallel to, the continental margin extending for several hundred kilometers. We infer these cooling events and deposition of clastic rocks are related to thermal effects that track the eastward passage of a slab window in Paleocene-Eocene time related to the subduction of the proposed Resurrection-Kula spreading ridge. In addition, we conclude that the reconstructed KFATmax negative age-elevation relationship is likely related to a long period of decreasing relief in the Tordrillo Mountains.

  16. Holocene faulting in the Bellingham forearc basin: upper-plate deformation at the northern end of the Cascadia subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Blakely, Richard J.; Haugerud, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    The northern Cascadia forearc takes up most of the strain transmitted northward via the Oregon Coast block from the northward-migrating Sierra Nevada block. The north-south contractional strain in the forearc manifests in upper-plate faults active during the Holocene, the northern-most components of which are faults within the Bellingham Basin. The Bellingham Basin is the northern of four basins of the actively deforming northern Cascadia forearc. A set of Holocene faults, Drayton Harbor, Birch Bay, and Sandy Point faults, occur within the Bellingham Basin and can be traced from onshore to offshore using a combination of aeromagnetic lineaments, paleoseismic investigations and scarps identified using LiDAR imagery. With the recognition of such Holocene faults, the northernmost margin of the actively deforming Cascadia forearc extends 60 km north of the previously recognized limit of Holocene forearc deformation. Although to date no Holocene faults are recognized at the northern boundary of the Bellingham Basin, which is 15 km north of the international border, there is no compelling tectonic reason to expect that Holocene faults are limited to south of the international border.

  17. Structural Overview and Morphotectonic Evolution of a Strike-Slip Fault in the Zone of North Almora Thrust, Central Kumaun Himalaya, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit M. Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to provide the base line details of the NNW-SSE trending Raintoli fault (RF which is running parallel to the North Almora Thrust (NAT along the Saryu valley from Seraghat-Naichun to Seri in the central sector of the Uttarakhand Himalaya, India. The RF is characterized as dextral strike slip fault and behaves as a ductile shear zone within the zone of NAT. The dextral sense of shear movement of RF is delineated by the fabric of the shear zone rocks including microscopically observed indicators such as sigma and delta porphyroclasts, quartz c-axis, and the field structural data. Additionally, in the quaternary period the dextral strike slip fault is reactivated with oblique slip component as characterized by various geomorphic indicators, for example, triangular facets, abandoned river channels, unpaired fluvial terraces, and V-shaped valleys with recurrent seismicity. Further, the morphometric parameters including Valley Floor Width to Valley Height (Vf, asymmetry factor (AF, and gradient index (GI further prove active nature of RF as suggested by low values of hypsometric integration, V-shaped valley, higher gradient index, and tilting of Saryu basin.

  18. Geometry and kinematics of the fold-thrust belt and structural evolution of the major Himalayan fault zones in the Darjeeling -- Sikkim Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kathakali

    The Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya lies in the eastern part of the Himalayan fold-thrust belt (FTB) in a zone of high arc-perpendicular convergence between the Indian and Eurasian plates. In this region two distinct faults form the Main Central thrust (MCT), the structurally higher MCT1 and the lower MCT2; both these faults have translated the Greater Himalayan hanging wall rocks farther towards the foreland than in the western Himalaya. The width of the sub-MCT Lesser Himalayan rocks progressively decreases from the western Himalaya to this part of the eastern Himalaya, and as a result, the width of the FTB is narrower in this region compared to the western Himalaya. Our structural analysis shows that in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya the sub-MCT Lesser Himalayan duplex is composed of two duplex systems and has a more complex geometry than in the rest of the Himalayan fold-thrust belt. The structurally higher Dating duplex is a hinterland-dipping duplex; the structurally lower Rangit duplex varies in geometry from a hinterland-dipping duplex in the north to an antiformal stack in the middle and a foreland-dipping duplex in the south. The MCT2 is the roof thrust of the Daling duplex and the Ramgarh thrust is the roof thrust of the Rangit duplex. In this region, the Ramgarh thrust has a complex structural history with continued reactivation during footwall imbrication. The foreland-dipping component of the Rangit duplex, along with the large displacement associated with the reactivation of the Ramgarh thrust accounts for the large translation of the MCT sheets in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. The growth of the Lesser Himalayan duplex modified the final geometry of the overlying MCT sheets, resulting in a plunge culmination that manifests itself as a broad N-S trending "anticline" in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. This is not a "river anticline" as its trace lies west of the Teesta river. A transport parallel balanced cross section across this region has accommodated

  19. Plume-induced subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T.; Stern, R. J.; Baes, M.; Sobolev, S. V.; Whattam, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Dominant present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and/or pre-existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are themselves consequences of plate tectonics. In contrast, recently discovered plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without pre-existing plate tectonics. Here, we investigate this new mechanism with high-resolution 3D numerical thermomechanical modeling experiments. We show that typical plume-induced subduction dynamics is subdivided into five different stages: (1) oceanic plateau formation by arrival of a mantle plume head; (2) formation of an incipient trench and a descending nearly-circular slab at the plateau margins; (3) tearing of the circular slab; (4) formation of several self-sustained retreating subduction zones and (5) cooling and spreading of the new lithosphere formed between the retreating subduction zones. At the final stage of plume-induced subduction initiation, a mosaic of independently moving, growing and cooling small oceanic plates heading toward individual retreating subduction zones forms. The plates are separated by spreading centers, triple junctions and transform faults and thus the newly formed multi-slab subduction system operates as an embryonic plate tectonic cell. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained plume-induced subduction: (1) old negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) intense weakening of the lithosphere by plume-derived magmas; and (3) lubrication of the forming subduction interface by hydrated oceanic crust. We furthermore discuss that plume-induced subduction, which is rare at present day conditions, may have been common in the Precambrian time and likely started global plate tectonics on Earth.

  20. Kinematics of subduction and plate convergence under Taiwan and its geomorphic, geodetic and seismic expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppe, J.; Carena, S.; Kanda, R. V.; Wu, Y.; Huang, H.; Wu, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Deciphering the kinematics of ongoing subduction and rapid plate convergence under Taiwan is neither trivial nor straightforward. A 3D synthesis of diverse constraints is required, for example tomography, geodesy, tectonic geomorphology, stress inversion, and Philippine Sea plate motions. Eurasian-Philippine Sea plate convergence is ~90mm/y in a mildly oblique 300° azimuth relative to the ~NS nearly vertically subducting Eurasian mantle lithosphere which extends to ~500km depth. If all the current plate convergence were consumed in subduction of Eurasian mantle, the subduction flexural hinge would migrate westward at ~80mm/y, which is fast relative to the ~30mm/y long-term slip rate on the Taiwan main detachment that represents the Eurasian subduction interface under the Taiwan Central Mountains. If this fast simple subduction were occurring, subduction would too quickly outrun the mountain belt in conflict with data. Instead we estimate that subduction of Eurasian lithosphere is proceeding at ~50mm/y with the remaining ~40mm/y convergence at a lithospheric level consumed by secondary subduction above and to the east of the main plate interface. This secondary subduction is largely transient deformation that is most obvious under the Coastal Range, which represents the deforming western margin of the Philippine Sea plate during the last ~1-1.5 Ma. The thrust faults of the Coastal Range function as subduction faults with the long-term net motion of their footwalls moving largely down relative to their only slowly uplifting hanging walls, with a net secondary subduction of ~40-50km in the last ~1-1.5Ma as estimated from seismic tomography and other data. In addition we find evidence for ongoing subduction of the eastern Central Mountains of Taiwan. The crest of the mountains coincides with the western edge of the migrating plate flexure, a band of extensional geodetic strain coincides with the flexure, and an extensional stress state in the upper 5-10km coincides

  1. Faults

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  2. Upper-plate splay fault earthquakes along the Arakan subduction belt recorded by uplifted coral microatolls on northern Ramree Island, western Myanmar (Burma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, J. Bruce H.; Wang, Chung-Che; Wang, Yu; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Chiang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Sze-Chieh; Min, Soe; Aung, Lin Thu; Than, Oo; Tun, Soe Thura

    2018-02-01

    Upper-plate structures that splay out from the megathrusts are common features along major convergent plate boundaries. However, their earthquake and tsunami hazard potentials have not yet received significant attention. In this study, we identified at least one earthquake event that may have been produced by an upper-plate splay fault offshore western Myanmar, based on U-Th ages of uplifted coral microatolls. This event is likely an earthquake that was documented historically in C.E. 1848, with an estimated magnitude between 6.8 and 7.2 based on regional structural characteristics. Such magnitude is consistent with the observed co-seismic uplift amount of ∼0.5 m. Although these events are smaller in magnitude than events produced by megathrusts, they may produce higher earthquake and tsunami hazards for local coastal communities due to their proximity. Our results also indicate that earthquake events with co-seismic uplift along the coast may not necessarily produce a flight of marine terraces. Therefore, using only records of uplifted marine terraces as megathrust earthquake proxies may overlook the importance of upper-plate splay fault ruptures, and underestimate the overall earthquake frequency for future seismic and tsunami hazards along major subduction zones of the world.

  3. Fluid and deformation regime of an advancing subduction system at Marlborough, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannamaker, Philip E; Caldwell, T Grant; Jiracek, George R; Maris, Virginie; Hill, Graham J; Ogawa, Yasuo; Bibby, Hugh M; Bennie, Stewart L; Heise, Wiebke

    2009-08-06

    Newly forming subduction zones on Earth can provide insights into the evolution of major fault zone geometries from shallow levels to deep in the lithosphere and into the role of fluids in element transport and in promoting rock failure by several modes. The transpressional subduction regime of New Zealand, which is advancing laterally to the southwest below the Marlborough strike-slip fault system of the northern South Island, is an ideal setting in which to investigate these processes. Here we acquired a dense, high-quality transect of magnetotelluric soundings across the system, yielding an electrical resistivity cross-section to depths beyond 100 km. Our data imply three distinct processes connecting fluid generation along the upper mantle plate interface to rock deformation in the crust as the subduction zone develops. Massive fluid release just inland of the trench induces fault-fracture meshes through the crust above that undoubtedly weaken it as regional shear initiates. Narrow strike-slip faults in the shallow brittle regime of interior Marlborough diffuse in width upon entering the deeper ductile domain aided by fluids and do not project as narrow deformation zones. Deep subduction-generated fluids rise from 100 km or more and invade upper crustal seismogenic zones that have exhibited historic great earthquakes on high-angle thrusts that are poorly oriented for failure under dry conditions. The fluid-deformation connections described in our work emphasize the need to include metamorphic and fluid transport processes in geodynamic models.

  4. Buoyant subduction on Venus: Implications for subduction around coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, J. D.; Head, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Potentially low lithospheric densities, caused by high Venus surface and perhaps mantle temperatures, could inhibit the development of negative buoyancy-driven subduction and a global system of plate tectonics/crustal recycling on that planet. No evidence for a global plate tectonic system was found so far, however, specific features strongly resembling terrestrial subduction zones in planform and topographic cross-section were described, including trenches around large coronae and chasmata in eastern Aphrodite Terra. The cause for the absence, or an altered expression, of plate tectonics on Venus remains to be found. Slab buoyancy may play a role in this difference, with higher lithospheric temperatures and a tendency toward positive buoyancy acting to oppose the descent of slabs and favoring under thrusting instead. The effect of slab buoyancy on subduction was explored and the conditions which would lead to under thrusting versus those allowing the formation of trenches and self-perpetuating subduction were defined. Applying a finite element code to assess the effects of buoyant forces on slabs subducting into a viscous mantle, it was found that mantle flow induced by horizontal motion of the convergent lithosphere greatly influences subduction angle, while buoyancy forces produce a lesser effect. Induced mantle flow tends to decrease subduction angle to near an under thrusting position when the subducting lithosphere converges on a stationary overriding lithosphere. When the overriding lithosphere is in motion, as in the case of an expanding corona, subduction angles are expected to increase. An initial stage involved estimating the changes in slab buoyancy due to slab healing and pressurization over the course of subduction. Modeling a slab, descending at a fixed angle and heated by conduction, radioactivity, and the heat released in phase changes, slab material density changes due to changing temperature, phase, and pressure were derived.

  5. Detecting Significant Stress Drop Variations in Large Micro-Earthquake Datasets: A Comparison Between a Convergent Step-Over in the San Andreas Fault and the Ventura Thrust Fault System, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Hauksson, E.; Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.

    2017-06-01

    A key parameter in engineering seismology and earthquake physics is seismic stress drop, which describes the relative amount of high-frequency energy radiation at the source. To identify regions with potentially significant stress drop variations, we perform a comparative analysis of source parameters in the greater San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) and Ventura basin (VB) in southern California. The identification of physical stress drop variations is complicated by large data scatter as a result of attenuation, limited recording bandwidth and imprecise modeling assumptions. In light of the inherently high uncertainties in single stress drop measurements, we follow the strategy of stacking large numbers of source spectra thereby enhancing the resolution of our method. We analyze more than 6000 high-quality waveforms between 2000 and 2014, and compute seismic moments, corner frequencies and stress drops. Significant variations in stress drop estimates exist within the SGP area. Moreover, the SGP also exhibits systematically higher stress drops than VB and shows more scatter. We demonstrate that the higher scatter in SGP is not a generic artifact of our method but an expression of differences in underlying source processes. Our results suggest that higher differential stresses, which can be deduced from larger focal depth and more thrust faulting, may only be of secondary importance for stress drop variations. Instead, the general degree of stress field heterogeneity and strain localization may influence stress drops more strongly, so that more localized faulting and homogeneous stress fields favor lower stress drops. In addition, higher loading rates, for example, across the VB potentially result in stress drop reduction whereas slow loading rates on local fault segments within the SGP region result in anomalously high stress drop estimates. Our results show that crustal and fault properties systematically influence earthquake stress drops of small and large events and should

  6. Latest Pleistocene to Holocene thrust faulting paleoearthquakes at Monte Netto (Brescia, Italy): lessons learned from the Middle Ages seismic events in the Po Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michetti, Alessandro Maria; Berlusconi, Andrea; Livio, Franz; Sileo, Giancanio; Zerboni, Andrea; Serva, Leonello; Vittori, Eutizio; Rodnight, Helena; Spötl, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    The seismicity of the Po Plain in Northern Italy is characterized by two strong Middle Ages earthquakes, the 1117, I° X MCS Verona, and the December 25, 1222, I° IX-X Brescia, events. Historical reports from these events describe relevant coseismic environmental effects, such as drainage changes, ground rupture and landslides. Due to the difficult interpretation of intensity data from such old seismic events, considerable uncertainty exists about their source parameters, and therefore about their causative tectonic structures. In a recent review, Stucchi et al. (2008) concluded that 'the historical data do not significantly help to constrain the assessment of the seismogenic potential of the area, which remains one of the most unknown, although potentially dangerous, seismic areas of the Italian region'. This issue needs therefore to be addressed by using the archaeological and geological evidence of past earthquakes, that is, archeoseismology and paleoseismology. Earthquake damage to archaeological sites in the study area has been the subject of several recent papers. Here we focus on new paleoseismological evidence, and in particular on the first observation of Holocene paleoseismic surface faulting in the Po Plain identified at the Monte Netto site, located ca. 10 km S of Brescia, in the area where the highest damage from the Christmas 1222 earthquake have been recorded. Monte Netto is a small hill, ca. 30 m higher than the surrounding piedmont plain, which represent the top of a growing fault-related fold belonging to the Quaternary frontal sector of the Southern Alps; the causative deep structure is a N-verging back thrust, well imaged in the industrial seismic reflection profiles kindly made available by ENI E&P. New trenching investigations have been conducted at the Cava Danesi of Monte Netto in October 2009, focused on the 1:10 scale analysis of the upper part of the 7 m high mid-Pleistocene to Holocene stratigraphic section exposed along the quarry

  7. Subduction zone and crustal dynamics of western Washington; a tectonic model for earthquake hazards evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dal; Villaseñor, Antonio; Benz, Harley

    1999-01-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone is extremely complex in the western Washington region, involving local deformation of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate and complicated block structures in the crust. It has been postulated that the Cascadia subduction zone could be the source for a large thrust earthquake, possibly as large as M9.0. Large intraplate earthquakes from within the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Puget Sound region have accounted for most of the energy release in this century and future such large earthquakes are expected. Added to these possible hazards is clear evidence for strong crustal deformation events in the Puget Sound region near faults such as the Seattle fault, which passes through the southern Seattle metropolitan area. In order to understand the nature of these individual earthquake sources and their possible interrelationship, we have conducted an extensive seismotectonic study of the region. We have employed P-wave velocity models developed using local earthquake tomography as a key tool in this research. Other information utilized includes geological, paleoseismic, gravity, magnetic, magnetotelluric, deformation, seismicity, focal mechanism and geodetic data. Neotectonic concepts were tested and augmented through use of anelastic (creep) deformation models based on thin-plate, finite-element techniques developed by Peter Bird, UCLA. These programs model anelastic strain rate, stress, and velocity fields for given rheological parameters, variable crust and lithosphere thicknesses, heat flow, and elevation. Known faults in western Washington and the main Cascadia subduction thrust were incorporated in the modeling process. Significant results from the velocity models include delineation of a previously studied arch in the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The axis of the arch is oriented in the direction of current subduction and asymmetrically deformed due to the effects of a northern buttress mapped in the velocity models. This

  8. Stress history and fracture pattern in fault-related folds based on limit analysis: application to the Sub-Andean thrust belt of Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Charlotte; Leroy, Yves; Ben Miloud, Camille

    2017-04-01

    A methodology is proposed to construct the stress history of a complex fault-related fold in which the deformation mechanisms are essentially frictional. To illustrate the approach, fours steps of the deformation of an initially horizontally layered sand/silicone laboratory experiment (Driehaus et al., J. of Struc. Geol., 65, 2014) are analysed with the kinematic approach of limit analysis (LA). The stress, conjugate to the virtual velocity gradient in the sense of mechanicam power, is a proxy for the true statically admmissible stress field which prevailed over the structure. The material properties, friction angles and cohesion, including their time evolution are selected such that the deformation pattern predicted by the LA is consistent with the two main thrusting events, the first forward and the second backward once the layers have sufficiently rotated. The fractures associated to the stress field determined at each step are convected on today configuration to define the complete pattern which should be observed. The end results are presented along virtual vertical wells and could be used within the oil industry at an early phase of exploration to prepare drealing operations.

  9. Deep-water turbidites as Holocene earthquake proxies: the Cascadia subduction zone and Northern San Andreas Fault systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Johnson

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available New stratigraphic evidence from the Cascadia margin demonstrates that 13 earthquakes ruptured the margin from Vancouver Island to at least the California border following the catastrophic eruption of Mount Mazama. These 13 events have occurred with an average repeat time of ?? 600 years since the first post-Mazama event ?? 7500 years ago. The youngest event ?? 300 years ago probably coincides with widespread evidence of coastal subsidence and tsunami inundation in buried marshes along the Cascadia coast. We can extend the Holocene record to at least 9850 years, during which 18 events correlate along the same region. The pattern of repeat times is consistent with the pattern observed at most (but not all localities onshore, strengthening the contention that both were produced by plate-wide earthquakes. We also observe that the sequence of Holocene events in Cascadia may contain a repeating pattern, a tantalizing look at what may be the long-term behavior of a major fault system. Over the last ?? 7500 years, the pattern appears to have repeated at least three times, with the most recent A.D. 1700 event being the third of three events following a long interval of 845 years between events T4 and T5. This long interval is one that is also recognized in many of the coastal records, and may serve as an anchor point between the offshore and onshore records. Similar stratigraphic records are found in two piston cores and one box core from Noyo Channel, adjacent to the Northern San Andreas Fault, which show a cyclic record of turbidite beds, with thirty- one turbidite beds above a Holocene/.Pleistocene faunal «datum». Thus far, we have determined ages for 20 events including the uppermost 5 events from these cores. The uppermost event returns a «modern» age, which we interpret is likely the 1906 San Andreas earthquake. The penultimate event returns an intercept age of A.D. 1664 (2 ?? range 1505- 1822. The third event and fourth event

  10. Interseismic Strain Accumulation Across Metropolitan Los Angeles: Puente Hills Thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, D.; Liu, Z.; Heflin, M. B.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.; Lundgren, P.; Drake, V. G.; Rodriguez, I. I.

    2012-12-01

    Twelve years of observation of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) are tightly constraining the distribution of shortening across metropolitan Los Angeles, providing information on strain accumulation across blind thrust faults. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) and water well records are allowing the effects of water and oil management to be distinguished. The Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault is at a 25° angle to Pacific-North America plate motion. GPS shows that NNE-SSW shortening due to this big restraining bend is fastest not immediately south of the San Andreas fault across the San Gabriel mountains, but rather 50 km south of the fault in northern metropolitan Los Angeles. The GPS results we quote next are for a NNE profile through downtown Los Angeles. Just 2 mm/yr of shortening is being taken up across the San Gabriel mountains, 40 km wide (0.05 micro strain/yr); 4 mm/yr of shortening is being taken up between the Sierra Madre fault, at the southern front of the San Gabriel mountains, and South Central Los Angeles, also 40 km wide (0.10 micro strain/yr). We find shortening to be more evenly distributed across metropolitan Los Angeles than we found before [Argus et al. 2005], though within the 95% confidence limits. An elastic models of interseismic strain accumulation is fit to the GPS observations using the Back Slip model of Savage [1983]. Rheology differences between crystalline basement and sedimentary basin rocks are incorporated using the EDGRN/EDCMP algorithm of Wang et al. [2003]. We attempt to place the Back Slip model into the context of the Elastic Subducting Plate Model of Kanda and Simons [2010]. We find, along the NNE profile through downtown, that: (1) The deep Sierra Madre Thrust cannot be slipping faster than 2 mm/yr, and (2) The Puente Hills Thrust and nearby thrust faults (such as the upper Elysian Park Thrust) are slipping at 9 ±2 mm/yr beneath a locking depth of 12 ±5 km (95% confidence limits

  11. A discussion of numerical subduction initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buiter, Susanne; Ellis, Susan

    2016-04-01

    In nature, subduction can initiate in various ways: Shortening can localise at oceanic transform faults, extinct spreading centres, or inherited passive margin faults; or, alternatively, subduction can be triggered from existing subduction systems by along-strike trench propagation, polarity reversals, or trench jumps. Numerical studies that specifically address subduction initiation have highlighted the roles of sediment loading, rheological strength contrasts, strain softening, and continental topographic gradients, among others. Usually, however, numerical models that aim to investigate subduction dynamics prefer to bypass the subduction initiation phase and its complexities, and focus instead on the stages during which the slab is descending into the mantle. However, even in these models, subduction still needs to begin. It is disturbingly easy to define initial model geometries that do not result in subduction. The specific combination of initial model geometries and values for rheological parameters that successfully initiates subduction has even been referred to as 'the sweet spot' in model space. One cause of subduction initiation failure is when the subducting and overriding plates lock, resulting in either indentation or severe dragging downwards of the overriding plate. This may point to a difficulty in maintaining a weak subduction interface during model evolution. A second factor that may cause difficulties is that initial model geometry and stresses need to balance, as otherwise the first model stages may show spurious deformation associated with reaching equilibrium. A third requirement that may cause problems is that the surface needs to have sufficient displacement freedom to allow the overriding plate to overthrust the subducting plate. That also implies an exclusion of sharp corners in the subduction interface near the surface. It is the interplay of subduction interface geometry, interface strength and subducting plate rheology that determines

  12. Paleoseismologic evidence for large-magnitude (Mw 7.5-8.0) earthquakes on the Ventura blind thrust fault: Implications for multifault ruptures in the Transverse Ranges of southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Lee J.; Dolan, James F.; Rhodes, Edward J.; Hubbard, Judith; Shaw, John H.; Pratt, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed analysis of continuously cored boreholes and cone penetrometer tests (CPTs), high-resolution seismic-reflection data, and luminescence and 14C dates from Holocene strata folded above the tip of the Ventura blind thrust fault constrain the ages and displacements of the two (or more) most recent earthquakes. These two earthquakes, which are identified by a prominent surface fold scarp and a stratigraphic sequence that thickens across an older buried fold scarp, occurred before the 235-yr-long historic era and after 805 ± 75 yr ago (most recent folding event[s]) and between 4065 and 4665 yr ago (previous folding event[s]). Minimum uplift in these two scarp-forming events was ∼6 m for the most recent earthquake(s) and ∼5.2 m for the previous event(s). Large uplifts such as these typically occur in large-magnitude earthquakes in the range of Mw7.5–8.0. Any such events along the Ventura fault would likely involve rupture of other Transverse Ranges faults to the east and west and/or rupture downward onto the deep, low-angle décollements that underlie these faults. The proximity of this large reverse-fault system to major population centers, including the greater Los Angeles region, and the potential for tsunami generation during ruptures extending offshore along the western parts of the system highlight the importance of understanding the complex behavior of these faults for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment.

  13. Large seismic faults in the Hellenic arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Papazachos

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Using information concerning reliable fault plane solutions, spatial distribution of strong earthquakes (Ms³ 6.0 as well as sea bottom and coastal topography, properties of the seismic faults (orientation, dimension, type of faulting were determined in seven shallow (h < 40 km seismogenic regions along the convex part of thc Hellenic arc (Hellenic trench and in four seismogenic regions of intermediate depth earthquakes (h = 40-100 km along the concave part of this arc. Except for the northwesternmost part of the Hellenic trench, where the strike-slip Cephalonia transform fault dominates, all other faults along this trench are low angle thrust faults. III thc western part of the trench (Zante-west Crete faults strike NW-SE and dip NE, while in its eastern part (east Crete-Rhodos faults strike WNW-ESE and dip NNE. Such system of faulting can be attributed to an overthrust of the Aegean lithosphere on the eastern Mediterranean lithosphere. The longest of these faults (L = 300 km is that which produced the largest known shallow earthquake in the Mediterranean area (21 July 365, Ms = 8.3 which is located near the southwestern coast of Crete. The second longest such fault (L = l 70 km is that which produced a large earthquake (December 1303, Ms = 8.0 in the easternmost part of the trench (east of Rhodos island. Both earthquakes were associated with gigantic tsunamis which caused extensive damage in the coast of many Eastern Mediterranean countries. Seismic faults of the intermediate depth earthquakes in the shallow part of the Benioff zone (h = 40- 100 km are of strike-slip type, with a thrust component. The orientations of these faults vary along the concave part of the arc in accordance with a subduction of remnants of all old lithospheric slab from the convex side (Mediterranean to the concave side (Aegean of thc Hellenic arc. The longest of these faults (L = 220 km is that which produced the largest known intermediate depth earthquake in the

  14. The South Sandwich "Forgotten" Subduction Zone and Tsunami Hazard in the South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okal, E. A.; Hartnady, C. J. H.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2009-04-01

    While no large interplate thrust earthquakes are know at the "forgotten" South Sandwich subduction zone, historical catalogues include a number of events with reported magnitudes 7 or more. A detailed seismological study of the largest event (27 June 1929; M (G&R) = 8.3) is presented. The earthquake relocates 80 km North of the Northwestern corner of the arc and its mechanism, inverted using the PDFM method, features normal faulting on a steeply dipping fault plane (phi, delta, lambda = 71, 70, 272 deg. respectively). The seismic moment of 1.7*10**28 dyn*cm supports Gutenberg and Richter's estimate, and is 28 times the largest shallow CMT in the region. This event is interpreted as representing a lateral tear in the South Atlantic plate, comparable to similar earthquakes in Samoa and Loyalty, deemed "STEP faults" by Gover and Wortel [2005]. Hydrodynamic simulations were performed using the MOST method [Titov and Synolakis, 1997]. Computed deep-water tsunami amplitudes of 30cm and 20cm were found off the coast of Brazil and along the Gulf of Guinea (Ivory Coast, Ghana) respectively. The 1929 moment was assigned to the geometries of other know earthquakes in the region, namely outer-rise normal faulting events at the center of the arc and its southern extremity, and an interplate thrust fault at the Southern corner, where the youngest lithosphere is subducted. Tsunami hydrodynamic simulation of these scenarios revealed strong focusing of tsunami wave energy by the SAR, the SWIOR and the Agulhas Rise, in Ghana, Southern Mozambique and certain parts of the coast of South Africa. This study documents the potential tsunami hazard to South Atlantic shorelines from earthquakes in this region, principally normal faulting events.

  15. Deep structure and historical earthquakes in the Calabrian subduction zone (Southern Italy): preliminary results from multi-channel seismic reflection profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, F.; Gutscher, M.; Torelli, L.; Polonia, A.; Riminucci, F.

    2009-12-01

    The Calabrian subduction zone is located in the complex Central Mediterranean area. This subduction is characterized by the presence of deep earthquakes under the Tyrrhenian Sea down to 500 km depth. The Tethyan remnant Ionian slab descends towards the NW at a dip of about 70° and is associated with an active volcanic arc (the Aeolian Islands). Recently reported GPS and seismicity studies suggest that the subduction of the Ionian lithosphere beneath the Calabrian Arc may be locally still active, though at very slow rates (thrust earthquakes, characteristic of active subduction zone, suggests that if subduction is active, the fault plane may be locked since the instrumental period. To seek evidence of continuous tectonic activity of the Calabrian system, we present preliminary results from reprocessed 96-channels seismic reflection profiles (French Archimede cruise, 1997) offshore Sicily. This analysis permits to recognize a well-defined stratigraphy in the Ionian Abyssal Plain, this stratigraphy becomes difficult to follow under the deformed Calabrian Prism. But the joint interpretation with the reprocessed PM01 profile (French PRISMED cruise, 1994) helps constrain this interpretation and to image some characteristic structures of an accretionary wedge (fore/back-thrusts, basal decollement...). This study also include interpretation of a more recent Italian seismic cruise (Calamare, 2008) and CROP profiles. This work will help to prepare a future cruise proposal (CIRCEE, to be submitted in January 2010) to study the Calabrian subduction with OBS, MCS seismic, heat-flow measurements and sediment coring. The goals are : 1/ to image the deep structure of this subduction zone, 2/ to characterize its thermal state to deduce a geometry of the seismogenic part of the plate interface and add new constraints on seismic risk linked with the Calabrian subduction.

  16. Late Quaternary Deformation Along the Wairarapa Fault, North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, E. R.; Little, T. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Wairarapa fault, one of the largest active faults in the hanging wall of the Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand, averaged 16m dextral slip during the M >8.1 1855 earthquake. Previous workers inferred that uplift of 2.7m at the coast, observed by a surveyor in 1855, occurred on the southern continuation of the Wairarapa fault, the Wharekauhau (WH) thrust. New mapping, stratigraphic, and paloseismologic results from the WH thrust suggest the pattern of surface rupture in 1855 and earlier earthquakes was significantly different than previously inferred, requiring a more complex model for seismic hazard and tectonic evolution of the region. Detailed mapping indicates that the coastal segment of the WH thrust did not rupture the surface in 1855. The thrust, a major range-bounding fault, emplaces Mesozoic graywacke over ~80-100 ka last- interglacial marine, and lacustrine rocks, and in part coeval to younger alluvial gravels. Fault activity is indicated by facies and thickness changes. This older sequence is tilted and overlapped unconformably by a silt layer and much less deformed alluvial fan gravels that range in age from >22ka to ages record a period of fault inactivity from 14 - 9 ka (calib yrs BP). The abandoned, overlapping fan surface is slightly deformed across the fault (15 m of folding- related throw). We infer that the thrust has propagated eastward in the subsurface, uplifting the abandoned WH fault, an inference that is supported by the pattern of Holocene incision. The only recent faulting consists of subvertical en echelon segments that have undergone minor dip-slip and dextral slip. A trench excavated across the fault scarp in late Holocene gravels suggests that the only fault along the trace of the WH thrust that broke within 3 m of the surface in 1855 was a minor strike-slip fault splay. New14C ages are consistent with the most recent event occurring in 1855 and suggest one earlier event. The range-bounding trace of the WH thrust appears to

  17. Seismotectonics in the Pamir: An oblique transpressional shear and south-directed deep-subduction model

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    Jiasheng Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3-D geometry of the seismicity in Hindu Kush–Pamir–western China region has been defined by seismic records for 1975–1999 from the National Earthquake Information Center, the U.S. Geological Survey, and over 16,000 relocated earthquakes since 1975 recorded by the Xinjiang seismic network of China. The results show that most Ms ≥ 5.0 hypocenters in the area are confined to a major intracontinental seismic shear zone (MSSZ. The MSSZ, which dips southwards in Pamir has a north-dipping counterpart in the Hindu Kush to the west; the two tectonic realms are separated by the sinistral Chaman transform fault of the India–Asia collisional zone. We demonstrate that the MSSZ constitutes the upper boundary of a south-dipping, actively subducting Pamir continental plate. Three seismic concentrations are recognized just above the Pamir MSSZ at depths between 45–65 km, 95–120 km, and 180–220 km, suggesting different structural relationships where each occurs. Results from focal mechanism solutions in all three seismological concentrations show orientations of the principal maximum stress to be nearly horizontal in an NNW–SSE direction. The south-dipping Pamir subduction slab is wedge-shaped with a wide upper top and a narrow deeper bottom; the slab has a gentle angle of dip in the upper part and steeper dips in the lower part below an elbow depth of ca. 80–120 km. Most of the deformation related to the earthquakes occurs within the hanging wall of the subducting Pamir slab. Published geologic data and repeated GPS measurements in the Pamir document a broad supra-subduction, upper crustal zone of evolving antithetic (i.e. north-dipping back-thrusts that contribute to north-south crustal shortening and are responsible for exhumation of some ultrahigh-pressure rocks formed during earlier Tethyan plate convergence. An alternating occurrence in activity of Pamir and Chaman seismic zones indicates that there is interaction between

  18. Detecting Possible Fault Zone Head Waves Along the Longmenshan Fault Zone Using Aftershocks of the 2013 Mw6.7 Lushan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C.; Peng, Z.; Li, Z.; Ross, Z. E.; Wu, J.; Su, J.; Zhang, H.; Pei, S.

    2016-12-01

    Fault zone head waves (FZHWs) are subtle refracted waves propagated along bi-material fault interfaces and recorded at stations at slower side of the fault. FZHWs are typically observed in association with mature strike-slip faults or subduction zones, where two sides exhibit a noticeable P-wave velocity difference. So far FZHWs have not been observed along continental thrust faults. In this study we search for possible FZHWs using abundant aftershock observations following the 2013 Mw6.7 Lushan earthquake. This event occurred along the southern portion of the Longmenshan Fault Zone that separated the Tibetan Plateau and Sichuan Basin in Western China. Recent P-wave tomographic studies have found clear velocity contrasts along this fault, suggesting that events occurred at the fault boundary are capable of producing FZHW-like signals. We are in the process of analyzing 4100 aftershocks recorded by 28 temporary stations deployed between April 24 to May 19 2013. We use both visual inspections and automatic FZHW pickers to identify weak precursory-type signals before sharp direct P wave arrivals. Next, we align them on the P-wave onset, and examine the moveout between the time delays of P and weak arrivals and distance along the fault strike. So far we find that many stations on both sides of the fault recorded possible evidence of FZHWs, but we do not find clear moveout with along-strike distances. Our next step is to combine this dataset with another larger dataset recorded by both permanent and temporary stations, and use automatic FZHW pickers to quantify the existences of FZHWs in this region. A systematic detection of FZHW along continental thrust faults could provide new insights on the fault geometry and high-resolution fault interface properties at seismogenic depth.

  19. Seismotectonics of the southern boundary of Anatolia, Eastern Mediterranean region: subduction, collision, and arc jumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotstein, Y.; Kafka, A.L.

    1982-09-10

    The pattern of seismicity and fault plane solutions of earthquakes are used to outline the tectonic features of the southern boundary of Anatolia in the eastern Mediterranean and southeastern Turkey. The results of this study show that this boundary is composed of two distinct parts. One, in southeastern Turkey and Syria, is a wide and complex zone of continental collision. The other, in the Levantine basin of the eastern Mediterranean, is a zone of oceanic subduction. In the region of continental collision three zones of seismicity are observed. Most of the seismic activity in this region follows the Bitlis zone and is associated with a zone of thrusting and mountain building. This appears to be the zone of most active deformation and plate consumption in the plate boundary region between Arabia and Turkey. A less active zone of seismicity to the north of the Bitlis zone is interpreted to have been more active in the past whereas another active zone of seismicity to the south is interpreted to be a zone which may be more active in the future as the main zone of plate consumption jumps to the south. In the subduction zone of the eastern Mediterranean the depth of the subducted slab and the rate of seismicity generally increease from east to west. The zone of present-day convergence between Africa and Turkey in the Levantine basin can be best outlined by the northern edge of the Mediterranean ridge. Deep seismic activity near the Gulf of Antalya is associated with a detached subducted slab north of the Anaximander Mountains that is distinctly different from the seismic trend which is associated with present-day active subduction. Most of the focal mechanisms of the earthquakes along the entire southern boundary of Anatolia indicate that N to NNW thrusting is the dominant mode of seismic deformation.

  20. Seismotectonics of the southern boundary of Anatolia, eastern Mediterranean region: Subduction, collision, and arc jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, Yair; Kafka, Alan L.

    1982-09-01

    The pattern of seismicity and fault plane solutions of earthquakes are used to outline the tectonic features of the southern boundary of Anatolia in the eastern Mediterranean and southeastern Turkey. The results of this study show that this boundary is composed of two distinct parts. One, in southeastern Turkey and Syria, is a wide and complex zone of continental collision. The other, in the Levantine basin of the eastern Mediterranean, is a zone of oceanic subduction. In the region of continental collision three zones of seismicity are observed. Most of the seismic activity in this region follows the Bitlis zone and is associated with a zone of thrusting and mountain building. This appears to be the zone of most active deformation and plate consumption in the plate boundary region between Arabia and Turkey. A less active zone of seismicity to the north of the Bitlis zone is interpreted to have been more active in the past whereas another active zone of seismicity to the south is interpreted to be a zone which may be more active in the future as the main zone of plate consumption jumps to the south. In the subduction zone of the eastern Mediterranean the depth of the subducted slab and the rate of seismicity generally increase from east to west. The zone of present-day convergence between Africa and Turkey in the Levantine basin can be best outlined by the northern edge of the Mediterranean ridge. The subduction zone in this area sequentially jumps to the south as small continental fragments collide with existing zones of subduction. Deep seismic activity near the Gulf of Antalya is associated with a detached subducted slab north of the Anaximander Mountains that is distinctly different from the seismic trend which is associated with present-day active subduction. The plate boundary between Africa and Turkey at the center of the Levantine basin appears to have shifted to the south of the Anaximander Mountains and Florence rise. Most of the focal mechanisms of the

  1. Raman spectra of carbonaceous materials in a fault zone in the Longmenshan thrust belt, China; comparisons with those of sedimentary and metamorphic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouketsu, Yui; Shimizu, Ichiko; Wang, Yu; Yao, Lu; Ma, Shengli; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2017-03-01

    We analyzed micro-Raman spectra of carbonaceous materials (CM) in natural and experimentally deformed fault rocks from Longmenshan fault zone that caused the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, to characterize degree of disordering of CM in a fault zone. Raman spectral parameters for 12 samples from a fault zone in Shenxigou, Sichuan, China, all show low-grade structures with no graphite. Low crystallinity and δ13C values (-24‰ to -25‰) suggest that CM in fault zone originated from host rocks (Late Triassic Xujiahe Formation). Full width at half maximum values of main spectral bands (D1 and D2), and relative intensities of two subbands (D3 and D4) of CM were variable with sample locations. However, Raman parameters of measured fault rocks fall on established trends of graphitization in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. An empirical geothermometer gives temperatures of 160-230 °C for fault rocks in Shenxigou, and these temperatures were lower for highly sheared gouge than those for less deformed fault breccia at inner parts of the fault zone. The lower temperature and less crystallinity of CM in gouge might have been caused by the mechanical destruction of CM by severe shearing deformation, or may be due to mixing of host rocks on the footwall. CM in gouge deformed in high-velocity experiments exhibits slight changes towards graphitization characterized by reduction of D3 and D4 intensities. Thus low crystallinity of CM in natural gouge cannot be explained by our experimental results. Graphite formation during seismic fault motion is extremely local or did not occur in the study area, and the CM crystallinity from shallow to deep fault zones may be predicted as a first approximation from the graphitization trend in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. If that case, graphite may lower the friction of shear zones at temperatures above 300 °C, deeper than the lower part of seismogenic zone.

  2. Tectonics of the IndoBurma Oblique Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, M. S.; Seeber, L.; Akhter, S. H.; Betka, P. M.; Cai, Y.; Grall, C.; Mondal, D. R.; Gahalaut, V. K.; Gaherty, J. B.; Maung Maung, P.; Ni, J.; Persaud, P.; Sandvol, E. A.; Tun, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) is obliquely colliding with the IndoBurma subduction zone. Most of the 42 mm/y of arc-parallel motion is absorbed in a set of dextral to dextral-convergent faults, the Sagaing, Kabaw and Churachandpur-Mao Faults. The 13-17 mm/y of convergence with the delta has built a 250-km wide active accretionary prism. The upper part of the 19-km sediment thickness consists of a shallowing-up stack of prograding strata that has shifted the shelf edge 3-400 km since the Himalayan orogeny at 50 Ma. The upper 3-5 km sandy shelf to fluvial strata are deformed into a broad fold and thrust belt above an overpressured décollement. It forms a flat shallow roof thrust in the frontal accretionary prism. The structure of the deeper part of the accretionary prism, which must transfer the incoming sediments to the upper plate, is unknown. GPS indicates the downdip end of the megathrust locked zone is 25 km at 92.5°E. The deformation front, marked by nascent detachment folds above the shallow décollement reaches the megacity of Dhaka in the middle of the GBD. The seismogenic potential of this portion of the prism is unknown. Arc volcanism in Myanmar, 500 km east of the deformation front, is sparse. Limited geochemical data on the arc volcanics are consistent with hot slab conditions. One possibility is that the deep GBD slab and basement are metamorphosed and dewatered early in the subduction process whereby most of the fluids are transferred to the growing prism by buoyancy driven migration or accretion of fluid-rich strata. Since it is entirely subaerial this little-studied region crossing Bangladesh, India and Myanmar provides an opportunity for a detailed multidisciplinary geophysical and geological investigation. It has the potential to highlight the role of fluids in subduction zones, the tectonics of extreme accretion and their seismic hazards, and the interplay between driving and resistance forces of a subduction zone during a soft collision.

  3. Subduction of the Caribbean Plate and Basement Uplifts in the Overriding South American Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, J. N.; Bonini, W. E.

    1982-06-01

    The new tectonic interpretations presented in this paper are based on geologic field mapping and gravity data supplemented by well logs, seismic profiles, and radiometric and earthquake data. The present Caribbean-South American plate boundary is the South Caribbean marginal fault, where subduction is indicated by folding and thrusting in the deformed belt and a seismic zone that dips 30° to the southeast and terminates 200 km below the Maracaibo Basin. The Caribbean-South American convergence rate is estimated as 1.9 ± 0.3 cm/yr on the basis of the 390-km length of the seismic zone and a thermal equilibration time of 10 m.y. The Caribbean-South American convergence has produced a northwest-southeast maximum principal stress direction σ1 in the overriding South American plate. The mean σ1 direction for the Maracaibo-Santa Marta block is 310° ± 10° based on earthquake focal mechanism determinations, and structural and gravity data. On the overriding South American plate, basement blocks have been uplifted 7-12 km in the last 10 m.y. to form the Venezuelan Andes, Sierra de Perija, and the Colombian Santa Marta massif. Crystalline basement of the Venezuelan Andes has been thrust to the northwest over Tertiary sediments on a fault dipping about 25° and extending to the mantle. In the Sierra de Perija, Mesozoic sediments have been thrust 16-26 km to the northwest over Tertiary sandstones along the Cerrejon fault. A thrust fault dipping 15° ± 10° to the southeast is consistent with field mapping, and gravity and density data. The Santa Marta massif has been uplifted 12 km in the last 10 m.y. by northwest thrusting over sediments. The basement block overthrusts of the Perijas, Venezuelan Andes, and the Santa Marta massif are Pliocene-Pleistocene analogs for Laramide orogenic structures in the middle and southern Rocky Mountains of the United States. The nonmagmatic basement block uplifts along low-angle thrust faults reveal horizontal compression in the

  4. Dynamics of intraoceanic subduction initiation: 2D thermomechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Gerya, T.; LI, Z.; Stern, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Intraoceanic subduction initiation occurs in previous weak zones which could be transform faults or old fracture zones, and concurrents with the change of plate motions. It is an important process to understand the beginning of plate tectonics. However, the dynamic process during (after) subduction initiation remain obscure. The process of suducting slabs move from down to downdip is also not revealed clearly. In order to obtain better understanding of the transitional process of subducting slab motion, we use finite difference and marker-in-cell methods to establish a series of self-sustainable subduction initiation models and explore many visco-plastic parameters to qualify the dynamical process of subduction initiation. The following parameters are systematic tested: (1) the age of the subducting slab; (2) friction coefficient of the mantle material; (3) the mantle potential temperature; (4) the age of the overriding slab. We find out the critical age of the oceanic lithosphere which can produce subduction initiation. And the age of subducting slab plays important roles during subduction initiation. The young subducting slab induces fast trench retreat and then trench begin to advance. For the old subducting slab, it induces relative slower trench retreat and then stop moving. The age of overriding slabs impacts coupling with the subducting slab. The friction coefficient of lithosphere also impacts the backarc spreading and subduction velocity. Stronger subducted plate gives lower subduction velocity and faster trench retreat velocity. The mantle potential temperature changes the critical age of subducted slabs.

  5. Shallow seismicity patterns in the northwestern section of the Mexico Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Elizabeth R.; Brudzinski, Michael R.

    2015-11-01

    This study characterizes subduction related seismicity with local deployments along the northwestern section of the Mexico Subduction Zone where 4 portions of the plate interface have ruptured in 1973, 1985, 1995, and 2003. It has been proposed that the subducted boundary between the Cocos and Rivera plates occurs beneath this region, as indicated by inland volcanic activity, a gap in tectonic tremor, and the Manzanillo Trough and Colima Graben, which are depressions thought to be associated with the splitting of the two plates after subduction. Data from 50 broadband stations that comprised the MARS seismic array, deployed from January 2006 to June 2007, were processed with the software program Antelope and its generalized source location algorithm, genloc, to detect and locate earthquakes within the network. Slab surface depth contours from the resulting catalog indicate a change in subduction trajectory between the Rivera and Cocos plates. The earthquake locations are spatially anti-correlated with tectonic tremor, supporting the idea that they represent different types of fault slip. Hypocentral patterns also reveal areas of more intense seismic activity (clusters) that appear to be associated with the 2003 and 1973 megathrust rupture regions. Seismicity concentrated inland of the 2003 rupture is consistent with slip on a shallowly dipping trajectory for the Rivera plate interface as opposed to crustal faulting in the overriding North American plate. A prominent cluster of seismicity within the suspected 1973 rupture zone appears to be a commonly active portion of the megathrust as it has been active during three previous deployments. We support these interpretations by determining focal mechanisms and detailed relocations of the largest events within the 1973 and inland 2003 clusters, which indicate primarily thrust mechanisms near the plate interface.

  6. Two-dimensional Numerical Models of Accretionary Wedges Deformation in Response to Subduction and Obduction: Evidence from the Middle Part of the Manila Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L.; Ding, W.; Chen, L.; Gerya, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Manila Trench is located at the eastern boundary of the South China Sea (SCS). It was created by the subduction of the South China Sea Plate beneath the Philippine Sea Plate since the early Neogene, and also influenced by the northwestern movement of the Philippine Sea Plate. There is wide discussion whether the dual-subduction and widespread seamounts in the South China Sea would have play important roles in the 'S-shaped' geometry and the different diving angle along the Manila Trench. Multi-beam tectono-geomorphological studies on the accretionary wedges have suggested that: (1) the stress direction of the subduction along the middle part of the Manila Trench, between 17o and 18 o N, is NW55 o; (2) The Manila Trench is actually caused by obduction due to the northwestern movement of the Philippine Sea Plate. Although the NW 55 o stress direction has been supported by detailed analysis on the trend of the folds, thrust faults, extension fractures and large sea-floor canyon, its obduction-origin is purely based on regional structure. Here we use 2D numerical modeling experiments to investigate the deformation style of accretionary wedge in response to the seamounts subduction and obduction, and provide new insights into the mechanism responsible for the Luzon obduction along the Manila Trench. Our preliminary results show that: (1) the accretionary wedge is eroded faster in subduction model; (2) the velocity field direction of the slab differs in two models at the beginning of seamount subduction, which is vertical in obduction model, but oblique in subduction model; (3) both sides of the accretionary wedge deform strongly in subduction model, whereas in obduction model only the leading edge shows intensive deformation. Further modelling will focus on other parts of the Manila Trench with different slab age and subduction velocity to see their tectonic influences on the accretionary wedges.

  7. How does a brittle-ductile fault nucleate and grow in dolostone? A lesson learnt from a structural, geochemical and K-Ar chronological study of a reactivated Paleozoic thrust fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, G.; Torgersen, E.; Zwingmann, H.; Harris, C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate-hosted faults in the upper crust are mechanically strong, yet, under certain environmental conditions, carbonates may decompose into mechanically weak minerals, with major consequences for faults´ rheological behavior. We combine structural analysis, geochemistry, stable isotopes and K-Ar dating of synkinematic illite/muscovite to investigate the processes that control localization and weakening of initially strong, seismogenic brittle faults. We aim at better understanding how the constantly evolving architecture and composition of brittle-ductile faults affect their seismogenic properties. The Kvenklubben fault in northern Norway is part of a Caledonian compressional imbricate stack. It juxtaposes greenschist facies metabasalts in the hanging wall against meta-dolostones and has a 2.5 m thick fault core consisting of talc-bearing calc-phyllonites and chlorite phyllonites. Petrographic and geochemical results indicate that the phyllonites formed mainly through fluid-rock interaction and progressive decomposition of the adjacent wall rocks. K-Ar dating and chlorite geothermometry documents that the fault damage zone developed from the base upwards with fault initiation at 530 Ma around 200°C and the main development during reactivation around 440 Ma at c. 285°C. Early strain increments were accommodated in the dolostone by pressure-solution, formation of optimally oriented tensional fractures and cataclasis along geometrical irregularities of the growing fault plane. Fluids caused sequential decarbonation of the dolostones and carbonation of the metabasalts, resulting in the formation of phyllosilicate-decorated planar fabrics. The newly formed phyllosilicate levels weakened the fault under overall viscous creep conditions. The strongly anisotropic fluid-flow within the phyllonites, together with vein sealing following localized and transient high pore pressure-driven embrittlement, caused strain hardening. Together, the interaction between strain

  8. Structural characteristics around the frontal thrust along the Nankai Trough revealed by bathymetric and seismic reflection survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, M.; Nakanishi, A.; Moore, G. F.; Kodaira, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Miura, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Great earthquakes with tsunamis with recurrence intervals of 100-200 years have occurred along the Nankai Trough near central Japan where the Shikoku Basin is subducting with thick sediments on the Philippine Sea plate. To predict the exact height of the tsunami on the coast region generated by these large ruptures, it is important to estimate the vertical deformation that occurs on the seaward end of the rupture area. Recent drilling results have also yielded evidence not only of splay faults that generate tsunamigenic rupture, but also new evidence of tsunamigenic rupture along the frontal thrust at the trench axis in the Nankai Trough. In order to understand the deformation around the frontal thrust at the trench axis, we conducted a dense high-resolution seismic reflection survey with 10-20 km spacing over 1500 km of line length during 2013 and 2014. Clear seismic reflection images of frontal thrusts in the accretionary prism and subducting Shikoku Basin, image deformation along the trench axis between off Muroto Cape and off Ashizuri Cape. The cumulative displacement along the frontal thrust and second thrust are measured from picked distinct reflectors in depth-converted profiles. The average value of cumulative displacement of the frontal thrust is more than 100 m within 2 km depth beneath the seafloor. The location of highest displacement of 300 m displacement agree with the seaward end of slip distribution of the 1946 Nankai event calculated by numerical simulations. We also evaluate the seaward structure for understanding the future rupture distribution. The protothrust zone (PTZ) consisting of many incipient thrusts is identifiable in the portion of trough-fill sediments seaward of the frontal thrust. In order to emphasize the characteristics of frontal thrust and PTZ, we construct the detailed relief image for focusing on the lineated slope of the PTZ at the trough axis. Although our surveys covered a part of Nankai seismogenic zone, it is important to

  9. Characteristics, structural styles and tectonic implications of Mesozoic-Cenozoic faults in the eastern Heilongjiang basins (NE China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Chen, Hanlin; Zhang, Fengqi; Sun, Mingdao; Yang, Jianguo; Tan, Baode

    2017-09-01

    The Eastern Heilongjiang Basins (EHBs) are the assemblage of a series of meso-Cenozoic residual basins located in the northeastern corner of China. The deformation pattern of the EHBs has significant implications for the history of the Pacific Plate subduction beneath the Eurasia since the Late Mesozoic. In this paper, research on the characteristics and structural styles of the meso-Cenzoic faults in the EHBs has been conducted on the basis of a comprehensive analysis of field geology, drilling data and seismic reflection profiles. As a result, five different stages of the meso-Cenozoic faults in the EHBs have been recognized. These are in accordance with the time and relevant characteristics of fault movements, i.e. the early-stage of the Early Cretaceous normal fault, the early-stage of the Late Cretaceous thrust fault, the late-stage of the Late Cretaceous thrust fault, the Cenozoic synsedimentary normal fault and the late-stage Cenozoic shear fault. A regional geological section has been generated across the EHBs by linking four local seismic profiles together. A step-by-step reconstruction has been made to help better understand the Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the EHBs. Two phases of extension (rifting) in the early Cretaceous Period and the Paleogene, respectively, are demonstrated to be interfered with two phases of regional uplift (compression) and erosion in the Late Cretaceous Period. The complicated development of multiple fault systems within the EHBs has reflected the evolution of a complex tectonic subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasia since the Cretaceous Period.

  10. 3D geometry of a plate boundary fault related to the 2016 Off-Mie earthquake in the Nankai subduction zone, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Minato, Shohei; Kamei, Rie; Tsuru, Tetsuro; Kimura, Gaku

    2017-11-01

    We used recent seismic data and advanced techniques to investigate 3D fault geometry over the transition from the partially coupled to the fully coupled plate interface inboard of the Nankai Trough off the Kii Peninsula, Japan. We found that a gently dipping plate boundary décollement with a thick underthrust layer extends beneath the entire Kumano forearc basin. The 1 April 2016 Off-Mie earthquake (Mw6.0) and its aftershocks occurred, where the plate boundary décollement steps down close to the oceanic crust surface. This location also lies beneath the trenchward edge of an older accretionary prism (∼14 Ma) developed along the coast of the Kii peninsula. The strike of the 2016 rupture plane was similar to that of a formerly active splay fault system in the accretionary prism. Thus, the fault planes of the 2016 earthquake and its aftershocks were influenced by the geometry of the plate interface as well as splay faulting. The 2016 earthquake occurred within the rupture area of large interplate earthquakes such as the 1944 Tonankai earthquake (Mw8.1), although the 2016 rupture area was much smaller than that of the 1944 event. Whereas the hypocenter of the 2016 earthquake was around the underplating sequence beneath the younger accretionary prism (∼6 Ma), the 1944 great earthquake hypocenter was close to oceanic crust surface beneath the older accretionary prism. The variation of fault geometry and lithology may influence the degree of coupling along the plate interface, and such coupling variation could hinder slip propagation toward the deeper plate interface in the 2016 event.

  11. Scale independence of décollement thrusting

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, John H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Hatcher, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Orogen-scale décollements (detachment surfaces) are an enduring subject of investigation by geoscientists. Uncertainties remain as to how crustal convergence processes maintain the stresses necessary for development of low-angle fault surfaces above which huge slabs of rock are transported horizontally for tens to hundreds of kilometers. Seismic reflection profiles from the southern Appalachian crystalline core and several foreland fold-and-thrust belts provide useful comparisons with high-resolution shallow-penetration seismic reflection profiles acquired over the frontal zone of the Michigan lobe of the Wisconsinan ice sheet northwest of Chicago, Illinois. These profiles provide images of subhorizontal and overlapping dipping reflections that reveal a ramp-and-flat thrust system developed in poorly consolidated glacial till. The system is rooted in a master décollement at the top of bedrock. These 2–3 km long images contain analogs of images observed in seismic reflection profiles from orogenic belts, except that the scale of observation in the profiles in glacial materials is two orders of magnitude less. Whereas the décollement beneath the ice lobe thrust belt lies ∼70 m below thrusted anticlines having wavelengths of tens of meters driven by an advancing ice sheet, seismic images from overthrust terranes are related to lithospheric convergence that produces décollements traceable for thousands of kilometers at depths ranging from a few to over 10 km. Dual vergence or reversals in vergence (retrocharriage) that developed over abrupt changes in depth to the décollement can be observed at all scales. The strikingly similar images, despite the contrast in scale and driving mechanism, suggest a scale- and driving mechanism–independent behavior for décollement thrust systems. All these systems initially had the mechanical properties needed to produce very similar geometries with a compressional driving mechanism directed subparallel to Earth's surface

  12. The August 1st, 2014 ( M w 5.3) Moderate Earthquake: Evidence for an Active Thrust Fault in the Bay of Algiers (Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfedda, A.; Abbes, K.; Bouziane, D.; Bouhadad, Y.; Slimani, A.; Larbes, S.; Haddouche, D.; Bezzeghoud, M.

    2017-03-01

    On August 1st, 2014, a moderate-sized earthquake struck the capital city of Algiers at 05:11:17.6 (GMT+1). The earthquake caused the death of six peoples and injured 420, mainly following a panic movement among the population. Following the main shock, we surveyed the aftershock activity using a portable seismological network (short period), installed from August 2nd, 2014 to August 21st, 2015. In this work, first, we determined the main shock epicenter using the accelerograms recorded by the Algerian accelerograph network (under the coordination of the National Center of Applied Research in Earthquake Engineering-CGS). We calculated the focal mechanism of the main shock, using the inversion of the accelerograph waveforms in displacement that provides a reverse fault with a slight right-lateral component of slip and a compression axis striking NNW-SSE. The obtained scalar seismic moment ( M o = 1.25 × 1017 Nm) corresponds to a moment magnitude of M w = 5.3. Second, the analysis of the obtained aftershock swarm, of the survey, suggests an offshore ENE-WSW, trending and NNW dipping, causative active fault in the bay of Algiers, which may likely correspond to an offshore unknown segment of the Sahel active fault.

  13. Development of the Global Earthquake Model’s neotectonic fault database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, Annemarie; Litchfield, Nicola; Berryman, Kelvin; Thomas, Richard; Basili, Roberto; Wallace, Laura; Ries, William; Hayes, Gavin P.; Haller, Kathleen M.; Yoshioka, Toshikazu; Koehler, Richard D.; Clark, Dan; Wolfson-Schwehr, Monica; Boettcher, Margaret S.; Villamor, Pilar; Horspool, Nick; Ornthammarath, Teraphan; Zuñiga, Ramon; Langridge, Robert M.; Stirling, Mark W.; Goded, Tatiana; Costa, Carlos; Yeats, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) aims to develop uniform, openly available, standards, datasets and tools for worldwide seismic risk assessment through global collaboration, transparent communication and adapting state-of-the-art science. GEM Faulted Earth (GFE) is one of GEM’s global hazard module projects. This paper describes GFE’s development of a modern neotectonic fault database and a unique graphical interface for the compilation of new fault data. A key design principle is that of an electronic field notebook for capturing observations a geologist would make about a fault. The database is designed to accommodate abundant as well as sparse fault observations. It features two layers, one for capturing neotectonic faults and fold observations, and the other to calculate potential earthquake fault sources from the observations. In order to test the flexibility of the database structure and to start a global compilation, five preexisting databases have been uploaded to the first layer and two to the second. In addition, the GFE project has characterised the world’s approximately 55,000 km of subduction interfaces in a globally consistent manner as a basis for generating earthquake event sets for inclusion in earthquake hazard and risk modelling. Following the subduction interface fault schema and including the trace attributes of the GFE database schema, the 2500-km-long frontal thrust fault system of the Himalaya has also been characterised. We propose the database structure to be used widely, so that neotectonic fault data can make a more complete and beneficial contribution to seismic hazard and risk characterisation globally.

  14. New Attenuation Relationship for Peak Ground and Pseudo-Spectral Acceleration of Normal-Faulting Earthquakes in Offshore Northeast Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ju Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ground motions from normal-faulting earthquakes are generally considered to be smaller than those of strike-slip and thrust events. On 11 April 2011 a crustal normal-faulting earthquake [the Fukushima earthquake (Mw 6.6] occurred in Eastern Japan. The peak ground acceleration (PGA observed was considerably higher than the predictions of several ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs, which were derived mainly from thrust or strike-slip earthquakes. In northeast Taiwan, the tectonic structure of the Ryukyu Arc and the Okinawa Trough typically entail normal-faulting earthquakes. Because of the normal-faulting earthquakes relevance to ground motions and nuclear power plant sites in northeast Taiwan, we evaluated the impact of the ground motion of normal-faulting earthquakes in offshore northeast Taiwan using a newly constructed attenuation relationship for PGA and pseudo-spectral acceleration (Sa. We collected 832 records from 13 normal-faulting earthquakes with focal depths of less than 50 km. The moment magnitude (Mw of the 13 events was between 4 - 6. The Sa and PGA of normal-faulting earthquakes offshore northeast Taiwan determined with the newly constructed attenuation relationship were higher and lower, respectively, than those obtained using attenuation equations commonly used in the Taiwan subduction zone.

  15. Mountain building, strike-slip faulting, and landscape evolution in the Marlborough Fault System, NZ: Insights from new low-temperature thermochronology and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, A. R.; Collett, C.; Flowers, R. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Upton, P.

    2016-12-01

    The 150 km wide Marlborough Fault System (MFS) and adjacent dextral-reverse Alpine Fault accommodate oblique convergence of the Australian and Pacific plates in a broad transform boundary that extends for much of the South Island New Zealand. Understanding the deformation history of the Marlborough region offers the opportunity to study topographic evolution in a strike-slip setting and a fuller picture of the evolving New Zealand plate boundary as the MFS lies at the transition from oceanic Pacific plate subduction to oblique continental collision. Here we present low-temperature thermochronology from the MFS to place new limits on the timing and style of mountain building. We sampled a range of elevations spanning 2 km within and adjacent to the Kaikoura Mountains, which stand high as topographic anomalies above active strike-slip faults. Young apatite (U-Th)/He ages ( 2-5 Ma) on both sides of range-bounding faults are consistent with regional distributed deformation since the Pliocene initiation of strike-slip faulting. However, large differences in both zircon helium and apatite fission track ages, from Paleogene/Neogene ages within hanging walls to unreset >100 Ma ages in footwalls, indicate an early phase of fault-related vertical exhumation. Thermal modeling using the QTQt program reveals two phases of exhumation within the Kaikoura Ranges: rapid cooling at 15-12 Ma localized to hanging wall rocks and regional rapid cooling reflected in all samples starting at 4-5 Ma. These results and landscape evolution models suggest that, despite the presence of active mountain front faults, much of the topographic relief in this region may predate the onset of strike-slip faulting and that portions of the Marlborough Faults are re-activated thrusts that coincide with the early development of the transpressive plate boundary. Regional exhumation after 5 Ma likely reflects increased proximity to the migrating Pacific plate subduction zone and the buoyant Chatham Rise.

  16. Evidence for distributed clockwise rotation of the crust in the northwestern United States from fault geometries and focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Wells, Ray E.; Lamb, Andrew P.; Weaver, Craig S.

    2017-05-01

    Paleomagnetic and GPS data indicate that Washington and Oregon have rotated clockwise for the past 16 Myr. Late Cenozoic and Quaternary fault geometries, seismicity lineaments, and focal mechanisms provide evidence that this rotation is accommodated by north directed thrusting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting in Washington, and SW to W directed normal faulting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting to the east. Several curvilinear NW to NNW trending high-angle strike-slip faults and seismicity lineaments in Washington and NW Oregon define a geologic pole (117.7°W, 47.9°N) of rotation relative to North America. Many faults and focal mechanisms throughout northwestern U.S. and southwestern British Columbia have orientations consistent with this geologic pole as do GPS surface velocities corrected for elastic Cascadia subduction zone coupling. Large Quaternary normal faults radial to the geologic pole, which appear to accommodate crustal rotation via crustal extension, are widespread and can be found along the Lewis and Clark zone in Montana, within the Centennial fault system north of the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Montana, to the west of the Wasatch Front in Utah, and within the northern Basin and Range in Oregon and Nevada. Distributed strike-slip faults are most prominent in western Washington and Oregon and may serve to transfer slip between faults throughout the northwestern U.S.

  17. Analecta of structures formed during the 28 June 1992 Landers-Big Bear, California earthquake sequence (including maps of shear zones, belts of shear zones, tectonic ridge, duplex en echelon fault, fault elements, and thrusts in restraining steps)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.M.; Johnson, N.A.; Johnson, K.M.; Wei, W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Fleming, R.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Cruikshank, K.M. [Portland State Univ., OR (United States). Dept. of Geology; Martosudarmo, S.Y. [BPP Technologi, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1997-12-31

    The June 28, 1992, M{sub s} 7.5 earthquake at Landers, California, which occurred about 10 km north of the community of Yucca Valley, California, produced spectacular ground rupturing more than 80 km in length (Hough and others, 1993). The ground rupturing, which was dominated by right-lateral shearing, extended along at least four distinct faults arranged broadly en echelon. The faults were connected through wide transfer zones by stepovers, consisting of right-lateral fault zones and tension cracks. The Landers earthquakes occurred in the desert of southeastern California, where details of ruptures were well preserved, and patterns of rupturing were generally unaffected by urbanization. The structures were varied and well-displayed and, because the differential displacements were so large, spectacular. The scarcity of vegetation, the aridity of the area, the compactness of the alluvium and bedrock, and the relative isotropy and brittleness of surficial materials collaborated to provide a marvelous visual record of the character of the deformation zones. The authors present a series of analecta -- that is, verbal clips or snippets -- dealing with a variety of structures, including belts of shear zones, segmentation of ruptures, rotating fault block, en echelon fault zones, releasing duplex structures, spines, and ramps. All of these structures are documented with detailed maps in text figures or in plates (in pocket). The purpose is to describe the structures and to present an understanding of the mechanics of their formation. Hence, most descriptions focus on structures where the authors have information on differential displacements as well as spatial data on the position and orientation of fractures.

  18. A Late Cenozoic Kinematic Model for Deformation Within the Greater Cascadia Subduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. S.; McCrory, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Relatively low fault slip rates have complicated efforts to characterize seismic hazards associated with the diffuse subduction boundary between North America and offshore oceanic plates in the Pacific Northwest region. A kinematic forward model that encompasses a broader region, and incorporates seismologic and geodetic as well as geologic and paleomagnetic constraints offers a tool for constraining fault rupture chronologies—all within a framework tracking relative motion of the Juan de Fuca, Pacific, and North American plates during late Cenozoic time. Our kinematic model tracks motions as a system of rigid microplates, bounded by the more important mapped faults of the region or zones of distributed deformation. Though our emphasis is on Washington and Oregon, the scope of the model extends eastward to the rigid craton in Montana and Wyoming, and southward to the Sierra Nevada block of California to provide important checks on its internal consistency. The model reproduces observed geodetic velocities [e.g., McCaffrey et al., 2013, JGR], for 6 Ma to present, with only minor reorganization for 12-6 Ma. Constraints for the older deformation history are based on paleomagnetic rotations within the Columbia River Basalt Group, and geologic details of fault offsets. Since 17 Ma, our model includes 50 km of N-S shortening across the central Yakima fold and thrust belt, substantial NW-SE right-lateral strike slip distributed among faults in the Washington Cascade Range, 90 km of shortening on thrusts of Puget Lowland, and substantial oroclinal bending of the Crescent Formation basement surrounding the Olympic Peninsula. This kinematic reconstruction provides an integrated, quantitative framework with which to investigate the motions of various PNW forearc and backarc blocks during late Cenozoic time, an essential tool for characterizing the seismic risk associated with the Puget Sound and Portland urban areas, hydroelectric dams, and other critical infrastructure.

  19. Oceanic-style Subduction Controls Late Cenozoic Deformation of the Northern Pamir and Alai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, E. R.; Chen, J.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Thiede, R. C.; Stockli, D. F.; Sudo, M.; Strecker, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Pamir - Alai represents the preeminent example of an active intracontinental subduction zone in the early stages of continent-continent collision. Such zones are the least understood type of plate boundary because modern examples are few and of limited access, and ancient analogs have been extensively overprinted by subsequent continent-continent collision and erosion processes. In the Pamir, at least 300 km of convergence has apparently occurred between the North Pamir and the South Tien Shan. Published P-wave tomography and earthquake epicenters suggest subduction of a ~300 km-long slab. The MPT and Pamir Frontal Thrusts (PFT) correspond to the updip projection of this subduction zone. We have compiled ca. 260 published and 18 new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and fission track, and biotite and muscovite Argon cooling ages from basement samples as well as several detrital samples from key areas in the Pamir region. Our synopsis shows that the hanging wall of the MPT experienced relatively minor amounts of late Cenozoic exhumation. This is incompatible with a model of a huge overthrust such as the Himalayan Main Central Thrust. Rather, the bulk of the convergence is apparently accommodated by underthrusting. The Pamir orogen as a whole is an integral part of the overriding plate in a subduction system, while the remnant basin to the north constitutes the downgoing plate. Herein, we demonstrate that the observed deformation of the upper and lower plates within the Pamir-Alai convergence zone resembles highly arcuate oceanic subduction systems characterized by slab rollback, subduction erosion, subduction accretion, and marginal slab-tear faults. We suggest that the curvature of the North Pamir is genetically linked to the short width and rollback of the south-dipping Alai slab; northward motion (indentation) of the Pamir is accommodated by crustal processes related to slab rollback and intracontinental subduction. Our model relates late Oligocene - early Miocene

  20. Varying frontal thrust spacing in mono-vergent wedges: An insight ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandbox experiments are used to study frontal thrust fault spacing, which is a function of physical properties within the thrust wedge. We consider three styles of thrust progression in mono-vergent wedges: Style I, II and III. In Style I, frontal thrusts progress forelandward, maintaining a constant spacing, whereas Style II and ...

  1. What favors the occurrence of subduction mega-earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzi, Silvia; Funiciello, Francesca; Corbi, Fabio; Sandri, Laura; van Zelst, Iris; Heuret, Arnauld; Piromallo, Claudia; van Dinther, Ylona

    2017-04-01

    Most of mega-earthquakes (MEqs; Mw > 8.5) occur at shallow depths along the subduction thrust fault (STF). The contribution of each subduction zone to the globally released seismic moment is not homogenous, as well as the maximum recorded magnitude MMax. Highlighting the ingredients likely responsible for MEqs nucleation has great implications for hazard assessment. In this work, we investigate the conditions favoring the occurrence of MEqs with a multi-disciplinary approach based on: i) multivariate statistics, ii) analogue- and iii) numerical modelling. Previous works have investigated the potential dependence between STF seismicity and various subduction zone parameters using simple regression models. Correlations are generally weak due to the limited instrumental seismic record and multi-parameter influence, which make the forecasting of the potential MMax rather difficult. To unravel the multi-parameter influence, we perform a multivariate statistical study (i.e., Pattern Recognition, PR) of the global database on convergent margins (Heuret et al., 2011), which includes seismological, geometrical, kinematic and physical parameters of 62 subduction segments. PR is based on the classification of objects (i.e., subduction segments) belonging to different classes through the identification of possible repetitive patterns. Tests have been performed using different MMax datasets and combination of inputs to indirectly test the stability of the identified patterns. Results show that the trench-parallel width of the subducting slab (Wtrench) and the sediment thickness at the trench (Tsed) are the most recurring parameters for MEqs occurrence. These features are mostly consistent, independently of the MMax dataset and combination of inputs used for the analysis. MEqs thus seem to be promoted for high Wtrench and Tsed, as their combination may potentially favor extreme (i.e., in the order of thousands of km) trench-parallel rupture propagation. To tackle the

  2. Seismic coupling and uncoupling at subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the correlations concerning the properties of subduction zones are reviewed. A quantitative global comparison of many subduction zones reveals that the largest earthquakes occur in zones with young lithosphere and fast convergence rates. Maximum earthquake size is directly related to the asperity distribution on the fault plane. This observation can be translated into a simple model of seismic coupling where the horizontal compressive stress between two plates is proportional to the ratio of the summed asperity area to the total area of the contact surface. Plate age and rate can control asperity distribution directly through the horizontal compressive stress associated with the vertical and horizontal velocities of subducting slabs. The basalt to eclogite phase change in the down-going oceanic crust may be largely responsible for the uncoupling of subduction zones below a depth of about 40 km.

  3. Forearc structure from legacy multichannel seismic data linked to mechanical variability and rupture segmentation on the central Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, E. C.; von Huene, R.; Miller, J.; Haeussler, P. J.; Scholl, D. W.; Ryan, H. F.; Kirby, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    The historical earthquake record, geodetic observations, and modern interseismic seismicity patterns indicate along-strike variability in the mechanical behavior of the subduction zone extending from the central Alaska peninsula west to the eastern Aleutian Islands. This region spans the rupture areas of several historical megathrust earthquakes, including the 1938 M8.3 Semidi Islands event, the 1946 M8.5 earthquake near Unimak Pass, and the 1957 M8.6 Andreanof Islands earthquake. Each of these events produced tsunamis that affected Alaska and/or far-field coastal regions in Hawaii and the mainland U.S. The '38 and '46 rupture areas are separated by a segment of the subduction zone in the vicinity of the Shumagin Islands where, based on plate velocities from GPS, plate coupling decreases from nearly fully locked in the east, to very low coupling in the western Shumagins, indicating an important change in seismic style along-strike. Changes in the degree of interseismic coupling are often attributed to variability in the mechanical strength of the thrust interface, influenced by heterogeneity in the material properties and subducted topographic relief. Furthermore, the expression of forearc structural features along the margin may indicate the width and up-dip limit of the locked zone. We explore structural characteristics of the shallow portion of the subduction system related to variations in the mechanical properties of the megathrust and interseismic coupling using legacy multichannel seismic (MCS) data from several segments along the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone. Critical images were reprocessed with modern seismic processing systems. We characterize structural features of the downgoing plate and forearc, including the variation in thickness and character of subducted sediment, the geometry of the upper plate wedge, the distribution of imbricate thrust faults, the transition from outer prism to margin rock framework and extensional faulting. These

  4. Origin and dynamics of depositionary subduction margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.; Silver, Eli; Kluesner, Jared W.

    2016-01-01

    Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a “depositionary forearc,” a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes, and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  5. Origin and dynamics of depositionary subduction margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.; Silver, Eli A.; Kluesner, Jared W.

    2016-06-01

    Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a "depositionary forearc," a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes, and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  6. Impact of great subduction earthquakes on the long-term forearc morphology, insight from mechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubas, Nadaya

    2017-04-01

    The surge of great subduction earthquakes during the last fifteen years provided numerous observations requiring revisiting our understanding of large seismic events mechanics. For instance, we now have clear evidence that a significant part of the upper plate deformation is permanently acquired. The link between great earthquakes and long-term deformation offers a new perspective for the relief construction understanding. In addition, a better understanding of these relations could provide us with new constraints on earthquake mechanics. It is also of fundamental importance for seismic risk assessment. In this presentation, I will compile recent results obtained from mechanical modelling linking megathrust ruptures with upper-plate permanent deformation and discuss their impact. We will first show that, in good accordance with lab experiments, aseismic zones are characterized by frictions larger or equal to 0.1 whereas seismic asperities have dynamic frictions lower than 0.05. This difference will control the long-term upper-plate morphology. The larger values along aseismic zones allow the wedge to reach the critical state, and will lead to active thrust systems forming a relief. On the contrary, low dynamic friction along seismic asperities will place the taper in the sub-critical domain impeding any internal deformation. This will lead to the formation of forearc basins inducing negative gravity anomalies. Since aseismic zones have higher friction and larger taper, fully creeping segments will tend to develop peninsulas. On the contrary, fully locked segments with low dynamic friction and very low taper will favor subsiding coasts. The taper variation due to megathrust friction is also expressed through a correlation between coast-to-trench distance and forearc coupling (e.g., Mexican and South-American subduction zones). We will then discuss how variations of frictional properties along the megathrust can induce splay fault activation. For instance, we can

  7. Neogene folding and faulting in southern Monterey Bay, Central California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Taggart, J. M.; Greene, H. Gary; Ledbetter, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the Neogene structural history of southern Monterey Bay by mapping and correlating the shallow tectonic structures with previously identified deeper occurring structures. Side scan sonographs and Uniboom seismic reflection profiles collected in the region suggest that deformation associated with both compressional and transcurrent movement is occurring. Strike-slip movement between the North American and Pacific plates started as subduction ceased 21 Ma, creating the San Andreas fault system. Clockwise rotation of the Pacific plate occurred between 3.4 and 3.9 Ma causing orthogonal convergence between the two plates. This plate rotation is responsible for compressional Neogene structures along the central California coast. Structures exhibit transpressional tectonic characteristics such as thrust faulting, reverse faulting and asymmetrical folding. Folding and faulting are confined to middle Miocene and younger strata. Shallow Mesozoic granitic basement rocks either crop out or lie near the surface in most of the region and form a possible de??collement along which the Miocene Monterey Formation has decoupled and been folded. Over 50% of the shallow faults strike normal (NE-SW) to the previously identified faults. Wrench fault tectonics complicated by compression, gradual uplift of the basement rocks, and a change in plate convergence direction are responsible for the observed structures in southern Monterey Bay. ?? 1993.

  8. Recent Mega-Thrust Tsunamigenic Earthquakes and PTHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorito, S.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of several mega-thrust tsunamigenic earthquakes in the last decade, including but not limited to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman, the 2010 Maule, and 2011 Tohoku earthquakes, has been a dramatic reminder of the limitations in our capability of assessing earthquake and tsunami hazard and risk. However, the increasingly high-quality geophysical observational networks allowed the retrieval of most accurate than ever models of the rupture process of mega-thrust earthquakes, thus paving the way for future improved hazard assessments. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) methodology, in particular, is less mature than its seismic counterpart, PSHA. Worldwide recent research efforts of the tsunami science community allowed to start filling this gap, and to define some best practices that are being progressively employed in PTHA for different regions and coasts at threat. In the first part of my talk, I will briefly review some rupture models of recent mega-thrust earthquakes, and highlight some of their surprising features that likely result in bigger error bars associated to PTHA results. More specifically, recent events of unexpected size at a given location, and with unexpected rupture process features, posed first-order open questions which prevent the definition of an heterogeneous rupture probability along a subduction zone, despite of several recent promising results on the subduction zone seismic cycle. In the second part of the talk, I will dig a bit more into a specific ongoing effort for improving PTHA methods, in particular as regards epistemic and aleatory uncertainties determination, and the computational PTHA feasibility when considering the full assumed source variability. Only logic trees are usually explicated in PTHA studies, accounting for different possible assumptions on the source zone properties and behavior. The selection of the earthquakes to be actually modelled is then in general made on a qualitative basis or remains implicit

  9. Gondwana breakup via double-saloon-door rifting and seafloor spreading in a backarc basin during subduction rollback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. K.

    2007-12-01

    A model has been developed where two arc-parallel rifts propagate in opposite directions from an initial central location during backarc seafloor spreading and subduction rollback. The resultant geometry causes pairs of terranes to simultaneously rotate clockwise and counterclockwise like the motion of double-saloon-doors about their hinges. As movement proceeds and the two terranes rotate, a gap begins to extend between them, where a third rift initiates and propagates in the opposite direction to subduction rollback. Observations from the Oligocene to Recent Western Mediterranean, the Miocene to Recent Carpathians, the Miocene to Recent Aegean and the Oligocene to Recent Caribbean point to a two-stage process. Initially, pairs of terranes comprising a pre-existing retro-arc fold thrust belt and magmatic arc rotate about poles and accrete to adjacent continents. Terrane docking reduces the width of the subduction zone, leading to a second phase during which subduction to strike-slip transitions initiate. The clockwise rotated terrane is caught up in a dextral strike-slip zone, whereas the counterclockwise rotated terrane is entrained in a sinistral strike-slip fault system. The likely driving force is a pair of rotational torques caused by slab sinking and rollback of a curved subduction hingeline. By analogy with the above model, a revised five-stage Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Gondwana dispersal model is proposed in which three plates always separate about a single triple rift or triple junction in the Weddell Sea area. Seven features are considered diagnostic of double-saloon-door rifting and seafloor spreading: earliest movement involves clockwise and counterclockwise rotations of the Falkland Islands Block and the Ellsworth Whitmore Terrane respectively; terranes comprise areas of a pre-existing retro-arc fold thrust belt (the Permo-Triassic Gondwanide Orogeny) attached to an accretionary wedge/magmatic arc; the Falklands Islands Block is initially

  10. Middle Proterozoic thrusting in central New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grambling, J.A.; Thompson, A.G. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences); Dallmeyer, R.D. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Ductile thrust faults truncate contact-metamorphic aureoles surrounding two 1.4 Ga plutons in central New Mexico. The Priest quartz monzonite (1440 Ma) and Sandia granite (1420 Ma) are 50 km apart in the continuous Sandia/Manzano mountain chain. Thermobarometry and phase relations demonstrate that country-rock temperatures rose from 700 C toward the pluton, at pressure near 4 kb. The northern edge of this aureole is cut by the southeast-dipping ductile Monte Largo thrust fault. Prograde, greenschist-facies metamorphism of footwall rocks accompanied local retrogression of hangingwall rocks during thrusting. This second metamorphism took place at P-T conditions of 2-3 kb and 450-475 C. Another contact aureole surrounds the Sandia granite. Mafic rocks near the granite reflect amphibolite-facies conditions, whereas pelites display low-pressure contact assemblages. Quantitative temperatures increase from 500--750 C toward the granite, at pressures of 2.5--3.5 kb. The shallowly southeast-dipping Vincent Moore fault truncates the Sandia granite and the southern portion of its contact aureole. This ductile shear zone emplaced greenschist-facies rocks northwestward above the Sandia contact aureole. Footwall rocks were retrograded to the greenschist facies within 100 m of this fault; the retrograde phases are aligned parallel to the trace of the thrust. Metamorphic temperatures in hangingwall rocks (during thrusting ) were 400-475 C at pressures above 2.75 kb. Additional northwest-vergent ductile thrusts are found elsewhere in the mountain chain. This may represent the age of thrusting and of the related greenschist and the related greenschist-facies metamorphic overprint.

  11. Rock uplift above the subduction megathrust at Montague and Hinchinbrook Islands, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kelly M.

    Deformation related to the transition from strike-slip to convergent slip during flat-slab subduction of the Yakutat microplate has resulted in regions of focused rock uplift and exhumation. In the St. Elias and Chugach Mountains, faulting related to transpressional processes and bending of fault systems coupled with enhanced glacial erosion causes rapid exhumation. Underplating below the syntaxial bend farther west in the Chugach Mountains and central Prince William Sound causes focused, but less rapid, exhumation. Farther south in the Prince William Sound, plate boundary deformation transitions from strike-slip to nearly full convergence in the Montague Island and Hinchinbrook Island region, which is ˜20 km above the megathrust between the Yakutat microplate and overriding North American Plate. Montague and Hinchinbrook Islands are narrow, elongate, and steep, with a structural grain formed by several megathrust fault splays, some of which slipped during the 1964 M9.2 earthquake. Presented here are 32 new apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and 28 new apatite fission-track (AFT) ages from the Montague and Hinchinbrook Island regions. Most AHe ages are Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults during the 1964 earthquake. AFT ages range from ˜5 Ma to ˜20 Ma and are also younger at the SW end of Montague Island. These ages and corresponding exhumation rates indicate that the Montague and Hinchinbrook Island region is a narrow zone of intense deformation probably related to duplex thrusting along one or more megathrust fault splays. I interpret the rates of rock uplift and exhumation to have increased in the last ˜5 My, especially at the southwest end of the island system and farthest from the region dominated by strike-slip and transpressional deformation to the northeast. The narrow band of deformation along these islands likely represents the northwestern edge of a broader swath of plate boundary deformation between the Montague-Hinchinbrook Island region and the Kayak Island

  12. The Miocene to Recent evolution of an active transform fault at the junction of Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs, eastern Mediterranean: the linkage between the western Antalya Basin and Finike Basin and Anaximander Seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, E.; King, H.; Aksu, A.; Hall, J.; Gurcay, S.; Çifçi, G.

    2011-12-01

    A 100 km-wide transform ('STEP') fault zone separates the Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs at the convergent plate boundary of the eastern Mediterranean, where the African plate to the south is being subducted below the Aegean-Anatolian microplate to the north. The eastern edge of the transform fault zone is a N-S transtensional lineament which occurs at the shelf edge between the onland Bey Daglari mountains and the offshore Antalya Basin. The lineament runs northwards to the Isparta Angle in southern Turkey; and continues southwards to veer to the southwest through the Anaximander Seamounts to connect with the Strabo Trough. The Finike Basin lies immediately west of the transtensional fault zone, and south of the Turkish shelf. Its Pliocene-Quaternary sedimentary fill is trapped between the shelf and the Anaximander Seamounts, which appear to override it in a shallow-dipping north-verging thrust which carries the Sirri Erinç Plateau. Recent acquisition of around 1500 km of multi-channel seismic reflection profiles has enabled us to discern the relationships of the Finike Basin with the fault systems which bound it. Miocene thrusts verging to the south characterise the area, and many are reactivated in Pliocene-Quaternary time, accompanied by back thrusts (verging to the north) indicative of transpression. A north-verging thrust carries the Sirri Erinç Plateau over the southern margin of the Finike Basin, and similarly-verging thrusts occur within the Basin. These, like the back-thrusts, are indicative of the (?)sinistral transpression that characterizes the STEP fault zone in Pliocene-Quaternary time. The Kas 1 well illustrates south-verging thrusting on land, probably as a continuation of the contraction in the Taurides to the north. We suggest that the normal faulting along the coast is superficial and gravitational, formed on the back of the deep thrusts carrying Tauride Mountains. The Finike Basin has similarities with the adjacent Rhodes Basin. It is a deep

  13. 3D Fault modeling of the active Chittagong-Myanmar fold belt, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. E.; Hubbard, J.; Akhter, S. H.; Shamim, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Chittagong-Myanmar fold belt (CMFB), located in eastern Bangladesh, eastern India and western Myanmar, accommodates east-west shortening at the India-Burma plate boundary. Oblique subduction of the Indian Plate beneath the Burma Plate since the Eocene has led to the development of a large accretionary prism complex, creating a series of north-south trending folds. A continuous sediment record from ~55 Ma to the present has been deposited in the Bengal Basin by the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna rivers, providing an opportunity to learn about the history of tectonic deformation and activity in this fold-and-thrust belt. Surface mapping indicates that the fold-and-thrust belt is characterized by extensive N-S-trending anticlines and synclines in a belt ~150-200 km wide. Seismic reflection profiles from the Chittagong and Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh, indicate that the anticlines mapped at the surface narrow with depth and extend to ~3.0 seconds TWTT (two-way travel time), or ~6.0 km. The folds of Chittagong and Chittagong Hill Tracts are characterized by doubly plunging box-shaped en-echelon anticlines separated by wide synclines. The seismic data suggest that some of these anticlines are cored by thrust fault ramps that extend to a large-scale décollement that dips gently to the east. Other anticlines may be the result of detachment folding from the same décollement. The décollement likely deepens to the east and intersects with the northerly-trending, oblique-slip Kaladan fault. The CMFB region is bounded to the north by the north-dipping Dauki fault and the Shillong Plateau. The tectonic transition from a wide band of E-W shortening in the south to a narrow zone of N-S shortening along the Dauki fault is poorly understood. We integrate surface and subsurface datasets, including topography, geological maps, seismicity, and industry seismic reflection profiles, into a 3D modeling environment and construct initial 3D surfaces of the major faults in this

  14. The 3 May 2006 (Mw 8.0) and 19 March 2009 (Mw 7.6) Tonga earthquakes: Intraslab compressional faulting below the megathrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingjun; Heeszel, David S.; Ye, Lingling; Lay, Thorne; Wiens, Douglas A.; Jia, Minghai; Cummins, Phil R.

    2015-09-01

    The Tonga subduction zone is among the most seismically active regions and has the highest plate convergence rate in the world. However, recorded thrust events confidently located on the plate boundary have not exceeded Mw 8.0, and the historic record suggests low seismic coupling along the arc. We analyze two major thrust fault earthquakes that occurred in central Tonga in 2006 and 2009. The 3 May 2006 Mw 8.0 event has a focal mechanism consistent with interplate thrusting, was located west of the trench, and caused a moderate regional tsunami. However, long-period seismic wave inversions and finite-fault modeling by joint inversion of teleseismic body waves and local GPS static offsets indicate a slip distribution centered ~65 km deep, about 30 km deeper than the plate boundary revealed by locations of aftershocks, demonstrating that this was an intraslab event. The aftershock locations were obtained using data from seven temporary seismic stations deployed shortly after the main shock, and most lie on the plate boundary, not on either nodal plane of the deeper main shock. The fault plane is ambiguous, and investigation of compound rupture involving coseismic slip along the megathrust does not provide a better fit, although activation of megathrust faulting is responsible for the aftershocks. The 19 March 2009 Mw 7.6 compressional faulting event occurred below the trench; finite-fault and W-phase inversions indicate an intraslab, ~50 km deep centroid, with ambiguous fault plane. This event also triggered small megathrust faulting. There continues to be a paucity of large megathrust earthquakes in Tonga.

  15. Flat-slab subduction, orogenesis, intraplate deformation, and glacial erosion in southern Alaska: A tectonic-glacial progression from STEEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, T. L.; Gulick, S. S.; Bruhn, R. L.; Christeson, G. L.; Enkelmann, E.; Freymueller, J. T.; Hallet, B.; Horton, B. K.; Hansen, R. A.; Koons, P. O.; Pavlis, G. L.; Ridgway, K. D.; Spotila, J. A.; Van Avendonk, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The ST. Elias Erosion and tectonics Project (STEEP) is a Continental Dynamics multidisciplinary collaboration involving offshore and onshore studies of a modern example of an oceanic plateau collision with a continental margin in southern Alaska. These studies constrain erosion-tectonic interactions and clarify the timeline of northern Cordilleran orogenesis. At ~55 Ma an oceanic plateau formed on either the Kula-Farallon or Farallon-Resurrection spreading center. From 50-46 Ma, this plateau attempted to subduct beneath an accretionary complex, the Yakutat Group (YG), near offshore British Columbia. The YG was thrust onto the plateau to form what is now the Yakutat Terrane. From ~40 to as late as 33 Ma the Yakutat Terrane was part of North America and the proto-Transition Fault was active moving the remnant Kula Plate towards the Aleutian Trench, slicing off the southern edge of the Yakutat Terrane, and emplacing Pacific crust adjacent to the Terrane. From ~33 to 6 Ma the Yakutat Terrane moved northward with the Pacific Plate. There is some Oligocene paleogeographic uncertainly, but upper plate deformation and basin development starting ~ 20-25 Ma may be Yakutat related. At ~6 Ma the Pacific Plate underwent a clockwise shift in motion reactivating the Transition Fault, albeit at a slow rate, and this motion drove a component of oblique convergence along the Fairweather Fault and orogenesis in the St. Elias. Rejuvenation of the Transition Fault formed a stable triple junction with the Aleutian Trench and the Yakutat-North American subduction front. Uplift in the orogen seeded glacial systems that reached tidewater by ~5.5 Ma and the sediments produced were the glaciomarine, syn-orogenic Yakataga Formation. The eastern syntaxis of the St. Elias orogen began to focus exhumation as thickened crust generated along the transpressive Fairweather system was fed into the fully contractional core of the orogen. Between 4 and 3 Ma, the thicker portions of the Yakutat Terrane

  16. Developing framework to constrain the geometry of the seismic rupture plane on subduction interfaces a priori - A probabilistic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    A key step in many earthquake source inversions requires knowledge of the geometry of the fault surface on which the earthquake occurred. Our knowledge of this surface is often uncertain, however, and as a result fault geometry misinterpretation can map into significant error in the final temporal and spatial slip patterns of these inversions. Relying solely on an initial hypocentre and CMT mechanism can be problematic when establishing rupture characteristics needed for rapid tsunami and ground shaking estimates. Here, we attempt to improve the quality of fast finite-fault inversion results by combining several independent and complementary data sets to more accurately constrain the geometry of the seismic rupture plane of subducting slabs. Unlike previous analyses aimed at defining the general form of the plate interface, we require mechanisms and locations of the seismicity considered in our inversions to be consistent with their occurrence on the plate interface, by limiting events to those with well-constrained depths and with CMT solutions indicative of shallow-dip thrust faulting. We construct probability density functions about each location based on formal assumptions of their depth uncertainty and use these constraints to solve for the ‘most-likely’ fault plane. Examples are shown for the trench in the source region of the Mw 8.6 Southern Sumatra earthquake of March 2005, and for the Northern Chile Trench in the source region of the November 2007 Antofagasta earthquake. We also show examples using only the historic catalogues in regions without recent great earthquakes, such as the Japan and Kamchatka Trenches. In most cases, this method produces a fault plane that is more consistent with all of the data available than is the plane implied by the initial hypocentre and CMT mechanism. Using the aggregated data sets, we have developed an algorithm to rapidly determine more accurate initial fault plane geometries for source inversions of future

  17. Seafloor expression and shallow structure of a fold-and-thrust system, Isfjorden, west Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Blinova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A detailed map of the structure of the west Spitsbergen fold-and-thrust belt in the Isfjorden area, Spitsbergen, is presented. The map was constructed from a dense grid of two-dimensional multichannel reflection seismic and bathymetric data. Joint interpretation of two data sets allowed a comparison of tectonic structures detected along the uppermost parts of the seismic sections and those reflected in the morphology of the seafloor. Three major, predominantly north-west–south-east striking faults were identified. The westernmost fault (T1 is a hinterland-directed (most likely out of sequence thrust, while the central and easternmost faults (T2 and T3 are foreland-directed (in-sequence thrusts. The thrusts divide Isfjorden into three subareas. Subarea 1 is bounded by thrust faults T1 and T2 and comprises Tertiary rocks surrounded by Jurassic–Cretaceous strata. The structural signature of Subarea 1 is that of a system of hinterland- and foreland-directed thrust faults, resulting in a seafloor relief characterized by parallel ridges and troughs. Subarea 2 is limited by thrust faults T2 and T3 and shows Jurassic–Cretaceous outcrops on the seafloor. Subarea 3 is situated east of the main thrust fault T3 and mainly involves outcrops of Triassic–Jurassic rocks. Together, Subareas 2 and 3 are dominated by foreland-directed, north-west–south-east and NNW–SSE-striking thrusts that are hardly detectable in bathymetric data.

  18. Metallogeny of subduction zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokhtin N. O.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the multistage mechanism of the Earth's crust enrichment in ore elements in underthrust zones. The processes of metamorphism and the formation of hydrothermal solutions at pulling of the watered oceanic lithospheric plate into the subduction zone have been described. Some physical and chemical transformation regularities of structural-material complexes in these areas and mechanisms of the formation of ore deposits have been discussed. Spatio-temporal patterns of the localization of a number of endogenetic and exogenetic deposits have been described using metallogeny of the Ural and the Verkhoyansk-Kolyma Fold Belts as an example. It has been shown that in nature there are several effective mechanisms of the enrichment of the crust in ore minerals. One of them is the process of pulling into subduction zone of metalliferous sediments and ferromanganese crusts as well as seabed nodules, their metamorphic transformation, partial melting and transition of ore components into magmatic melts and mineralized fluids. In the future this leads to the release of ore material by magmas and hydrothermal solutions into the folded formations of island-arc and Andean types and the formation of igneous, metasomatic and hydrothermal deposits. Another, yet no less powerful natural mechanism of a conveyor enrichment of the crust in ore elements is the process of destruction and sedimentation of mineral deposits formed in the folded areas as well as the formation of placers and their transfer to the marginal parts of the continent. Later, during the collision of active and passive margins of two lithospheric plates, such as the collision of the Kolyma Massif with the eastern part of the Siberian craton in the middle of the Mesozoic there was a thrusting of a younger lithospheric plate over a more ancient one. As a result, the sedimentary sequences of the passive margin of the Siberian plate were submerged and partially melted by the basic magmas

  19. The Southern Tyrrhenian subduction system: recent evolution and neotectonic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Argnani

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Geological and geophysical data have been integrated with the aim of presenting a new evolutionary model for the Southern Tyrrhenian and adjacent regions. The Southern Tyrrhenian backarc basin opened within a plate convergence regime because of sinking and rollback of the oceanic Ionian lithosphere. On the basis of seismological observations, I infer that the sinking slab was torn apart on either side in the last 2 Ma and this process controlled the neotectonics of the Southern Apennines - Tyrrhenian region. On the north-eastern side the slab broke off from NW to SE and this process triggered volcanism and NW-SE extension along the Eastern Tyrrhenian margin, and strike-slip tectonics along NW-SE trending faults in Northern Calabria. On the south-western side the slab broke off from W to E along the Aeolian Island alignment, although the tear has currently been reoriented along the NNW-SSE Malta escarpment. During its sinking the subducted slab also detached from the overriding plate, favouring the wedging of the asthenosphere between the two plates and the regional uplift of the Calabrian arc and surroundings. This regional uplift promoted gravitational instability within the orogenic wedge, particularly towards low topography areas; the large-scale sliding of the Calabrian arc towards the Ionian basin can be the cause of CW rotation and graben formation in Calabria. Also the E-dipping extensional faults of the Southern Apennines can be related to accommodation of vertical motions within the fold-and-thrust belt. The pattern of recent seismicity reflects this neotectonics where crustal-scale gravity deformation within the orogenic wedge is responsible for extensional earthquakes in Calabria and the Southern Apennines, whereas Africa plate convergence can account for compressional earthquakes in Sicily.

  20. Constraining the hydration of the subducting Nazca plate beneath Northern Chile using subduction zone guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garth, Tom; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Guided wave dispersion is observed from earthquakes at 180-280 km depth recorded at stations in the fore-arc of Northern Chile, where the 44 Ma Nazca plate subducts beneath South America. Characteristic P-wave dispersion is observed at several stations in the Chilean fore-arc with high frequency energy (>5 Hz) arriving up to 3 s after low frequency (first motion dispersion observed at multiple stations, or the extended P-wave coda observed in arrivals from intermediate depth events within the Nazca plate. These signals can however be accurately accounted for if dipping low velocity fault zones are included within the subducting lithospheric mantle. A grid search over possible LVL and faults zone parameters (width, velocity contrast and separation distance) was carried out to constrain the best fitting model parameters. Our results imply that fault zone structures of 0.5-1.0 km thickness, and 5-10 km spacing, consistent with observations at the outer rise are present within the subducted slab at intermediate depths. We propose that these low velocity fault zone structures represent the hydrated structure within the lithospheric mantle. They may be formed initially by normal faults at the outer rise, which act as a pathway for fluids to penetrate the deeper slab due to the bending and unbending stresses within the subducting plate. Our observations suggest that the lithospheric mantle is 5-15% serpentinised, and therefore may transport approximately 13-42 Tg/Myr of water per meter of arc. The guided wave observations also suggest that a thin LVL (∼1 km thick) interpreted as un-eclogitised subducted oceanic crust persists to depths of at least 220 km. Comparison of the inferred seismic velocities with those predicted for various MORB assemblages suggest that this thin LVL may be accounted for by low velocity lawsonite-bearing assemblages, suggesting that some mineral-bound water within the oceanic crust may be transported well beyond the volcanic arc. While older

  1. Mapping fluids to subduction megathrust locking and slip behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffer, Demian M.

    2017-09-01

    In subduction zones, high fluid content and pore pressure are thought to promote aseismic creep, whereas well-drained conditions are thought to promote locking and failure in earthquakes. However, observations directly linking fluid content and seismic coupling remain elusive. Heise et al. (2017) use a magnetotelluric survey to image the electrical resistivity structure of the northern Hikurangi subduction thrust to 30 km depth, as an indicator of interconnected fluid content. The authors document a clear correlation between high resistivity and a distinct geodetically locked patch and between conductive areas and weak coupling. Their study, together with other recent geophysical investigations, provides new evidence for the role of fluids in governing subduction thrust locking.

  2. Layer-parallel shortening across the Sevier fold-thrust belt and Laramide foreland of Wyoming: spatial and temporal evolution of a complex geodynamic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Arlo Brandon; Yonkee, W. Adolph

    2012-12-01

    Varying patterns of layer-parallel shortening (LPS) and vertical-axis rotations from the thin-skin Sevier fold-thrust belt to the thick-skin Laramide foreland of Wyoming are quantified from integrated structural, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), and paleomagnetic analyses. Within the Sevier belt, widespread early LPS was accommodated by spaced cleavage, fracture sets, minor folds, and minor faults. LPS directions are subperpendicular to structural trends of systematically curved thrust sheets of the Wyoming salient, reflecting a combination of primary dispersion and secondary rotation during thrusting. Within the Laramide foreland, limited LPS was accommodated mostly by minor faults with conjugate wedge and strike-slip geometries. LPS directions in gentler fold limbs vary from perpendicular to acute with structural trends of variably oriented, anastomosing basement-cored arches. Steep forelimbs display more complex relations, including younger fault sets that developed during evolving stress states and localized vertical-axis rotations. Although internal strain is limited, weak AMS lineations defined by kinked and rotated phyllosilicates are widely developed and consistently oriented perpendicular to measured LPS directions. Palinspastically restored LPS directions, corrected for paleomagnetically determined vertical-axis rotations, vary on average from W-E in the Sevier belt to WSW-ENE in the Laramide foreland. In detail, LPS directions display deflections related to primary sedimentary wedge geometry and basement fabrics. LPS in the Sevier belt is interpreted to partly reflect stress transmitted from the hinterland through the growing orogenic wedge and topographic stress along the front of the wedge. LPS in the Laramide foreland is interpreted to partly reflect basal traction during flat-slab subduction beneath thick cratonic lithosphere, with spatial-temporal variations in stress trajectories related to basement heterogeneities and evolving fault

  3. A 3-D Model of Stacked Thrusts in the Sevier Thrust Belt, Eastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. W.; Clayton, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Using published and new geologic map data and two exploratory wells for control, we constructed a three-dimensional geological model of the Pine Creek area in the Big Hole Mountains of eastern Idaho, where stacked Sevier thrust sheets are exposed at the surface. In this area, Cretaceous crustal shortening displaced and folded strata from Cambrian to Cretaceous in age. Using geologic map data as a primary input to a 3-D model presents a number of challenges, especially representing fault geometries at depth and maintaining strata thicknesses. The highly variable attitudes measured at the surface are also difficult to represent in a subsurface model because they require extensive extrapolation to depth. To overcome these challenges we EarthVision software, which has tools for model construction with minimal data inputs and uses a minimum tension algorithm to create geologically realistic surfaces. We also constructed two primary cross-sections to constrain strata and fault geometries according to structural principles, and used these to guide construction of fault and horizon surfaces. We then designated horizons with the best control as reference horizons to constrain strata geometries, and built the remaining horizons using isochores to add or subtract from those surfaces. The model shows classic flat-ramp thrust geometries as seen farther southeast in the Wyoming section of the thrust belt. The model also shows uniform southwestward tilting of faults and strata in the north end above younger thrusts, but strong effects from a duplex on a younger thrust fault encountered in the southern well, which rotated the strata and older faults above it.

  4. The Calabrian subduction zone (Ionian Sea): Historical seismicity and a new review of the system from multi-channel seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Flora; Gutscher, Marc-Andre; Torelli, Luigi; Polonia, Alina; Graindorge, David

    2010-05-01

    The Calabrian subduction zone is included in the long W-E elongated compressive South Mediterranean belt. This subduction is located in the complex Central Mediterranean area and accommodates the African/Eurasian convergence at very slow rates (thrusts events characteristic of active subduction have been recorded during the instrumental era. However, the South Calabrian/East Sicilian region is well-known to have been affected by strong historical seismicity with Mercalli intensities reaching XI. The sources of these events is often linked to the activity of crustal, normal faults in the Calabrian region: 1638, 1783, 1905. Furthermore, important details of the Messina 1908 earthquake (72000 killed) and tsunami remain unresolved, in particular the origin of the tsunami (fault induced or submarine landslide). Moreover, the origin of two of the most destructive earthquakes (1169 and 1693) remains enigmatic. For the 1169 and 1693 (60000 killed and 5 to 10 m tsunami wave) Catania earthquakes, the source faults are the subject of debate and linked alternatively to the activity of the Malta escarpment or of the subduction fault plane (because the isoseismals are open to the sea). In this case, the 1169 earthquake which had similar intensities and a comparable isoseismal pattern, is suggested to have the same source and so the fault plane may have be locked between these two events. To better understand the origins of the 1169 and 1693 major events and seek evidence of activity of Calabrian system, we present new results from reprocessed 96-channels seismic reflection profiles (French Archimede cruise, 1997) offshore Sicily. Interpretation of the seismic dataset is based on correlations with published seismic data and with ESP results and allows us to identify the following thick sedimentary cover (>5km) in the Ionian Abyssal Plain overlying an oceanic crust: Mesozoic (1400 to 1800m) and Tertiary (~1800m) sequences, a Messinian unit (1400m) and the Plio-Quaternary deposits

  5. An integrated approach to the seismic activity and structure of the central Lesser Antilles subduction megathrust seismogenic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirn, Alfred; Laigle, Mireille; Charvis, Philippe; Flueh, Ernst; Gallart, Josep; Kissling, Edi; Lebrun, Jean-Frederic; Nicolich, Rinaldo; Sachpazi, Maria

    2010-05-01

    In order to increase the understanding of plate boundaries that show currently low seismic activity, as was the Sumatra-Andaman subduction before the major earthquake in 2004, a cluster of surveys and cruises has been carried out in 2007 and coordinated under the European Union THALES WAS RIGHT project on the Lesser Antilles subduction zone of the Carribean-America plate boundary. A segment of the corresponding transform boundary just tragically ruptured in the 2010 January 12, Haïti earthquake. This cluster is composed by the German cruise TRAIL with the vessel F/S M. A. MERIAN, the French cruise SISMANTILLES II with the IFREMER vessel N/O ATALANTE), and French cruise OBSANTILLES with the IRD vessel N/O ANTEA. During these cruises and surveys, 80 OBS, Ocean Bottom Seismometers, 64 of which with 3-components seismometers and hydrophones, and 20 OBH with hydrophones have been brought together from several pools (Geoazur Nice, INSU/IPGP Paris, IfM-GEOMAR Kiel, AWI Bremerhaven), with up to 30 land stations (CSIC Barcelona, IPG Paris, INSU-RLBM and -Lithoscope, ETH Zurich). The deployment of all these instruments has been supported principally in addition by ANR Catastrophes Telluriques et Tsunamis (SUBSISMANTI), by the EU SALVADOR Programme of IFM-GEOMAR, as well as by the EU project THALES WAS RIGHT. The main goal of this large seismic investigation effort is the understanding of the behaviour of the seismogenic zone and location of potential source regions of mega-thrust earthquakes. Specific goals are the mapping of the subduction interplate in the range where it may be seismogenic along the Lesser Antilles Arc from Antigua to Martinique Islands, as a contribution to identification and localisation in advance of main rupture zones of possible future major earthquakes, and to the search for transient signals of the activity. The forearc region, commonly considered as a proxy to the seismogenic portion of the subduction mega-thrust fault plane, and which is here the

  6. Present-day strain partitioning and strain transfer across the Fairweather and Denali Faults in SW Yukon - SE Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, S.; Marechal, A.; Elliott, J.; Freymueller, J. T.; Schmidt, M.

    2012-12-01

    In SW Yukon - SE Alaska, the present-day Pacific - North America relative motion is highly oblique to the main plate boundary, resulting in strong strain partitioning tectonics that link the Aleutian subduction to the west to Queen-Charlotte transform to the south. This transition region is also the site of present-day orogeny and accretion of the allochthonous Yakutat Terrane to the Northern Cordillera. We present results from new campaign and permanent GPS stations deployed in SW Yukon, combined with STEEP data from SE Alaska, straddling the Fairweather and Denali Faults. GPS data are processed with the NRCan PPP software to derive long-term velocities and are corrected for transient effects primarily due to Glacial Isostatic Adjustment to recent ice mass loss. In the southern region (from Yakutat, AK to Whitehorse, YK), our preferred model gives slip rates of 49.9 +/- 2.6 mm/a on the Fairweather Fault and 1.1 +/- 1.0 mm/a on the Denali Fault; i.e., over 95% the Pacific - North America strike-slip motion is accommodated on the main plate-boundary fault. However, the fault-normal component is strongly partitioned, with ~25% of the Pacific - North America convergence transferred inland, into the Yukon and Northern Cordillera. This strain transfer could explain the seismicity observed in the Mackenzie Mountains 500 - 800 km from the coast. In the northern region (from Yakutat, AK to Beaver Creek, YK), the Pacific - North America convergence is strongly partitioned, with less than ~60% accommodated on the Chugach-St. Elias Fault and the residual motion distributed between the Pamplona thrust zone to the south (~15%) and internal shortening of the St. Elias Mountains to the north (~25%), where few faults and little seismicity are observed. The new GPS data also helps address the activity and slip rate of a potential "Connector Fault" that would link the Fairweather and Totschunda Faults, bypassing the Denali Fault in SW Yukon.

  7. Role of detachments and thrust kinematics in Structural evolution of Kohat and Potwar fold thrust belt in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Humaad; Zeilinger, Gerold; Sobel, Edward; Heidarzadeh, Ghasem

    2016-04-01

    The Kohat and Potwar fold thrust belts in Pakistan represent the outermost external zone of the Himalayan fold and thrust system. The Main Boundary thrust marks their northern extent, showing that they are genetically linked; however, both exhibit a distinct contrast between the structural style at the surface and subsurface. This contrast becomes more conspicuous at the leading edge of the thrust belt where the Potwar allochothon extends further south, linked to Kohat in the north via an active strike-slip fault. Previous workers explained the structural evolution of the two belts separately, disregarding the influence of similar fold and thrusts developed in both belts. This research focuses on the preparation of a 3D structural model at the boundary of the two thrust belts to understand similarities and differences in their structural style and evolution. The model is constrained by integrating field, seismic and well data for better subsurface interpretation. Cross sections show that Potwar evolved on thrust faults originating from a basal detachment in Precambrian (pC) salt and terminating in Miocene Molasse forming duplexes of pre Himalayan strata. To the south, the Potwar allochothon is glided over a salt detachment with rare internal deformation toward its leading edge, forming fault bend fold thrust structure known as Salt range. The structural evolution towards the west in Kohat results from deformation on multiple detachment horizons at the pC salt, Eocene evaporites and Miocene Molasse. Disharmonic folding over Eocene evaporites is evident from their presence in the cores of outcropping folds. In the subsurface, closely spaced thrusts cut up section from basal detachment terminates in Eocene evaporites forming duplex in northern part of area. In south change of lithological facies from evaporites to limestone shift detachment level upward in to molasse strata which resemble structural style in northern Potwar. Thrusts at the surface evolved from the

  8. Geometric and kinematics of West Segment of South Dabashan Foreland Fold-and-Thrust Belt, Northeast Sichuan Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dengfa

    2017-04-01

    The west segment of South Daba Shan (WSD) foreland thrust belt is an ideal area to disclose the intra-continental tectonic processes. Based on the latest pre-stack depth migration of 3-D seismic data, 2-D seismic profile, well data and geological outcrop, the paper explore the structural geometric and kinematic features of WSD with the application of fault-related folding theories. WSD is characterized by multi-level detachment deformation due to the three predominant sets of weak layers, Lower Triassic Jialingjiang Formation gypsum interval, Silurian mudstone beds and Cambrian shale zone. It is accordingly subdivided vertically into three tectonic systems. The upper one is above the Jialingjiang Formation gypsolith layer and presents a Jura-like fold-and-thrust belt. The middle one takes Silurian shale as the base and Jialingjiang Formation gypsolith interval as the passive roof, in which imbricate thrusts developed. The lower one is bounded to Cambrian and Silurian detachment layers, in which duplex dominated. The Sinian and Proterozoic basements below Cambrian have not been involved in deformation. WSD underwent four periods of tectonic evolution: Late Jurassic -Cretaceous (150-110Ma); Late Cretaceous (110-70Ma); Latest Cretaceous to Paleogene (70-30Ma); Oligocene to Quaternary (30-0 Ma). The deformation propagated southward as an imbricate style, which results in the passive uplifting of overlying structural layer. WSD exhibits a rather low taper tectonic wedge. According to the magnetotelluric and deep seismic profiles, it is inferred that the WSD tectonic processes is mainly controlled by the Yangtze continental block subduction northward under the Qingling Mountains and the pro-wedge multi-level thrusting during late Jurassic to Cretaceous. The Upper Paleozoic carbonates in the middle tectonic deformation system are favorable for gas exploration in thea area.

  9. Strength of stick-slip and creeping subduction megathrusts from heat flow observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Kelin

    2014-08-29

    Subduction faults, called megathrusts, can generate large and hazardous earthquakes. The mode of slip and seismicity of a megathrust is controlled by the structural complexity of the fault zone. However, the relative strength of a megathrust based on the mode of slip is far from clear. The fault strength affects surface heat flow by frictional heating during slip. We model heat-flow data for a number of subduction zones to determine the fault strength. We find that smooth megathrusts that produce great earthquakes tend to be weaker and therefore dissipate less heat than geometrically rough megathrusts that slip mainly by creeping. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. The Ionian Abyssal Plain - closure of a remnant Mesozoic oceanic domain: subbottom structures, deep deformation and the Calabrian subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, F.; Gutscher, M.; Graindorge, D.; Klaeschen, D.

    2010-12-01

    rheology of the Messinian salts acts as the décollement level in the frontal part of the wedge. Repeated imbricate thrusting within in the Calabrian wedge allows the thickening of the Messinian sediments from 1200 m beneath the IAP to 2400 m 30 km away from the deformation front. A major tectonic structure is imaged east of the Malta Escarpment by the Archimede profiles, it offsets the top Pre-Messinian deposits by 0.5 - 1 sTWT increasing from S to N. This N150°E oriented lithospheric fault is interpreted as a tear fault (“STEP” fault) which has allowed the roll-back of the Ionian slab. The activity of these faults and the Calabrian and Mediterranean subduction zones have been reconstructed through time to reach the present-day physiology of the remnant Ionian basin. The analysis of their activity will allow a better understanding of the closure of the Ionian domain.

  11. Variable thrust cartridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  12. Differential displacement and rotation in thrust fronts: A magnetic, calcite twinning and palinspastic study of the Jones Valley thrust, Alabama, US Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, James S.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Van der Voo, Rob; Thomas, William A.

    2008-06-01

    To test whether a displacement gradient along a curved fault structure requires rotation, we studied the northeast-striking, northwest-verging, large-displacement Jones Valley thrust fault of the Appalachian thrust belt in Alabama. Paleomagnetism, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and calcite twinning analysis, complemented by balanced cross-sections, were used to evaluate the presence and magnitude of any rotation. Remanence directions from the Silurian Red Mountain Formation reveal a prefolding magnetization acquired in the Pennsylvanian, whereas magnetic analysis shows a strong, bedding-parallel compaction fabric with a tectonic lineation. Paleomagnetic directions and magnetic lineations reveal no relative rotation between the hanging wall and footwall of the thrust fault. Rather than rotation, therefore, we interpret the Jones Valley thrust sheet as a structure that developed in a self-similar fashion, with lateral growth of the fault surface occurring coincident with growth into the foreland.

  13. Combining paleomagnetism and structural geology to better understand complex orogenic systems: development of a robust kinematic model for Sevier fold-thrust belt and Laramide foreland of Wyoming, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Arlo; Yonkee, Adolph

    2013-04-01

    Varying patterns of layer-parallel shortening (LPS) and vertical-axis rotations from the thin-skin Sevier fold-thrust belt to the thick-skin Laramide foreland of Wyoming are quantified from integrated structural, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), and paleomagnetic analyses. Within the Sevier belt, widespread early LPS was accommodated by spaced cleavage, fracture sets, minor folds, and minor faults. LPS directions are subperpendicular to structural trends of systematically curved thrust sheets of the Wyoming salient, reflecting a combination of primary dispersion and secondary rotation during thrusting. Within the Laramide foreland, limited LPS was accommodated mostly by minor faults with conjugate wedge and strike-slip geometries. LPS directions in gentler fold limbs vary from perpendicular to acute with structural trends of variably oriented, anastomosing basement-cored arches. Steep forelimbs display more complex relations, including younger fault sets that developed during evolving stress states and localized vertical-axis rotations. Although internal strain is limited, weak AMS lineations defined by kinked and rotated phyllosilicates are widely developed and consistently oriented perpendicular to measured LPS directions. Palinspastically restored LPS directions, corrected for paleomagnetically determined vertical-axis rotations, vary on average from W-E in the Sevier belt to WSW-ENE in the Laramide foreland. In detail, LPS directions display deflections related to primary sedimentary wedge geometry and basement fabrics. LPS in the Sevier belt is interpreted to partly reflect stress transmitted from the hinterland through the growing orogenic wedge and topographic stress along the front of the wedge. LPS in the Laramide foreland is interpreted to partly reflect basal traction during flat-slab subduction beneath thick cratonic lithosphere, with spatial-temporal variations in stress trajectories related to basement heterogeneities and evolving fault

  14. Thick-skinned tectonics within the intracontinental easternmost Atlas foreland-and-thrust belt (Tunisia): Meso-Cenozoic kinematics and implications for regional geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkhiria, W.; Boussiga, H.; Inoubli, M. H.

    2017-05-01

    The transition zone between western and central Mediterranean domains presents a key area to investigate kinematic interactions within the adjacent orogen systems such as the easternmost Atlas foreland-and-thrust belt. Gravity and seismic data revealed a highly structured basement, characterizing a series of structural highs and lows delimited by high-angle N-S, E-W, and NW-SE extensional faults. This basement architecture is inherited from successive extensional events related to the openings of the Triassic-Early Cretaceous Tethys oceans (i.e., Alpine Tethys, Ligurian Tethys, and Mesogea). Throughout this period, this mosaic of continental blocks significantly controlled the thickness and facies distributions. Early stages of diapirism took place along these basement faults and allowed maximum subsidence in minibasins revealed by the development of growth strata. In response to the Late Cretaceous-Eocene shortenings, these extensional faults have been reactivated as trasnpressional shear zones, giving rise to narrow pop-up structures. In addition, gravity modeling indicates crustal thinning and deep-rooted faults affecting the crust south of the Zaghouan Thrust and along E-W transfer zones. From the late Miocene, a drastic change in the stress regime is attributed to the effect of the adjacent Sicily channel on the study area. This promotes crustal thinning, basin subsidence, and channeling up of mantle-derived helium along lithospheric-scale weak zones. Our results give rise to new insights into the reactivation of inherited weakness zones of southern Tethys margin in response to the complex interaction between African and Eurasian plates accommodated by subduction, rollback, collision, and slab segmentation.

  15. Early Cenozoic Multiple Thrust in the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently completed regional geological mapping at a scale of 1 : 250,000 or larger across all of the Tibetan Plateau coupled with deep seismic surveys reveals for the first time a comprehensive depiction of the major early Cenozoic thrust systems resulting from the northward subduction of the Indian Continental Plate. These systems define a series of overlapping north-dipping thrust sheets that thickened the Tibetan crust and lead to the rise of the plateau. The few south-dipping thrusts present apparently developed within a sheet when the back moved faster than the toe. Many of the thrusts are shown to extend to the middle-lower crustal depths by seismic data. The regional thrust systems are the Main Central, Renbu-Zedong, Gangdese, Central Gangdese, North Gangdese, Bangoin-Nujiang, Qiangtang, Hohxil, and South Kunlun Thrusts. The minimal southward displacements of the South Kunlun, Hohxil, South Qiangtang, and Central Gangdese Thrusts are estimated to be 30 km, 25 km, 150 km and 50 km, respectively. Deep thrusting began in the Himalaya-Tibetan region soon after India-Eurasia continental collision and led to crustal thickening and subsequent uplift of the Tibetan Plateau during Late Eocene-Early Miocene when the systems were mainly active. The major thrust systems ceased moving in Early Miocene and many were soon covered by lacustrine strata. This activity succeeded in the late Cenozoic to crustal extension and strike-slip movement in the central Tibetan Plateau. The revelation of the full array of the early Cenozoic thrust systems provides a much more complete understanding of the tectonic framework of the Tibetan Plateau.

  16. Depositionary Margins: The Destruction and Renovation of Subduction Forearcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, P.; Morgan, J. P.; Silver, E. A.; Kluesner, J.

    2016-12-01

    A depositionary margin is a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  17. Comment on "Sandbox modeling of evolving thrust wedges with different preexisting topographic relief: Implications for the longmen Shan thrust belt, eastern Tibet" by C. Sun et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xibin; Xu, Xiwei; Lu, Renqi

    2017-02-01

    Sun et al.'s (2016) sandbox modeling takes preexisting topographic relief into account for faulting activity at the compressional orogenic belt, which promotes better understanding of Longmenshan thrust belt's (LTB) orogenic process and faulting behavior. However, topographic relief in sandbox modeling is contradictory to central LTB's actual topographic relief, and as a result, both the comparison between sandbox modeling and actual tectonics and topography and the conclusion that Xiaoyudong Fault is a tear fault should be reconsidered. Actually, based on Sun et al.'s (2016) sandbox modeling, the Xiaoyudong Fault cannot be treated as a tear fault.

  18. Seismicity, topography, and free-air gravity of the Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. E.; Blakely, R. J.; Scholl, D. W.; Ryan, H. F.

    2011-12-01

    The Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone, extending 3400 km from the Queen Charlotte Fault to Kamchatka, has been the source of six great megathrust earthquakes in the 20th Century. Four earthquakes have ruptured the 2000-km-long Aleutian segment, where the Cenozoic Aleutian arc overlies the subducting Pacific plate. These include the 1946 M 8.6 earthquake off Unimak Is., the 1957 M 8.6 and 1986 M 8.0 earthquakes off the Andreanoff Is., and the 1965 M 8.7 Rat Is. earthquake. The source regions of these earthquakes inferred from waveform inversions underlie the well-defined Aleutian deep-sea terrace. The deep-sea terrace is about 4 km deep and is underlain by Eocene arc framework rocks, which extend nearly to the trench. It is bounded on its seaward and landward margins by strong topographic and fee-air gravity gradients. The main asperities (areas of largest slip) for the great earthquakes and nearly all of the Aleutian thrust CMT solutions lie beneath the Aleutian terrace, between the maximum gradients. Similar deep-sea terraces are characteristic of non-accretionary convergent margins globally (75% of subduction zones), and, where sampled by drilling (e.g., Japan, Peru, Tonga, Central America), are undergoing sustained subsidence. Sustained subsidence requires removal of arc crust beneath the terrace by basal subduction erosion (BSE). BSE is in part linked to the seismic cycle, as it occurs in the same location as the megathrust earthquakes. Along the eastern 1400 km of the Alaskan subduction zone, the Pacific plate subducts beneath the North American continent. The boundary between the Aleutian segment and the continent is well defined in free-air gravity, and the distinctive deep-sea terrace observed along the Aleutian segment is absent. Instead, the Alaskan margin consists of exhumed, underplated accretionary complexes forming outer arc gravity highs. Superimposed on them are broad topographic highs and lows forming forearc basins (Shumagin, Stevenson) and islands

  19. Release of mineral-bound water prior to subduction tied to shallow seismogenic slip off Sumatra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüpers, Andre; Torres, Marta E; Owari, Satoko; McNeill, Lisa C; Dugan, Brandon; Henstock, Timothy J; Milliken, Kitty L; Petronotis, Katerina E; Backman, Jan; Bourlange, Sylvain; Chemale, Farid; Chen, Wenhuang; Colson, Tobias A; Frederik, Marina C G; Guèrin, Gilles; Hamahashi, Mari; House, Brian M; Jeppson, Tamara N; Kachovich, Sarah; Kenigsberg, Abby R; Kuranaga, Mebae; Kutterolf, Steffen; Mitchison, Freya L; Mukoyoshi, Hideki; Nair, Nisha; Pickering, Kevin T; Pouderoux, Hugo F A; Shan, Yehua; Song, Insun; Vannucchi, Paola; Vrolijk, Peter J; Yang, Tao; Zhao, Xixi

    2017-05-26

    Plate-boundary fault rupture during the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman subduction earthquake extended closer to the trench than expected, increasing earthquake and tsunami size. International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 362 sampled incoming sediments offshore northern Sumatra, revealing recent release of fresh water within the deep sediments. Thermal modeling links this freshening to amorphous silica dehydration driven by rapid burial-induced temperature increases in the past 9 million years. Complete dehydration of silicates is expected before plate subduction, contrasting with prevailing models for subduction seismogenesis calling for fluid production during subduction. Shallow slip offshore Sumatra appears driven by diagenetic strengthening of deeply buried fault-forming sediments, contrasting with weakening proposed for the shallow Tohoku-Oki 2011 rupture, but our results are applicable to other thickly sedimented subduction zones including those with limited earthquake records. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Multiscale Architecture of a Subduction Complex and Insight into Large-scale Material Movement in Subduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, J.

    2014-12-01

    The >1000 km by >100 km Franciscan complex of California records >100 Ma of subduction history that terminated with conversion to a transform margin. It affords an ideal natural laboratory to study the rock record of subduction-interface and related processes exhumed from 10-70 km. The Franciscan comprises coherent and block-in-matrix (mélange) units forming a nappe stack that youngs structurally downward in accretion age, indicating progressive subduction accretion. Gaps in accretion ages indicate periods of non-accretion or subduction erosion. The Franciscan comprises siliciclastic trench fill rocks, with lesser volcanic and pelagic rocks and serpentinite derived from the downgoing plate, as well as serpentinite and felsic-intermediate igneous blocks derived as detritus from the upper plate. The Franciscan records subduction, accretion, and metamorphism (including HP), spanning an extended period of subduction, rather than a single event superimposed on pre-formed stratigraphy. Melanges (serpentinite and siliciclastic matrix) with exotic blocks, that include high-grade metamorphic blocks, and felsic-intermediate igneous blocks from the upper plate, are mostly/entirely of sedimentary origin, whereas block-in-matrix rocks formed by tectonism lack exotic blocks and comprise disrupted ocean plate stratigraphy. Mélanges with exotic blocks are interbedded with coherent sandstones. Many blocks-in-melange record two HP burial events followed by surface exposure, and some record three. Paleomegathrust horizons, separating nappes accreted at different times, appear restricted to narrow fault zones of structures, are accommodated by discrete faults or narrow shear zones, rather than by significant penetrative strain. Exhumation of Franciscan HP units, both coherent and mélange, was accommodated by significant extension of the overlying plate, and possibly extension within the subduction complex, with cross-sectional extrusion, and like subduction burial, took place at

  1. Formation and stability of a double subduction system: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Stegman, Dave

    2017-04-01

    Examples of double subduction systems can be found in both modern (Izu-Bonin-Marianas and Ryukyu arcs, e.g. Hall [1997]) and ancient (Kohistan arc in Western Himalayas, e.g. Burg [2006], Burg et al. [2006]) tectonic record. A double subduction system has also been proposed to explain the high convergence rate observed for the India-Eurasia convergence [Jagoutz et al., 2015; Holt et al., 2016, 2017]. Rates of convergence across coupled double subduction systems can be significantly faster than across single subduction systems because of slab pull by two slabs. However, despite significant geological and geophysical observations, our understanding about this process is limited, and questions regarding double subduction remain largely unexplored in terms of physical factors controlling its initiation, duration and dynamics. Subduction initiation (of a single system) in itself has been a popular and challenging topic in the research community for the last few years, and various mechanisms (i.e., collapse at a passive margin or transform fault [Gerya et al., 2008; Stern, 2004], driven by compression [Hall et al., 2003; Toth and Gurnis, 1998], due to shear heating under compression [Thielmann and Kaus, 2012] or plume induced initiation [Gerya et al., 2015]) have been proposed. However, initiation of a secondary subduction, and formation of a stable double subduction system has not been studied before. Previous studies of double subduction either introduced weak zones to initiate subduction [Mishin et al., 2008] or both the subduction systems were already initiated [Jagoutz et al., 2015], thus assuming a priori information regarding the initial position of the two subduction zones. In this study, we perform 2D and 3D numerical simulations to investigate i) subduction initiation of a secondary system in an already initiated single subduction system, and ii) the dynamics and stability of the newly formed double subduction system. For this, we employ the code LaMEM [Kaus et

  2. Subduction and vertical coastal motions in the eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Andy; Jackson, James; Copley, Alex; McKenzie, Dan; Nissen, Ed

    2017-10-01

    Convergence in the eastern Mediterranean of oceanic Nubia with Anatolia and the Aegean is complex and poorly understood. Large volumes of sediment obscure the shallow structure of the subduction zone, and since much of the convergence is accommodated aseismically, there are limited earthquake data to constrain its kinematics. We present new source models for recent earthquakes, combining these with field observations, published GPS velocities and reflection-seismic data to investigate faulting in three areas: the Florence Rise, SW Turkey and the Pliny and Strabo Trenches. The depths and locations of earthquakes reveal the geometry of the subducting Nubian plate NE of the Florence Rise, a bathymetric high that is probably formed by deformation of sediment at the surface projection of the Anatolia-Nubia subduction interface. In SW Turkey, the presence of a strike-slip shear zone has often been inferred despite an absence of strike-slip earthquakes. We show that the GPS-derived strain-rate field is consistent with extension on the orthogonal systems of normal faults observed in the region and that strike-slip faulting is not required to explain observed GPS velocities. Further SW, the Pliny and Strabo Trenches are also often interpreted as strike-slip shear zones, but almost all nearby earthquakes have either reverse-faulting or normal-faulting focal mechanisms. Oblique convergence across the trenches may be accommodated either by a partitioned system of strike-slip and reverse faults or by oblique slip on the Aegean-Nubia subduction interface. The observed late-Quaternary vertical motions of coastlines close to the subduction zone are influenced by the interplay between: (1) thickening of the material overriding the subduction interface associated with convergence, which promotes coastal uplift; and (2) subsidence due to extension and associated crustal thinning. Long-wavelength gravity data suggest that some of the observed topographic contrasts in the eastern

  3. IODP Expedition 333: Return to Nankai Trough Subduction Inputs Sites and Coring of Mass Transport Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Strasser

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 333 returned to two sites drilled during IODP Expedition 322 on the ocean side of the Nankai Trough to pursue the characterization of the inputs to the Nankai subduction and seismogenic zone, as part of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Experiment (NanTroSEIZE multi-expedition project. SiteC0011 is located at the seaward edge of the trench and Site C0012 on a basement high, Kashinozaki Knoll (Fig. 1. The main objectives of drilling again at these sites were to fill coring gaps in the upper part (<350 m of the sedimentary sequence, to measure heat flow, and to core the oceanic basement to a greater depth on the Knoll. New results include the observation of a diagenetic boundary within the Shikoku Basin sediments that may be compared to one documented further west by ODP Legs 131, 190 and 196 but occurs here at a lower temperature. Borehole heat flow measurements confirm spatial variations in the Shikoku Basin that were indicated by short probe surveys. Heat flow variations between topographic highs and lows may be related to fluid convection within the basement. This expedition also included the objectives of the Nankai Trough Submarine LandSLIDEhistory (NanTroSLIDE Ancillary Project Letter (APL and cored at Site C0018 a pile of mass transport deposits on the footwall of the megasplay fault, a major out of sequence thrust that presumably slips coseismically during large subduction earthquakes. This brought newinsight on the timing of these mass wasting events and on the deformation within the sliding slope sediments.

  4. Finite-fault slip model of the 2016 Mw 7.5 Chiloé earthquake, southern Chile, estimated from Sentinel-1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbin

    2017-05-01

    Subduction earthquakes have been widely studied in the Chilean subduction zone, but earthquakes occurring in its southern part have attracted less research interest primarily due to its lower rate of seismic activity. Here I use Sentinel-1 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data and range offset measurements to generate coseismic crustal deformation maps of the 2016 Mw 7.5 Chiloé earthquake in southern Chile. I find a concentrated crustal deformation with ground displacement of approximately 50 cm in the southern part of the Chiloé island. The best fitting fault model shows a pure thrust-fault motion on a shallow dipping plane orienting 4° NNE. The InSAR-determined moment is 2.4 × 1020 Nm with a shear modulus of 30 GPa, equivalent to Mw 7.56, which is slightly lower than the seismic moment. The model shows that the slip did not reach the trench, and it reruptured part of the fault that ruptured in the 1960 Mw 9.5 earthquake. The 2016 event has only released a small portion of the accumulated strain energy on the 1960 rupture zone, suggesting that the seismic hazard of future great earthquakes in southern Chile is high.

  5. Multi-Physics Modelling of Fault Mechanics Using REDBACK: A Parallel Open-Source Simulator for Tightly Coupled Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Thomas; Paesold, Martin; Veveakis, Manolis

    2017-03-01

    Faults play a major role in many economically and environmentally important geological systems, ranging from impermeable seals in petroleum reservoirs to fluid pathways in ore-forming hydrothermal systems. Their behavior is therefore widely studied and fault mechanics is particularly focused on the mechanisms explaining their transient evolution. Single faults can change in time from seals to open channels as they become seismically active and various models have recently been presented to explain the driving forces responsible for such transitions. A model of particular interest is the multi-physics oscillator of Alevizos et al. (J Geophys Res Solid Earth 119(6), 4558-4582, 2014) which extends the traditional rate and state friction approach to rate and temperature-dependent ductile rocks, and has been successfully applied to explain spatial features of exposed thrusts as well as temporal evolutions of current subduction zones. In this contribution we implement that model in REDBACK, a parallel open-source multi-physics simulator developed to solve such geological instabilities in three dimensions. The resolution of the underlying system of equations in a tightly coupled manner allows REDBACK to capture appropriately the various theoretical regimes of the system, including the periodic and non-periodic instabilities. REDBACK can then be used to simulate the drastic permeability evolution in time of such systems, where nominally impermeable faults can sporadically become fluid pathways, with permeability increases of several orders of magnitude.

  6. The role of pre-existing thrust ramps on the evolution of a differently oriented thrust systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Lorenzo; Pini, Gian Andrea; Ponton, Maurizio; Del Ben, Anna

    2017-04-01

    In the accretionary wedges, as well as in fold-and-thrust belts, shortening is mostly accommodated by fault-related folding. This kind of structures are sensitive both to internal factors such as the mechanical characteristics of the rocks involved in contractional processes, and to external ones such as erosion or syn-kinematics sedimentation. Notwithstanding such diversity, the resulting geometries are commonly composed by faults with flat and ramp trajectory and their related folds. The above mentioned factors may directly affect both the geometry and the kinematics of a fault-related folding, for instance, the location, the number, and the frictional properties of weak horizons lead the location and the extent of the flat portion of the thrust systems. The mechanical properties of the rocks involved in the contractional phase impacts on the location and geometry of the thrust ramp. Thus, the stratigraphic and tectonic architecture of an area is central to predict or study the evolution of a contractional system. Among different factors, we select to test the role of pre-existing thrust ramp on the subsequent evolution on differently oriented thrust ramp. As a method we use analogue modeling and as an analogue material we use wet clay (kaolin). We reproduce different setups varying the initial orientation of the pre-existing thrust ramp with respect to the new ramp that we force to nucleate in the same region of the experiment box. The tested angles vary from 0°, i.e. the two ramps are parallel, to 90°, i.e. the two ramps are perpendicular. Our results show that the angle between the two systems directly impact on the degree of development of new ramps. When the angle between new and pre-existing thrust ramps is low, e.g. <30°, the reactivation of the pre-existing ramp prevail on the development of a new ramp. Conversely, high angles promote the development of new thrust ramps optimally oriented with respect to the imposed stress field. Our results are

  7. New active faults on Eurasian-Arabian collision zone: Tectonic activity of Özyurt and Gülsünler faults (Eastern Anatolian Plateau, Van-Turkey)

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    Dicle, S.; Üner, S.

    2017-11-01

    The Eastern Anatolian Plateau emerges from the continental collision between Arabian and Eurasian plates where intense seismicity related to the ongoing convergence characterizes the southern part of the plateau. Active deformation in this zone is shared by mainly thrust and strike-slip faults. The Özyurt thrust fault and the Gülsünler sinistral strike-slip fault are newly determined fault zones, located to the north of Van city centre. Different types of faults such as thrust, normal and strike-slip faults are observed on the quarry wall excavated in Quaternary lacustrine deposits at the intersection zone of these two faults. Kinematic analysis of fault-slip data has revealed coeval activities of transtensional and compressional structures for the Lake Van Basin. Seismological and geomorphological characteristics of these faults demonstrate the capability of devastating earthquakes for the area.

  8. Blueschist facies pseudotachylytes from Corsica: First account of fossil earthquakes from a subduction complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T. B.; Austrheim, H.

    2003-04-01

    Pseudotachylytes (PST) are products of deformation at extreme slip-rates along faults or in impact structures. Fault-plane PSTs are considered to represent fossil earthquakes. Tectonics in subduction zones, generate >80% of the seismic energy. Earthquake rocks should therefore also be common in old subduction complexes. Blueschist terrains are formed in the upper 15 to 50 km by tectonic burial in accreationary complexes and subduction zones. In spite of the very common earthquakes recorded from present-day subduction complexes, we are unaware of previous accounts of fossil earthquakes from exhumed subduction complexes. With a working hypothesis predicting fossil earthquakes to be preserved in subduction complexes, we have re-examined parts of the Alpine blueschist-eclogite terrain in Corsica. Within blueschist facies ophiolite gabbro and peridotite of Cape Corse, we discovered a number of faults decorated with ultra-fine fault rocks including PSTs. Detailed probe and SEM-studies reveal that some of the PSTs have quench textures proving the former presence of a melt. Quenched minerals, including fassaitic pyroxene are found as spherulites and dendrites. Fassaite has previously been described from UHP complexes and from PSTs formed in HP experiments. Other devitrification minerals include glaucophane, barroisite and zoisite as well as pumpellyite and albite. Our hypothesis -- fossil earthquakes in the form of frictional heat generated PST and ultra-cataclasite may be preserved within subduction complexes -- has been confirmed. Whilst most models view the properties of subducted lithosphere as a function of temperature, it is increasingly recognized that the rheological properties of rocks depend on their metamorphic status and importantly on fluids. Fluids from dehydration reactions in subduction complexes may reduce the effective stress to allow rapid brittle failure, which in turn may produce frictional heating and additional dehydration. It is, however, also

  9. A Silent Slip Event on the Deeper Cascadia Subduction Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragert, Herb; Wang, Kelin; James, Thomas S.

    2001-05-01

    Continuous Global Positioning System sites in southwestern British Columbia, Canada, and northwestern Washington state, USA, have been moving landward as a result of the locked state of the Cascadia subduction fault offshore. In the summer of 1999, a cluster of seven sites briefly reversed their direction of motion. No seismicity was associated with this event. The sudden displacements are best explained by ~2 centimeters of aseismic slip over a 50-kilometer-by-300-kilometer area on the subduction interface downdip from the seismogenic zone, a rupture equivalent to an earthquake of moment magnitude 6.7. This provides evidence that slip of the hotter, plastic part of the subduction interface, and hence stress loading of the megathrust earthquake zone, can occur in discrete pulses.

  10. A silent slip event on the deeper Cascadia subduction interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragert, G; Wang, K; James, T S

    2001-05-25

    Continuous Global Positioning System sites in southwestern British Columbia, Canada, and northwestern Washington state, USA, have been moving landward as a result of the locked state of the Cascadia subduction fault offshore. In the summer of 1999, a cluster of seven sites briefly reversed their direction of motion. No seismicity was associated with this event. The sudden displacements are best explained by approximately 2 centimeters of aseismic slip over a 50-kilometer-by-300-kilometer area on the subduction interface downdip from the seismogenic zone, a rupture equivalent to an earthquake of moment magnitude 6.7. This provides evidence that slip of the hotter, plastic part of the subduction interface, and hence stress loading of the megathrust earthquake zone, can occur in discrete pulses.

  11. THE POTENTIAL OF TSUNAMI GENERATION ALONG THE MAKRAN SUBDUCTION ZONE IN THE NORTHERN ARABIAN SEA. CASE STUDY: THE EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI OF NOVEMBER 28, 1945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although large earthquakes along the Makran Subduction Zone are infrequent, the potential for the generation of destructive tsunamis in the Northern Arabian Sea cannot be overlooked. It is quite possible that historical tsunamis in this region have not been properly reported or documented. Such past tsunamis must have affected Southern Pakistan, India, Iran, Oman, the Maldives and other countries bordering the Indian Ocean.The best known of the historical tsunamis in the region is the one generated by the great earthquake of November 28, 1945 off Pakistan's Makran Coast (Balochistan in the Northern Arabian Sea. The destructive tsunami killed more than 4,000 people in Southern Pakistan but also caused great loss of life and devastation along the coasts of Western India, Iran, Oman and possibly elsewhere.The seismotectonics of the Makran subduction zone, historical earthquakes in the region, the recent earthquake of October 8, 2005 in Northern Pakistan, and the great tsunamigenic earthquakes of December 26, 2004 and March 28, 2005, are indicative of the active tectonic collision process that is taking place along the entire southern and southeastern boundary of the Eurasian plate as it collides with the Indian plate and adjacent microplates. Tectonic stress transference to other, stress loaded tectonic regions could trigger tsunamigenic earthquakes in the Northern Arabian Sea in the future.The northward movement and subduction of the Oman oceanic lithosphere beneath the Iranian micro-plate at a very shallow angle and at the high rate is responsible for active orogenesis and uplift that has created a belt of highly folded and densely faulted coastal mountain ridges along the coastal region of Makran, in both the Balochistan and Sindh provinces. The same tectonic collision process has created offshore thrust faults. As in the past, large destructive tsunamigenic earthquakes can occur along major faults in the east Makran region, near Karachi, as

  12. The relationship between orogenesis, terrane accretion and the subduction of oceanic ridges in the Ecuadorian andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spikings, R.; Winkler, W.; Seward, D.; Hughes, R.; Handler, R.; Crowhurst, P.

    2003-04-01

    Oceanic hotspot activity, generating large oceanic igneous plateau provinces, plate rearrangements and the generation of new spreading centers since at least 90 Ma have formed large structural, thickness and density heterogeneities in the approaching and subducting oceanic crust offshore NW South America (SOAM). Various oceanic allochthonous terranes comprise western Ecuador and the relatively thick and buoyant Carnegie Ridge is being subducted. We present 40Ar/39Ar, fission track (FT) and (U-Th/He) data from i) the Eastern Cordillera and the Amotape Complex, which define the palaeo-continental margin, ii) the Western Cordillera, which is built upon allochthonous, oceanic crust and iii) a tectonic mélange at the ocean-continent suture. 40Ar/39Ar ages and FT data from exotic, Triassic blocks within the ocean-continent suture record elevated cooling rates of plateau basalts and the continental margin. 40Ar/39Ar ages and FT data from the palaeo-continental margin show that the entire contemporaneous continental margin was being cooled by rapid tectonic exhumation (combined with geochemical analyses, suggest that these periods of orogenesis were driven by stress imposed by the collision of terranes that originated at the Caribbean Plateau. Distinct periods of rapid cooling and exhumation of fault blocks in the W. Cordillera and the northern E. Cordillera occurred at ˜15 and ˜9 Ma. Cooling at ˜15 Ma was driven by the collision of the Carnegie Ridge with the trench at ˜15 Ma. The elevated, compressive stress field gave rise to a complex transcurrent system, resulting in uplift, exhumation and cooling in the northern E. Cordillera and extension in the southern E. Cordillera. Finally, FT and (U-Th)/He data record rapid cooling in the northern E. Cordillera and parts of the W. Cordillera at ˜6-5 Ma, suggesting that the middle Miocene transcurrent system was reactivated by thrust tectonics during the late Miocene, giving rise to the Interandean Valley, which split the

  13. High-resolution seismic profiles of the active wedge thrusts in the Toyama basin, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoko; Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya

    2017-04-01

    Thick-Neogene sediments accumulated in the Toyama basin, Miocene failed rift formed in the opening stage of the Sea of Japan. Due to the shortening deformation since the Pliocene, NE-trending reverse faults and folds have been developed to form active fault systems. Evaluation of seismic hazards requires understanding the relationship between active fault and seismic source fault is important. To obtain complete image of the active seismogenic source fault system, we carried out the high-resolution seismic profiling across the active faults in the Toyama basin, together with the deep seismic reflection profiling (KT01: Ishiyama et al., 2016). Seismic data were acquired using two vibrator trucks (IVI, EnviroVib) and a Mini-vib (IVI T15000). Shot and receiver intervals are 10 and 12.5 m respectively. The seismic data were processed using conventional CMP-reflection methods. The obtained seismic sections across the Takashozu and Isurugi faults portrays the growth strata associated with the Plio-Quaternary reverse faulting. The seismic sections show that both structures are formed as wedge thrusts at shallower structural levels. P-wave velocity profiles obtained by refraction tomography accords well to the geologic interpretation as a wedge thrust. The depth of thrust tip of main thrust is 0.6 km to 1.5 km and located in the syn rift Miocene mudstone. As the main anticline was formed by the deep-seated thrust, this shallow thrust played a secondary role for this anticline. Our results demonstrate that high-resolution seismic profiles help to reveal source fault geometry and their activity.

  14. Double-ramp on the Main Himalayan Thrust revealed by broadband waveform modeling of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wei, Shengji; Wu, Wenbo

    2017-09-01

    The 2015Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake sequence that unzipped the lower edge of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) in central Nepal provides an exceptional opportunity to understand the fault geometry in this region. However, the limited number of focal mechanisms and the poor horizontal locations and depths of earthquakes in the global catalog impede us from clearly imaging the ruptured MHT. In this study, we generalized the Amplitude Amplification Factor (AAF) method to teleseismic distance that allows us to model the teleseismic P-waves up to 1.5 Hz. We used well-constrained medium-sized earthquakes to establish AAF corrections for teleseismic stations that were later used to invert the high-frequency waveforms of other nearby events. This new approach enables us to invert the focal mechanisms of some early aftershocks, which is challenging by using other long-period methods. With this method, we obtained 12 focal mechanisms more than that in the GCMT catalog. We also modeled the high-frequency teleseismic P-waves and the surface reflection phases (pP and sP) to precisely constrain the depths of the earthquakes. Our results indicate that the uncertainty of the depth estimation is as small as 1-2 km. Finally, we refined the horizontal locations of these aftershocks using carefully hand-picked arrivals. The refined aftershock mechanisms and locations delineate a clear double-ramp geometry of the MHT, with an almost flat décollement sandwiched in between. The flat (dip ∼7 degrees) portion of the MHT is consistent with the coseismic rupture of the mainshock, which has a well-constrained slip distribution. The fault morphology suggests that the ramps, both along the up-dip and down-dip directions, play a significant role in stopping the rupture of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake. Our method can be applied to general subduction zone earthquakes and fault geometry studies.

  15. Recommended Practices in Thrust Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    thruster is an important measurement parameter. For instance, the thrusters for the ST7/ LISA Pathfinder mission had to demonstrate a thrust noise level...Ceccanti, F., Priami, L., and Paita, L., “Direct Thrust and Thrust Noise Measurements on the LISA Pathfinder Field Emission Thruster IEPC-2009-183

  16. Topographic and sedimentary features in the Yap subduction zone and their implications for the Caroline Ridge subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhengyi; Bai, Yongliang; Fan, Jianke; Zhang, Guangxu

    2018-01-01

    The Yap subduction zone in the western Pacific presents some unique features compared to normal intra-oceanic subduction zones such as the subduction of an oceanic plateau. However, due to the relative paucity of geophysical data, the detailed structure remains unknown in this area. In this study, we present the latest high-quality swath bathymetry and multi-channel seismic data acquired synchronously in 2015 across the Yap subduction zone. The topographic and sedimentary features are intensively investigated and a modified evolutionary model of the Yap subduction zone is proposed. The two-stage evolution of the Parece Vela Basin (PVB) produced fabrics that are N-S trending and NW-SE trending. Our seismic data clearly reveal landslide deposits at the upper slope break of the forearc, to the north of the Yap Island, which was identified as the fault notch denoting a lithological boundary in previous work. The swath bathymetry and seismic profile reveal detailed horst and graben structures, including a crescent-shaped fault zone near the contact between the Yap Trench and the Caroline Ridge. A simple geometric model is proposed to explain the structure formation, indicating that the higher topography of the Caroline Ridge resulted in enhanced bending-related extension. A seismic angular unconformity (named R1) is identified in the Sorol Trough, marking the onset of rifting in the trough. Based on the sequence thickness and deposition rate by Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP), it is deduced that the Sorol Trough formed at 10 Ma or even earlier. A modified model for the Yap subduction zone evolution is proposed, incorporating three major tectonic events: the proto-Yap Arc rupture in the Oligocene, the collision of the Caroline Ridge and the Yap Trench in the late Oligocene or middle Miocene, and the onset of the Sorol Trough rifting in the late Miocene.

  17. 3D geodynamic models for the development of opposing continental subduction zones: The Hindu Kush-Pamir example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras; Thielmann, Marcel; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Kufner, Sofia-Katerina; Yin, An

    2017-12-01

    The development of opposing continental subduction zones remains scantly explored in three dimensions. The Hindu Kush-Pamir orogenic system at the western end of the Himalayan orogen provides a rare example of continental collision linked to two opposing intra-continental subduction zones. The subducted plates feature a peculiar 3D geometry consisting of two distinct lithospheric fragments with different polarities, subduction angles and slab-curvatures beneath the Hindu Kush and Pamir, respectively. Using 3D geodynamic modeling, we simulate possible development of two opposing continental subduction zones to understand the dynamic evolution of the Hindu Kush-Pamir orogenic system. Our geodynamic model reproduces the major tectonic elements observed: (1) the deeper subduction depth, the steeper dip angle and the southward offset of the Hindu Kush subduction zone relative to the Pamir naturally occur if convergence direction of the subducting Indian plate and dip-direction of the Hindu Kush subduction zone match. (2) The formation of the highly asymmetrically curved Pamir region and the south-dipping subduction is promoted by the initial geometry of the indenting Indian lithosphere together with the existence of a major strike-slip fault on the eastern margin of the Pamir region. (3) Subduction of only the lower continental crust during continental collision can occur if the coupling between upper and lower crusts is weak enough to allow a separation of these two components, and that (4) the subduction of mainly lower crust then facilitates that conditions for intermediate-depth seismicity can be reached. (5) The secondary tectonic features modeled here such as strike-slip-fault growth, north-northwest striking extension zone, and lateral flow of the thickened ductile upper crust are comparable to the current tectonics of the region. (6) Model results are further compared to the potentially similar orogenic system, i.e., the Alpine orogen, in terms of the curved

  18. Breaking the oceanic lithosphere of a subducting slab: the 2013 Khash, Iran earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, William D.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Samsonov, S.; Fielding, E.; Seidman, L.

    2014-01-01

    [1] Large intermediate depth, intraslab normal faulting earthquakes are a common, dangerous, but poorly understood phenomenon in subduction zones owing to a paucity of near field geophysical observations. Seismological and high quality geodetic observations of the 2013 Mw7.7 Khash, Iran earthquake reveal that at least half of the oceanic lithosphere, including the mantle and entire crust, ruptured in a single earthquake, confirming with unprecedented resolution that large earthquakes can nucleate in and rupture through the oceanic mantle. A rupture width of at least 55 km is required to explain both InSAR observations and teleseismic waveforms, with the majority of slip occurring in the oceanic mantle. Combining our well-constrained earthquake slip distributions with the causative fault orientation and geometry of the local subduction zone, we hypothesize that the Khash earthquake likely occurred as the combined result of slab bending forces and dehydration of hydrous minerals along a preexisting fault formed prior to subduction.

  19. Mechanical power, thrust power

    OpenAIRE

    Gatta, Giorgio; Cortesi, Matteo; Swaine, Ian; Zamparo, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between mechanical power, thrust power, propelling efficiency and sprint performance in elite swimmers. Mechanical power was measured in 12 elite sprint male swimmers: i) in the laboratory, by using a whole body swimming ergometer (W’TOT); and ii) in the pool, by measuring full tethered swimming force (FT) and maximal swimming velocity (Vmax): W’T = FT .Vmax. Propelling efficiency ( P) was estimated based on the “paddle wheel model“ a...

  20. Subduction processes related to the Sea of Okhotsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabarinskaya, Ludmila P.; Sergeyeva, Nataliya

    2017-04-01

    It is obviously important to study a role of subduction processes in tectonic activity within the continental margins. They are marked by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunami and other natural disasters hazardous to the people,plants and animals that inhabit such regions. The northwest part of the Sea of Okhotsk including the northern part of Sakhalin Island and the Deryugin Basin is the area of the recent intensive tectonic movements. The geological and geophysical data have made it possible to construct the geodynamic model of a deep structure of a lithosphere for this region. This geodynamic model has confirmed the existence of the ophiolite complex in the region under consideration. It located between the North Sakhalin sedimentary basin and the Deryugin basin. The Deryugin basin was formed on the side of an ancient deep trench after subducting the Okhotsk Sea Plate under Sakhalin in the Late Cretaceous-Paleogene. The North Sakhalin Basin with oil and gas resources was formed on the side of back-arc basin at that time. Approximately in the Miocene period the subduction process, apparently, has stopped. The remains of the subduction zone in the form of ophiolite complex have been identified according to geological and geophysical data. On a surface the subduction zone is shown as deep faults stretched along Sakhalin.

  1. Crustal thickening in Gansu-Qinghai, lithospheric mantle subduction, and oblique, strike-slip controlled growth of the Tibet plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, B.; Tapponnier, P.; Bourjot, L.; Métivier, F.; Gaudemer, Y.; Peltzer, G.; Shunmin, Guo; Zhitai, Chen

    1998-10-01

    Fieldwork complemented by SPOT image analysis throws light on current crustal shortening processes in the ranges of northeastern Tibet (Gansu and Qinghai provinces, China). The ongoing deformation of Late-Pleistocene bajada aprons in the forelands of the ranges involves folding, at various scales, and chiefly north-vergent, seismogenic thrusts. The most active thrusts usually break the ground many kilometres north of the range-fronts, along the northeast limbs of growing, asymmetric ramp-anticlines. Normal faulting at the apex of other growing anticlines, between the range fronts and the thrust breaks, implies slip on blind ramps connecting distinct active décollement levels that deepen southwards. The various patterns of uplift of the bajada surfaces can be used to constrain plausible links between contemporary thrusts downsection. Typically, the foreland thrusts and décollements appear to splay from master thrusts that plunge at least 15-20 km down beneath the high ranges. Plio-Quaternary anticlinal ridges rising to more than 3000 m a.s.l. expose Palaeozoic metamorphic basement in their core. In general, the geology and topography of the ranges and forelands imply that structural reliefs of the order of 5-10 km have accrued at rates of 1-2 mm yr-1 in approximately the last 5 Ma. From hill to range size, the elongated reliefs that result from such Late-Cenozoic, NE-SW shortening appear to follow a simple scaling law, with roughly constant length/width ratio, suggesting that they have grown self-similarly. The greatest mountain ranges, which are over 5.5 km high, tens of kilometres wide and hundreds of kilometres long may thus be interpreted to have formed as NW-trending ramp anticlines, at the scale of the middle-upper crust. The fairly regular, large-scale arrangement of those ranges, with parallel crests separated by piggy-back basins, the coevality of many parallel, south-dipping thrusts, and a change in the scaling ratio (from ~5 to 8) for range widths

  2. New High-Resolution 3D Imagery of Fault Deformation and Segmentation of the San Onofre and San Mateo Trends in the Inner California Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G. M.; Bormann, J. M.; Harding, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Inner California Borderlands (ICB) is situated off the coast of southern California and northern Baja. The structural and geomorphic characteristics of the area record a middle Oligocene transition from subduction to microplate capture along the California coast. Marine stratigraphic evidence shows large-scale extension and rotation overprinted by modern strike-slip deformation. Geodetic and geologic observations indicate that approximately 6-8 mm/yr of Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by offshore strike-slip faulting in the ICB. The farthest inshore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood Rose Canyon (NIRC) fault complex is a dextral strike-slip system that extends primarily offshore approximately 120 km from San Diego to the San Joaquin Hills near Newport Beach, California. Based on trenching and well data, the NIRC fault system Holocene slip rate is 1.5-2.0 mm/yr to the south and 0.5-1.0 mm/yr along its northern extent. An earthquake rupturing the entire length of the system could produce an Mw 7.0 earthquake or larger. West of the main segments of the NIRC fault complex are the San Mateo and San Onofre fault trends along the continental slope. Previous work concluded that these were part of a strike-slip system that eventually merged with the NIRC complex. Others have interpreted these trends as deformation associated with the Oceanside Blind Thrust fault purported to underlie most of the region. In late 2013, we acquired the first high-resolution 3D P-Cable seismic surveys (3.125 m bin resolution) of the San Mateo and San Onofre trends as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project aboard the R/V New Horizon. Analysis of these volumes provides important new insights and constraints on the fault segmentation and transfer of deformation. Based on the new 3D sparker seismic data, our preferred interpretation for the San Mateo and San Onofre fault trends is they are transpressional features associated with westward

  3. Dehydration of lawsonite could directly trigger earthquakes in subducting oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Keishi; Hirth, Greg

    2016-02-01

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes in cold subduction zones are observed within the subducting oceanic crust, as well as the mantle. In contrast, intermediate-depth earthquakes in hot subduction zones predominantly occur just below the Mohorovičić discontinuity. These observations have stimulated interest in relationships between blueschist-facies metamorphism and seismicity, particularly through dehydration reactions involving the mineral lawsonite. Here we conducted deformation experiments on lawsonite, while monitoring acoustic emissions, in a Griggs-type deformation apparatus. The temperature was increased above the thermal stability of lawsonite, while the sample was deforming, to test whether the lawsonite dehydration reaction induces unstable fault slip. In contrast to similar tests on antigorite, unstable fault slip (that is, stick-slip) occurred during dehydration reactions in the lawsonite and acoustic emission signals were continuously observed. Microstructural observations indicate that strain is highly localized along the fault (R1 and B shears), and that the fault surface develops slickensides (very smooth fault surfaces polished by frictional sliding). The unloading slope during the unstable slip follows the stiffness of the apparatus at all experimental conditions, regardless of the strain rate and temperature ramping rate. A thermomechanical scaling factor for the experiments is within the range estimated for natural subduction zones, indicating the potential for unstable frictional sliding within natural lawsonite layers.

  4. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  5. From subduction to arc-continent collision: Geodynamic modeling of strain partitioning and mountain building in the Indonesia Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Liu, M.; Harris, R.

    2006-12-01

    The arc-continental collision in the eastern Indonesia archipelago began 3-5 million years ago. This process has been continuously building one of the youngest orogenic belts on Earth. Both GPS measurement and geological observation indicated westward weakening of crustal shortening in this region, correlating with the transition from continent-arc collision in the Timor trough to oceanic slab-arc convergence in the Java trench. We have developed a finite element model to investigate how the continent-ocean floor transition on the subducting Australian plate and rheologic heterogeneity of the Sunda region have controlled strain partitioning and mountain building in the overriding plate. To simulate the progressive oblique collision between the Indo- Australian plate and Southeast Asian plate, we constructed the model in 3D with nonlinear viscous rheology that also includes fault zones and rheological heterogeneity in both horizontal and vertical direction. Topographic loading is considered, and tectonic loading is calculated from the velocity boundary condition based on either Nuvel-1A or GPS measurements. Our model showed direct link between plate coupling and crustal shortening in the upper plate. When the coupling is weak, deformation concentrates near the trench. As coupling increases, more plate convergence is accommodated by crustal shorting in the upper plate. The initiation of the continent-arc collision in the eastern Timor could explain the cease of oceanic floor spreading in the south Banda basin and the development of back arc thrust. Slipping of the back arc thrusts played a critical role in uplift and tilting of the upper plate in the double-vergent Timor islands. Within a reasonable range of rheological parameters, our model is able to predict surface velocity, uplift rate, and stress states consistent with the GPS data, geological observation and earthquake mechanism solutions. Results of this model provide some useful insights into the evolution of

  6. Thrust modeling for hypersonic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, D. W.; Mcclinton, C. R.

    1995-01-01

    Expressions for the thrust losses of a scramjet engine are developed in terms of irreversible entropy increases and the degree of incomplete combustion. A method is developed which allows the calculation of the lost vehicle thrust due to different loss mechanisms within a given flow-field. This analysis demonstrates clearly the trade-off between mixing enhancement and resultant increased flow losses in scramjet combustors. An engine effectiveness parameter is defined in terms of thrust loss. Exergy and the thrust-potential method are related and compared.

  7. Evidence for early miocene wrench faulting in the Marlborough fault system, New Zealand: structural implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audru, Jean-Christophe; Delteil, Jean

    1998-10-01

    In New Zealand, the Marlborough strike-slip faults link the Hikurangi subduction zone to the Alpine fault collision zone. Stratigraphic and structural analysis in the Marlborough region constrain the inception of the current strike-slip tectonics. Six major Neogene basins are investigated. Their infill is composed of marine and freshwater sediments up to 3 km thick; they are characterised by coarse facies derived from the basins bounding relief, high sedimentation rates and asymmetric geometries. Proposed factors that controlled the basins' generation are the initial geometry of the strike-slip faults and the progressive strike-slip motion. Two groups of basins are presented: the early Miocene (23 My) basins were generated under wrench tectonics above releasing-jogs between basement faults. The late Miocene (11 My) basins were initiated by halfgrabens tilted along straighter faults during a transtensive stage. Development of faults during Cretaceous to Oligocene times facilitated the following propagation of wrench tectonics. The Pliocene (5 My) to current increasing convergence has shortened the basins and distorted the Miocene array of faults. This study indicates that the Marlborough Fault System is an old feature that connected part of the Hikurangi margin to the Alpine fault since the subduction and collision initiation.

  8. Source characteristics of moderate size events using empirical Green funclions: an application to some Guerrero (Mexico subduction zone earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Singh

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The records of an aftershock (M ~ 4 of a moderate size event (M = 5.9 which occurred along the subduction zone of Guerrero (Mexico, are used as empirical Green functions (EGF to determine the source characteristics of the mainshock and of its smaller size (M = 5.5 foreshock. The data consist of accelerograms recorded by the Guerrero Accelerograph Array, a high dynamic range strong motion array. The three events appear to be located close to each other at distances much smaller than the source to receiver distances. The fault mechanism of the mainshock is computed by non-linear inversion of P polarity readings and S wave polarizations determined at two near source stations. The foreshock and aftershock fault mechanisms are similar to that of the mainshock as inferred from long period data and shear wave polarization analysis. The maximum likelihood solution is well constrained, indicating a typical shallow dipping thrust fault mechanism, with the P-axis approximately oriented in a SSW direction. The source time functions (STFs of the mainshock and foreshock events are determined using a new method of deconvolution of the EGF records at three strong motion sites. In this method the STF of the large event is approximated by a superposition of pseudo triangular pulses whose parameters are determined by a non-linear inversion in frequency domain. The source time function of the mainshock shows the presence of two separate pulses, which can be related to multiple rupture episodes. The relative location of mainshock sub-events is done by using plots of isochrones computed from measurementes of the time delay between pulses on the STF records at each station. The first sub-event is located no more than 2.5-3 km away from the other along the fault strike. The STF retrieved from foreshock records shows single pulse waveforms. The computed STFs are used to estimate seismic moments, source radii and stress release of the events assuming a circular fault

  9. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  10. The Two Subduction Zones of the Southern Caribbean: Lithosphere Tearing and Continental Margin Recycling in the East, Flat Slab Subduction and Laramide-Style Uplifts in the West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Niu, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2015-12-01

    The southern Caribbean plate boundary is a complex strike-slip fault system bounded by oppositely vergent subduction zones, the Antilles subduction zone in the east, and a currently locked Caribbean-South American subduction zone in the west (Bilham and Mencin, 2013). Finite-frequency teleseismic P-wave tomography images both the Atlanic (ATL) and the Caribbean (CAR) plates subducting steeply in opposite directions to transition zone depths under northern South America. Ps receiver functions show a depressed 660 discontinuity and thickened transition zone associated with each subducting plate. In the east the oceanic (ATL) part of the South American (SA) plate subducts westward beneath the CAR, initiating the El Pilar-San Sebastian strike slip system, a subduction-transform edge propagator (STEP) fault (Govers and Wortel, 2005). The point at which the ATL tears away from SA as it descends into the mantle is evidenced by the Paria cluster seismicity at depths of 60-110 km (Russo et al, 1993). Body wave tomography and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) thickness determined from Sp and Ps receiver functions and Rayleigh waves suggest that the descending ATL also viscously removes the bottom third to half of the SA continental margin lithospheric mantle as it descends. This has left thinned continental lithosphere under northern SA in the wake of the eastward migrating Antilles subduction zone. The thinned lithosphere occupies ~70% of the length of the El Pilar-San Sebastian fault system, from ~64oW to ~69oW, and extends inland several hundred kilometers. In northwestern SA the CAR subducts east-southeast at low angle under northern Colombia and western Venezuela. The subducting CAR is at least 200 km wide, extending from northernmost Colombia as far south as the Bucaramanga nest seismicity. The CAR descends steeply under Lake Maracaibo and the Merida Andes. This flat slab is associated with three Neogene basement cored, Laramide-style uplifts: the Santa Marta

  11. Why style matters - uncertainty and structural interpretation in thrust belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rob; Bond, Clare; Watkins, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    Structural complexity together with challenging seismic imaging make for significant uncertainty in developing geometric interpretations of fold and thrust belts. Here we examine these issues and develop more realistic approaches to building interpretations. At all scales, the best tests of the internal consistency of individual interpretations come from structural restoration (section balancing), provided allowance is made for heterogeneity in stratigraphy and strain. However, many existing balancing approaches give misleading perceptions of interpretational risk - both on the scale of individual fold-thrust (trap) structures and in regional cross-sections. At the trap-scale, idealised models are widely cited - fault-bend-fold, fault-propagation folding and trishear. These make entirely arbitrary choices for fault localisation and layer-by-layer deformation: precise relationships between faults and fold geometry are generally invalidated by real-world conditions of stratigraphic variation and distributed strain. Furthermore, subsurface predictions made using these idealisations for hydrocarbon exploration commonly fail the test of drilling. Rarely acknowledged, the geometric reliability of seismic images depends on the assigned seismic velocity model, which in turn relies on geological interpretation. Thus iterative approaches are required between geology and geophysics. The portfolio of commonly cited outcrop analogues is strongly biased to examples that simply conform to idealised models - apparently abnormal structures are rarely described - or even photographed! Insight can come from gravity-driven deep-water fold-belts where part of the spectrum of fold-thrust complexity is resolved through seismic imaging. This imagery shows deformation complexity in fold forelimbs and backlimbs. However, the applicability of these, weakly lithified systems to well-lithified successions (e.g. carbonates) of many foreland thrust belts remains conjectural. Examples of

  12. Boron cycling in subduction zones

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Martin R.

    2017-01-01

    Subduction zones are geologically dramatic features, with much of the drama being driven by the movement of water. The “light and lively” nature of boron, coupled with its wide variations in isotopic composition shown by the different geo-players in this drama, make it an ideal tracer for the role and movement of water during subduction. The utility of boron ranges from monitoring how the fluids that are expelled from the accretionary prism influence seawater chemistry, to the subduction of c...

  13. Upper crustal shortening and forward modeling of the Himalayan thrust belt along the Budhi-Gandaki River, central Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Subodha; Robinson, Delores M.

    2013-04-01

    A balanced cross-section along the Budhi-Gandaki River in central Nepal between the Main Central thrust, including displacement on that fault, and the Main Frontal thrust reveals a minimum total shortening of 400 km. Minimum displacement on major orogen-scale structures include 116 km on the Main Central thrust, 110 km on the Ramgarh thrust, 95 km on the Trishuli thrust, and 56 km in the Lesser Himalayan duplex. The balanced cross-section was also incrementally forward modeled assuming a generally forward-breaking sequence of thrusting, where early faults and hanging-wall structures are passively carried from the hinterland toward the foreland. The approximate correspondence of the forward modeled result to observe present day geometries suggest that the section interpretation is viable and admissible. In the balanced cross-section, the Trishuli thrust is the roof thrust for the Lesser Himalayan duplex. The forward model and reconstruction emphasize that the Lesser Himalayan duplex grew by incorporating rock from the footwall and transferring it to the hanging wall along the Main Himalayan thrust. As the duplex developed, the Lesser Himalayan ramp migrated southward. The movement of Lesser Himalayan thrust sheets over the ramp pushed the Lesser Himalayan rock and the overburdens of the Greater and Tibetan Himalayan rock toward the erosional surface. This vertical structural movement caused by footwall collapse and duplexing, in combination with erosion, exhumed the Lesser Himalaya.

  14. Kinematics of Late Cretaceous subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructed from ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; de Gelder, Giovanni; van der Goes, Freek; Morris, Antony

    2017-04-01

    Formation of new subduction zones represents one of the cornerstones of plate tectonics, yet both the kinematics and geodynamics governing this process remain enigmatic. A major subduction initiation event occurred in the Late Cretaceous, within the Neo-Tethys Ocean between Gondwana and Eurasia. Supra-subduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites (i.e., emerged fragments of ancient oceanic lithosphere accreted at supra-subduction spreading centers) were generated during this subduction event, and are today distributed in the eastern Mediterranean region along three E-W trending ophiolitic belts. Current models associate these ophiolite belts to simultaneous initiation of multiple, E-W trending subduction zones at 95 Ma. Here we report paleospreading direction data obtained from paleomagnetic analysis of sheeted dyke sections from seven Neo-Tethyan ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria, demonstrating that these ophiolites formed at NNE-SSW striking ridges parallel to the newly formed subduction zones. This subduction system was step-shaped and composed of NNE-SSW and ESE-WNW segments. The eastern subduction segment invaded the SW Mediterranean, leading to a radial obduction pattern similar to the Banda arc. Emplacement age constraints indicate that this subduction system formed close to the Triassic passive and paleo-transform margins of the Anatolide-Tauride continental block. Because the original Triassic-Jurassic Neo-Tethyan spreading ridge must have already subducted below the Pontides before the Late Cretaceous, we infer that the Late Cretaceous Neo-Tethyan subduction system started within ancient lithosphere, along NNE-SSW oriented fracture zones and faults parallel to the E-W trending passive margins. This challenges current concepts suggesting that subduction initiation occurs along active intra-oceanic plate boundaries.

  15. Basement involved thrusts from Northwestern Maracaibo Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audemard, F. (Intevep, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela))

    1993-02-01

    The interpretation of seismic reflection profiles from northwestern Maracaibo Basin, north of the Palmar River, suggests a late Neogene age for all the structures located within the north-northeast trends of anticlinal belts. These folded structures appear to be ramp anticlines generated from basement involved thrusts. Such detachments are intercepted by conjugate systems of low-angle decollements decoupled from the thick shaly intervals of Cretaceous and Eocene age. The resulting configuration of these fault systems are related to a mechanic of deformation referred as [open quotes]fish tail[close quotes]. This structural style favors the superposition of structural traps at different levels. The superposed reservoirs from La Paz, Mara, Sibucara, Mara Oeste, and Ensenada among others constitute superb examples of this style of deformation. Similar anticlinal structures are also observed to the southeast of the Basin in the Ceuta-Tomoporo area.

  16. Faults Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  17. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.

    1987-03-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  18. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Seismic anisotropy and mantle flow below subducting slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, Jack; Wookey, James; Kendall, J.-Michael; Masters, T.-Guy

    2017-05-01

    Subduction is integral to mantle convection and plate tectonics, yet the role of the subslab mantle in this process is poorly understood. Some propose that decoupling from the slab permits widespread trench parallel flow in the subslab mantle, although the geodynamical feasibility of this has been questioned. Here, we use the source-side shear wave splitting technique to probe anisotropy beneath subducting slabs, enabling us to test petrofabric models and constrain the geometry of mantle fow. Our global dataset contains 6369 high quality measurements - spanning ∼ 40 , 000 km of subduction zone trenches - over the complete range of available source depths (4 to 687 km) - and a large range of angles in the slab reference frame. We find that anisotropy in the subslab mantle is well characterised by tilted transverse isotropy with a slow-symmetry-axis pointing normal to the plane of the slab. This appears incompatible with purely trench-parallel flow models. On the other hand it is compatible with the idea that the asthenosphere is tilted and entrained during subduction. Trench parallel measurements are most commonly associated with shallow events (source depth < 50 km) - suggesting a separate region of anisotropy in the lithospheric slab. This may correspond to the shape preferred orientation of cracks, fractures, and faults opened by slab bending. Meanwhile the deepest events probe the upper lower mantle where splitting is found to be consistent with deformed bridgmanite.

  20. Fault Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a range of optimization based approaches to fault diagnosis. A variety of fault diagnosis prob-lems are reformulated in the so-called standard problem setup introduced in the literature on robust control. Once the standard problem formulations are given, the fault diagnosis pr...

  1. Early Cretaceous wedge extrusion in the Indo-Burma Range accretionary complex: implications for the Mesozoic subduction of Neotethys in SE Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji'en; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Cai, Fulong; Sein, Kyaing; Naing, Soe

    2017-06-01

    The Indo-Burma Range (IBR) of Myanmar, the eastern extension of the Yarlung-Tsangpo Neotethyan belt of Tibet in China, contains mélanges with serpentinite, greenschist facies basalt, chert, sericite schist, silty slate and unmetamorphosed Triassic sandstone, mudstone and siltstone interbedded with chert in the east, and farther north high-pressure blueschist and eclogite blocks in the Naga Hills mélange. Our detailed mapping of the Mindat and Magwe sections in the middle IBR revealed a major 18 km antiformal isocline in a mélange in which greenschist facies rocks in the core decrease in grade eastwards and westwards symmetrically `outwards' to lower grade sericite schist and silty slate, and at the margins to unmetamorphosed sediments, and these metamorphic rocks are structurally repeated in small-scale imbricated thrust stacks. In the Mindat section the lower western boundary of the isoclinal mélange is a thrust on which the metamorphic rocks have been transported over unmetamorphosed sediments of the Triassic Pane Chaung Group, and the upper eastern boundary is a normal fault. These relations demonstrate that the IBR metamorphic rocks were exhumed by wedge extrusion in a subduction-generated accretionary complex. Along strike to the north in the Naga Hills is a comparable isoclinal mélange in which central eclogite lenses are succeeded `outwards' by layers of glaucophane schist and glaucophanite, and to lower grade greenschist facies sericite schist and slate towards the margins. In the Natchaung area (from west to east) unmetamorphosed Triassic sediments overlie quartzites, sericite schists, actinolite schists and meta-volcanic amphibolites derived from MORB-type basalt, which are in fault contact with peridotite. Olivine in the peridotite has undulatory extinction suggesting deformation at 600-700 °C, similar to the peak temperature of the amphibolite; these relations suggest generation in a metamorphic sole. The amphibolites have U/Pb zircon ages of 119

  2. Seismicity and the subduction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1980-01-01

    There is considerable variation between subduction zones in the largest characteristic earthquake within each zone. Assuming that coupling between downgoing and upper plates is directly related to characteristic earthquake size, tests for correlations between variation in coupling and other physical features of subduction zones are conducted: the lateral extent and penetration depth of Benioff zones, age of subducting lithosphere, convergence rate, and back-arc spreading. Using linear multivariate regression, coupling is correlated with two variables: convergence rate and lithosphere age. Secondary correlations within the data set are penetration depth versus lithosphere age, and lateral extent versus convergence rate. Taken together, the observed correlations suggest a simple qualitative model where convergence rate and lithosphere age determine the horizontal and sinking rates, respectively, of slabs: these parameters influence the seismic coupling in the subduction zone. In the limit of a fast sinking rate and slow convergence rate, back-arc spreading occurs and thereby appears to be a passive process.

  3. The mechanism of forearc basement subduction in eastern Taiwan: Insights from sandbox modeling: Insight from Sandbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chia-Yu

    2015-04-01

    In Taiwan today, the subduction of the Chinese continental margin under the Philippine Sea plate results in the progressive growth of an active orogenic wedge. It is one of the best places to study the complex relationships that occur between the tectono-metamorphic processes controlling deformation (plate rheology and kinematics) and surface processes (erosion and sedimentation). In the Central Range of Taiwan, foliation and lineation traces outline the geometry and kinematics of deformation in both, the foreland and hinterland of the orogenic wedge. The foliation dip and the strain ellipsoids distribution show the fan shape of a large pop-up structure characterizing the effects of oblique plate convergence. On the eastern flank, regionally developed penetrative cleavage dips, isotope data and sedimentary structures demonstrating regional overturned structures. Two mélange units, the Kenting and Lichi mélange are exposed at the south and east of the Central Range respectively. Experiments allow the study of interactions between tectonics and surface processes. Accounting for various boundary conditions and parameters such as sedimentation, erosion, basal friction, and décollement level. We present the results of 2D and 3D sandbox models designed to investigate the complex deformation characterizing the active Taiwan orogenic wedge and to demonstrate the development of those mélanges, overturned structures and mountain frontal thrusts. Models are analyzed using pictures, movies and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry software). We then characterize the exhumation patterns, the mode of fault propagation and displacement patterns by strain partitioning of those mélanges and overturned structures.

  4. Arc Boudinage, Basin Inversion and Obduction in an Evolving Subduction System of East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, F.; Balbi, P.; Armadillo, E.; Crispini, L.; Capponi, G.

    2014-12-01

    The paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana experienced protracted subduction and accretionary tectonics starting in late Neoproterozic-early Cambrian times. Northern Victoria Land (NVL), in East Antarctica, preserves a cryptic record of these active margin processes. Most models indicate that NVL contains three main terranes, namely the Robertson Bay, Bowers and Wilson terranes. Significant debate centres, however, on whether these are far travelled terranes with respect to the East Antarctic Craton, and on the tectonic and magmatic processes that affected its active margin and were ultimately responsible for the formation of the Ross Orogen. Here we interpret new aeromagnetic, aerogravity and land-gravity compilations that enable us to trace the extent of major subglacial faults in the basement of NVL, examine crustal architecture, and propose a new evolutionary model for the active margin of the craton. Prominent aeromagnetic anomalies at the edge of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin delineate the extent of an early-stage magmatic arc (ca 530 Ma?). This arc may have accreted as an exotic element onto the former Neoproterozoic rifted margin of East Antarctica or (perhaps more likely) developed in situ upon a pre-existing suture. Remnants of magnetic arc basement are also identified ca 150 km further to the east within the Wilson Terrane (WT). We propose that these were originally adjacent arc segments and that transtension triggered significant arc boudinage separating these segments. Transtension may have created accommodation space for the development of thick Cambrian sedimentary basins, which are marked by regional magnetic lows with an en-echelon geometry. Basin inversion likely occurred in a later traspressional stage of the Ross-Delamerian Orogen (ca. 490-460 Ma) that triggered the development of a major pop-up structure within the WT. Several buried thrusts of the pop-up can be traced in the aeromagnetic images and a prominent residual gravity high delineates its high

  5. Methods of evaluating segmentation characteristics and segmentation of major faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kie Hwa; Chang, Tae Woo; Kyung, Jai Bok [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2000-03-15

    Seismological, geological, and geophysical studies were made for reasonable segmentation of the Ulsan fault and the results are as follows. One- and two- dimensional electrical surveys revealed clearly the fault fracture zone enlarges systematically northward and southward from the vicinity of Mohwa-ri, indicating Mohwa-ri is at the seismic segment boundary. Field Geological survey and microscope observation of fault gouge indicates that the Quaternary faults in the area are reactivated products of the preexisting faults. Trench survey of the Chonbuk fault Galgok-ri revealed thrust faults and cumulative vertical displacement due to faulting during the late Quaternary with about 1.1-1.9 m displacement per event; the latest event occurred from 14000 to 25000 yrs. BP. The seismic survey showed the basement surface os cut by numerous reverse faults and indicated the possibility that the boundary between Kyeongsangbukdo and Kyeongsannamdo may be segment boundary.

  6. The relationship of near-surface active faulting to megathrust splay fault geometry in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S.; Liberty, L. M.; Haeussler, P. J.; Northrup, C.; Pratt, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    We interpret regionally extensive, active faults beneath Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, to be structurally linked to deeper megathrust splay faults, such as the one that ruptured in the 1964 M9.2 earthquake. Western PWS in particular is unique; the locations of active faulting offer insights into the transition at the southern terminus of the previously subducted Yakutat slab to Pacific plate subduction. Newly acquired high-resolution, marine seismic data show three seismic facies related to Holocene and older Quaternary to Tertiary strata. These sediments are cut by numerous high angle normal faults in the hanging wall of megathrust splay. Crustal-scale seismic reflection profiles show splay faults emerging from 20 km depth between the Yakutat block and North American crust and surfacing as the Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults. A distinct boundary coinciding beneath the Hinchinbrook Entrance causes a systematic fault trend change from N30E in southwestern PWS to N70E in northeastern PWS. The fault trend change underneath Hinchinbrook Entrance may occur gradually or abruptly and there is evidence for similar deformation near the Montague Strait Entrance. Landward of surface expressions of the splay fault, we observe subsidence, faulting, and landslides that record deformation associated with the 1964 and older megathrust earthquakes. Surface exposures of Tertiary rocks throughout PWS along with new apatite-helium dates suggest long-term and regional uplift with localized, fault-controlled subsidence.

  7. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-26

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the 'cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  8. Unraveling the deformational history of faults from AMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvín, Pablo; Casas-Sainz, Antonio; Román-Berdiel, Teresa; Oliva-Urcía, Belén; García-Lasanta, Cristina; Pocoví, Andrés; Gil-Imaz, Andrés; Pueyo-Anchuela, Oscar; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Osácar, Cinta; José Villalaín, Juan; Corrado, Sveva; Invernizzi, Chiara; Aldega, Luca; Caricchi, Chiara; Antolín-Tomás, Borja

    2014-05-01

    The faults chosen for this study belong to the Iberian Chain (Northeastern Iberian Plate) and include two kinematically different kinds of structures (thrusts and strike-slip), with well-developed fault gouges several tens or hundreds of meters thick (Datos Fault System and Daroca Fault) and thinner clayey layers linked to thrust surfaces (Cameros-Demanda Thrust). The Cameros-Demanda Thrust has a relatively simple history of Mesozoic extension and Tertiary inversion. Along the thrust several areas with fault rocks include weakly oriented breccias, deformed conglomerates and clayey fault gouge with S/C structures. The Datos and Daroca faults show a more complex history of movement and are of key importance in the Variscan and Alpine evolution of the Iberian microplate. They show fault rocks with thickness of up to hundreds of meters, consisting of fault gouges, microbreccias and fault breccias with large blocks of stratified Paleozoic and Mesozoic blocks. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) can be an useful tool in order to discriminate the tectonic evolution of such faults, remembering the different behaviors as part of different stages in northern Gondwana (Variscan cycle) and the Iberian microplate (Alpine cycle). Samples for the AMS study were collected from 56 sites, 29 (434 specimens) belonging to three areas of the Cameros-Demanda Thrust, 17 (196 specimens) in the Datos Fault System, and 10 (114 specimens) at the Daroca Fault. AMS results at the Cameros-Demanda Thrust show a main NW-SE magnetic lineation (Matute and Prejano areas), a secondary NE-SW magnetic lineation (Matute area) and a girdle distribution from NE to SW in the Panzares area. These results suggest a main NW movement for the Cameros-Demanda Thrust, consistent with kinematic indicators, but also evidence a NE-directed minor contribution, especially in the easternmost outcrops. Daroca and Datos Faults show a grater variability, both in plunge and azimuth, and magnetic lineation can be

  9. Seismic profile analysis of the Kangra and Dehradun re-entrant of NW Himalayan Foreland thrust belt, India: A new approach to delineate subsurface geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Joyjit; Perumal, R. Jayangonda; Sarkar, Subham; Bhowmik, Anamitra

    2017-08-01

    In the NW Sub-Himalayan frontal thrust belt in India, seismic interpretation of subsurface geometry of the Kangra and Dehradun re-entrant mismatch with the previously proposed models. These procedures lack direct quantitative measurement on the seismic profile required for subsurface structural architecture. Here we use a predictive angular function for establishing quantitative geometric relationships between fault and fold shapes with `Distance-displacement method' (D-d method). It is a prognostic straightforward mechanism to probe the possible structural network from a seismic profile. Two seismic profiles Kangra-2 and Kangra-4 of Kangra re-entrant, Himachal Pradesh (India), are investigated for the fault-related folds associated with the Balh and Paror anticlines. For Paror anticline, the final cut-off angle β =35{°} was obtained by transforming the seismic time profile into depth profile to corroborate the interpreted structures. Also, the estimated shortening along the Jawalamukhi Thrust and Jhor Fault, lying between the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) and the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) in the frontal fold-thrust belt, were found to be 6.06 and 0.25 km, respectively. Lastly, the geometric method of fold-fault relationship has been exercised to document the existence of a fault-bend fold above the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT). Measurement of shortening along the fault plane is employed as an ancillary tool to prove the multi-bending geometry of the blind thrust of the Dehradun re-entrant.

  10. Growth stratal records of instantaneous and progressive limb rotation in the Precordillera thrust belt and Bermejo basin, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, TomáS. R.; Allmendinger, Richard W.

    1996-10-01

    Analysis of synorogenic deposits preserved near the thrust front zone of the Precordillera fold and thrust belt and in the Bermejo foreland basin in central Argentina documents the evolution of deformation during the last 5 Myr as well as the thrust system kinematics. Seismic lines across the area display examples of progressive and instantaneous limb rotations. The easternmost thrust plate of the Central Precordillera, the Niquivil thrust, experienced episodic motion in two main stages: a first thrust movement as a fault-propagation fold and a second movement as a high-angle anticlinal breakthrough fault after a period of quiescence. Growth strata deposited in the La Pareja intermontane basin and the Las Salinas and Bermejo anticline recorded continuous growth of Eastern Precordilleran structures beginning at ˜2.7 Ma, with uplift rates of ˜0.3 mm/yr for the Niquivil anticline, 1.08 mm/yr for the Las Salinas anticline, and between ˜0.6 and 0.38 mm/yr during the last ˜2 Myr for the Bermejo anticline. Once the Eastern Precordillera began to grow, the propagation of the Niquivil thrust stopped, restricting the deformation to the young Vallecito out-of sequence thrust. The complex geometry of growth strata deposited on the back limb of the Las Salinas anticline can be explained by using a model of a two-step fault propagation fold with constant layer thickness. The Bermejo anticline of the Eastern Precordillera is formed by the simultaneous propagation of a shallow fault, responsible for the fold shape, and a deep fault that produced vertical uplift. A growth triangle that documents instantaneous forelimb rotation for a fault-propagation fold is recorded for the first time in a published seismic line.

  11. Neogene contraction between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley, San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Schmidt, K.M.; Jachens, R.C.; Stanley, R.G.; Jayko, A.S.; McDougall, K.A.; Tinsley, J.C.; Valin, Z.C.

    1999-01-01

    In the southern San Francisco Bay region of California, oblique dextral reverse faults that verge northeastward from the San Andreas fault experienced triggered slip during the 1989 M7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake. The role of these range-front thrusts in the evolution of the San Andreas fault system and the future seismic hazard that they may pose to the urban Santa Clara Valley are poorly understood. Based on recent geologic mapping and geophysical investigations, we propose that the range-front thrust system evolved in conjunction with development of the San Andreas fault system. In the early Miocene, the region was dominated by a system of northwestwardly propagating, basin-bounding, transtensional faults. Beginning as early as middle Miocene time, however, the transtensional faulting was superseded by transpressional NE-stepping thrust and reverse faults of the range-front thrust system. Age constraints on the thrust faults indicate that the locus of contraction has focused on the Monte Vista, Shannon, and Berrocal faults since about 4.8 Ma. Fault slip and fold reconstructions suggest that crustal shortening between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley within this time frame is ~21%, amounting to as much as 3.2 km at a rate of 0.6 mm/yr. Rates probably have not remained constant; average rates appear to have been much lower in the past few 100 ka. The distribution of coseismic surface contraction during the Loma Prieta earthquake, active seismicity, late Pleistocene to Holocene fluvial terrace warping, and geodetic data further suggest that the active range-front thrust system includes blind thrusts. Critical unresolved issues include information on the near-surface locations of buried thrusts, the timing of recent thrust earthquake events, and their recurrence in relation to earthquakes on the San Andreas fault.

  12. Tsunamis and splay fault dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, J.; Oglesby, D.D.; Geist, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    The geometry of a fault system can have significant effects on tsunami generation, but most tsunami models to date have not investigated the dynamic processes that determine which path rupture will take in a complex fault system. To gain insight into this problem, we use the 3D finite element method to model the dynamics of a plate boundary/splay fault system. We use the resulting ground deformation as a time-dependent boundary condition for a 2D shallow-water hydrodynamic tsunami calculation. We find that if me stress distribution is homogeneous, rupture remains on the plate boundary thrust. When a barrier is introduced along the strike of the plate boundary thrust, rupture propagates to the splay faults, and produces a significantly larger tsunami man in the homogeneous case. The results have implications for the dynamics of megathrust earthquakes, and also suggest mat dynamic earthquake modeling may be a useful tool in tsunami researcn. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Geologic signature of early Tertiary ridge subduction in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; Kusky, Timothy M.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Miller, Marti L.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Nelson, Steven W.; Karl, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    A mid-Paleocene to early Eocene encounter between an oceanic spreading center and a subduction zone produced a wide range of geologic features in Alaska. The most striking effects are seen in the accretionary prism (Chugach–Prince William terrane), where 61 to 50 Ma near-trench granitic to gabbroic plutons were intruded into accreted trench sediments that had been deposited only a few million years earlier. This short time interval also saw the genesis of ophiolites, some of which contain syngenetic massive sulfide deposits; the rapid burial of these ophiolites beneath trench turbidites, followed immediately by obduction; anomalous high-T, low-P, near-trench metamorphism; intense ductile deformation; motion on transverse strike-slip and normal faults; gold mineralization; and uplift of the accretionary prism above sea level. The magmatic arc experienced a brief flare-up followed by quiescence. In the Alaskan interior, 100 to 600 km landward of the paleotrench, several Paleocene to Eocene sedimentary basins underwent episodes of extensional subsidence, accompanied by bimodal volcanism. Even as far as 1000 km inboard of the paleotrench, the ancestral Brooks Range and its foreland basin experienced a pulse of uplift that followed about 40 million years of quiescence.All of these events - but most especially those in the accretionary prism - can be attributed with varying degrees of confidence to the subduction of an oceanic spreading center. In this model, the ophiolites and allied ore deposits were produced at the soon-to-be subducted ridge. Near-trench magmatism, metamorphism, deformation, and gold mineralization took place in the accretionary prism above a slab window, where hot asthenosphere welled up into the gap between the two subducted, but still diverging, plates. Deformation took place as the critically tapered accretionary prism adjusted its shape to changes in the bathymetry of the incoming plate, changes in the convergence direction before and after

  14. The contribution of 3D restoration for the reconstruction of pre-thrusting basin geometries in fold-and-thrust belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquè, R.; Tavarnelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of complex geological settings and of original, pre-thrusting basin geometry is one of the challenges for modern structural geology. It has indeed a critical role in many industrial applications, such as in the hydrocarbon exploration. By using commercial specific softwares to produce balanced cross-sections and inferred 3D reconstructions (2DMove™, Gocad™), we modelled a portion of the Umbria-Marche fold-and-thrust belt, in the outer zones of the Northern Apennines of Italy, in order to infer the pre-thrusting geometry of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic extensional basins and to test the applicability of existing computer tools in areas that have experienced the effects of positive tectonic inversion. In the study area, the accurate reconstruction of the structural setting, cross-cut relationships and timing of the deformation, was inferred by using field data, map analysis and cross-section balancing techniques. The structural overprinting relationships among the investigated thrusts made it possible to infer a general piggy-back thrusting sequence, with new thrust faults to the East, developed in the footwall of formerly emplaced thrust sheets, in the West. This allowed to sequentially remove the effects of the deformation for progressively older structures, and to back-strip the thrust sheets in sequential evolutionary steps, in order to reconstruct a viable pre-thrusting template. Four balanced cross-sections have been drawn, providing the initial skeleton for 3D modelling, together with the map trace of the major tectonic features. The cross-sections and the geological map have been digitized and geo-referred in 2D-Move™. Starting from the inferred geometries, a coherent 3D model was built in Gocad™. The surfaces represent post-thrust normal faults, thrust planes, and pre-thrust normal faults, and five key stratigraphic surfaces, from bottom; the base and top of the Calcare Massiccio fm. (Lower Liassic), the base of the

  15. A Possible Source Mechanism of the 1946 Unimak Alaska Far-Field Tsunami: Uplift of the Mid-Slope Terrace Above a Splay Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Huene, Roland; Miller, John J.; Klaeschen, Dirk; Dartnell, Peter

    2016-12-01

    In 1946, megathrust seismicity along the Unimak segment of the Alaska subduction zone generated the largest ever recorded Alaska/Aleutian tsunami. The tsunami severely damaged Pacific islands and coastal areas from Alaska to Antarctica. It is the charter member of "tsunami" earthquakes that produce outsized far-field tsunamis for the recorded magnitude. Its source mechanisms were unconstrained by observations because geophysical data for the Unimak segment were sparse and of low resolution. Reprocessing of legacy geophysical data reveals a deep water, high-angle reverse or splay thrust fault zone that leads megathrust slip upward to the mid-slope terrace seafloor rather than along the plate boundary toward the trench axis. Splay fault uplift elevates the outer mid-slope terrace and its inner area subsides. Multibeam bathymetry along the splay fault zone shows recent but undated seafloor disruption. The structural configuration of the nearby Semidi segment is similar to that of the Unimak segment, portending generation of a future large tsunami directed toward the US West coast.

  16. A possible source mechanism of the 1946 Unimak Alaska far-field tsunami, uplift of the mid-slope terrace above a splay fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Huene, Roland E.; Miller, John J.; Klaeschen, Dirk; Dartnell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In 1946, megathrust seismicity along the Unimak segment of the Alaska subduction zone generated the largest ever recorded Alaska/Aleutian tsunami. The tsunami severely damaged Pacific islands and coastal areas from Alaska to Antarctica. It is the charter member of “tsunami” earthquakes that produce outsized far-field tsunamis for the recorded magnitude. Its source mechanisms were unconstrained by observations because geophysical data for the Unimak segment were sparse and of low resolution. Reprocessing of legacy geophysical data reveals a deep water, high-angle reverse or splay thrust fault zone that leads megathrust slip upward to the mid-slope terrace seafloor rather than along the plate boundary toward the trench axis. Splay fault uplift elevates the outer mid-slope terrace and its inner area subsides. Multibeam bathymetry along the splay fault zone shows recent but undated seafloor disruption. The structural configuration of the nearby Semidi segment is similar to that of the Unimak segment, portending generation of a future large tsunami directed toward the US West coast.

  17. Aircraft Horizontal Thrust Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is designed to support the DoD mission by providing unique air vehicle installed engine performance (thrust output) measurements. This system consists...

  18. 2001 Bhuj-Kachchh earthquake: surface faulting and its relation with neotectonics and regional structures, Gujarat, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Thakkar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary and secondary surface deformation related to the 2001 Bhuj-Kachchh earthquake suggests that thrusting movement took place along an E-W fault near the western extension of the South Wagad Fault, a synthetic fault of the Kachchh Mainland Fault (KMF. Despite early reconnaissance reports that concluded there was no primary surface faulting, we describe an 830 m long, 15-35 cm high, east-west-trending thrust fault scarp near where the seismogenic fault plane would project to the surface, near Bharodiya village (between 23°34.912'N, 70°23.942'E and 23°34.304'N, 70°24.884'E. Along most of the scarp Jurassic bedrock is thrust over Quaternary deposits, but the fault scarp also displaces Holocene alluvium and an earth dam, with dips of 13° to 36° south. Secondary co-seismic features, mainly liquefaction and lateral spreading, dominate the area south of the thrust. Transverse right-lateral movement along the «Manfara Fault» and a parallel fault near Bharodiya suggests segmentation of the E-W master faults. Primary (thrust surface rupture had a length of 0.8 km, maximum displacement of about 35 cm, and average displacement of about 15 cm. Secondary (strike-slip faulting was more extensive, with a total end-to-end length of 15 km, maximum displacement of 35 cm, and average displacement of about 20 cm.

  19. Preliminary results constraining the kinematics of subduction and exhumation processes on Skopelos island, Northern Sporades (Aegean Domain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkolab, Kristof; Willingshofer, Ernst; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Creton, Iverna

    2017-04-01

    inferred. The second phase of deformation (D2) is defined by top-NE to E shear using the already existing S1 foliation planes in many cases. D2 folding (F2) entails the formation of sheath folds with their axes being sub-parallel to the dominantly NE-SW trending stretching lineation in zones of high strain, upright folds with NE-SW trending axes as well as recumbent folds that affected the already tilted penetrative foliation. The D3 phase is semi-brittle to brittle and is defined by outcrop-to regional-scale fault (and fault-related fold) systems, which have shaped the geometry and elevation of islands and basins of the region until present days. We interpret D1 to reflect prograde metamorphism and top-SW deformation during subduction of the Pelagonian continental block. In contrast, D2 records progressive and distributed top-NE to E extensional deformation and provides the main mechanism for exhuming the previously buried rocks. This phase of deformation was probably triggered by the southward retreat of the Hellenic trench. The emplacement of the Eohellenic and the Palouki units by thrusting (D3) is post-metamorphic and in our view related to the dextral displacement along the fault that borders the North Aegean Trough.

  20. Viscous Dissipation and Criticality of Subducting Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Mike; Karato, Shun; Yuen, Dave

    2016-04-01

    Rheology of subducting lithosphere appears to be complicated. In the shallow part, deformation is largely accomodated by brittle failure, whereas at greater depth, at higher confining pressures, ductile creep is expected to control slab strength. The amount of viscous dissipation ΔQ during subduction at greater depth, as constrained by experimental rock mechanics, can be estimated on the basis of a simple bending moment equation [1,2] 2ɛ˙0(z) ∫ +h/2 2 M (z) = h ṡ -h/2 4μ(y,z)y dy , (1) for a complex multi-phase rheology in the mantle transition zone, including the effects of a metastable phase transition as well as the pressure, temperature, grain-size and stress dependency of the relevant creep mechanisms; μ is here the effective viscosity and ɛ˙0(z) is a (reference) strain rate. Numerical analysis shows that the maximum bending moment, Mcrit, that can be sustained by a slab is of the order of 1019 Nm per m according to Mcrit˜=σp ∗h2/4, where σp is the Peierl's stress limit of slab materials and h is the slab thickness. Near Mcrit, the amount of viscous dissipation grows strongly as a consequence of a lattice instability of mantle minerals (dislocation glide in olivine), suggesting that thermo-mechanical instabilities become prone to occur at places where a critical shear-heating rate is exceeded, see figure. This implies that the lithosphere behaves in such cases like a perfectly plastic solid [3]. Recently available detailed data related to deep seismicity [4,5] seems to provide support to our conclusion. It shows, e.g., that thermal shear instabilities, and not transformational faulting, is likely the dominating mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes at the bottom of the transition zone, in accordance with this suggested "deep criticality" model. These new findings are therefore briefly outlined and possible implications are discussed. References [1] Riedel, M. R., Karato, S., Yuen, D. A. Criticality of Subducting Slabs. University of Minnesota

  1. Finding faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, J.; Duke, J. [Surpac Minex Group (Australia)

    2005-04-01

    The Surpac Minex Group has been building a geologic model to represent the coal seam structure at the Carbones del Cerrejon LLC mine in north eastern Colombia which is bonded by major reserve and normal faults. This is being achieved through a new software faulting tool. The tool combines existing Minex modelling with new fault interpretation tools. New software that permits 3-D photogrammetry and seismic data can also be incorporated. 6 figs.

  2. Active faults and related Late Quaternary deformation along the Northwestern Himalayan Frontal Zone, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nakata

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous newly-identified traces of active faults in the Himalayan foothill zone along the HFF around Chandigarh, in Pinjore Dun, along the piedmont zone of the Lower Siwalik hill front and within the Lower Tertiary hill range reveal the pattern of thrust and strike-slip faulting, striking parallel to the principal structural trend (NNW-SSE of the orogenic belt. The active Chandigarh Fault, Pinjore Garden Fault and Barsar thrust have vertically dislocated, warped and backtilted fluvial and alluvial-fan surfaces made up of Late Pleistocene-Holocene sediments. West- and southwest-facing fault scarplets with heights ranging from 12 to 50 m along these faults suggest continued tectonic movement through Late Pleistocene to recent times. Gentle warping and backtilting of the terraces on the hanging wall sides of the faults indicate fault-bend folding. These active faults are the manifestation of north-dipping imbricated thrust faults branching out from the major fault systems like the Main Boundary Fault (MBF and Himalayan Frontal Fault (HFF, probably merging down northward into a décollement. The Taksal Fault, striking NNW-SSE, shows prominent right-lateral movement marked by lateral offset of streams and younger Quaternary terraces and occupies a narrow deep linear valley along the fault trace. Right stepping along this fault has resulted in formation of a small pull-apart basin. Fault scarplets facing ENE and WSW are the manifestation of dip-slip movement. This fault is an example of slip-partitioning between the strike-slip and thrust faults, suggesting ongoing oblique convergence of the Indian plate and northward migration of a tectonic sliver. Slip rate along the Taksal Fault has been calculated as 2.8 mm/yr. Preliminary trench investigation at the base of the Chandigarh Fault Scarp has revealed total displacement of 3.5 m along a low angle thrust fault with variable dip of 20° to 46° due northeast, possibly the result of one

  3. Cenozoic structural evolution, thermal history, and erosion of the Ukrainian Carpathians fold-thrust belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakapelyukh, Mykhaylo; Bubniak, Ihor; Bubniak, Andriy; Jonckheere, Raymond; Ratschbacher, Lothar

    2018-01-01

    The Carpathians are part of the Alpine-Carpathian-Dinaridic orogen surrounding the Pannonian basin. Their Ukrainian part constitutes an ancient subduction-accretion complex that evolved into a foreland fold-thrust belt with a shortening history that was perpendicular to the orogenic strike. Herein, we constrain the evolution of the Ukrainian part of the Carpathian fold-thrust belt by apatite fission-track dating of sedimentary and volcanic samples and cross-section balancing and restoration. The apatite fission-track ages are uniform in the inner―southwestern part of the fold-thrust belt, implying post-shortening erosion since 12-10 Ma. The ages in the leading and trailing edges record provenance, i.e., sources in the Trans-European suture zone and the Inner Carpathians, respectively, and show that these parts of the fold-thrust were not heated to more than 100 °C. Syn-orogenic strata show sediment recycling: in the interior of the fold-thrust belt―the most thickened and most deeply eroded nappes―the apatite ages were reset, eroded, and redeposited in the syn-orogenic strata closer to the fore- and hinterland; the lag times are only a few million years. Two balanced cross sections, one constructed for this study and based on field and subsurface data, reveal an architecture characterized by nappe stacks separated by high-displacement thrusts; they record 340-390 km shortening. A kinematic forward model highlights the fold-thrust belt evolution from the pre-contractional configuration over the intermediate geometries during folding and thrusting and the post-shortening, erosional-unloading configuration at 12-10 Ma to the present-day geometry. Average shortening rates between 32-20 Ma and 20-12 Ma amounted to 13 and 21 km/Ma, respectively, implying a two-phased deformation of the Ukrainian fold-thrust belt.

  4. Mapping seismic azimuthal anisotropy of the Japan subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D.; Liu, X.

    2016-12-01

    We present 3-D images of azimuthal anisotropy tomography of the crust and upper mantle of the Japan subduction zone, which are determined using a large number of high-quality P- and S-wave arrival-time data of local earthquakes and teleseismic events recorded by the dense seismic networks on the Japan Islands. A tomographic method for P-wave velocity azimuthal anisotropy is modified and extended to invert S-wave travel times for 3-D S-wave velocity azimuthal anisotropy. A joint inversion of the P and S wave data is conducted to constrain the 3-D azimuthal anisotropy of the Japan subduction zone. Main findings of this work are summarized as follows. (1) The high-velocity subducting Pacific and Philippine Sea (PHS) slabs exhibit trench-parallel fast-velocity directions (FVDs), which may reflect frozen-in lattice-preferred orientation of aligned anisotropic minerals formed at the mid-ocean ridge as well as shape-preferred orientation such as normal faults produced at the outer-rise area near the trench axis. (2) Significant trench-normal FVDs are revealed in the mantle wedge, which reflects corner flow in the mantle wedge due to the active subduction and dehydration of the oceanic plates. (3) Obvious toroidal FVDs and low-velocity anomalies exist in and around a window (hole) in the aseismic PHS slab beneath Southwest Japan, which may reflect a toroidal mantle flow pattern resulting from hot and wet mantle upwelling caused by the joint effects of deep dehydration of the Pacific slab and the convective circulation process in the mantle wedge above the Pacific slab. (4) Significant low-velocity anomalies with trench-normal FVDs exist in the mantle below the Pacific slab beneath Northeast Japan, which may reflect a subducting oceanic asthenosphere affected by hot mantle upwelling from the deeper mantle. ReferencesLiu, X., D. Zhao (2016) Seismic velocity azimuthal anisotropy of the Japan subduction zone: Constraints from P and S wave traveltimes. J. Geophys. Res. 121, doi

  5. Origin and consequences of western Mediterranean subduction, rollback, and slab segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Vissers, Reinoud L. M.; Spakman, Wim

    2014-04-01

    The western Mediterranean recorded subduction rollback, slab segmentation and separation. Here we address the questions of what caused Oligocene rollback initiation, and how its subsequent evolution split up an originally coherent fore arc into circum-southwest Mediterranean segments. We kinematically reconstruct western Mediterranean geology from subduction initiation to present, using Atlantic plate reconstructions as boundary condition. We test possible reconstructions against remnants of subducted lithosphere imaged by seismic tomography. Transform motion between Africa and Iberia (including the Baleares) between 120 and 85 Ma was followed by up to 150 km convergence until 30 Ma. Subduction likely initiated along the transform fault that accommodated pre-85 Ma translation. By the 30 Ma inception of rollback, up to 150 km of convergence had formed a small slab below the Baleares. Iberia was disconnected from Sardinia/Calabria through the North Balearic Transform Zone (NBTZ). Subduction below Sardinia/Calabria was slightly faster than below the Baleares, the difference being accommodated in the Pyrenees. A moving triple junction at the trench-NBTZ intersection formed a subduction transform edge propagator fault between the Baleares and Calabria slab segments. Calabria rolled back eastward, whereas the Baleares slab underwent radial (SW-S-SE) rollback. After Kabylides-Africa collision, the western slab segment retreated toward Gibraltar, here reconstructed as the maximum rollback end-member model, and a Kabylides slab detached from Africa. Opening of a slab window below the NBTZ allowed asthenospheric rise to the base of the fore arc creating high-temperature metamorphism. Western Mediterranean rollback commenced only after sufficient slab-pull was created from 100 to 150 km of slow, forced subduction before 30 Ma.

  6. Seismic anisotropy in the Hellenic subduction zone: Effects of slab segmentation and subslab mantle flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelidis, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    The segmentation and differentiation of subducting slabs have considerable effects on mantle convection and tectonics. The Hellenic subduction zone is a complex convergent margin with strong curvature and fast slab rollback. The upper mantle seismic anisotropy in the region is studied focusing at its western and eastern edges in order to explore the effects of possible slab segmentation on mantle flow and fabrics. Complementary to new SKS shear-wave splitting measurements in regions not adequately sampled so far, the source-side splitting technique is applied to constrain the depth of anisotropy and to densify measurements. In the western Hellenic arc, a trench-normal subslab anisotropy is observed near the trench. In the forearc domain, source-side and SKS measurements reveal a trench-parallel pattern. This indicates subslab trench-parallel mantle flow, associated with return flow due to the fast slab rollback. The passage from continental to oceanic subduction in the western Hellenic zone is illustrated by a forearc transitional anisotropy pattern. This indicates subslab mantle flow parallel to a NE-SW smooth ramp that possibly connects the two subducted slabs. A young tear fault initiated at the Kefalonia Transform Fault is likely not entirely developed, as this trench-parallel anisotropy pattern is observed along the entire western Hellenic subduction system, even following this horizontal offset between the two slabs. At the eastern side of the Hellenic subduction zone, subslab source-side anisotropy measurements show a general trench-normal pattern. These are associated with mantle flow through a possible ongoing tearing of the oceanic lithosphere in the area. Although the exact geometry of this slab tear is relatively unknown, SKS trench-parallel measurements imply that the tear has not reached the surface yet. Further exploration of the Hellenic subduction system is necessary; denser seismic networks should be deployed at both its edges in order to achieve

  7. Multi-scale seismic reflection imaging of active fold-and-thrust belts in Niigata backarc basin in central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, T.; Kato, N.; Sato, H.; Takeda, T.; Abe, S.

    2012-04-01

    Structural characters of en echelon, active fold and thrust structures in backarc, thick sedimentary basins and their structural links to deeper structures are commonly complicated, depending on inherited structural and mechanical factors including their kinematic histories, present and past sedimentary environments, volcanisms, fault reactivation, and thermal and/or dynamic subsidence. In this study we present multi-scale seismic reflection profiles across active fold-and-thrust belts in Niigata backarc basin in central Japan to analyze their structures from shallow to otherwise inaccessible deeper levels. Niigata basin is underlain by ca. 8-km-thick Neogene sediments, which are deformed by highly active fold-and-thrust belts, where large devastating earthquakes have occurred in these several hundred years. Deep seismic reflection profile (2010 Mishima-Higashiyama Line) across the 2007 Chuetsu-oki earthquake (M6.8) source region illuminates highly complicated fold-and-thrust structures. Pairs of west-dipping thrusts merge into a shallow, easterly dipping thrust fault, on which the mainshock of the 2007 earthquake was located. In addition, decollement folding enhanced by over-pressured Miocene mudstone on the hangingwall of the deeper thrust also complicates styles of deformation at higher structural levels. In spite of these structural complexities, tight structural and stratigraphic constraints on the seismic reflection profile by rich dataset of industrial boreholes provide west-dipping thrust trajectories sole into the deeper thrust at depth of ca. 10 km. We also collected and processed shallow high-resolution seismic reflection data in order to resolve shallow structures and to understand structural linkage between active faults and folds recognized at ground surface and deeper, complicated fold and thrust structures. We deployed 200 seismic channels, 10-Hz geophones, and mini-vibrator as a seismic source along about 7-km-long seismic line. Common midpoint

  8. Processes and consequences of deep subduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubie, David C.; Hilst, R.D. van der

    2001-01-01

    Subduction of slabs of oceanic lithosphere into the deep mantle involves a wide range of geophysical and geochemical processes and is of major importance for the physical and chemical evolution of the Earth. For example, subduction and subduction-related volcanism are major processes through

  9. Dry Juan de Fuca slab revealed by quantification of water entering Cascadia subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nedimović, M. R.; Carton, H.

    2017-11-01

    Water is carried by subducting slabs as a pore fluid and in structurally bound minerals, yet no comprehensive quantification of water content and how it is stored and distributed at depth within incoming plates exists for any segment of the global subduction system. Here we use seismic data to quantify the amount of pore and structurally bound water in the Juan de Fuca plate entering the Cascadia subduction zone. Specifically, we analyse these water reservoirs in the sediments, crust and lithospheric mantle, and their variations along the central Cascadia margin. We find that the Juan de Fuca lower crust and mantle are drier than at any other subducting plate, with most of the water stored in the sediments and upper crust. Variable but limited bend faulting along the margin limits slab access to water, and a warm thermal structure resulting from a thick sediment cover and young plate age prevents significant serpentinization of the mantle. The dryness of the lower crust and mantle indicates that fluids that facilitate episodic tremor and slip must be sourced from the subducted upper crust, and that decompression rather than hydrous melting must dominate arc magmatism in central Cascadia. Additionally, dry subducted lower crust and mantle can explain the low levels of intermediate-depth seismicity in the Juan de Fuca slab.

  10. Ups and downs in western Crete (Hellenic subduction zone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiberti, Mara Monica; Basili, Roberto; Vannoli, Paola

    2014-07-14

    Studies of past sea-level markers are commonly used to unveil the tectonic history and seismic behavior of subduction zones. We present new evidence on vertical motions of the Hellenic subduction zone as resulting from a suite of Late Pleistocene - Holocene shorelines in western Crete (Greece). Shoreline ages obtained by AMS radiocarbon dating of seashells, together with the reappraisal of shoreline ages from previous works, testify a long-term uplift rate of 2.5-2.7 mm/y. This average value, however, includes periods in which the vertical motions vary significantly: 2.6-3.2 mm/y subsidence rate from 42 ka to 23 ka, followed by ~7.7 mm/y sustained uplift rate from 23 ka to present. The last ~5 ky shows a relatively slower uplift rate of 3.0-3.3 mm/y, yet slightly higher than the long-term average. A preliminary tectonic model attempts at explaining these up and down motions by across-strike partitioning of fault activity in the subduction zone.

  11. Building a Subduction Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Bodin, Paul; Bourgeois, Jody; Cashman, Susan; Cowan, Darrel; Creager, Kenneth C.; Crowell, Brendan; Duvall, Alison; Frankel, Arthur; Gonzalez, Frank; Houston, Heidi; Johnson, Paul; Kelsey, Harvey; Miller, Una; Roland, Emily C.; Schmidt, David; Staisch, Lydia; Vidale, John; Wilcock, William; Wirth, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Subduction zones contain many of Earth’s most remarkable geologic structures, from the deepest oceanic trenches to glacier-covered mountains and steaming volcanoes. These environments formed through spectacular events: Nature’s largest earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions are born here.

  12. Seismic reflection imaging of two megathrust shear zones in the northern Cascadia subduction zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Andrew J

    2004-03-11

    At convergent continental margins, the relative motion between the subducting oceanic plate and the overriding continent is usually accommodated by movement along a single, thin interface known as a megathrust. Great thrust earthquakes occur on the shallow part of this interface where the two plates are locked together. Earthquakes of lower magnitude occur within the underlying oceanic plate, and have been linked to geochemical dehydration reactions caused by the plate's descent. Here I present deep seismic reflection data from the northern Cascadia subduction zone that show that the inter-plate boundary is up to 16 km thick and comprises two megathrust shear zones that bound a >5-km-thick, approximately 110-km-wide region of imbricated crustal rocks. Earthquakes within the subducting plate occur predominantly in two geographic bands where the dip of the plate is inferred to increase as it is forced around the edges of the imbricated inter-plate boundary zone. This implies that seismicity in the subducting slab is controlled primarily by deformation in the upper part of the plate. Slip on the shallower megathrust shear zone, which may occur by aseismic slow slip, will transport crustal rocks into the upper mantle above the subducting oceanic plate and may, in part, provide an explanation for the unusually low seismic wave speeds that are observed there.

  13. Faulting and hydration of the Juan de Fuca plate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedimović, Mladen R.; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R.; Carbotte, Suzanne M.; Pablo Canales, J.; Dziak, Robert P.

    2009-06-01

    Multichannel seismic observations provide the first direct images of crustal scale normal faults within the Juan de Fuca plate system and indicate that brittle deformation extends up to ~ 200 km seaward of the Cascadia trench. Within the sedimentary layering steeply dipping faults are identified by stratigraphic offsets, with maximum throws of 110 ± 10 m found near the trench. Fault throws diminish both upsection and seaward from the trench. Long-term throw rates are estimated to be 13 ± 2 mm/kyr. Faulted offsets within the sedimentary layering are typically linked to larger offset scarps in the basement topography, suggesting reactivation of the normal fault systems formed at the spreading center. Imaged reflections within the gabbroic igneous crust indicate swallowing fault dips at depth. These reflections require local alteration to produce an impedance contrast, indicating that the imaged fault structures provide pathways for fluid transport and hydration. As the depth extent of imaged faulting within this young and sediment insulated oceanic plate is primarily limited to approximately Moho depths, fault-controlled hydration appears to be largely restricted to crustal levels. If dehydration embrittlement is an important mechanism for triggering intermediate-depth earthquakes within the subducting slab, then the limited occurrence rate and magnitude of intraslab seismicity at the Cascadia margin may in part be explained by the limited amount of water imbedded into the uppermost oceanic mantle prior to subduction. The distribution of submarine earthquakes within the Juan de Fuca plate system indicates that propagator wake areas are likely to be more faulted and therefore more hydrated than other parts of this plate system. However, being largely restricted to crustal levels, this localized increase in hydration generally does not appear to have a measurable effect on the intraslab seismicity along most of the subducted propagator wakes at the Cascadia margin.

  14. Thermal buoyancy on Venus - Underthrusting vs subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Jeffrey D.; Head, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal and buoyancy consequences of the subduction endmember are modeled in an attempt to evaluate the conditions distinguishing underthrusting and subduction. Thermal changes in slabs subducting into the Venusian mantle with a range of initial geotherms are used to predict density changes and, thus, slab buoyancy. Based on a model for subduction-induced mantle flow, it is then argued that the angle of the slab dip helps differentiate between underthrusting and subduction. Mantle flow applies torques to the slab which, in combination with torques due to slab buoyancy, act to change the angle of slab dip.

  15. Fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  16. Softening trigerred by eclogitization, the first step toward exhumation during continental subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivet, Laurent; Raimbourg, Hugues; Labrousse, Loïc; Avigad, Dov; Leroy, Yves; Austrheim, Håkon; Andersen, Torgeir B.

    2005-09-01

    Direct observation of peak pressure deformation in exhumed subduction channels is difficult because little evidence of this deformation survives later syn-exhumation deformation. Most ultrahigh-pressure parageneses are found in continental derived metamorphic rocks making continental subduction the best context to observe peak pressure deformation. Whereas many studies have enlightened the main driving parameters of exhumation such as buoyancy forces, low viscosity in the subduction channel, overburden removal by erosion and normal faulting, a basic question is seldom considered: why is a tectonic unit disconnected from the descending lithosphere and why does it start its way towards the surface? This event, seminal to exhumation processes, must involve some deformation and decoupling of the exhumed slice from the descending slab at peak pressure conditions or close to it. Our field observations in the Bergen arc show that Caledonian eclogitization and later amphibolitization of a granulitic terrane was achieved with a consistent component of simple shear compatible with the sense of the Caledonian subduction. Thus, the sequence of deformation preserved in the Bergen Arc documents the decoupling of subducted crustal material from the descending slab at the onset of exhumation. This observation suggests that deformation in the subduction channel is largely controlled by kinematic boundary conditions, i.e. underthrusting of the subducting slab. In this context of simple shear, metamorphic reactions assisted by fracturating, fluid infiltration and ductile deformation lower the resistance of rocks and allow the localisation of shear zones and the decoupling of buoyant tectonic units from the subducting slab. These tectonic units can then be incorporated into the channel circulation and start their upward travel.

  17. Fault Diagnosis and Fault Handling for Autonomous Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren

    Unmanned Aerial vehicles (UAVs) or drones are used increasingly for missions where piloted aircraft are unsuitable. The unmanned aircraft has a number of advantages with respect to size, weight and manoeuvrability that makes it possible for them to solve tasks that an aircraft previously has been...... to another type of aircraft with different parameters. Amongst the main findings of this research project is a method to handle faults on the UAV’s pitot tube, which measures the aircraft speed. A set of software redundancies based on GPS velocity information and engine thrust are used to detect abnormal...

  18. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  19. San Andreas tremor cascades define deep fault zone complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Weak seismic vibrations - tectonic tremor - can be used to delineate some plate boundary faults. Tremor on the deep San Andreas Fault, located at the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, is thought to be a passive indicator of slow fault slip. San Andreas Fault tremor migrates at up to 30 m s-1, but the processes regulating tremor migration are unclear. Here I use a 12-year catalogue of more than 850,000 low-frequency earthquakes to systematically analyse the high-speed migration of tremor along the San Andreas Fault. I find that tremor migrates most effectively through regions of greatest tremor production and does not propagate through regions with gaps in tremor production. I interpret the rapid tremor migration as a self-regulating cascade of seismic ruptures along the fault, which implies that tremor may be an active, rather than passive participant in the slip propagation. I also identify an isolated group of tremor sources that are offset eastwards beneath the San Andreas Fault, possibly indicative of the interface between the Monterey Microplate, a hypothesized remnant of the subducted Farallon Plate, and the North American Plate. These observations illustrate a possible link between the central San Andreas Fault and tremor-producing subduction zones.

  20. Geometry and Kinematics of Tumuxiuke Fold and Thrust Belt in Bachu Uplift, Tarim Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Z.; Tang, L.

    2016-12-01

    Bachu uplift, mainly characterized by a series of out-of-sequence basement involved structures, is a large scale Cenozoic structural unit located in the west of Tarim basin. The NW-SE oriented, arc shaped Tumuxiuke fold and thrust belt (TFTB), which is roughly 200km in length, constrains the northern boundary of Bachu uplift. Based on multiple 2D seismic reflection profiles, we analysed the differences in structural styles along the strike of TFTB. It is mainly consist of several basement involved thrust faults and associated folds (or monoclines). The western segment of TFTB is characterized by a single basement involved structure; as to the middle segment, there is also backthrust branching from the main basement involved structure; in contrast, the eastern segment is consist of basement involved contractional wedge structures. According to the analysis of stratigraphy involved in deformation, fault slip and growth strata, we summarized that the TFTB mainly constructed by the compressional stress during late Miocene Himalayan orogency. Then, we analyzed the kinematics of TFTB with trishear fault propagation folding model. It is suggested that the initial fault tip that located below the basement-cover contact began to propagate during the late Miocene epoch and the propagation to slip ratio (P/S) also changes along strike. At the early stage of compression, the P/S was low and sedimentary cover mainly folded; then, the thrust faults of western segment and middle segment propagated rapidly with high P/S ratio and broke through early formed folds into Neogene strata; but in the eastern segment, the main thrust fault pinch out in the thick gypsum salt layer of middle Cambrian and the sedimentary cover decoupled from basement. About the genesis of basement-involved structures of TFTB in the intracontinent circumstance, we consider the effect of positive inversion of late Proterozoic-early Palaeozoic rift which requires further evidences.

  1. Cenozoic faults and faulting phases in the western Tarim Basin (NW China): Effects of the collisions on the southern margin of the Eurasian Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-Jun; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Guang-Ya; Tian, Zuo-Ji; Peng, Geng-Xin; Qiu, Bin; Huang, Zhi-Bin; Luo, Jun-Cheng; Wen, Lei; Zhao, Yan; Jia, Tie-Gan

    2016-12-01

    The Bachu Rise in the western Tarim Basin is the fore-bulge of the Kunlun late Cenozoic intra-continental foreland basin system formed under the far-field effect of India-Asia collision. Cenozoic faults and faulting are abnormally developed in the Bachu Rise and its adjacent area. Taking the Niaoshan-Gudongshan area on the southern boundary of the Bachu Rise as the key study area, 5 Cenozoic faulting phases were identified in the Bachu Rise and its adjacent area after careful seismic interpretation. They are end Cretaceous ∼ beginning Paleogene (ca. 65 Ma) décollement-thrusting, end Paleogene ∼ beginning Neogene (ca. 23 Ma) décollement-thrusting, end Miocene ∼ beginning Pliocene (ca. 5 Ma) basement-involved thrusting, late Pliocene ∼ early Pleistocene (ca. 3-2 Ma) normal faulting, middle Pleistocene ∼ Holocene (ca. <1.5 Ma) décollement-thrusting and strike-slip faulting. The Middle Cambrian and Paleogene gypsum-salt layers serve as the two main décollement layers in the study area. Thrusting of ca. 65 Ma was under the far-field effect of the collision between Lhasa (part of the Cimmerian Continent) and Asia; and the other 4 Cenozoic faulting phases were all under the far-field effect of the India-Asia collision. The late Cenozoic faulting is characterized by pulse thrust. There is one tectonic pause between each two successive thrust pulses. The compressive tectonic stress is weaker and even evolved into a slight tensional tectonic stress and forms normal fault in the tectonic pauses.

  2. Active tectonics west of New Zealand's Alpine Fault: South Westland Fault Zone activity shows Australian Plate instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, Gregory P.; Chandler-Yates, Nicholas; Dela Pena, Federico; Wilson, Pam; May, Elijah; Twiss, Amber; Cheng, Che

    2016-04-01

    The 300 km long South Westland Fault Zone (SWFZ) is within the footwall of the Central Alpine Fault (Holocene sediments and gentle hanging wall anticlinal folding. Cone penetration test (CPT) stratigraphy shows repeated sequences within the fault scarp (consistent with thrusting). Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating constrains the most recent rupture post-12.1 ± 1.7 ka with evidence for three to four events during earthquakes of at least Mw 6.8. This study shows significant deformation is accommodated on poorly characterized Australian Plate structures northwest of the Alpine Fault and demonstrates that major active and seismogenic structures remain uncharacterized in densely forested regions on Earth.

  3. High-pressure creep of serpentine, interseismic deformation, and initiation of subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilairet, Nadege; Reynard, Bruno; Wang, Yanbin; Daniel, Isabelle; Merkel, Sebastien; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Petitgirard, Sylvain

    2007-12-21

    The supposed low viscosity of serpentine may strongly influence subduction-zone dynamics at all time scales, but until now its role could not be quantified because measurements relevant to intermediate-depth settings were lacking. Deformation experiments on the serpentine antigorite at high pressures and temperatures (1 to 4 gigapascals, 200 degrees to 500 degrees C) showed that the viscosity of serpentine is much lower than that of the major mantle-forming minerals. Regardless of the temperature, low-viscosity serpentinized mantle at the slab surface can localize deformation, impede stress buildup, and limit the downdip propagation of large earthquakes at subduction zones. Antigorite enables viscous relaxation with characteristic times comparable to those of long-term postseismic deformations after large earthquakes and slow earthquakes. Antigorite viscosity is sufficiently low to make serpentinized faults in the oceanic lithosphere a site for subduction initiation.

  4. High Thrust-Density Electrostaic Engines Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These issues are addressable by: increasing the thrust, power, and thrust-to-power ratio capability of EP systems; reducing the non-recurring engineering systems...

  5. Horizontal mantle flow controls subduction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficini, E; Dal Zilio, L; Doglioni, C; Gerya, T V

    2017-08-08

    It is generally accepted that subduction is driven by downgoing-plate negative buoyancy. Yet plate age -the main control on buoyancy- exhibits little correlation with most of the present-day subduction velocities and slab dips. "West"-directed subduction zones are on average steeper (~65°) than "East"-directed (~27°). Also, a "westerly"-directed net rotation of the lithosphere relative to the mantle has been detected in the hotspot reference frame. Thus, the existence of an "easterly"-directed horizontal mantle wind could explain this subduction asymmetry, favouring steepening or lifting of slab dip angles. Here we test this hypothesis using high-resolution two-dimensional numerical thermomechanical models of oceanic plate subduction interacting with a mantle flow. Results show that when subduction polarity is opposite to that of the mantle flow, the descending slab dips subvertically and the hinge retreats, thus leading to the development of a back-arc basin. In contrast, concordance between mantle flow and subduction polarity results in shallow dipping subduction, hinge advance and pronounced topography of the overriding plate, regardless of their age-dependent negative buoyancy. Our results are consistent with seismicity data and tomographic images of subduction zones. Thus, our models may explain why subduction asymmetry is a common feature of convergent margins on Earth.

  6. Crustal Gravitational Potential Energy Change and Subduction Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P. P.

    2017-05-01

    Crustal gravitational potential energy (GPE) change induced by earthquakes is an important subject in geophysics and seismology. For the past forty years the research on this subject stayed in the stage of qualitative estimate. In recent few years the 3D dynamic faulting theory provided a quantitative solution of this subject. The theory deduced a quantitative calculating formula for the crustal GPE change using the mathematic method of tensor analysis under the principal stresses system. This formula contains only the vertical principal stress, rupture area, slip, dip, and rake; it does not include the horizontal principal stresses. It is just involved in simple mathematical operations and does not hold complicated surface or volume integrals. Moreover, the hanging wall vertical moving (up or down) height has a very simple expression containing only slip, dip, and rake. The above results are significant to investigate crustal GPE change. Commonly, the vertical principal stress is related to the gravitational field, substituting the relationship between the vertical principal stress and gravitational force into the above formula yields an alternative formula of crustal GPE change. The alternative formula indicates that even with lack of in situ borehole measured stress data, scientists can still quantitatively calculate crustal GPE change. The 3D dynamic faulting theory can be used for research on continental fault earthquakes; it also can be applied to investigate subduction earthquakes between oceanic and continental plates. Subduction earthquakes hold three types: (a) crust only on the vertical up side of the rupture area; (b) crust and seawater both on the vertical up side of the rupture area; (c) crust only on the vertical up side of the partial rupture area, and crust and seawater both on the vertical up side of the remaining rupture area. For each type we provide its quantitative formula of the crustal GPE change. We also establish a simplified model (called

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of a vectored thrust aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, C.B; Mosekilde, Erik

    1996-01-01

    With realistic relations for the aerodynamic coefficients, numerical simulations are applied to study the longitudional dynamics of a thrust vectored aircraft. As function of the thrust magnitude and the thrust vectoring angle the equilibrium state exhibits two saddle-node bifurcations and three...

  8. Reverse fault growth and fault interaction with frictional interfaces: insights from analogue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Emanuele; Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Seno, Silvio

    2017-04-01

    The association of faulting and folding is a common feature in mountain chains, fold-and-thrust belts, and accretionary wedges. Kinematic models are developed and widely used to explain a range of relationships between faulting and folding. However, these models may result not to be completely appropriate to explain shortening in mechanically heterogeneous rock bodies. Weak layers, bedding surfaces, or pre-existing faults placed ahead of a propagating fault tip may influence the fault propagation rate itself and the associated fold shape. In this work, we employed clay analogue models to investigate how mechanical discontinuities affect the propagation rate and the associated fold shape during the growth of reverse master faults. The simulated master faults dip at 30° and 45°, recalling the range of the most frequent dip angles for active reverse faults that occurs in nature. The mechanical discontinuities are simulated by pre-cutting the clay pack. For both experimental setups (30° and 45° dipping faults) we analyzed three different configurations: 1) isotropic, i.e. without precuts; 2) with one precut in the middle of the clay pack; and 3) with two evenly-spaced precuts. To test the repeatability of the processes and to have a statistically valid dataset we replicate each configuration three times. The experiments were monitored by collecting successive snapshots with a high-resolution camera pointing at the side of the model. The pictures were then processed using the Digital Image Correlation method (D.I.C.), in order to extract the displacement and shear-rate fields. These two quantities effectively show both the on-fault and off-fault deformation, indicating the activity along the newly-formed faults and whether and at what stage the discontinuities (precuts) are reactivated. To study the fault propagation and fold shape variability we marked the position of the fault tips and the fold profiles for every successive step of deformation. Then we compared

  9. Reflection signature of seismic and aseismic slip on the northern Cascadia subduction interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedimović, Mladen R; Hyndman, Roy D; Ramachandran, Kumar; Spence, George D

    2003-07-24

    At the northern Cascadia margin, the Juan de Fuca plate is underthrusting North America at about 45 mm x yr(-1) (ref. 1), resulting in the potential for destructive great earthquakes. The downdip extent of coupling between the two plates is difficult to determine because the most recent such earthquake (thought to have been in 1700) occurred before instrumental recording. Thermal and deformation studies indicate that, off southern Vancouver Island, the interplate interface is presently fully locked for a distance of approximately 60 km downdip from the deformation front. Great thrust earthquakes on this section of the interface (with magnitudes of up to 9) have been estimated to occur at an average interval of about 590 yr (ref. 3). Further downdip there is a transition from fully locked behaviour to aseismic sliding (where high temperatures allow ductile deformation), with the deep aseismic zone exhibiting slow-slip thrust events. Here we show that there is a change in the reflection character on seismic images from a thin sharp reflection where the subduction thrust is inferred to be locked, to a broad reflection band at greater depth where aseismic slip is thought to be occurring. This change in reflection character may provide a new technique to map the landward extent of rupture in great earthquakes and improve the characterization of seismic hazards in subduction zones.

  10. Thrust sensing for small UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchman, Christopher Scott

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have become prevalent in both military and civilian applications. UAVs have many size categories from large-scale aircraft to micro air vehicles. The performance, health, and efficiency for UAVs of smaller sizes can be difficult to assess and few associated instrumentation systems have been developed. Thrust measurements on the ground can characterize systems especially when combined with simultaneous motor power measurements. This thesis demonstrates the use of strain measurements to measure the thrust produced by motor/propeller combinations for such small UAVs. A full-bridge Wheatstone circuit and electrical resistance strain gauges were used in conjunction with constant-stress cantilever beams for static tests and dynamic wind tunnel tests. An associated instrumentation module monitored power from the electric motor. Monitoring the thrust data over time can provide insights into optimal propeller and motor selection and early detection of problems such as component failure. The approach provides a system for laboratory or field measurements that can be scaled for a wide range of small UAVs.

  11. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.; Johnson, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/ d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of average active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Probing the transition between seismically coupled and decoupled segments along an ancient subduction interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiboust, Samuel; Kirsch, Josephine; Oncken, Onno; Glodny, Johannes; Monié, Patrick; Rybacki, Erik

    2015-06-01

    The transition zone at the downdip end of seismic coupling along subduction interfaces is often the site of megathrust earthquake nucleation and concentrated postseismic afterslip, as well as the focus site of episodic tremor and slip features. Exhumed remnants of the former Alpine subduction zone found in the Swiss Alps allow analyzing fluid and deformation processes near the transition zone region (30-40 km paleodepth). The Dent Blanche Thrust (DBT) is a lower blueschist-facies shear zone interpreted as a fossilized subduction interface where granitic mylonites overlie a metamorphosed accretionary wedge. We report field observations from the DBT region where multiple, several tens of meters thick foliated cataclastic networks are interlayered within the basal DBT mylonites. Petrological results and microstructural observations indicate that the various cataclasis events took place at near-peak metamorphic conditions (400-500°C, 1.1-1.3 GPa) during subduction of the Tethyan seafloor in Eocene times (42-48 Ma). Some of these networks exhibit mutual crosscutting relationships between mylonites, foliated cataclasites, and vein systems indicating mutual overprinting between brittle deformation and ductile creep. Whole-rock chemical compositions, in situ 40Ar-39Ar age data of recrystallized phengite, and Sr isotopic signatures reveal that DBT rocks also underwent multiple hydrofracturing and metasomatic events via the infiltration of fluids mainly derived from the oceanic metasediments underneath the DBT. From the rock fabrics, we infer strain rate fluctuations of several orders of magnitude beyond subduction strain rates (˜10-12 s-1) accompanied by fluctuation of supralithostatic and quasi-lithostatic fluid pressures (1 ≥ λ > 0.95). DBT brittle-plastic deformation switches highlight the diversity of deformation processes and fluid-rock interactions in the transition zone region of the subduction interface.

  13. Dynamic Subsidence across the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Basin in Response to Farallon Slab Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Nummedal, D.; Liu, L.

    2015-12-01

    The United States Cretaceous Western Interior Basin has long been considered a foreland basin, driven by the Sevier thrust and associated basin sediment loads. However, flexural studies demonstrate that this effect exists only within a narrow band in front of the thrust belt. Most of the basin appears to be due to mantle flow-induced dynamic subsidence associated with Farallon plate subduction. Here we show how the components of evolving long-wavelength dynamic subsidence and flexural subsidence created the accommodation space and controlled the stratigraphy across the western United Sates, based on the correlated stratigraphic sections across central Utah-Colorado and southern Wyoming.These backstripped subsidence data reveal a component of continuously evolving long-wavelength dynamic subsidence, in addition to subsidence driven by the Sevier thrust belt and associated sediment loads. The loci of maximum rates of this dynamic subsidence moved eastward from ~98 to 74 Ma in phase with the west-to-east passage of the Farallon slab, as reconstructed from tomography based on quantitative inverse models. These subsidence data allow testing of existing subduction models and confirm the dynamic-topography driven nature of the Western Interior Basin. The results seem to support that the depocenters track the trough of dynamic subsidence with ca.18 Myr cycles through time and space and the stratigraphic patterns of large-scale progradation, eastward migration of depocenter, and regional clinoform-like downlap are related with the dynamic subsidence. Interpretation of these data also provides more insights into the repeated, ca.2 to 6 Myr cycles of thrust-induced subsidence in front of the thrust belt, which control the local eastward progradation of the sand bodies from the thrust belt. The dynamic, flexural subsidence and eustatic sea level changes interacted and controlled the timing and distribution of unconformities. Our work shows how the stratigraphy precisely

  14. Geometry and slip rates of active blind thrusts in a reactivated back-arc rift using shallow seismic imaging: Toyama basin, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Kato, Naoko; Sato, Hiroshi; Koshiya, Shin; Toda, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Kenta

    2017-10-01

    Active blind thrust faults, which can be a major seismic hazard in urbanized areas, are commonly difficult to image with seismic reflection surveys. To address these challenges in coastal plains, we collected about 8 km-long onshore high-resolution two-dimensional (2D) seismic reflection data using a dense array of 800 geophones across compressionally reactivated normal faults within a failed rift system located along the southwestern extension of the Toyama trough in the Sea of Japan. The processing of the seismic reflection data illuminated their detailed subsurface structures to depths of about 3 km. The interpreted depth-converted section, correlated with nearby Neogene stratigraphy, indicated the presence of and along-strike variation of previously unrecognized complex thrust-related structures composed of active fault-bend folds coupled with pairs of flexural slip faults within the forelimb and newly identified frontal active blind thrusts beneath the alluvial plain. In addition, growth strata and fold scarps that deform lower to upper Pleistocene units record the recent history of their structural growth and fault activity. This case shows that shallow seismic reflection imaging with densely spaced seismic recorders is a useful tool in defining locations, recent fault activity, and complex geometry of otherwise inaccessible active blind thrust faults.

  15. Quantitative Study of Seismogenic Potential Along Manila Trench: Effects of Scaborough Seamount Chain Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Liu, Y.; Li, D.; Ning, J.; Matsuzawa, T.; Shibazaki, B.; Hsu, Y. J.

    2014-12-01

    Modern seismicity record along the Manila Trench shows only infrequent Mw7 earthquakes, the lack of great earthquakes may indicate the subduction fault is either aseismically slipping or is accumulating strain energy toward rapid release in a megathrust earthquake. We conduct numerical simulations of the plate coupling, earthquake nucleation and dynamic rupture propagation processes along the Manila subduction fault (15-19.5ºN), taking into consideration the effects of plate geometry (including subducted seamounts), fault strength, rate-state frictional properties and pore pressure variations. Specifically, we use the bathymetry to depict the outline of Manila trench along its strike, 2681 background seismicity (1970/02/13 to 2013/09/06) from Chinese Earthquake Network Center and 540 focal mechanism solutions (1976/01/01 to 2013/01/27) from Global CMT project to constrain the geometry of the subducting Sunda/Eurasian slab. The compilation of seismicity and focal mechanism indicates the plate dipping angle gradually changes from 28º (south of the Scaborough Seamount Chain) to 12º (north of it). This geometric anomaly may due to the subducted part of the seamount chain. Preliminary modeling results using gabbro gouge friction data show that the Scaborough Seamount Chain could be a barrier to earthquake rupture propagation. Only earthquakes larger than Mw7 can overcome the barrier to rupture the entire Manila trench. Smaller earthquakes would cease rupturing when it encounters the seamount chain. Moreover, we propose that Manila trench subduction zone has the potential of rupturing in a Mw8 megathrust earthquake, if the simulation period is long enough for an Mw8 earthquake cycle and dynamic rupture overcomes the subducted Scaborough Seamount Chain. Our model parameters will be further constrained by laboratory rock mechanics experiments conducted on IODP Expedition 349, South China Sea (SCS), drilling samples (work in progress at China Earthquake Administration

  16. Geodetic Observations of Interseismic Strain Segmentation at the Sumatra Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawirodirdjo, L.; Bock, Y.; McCaffrey, R.; Genrich, J.; Calais, E.; Puntodewo, S. S. O.; Subarya, C.; Rais, J.; Zwick, P.; Fauzi

    1997-01-01

    Deformation above the Sumatra subduction zone, revealed by Global Positioning System (GPS) geodetic surveys, shows nearly complete coupling of the forearc to the subducting plate south of 0.5 deg S and half as much to north. The abrupt change in plate coupling coincides with the boundary between the rupture zones of the 1833 and 1861 (Mw greater than 8) thrust earthquakes. The rupture boundary appears as an abrupt change in strain accumulation well into the interseismic cycle, suggesting that seismic segmentation is controlled by properties of the plate interface that persist occupied through more than one earthquake cycle. Structural evidence indicates that differences in basal shear stress may be related to elevated pore pressure in the north.

  17. Middle Miocene E-W tectonic horst structure of Crete through extensional detachment faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, D.; Vassilakis, E.

    2008-07-01

    Two east-west trending extensional detachment faults have been recognized in Crete, one with top-to-the-north motion of the hanging wall toward the Cretan Sea and one with top-to-the-south motion of the hanging wall toward the Libyan Sea. The east-west trending zone between these two detachment faults, which forms their common footwall, comprises a tectonic horst formed during Middle Miocene slip on the detachment faults. The detachment faults disrupt the overall tectono-stratigraphic succession of Crete and are localized along pre-existing thrust faults and along particular portions of the stratigraphic sequence, including the transition between the Permo-Triassic Tyros Beds and the base of the Upper Triassic-Eocene carbonate platform of the Tripolis nappe. By recognizing several different tectono-stratigraphic formations within what is generally termed the 'phyllite-quartzite', it is possible to distinguish these extensional detachment faults from thrust faults and minor discontinuities in the sequence. The deformation history of units within Crete can be summarized as: (i) compressional deformation producing arc-parallel east-west trending south-directed thrust faults in Oligocene to Early Miocene time (ii) extensional deformation along arc-parallel, east-west trending detachment faults in Middle Miocene time, with hanging wall motion to the north and south; (iii) Late Miocene-Quaternary extensional deformation along high-angle normal and oblique normal faults that disrupt the older arc-parallel structures.

  18. Middle Miocene E-W tectonic horst structure of Crete through extensional detachment faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanikolaou, D [Professor of Dynamics and Tectonics, School of Geology and Geoenvironment, Department of Dynamics, Tectonics and Applied Geology, National and Kapodestrian University of Athens, 15784 (Greece); Vassilakis, E [Research Scientist, School of Geology and Geoenvironment, Department of Dynamics, Tectonics and Applied Geology, National and Kapodestrian University of Athens, 15784 (Greece)], E-mail: dpapan@geol.uoa.gr, E-mail: evasilak@geol.uoa.gr

    2008-07-01

    Two east-west trending extensional detachment faults have been recognized in Crete, one with top-to-the-north motion of the hanging wall toward the Cretan Sea and one with top-to-the-south motion of the hanging wall toward the Libyan Sea. The east-west trending zone between these two detachment faults, which forms their common footwall, comprises a tectonic horst formed during Middle Miocene slip on the detachment faults. The detachment faults disrupt the overall tectono-stratigraphic succession of Crete and are localized along pre-existing thrust faults and along particular portions of the stratigraphic sequence, including the transition between the Permo-Triassic Tyros Beds and the base of the Upper Triassic-Eocene carbonate platform of the Tripolis nappe. By recognizing several different tectono-stratigraphic formations within what is generally termed the 'phyllite-quartzite', it is possible to distinguish these extensional detachment faults from thrust faults and minor discontinuities in the sequence. The deformation history of units within Crete can be summarized as: (i) compressional deformation producing arc-parallel east-west trending south-directed thrust faults in Oligocene to Early Miocene time (ii) extensional deformation along arc-parallel, east-west trending detachment faults in Middle Miocene time, with hanging wall motion to the north and south; (iii) Late Miocene-Quaternary extensional deformation along high-angle normal and oblique normal faults that disrupt the older arc-parallel structures.

  19. Active and long-lived permanent forearc deformation driven by the subduction seismic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron Melo, Felipe Alejandro

    I have used geological, geophysical and engineering methods to explore mechanisms of upper plate, brittle deformation at active forearc regions. My dissertation particularly addresses the permanent deformation style experienced by the forearc following great subduction ruptures, such as the 2010 M w8.8 Maule, Chile and 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquakes. These events triggered large, shallow seismicity on upper plate normal faults above the rupture reaching Mw7.0. First I present new structural data from the Chilean Coastal Cordillera over the rupture zone of the Maule earthquake. The study area contains the Pichilemu normal fault, which produced the large crustal aftershocks of the megathrust event. Normal faults are the major neotectonic structural elements but reverse faults also exist. Crustal seismicity and GPS surface displacements show that the forearc experiences pulses of rapid coseismic extension, parallel to the heave of the megathrust, and slow interseismic, convergence-parallel shortening. These cycles, over geologic time, build the forearc structural grain, reactivating structures properly-oriented respect to the deformation field of each stage of the interplate cycle. Great subduction events may play a fundamental role in constructing the crustal architecture of extensional forearc regions. Static mechanical models of coseismic and interseismic upper plate deformation are used to explore for distinct features that could result from brittle fracturing over the two stages of the interplate cycle. I show that the semi-elliptical outline of the first-order normal faults along the Coastal Cordillera may define the location of a characteristic, long-lived megathrust segment. Finally, using data from the Global CMT catalog I analyzed the seismic behavior through time of forearc regions that have experienced great subduction ruptures >Mw7.7 worldwide. Between 61% and 83% of the cases where upper plate earthquakes exhibited periods of increased seismicity

  20. Structural analysis of the Gachsar sub-zone in central Alborz range; constrain for inversion tectonics followed by the range transverse faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaghi, A.; Naeimi, A.

    2010-04-01

    Analysis of the Gachsar structural sub-zone has been carried out to constrain structural evolution of the central Alborz range situated in the central Alpine Himalayan orogenic system. The sub-zone bounded by the northward-dipping Kandovan Fault to the north and the southward-dipping Taleghan Fault to the south is transversely cut by several sinistral faults. The Kandovan Fault that controls development of the Eocene rocks in its footwall from the Paleozoic-Mesozoic units in the fault hanging wall is interpreted as an inverted basin-bounding fault. Structural evidences include the presence of a thin-skinned imbricate thrust system propagated from a detachment zone that acts as a footwall shortcut thrust, development of large synclines in the fault footwall as well as back thrusts and pop-up structures on the fault hanging wall. Kinematics of the inverted Kandovan Fault and its accompanying structures constrain the N-S shortening direction proposed for the Alborz range until Late Miocene. The transverse sinistral faults that are in acute angle of 15° to a major magnetic lineament, which represents a basement fault, are interpreted to develop as synthetic Riedel shears on the cover sequences during reactivation of the basement fault. This overprinting of the transverse faults on the earlier inverted extensional fault occurs since the Late Miocene when the south Caspian basin block attained a SSW movement relative to the central Iran. Therefore, recent deformation in the range is a result of the basement transverse-fault reactivation.

  1. Evolution and depocentre migration in thrust-top basins: inferences from the Messinian Velona Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Marco; Moratti, Giovanna; Sani, Federico

    1999-03-01

    A structural study of the thrust-related Messinian Velona Basin is presented. This basin developed in the hinterland area of the Northern Apennines between two N-trending and E-verging thrust anticlines, the Montalcino-Castelnuovo dell'Abate anticline to the west and the Ripa d'Orcia anticline to the east. The architecture of the basin and the deformation affecting the syntectonic sedimentary deposits show that the Velona Basin was affected by two strong compressive phases during the Messinian. The results of this study fit well into the structural evolution of the nearby hinterland basins, indicating a Neogene tectonic scenario dominated by compression. The evolution of the Velona Basin is compared with simple models of thrust-top basins whose development is controlled by the kinematics of two competing thrust anticlines. The westward-directed depocentre migration recognized in the Velona Basin is related to a higher displacement rate along the eastern thrust fault (Ripa d'Orcia thrust anticline), whereas the deformations at the opposite basin margin are related to the Montalcino-Castelnuovo dell'Abate thrust anticline. The general models of thrust-top basin evolution presented here were successfully applied to the Velona Basin case, and may be compared with other natural examples as well.

  2. Effect of fault geometry on earthquake rupture migration induced by fluid injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, B.; Aochi, H.

    2008-12-01

    The role of fluid on the earthquake generation process has attracted attention because of recent discoveries, such as non-volcanic tremors and low-frequency earthquakes beneath the subduction seismogenic zone. Although there have been many conceptual models on fault rheology and fluid flow, and numerical studies on seismicity, nucleation and aseismic slip, most of them are carried out for a planar fault. However, it has been pointed out that the fault geometry should be important for the earthquake generation process even in subduction zones due to the plate curvature or the existence of subducting seamounts. In this study, we numerically study the earthquake evolution along a non-planar fault due to constant fluid injection. The basic model of the fault rheology and fluid flow is the same as in the work of Yamashita (JGR, 102(B8), 1997), where fluid flow is allowed only along the fault surface based on Darcy law and the fault zone width evolves with slip. The static elastic response in an infinite, homogeneous 2D medium is calculated by the theoretical Green's function (e.g. Tada, PhD thesis, Univ. Tokyo, 1996). We carry out preliminary parametric studies on a zigzag fault and an echelon fault with respect to their angles and surrounding stress condition. It is shown that the system behaviour differs from the planar fault case but it is strongly influenced by the hypothesis of the role of how such irregular "mesoscopic" geometry is (in)dependent of the macroscopic condition. Our attempts should be useful in understanding the preparation process of large earthquakes in subduction zone and elsewhere as well as other seismic phenomena strongly related to the existence of fluids.

  3. Subduction dynamics: Constraints from gravity field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcadoo, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Satellite systems do the best job of resolving the long wavelength components of the Earth's gravity field. Over the oceans, satellite-borne radar altimeters such as SEASAT provide the best resolution observations of the intermediate wavelength components. Satellite observations of gravity contributed to the understanding of the dynamics of subduction. Large, long wavelength geoidal highs generally occur over subduction zones. These highs are attributed to the superposition of two effects of subduction: (1) the positive mass anomalies of subducting slabs themselves; and (2) the surface deformations such as the trenches convectively inducted by these slabs as they sink into the mantle. Models of this subduction process suggest that the mantle behaves as a nonNewtonian fluid, its effective viscosity increases significantly with depth, and that large positive mass anomalies may occur beneath the seismically defined Benioff zones.

  4. Switching deformation mode and mechanisms during subduction of continental crust: a case study from Alpine Corsica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Molli

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The switching in deformation mode (from distributed to localized and mechanisms (viscous versus frictional represent a relevant issue in the frame of crustal deformation, being also connected with the concept of the brittle–ductile transition and seismogenesis. In a subduction environment, switching in deformation mode and mechanisms and scale of localization may be inferred along the subduction interface, in a transition zone between the highly coupled (seismogenic zone and decoupled deeper aseismic domain (stable slip. However, the role of brittle precursors in nucleating crystal-plastic shear zones has received more and more consideration being now recognized as fundamental in some cases for the localization of deformation and shear zone development, thus representing a case in which switching deformation mechanisms and scale and style of localization (deformation mode interact and relate to each other. This contribution analyses an example of a millimetre-scale shear zone localized by brittle precursor formed within a host granitic protomylonite. The studied structures, developed in ambient pressure–temperature (P–T conditions of low-grade blueschist facies (temperature T of ca. 300 °C and pressure P ≥ 0. 70 GPa during involvement of Corsican continental crust in the Alpine subduction. We used a multidisciplinary approach by combining detailed microstructural and petrographic analyses, crystallographic preferred orientation by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD, and palaeopiezometric studies on a selected sample to support an evolutionary model and deformation path for subducted continental crust. We infer that the studied structures, possibly formed by transient instability associated with fluctuations of pore fluid pressure and episodic strain rate variations, may be considered as a small-scale example of fault behaviour associated with a cycle of interseismic creep and coseismic rupture or a new analogue for

  5. Three-dimensional structure and seismicity beneath the Central Vanuatu subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foix, Oceane; Crawford, Wayne; Pelletier, Bernard; Regnier, Marc; Garaebiti, Esline; Koulakov, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    The 1400-km long Vanuatu subduction zone results from subduction of the oceanic Australian plate (OAP) beneath the North-Fijian microplate (NFM). Seismic and volcanic activity are both high, and several morphologic features enter into subduction, affecting seismicity and probably plate coupling. The Entrecasteaux Ridge, West-Torres plateau, and Bougainville seamount currently enter into subduction below the large forearc islands of Santo and Malekula. This collision coincides with a strongly decreased local convergence velocity rate - 35 mm/yr compared to 120-160 mm/yr to the north and south - and significant uplift on the overriding plate, indicating a high degree of deformation. The close proximity of large uplifted forearc islands to the trench provides excellent coverage of the megathrust seismogenic zone for a seismological study. We used 10 months of seismological data collected using the 30-instrument land and sea ARC-VANUATU seismology network to construct a 3D velocity model — using the LOTOS joint location/model inversion software — and locate 11655 earthquakes using the NonLinLoc software suite. The 3-D model reveals low P and S velocities in the first tens of kilometers beneath both islands, probably due to water infiltration in the heavily faulted upper plate. The model also suggests the presence of a subducted seamount beneath south Santo. The earthquake locations reveal a complex interaction of faults and stress zones related to high and highly variable deformation. Both brittle deformation and the seismogenic zone depth limits vary along-slab and earthquake clusters are identified beneath central and south Santo, at about 10-30 km of depth, and southwest of Malekula island between 10-20 km depth.

  6. Landforms along transverse faults parallel to axial zone of folded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 1. Landforms along transverse faults parallel to axial zone of folded mountain front, north-eastern Kumaun Sub-Himalaya, India. Khayingshing ... Keywords. Himalayan Frontal Thrust; outer Kumaun Himalaya; transverse structure; folded mountain front.

  7. Deformation history from microstructures: an example from Ramgarh Thrust Sheet, Eastern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S.; Matin, A.; Mukul, M.; Mukherjee, A.

    2011-12-01

    The emplacement of thrust sheets in a fold and thrust belt is an integral part in the evolution of orogenic belts. The signatures of deformation present in a thrust sheet is often very useful to elucidate the history of deformation and also to understand the mechanisms of deformation that operates in stages during the emplacement of thrust sheets. The Himalayan orogenic belt has experienced multiple stages of thrusting and duplex formation. Ramgarh thrust sheet (RTS), one of the major thrust sheets bounded by the Main Central Thrust to the North and Ramgarh thrust (RT) in the south, is studied in the eastern Himalaya to understand its emplacement history and formation of microstructures in response to the deformation. The RTS consists dominantly of metapelitic sequence with intercalated quartzite bands. The present study attempts to understand the deformation history and mechanisms of deformation from microstructures developed in Daling group of rocks of the RTS, in the immediate northern side outside the Rangit window, Sikkim Himalaya. Three stages of cleavage formation in phyllite have been identified. The cleavages of the early stages are transposed to the present stage through the process of shearing adjacent to the RT fault zone as deformation progresses. The remnants of earlier cleavages are present as obliterated relict structures within the dominant last stage fabric. The evidence of shearing is present in both quartz-poor as well as in quartz-rich sericite schist. Schistosity plane is sheared to form S-C structure along with the development of pressure solution planes usually parallel to C-plane. Shear band cleavage is a common micro-scale structure in the deformed schistose rocks. Quartz grains in quartz mylonite have undergone crystal-plastic deformation and exhibit sweeping undulatory extinction, deformation bands, sub-grain formation and incipient to almost complete recrystallization of original grains. In phyllosilicate grains, undulatory extinction

  8. Investigating the Role of Dehydration Reactions in Subduction Zone Pore Pressures Using Newly-Developed Permeability-Porosity Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screaton, E.; Daigle, H.; James, S.; Meridth, L.; Jaeger, J. M.; Villaseñor, T. G.

    2014-12-01

    Dehydration reactions are linked to shallow subduction zone deformation through excess pore pressures and their effect on mechanical properties. Two reactions, the transformation of smectite to illite and of opal-A to opal-CT and then to quartz, can occur relatively early in the subduction process and may affect the propagation of the plate boundary fault, the updip limit of velocity-weakening frictional paper, and tsunamigenesis. Due to large variations between subduction zones in heat flow, sedimentation rates, and geometries, dehydration location may peak prior to subduction to as much as 100 km landward of the deformation front. The location of the dehydration reaction peak relative to when compaction occurs, causes significant differences in pore pressure generation. As a result, a key element to modeling excess pore pressures due to dehydration reactions is the assumed relationship between permeability and porosity. Data from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) drilling of subduction zone reference sites were combined with previously collected results to develop relationships for porosity-permeability behavior for various sediment types. Comparison with measurements of deeper analog data show that porosity-permeability trends are maintained through burial and diagenesis to porosities <10%, suggesting that behavior observed in shallow samples is informative for predicting behavior at depth following subduction. We integrate these permeability-porosity relationships, compaction behavior, predictions of temperature distribution, kinetic expressions for smectite and opal-A dehydration, into fluid flow models to examine the role of dehydration reactions in pore pressure generation.

  9. Thrust augmentation for a small turbojet engine

    OpenAIRE

    Hackaday, Gary L.

    1999-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A Sophia J450 (nine pounds of thrust) gas turbine engine was used first to examine the thrust augmentation generated using an ejector shroud. Experimental results obtained with and without the ejector were compared with performance predicted using an engine code and a one-dimensional ejector analysis. The engine code was revised to incorporate a radial turbine and the correct compressor map. Thrust augmentation of 3-10% was measured an...

  10. Reply to comment by Tan et al. on "Sandbox modeling of evolving thrust wedges with different preexisting topographic relief: Implications for the Longmen Shan thrust belt, eastern Tibet"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chuang; Jia, Dong; Yin, Hongwei; Chen, Zhuxin; Li, Zhigang; Li, Shen; Wei, Dongtao; Li, Yiquan; Yan, Bin; Wang, Maomao; Fang, Shaozhi; Cui, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Tan et al. comment that the preexisting topographic relief in our sandbox is opposed to its prototype in the central Longmen Shan. Therefore, the comparison between our sandbox modeling and the natural topography is questionable and does not agree with our conclusion that the Xiaoyudong fault is a tear fault. First, we are grateful to the authors for their approval of our sandbox modeling and its contribution to understanding fault behavior within thrust wedges. However, after reading the comment carefully, we found that they misunderstood the meaning of topographic relief we conveyed. In response, we would like to address the differences between the topography in their comment and the orogen-scale topography we investigated in our modeling to defend our conclusion.

  11. Drilling the North Anatolian Fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aktar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An international workshop entitled “GONAF: A deep Geophysical Observatory at the North Anatolian Fault”, was held 23–27 April 2007 in Istanbul, Turkey. The aim of this workshop was to refine plans for a deep drilling project at the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ in northwestern Turkey. The current drilling target is located in the Marmara Sea offshore the megacity of Istanbul in the direct vicinity of the main branch of the North Anatolian Fault on the PrinceIslands (Figs. 1 and 2.The NAFZ represents a 1600-km-long plate boundary that slips at an average rate of 20–30 mm·yr-1 (McClusky et al., 2000. It has developed in the framework of the northward moving Arabian plate and the Hellenic subduction zone where the African lithosphere is subducting below the Aegean. Comparison of long-term slip rates with Holocene and GPS-derived slip rates indicate an increasing westwardmovement of the Anatolian plate with respect to stable Eurasia. During the twentieth century, the NAFZ has ruptured over 900 km of its length. A series of large earthquakes starting in 1939 near Erzincan in Eastern Anatolia propagated westward towards the Istanbul-Marmara region in northwestern Turkey that today represents a seismic gap along a ≥100-km-long segment below the Sea of Marmara. This segment did not rupture since 1766 and, if locked, may have accumulated a slip deficit of 4–5 m. It is believed being capable of generating two M≥7.4 earthquakes within the next decades (Hubert-Ferrari et al., 2000; however, it could even rupture in a large single event (Le Pichon et al., 1999.

  12. Deformation along a salient-transverse zone junction: An example from the Leamington transverse zone, Utah, Sevier fold-thrust belt (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismat, Zeshan; Toeneboehn, Kevin

    2015-06-01

    Within fold-thrust belts, the junctions between salients and recesses may hold critical clues to the overall kinematic history of fold-thrust belts. The deformation history within these junctions is best preserved in areas where thrust sheets extend from a salient through an adjacent recess. We examine one such junction within the Sevier fold-thrust belt (western United States) along the Leamington transverse zone, northern Utah. The Canyon Range thrust sheet can be traced continuously from the Leamington transverse zone to its adjacent salient to the south, the Central Utah segment. Deformation within the Canyon Range thrust sheet took place by faulting and cataclastic flow. Analyses of these fault networks preserved throughout the Canyon Range thrust sheet are used to develop a kinematic history of the Leamington transverse zone. Field data is supplemented by analog sandbox experiments. This study suggests that, in detail, deformation within the overlying thrust sheet may not directly reflect the underlying basement structure. Moreover, these junctions may contain several types of accommodating structures that helped to maintain critical-taper and that serve as potential targets for natural resource exploration.

  13. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators Thrust-Measurement Methodology Incorporating New Anti-Thrust Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss thrust measurements of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators devices used for aerodynamic active flow control. After a review of our experience with conventional thrust measurement and significant non-repeatability of the results, we devised a suspended actuator test setup, and now present a methodology of thrust measurements with decreased uncertainty. The methodology consists of frequency scans at constant voltages. The procedure consists of increasing the frequency in a step-wise fashion from several Hz to the maximum frequency of several kHz, followed by frequency decrease back down to the start frequency of several Hz. This sequence is performed first at the highest voltage of interest, then repeated at lower voltages. The data in the descending frequency direction is more consistent and selected for reporting. Sample results show strong dependence of thrust on humidity which also affects the consistency and fluctuations of the measurements. We also observed negative values of thrust or "anti-thrust", at low frequencies between 4 Hz and up to 64 Hz. The anti-thrust is proportional to the mean-squared voltage and is frequency independent. Departures from the parabolic anti-thrust curve are correlated with appearance of visible plasma discharges. We propose the anti-thrust hypothesis. It states that the measured thrust is a sum of plasma thrust and anti-thrust, and assumes that the anti-thrust exists at all frequencies and voltages. The anti-thrust depends on actuator geometry and materials and on the test installation. It enables the separation of the plasma thrust from the measured total thrust. This approach enables more meaningful comparisons between actuators at different installations and laboratories. The dependence on test installation was validated by surrounding the actuator with a large diameter, grounded, metal sleeve.

  14. Thermal State, Slab Metamorphism, and Interface Seismicity in the Cascadia Subduction Zone Based On 3-D Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yingfeng; Yoshioka, Shoichi; Banay, Yuval A.

    2017-09-01

    Giant earthquakes have repeatedly ruptured the Cascadia subduction zone, and similar earthquakes will likely also occur there in the near future. We employ a 3-D time-dependent thermomechanical model that incorporates an up-to-date description of the slab geometry to study the Cascadia subduction thrust. Results show a distinct band of 3-D slab dehydration that extends from Vancouver Island to the Seattle Basin and farther southward to the Klamath Mountains in northern California, where episodic tremors cluster. This distribution appears to include a region of increased dehydration in northern Cascadia. The phenomenon of heterogeneous megathrust seismicity associated with oblique subduction suggests that the presence of fluid-rich interfaces generated by slab dehydration favors megathrust seismogenesis in the northern part of this zone. The thin, relatively weakly metamorphosed Explorer, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda Plates are associated with an anomalous lack of thrust earthquakes, and metamorphism that occurs at temperatures of 500-700°C near the Moho discontinuity may represent a key factor in explaining the presence of the associated episodic tremor and slip (ETS), which requires a young oceanic plate to subduct at a small dip angle, as is the case in Cascadia and southwestern Japan. The 3-D intraslab dehydration distribution suggests that the metamorphosed plate environment is more complex than had previously been believed, despite the existence of channeling vein networks. Slab amphibolization and eclogitization near the continental Moho depth is thus inferred to account for the resultant overpressurization at the interface, facilitating the generation of ETS and the occurrence of small to medium thrust earthquakes beneath Cascadia.

  15. Optimal fault signal estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij; Niemann, H.H.; Saberi, A.; Sannuti, P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider here both fault identification and fault signal estimation. Regarding fault identification, we seek either exact or almost fault identification. On the other hand, regarding fault signal estimation, we seek either $H_2$ optimal, $H_2$ suboptimal or Hinfinity suboptimal estimation. By

  16. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  17. Fossil intermediate-depth earthquakes in subducting slabs linked to differential stress release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scambelluri, Marco; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Gilio, Mattia; Bestmann, Michel; Plümper, Oliver; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2017-12-01

    The cause of intermediate-depth (50-300 km) seismicity in subduction zones is uncertain. It is typically attributed either to rock embrittlement associated with fluid pressurization, or to thermal runaway instabilities. Here we document glassy pseudotachylyte fault rocks—the products of frictional melting during coseismic faulting—in the Lanzo Massif ophiolite in the Italian Western Alps. These pseudotachylytes formed at subduction-zone depths of 60-70 km in poorly hydrated to dry oceanic gabbro and mantle peridotite. This rock suite is a fossil analogue to an oceanic lithospheric mantle that undergoes present-day subduction. The pseudotachylytes locally preserve high-pressure minerals that indicate an intermediate-depth seismic environment. These pseudotachylytes are important because they are hosted in a near-anhydrous lithosphere free of coeval ductile deformation, which excludes an origin by dehydration embrittlement or thermal runaway processes. Instead, our observations indicate that seismicity in cold subducting slabs can be explained by the release of differential stresses accumulated in strong dry metastable rocks.

  18. Megathrust and accretionary wedge properties and behaviour in the Makran subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Camilla; Tavakoli, Farokh; Saadat, Abdolreza; Nankali, Hamid Reza; Sedighi, Morteza; Khorrami, Fateme; Sobouti, Farhad; Rafi, Zahid; Copley, Alex; Jackson, James; Priestley, Keith

    2017-06-01

    We study the Makran subduction zone, along the southern coasts of Iran and Pakistan, to gain insights into the kinematics and dynamics of accretionary prism deformation. By combining techniques from seismology, geodesy and geomorphology, we are able to put constraints on the shape of the subduction interface and the style of strain across the prism. We also address the long-standing tectonic problem of how the right-lateral shear taken up by strike-slip faulting in the Sistan Suture Zone in eastern Iran is accommodated at the zone's southern end. We find that the subduction interface in the western Makran may be locked, accumulating elastic strain, and move in megathrust earthquakes. Such earthquakes, and associated tsunamis, present a significant hazard to populations around the Arabian Sea. The time-dependent strain within the accretionary prism, resulting from the megathrust earthquake cycle, may play an important role in the deformation of the Makran region. By considering the kinematics of the 2013 Balochistan and Minab earthquakes, we infer that the local gravitational and far-field compressive forces in the Makran accretionary prism are in balance. This force balance allows us to calculate the mean shear stress and effective coefficient of friction on the Makran megathrust, which we find to be 5-35 MPa and 0.01-0.03, respectively. These values are similar to those found in other subduction zones, showing that the abnormally high sediment thickness in the offshore Makran does not significantly reduce the shear stress on the megathrust.

  19. A subduction zone reference frame based on slab geometry and subduction partitioning of plate motion and trench migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2011-01-01

    The geometry of subducted slabs that interact with the transition zone depends critically on the partitioning of the subduction velocity (v S⊥) at the surface into its subducting plate motion component (vSP⊥) and trench migration component (vT⊥). Geodynamic models of progressive subduction

  20. Main Frontal thrust deformation and topographic growth of the Mohand Range, northwest Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vinee; Mukul, Malay; Barnes, Jason B.

    2016-12-01

    The Main Frontal thrust (MFT) uplifts the Himalayan topographic front. Deciphering MFT deformation kinematics is crucial for understanding how the orogen accommodates continuing continental collision and assessing associated hazards. Here, we (a) detail newly discovered fault-zone exposures along the MFT at the Mohand Range front in northwestern India and (b) apply contemporary fault zone theory to show that the MFT is an emergent fault with a well-developed fault zone overlain by uplifted Quaternary gravels over a horizontal length of ∼700 m. Northward from the front, the fault zone grades from a central, gouge-dominated core to a hanging-wall, rock-dominated damage zone. We observed incohesive, non-foliated breccia, fault gouge, and brittle deformation microstructures within the fractured country rocks (Middle Siwaliks) and outcrop scale, non-plunging folds in the proximal hanging wall. We interpret these observations to suggest that (1) elastico-frictional (brittle) deformation processes operated in the fault zone at near surface (∼1-5 km depth) conditions and (2) the folds formed first at the propagating MFT fault tip, then were subsequently dismembered by the fault itself. Thus, we interpret the Mohand Range as a fault-propagation fold driven by an emergent MFT in contrast to the consensus view that it is a fault-bend fold. A fault-propagation fold model is more consistent with these new observations, the modern range-scale topography, and existing erosion estimates. To further evaluate our proposed structural model, we used a Boundary Element Method-based dislocation model to simulate topographic growth from excess slip at a propagating fault tip. Results show that the frontal topography could have evolved by slip along a (a) near-surface fault plane consistent with the present-day MFT location, or (b) blind MFT at ∼3 km depth farther north near the drainage divide. Comparing modelled vs. measured high resolution (∼16 cm) topographic profiles for each

  1. Thermobarometric and fluid expulsion history of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, W. G.

    1990-06-01

    approximately retraced the prograde path or, for early formed high-grade blocks, reflect somewhat higher pressures and lower temperatures. Subducted sections constituting portions of the Franciscan-type of metamorphic belt evidently moved slowly back up the inclined lithospheric plate junction during continued convergence and sustained refrigeration. Upward motion due to isostatic forces was produced by tectonic imbrication of fault suces, laminar return flow in melange zones, and lateral extension of the underplated accretionary prism. The ease with which volatiles are expelled from a subduction complex and migrate upward along the plate junction zone is roughly proportional to the sandstone/shale ratio: low-permeability mudstones tend to maintain fluid values approaching lithostatic, lose strength, and deform chaotically (forming melange belts), whereas permeable sandstone-rich sections retain structural/stratigraphic coherence and fail brittlely (forming coherent terranes). Because of substantial updip expulsion of volatiles during prograde recrystallization, only small amounts of H2O and CO2 are available to support hydration and carbonation of the accretionary complex during its return toward the surface; thus limited back reaction takes place and occurs at low Pfluid/Plithostatic ratios, unless an abundance of volatiles is introduced during uplift.

  2. The earthquake cycle in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosh, H. J.; Fleitout, L.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified model of a subduction zone is presented, which incorporates the mechanical asymmetry induced by the subducted slab to anchor the subducting plate during post-seismic rebound and thus throw most of the coseismic stream release into the overthrust plate. The model predicts that the trench moves with respect to the deep mantle toward the subducting plate at a velocity equal to one-half of the convergence rate. A strong extensional pulse is propagated into the overthrust plate shortly after the earthquake, and although this extension changes into compression before the next earthquake in the cycle, the period of strong extension following the earthquake may be responsible for extensional tectonic features in the back-arc region.

  3. Seamount subduction at the North-Ecuadorian convergent margin: Effects on structures, inter-seismic coupling and seismogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaillou, Boris; Collot, Jean-Yves; Ribodetti, Alessandra; d'Acremont, Elia; Mahamat, Ammy-Adoum; Alvarado, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    At the North-Ecuadorian convergent margin (1°S-1.5°N), the subduction of the rough Nazca oceanic plate leads to tectonic erosion of the upper plate and complex seismogenic behavior of the megathrust. We used three selected pre-stack depth migrated, multi-channel seismic reflection lines collected during the SISTEUR cruise to investigate the margin structure and decipher the impact of the subducted Atacames seamounts on tectonic erosion, interseismic coupling, and seismogenesis in the region of the 1942 Mw7.8 earthquake. This dataset highlights a subducted ∼ 30 × 40 km, double-peak seamount that belongs to the Atacames seamount chain and that is associated with a deep morphologic re-entrant containing mass transport deposits. The seamount subduction uplifted the margin basement by ∼1.6 km and pervasively broke the margin by deep and intense reverse faulting ahead of the seamount, a process that is likely to weaken considerably the margin. In the seamount wake, the basement reverse fault system rotated counter-clockwise. This faulted basement is overlain with slope sediment sliding along listric normal faults that sole out onto the BSR. This superposition of deep tectonic contraction within the basement and shallow gravitational extension deformation within the sediment highlights the key role of gas hydrate on outer slope erosion. In addition to long-term regional basal erosion, the margin basement has thinned locally by an extra 0.8-1 km in response to the subduction of the Atacames seamount chain and hydrofracturing by overpressured fluids at the margin toe. This pervasively and deeply fractured margin segment is associated with a seismically quiet and GPS-modeled low interseismic coupling corridor that terminates downdip near the 1942 epicenter and locked zone. We suggest that the deeply buried double-peak Atacames seamount triggered the 1942 earthquake ahead of its leading flank. This result supports previous studies proposing that subducted seamounts

  4. Structural model of the eastern Achara-Trialeti fold and thrust belt using seismic reflection profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alania, Victor; Chabukiani, Alexander; Enukidze, Onise; Razmadze, Alexander; Sosson, Marc; Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashvili, Otar

    2017-04-01

    Our study focused on the structural geometry at the eastern Achara-Trialeti fold and thrust belt (ATFTB) located at the retro-wedge of the Lesser Caucasus orogen (Alania et al., 2016a). Our interpretation has integrated seismic reflection profiles, several oil-wells, and the surface geology data to reveal structural characteristics of the eastern ATFTB. Fault-related folding theories were used to seismic interpretation (Shaw et al., 2004). Seismic reflection data reveal the presence of basement structural wedge, south-vergent backthrust, north-vergent forethrust and some structural wedges (or duplex). The rocks are involved in the deformation range from Paleozoic basement rocks to Tertiary strata. Building of thick-skinned structures of eastern Achara-Trialeti was formed by basement wedges propagated from south to north along detachment horizons within the cover generating thin-skinned structures. The kinematic evolution of the south-vergent backthrust zone with respect to the northward propagating structural wedge (or duplexes). The main style of deformation within the backthrust belt is a series of fault-propagation folds. Frontal part of eastern ATFTB are represent by triangle zone (Alania et al., 2016b; Sosson et al., 2016). A detailed study was done for Tbilisi area: seismic refection profiles, serial balanced cross-sections, and earthquakes reveal the presence of an active blind thrust fault beneath Tbilisi. 2 & 3-D structural models show that 2002 Mw 4.5 Tbilisi earthquake related to a north-vergent blind thrust. Empirical relations between blind fault rupture area and magnitude suggest that these fault segments could generate earthquakes of Mw 6.5. The growth fault-propagation fold has been observed near Tbilisi in the frontal part of eastern ATFTB. Seismic reflection profile through Ormoiani syncline shows that south-vergent growth fault-propagation fold related to out-of-the-syncline thrust. The outcrop of fault-propagation fold shown the geometry of the

  5. A numerical reference model for themomechanical subduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinquis, Matthieu; Chemia, Zurab; Tosi, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    response to systematic variations in input parameters, numerical studies often start from a 'reference' subduction model. However, the reference model often varies between different numerical studies, making it difficult to compare results directly. We aim therefore to define a numerical reference model......, and initial temperature distribution. We will show results of the evolution and dynamics of the subduction reference model using different numerical codes: a finite element code, SULEC, and two finite difference codes, YACC and FDcon....

  6. Focused rock uplift above the subduction décollement at Montague and Hinchinbrook Islands, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kelly M; Armstrong, Phillip A; Arkle Jeanette C,; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Megathrust splay fault systems in accretionary prisms have been identified as conduits for long-term plate motion and significant coseismic slip during subduction earthquakes. These fault systems are important because of their role in generating tsunamis, but rarely are emergent above sea level where their long-term (million year) history can be studied. We present 32 apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and 27 apatite fission-track (AFT) ages from rocks along an emergent megathrust splay fault system in the Prince William Sound region of Alaska above the shallowly subducting Yakutat microplate. The data show focused exhumation along the Patton Bay megathrust splay fault system since 3–2 Ma. Most AHe ages are younger than 5 Ma; some are as young as 1.1 Ma. AHe ages are youngest at the southwest end of Montague Island, where maximum fault displacement occurred on the Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults and the highest shoreline uplift occurred during the 1964 earthquake. AFT ages range from ca. 20 to 5 Ma. Age changes across the Montague Strait fault, north of Montague Island, suggest that this fault may be a major structural boundary that acts as backstop to deformation and may be the westward mechanical continuation of the Bagley fault system backstop in the Saint Elias orogen. The regional pattern of ages and corresponding cooling and exhumation rates indicate that the Montague and Hinchinbrook Island splay faults, though separated by only a few kilometers, accommodate kilometer-scale exhumation above a shallowly subducting plate at million year time scales. This long-term pattern of exhumation also reflects short-term seismogenic uplift patterns formed during the 1964 earthquake. The increase in rock uplift and exhumation rate ca. 3–2 Ma is coincident with increased glacial erosion that, in combination with the fault-bounded, narrow width of the islands, has limited topographic development. Increased exhumation starting ca. 3–2 Ma is interpreted to be due to rock uplift

  7. Subduction Zone Concepts and the 2010 Chile Earthqake (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Huene, Roland

    2010-05-01

    Knowledge of convergent margin systems evolved from hypothesis testing with marine geophysical technology that improved over decades. Wegener's drift hypothesis, Holmes mantle convection, and marine magnetic anomaly patterns were integrated into an ocean spreading concept that won wide acceptance after ocean drilling confirmed the crustal younging trend toward the Mid-Atlantic ridge. In contrast, the necessary disposal of oceanic and trench sediment at convergent margins remained largely hypothetical. Fresh interpretations of some coastal mountains as exposing ancient convergent margin rock assemblages and the seismologist's "Wadati-Benioff" zone were combined into a widely-accepted hypothesis. A convergent margin upper plate was pictured as an imbricate fan of ocean sediment thrust slices detached from the lower plate. During the 1980s ocean drilling to test the hypothesis revealed what then were counter-intuitive processes of sediment subduction and subduction erosion. Rather than the proposed seaward growth by accretion, many margins had lost material from erosion. In current concepts, individual margins are shaped by the net consequences of subduction accretion, sediment subduction, and subduction erosion. Similarly, recently acquired age data from ancient subduction complexes reveal periods dominated by accretion separated by periods dominated by tectonic erosion. Globally, the recycling of continental crustal material at subduction zones appears largely balanced by magmatic addition at volcanic arcs. The longevity of the original imbricate fan model in text books confirms its pictorial simplicity, because geophysical images and drill core evidence show that it commonly applies to only a relatively small frontal prism. A better understanding of convergent margin dynamics is of urgent societal importance as coastal populations increase rapidly and as recent disastrous earthquakes and tsunamis verify. The shift in convergent margin concepts has developed through

  8. Zagros blueschists: Episodic underplating and long-lived cooling of a subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiboust, Samuel; Agard, Philippe; Glodny, Johannes; Omrani, Jafar; Oncken, Onno

    2016-06-01

    Pressure-temperature-time (P- T- t) trajectories of high-pressure rocks provide important constraints to understand the tectonic evolution of convergent margins. New field observations and P- T- t constraints for the evolution of the only known blueschist-facies exposure along the Zagros suture zone in Southern Iran are reported here. These blueschists, now exposed in tectonic windows under the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (upper plate), constitute accreted fragments of the Tethyan domain during N-directed Cretaceous subduction. Three units were identified in the field: from top to bottom, the Ashin unit (mafic and felsic gneisses), the Seghin complex (mafic tuffs and ultramafics) and the Siah Kuh massif (coherent volcanic edifice). Microstructural observations, P- T estimates and Rb-Sr deformation ages indicate that the Ashin unit possibly underwent burial down to 30-35 km and 550 °C along a relatively warm P- T gradient (c. 17°/km) and was ultimately deformed between 85 and 100 Ma. The Seghin complex exhibits remarkably well-preserved HP-LT assemblages comprising lawsonite, glaucophane, aragonite, omphacite and garnet. P- T- t reconstruction indicates that this slice was subducted down to c. 50 km at temperatures of c. 500 °C along a very cold subduction gradient (c. 7°/km). Deformation in the Seghin complex stopped at around 65 Ma, close to peak metamorphic conditions. Field relationships and estimates of the P- T trajectory followed by the Siah Kuh volcanic edifice indicate that this massif was lately subducted down to 15 km depth along the same very cold gradient. This slice-stack represents a well-preserved field example (i) highlighting the existence of transient underplating processes juxtaposing pluri-kilometric tectonic slices along the subduction channel and (ii) imaging the discontinuous down-stepping of the active main subduction thrust with ongoing accretion. The Zagros blueschists also record an apparent cooling of the Zagros subduction zone between 90

  9. Oblique strike-slip faulting of the Cascadia submarine forearc: The Daisy Bank fault zone off central Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, Chris; Kulm, LaVerne D.; Yeats, Robert S.; Hummon, Cheryl; Huftile, Gary J.; Niem, Alan R.; McNeill, Lisa C.

    The Cascadia submarine forearc off Oregon and Washington is deformed by numerous active WNW-trending, left-lateral strike-slip faults. The kinematics of this set of sub-parallel left-lateral faults suggests clockwise block rotation of the forearc driven by oblique subduction. One major left-lateral strike-slip fault, the 94 km-long Daisy Bank fault, located off central Oregon, was studied in detail using high-resolution AMS 150 kHz and SeaMARC-lA sidescan sonar, swath bathymetry, multichannel seismic reflection profiles and a submersible. The Daisy Bank fault zone cuts the sediments and basaltic basement of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and the overriding North American plate, extending from the abyssal plain to the upper slope-outer shelf region. The Daisy Bank fault, a near-vertical left-lateral fault striking 292°, is a wide structural zone with multiple scarps observed in high-resolution sidescan images. From a submersible, we observe that these scarps offset late Pleistocene gray clay and overlying olive green Holocene mud, dating fault activity as post-12 ka on the upper slope. Vertical separation along individual fault scarps ranges from a few centimeters to 130 meters. Using a retrodeformation technique with multichannel reflection records, we calculate a net slip of 2.2±0.5 km. Fault movement commenced at about 380±50 ka near the western fault tip, based upon an analysis of growth strata and correlation with deep-sea drill hole biostratigraphy. We calculate a slip rate of 5.7±2.0 mm/yr. for the Daisy Bank fault at its western end on the Juan de Fuca plate. The motion of the set of oblique faults, including the Daisy Bank fault, may accommodate a significant portion of the oblique component of plate motion along the central Cascadia margin. We propose a block rotation model by which the seawardmost part of the forearc rotates clockwise and translates northward.

  10. Low thrust chemical rocket technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    An on-going technology program to improve the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft on-board propulsion applications is reviewed. Improved performance and lifetime is sought by the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, introduction of high temperature materials and improved component designs to optimize performance, and use of higher performance propellants. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Predictions are based on both the RPLUS Navier-Stokes code with finite rate kinetics and the JANNAF methodology. Data were obtained with laser-based diagnostics along with global performance measurements. Results indicate that the modeling of the injector and the combustion process needs improvement in these codes and flow visualization with a technique such as 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) would aid in resolving issues of flow symmetry and shear layer combustion processes. High temperature material fabrication processes are under development and small rockets are being designed, fabricated, and tested using these new materials. Rhenium coated with iridium for oxidation protection was produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process and enabled an 800 K increase in rocket operating temperature. Performance gains with this material in rockets using Earth storable propellants (nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine or hydrazine) were obtained through component redesign to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency while managing head end thermal soakback. Material interdiffusion and oxidation characteristics indicated that the requisite lifetimes of tens of hours were available for thruster applications. Rockets were designed, fabricated, and tested with thrusts of 22, 62, 440 and 550 N. Performance improvements of 10 to 20 seconds specific impulse were demonstrated. Higher

  11. Mw 8.6 Sumatran earthquake of 11 April 2012: rare seaward expression of oblique subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Miaki; Kiser, Eric; Geist, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude 8.6 and 8.2 earthquakes off northwestern Sumatra on 11 April 2012 generated small tsunami waves that were recorded by stations around the Indian Ocean. Combining differential travel-time modeling of tsunami waves with results from back projection of seismic data reveals a complex source with a significant trench-parallel component. The oblique plate convergence indicates that ~20-50 m of trench-parallel displacement could have accumulated since the last megathrust earthquake, only part of which has been taken up by the Great Sumatran fault. This suggests that the remaining trench-parallel motion was released during the magnitude 8.6 earthquake on 11 April 2012 within the subducting plate. The magnitude 8.6 earthquake is interpreted to be a result of oblique subduction as well as a reduction in normal stress due to the occurrence of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake in 2004.

  12. Slow slip near the trench at the Hikurangi subduction zone, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Laura M; Webb, Spahr C; Ito, Yoshihiro; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Hino, Ryota; Henrys, Stuart; Schwartz, Susan Y; Sheehan, Anne F

    2016-05-06

    The range of fault slip behaviors near the trench at subduction plate boundaries is critical to know, as this is where the world's largest, most damaging tsunamis are generated. Our knowledge of these behaviors has remained largely incomplete, partially due to the challenging nature of crustal deformation measurements at offshore plate boundaries. Here we present detailed seafloor deformation observations made during an offshore slow-slip event (SSE) in September and October 2014, using a network of absolute pressure gauges deployed at the Hikurangi subduction margin offshore New Zealand. These data show the distribution of vertical seafloor deformation during the SSE and reveal direct evidence for SSEs occurring close to the trench (within 2 kilometers of the seafloor), where very low temperatures and pressures exist. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Structural context and variation of ocean plate stratigraphy, Franciscan Complex, California: insight into mélange origins and subduction-accretion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, John

    2017-12-01

    The transfer (accretion) of materials from a subducting oceanic plate to a subduction-accretionary complex has produced rock assemblages recording the history of the subducted oceanic plate from formation to arrival at the trench. These rock assemblages, comprising oceanic igneous rocks progressively overlain by pelagic sedimentary rocks (chert and/or limestone) and trench-fill clastic sedimentary rocks (mostly sandstone, shale/mudstone), have been called ocean plate stratigraphy (OPS). During accretion of OPS, megathrust slip is accommodated by imbricate faults and penetrative strain, shortening the unit and leading to tectonic repetition of the OPS sequence, whereas OPS accreted at different times are separated by non-accretionary megathrust horizons. The Franciscan subduction complex of California accreted episodically over a period of over 150 million years and incorporated OPS units with a variety of characteristics separated by non-accretionary megathrust horizons. Most Franciscan OPS comprises MORB (mid-ocean-ridge basalt) progressively overlain by chert and trench-fill clastic sedimentary rocks that are composed of variable proportions of turbidites and siliciclastic and serpentinite-matrix olistostromes (sedimentary mélanges). Volumetrically, the trench-fill component predominates in most Franciscan OPS, but some units have a significant component of igneous and pelagic rocks. Ocean island basalt (OIB) overlain by limestone is less common than MORB-chert assemblages, as are abyssal serpentinized peridotite slabs. The earliest accreted OPS comprises metabasite of supra-subduction zone affinity imbricated with smaller amounts of metaultramafic rocks and metachert, but lacking a clastic component. Most deformation of Franciscan OPS is localized along discrete faults rather than being distributed in the form of penetrative strain. This deformation locally results in block-in-matrix tectonic mélanges, in contrast to the sedimentary mélanges making up part of

  14. Late Cenozoic extensional faulting in Central-Western Peloponnesus, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtsos, E.; Fountoulis, I.; Mavroulis, S.; Kranis, H.

    2012-04-01

    A series of forearc-dipping, orogen-parallel extensional faults are found in the central-western Peloponnesus, (south-western Aegean) which control the western margin of Mt Mainalon. The latter comprises HP/LT rocks of the Phyllites-Quartzites Unit (PQ), overlain by the carbonates and flysch of the Tripolis Unit while the uppermost nappe is the Pindos Unit, a sequence of Mesozoic pelagic sequence, topped by a Paleocene flysch. Most of the extensional structures were previously thought of as the original thrust between the Pindos and Tripolis Units. However, the cross-cutting relationships among these structures indicate that these are forearc (SW-dipping) extensional faults, downthrowing the Pindos thrust by a few tens or hundreds of meters each, rooting onto different levels of the nappe pile. In SW Mainalon the lowermost of the extensional faults is a low-angle normal fault dipping SW juxtaposing the metamorphic rocks of the PQ Unit against the non-metamorphic sequence of the Tripolis Unit. High-angle normal faults, found further to the west, have truncated or even sole onto the low-angle ones and control the eastern margin of the Quaternary Megalopolis basin. All these extensional structures form the eastern boundary of a series of Neogene-Quaternary tectonic depressions, which in turn are separated by E-W horsts. In the NW, these faults are truncated by NE to NNE-striking, NW-dipping faults, which relay the whole fault activity to the eastern margin of the Pyrgos graben. The whole extensional fault architecture has resulted (i) in the Pindos thrust stepping down from altitudes higher than 1000 m in Mainalon in the east, to negative heights in North Messinia and Southern Ilia in the west; and (ii) the gradual disappearance of the Phyllite-Quartzite metamorphics of Mainalon towards the west. The combination of these extensional faults (which may reach down to the Ionian décollement) with the low-angle floor thrusts of the Pindos, Tripolis and Ionian Units leads

  15. Rheological property of mafic schist and geological interpretation to the subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, K.; Hirth, G.

    2013-12-01

    some recovered samples showed that deformation was concentrated along calcite vein in some areas, differential stresses were much higher than expected stresses from calcite Peierls flow law. These may suggest that the deformation of mafic schist is accommodated with semi-brittle deformation resulting in localization on faults. In addition, samples exhibit strain rate strengthening, a frictional behavior that inhibits earthquake nucleation. Stress exponent n at these conditions was n ~ 29 at 400C and n ~ 17 at 500C, respectively. Apparent friction coefficient μ was μ ~ 0.42 at 400C and μ ~ 0.34 at 500C, respectively. We also conducted deformation experiments in which temperature was increased above the thermal stability of chlorite (~ 800C) to simulate a prograde metamorphism in subduction zones. With increasing temperature during deformation, differential stress decreased and reached nearly 0 MPa. This might suggest that such reaction-enhanced weakening of metamorphic rocks forms weak fault zones in subducting slab, which might emphasizes oceanic crust to detach from subducting slab and to underplate to forearc crust, while these faults shows less seismicity.

  16. Fault zone fabric and fault weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collettini, C.; Niemeijer, A.; Viti, C.; Marone, C.

    2009-01-01

    Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that some crustal faults are weak1–6 compared to laboratory measurements of frictional strength7. Explanations for fault weakness include the presence of weak minerals4, high fluid pressures within the fault core8,9 and dynamic processes such as

  17. Size Constraints on Late Miocene to Pliocene Submarine Slope Failures along the Colombian Caribbean Subduction Margin as a Basis for Assessing Circum-Caribbean Impact of Future Tsunami Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, S.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Colombian Caribbean margin provides an ideal setting for the formation of large mass transport deposits (MTDs): 1) the Caribbean Plate is slowly subducting at rates of 20 mm/yr with infrequent large thrust earthquakes and a complete lack of subduction events in the 400-year-long historical record; 2) the margin is a broad zone of active faults including a ~50 km-wide accretionary prism and strike-slip faults landward of the prism; 3) the active margin is draped by the Magdalena delta and submarine fan fed by the Magdalena River, the 26th largest in the world; and 4) the margin is over-steepened to slopes of up to 7° from the combination of tectonic activity and rapid rates of deltaic progradation. Using seismic data we have identified three late Miocene-Pliocene MTDs, the largest of which is between 4500 and 6000 km3, comparable in size to the well-studied Storegga slide of Norway. The tsunamigenic potential of future, analog MTD events are modeled using GeoWave tsunami modeling software. The largest and youngest of these MTDs, the Santa Marta slide, is used as an analog to infer the location and input parameters for the tsunami model. The event is modeled as a translational slide ~46 km long and ~37 km wide with the center of the slide located ~57 km W/NW from the mouth of the present day Magdalena River in water depths of 1500 m. The volume for the initial failure is conservatively estimated at ~680 km3 of material. The resulting tsunami wave from such an event has an initial maximum trough amplitude of -65.8 m and a peak amplitude of 19.2 m. The impact of such a tsunami would include: 1) Kingston, Jamaica (population 938K), tsunami height 7.5 m, peak arrival at 60 min.; 2) Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (population 965K, height 6 m, peak arrival at 80 min.); and 3) Cartagena, Colombia (population 845K, height 21 m, peak arrival at 34 min.). A number of parameters to the model are varied to analyze sensitivity of modeling results to changes in slide depth

  18. Two successive crustal melting events resulting from extensional exhumation and then thrusting of the Ronda Peridotites (South Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, Gianluca; Gueydan, Frédéric; Poujol, Marc; Brun, Jean-Pierre; Parat, Fleurice; Monié, Patrick; Pichat, Alexandre; Maziers, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    The Alboran Domain, situated at the western end of the Mediterranean subduction system, is characterized by the Ronda Peridotites, one of the world largest exposures of sub-continental mantle. Using U-Pb (LA-ICP-MS) and Ar-Ar dating, we precisely dated two tectonic events associated with the Tertiary exhumation of the Ronda Peridotites. First, shearing along the Crust-Mantle Extensional Shear Zone caused, at ca. 22.5 Ma, mantle exhumation, local partial melting in the deep crust and coeval cooling in the upper crust. Second, the Ronda Peridotites Thrust triggered the final crustal emplacement of the peridotites onto the continental crust at ca. 21 Ma, as testified by granitic intrusions in the thrust hanging-wall. The tectonic evolution of the western Alboran Domain is therefore characterized by a fast switch from a continental lithosphere extension in a backarc setting, with sub-continental mantle exhumation, to a rift inversion by thrusting driven by shortening of the subduction upper plate.

  19. Miocene crustal extension following thrust tectonic in the Lower Sebtides units (internal Rif, Ceuta Peninsula, Spain): Implication for the geodynamic evolution of the Alboran domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homonnay, Emmanuelle; Corsini, Michel; Lardeaux, Jean-Marc; Romagny, Adrien; Münch, Philippe; Bosch, Delphine; Cenki-Tok, Bénédicte; Ouazzani-Touhami, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    In Western Mediterranean, the Rif belt in Morocco is part of the Gibraltar Arc built during the Tertiary in the framework of Eurasia-Africa convergence. The structural and metamorphic evolution of the internal units of this belt as well as their timing, crucial to constrain the geodynamic evolution of the Alboran Sea, is still largely debated. Our study on the Ceuta Peninsula (Northern Rif) provides new structural, petrological and geochronological data (U-Th-Pb, Ar-Ar), which allow to precise the tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Lower Sebtides metamorphic units with: (1) a syn-metamorphic thrusting event developed under granulite facies conditions (7-10 kbar and 780-820 °C). A major thrust zone, the Ceuta Shear Zone, drove the emplacement of metapelites and peridotitic lenses from the Ceuta Upper Unit over the orthogneisses of the Monte Hacho Lower Unit. This compressional event ended during the Upper Oligocene. (2) an extensional event developed at the boundary between amphibolite and greenschist facies conditions (400-550 °C and 1-3 kbar). During this event, the Ceuta Shear Zone has been reactivated as a normal fault. Normal ductile shear zones contributed to the final exhumation of the metamorphic units during the Early Miocene. We propose that the compressional event is related to the formation of an orogenic wedge located in the upper plate, in a backward position, of the subduction zone driving the geodynamic evolution of the Alboran domain. In this context, the episode of lithospheric thinning could be related to the opening of the Alboran basin in a back-arc position. Furthermore, unlike the previous models proposed for the Rif belt, the tectonic coupling between mantle peridotites and crustal metamorphic rocks occurred in Ceuta Peninsula at a depth of 20-30 km under high temperature conditions, before the extensional event, and thus cannot be related to the back-arc extension. 1, BSE image of monazite. 2, CL image of monazite showing a thin rim

  20. Pulsed Ejector Thrust Amplification Tested and Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jack

    2004-01-01

    There is currently much interest in pulsed detonation engines for aeronautical propulsion. This, in turn, has sparked renewed interest in pulsed ejectors to increase the thrust of such engines, since previous, though limited, research had indicated that pulsed ejectors could double the thrust in a short device. An experiment has been run at the NASA Glenn Research Center, using a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube as a source of pulsed flow, to measure the thrust augmentation of a statistically designed set of ejectors. A Hartmann- Sprenger tube directs the flow from a supersonic nozzle (Mach 2 in the present experiment) into a closed tube. Under appropriate conditions, an oscillation is set up in which the jet flow alternately fills the tube and then spills around flow emerging from the tube. The tube length determines the frequency of oscillation. By shrouding the tube, the flow was directed out of the shroud as an axial stream. The set of ejectors comprised three different ejector lengths, three ejector diameters, and three nose radii. The thrust of the jet alone, and then of the jet plus ejector, was measured using a thrust plate. The arrangement is shown in this photograph. Thrust augmentation is defined as the thrust of the jet with an ejector divided by the thrust of the jet alone. The experiments exhibited an optimum ejector diameter and length for maximizing the thrust augmentation, but little dependence on nose radius. Different frequencies were produced by changing the length of the Hartmann-Sprenger tube, and the experiment was run at a total of four frequencies. Additional measurements showed that the major feature of the pulsed jet was a starting vortex ring. The size of the vortex ring depended on the frequency, as did the optimum ejector diameter.

  1. Mechanical Analysis of Fault Interaction in the Puente Hills Region, Los Angeles Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, W. A.; Cooke, M.

    2002-12-01

    A three-dimensional model of the Puente Hills thrust system (PHT) and the Whittier fault has been constructed using published cross sections, surface trace maps [Shaw (1999); Shaw and Suppe (1996); Wright (1991)] and products of the Southern California Earthquake Center. This study utilizes boundary element method models to validate the proposed fault geometry of the Puente Hills region via investigating fault interaction. The interaction between PHT and Whittier faults is evaluated within an elastic half-space under horizontal contraction and evidenced by slip rates on faults, strain energy density (SED), and Navier-Coulomb stress (NC) throughout the host rock. Modeled slip rates are compared to paleoseismic estimates to validate the proposed fault configuration while maps of SED and NC highlight regions of high strain in the host rock and likely faulting. Subsequently, the sensitivity of SED and NC distribution to changes in fault geometry illuminate the nature of fault interaction within this complex system of interacting faults. We explore interaction of faults within the PHT region using two sets of models. The first examines slip rates and SED and NC distribution within a local model of the PHT region while the second set incorporates the PHT faults within the context of the Los Angeles basin. Both sets explore the response of the fault system to systematic addition of faults. Adding faults within regions of high SED and NC does not influence slip on neighboring faults; however the addition of fault surfaces in regions of low/moderate SED and NC reduces slip along adjacent faults. The sensitivity of fault slip rates to direction of remote contraction in the Los Angeles Basin is examined with contraction directions of 036, 017, and 006.5 [Bawden (2001), Argus (1999), and Feigl (1993)]. Furthermore, variations on intersection geometry between the PHT and Whittier fault are explored. Portions of the PHT and Whittier faults show reasonable match to available

  2. A recent deep earthquake doublet in light of long-term evolution of Nazca subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradník, J; Čížková, H; Bina, C R; Sokos, E; Janský, J; Tavera, H; Carvalho, J

    2017-03-31

    Earthquake faulting at ~600 km depth remains puzzling. Here we present a new kinematic interpretation of two Mw7.6 earthquakes of November 24, 2015. In contrast to teleseismic analysis of this doublet, we use regional seismic data providing robust two-point source models, further validated by regional back-projection and rupture-stop analysis. The doublet represents segmented rupture of a ∼30-year gap in a narrow, deep fault zone, fully consistent with the stress field derived from neighbouring 1976-2015 earthquakes. Seismic observations are interpreted using a geodynamic model of regional subduction, incorporating realistic rheology and major phase transitions, yielding a model slab that is nearly vertical in the deep-earthquake zone but stagnant below 660 km, consistent with tomographic imaging. Geodynamically modelled stresses match the seismically inferred stress field, where the steeply down-dip orientation of compressive stress axes at ∼600 km arises from combined viscous and buoyant forces resisting slab penetration into the lower mantle and deformation associated with slab buckling and stagnation. Observed fault-rupture geometry, demonstrated likelihood of seismic triggering, and high model temperatures in young subducted lithosphere, together favour nanometric crystallisation (and associated grain-boundary sliding) attending high-pressure dehydration as a likely seismogenic mechanism, unless a segment of much older lithosphere is present at depth.

  3. Magnetic fabric of brittle fault rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomella, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been recognized as a highly sensitive indicator of rock fabric and is widely employed in the field of structural geology. Brittle faults are often characterized by fault breccia and gouge, fault rocks with clast-in-matrix textures. A noteworthy property of both gouge and breccia is the often observed presence of a fabric that is defined by the preferred orientation of clasts and grains in the matrix. In the very fine-grained gouge and in the matrix of the breccia the fabric is not visible in the field or in thin sections but can probably be detected by AMS analyses. For the present study different kinds of brittle fault rocks have been sampled on two faults with known tectonic settings, in order to allow for a structural interpretation of the measured AMS signal. The measurements were carried out with an AGICO MFK1-FA Kappabridge and a CS4 furnace apparatus at the Institute of Geology, University of Innsbruck. Fault gouge was sampled on the Naif fault located in the Southern Alps, E of Meran, South Tyrol, Italy. Along this fault the Permian Granodiorite overthrusts the Southalpine basement and its Permomesozoic cover. The Neoalpine thrust fault is characterised by a wide cataclastic zone and an up to 1 m thick fault gouge. The gouge was sampled using paleomagnetic sample boxes. Heating experiments indicate that the magnetic fabric is dominated by paramagnetic minerals (>95%). The samples provide a magnetic susceptibility in the range of +10*E-5 [SI]. The K-min axis of the magnetic ellipsoid corresponds approximately to the pol of the fault plane measured in the field. However the whole magnetic ellipsoid shows a variation in the inclination compared to the structural data. Fine-grained ultracataclasites were sampled on the Assergi fault, located in the Abruzzi Apennines, NE of L'Aquila, Italy. This normal fault was active in historical time and crosscuts limestones as well as talus deposits. An up to 20 cm thick

  4. Geophysical evidence for a transform margin offshore Western Algeria: a witness of a subduction-transform edge propagator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badji, Rabia; Charvis, Philippe; Bracene, Rabah; Galve, Audrey; Badsi, Madjid; Ribodetti, Alessandra; Benaissa, Zahia; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Medaouri, Mourad; Beslier, Marie-Odile

    2015-02-01

    For the first time, a deep seismic data set acquired in the frame of the Algerian-French SPIRAL program provides new insights regarding the origin of the westernmost Algerian margin and basin. We performed a tomographic inversion of traveltimes along a 100-km-long wide-angle seismic profile shot over 40 ocean bottom seismometers offshore Mostaganem (Northwestern Algeria). The resulting velocity model and multichannel seismic reflection profiles show a thin (3-4 km thick) oceanic crust. The narrow ocean-continent transition (less than 10 km wide) is bounded by vertical faults and surmounted by a narrow almost continuous basin filled with Miocene to Quaternary sediments. This fault system, as well as the faults organized in a negative-flower structure on the continent side, marks a major strike-slip fault system. The extremely sharp variation of the Moho depth (up to 45 ± 3°) beneath the continental border underscores the absence of continental extension in this area. All these features support the hypothesis that this part of the margin from Oran to Tenes, trending N65-N70°E, is a fossil subduction-transform edge propagator fault, vestige of the propagation of the edge of the Gibraltar subduction zone during the westward migration of the Alborán domain.

  5. Mechanical study of the Chartreuse Fold-and-Thrust Belt: relationships between fluids overpressure and decollement within the Toarcian source-rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelon, Josselin; Sassi, William; Burov, Evgueni

    2016-04-01

    the decollement layer. In turn, with the FLAMAR geo-mechanical models it is shown that for key mechanical parameters within the Chartreuse mechanical stratigraphy (such as friction coefficient, cohesion and viscosity properties), the mechanical boundary conditions to activate, localize and propagate shear thrust in the toarcian source-rock can be found to discuss on the hydro-mechanics of the structural evolution: the very weak mechanical properties that must be attributed to the source-rock to promote the formation of a decollement tend to justify the hypothesis of high fluids pressures in it. In FLAMAR, the evolution of the toarcian source-rock mechanical properties, calibrated on the temperature of kerogen-to-gas transformation, can be introduced to allow its activation as a decollement at a burial threshold. However, without hydro-mechanical coupling, it is not possible to predict where the overpressured regions that localised these changes are positioned. As such, this work also highlights the need for a fully-coupled hydro-mechanical model to further investigate the relationship between fluids and deformations in FTB and accretionary prisms. Burov, E., Francois, T., Yamato, P., & Wolf, S. (2014). Mechanisms of continental subduction and exhumation of HP and UHP rocks. Gondwana Research, 25(2), 464-493. Faille, I., Thibaut, M., Cacas, M.-C., Havé, P., Willien, F., Wolf, S., Agelas, L., Pegaz-Fiornet, S., 2014. Modeling Fluid Flow in Faulted Basins. Oil Gas Sci. Technol. - Rev. d'IFP Energies Nouv. 69, 529-553.

  6. Kinematics of subduction and subduction-induced flow in the upper mantle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2004-01-01

    Results of fluid dynamical experiments are presented to model the kinematics of lithospheric subduction in the upper mantle. The experiments model a dense highviscosity plate (subducting lithosphere) overlying a less dense low-viscosity layer (upper mantle). The overriding lithosphere is not

  7. Geodynamics of the Dead Sea Fault: Do active faulting and past earthquakes determine the seismic gaps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghraoui, Mustapha

    2014-05-01

    The ~1000-km-long North-South trending Dead Sea transform fault (DSF) presents structural discontinuities and includes segments that experienced large earthquakes (Mw>7) in historical times. The Wadi Araba and Jordan Valley, the Lebanese restraining bend, the Missyaf and Ghab fault segments in Syria and the Ziyaret Fault segment in Turkey display geometrical complexities made of step overs, restraining and releasing bends that may constitute major obstacles to earthquake rupture propagation. Using active tectonics, GPS measurements and paleoseismology we investigate the kinematics and long-term/short term slip rates along the DSF. Tectonic geomorphology with paleoseismic trenching and archeoseismic investigations indicate repeated faulting events and left-lateral slip rate ranging from 4 mm/yr in the southern fault section to 6 mm/yr in the northern fault section. Except for the northernmost DSF section, these estimates of fault slip rate are consistent with GPS measurements that show 4 to 5 mm/yr deformation rate across the plate boundary. However, recent GPS results showing ~2.5 mm/yr velocity rate of the northern DSF appears to be quite different than the ~6 mm/yr paleoseismic slip rate. The kinematic modeling that combines GPS and seismotectonic results implies a complex geodynamic pattern where the DSF transforms the Cyprus arc subduction zone into transpressive tectonics on the East Anatolian fault. The timing of past earthquake ruptures shows the occurrence of seismic sequences and a southward migration of large earthquakes, with the existence of major seismic gaps along strike. In this paper, we discuss the role of the DSF in the regional geodynamics and its implication on the identification of seismic gaps.

  8. Seattle - seeking balance between the Space Needle, Starbucks, the Seahawks, and subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Seattle has rich natural hazards. Lahars from Mount Rainier flow from the south, volcanic ash drifts from the East, the South Whidbey Island fault lies north and east, the Cascadia subduction zone dives underfoot from the west, and the Seattle fault lies just below the surface. Past and future landslides are sprinkled democratically across the surface, and Lake Washington and Puget Sound are known to seiche. All are ultimately due to subduction tectonics. As in most tectonically-exposed cities, the hazards are due mainly (1) to the buildings predating the relatively recent revelation that faulting here is active, (2) transportation corridors built long ago that are aging without a good budget for renewal, and (3) the unknown unknowns. These hazards are hard to quantify. Only the largest earthquakes on the Cascadia megathrust have a 10,000-year history, and even for them the down-dip rupture limits, stress drop and attenuation have unacceptable uncertainty. For the threatening faults closer in the upper crust, written history is short, glacial erosion and blanketing preclude many geophysical investigations, and healthy forests frustrate InSAR. On the brighter side, the direct hazard of earthquake shaking is being addressed as well as it can be. The current seismic hazard estimate is derived by methods among the most sophisticated in the world. Logic trees informed by consensus forged from a series of workshops delineate the scenarios. Finite difference calculations that include the world-class deep and soggy basins project the shaking from fault to vulnerable city. One useful cartoon synthesizing the earthquake hazard, based on Art Frankel's report, is shown below. It illustrates that important areas will be strongly shaken, and issues remain to be addressed. Fortunately, with great coffee and good perspective, we are moving toward improved disaster preparedness and resilience.

  9. From rifting to subduction: the role of inheritance in the Wilson Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussier, Stéphane; Gerya, Taras; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2017-04-01

    The Wilson Cycle entails that oceans close and reopen. This cycle is a fundamental principle in plate tectonics, inferring continuity from divergence to convergence and that continental rifting takes place along former suture zones. This view questions the role of inherited structures at each stage of the Wilson Cycle. Using the 3D thermo-mechanical code, I3ELVIS (Gerya and Yuen 2007) we present a high-resolution continuous model of the Wilson cycle from continental rifting, breakup and oceanic spreading to convergence and spontaneous subduction initiation. Therefore, all lateral and longitudinal structures of the lithospheres are generated self-consistently and are consequences of the initial continental structure, tectono-magmatic inheritance and material rheology. In the models, subduction systematically initiates off-ridge and is controlled by the convergence-induced swelling of the ridge. Geometry and dynamics of the developing off-ridge subduction is controlled by four main factors: (1) the obliquity of the ridge with respect to the convergence direction; (2) fluid-induced weakening of the oceanic crust; (3) irregularity of ridge and margins inherited from rifting and spreading; (4) strain localization at transform faults formed during ocean floor spreading. Further convergence can lead to obduction of the oceanic crust and segments of ridge after the oceanic lithosphere is entrained into subduction. We show that the main parameters controlling the occurrence and geometry of obducted ophiolite are the convergence rate and the inherited structure of the passive margins and ridge. Our numerical experiments results show the essential role played by inheritance during the Wilson Cycle and are consistent with nature observations such as the tectonic history of the Oman subduction-obduction system. REFERENCES Gerya, T. V., and D. A. Yuen. 2007: "Robust Characteristics Method for Modelling Multiphase Visco-Elasto-Plastic Thermo-Mechanical Problems, Physics of the

  10. High Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMTC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a High-Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMRE) to meet the demands of advanced chemical propulsion systems for deep-space mission...

  11. K Ar age constraints on the evolution of polydeformed fold thrust belts: The case of the Northern Appalachians (southern Quebec)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasseville, C.; Tremblay, A.; Clauer, N.; Liewig, N.

    2008-03-01

    Precise geometric and temporal constraints are essential for understanding the evolution of fold-thrust belts. The lack of isotopic dating for shallow faults in the Northern Appalachian Taconic allochthons limits the interpretation of their structural evolution. New and more precise kinematic constraints have been obtained using a structural study that combined field work with the mineralogical, morphological and K-Ar isotopic analysis of clay-rich fractions (time (ca. 490 Ma) and culminated with the out-of-sequence imbrication of thrust stacks during Middle (ca. 465 Ma) to Late Ordovician time (ca. 450 Ma). The Silurian-Early Devonian subsidence (ca. 410 Ma) of the Appalachian foreland along wrench and normal fault systems occurred simultaneously with D 3 hinterland-directed tectonic transport at the boundary between the external and internal Humber zones. Late Devonian Acadian imbrications (D 4) in the Taconic allochthons of the Quebec Appalachians are reported here for the first time. The combination of a D 4 contractional pulse and Silurian-Early Devonian D 3 back-thrust faulting caused the exhumation of low-grade metamorphic rocks affected by an Early Devonian thermal event. Across the Laurentian margin, the Acadian contraction evolved from Middle Devonian deformation in the internal metamorphic domain to Late Devonian deformation in the allochthons. The relaxation of Acadian tectonic stress is characterized by D 5 normal faults and related hydrothermal activity. The recognition of an Acadian contraction event in the southern Quebec Appalachians challenges the traditional view of a gradual NW-directed progression of faulting in the Taconic thrust belt, and allows for a new reconstruction that bridges the Appalachians of mainland Canada and Newfoundland.

  12. Optimal low thrust-based rendezvous maneuvers

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo Gomez, Juan Luis; Bombardelli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The minimum-time, low-constant-thrust, same circular orbit rendezvous problem is studied using a relative motion description of the system dynamics. The resulting Optimal Control Problem in the thrust orientation angle is formulated using both the Direct and Indirect methods. An extensive set of test cases is numerically solved with the former, while perturbation techniques applied to the later allow to obtain several approximate solutions and provide a greater insight on the underlying physi...

  13. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors in Subduction Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billen, Magali; Arredondo, Katrina

    2014-05-01

    Since the realization that tectonic plates sink into the mantle, in a process we now call subduction, our understanding of this process has improved dramatically through the combined application of observations, theory and modeling. During that time independent research groups focusing on different aspects of subduction have identified factors with a significant impact on subduction, such as three-dimensionality, slab rollback, rheology of the slab and mantle and magnitude of phase changes. However, as each group makes progress we often wonder how these different factors interact as we all strive to understand the real world subduction system. These factors can be divided in two groups: intrinsic factors, including the age of the slab, its thermal structure, composition, and rheology, and extrinsic factors including others forces on plates, overall mantle flow, structure of the overriding plate, rheology of the mantle and phase changes. In addition, while modeling has been a powerful tool for understanding subduction, all models make important (but often necessary) approximations, such as using two dimensions, imposed boundary conditions, and approximations of the conservation equations and material properties. Here we present results of a study in which the "training wheels" are systematically removed from 2D models of subduction to build a more realistic model of subduction and to better understand how combined effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to the dynamics. We find that a change from the Boussinesq to the extended Boussinesq form of the conservation equations has a dramatic effect on slab evolution in particular when phase changes are included. Allowing for free (dynamically-driven) subduction and trench motion is numerically challenging, but also an important factor that allows for more direct comparison to observations of plate kinematics. Finally, compositional layering of the slab and compositionally-controlled phase changes also have

  14. Position and Life Span of Volcanic Arcs - What Link to Present-day Kinematic Parameters in Subduction Zones ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Poli, S.

    2003-12-01

    continental subduction zones (e.g. SVZ, Sumatra), the volcanic arc simply locates on a major fault which apparently provides pathways for melt arriving at the base of the crust. We conclude that the position and life span of volcanic arcs is controlled by thermal and flow fields that evolve over geological time scales and as a consequence, any attempt to understand volcanic arcs mainly through a correlation with present day kinematics becomes futile. Only a time-integrated kinematic analysis is, on principle, able to provide a feasible solution to the volcanic arc dilemma.

  15. Effects of fault propagation on superficial soils/gravel aquifer properties: The Chihshang Fault in Eastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, C.; Lee, J.; guglielmi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A mature bedrock fault zone generally consists of a fault core, a damage zone, and a surrounding host rock with different permeabilities, which mainly depend on the fracture density. However, near the surface, when an active thrust fault propagates from bedrocks into an unconsolidated surface cover, it results in a diffused fault zone, which may influence the hydraulic and mechanical properties around the fault zone. It is thus of great concern to understand to which extent surface soil/gravel hydraulic properties modifications by continuously active faulting can impact geotechnical projects in countries under active tectonic context, such as Taiwan, where active faults often are blinded beneath thick soil/gravel covers. By contrast, it is also interesting to decipher those fault-induced permeability modifications to estimate potential activity precursors to large earthquakes. Here, we combined a variety of measurements and analyses on the Chihshang fault, located at the plate suture between the Philippine Sea and Eurasian plates, which converge at a rapid rate of 8 cm/yr in Taiwan. At the Chinyuan site, the Chihshang fault is propagating from depth to emerge through thick alluvial deposits. We characterized the fault geometry and slip behavior at the shallow level by measuring and analyzing horizontal, vertical displacements, and groundwater table across the surface fault zone. The yielded fault dip of 45o in the shallow alluvium is consistent with the observations from surface ruptures and subsurface core logging. The 7-year-long groundwater table record shows that the piezometric level in the hanging wall is about 8 meter higher than that in the footwall in the summer; and about 10 meter higher in the winter. Repeated slug tests have been monthly conducted since 2007 to provide the average permeability within the fault zone and the presumably low-deformed zone outside of the diffused fault zone. Based on in-situ measurements at four wells across the fault zone

  16. Compression-extension transition of continental crust in a subduction zone: A parametric numerical modeling study with implications on Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Cathaysia Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xuran; Chan, Lung Sang; Gao, Jian-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The Cathaysia Block is located in southeastern part of South China, which situates in the west Pacific subduction zone. It is thought to have undergone a compression-extension transition of the continental crust during Mesozoic-Cenozoic during the subduction of Pacific Plate beneath Eurasia-Pacific Plate, resulting in extensive magmatism, extensional basins and reactivation of fault systems. Although some mechanisms such as the trench roll-back have been generally proposed for the compression-extension transition, the timing and progress of the transition under a convergence setting remain ambiguous due to lack of suitable geological records and overprinting by later tectonic events. In this study, a numerical thermo-dynamical program was employed to evaluate how variable slab angles, thermal gradients of the lithospheres and convergence velocities would give rise to the change of crustal stress in a convergent subduction zone. Model results show that higher slab dip angle, lower convergence velocity and higher lithospheric thermal gradient facilitate the subduction process. The modeling results reveal the continental crust stress is dominated by horizontal compression during the early stage of the subduction, which could revert to a horizontal extension in the back-arc region, combing with the roll-back of the subducting slab and development of mantle upwelling. The parameters facilitating the subduction process also favor the compression-extension transition in the upper plate of the subduction zone. Such results corroborate the geology of the Cathaysia Block: the initiation of the extensional regime in the Cathaysia Block occurring was probably triggered by roll-back of the slowly subducting slab.

  17. Detection of Very Low Frequency Earthquakes in the Mexican Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, J.; Ide, S.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Kostoglodov, V.; Perez-Campos, X.

    2016-12-01

    Tremors have already been detected in three different areas (Jalisco, Guerrero and Oaxaca) of the Mexican subduction zone but their moment tensor is difficult to estimate. However, Very Low Frequency (VLF) earthquakes have been shown to occur at the subduction interface in Guerrero, Mexico at the same time as tremors and their focal mechanisms have been calculated. We try to detect VLF events using the same method in Jalisco and in Oaxaca. With this aim we detect tremors using an envelope correlation method in Oaxaca and use a previously determined tremor catalog in Jalisco [Idehara et al., 2014]. Using the method of Ide and Yabe [2014], we stack waveforms, in the VLF band, at the time of occurrence of tremors. Finally, the stacked waveforms are inverted to better estimate the depth of these events and their moment tensor. This analysis is carried out for different time periods between 2005 and 2015, depending on the deployment of temporary network along the Mexican coast. In addition, permanent broadband stations of the Servicio Sismológico Nacional (Mexico) are used. The tremors detected in Oaxaca area are located farther west than previously known probably because of the more eastern location of stations. Our results show the spatial distribution of moment tensor along the Mexican subduction zone. The VLF sources are located at or close to the plate interface in Oaxaca and Jalisco as is observed in Guerrero. These events have magnitudes of about 3 and very low-angle to low-angle thrust mechanisms in agreement with the varying geometry of the subduction interface. The slip directions of VLF earthquakes are also consistent with the plates convergence vectors. In addition, some clear VLF signals are detected without any stacking using correlation methods. These individual detections confirm the results of our statistical analysis.

  18. Cascadia subducting plate fluids channelled to fore-arc mantle corner: ETS and silica deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, Roy D; McCrory, Patricia A.; Wech, Aaron; Kao, Han; Ague, Jay j

    2015-01-01

    In this study we first summarize the constraints that on the Cascadia subduction thrust, there is a 70 km gap downdip between the megathrust seismogenic zone and the Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) that lies further landward; there is not a continuous transition from unstable to conditionally stable sliding. Seismic rupture occurs mainly offshore for this hot subduction zone. ETS lies onshore. We then suggest what does control the downdip position of ETS. We conclude that fluids from dehydration of the downgoing plate, focused to rise above the fore-arc mantle corner, are responsible for ETS. There is a remarkable correspondence between the position of ETS and this corner along the whole margin. Hydrated mineral assemblages in the subducting oceanic crust and uppermost mantle are dehydrated with downdip increasing temperature, and seismic tomography data indicate that these fluids have strongly serpentinized the overlying fore-arc mantle. Laboratory data show that such fore-arc mantle serpentinite has low permeability and likely blocks vertical expulsion and restricts flow updip within the underlying permeable oceanic crust and subduction shear zone. At the fore-arc mantle corner these fluids are released upward into the more permeable overlying fore-arc crust. An indication of this fluid flux comes from low Poisson's Ratios (and Vp/Vs) found above the corner that may be explained by a concentration of quartz which has exceptionally low Poisson's Ratio. The rising fluids should be silica saturated and precipitate quartz with decreasing temperature and pressure as they rise above the corner.

  19. A workflow for 3D model building in fold-thrust belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Hannah; Bond, Clare; Butler, Rob

    2016-04-01

    3D geological models can be used in fold-thrust belts for many purposes such as analysing geometric variation in folds, kinematic modelling to restore fold surfaces, generating strain distribution maps and predicting fracture network distribution. We present a workflow for 3D model building using outcrop bedding data, geological maps, Digital Terrain Models (DTM's), air photos and field photographs. We discuss the challenges of software limitations for 3D kinematic restoration and forward modelling in fold-thrust belt settings. We then discuss the sensitivity of model building approaches to the application of 3D geological models in fold-thrust belts for further analysis e.g. changes in along strike fold geometry, restoration using kinematic and geomechanical modelling, strain prediction and Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) modelling. To create 3D models geological maps and bedding data are digitised using Move software; digitised maps and data are then draped onto DTM's. A series of closely spaced cross section lines are selected; the orientation of these is calculated by determining the average orientation of bedding dip direction. Fault and horizon line intersections, along with bedding data from within a narrow margin of the section lines are projected onto each cross section. Field photographs and sketches are integrated into the cross sections to determine thrust angles at the surface. Horizon lines are then constructed using bedding data. Displacement profiles for thrusts are plotted to ensure thrust displacements are valid with respect to neighbouring cross section interpretations; any discrepancies are alleviated by making minor adjustments to horizon and thrust lines, while ensuring that resultant cross section geometries still adhere to bedding data and other field observations. Once the cross sections have been finalised, 3D surfaces are created using the horizon and thrust line interpretations on each cross section. The simple curvature of 3D surfaces

  20. Kinematic Analysis of the Almora Klippe: Testing Tectonic Models of the Himalayan Thrust Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosu, S.; Robinson, D. M.; Mamtani, M. A.; Bhattacharya, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Almora klippe is located in the Kumaun Himalaya, northwest India and continues east in the western Nepal as the Dadeldhura klippe. Rocks in the Almora klippe have a similar detrital zircon population and ɛ-Nd values to the Greater Himalayan rock north of the Main Central thrust and are either from the same thrust sheet or part of a similar Greater Himalayan thrust belt. During the development of the Lesser Himalayan duplex, this thrust sheet was folded by an antiformal duplex, leaving the klippe as an erosional outlier of Greater Himalayan rock. In this hypothesis, the fault on the north side of the klippe is a thrust. However, a recent study from the Dadeldhura klippe in western Nepal identified two separate shear zones north of the klippe. The shear zone to the south has top-to-the-north sense of shear and the shear zone to the north has top-to-the-south sense of shear. To determine which model is more accurate, we conducted field work and sampled north of the Almora klippe and towards east in the Dadeldhura klippe to identify the presence of shear zone(s) and the sense of shear. Only one shear zone was identified in the field in 3 transects north of the Almora klippe and 1 transect north of the Dadeldhura klippe. Shear sense indicators in outcrop and microscopic scales show top-to-the-south sense of shear, which matches with the general shear sense of the Main Central thrust. Electron Back-scatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis is in progress to identify crystallographic deformation and compare that with microstructures.

  1. Some geophysical and geochemical consequences of slab serpentinization at subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps Morgan, J.; Ruepke, L. H.; Ranero, C.; Hort, M.

    2002-12-01

    Here we explore the potential impact of slab serpentinization and deserpentinization processes on arc-melting and on water, carbon-dioxide, U, Pb, and noble gas recycling into the deep mantle. We examine the consequences of a scenario in which bend-faulting between the outer rise and trench axis creates the conduits for seawater to reach and react with cold lithospheric mantle to serpentinize it. Water penetration to serpentinize the slab-lithosphere will be inhibited by thick sediments (e.g. Cascades) or thick oceanic crust (subducting oceanic plateaus), while subducting long-offset fracture zones will be especially serpentine-rich because they serpentinized at both the spreading center and subduction zone. If this process occurs, then the incoming lithosphere will typically contain ~500m of altered sediments, ~6 km of partially hydrated oceanic crust, and ~20-55km of partially serpentinized slab mantle. Possible regional geophysical consequences of this scenario are: (1) Fracture Zones preferentially become tears in subducting slabs because they are relatively serpentine rich, thus they deserpentinize more. (2) If so, then their greater deserpentinization should produce greater sub-arc water release which leads to greater arc melting above subducted fracture zones. (3) Regions of little serpentinization will be correlated with flat subduction, lower volumes of slab-water release, and relatively low rates of arc-volcanism. Our thermomechanical modelling implies, depending upon a slab's age and subduction rate, between 30-90% of the slab's chemically bound water is likely to survive sub-arc dehydration to transport its water into the deeper mantle. Possible global geochemical consequences of this scenario are: (1) At current subduction rates, 0.5-1.5 oceans of water would be recycled past the arc-melting region into the deeper mantle during the past Ga. (2) Since 0.3%, 1%, and 3% of the exosphere's Ne, Ar, and Xe are dissolved in the oceans, this implies that at

  2. Paleomagnetic, structural, and stratigraphic constraints on transverse fault kinematics during basin inversion: The Pamplona Fault (Pyrenees, north Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    LarrasoañA, Juan Cruz; ParéS, Josep MaríA.; MilláN, HéCtor; Del Valle, JoaquíN.; Pueyo, Emilio Luis

    2003-12-01

    The Pamplona Fault in the Pyrenees is a major transverse structure that has been classically interpreted as a strike-slip fault. However, lack of consensus concerning the sense of movement casts doubt on its actual kinematics and, as a consequence, its role in the Cenozoic evolution of the Pyrenees remains controversial. In order to assess its kinematics, we have conducted a paleomagnetic, structural, and stratigraphic study focused on the Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks that outcrop around the southern segment of the fault. Restoration of balanced cross sections allows us to examine the present-day spatial relationship of the sedimentary sequences on both sides of the fault and to reconstruct the geometry of the extensional basins formed during Mesozoic rifting episodes in the Bay of Biscay and Pyrenean domains. Paleomagnetic results indicate that no significant tectonic rotations occurred around the fault during Tertiary inversion of the Pyrenees. The lack of tectonic rotations and revaluation of previous hypotheses argues against a strike-slip movement of the fault. We propose a new model in which the Pamplona Fault is treated as a large-scale "hanging wall drop" fault whose kinematics was determined by variations in the geometry and thickness of Mesozoic sequences on both sides of the fault. These variations influenced the geometry of the thrust sheet developed during Tertiary compression. We are unaware of any other transverse fault that has been interpreted in this fashion; thus the Pamplona Fault serves as a case study for the evolution of transverse faults involved in basin inversion processes.

  3. West-directed thrusting south of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis indicates clockwise crustal flow at the indenter corner during the India-Asia collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haproff, Peter J.; Zuza, Andrew V.; Yin, An

    2018-01-01

    Whether continental deformation is accommodated by microplate motion or continuum flow is a central issue regarding the nature of Cenozoic deformation surrounding the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. The microplate model predicts southeastward extrusion of rigid blocks along widely-spaced strike-slip faults, whereas the crustal-flow model requires clockwise crustal rotation along closely-spaced, semi-circular right-slip faults around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. Although global positioning system (GPS) data support the crustal-flow model, the surface velocity field provides no information on the evolution of the India-Asia orogenic system at million-year scales. In this work, we present the results of systematic geologic mapping across the northernmost segment of the Indo-Burma Ranges, located directly southeast of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. Early research inferred the area to have experienced either right-slip faulting accommodating northward indentation of India or thrusting due to the eastward continuation of the Himalayan orogen in the Cenozoic. Our mapping supports the presence of dip-slip thrust faults, rather than strike-slip faults. Specifically, the northern Indo-Burma Ranges exposes south- to west-directed ductile thrust shear zones in the hinterland and brittle fault zones in the foreland. The trends of ductile stretching lineations within thrust shear zones and thrust sheets rotate clockwise from the northeast direction in the northern part of the study area to the east direction in the southern part of the study area. This clockwise deflection pattern of lineations around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis mirrors the clockwise crustal-rotation pattern as suggested by the crustal-flow model and contemporary GPS velocity field. However, our finding is inconsistent with discrete strike-slip deformation in the area and the microplate model.

  4. Evidence for retrograde lithospheric subduction on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Annular moats and outer rises around large Venus coronas such as Artemis, Latona, and Eithinoha are similar in arcuate planform and topography to the trenches and outer rises of terrestrial subduction zones. On earth, trenches and outer rises are modeled as the flexural response of a thin elastic lithosphere to the bending moment of the subducted slab; this lithospheric flexure model also accounts for the trenches and outer rises outboard of the major coronas on Venus. Accordingly, it is proposed that retrograde lithospheric subduction may be occurring on the margins of the large Venus coronas while compensating back-arc extension is occurring in the expanding coronas interiors. Similar processes may be taking place at other deep arcuate trenches or chasmata on Venus such as those in the Dali-Diana chasmata area of aestern Aphrodite Terra.

  5. Seismic Structure of the Subducted Cocos Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. W.; Davis, P. M.; Perez-Campos, X.

    2007-05-01

    The Meso-American Subduction Experiment (MASE) was designed to determine the critical parameters to necessary to simulate the subduction process in Central Mexico . A preliminary analysis of the data shows a 200km section of the slab that is subhorizontal and to within the resolution of the receiver functions it underplates the continental crust with no intervening asthenosphere. This is an interesting situation because the short-term (GPS) and long-term (geologic) strain measurements show almost no compressive strain in this region. This would imply that the crust is decoupled from the subducting slab. Near the coast, the receiver functions show that the slab cuts through the crust at an approximately a 15-degree angle, and under the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt the slab becomes detached from the crust, but its geometry at depth is not yet determined from the receiver functions, but a well-developed mantle wedge is apparent from the attenuation of regional earthquakes.

  6. Subduction zones seen by GOCE gravity gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Švarc, Mario; Herceg, Matija; Cammarano, Fabio

    In this study, the GOCE (Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer) gradiometry data were used to study geologic structures and mass variations within the lithosphere in areas of known subduction zones. The advantage of gravity gradiometry over other gravity methods...... is that gradients are extremely sensitive to localized density contrasts within regional geological settings, which makes it ideally suited for detecting subduction zones. Second order gravity gradients of disturbing potential were extracted from global geopotential model, the fifth release GOCE model ‘EGM_TIM_RL05......’. In order to remove the signal which mainly corresponds to the gravity signal of the lower mantle, long wavelength part of the gravity signal was removed up to degree and order 60. Because the areas with notable topography differences coincide with subduction zones, topography correction was also performed...

  7. Thermal impact of magmatism in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees Jones, David W.; Katz, Richard F.; Tian, Meng; Rudge, John F.

    2018-01-01

    Magmatism in subduction zones builds continental crust and causes most of Earth's subaerial volcanism. The production rate and composition of magmas are controlled by the thermal structure of subduction zones. A range of geochemical and heat flow evidence has recently converged to indicate that subduction zones are hotter at lithospheric depths beneath the arc than predicted by canonical thermomechanical models, which neglect magmatism. We show that this discrepancy can be resolved by consideration of the heat transported by magma. In our one- and two-dimensional numerical models and scaling analysis, magmatic transport of sensible and latent heat locally alters the thermal structure of canonical models by ∼300 K, increasing predicted surface heat flow and mid-lithospheric temperatures to observed values. We find the advection of sensible heat to be larger than the deposition of latent heat. Based on these results we conclude that thermal transport by magma migration affects the chemistry and the location of arc volcanoes.

  8. Morphotectonics of the central Muertos thrust belt and Muertos Trough (northeastern Caribbean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Bruna J.L.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Carbó-Gorosabel, Andrés; Muñoz-Martín, A.; Gomez, Ballesteros M.

    2009-01-01

    Multibeam bathymetry data acquired during the 2005 Spanish R/V Hesp??rides cruise and reprocessed multichannel seismic profiles provide the basis for the analysis of the morphology and deformation in the central Muertos Trough and Muertos thrust belt. The Muertos Trough is an elongated basin developed where the Venezuelan Basin crust is thrusted under the Muertos fold-and-thrust belt. Structural variations along the Muertos Trough are suggested to be a consequence of the overburden of the asymmetrical thrust belt and by the variable nature of the Venezuelan Basin crust along the margin. The insular slope can be divided into three east-west trending slope provinces with high lateral variability which correspond to different accretion stages: 1) The lower slope is composed of an active sequence of imbricate thrust slices and closed fold axes, which form short and narrow accretionary ridges and elongated slope basins; 2) The middle slope shows a less active imbricate structure resulting in lower superficial deformation and bigger slope basins; 3) The upper slope comprises the talus region and extended terraces burying an island arc basement and an inactive imbricate structure. The talus region is characterized by a dense drainage network that transports turbidite flows from the islands and their surrounding carbonate platform areas to the slope basins and sometimes to the trough. In the survey area the accommodation of the ongoing east-west differential motion between the Hispaniola and the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands blocks takes place by means of diffuse deformation. The asymmetrical development of the thrust belt is not related to the geological conditions in the foreland, but rather may be caused by variations in the geometry and movement of the backstop. The map-view curves of the thrust belt and the symmetry of the recesses suggest a main north-south convergence along the Muertos margin. The western end of the Investigator Fault Zone comprises a broad band of

  9. Style, magnitude, and timing of shortening at the eastern end of Kura fold-thrust belt, Azerbaijan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, A. M.; Cowgill, E.; Murtuzayev, I.

    2010-12-01

    Although the Greater Caucasus forms the northern edge of the Arabia-Eurasia collision, the main locus of shortening has shifted south since 5 Ma, producing the Kura fold-thrust belt in Georgia and Azerbaijan. Eastward-decreasing structural complexity and depth of exposure within the thrust belt suggest eastward propagation of faulting. Two topographic features define the eastern termination of the Kura fold-thrust belt at ~48°E: a southern range front exposing south-directed, closely spaced (back thrust. To determine the style, magnitude, and timing of shortening at the east end of the fold-thrust belt, we conducted 1:100K-scale structural mapping covering ~1000 ~km^2 of this region. Along-strike changes in structural geometry divide the map area into two structural domains, the Surxayxan in the west and the Qaramaryam to the east. The Surxayxan domain (47.5°E to 47.8°E) is characterized by two main, north-dipping thrusts, the Savalan to the north and Agcayazi ~4-6 km to the S. At maximum displacement the Savalan thrust places Apsheron sediments over Baku-Khazar deposits, repeating ~2 km of section. The hanging wall anticline of the Savalan thrust is poorly preserved, but a footwall syncline occurs along its full length. The Agcayazi thrust defines the southern range front in this domain, characterized by exposures of Apsheron sediments with the overturned forelimb of the hanging wall anticline preserved in limited areas, but no definitive exposure of the thrust. The Qaramaryam structural domain (47.8°E to 48.3°E) is characterized by the eastwards termination of the Agcayazi thrust and transfer of slip to the north-dipping Padar and Inca thrusts to the south, which together form the Qaramaryam anticline. The latter two thrusts are separated by ~4 km and expose the top of the Apsheron at their maximum displacements but mostly deform Baku-Khazar sediments. In both domains, fold geometries are consistent with a trishear model. Preliminary balanced cross sections

  10. Subduction trench migration since the Cretaceous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S.; Flament, N. E.; Müller, D.; Butterworth, N. P.

    2015-12-01

    Much of our knowledge about subduction zone processes is derived from analyzing present-day Earth. Several studies of contemporary plate motions have investigated the balance between retreating and advancing trenches and shown that subduction zone kinematics are sensitive to the choice of Absolute Plate Motion (APM) model (or "reference frame"). For past times, the absolute motions of the lithospheric plates relative to the Earth's deep interior over tens of millions of years are commonly constrained using observations from paleomagnetism and age-progressive seamount trails. In contrast, a reference frame linking surface plate motions to subducted slab remnants mapped from seismic tomography has recently been proposed. APM models derived using different methodologies, different subsets of hotspots, or differing assumptions of hotspot motion, have contrasting implications for parameters that describe the long term state of the plate-mantle system, such as the balance between advance and retreat of subduction zones, plate velocities, and net lithospheric rotation. Here we quantitatively compare the subduction zone kinematics, net lithospheric rotation and fit to hotspot trails derived the last 130 Myr for a range of alternative reference frames and a single relative plate motion model. We find that hotspot and tomographic slab-remnant reference frames yield similar results for the last 70 Myr. For the period between 130 and 70 Ma, when hotspot trails become scarce, hotspot reference frames yield a much more dispersed distribution of slab advance and retreat velocities, which is considered geodynamically less plausible. By contrast, plate motions calculated using the slab-remnant reference frame, or using a reference frame designed to minimise net rotation, yield more consistent subduction zone kinematics for times older than 70 Ma. Introducing the global minimisation of trench migration rates as a key criterion in the construction of APM models forms the foundation

  11. The Morelia-Acambay Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez Bucio, M.; Soria-Caballero, D.; Garduño-Monroy, V.; Mennella, L.

    2013-05-01

    associated to an alignment or different structures oblique directed to the principal fault trace which sometimes shows inverted moves suggest that the MAFS is a system with ''en echelon'' geometry which respond to transtensive tectonic activity. Recent research based in cinematic indicators from some of the most important faults of the MAFS concludes with evidence of the existence of a transtensive deformation in the center section of the TMVB, which can be explained through the oblique convergence model of plates Northamerica, Rivera and Cocos added to the division of the subduction angle at the North of the Mesoamerican trench.

  12. Geomorphic evidence of Quaternary tectonics within an underlap fault zone of southern Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giano, Salvatore Ivo; Pescatore, Eva; Agosta, Fabrizio; Prosser, Giacomo

    2018-02-01

    A composite seismic source, the Irpinia - Agri Valley Fault zone, located in the axial sector of the fold-and-thrust belt of southern Apennines, Italy, is investigated. This composite source is made up of a series of nearly parallel, NW-striking normal fault segments which caused many historical earthquakes. Two of these fault segments, known as the San Gregorio Magno and Pergola-Melandro, and the fault-related mountain fronts, form a wedge-shaped, right-stepping, underlap fault zone. This work is aimed at documenting tectonic geomorphology and geology of this underlap fault zone. The goal is to decipher the evidence of surface topographic interaction between two bounding fault segments and their related mountain fronts. In particular, computation of geomorphic indices such as mountain front sinuosity (Smf), water divide sinuosity (Swd), asymmetry factor (AF), drainage basin elongation (Bs), relief ratio (Rh), Hypsometry (HI), normalized steepness (Ksn), and concavity (θ) is integrated with geomorphological analysis, the geological mapping, and structural analysis in order to assess the recent activity of the fault scarp sets recognized within the underlap zone. Results are consistent with the NW-striking faults as those showing the most recent tectonic activity, as also suggested by presence of related slope deposits younger than 38 ka. The results of this work therefore show how the integration of a multidisciplinary approach that combines geomorphology, morphometry, and structural analyses may be key to solving tectonic geomorphology issues in a complex, fold-and-thrust belt configuration.

  13. Metamorphic zirconology of continental subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ren-Xu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2017-09-01

    Zircon is widely used to date geological events and trace geochemical sources in high-pressure (HP) to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks of continental subduction zones. However, protolith zircons may be modified by three different types of metamorphic recrystallization via mechanisms of solid-state transformation, metasomatic alteration and dissolution reprecipitation; new zircon growth may be induced by dehydration reactions below the wet solidus of crustal rocks (metamorphic zircon) or peritectic reactions above the wet solidus (peritectic zircon). As a consequence, there are different origins of zircon domains in high-grade metamorphic rocks from collisional orogens. Thus, determining the nature of individual zircon domains is substantial to correct interpretation of their origin in studies of isotopic geochronology and geochemical tracing. We advocate an integrated study of zircon mineragraphy (internal structure and external morphology), U-Pb ages, mineral inclusions, trace elements, and Lu-Hf and O isotope compositions. Only in this way we are in a position to advance the simple zircon applications to metamorphic zirconology, enabling discrimination between the different origins of zircon and providing constraints on the property of fluid activity at subduction-zone conditions. The metamorphic recrystallization of protolith zircons and the new growth of metamorphic and peritectic zircons are prominent in HP to UHP metamorphic rocks of collisional orogens. These different types of recrystallized and grown zircons can be distinguished by their differences in element and isotope compositions. While the protolith nature of metamorphosed rocks dictates water availability, the P-T conditions of subduction zones dictate the property of subduction-zone fluids. The fluids of different properties may be produced at different positions of subducting and exhuming crustal slices, and they may physically and chemically mix with each other in continental

  14. Lateral continuity of the Blarney Creek Thrust, Doonerak Windown, Central Brooks Range, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, C.M.; Julian, F.E.; Phelps, J.C.; Oldow, J.S.; Avellemant, H.G.

    1985-04-01

    The contact between Carboniferous and lower Paleozoic rocks, exposed along the northern margin of the Doonerak window in the central Brooks Range, is a major thrust fault called the Blarney Creek thrust (BCT). The BCT has been traced over a distance of 25 km, from Falsoola Mountain to Wien Mountain. The tectonic nature of this contact is demonstrated by: (1) omission of stratigraphic units above and below the BCT; (2) large angular discordance in orientation of first-generation cleavage at the BCT; (3) numerous thrust imbricates developed in the upper-plate Carboniferous section that sole into the BCT; and (4) truncation of an upper-plate graben structure at the BCT. Lack of evidence for pre-Carboniferous deformation in the lower plate casts doubt on the interpretation of the contact as an angular unconformity. However, the localized presence below the BCT of Mississippian Kekiktuk Conglomerate and Kayak Shale, in apparent depositional contact with lower Paleozoic rocks, suggests that the BCT follows an originally disconformable contact between the Carboniferous and lower Paleozoic rocks. The juxtaposition of younger over older rocks at the BCT is explained by calling upon the BCT to act as the upper detachment surface of a duplex structure. Duplex development involves initial imbrication of the Carboniferous section using the BCT as a basal decollement, followed by formation of deeper thrusts in the lower Paleozoic section, which ramp up and merge into the BCT.

  15. Structural analysis of Nalagarh lobe, NW Himalaya: implication of thrusting across tectonic edge of NW limb of Nahan salient, Himachal Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakuni, S. S.; Philip, G.; Suresh, N.

    2017-07-01

    The Main Boundary Fault (MBF), convex towards southwest, forms the leading edge of the Nahan salient. Near the southern end of an oblique ramp, a lobe-shaped physiographic front, named in this work as Nalagarh lobe, has developed across NW limb of salient. The lobe has formed across the MBF that separates the hanging wall Lower Tertiary Dharmsala rocks from the footwall Upper Tertiary Siwalik rocks and overlying Quaternaries. In front of lobe, thrust fault splays (Splay-1 and Splay-2) and associated tectonic fabrics have developed within the Late Pleistocene fan deposit. Structural elements developed across the front of Nalagarh lobe are analysed with reference to evolution of lobe. An unweathered 15-m-high hanging wall or wedge top forms the uplifted and rejuvenated bedrock fault scarp of the MBF. Below the MBF, the fan deposit has underthrust along Splay-1. Later the Splay-2 formed within fan deposit near south of Splay-1. Geometry of the overturned limb of tight to isoclinal fault propagation fold, formed on Splay-2 plane, suggests that the fold formed by normal drag, produced by intermittent fault-slips along Splay-2. The displacement along Splay-2 offset the marker bed to 1 m by which some clasts rotated parallel to the traces of brittle axial planes of fold. The variable fold geometry and style of deformation are analysed along length of thrust splays for 5 km. It is revealed that the lobe is bounded by transverse thrust faults along its NW and SE margins. The geometry of salient and oblique ramp suggests that the transverse thrust faults and associated transverse folds formed by right-lateral displacement along the NW limb of the salient. Marking the northern margin of the intermontane piggyback basin of Pinjaur dun, the MBF is interpreted to be an out-of-sequence thrust that has brought up the Lower Tertiary Dharmsala rocks over the Late Pleistocene fan deposit. The geometry of lobe and its bounding transverse faults suggest that faults are intimately

  16. Ophiolite Emplacement and the Effects of the Subduction of the Active Chile Ridge System: Heterogeneous Paleostress Regimes Recorded in the Taitao Ophiolite (Southern Chile Emplazamiento de ofiolitas y los efectos de la subducción de la dorsal activa de Chile: Regímenes heterogéneos de paleostress registrados en la Oflolita Taitao (Sur de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio E Veloso

    2009-01-01

    relatively weak compression (slow subduction of the Antarctic píate, the fault-zone experienced a complex mixture of thrust and strike-slip movements (solution E. Thus, the wide range of calculated stress ratios for all solutions could be attributed to the alternated change in convergent velocity of the subducting plates beneath the Taitao área.Es esperable que la repetida migración norte-sur del Punto Triple de Chile cercana a la costa de la Península de Taitao haya impuesto campos de esfuerzos distintos en el antearco por los últimos 6 Ma debido a cambios en la dirección de convergencia y tasa de subducción. Fallas con rumbos NNO-SSE y E-O y otras menores con rumbos NE-SO se desarrollaron en las unidades plutónicas de la Oflolita Miocena-Pliocena de Taitao, mientras que fallas con rumbos NNE-SSO y otras menores con rumbos NO-SE se desarrollaron en el borde Este de esta (Zona de falla de Bahía Barrientes. Estas estructuras frágiles son estudiadas para dilucidar el estilo de emplazamiento de la oflolita y los efectos tectónicos resultantes de la migración alternada del Punto Triple de Chile en al área. Análisis de datos heterogéneos de fallas en ambas áreas sugieren que fueron activadas por campos de esfuerzos diferentes. Dos campos de stress compresionales distintos fueron identificados en las unidades plutónicas (A y B, mientras que 3 campos de stress diferentes, desde compresionales a transcurrentes, lo fueron en la zona de falla de Bahía Barrientes (C, D y E. Las direcciones de los ejes a1 calculadas para las soluciones A, C, D y E son principalmente este-oeste, similares a la dirección de convergencia de las placas subductantes, mientras que aquella para la solución B está rotada antihorario ca. 60° con respecto del patrón anterior este-oeste. Las estructuras frágiles relacionadas con la solución B fueron atribuidas a una deformación temprana de la ofiolita, muy probablemente desarrolladas después de su emplazamiento (ca. 6 Ma. Estas

  17. Long-term perspectives on giant earthquakes and tsunamis at subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, K.; Atwater, B.F.; ,

    2007-01-01

    Histories of earthquakes and tsunamis, inferred from geological evidence, aid in anticipating future catastrophes. This natural warning system now influences building codes and tsunami planning in the United States, Canada, and Japan, particularly where geology demonstrates the past occurrence of earthquakes and tsunamis larger than those known from written and instrumental records. Under favorable circumstances, paleoseismology can thus provide long-term advisories of unusually large tsunamis. The extraordinary Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 resulted from a fault rupture more than 1000 km in length that included and dwarfed fault patches that had broken historically during lesser shocks. Such variation in rupture mode, known from written history at a few subduction zones, is also characteristic of earthquake histories inferred from geology on the Pacific Rim. Copyright ?? 2007 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  18. Holocene deposition and megathrust splay fault geometries within Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S.; Liberty, L. M.; Haeussler, P. J.; Pratt, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    New high resolution sparker seismic reflection data, in conjunction with reprocessed legacy seismic data, provide the basis for a new fault, fold, and Holocene sediment thickness database for Prince William Sound, Alaska. Additionally, legacy airgun seismic data in Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska tie features on these new sparker data to deeper portions of megathrust splay faults. We correlate regionally extensive bathymetric lineaments within Prince William Sound to megathrust splay faults, such as the ones that ruptured in the 1964 M9.2 earthquake. Lastly, we estimate Holocene sediment thickness within Prince William Sound to better constrain the Holocene fault history throughout the region. We identify three seismic facies related to Holocene, Quaternary, and Tertiary strata that are crosscut by numerous high angle normal faults in the hanging wall of the megathrust splay faults. The crustal-scale seismic reflection profiles show splay faults emerging from 20 km depth between the Yakutat block and North American crust and surfacing as the Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults. A change in exhumation rates, slip rates, and fault orientation appears near Hinchinbrook that we attribute to differences in subducted slab geometry. Based on our slip rate analysis, we calculate average Holocene displacements of 20 m and 100 m in eastern and western Prince William Sound, respectively. Landward of two splay faults exposed on Montague Island, we observe subsidence, faulting, and landslides that record deformation associated with the 1964 and older megathrust earthquakes.

  19. Influence of the subducting plate velocity on the geometry of the slab and migration of the subduction hinge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, Wouter P.

    2005-01-01

    Geological observations indicate that along two active continental margins (East Asia and Mediterranean) major phases of overriding plate extension, resulting from subduction hinge-retreat, occurred synchronously with a reduction in subducting plate velocity. In this paper, results of fluid

  20. An alternative interpretation for the map expression of “abrupt” changes in lateral stratigraphic level near transverse zones in fold-thrust belts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghoon Kwon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The map expression of “abrupt” changes in lateral stratigraphic level of a thrust fault has been traditionally interpreted to be a result of the presence of (1 a lateral (or oblique thrust-ramp, or (2 a frontal ramp with displacement gradient, and/or (3 a combination of these geometries. These geometries have been used to interpret the structures near transverse zones in fold-thrust belts (FTB. This contribution outlines an alternative explanation that can result in the same map pattern by lateral variations in stratigraphy along the strike of a low angle thrust fault. We describe the natural example of the Leamington transverse zone, which marks the southern margin of the Pennsylvanian–Permian Oquirrh basin with genetically related lateral stratigraphic variations in the North American Sevier FTB. Thus, the observed map pattern at this zone is closely related to lateral stratigraphic variations along the strike of a horizontal fault. Even though the present-day erosional level shows the map pattern that could be interpreted as a lateral ramp, the observed structures along the Leamington zone most likely share the effects of the presence of a lateral (or oblique ramp, lateral stratigraphic variations along the fault trace, and the displacement gradient.

  1. Thrust distribution for attitude control in a variable thrust propulsion system with four ACS nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yeerang; Lee, Wonsuk; Bang, Hyochoong; Lee, Hosung

    2017-04-01

    A thrust distribution approach is proposed in this paper for a variable thrust solid propulsion system with an attitude control system (ACS) that uses a reduced number of nozzles for a three-axis attitude maneuver. Although a conventional variable thrust solid propulsion system needs six ACS nozzles, this paper proposes a thrust system with four ACS nozzles to reduce the complexity and mass of the system. The performance of the new system was analyzed with numerical simulations, and the results show that the performance of the system with four ACS nozzles was similar to the original system while the mass of the whole system was simultaneously reduced. Moreover, a feasibility analysis was performed to determine whether a thrust system with three ACS nozzles is possible.

  2. Thrust Augmentation with Mixer/Ejector Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presz, Walter M., Jr.; Reynolds, Gary; Hunter, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Older commercial aircraft often exceed FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) sideline noise regulations. The major problem is the jet noise associated with the high exhaust velocities of the low bypass ratio engines on such aircraft. Mixer/ejector exhaust systems can provide a simple means of reducing the jet noise on these aircraft by mixing cool ambient air with the high velocity engine gases before they are exhausted to ambient. This paper presents new information on thrust performance predictions, and thrust augmentation capabilities of mixer/ejectors. Results are presented from the recent development program of the patented Alternating Lobe Mixer Ejector Concept (ALMEC) suppressor system for the Gulfstream GII, GIIB and GIII aircraft. Mixer/ejector performance procedures are presented which include classical control volume analyses, compound compressible flow theory, lobed nozzle loss correlations and state of the art computational fluid dynamic predictions. The mixer/ejector thrust predictions are compared to subscale wind tunnel test model data and actual aircraft flight test measurements. The results demonstrate that a properly designed mixer/ejector noise suppressor can increase effective engine bypass ratio and generate large thrust gains at takeoff conditions with little or no thrust loss at cruise conditions. The cruise performance obtained for such noise suppressor systems is shown to be a strong function of installation effects on the aircraft.

  3. Large paleoearthquake timing and displacement near Damak in eastern Nepal on the Himalayan Frontal Thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.; Kumahara, Yasuhiro; Chamlagain, Deepak; Pierce, Ian K.; Reedy, Tabor; Angster, Stephen J.; Giri, Bibek

    2017-08-01

    An excavation across the Himalayan Frontal Thrust near Damak in eastern Nepal shows displacement on a fault plane dipping 22° has produced vertical separation across a scarp equal to 5.5 m. Stratigraphic, structural, geometrical, and radiocarbon observations are interpreted to indicate that the displacement is the result of a single earthquake of 11.3 ± 3.5 m of dip-slip displacement that occurred 1146-1256 A.D. Empirical scaling laws indicate that thrust earthquakes characterized by average displacements of this size may produce rupture lengths of 450 to >800 km and moment magnitudes Mw of 8.6 to >9. Sufficient strain has accumulated along this portion of the Himalayan arc during the roughly 800 years since the 1146-1256 A.D. earthquake to produce another earthquake displacement of similar size.

  4. Geometry and Evolution of the Cangdong Sag in the Bohai Bay Basin, China: Implications for Subduction of the Pacific Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Liang; Qi, Jiafu; Li, Hongxiang; Dong, Yueqi; Zhang, Shuai; Zhang, Xichen; Yu, Xiaoxia; Luo, Lingyan

    2017-11-13

    The Cangdong Sag is a complex Cenozoic rift basin at the center of the Bohai Bay Basin. Cenozoic structures in the Cangdong Sag can be subdivided into the Cangdong Fault System in the west and the Xuxi Fault System in the east. The geometry of the boundary faults varies along the axes of half-grabens. According to the cross-sectional strata geometry, unconformity and planar structural pattern, the Cenozoic structural evolution of the Cangdong Sag can be divided into four distinct stages: (1) major Paleocene initial rift, (2) latest Paleocene-early Eocene intensive rift, (3) late Eocene-Oligocene strike-slip superimposed rift, and (4) Neogene to present-day post-rift depression. The extensional deformation was mainly derived from horizontal stress induced by the upwelling of asthenosphere. The strike-slip structure of the Cangdong Sag provides important information related to the subduction of the Western Pacific Plate. It was found that the strike-slip movement of the southern Xuxi Fault Zone was activated during the deposition of the third member of Shahejie Formation to the Dongying Formation; therefore, ~43 Ma probably marks the time when the Western Pacific Plate initially changed its subduction direction from northwest to nearly west.

  5. Incremental Holocene slip rates from the Hope fault at Hossack Station, Marlborough fault zone, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, A. E.; Dolan, J. F.; Langridge, R.; Zinke, R. W.; McGuire, C. P.; Rhodes, E. J.; Van Dissen, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Marlborough fault system, which links the Alpine fault with the Hikurangi subduction zone within the complex Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone, partitions strain between the Wairau, Awatere, Clarence and Hope faults. Previous best estimates of dextral strike-slip along the Hope fault are ≤ ~23 mm/yr± 4 mm/year. Those rates, however, are poorly constrained and could be improved using better age determinations in conjunction with measurements of fault offsets using high-resolution imagery. In this study, we use airborne lidar- and field-based mapping together with the subsurface geometry of offset channels at the Hossack site 12 km ESE of Hanmer Springs to more precisely determine stream offsets that were previously identified by McMorran (1991). Specifically, we measured fault offsets of ~10m, ~75 m, and ~195m. Together with 65 radiocarbon ages on charcoal, peat, and wood and 25 pending post-IR50-IRSL225 luminescence ages from the channel deposits, these offsets yield three different fault slip rates for the early Holocene, the late Holocene, and the past ca. 500-1,000 years. Using the large number of age determinations, we document in detail the timing of initiation and abandonment of each channel, enhancing the geomorphic interpretation at the Hossack site as channels deform over many earthquake cycles. Our preliminary incremental slip rate results from the Hossack site may indicate temporally variable strain release along the Hope fault. This study is part of a broader effort aimed at determining incremental slip rates and paleo-earthquake ages and displacements from all four main Marlborough faults. Collectively, these data will allow us to determine how the four main Marlborough faults have work together during Holocene-late Pleistocene to accommodate plate-boundary deformation in time and space.

  6. Long streamer waveform tomography imaging of the Sanak Basin, Alaska subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Pierre-Henri; Delescluse, Matthias; Becel, Anne; Nedimovic, Mladen; Shillington, Donna; Webb, Spahr; Kuehn, Harold

    2017-04-01

    The Alaska subduction zone is prone to large megathrust earthquakes, including several large tsunamigenic events in the historical record (e.g. the 1964 Mw 9.2 and the 1946 Mw 8.6 earthquakes). Along the Alaska Peninsula trench, seismic coupling varies from fully locked to the east to weakly coupled to the West, with apparent aseismic slip in the Shumagin Gap and Unimak rupture zone. Overlapping the Shumagin gap and the Unimak area, the Sanak basin is a Miocene basin formed by a large-scale normal fault recently imaged by the ALEUT 2011 cruise and clearly rooting in the subduction interface at 30 km depth (Becel et al., submitted). Recent activity on this normal fault is detected at the seafloor of the Sanak Basin by a 5 m scarp in the multibeam bathymetry data. As this normal fault may be associated with faults involved in the 1946 tsunami earthquake, it is particularly important to try to decipher its history in the Sanak basin, where sediments record the fault activity. MCS data processing and interpretation shows evidence for the activity of the fault from Miocene to recent geological times. Very limited knowledge of the sedimentation rates and ages as well as complexities due to submarine landslides and channel depositions make it difficult to quantify the present day fault activity with respect to the Miocene fault activity. In addition, the mechanical behaviour of a normal splay fault system requires low to zero effective friction and probably involves fluids. High-resolution seismic velocity imaging can help with both the interpretation of complex sedimentary deposition and fluid detection. To obtain such a high resolution velocity field, we use two 45-km-long MCS profiles from the ALEUT 2011 cruise acquired with an 8-km-long streamer towed at 12 m depth to enhance low frequencies with shots fired from a large, tuned airgun array (6600 cu.in.). The two profiles extend from the shelf break to mid slope and encompass the normal splay fault emerging at 1 km

  7. Fault Trends and the Evolution of the Pacific-North America Transform in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, M. R.; Kamerling, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Pacific-North America (PAC-NOAM) transform boundary evolved during the past 30 Ma, lengthening more than 1000 km and spanning a zone exceeding 200-km across southern California. The relative plate motion vector has been estimated using seafloor magnetic anomaly patterns. Orientations of major transform fault segments within this boundary provide direct evidence of the relative motion at the time these faults formed, where the faults preserve their original orientations. Avoiding areas of known vertical-axis block rotations, we find at least three major fault trends that document past and present tectonic kinematics. A northwest trend of 330 degrees is related to subduction trends in the forearc region that defined the late Mesozoic and early Tertiary coastline and has subsequently controlled the orientation of oblique rifting during the Neogene initiation and growth of the PAC-NOAM transform. This trend is manifest in the San Diego Trough and adjacent coastal rifts and associated fault zones including the Coronado Bank and Newport-Inglewood. The middle Miocene transform orientation appears to be 300-310 degrees, which imparted extensional character to faults reactivated with older subduction trends. Major faults inferred to represent Neogene transform fault segments with this trend include the Whittier, Palos Verdes Hills, Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge, Catalina Escarpment, and possibly the Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault. In late Miocene time, the plate motion vector rotated clockwise eventually achieving its modern orientation of about 320 degrees. Active faulting showing pure strike-slip character on the San Clemente - San Isidro fault zone and the Imperial Fault show this trend, as do transform faults in the northern Gulf of California. An intermediate trend is apparent in some areas along the San Clemente fault zone in the Borderland, and along the Elsinore and San Jacinto fault zones, which transect the Peninsular Ranges. The intermediate trends may

  8. Switching deformation mode and mechanisms during subduction of continental crust: a case study from Alpine Corsica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molli, Giancarlo; Menegon, Luca; Malasoma, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    The switching in deformation mode (from distributed to localized) and mechanism (viscous versus frictional) represent a relevant issue in the frame of processes of crustal deformation in turn connected with the concept of the brittle-"ductile" transition and seismogenesis. On the other hand the role of brittle precursors in nucleating crystal-plastic shear zones has received more and more consideration being now recognized as having a fundamental role in the localization of deformation and shear zone development, thus representing a case in which switching deformation mode and mechanisms interact and relate to each other. This contribution analyses an example of a crystal plastic shear zone localized by brittle precursor formed within a host granitic-mylonite during deformation in subduction-related environment. The studied sample come from the external Corsican continental crust units involved in alpine age subduction and characterized by a low grade blueschist facies peak assemblages. The blueschist facies host rock is cut by a thin (girdle c-axis CPO. Extrapolation of laboratory-derived flow laws indicates strain rate of ca. 3.5 * 10-12 s-1 during viscous flow in the shear zone. The studied structures, possibly formed by transient instability related to episodic stress/strain rate variations, may be considered as a small scale example of fault behaviour associated with a cycle of interseismic creep with coseismic rupture and then a fossil example of stick-slip strain accommodation in subduction environment of continental crust.

  9. Synthesis of Late Cretaceous-Quaternary tectonic, sedimentary and magmatic processes and basin formation related to episodic subduction-collision in the easternmost Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alastair; Kinnaird, Timothy; McCay, Gillian; Palamakumbura, Romesh; Taslı, Kemal

    2015-04-01

    subaerial lineament; 8. Mid-Late Quaternary: gradual tectonic uplift giving rise to a flight of shallow marine to non-marine terrace deposits, that were also influenced by eustatic sea-level fluctuations and climatic change. The stages of basin development were punctuated by four main episodes of compression/uplift. A. Late Miocene underthrusting/metamorphism/exhumation; B. Mid-Eocene southwards thrusting; C. Late Miocene southward thrusting/left-lateral transpression; D. Late Pliocene-Mid Quaternary tectonic uplift. In a setting of continuing plate convergence why did the nature of sedimentation change so dramatically through time? The deformation front between the Kyrenia Range and the Troodos Massif is delineated by the Ovgos Fault which shows an episodic development including Late Miocene compression (transpression) and Quaternary left-lateral strike slip. The Late Cretaceous volcanogenic rocks relate to a phase of regional arc magmatism also documented in SE Turkey. Subduction appears to have slowed or ceased during the Maastrichtian-Palaeocene while the active margin experienced extension or transtension. Following final closure of a Tethyan oceanic basin further north ('northern Neotethys') subduction appears to have relocated southwards and re-activated/accelerated during the Early Eocene triggering large-scale collapse of the over-riding plate and olistostrome formation. Diachronous continental collision was in progress during Early Miocene causing strong uplift of the over-riding plate, intense erosion and voluminous siliciclastic sediment supply to a fore-arc type basin in the N Cyprus-Misis area (becoming foreland basin further east, in SE Turkey). The Pliocene was characterised by eastward 'tectonic escape' of the Anatolian plate towards the Aegean and this allowed relatively fine-grained deposition to accumulate along the former convergent continental margin in northern Cyprus and adjacent areas (e.g. Mesaoria basin). The dramatic late Pliocene to mid

  10. Subduction and volatile recycling in Earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S. D.; Ita, J. J.; Staudigel, H.

    1994-01-01

    The subduction of water and other volatiles into the mantle from oceanic sediments and altered oceanic crust is the major source of volatile recycling in the mantle. Until now, the geotherms that have been used to estimate the amount of volatiles that are recycled at subduction zones have been produced using the hypothesis that the slab is rigid and undergoes no internal deformation. On the other hand, most fluid dynamical mantle flow calculations assume that the slab has no greater strength than the surrounding mantle. Both of these views are inconsistent with laboratory work on the deformation of mantle minerals at high pressures. We consider the effects of the strength of the slab using two-dimensional calculations of a slab-like thermal downwelling with an endothermic phase change. Because the rheology and composition of subducting slabs are uncertain, we consider a range of Clapeyron slopes which bound current laboratory estimates of the spinel to perovskite plus magnesiowustite phase transition and simple temperature-dependent rheologies based on an Arrhenius law diffusion mechanism. In uniform viscosity convection models, subducted material piles up above the phase change until the pile becomes gravitationally unstable and sinks into the lower mantle (the avalanche). Strong slabs moderate the 'catastrophic' effects of the instabilities seen in many constant-viscosity convection calculations; however, even in the strongest slabs we consider, there is some retardation of the slab descent due to the presence of the phase change.

  11. Earth's oldest mantle fabrics indicate Eoarchaean subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix; Reddy, Steven M; Nutman, Allen P; Friend, Clark R L; Bennett, Vickie C

    2016-02-16

    The extension of subduction processes into the Eoarchaean era (4.0-3.6 Ga) is controversial. The oldest reported terrestrial olivine, from two dunite lenses within the ∼3,720 Ma Isua supracrustal belt in Greenland, record a shape-preferred orientation of olivine crystals defining a weak foliation and a well-defined lattice-preferred orientation (LPO). [001] parallel to the maximum finite elongation direction and (010) perpendicular to the foliation plane define a B-type LPO. In the modern Earth such fabrics are associated with deformation of mantle rocks in the hanging wall of subduction systems; an interpretation supported by experiments. Here we show that the presence of B-type fabrics in the studied Isua dunites is consistent with a mantle origin and a supra-subduction mantle wedge setting, the latter supported by compositional data from nearby mafic rocks. Our results provide independent microstructural data consistent with the operation of Eoarchaean subduction and indicate that microstructural analyses of ancient ultramafic rocks provide a valuable record of Archaean geodynamics.

  12. Earthquake nucleation in weak subducted carbonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurzawski, Robert M.; Stipp, Michael; Niemeijer, André R.; Spiers, Chirstopher J.; Behrmann, Jan H.

    Ocean-floor carbonate- and clay-rich sediments form major inputs to subduction zones, especially at low-latitude convergent plate margins. Therefore, knowledge of their frictional behaviour is fundamental for understanding plate-boundary earthquakes. Here we report results of mechanical tests

  13. Kinematic Evolution of the Western Pyrenees Thrust Front From Paleomagnetic Analysis on its Foreland Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almar, Y.; Beamud, E.; Muñoz, J. A.; Garcés, M.; Murelaga, X.

    2007-12-01

    The Pyrenees is a collisional orogen formed during the Alpine orogeny. Its southwestern frontal thrust was originated as a result of the Cenozoic inversion of preexisting extensional faults. The emplacement of the frontal thrust in the Western Pyrenees generated a foreland basin, which locally accumulated more than 4,500 meters of Tertiary sediments. The kinematic evolution of the Western Pyrenees thrust front is poorly constrained due to the scarcity of reliable age constraints within the Tertiary sediments. However, the good exposure conditions of syntectonic continental deposits in its foreland basin makes it an excellent scenario to carry out paleomagnetic and structural studies in order to unravel the kinematic history, geometry and evolution of the thrust front. A magnetostratigraphic composite section along the continental basin infill was sampled covering up to 3,000 m of succession. Correlation of the local magnetostratigraphy with the GPTS was helped by a new mammal fossil locality found in continental sediments and attributed to the Agenian local biozone Y (MN2D). The cronostratigraphy of the tectosedimentary units, ranging from lower Oligocene (Cr12r) to lower Miocene, provides further constraints on the timing of two main tectosedimentary events recorded as major unconformities within the basin infill. From this study, sedimentation rates have been also obtained. The analysis of several paleomagnetic sites revealed that no vertical axes rotations occurred in the Tertiary sediments regardless superimposed folding with oblique axes could be observed, and the proximity of adjacent structures as the Estella diapir and the Pamplona fault. Finally, the analysis of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility together with collected sedimentary data suggests that magnetic fabrics record both, a depositional and tectonic fabric.

  14. Controls on continental strain partitioning above an oblique subduction zone, Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Jorina M.; Whipp, David M., Jr.

    2016-04-01

    Strain partitioning is a common process at obliquely convergent plate margins dividing oblique convergence into margin-normal slip on the plate-bounding fault and horizontal shearing on a strike-slip system parallel to the subduction margin. In subduction zones, strain partitioning in the upper continental plate is mainly controlled by the shear forces acting on the plate interface and the strength of the continental crust. The plate interface forces are influenced by the subducting plate dip angle and the obliquity angle between the normal to the plate margin and the convergence velocity vector, and the crustal strength of the continent is strongly affected by the presence or absence of a volcanic arc, with the presence of the volcanic arcs being common at steep subduction zones. Along the ˜7000 km western margin of South America the convergence obliquity, subduction dip angles and presence of a volcanic arc all vary, but strain partitioning is only observed along parts of it. This raises the questions, to what extent do subduction zone characteristics control strain partitioning in the overriding continental plate, and which factors have the largest influence? We address these questions using lithospheric-scale 3D numerical geodynamic experiments to investigate the influence of subduction dip angle, convergence obliquity, and weaknesses in the crust owing to the volcanic arc on strain partitioning behavior. We base the model design on the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andes (5° N - 2° S), characterized by steep subduction (˜ 35°), a convergence obliquity between 31° -45° and extensive arc volcanism, and where strain partitioning is observed. The numerical modelling software (DOUAR) solves the Stokes flow and heat transfer equations for a viscous-plastic creeping flow to calculate velocity fields, thermal evolution, rock uplift and strain rates in a 1600 km x 1600 km box with depth 160 km. Subduction geometry and material properties are based on a

  15. Role of wing morphing in thrust generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghommem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the role of morphing on flight dynamics of two birds by simulating the flow over rigid and morphing wings that have the characteristics of two different birds, namely the Giant Petrel and Dove Prion. The simulation of a flapping rigid wing shows that the root of the wing should be placed at a specific angle of attack in order to generate enough lift to balance the weight of the bird. However, in this case the generated thrust is either very small, or even negative, depending on the wing shape. Further, results show that morphing of the wing enables a significant increase in the thrust and propulsive efficiency. This indicates that the birds actually utilize some sort of active wing twisting and bending to produce enough thrust. This study should facilitate better guidance for the design of flapping air vehicles.

  16. Quadcopter thrust optimization with ducted-propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuantama Endrowednes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In relation to quadcopter body frame model, propeller can be categorized into propeller with ducted and without ducted. This study present differences between those two using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics method. Both categories utilize two blade-propeller with diameter of 406 (mm. Propeller rotation generates acceleration per time unit on the volume of air. Based on the behavior of generated air velocity, ducted propeller can be modeled into three versions. The generated thrust and performance on each model were calculated to determine the best model. The use of ducted propeller increases the total weight of quadcopter and also total thrust. The influence of this modeling were analyzed in detail with variation of angular velocity propeller from 1000 (rpm to 9000 (rpm. Besides the distance between propeller tip and ducted barrier, the size of ducted is also an important part in thrust optimization and total weight minimization of quadcopter.

  17. Left-Lateral Strike-Slip Faulting in the East Alborz, NE Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Walker, R.; Jackson, J.; Bolourchi, M. J.; Eshraghi, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    The East Alborz mountains of NE Iran are actively deforming as a result of Arabia-Eurasia collision. We combine observations of the geomorphology made using high resolution satellite, topographic and field data, with historical and recent seismicity to map major active faults in this poorly studied region. Deformation on the north side of the range occurs by range-normal shortening on the Khazar thrust fault, which separates Central Iran from the South Caspian. South of the range, deformation involves both left-lateral slip on the previously undocumented Shahrud fault system, which comprises several range-bounding fault segments, and shortening on (probably minor) thrust faults. Faulting south of the range is responsible for major historical earthquakes at Damghan (856AD) and Shahrud (1890). Deformation accommodated across the East Alborz is estimated from the difference in GPS velocities north and south of the range. South of the Alborz, northward GPS velocities across Central Iran decrease eastwards and the strike of the deforming belt changes to become more sub-parallel to the direction of South Caspian- Iran relative motion. This reduces the shortening component across the East Alborz, resulting in lower elevations between 54--57°E. West of 55.5°E, the more arc-normal shortening is achieved by partitioning of deformation onto the Khazar thrust (~1 mm/yr) and the Astaneh and Firuzkuh strike-slip faults (~3 mm/yr). East of 55.5°E, the Khazar fault ends and East Alborz deformation is accommodated primarily on the left-lateral Shahrud fault system, which may slip up to 3~mm/yr. Due to the long gap in seismicity along the eastern Shahrud fault system, the city of Jajarm (15,000 pop.) is considered at high risk from future earthquakes.

  18. Earthquake Hazard and Segmented Fault Evolution, Hat Creek Fault, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, M. W.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Precise insight into surface rupture and the evolution and mechanical interaction of segmented normal fault systems is critical for assessing the potential seismic hazard. The Hat Creek fault is a ~35 km long, NNW trending segmented normal fault system located on the western boundary of the Modoc Plateau and within the extending backarc basin of the Cascadia subduction zone in northern California. The Hat Creek fault has a prominent surface rupture showing evidence of multiple events in the past 15 ka, although there have been no historic earthquakes. In response to interactions with volcanic activity, the fault system has progressively migrated several km westward, causing older scarps to become seemingly inactive, and producing three distinct, semi-parallel scarps with different ages. The oldest scarp, designated the “Rim”, is the farthest west and has up to 352 m of throw. The relatively younger “Pali” scarp has up to 174 m of throw. The young “Active” scarp has a maximum throw of 65 m in the 24±6 ka Hat Creek basalt, with 20 m of throw in ~15 ka glacial gravels (i.e., a Holocene slip rate of ~1.3 mm/yr). Changes in the geometry and kinematics of the separate scarps during the faulting history imply the orientation of the stress field has rotated clockwise, now inducing oblique right-lateral motion. Previous studies suggested that the Active scarp consists of 7 left-stepping segments with a cumulative length of 23.5 km. We advocate that the Active scarp is actually composed of 8 or 9 segments and extends 4 km longer than previous estimates. This addition to the active portion of the fault is based on detailed mapping of a young surface rupture in the northern portion of the fault system. This ~30 m high young scarp offsets lavas that erupted from Cinder Butte, a low shield volcano, but has a similar geometry and properties as the Active scarp in the Hat Creek basalt. At its northern end, the Active scarp terminates at Cinder Butte. Our mapping

  19. Fault detection and isolation in systems with parametric faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem of fault detection and isolation of parametric faults is considered in this paper. A fault detection problem based on parametric faults are associated with internal parameter variations in the dynamical system. A fault detection and isolation method for parametric faults is formulated...

  20. Iowa Bedrock Faults

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This fault coverage locates and identifies all currently known/interpreted fault zones in Iowa, that demonstrate offset of geologic units in exposure or subsurface...

  1. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  2. Cleavage development within a foreland fold and thrust belt, southern Pyrenees, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, James E.; Anastasio, David J.

    1995-03-01

    In the southern Pyrenees lithologically distinct cleavage fronts are each parallel to bedding and dip ˜20° towards the foreland. Pressure solution was the dominant mechanism of cleavage development. The mudstone cleavage front is coincident with the ˜195°C paleoisotherm and is associated with a pressure solution strain of ˜5%, a mechanical twin strain of ˜4%, and a deviatoric stress magnitude of ˜65 MPa. Illite crystallinity measurements define a geothermal gradient of 15°C km -1 and indicate that the paleoisotherms are bedding-parallel. Deviatoric stress magnitudes, from calcite twins, were regionally constant at ˜65 MPa and principal stress axes were perpendicular to cleavage. Temperature was the primary control on deformation micromechanisms and the position and orientation of the cleavage front within the foreland thrust wedge. Deformation below the cleavage front occurs predominantly by pressure solution, which in conjunction with mechanical twinning and microfracturing produces a quasi-plastic rheology. Stress magnitudes determined from mechanical twinning of carbonate grains and long-term (10 6-10 76 y) strain rates determined for regional folds and faults suggest an apparent macroscopic viscosity of 9.8 × 10 18 to 7.2 × 10 19 Pa s for the lower thrust wedge. Above the cleavage front temperature, pressure solution strain, total strain, and mesoscale deformation diminish. The region of the thrust wedge above the ˜100°C paleoisotherm is characterized by large brittle faults with cataclastic fault zones and negligible grain-scale deformation indicating an elastico-frictional rheology.

  3. Reevaluation of 1935 M 7.0 earthquake fault, Miaoli-Taichung Area, western Taiwan: a DEM and field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. N.; Chen, Y.; Ota, Y.

    2003-12-01

    A large earthquake (M 7.0) took place in Miaoli area, western Taiwan on April 21st, 1935. Right to its south is the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake fault, indicating it is not only tectonically but seismically active. As the previous study, the study area is located in the mature zone of a tectonic collision that occurred between Philippine sea Plate and Eurasia continental Plate. The associated surface ruptures of 1935 earthquake daylighted Tungtsichiao Fault, a tear fault trending NE in the south and Chihhu Fault, a back thrust trending N-S in the north, but no ruptures occurred in between. Strike-slip component was identified by the horizontal offset observed along Tungtsichiao Fault; however, there are still disputes on the reported field evidence. Our purposes are (1) to identify the structural behaviors of these two faults, (2) to find out what the seismogenic structure is, and (3) to reconstruct the regional geology by information given by this earthquake. By DEM interpretation and field survey, we can clearly recognize a lot of the 1935 associated features. In the west of Chihhu Fault, a series of N-S higher terraces can be identified with eastward tilted surfaces and nearly 200 m relative height. Another lower terrace is also believed being created during the 1935 earthquake, showing an east-facing scarp with a height of ca. 1.5~2 m. Outcrop investigation reveals that the late-Miocene bedrock has been easterly thrusted over the Holocene conglomerates, indicating a west-dipping fault plane. The Tungtsichiao Fault cuts through a lateritic terrace at Holi, which is supposed developed in Pleistocene. The fault scarp is only discernible in the northeastern ending. Other noticeable features are the fault related antiforms that line up along the surface rupture. There is no outcrop to show the fault geometry among bedrocks. We re-interpret the northern Chihhu Fault as the back thrust generated from a main subsurface detachment, which may be the actual seismogenic fault

  4. Fold-Thrust mapping using photogrammetry in Western Champsaur basin, SE France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totake, Y.; Butler, R.; Bond, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    There is an increasing demand for high-resolution geometric data for outcropping geological structures - not only to test models for their formation and evolution but also to create synthetic seismic visualisations for comparison with subsurface data. High-resolution 3D scenes reconstructed by modern photogrammetry offer an efficient toolbox for such work. When integrated with direct field measurements and observations, these products can be used to build geological interpretations and models. Photogrammetric techniques using standard equipment are ideally suited to working in the high mountain terrain that commonly offers the best outcrops, as all equipment is readily portable and, in the absence of cloud-cover, not restricted to the meteorological and legal restrictions that can affect some airborne approaches. The workflows and approaches for generating geological models utilising such photogrammetry techniques are the focus of our contribution. Our case study comes from SE France where early Alpine fore-deep sediments have been deformed into arrays of fold-thrust complexes. Over 1500m vertical relief provides excellent outcrop control with surrounding hillsides providing vantage points for ground-based photogrammetry. We collected over 9,400 photographs across the fold-thrust array using a handheld digital camera from 133 ground locations that were individually georeferenced. We processed the photographic images within the software PhotoScan-Pro to build 3D landscape scenes. The built photogrammetric models were then imported into the software Move, along with field measurements, to map faults and sedimentary layers and to produce geological cross sections and 3D geological surfaces. Polylines of sediment beds and faults traced on our photogrammetry models allow interpretation of a pseudo-3D geometry of the deformation structures, and enable prediction of dips and strikes from inaccessible field areas, to map the complex geometries of the thrust faults and

  5. Thrust allocation for DP in ice

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, Henrik Emil

    2013-01-01

    The commercial industry has initiated work on how to make it feasible to enter the Arctic seas. Ice loads affects most aspects of the Arctic operation, and the marine crafts must be able to handle them all. The DP control system, and thus the thrust allocation, is not designed to handle ice loads and will not work properly \\cite{Moran}. The main purpose of this master thesis is to enhance the thrust allocation for handling ice loads. This is done by including thruster dynamics and adding thru...

  6. Software fault tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Kazinov, Tofik Hasanaga; Mostafa, Jalilian Shahrukh

    2009-01-01

    Because of our present inability to produce errorfree software, software fault tolerance is and will contiune to be an important consideration in software system. The root cause of software design errors in the complexity of the systems. This paper surveys various software fault tolerance techniquest and methodologies. They are two gpoups: Single version and Multi version software fault tolerance techniques. It is expected that software fault tolerance research will benefit from this research...

  7. The fluid budget of a continental plate boundary fault: Quantification from the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Catriona D.; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Niedermann, Samuel; Cox, Simon C.; Craw, Dave; Zimmer, Martin; Cooper, Matthew J.; Erzinger, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    Fluids play a key role in modifying the chemical and physical properties of fault zones, which may prime them for repeated rupture by the generation of high pore fluid pressures and precipitation of commonly weak, secondary minerals. Fluid flow paths, sources and fluxes, and the permeability evolution of fault zones throughout their seismic cycles remain poorly constrained, despite their importance to understanding fault zone behaviour. Here we use geochemical tracers of fluid-rock exchange to determine budgets for meteoric, metamorphic and mantle fluids on a major compressional tectonic plate boundary. The Alpine Fault marks the transpressional Pacific-Australian plate boundary through South Island, New Zealand and appears to fail in regular (329 ± 68 yrs) large earthquakes (Mw ∼ 8) with the most recent event in 1717 AD. Significant convergent motion has formed the Southern Alps and elevated geothermal gradients in the hangingwall, which drive crustal fluid flow. Along the Alpine Fault the Alpine Schist of the Pacific Plate is thrust over radiogenic metasedimentary rocks on the Australian plate. The absence of highly radiogenic (87Sr/86Sr > 0.7200) strontium isotope ratios of hangingwall hot springs and hydrothermal minerals formed at a range of depths in the Alpine Fault damage zone indicates that the fluid flow is restricted to the hangingwall by a cross-fault fluid flow barrier throughout the seismogenic crust. Helium isotope ratios measured in hot springs near to the Alpine Fault (0.15-0.81 RA) indicate the fault is a crustal-scale feature that acts as a conduit for fluids from the mantle. Rock-exchanged oxygen, but meteoric water-like hydrogen isotope signatures of hydrothermal veins indicate that partially rock-exchanged meteoric fluids dominate down to the top of the brittle to ductile transition zone at ∼6 km. Geochemical tracer transport modelling suggests only ∼0.02 to 0.05% of total rainfall west of the Main Divide penetrates to depth, yet this

  8. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out that there...

  9. Performance based fault diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Different aspects of fault detection and fault isolation in closed-loop systems are considered. It is shown that using the standard setup known from feedback control, it is possible to formulate fault diagnosis problems based on a performance index in this general standard setup. It is also shown...

  10. A new integrated tectonic model for the Mesozoic-Early Cenozoic subduction, spreading, accretion and collision history of Tethys adjacent to the southern margin of Eurasia (NE Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alastair; Parlak, Osman; Ustaömer, Timur; Taslı, Kemal; İnan, Nurdan; Dumitrica, Paulian; Karaoǧlan, Fatih

    2014-05-01

    A major Tethyan suture zone (İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan-Kars Suture Zone) borders the southern margin of Eurasia throughout the Pontides. In eastern Turkey the suture zone includes a range of redeposited terrigenous and volcanogenic sedimentary rocks, pelagic sedimentary rocks and also igneous/metamorphic rocks. The igneous rocks are mostly basaltic blocks and thrust sheets within melange, plus relatively intact, to dismembered, ophiolitic rocks (oceanic crust). Two alternative hypotheses have been developed and tested during this work: 1. The suture zone preserves a single Andean-type active continental margin associated with northward subduction, accretion and arc magmatism during Mesozoic-early Cenozoic time; 2. The suture zone preserves the remnants of two different subduction zones, namely a continental margin subduction zone (as above) and an intra-ocean subduction zone (preferred model). To determine the age of the oceanic crust, relevant to both hypotheses, zircons were extracted from basic ophiolitic rocks (both intact and dismembered) and dated by the U/Pb method (U238/U236) using an ion probe at Edinburgh University. This yielded the following results for the intact ophiolites (Ma): plagiogranite cutting sheeted dykes of the Refahiye ophiolite (east of Erzincan), 183.6±1.7 (2σ); isotropic gabbro from the Karadaǧ ophiolite (northeast of Erzurum), 179.4±1.7 (2σ). In addition, dismembered ophiolites gave the following ages: gabbro cumulate (Bayburt area), 186.2±1.4 (2σ), gabbro cumulate (N of Horasan), 178.1±1.8 (2σ). Furthermore, two samples from a kilometre-sized (arc-related) tonalite body, mapped as cutting a thrust sheet of ophiolitic isotropic gabbro in the Kırdaǧ area, yielded ages of 182.1±3.2 (2σ) and 185.1±3.0 (2σ) Ma. We infer that the ophiolitic and related magmatic arc rocks formed by spreading in a supra-subduction zone setting during the late Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian-Toarcian). This amends former assumptions of a Late

  11. Is subduction really in the plate tectonics driving seat, or do two other global mechanisms do the driving? A review in the 'deep-keeled cratons' frame for global dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmaston, M. F.

    2012-04-01

    mantle boundary layer habitually assumed, but its LVZ content gives it (i) residual heat content, (ii) corresponding buoyancy, and (iii) a flexural strength which demands a reconsideration of its mode of downbend, hitherto widely regarded as flexural, but still be able to explain outer rises and their differences. Solutions for (ii) and (iii) are convincingly supported by widespread exposure of the resulting rocks in the Alps, telling us how they and other UHP metamorphic mountain belts have been built [11]. I will illustrate the essential points. In particular, the buoyancy (ii) provides the upward mechanical contact essential for the shallow basal subduction tectonic erosion of the upper plate as preparation of thin imbricate crustal slices to subduct to UHP. And a seismologically supported through-plate step-faulting mode of downbend copes with the flexure problem (iii) and provides the tectonic erosion mechanism. In tackling these matters, important intrinsic properties of the materials are, notably:- (1) the thermal conductivity of non-migrating interstitial melt is >20 times less than its parent rock, so the LVZ heat is effectively trapped during the plate's journey across the ocean, only to be released when subduction raises the pressure and the melt freezes; (2) the garnet-to-spinel peridotite phase change, typically at 50 to 90 km depth, gives some 50 times more volume change per joule than pure expansivity, and it does so with the big force of solid-state recrystallization. This force is the crack-wall push-apart force provided by our thick-plate MOR model, which thereby develops at least an order more ridge push than the divergent flow model. We now consider the post-downbend evolution of the subducting plate, recognizing both the heat content of its ex-LVZ material and that, within the 2-layer mantle picture established by the plate dynamics of 'deep-keeled cratons' [2 - 5], there is no substantial mantle transport across the 660 km level. Examination of

  12. Slip partitioning on the Enriquillo and Lamentin faults during the 2010 Haiti earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Fleur, Newdeskarl; Feuillet, Nathalie; Grandin, Raphaël; Jacques, Éric; Weil-Accardo, Jennifer; Klinger, Yann

    2014-05-01

    A general consensus has emerged from the study of the 12 January 2010, Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake: the coseismic rupture was complex, portraying both reverse and strike-slip motion, but lacking unambiguous surface break. Based on seismological, geodetic and geologic data, numerous slip models have been proposed for that event. However, using an incomplete fault map, the latter models were preliminary, proposing a rupture on unmapped buried faults. Here, using bathymetric data offshore Port-au-Prince along with a digital elevation model derived from LiDAR on-land, we identified the south-dipping Lamentin thrust in the Bay of Port-au-Prince. The fault prolongs on-land where it deforms active alluvial fans in the city of Carrefour. The geometry and distribution of the aftershocks of the 2010 earthquake and the analysis of the regional geology allow us to place constraints on the connection at depth between the Lamentin thrust and the sinistral strike-slip Enriquillo -Plantain Garden Fault (EPGF). Inversion of geodetic data suggests that both faults may have broken in 2010, consistently with the regional geodynamical setting. The rupture initiated along the Lamentin thrust and further propagated along the EPGF due to instantaneous unclamping at depth. The corals uplifted around the Léogâne Delta Fan, contributing to the build-up of long-term topography between the Lamentin thrust and the EPGF. The 2010 earthquake increased the stress toward failure on unruptured EPGF segments as well as on the thrust fault sitting in the middle of the city of Carrefour, in the direct vicinity of Port-au-Prince, thereby increasing the seismic hazard in these areas.

  13. From transpressional to transtensional tectonics in Northern Central America controlled by Cocos - Caribbean subduction coupling change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Henar, Jorge; Alvarez-Gomez, José Antonio; Jesús Martinez-Diaz, José

    2017-04-01

    The Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) is located at the western margin of the Caribbean plate, over the Chortís Block, spanning from Guatemala to Costa Rica. The CAVA is associated to the subduction of the Cocos plate under the Caribbean plate at the Middle America Trench. Our study is focused in the Salvadorian CAVA segment, which is tectonically characterized by the presence of the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ), part of the western boundary of a major block forming the Caribbean plate (the Chortis Block). The structural evolution of the western boundary of the Chortis Block, particularly in the CAVA crossing El Salvador remains unknown. We have done a kinematic analysis from seismic and fault slip data and combined our results with a review of regional previous studies. This approach allowed us to constrain the tectonic evolution and the forces that control the deformation in northern Central America. Along the active volcanic arc we identified active transtensional deformation. On the other hand, we have identified two deformation phases in the back arc region: A first one of transpressional wrenching close to simple shearing (Miocene); and a second one characterized by almost E-W extension. Our results reveal a change from transpressional to transtensional shearing coeval with a migration of the volcanism towards the trench in Late Miocene times. This strain change could be related with a coupled to decoupled transition on the Cocos - Caribbean subduction interface, which could be related to a slab roll-back of the Cocos Plate beneath the Chortis Block. The combination of different degrees of coupling on the subduction interface, together with a constant relative eastward drift of the Caribbean Plate, control the deformation style along the western boundary of the Chortis Block.

  14. Fault Structural Control on Earthquake Strong Ground Motions: The 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Dongli; Li, Xiaojun; Huang, Bei; Zheng, Wenjun; Wang, Yuejun

    2017-12-01

    Continental thrust faulting earthquakes pose severe threats to megacities across the world. Recent events show the possible control of fault structures on strong ground motions. The seismogenic structure of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake is associated with high-angle listric reverse fault zones. Its peak ground accelerations (PGAs) show a prominent feature of fault zone amplification: the values within the 30- to 40-km-wide fault zone block are significantly larger than those on both the hanging wall and the footwall. The PGA values attenuate asymmetrically: they decay much more rapidly in the footwall than in the hanging wall. The hanging wall effects can be seen on both the vertical and horizontal components of the PGAs, with the former significantly more prominent than the latter. All these characteristics can be adequately interpreted by upward extrusion of the high-angle listric reverse fault zone block. Through comparison with a low-angle planar thrust fault associated with the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, we conclude that different fault structures might have controlled different patterns of strong ground motion, which should be taken into account in seismic design and construction.

  15. Interactions between strike-slip earthquakes and the subduction interface near the Mendocino Triple Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianhua; McGuire, Jeffrey J.

    2018-01-01

    The interactions between the North American, Pacific, and Gorda plates at the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) create one of the most seismically active regions in North America. The earthquakes rupture all three plate boundaries but also include considerable intraplate seismicity reflecting the strong internal deformation of the Gorda plate. Understanding the stress levels that drive these ruptures and estimating the locking state of the subduction interface are especially important topics for regional earthquake hazard assessment. However owing to the lack of offshore seismic and geodetic instruments, the rupture process of only a few large earthquakes near the MTJ have been studied in detail and the locking state of the subduction interface is not well constrained. In this paper, first, we use the second moments inversion method to study the rupture process of the January 28, 2015 Mw 5.7 earthquake on the Mendocino transform fault that was unusually well recorded by both onshore and offshore strong motion instruments. We estimate the rupture dimension to be approximately 6 km by 3 km corresponding to a stress drop of ∼4 MPa for a crack model. Next we investigate the frictional state of the subduction interface by simulating the afterslip that would be expected there as a result of the stress changes from the 2015 earthquake and a 2010 Mw 6.5 intraplate earthquake within the subducted Gorda plate. We simulate afterslip scenarios for a range of depths of the downdip end of the locked zone defined as the transition to velocity strengthening friction and calculate the corresponding surface deformation expected at onshore GPS monuments. We can rule out a very shallow downdip limit owing to the lack of a detectable signal at onshore GPS stations following the 2010 earthquake. Our simulations indicate that the locking depth on the slab surface is at least 14 km, which suggests that the next M8 earthquake rupture will likely reach the coastline and strong shaking

  16. Imaging the Seismic Cycle in the Central Andean Subduction Zone from Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Culaciati, F.; Becerra-Carreño, V. C.; Socquet, A.; Jara, J.; Carrizo, D.; Norabuena, E. O.; Simons, M.; Vigny, C.; Bataille, K. D.; Moreno, M.; Baez, J. C.; Comte, D.; Contreras-Reyes, E.; Delorme, A.; Genrich, J. F.; Klein, E.; Ortega, I.; Valderas, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    We aim to quantify spatial and temporal evolution of fault slip behavior during all stages of the seismic cycle in subduction megathrusts, with the eventual goal of improving our understanding of the mechanical behavior of the subduction system and its implications for earthquake and tsunami hazards. In this work, we analyze the portion of the Nazca-SouthAmerican plates subduction zone affected by the 1868 southern Peru and 1877 northern Chile mega-earthquakes. The 1868 and 1878 events defined a seismic gap that did not experience a large earthquake for over 124 years. Only recently, the 1995 Mw 8.1 Antofagasta, 2001 Mw 8.4 Arequipa, 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, and 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua earthquakes released only a small fraction of the potential slip budget, thereby raising concerns about continued seismic and tsunami hazard. We use over a decade of observations from continuous and campaign GPS networks to analyze inter-seismic strain accumulation, as well as co-sei