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Sample records for subducted morro fracture

  1. Subduction of fracture zones controls mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Vlad C; Leeman, William P; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-10-24

    For some volcanic arcs, the geochemistry of volcanic rocks erupting above subducted oceanic fracture zones is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here we use enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas as a proxy to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent fracture zones in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones where fracture zone subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs. Geodynamic models of subduction have not previously considered how fracture zones may influence the melt and fluid distribution above slabs. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that enhanced production of slab-derived fluids and mantle wedge melts concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in significant along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes.

  2. The link between great earthquakes and the subduction of oceanic fracture zones

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    R. D. Müller

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant subduction earthquakes are known to occur in areas not previously identified as prone to high seismic risk. This highlights the need to better identify subduction zone segments potentially dominated by relatively long (up to 1000 yr and more recurrence times of giant earthquakes. We construct a model for the geometry of subduction coupling zones and combine it with global geophysical data sets to demonstrate that the occurrence of great (magnitude ≥ 8 subduction earthquakes is strongly biased towards regions associated with intersections of oceanic fracture zones and subduction zones. We use a computational recommendation technology, a type of information filtering system technique widely used in searching, sorting, classifying, and filtering very large, statistically skewed data sets on the Internet, to demonstrate a robust association and rule out a random effect. Fracture zone–subduction zone intersection regions, representing only 25% of the global subduction coupling zone, are linked with 13 of the 15 largest (magnitude Mw ≥ 8.6 and half of the 50 largest (magnitude Mw ≥ 8.4 earthquakes. In contrast, subducting volcanic ridges and chains are only biased towards smaller earthquakes (magnitude < 8. The associations captured by our statistical analysis can be conceptually related to physical differences between subducting fracture zones and volcanic chains/ridges. Fracture zones are characterised by laterally continuous, uplifted ridges that represent normal ocean crust with a high degree of structural integrity, causing strong, persistent coupling in the subduction interface. Smaller volcanic ridges and chains have a relatively fragile heterogeneous internal structure and are separated from the underlying ocean crust by a detachment interface, resulting in weak coupling and relatively small earthquakes, providing a conceptual basis for the observed dichotomy.

  3. The Morro do Resende orthogneiss: mineralogy, petrography, geochemistry and geochronology; Ortognaisse Morro do Resende: mineralogia, petrografia, geoquimica e geocronologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Fabiana Franco de; Avila, Ciro Alexandre; Bongiolo, Everton Marques; Camara, Beatriz de Oliveira; Menezes, Victor Hugo Riboura; Cunha, Fernanda Caetano de Mattos, E-mail: fma3003@globo.com, E-mail: avila@mn.ufrj.br, E-mail: ebongiolo@geologia.ufrj.br, E-mail: camara_b@hotmail.com, E-mail: vmenezes92@gmail.com, E-mail: fefemattos@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Neumann, Reiner, E-mail: reiner.neumann@gmail.com [Centro de Tecnologia Mineral (CETEM), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Teixeira, Wilson; Barbosa, Natali, E-mail: wteixeir@usp.br, E-mail: natali@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias

    2017-01-15

    The Morro do Resende orthogneiss is a hololeucocratic to leucocratic, fine-grained body with monzogranitic to granodioritic composition, cropping out near the Volta Grande mine in Nazareno County, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. It bears xenoliths of metamafic rocks of the Rio das Mortes metavolcano-sedimentary sequence and yields a U-Pb SHRIMP crystallization age of 2174 ± 4 Ma, relating it to one of the magmatic pulses of the Mineiro Belt. The primary mineralogy includes quartz, albite, microcline, biotite, allanite, zircon, magnetite, titanite and apatite, while sericite, epidote, zoisite, clinozoisite, carbonate and chlorite are metamorphic minerals. Maghemite, barite, fluorite, monazite, xenotime, garnet and REE fluorides (possibly gagarinite) are hydrothermal, as they fill the fractures, intergrow or replace the primary and metamorphic minerals. Fluid interaction was not homogeneous throughout the body. Metamorphic paragenesis points to greenschist facies conditions, which could be related to the Paleoproterozoic II event of the Mineiro Belt, which lasted from 2131 to 2101 Ma. The Morro do Resende orthogneiss is distinguished by significant REE enrichment, as well as a negative Eu anomaly linked to the magmatic crystallization and a negative Ce anomaly related to oxidizing hydrothermal fluids circulation. (author)

  4. On the initiation of subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Steve; Phillips, Roger J.

    1991-01-01

    Estimates of shear resistance associated with lithospheric thrusting and convergence represent lower bounds on the force necessary to promote trench formation. Three environments proposed as preferential sites of incipient subduction are investigated: passive continental margins, transform faults/fracture zones, and extinct ridges. None of these are predicted to convert into subduction zones simply by the accumulation of local gravitational stresses. Subduction cannot initiate through the foundering of dense oceanic lithosphere immediately adjacent to passive continental margins. The attempted subduction of buoyant material at a mature trench can result in large compressional forces in both subducting and overriding plates. This is the only tectonic force sufficient to trigger the nucleation of a new subduction zone. The ubiquitous distribution of transform faults and fracture zones, combined with the common proximity of these features to mature subduction complexes, suggests that they may represent the most likely sites of trench formation if they are even marginally weaker than normal oceanic lithosphere.

  5. Effects of Entrance Channel Dredging at Morro Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    oz. Marro Bog, CcLLJornLo L 3 LEGEND Q.’ 0 BasLn Number Figure B-i. WAVE AMP. FACTOR THROUGH ENTRANCE CHANNEL T-11.14 sec., DIR-202.5 deg. oz. Morro...CC Figure B-38. B62 aM-II Ii WAVE AMP. FACTOR THROUGH ENTRANCE CHANNEL T-14.75 sec., 01R-315.O deg. az. U Marro Bag, CoLlfornLo 0 LEGEND U

  6. Dynamics of intraoceanic subduction initiation : 1. Oceanic detachment fault inversion and the formation of supra-subduction zone ophiolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maffione, Marco; Thieulot, Cedric|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270177493; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269263624; Morris, Antony; Plümper, Oliver|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/37155960X; Spakman, Wim|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074103164

    Subduction initiation is a critical link in the plate tectonic cycle. Intraoceanic subduction zones can form along transform faults and fracture zones, but how subduction nucleates parallel to mid-ocean ridges, as in e.g., the Neotethys Ocean during the Jurassic, remains a matter of debate. In

  7. Dynamics of intraoceanic subduction initiation: 2D thermomechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Gerya, T.; LI, Z.; Stern, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Intraoceanic subduction initiation occurs in previous weak zones which could be transform faults or old fracture zones, and concurrents with the change of plate motions. It is an important process to understand the beginning of plate tectonics. However, the dynamic process during (after) subduction initiation remain obscure. The process of suducting slabs move from down to downdip is also not revealed clearly. In order to obtain better understanding of the transitional process of subducting slab motion, we use finite difference and marker-in-cell methods to establish a series of self-sustainable subduction initiation models and explore many visco-plastic parameters to qualify the dynamical process of subduction initiation. The following parameters are systematic tested: (1) the age of the subducting slab; (2) friction coefficient of the mantle material; (3) the mantle potential temperature; (4) the age of the overriding slab. We find out the critical age of the oceanic lithosphere which can produce subduction initiation. And the age of subducting slab plays important roles during subduction initiation. The young subducting slab induces fast trench retreat and then trench begin to advance. For the old subducting slab, it induces relative slower trench retreat and then stop moving. The age of overriding slabs impacts coupling with the subducting slab. The friction coefficient of lithosphere also impacts the backarc spreading and subduction velocity. Stronger subducted plate gives lower subduction velocity and faster trench retreat velocity. The mantle potential temperature changes the critical age of subducted slabs.

  8. Mineralogical aspects of Morro de Seis Lagos deposit (Amazonas, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Lucy; Almeida, Marcelo; Silveira, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    The alkaline body Morro dos Seis Lagos, situated in the northwest Amazonian region, is a Nb bearing deposit formed by thick lateritic regolith as circular geological feature about 5 km in diameter. The host rock of this deposit is an intensely weathered siderite carbonatite. The alkaline intrusion body was formed during the late Mesozoic and enriched during the Cenozoic by process of denudation of the surrounding rocks and formation of lateritic cover with thickness in the order of hundreds of meters. In this process, enrichment of Nb, Fe, Ti, Mn, P and rare earth elements (REE) occurred where the lateritic regolith represents the major Nb mineralization, with estimated inferred reserves of 2.9 billion ton@ 2.8 % Nb2O5, one of the largest deposits of Nb in the world. The mineralogical composition of the lateritic regolith has the predominance of the goethite and hematite, followed by oxy - hydroxides of Mn, Ti - Nb oxides, pyrochlore, cerianite and phosphates. The lateritic regolith samples showed high contents of Fe2O3 40 %, and is followed by elevated Th concentration, which locally has concentration higher than (18%). Another REE mineral is the cerianite. The main manganese minerals are hollandite, romanechite (BaMn9O16[OH4] - mixtures of manganese oxides) and amorphous Mn oxy - hydroxides. The higher concentration of MnO2 (about 40 %) is restricted to manganesiferous range, where manganese minerals occur as layers and filling voids, indicating strong remobilization by later process.

  9. Morro 1-5 (Arica). Momias y sociedades complejas del Arcaico de los Andes Centrales

    OpenAIRE

    Guillén, Sonia E.

    2012-01-01

    Morro 1-5 (Arica). Mummies and Complex Societies in South Central AndesThe comparative study of a series of 17 mummies from the Morro 1-5 site in Arica, Chile, is used to discuss the adaptation of the Chinchorro culture of the Archaic period in the South Central Andes. Issues related to the origin and distribution of cultural traits such as artificial mummification and its tipology of forms, as well as biological aspects such as craniometric and epigenetic traits, are íntegrated in the presen...

  10. Control of high oceanic features and subduction channel on earthquake ruptures along the Chile-Peru subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Carrizo, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the earthquake rupture behavior along the Chile-Peru subduction zone in terms of the buoyancy of the subducting high oceanic features (HOF's), and the effect of the interplay between HOF and subduction channel thickness on the degree of interplate coupling. We show a strong relation between subduction of HOF's and earthquake rupture segments along the Chile-Peru margin, elucidating how these subducting features play a key role in seismic segmentation. Within this context, the extra increase of normal stress at the subduction interface is strongly controlled by the buoyancy of HOF's which is likely caused by crustal thickening and mantle serpentinization beneath hotspot ridges and fracture zones, respectively. Buoyancy of HOF's provide an increase in normal stress estimated to be as high as 10-50 MPa. This significant increase of normal stress will enhance seismic coupling across the subduction interface and hence will affect the seismicity. In particular, several large earthquakes (Mw ≥ 7.5) have occurred in regions characterized by subduction of HOF's including fracture zones (e.g., Nazca, Challenger and Mocha), hotspot ridges (e.g., Nazca, Iquique, and Juan Fernández) and the active Nazca-Antarctic spreading center. For instance, the giant 1960 earthquake (Mw = 9.5) is coincident with the linear projections of the Mocha Fracture Zone and the buoyant Chile Rise, while the active seismic gap of north Chile spatially correlates with the subduction of the Iquique Ridge. Further comparison of rupture characteristics of large underthrusting earthquakes and the locations of subducting features provide evidence that HOF's control earthquake rupture acting as both asperities and barriers. This dual behavior can be partially controlled by the subduction channel thickness. A thick subduction channel smooths the degree of coupling caused by the subducted HOF which allows lateral earthquake rupture propagation. This may explain why the 1960 rupture propagates

  11. Subduction of oceanic plate irregularities and seismicity distribution along the Mexican Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Marina; Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Wong, Raul-Valenzuela; Radulian, Mircea

    2017-04-01

    It is known that oceanic plates morphology is not a simple one, but rather complicated by a series of irregularities as seamounts, fracture zones and mid-ocean ridges. These features present on the oceanic floor form part of the fabric of oceanic crust, and once formed they move together with the oceanic plates until eventually enter a subduction zone. Offshore Mexico the oceanic Cocos plate seafloor is littered with relatively small but numerous seamounts and seamount chains, and also large fracture zones. In this study we investigate the relationship between these oceanic irregularities located in the vicinity of the trench in Mexico and the distribution of subduction seismicity, including the rupture history of large subduction zone earthquakes. Since the interseismic locking degree is influenced by the rheological properties of crustal and mantle rocks, any variations along strike will result in significant changes in seismic behavior due to a change in frictional stability. Our preliminary study shows a direct relationship between the presence of seamounts chains on the incoming oceanic plate and the subduction seismicity distribution. We also found a clear relationship between the subduction of the Tehuantepec fracture zone (TFZ) and the low seismic activity in the region where this fracture zone intersects the trench. This region is also long term conspicuously quiet and considered a seismic gap where no significant large earthquake has occurred in more than 100 years. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations specifically tailored for the subduction of the Cocos plate in the region of TFZ we show that the weakened serpentinized fracture zone is partially scraped out in the forearc region because of its low strength and positive buoyancy. The presence of serpentinite in the fore arc apparently lowers the degree of interseismic locking, producing a seismic gap in southern Mexico.

  12. Plume-induced subduction

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    Gerya, T.; Stern, R. J.; Baes, M.; Sobolev, S. V.; Whattam, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Dominant present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and/or pre-existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are themselves consequences of plate tectonics. In contrast, recently discovered plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without pre-existing plate tectonics. Here, we investigate this new mechanism with high-resolution 3D numerical thermomechanical modeling experiments. We show that typical plume-induced subduction dynamics is subdivided into five different stages: (1) oceanic plateau formation by arrival of a mantle plume head; (2) formation of an incipient trench and a descending nearly-circular slab at the plateau margins; (3) tearing of the circular slab; (4) formation of several self-sustained retreating subduction zones and (5) cooling and spreading of the new lithosphere formed between the retreating subduction zones. At the final stage of plume-induced subduction initiation, a mosaic of independently moving, growing and cooling small oceanic plates heading toward individual retreating subduction zones forms. The plates are separated by spreading centers, triple junctions and transform faults and thus the newly formed multi-slab subduction system operates as an embryonic plate tectonic cell. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained plume-induced subduction: (1) old negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) intense weakening of the lithosphere by plume-derived magmas; and (3) lubrication of the forming subduction interface by hydrated oceanic crust. We furthermore discuss that plume-induced subduction, which is rare at present day conditions, may have been common in the Precambrian time and likely started global plate tectonics on Earth.

  13. Geochemistry of tourmalines associated with iron formation and quartz veins of the Morro da Pedra Preta Formation, Serra do Itaberaba Group (São Paulo, Brazil

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    Gianna M. Garda

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourmalines of intermediate schorl-dravite composition occur in iron formation (including metachert and tourmalinites, metasediments, calc-silicate and metabasic/intermediate rocks of the Morro da Pedra Preta Formation, a volcanic-sedimentary sequence of the Serra do Itaberaba Group (northeast of São Paulo City, southeastern Brazil. The Morro da Pedra Preta Formation is crosscut by quartz veins that contain both intermediate schorl-dravite and an alkali-deficient, Cr-(V-bearing tourmaline, in which the occupancy of the X-site is ϑ0.51Ca0.33Na0.15, characterizing it as intermediate to foitite and magnesiofoitite end-members. Mg# values for this tourmaline are higher than those for intermediate schorl-dravite. Raman spectroscopy also confirms the presence of two groups of tourmalines. Stable isotope data indicate sediment waters as fluid sources, rather than fluids from magmatic/post-magmatic sources. Delta18O compositions for tourmalines, host metachert, and quartz veins are similar, showing that fluid equilibration occurred during crystallization of both quartz and tourmaline. Syngenetic, intermediate schorl-dravite tourmalines were formed under submarine, sedimentary-exhalative conditions; amphibolite-grade metamorphism did not strongly affect their compositions. Younger tourmalines of compositions intermediate to foitite and magnesiofoitite reflect the composition of the host rocks of quartz veins, due to fluid percolation along faults and fractures that caused leaching of Cr (and V and the crystallization of these alkali-deficient, Cr-(V-bearing tourmalines.Na Formação Morro da Pedra Preta, seqüência vulcano-sedimentar do Grupo Serra do Itaberaba (São Paulo, Brasil, turmalinas de composição intermediária schorl-dravita ocorrem em formação ferrífera (incluindo turmalinito e metachert, metassedimentos, rochas cálcio-silicáticas e metabásicas a intermediárias. A Formação Morro da Pedra Preta é cortada por veios de quartzo que

  14. Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Bourdin, Blaise; Francfort, Gilles A.

    2011-01-01

    These notes begin with a review of the mainstream theory of brittle fracture, as it has emerged from the works of Griffi th and Irwin. We propose a re-formulation of that theory within the confi nes of the calculus of variations, focussing on crack path prediction. We then illustrate the various possible minimality criteria in a simple 1d-case as well as in a tearing experiment and discuss in some details the only complete mathematical formulation so far, that is that where global minimality ...

  15. Sociedade: Um Estudo Sobre o Morro do Corcovado/ Rio de Janeiro

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    Isabella de Souza Neto Teixeira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ao iniciar o estudo sobre a importância patrimonial do Morro do Corcovado, situado no setor B do Parque Nacional da Tijuca, na Serra da Carioca, município do Rio de Janeiro/RJ, encontrou-se metodologia aplicada somente sob a visão do pesquisador para valorar a geodiversidade. Mas, ao longo do estudo, surgiu a necessidade de saber como a sociedade o via. Seria o Morro do Corcovado apenas reconhecido como uma paisagem deslumbrante pelos seus visitantes? Será que é entendido e valorizado como patrimônio? Será que os indivíduos vêem algo além dessa paisagem? E se vêem o quê seria? Para responder a esses questionamentos se buscou uma ferramenta que fornecesse a relação da sociedade com Morro do Corcovado. Nesse contexto, o questionário/entrevista estruturado mostrou ser uma ferramenta indispensável para a coleta de dados, visando decifrar a percepção patrimonial dos indivíduos. O questionário/entrevista foi pensado e organizado de forma estruturada, visando, através de sua aplicação e análise preliminares, mostrar como esse instrumento serve como ferramenta para compreender as apropriações do patrimônio geológico pela sociedade e possibilitar as tomadas de decisão quanto ao uso mais indicado desse patrimônio.

  16. Governo dos escravos na mina de Morro Velho 1835-1888

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    Alisson Eugênio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Este texto objetiva analisar a administração da população escrava na mina de Morro Velho, para saber se o novo ideário de governo dos escravos, que vinha sendo proposto por intelectuais de diversos campos de saber desde o fim do século XVIII dos dois lados do Atlântico, foi ou não colocado em prática pelos administradores de tal mina e qual resultado disso para as condições de vida e saúde da sua população escrava.

  17. ASPECTOS SOCIOAMBIENTAIS NA COMUNIDADE DO MORRO DA MARIQUINHA EM FLORIANÓPOLIS/SC

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    Claudia Xavier MACHADO

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo são apresentados e discutidos os problemas socioambientais do Morro da Mariquinha – comunidade inserida no maciço central de Florianópolis. Foram realizadas entrevistas e levantamento de notícias em jornal e do histórico da ocupação, posteriormente, foi feita uma análise do modo como a mídia retrata o morro e foi elaborado um perfil da comunidade dentro dos aspectos analisados. Socio-environmental aspects in the Mariquinha’s Mount at Florianópolis/SC Abstract This article analyzes the socio-environmental problems in the Mariquinha´s Mount; inserted community in the central bulk of Florianópolis. Interviews had been carried through and survey of news in newspapers survey of job history, later, was made an analysis concerning the way as the press shows the mount and a profile of the situation in the community was elaborated.

  18. Estudio preliminar de la fauna en el morro de basuras de Moravia y presencia de metales pesados en artropodos y roedores

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Solange Sanchez, Maria; Bedoya, Alejandra; Barahona, Rolando

    2010-01-01

    .... Realizar la caracterizacion preliminar de artropodos y pequenos mamiferos no voladores del morro de basuras de Moravia, asi como la determinacion de metales pesados en muestras de tejido animal...

  19. Experimental and observational evidence for plume-induced subduction on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaille, A.; Smrekar, S. E.; Tomlinson, S.

    2017-04-01

    Why Venus lacks plate tectonics remains an unanswered question in terrestrial planet evolution. There is observational evidence for subduction--a requirement for plate tectonics--on Venus, but it is unclear why the features have characteristics of both mantle plumes and subduction zones. One explanation is that mantle plumes trigger subduction. Here we compare laboratory experiments of plume-induced subduction in a colloidal solution of nanoparticles to observations of proposed subduction sites on Venus. The experimental fluids are heated from below to produce upwelling plumes, which in turn produce tensile fractures in the lithosphere-like skin that forms on the upper surface. Plume material upwells through the fractures and spreads above the skin, analogous to volcanic flooding, and leads to bending and eventual subduction of the skin along arcuate segments. The segments are analogous to the semi-circular trenches seen at two proposed sites of plume-triggered subduction at Quetzalpetlatl and Artemis coronae. Other experimental deformation structures and subsurface density variations are also consistent with topography, radar and gravity data for Venus. Scaling analysis suggests that this regime with limited, plume-induced subduction is favoured by a hot lithosphere, such as that found on early Earth or present-day Venus.

  20. Buoyant subduction on Venus: Implications for subduction around coronae

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    Burt, J. D.; Head, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Potentially low lithospheric densities, caused by high Venus surface and perhaps mantle temperatures, could inhibit the development of negative buoyancy-driven subduction and a global system of plate tectonics/crustal recycling on that planet. No evidence for a global plate tectonic system was found so far, however, specific features strongly resembling terrestrial subduction zones in planform and topographic cross-section were described, including trenches around large coronae and chasmata in eastern Aphrodite Terra. The cause for the absence, or an altered expression, of plate tectonics on Venus remains to be found. Slab buoyancy may play a role in this difference, with higher lithospheric temperatures and a tendency toward positive buoyancy acting to oppose the descent of slabs and favoring under thrusting instead. The effect of slab buoyancy on subduction was explored and the conditions which would lead to under thrusting versus those allowing the formation of trenches and self-perpetuating subduction were defined. Applying a finite element code to assess the effects of buoyant forces on slabs subducting into a viscous mantle, it was found that mantle flow induced by horizontal motion of the convergent lithosphere greatly influences subduction angle, while buoyancy forces produce a lesser effect. Induced mantle flow tends to decrease subduction angle to near an under thrusting position when the subducting lithosphere converges on a stationary overriding lithosphere. When the overriding lithosphere is in motion, as in the case of an expanding corona, subduction angles are expected to increase. An initial stage involved estimating the changes in slab buoyancy due to slab healing and pressurization over the course of subduction. Modeling a slab, descending at a fixed angle and heated by conduction, radioactivity, and the heat released in phase changes, slab material density changes due to changing temperature, phase, and pressure were derived.

  1. Morro Azul Observatory: A New Center for Teaching and Popularization of Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretones, Paulo Sergio; Cardoso de Oliveira, Vladimir

    2002-08-01

    In 1999, the Instituto Superior de Ciências Aplicadas (ISCA Faculdades de Limeira) started a project to build an observatory and initiate several astronomy related activities in the city of Limeira and region (São Paulo state) with the aim of teaching and popularizing astronomy. After contracting teachers, a technician and an intern, the Morro Azul Observatory was inaugurated in March 2000 as a part of the geosciences department of ISCA Faculdades. This poster describes the development phases of the Observatory, the activities initiated by the Observatory, and assesses the impact of the project. Several issues will be discussed such as the criteria for choosing the site, buildings, instruments, group visits, and particularly the goals that were reached. The Observatory, as described here, serves as a model for other centers with the same purpose in the country. The achievements of this project include the creation of two astronomical disciplines for the geography course and liaisons with other courses such as tourism, pedagogy, social communication and engineering. New activities were initiated, educational materials created, and the Observatory is now part of the regions teaching network and is in contact with other Brazilian and foreign centers. This poster presents the results from report analyses, visitor records, the local media, goal strategy assessment, and the current state of the project. It concludes with an evaluation of the social commitment of the Observatory, its initiatives for the constant renewal and growth of the project, its policy of maintaining the activities and interchange with other national and international astronomy centers, and the future perspectives in terms of its contribution for the research in science education.

  2. Restauración integral de cuencas fluviales urbanas mediante el uso de tecnologías sostenibles: el Morro de Moravia

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Angeles; Morató Farreras, Jordi; Pires Carneiro, Álex; Codony Iglesias, Francesc; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    El Morro de Moravia es un cerro ubicado sobre depósitos aluviales del río Aburrá en la Ladera Nororiental de Medellín, Colombia. Entre los años de 1972 y 1984 se empleó como tiradero de residuos sólidos. Esta disposición de los residuos en la zona ocasionó que las personas dedicadas al reciclaje empezaran a invadir “El Morro”, iniciando así un asentamiento humano descontrolado y no planificado en el sitio. A partir de 1999 se realizaron estudios que mostraron que el Morro de Moravia pres...

  3. Boron cycling in subduction zones

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Martin R.

    2017-01-01

    Subduction zones are geologically dramatic features, with much of the drama being driven by the movement of water. The “light and lively” nature of boron, coupled with its wide variations in isotopic composition shown by the different geo-players in this drama, make it an ideal tracer for the role and movement of water during subduction. The utility of boron ranges from monitoring how the fluids that are expelled from the accretionary prism influence seawater chemistry, to the subduction of c...

  4. Cascadia subduction tremor muted by crustal faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Ray; Blakely, Richard J.; Wech, Aaron G.; McCrory, Patricia A.; Michael, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Deep, episodic slow slip on the Cascadia subduction megathrust of western North America is accompanied by low-frequency tremor in a zone of high fluid pressure between 30 and 40 km depth. Tremor density (tremor epicenters per square kilometer) varies along strike, and lower tremor density statistically correlates with upper plate faults that accommodate northward motion and rotation of forearc blocks. Upper plate earthquakes occur to 35 km depth beneath the faults. We suggest that the faults extend to the overpressured megathrust, where they provide fracture pathways for fluid escape into the upper plate. This locally reduces megathrust fluid pressure and tremor occurrence beneath the faults. Damping of tremor and related slow slip caused by fluid escape could affect fault properties of the megathrust, possibly influencing the behavior of great earthquakes.

  5. Seismicity and the subduction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1980-01-01

    There is considerable variation between subduction zones in the largest characteristic earthquake within each zone. Assuming that coupling between downgoing and upper plates is directly related to characteristic earthquake size, tests for correlations between variation in coupling and other physical features of subduction zones are conducted: the lateral extent and penetration depth of Benioff zones, age of subducting lithosphere, convergence rate, and back-arc spreading. Using linear multivariate regression, coupling is correlated with two variables: convergence rate and lithosphere age. Secondary correlations within the data set are penetration depth versus lithosphere age, and lateral extent versus convergence rate. Taken together, the observed correlations suggest a simple qualitative model where convergence rate and lithosphere age determine the horizontal and sinking rates, respectively, of slabs: these parameters influence the seismic coupling in the subduction zone. In the limit of a fast sinking rate and slow convergence rate, back-arc spreading occurs and thereby appears to be a passive process.

  6. Metallogeny of subduction zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokhtin N. O.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the multistage mechanism of the Earth's crust enrichment in ore elements in underthrust zones. The processes of metamorphism and the formation of hydrothermal solutions at pulling of the watered oceanic lithospheric plate into the subduction zone have been described. Some physical and chemical transformation regularities of structural-material complexes in these areas and mechanisms of the formation of ore deposits have been discussed. Spatio-temporal patterns of the localization of a number of endogenetic and exogenetic deposits have been described using metallogeny of the Ural and the Verkhoyansk-Kolyma Fold Belts as an example. It has been shown that in nature there are several effective mechanisms of the enrichment of the crust in ore minerals. One of them is the process of pulling into subduction zone of metalliferous sediments and ferromanganese crusts as well as seabed nodules, their metamorphic transformation, partial melting and transition of ore components into magmatic melts and mineralized fluids. In the future this leads to the release of ore material by magmas and hydrothermal solutions into the folded formations of island-arc and Andean types and the formation of igneous, metasomatic and hydrothermal deposits. Another, yet no less powerful natural mechanism of a conveyor enrichment of the crust in ore elements is the process of destruction and sedimentation of mineral deposits formed in the folded areas as well as the formation of placers and their transfer to the marginal parts of the continent. Later, during the collision of active and passive margins of two lithospheric plates, such as the collision of the Kolyma Massif with the eastern part of the Siberian craton in the middle of the Mesozoic there was a thrusting of a younger lithospheric plate over a more ancient one. As a result, the sedimentary sequences of the passive margin of the Siberian plate were submerged and partially melted by the basic magmas

  7. Herpetofauna of an Atlantic rainforest area (Morro São João) in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Gomes, Mauricio; Vrcibradic, Davor; Siqueira, Carla C; Kiefer, Mara C; Klaion, Thaís; Almeida-Santos, Patrícia; Nascimento, Denise; Ariani, Cristina V; Borges-Junior, Vitor N T; Freitas-Filho, Ricardo F; van Sluys, Monique; Rocha, Carlos F D

    2008-06-01

    We studied the herpetofaunal community from the Atlantic forest of Morro São João, in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, and present data on species composition, richness, relative abundance and densities. We combined three sampling methods: plot sampling, visual encounter surveys and pit-fall traps. We recorded sixteen species of amphibians and nine of reptiles. The estimated densities (based on results of plot sampling) were 4.5 ind/100 m2 for amphibians and 0.8 ind/100 m2 for lizards, and the overall density (amphibians and lizards) was 5.3 ind/100 m2. For amphibians, Eleutherodactylus and Scinax were the most speciose genera with three species each, and Eleutherodactylus binotatus was the most abundant species (mean density of 3.0 frogs/100 m2). The reptile community of Morro São João was dominated by species of the families Gekkonidae and Gymnophtalmidae (Lacertilia) and Colubridae (Serpentes). The gymnophtalmid lizard Leposoma scincoides was the most abundant reptile species (mean density of 0.3 ind/100 m2). We compare densities obtained in our study data with those of other studied rainforest sites in various tropical regions of the world.

  8. Kinematics of Late Cretaceous subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructed from ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; de Gelder, Giovanni; van der Goes, Freek; Morris, Antony

    2017-04-01

    Formation of new subduction zones represents one of the cornerstones of plate tectonics, yet both the kinematics and geodynamics governing this process remain enigmatic. A major subduction initiation event occurred in the Late Cretaceous, within the Neo-Tethys Ocean between Gondwana and Eurasia. Supra-subduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites (i.e., emerged fragments of ancient oceanic lithosphere accreted at supra-subduction spreading centers) were generated during this subduction event, and are today distributed in the eastern Mediterranean region along three E-W trending ophiolitic belts. Current models associate these ophiolite belts to simultaneous initiation of multiple, E-W trending subduction zones at 95 Ma. Here we report paleospreading direction data obtained from paleomagnetic analysis of sheeted dyke sections from seven Neo-Tethyan ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria, demonstrating that these ophiolites formed at NNE-SSW striking ridges parallel to the newly formed subduction zones. This subduction system was step-shaped and composed of NNE-SSW and ESE-WNW segments. The eastern subduction segment invaded the SW Mediterranean, leading to a radial obduction pattern similar to the Banda arc. Emplacement age constraints indicate that this subduction system formed close to the Triassic passive and paleo-transform margins of the Anatolide-Tauride continental block. Because the original Triassic-Jurassic Neo-Tethyan spreading ridge must have already subducted below the Pontides before the Late Cretaceous, we infer that the Late Cretaceous Neo-Tethyan subduction system started within ancient lithosphere, along NNE-SSW oriented fracture zones and faults parallel to the E-W trending passive margins. This challenges current concepts suggesting that subduction initiation occurs along active intra-oceanic plate boundaries.

  9. Seismic anisotropy and mantle flow below subducting slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, Jack; Wookey, James; Kendall, J.-Michael; Masters, T.-Guy

    2017-05-01

    Subduction is integral to mantle convection and plate tectonics, yet the role of the subslab mantle in this process is poorly understood. Some propose that decoupling from the slab permits widespread trench parallel flow in the subslab mantle, although the geodynamical feasibility of this has been questioned. Here, we use the source-side shear wave splitting technique to probe anisotropy beneath subducting slabs, enabling us to test petrofabric models and constrain the geometry of mantle fow. Our global dataset contains 6369 high quality measurements - spanning ∼ 40 , 000 km of subduction zone trenches - over the complete range of available source depths (4 to 687 km) - and a large range of angles in the slab reference frame. We find that anisotropy in the subslab mantle is well characterised by tilted transverse isotropy with a slow-symmetry-axis pointing normal to the plane of the slab. This appears incompatible with purely trench-parallel flow models. On the other hand it is compatible with the idea that the asthenosphere is tilted and entrained during subduction. Trench parallel measurements are most commonly associated with shallow events (source depth < 50 km) - suggesting a separate region of anisotropy in the lithospheric slab. This may correspond to the shape preferred orientation of cracks, fractures, and faults opened by slab bending. Meanwhile the deepest events probe the upper lower mantle where splitting is found to be consistent with deformed bridgmanite.

  10. El Morro caldera (33° 10‧ S, 66° 24‧ W), San Luis, Argentina: An exceptional case of fossil pre-collapse updoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sruoga, P.; Ibañes, O. D.; Japas, M. S.; Urbina, N. E.

    2017-05-01

    Volcanism at Sierra del Morro represents the final stages of the flat-slab related magmatism in the easternmost San Luis Neogene Volcanic Belt. This 80 km-long NW-WNW-trending belt tracks the episodic inland migration of both magmatism and tectonic deformation since 18 Ma. The Sierra del Morro stands out in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas as a metamorphic block uplifted during the Late Miocene-Pleistocene by a combination of magma injection and tectonic deformation. Although sequences that preserve stages of basement updoming are not often preserved, exposures in Sierra del Morro are exception in providing key evidence and insight into the involved processes. Based on the comprehensive study of volcanic stratigraphy and structures, the reconstruction of the volcanic architecture has been carried out. We infer a three stage evolution of the El Morro caldera as follows: 1) pre-collapse updoming and volcanism, 2) collapse caldera formation and 3) post-caldera volcanism. The ascent of magma is recorded in small tumescence sites, strongly controlled by oblique transtensional WNW-NW and ENE-striking brittle-ductile megashear zones. Even though the area affected by tumescence was large, magma injection progressed only locally. At Cerros Guanaco and Pampa, metamorphic rocks were updomed and strongly brecciated, whereas at Sierra del Morro magma was emplaced as pre-collapse domes with associated block-and-ash flows, ignimbrite caldera-forming eruptions and post-caldera lava domes and dykes. The caldera is located in the intersection of two major oblique transtensional WNW-NW and ENE-trending brittle-ductile megashear zones, where the highest positive dilatation occurred.

  11. A discussion of numerical subduction initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buiter, Susanne; Ellis, Susan

    2016-04-01

    In nature, subduction can initiate in various ways: Shortening can localise at oceanic transform faults, extinct spreading centres, or inherited passive margin faults; or, alternatively, subduction can be triggered from existing subduction systems by along-strike trench propagation, polarity reversals, or trench jumps. Numerical studies that specifically address subduction initiation have highlighted the roles of sediment loading, rheological strength contrasts, strain softening, and continental topographic gradients, among others. Usually, however, numerical models that aim to investigate subduction dynamics prefer to bypass the subduction initiation phase and its complexities, and focus instead on the stages during which the slab is descending into the mantle. However, even in these models, subduction still needs to begin. It is disturbingly easy to define initial model geometries that do not result in subduction. The specific combination of initial model geometries and values for rheological parameters that successfully initiates subduction has even been referred to as 'the sweet spot' in model space. One cause of subduction initiation failure is when the subducting and overriding plates lock, resulting in either indentation or severe dragging downwards of the overriding plate. This may point to a difficulty in maintaining a weak subduction interface during model evolution. A second factor that may cause difficulties is that initial model geometry and stresses need to balance, as otherwise the first model stages may show spurious deformation associated with reaching equilibrium. A third requirement that may cause problems is that the surface needs to have sufficient displacement freedom to allow the overriding plate to overthrust the subducting plate. That also implies an exclusion of sharp corners in the subduction interface near the surface. It is the interplay of subduction interface geometry, interface strength and subducting plate rheology that determines

  12. Ecología reproductiva del bobo café (Sula leucogaster en Morros El Potosí, Guerrero, México Reproductive ecology of Brown Boobies (Sula leucogaster at Morros El Potosí, Guerrero, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Ceyca

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Entre enero y junio de 2006 se estudió la ecología reproductiva del bobo café (Sula leucogaster en Morros El Potosí, Guerrero. Determinamos parámetros reproductivos, profundidad máxima de buceo, duración de viajes de forrajeo y porcentaje de atención al nido. Los bobos cafés anidaron durante gran parte del año y exhibieron 2 picos reproductivos: otoño y primavera. Durante este último, el éxito de eclosión fue 61%. Estimamos densidades de 1 300 nidos/ha en la ladera y de 2 000 nidos/ha en la cima de la isla. No observamos depredación, pero condiciones meteorológicas adversas causaron pérdida de huevos y muerte de pollos. Los viajes de forrajeo más largos (5.78 ± 0.21 h y los buceos más profundos (5.52 ± 0.42 m en Morros El Potosí que en otras colonias, sugirieron que los bobos cafés requirieron aquí un mayor esfuerzo de forrajeo, quizás por estar en aguas más calientes, con menos recursos. Los bobos cafés hembra atendieron por más tiempo los nidos con huevos o con pollos que los machos. No hubo diferencias en el tiempo de presencia de los padres en el nido entre meses, lo que, aunado a la variación en la duración de los viajes de forrajeo entre meses, sugiere que hubo fluctuaciones de corta duración en la disponibilidad de alimento durante el periodo de estudio.We studied the breeding ecology of Brown Boobies (Sula leucogaster at Morros El Potosí, Guerrero, between January and June 2006. We determined breeding parameters, foraging habits, and patterns of parental care, and evaluated their effects upon breeding success. Brown Boobies nested during a great part of the year, and exhibited 2 breeding peaks: Fall and Spring. During the later, hatching success was 61%. We estimated 1 300 nests/ha on the slope of the island, and 2 000 nests/ha on the top. We did not record predation, but adverse meteorological conditions caused the loss of eggs and chicks. The longer foraging trips (5.78 ± 0.21 h and deeper diving (5

  13. Herpetofauna of an Atlantic rainforest area (Morro São João in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Almeida-Gomes

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the herpetofaunal community from the Atlantic forest of Morro São João, in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, and present data on species composition, richness, relative abundance and densities. We combined three sampling methods: plot sampling, visual encounter surveys and pit-fall traps. We recorded sixteen species of amphibians and nine of reptiles. The estimated densities (based on results of plot sampling were 4.5 ind/100 m2 for amphibians and 0.8 ind/100 m² for lizards, and the overall density (amphibians and lizards was 5.3 ind/100 m². For amphibians, Eleutherodactylus and Scinax were the most speciose genera with three species each, and Eleutherodactylus binotatus was the most abundant species (mean density of 3.0 frogs/100 m². The reptile community of Morro São João was dominated by species of the families Gekkonidae and Gymnophtalmidae (Lacertilia and Colubridae (Serpentes. The gymnophtalmid lizard Leposoma scincoides was the most abundant reptile species (mean density of 0.3 ind/100 m². We compare densities obtained in our study data with those of other studied rainforest sites in various tropical regions of the world.Estudamos a comunidade herpetofaunística da Mata Atlântica do Morro São João, Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, e apresentamos dados da composição, riqueza, abundância relativa e densidade das espécies. Combinamos três metodologias de amostragem: parcelas, encontros visuais e armadilhas de queda. Registramos 16 espécies de anfíbios e 9 espécies de répteis. As densidades estimadas (baseadas nos resultados da amostragem através de parcelas foram 4.5 ind/100 m² para anfíbios, 0.8 ind/100 m² para lagartos, e a densidade total (anfíbios e répteis foi 5.3 ind/100 m². Para anfíbios, Eleutherodactylus e Scinax foram os gêneros com maior número de espécies, com três espécies cada, e Eleutherodactylus binotatus foi a espécie mais abundante (densidade média de 3.0 anuros/100 m². A

  14. Nose fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It most ... occurs with other fractures of the face. Nose injuries and neck ...

  15. Processes and consequences of deep subduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubie, David C.; Hilst, R.D. van der

    2001-01-01

    Subduction of slabs of oceanic lithosphere into the deep mantle involves a wide range of geophysical and geochemical processes and is of major importance for the physical and chemical evolution of the Earth. For example, subduction and subduction-related volcanism are major processes through

  16. Building a Subduction Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Bodin, Paul; Bourgeois, Jody; Cashman, Susan; Cowan, Darrel; Creager, Kenneth C.; Crowell, Brendan; Duvall, Alison; Frankel, Arthur; Gonzalez, Frank; Houston, Heidi; Johnson, Paul; Kelsey, Harvey; Miller, Una; Roland, Emily C.; Schmidt, David; Staisch, Lydia; Vidale, John; Wilcock, William; Wirth, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Subduction zones contain many of Earth’s most remarkable geologic structures, from the deepest oceanic trenches to glacier-covered mountains and steaming volcanoes. These environments formed through spectacular events: Nature’s largest earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions are born here.

  17. Thermal buoyancy on Venus - Underthrusting vs subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Jeffrey D.; Head, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal and buoyancy consequences of the subduction endmember are modeled in an attempt to evaluate the conditions distinguishing underthrusting and subduction. Thermal changes in slabs subducting into the Venusian mantle with a range of initial geotherms are used to predict density changes and, thus, slab buoyancy. Based on a model for subduction-induced mantle flow, it is then argued that the angle of the slab dip helps differentiate between underthrusting and subduction. Mantle flow applies torques to the slab which, in combination with torques due to slab buoyancy, act to change the angle of slab dip.

  18. Kinematics of Late Cretaceous subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructed from ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; de Gelder, Giovanni I. N. O.; van der Goes, Freek C.; Morris, Antony

    2017-05-01

    Formation of new subduction zones represents one of the cornerstones of plate tectonics, yet both the kinematics and geodynamics governing this process remain enigmatic. A major subduction initiation event occurred in the Late Cretaceous, within the Neo-Tethys Ocean between Gondwana and Eurasia. Suprasubduction zone ophiolites (i.e., emerged fragments of ancient oceanic lithosphere formed at suprasubduction spreading centers) were generated during this subduction event and are today distributed in the eastern Mediterranean region along three E-W trending ophiolitic belts. Several models have been proposed to explain the formation of these ophiolites and the evolution of the associated intra-Neo-Tethyan subduction zone. Here we present new paleospreading directions from six Upper Cretaceous ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria, calculated by using new and published paleomagnetic data from sheeted dyke complexes. Our results show that NNE-SSW subduction zones were formed within the Neo-Tethys during the Late Cretaceous, which we propose were part of a major step-shaped subduction system composed of NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE segments. We infer that this subduction system developed within old (Triassic?) lithosphere, along fracture zones and perpendicular weakness zones, since the Neo-Tethyan spreading ridge formed during Gondwana fragmentation would have already been subducted at the Pontides subduction zone by the Late Cretaceous. Our new results provide an alternative kinematic model of Cretaceous Neo-Tethyan subduction initiation and call for future research on the mechanisms of subduction inception within old (and cold) lithosphere and the formation of metamorphic soles below suprasubduction zone ophiolites in the absence of nearby spreading ridges.

  19. Rapid conversion of an oceanic spreading center to a subduction zone inferred from high-precision geochronology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Timothy E; Encarnación, John; Buchwaldt, Robert; Fernandez, Dan; Mattinson, James; Rasoazanamparany, Christine; Luetkemeyer, P Benjamin

    2016-11-22

    Where and how subduction zones initiate is a fundamental tectonic problem, yet there are few well-constrained geologic tests that address the tectonic settings and dynamics of the process. Numerical modeling has shown that oceanic spreading centers are some of the weakest parts of the plate tectonic system [Gurnis M, Hall C, Lavier L (2004) Geochem Geophys Geosys 5:Q07001], but previous studies have not favored them for subduction initiation because of the positive buoyancy of young lithosphere. Instead, other weak zones, such as fracture zones, have been invoked. Because these models differ in terms of the ages of crust that are juxtaposed at the site of subduction initiation, they can be tested by dating the protoliths of metamorphosed oceanic crust that is formed by underthrusting at the beginning of subduction and comparing that age with the age of the overlying lithosphere and the timing of subduction initiation itself. In the western Philippines, we find that oceanic crust was less than ∼1 My old when it was underthrust and metamorphosed at the onset of subduction in Palawan, Philippines, implying forced subduction initiation at a spreading center. This result shows that young and positively buoyant, but weak, lithosphere was the preferred site for subduction nucleation despite the proximity of other potential weak zones with older, denser lithosphere and that plate motion rapidly changed from divergence to convergence.

  20. Horizontal mantle flow controls subduction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficini, E; Dal Zilio, L; Doglioni, C; Gerya, T V

    2017-08-08

    It is generally accepted that subduction is driven by downgoing-plate negative buoyancy. Yet plate age -the main control on buoyancy- exhibits little correlation with most of the present-day subduction velocities and slab dips. "West"-directed subduction zones are on average steeper (~65°) than "East"-directed (~27°). Also, a "westerly"-directed net rotation of the lithosphere relative to the mantle has been detected in the hotspot reference frame. Thus, the existence of an "easterly"-directed horizontal mantle wind could explain this subduction asymmetry, favouring steepening or lifting of slab dip angles. Here we test this hypothesis using high-resolution two-dimensional numerical thermomechanical models of oceanic plate subduction interacting with a mantle flow. Results show that when subduction polarity is opposite to that of the mantle flow, the descending slab dips subvertically and the hinge retreats, thus leading to the development of a back-arc basin. In contrast, concordance between mantle flow and subduction polarity results in shallow dipping subduction, hinge advance and pronounced topography of the overriding plate, regardless of their age-dependent negative buoyancy. Our results are consistent with seismicity data and tomographic images of subduction zones. Thus, our models may explain why subduction asymmetry is a common feature of convergent margins on Earth.

  1. Skull fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture ... Skull fractures may occur with head injuries . The skull provides good protection for the brain. However, a severe impact ...

  2. Softening trigerred by eclogitization, the first step toward exhumation during continental subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivet, Laurent; Raimbourg, Hugues; Labrousse, Loïc; Avigad, Dov; Leroy, Yves; Austrheim, Håkon; Andersen, Torgeir B.

    2005-09-01

    Direct observation of peak pressure deformation in exhumed subduction channels is difficult because little evidence of this deformation survives later syn-exhumation deformation. Most ultrahigh-pressure parageneses are found in continental derived metamorphic rocks making continental subduction the best context to observe peak pressure deformation. Whereas many studies have enlightened the main driving parameters of exhumation such as buoyancy forces, low viscosity in the subduction channel, overburden removal by erosion and normal faulting, a basic question is seldom considered: why is a tectonic unit disconnected from the descending lithosphere and why does it start its way towards the surface? This event, seminal to exhumation processes, must involve some deformation and decoupling of the exhumed slice from the descending slab at peak pressure conditions or close to it. Our field observations in the Bergen arc show that Caledonian eclogitization and later amphibolitization of a granulitic terrane was achieved with a consistent component of simple shear compatible with the sense of the Caledonian subduction. Thus, the sequence of deformation preserved in the Bergen Arc documents the decoupling of subducted crustal material from the descending slab at the onset of exhumation. This observation suggests that deformation in the subduction channel is largely controlled by kinematic boundary conditions, i.e. underthrusting of the subducting slab. In this context of simple shear, metamorphic reactions assisted by fracturating, fluid infiltration and ductile deformation lower the resistance of rocks and allow the localisation of shear zones and the decoupling of buoyant tectonic units from the subducting slab. These tectonic units can then be incorporated into the channel circulation and start their upward travel.

  3. Seismic-geometric facies model of lacustrine carbonates of Morro do Chaves Formation, Sergipe-Alagoas Basin; Modelagem sismica-geometrica de facies dos carbonatos lacustres da Formacao Morro do Chaves, Bacia de Sergipe-Alagoas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Eliseu Massaaki [Internacional America Latina PETROBRAS Colombia (Colombia). E e P. UN-COL. Gerencia de Ativos Offshore], e-mail: eliseuk@petrobras.com.br

    2010-05-15

    Sergipe-Alagoas Basin, to the seismic facies of a high-resolution seismic section (out thrust-1) from the same outcrop This model was based on the interaction of three models: the Integration Facies Model; Stratigraphic- Structural Facies Model and Velocity Facies Model. The first relates the gamma-rays, sonic velocity, porosity and geometry information with the kinds of facies associations. The second is the result of the integration of the first model with the outcrop 3-D Laser-scanner topographic image and the structural geometric observations. The last is the representation of the substitution of the facies associations of the second model for their respective sonic velocities. This last model was the input parameter to the 2-D acoustic model, which produced a synthetic seismic section of the outcrop of a similar standard to the high-resolution section of out thrust-1. The out thrust-1 high-resolution seismic section interpretation, based on the Seismic-Geometric Facies Model, demonstrated that the facies associations found in the shallow drill hole S-217 and well FU-107, both 50m from the seismic line, correlate in the same seismic-stratigraphic level. More importantly, the geometries of the seismic facies found in the stratigraphic and structural positions were consistent with those observed in the outcrop geological structural analysis. This evidence indicates that the seismic model of the coquinas outcrop, Morro do Chaves Formation, may be used as an analogue model in hydrocarbon exploration and production activities, particularly in the coquinas facies reservoirs of the Lagoa Feia Formation, Campos Basin. (author)

  4. Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

    2010-08-29

    trench east of the Amlia Fracture Zone, which is being subducting beneath the arc at Seguam Island. Mixing trends between mantle wedge and sediment end members become flatter in Hf-Nd isotope space at locations further west along the arc, indicating that the sediment end member in the west has either higher Nd/Hf or is more radiogenic in Hf compared to Nd. This pattern is interpreted to reflect an increase in pelagic clay relative to the terrigenous subducted sedimentary component westward along the arc. Results of this study imply that Hf does not behave as a conservative element in the Aleutian subduction system, as has been proposed for some other arcs.

  5. Subduction dynamics: Constraints from gravity field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcadoo, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Satellite systems do the best job of resolving the long wavelength components of the Earth's gravity field. Over the oceans, satellite-borne radar altimeters such as SEASAT provide the best resolution observations of the intermediate wavelength components. Satellite observations of gravity contributed to the understanding of the dynamics of subduction. Large, long wavelength geoidal highs generally occur over subduction zones. These highs are attributed to the superposition of two effects of subduction: (1) the positive mass anomalies of subducting slabs themselves; and (2) the surface deformations such as the trenches convectively inducted by these slabs as they sink into the mantle. Models of this subduction process suggest that the mantle behaves as a nonNewtonian fluid, its effective viscosity increases significantly with depth, and that large positive mass anomalies may occur beneath the seismically defined Benioff zones.

  6. Estudio preliminar de la fauna en el morro de basuras de Moravia y presencia de metales pesados en artrópodos y roedores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Barahona

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary study of the fauna in the Morro de Moravia open dump and presence of heavy metals in arthropods and rodents.Characterization of the species present in a given locality by means of biological inventories provides information about diversity, even ifit is done in disturbed environments such as open dumps, which are considered a threat for health due to the accumulation of heavy metalsthat are well known for their negative effects on human health and the environment. Objectives. To carry out a preliminary characterizationof arthropods and non-flying small mammals in the Morro de Moravia open dump, and to determine the heavy metal contents in animaltissue samples. Materials and Methods. Arthropods were collected with pitfall traps and manually. Rodents were captured with Shermantraps. The heavy metal analysis was carried out with atomic spectroscopy. Results. A total of 9 orders, 51 families and 75 morphospeciesof insects, 5 families of spiders, two syrphid and a millipede species were identified; Mus musculus was the only small mammal speciesidentified. Heavy metal analysis showed various concentrations mainly of Pb and Cd. The highest content of Pb (45.05 mg/kg was foundin samples of M. musculus and the highest Cd content (10.31 mg/kg was found in spiders of the family Gasteracantha. Conclusions. TheMorro de Moravia open dump provides conditions that allow the establishment of an arthropod community with various diets and niches.The transference of heavy metals from the residue matrix towards higher levels of the trophic chain was corroborated.

  7. A luz verde do Morro Vermelho: a elaboração da experiência do sobrenatural em uma tradicional comunidade mineira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Marçolla

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de depoimentos de moradores de Morro Vermelho (MG e na perspectivafenomenológica de pesquisa em Psicologia, procura-se abordar algumasexperiências ligadas ao sobrenatural ocorridas naquela região. Pretende-se compreender o modo como tais experiências se estruturam na vidadaquela comunidade, procurando-se, ainda, articular tal compreensão comos conceitos de memória coletiva e individual em Maurice Halbwachs e, ainda,com a noção de fontes morais descrita por Charles Taylor.

  8. Origin and dynamics of depositionary subduction margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.; Silver, Eli; Kluesner, Jared W.

    2016-01-01

    Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a “depositionary forearc,” a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes, and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  9. Origin and dynamics of depositionary subduction margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.; Silver, Eli A.; Kluesner, Jared W.

    2016-06-01

    Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a "depositionary forearc," a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes, and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  10. Some geophysical and geochemical consequences of slab serpentinization at subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps Morgan, J.; Ruepke, L. H.; Ranero, C.; Hort, M.

    2002-12-01

    Here we explore the potential impact of slab serpentinization and deserpentinization processes on arc-melting and on water, carbon-dioxide, U, Pb, and noble gas recycling into the deep mantle. We examine the consequences of a scenario in which bend-faulting between the outer rise and trench axis creates the conduits for seawater to reach and react with cold lithospheric mantle to serpentinize it. Water penetration to serpentinize the slab-lithosphere will be inhibited by thick sediments (e.g. Cascades) or thick oceanic crust (subducting oceanic plateaus), while subducting long-offset fracture zones will be especially serpentine-rich because they serpentinized at both the spreading center and subduction zone. If this process occurs, then the incoming lithosphere will typically contain ~500m of altered sediments, ~6 km of partially hydrated oceanic crust, and ~20-55km of partially serpentinized slab mantle. Possible regional geophysical consequences of this scenario are: (1) Fracture Zones preferentially become tears in subducting slabs because they are relatively serpentine rich, thus they deserpentinize more. (2) If so, then their greater deserpentinization should produce greater sub-arc water release which leads to greater arc melting above subducted fracture zones. (3) Regions of little serpentinization will be correlated with flat subduction, lower volumes of slab-water release, and relatively low rates of arc-volcanism. Our thermomechanical modelling implies, depending upon a slab's age and subduction rate, between 30-90% of the slab's chemically bound water is likely to survive sub-arc dehydration to transport its water into the deeper mantle. Possible global geochemical consequences of this scenario are: (1) At current subduction rates, 0.5-1.5 oceans of water would be recycled past the arc-melting region into the deeper mantle during the past Ga. (2) Since 0.3%, 1%, and 3% of the exosphere's Ne, Ar, and Xe are dissolved in the oceans, this implies that at

  11. Geology, petrography and geochemistry of the A-type granites from the Morro Redondo Complex (PR-SC, southern Brazil, Graciosa Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FREDERICO C.J. VILALVA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Morro Redondo Complex is one of the most important occurrences of the Graciosa A-type Province, southern Brazil. It consists of the Papanduva and Quiriri granitic plutons and a contemporaneous bimodal volcanic association. The Papanduva Pluton includes massive and deformed peralkaline alkali-feldspar granites with Na-Ca and Na-amphiboles and clinopyroxenes. The deformed types are the most evolved rocks in the province and carry rare ‘agpaitic’ minerals, some being described for the first time in granites from Brazil. The larger Quiriri Pluton comprises massive, slightly peraluminous, biotite syeno- and monzogranites with rare Ca-amphibole. Biotite compositions are relatively homogeneous, whereas sodic amphiboles and clinopyroxenes show increasing Na and Fe3+ evolving paths. The Morro Redondo granites are ferroan, with high SiO2, alkalis and HFSE contents; the peralkaline types registering the highest fe#. LILE and HFSE abundances increase with the agpaitic index and the most evolved are HHP granites, with radiogenic heat production up to 5.7 µWm–3. Geothermobarometric estimates indicate emplacement under low pressures (∼100 MPa, at temperatures up to 850-800 °C, and relatively reduced (QFM and oxidized (+1 REPLACE_LT ΔQFM REPLACE_LT +3 environments for the Papanduva and Quiriri Plutons, respectively. In both cases, melts evolved to relatively high oxidation states upon crystallization progress.

  12. A subduction zone reference frame based on slab geometry and subduction partitioning of plate motion and trench migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2011-01-01

    The geometry of subducted slabs that interact with the transition zone depends critically on the partitioning of the subduction velocity (v S⊥) at the surface into its subducting plate motion component (vSP⊥) and trench migration component (vT⊥). Geodynamic models of progressive subduction

  13. Empreendedorismo feminino no artesanato: uma análise crítica do caso das rendeiras dos morros da Mariana [doi: 10.21529/RECADM.2015010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dantas de Figueiredo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available O artigo busca problematizar o empreendedorismo feminino a partir de uma perspectiva crítica, subsidiada por teorias feministas baseadas na relação entre trabalho e práticas sociais. O objetivo é compreender como a ação empreendedora pode contribuir para a emancipação feminina. A complexidade do estudo reside no objeto de pesquisa escolhido, qual seja as iniciativas empreendedoras de mulheres dedicadas a atividades artesanais. Por meio de um estudo de caso, exploram-se as causas e consequências da ação das empreendedoras reunidas na Associação de Rendeiras dos Morros da Mariana, com sua produção de rendas de bilro no município de Ilha Grande, Piauí, a partir do viés das relações de poder de gênero. Os achados do estudo apontam para a vinculação entre o desempenho da atividade artesanal das rendeiras e o reforço dos papeis de gênero tradicionais. Como conclusão, tem-se que mesmo que a produção e comercialização da renda sejam fontes geradoras de recursos para as mulheres da Associação, a atividade empreendedora baseada no artesanato não é uma ação emancipatória, capaz de subverter a desigual distribuição de poder de gênero na sociedade em questão. Recomenda-se, a partir dessa conclusão, a realização de outros estudos que tomem como objeto a atividade empreendedora feminina baseada em atividades artesanais tradicionais. Palavras-Chave Empreendedorismo feminino; Gênero; Artesanato; Perspectiva crítica; Associação de Rendeiras dos Morros da Mariana.   FEMALE ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN CRAFTWORK: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF MORROS DA MARIANA LACE MAKERS CASE, IN PIAUI   ABSTRACT This article aims to discuss female entrepreneurship from a critical perspective, supported by feminist theories based on the relationship between work and social practices. The objective is to understand how female entrepreneurial action can lead to female emancipation. The complexity of the study relies on the chosen research object

  14. The earthquake cycle in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosh, H. J.; Fleitout, L.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified model of a subduction zone is presented, which incorporates the mechanical asymmetry induced by the subducted slab to anchor the subducting plate during post-seismic rebound and thus throw most of the coseismic stream release into the overthrust plate. The model predicts that the trench moves with respect to the deep mantle toward the subducting plate at a velocity equal to one-half of the convergence rate. A strong extensional pulse is propagated into the overthrust plate shortly after the earthquake, and although this extension changes into compression before the next earthquake in the cycle, the period of strong extension following the earthquake may be responsible for extensional tectonic features in the back-arc region.

  15. Seismic coupling and uncoupling at subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the correlations concerning the properties of subduction zones are reviewed. A quantitative global comparison of many subduction zones reveals that the largest earthquakes occur in zones with young lithosphere and fast convergence rates. Maximum earthquake size is directly related to the asperity distribution on the fault plane. This observation can be translated into a simple model of seismic coupling where the horizontal compressive stress between two plates is proportional to the ratio of the summed asperity area to the total area of the contact surface. Plate age and rate can control asperity distribution directly through the horizontal compressive stress associated with the vertical and horizontal velocities of subducting slabs. The basalt to eclogite phase change in the down-going oceanic crust may be largely responsible for the uncoupling of subduction zones below a depth of about 40 km.

  16. A numerical reference model for themomechanical subduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinquis, Matthieu; Chemia, Zurab; Tosi, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    response to systematic variations in input parameters, numerical studies often start from a 'reference' subduction model. However, the reference model often varies between different numerical studies, making it difficult to compare results directly. We aim therefore to define a numerical reference model......, and initial temperature distribution. We will show results of the evolution and dynamics of the subduction reference model using different numerical codes: a finite element code, SULEC, and two finite difference codes, YACC and FDcon....

  17. Geological model of supercritical geothermal reservoir related to subduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Following the Great East Japan Earthquake and the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power station on 3.11 (11th March) 2011, geothermal energy came to be considered one of the most promising sources of renewable energy for the future in Japan. The temperatures of geothermal fields operating in Japan range from 200 to 300 °C (average 250 °C), and the depths range from 1000 to 2000 m (average 1500 m). In conventional geothermal reservoirs, the mechanical behavior of the rocks is presumed to be brittle, and convection of the hydrothermal fluid through existing network is the main method of circulation in the reservoir. In order to minimize induced seismicity, a rock mass that is "beyond brittle" is one possible candidate, because the rock mechanics of "beyond brittle" material is one of plastic deformation rather than brittle failure. Supercritical geothermal resources could be evaluated in terms of present volcanic activities, thermal structure, dimension of hydrothermal circulation, properties of fracture system, depth of heat source, depth of brittle factures zone, dimension of geothermal reservoir. On the basis of the GIS, potential of supercritical geothermal resources could be characterized into the following four categories. 1. Promising: surface manifestation d shallow high temperature, 2 Probability: high geothermal gradient, 3 Possibility: Aseismic zone which indicates an existence of melt, 4 Potential : low velocity zone which indicates magma input. Base on geophysical data for geothermal reservoirs, we have propose adequate tectonic model of development of the supercritical geothermal reservoirs. To understand the geological model of a supercritical geothermal reservoir, granite-porphyry system, which had been formed in subduction zone, was investigated as a natural analog of the supercritical geothermal energy system. Quartz veins, hydrothermal breccia veins, and glassy veins are observed in a granitic body. The glassy veins formed at 500-550

  18. Kinematics of subduction and subduction-induced flow in the upper mantle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2004-01-01

    Results of fluid dynamical experiments are presented to model the kinematics of lithospheric subduction in the upper mantle. The experiments model a dense highviscosity plate (subducting lithosphere) overlying a less dense low-viscosity layer (upper mantle). The overriding lithosphere is not

  19. Fluid and deformation regime of an advancing subduction system at Marlborough, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannamaker, Philip E; Caldwell, T Grant; Jiracek, George R; Maris, Virginie; Hill, Graham J; Ogawa, Yasuo; Bibby, Hugh M; Bennie, Stewart L; Heise, Wiebke

    2009-08-06

    Newly forming subduction zones on Earth can provide insights into the evolution of major fault zone geometries from shallow levels to deep in the lithosphere and into the role of fluids in element transport and in promoting rock failure by several modes. The transpressional subduction regime of New Zealand, which is advancing laterally to the southwest below the Marlborough strike-slip fault system of the northern South Island, is an ideal setting in which to investigate these processes. Here we acquired a dense, high-quality transect of magnetotelluric soundings across the system, yielding an electrical resistivity cross-section to depths beyond 100 km. Our data imply three distinct processes connecting fluid generation along the upper mantle plate interface to rock deformation in the crust as the subduction zone develops. Massive fluid release just inland of the trench induces fault-fracture meshes through the crust above that undoubtedly weaken it as regional shear initiates. Narrow strike-slip faults in the shallow brittle regime of interior Marlborough diffuse in width upon entering the deeper ductile domain aided by fluids and do not project as narrow deformation zones. Deep subduction-generated fluids rise from 100 km or more and invade upper crustal seismogenic zones that have exhibited historic great earthquakes on high-angle thrusts that are poorly oriented for failure under dry conditions. The fluid-deformation connections described in our work emphasize the need to include metamorphic and fluid transport processes in geodynamic models.

  20. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors in Subduction Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billen, Magali; Arredondo, Katrina

    2014-05-01

    Since the realization that tectonic plates sink into the mantle, in a process we now call subduction, our understanding of this process has improved dramatically through the combined application of observations, theory and modeling. During that time independent research groups focusing on different aspects of subduction have identified factors with a significant impact on subduction, such as three-dimensionality, slab rollback, rheology of the slab and mantle and magnitude of phase changes. However, as each group makes progress we often wonder how these different factors interact as we all strive to understand the real world subduction system. These factors can be divided in two groups: intrinsic factors, including the age of the slab, its thermal structure, composition, and rheology, and extrinsic factors including others forces on plates, overall mantle flow, structure of the overriding plate, rheology of the mantle and phase changes. In addition, while modeling has been a powerful tool for understanding subduction, all models make important (but often necessary) approximations, such as using two dimensions, imposed boundary conditions, and approximations of the conservation equations and material properties. Here we present results of a study in which the "training wheels" are systematically removed from 2D models of subduction to build a more realistic model of subduction and to better understand how combined effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to the dynamics. We find that a change from the Boussinesq to the extended Boussinesq form of the conservation equations has a dramatic effect on slab evolution in particular when phase changes are included. Allowing for free (dynamically-driven) subduction and trench motion is numerically challenging, but also an important factor that allows for more direct comparison to observations of plate kinematics. Finally, compositional layering of the slab and compositionally-controlled phase changes also have

  1. Topographic form of the Coast Ranges of the Cascadia Margin in relation ot coastal uplift rates and plate subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Engebretson, David C.; Mitchell, Clifton E.; Ticknor, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    The Coast Ranges of the Cascadia margin are overriding the subducted Juan de Fuca/Gorda plate. We investigate the extent to which the latitudinal change in attributes related to the subduction process. These attributes include the varibale age of the subducted slab that underlies the Coast Ranges and average vertical crustal velocities of the western margin of the Coast Rnages for two markedly different time periods, the last 45 years and the last 100 kyr. These vertical crustal velocities are computed from the resurveying of highway bech marks and from the present elevation of shore platforms that have been uplifted in the late Quaternary, respectively. Topogarphy of the Coast Ranges is in part a function of the age and bouyancy of the underlying subducted plate. This is evident in the fact that the two highest topographic elements of the Coast Rnages, the Klamath Mountains and the Olympic Mountains, are underlain by youngest subducted oceanic crust. The subducted Blanco Fracture Zone in southernmost Oregon is responsible for an age discontinuity of subducted crust under the Klamath Mountains. The norhtern terminus of hte topographically higher Klamaths is offset to the north relative to the position of the underlying Blanco Fracture Zone, teh offset being in the direction of migration of the farcture zone, as dictated by relative plate motions. Vertical crustal velocities at the coast, derived from becnh mark surveys, are as much as an order of magnitude greater than vertical crustal velocities derived from uplifted shore platforms. This uplift rate discrepancy indicates that strain is accumulating on the plate margin, to be released during the next interplate earthquake. In a latitudinal sense, average Coast Rnage topography is relatively high where bench mark-derived, short-term vertical crustal velocities are highest. Becuase the shore platform vertical crustal velocities reflect longer-term, premanent uplift, we infer that a small percentage of the

  2. Evidence for retrograde lithospheric subduction on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Annular moats and outer rises around large Venus coronas such as Artemis, Latona, and Eithinoha are similar in arcuate planform and topography to the trenches and outer rises of terrestrial subduction zones. On earth, trenches and outer rises are modeled as the flexural response of a thin elastic lithosphere to the bending moment of the subducted slab; this lithospheric flexure model also accounts for the trenches and outer rises outboard of the major coronas on Venus. Accordingly, it is proposed that retrograde lithospheric subduction may be occurring on the margins of the large Venus coronas while compensating back-arc extension is occurring in the expanding coronas interiors. Similar processes may be taking place at other deep arcuate trenches or chasmata on Venus such as those in the Dali-Diana chasmata area of aestern Aphrodite Terra.

  3. Seismic Structure of the Subducted Cocos Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. W.; Davis, P. M.; Perez-Campos, X.

    2007-05-01

    The Meso-American Subduction Experiment (MASE) was designed to determine the critical parameters to necessary to simulate the subduction process in Central Mexico . A preliminary analysis of the data shows a 200km section of the slab that is subhorizontal and to within the resolution of the receiver functions it underplates the continental crust with no intervening asthenosphere. This is an interesting situation because the short-term (GPS) and long-term (geologic) strain measurements show almost no compressive strain in this region. This would imply that the crust is decoupled from the subducting slab. Near the coast, the receiver functions show that the slab cuts through the crust at an approximately a 15-degree angle, and under the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt the slab becomes detached from the crust, but its geometry at depth is not yet determined from the receiver functions, but a well-developed mantle wedge is apparent from the attenuation of regional earthquakes.

  4. Subduction zones seen by GOCE gravity gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Švarc, Mario; Herceg, Matija; Cammarano, Fabio

    In this study, the GOCE (Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer) gradiometry data were used to study geologic structures and mass variations within the lithosphere in areas of known subduction zones. The advantage of gravity gradiometry over other gravity methods...... is that gradients are extremely sensitive to localized density contrasts within regional geological settings, which makes it ideally suited for detecting subduction zones. Second order gravity gradients of disturbing potential were extracted from global geopotential model, the fifth release GOCE model ‘EGM_TIM_RL05......’. In order to remove the signal which mainly corresponds to the gravity signal of the lower mantle, long wavelength part of the gravity signal was removed up to degree and order 60. Because the areas with notable topography differences coincide with subduction zones, topography correction was also performed...

  5. Thermal impact of magmatism in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees Jones, David W.; Katz, Richard F.; Tian, Meng; Rudge, John F.

    2018-01-01

    Magmatism in subduction zones builds continental crust and causes most of Earth's subaerial volcanism. The production rate and composition of magmas are controlled by the thermal structure of subduction zones. A range of geochemical and heat flow evidence has recently converged to indicate that subduction zones are hotter at lithospheric depths beneath the arc than predicted by canonical thermomechanical models, which neglect magmatism. We show that this discrepancy can be resolved by consideration of the heat transported by magma. In our one- and two-dimensional numerical models and scaling analysis, magmatic transport of sensible and latent heat locally alters the thermal structure of canonical models by ∼300 K, increasing predicted surface heat flow and mid-lithospheric temperatures to observed values. We find the advection of sensible heat to be larger than the deposition of latent heat. Based on these results we conclude that thermal transport by magma migration affects the chemistry and the location of arc volcanoes.

  6. Subduction trench migration since the Cretaceous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S.; Flament, N. E.; Müller, D.; Butterworth, N. P.

    2015-12-01

    Much of our knowledge about subduction zone processes is derived from analyzing present-day Earth. Several studies of contemporary plate motions have investigated the balance between retreating and advancing trenches and shown that subduction zone kinematics are sensitive to the choice of Absolute Plate Motion (APM) model (or "reference frame"). For past times, the absolute motions of the lithospheric plates relative to the Earth's deep interior over tens of millions of years are commonly constrained using observations from paleomagnetism and age-progressive seamount trails. In contrast, a reference frame linking surface plate motions to subducted slab remnants mapped from seismic tomography has recently been proposed. APM models derived using different methodologies, different subsets of hotspots, or differing assumptions of hotspot motion, have contrasting implications for parameters that describe the long term state of the plate-mantle system, such as the balance between advance and retreat of subduction zones, plate velocities, and net lithospheric rotation. Here we quantitatively compare the subduction zone kinematics, net lithospheric rotation and fit to hotspot trails derived the last 130 Myr for a range of alternative reference frames and a single relative plate motion model. We find that hotspot and tomographic slab-remnant reference frames yield similar results for the last 70 Myr. For the period between 130 and 70 Ma, when hotspot trails become scarce, hotspot reference frames yield a much more dispersed distribution of slab advance and retreat velocities, which is considered geodynamically less plausible. By contrast, plate motions calculated using the slab-remnant reference frame, or using a reference frame designed to minimise net rotation, yield more consistent subduction zone kinematics for times older than 70 Ma. Introducing the global minimisation of trench migration rates as a key criterion in the construction of APM models forms the foundation

  7. Metamorphic zirconology of continental subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ren-Xu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2017-09-01

    Zircon is widely used to date geological events and trace geochemical sources in high-pressure (HP) to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks of continental subduction zones. However, protolith zircons may be modified by three different types of metamorphic recrystallization via mechanisms of solid-state transformation, metasomatic alteration and dissolution reprecipitation; new zircon growth may be induced by dehydration reactions below the wet solidus of crustal rocks (metamorphic zircon) or peritectic reactions above the wet solidus (peritectic zircon). As a consequence, there are different origins of zircon domains in high-grade metamorphic rocks from collisional orogens. Thus, determining the nature of individual zircon domains is substantial to correct interpretation of their origin in studies of isotopic geochronology and geochemical tracing. We advocate an integrated study of zircon mineragraphy (internal structure and external morphology), U-Pb ages, mineral inclusions, trace elements, and Lu-Hf and O isotope compositions. Only in this way we are in a position to advance the simple zircon applications to metamorphic zirconology, enabling discrimination between the different origins of zircon and providing constraints on the property of fluid activity at subduction-zone conditions. The metamorphic recrystallization of protolith zircons and the new growth of metamorphic and peritectic zircons are prominent in HP to UHP metamorphic rocks of collisional orogens. These different types of recrystallized and grown zircons can be distinguished by their differences in element and isotope compositions. While the protolith nature of metamorphosed rocks dictates water availability, the P-T conditions of subduction zones dictate the property of subduction-zone fluids. The fluids of different properties may be produced at different positions of subducting and exhuming crustal slices, and they may physically and chemically mix with each other in continental

  8. Influence of the subducting plate velocity on the geometry of the slab and migration of the subduction hinge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, Wouter P.

    2005-01-01

    Geological observations indicate that along two active continental margins (East Asia and Mediterranean) major phases of overriding plate extension, resulting from subduction hinge-retreat, occurred synchronously with a reduction in subducting plate velocity. In this paper, results of fluid

  9. Two-dimensional Numerical Models of Accretionary Wedges Deformation in Response to Subduction and Obduction: Evidence from the Middle Part of the Manila Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L.; Ding, W.; Chen, L.; Gerya, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Manila Trench is located at the eastern boundary of the South China Sea (SCS). It was created by the subduction of the South China Sea Plate beneath the Philippine Sea Plate since the early Neogene, and also influenced by the northwestern movement of the Philippine Sea Plate. There is wide discussion whether the dual-subduction and widespread seamounts in the South China Sea would have play important roles in the 'S-shaped' geometry and the different diving angle along the Manila Trench. Multi-beam tectono-geomorphological studies on the accretionary wedges have suggested that: (1) the stress direction of the subduction along the middle part of the Manila Trench, between 17o and 18 o N, is NW55 o; (2) The Manila Trench is actually caused by obduction due to the northwestern movement of the Philippine Sea Plate. Although the NW 55 o stress direction has been supported by detailed analysis on the trend of the folds, thrust faults, extension fractures and large sea-floor canyon, its obduction-origin is purely based on regional structure. Here we use 2D numerical modeling experiments to investigate the deformation style of accretionary wedge in response to the seamounts subduction and obduction, and provide new insights into the mechanism responsible for the Luzon obduction along the Manila Trench. Our preliminary results show that: (1) the accretionary wedge is eroded faster in subduction model; (2) the velocity field direction of the slab differs in two models at the beginning of seamount subduction, which is vertical in obduction model, but oblique in subduction model; (3) both sides of the accretionary wedge deform strongly in subduction model, whereas in obduction model only the leading edge shows intensive deformation. Further modelling will focus on other parts of the Manila Trench with different slab age and subduction velocity to see their tectonic influences on the accretionary wedges.

  10. Stress orientations in subduction zones and the strength of subduction megathrust faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L

    2015-09-11

    Subduction zone megathrust faults produce most of the world's largest earthquakes. Although the physical properties of these faults are difficult to observe directly, their frictional strength can be estimated indirectly by constraining the orientations of the stresses that act on them. A global investigation of stress orientations in subduction zones finds that the maximum compressive stress axis plunges systematically trenchward, consistently making an angle of 45° to 60° with respect to the subduction megathrust fault. These angles indicate that the megathrust fault is not substantially weaker than its surroundings. Together with several other lines of evidence, this implies that subduction zone megathrusts are weak faults in a low-stress environment. The deforming outer accretionary wedge may decouple the stress state along the megathrust from the constraints of the free surface. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Stress orientations in subduction zones and the strength of subduction megathrust faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Subduction zone megathrust faults produce most of the world’s largest earthquakes. Although the physical properties of these faults are difficult to observe directly, their frictional strength can be estimated indirectly by constraining the orientations of the stresses that act on them. A global investigation of stress orientations in subduction zones finds that the maximum compressive stress axis plunges systematically trenchward, consistently making a 45°-60° angle to the subduction megathrust fault. These angles indicate that the megathrust fault is not substantially weaker than its surroundings. Together with several other lines of evidence, this implies that subduction zone megathrusts are weak faults in a low-stress environment. The deforming outer accretionary wedge may decouple the stress state along the megathrust from the constraints of the free surface.

  12. Subduction and volatile recycling in Earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S. D.; Ita, J. J.; Staudigel, H.

    1994-01-01

    The subduction of water and other volatiles into the mantle from oceanic sediments and altered oceanic crust is the major source of volatile recycling in the mantle. Until now, the geotherms that have been used to estimate the amount of volatiles that are recycled at subduction zones have been produced using the hypothesis that the slab is rigid and undergoes no internal deformation. On the other hand, most fluid dynamical mantle flow calculations assume that the slab has no greater strength than the surrounding mantle. Both of these views are inconsistent with laboratory work on the deformation of mantle minerals at high pressures. We consider the effects of the strength of the slab using two-dimensional calculations of a slab-like thermal downwelling with an endothermic phase change. Because the rheology and composition of subducting slabs are uncertain, we consider a range of Clapeyron slopes which bound current laboratory estimates of the spinel to perovskite plus magnesiowustite phase transition and simple temperature-dependent rheologies based on an Arrhenius law diffusion mechanism. In uniform viscosity convection models, subducted material piles up above the phase change until the pile becomes gravitationally unstable and sinks into the lower mantle (the avalanche). Strong slabs moderate the 'catastrophic' effects of the instabilities seen in many constant-viscosity convection calculations; however, even in the strongest slabs we consider, there is some retardation of the slab descent due to the presence of the phase change.

  13. Earth's oldest mantle fabrics indicate Eoarchaean subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix; Reddy, Steven M; Nutman, Allen P; Friend, Clark R L; Bennett, Vickie C

    2016-02-16

    The extension of subduction processes into the Eoarchaean era (4.0-3.6 Ga) is controversial. The oldest reported terrestrial olivine, from two dunite lenses within the ∼3,720 Ma Isua supracrustal belt in Greenland, record a shape-preferred orientation of olivine crystals defining a weak foliation and a well-defined lattice-preferred orientation (LPO). [001] parallel to the maximum finite elongation direction and (010) perpendicular to the foliation plane define a B-type LPO. In the modern Earth such fabrics are associated with deformation of mantle rocks in the hanging wall of subduction systems; an interpretation supported by experiments. Here we show that the presence of B-type fabrics in the studied Isua dunites is consistent with a mantle origin and a supra-subduction mantle wedge setting, the latter supported by compositional data from nearby mafic rocks. Our results provide independent microstructural data consistent with the operation of Eoarchaean subduction and indicate that microstructural analyses of ancient ultramafic rocks provide a valuable record of Archaean geodynamics.

  14. Earthquake nucleation in weak subducted carbonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurzawski, Robert M.; Stipp, Michael; Niemeijer, André R.; Spiers, Chirstopher J.; Behrmann, Jan H.

    Ocean-floor carbonate- and clay-rich sediments form major inputs to subduction zones, especially at low-latitude convergent plate margins. Therefore, knowledge of their frictional behaviour is fundamental for understanding plate-boundary earthquakes. Here we report results of mechanical tests

  15. Global correlations between maximum magnitudes of subduction zone interface thrust earthquakes and physical parameters of subduction zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Rawlinson, N.

    2013-01-01

    The maximum earthquake magnitude recorded for subduction zone plate boundaries varies considerably on Earth, with some subduction zone segments producing giant subduction zone thrust earthquakes (e.g. Chile, Alaska, Sumatra-Andaman, Japan) and others producing relatively small earthquakes (e.g.

  16. Monitoring transient changes within overpressured regions of subduction zones using ambient seismic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Esteban J; Schwartz, Susan Y

    2016-01-01

    In subduction zones, elevated pore fluid pressure, generally linked to metamorphic dehydration reactions, has a profound influence on the mechanical behavior of the plate interface and forearc crust through its control on effective stress. We use seismic noise-based monitoring to characterize seismic velocity variations following the 2012 Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica earthquake [M w (moment magnitude) 7.6] that we attribute to the presence of pressurized pore fluids. Our study reveals a strong velocity reduction (~0.6%) in a region where previous work identified high forearc pore fluid pressure. The depth of this velocity reduction is constrained to be below 5 km and therefore not the result of near-surface damage due to strong ground motions; rather, we posit that it is caused by fracturing of the fluid-pressurized weakened crust due to dynamic stresses. Although pressurized fluids have been implicated in causing coseismic velocity reductions beneath the Japanese volcanic arc, this is the first report of a similar phenomenon in a subduction zone setting. It demonstrates the potential to identify pressurized fluids in subduction zones using temporal variations of seismic velocity inferred from ambient seismic noise correlations.

  17. Subduction zone earthquakes and stress in slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, M. S.; Hager, B. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simple viscous fluid models of subducting slabs are used to explain observations of the distribution of earthquakes as a function of depth and the orientation of stress axes of deep (greater than 300 km) and intermediate (70-300 km) earthquakes. Results suggest the following features in the distribution of earthquakes with depth: (1) an exponential decrease from shallow depths down to 250 to 300 km, (2) a minimum near 250 to 300 km, and (3) a deep peak below 300 km. Many shallow subducting slabs show only the first characteristic, while deeper extending regions tend to show all three features, with the deep peak varying in position and intensity. These data, combined with the results on the stress orientations of various-depth earthquakes, are consistent with the existence of a barrier of some sort at 670-km depth and a uniform viscosity mantle above this barrier.

  18. The hidden simplicity of subduction megathrust earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, M.-A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Heaton, T. H.

    2017-09-01

    The largest observed earthquakes occur on subduction interfaces and frequently cause widespread damage and loss of life. Understanding the rupture behavior of megathrust events is crucial for earthquake rupture physics, as well as for earthquake early-warning systems. However, the large variability in behavior between individual events seemingly defies a description with a simple unifying model. Here we use three source time function (STF) data sets for subduction zone earthquakes, with moment magnitude Mw ≥ 7, and show that such large ruptures share a typical universal behavior. The median STF is scalable between events with different sizes, grows linearly, and is nearly triangular. The deviations from the median behavior are multiplicative and Gaussian—that is, they are proportionally larger for larger events. Our observations suggest that earthquake magnitudes cannot be predicted from the characteristics of rupture onsets.

  19. Subduction related fluids fractionate Nb/Ta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salters, V. J.; Bizimis, M.; Sachi-Kocher, A.; Taylor, R.; Savov, I. P.; Stern, C. R.

    2009-12-01

    Key differences between the chemical composition of terrestrial materials and those of meteorites have led to the suggestion that a `hidden’ high Nb/Ta reservoir exists in the Earth’s mantle. In order to test this hypothesis we must identify the processes that can create such a reservoir. It has been suggested that during subduction Nb is more refractory then Ta resulting in low Nb/Ta in the subducted slab, which then serves as a reservoir for the high Nb/Ta. Here we report high precision HFSE data on products of the subduction processes thought to fractionate Nb from Ta: boninites (hydrous melting), adakites (slab melting), oceanic island arc basalts and supra subduction zone peridotites. We developed a new method for the high precision determination of Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf concentrations based on a modified version of standard addition. All analyses were performed on a single collector ICPMS (ELEMENT 1), using Y and Yb as internal standards to correct for instrumental drift during the unspiked -spiked sample sequence. Concentrations are calculated using a York- type regression that accounts for all measured and propagated errors. Long-term reproducibility (multiple dissolutions and multiple spike solutions) for the standards BHVO-1, BIR-1 AGV-1 and BCR-1 are better than 0.8% (1s) for Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf ratios. The advantages of this method compared to previous methods are fast throughput, no column chemistry and low blanks. While the Zr/Hf ratios in subduction-related volcanics and ocean island basalts vary by less than a factor of two, the Nb/Ta ratio varies by a factor of four. Most of the Nb/Ta variation is observed in subduction related rocks. Samples with the highest Nb/Ta ratio (up to 19.5) are adakites from the Austral Volcanic Zone (Andes) which are thought to represent eclogitic melts from subducted oceanic crust which was most likely dehydrated. The lowest Nb/Ta (5) was found in boninites from Chichi-Jima, Bonin Island. Samples from Chichi-Jima and from the

  20. Diverse melanges of an ancient subduction complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lash, G.G.

    1987-07-01

    Three lithologically and structurally diverse melanges occur within an early Paleozoic (Early-Middle Ordovician) subduction complex in the central Appalachian orogen. Type I melange, characterized by horizons of variably deformed sandstone and scaly mudstone that alternate with coherent sandstone-rich sequences, is interpreted to reflect accretion-related deformation of water-saturated trench deposits. Type II melange, composed of exotic radiolaria-bearing mudstone clasts in a scaly mudstone matrix, can be explained by remobilization and mixing of inner-trench slope sediments. Type III melange is a poorly sorted polymict assemblage of native lithology clasts in a scaly mudstone matrix. Evidence of forceful injection of matrix mud into clasts and inferred discordant contacts between melange and surrounding bedded deposits suggest that the type III melange formed from mud diapirism. The close association of these melanges points out the diversity of tectonic and sedimentary processes previously documented from modern convergent margins that may be reflected in older subduction complexes.

  1. O efeito da fragmentação florestal na composição e riqueza de árvores na região da Reserva Morro Grande (Planalto de Ibiúna, SP. The effect of the forest fragmentation in the composition and richness of trees in the region of the Morro Grande Reserve (Ibiúna plateau, SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Carlos BERNACCI

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Diversas modificações estruturais efuncionais têm sido indicadas como decorrência doprocesso de fragmentação das comunidades vegetais.Para avaliar alguns desses efeitos, foramcomparadas a composição e a riqueza arbóreaem diferentes áreas em duas paisagens do Planaltode Ibiúna (Cotia e Ibiúna, SP. As duas paisagenslocalizam-se sob condições abióticas similares,mas uma é predominantemente florestal (ReservaMorro Grande - 9.400 ha, onde foram estudadas6 áreas e outra agrícola (onde foram estudados21 fragmentos com ampla gama de tamanhos – 0,9 a275 ha. Utilizou-se o método de quadrantes paraindivíduos com Diâmetro à Altura do Peito 5 cm,sendo que o esforço amostral incluiu 2.400 indivíduosna Reserva e 5.000 indivíduos na paisagemfragmentada. Foram amostradas 362 espécies,pertencentes a 171 gêneros e 71 famílias, sendo asmais ricas Myrtaceae, Lauraceae, Fabaceae,Rubiaceae e Euphorbiaceae. Considerando-se oconjunto dos fragmentos foram observadasdiferenças na composição de espécies e menorriqueza. Nos fragmentos ocorreram mais indivíduose espécies anemocóricas e barocóricas e pioneirase secundárias iniciais. Inversamente, ocorrerammais indivíduos e espécies secundárias tardias eumbrófilas e zoocóricas na Reserva Morro Grande,destacando a importância desta área para amanutenção da biodiversidade regional. Apesardesses claros efeitos da fragmentação, algumasespécies ameaçadas de extinção, pouco conhecidasou mesmo inéditas para São Paulo, foramamostradas exclusivamente nos fragmentosflorestais, evidenciando a necessidade de incluirestes fragmentos remanescentes, da região sul doPlanalto Paulistano, em mecanismos de preservaçãoe promover a restauração florestal, para garantir amanutenção da biodiversidade regional.Several structural and functionalmodifications have been indicated as result ofthe process of fragmentation of the forestcommunities. To evaluate some of these effects,we compared

  2. Evidences for recent plume-induced subduction, microplates and localized lateral plate motions on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaille, Anne; Smrekar, Suzanne

    2017-04-01

    Using laboratory experiments and theoretical modeling, we recently showed that plumes could induce roll-back subduction around large coronae. When a hot plume rises under a brittle and visco-elasto-plastic skin/lithosphere, the latter undergoes a flexural deformation which puts it under tension. Radial cracks and rifting of the skin then develop, sometimes using pre-existing weaknesses. Plume material upwells through the cracks (because it is more buoyant) and spreads as a axisymmetric gravity current above the broken denser skin. The latter bends and sinks under the combined force of its own weight and that of the plume gravity current. However, due to the brittle character of the upper part of the experimental lithosphere, it cannot deform viscously to accomodate the sinking motions. Instead, the plate continues to tear, as a sheet of paper would do upon intrusion. Several slabs are therefore produced, associated with trenches localized along partial circles on the plume, and strong roll-back is always observed. Depending on the lithospheric strength, roll-back can continue and triggers a complete resurfacing, or it stops when the plume stops spreading. Two types of microplates are also observed. First, the upwelling plume material creates a set of new plates interior to the trench segments. These plates move rapidly and expand through time, but do not subduct.. In a few cases, we also observe additional microplates exterior to the trenches. This happens when the subducting plate contains preexisting heterogeneities (e.g. fractures) and the subducted slab is massive enough for slab pull to become efficient and induce horizontal plate motions. Scalings derived from the experiments suggest that Venus lithosphere is soft enough to undergo such a regime. And indeed, at least two candidates can be identified on Venus, where plume-induced subduction could have operated. (1) Artemis Coronae is the largest (2300 km across) coronae on Venus and is bounded over 270° of

  3. fracture criterion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fracture in metallic glasses. What are the connections between nano- and micro- mechanisms and toughness? Metallic glasses are schizophrenic in the fracture sense. PDF Create! 5 Trial www.nuance.com ...

  4. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arm bone), the scapula (shoulder blade) and the clavicle (collarbone) (Figure 1). The upper end of the humerus ... age. Most fractures in children occur in the clavicle bone. In adults, the most common fracture is ...

  5. Hand Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead to arthritis down the road. In addition, fractures in children occasionally affect future growth of that bone. Figure 1: Examples of fractures in fingers Figure 2: Examples of plates, pins ...

  6. Volcanism and Subduction: The Kamchatka Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, John; Gordeev, Evgenii; Izbekov, Pavel; Kasahara, Minoru; Lees, Jonathan

    The Kamchatka Peninsula and contiguous North Pacific Rim is among the most active regions in the world. Kamchatka itself contains 29 active volcanoes, 4 now in a state of semi-continuous eruption, and I has experienced 14 magnitude 7 or greater earthquakes since accurate recording began in 1962. At its heart is the uniquely acute subduction cusp where the Kamchatka and Aleutian Arcs and Emperor Seamount Chain meet. Volcanism and Subduction covers coupled magmatism and tectonics in this spectacular region, where the torn North Pacific slab dives into hot mantle. Senior Russian and American authors grapple with the dynamics of the cusp with perspectives from the west and east of it, respectively, while careful tephrostratigraphy yields a remarkably precise record of behavior of storied volcanoes such as Kliuchevskoi and Shiveluch. Towards the south, Japanese researchers elucidate subduction earthquake processes with unprecedented geodetic resolution. Looking eastward, new insights on caldera formation, monitoring, and magma ascent are presented for the Aleutians. This is one of the first books of its kind printed in the English language. Students and scientists beginning research in the region will find in this book a useful context and introduction to the region's scientific leaders. Others who wish to apply lessons learned in the North Pacific to their areas of interest will find the volume a valuable reference.

  7. Regional differences in subduction ground motions

    CERN Document Server

    Beauval, Céline; Abrahamson, N; Theodulidis, N; Delavaud, E; Rodriguez, L; Scherbaum, F; Haendel, A

    2012-01-01

    A few ground-motion prediction models have been published in the last years, for predicting ground motions produced by interface and intraslab earthquakes. When one must carry out a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis in a region including a subduction zone, GMPEs must be selected to feed a logic tree. In the present study, the aim is to identify which models provide the best fit to the dataset M6+, global or local models. The subduction regions considered are Japan, Taiwan, Central and South America, and Greece. Most of the data comes from the database built to develop the new BCHydro subduction global GMPE (Abrahamson et al., submitted). We show that this model is among best-fitting models in all cases, followed closely by Zhao et al. (2006), whereas the local Lin and Lee (2008) is well predicting the data in Taiwan and also in Greece. The Scherbaum et al. (2009) LLH method prove to be efficient in providing one number quantifying the overall fit, but additional analysis on the between-event and within-ev...

  8. Musica e metropoli. I flussi urbani del funk carioca tra i morro, l’asfalto e il largo di Rio de Janeiro - Music and metropolis. The urban flows of carioca funk among the morro, the asfalto and the largo in Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizia Tinti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 70’s, American funk and Miami Bass music genres have been incorporated into the soundscape of Rio de Janeiro. They crossed national boundaries and reached marginal areas of the metropolis – which I call “morro” (hills hosting the favelas – where they turned funk carioca. Along the 80’s and 90’s, this new Brazilian music genre has been subject to conflicting processes of commercialization and discrimination. Funk carioca has spread all the way to the city and in the mass media, but at the same time it has been stigmatized as a violent and dangerous borderline culture: it was reaching and endangering the “asphalt” – the way Carioca people refer to the flat areas inhabited by middle and upper social classes. From 2000 on, some social movements claimed acknowledgement of the music genre as a positive carioca feature and cultural expression, organizing funk parties (bailes funk in emblematic public places, such as Largo da Carioca. Considering funk carioca as a fluid which crossed international and national boundaries, this paper’s aim is to analyze the “urban flows” it has been drawing in the social and urban texture of Rio. It puts at stake the historical trajectory funk carioca outlined through the milieus of morro, asfalto and largo. Hence, the ethnographic and comparative description of bailes funk suggests that funk carioca has not undergone a straightforward trajectory, but a synchronic, fluid and dispersive diffusion: it finally reached the largo, but it is still present both on morro and asfalto, where bailes funk differ but still coexist.

  9. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  10. Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  11. Introduction to the structures and processes of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2017-09-01

    Subduction zones have been the focus of many studies since the advent of plate tectonics in 1960s. Workings within subduction zones beneath volcanic arcs have been of particular interest because they prime the source of arc magmas. The results from magmatic products have been used to decipher the structures and processes of subduction zones. In doing so, many progresses have been made on modern oceanic subduction zones, but less progresses on ancient oceanic subduction zones. On the other hand, continental subduction zones have been studied since findings of coesite in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal origin in 1980s. It turns out that high-pressure to ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks in collisional orogens provide a direct target to investigate the tectonism of subduction zones, whereas oceanic and continental arc volcanic rocks in accretionary orogens provide an indirect target to investigate the geochemistry of subduction zones. Nevertheless, metamorphic dehydration and partial melting at high-pressure to ultrahigh-pressure conditions are tectonically applicable to subduction zone processes at forearc to subarc depths, and crustal metasomatism is the physicochemical mechanism for geochemical transfer from the slab to the mantle in subduction channels. Taken together, these provide us with an excellent opportunity to find how the metamorphic, metasomatic and magmatic products are a function of the structures and processes in both oceanic and continental subduction zones. Because of the change in the thermal structures of subduction zones, different styles of metamorphism, metasomatism and magmatism are produced at convergent plate margins. In addition, juvenile and ancient crustal rocks have often suffered reworking in episodes independent of either accretionary or collisional orogeny, leading to continental rifting metamorphism and thus rifting orogeny for mountain building in intracontinental settings. This brings complexity to distinguish the syn-subduction

  12. Fantasmagorias e fantasmas em dois romances de Rui Mourão: Boca de Chafariz e Os demônios descem o morro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Silviano Brandão

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa dois romances de Rui Mourão, Boca de chafariz e Os demônios descem o morro, com uma base teórica de Walter Benjamin, através de seus conceitos sobre a história, a melancolia, o barroco mineiro, a fantasmagoria. Além de Benjamin, recorremos a algumas ideias pontuais de Luciano de Samósata sobre como escrever história, principalmente sua relação com a verdade e a ficção. Os conceitos dos dois autores teóricos, Benjamin e Luciano, tangenciam-se em alguns pontos e, segundo nosso ponto de vista, favorecem um diálogo, tanto no plano ficcional, como com o histórico, através de figuras de outros séculos, presentes como fantasmas, que também dialogam com nosso presente, tornando os romances polissêmicos, pelo jogo de vozes. O método de leitura é comparativo, já que se articulam valores de duas culturas, vários autores, apresentando revisões da história, sob o olhar contemporâneo.

  13. Great earthquakes hazard in slow subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaillou, B.; Gutscher, M.; Westbrook, G. K.

    2008-12-01

    Research on the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 2004 has challenged two popular paradigms; that the strongest subduction earthquakes strike in regions of rapid plate convergence and that rupture occurs primarily along the contact between the basement of the overriding plate and the downgoing plate. Subduction zones presenting similar structural and geodynamic characteristics (slow convergence and thick wedges of accreted sediment) may be capable of generating great megathrust earthquakes (M>8.5) despite an absence of thrust type earthquakes over the past 40 years. Existing deep seismic sounding data and hypocenters are used to constrain the geometry of several key slow subduction zones (Antilles, Hellenic, Sumatra). This geometry forms the basis for numerical modelling of fore-arc thermal structure, which is applied to calculate the estimated width of the seismogenic portion of the subduction fault plane. The margins with the thickest accretionary wedges are commonly found to have the widest (predicted) seismogenic zone. Furthermore, for these margins there exists a substantial (20-60 km wide) region above the up-dip limit for which the contribution to tsunami generation is poorly understood. As the rigidity (mu) of these high-porosity sediments is low, co-seismic slip here can be expected to be slow. Accordingly, the contribution to seismic moment will be low, but the contribution to tsunami generation may be very high. Indeed, recent seismological data from Nankai indicate very low frequency shallow-thrust earthquakes beneath this portion of the accretionary wedge, long-considered to be "aseismic". We propose that thick accumulations of sediment on the downgoing plate and the presence of a thick accretionary wedge can increase the maximum size of the potential rupture fault plane in two ways; 1) by thermally insulating the downgoing plate and thereby increasing the total downdip length of the fault which can rupture seismically and 2) by "smoothing out" the

  14. What's happening inside the subduction factory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penniston-Dorland, S. C.; Bebout, G. E.; Gorman, J. K.; Piccoli, P. M.; Walker, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Much research has focused on the inputs and outputs of the 'subduction factory,' however a variety of metamorphic processes occur within the subducting slab and at its interface with the mantle wedge that contribute to creating the mixed signals observed in arc magmas. Subduction-related metamorphic rocks from the Catalina Schist represent a range of metamorphic grades and provide a natural laboratory to investigate these processes. Hybrid rock types such as reaction zones or 'rinds' between mafic (crustal) and ultramafic (mantle) rocks have attracted recent interest since they have a different bulk chemistry and mineralogy compared to the original inputs to the subduction factory. Here we explore the mineralogical and geochemical differences between the metamorphic rocks, their reaction zones, and endmember subduction input lithologies over a range of metamorphic grades including lawsonite albite, lawsonite blueschist, and amphibolite facies (with peak T ranging from ~ 275 to ~ 750°C and peak P ranging up to ~1.1 GPa). The results shed light on chemical changes occurring within the subduction zone and the processes happening inside the 'subduction factory', including mass transfer of elements by both fluid infiltration and mechanical mixing. Elements commonly enriched in arc magmatic rocks, such as the LILE (e.g. Ba, K), are enriched in metamafic rocks at all metamorphic grades relative to likely MORB protoliths. These enrichments are interpreted as the product of metamorphic fluid infiltration. Many major- and trace-element concentrations in reaction rinds fall between those of metamafic blocks and surrounding ultramafic-rich mélange matrix (including TiO2, MgO, FeO, Al2O3, Zr, Ni and Cr). Spatial distributions of these elements within the rinds suggest that the intermediate concentrations may be due to mechanical mixing of crustal and mantle materials. Rind concentrations of the highly siderophile elements (HSE: including Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) as well as

  15. Velocities of Subducted Sediments and Continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, B. R.; van Keken, P. E.; Abers, G. A.; Seward, G.

    2009-12-01

    The growing capability to measure seismic velocities in subduction zones has led to unusual observations. For example, although most minerals have VP/ VS ratios around 1.77, ratios 1.8 have been observed. Here we explore the velocities of subducted sediments and continental crust from trench to sub-arc depths using two methods. (1) Mineralogy was calculated as a function of P & T for a range of subducted sediment compositions using Perple_X, and rock velocities were calculated using the methodology of Hacker & Abers [2004]. Calculated slab-top temperatures have 3 distinct depth intervals with different dP/dT gradients that are determined by how coupling between the slab and mantle wedge is modeled. These three depth intervals show concomitant changes in VP and VS: velocities initially increase with depth, then decrease beyond the modeled decoupling depth where induced flow in the wedge causes rapid heating, and increase again at depth. Subducted limestones, composed chiefly of aragonite, show monotonic increases in VP/ VS from 1.63 to 1.72. Cherts show large jumps in VP/ VS from 1.55-1.65 to 1.75 associated with the quartz-coesite transition. Terrigenous sediments dominated by quartz and mica show similar, but more-subdued, transitions from ~1.67 to 1.78. Pelagic sediments dominated by mica and clinopyroxene show near-monotonic increases in VP/ VS from 1.74 to 1.80. Subducted continental crust that is too dry to transform to high-pressure minerals has a VP/ VS ratio of 1.68-1.70. (2) Velocity anisotropy calculations were made for the same P-T dependent mineralogies using the Christoffel equation and crystal preferred orientations measured via electron-backscatter diffraction for typical constituent phases. The calculated velocity anisotropies range from 5-30%. For quartz-rich rocks, the calculated velocities show a distinct depth dependence because crystal slip systems and CPOs change with temperature. In such rocks, the fast VP direction varies from slab-normal at

  16. Extensive decarbonation of continuously hydrated subducting slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Burton, Mike; La Spina, Giuseppe; Macpherson, Colin G.

    2017-04-01

    CO2 release from subducting slabs is a key element of Earth's carbon cycle, consigning slab carbon either to mantle burial or recycling to the surface through arc volcanism, however, what controls subducted carbon's fate is poorly understood. Fluids mobilized by devolatilization of subducting slabs play a fundamental role in the melting of mantle wedges and in global geochemical cycles [1]. The effect of such fluids on decarbonation in subducting lithologies has been investigated recently [2-5], but several thermodynamic models [2-3], and experimental studies [6] suggest that carbon-bearing phases are stable at sub-arc depths (80-140 km; 2.6-4.5 GPa), implying that this carbon can be carried to mantle depths of >140 km. This is inconsistent with observations of voluminous CO2 release from arc volcanoes [7-10], located above slabs that are at 2.6-4.5 GPa pressure. The aim of this study is to re-evaluate the role of metamorphic decarbonation, showing if decarbonation reactions could be feasible at sub-arc depths combined with a continuous hydration scenario. We used the PerpleX software combined with a custom-designed algorithm to simulate a pervasive fluid infiltration characterized by "continuous hydration" combined with a distillation model, in which is possible to remove CO2 when decarbonation occurs, to obtain an open-system scenario. This is performed by repeatedly flushing the sediment with pure H2O at 0.5, 1.0 or 5 wt.% until no further decarbonation occurs. Here we show that continuous hydrated of sediment veneers on subducting slabs by H2O released from oceanic crust and serpentinised mantle lithosphere [11-13], produces extensive slab decarbonation over a narrow, sub-arc pressure range, even for low temperature subduction pathways. This explains the location of CO2-rich volcanism, quantitatively links the sedimentary composition of slab material to the degree of decarbonation and greatly increases estimates for the magnitude of carbon flux through the arc

  17. Constraining the hydration of the subducting Nazca plate beneath Northern Chile using subduction zone guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garth, Tom; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Guided wave dispersion is observed from earthquakes at 180-280 km depth recorded at stations in the fore-arc of Northern Chile, where the 44 Ma Nazca plate subducts beneath South America. Characteristic P-wave dispersion is observed at several stations in the Chilean fore-arc with high frequency energy (>5 Hz) arriving up to 3 s after low frequency (first motion dispersion observed at multiple stations, or the extended P-wave coda observed in arrivals from intermediate depth events within the Nazca plate. These signals can however be accurately accounted for if dipping low velocity fault zones are included within the subducting lithospheric mantle. A grid search over possible LVL and faults zone parameters (width, velocity contrast and separation distance) was carried out to constrain the best fitting model parameters. Our results imply that fault zone structures of 0.5-1.0 km thickness, and 5-10 km spacing, consistent with observations at the outer rise are present within the subducted slab at intermediate depths. We propose that these low velocity fault zone structures represent the hydrated structure within the lithospheric mantle. They may be formed initially by normal faults at the outer rise, which act as a pathway for fluids to penetrate the deeper slab due to the bending and unbending stresses within the subducting plate. Our observations suggest that the lithospheric mantle is 5-15% serpentinised, and therefore may transport approximately 13-42 Tg/Myr of water per meter of arc. The guided wave observations also suggest that a thin LVL (∼1 km thick) interpreted as un-eclogitised subducted oceanic crust persists to depths of at least 220 km. Comparison of the inferred seismic velocities with those predicted for various MORB assemblages suggest that this thin LVL may be accounted for by low velocity lawsonite-bearing assemblages, suggesting that some mineral-bound water within the oceanic crust may be transported well beyond the volcanic arc. While older

  18. Diapiric flow at subduction zones: a recipe for rapid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, P S; Kincaid, C

    2001-06-29

    Recent geochemical studies of uranium-thorium series disequilibrium in rocks from subduction zones require magmas to be transported through the mantle from just above the subducting slab to the surface in as little as approximately 30,000 years. We present a series of laboratory experiments that investigate the characteristic time scales and flow patterns of the diapiric upwelling model of subduction zone magmatism. Results indicate that the interaction between buoyantly upwelling diapirs and subduction-induced flow in the mantle creates a network of low-density, low-viscosity conduits through which buoyant flow is rapid, yielding transport times commensurate with those indicated by uranium-thorium studies.

  19. Hip fracture - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - ...

  20. Acetabular Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Correa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to her primary care physician (PCP with right hip pain after a mechanical fall. She did not lose consciousness or have any other traumatic injuries. She was unable to ambulate post-fall, so X-rays were ordered by her PCP. Her X-rays were concerning for a right acetabular fracture (see purple arrows, so the patient was referred to the emergency department where a computed tomography (CT scan was ordered. Significant findings: The non-contrast CT images show a minimally displaced comminuted fracture of the right acetabulum involving the acetabular roof, medial and anterior walls (red arrows, with associated obturator muscle hematoma (blue oval. Discussion: Acetabular fractures are quite rare. There are 37 pelvic fractures per 100,000 people in the United States annually, and only 10% of these involve the acetabulum. They occur more frequently in the elderly totaling an estimated 4,000 per year. High-energy trauma is the primary cause of acetabular fractures in younger individuals and these fractures are commonly associated with other fractures and pelvic ring disruptions. Fractures secondary to moderate or minimal trauma are increasingly of concern in patients of advanced age.1 Classification of acetabular fractures can be challenging. However, the approach can be simplified by remembering the three basic types of acetabular fractures (column, transverse, and wall and their corresponding radiologic views. First, column fractures should be evaluated with coronally oriented CT images. This type of fracture demonstrates a coronal fracture line running caudad to craniad, essentially breaking the acetabulum into two halves: a front half and a back half. Secondly, transverse fractures should be evaluated by sagittally oriented CT images. By definition, a transverse fracture separates the acetabulum into superior and inferior halves with the fracture line extending from anterior to posterior

  1. Imaging of the subducted Kyushu-Palau Ridge in the Hyuga-nada region, western Nankai Trough subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yojiro; Obana, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Nakanishi, Ayako; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2013-03-01

    We performed 3D seismic tomography of the Hyuga-nada region, western Nankai subduction zone, to investigate the relationship of the subducted part of Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR) to coseismic rupture propagation, seismicity, and shallow very low frequency earthquakes. Combining active-source and passive-source data recorded both onshore and offshore, we imaged the deep slab from near the trough axis to the coastal area. Our results show the subducted KPR as a low-velocity belt oriented NW-SE extending down the plate boundary to around 30 km depth. At this depth, we suggest that the subducted KPR detaches from the slab and becomes underplated on the overriding continental plate. As the coseismic slip areas of past large earthquakes do not extend into the subducted KPR, we suggest that it may inhibit rupture propagation. The interior of the subducted KPR shows active intraslab seismicity with a wide depth distribution. Shallow very low frequency earthquakes are continuously active above the location of the subducted KPR, whereas they are intermittent to the northeast of the subducted KPR. Thus, the subducted KPR appears to be an important factor in coseismic rupture propagation and seismic phenomena in this region.

  2. Ablative subduction - A two-sided alternative to the conventional subduction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Winston C.; O'Connell, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    The plausibility of a two-sided fluid-based model of lithospheric subduction that is based upon current views of lithospheric structure is examined. In this model the viscous lower lithosphere flows downward, and the brittle upper lithosphere deforms in passive response. This process is potentially double-sided, since it is found that even a buoyant plate can be dragged downward by a dense descending neighbor. Thus an apparent overriding plate may be worn away by a process of viscous ablation, with the rate of ablation a function of plate buoyancy. This process, called 'ablative subduction,' makes it possible to simply interpret observations concerning slab profiles, interplate seismicity, back arc tectonics, and complex processes such as double subduction and subduction polarity reversal. When experiments modeling the evolution of simple fluid 'slabs' are performed, slab profile is found to be strongly influenced by ablation in the overriding plate. When ablation is weak, as when a buoyant continent borders the trench, deformable slabs adopt shallow Andean-style profiles.

  3. The melting of subducted banded iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nathan; Schmidt, Max W.

    2017-10-01

    Banded iron formations (BIF) were common shelf and ocean basin sediments 3.5-1.8 Ga ago. To understand the fate of these dense rocks upon subduction, the melting relations of carbonated BIF were determined in Fe-Ca-(Mg)-Si-C-O2 at 950-1400 °C, 6 and 10 GPa, oxidizing (fO2 = hematite-magnetite, HM) and moderately reducing (fO2 ∼CO2-graphite/diamond, CCO) conditions. Solidus temperatures under oxidizing conditions are 950-1025 °C with H2O, and 1050-1150 °C anhydrous, but 250-175 °C higher at graphite saturation (values at 6-10 GPa). The combination of Fe3+ and carbonate leads to a strong melting depression. Solidus curves are steep with 17-20 °C/GPa. Near-solidus melts are ferro-carbonatites with ∼22 wt.% FeOtot, ∼48 wt% CO2 and 1-5 wt.% SiO2 at fO2 ∼ HM and ∼49 wt.% FeOtot, ∼20 wt% CO2 and 19-25 wt.% SiO2 at fO2 ∼ CCO . At elevated subduction geotherms, as likely for the Archean, C-bearing BIF could melt out all carbonate around 6 GPa. Fe-rich carbonatites would rise but stagnate gravitationally near the slab/mantle interface until they react with the mantle through Fe-Mg exchange and partial reduction. The latter would precipitate diamond and yield Fe- and C-rich mantle domains, yet, Fe-Mg is expected to diffusively re-equilibrate over Ga time scales. We propose that the oldest subduction derived diamonds stem from BIF derived melts.

  4. Subducting Plate Breakup by Plume-Lithosphere Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koptev, A.; Gerya, T.; Jolivet, L.; Leroy, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    We use a 3D high-resolution thermo-mechanical modeling to investigate the impact of active mantle plume on a subducting lithospheric plate. Initial model setup consists of an overriding continental lithosphere and subducting lithospheric plate including oceanic and continental lithosphere. A mantle plume thermal anomaly has been initially seeded at the bottom of the model box underneath the continental segment of subducting plate. Mantle plume impingement on lithospheric bottom leads to thinning of continental lithosphere and decompressional melting of both lithospheric and sublithospheric mantle along stretched trench-parallel zone. Further continental breakup is followed by opening of an oceanic basin separating a newly formed microcontinent from the main subducting continent. Despite continuous push applied at the boundary of subducting plate, plume-induced oceanic basin opens during several Myrs reaching several hundred kilometers wide. Cooling of the mantle plume and beginning of collision between the separated microcontinent and the overriding continental plate lead to gradual closure of newly formed oceanic basin that gets further involved into subduction and collision. The final stage sees continental subduction of main body of subducting plate and simultaneous tectonic exhumation of the upper crust of the subducted microcontinent. This scenario involving a plume-induced rifting of a microcontinent away from main body of subducted plate can be compared to the Mesozoic-Cenozoic development of the African plate characterized by the consecutive separation of the Apulian microcontinent and Arabian plate (in the Jurassic and the Neogene, respectively) during subduction of Neo-Tethys oceanic lithosphere beneath the Eurasian margin.

  5. Dynamics of interplate domain in subduction zones: influence of rheological parameters and subducting plate age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Arcay

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the subduction interplate domain are likely to affect not only the seismogenic potential of the subduction area but also the overall subduction process, as it influences its viability. Numerical simulations are performed to model the long-term equilibrium state of the subduction interplate when the diving lithosphere interacts with both the overriding plate and the surrounding convective mantle. The thermomechanical model combines a non-Newtonian viscous rheology and a pseudo-brittle rheology. Rock strength here depends on depth, temperature and stress, for both oceanic crust and mantle rocks. I study the evolution through time of, on one hand, the brittle-ductile transition (BDT depth, zBDT, and, on the other hand, of the kinematic decoupling depth, zdec, simulated along the subduction interplate. The results show that both a high friction and a low ductile strength at the asthenospheric wedge tip shallow zBDT. The influence of the weak material activation energy is of second order but not negligible. zBDT becomes dependent on the ductile strength increase with depth (activation volume if the BDT occurs at the interplate decoupling depth. Regarding the interplate decoupling depth, it is shallowed (1 significantly if mantle viscosity at asthenospheric wedge tip is low, (2 if the difference in mantle and interplate activation energy is weak, and (3 if the activation volume is increased. Very low friction coefficients and/or low asthenospheric viscosities promote zBDT = zdec. I then present how the subducting lithosphere age affects the brittle-ductile transition depth and the kinematic decoupling depth in this model. Simulations show that a rheological model in which the respective activation energies of mantle and interplate material are too close hinders the mechanical decoupling at the down-dip extent of the interplate

  6. Geochemical evidence for subduction in the early Archaean from quartz-carbonate-fuchsite mineralization, Isua Supracrustal Belt, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pope, Emily Catherine; Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Bird, Dennis K.

    of this metasomatic-tectonic relationship requires that 1) Phanerozoic orogenic Au-deposits form in subduction-zone environments, and 2) the geochemical similarity of Precambrian orogenic deposits to their younger counterparts is the result of having the same petrogenetic origin. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope...... compositions of fuchsite and quartz from auriferous mineralization in the ca. 3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt (ISB) in West Greenland, in conjunction with elevated concentrations of CO2, Cr, Al, K and silica relative to protolith assemblages, suggest that this mineralization shares a common petro-tectonic origin......, are the result of seawater-derived fluids liberated from subducting lithosphere interacting with ultramafic rocks in the mantle wedge and lower crust, before migrating up crustal-scale vertical fracture zones. Thus, the presence of quartz-carbonate-fuchsite mineralization in the Isua supracrustal belt and other...

  7. Taeniasis and cysticercosis prevalence in a small village from Northeastern Brazil Prevalência de teníase e sorologia positiva para cisticercose em Mulungu do Morro, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irenio Gomes

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Although not considered as an endemic region, the Northeast of Brazil has the necessary conditions for the development of taeniasis-cysticercosis complex. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that Mulungu do Morro municipality, in the State of Bahia, has a high seroprevalence to cysticercosis in epileptic patients. OBJECTIVE: to determine the prevalence of taeniasis and positive cysticercosis serology in the population of Mulungu do Morro. METHOD: blood and stool samples were collected from a random sampling of the population, by family. The identification of antibodies against T. solium cysticerci was made by EITB and T. solium antigens were identified using a polyclonal antibody-capture ELISA. RESULTS: the cysticercosis seroprevalence was 1.6% (C.I. = 0.8 to 2.8% and the taeniasis prevalence 4.5% (C.I. = 3.0 to 6.5%. Seropositivity to cysticercosis was higher among those who lived in a house of a person testing positive for coproantigen, p=0.017. CONCLUSION: our results demonstrate that the taeniasis-cysticercosis complex is endemic in Mulungu do Morro. We believe that all areas in the world with the same socio-economic and sanitary characteristics are likely to have high prevalence of this parasite.Embora alguns autores não a considerem uma região endêmica, existem no Nordeste do Brasil as condições necessárias para o desenvolvimento do complexo teníase/ cisticercose. Em uma publicação prévia demosntramos no município de Mulungu do Morro, Bahia, alta soroprevalência para cisticercose em pacientes epilépticos. OBJETIVO: determinar a prevalência de teníase e sorologia positiva para cisticercose na população de Mulungu do Morro. MÉTODO: foram coletadas amostras de sangue e fezes em 175 famílias definidas aleatoriamente. A identificação de anticorpos séricos anti-cisticerco foi feita através do método de EITB e a presença de teníase foi verificada através de ELISA de captura para identificação de antígenos do

  8. The geology of the Morro Velho gold deposit in the Archean Rio das Velhas greenstone belt, Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Diogenes Scipioni; DeWitt, Ed; Lobato, Lydia Maria; Thorman, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    The Morro Velho gold deposit, Quadrilátero Ferrífero region, Minas Gerais, Brazil, is hosted by rocks at the base of the Archean Rio das Velhas greenstone belt. The deposit occurs within a thick carbonaceous phyllite package, containing intercalations of felsic and intermediate volcaniclastic rocks and dolomites. Considering the temporal and spatial association of the deposit with the Rio das Velhas orogeny, and location in close proximity to a major NNW-trending fault zone, it can be classified as an orogenic gold deposit. Hydrothermal activity was characterized by intense enrichment in alteration zones of carbonates, sulfides, chlorite, white mica±biotite, albite and quartz, as described in other Archean lode-type gold ores. Two types of ore occur in the deposit: dark gray quartz veins and sulfide-rich gold orebodies. The sulfide-rich orebodies range from disseminated concentrations of sulfide minerals to massive sulfide bodies. The sulfide assemblage comprises (by volume), on average, 74% pyrrhotite, 17% arsenopyrite, 8% pyrite and 1% chalcopyrite. The orebodies have a long axis parallel to the local stretching lineation, with continuity down the plunge of fold axis for at least 4.8 km. The group of rocks hosting the Morro Velho gold mineralization is locally referred to as lapa seca. These were isoclinally folded and metamorphosed prior to gold mineralization. The lapa seca and the orebodies it hosts are distributed in five main tight folds related to F1 (the best examples are the X, Main and South orebodies, in level 25), which are disrupted by NE- to E-striking shear zones. Textural features indicate that the sulfide mineralization postdated regional peak metamorphism, and that the massive sulfide ore has subsequently been neither metamorphosed nor deformed. Lead isotope ratios indicate a model age of 2.82 ± 0.05 Ga for both sulfide and gold mineralization. The lapa seca are interpreted as the results of a pre-gold alteration process and may be

  9. Hip Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R; Kaufmann, Judith; Drahnak, Gwendolen

    Hip fractures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and a major health problem in the United States (). Eighty percent of hip fractures are experienced by 80-year-old women. Plain radiographs usually confirm the diagnosis, but if there is a high level of suspicion of an occult hip fracture, magnetic resonance imaging or bone scan is the next step to confirm the diagnosis. Areas of the hip bone have varied bone strength and blood supply, making the femoral neck one of the most vulnerable areas for fracture. A consultation to an orthopedic surgeon will determine surgical interventions.

  10. Hamate fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabia Condés, J M; Ibañez Martínez, L; Sánchez Carrasco, M A; Carrillo Julia, F J; Salmerón Martínez, E L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present our experience in the treatment of the fractures of the hamate and to make a review of the literature on this topic. We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients treated in our clinic between 2005-2012 suffering from fractures of the hamate. Six cases were fractures of the body and four were fractures of the hamate. Five cases were of associated injuries. Diagnostic delay ranged from 30 days to 2 years. Patient follow-up ranged from 1 to 10 years. Patient satisfaction was evaluated using the DASH questionnaire. Five patients with a fracture of the body underwent surgery, and one was treated conservatively. Two patients with fracture of the hook of the hamate were treated with immobilization, and two more patients had the fragment removed. The grip strength and the digital clip were reduced in 2 cases. Flexion and extension of the wrist was limited in 3 cases. The mobility of the fingers was normal in all the cases, except in one. The results obtained from the DASH questionnaire were normal in all the cases, except in one case of fracture of the hamate, and in two cases of fracture of the body. The surgical treatment should reduce the dislocation and stabilize the injuries with osteosynthesis. The fractures of the hamate are usually diagnosed late, and the most recommended treatment is removal of the fragment, although it cannot be deduced from this study. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Colles Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez León, Belisario; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Our expertise is the study of more than 2,000 cases of Colles' fractures. Colles name should in this case to synthesize the type of fractures of the lower end of the radius. There have been various proposed classifications according to the different fracture lines can be demonstrated radiologically in the region of the wrist. We believe that these ratings should only be retained if the concept of the articular fracture or not in the classical sense, since it has great value in the functional ...

  12. Noble gases recycled into the mantle through cold subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smye, Andrew J.; Jackson, Colin R. M.; Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Hesse, Marc A.; Parman, Steve W.; Shuster, David L.; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2017-08-01

    Subduction of hydrous and carbonated oceanic lithosphere replenishes the mantle volatile inventory. Substantial uncertainties exist on the magnitudes of the recycled volatile fluxes and it is unclear whether Earth surface reservoirs are undergoing net-loss or net-gain of H2O and CO2. Here, we use noble gases as tracers for deep volatile cycling. Specifically, we construct and apply a kinetic model to estimate the effect of subduction zone metamorphism on the elemental composition of noble gases in amphibole - a common constituent of altered oceanic crust. We show that progressive dehydration of the slab leads to the extraction of noble gases, linking noble gas recycling to H2O. Noble gases are strongly fractionated within hot subduction zones, whereas minimal fractionation occurs along colder subduction geotherms. In the context of our modelling, this implies that the mantle heavy noble gas inventory is dominated by the injection of noble gases through cold subduction zones. For cold subduction zones, we estimate a present-day bulk recycling efficiency, past the depth of amphibole breakdown, of 5-35% and 60-80% for 36Ar and H2O bound within oceanic crust, respectively. Given that hotter subduction dominates over geologic history, this result highlights the importance of cooler subduction zones in regassing the mantle and in affecting the modern volatile budget of Earth's interior.

  13. GPS Monitoring of Subduction Zone Deformation in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The subduction of the Cocos plate beneath Costa Rica is among the highest convergence rates in the world. The high subduction rate and nearness of the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica to the Middle America Trench (MAT) provide a unique opportunity to map variations in interseismic strain of the crust above the seismogenic zone in response to variations in seismic coupling.

  14. The subduction dichotomy of strong plates and weak slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Robert I.; Stegman, Dave R.; Tackley, Paul J.

    2017-03-01

    A key element of plate tectonics on Earth is that the lithosphere is subducting into the mantle. Subduction results from forces that bend and pull the lithosphere into the interior of the Earth. Once subducted, lithospheric slabs are further modified by dynamic forces in the mantle, and their sinking is inhibited by the increase in viscosity of the lower mantle. These forces are resisted by the material strength of the lithosphere. Using geodynamic models, we investigate several subduction models, wherein we control material strength by setting a maximum viscosity for the surface plates and the subducted slabs independently. We find that models characterized by a dichotomy of lithosphere strengths produce a spectrum of results that are comparable to interpretations of observations of subduction on Earth. These models have strong lithospheric plates at the surface, which promotes Earth-like single-sided subduction. At the same time, these models have weakened lithospheric subducted slabs which can more easily bend to either lie flat or fold into a slab pile atop the lower mantle, reproducing the spectrum of slab morphologies that have been interpreted from images of seismic tomography.

  15. Slab detachment of subducted Indo-Australian plate beneath Sunda ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007). We investigate the northward subduction of the. Indo-Australian plate along the eastern Sunda arc right from northwestern Sumatra, along Java to. Keywords. Slab detachment; subduction zone; Sunda arc; Indo-Australian slab; trench migration. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 120, No. 2, April 2011, pp. 193–204 c Indian Academy ...

  16. Matéria orgânica de horizontes superficiais em topolitossequências em ambiente de Mar de Morros, Pinheiral, RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Fontana

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi quantificar o carbono orgânico e as frações húmicas de horizontes superficiais de perfis de solo em três topolitossequências no ambiente de Mar de Morros, no município de Pinheiral, RJ. Foram selecionadas as topolitossequências: T1 (basalto, T2 (muscovita-biotita-gnaisse e T3 (gabro. Os horizontes superficiais de 14 perfis de solo, sob cobertura de pastagem (T1 e T3 e pastagem mista não manejada e leguminosa (pasto sujo/capoeira (T2, foram descritos e coletados para análises químicas, físicas e do teor de carbono nas frações húmicas. Os teores de carbono orgânico variaram de acordo com o material de origem e decrescem na seguinte ordem: T3 > T1 > T2. Os teores de carbono orgânico aumentam do topo para a várzea na T1, ocorrendo o inverso na T3 e sem um padrão definido na T2. A fração humina predominou em todos os perfis de solo das topolitossequências e foi seguida pela fração ácidos fúlvicos na T1 e de forma equitativa entre as frações ácidos fúlvicos e ácidos húmicos na T2 e T3. Considerando o ambiente similar em termos da vegetação original e o uso agrícola, as mudanças no carbono do solo e nas frações húmicas podem refletir as interações com os componentes minerais e processos pedogenéticos, influenciados pelo material de origem e o relevo.

  17. Resiliência e reconhecimento em neocomunidades: o caso da comunidade quilombola morro de São João (TO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Pizzio da Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-1384.2016v13n3p1 O cenário atual, caracterizado pelas transformações sociais e econômicas impostas pela globalização, tem produzido novos condicionamentos sociais, impactando diretamente as comunidades tradicionais e ampliando a vulnerabilidade. Cada comunidade apresenta maior ou menor capacidade de superação das adversidades. Aquelas que conseguem superá-las e ainda e se fortalecerem são consideradas pelos estudiosos como resilientes. O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar o resultado de uma investigação realizada na comunidade quilombola Morro de São João, no Estado do Tocantins, em que se analisaram sua capacidade de resiliência e os fatores que possibilitam essa condição. A pesquisa desenvolvida possui natureza quanti-qualitativa e foi realizada por meio de um estudo de caso, utilizando como técnicas de coleta de dados a entrevista não estruturada, a observação participante, pesquisa documental, questionário e história de vida, que ocorreram durante as viagens ao campo, ocasião que permitiu também a participação nas cerimônias e nos festejos da comunidade. Os principais conceitos utilizados na análise teórica foram resiliência, neocomunidades, reconhecimento e cultura como recurso. A análise demonstrou que a comunidade possui capacidade de superação das adversidades, e o reconhecimento da identidade cultural constitui um fator de promoção da resiliência.

  18. The Run-Up of Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, S.; Bravo, F. J.; Fuentes, M.; Matias, M.; Medina, M.

    2016-12-01

    Large earthquakes in subduction zones are liable to produce tsunamis that can cause destruction and fatalities. The Run-up is a geophysical parameter that quantifies damage and if critical facilities or population are exposed to. Here we use the coupling for certain subduction regions measured by different techniques (Potency and GPS observations) to define areas where large earthquakes can occur. Taking the slab 1.0 from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), we can define the geometry of the area including its tsunamigenic potential. By using stochastic earthquakes sources for each area with its maximum tsunamigenic potential, we calculate the numerical and analytical run-up for each case. Then, we perform a statistical analysis and calculate the envelope for both methods. Furthermore, we build an index of risk using: the closest slope to the shore in a piecewise linear approach (last slopecriteria) and the outputsfrom tsunami modeling. Results show that there are areas prone to produce higher run-up than others based on the size of the earthquake, geometrical constraints of the source, tectonic setting and the coast last slope. Based on these results, there are zones that have low risk index which can define escape routes or secure coastal areas for tsunami early warning, urban and planning purposes when detailed data is available.

  19. Tectonics and volcanism of Eastern Aphrodite Terra: No subduction, no spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Vicki L.; Keep, Myra; Herrick, Robert R.; Phillips, Roger J.

    1992-01-01

    Eastern Aphrodite Terra is approximately equal in size to the western North American Cordillera, from Mexico to Alaska. Its size and unique landforms make it an important area for understanding the tectonics of Venus, yet models for its formation are diametrically opposed. This region is part of the Equatorial Highlands, which was proposed as a region of lithospheric thinning, isostatic uplift, and attendant volcanism. Eastern Aphrodite Terra is dominated by circular structures within which deformation and volcanism are intimately related. These structures are marked by radial and concentric fractures, and volcanic flows that emanate from a central vent, as well as from concentric fracture sets. Cross-cutting relations between flows and concentric fracture sets indicate that outer concentric fracture sets are younger than inner fracture sets. The circular structures are joined by regional northeast- to east-trending fractures that dominantly postdate formation of the circular structures. We propose that the circular structures 'grow' outward with time. Although these structures probably represent addition of crust to the lithosphere, they do not represent significant lithospheric spreading or convergence, and the region does not mark the boundary between two distinct tectonic plates. This region is not easily explained by analogy with either terrestrial midocean rifts or subduction zones. It is perhaps best explained by upwelling of magma diapirs that blister the surface, but do not cause significant lithospheric spreading. Further study of the structural and volcanic evolution of this region using Magellan altimetry and SAR data should lead to better understanding of the tectonic evolution of this region.

  20. Middle Miocene near trench volcanism in northern Colombia: A record of slab tearing due to the simultaneous subduction of the Caribbean Plate under South and Central America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M.; Cardona, A.; Monsalve, G.; Yarce, J.; Montes, C.; Valencia, V.; Weber, M.; De La Parra, F.; Espitia, D.; López-Martínez, M.

    2013-08-01

    Field, geochemical, geochronological, biostratigraphical and sedimentary provenance results of basaltic and associated sediments northern Colombia reveal the existence of Middle Miocene (13-14 Ma) mafic volcanism within a continental margin setting usually considered as amagmatic. This basaltic volcanism is characterized by relatively high Al2O3 and Na2O values (>15%), a High-K calc-alkaline affinity, large ion lithophile enrichment and associated Nb, Ta and Ti negative anomalies which resemble High Al basalts formed by low degree of asthenospheric melting at shallow depths mixed with some additional slab input. The presence of pre-Cretaceous detrital zircons, tourmaline and rutile as well as biostratigraphic results suggest that the host sedimentary rocks were deposited in a platform setting within the South American margin. New results of P-wave residuals from northern Colombia reinforce the view of a Caribbean slab subducting under the South American margin. The absence of a mantle wedge, the upper plate setting, and proximity of this magmatism to the trench, together with geodynamic constraints suggest that the subducted Caribbean oceanic plate was fractured and a slab tear was formed within the oceanic plate. Oceanic plate fracturing is related to the splitting of the subducting Caribbean Plate due to simultaneous subduction under the Panama-Choco block and northwestern South America, and the fast overthrusting of the later onto the Caribbean oceanic plate.

  1. Viscous Dissipation and Criticality of Subducting Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Mike; Karato, Shun; Yuen, Dave

    2016-04-01

    Rheology of subducting lithosphere appears to be complicated. In the shallow part, deformation is largely accomodated by brittle failure, whereas at greater depth, at higher confining pressures, ductile creep is expected to control slab strength. The amount of viscous dissipation ΔQ during subduction at greater depth, as constrained by experimental rock mechanics, can be estimated on the basis of a simple bending moment equation [1,2] 2ɛ˙0(z) ∫ +h/2 2 M (z) = h ṡ -h/2 4μ(y,z)y dy , (1) for a complex multi-phase rheology in the mantle transition zone, including the effects of a metastable phase transition as well as the pressure, temperature, grain-size and stress dependency of the relevant creep mechanisms; μ is here the effective viscosity and ɛ˙0(z) is a (reference) strain rate. Numerical analysis shows that the maximum bending moment, Mcrit, that can be sustained by a slab is of the order of 1019 Nm per m according to Mcrit˜=σp ∗h2/4, where σp is the Peierl's stress limit of slab materials and h is the slab thickness. Near Mcrit, the amount of viscous dissipation grows strongly as a consequence of a lattice instability of mantle minerals (dislocation glide in olivine), suggesting that thermo-mechanical instabilities become prone to occur at places where a critical shear-heating rate is exceeded, see figure. This implies that the lithosphere behaves in such cases like a perfectly plastic solid [3]. Recently available detailed data related to deep seismicity [4,5] seems to provide support to our conclusion. It shows, e.g., that thermal shear instabilities, and not transformational faulting, is likely the dominating mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes at the bottom of the transition zone, in accordance with this suggested "deep criticality" model. These new findings are therefore briefly outlined and possible implications are discussed. References [1] Riedel, M. R., Karato, S., Yuen, D. A. Criticality of Subducting Slabs. University of Minnesota

  2. Aspectos florísticos e ecológicos da vegetação campestre do Morro da Polícia, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil Floristics and ecological aspects of a grassland vegetation on Morro da Polícia, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilsi Iob Boldrini

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a variação da composição florística da vegetação campestre e suas relações com altitude e exposição no Morro da Polícia, de origem granítica, em Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, a 30ºS e 51 ºW. O levantamento foi realizado de novembro de 1992 a novembro de 1994. A presença e freqüência de espécies foi avaliada usando o método de pontos sobre transecções em 19 unidades de vegetação, as quais foram delimitadas com base na exposição da encosta (N, S, L, O e altitude (160 a 280m. Os dados foram submetidos a análise multivariada de agrupamentos e ordenação. Nas transecções foram observadas 189 espécies, sendo Poaceae, Asteraceae e Apiaceae as famílias mais freqüentes e Trachypogon montufari e Schizachyrium tenerum as espécies dominantes. A análise de agrupamentos e de ordenação revelou conexões entre variação da vegetação e fatores altitude e exposição solar. Aristida laevis e Sorghastrum albescens são características de comunidades mais expostas à radiação solar, enquanto Agenium villosum e Eryngium eriophorum o são de comunidades menos expostas. Vernonia nudiflora e Axonopus suffultus caracterizam as áreas mais elevadas do morro, enquanto Eupatoriitm ligulifolium e Sorghastrum albescens as mais baixas.We studied floristic composition variation and its conections to elevation and exposure in the grassland vegetation of Morro da Polícia, a hill of granitic origin in the city of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, 30ºS e 51 ºW. The survey took place from November 1992 to November 1994. Species presence and frequency were assessed by using the point method on transects in 19 vegetation units, which were delimited by slope exposure and elevation (160 to 280m. Data were subjected to cluster analysis and ordination. Based on data from transects we detected 189 species, mainly from the Poaceae, Asteraceae and Apiaceae families, with Trachypogon montufari and Schizachyrium tenerum as dominant

  3. Manejo sustentable y comercialización de concha prieta en cautiverío en puerto El Morro (provincia del Guayas), para su exportación hacia españa

    OpenAIRE

    Rendon Yllescas, Mayra; Suarez Gomez, Elizabeth Vanessa; Mejia Coronel, Marco Tulio

    2009-01-01

    La disponibilidad de concha prieta en Ecuador se ha visto reducida durante las últimas dos décadas. Desde Esmeraldas hasta El Oro, el molusco representa el sustento de miles de familias. Pese a ello, los propios concheros advierten que el recurso está sobreexplotado. Un estudio del Instituto Nacional de Pesca (INP) indica que en el año 2004 se recolectaron algo más de 26 millones de conchas prietas en San Lorenzo y Muisne (Esmeraldas), El Morro, en Guayas, y en los puertos artesanales Jelí, B...

  4. Rochas Ricas em Turmalina da Formação Morro da Pedra Preta: Relações com os Turmalinitos Portadores de Ouro do Grupo Serra do Itaberaba, SP

    OpenAIRE

    Gianna Maria Garda; Paulo Beljavskis; Marcos de Souza Mansueto

    2006-01-01

    A turmalina é um mineral comum no Grupo Serra do Itaberaba, particularmente na Formação Morro da Pedra Preta.Dentre as rochas ricas em turmalina, destacam-se: turmalinitos, metatufos básicos, metavulcanoclásticas intermediárias aácidas, metapelitos e veios de quartzo. A presença de ouro disseminado em turmalinito do prospecto Tapera Grandeestimulou a investigação da relação entre os ambientes de formação dos turmalinitos e as mineralizações do Grupo Serra doItaberaba. A investigação é ampliad...

  5. Análisis de los parámetros geotécnicos y de infiltración del “Morro de basuras” del barrio Moravia en la ciudad de Medellín

    OpenAIRE

    Galeano Parra, Diego Iván

    2013-01-01

    Resumen: En este trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en ensayos de carga axial en micro pilotes, determinando su validez y confiabilidad a partir de la comparación de estos con los parámetros de resistencia reportados en la literatura técnica determinados en ensayos in situ en condiciones similares, obteniendo los parámetros de resistencia mecánica que gobiernan el comportamiento global del Morro de basuras, estableciendo un ángulo de fricción de 30° y una cohesión de 5 kPa. S...

  6. Mapping subduction interface coupling using magnetotellurics: Hikurangi margin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, W.; Caldwell, T. G.; Bannister, S.; Bertrand, E. A.; Ogawa, Y.; Bennie, S. L.; Ichihara, H.

    2017-09-01

    The observation of slow-slip, seismic tremor, and low-frequency earthquakes at subduction margins has provided new insight into the mechanisms by which stress accumulates between large subduction (megathrust) earthquakes. However, the relationship between the physical properties of the subduction interface and the nature of the controls on interplate seismic coupling is not fully understood. Using magnetotelluric data, we show in situ that an electrically resistive patch on the Hikurangi subduction interface corresponds with an area of increased coupling inferred from geodetic data. This resistive patch must reflect a decrease in the fluid or sediment content of the interface shear zone. Together, the magnetotelluric and geodetic data suggest that the frictional coupling of this part on the Hikurangi margin may be controlled by the interface fluid and sediment content: the resistive patch marking a fluid- and sediment-starved area with an increased density of small, seismogenic-asperities, and therefore a greater likelihood of subduction earthquake nucleation.

  7. Greenstick Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... small, "green" branch on a tree. Most greenstick fractures occur in children younger than 10 years of age. This type ... mistaken for sprains or bruises. More-severe greenstick fractures may cause an obvious ... your doctor if your child has persistent pain in an injured limb. Seek ...

  8. Seamount subduction at the North-Ecuadorian convergent margin: Effects on structures, inter-seismic coupling and seismogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaillou, Boris; Collot, Jean-Yves; Ribodetti, Alessandra; d'Acremont, Elia; Mahamat, Ammy-Adoum; Alvarado, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    At the North-Ecuadorian convergent margin (1°S-1.5°N), the subduction of the rough Nazca oceanic plate leads to tectonic erosion of the upper plate and complex seismogenic behavior of the megathrust. We used three selected pre-stack depth migrated, multi-channel seismic reflection lines collected during the SISTEUR cruise to investigate the margin structure and decipher the impact of the subducted Atacames seamounts on tectonic erosion, interseismic coupling, and seismogenesis in the region of the 1942 Mw7.8 earthquake. This dataset highlights a subducted ∼ 30 × 40 km, double-peak seamount that belongs to the Atacames seamount chain and that is associated with a deep morphologic re-entrant containing mass transport deposits. The seamount subduction uplifted the margin basement by ∼1.6 km and pervasively broke the margin by deep and intense reverse faulting ahead of the seamount, a process that is likely to weaken considerably the margin. In the seamount wake, the basement reverse fault system rotated counter-clockwise. This faulted basement is overlain with slope sediment sliding along listric normal faults that sole out onto the BSR. This superposition of deep tectonic contraction within the basement and shallow gravitational extension deformation within the sediment highlights the key role of gas hydrate on outer slope erosion. In addition to long-term regional basal erosion, the margin basement has thinned locally by an extra 0.8-1 km in response to the subduction of the Atacames seamount chain and hydrofracturing by overpressured fluids at the margin toe. This pervasively and deeply fractured margin segment is associated with a seismically quiet and GPS-modeled low interseismic coupling corridor that terminates downdip near the 1942 epicenter and locked zone. We suggest that the deeply buried double-peak Atacames seamount triggered the 1942 earthquake ahead of its leading flank. This result supports previous studies proposing that subducted seamounts

  9. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  10. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malleolar fracture; Tri-malleolar; Bi-malleolar; Distal tibia fracture; Distal fibula fracture; Malleolus fracture ... Some ankle fractures may require surgery when: The ends of the bone are out of line with each other (displaced). The ...

  11. Depositionary Margins: The Destruction and Renovation of Subduction Forearcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, P.; Morgan, J. P.; Silver, E. A.; Kluesner, J.

    2016-12-01

    A depositionary margin is a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  12. Fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Jones, Marci D; Ruth, John T; Benjamin, James B; Sheppard, Joseph E; Hunter, Tim B

    2003-01-01

    The basic goal of fracture fixation is to stabilize the fractured bone, to enable fast healing of the injured bone, and to return early mobility and full function of the injured extremity. Fractures can be treated conservatively or with external and internal fixation. Conservative fracture treatment consists of closed reduction to restore the bone alignment. Subsequent stabilization is then achieved with traction or external splinting by slings, splints, or casts. Braces are used to limit range of motion of a joint. External fixators provide fracture fixation based on the principle of splinting. There are three basic types of external fixators: standard uniplanar fixator, ring fixator, and hybrid fixator. The numerous devices used for internal fixation are roughly divided into a few major categories: wires, pins and screws, plates, and intramedullary nails or rods. Staples and clamps are also used occasionally for osteotomy or fracture fixation. Autogenous bone grafts, allografts, and bone graft substitutes are frequently used for the treatment of bone defects of various causes. For infected fractures as well as for treatment of bone infections, antibiotic beads are frequently used. Copyright RSNA, 2003

  13. Reaction-induced grain boundary cracking and anisotropic fluid flow during prograde devolatilization reactions within subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Muto, Jun; Okudaira, Takamoto

    2017-09-01

    Devolatilization reactions during prograde metamorphism are a key control on the fluid distribution within subduction zones. Garnets in Mn-rich quartz schist within the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt of Japan are characterized by skeletal structures containing abundant quartz inclusions. Each quartz inclusion was angular-shaped, and showed random crystallographic orientations, suggesting that these quartz inclusions were trapped via grain boundary cracking during garnet growth. Such skeletal garnet within the quartz schist formed related to decarbonation reactions with a positive total volume change (Δ V t > 0), whereas the euhedral garnet within the pelitic schists formed as a result of dehydration reaction with negative Δ V t values. Coupled hydrological-chemical-mechanical processes during metamorphic devolatilization reactions were investigated by a distinct element method (DEM) numerical simulation on a foliated rock that contained reactive minerals and non-reactive matrix minerals. Negative Δ V t reactions cause a decrease in fluid pressure and do not produce fractures within the matrix. In contrast, a fluid pressure increase by positive Δ V t reactions results in hydrofracturing of the matrix. This fracturing preferentially occurs along grain boundaries and causes episodic fluid pulses associated with the development of the fracture network. The precipitation of garnet within grain boundary fractures could explain the formation of the skeletal garnet. Our DEM model also suggests a strong influence of reaction-induced fracturing on anisotropic fluid flow, meaning that dominant fluid flow directions could easily change in response to changes in stress configuration and the magnitude of differential stress during prograde metamorphism within a subduction zone.

  14. Subducted oceanic relief locks the shallow megathrust in central Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collot, Jean-Yves; Sanclemente, Eddy; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Leprêtre, Angélique; Ribodetti, Alessandra; Jarrin, Paul; Chlieh, Mohamed; Graindorge, David; Charvis, Philippe

    2017-05-01

    Whether subducted oceanic reliefs such as seamounts promote seismic rupture or aseismic slip remains controversial. Here we use swath bathymetry, prestack depth-migrated multichannel seismic reflection lines, and wide-angle seismic data collected across the central Ecuador subduction segment to reveal a broad 55 km × 50 km, 1.5-2.0 km high, low height-to-width ratio, multipeaked, sediment-bare, shallow subducted oceanic relief. Owing to La Plata Island and the coastline being located, respectively, 35 km and 50-60 km from the trench, GPS measurements allow us to demonstrate that the subducted oceanic relief spatially correlates to a shallow, 80 km × 55 km locked interplate asperity within a dominantly creeping subduction segment. The oceanic relief geometrical anomaly together with its highly jagged topography, the absence of a subduction channel, and a stiff erosive oceanic margin are found to be long-term geological characteristics associated with the shallow locking of the megathrust. Although the size and level of locking observed at the subducted relief scale could produce an Mw >7+ event, no large earthquakes are known to have happened for several centuries. On the contrary, frequent slow slip events have been recorded since 2010 within the locked patch, and regular seismic swarms have occurred in this area during the last 40 years. These transient processes, together with the rough subducted oceanic topography, suggest that interplate friction might actually be heterogeneous within the locked patch. Additionally, we find that the subducted relief undergoes internal shearing and produces a permanent flexural bulge of the margin, which uplifted La Plata Island.

  15. 'Culture and memory of the Sto. Antonio do Morro Grande/MG Quilombola community' program - case study: environmental licensing progress for the Rio de Janeiro-Belo Horizonte Gas Pipeline (GASBEL II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismerio, Marcia [Pallos Environmental Consulting, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (United States); Bartolini, Marcia [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The 'Culture and Memory of the Sto. Antonio do Morro Grande Quilombola Community' Program was included in the environmental licensing process of the Rio de Janeiro-Minas Gerais gas pipeline ('GASBEL II'), as requested by the Palmares Cultural Foundation (Fundacao Cultural Palmares), which stipulates the elaboration and implementation of this program as a condition for obtaining the installation license. To develop the program and submit it to this institution, we used methodological procedures in the form of an anthropological social research, such as: interviews with the community's older or most active residents, and a preliminary recognition of the territory and the local culture; all in order to learn more about the community's history and current needs and to identify the remaining 'quilombolas' still living in the community. Analyzing the information raised the need for guided actions designed to rescue the community's cultural memory as an ethnic group and to contribute to its process of affirmation as a Traditional Rural 'Quilombola' Community. This led to the creation of the proposed 'Culture and Memory of the Sto. Antonio do Morro Grande Quilombola Community' Program, currently being developed for the Quilombola Community located in Ressaquinha, in the State of Minas Gerais. (author)

  16. ENFOQUES DA CRIAÇÃO DE UNIDADE DE CONSERVAÇÃO DA NATUREZA EM ZONA URBANA E A TRIBUTAÇÃO DESTA PROPRIEDADE: ESTUDO DE CASO DO MORRO DO OSSO EM PORTO ALEGRE, RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Lengler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Discorre-se sobre a restrição ao direito de propriedade quando da instituição de Unidade de Conservação integral em zona urbana coberta por vegetação nativa em morro. O objetivo é contrapor a função social frente a este direito, bem como a proteção econômico-ambiental que o instituto tributário do Imposto sobre a Propriedade Territorial Urbana poderia oferecer. Como estudo de caso tomou-se o Parque Natural do Morro do Osso, localizado na cidade de Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. Constatou-se que a desapropriação indireta, ocorrida com a criação do Parque, esvaziou o conteúdo econômico das grandes glebas atingidas, pois determinada em Lei e ainda não paga. A possibilidade de fixação de população indígena que reivindica a área nos termos do artigo 231 da Constituição Federal de 1988 sobrepõe-se ao zoneamento definido no Plano Diretor. Urge uma estratégia diferenciada de proteção, evitando que se legitime a criação de mais uma favela urbana.

  17. The initiation of subduction: criticality by addition of water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K; Yuen, D A; Branlund, J

    2001-10-19

    Subduction is a major process of plate tectonics; however, its initiation is not understood. We used high-resolution (less than 1 kilometer) finite-element models based on rheological data of the lithosphere to investigate the role played by water on initiating subduction. A solid-fluid thermomechanical instability is needed to drive a cold, stiff, and negatively buoyant lithosphere into the mantle. This instability can be triggered slowly by sedimentary loading over a time span of 100 million years. Our results indicate that subduction can proceed by a double feedback mechanism (thermoelastic and thermal-rheological) promoted by lubrication due to water.

  18. Deformation cycles of subduction earthquakes in a viscoelastic Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kelin; Hu, Yan; He, Jiangheng

    2012-04-18

    Subduction zones produce the largest earthquakes. Over the past two decades, space geodesy has revolutionized our view of crustal deformation between consecutive earthquakes. The short time span of modern measurements necessitates comparative studies of subduction zones that are at different stages of the deformation cycle. Piecing together geodetic 'snapshots' from different subduction zones leads to a unifying picture in which the deformation is controlled by both the short-term (years) and long-term (decades and centuries) viscous behaviour of the mantle. Traditional views based on elastic models, such as coseismic deformation being a mirror image of interseismic deformation, are being thoroughly revised.

  19. A record of spontaneous subduction initiation in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arculus, Richard J.; Ishizuka, Osamu; Bogus, Kara A.; Gurnis, Michael; Hickey-Vargas, Rosemary; Aljahdali, Mohammed H.; Bandini-Maeder, Alexandre N.; Barth, Andrew P.; Brandl, Philipp A.; Drab, Laureen; Do Monte Guerra, Rodrigo; Hamada, Morihisa; Jiang, Fuqing; Kanayama, Kyoko; Kender, Sev; Kusano, Yuki; Li, He; Loudin, Lorne C.; Maffione, Marco; Marsaglia, Kathleen M.; McCarthy, Anders; Meffre, Sebastién; Morris, Antony; Neuhaus, Martin; Savov, Ivan P.; Sena, Clara; Tepley, Frank J.; Van Der Land, Cees; Yogodzinski, Gene M.; Zhang, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of tectonic plate subduction into the mantle is poorly understood. If subduction is induced by the push of a distant mid-ocean ridge or subducted slab pull, we expect compression and uplift of the overriding plate. In contrast, spontaneous subduction initiation, driven by subsidence

  20. Three-dimensional dynamic laboratory models of subduction with an overriding plate and variable interplate rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, João C.; Schellart, Wouter P.; Cruden, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Subduction zones are complex 3-D features in which one tectonic plate sinks underneath another into the deep mantle. During subduction the overriding plate (OP) remains in physical contact with the subducting plate and stresses generated at the subduction zone interface and by mantle flowforce the

  1. Dehydration of subducting slow-spread oceanic lithosphere in the Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulatto, Michele; Laigle, Mireille; Galve, Audrey; Charvis, Philippe; Sapin, Martine; Bayrakci, Gaye; Evain, Mikael; Kopp, Heidrun

    2017-01-01

    Subducting slabs carry water into the mantle and are a major gateway in the global geochemical water cycle. Fluid transport and release can be constrained with seismological data. Here we use joint active-source/local-earthquake seismic tomography to derive unprecedented constraints on multi-stage fluid release from subducting slow-spread oceanic lithosphere. We image the low P-wave velocity crustal layer on the slab top and show that it disappears beneath 60–100 km depth, marking the depth of dehydration metamorphism and eclogitization. Clustering of seismicity at 120–160 km depth suggests that the slab’s mantle dehydrates beneath the volcanic arc, and may be the main source of fluids triggering arc magma generation. Lateral variations in seismic properties on the slab surface suggest that serpentinized peridotite exhumed in tectonized slow-spread crust near fracture zones may increase water transport to sub-arc depths. This results in heterogeneous water release and directly impacts earthquakes generation and mantle wedge dynamics. PMID:28691714

  2. Dehydration of subducting slow-spread oceanic lithosphere in the Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulatto, Michele; Laigle, Mireille; Galve, Audrey; Charvis, Philippe; Sapin, Martine; Bayrakci, Gaye; Evain, Mikael; Kopp, Heidrun

    2017-07-01

    Subducting slabs carry water into the mantle and are a major gateway in the global geochemical water cycle. Fluid transport and release can be constrained with seismological data. Here we use joint active-source/local-earthquake seismic tomography to derive unprecedented constraints on multi-stage fluid release from subducting slow-spread oceanic lithosphere. We image the low P-wave velocity crustal layer on the slab top and show that it disappears beneath 60-100 km depth, marking the depth of dehydration metamorphism and eclogitization. Clustering of seismicity at 120-160 km depth suggests that the slab's mantle dehydrates beneath the volcanic arc, and may be the main source of fluids triggering arc magma generation. Lateral variations in seismic properties on the slab surface suggest that serpentinized peridotite exhumed in tectonized slow-spread crust near fracture zones may increase water transport to sub-arc depths. This results in heterogeneous water release and directly impacts earthquakes generation and mantle wedge dynamics.

  3. Alteration and dehydration of subducting oceanic crust within subduction zones: implications for décollement step-down and plate-boundary seismogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Jun; Inoue, Sayako; Tanikawa, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Hamada, Yohei; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Kimura, Gaku

    2017-04-01

    The alteration and dehydration of predominantly basaltic subducting oceanic crustal material are thought to be important controls on the mechanical and hydrological properties of the seismogenic plate interface below accretionary prisms. This study focuses on pillow basalts exposed in an ancient accretionary complex within the Shimanto Belt of southwest Japan and provides new quantitative data that provide insight into clay mineral reactions and the associated dehydration of underthrust basalts. Whole-rock and clay-fraction X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that the progressive conversion of saponite to chlorite proceeds under an almost constant bulk-rock mineral assemblage. These clay mineral reactions may persist to deep crustal levels ( 320 °C), possibly contributing to the bulk dehydration of the basalt and supplying fluid to plate-boundary fault systems. This dehydration can also cause fluid pressurization at certain horizons within hydrous basalt sequences, eventually leading to fracturing and subsequent underplating of upper basement rock into the overriding accretionary prism. This dehydration-induced breakage of the basalt can explain variations in the thickness of accreted basalt fragments within accretionary prisms as well as the reported geochemical compositions of mineralized veins associated with exposed basalts in onland locations. This fracturing of intact basalt can also nucleate seismic rupturing that would subsequently propagate along seismogenic plate interfaces.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  5. Supracondylar Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Andrusaitis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 15-year-old male presented to the emergency department with right elbow pain after falling off a skateboard. The patient denied a decrease in strength or sensation but did endorse paresthesias to his hand. On exam, the patient had an obvious deformity of his right elbow with tenderness to palpation and decreased range of motion at the elbow. Sensation, motor function, and pulses were intact. Radiographic imaging was obtained. Significant findings: The pre-reduction films show a type III supracondylar fracture. There is complete displacement of the distal humerus anteriorly. Specific findings for supracondylar fracture include: a posterior fat pad (red arrow and a displaced anterior humeral line (yellow line.1 When no fracture is present, the anterior humeral line should intersect the middle third of the capitellum; in this X-ray, it does not intersect the capitellum at all. This X-ray demonstrates a normal radiocapitellar line (blue line that intersects the capitellum. The presence of a narrow anterior fat pad aka “sail sign” can be normal. Discussion: Supracondylar fractures of the humerus occur at the distal portion of the humerus without involving the growth plate.2 This is the second most common fracture in children overall. In children, it is the most common fracture of the elbow.3 This injury has a high risk of neurovascular compromise, such as compartment syndrome or ischemic contracture, and thus the clinician must perform immediate and frequent neurovascular assessments focusing on the distributions of the brachial artery in addition to the median, ulnar, and radial nerves.4 Hyperextension injuries that typically occur following a fall onto an outstretched arm are responsible for 95% of supracondylar fractures.1 A type I supracondylar fracture is non-displaced and can be treated with immobilization through a posterior splint and sling5 with close follow-up, type II is angulated but with an intact

  6. Subduction-stage P-T path of eclogite from the Sambagawa belt: Prophetic record for oceanic-ridge subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoya, M.; Uehara, S.; Wallis, S. R.; Enami, M.

    2003-12-01

    The Sambagawa belt in SW Japan is a subduction-type high-P/T metamorphic belt. Subduction-stage P-T paths of its constituent rocks are important because they directly constrain physical conditions of the EarthOs interior at the time exhumation of high-P/T metamorphic rocks became feasible. Although a few examples of subduction-stage P-T paths for the Sambagawa rocks have been recognized, these are limited to relatively low-pressure regions (~10 kbar). To augment these data the subduction-stage P-T path of the Kotsu glaucophane (Gln) eclogite is derived. The tectonic significance of the derived and previously determined P-T paths is further examined using a new thermal model. By using compositions of matrix minerals and rims of porphyroblastic garnet (Grt), the peak-T conditions of the Kotsu Gln eclogite have been estimated as ~20 kbar/ 600° C. However, the dP/dT of the P-T path leading to the peak-T conditions is unknown. Petrological studies focusing on inclusion minerals in Grt show: (1) albite is absent as inclusions within Grt; (2) acmite (Acm) component of cpx decreased during growth of Grt; (3) Tschermakite (Ts) component of amphibole decreased and Gln component increased during growth of Grt; and (4) Grt-Cpx thermometry shows a temperature increase during growth of Grt. Along with mineral textures observed in the matrix, the Gln-formation reaction can be determined as: 4Acm + 2Ts + 2quartz + H2O (R) 2Gln + 2epidote + hematite. P-T curve of this reaction always has a large positive dP/dT (>7.1 kbar/100 ?C) with the Gln stability field on the high-P/T side. To cross this reaction curve into the Gln stability field during a rise in temperature, the Kotsu eclogite must trace a very steep subduction-type P-T path. Compilation of previously obtained subduction-stage P-T paths for the Sambagawa rocks along with the P-T path of the Kotsu Gln eclogite shows that the series of subduction-stage P-T paths are not distributed on a straight line starting from the origin

  7. Subduction, back-arc spreading and global mantle flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, B. H.; Oconnell, R. J.; Raefsky, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the subducted lithosphere associated with Benioff zones provides the only direct evidence about the flow in the earth's interior associated with plate motions. It is the primary objective of the present investigation to study the relation between the orientation of subducting lithosphere and the flow patterns (both local and global) near subduction zones. Most of the calculations conducted are based on simple flow models for radially symmetric, Newtonian viscous spheres. The investigation is concerned with the possibility that a simple model of global mantle flow could account for some features of subduction zones. It is found that such a model can account for the orientation of the seismic zones, and, in addition, also for features related to back-arc spreading and perhaps the maximum earthquake size.

  8. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction

    OpenAIRE

    Hirauchi, Ken-ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite goug...

  9. Active and long-lived permanent forearc deformation driven by the subduction seismic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron Melo, Felipe Alejandro

    I have used geological, geophysical and engineering methods to explore mechanisms of upper plate, brittle deformation at active forearc regions. My dissertation particularly addresses the permanent deformation style experienced by the forearc following great subduction ruptures, such as the 2010 M w8.8 Maule, Chile and 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquakes. These events triggered large, shallow seismicity on upper plate normal faults above the rupture reaching Mw7.0. First I present new structural data from the Chilean Coastal Cordillera over the rupture zone of the Maule earthquake. The study area contains the Pichilemu normal fault, which produced the large crustal aftershocks of the megathrust event. Normal faults are the major neotectonic structural elements but reverse faults also exist. Crustal seismicity and GPS surface displacements show that the forearc experiences pulses of rapid coseismic extension, parallel to the heave of the megathrust, and slow interseismic, convergence-parallel shortening. These cycles, over geologic time, build the forearc structural grain, reactivating structures properly-oriented respect to the deformation field of each stage of the interplate cycle. Great subduction events may play a fundamental role in constructing the crustal architecture of extensional forearc regions. Static mechanical models of coseismic and interseismic upper plate deformation are used to explore for distinct features that could result from brittle fracturing over the two stages of the interplate cycle. I show that the semi-elliptical outline of the first-order normal faults along the Coastal Cordillera may define the location of a characteristic, long-lived megathrust segment. Finally, using data from the Global CMT catalog I analyzed the seismic behavior through time of forearc regions that have experienced great subduction ruptures >Mw7.7 worldwide. Between 61% and 83% of the cases where upper plate earthquakes exhibited periods of increased seismicity

  10. Evolution of the Archaean crust by delamination and shallow subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Stephen F; Buhre, Stephan; Jacob, Dorrit E

    2003-01-16

    The Archaean oceanic crust was probably thicker than present-day oceanic crust owing to higher heat flow and thus higher degrees of melting at mid-ocean ridges. These conditions would also have led to a different bulk composition of oceanic crust in the early Archaean, that would probably have consisted of magnesium-rich picrite (with variably differentiated portions made up of basalt, gabbro, ultramafic cumulates and picrite). It is unclear whether these differences would have influenced crustal subduction and recycling processes, as experiments that have investigated the metamorphic reactions that take place during subduction have to date considered only modern mid-ocean-ridge basalts. Here we present data from high-pressure experiments that show that metamorphism of ultramafic cumulates and picrites produces pyroxenites, which we infer would have delaminated and melted to produce basaltic rocks, rather than continental crust as has previously been thought. Instead, the formation of continental crust requires subduction and melting of garnet-amphibolite--formed only in the upper regions of oceanic crust--which is thought to have first occurred on a large scale during subduction in the late Archaean. We deduce from this that shallow subduction and recycling of oceanic crust took place in the early Archaean, and that this would have resulted in strong depletion of only a thin layer of the uppermost mantle. The misfit between geochemical depletion models and geophysical models for mantle convection (which include deep subduction) might therefore be explained by continuous deepening of this depleted layer through geological time.

  11. Impact-driven subduction on the Hadean Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, C.; Marchi, S.; Zhang, S.; Bottke, W.

    2017-10-01

    Impact cratering was a dominant geologic process in the early Solar System that probably played an active role in the crustal evolution of the young terrestrial planets. The Earth's interior during the Hadean, 4.56 to 4 billion years ago, may have been too hot to sustain plate tectonics. However, whether large impacts could have triggered tectonism on the early Earth remains unclear. Here we conduct global-scale tectonic simulations of the evolution of the Earth through the Hadean eon under variable impact fluxes. Our simulations show that the thermal anomalies produced by large impacts induce mantle upwellings that are capable of driving transient subduction events. Furthermore, we find that moderate-sized impacts can act as subduction triggers by causing localized lithospheric thinning and mantle upwelling, and modulate tectonic activity. In contrast to contemporary subduction, the simulated localized subduction events are relatively short-lived (less than 10 Myr) with relatively thin, weak plates. We suggest that resurgence in subduction activity induced by an increased impact flux between 4.1 and 4.0 billion years ago may explain the coincident increase in palaeointensity of the magnetic field. We further suggest that transient impact-driven subduction reconciles evidence from Hadean zircons for tectonic activity with other lines of evidence consistent with an Earth that was largely tectonically stagnant from the Hadean into the Archaean.

  12. Multiscale Architecture of a Subduction Complex and Insight into Large-scale Material Movement in Subduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, J.

    2014-12-01

    The >1000 km by >100 km Franciscan complex of California records >100 Ma of subduction history that terminated with conversion to a transform margin. It affords an ideal natural laboratory to study the rock record of subduction-interface and related processes exhumed from 10-70 km. The Franciscan comprises coherent and block-in-matrix (mélange) units forming a nappe stack that youngs structurally downward in accretion age, indicating progressive subduction accretion. Gaps in accretion ages indicate periods of non-accretion or subduction erosion. The Franciscan comprises siliciclastic trench fill rocks, with lesser volcanic and pelagic rocks and serpentinite derived from the downgoing plate, as well as serpentinite and felsic-intermediate igneous blocks derived as detritus from the upper plate. The Franciscan records subduction, accretion, and metamorphism (including HP), spanning an extended period of subduction, rather than a single event superimposed on pre-formed stratigraphy. Melanges (serpentinite and siliciclastic matrix) with exotic blocks, that include high-grade metamorphic blocks, and felsic-intermediate igneous blocks from the upper plate, are mostly/entirely of sedimentary origin, whereas block-in-matrix rocks formed by tectonism lack exotic blocks and comprise disrupted ocean plate stratigraphy. Mélanges with exotic blocks are interbedded with coherent sandstones. Many blocks-in-melange record two HP burial events followed by surface exposure, and some record three. Paleomegathrust horizons, separating nappes accreted at different times, appear restricted to narrow fault zones of structures, are accommodated by discrete faults or narrow shear zones, rather than by significant penetrative strain. Exhumation of Franciscan HP units, both coherent and mélange, was accommodated by significant extension of the overlying plate, and possibly extension within the subduction complex, with cross-sectional extrusion, and like subduction burial, took place at

  13. Gênese e classificação de solos numa topossequência no ambiente de mar de morros do médio Vale do Paraíba do Sul, RJ Soil genesis and classification in the environment "mar de morros" in the mid-valley of the river Paraiba do Sul, RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adailde do Carmo Santos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Solos tropicais são geralmente considerados altamente intemperizados, o que é atribuído às condições climáticas de altas temperaturas e precipitação pluvial. Entretanto, no ambiente de Mar de Morros, a intensidade dos processos pedogenéticos pode ser alterada pela remoção de material, em consequência do relevo movimentado, rejuvenescendo as superfícies. Este trabalho teve como objetivos caracterizar e classificar solos, formados a partir de muscovita-biotita gnaisse, em uma topossequência em Pinheiral (RJ. Os perfis localizam-se nos seguintes pontos da topossequência: (P1 topo de elevação, (P2 terço superior, (P3 terço médio, (P4 terço inferior e (P5 em área plana de várzea. Os perfis foram descritos, caracterizados e classificados segundo o Sistema Brasileiro de Classificação de Solos (SiBCS. As características edáficas que se destacaram foram: relação silte/argila; valor V %; valor T; ki; mineralogia da fração argila; e formas de Fe pedogênicas de alta cristalinidade (Fed. Ao longo da topossequência encontrou-se Cambissolo Háplico Tb distrófico típico no topo e no terço médio da topossequência. No terço superior foi identificado um Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico típico e, no terço inferior, um Argissolo Amarelo eutrófico típico. Já na área plana de várzea foi observado um Gleissolo Háplico Tb distrófico típico. O relevo e o material de origem gnáissico estratificado foram os principais fatores que alteram a pedogênese.Brazilian tropical soils are generally regarded as highly weathered, which is attributed to the climatic conditions (high temperatures and rainfall. However, in the "Mar de Morros" environment the intensity of pedogenic processes can be affected by the erosional removal of material, due to the hilly relief, which rejuvenates the surfaces. The objective of this study was to characterize and classify soil profiles in a toposequence developed from muscovite-biotite gneiss

  14. Hydraulic fracturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clampitt, R.L.

    1973-04-17

    A method of fracturing a subterranean porous formation penetrated by a well bore consists of injecting down the well and into the formation, at a pressure sufficient to fracture the formation, a fracturing fluid comprising an aqueous gel. This gel is composed of water to which there has been added: a water-thickening amount of a water-dispersible polymer selected from the group consisting of polyacrylamides and polymethacrylamides; crosslinked polyacrylamides and crosslinked polyacrylamides; polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid; polyacrylates; polymers of N-substituted acrylamides; copolymers of acrylamide with another ethylenically unsaturated monomer copolymerizable therewith; mixtures of the polymers; a water-soluble compound of a polyvalent metal which is capable of gelling the water when the valence of the metal is reduced to a lower valence state; and a water-soluble reducing agent. (31 claims)

  15. [Stress fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, M

    2016-07-01

    Bone stress injuries are due to repetitive mechanical overuse of the skeleton and occur as a result of microscopic lesions sustained when bone is subjected to repeated submaximal stress. Over time accumulation of such injuries can lead to bone failure and fractures. Stress-related bone injuries are relatively common among otherwise healthy persons who have recently started new or intensified forms of physical training activities. Stress injuries lead to typical findings on radiography, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and need to be discriminated from other conditions, in particular infections and neoplasms. Stress fractures must be differentiated from insufficiency fractures that occur in bones with reduced mechanical resistance or disturbed structure.

  16. Subduction initiation and Obduction: insights from analog models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agard, P.; Zuo, X.; Funiciello, F.; Bellahsen, N.; Faccenna, C.; Savva, D.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction initiation and obduction are two poorly constrained geodynamic processes which are interrelated in a number of natural settings. Subduction initiation can be viewed as the result of a regional-scale change in plate convergence partitioning between the set of existing subduction (and collision or obduction) zones worldwide. Intraoceanic subduction initiation may also ultimately lead to obduction of dense oceanic "ophiolites" atop light continental plates. A classic example is the short-lived Peri-Arabic obduction, which took place along thousands of km almost synchronously (within ~5-10 myr), from Turkey to Oman, while the subduction zone beneath Eurasia became temporarily jammed. We herein present analog models designed to study both processes and more specifically (1) subduction initiation through the partitioning of deformation between two convergent zones (a preexisting and a potential one) and, as a consequence, (2) the possible development of obduction, which has so far never been modeled. These models explore the mechanisms of subduction initiation and obduction and test various triggering hypotheses (i.e., plate acceleration, slab crossing the 660 km discontinuity, ridge subduction; Agard et al., 2007). The experimental setup comprises an upper mantle modelled as a low-viscosity transparent Newtonian glucose syrup filling a rigid Plexiglas tank and high-viscosity silicone plates. Convergence is simulated by pushing on a piston at one end of the model with plate tectonics like velocities (1-10 cm/yr) onto (i) a continental margin, (ii) a weakness zone with variable resistance and dip (W), (iii) an oceanic plate - with or without a spreading ridge, (iv) a subduction zone (S) dipping away from the piston and (v) an upper active continental margin, below which the oceanic plate is being subducted at the start of the experiment (as for the Oman case). Several configurations were tested over thirty-five parametric experiments. Special emphasis was

  17. Fracture Blisters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uebbing, Claire M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fracture blisters are a relatively uncommon complication of fractures in locations of the body, such as the ankle, wrist elbow and foot, where skin adheres tightly to bone with little subcutaneous fat cushioning. The blister that results resembles that of a second degree burn.These blisters significantly alter treatment, making it difficult to splint or cast and often overlying ideal surgical incision sites. Review of the literature reveals no consensus on management; however, most authors agree on early treatment prior to blister formation or delay until blister resolution before attempting surgical correction or stabilization. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1;131-133.

  18. The Geodynamics of Continental Lithosphere Entering a Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steedman, C. E.; Kaus, B. J.; Becker, T. W.; Okaya, D.; Wu, F. T.

    2006-12-01

    As deformation patterns resulting from subduction of a passive continental margin are insufficiently understood, here we perform 2-D numerical simulations to explore the effects of continental lithosphere entering a subduction zone. The model setup consists of a subduction zone in which the oceanic part of a passive continental margin initially subducts beneath an oceanic plate. A particle-based 2-D visco-elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical finite element code is employed to study the dynamics of the system. A novel new feature of the code is that the resolution of the model can be significantly increased in selected parts of the domain, which allows for self-consistent modelling of mantle-lithosphere interaction. In the present study this feature is employed to study how crustal scale deformation around the subduction zone is influenced by surface processes and by flow in the upper mantle. Using systematic 2-D numerical simulations, we explore the parameters that are dominant in controlling near- surface structures, both with regards to changes in topography over time, and subsurface features such as Moho undulations. The main parameters that have been varied are: the lithospheric density structure; the strength of the lower crust; the amounts of erosion; imposed pushing versus density-driven (slab-pull and ridge- push) convergence; the upper boundary condition (free surface versus free slip); rheology (non-Newtonian versus Newtonian, viscous, visco-elasto-plastic); and finally the effect of an imposed slab breakoff. In all cases we track surface uplift, subduction evolution and rock exhumation history. The results can be compared to evidence from areas such as Taiwan where continental subduction or convergence is thought to be happening. Preliminary results indicate that a low viscosity lower crust may contribute to crustal uplift.

  19. Subduction-driven recycling of continental margin lithosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A; Bezada, M J; Niu, F; Humphreys, E D; Palomeras, I; Thurner, S M; Masy, J; Schmitz, M; Gallart, J; Carbonell, R; Miller, M S

    2014-11-13

    Whereas subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere is one of the central themes of plate tectonics, the recycling of continental lithosphere appears to be far more complicated and less well understood. Delamination and convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we relate oceanic plate subduction to removal of adjacent continental lithosphere in certain plate tectonic settings. We have developed teleseismic body wave images from dense broadband seismic experiments that show higher than expected volumes of anomalously fast mantle associated with the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern South America and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region; the anomalies are under, and are aligned with, the continental margins at depths greater than 200 kilometres. Rayleigh wave analysis finds that the lithospheric mantle under the continental margins is significantly thinner than expected, and that thin lithosphere extends from the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones inland to the edges of nearby cratonic cores. Taking these data together, here we describe a process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone. Subducting oceanic plates can viscously entrain and remove the bottom of the continental thermal boundary layer lithosphere from adjacent continental margins. This drives surface tectonics and pre-conditions the margins for further deformation by creating topography along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This can lead to development of secondary downwellings under the continental interior, probably under both South America and the Gibraltar arc, and to delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around the Gibraltar arc. This process reconciles numerous, sometimes mutually exclusive, geodynamic models proposed to explain the complex oceanic-continental tectonics of these subduction zones.

  20. Deep electrical resistivity structure of Costa Rican Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worzewski, T.; Jegen, M.; Brasse, H.; Taylor, W.

    2009-04-01

    The water content and its distribution play an important role in the subduction process. Water is released from the subducting slab in a series of metamorphic reactions and the hydration of the mantle wedge may trigger the onset of melting, weakening and changes in the dynamics and thermal structure of subduction zones. However, the amount of water carried into the subduction zone and its distribution are not well constrained by existing data and are subject of vigorous current research in SFB574 (Volatiles and Fluids in Subduction Zones: Climate Feedback and Trigger Mechanisms for Natural Disasters). We will show numerical modeling studies which are used to determine the resolution and sensitivity of the MT response to fluids in the crust and subducting slab under the special condition of a coastal setting. In 2007-2008 we conducted a long-period magnetotelluric investigations in northwestern Costa Rica on- and offshore, where the Cocos Plate subducts beneath the Carribean plate. Eleven marine magnetotelluric Stations newly developed and constructed by IFM-GEOMAR and University of Kiel were deployed on the 200 km long marine extension of the profile for several months. We will present the data and its processing, as well as our attempts to eliminate motion induced noise observed on some stations on the cliffy shelf due to tidal waves hitting the shelf and trench parallel- and perpendicular currents. The marine profile was extended landwards by the Free University of Berlin over length of 160 kilometers with further 18 stations. We present preliminary modeling results of land data, which revealed interesting features, inter alia a possible image of fluid release from the downgoing slab in the forearc, as well as ongoing modeling of the combined on- and offshore data sets.

  1. Subduction zone decoupling/retreat modeling explains south Tibet (Xigaze) and other supra-subduction zone ophiolites and their UHP mineral phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jared P.; Beaumont, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The plate tectonic setting in which proto-ophiolite 'oceanic' lithosphere is created remains controversial with a number of environments suggested. Recent opinions tend to coalesce around supra-subduction zone (SSZ) forearc extension, with a popular conceptual model in which the proto-ophiolite forms during foundering of oceanic lithosphere at the time of spontaneous or induced onset of subduction. This mechanism is favored in intra-oceanic settings where the subducting lithosphere is old and the upper plate is young and thin. We investigate an alternative mechanism; namely, decoupling of the subducting oceanic lithosphere in the forearc of an active continental margin, followed by subduction zone (trench) retreat and creation of a forearc oceanic rift basin, containing proto-ophiolite lithosphere, between the continental margin and the retreating subduction zone. A template of 2D numerical model experiments examines the trade-off between strength of viscous coupling in the lithospheric subduction channel and net slab pull of the subducting lithosphere. Three tectonic styles are observed: 1) C, continuous subduction without forearc decoupling; 2) R, forearc decoupling followed by rapid subduction zone retreat; 3) B, breakoff of subducting lithosphere followed by re-initiation of subduction and in some cases, forearc decoupling (B-R). In one case (BA-B-R; where BA denotes backarc) subduction zone retreat follows backarc rifting. Subduction zone decoupling is analyzed using frictional-plastic yield theory and the Stefan solution for the separation of plates containing a viscous fluid. The numerical model results are used to explain the formation of Xigaze group ophiolites, southern Tibet, which formed in the Lhasa terrane forearc, likely following earlier subduction and not necessarily during subduction initiation. Either there was normal coupled subduction before subduction zone decoupling, or precursor slab breakoff, subduction re-initiation and then decoupling

  2. Sustentabilidade Socioeconômica de Sistemas Agrícolas de Pequena Produção na Comunidade de Morro Grande, Município de Santo Antonio de Leverger-MT

    OpenAIRE

    Valmir Parreira Matos; Carlos Alberto Moraes Passos; Carlo Ralph de Musis

    2011-01-01

    Este artigo tem por objetivo estudar a sustentabilidade socioeconômica da pequena produção na comunidade de Morro Grande, Município de Santo Antônio de Leverger - MT. Na análise de sustentabilidade estabeleceram-se 21 indicadores que permitissem caracterizar nas propriedades: o uso do solo, a infraestrutura disponível, os sistemas produtivos, o potencial de mão-de-obra e a produção de energia calórica. A análise estatística multivariada foi o método utilizado pare a análise de dados. O balanç...

  3. Subduction processes related to the Sea of Okhotsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabarinskaya, Ludmila P.; Sergeyeva, Nataliya

    2017-04-01

    It is obviously important to study a role of subduction processes in tectonic activity within the continental margins. They are marked by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunami and other natural disasters hazardous to the people,plants and animals that inhabit such regions. The northwest part of the Sea of Okhotsk including the northern part of Sakhalin Island and the Deryugin Basin is the area of the recent intensive tectonic movements. The geological and geophysical data have made it possible to construct the geodynamic model of a deep structure of a lithosphere for this region. This geodynamic model has confirmed the existence of the ophiolite complex in the region under consideration. It located between the North Sakhalin sedimentary basin and the Deryugin basin. The Deryugin basin was formed on the side of an ancient deep trench after subducting the Okhotsk Sea Plate under Sakhalin in the Late Cretaceous-Paleogene. The North Sakhalin Basin with oil and gas resources was formed on the side of back-arc basin at that time. Approximately in the Miocene period the subduction process, apparently, has stopped. The remains of the subduction zone in the form of ophiolite complex have been identified according to geological and geophysical data. On a surface the subduction zone is shown as deep faults stretched along Sakhalin.

  4. Highly oxidising fluids generated during serpentinite breakdown in subduction zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debret, B; Sverjensky, D A

    2017-09-04

    Subduction zones facilitate chemical exchanges between Earth's deep interior and volcanism that affects habitability of the surface environment. Lavas erupted at subduction zones are oxidized and release volatile species. These features may reflect a modification of the oxidation state of the sub-arc mantle by hydrous, oxidizing sulfate and/or carbonate-bearing fluids derived from subducting slabs. But the reason that the fluids are oxidizing has been unclear. Here we use theoretical chemical mass transfer calculations to predict the redox state of fluids generated during serpentinite dehydration. Specifically, the breakdown of antigorite to olivine, enstatite, and chlorite generates fluids with high oxygen fugacities, close to the hematite-magnetite buffer, that can contain significant amounts of sulfate. The migration of these fluids from the slab to the mantle wedge could therefore provide the oxidized source for the genesis of primary arc magmas that release gases to the atmosphere during volcanism. Our results also show that the evolution of oxygen fugacity in serpentinite during subduction is sensitive to the amount of sulfides and potentially metal alloys in bulk rock, possibly producing redox heterogeneities in subducting slabs.

  5. Fluid flux and melting reactions in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouilhol, Pierre; Magni, Valentina; van Hunen, Jeroen; Kaislaniemi, Lars

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the metamorphic reactions that occurs within the slab is a must to constrain subduction zone processes. Slab dehydration reactions ultimately permit the mantle wedge to melt, by lowering its solidus, thus forming arcs above descending slabs. Alternatively the slab crust may cross its solidus in warm hydrated slabs. Moreover, slab dehydration allows chemical fractionation to occur between residual phases and transferred fluid phase, giving arc magmas part of their typical subduction zone chemical characteristics. To better comprehend such complex thermo-chemical open system, we are using a numerical model that reproduces the thermo-mechanical behaviour of a subducting slab and computes the thermodynamic equilibrium paragenesis at each P-T-X conditions of the system. Hence we generate a "paragenetic map" of a subduction system, allowing us to track the fate of water during dehydration and subsequent re-hydration or melting reactions. Here we highlight the role of dehydration and re-hydration reactions occurring in the slab's igneous crust and mantle and the mantle wedge for different slab configuration hence presenting the evolution of a subduction paragenetic map for different regimes. We intend to show the key roles of a) antigorite and chlorite breakdown in the hydrated part of the slab mantle, b) amphibole and lawsonite in the slab crust, and c) the role of amphibole and chlorite in the mantle wedge. Our results show the crucial role of dehydration and re-hydration reactions on slab and mantle wedge melting potential.

  6. A model for the termination of the Ryukyu subduction zone against Taiwan: A junction of collision, subduction/separation, and subduction boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F.T.; Liang, W.-T.; Lee, J.-C.; Benz, H.; Villasenor, A.

    2009-01-01

    The NW moving Philippine Sea plate (PSP) collides with the Eurasian plate (EUP) in the vicinity of Taiwan, and at the same time, it subducts toward the north along SW Ryukyu. The Ryukyu subduction zone terminates against eastern Taiwan. While the Ryukyu Trench is a linear bathym??trie low about 100 km east of Taiwan, closer to Taiwan, it cannot be clearly identified bathymetrically owing to the deformation related to the collision, making the location of the intersection of the Ryukyu with Taiwan difficult to decipher. We propose a model for this complex of boundaries on the basis of seismicity and 3-D velocity structures. In this model the intersection is placed at the latitude of about 23.7??N, placing the northern part of the Coastal Range on EUP. As PSP gets deeper along the subduction zone it collides with EUP on the Taiwan side only where they are in direct contact. Thus, the Eurasian plate on the Taiwan side is being pushed and compressed by the NW moving Philippine Sea plate, at increasing depth toward the north. Offshore of northeastern Taiwan the wedge-shaped EUP on top of the Ryukyu subducting plate is connected to the EUP on the Ryukyu side and coupled to the NW moving PSP by friction at the plate interface. The two sides of the EUP above the western end of the subduction zone are not subjected to the same forces, and a difference in motions can be expected. The deformation of Taiwan as revealed by continuous GPS measurements, geodetic movement along the east coast of Taiwan, and the formation of the Hoping Basin can be understood in terms of the proposed model. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Prevenção à cegueira em crianças de 3 a 6 anos assistidas pelo programa de saúde da família (PSF do Morro do Alemão - Rio de Janeiro Blindness prevention on 3 to 6 years old children at a health family program assisted community in Morro do Alemão - Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Cardoso Jeveaux

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este trabalho visou fazer um levantamento da prevalência de ambliopia e fatores ambliopiogênicos em crianças com idade pré-escolar em áreas assistidas pelo Programa de Saúde da Família no Morro do Alemão-RJ. MÉTODOS: Crianças com idade entre 3 e 6 anos foram submetidas a exame de triagem visual. Os resultados positivos foram confirmados por exame oftalmológico realizado sob cicloplegia na própria unidade de saúde. Foram aplicados questionários semi-estruturados aos acompanhantes das crianças e aos membros de todas as equipes de saúde da unidade. RESULTADOS: De 559 crianças convocadas para triagem, 265 (47,4% compareceram e, destas, 127 (48% foram encaminhadas para exame oftalmológico completo. Tiveram o exame ocular normal 138 (52% das crianças examinadas pela triagem. Compareceram para exame especializado 81 (63,7% crianças. Destas, 9 (4,1% crianças tiveram diagnóstico de ambliopia. Quatro (1,8% por estrabismo, uma (0,46% por privação de estímulo, uma (0,46% por anisometropia e três (33,3% por erros refracionais isometrópicos. CONCLUSÃO: Os dados obtidos pela triagem seguida de exame ocular especializado executada na unidade de atenção primária à saúde (PSF do Morro do Alemão-RJ, mostraram que os exames de triagem realizados são relevantes para a detecção de ambliopia e fatores ambliopiogênicos e para a promoção da saúde ocular infantil.PURPOSE: The study objective is to determine the prevalence of amblyopia and amblyopiogenic factors in children from 3 to 6 years old at a health family program assisted community in Morro do Alemão-RJ. METHODS: A preschool children ocular evaluation cross sectional study will be submitted to an ophthalmic screening exam.The positive results were confirmed by oftalmologic examination under cicloplegia inside of the health centre. Were applied a semi-structure questionnaire to the health members of the health centre team and to all children accompanist. RESULTS

  8. Trench dynamics: Effects of dynamically migrating trench on subducting slab morphology and characteristics of subduction zones systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masaki

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of trench migration (retreat or advance) is crucial to characterizing the driving forces of Earth's tectonics plates, the origins of subducting slab morphologies in the deep mantle, and identifying the characteristics of subduction zones systems, which are among the fundamental issues of solid Earth science. A series of numerical simulations of mantle convection, focusing on plate subduction in a three-dimensional (3-D) regional spherical shell coordinate system, was performed to examine subduction zone characteristics, including geodynamic relationships among trench migration, back-arc stress, and slab morphology. The results show that a subducting slab tends to deflect around the base of the mantle transition zone and form a sub-horizontal slab because its front edge (its 'toe') is subject to resistance from the highly viscous lower mantle. As the sub-horizontal slab starts to penetrate into the lower mantle from its 'heel,' the toe of the slab is drawn into the lower mantle. The results for models with dynamically migrating trenches suggest that trench retreat is the dynamically self-consistent phenomenon in trench migration. The reason for this is that the strong lateral mantle flow that is generated as a sequence of events leading from corner flow at the subduction initiation to return flow of the formation of a sub-horizontal slab in the shallower part of mantle wedge produces the retreat of the subducting slab. In fact, a 'mantle suction force,' which is generated in the mantle wedge to fill space left by the retreating subducting plate, is enhanced by the subsequent trench retreat. Even when upwelling flow with significant positive buoyancy originates just above a mantle phase boundary at a depth of 410 km (as inferred from independent seismic tomographic, geodynamic, geochemical, and mineral physics), reaches the base of the overriding plate, and the overriding plate is slightly thinned, lithospheric stress tends to be

  9. Bimalleolar ankle fracture with proximal fibular fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colenbrander, R. J.; Struijs, P. A. A.; Ultee, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    A 56-year-old female patient suffered a bimalleolar ankle fracture with an additional proximal fibular fracture. This is an unusual fracture type, seldom reported in literature. It was operatively treated by open reduction and internal fixation of the lateral malleolar fracture. The proximal fibular

  10. Mapping fluids to subduction megathrust locking and slip behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffer, Demian M.

    2017-09-01

    In subduction zones, high fluid content and pore pressure are thought to promote aseismic creep, whereas well-drained conditions are thought to promote locking and failure in earthquakes. However, observations directly linking fluid content and seismic coupling remain elusive. Heise et al. (2017) use a magnetotelluric survey to image the electrical resistivity structure of the northern Hikurangi subduction thrust to 30 km depth, as an indicator of interconnected fluid content. The authors document a clear correlation between high resistivity and a distinct geodetically locked patch and between conductive areas and weak coupling. Their study, together with other recent geophysical investigations, provides new evidence for the role of fluids in governing subduction thrust locking.

  11. A Silent Slip Event on the Deeper Cascadia Subduction Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragert, Herb; Wang, Kelin; James, Thomas S.

    2001-05-01

    Continuous Global Positioning System sites in southwestern British Columbia, Canada, and northwestern Washington state, USA, have been moving landward as a result of the locked state of the Cascadia subduction fault offshore. In the summer of 1999, a cluster of seven sites briefly reversed their direction of motion. No seismicity was associated with this event. The sudden displacements are best explained by ~2 centimeters of aseismic slip over a 50-kilometer-by-300-kilometer area on the subduction interface downdip from the seismogenic zone, a rupture equivalent to an earthquake of moment magnitude 6.7. This provides evidence that slip of the hotter, plastic part of the subduction interface, and hence stress loading of the megathrust earthquake zone, can occur in discrete pulses.

  12. A silent slip event on the deeper Cascadia subduction interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragert, G; Wang, K; James, T S

    2001-05-25

    Continuous Global Positioning System sites in southwestern British Columbia, Canada, and northwestern Washington state, USA, have been moving landward as a result of the locked state of the Cascadia subduction fault offshore. In the summer of 1999, a cluster of seven sites briefly reversed their direction of motion. No seismicity was associated with this event. The sudden displacements are best explained by approximately 2 centimeters of aseismic slip over a 50-kilometer-by-300-kilometer area on the subduction interface downdip from the seismogenic zone, a rupture equivalent to an earthquake of moment magnitude 6.7. This provides evidence that slip of the hotter, plastic part of the subduction interface, and hence stress loading of the megathrust earthquake zone, can occur in discrete pulses.

  13. Friction and stress coupling on the subduction interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, E.; Lavier, L.; van Avendonk, H.

    2011-12-01

    At a subduction zone, the down-going oceanic plate slides underneath the overriding plate. The frictional resistance to the relative motion between the plates generates great earthquakes along the subduction interface, which can cause tremendous damage in the civil life and property. There is a strong incentive to understand the frictional strength of the subduction interface. One fundamental question of mechanics of subuction is the degree of coupling between the plates, which is linked to the size of earthquakes. It has been noted that the trench-parallel (along-strike) gravity variation correlates positively with the trench-parallel topography anomaly and negatively with the activity of great earthquake (Song and Simons, 2003). Regions with a negative trench-parallel gravity anomaly are more likely to have great earthquakes. The interpretation of such correlation is that strong coupling along subduction interface will drag down the for-arc region of the overriding plate, which generates the gravity and topography anomalies, and could store more strain energy to be released during a great earthquake. We developed a 2D numerical thermo-mechanical code for modeling subduction. The numerical method is based on an explicit finite element method similar to the Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua (FLAC) technique. The constitutive law is visco-elasti-plastic with strain weakening. The cohesion and friction angle are reduced with increasing plastic strain after yielding. To track different petrologic phases, Lagrangian particles are distributed in the domain. Basalt-eclogite, sediment-schist and peridotite-serpentinite phase changes are included in the model. Our numerical models show that the degree of coupling negatively correlates with the coefficient of friction. In the low friction case, the subduction interface has very shallow dipping angle, which helps to elastically couple the downing plate with the overriding plate. The topography and gravity anomalies of the

  14. Splay fault branching along the Nankai subduction zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Oh; Tsuru, Tetsuro; Kodaira, Shuichi; Cummins, Phil R; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2002-08-16

    Seismic reflection profiles reveal steeply landward-dipping splay faults in the rupture area of the magnitude (M) 8.1 Tonankai earthquake in the Nankai subduction zone. These splay faults branch upward from the plate-boundary interface (that is, the subduction zone) at a depth of approximately 10 kilometers, approximately 50 to 55 kilometers landward of the trough axis, breaking through the upper crustal plate. Slip on the active splay fault may be an important mechanism that accommodates the elastic strain caused by relative plate motion.

  15. Bulk rheology and simulated episodic tremor and slip within a numerically-modeled block-dominated subduction melange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, S.; Ellis, S. M.; Fagereng, A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of melange rheology in a subduction thrust interface on stress and slip cycling constrained by observations from an exhumed subduction complex at Chrystalls Beach, New Zealand. A two-phase mélange dominated by large, competent brittle-viscous blocks surrounded by a weak non-linear viscous matrix is numerically modeled, and the evolution of bulk stress are analysed as the domain deforms. The models produce stress cycling behaviour under constant shear strain rate boundary conditions for a wide range of physical conditions that roughly corresponds to depths and strain rates calculated for instrumentally observed episodic tremor and slip (ETS) in presently-deforming subduction thrust interfaces. Stress cycling is accompanied by mixed brittle plastic-viscous deformation, and occurs as a consequence of geometric reorganisation and the progressive development and breakdown of stress bridges as blocks mutually obstruct one another. We argue that periods of low differential stress correspond to periods of rapid mixed-mode deformation and ETS. Stress cycling episodicities are a function of shear strain rate and pressure/temperature conditions at depth. The time period of stress cycling is principally controlled by the geometry (block distribution and density through time) and stress cycling amplitudes are controlled by effective stress. The duration of stress cycling events in the models (months-years) and rapid strain rates are comparable to instrumentally observed ETS. Shear strain rates are 1 - 2 orders of magnitude slower between stress cycling events, suggesting episodic return times within a single model domain are long duration (> centennial timescales), assuming constant flow stress. Finally, we derive a bulk viscous flow law for block dominated subduction mélanges for conditions 300 - 500°C and elevated pore fluid pressures. Bulk flow laws calculated for block-dominated subduction mélanges are non-linear, owing to a combination of

  16. Topographic and sedimentary features in the Yap subduction zone and their implications for the Caroline Ridge subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhengyi; Bai, Yongliang; Fan, Jianke; Zhang, Guangxu

    2018-01-01

    The Yap subduction zone in the western Pacific presents some unique features compared to normal intra-oceanic subduction zones such as the subduction of an oceanic plateau. However, due to the relative paucity of geophysical data, the detailed structure remains unknown in this area. In this study, we present the latest high-quality swath bathymetry and multi-channel seismic data acquired synchronously in 2015 across the Yap subduction zone. The topographic and sedimentary features are intensively investigated and a modified evolutionary model of the Yap subduction zone is proposed. The two-stage evolution of the Parece Vela Basin (PVB) produced fabrics that are N-S trending and NW-SE trending. Our seismic data clearly reveal landslide deposits at the upper slope break of the forearc, to the north of the Yap Island, which was identified as the fault notch denoting a lithological boundary in previous work. The swath bathymetry and seismic profile reveal detailed horst and graben structures, including a crescent-shaped fault zone near the contact between the Yap Trench and the Caroline Ridge. A simple geometric model is proposed to explain the structure formation, indicating that the higher topography of the Caroline Ridge resulted in enhanced bending-related extension. A seismic angular unconformity (named R1) is identified in the Sorol Trough, marking the onset of rifting in the trough. Based on the sequence thickness and deposition rate by Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP), it is deduced that the Sorol Trough formed at 10 Ma or even earlier. A modified model for the Yap subduction zone evolution is proposed, incorporating three major tectonic events: the proto-Yap Arc rupture in the Oligocene, the collision of the Caroline Ridge and the Yap Trench in the late Oligocene or middle Miocene, and the onset of the Sorol Trough rifting in the late Miocene.

  17. Plume-subduction interaction in southern Central America: Mantle upwelling and slab melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, Esteban; Hoernle, Kaj; Carr, Michael J.; Herzberg, Claude; Saginor, Ian; den Bogaard, Paul van; Hauff, Folkmar; Feigenson, Mark; Swisher, Carl

    2011-01-01

    The volcanic front in southern Central America is well known for its Galapagos OIB-like geochemical signature. A comprehensive set of geochemical, isotopic and geochronological data collected on volumetrically minor alkaline basalts and adakites were used to better constrain the mantle and subduction magma components and to test the different models that explain this OIB signature in an arc setting. We report a migration of back-arc alkaline volcanism towards the northwest, consistent with arc-parallel mantle flow models, and a migration towards the southeast in the adakites possibly tracking the eastward movement of the triple junction where the Panama Fracture Zone intersects the Middle America Trench. The adakites major and trace element compositions are consistent with magmas produced by melting a mantle-wedge source metasomatized by slab derived melts. The alkaline magmas are restricted to areas that have no seismic evidence of a subducting slab. The geochemical signature of the alkaline magmas is mostly controlled by upwelling asthenosphere with minor contributions from subduction components. Mantle potential temperatures calculated from the alkaline basalt primary magmas increased from close to ambient mantle (~ 1380-1410 °C) in the Pliocene to ~ 1450 °C in the younger units. The calculated initial melting pressures for these primary magmas are in the garnet stability field (3.0-2.7 GPa). The average final melting pressures range between 2.7 and 2.5 GPa, which is interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary at ~ 85-90 km. We provide a geotectonic model that integrates the diverse observations presented here. The slab detached after the collision of the Galapagos tracks with the arc (~ 10-8 Ma). The detachment allowed hotter asthenosphere to flow into the mantle wedge. This influx of hotter asthenosphere explains the increase in mantle potential temperatures, the northwest migration in the back-arc alkaline lavas that tracks the passage of the

  18. Distal radius triplane fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkar, A A H; Marya, S; Auplish, S

    2014-11-01

    A triplane fracture is so named because of the three planes traversed by the fracture line. These are physeal fractures that result from injury during the final phase of maturation and cessation of growth. This fracture pattern typically involves the distal tibia. We present a rare case of a triplane fracture involving the distal radius.

  19. Influence of trench width on subduction hinge retreat rates in 3-D models of slab rollback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegman, D. R.; Freeman, J.A.; Schellart, W. P.; Moresi, L.; May, D.

    Subduction of tectonic plates limited in lateral extent and with a free-trailing tail, i.e., "free subduction,'' is modeled in a three-dimensional (3-D) geometry. The models use a nonlinear viscoplastic rheology for the subducting plate and exhibit a wide range of behaviors depending on such plate

  20. Review of subduction and its association with geothermal system in Sumatera-Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladiba, A. F.; Putriyana, L.; Sibarani, B. br.; Soekarno, H.

    2017-12-01

    Java and Sumatera have the largest geothermal resources in Indonesia, in which mostly are spatially associated with volcanoes of subduction zones. However, those volcanoes are not distributed in a regular pattern due to the difference of subduction position. Subduction position in java is relatively more perpendicular to the trench than in Sumatera. In addition, Java has a concentration of large productive geothermal field with vapour dominated system in the western part of Java, which may be caused by the various subduction dip along the island. In order to understand the relationship between the subduction process and geothermal system in the subduction zone volcanoes, we examined several kinematic parameters of subduction that potentially relevant to the formation of geothermal system in overriding plate such as slab dip, subduction rate, and direction of subduction. Data and information regarding tectonic setting of Sumatera and Java and productive geothermal field in Sumatera and Java have been collected and evaluated. In conclusion, there are three condition that caused the geothermal fluid to be more likely being in vapour phase, which are: the subduction is in an orthogonal position, the slab dip is high, and rate of subduction is high. Although there are plenty researches of subduction zone volcanoes, only a few of them present information about its formation and implication to the geothermal system. The result of this study may be used as reference in exploration of geothermal field in mutual geologic environment.

  1. Back-arc Extension: Critical Analisys of Subduction-related and Non Subduction-related Driving Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, E.; Viti, M.; Babbucci, D.; Tamburelli, C.; Albarello, D.

    It is argued that the opening of back arc basins can hardly be explained as an effect of subduction related forces, since this kind of interpretation has not yet provided plausible explanations for several major features of such processes in the world. In particular, it is not clear why back arc extension occurs in some subduction zones and not in others, why extension ceased in zones where subduction has remained active, why the arcs associated with back arc basins are often characterized by a strongly curved shape, why arc-trench-back arc systems do not develop along the entire length of consuming borders and why no significant correlation can be recognized between any parameter of subduction processes and the occurrence of back arc extension. In addition, modelling experiments indicate that the magnitude of the tensional stress induced in the overriding plate by subduction-related forces is significantly lower than the lithospheric strength. These problems are discussed, in particular, for three subduction-related interpretations, the "slab-pull", the "corner flow" and the "sea an- chor" models, which seem to be the most quoted in literature. It is then argued that possible solutions of the above problems may be provided by the extrusion model, which postulates that back arc basins are generated by the forced separation of the arc from the overriding plate, along a sector of the consuming border. This separa- tion is generally caused by the oblique indentation of strong and buoyant structures against the accretionary belt. In this view, subduction and back arc extension are not causally linked one to the other, but rather represent simultaneous effects of the lateral migration of the arc, driven by plate convergence. It is pointed out that the conditions required for the occurrence of this kind of mechanism may be recognized in the tec- tonic contexts where back arc basins developed in the wake of arc-trench migrating systems. On the other hand, in the zones

  2. Formation and stability of a double subduction system: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Stegman, Dave

    2017-04-01

    Examples of double subduction systems can be found in both modern (Izu-Bonin-Marianas and Ryukyu arcs, e.g. Hall [1997]) and ancient (Kohistan arc in Western Himalayas, e.g. Burg [2006], Burg et al. [2006]) tectonic record. A double subduction system has also been proposed to explain the high convergence rate observed for the India-Eurasia convergence [Jagoutz et al., 2015; Holt et al., 2016, 2017]. Rates of convergence across coupled double subduction systems can be significantly faster than across single subduction systems because of slab pull by two slabs. However, despite significant geological and geophysical observations, our understanding about this process is limited, and questions regarding double subduction remain largely unexplored in terms of physical factors controlling its initiation, duration and dynamics. Subduction initiation (of a single system) in itself has been a popular and challenging topic in the research community for the last few years, and various mechanisms (i.e., collapse at a passive margin or transform fault [Gerya et al., 2008; Stern, 2004], driven by compression [Hall et al., 2003; Toth and Gurnis, 1998], due to shear heating under compression [Thielmann and Kaus, 2012] or plume induced initiation [Gerya et al., 2015]) have been proposed. However, initiation of a secondary subduction, and formation of a stable double subduction system has not been studied before. Previous studies of double subduction either introduced weak zones to initiate subduction [Mishin et al., 2008] or both the subduction systems were already initiated [Jagoutz et al., 2015], thus assuming a priori information regarding the initial position of the two subduction zones. In this study, we perform 2D and 3D numerical simulations to investigate i) subduction initiation of a secondary system in an already initiated single subduction system, and ii) the dynamics and stability of the newly formed double subduction system. For this, we employ the code LaMEM [Kaus et

  3. Fenologia de Syngonanthus mucugensis Giul. subsp. mucugensis e S. curralensis Moldenke (Eriocaulaceae, nos municípios de Mucugê e Morro do Chapéu, Chapada Diamantina, BA, Brasil The phenology of Syngonanthus mucugensis Giul. subsp. mucugensis and S. curralensis Moldenke (Eriocaulaceae in Mucugê and Morro do Chapéu municipalities, Chapada Diamantina, Bahia State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlianne Oliveira Cerqueira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Syngonanthus mucugensis subsp. mucugensis e S. curralensis são conhecidas como sempre-vivas por possuírem capítulos que permanecem com a aparência de vivos durante anos. São plantas herbáceas com distribuição agrupada, folhas reunidas em roseta e inflorescências monóicas tipo capítulo, flores alvas e reduzidas. Este estudo apresenta os padrões fenológicos dessas espécies, relacionando-os com fatores abióticos e modo provável de dispersão. As observações foram realizadas mensalmente entre agosto/2002 e setembro/2004, em campo rupestre, nos municípios de Mucugê e Morro do Chapéu, registrando-se presença/ausência das fenofases. A fase vegetativa constitui grande parte do ciclo fenológico, aproximadamente cinco meses, na estação chuvosa (novembro-março. Os escapos levam três a quatro meses do início do desenvolvimento até a presença de capítulos jovens. As flores estaminadas e pistiladas apresentam ântese no início da manhã; as flores estaminadas duram um dia, e o ciclo estaminado cerca de sete dias. As flores pistiladas duram três dias e o ciclo pistilado três a quatro dias. Não ocorre sobreposição temporal das fases estaminada e pistilada em um mesmo capítulo. As duas espécies apresentaram padrão de floração (junho-agosto e frutificação (julho-novembro anual, regular, com duração intermediária, na estação seca. A dispersão ocorre ca. 45 dias após a fecundação, estendendo-se por quatro meses, durante a estação seca e início das chuvas. O tipo de diásporo e a dispersão sazonal sugerem dispersão anemocórica e autocórica.Syngonanthus mucugensis subsp. mucugensis Giul. and S. curralensis are straw-flowers (sempre-vivas in which the capitula maintain their appearance and color for many years. These herbaceous plants have a clumped distribution, their leaves form a rosette, and they have small whitish monoecious inflorescences united in a capitulum. The present study examined the phenology

  4. Evolution of passive continental margins and initiation of subduction zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloetingh, Sierd

    1982-01-01

    The initiation of subduction is a key element in plate tectonic schemes for the evolution of the Earth's lithosphere. Nevertheless, up to present, the underlying mechanism has not been very well understood (e.g. Dickinson and Seely, 1979; Hager, 1980; Kanamori, 1980). The insight into the initiation

  5. Evolution of passive continental margins and initiation of subduction zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    1982-01-01

    The initiation of subduction is a key element in plate tectonic schemes for the evolution of the Earth's lithosphere. Nevertheless, up to present, the underlying mechanism has not been very well understood (e.g. Dickinson and Seely, 1979; Hager, 1980; Kanamori, 1980). The insight into the

  6. The course of water in Archean subduction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouilhol, P.; Magni, V.; Van Hunen, J.; Kaislaniemi, L.

    2012-12-01

    The andesitic nature of the bulk continental crust, as well as its characteristic trace element ratios, have a close resemblance to the differentiated crust of volcanic arcs, thus leading to models for formation of continental crust in subduction zone settings. If the modern processes leading to continental crust formation at convergent margins are well constrained, the extrapolation to early Earth conditions is hazardous, because the composition of Earth's early crust can be achieved through several processes. We study the different scenarios that may have operated during early Earth subduction to form differentiated crust. Each scenario (e.g. arc crust melting, slab melting, mantle melting followed by differentiation…) has a common denominator that is the fate of water, because it reflects slab devolatilization and controls the melting process and the stability of minerals such as garnet, amphibole and plagioclase, which are major players in the final melt composition. To this end, we present thermomechanical numerical models that incorporate internally consistent thermodynamic data in order to simulate slab dehydration. Our goal is to track the fate of subducted water in an Archean style subduction regime to better comprehend its modus operandi.

  7. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-05-17

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H(2)O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones.

  8. Surface deformation resulting from subduction and slab detachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buiter, S.J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Convergence of lithospheric plates is accommodated at active margins by one plate moving beneath the other into the Earth's mantle. Changes in this subduction process may cause variations in the topography of the Earth's surface near a convergent plate margin. The focus of this thesis lies on

  9. Some consequences of the subduction of young slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    England, P.; Wortel, R.

    The negative buoyancy force exerted by a subducting oceanic slab depends on its descent velocity, and strongly on its age. For lithosphere close to thermal equilibrium, this force dominates by a large margin the resisting forces arising from friction on the plate boundary and compositional buoyancy.

  10. Fluid Release and the Deformation of Subducting Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunder, Benjamin; van Hunen, Jeroen; Magni, Valentina; Bouilhol, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    It is known that slab dehydration is crucial in subduction dynamics and for the formation of arc-magmatism. Previous studies of this process have constrained this intake and subsequent release of fluids into the mantle wedge by considering the stability hydrous phases within the slab. Other, more dynamical effects of this hydration state and partial melting have also been suggested, such as the possibility of "cold plumes", crustal delamination, and subduction channel return flow. These processes have been inferred to play a role in the generation of continental crust over time through accumulation and melting beneath the overriding plate. Water content and melt fraction have a strong control on the rheology of the system. Therefore we investigate the effect of these parameters on the dynamics of a subducting slab, with the aim to establish the physical bounds on the delamination process. To do this we use a coupled geodynamical-petrological model that tracks dehydration and melting reactions in order to factor in the rheological effect of metamorphism and magmatism on slab and mantle wedge dynamics. We focus primarily on the strength of the subducting crust and the possibility of delamination. We then extend this investigation by considering whether early earth crust formation could have been the result of such a processes by looking at a hypothetical Archean setting.

  11. Tensor-guided fitting of subduction slab depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Farhad; Hayes, Gavin P.

    2013-01-01

    Geophysical measurements are often acquired at scattered locations in space. Therefore, interpolating or fitting the sparsely sampled data as a uniform function of space (a procedure commonly known as gridding) is a ubiquitous problem in geophysics. Most gridding methods require a model of spatial correlation for data. This spatial correlation model can often be inferred from some sort of secondary information, which may also be sparsely sampled in space. In this paper, we present a new method to model the geometry of a subducting slab in which we use a data‐fitting approach to address the problem. Earthquakes and active‐source seismic surveys provide estimates of depths of subducting slabs but only at scattered locations. In addition to estimates of depths from earthquake locations, focal mechanisms of subduction zone earthquakes also provide estimates of the strikes of the subducting slab on which they occur. We use these spatially sparse strike samples and the Earth’s curved surface geometry to infer a model for spatial correlation that guides a blended neighbor interpolation of slab depths. We then modify the interpolation method to account for the uncertainties associated with the depth estimates.

  12. Hafnium at subduction zones: isotopic budget of input and output fluxes; L'hafnium dans les zones de subduction: bilan isotopique des flux entrant et sortant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, J.Ch

    2004-05-15

    Subduction zones are the primary regions of mass exchanges between continental crust and mantle of Earth through sediment subduction toward the earth's mantle and by supply of mantellic magmas to volcanic arcs. We analyze these mass exchanges using Hafnium and Neodymium isotopes. At the Izu-Mariana subduction zone, subducting sediments have Hf and Nd isotopes equivalent to Pacific seawater. Altered oceanic crust has Hf and Nd isotopic compositions equivalent to the isotopic budget of unaltered Pacific oceanic crust. At Luzon and Java subduction zones, arc lavas present Hf isotopic ratios highly radiogenic in comparison to their Nd isotopic ratios. Such compositions of the Luzon and Java arc lavas are controlled by a contamination of their sources by the subducted oceanic sediments. (author)

  13. Recycling Revisited: Where did all the Subducted Sediments go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A. W.; Chauvel, C.; Lewin, E.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hacker, B. R.

    2016-12-01

    Several lines of reasoning have revived the idea [1] that subduction has recycled continent-derived sediments into the mantle on a massive scale. For example, well-known peaks in zircon ages have been reinterpreted as reflecting variable rates of crust destruction via erosion and sediment subduction [2]. In addition, assessment of the trace element budgets of subducted sediments and arc volcanics, as well as geological and geophysical studies of accretionary wedges have led to estimates that about one mass of present-day continental crust has been returned to the mantle [3]. If these ideas are correct, then recycled sedimentary components should be present in MORB and OIB sources. As previously established, Nb/U and 87Sr/86Sr are negatively correlated in all EM2-type OIBs, clearly indicating continental/sedimentary input. However, the MORB source reservoir, being depleted in incompatible elements, is particularly susceptible to "pollution" by subducted sediments. Chauvel et al. [4] modeled the Hf-Nd isotopic array of MORBs+OIBs and concluded that it requires the addition of up to 6 % subducted sediment. We revisit this issue and show that global MORBs show no decrease in Nb/U with increasing 87Sr/86Sr, ruling out extensive addition of recycled sediment into global MORB sources. Instead, the Hf-Nd array can be obtained by recycled alkali basalts derived from subducted seamounts and ocean islands, rather than sediments. Moreover, mantle plumes with clearly identifiable sediment input contribute less than 20% of the total plume flux. We conclude that most of the subducted sediment flux is not returned to the convecting mantle. Instead, its most plausible fate is to be underplated beneath existing continental crust via "relamination" [5]. These results imply that continental recycling is subordinate and the growth of the continental crust has been largely irreversible. [1] Armstrong, 1968, Rev. Geophys. 6, 175. [2] Hawkesworth et al., 2009, Science 323, 49. [3] Porter

  14. Subduction and vertical coastal motions in the eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Andy; Jackson, James; Copley, Alex; McKenzie, Dan; Nissen, Ed

    2017-10-01

    Convergence in the eastern Mediterranean of oceanic Nubia with Anatolia and the Aegean is complex and poorly understood. Large volumes of sediment obscure the shallow structure of the subduction zone, and since much of the convergence is accommodated aseismically, there are limited earthquake data to constrain its kinematics. We present new source models for recent earthquakes, combining these with field observations, published GPS velocities and reflection-seismic data to investigate faulting in three areas: the Florence Rise, SW Turkey and the Pliny and Strabo Trenches. The depths and locations of earthquakes reveal the geometry of the subducting Nubian plate NE of the Florence Rise, a bathymetric high that is probably formed by deformation of sediment at the surface projection of the Anatolia-Nubia subduction interface. In SW Turkey, the presence of a strike-slip shear zone has often been inferred despite an absence of strike-slip earthquakes. We show that the GPS-derived strain-rate field is consistent with extension on the orthogonal systems of normal faults observed in the region and that strike-slip faulting is not required to explain observed GPS velocities. Further SW, the Pliny and Strabo Trenches are also often interpreted as strike-slip shear zones, but almost all nearby earthquakes have either reverse-faulting or normal-faulting focal mechanisms. Oblique convergence across the trenches may be accommodated either by a partitioned system of strike-slip and reverse faults or by oblique slip on the Aegean-Nubia subduction interface. The observed late-Quaternary vertical motions of coastlines close to the subduction zone are influenced by the interplay between: (1) thickening of the material overriding the subduction interface associated with convergence, which promotes coastal uplift; and (2) subsidence due to extension and associated crustal thinning. Long-wavelength gravity data suggest that some of the observed topographic contrasts in the eastern

  15. Frictional behavior of carbonate-rich sediments in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, H. S.; Savage, H. M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Collettini, C.

    2016-12-01

    Deformation in rocks and sediments is controlled by multiple mechanisms, each governed by its own pressure- (P), temperature- (T), and slip velocity- (v) dependent kinetics. Frictional behavior depends on which of these mechanisms are dominant, and, thus, varies with P, T, and v. Carbonates are a useful material with which to interrogate the PTv controls on friction due to the fact that a wide range of mechanisms can be easily accessed in the lab at geologically relevant conditions. In addition, carbonate-rich layers make up a significant component of subducting sediments around the world and may impact the frictional behavior of shallow subduction zones. In order to investigate the effect of carbonate subduction and the evolution of friction at subduction zone conditions, we conducted deformation experiments on input sediments for two subduction zones, the Hikurangi trench, New Zealand (ODP Site 1124) and the Peru trench (DSDP Site 321), which have carbonate/clay contents of 40/60 wt% and 80/20 wt%, respectively. Samples were saturated with distilled water mixed with 35g/l sea salt and deformed at room temperature. Experiments were conducted at σeff = 1-100 MPa and T = 20-100 °C with sliding velocities of 1-300 μm/s and hold times of 1-1000 s. We test the changes in velocity dependence and healing over these PT conditions to elucidate the frictional behavior of carbonates in subduction zone settings. The mechanical results are complemented by microstructural analysis. In lower stress experiments, there is no obvious shear localization; however, by 25 MPa, pervasive boundary-parallel shears become dominant, particularly in the Peru samples. Optical observations of these shear zones under cross-polarized light show evidence of plastic deformation (CPO development) while SEM-EDS observations indicate phase segregation in the boundary shears. Degree of microstructural localization appears to correspond with the trends observed in velocity-dependence. Our

  16. Mapping seismic azimuthal anisotropy of the Japan subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D.; Liu, X.

    2016-12-01

    We present 3-D images of azimuthal anisotropy tomography of the crust and upper mantle of the Japan subduction zone, which are determined using a large number of high-quality P- and S-wave arrival-time data of local earthquakes and teleseismic events recorded by the dense seismic networks on the Japan Islands. A tomographic method for P-wave velocity azimuthal anisotropy is modified and extended to invert S-wave travel times for 3-D S-wave velocity azimuthal anisotropy. A joint inversion of the P and S wave data is conducted to constrain the 3-D azimuthal anisotropy of the Japan subduction zone. Main findings of this work are summarized as follows. (1) The high-velocity subducting Pacific and Philippine Sea (PHS) slabs exhibit trench-parallel fast-velocity directions (FVDs), which may reflect frozen-in lattice-preferred orientation of aligned anisotropic minerals formed at the mid-ocean ridge as well as shape-preferred orientation such as normal faults produced at the outer-rise area near the trench axis. (2) Significant trench-normal FVDs are revealed in the mantle wedge, which reflects corner flow in the mantle wedge due to the active subduction and dehydration of the oceanic plates. (3) Obvious toroidal FVDs and low-velocity anomalies exist in and around a window (hole) in the aseismic PHS slab beneath Southwest Japan, which may reflect a toroidal mantle flow pattern resulting from hot and wet mantle upwelling caused by the joint effects of deep dehydration of the Pacific slab and the convective circulation process in the mantle wedge above the Pacific slab. (4) Significant low-velocity anomalies with trench-normal FVDs exist in the mantle below the Pacific slab beneath Northeast Japan, which may reflect a subducting oceanic asthenosphere affected by hot mantle upwelling from the deeper mantle. ReferencesLiu, X., D. Zhao (2016) Seismic velocity azimuthal anisotropy of the Japan subduction zone: Constraints from P and S wave traveltimes. J. Geophys. Res. 121, doi

  17. Three-dimensional Thermal Model of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, J. C.; Pimentel, F. D. C.; Currie, C. A.; He, J.; Harris, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    Along the Mexican section of the Middle America Trench (MAT), the Cocos plate subducts beneath the North American plate. The most important feature of this subduction zone is the flat-slab section below central Mexico, extending approximately 250 km landward from the trench at a depth of 50 km. Further west, the dip changes to 45-50º. This particular geometry has several unique consequences, such as a volcanic arc that is not aligned with the trench and very shallow slab seismicity. For the mantle wedge, the abrupt change in slab geometry could lead to a three-dimensional (3D) mantle wedge flow that departs from the classical 2D subduction-driven corner flow. Evidence of 3D flow in the region comes from seismic anisotropy studies, which show that olivine fast-direction axes have a component that is parallel to the MAT. In other subduction zones, such as Costa Rica-Nicaragua and Japan, 3D flow has been observed to increase temperatures by >50º C relative to corner flow models.For this study, we have created the first 3D finite-element model of the Mexican subduction zone in order to analyze its thermal structure. Our objective is to assess the effects of 3D mantle flow and hydrothermal circulation (HC) in the subducting slab. In this region, low surface heat flow values near the trench indicate that HC may remove heat from the oceanic plate. Our model incorporates the effect of HC through conductivity proxies in the subducting crust and a 2D oceanic geotherm that includes the age variations of the Cocos plate along the MAT. For an isoviscous mantle, our model shows that the slab dip variations induce a flow that departs from 2D corner flow near the transition between the flat-slab and normal-dipping sections. The mantle flows in eastward direction toward the flat slab, and its orientation is consistent with seismic anisotropy studies. The maximum along-margin flow rate is nearly 2 cm/yr, which is >30% of the convergence rate. Temperatures at the location of this

  18. Geologic signature of early Tertiary ridge subduction in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; Kusky, Timothy M.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Miller, Marti L.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Nelson, Steven W.; Karl, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    A mid-Paleocene to early Eocene encounter between an oceanic spreading center and a subduction zone produced a wide range of geologic features in Alaska. The most striking effects are seen in the accretionary prism (Chugach–Prince William terrane), where 61 to 50 Ma near-trench granitic to gabbroic plutons were intruded into accreted trench sediments that had been deposited only a few million years earlier. This short time interval also saw the genesis of ophiolites, some of which contain syngenetic massive sulfide deposits; the rapid burial of these ophiolites beneath trench turbidites, followed immediately by obduction; anomalous high-T, low-P, near-trench metamorphism; intense ductile deformation; motion on transverse strike-slip and normal faults; gold mineralization; and uplift of the accretionary prism above sea level. The magmatic arc experienced a brief flare-up followed by quiescence. In the Alaskan interior, 100 to 600 km landward of the paleotrench, several Paleocene to Eocene sedimentary basins underwent episodes of extensional subsidence, accompanied by bimodal volcanism. Even as far as 1000 km inboard of the paleotrench, the ancestral Brooks Range and its foreland basin experienced a pulse of uplift that followed about 40 million years of quiescence.All of these events - but most especially those in the accretionary prism - can be attributed with varying degrees of confidence to the subduction of an oceanic spreading center. In this model, the ophiolites and allied ore deposits were produced at the soon-to-be subducted ridge. Near-trench magmatism, metamorphism, deformation, and gold mineralization took place in the accretionary prism above a slab window, where hot asthenosphere welled up into the gap between the two subducted, but still diverging, plates. Deformation took place as the critically tapered accretionary prism adjusted its shape to changes in the bathymetry of the incoming plate, changes in the convergence direction before and after

  19. Hand fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000552.htm Hand fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... need to be repaired with surgery. Types of Hand Fractures Your fracture may be in one of ...

  20. Fractured porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Pierre M; Mourzenko, Valeri V

    2013-01-01

    This monograph on fractures, fracture networks, and fractured porous media provides a systematic treatment of their geometrical and transport properties for students and professionals in geophysics, materials science, and Earth sciences.

  1. Acetabular Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Correa, Chad; Lahham, Sari

    2017-01-01

    History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to her primary care physician (PCP) with right hip pain after a mechanical fall. She did not lose consciousness or have any other traumatic injuries. She was unable to ambulate post-fall, so X-rays were ordered by her PCP. Her X-rays were concerning for a right acetabular fracture (see purple arrows), so the patient was referred to the emergency department where a computed tomography (CT) scan was ordered. Significant findings:...

  2. Galeazzi Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Reid Honda

    2017-01-01

    History of present illness: A 19-year-old male presented to the ED with right forearm pain after being struck in the forearm by a baseball. The patient then threw the ball and felt a sharp “pop” in his arm. The patient complained of sharp pain, worse with movement. Upon examination, the patient was neurovascularly intact. Significant findings: The X-ray showed an acute comminuted fracture of the distal diaphysis of the radius with disruption of the distal radioulnar joint, consisten...

  3. Wind-induced subduction at the South Atlantic subtropical front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calil, Paulo H. R.

    2017-10-01

    The South Atlantic Subtropical Front, associated with the eastward-flowing South Atlantic Current, separates the colder, nutrient-rich waters of the subpolar gyre from the warmer, nutrient-poor waters of the subtropical gyre. Perturbations to the quasi-geostrophic, eastward flow generate meanders and filaments which induce cross-frontal exchange of water properties. Down-front winds transport denser waters from the South over warm waters from the North, inducing convective instability and subduction. Such processes occur over spatial scales of the order of 1 km and thus require high horizontal spatial resolution. In this modeling study, a high-resolution (4 km) regional grid is embedded in a basin-wide configuration (12 km) of the South Atlantic Ocean in order to test the importance of submesoscale processes in water mass subduction along the subtropical front. Stronger and more numerous eddies obtained in the high-resolution run yield more intense zonal jets along the frontal zone. Such stronger jets are more susceptible to instabilities, frontogenesis, and the generation of submesoscale meanders and filaments with O(1) Rossby number. As a consequence, vertical velocities larger than 100 md 1 are obtained in the high-resolution run, one order of magnitude larger than in the low-resolution run. Wind-driven subduction occurs along the frontal region, associated with negative Ertel potential vorticity in the surface layer. Such processes are not observed in the low-resolution run. A passive tracer experiment shows that waters with density characteristics similar to subtropical mode waters are preferentially subducted along the frontal region. The wind-driven buoyancy flux is shown to be much larger than thermal or haline fluxes during the wintertime, which highlights the importance of the frictional component in extracting PV from the surface ocean and inducing subduction, a process that has been overlooked in subtropical mode water formation in the region.

  4. The dynamical control of subduction parameters on surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crameri, F.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Tackley, P. J.

    2017-04-01

    The long-wavelength surface deflection of Earth's outermost rocky shell is mainly controlled by large-scale dynamic processes like isostasy or mantle flow. The largest topographic amplitudes are therefore observed at plate boundaries due to the presence of large thermal heterogeneities and strong tectonic forces. Distinct vertical surface deflections are particularly apparent at convergent plate boundaries mostly due to the convergence and asymmetric sinking of the plates. Having a mantle convection model with a free surface that is able to reproduce both realistic single-sided subduction and long-wavelength surface topography self-consistently, we are now able to better investigate this interaction. We separate the topographic signal into distinct features and quantify the individual topographic contribution of several controlling subduction parameters. Results are diagnosed by splitting the topographic signal into isostatic and residual components, and by considering various physical aspects like viscous dissipation during plate bending. Performing several systematic suites of experiments, we are then able to quantify the topographic impact of the buoyancy, rheology, and geometry of the subduction-zone system to each and every topographic feature at a subduction zone and to provide corresponding scaling laws. We identify slab dip and, slightly less importantly, slab buoyancy as the major agents controlling surface topography at subduction zones on Earth. Only the island-arc high and the back-arc depression extent are mainly controlled by plate strength. Overall, his modeling study sets the basis to better constrain deep-seated mantle structures and their physical properties via the observed surface topography on present-day Earth and back through time.

  5. Deciphering the 3-D distribution of fluid along the shallow Hikurangi subduction zone using P- and S-wave attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart-Phillips, Donna; Bannister, Stephen; Reyners, Martin

    2017-11-01

    We use local earthquake velocity spectra to solve for the 3-D distribution of P- and S-wave attenuation in the shallow Hikurangi subduction zone in the North Island of New Zealand to gain insight into how fluids control both the distribution of slip rate deficit and slow-slip events at the shallow plate interface. Qs/Qp gives us information on the 3-D distribution of fluid saturation, which we can compare with the previously determined 3-D distribution of Vp/Vs, which gives information on pore fluid pressure. The Hikurangi margin is unusual, in that a large igneous province (the Hikurangi Plateau) is being subducted. This plateau has had two episodes of subduction—first at 105-100 Ma during north-south convergence with Gondwana, and currently during east-west convergence between the Pacific and Australian plates. We find that in the southern part of the subduction zone, where there is a large deficit in slip rate at the plate interface, the plate interface region is only moderately fluid-rich because the underlying plateau had already had an episode of dehydration during Gondwana subduction. But fluid pressure is relatively high, due to an impermeable terrane in the upper plate trapping fluids below the plate interface. The central part of the margin, where the slip rate deficit is very low, is the most fluid-rich part of the shallow subduction zone. We attribute this to an excess of fluid from the subducted plateau. Our results suggest this part of the plateau has unusually high fracture permeability, on account of it having had two episodes of bending—first at the Gondwana trench and now at the Hikurangi Trough. Qs/Qp is consistent with fluids migrating across the plate interface in this region, leaving it drained and producing high fluid pressure in the overlying plate. The northern part of the margin is a region of heterogeneous deficit in slip rate. Here the Hikurangi Plateau is subducting for the first time, so there is less fluid available from its

  6. Subduction Mode Selection During Slab and Mantle Transition Zone Interaction: Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanan; Wei, Dongping; Li, Zhong-Hai; Liu, Ming-Qi; Liu, Mengxue

    2017-12-01

    Global seismic tomography of the subduction zones shows that the subducting slabs could either stagnate around the 660-km discontinuity, or penetrate into the lower mantle. The stagnating slabs also have various morphologies. These are directly related to the interaction between the subducting slabs and the mantle transition zone (MTZ), the dynamics of which are still debated. Using a 2-D thermo-mechanical model, we systematically investigated the modes of subduction in the mantle transition zone and explored the key constraints of various subduction styles. Four basic subduction modes are obtained in the numerical experiments, including one with slab penetrating through the 660-km discontinuity and three other modes with slab stagnating in the MTZ (i.e. folding, lying and rolling-back). The numerical models indicate that the age of subducting oceanic plate, the thickness of overriding continental lithosphere and the convergence velocity play crucial roles in the dynamics of subducting slab and MTZ interaction. In general, the young subducting slab favors the penetration or folding mode, whereas the old subducting slab tends to result in lying or rolling-back mode, although other parameters can also affect. Our models also show a strong correlation between the subduction mode selection and dip angle of the slab tip when reaching the 660-km phase boundary.

  7. Reevaluating plate driving forces from 3-D models of subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, D. R.; Freeman, J.; Schellart, W. P.; Moresi, L.; May, D.; Turnbull, R.

    2004-12-01

    Subducting lithospheric slabs mechanically attached to tectonic plates provide the main driving force for surface plate motion. Numerical models historically simulate slab dynamics as a 2-D process and further simplify the problem into either a density driven model (no heat transfer) or a corner-flow problem (thermal convection) [Christensen, 2001; Enns et al., (in revision); van Keken, 2003]. Recent 3-D global models of density driven flow incorporating a history of plate motion (Conrad and Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2002) have succussfully ruled out slab "suction" (basal shear traction induced by downward flow of the slabs) as a major driving force, but exact partitioning of the remaining forces acting on the slab remain unconstrained. A survey of trenches around the world reveals that over half of the slabs presently subducted in the upper mantle have a discontinuous edge (either a slab tip on a young slab, or the side edge of a slab with finite width) around which mantle can flow: prime examples being slabs in the Mediterranean and Carribean. However, even slabs with a wide lateral extent (and where a 2-D approximation may seem appropriate), show signs of having 3-D complexity. For example, on the surface Tonga appears relatively symmetric, but when the history of subduction is considered, the slab has a twisted, 3-D structure due to significant eastward retreat of just the northern part of an originally N-S oriented trench edge. Similarly the widest slabs, South American and Kamchatka, show seismic anisotropy attributed to trench parallel mantle flow (Russo and Silver, 1994; Peyton, et al., 2001, respectively), while the Aleutian trench has oblique subduction varying in magnitude from west to east, and medium width Central American slab likely has a slab window allowing 3-D flow (Johnston and Thorkelson, 1997). Recent laboratory experiments of subduction have demonstrated the full complexity of flow occuring in 3-D geometry (Kincaid and Griffiths, 2003; Schellart

  8. 3D Numerical modelling of topography development associated with curved subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, Jessica; Ueda, Kosuke; Burg, Jean-Pierre; May, Dave; Gerya, Taras

    2017-04-01

    Curved subduction zones, also called oroclines, are geological features found in various places on Earth. They occur in diverse geodynamic settings: 1) single slab subduction in oceanic domain (e.g. Sandwich trench in the Southern Atlantic); 2) single slab subduction in continental domain, (e.g. Gibraltar-Alboran orocline in the Western Mediterranean) 3); multi-slab subduction (e.g. Caribbean orocline in the South-East of the Gulf of Mexico). These systems present various curvatures, lengths (few hundreds to thousands of km) and ages (less than 35 Ma for Gibraltar Alboran orocline, up to 100 Ma for the Caribbean). Recent studies suggested that the formation of curved subduction systems depends on slab properties (age, length, etc) and may be linked with processes such as retreating subduction and delamination. Plume induced subduction initiation has been proposed for the Caribbean. All of these processes involve deep mechanisms such as mantle and slab dynamics. However, subduction zones always generate topography (trenches, uplifts, etc), which is likely to be influenced by surface processes. Hence, surface processes may also influence the evolution of subduction zones. We focus on different kinds of subduction systems initiated by plume-lithosphere interactions (single slab subduction/multi-slab subduction) and scrutinize their surface expression. We use numerical modeling to examine large-scale subduction initiation and three-dimensional slab retreat. We perform two kinds of simulations: 1) large scale subduction initiation with the 3D-thermomechanical code I3ELVIS (Gerya and Yuen, 2007) in an oceanic domain and 2) large scale subduction initiation in oceanic domain using I3ELVIS coupled with a robust new surface processes model (SPM). One to several retreating slabs form in the absence of surface processes, when the conditions for subduction initiation are reached (c.f. Gerya et al., 2015), and ridges occur in the middle of the extensional domain opened by slab

  9. Dynamic Topography during Flat Subduction: Subsidence or Uplift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, F. M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Since the first studies on dynamic topography and basin evolution, low-dipping subduction has been related to intracontinental, long-wavelength and high-amplitude subsidence, whereas retreating to normal subduction systems to uplift. This was proposed to explain the Cretaceous-early Cenozoic topographic evolution of the western US. However, modern flat-slab and slab-retreating segments of South America do not record such a subsidence and uplift patterns. For example, the flat slab of Peru at ˜10°SL, related to the subduction of the Nazca Ridge, underlies an elevated promontory known as the Fitzcarrald Arch. The Argentine flat-slab at ˜31°SL associated to the subduction of the Juan Fernandez Ridge underlies a high-elevated intermontane system known as the Pampean broken foreland. Both upwarping features are younger than 7 Ma and contemporaneous with the arrival of flat subduction to these segments. In order to shed light into this controversy, we calculate dynamic topography along the Andean flat-slab segments using the Hager and O'Connell (1981) instantaneous flow formulation, an accurate reconstruction of the slab geometry along the central Andes and a density contrast between the flat slabs and the country mantle close to zero (△δ≈0) in order to simulate a buoyant oceanic lithosphere. We demonstrate that dynamic subsidence develops only at the leading edge of flat subduction, where the slabs plunge >30°, whereas the flatter slabs reproduce minor or no dynamic topography signals. These results agree with geological and geophysical proxies. Along the Argentine Plains, the account for a accumulated relief of ˜200 m, which might be considered as an "observed dynamic subsidence" signal (given that no tectonic activity has been recorded in this region since the Cretaceous to explain this surface topography). This gives a ˜0.03 mm/yr dynamic subsidence rate that are curiously similar to the exhumations estimated by low-temperature thermochronology along the

  10. Incremental Slip Along Dilatant Faults in Ancient Fluid-Rich Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remitti, F.; Fagereng, A.; Sibson, R. H.; Vannucchi, P.; Bettelli, G.

    2012-12-01

    At a variety of depths in subduction zones a proportion of relative plate motion is accommodated by episodic tremor and slow slip events. These events are accompanied by distinct low frequency seismic signals and/or high levels of micro-seismic activity. Based on theoretical studies and seismic attributes of the source region, fluids overpressured to near-lithostatic values seem likely to be involved in the mechanism behind episodic tremor. Ancient crust surrounding paleoseismic zones, especially if rich in overpressured fluids, should contain widespread relics of this kind of activity. Here we present microstructural observations from two ancient subduction thrust analogues where brittle deformation was accommodated by repeating micro-movements along dilatant faults. The first example is a mélange formed during Triassic-Jurassic tectonic accretion of ocean floor sediments now exposed in the Chrystalls Beach Complex, South Island, NZ. The mélange comprises competent sandstone and chert lenses set in a cleaved mudstone matrix deformed in a continuous-discontinuous style under subgreenschist conditions. Deformation is characterized by a pervasive anastomosing fault-fracture mesh of multiple shearing surfaces, subparallel to cleavage and coated with incrementally developed quartz-calcite slickenfibres. Microstructural observations reveal that slickenfibres grew by 'crack-seal' increments of 10-100 μm. Incremental slip transfer was constant over a single slickenfiber and accommodated by opening of extension fractures that link en echelon slip surfaces. The characteristic spacing of inclusion bands indicates relatively constant growth increments, possibly occurring into regular size cracks. Increments of non-constant growth and, instead, fractures significantly wider than 100 μm, are represented by local veins of euhedral quartz and carbonate. Similar structures are present in the shallow part of an ancient plate interface, now exposed in the Northern Apennines of

  11. Fractures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 299 MS patients 22 have had fractures and of these 17 after onset of MS. The fractures most frequently involved the femoral neck and trochanter (41%). Three patients had had more than one fracture. Only 1 patient had osteoporosis. The percentage of fractures increase...

  12. What favors the occurrence of subduction mega-earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzi, Silvia; Funiciello, Francesca; Corbi, Fabio; Sandri, Laura; van Zelst, Iris; Heuret, Arnauld; Piromallo, Claudia; van Dinther, Ylona

    2017-04-01

    Most of mega-earthquakes (MEqs; Mw > 8.5) occur at shallow depths along the subduction thrust fault (STF). The contribution of each subduction zone to the globally released seismic moment is not homogenous, as well as the maximum recorded magnitude MMax. Highlighting the ingredients likely responsible for MEqs nucleation has great implications for hazard assessment. In this work, we investigate the conditions favoring the occurrence of MEqs with a multi-disciplinary approach based on: i) multivariate statistics, ii) analogue- and iii) numerical modelling. Previous works have investigated the potential dependence between STF seismicity and various subduction zone parameters using simple regression models. Correlations are generally weak due to the limited instrumental seismic record and multi-parameter influence, which make the forecasting of the potential MMax rather difficult. To unravel the multi-parameter influence, we perform a multivariate statistical study (i.e., Pattern Recognition, PR) of the global database on convergent margins (Heuret et al., 2011), which includes seismological, geometrical, kinematic and physical parameters of 62 subduction segments. PR is based on the classification of objects (i.e., subduction segments) belonging to different classes through the identification of possible repetitive patterns. Tests have been performed using different MMax datasets and combination of inputs to indirectly test the stability of the identified patterns. Results show that the trench-parallel width of the subducting slab (Wtrench) and the sediment thickness at the trench (Tsed) are the most recurring parameters for MEqs occurrence. These features are mostly consistent, independently of the MMax dataset and combination of inputs used for the analysis. MEqs thus seem to be promoted for high Wtrench and Tsed, as their combination may potentially favor extreme (i.e., in the order of thousands of km) trench-parallel rupture propagation. To tackle the

  13. Nonuniform subduction of the Indian crust beneath the Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Li, Wenhui; Gao, Rui; Xu, Xiao; Li, Hongqiang; Huang, Xingfu; Ye, Zhuo; Lu, Zhanwu; Klemperer, Simon L

    2017-10-02

    Himalayan tectonic activity is triggered by downward penetration of the Indian plate beneath the Asian plate. The subsurface geometry of this interaction has not been fully investigated. This study presents novel constraints on this geometry provided by two newly obtained, deep seismic reflection profiles. The profiles cover 100- and 60-km transects across the Yarlung-Zangbo suture of the Himalaya-Tibet orogen at c. 88°E. Both profiles show a crustal-scale outline of the subducting Indian crust. This outline clearly shows Indian understhrusting southern Tibet, but only to a limited degree. When combined with a third seismic reflection profile of the western Himalayas, the new profiles reveal progressive, eastward steepening and shortening in the horizontal advance of the subducting Indian crust.

  14. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-26

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the 'cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  15. Oblique Axis Body Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takai, Hirokazu; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Schmal, Hagen

    2016-01-01

    Anderson type III fractures with a characteristic fracture pattern that we refer to as "oblique type axis body fracture." Results. The female patients aged 90 and 72 years, respectively, were both diagnosed with minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures. Both fractures had a characteristic "oblique...... was uneventful. Conclusions. Oblique type axis body fractures resemble a highly unstable subtype of Anderson type III fractures with the potential of severe secondary deformity following conservative treatment, irrespective of initial grade of displacement. The authors therefore warrant a high index of suspicion...

  16. Assessment of fracture risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanis, John A. [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.j.pontefract@sheffield.ac.uk; Johansson, Helena; Oden, Anders [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); McCloskey, Eugene V. [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); Osteoporosis Centre, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Fractures are a common complication of osteoporosis. Although osteoporosis is defined by bone mineral density at the femoral neck, other sites and validated techniques can be used for fracture prediction. Several clinical risk factors contribute to fracture risk independently of BMD. These include age, prior fragility fracture, smoking, excess alcohol, family history of hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and the use of oral glucocorticoids. These risk factors in conjunction with BMD can be integrated to provide estimates of fracture probability using the FRAX tool. Fracture probability rather than BMD alone can be used to fashion strategies for the assessment and treatment of osteoporosis.

  17. The dominant surface-topography contributions of individual subduction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crameri, Fabio; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina; Tackley, Paul

    2017-04-01

    It is no secret, not any longer, that dynamic processes below the plate exert a significant contribution to the elevation of the plate at the surface (e.g., Flament et al., 2013). We have therefore studied* the individual impact each and every major subduction parameter has on surface topography. This allows us to qualitatively compare the different sources amongst each other, and to quantify their actual potential to vertically deflect the surface. The gained knowledge from this compilation is crucial: We might finally be able to link the directly-observable surface topography to the dynamics (buoyancy, rheology, and geometry) of the subduction system. *This study is made possible by the efficient convection code StagYY (Tackley 2008), the largely-automated post-processing and visualisation toolbox StagLab (www.fabiocrameri.ch/software), and crucial model developments (Crameri and Tackley, 2015; Crameri et al., G-cubed, submitted, Crameri and Lithgow-Bertelloni, Tectonophysics, submitted). REFERENCES 
Flament, N., M. Gurnis, and R. D. Müller (2013), A review of observations and models of dynamic topography, Lithosphere, 5(2), 189-210. Crameri, F., and P. J. Tackley (2015), Parameters controlling dynamically self-consistent plate tectonics and single-sided subduction in global models of mantle convection, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 120(5), 3680-3706. Crameri, F., C. R. Lithgow-Bertelloni, and P. J. Tackley (submitted), The dynamical control of subduction parameters on surface topography, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. Crameri, F., and C. R. Lithgow-Bertelloni (submitted), Dynamic Mantle-Transition-Zone Controls on Upper-Plate Tilt, Tectonophysics. Tackley, P.J (2008) Modelling compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three- dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 171(1-4), 7-18.

  18. Complex Subduction Imaged by Diffractional Tomography of USArray Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction of a large oceanic plate beneath a continental plate is a complex process. In the Western United States, fragmentation of the Farallon slab has been reported in recent tomographic models. In this study, we measure finite-frequency travel times of P410s and P660s receiver functions recorded at USArray Transportable Array (TA) stations for teleseismic events occurred between 2015 and 2011. We calculate the finite-frequency sensitivities of receiver functions to depth perturbations of the 410-km and 660-km discontinuities to obtain high resolution mantle transition zone models based on diffractional tomography. The high-resolution discontinuity models reveal several interesting anomalies associated with complex subduction of the Farallon plate. In particular, we observe a linear feature in both the 410-km and 660-km discontinuity models. This mantle transition zone anomaly is roughly located in the western Snake River Plain and aligns with a major slab gap imaged in an earlier finite-frequency S-wave velocity model. We show that non-stationary upwellings generated by eastward propagation of a slab tearing event, together with a westward motion of the North American plate at a rate of about 1 to 1.5 centimeters per year (comparable to the half spreading rate of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge) in the past 16 million years can explain the age-progressive Snake River Plain / Yellowstone volcanic track. The slab to the west of the anomaly shows a near vertical subduction, it is heavily fragmented and the 410-km and 660-km discontinuity topography indicates that the southern fragment north of the Mendocino triple junction has subducted down to the mantle transition zone.

  19. Subducting characteristic of the Pacific slab beneath northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, G.; Zhang, G.; Xu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The volcanoes locating in northeast China are very active. Some researchers consider that the origin of volcanoes is closely related to the subducting western Pacific plate and the upwelling asthenosphere. The thickness and the existing range of the subducted plate are not clear as far although the seismic tomography results obviously show that the Pacific plate exists below the volcano region. Therefore, in this study, we adopted the method combining the teleseismic tomography with travel time forward modeling to further study the velocity structure beneath northeast China, especially the precise model of subducted Pacific plate. Our results show that (1) the average thickness and velocity perturbation of slab is 85 km and 1%, respectively, and the slab has not been thickened compared with the previous result of the Japan Sea; (2) the Pacific plate subducted into the mantle transition zone with a shallow dip angle, and changed horizontally when it touched the bottom of mantle transition zone, and extended westward to Longitude 127°E and then stops over there; (3) the horizontal slab locates right below the volcano region. These above features help people understand the origin of intraplate volcanoes and the geodynamical process better. (a) Tomographic result along 43°N. Red and blue colors represent the high and low velocity anomalies, respectively, and the scale is shown at the right-bottom; The profile line is shown in (b); The black triangles represent the volcanoes locating near the profile; The black solid and dashed lines show the depths of upper and lower boundaries of Pacific plate, respectively. The red dots represent the deep earthquakes around the profile. (b) Location of profile AA' along 43°N. Black triangles denote volcanoes; White squares represent the stations; Blue contours denote the depth of upper boundary of Pacific plate; Black and red dots represent the deep epicenters.

  20. Crust and subduction zone structure of Southwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhardja, Sandy Kurniawan; Grand, Stephen P.; Wilson, David; Guzman-Speziale, Marco; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan Martin; Dominguez-Reyes, Tonatiuh; Ni, James

    2015-02-01

    Southwestern Mexico is a region of complex active tectonics with subduction of the young Rivera and Cocos plates to the south and widespread magmatism and rifting in the continental interior. Here we use receiver function analysis on data recorded by a 50 station temporary deployment of seismometers known as the MARS (MApping the Rivera Subduction zone) array to investigate crustal structure as well as the nature of the subduction interface near the coast. The array was deployed in the Mexican states of Jalisco, Colima, and Michoacan. Crustal thickness varies from 20 km near the coast to 42 km in the continental interior. The Rivera plate has steeper dip than the Cocos plate and is also deeper along the coast than previous estimates have shown. Inland, there is not a correlation between the thickness of the crust and topography indicating that the high topography in northern Jalisco and Michoacan is likely supported by buoyant mantle. High crustal Vp/Vs ratios (greater than 1.82) are found beneath the trenchward edge of magmatism including below the Central Jalisco Volcanic Lineament and the Michoacan-Guanajuato Volcanic Field implying a new arc is forming closer to the trench than the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Elsewhere in the region, crustal Vp/Vs ratios are normal. The subducting Rivera and Cocos plates are marked by a dipping shear wave low-velocity layer. We estimate the thickness of the low-velocity layer to be 3 to 4 km with an unusually high Vp/Vs ratio of 2.0 to 2.1 and a drop in S velocity of 25%. We postulate that the low-velocity zone is the upper oceanic crust with high pore pressures. The low-velocity zone ends from 45 to 50 km depth and likely marks the basalt to eclogite transition.

  1. Retrograde lawsonite formation in the Franciscan subduction complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S.; Mulcahy, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Lawsonite [CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2·H2O] is an index mineral of low-temperature subduction zones, contains a significant amount of water, and is an important host of rare-earth and trace elements in mafic protoliths. For these reasons, numerous studies have investigated the consequences of lawsonite breakdown during prograde subduction. In the Franciscan subduction complex, however, lawsonite in mafic blueschist largely formed along a retrograde path from pre-existing eclogite. In order to asses the conditions and significance of retrograde lawsonite formation we examined the petrology and geochemistry of lawsonite-bearing assemblages in Franciscan mafic rocks. All of the samples have the common assemblage: lawsonite, glaucophane, and sphene. Quartz is generally absent. Muscovite, chlorite, and relict epidote and rutile are variably present. Different index minerals calcite, aragonite, albite, and jadeitic pyroxene are present within lawsonite assemblages. Garnet occurs in equilibrium with lawsonite, as a relict mineral in lawsonite and the matrix, or is completely absent. Major element compositions vary from typical basalts and are strongly correlated with one another. Chondrite normalized REE compositions are variably LREE depleted or enriched, MREE are flat to enriched, and HREE are generally flat. Trace elements normalized to NMORB show variably enriched and depleted LILE. The petrology suggests lawsonite, glaucophane, and sphene formed from multiple retrograde reactions involving garnet, clinopyroxene, epidote, and rutile, together with significant hydration. Important index minerals imply lawsonite formed over a wide range of pressures within the subduction zone. The major, REE, and trace element compositions suggest lawsonite assemblages were derived from different protoliths or experienced variable amounts of metasomatism and interaction with crustally derived material and serpentinite.

  2. Um mergulho no “Morro do Querosene” e o encontro com os artistas do invisível: reflexões sobre arte, comunidade, afeto e práxis psicossocial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Maria Camilo dos Santos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma reflexão sobre arte e comunidade, com foco na análise das afetações que a cultura popular promove em um bairro.  Vigotski é autor de referência, com sua defesa  do psicológico como fenômeno sócio-histórico, da positividade dos afetos e da concepção de  arte  como a linguagem das emoções. As reflexões partem de pesquisa realizada no “Morro do Querosene”, situado na cidade mais populosa e de maior poder aquisitivo do Brasil, que possui uma história marcada pela arte e cultura. Elas  evidenciam que a cultura popular , quando realizada na rua,  promove encontros que  favorecem  configurações comunitárias, paralelamente à explicitação das contradições e relações de poder que permeiam o cotidiano dos moradores. Os relatos  de dois mestres de expressões culturais diferentes, bumba meu boi e capoeira, sugerem que é possível fazer a vida pessoal e urbana por outras vias, oferecendo subsídios à práxis  psicossocial potencializadora do agir em comum.

  3. Silicate dissolution boosts the CO2 concentrations in subduction fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiati, S; Tiraboschi, C; Sverjensky, D A; Pettke, T; Recchia, S; Ulmer, P; Miozzi, F; Poli, S

    2017-09-20

    Estimates of dissolved CO2 in subduction-zone fluids are based on thermodynamic models, relying on a very sparse experimental data base. Here, we present experimental data at 1-3 GPa, 800 °C, and ∆FMQ ≈ -0.5 for the volatiles and solute contents of graphite-saturated fluids in the systems COH, SiO2-COH ( + quartz/coesite) and MgO-SiO2-COH ( + forsterite and enstatite). The CO2 content of fluids interacting with silicates exceeds the amounts measured in the pure COH system by up to 30 mol%, as a consequence of a decrease in water activity probably associated with the formation of organic complexes containing Si-O-C and Si-O-Mg bonds. The interaction of deep aqueous fluids with silicates is a novel mechanism for controlling the composition of subduction COH fluids, promoting the deep CO2 transfer from the slab-mantle interface to the overlying mantle wedge, in particular where fluids are stable over melts.Current estimates of dissolved CO2 in subduction-zone fluids based on thermodynamic models rely on a very sparse experimental data base. Here, the authors show that experimental graphite-saturated COH fluids interacting with silicates at 1-3 GPa and 800 °C display unpredictably high CO2 contents.

  4. Ups and downs in western Crete (Hellenic subduction zone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiberti, Mara Monica; Basili, Roberto; Vannoli, Paola

    2014-07-14

    Studies of past sea-level markers are commonly used to unveil the tectonic history and seismic behavior of subduction zones. We present new evidence on vertical motions of the Hellenic subduction zone as resulting from a suite of Late Pleistocene - Holocene shorelines in western Crete (Greece). Shoreline ages obtained by AMS radiocarbon dating of seashells, together with the reappraisal of shoreline ages from previous works, testify a long-term uplift rate of 2.5-2.7 mm/y. This average value, however, includes periods in which the vertical motions vary significantly: 2.6-3.2 mm/y subsidence rate from 42 ka to 23 ka, followed by ~7.7 mm/y sustained uplift rate from 23 ka to present. The last ~5 ky shows a relatively slower uplift rate of 3.0-3.3 mm/y, yet slightly higher than the long-term average. A preliminary tectonic model attempts at explaining these up and down motions by across-strike partitioning of fault activity in the subduction zone.

  5. Water and the oxidation state of subduction zone magmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Katherine A; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2009-07-31

    Mantle oxygen fugacity exerts a primary control on mass exchange between Earth's surface and interior at subduction zones, but the major factors controlling mantle oxygen fugacity (such as volatiles and phase assemblages) and how tectonic cycles drive its secular evolution are still debated. We present integrated measurements of redox-sensitive ratios of oxidized iron to total iron (Fe3+/SigmaFe), determined with Fe K-edge micro-x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, and pre-eruptive magmatic H2O contents of a global sampling of primitive undegassed basaltic glasses and melt inclusions covering a range of plate tectonic settings. Magmatic Fe3+/SigmaFe ratios increase toward subduction zones (at ridges, 0.13 to 0.17; at back arcs, 0.15 to 0.19; and at arcs, 0.18 to 0.32) and correlate linearly with H2O content and element tracers of slab-derived fluids. These observations indicate a direct link between mass transfer from the subducted plate and oxidation of the mantle wedge.

  6. Extending Alaska's plate boundary: tectonic tremor generated by Yakutat subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wech, Aaron G.

    2016-01-01

    The tectonics of the eastern end of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone are complicated by the inclusion of the Yakutat microplate, which is colliding into and subducting beneath continental North America at near-Pacific-plate rates. The interaction among these plates at depth is not well understood, and further east, even less is known about the plate boundary or the source of Wrangell volcanism. The drop-off in Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) seismicity could signal the end of the plate boundary, the start of aseismic subduction, or a tear in the downgoing plate. Further compounding the issue is the possible presence of the Wrangell slab, which is faintly outlined by an anemic, eastward-dipping WBZ beneath the Wrangell volcanoes. In this study, I performed a search for tectonic tremor to map slow, plate-boundary slip in south-central Alaska. I identified ∼11,000 tremor epicenters, which continue 85 km east of the inferred Pacific plate edge marked by WBZ seismicity. The tremor zone coincides with the edges of the downgoing Yakutat terrane, and tremors transition from periodic to continuous behavior as they near the aseismic Wrangell slab. I interpret tremor to mark slow, semicontinuous slip occurring at the interface between the Yakutat and North America plates. The slow slip region lengthens the megathrust interface beyond the WBZ and may provide evidence for a connection between the Yakutat slab and the aseismic Wrangell slab.

  7. Thermobarometric and fluid expulsion history of subduction zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, W.G. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1990-06-10

    Phanerozoic, unmetamorphosed, weathered, and altered lithotectonic complexes subjected to subduction exhibit the prograde metamorphic facies sequence: zeolite {r arrow} prehnite-pumpellyite {r arrow} glaucophane schist {r arrow} eclogite. Parageneses reflect relatively high-P trajectories, accompanied by semicontinuous devolatilization. The thermal evolution of convergent plate junctions results in early production of high-rank blueschists, high-P amphibolites, and eclogites at depth. Inclusion studies suggest that two-phase immiscible volatiles are evolved in turn during progressive metamorphism of the subducted sections. Expulsion of pore fluids and transitions from weathered and altered supracrustal rocks to zeolite facies assemblages release far more fluid than the better understood higher-grade transformations. Many blueschist parageneses (e.g., Western Alps) have been partially overprinted by later greenschist and/or epidote-amphibolite facies assemblages. Less common blueschist terranes (e.g., Franciscan belt of western California) preserve metamorphic aragonite and other high-P minerals, and lack a low-pressure overprint; physical conditions during retrogression approximately retraced the prograde path or, for early formed high-grade blocks, reflect somewhat higher pressures and lower temperatures. The ease with which volatiles are expelled from a subduction complex and migrate upward along the plate junction zone is roughly proportional to the sandstone/shale ratio: low-permeability mudstones tend to maintain P{sub fluid} values approaching lithostatic, lose strength, and deform chaotically (forming melange belts), whereas permeable sandstone-rich sections retain structural/stratigraphic coherence and fail brittlely (forming coherent terranes).

  8. Reevaluating carbon fluxes in subduction zones, what goes down, mostly comes up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Peter B; Manning, Craig E

    2015-07-28

    Carbon fluxes in subduction zones can be better constrained by including new estimates of carbon concentration in subducting mantle peridotites, consideration of carbonate solubility in aqueous fluid along subduction geotherms, and diapirism of carbon-bearing metasediments. Whereas previous studies concluded that about half the subducting carbon is returned to the convecting mantle, we find that relatively little carbon may be recycled. If so, input from subduction zones into the overlying plate is larger than output from arc volcanoes plus diffuse venting, and substantial quantities of carbon are stored in the mantle lithosphere and crust. Also, if the subduction zone carbon cycle is nearly closed on time scales of 5-10 Ma, then the carbon content of the mantle lithosphere + crust + ocean + atmosphere must be increasing. Such an increase is consistent with inferences from noble gas data. Carbon in diamonds, which may have been recycled into the convecting mantle, is a small fraction of the global carbon inventory.

  9. Louisville seamount subduction and its implication on mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Christian; Bassett, Daniel; Graham, Ian J; Leybourne, Matthew I; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Woodhead, Jon; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Watts, Anthony B

    2013-01-01

    Subduction of intraplate seamounts beneath a geochemically depleted mantle wedge provides a seldom opportunity to trace element recycling and mantle flow in subduction zones. Here we present trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc, west of the contemporary Louisville-Tonga trench intersection, to provide new insights into the effects of Louisville seamount subduction. Elevated (206)Pb/(204)Pb, (208)Pb/(204)Pb, (86)Sr/(87)Sr in lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc front are consistent with localized input of subducted alkaline Louisville material (lavas and volcaniclastics) into sub-arc partial melts. Furthermore, absolute Pacific Plate motion models indicate an anticlockwise rotation in the subducted Louisville seamount chain that, combined with estimates of the timing of fluid release from the subducting slab, suggests primarily trench-normal mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc system.

  10. Collapse risk of buildings in the Pacific Northwest region due to subduction earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunandan, Meera; Liel, Abbie B.; Luco, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Subduction earthquakes similar to the 2011 Japan and 2010 Chile events will occur in the future in the Cascadia subduction zone in the Pacific Northwest. In this paper, nonlinear dynamic analyses are carried out on 24 buildings designed according to outdated and modern building codes for the cities of Seattle, Washington, and Portland, Oregon. The results indicate that the median collapse capacity of the ductile (post-1970) buildings is approximately 40% less when subjected to ground motions from subduction, as compared to crustal earthquakes. Buildings are more susceptible to earthquake-induced collapse when shaken by subduction records (as compared to crustal records of the same intensity) because the subduction motions tend to be longer in duration due to their larger magnitude and the greater source-to-site distance. As a result, subduction earthquakes are shown to contribute to the majority of the collapse risk of the buildings analyzed.

  11. Geodynamic Modeling of the Subduction Zone around the Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, S.

    2017-06-01

    In this review, which focuses on our research, we describe the development of the thermomechanical modeling of subduction zones, paying special attention to those around the Japanese Islands. Without a sufficient amount of data and observations, models tended to be conceptual and general. However, the increasing power of computational tools has resulted in simple analytical and numerical models becoming more realistic, by incorporating the mantle flow around the subducting slab. The accumulation of observations and data has made it possible to construct regional models to understand the detail of the subduction processes. Recent advancements in the study of the seismic tomography and geology around the Japanese Islands has enabled new aspects of modeling the mantle processes. A good correlation between the seismic velocity anomalies and the finger-like distribution of volcanoes in northeast Japan has been recognized and small-scale convection (SSC) in the mantle wedge has been proposed to explain such a feature. The spatial and temporal evolution of the distribution of past volcanoes may reflect the characteristics of the flow in the mantle wedge, and points to the possibility of the flip-flopping of the finger-like pattern of the volcano distribution and the migration of volcanic activity from the back-arc side to the trench side. These observations are found to be qualitatively consistent with the results of the SSC model. We have also investigated the expected seismic anisotropy in the presence of SSC. The fast direction of the P-wave anisotropy generally shows the trench-normal direction with a reduced magnitude compared to the case without SSC. An analysis of full 3D seismic anisotropy is necessary to confirm the existence and nature of SSC. The 3D mantle flow around the subduction zone of plate-size scale has been modeled. It was found that the trench-parallel flow in the sub-slab mantle around the northern edge of the Pacific plate at the junction between

  12. [Arthroscopic fracture management in proximal humeral fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, H; Katthagen, C; Jensen, G; Voigt, C

    2013-04-01

    Arthroscopy has become increasingly more established in the treatment of proximal humeral fractures. In addition to the known advantages of minimally invasive surgery fracture and implant positioning can be optimized and controlled arthroscopically and relevant intra-articular concomitant pathologies (e.g. biceps tendon complex and rotator cuff) can be diagnosed and treated. Arthroscopic techniques have proven to be advantageous in the treatment of various entities of greater tuberosity fractures, lesser tuberosity fractures (suture bridging technique) and subcapital humeral fractures (arthroscopic nailing). This article presents an overview on innovative arthroscopic modalities for treating proximal humeral fractures, describes the surgical techniques and the advantages compared to open procedures as well as initial clinical results.

  13. Pediatric Phalanx Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abzug, Joshua M; Dua, Karan; Sesko Bauer, Andrea; Cornwall, Roger; Wyrick, Theresa O

    2017-02-15

    Phalangeal fractures are the most common type of hand fracture that occurs in the pediatric population and account for the second highest number of emergency department visits in the United States for fractures. The incidence of phalangeal fractures is the highest in children aged 10 to 14 years, which coincides with the time that most children begin playing contact sports. Younger children are more likely to sustain a phalangeal fracture in the home setting as a result of crush and laceration injuries. Salter-Harris type II fractures of the proximal phalanx are the most common type of finger fracture. An unmineralized physis is biomechanically weaker compared with the surrounding ligamentous structures and mature bone, which make fractures about the physis likely. A thorough physical examination is necessary to assess the digital cascade for signs of rotational deformity and/or coronal malalignment. Plain radiographs of the hand and digits are sufficient to confirm a diagnosis of a phalangeal fracture. The management of phalangeal fractures is based on the initial severity of the injury and depends on the success of closed reduction techniques. Nondisplaced phalanx fractures are managed with splint immobilization. Stable, reduced phalanx fractures are immobilized but require close monitoring to ensure maintenance of fracture reduction. Unstable, displaced phalanx fractures require surgical management, preferably via closed reduction and percutaneous pinning.

  14. Subduction of a buoyant plateau at the Manila Trench: Tomographic evidence and geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianke; Zhao, Dapeng; Dong, Dongdong

    2016-02-01

    We determined P-wave tomographic images by inverting a large number of arrival-time data from 2749 local earthquakes and 1462 teleseismic events, which are used to depict the three-dimensional morphology of the subducted Eurasian Plate along the northern segment of the Manila Trench. Dramatic changes in the dip angle of the subducted Eurasian Plate are revealed from the north to the south, being consistent with the partial subduction of a buoyant plateau beneath the Luzon Arc. Slab tears may exist along the edges of the buoyant plateau within the subducted plate induced by the plateau subduction, and the subducted lithosphere may be absent at depths greater than 250 km at ˜19°N and ˜21°N. The subducted buoyant plateau is possibly oriented toward NW-SE, and the subducted plate at ˜21°N is slightly steeper than that at ˜19°N. These results may explain why the western and eastern volcanic chains in the Luzon Arc are separated by ˜50 km at ˜18°N, whereas they converge into a single volcanic chain northward, which may be related to the oblique subduction along the Manila Trench caused by the northwestern movement of the Philippine Sea Plate. A low-velocity zone is revealed at depths of 20-200 km beneath the Manila Accretionary Prism at ˜22°N, suggesting that the subduction along the Manila Trench may stop there and the collision develops northward. The Taiwan Orogeny may originate directly from the subduction of the buoyant plateau, because the initial time of the Taiwan Orogeny is coincident with that of the buoyant plateau subduction.

  15. Plate tectonics on the Earth triggered by plume-induced subduction initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T V; Stern, R J; Baes, M; Sobolev, S V; Whattam, S A

    2015-11-12

    Scientific theories of how subduction and plate tectonics began on Earth--and what the tectonic structure of Earth was before this--remain enigmatic and contentious. Understanding viable scenarios for the onset of subduction and plate tectonics is hampered by the fact that subduction initiation processes must have been markedly different before the onset of global plate tectonics because most present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are both consequences of plate tectonics. However, plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without the help of plate tectonics. Here, we test this mechanism using high-resolution three-dimensional numerical thermomechanical modelling. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained subduction: (1) a strong, negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) focused magmatic weakening and thinning of lithosphere above the plume; and (3) lubrication of the slab interface by hydrated crust. We also show that plume-induced subduction could only have been feasible in the hotter early Earth for old oceanic plates. In contrast, younger plates favoured episodic lithospheric drips rather than self-sustained subduction and global plate tectonics.

  16. Porosity and Salt Content Determine if Subduction Can Occur in Europa's Ice Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brandon C.; Sheppard, Rachel Y.; Pascuzzo, Alyssa C.; Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Wiggins, Sean E.

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by recent evidence for subduction in Europa's ice shell, we explore the geophysical feasibility of this process. Here we construct a simple model to track the evolution of porosity and temperature within a slab that is forced to subduct. We also vary the initial salt content in Europa's ice shell and determine the buoyancy of our simulated subducting slab. We find that porosity and salt content play a dominant role in determining whether the slab is nonbuoyant and subduction in Europa's ice shell is actually possible. Generally, we find that initially low porosities and high salt contents within the conductive lid are more conducive to subduction. If salt contents are laterally homogenous, and Europa has a reasonable surface porosity of ϕ0 = 0.1, the conductive portion of Europa's shell must have salt contents exceeding 22% for subduction to occur. However, if salt contents are laterally heterogeneous, with salt contents varying by a few percent, subduction may occur for a surface porosity of ϕ0 = 0.1 and overall salt contents of 5%. Thus, we argue that under plausible conditions, subduction in Europa's ice shell is possible. Moreover, assuming that subduction is actively occurring or has occurred in Europa's recent past provides important constraints on the structure and composition of the ice shell.

  17. He isotope ratios in the Nankai Trough and Costa Rica subduction zones - implications for volatile cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, M.; Hilton, D. R.; Jenkins, W. J.; Solomon, E. A.; Spivack, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    , even along conduits, the fluids were not greatly enriched in 3He, hence there is no evidence for fluid advection from the subducting Cocos Ridge and numerous seamounts into the sediments, suggesting greatly diminished hydrothermal activity. Focused flow along faults, the décollement, splay and out of sequence faults, and fractured and permeable horizons at SZs play a key role in controlling fluid and heat transport, including mantle He, whereas diffuse flow plays a minor role; mud volcanoes and seeps as well play some role in volatile cycling.

  18. Is localised dehydration and vein generation the tremor-generating mechanism in subduction zones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagereng, Ake; Meneghini, Francesca; Diener, Johann; Harris, Chris

    2017-04-01

    The phenomena of tectonic, non-volcanic, tremor was first discovered at the down-dip end of the seismogenic zone in Japan early this millennium. Now this low amplitude, low frequency, noise-like seismic signal has been observed at and/or below the deep limit of interseismic coupling along most well-instrumented subduction thrust interfaces. Data and models from these examples suggest a link between tremor and areas of elevated fluid pressure, or at least fluid presence. Tremor locations appear to also correlate with margin-specific locations of metamorphic fluid release, determined by composition and thermal structure. We therefore hypothesise that: (i) tremor on the deep subduction thrust interface is related to localised fluid release; and (ii) accretionary complex rocks exhumed from appropriate pressure - temperature conditions should include a record of this process, and allow a test for the hypothesis. Hydrothermal veins are a record of mineral precipitation at non-equilibrium conditions, commonly caused by fracture, fluid influx, and precipitation of dissolved minerals from this fluid. Quartz veins are ubiquitous in several accretionary complexes, including the Chrystalls Beach Complex, New Zealand, and the Kuiseb Schist of the Namibian Damara Belt. In both locations, representing temperatures of deformation of tremor. In the Chrystalls Beach Complex, quartz δ18O values range from 14.1 ‰ to 17.0 ‰ (n = 18), whereas in the Kuiseb schist, values range from 9.4 ‰ to 17.9 ‰ (n = 30). In the latter, values less than 14.0‰ are associated with long-lived shear zones. Excluding the lower values in the Kuiseb schist, the δ18O values are consistent with metamorphic fluids in near equilibrium with the host rocks. We thus infer that the veins that developed on the prograde path formed at a small range of temperatures from a local fluid source. This interpretation is consistent with the veins forming in response to a spatially localised metamorphic fluid

  19. Permeability of displaced fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Christian; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido

    2017-04-01

    Flow along fractures or in fissured systems becomes increasingly important in the context of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), shale gas recovery or nuclear waste deposit. Commonly, the permeability of fractures is approximated using the Hagen-Poiseuille solution of Navier Stokes equation. Furthermore, the flow in fractures is assumed to be laminar flow between two parallel plates and the cubic law for calculating the velocity field is applied. It is a well-known fact, that fracture flow is strongly influenced by the fracture surface roughness and the shear displacement along the fracture plane. Therefore, a numerical approach was developed which calculates the flow pattern within a fracture-matrix system. The flow in the fracture is described by a free fluid flow and the flow in the matrix is assumed to be laminar and therefore validates Darcy's law. The presented approach can be applied for artificially generated fractures or real fractures measured by surface scanning. Artificial fracture surfaces are generated using the power spectral density of the surface height random process with a spectral exponent to define roughness. For calculating the permeability of such fracture-matrix systems the mean fracture aperture, the shear displacement and the surface roughness are considered by use of a 3D numerical simulator. By use of this approach correlation between shear displacement and mean aperture, shear displacement and permeability, as well as surface roughness and permeability can be obtained. Furthermore, the intrinsic measured permeability presents a combination of matrix and fracture permeability. The presented approach allows the separation and quantification of the absolute magnitudes of the matrix and the fracture permeability and the permeability of displaced fractures can be calculated. The numerical approach which is a 3D numerical simulation of the fracture-matrix system can be applied for artificial as well as real systems.

  20. Crustal Gravitational Potential Energy Change and Subduction Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P. P.

    2017-05-01

    Crustal gravitational potential energy (GPE) change induced by earthquakes is an important subject in geophysics and seismology. For the past forty years the research on this subject stayed in the stage of qualitative estimate. In recent few years the 3D dynamic faulting theory provided a quantitative solution of this subject. The theory deduced a quantitative calculating formula for the crustal GPE change using the mathematic method of tensor analysis under the principal stresses system. This formula contains only the vertical principal stress, rupture area, slip, dip, and rake; it does not include the horizontal principal stresses. It is just involved in simple mathematical operations and does not hold complicated surface or volume integrals. Moreover, the hanging wall vertical moving (up or down) height has a very simple expression containing only slip, dip, and rake. The above results are significant to investigate crustal GPE change. Commonly, the vertical principal stress is related to the gravitational field, substituting the relationship between the vertical principal stress and gravitational force into the above formula yields an alternative formula of crustal GPE change. The alternative formula indicates that even with lack of in situ borehole measured stress data, scientists can still quantitatively calculate crustal GPE change. The 3D dynamic faulting theory can be used for research on continental fault earthquakes; it also can be applied to investigate subduction earthquakes between oceanic and continental plates. Subduction earthquakes hold three types: (a) crust only on the vertical up side of the rupture area; (b) crust and seawater both on the vertical up side of the rupture area; (c) crust only on the vertical up side of the partial rupture area, and crust and seawater both on the vertical up side of the remaining rupture area. For each type we provide its quantitative formula of the crustal GPE change. We also establish a simplified model (called

  1. Stress and Strength of Seismogenic and Creeping Subduction Faults (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Bilek, S. L.; Wada, I.; Gao, X.; Brown, L.

    2013-12-01

    Force balance studies of subduction zone forearcs constrained by earthquake focal mechanisms, active faulting, and topography suggest very weak subduction megathrusts. If represented by an effective coefficient of friction μ', the ratio of shear to normal stress at failure, the average μ' value of most megathrusts is about 0.03, seldom exceeding 0.06, an order of magnitude lower than fault strengths predicted by the Byerlee's law with hydrostatic pore fluid pressure. The μ' value required to explain heat flow observations using megathrust frictional heating modeling is usually also about 0.03, regardless of whether the megathrust is seismogenic or creeping. The mechanism for the weakness is not fully understood, although it must be a combined consequence of fault zone material, fault zone fabric, and pore fluid pressure. Prior to March 11, 2011, the Japan Trench was a rare exception where pervasive margin-normal compression of the upper plate made it difficult to infer megathrust strength. But wholesale stress reversal in much of the forearc due to the M 9 Tohoku earthquake dramatically verified the low-strength (μ' = 0.03) prediction of Wang and Suyehiro (1999, GRL 26(35), 2307-2310). This value translates to depth-dependant shear strength of roughly 10 MPa at 10 km and 30 MPa at 30 km. With regard to how fault strength and stress affect earthquake processes, several issues deserve special attention. (1) There is little doubt that no megathrust is 'strongly' locked, but creeping megathrusts can be either weaker or stronger than locked faults. In fact, subduction of extremely rugged seafloor causes creeping, despite strong resistance caused by geometrical incompatibilities. Physical meanings of regarding locked and creeping faults as 'strongly coupled' and 'weakly coupled', respectively, are in serious question. (2) A μ' value of 0.03-0.05 is a spatial average. For a smooth fault, even small changes in pore fluid pressure alone can cause local deviations from

  2. Thermobarometric and fluid expulsion history of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, W. G.

    1990-06-01

    Phanerozoic, unmetamorphosed, weathered, and altered lithotectonic complexes subjected to subduction exhibit the prograde metamorphic facies sequence: zeolite → prehnite-pumpellyite → glaucophane schist → eclogite. Parageneses reflect relatively high-P trajectories, accompanied by semicontinuous devolatilization. The thermal evolution of convergent plate junctions results in early production of high-rank blueschists, high-P amphibolites, and eclogues at depth within narrow subduction zones while the hanging wall lithosphere is still hot. Protracted underflow drains heat from the nonsubducted plate and, even at profound depths, generates very low-T/high-P parageneses. Inclusion studies suggest that two-phase immiscible volatiles (liquid H2O, and gaseous high-hydrocarbons, CH4 and CO2) are evolved in turn during progressive metamorphism of the subducted sections. Expulsion of pore fluids and transitions from weathered and altered supracrustal rocks to zeolite facies assemblages release far more fluid than the better understood higher-grade transformations. Many blueschist parageneses, such as those of the internal Western Alps, have been partially overprinted by later greenschist and/or epidote-amphibolite facies assemblages. Alpine-type postblueschist metamorphic paths involved fairly rapid, nearly adiabatic decompression; some terranes even underwent modest continued heating and fluid evolution during early stages of ascent. Uplift probably occurred as a consequence of the underthrusting of low-density island arc or microcontinental crust along the convergent plate junction, resulting in marked deceleration or cessation of lithospheric underflow, decoupling, and nearly isothermal rise of the recrystallized subduction complex. Other, less common blueschist terranes, such as the eastern Franciscan belt of western California, preserve metamorphic aragonite and other high-P minerals, and lack a low-pressure overprint; physical conditions during retrogression

  3. Subduction zone forearc serpentinites as incubators for deep microbial life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plümper, Oliver; King, Helen E.; Geisler, Thorsten; Liu, Yang; Pabst, Sonja; Savov, Ivan P.; Rost, Detlef; Zack, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Serpentinization-fueled systems in the cool, hydrated forearc mantle of subduction zones may provide an environment that supports deep chemolithoautotrophic life. Here, we examine serpentinite clasts expelled from mud volcanoes above the Izu-Bonin-Mariana subduction zone forearc (Pacific Ocean) that contain complex organic matter and nanosized Ni-Fe alloys. Using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the organic matter consists of a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic compounds and functional groups such as amides. Although an abiotic or subduction slab-derived fluid origin cannot be excluded, the similarities between the molecular signatures identified in the clasts and those of bacteria-derived biopolymers from other serpentinizing systems hint at the possibility of deep microbial life within the forearc. To test this hypothesis, we coupled the currently known temperature limit for life, 122 °C, with a heat conduction model that predicts a potential depth limit for life within the forearc at ˜10,000 m below the seafloor. This is deeper than the 122 °C isotherm in known oceanic serpentinizing regions and an order of magnitude deeper than the downhole temperature at the serpentinized Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex, Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We suggest that the organic-rich serpentinites may be indicators for microbial life deep within or below the mud volcano. Thus, the hydrated forearc mantle may represent one of Earth’s largest hidden microbial ecosystems. These types of protected ecosystems may have allowed the deep biosphere to thrive, despite violent phases during Earth’s history such as the late heavy bombardment and global mass extinctions.

  4. Subduction zone forearc serpentinites as incubators for deep microbial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plümper, Oliver; King, Helen E; Geisler, Thorsten; Liu, Yang; Pabst, Sonja; Savov, Ivan P; Rost, Detlef; Zack, Thomas

    2017-04-25

    Serpentinization-fueled systems in the cool, hydrated forearc mantle of subduction zones may provide an environment that supports deep chemolithoautotrophic life. Here, we examine serpentinite clasts expelled from mud volcanoes above the Izu-Bonin-Mariana subduction zone forearc (Pacific Ocean) that contain complex organic matter and nanosized Ni-Fe alloys. Using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the organic matter consists of a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic compounds and functional groups such as amides. Although an abiotic or subduction slab-derived fluid origin cannot be excluded, the similarities between the molecular signatures identified in the clasts and those of bacteria-derived biopolymers from other serpentinizing systems hint at the possibility of deep microbial life within the forearc. To test this hypothesis, we coupled the currently known temperature limit for life, 122 °C, with a heat conduction model that predicts a potential depth limit for life within the forearc at ∼10,000 m below the seafloor. This is deeper than the 122 °C isotherm in known oceanic serpentinizing regions and an order of magnitude deeper than the downhole temperature at the serpentinized Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex, Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We suggest that the organic-rich serpentinites may be indicators for microbial life deep within or below the mud volcano. Thus, the hydrated forearc mantle may represent one of Earth's largest hidden microbial ecosystems. These types of protected ecosystems may have allowed the deep biosphere to thrive, despite violent phases during Earth's history such as the late heavy bombardment and global mass extinctions.

  5. Infant skull fracture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent protection ... a severe impact or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by ...

  6. Nasal fracture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  7. Growth Plate Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Growth Plate Fractures Page ( 1 ) The bones of children and adults share many of the same risks for ... also subject to a unique injury called a growth plate fracture. Growth plates are areas of cartilage ...

  8. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  9. Femur fracture repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000166.htm Femur fracture repair - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a fracture (break) in the femur in your leg. It ...

  10. Rib fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000539.htm Rib fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A rib fracture is a crack or break in one or ...

  11. Nasal fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000554.htm Nasal fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... that gives your nose its shape. A nasal fracture occurs when the bony part of your nose ...

  12. Hip fracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis - hip ... You may receive general anesthesia for this surgery. This means you ... spinal anesthesia . With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  13. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000553.htm Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... that connect your ankle to your toes. A stress fracture is a break in the bone that ...

  14. Everted skull fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Tyagi, Devendra K; Savant, Hemant V

    2011-11-01

    Skull bone fractures are common in trauma. They are usually linear undisplaced or depressed; however, a distinct possibility of elevated fracture remains. We describe an entity of everted fracture skull in which the fracture segment is totally everted. The nature of trauma, management, and complications of this unique case are discussed. A 21-year-old woman involved in a railway accident presented to us with a primary dressing on her wound. Investigations revealed an everted fracture skull. She underwent surgery with good results. We would like to add everted fracture skull to the nomenclature describing skull fractures in addition to elevated compound fracture skull as a new entity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Slow earthquakes linked along dip in the Nankai subduction zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Hitoshi; Asano, Youichi; Obara, Kazushige; Kimura, Takeshi; Matsuzawa, Takanori; Tanaka, Sachiko; Maeda, Takuto

    2010-12-10

    We identified a strong temporal correlation between three distinct types of slow earthquakes distributed over 100 kilometers along the dip of the subducting oceanic plate at the western margin of the Nankai megathrust rupture zone, southwest Japan. In 2003 and 2010, shallow very-low-frequency earthquakes near the Nankai trough as well as nonvolcanic tremor at depths of 30 to 40 kilometers were triggered by the acceleration of a long-term slow slip event in between. This correlation suggests that the slow slip might extend along-dip between the source areas of deeper and shallower slow earthquakes and thus could modulate the stress buildup on the adjacent megathrust rupture zone.

  16. Tectonics of the IndoBurma Oblique Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, M. S.; Seeber, L.; Akhter, S. H.; Betka, P. M.; Cai, Y.; Grall, C.; Mondal, D. R.; Gahalaut, V. K.; Gaherty, J. B.; Maung Maung, P.; Ni, J.; Persaud, P.; Sandvol, E. A.; Tun, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) is obliquely colliding with the IndoBurma subduction zone. Most of the 42 mm/y of arc-parallel motion is absorbed in a set of dextral to dextral-convergent faults, the Sagaing, Kabaw and Churachandpur-Mao Faults. The 13-17 mm/y of convergence with the delta has built a 250-km wide active accretionary prism. The upper part of the 19-km sediment thickness consists of a shallowing-up stack of prograding strata that has shifted the shelf edge 3-400 km since the Himalayan orogeny at 50 Ma. The upper 3-5 km sandy shelf to fluvial strata are deformed into a broad fold and thrust belt above an overpressured décollement. It forms a flat shallow roof thrust in the frontal accretionary prism. The structure of the deeper part of the accretionary prism, which must transfer the incoming sediments to the upper plate, is unknown. GPS indicates the downdip end of the megathrust locked zone is 25 km at 92.5°E. The deformation front, marked by nascent detachment folds above the shallow décollement reaches the megacity of Dhaka in the middle of the GBD. The seismogenic potential of this portion of the prism is unknown. Arc volcanism in Myanmar, 500 km east of the deformation front, is sparse. Limited geochemical data on the arc volcanics are consistent with hot slab conditions. One possibility is that the deep GBD slab and basement are metamorphosed and dewatered early in the subduction process whereby most of the fluids are transferred to the growing prism by buoyancy driven migration or accretion of fluid-rich strata. Since it is entirely subaerial this little-studied region crossing Bangladesh, India and Myanmar provides an opportunity for a detailed multidisciplinary geophysical and geological investigation. It has the potential to highlight the role of fluids in subduction zones, the tectonics of extreme accretion and their seismic hazards, and the interplay between driving and resistance forces of a subduction zone during a soft collision.

  17. Modeling Diverse Pathways to Age Progressive Volcanism in Subduction Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, C. R.; Szwaja, S.; Sylvia, R. T.; Druken, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    One of the best, and most challenging clues to unraveling mantle circulation patterns in subduction zones comes in the form of age progressive volcanic and geochemical trends. Hard fought geological data from many subduction zones, like Tonga-Lau, the Cascades and Costa-Rica/Nicaragua, reveal striking temporal patterns used in defining mantle flow directions and rates. We summarize results from laboratory subduction models showing a range in circulation and thermal-chemical transport processes. These interaction styles are capable of producing such trends, often reflecting apparent instead of actual mantle velocities. Lab experiments use a glucose working fluid to represent Earth's upper mantle and kinematically driven plates to produce a range in slab sinking and related wedge transport patterns. Kinematic forcing assumes most of the super-adiabatic temperature gradient available to drive major downwellings is in the tabular slabs. Moreover, sinking styles for fully dynamic subduction depend on many complicating factors that are only poorly understood and which can vary widely even for repeated parameter combinations. Kinematic models have the benefit of precise, repeatable control of slab motions and wedge flow responses. Results generated with these techniques show the evolution of near-surface thermal-chemical-rheological heterogeneities leads to age progressive surface expressions in a variety of ways. One set of experiments shows that rollback and back-arc extension combine to produce distinct modes of linear, age progressive melt delivery to the surface through a) erosion of the rheological boundary layer beneath the overriding plate, and deformation and redistribution of both b) mantle residuum produced from decompression melting and c) formerly active, buoyant plumes. Additional experiments consider buoyant diapirs rising in a wedge under the influence of rollback, back-arc spreading and slab-gaps. Strongly deflected diapirs, experiencing variable rise

  18. Effect of the Earth's rotation on subduction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, B. W.; Rodkin, M. V.; Sasorova, E. V.

    2017-09-01

    The role played by the Earth's rotation is very important in problems of physics of the atmosphere and ocean. The importance of inertia forces is traditionally estimated by the value of the Rossby number: if this parameter is small, the Coriolis force considerably affects the character of movements. In the case of convection in the Earth's mantle and movements of lithospheric plates, the Rossby number is quite small; therefore, the effect of the Coriolis force is reflected in the character of movements of the lithospheric plates. Analysis of statistical data on subduction zones verifies this suggestion.

  19. Slab2 - Updated subduction zone geometries and modeling tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, D. E.; Hayes, G. P.; Furtney, M.; Moore, G.; Flamme, H. E.; Hearne, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey database of global subduction zone geometries (Slab1.0) combines a variety of geophysical data sets (earthquake hypocenters, moment tensors, active-source seismic survey images of the shallow subduction zone, bathymetry, trench locations, and sediment thickness information) to image the shape of subducting slabs in three dimensions, at approximately 85% of the world's convergent margins. The database is used extensively for a variety of purposes from earthquake source imaging to magnetotelluric modeling. Gaps in Slab1.0 exist where input data are sparse and/or where slabs are geometrically complex (and difficult to image with an automated approach). Slab1.0 also does not include information on the uncertainty in the modeled geometrical parameters, or the input data used to image them, and provides no means for others to reproduce the models it describes. Now near completion, Slab2 will update and replace Slab1.0 by: (1) extending modeled slab geometries to the full extent of all known global subduction zones; (2) incorporating regional data sets (e.g., tomography models) that may describe slab geometry more comprehensively than do previously used teleseismic data; (3) providing information on the uncertainties in each modeled slab surface; (4) modifying our modeling approach to a fully-three dimensional data interpolation, rather than following the 2-D to 3-D steps of Slab1.0; (5) adding further layers to the base geometry dataset, such as historic moment release, earthquake tectonic providence, and interface coupling; (6) migrating the slab modeling code base to a more universally distributable language, Python; and (7) providing the code base and input data we use to create our models, such that the community can both reproduce the slab geometries, and add their own data sets to ours to further improve upon those models in the future. In this presentation we will describe our progress made in creating Slab2, and provide information on

  20. Kinematics of subduction and plate convergence under Taiwan and its geomorphic, geodetic and seismic expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppe, J.; Carena, S.; Kanda, R. V.; Wu, Y.; Huang, H.; Wu, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Deciphering the kinematics of ongoing subduction and rapid plate convergence under Taiwan is neither trivial nor straightforward. A 3D synthesis of diverse constraints is required, for example tomography, geodesy, tectonic geomorphology, stress inversion, and Philippine Sea plate motions. Eurasian-Philippine Sea plate convergence is ~90mm/y in a mildly oblique 300° azimuth relative to the ~NS nearly vertically subducting Eurasian mantle lithosphere which extends to ~500km depth. If all the current plate convergence were consumed in subduction of Eurasian mantle, the subduction flexural hinge would migrate westward at ~80mm/y, which is fast relative to the ~30mm/y long-term slip rate on the Taiwan main detachment that represents the Eurasian subduction interface under the Taiwan Central Mountains. If this fast simple subduction were occurring, subduction would too quickly outrun the mountain belt in conflict with data. Instead we estimate that subduction of Eurasian lithosphere is proceeding at ~50mm/y with the remaining ~40mm/y convergence at a lithospheric level consumed by secondary subduction above and to the east of the main plate interface. This secondary subduction is largely transient deformation that is most obvious under the Coastal Range, which represents the deforming western margin of the Philippine Sea plate during the last ~1-1.5 Ma. The thrust faults of the Coastal Range function as subduction faults with the long-term net motion of their footwalls moving largely down relative to their only slowly uplifting hanging walls, with a net secondary subduction of ~40-50km in the last ~1-1.5Ma as estimated from seismic tomography and other data. In addition we find evidence for ongoing subduction of the eastern Central Mountains of Taiwan. The crest of the mountains coincides with the western edge of the migrating plate flexure, a band of extensional geodetic strain coincides with the flexure, and an extensional stress state in the upper 5-10km coincides

  1. Management of common fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennie

    2013-02-01

    The incidence of fractures increases with advancing age partly due to the presence of multiple comorbidities and increased risk of falls. Common fracture sites in older people include femoral neck, distal radius and vertebral bodies. Nurses have an important role in caring for older patients who have sustained fractures, not only to maximise function and recovery, but as part of a team to minimise the morbidity and mortality associated with fractures in this group.

  2. Imaging of insufficiency fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestan, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringerstr. 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: christian.krestan@meduniwien.ac.at; Hojreh, Azadeh [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringerstr. 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-09-15

    This review focuses on the occurrence, imaging and differential diagnosis of insufficiency fractures. Prevalence, the most common sites of insufficiency fractures and their clinical implications are discussed. Insufficiency fractures occur with normal stress exerted on weakened bone. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common cause of insufficiency fractures. Other conditions which affect bone turnover include osteomalacia, hyperparathyroidism, chronic renal failure and high-dose glucocorticoid therapy. It is a challenge for the radiologist to detect and diagnose insufficiency fractures, and to differentiate them from other bone lesions. Radiographs are still the most widely used imaging method for identification of insufficiency fractures, but sensitivity is limited, depending on the location of the fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very sensitive tool to visualize bone marrow abnormalities associated with insufficiency fractures. Thin section, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) depicts subtle fracture lines allowing direct visualization of cortical and trabecular bone. Bone scintigraphy still plays a role in detecting fractures, with good sensitivity but limited specificity. The most important differential diagnosis is underlying malignant disease leading to pathologic fractures. Bone densitometry and clinical history may also be helpful in confirming the diagnosis of insufficiency fractures.

  3. Sprains, Strains and Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bone. Causes Injuries are the most common causes of foot and ankle sprains and fractures. Many fractures and sprains occur during ... or stumbling on uneven ground is another common cause of foot and ankle sprains and fractures. Symptoms Pain, swelling, bruising, and difficulty ...

  4. Obesity and fracture risk

    OpenAIRE

    Gonnelli, S; Caffarelli, C.; Nuti, R.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and osteoporosis are two common diseases with an increasing prevalence and a high impact on morbidity and mortality. Obese women have always been considered protected against osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. However, several recent studies have challenged the widespread belief that obesity is protective against fracture and have suggested that obesity is a risk factor for certain fractures.

  5. Turmalinitos Vulcanogênicos da Formação Morro da Pedra Preta do Grupo Serra do Itaberaba (SP): Petrografia, Composição Química da Turmalina e Implicações Metalogenéticas

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Beljavskis; Gianna Maria Garda; Marcos de Souza Mansueto; Dailto Silva

    2005-01-01

    Turmalinitos associados a anfibolitos, metachert, formação ferrífera, metatufos, rochas metassedimentares, metavulcanoclásticase calciossilicáticas são encontrados na Formação Morro da Pedra Preta, seqüência metavulcano-sedimentarbasal do Grupo Serra do Itaberaba (SP - Brasil). A deformação da rocha, que é formada por leitos ricos em turmalina alternadoscom leitos ricos em quartzo, a presença de clastos do tipo rip-up e a química de rocha total semelhante à das rochasmetassedimentares comprov...

  6. Avaliação da contaminação e poluição ambiental na área de influência do aterro controlado do Morro do Céu, Niterói, Brasil Evaluation of environmental contamination and pollution at the area under the influence of the Morro do Céu landfill dump in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina L. S. Sisinno

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available As áreas utilizadas como depósito final de lixo ­ normalmente representadas pelos "lixões" e aterros controlados ­ configuram-se como focos potenciais de poluição, influenciando negativamente a qualidade da saúde humana e ambiental nas regiões sob sua influência. Neste trabalho são avaliadas as concentrações de Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb e Zn no líquido percolado (chorume e em compartimentos ambientais (águas superficiais e subterrâneas, solos e sedimentos da área do aterro controlado do Morro do Céu (Niterói ­ RJ. A qualidade dos corpos d'água localizados nas proximidades desse aterro foi também avaliada com base na análise de outros parâmetros físico-químicos e microbiológicos complementares (pH, DBO, DQO, colimetria etc.. Os resultados encontrados mostram que as maiores concentrações dos metais são observadas no solo do sítio limítrofe ao aterro e no sedimento da vala do aterro, indicando tendência à retenção destes elementos nesses segmentos. Da mesma forma, a qualidade das águas superficiais e subterrâneas é ruim, destacando-se a presença de coliformes nas amostras analisadas, além da evidência ­ nas águas superficiais ­ de grande carga de compostos orgânicos expressos pelos valores de DQO (5.200 mg/l e DBO (2.800 mg/l, e das concentrações de Fe (6,4 mg/l, Mn (2,4 mg/l, Ni (0,12 mg/l e Zn (0,23 mg/l acima dos limites permissíveis pela legislação ambiental.In general, areas used for waste disposal represent potential foci of environmental pollution, as they can contaminate the surrounding environment and negatively impact the health of the populations living nearby. This study reports on results obtained in the analysis of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the leachate and other environmental compartments (ground and subsoil waters, soil, and sediments of an area under the influence of the Morro do Céu Landfill Dump, located in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Quality of water

  7. Multifocal humeral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, A; Pascarella, R; Bettuzzi, C; Amendola, L; Politano, R; Fantasia, R; Del Torto, M

    2014-02-01

    Multifocal humeral fractures are extremely rare. These may affect the neck and the shaft, the shaft alone, or the diaphysis and the distal humerus. There is no classification of these fractures in the literature. From 2004 to 2010, 717 patients with humeral fracture were treated surgically at our department. Thirty-five patients presented with an associated fracture of the proximal and diaphyseal humerus: synthesis was performed with plate and screws in 34 patients, and the remaining patient had an open fracture that was treated with an external fixator. Mean follow-up was 3 years and 3 months. A classification is proposed in which type A fractures are those affecting the proximal and the humeral shaft, type B the diaphysis alone, and type C the diaphysis in association with the distal humerus. Type A fractures are then divided into three subgroups: A-I, undisplaced fracture of the proximal humerus and displaced shaft fracture; A-II: displaced fracture of the proximal and humeral shaft; and A-III: multifragmentary fracture affecting the proximal humerus and extending to the diaphysis. Multifocal humeral fractures are very rare and little described in the literature, both for classification and treatment. The AO classification describes bifocal fracture of the humeral diaphysis, type B and C. The classification suggested in this article mainly concerns fractures involving the proximal and humeral shaft. A simple classification of multifocal fractures is suggested to help the surgeon choose the most suitable type of synthesis for surgical treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A plate tectonics oddity: Caterpillar-walk exhumation of subducted continental crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tirel, C.; Brun, J.-P.; Burov, E.; Wortel, M.J.R.; Lebedev, S.

    2013-01-01

    Since plate tectonics began on Earth, grandiose "subduction factories" have continually shaped the continents, accreting continental blocks and new crust at the convergent plate boundaries. An enigmatic product of subduction factories is the high-pressure to ultrahigh-pressure (HP-UHP) metamorphic

  9. A thermo-mechanical model of horizontal subduction below an overriding plate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunen, Jeroen van; Berg, A.P. van den; Vlaar, N.J.

    2000-01-01

    Subduction of young oceanic lithosphere cannot be explained by the gravitational driving mechanisms of slab pull and ridge push. This deficiency of driving forces can be overcome by obduction of an actively overriding plate, which forces the young plate either to subduct or to collide. This

  10. Subduction on the margins of coronae on Venus: Evidence from radiothermal emissivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    Retrograde subduction has been suggested to occur at three coronae on Venus: Latona, Artemis, and Eithinoha. Using the mineralogical arguments of Klose to explain surface emissivity, a study of radio thermal emissivity of Venus coronae showed that emissivity changes associated with Latona, Artemis, and Ceres imply the same crustal movements predicted by the subduction model of Sandwell and Schubert.

  11. Does subduction polarity changes below the Alps? Inferences from analogue modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luth, S.; Willingshofer, E.; Sokoutis, D.; Cloetingh, S.

    2013-01-01

    The surface expression of a lateral polarity change of continental mantle lithosphere subduction has been studied by using lithosphere-scale physical models. Key parameters investigated were: the degree of lateral coupling between adjacent domains of opposing subduction polarity, the width of the

  12. Subduction in an Eddy-Resolving State Estimate of the Northeast Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbie, Geoffrey

    2004-01-01

    Are eddies an important contributor to subduction in the eastern subtropical gyre? Here, an adjoint model is used to combine a regional, eddy-resolving numerical model with observations to produce a state estimate of the ocean circulation. The estimate is a synthesis of a variety of in- situ observations from the Subduction Experiment, TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry, and the MTI General Circulation Model. The adjoint method is successful because the Northeast Atlantic Ocean is only weakly nonlinear. The state estimate provides a physically-interpretable, eddy-resolving information source to diagnose subduction. Estimates of eddy subduction for the eastern subtropical gyre of the North Atlantic are larger than previously calculated from parameterizations in coarse-resolution models. Furthermore, eddy subduction rates have typical magnitudes of 15% of the total subduction rate. Eddies contribute as much as 1 Sverdrup to water-mass transformation, and hence subduction, in the North Equatorial Current and the Azores Current. The findings of this thesis imply that the inability to resolve or accurately parameterize eddy subduction in climate models would lead to an accumulation of error in the structure of the main thermocline, even in the relatively-quiescent eastern subtropical gyre.

  13. Using open sidewalls for modelling self-consistent lithosphere subduction dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chertova, M.V.; Geenen, T.; van den Berg, A.; Spakman, W.

    2012-01-01

    Subduction modelling in regional model domains, in 2-D or 3-D, is commonly performed using closed (impermeable) vertical boundaries. Here we investigate the merits of using open boundaries for 2-D modelling of lithosphere subduction. Our experiments are focused on using open and closed (free

  14. A two-way interaction between the Hainan plume and the Manila subduction zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mériaux, Catherine A.; Duarte, João C.; Schellart, Wouter P.; Mériaux, Anne Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between mantle plumes and subducting slabs is well accepted, but the influence of slabs on plumes has more often been portrayed than the reverse. Here we present three-dimensional upper mantle laboratory models in which a compositional plume rises underneath a subducting plate.

  15. Molecular modelling of rare earth element complexation in subduction zone fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sijl, J.; Allan, N.L.; Davies, G.R.; van Westrenen, W.

    2009-01-01

    Complexation of (trace) elements in fluids plays a critical role in determining element mobility in subduction zones, but to date, the atomic-scale processes controlling elemental solubilities are poorly understood. As a first step towards computer simulation of element complexation in subduction

  16. Rapid fore-arc extension and detachment-mode spreading following subduction initiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morris, Antony; Anderson, Mark W.; Omer, Ahmed; Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269263624

    2017-01-01

    Most ophiolites have geochemical signatures that indicate formation by suprasubduction seafloor spreading above newly initiated subduction zones, and hence they record fore-arc processes operating following subduction initiation. They are frequently underlain by a metamorphic sole formed at the top

  17. Slab melting as a barrier to deep carbon subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Andrew R; Walter, Michael J; Kohn, Simon C; Brooker, Richard A

    2016-01-07

    Interactions between crustal and mantle reservoirs dominate the surface inventory of volatile elements over geological time, moderating atmospheric composition and maintaining a life-supporting planet. While volcanoes expel volatile components into surface reservoirs, subduction of oceanic crust is responsible for replenishment of mantle reservoirs. Many natural, 'superdeep' diamonds originating in the deep upper mantle and transition zone host mineral inclusions, indicating an affinity to subducted oceanic crust. Here we show that the majority of slab geotherms will intersect a deep depression along the melting curve of carbonated oceanic crust at depths of approximately 300 to 700 kilometres, creating a barrier to direct carbonate recycling into the deep mantle. Low-degree partial melts are alkaline carbonatites that are highly reactive with reduced ambient mantle, producing diamond. Many inclusions in superdeep diamonds are best explained by carbonate melt-peridotite reaction. A deep carbon barrier may dominate the recycling of carbon in the mantle and contribute to chemical and isotopic heterogeneity of the mantle reservoir.

  18. Dehydration-induced instabilities at intermediate depths in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantut, Nicolas; Stefanou, Ioannis; Sulem, Jean

    2017-08-01

    We formulate a model for coupled deformation and dehydration of antigorite, based on a porosity-dependent yield criterion and including shear-enhanced compaction. A pore pressure and compaction instability can develop when the net volume change associated with the reaction is negative, i.e., at intermediate depth in subduction zones. The instability criterion is derived in terms of the dependence of the yield criterion on porosity: if that dependence is strong, instabilities are more likely to occur. We also find that the instability is associated with strain localization, over characteristic length scales determined by the hydraulic diffusivity, the elasto-plastic parameters of the rock, and the reaction rate. Typical lower bounds for the localization length are of the order of 10 to 100 for antigorite dehydration and deformation at 3 GPa. The fluid pressure and deformation instability is expected to induce stress buildup in the surrounding rocks forming the subducted slab, which provides a mechanism for the nucleation and propagation of intermediate-depth earthquakes.

  19. Stress fractures in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Frank; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Provencher, Matthew T

    2012-04-01

    Stress fractures are a relatively common entity in athletes, in particular, runners. Physicians and health care providers should maintain a high index of suspicion for stress fractures in runners presenting with insidious onset of focal bone tenderness associated with recent changes in training intensity or regimen. It is particularly important to recognize “high-risk” fractures, as these are associated with an increased risk of complication. A patient with confirmed radiographic evidence of a high-risk stress fracture should be evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon. Runners may benefit from orthotics, cushioned sneakers, interval training, and vitamin/calcium supplementation as a means of stress fracture prevention.

  20. Release of mineral-bound water prior to subduction tied to shallow seismogenic slip off Sumatra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüpers, Andre; Torres, Marta E; Owari, Satoko; McNeill, Lisa C; Dugan, Brandon; Henstock, Timothy J; Milliken, Kitty L; Petronotis, Katerina E; Backman, Jan; Bourlange, Sylvain; Chemale, Farid; Chen, Wenhuang; Colson, Tobias A; Frederik, Marina C G; Guèrin, Gilles; Hamahashi, Mari; House, Brian M; Jeppson, Tamara N; Kachovich, Sarah; Kenigsberg, Abby R; Kuranaga, Mebae; Kutterolf, Steffen; Mitchison, Freya L; Mukoyoshi, Hideki; Nair, Nisha; Pickering, Kevin T; Pouderoux, Hugo F A; Shan, Yehua; Song, Insun; Vannucchi, Paola; Vrolijk, Peter J; Yang, Tao; Zhao, Xixi

    2017-05-26

    Plate-boundary fault rupture during the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman subduction earthquake extended closer to the trench than expected, increasing earthquake and tsunami size. International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 362 sampled incoming sediments offshore northern Sumatra, revealing recent release of fresh water within the deep sediments. Thermal modeling links this freshening to amorphous silica dehydration driven by rapid burial-induced temperature increases in the past 9 million years. Complete dehydration of silicates is expected before plate subduction, contrasting with prevailing models for subduction seismogenesis calling for fluid production during subduction. Shallow slip offshore Sumatra appears driven by diagenetic strengthening of deeply buried fault-forming sediments, contrasting with weakening proposed for the shallow Tohoku-Oki 2011 rupture, but our results are applicable to other thickly sedimented subduction zones including those with limited earthquake records. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. [Fractures of the patella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, M; Windolf, J; Flohé, S

    2010-05-01

    Fractures of the patella account for approximately 0.5% to 1.5% of all skeletal injuries. The diagnosis is made by means of the mechanism of injury, physical and radiological findings. The kind of treatment of patella fractures depends on the type of fracture, the size of the fragments, the integrity of the extensor mechanism and the congruity of the articular surface. Independent of the kind of treatment an early rehabilitation is recommended. Modified tension band wiring is the most commonly used surgical treatment for patella fractures and can be used for almost every type of fracture. Due the superior stability in biomechanical studies two parallel cannulated lag screws combined with a tension band wiring are the treatment of choice for horizontally displaced two-part fractures. In comminuted fractures a partial or total patellectomy may be necessary. However, since the loss of quadriceps muscle power and the poor outcome total patellectomy should be considered as a salvage procedure.

  2. Fracture in Soft Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole

    Fracture is a phenomenon that is generally associated with solids. A key element in fracture theory is the so-called weakest link idea that fracture initiates from the largest pre-existing material imperfection. However, recent work has demonstrated that fracture can also happen in liquids, where...... surface tension will act to suppress such imperfections. Therefore, the weakest link idea does not seem immediately applicable to fracture in liquids. This presentation will review fracture in liquids and argue that fracture in soft liquids is a material property independent of pre-existing imperfections....... The following questions then emerge: What is the material description needed to predict crack initiation, crack speed and crack shape in soft materials and liquids....

  3. Orbital fractures: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey M Joseph, Ioannis P GlavasDivision of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USAAbstract: This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1 to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2 to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3 to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training.Keywords: orbit, trauma, fracture, orbital floor, medial wall, zygomatic, zygomatic complex, zmc fracture, zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures 

  4. Fault and fluid systems in supra-subduction zones: The Troodos ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, Dennis; Micheuz, Peter; Kurz, Walter; Krenn, Kurt

    2017-04-01

    The Troodos massif on the island of Cyprus represents a well-preserved and complete supra-subduction zone (SSZ) ophiolite. It includes an extrusive sequence that is subdivided into Upper (UPL) and Lower Pillow Lavas (LPL). These volcanic rocks contain mineralized fractures (veins) and vesicles that record fluid availability probably related to slab dehydration and deformation subsequent to a period of subduction initiation in the framework of a SSZ setting. Here, we present electron microprobe element mappings and cathodoluminescence studies of vein minerals as well as analyses of fluid inclusions entrapped in zeolite, calcite and quartz from veins and vesicles of the Pillow Lavas of the Troodos ophiolite. Two different zeolite type assemblages, interpreted as alteration products of compositional varying volcanic glasses, occur: (1) Na-zeolites analcime and natrolite from the UPL that require lower formation temperatures, higher Na/Ca ratios and pH values than (2) Ca-zeolites heulandite and mordenite from the LPL which indicate temporal or spatial varying fluid compositions and conditions. Calcite represents a late stage phase in incompletely sealed blocky type (1) assemblage and in syntaxial quartz veins. Additionally, calcite occurs as major phase in syntaxial and blocky veins of UPL and LPL. These syntaxial quartz and calcite veins are assumed to be related to tectonic extension. Chalcedony is associated with quartz and occurs in typical veins and vesicles of the LPL. In addition, the presence of neptunian dykes in veins suggests that seawater penetrated fractures throughout the extrusive sequence. Thus, circulation in an open system via advective transport is favored while diffusion in a closed system is a subordinate, local and late stage phenomenon. Calcite veins and quartz vesicles contain primary, partly re-equilibrated two phase (liquid, vapor) fluid inclusions. The chemical system of all studied inclusions in both host minerals is restricted to aqueous

  5. The role of frictional strength on plate coupling at the subduction interface

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Eh

    2012-10-01

    At a subduction zone the amount of friction between the incoming plate and the forearc is an important factor in controlling the dip angle of subduction and the structure of the forearc. In this paper, we investigate the role of the frictional strength of sediments and of the serpentinized peridotite on the evolution of convergent margins. In numerical models, we vary thickness of a serpentinized layer in the mantle wedge (15 to 25km) and the frictional strength of both the sediments and serpentinized mantle (friction angle 1 to 15, or static friction coefficient 0.017 to 0.27) to control the amount of frictional coupling between the plates. With plastic strain weakening in the lithosphere, our numerical models can attain stable subduction geometry over millions of years. We find that the frictional strength of the sediments and serpentinized peridotite exerts the largest control on the dip angle of the subduction interface at seismogenic depths. In the case of low sediment and serpentinite friction, the subduction interface has a shallow dip, while the subduction zone develops an accretionary prism, a broad forearc high, a deep forearc basin, and a shallow trench. In the high friction case, the subduction interface is steep, the trench is deeper, and the accretionary prism, forearc high and basin are all absent. The resultant free-air gravity and topographic signature of these subduction zone models are consistent with observations. We believe that the low-friction model produces a geometry and forearc structure similar to that of accretionary margins. Conversely, models with high friction angles in sediments and serpentinite develop characteristics of an erosional convergent margin. We find that the strength of the subduction interface is critical in controlling the amount of coupling at the seismogenic zone and perhaps ultimately the size of the largest earthquakes at subduction zones. © 2012. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Dynamics and Significance of Plume-Induced Subduction Initiation: Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T.; Stern, R. J.; Baes, M.; Sobolev, S. V.; Whattam, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    How did the first subduction zone form? Most present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and/or preexisting zones of lithospheric weakness, which are themselves the consequence of plate tectonics (Stern 2004). In contrast, spontaneous plume-induced subduction initiation - suggested on the basis of numerical thermo-mechanical experiments (Ueda et al., 2008) and supported by data re-interpretation of how subduction started in Late Cretaceous time around the Caribbean LIP (Whattam and Stern, 2014) - does not require pre-existing lithospheric fabric, such as are created by active plate tectonics and is viable for both stagnant lid and mobile/deformable lid conditions. Here, we present first results of high-resolution 3D numerical thermo-mechanical modeling of plume-induced subduction resulting from mechanical-magmatic interaction of an ascending thermal mantle plume with old, cold, dense oceanic lithosphere. We demonstrate that weakening of the strong lithosphere by plume-induced magmatism is the key factor enabling subduction initiation around the plume head. A large plume head is required to overcome ring confinement, and subduction initiation is further favored when plume activity and lithospheric weakening continues for several tens of Ma. We further discuss possible implications of this scenario for modern plate tectonics as well as for plate tectonics initiation in Precambrian time. ReferencesStern, R.J., 2004. Subduction initiation: spontaneous and induced. EPSL 226, 275-292.Ueda, K., Gerya, T., Sobolev, S.V., 2008. Subduction initiation by thermal-chemical plumes. PEPI 171, 296-312.Whattam, S.A., Stern, R. 2014. Late Cretaceous plume-induced subduction initiation along the southern margin of the Caribbean and NW South America: The first documented example with implications for the onset of plate tectonics. Gondwana Research, (accepted).

  7. The Two Subduction Zones of the Southern Caribbean: Lithosphere Tearing and Continental Margin Recycling in the East, Flat Slab Subduction and Laramide-Style Uplifts in the West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Niu, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2015-12-01

    The southern Caribbean plate boundary is a complex strike-slip fault system bounded by oppositely vergent subduction zones, the Antilles subduction zone in the east, and a currently locked Caribbean-South American subduction zone in the west (Bilham and Mencin, 2013). Finite-frequency teleseismic P-wave tomography images both the Atlanic (ATL) and the Caribbean (CAR) plates subducting steeply in opposite directions to transition zone depths under northern South America. Ps receiver functions show a depressed 660 discontinuity and thickened transition zone associated with each subducting plate. In the east the oceanic (ATL) part of the South American (SA) plate subducts westward beneath the CAR, initiating the El Pilar-San Sebastian strike slip system, a subduction-transform edge propagator (STEP) fault (Govers and Wortel, 2005). The point at which the ATL tears away from SA as it descends into the mantle is evidenced by the Paria cluster seismicity at depths of 60-110 km (Russo et al, 1993). Body wave tomography and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) thickness determined from Sp and Ps receiver functions and Rayleigh waves suggest that the descending ATL also viscously removes the bottom third to half of the SA continental margin lithospheric mantle as it descends. This has left thinned continental lithosphere under northern SA in the wake of the eastward migrating Antilles subduction zone. The thinned lithosphere occupies ~70% of the length of the El Pilar-San Sebastian fault system, from ~64oW to ~69oW, and extends inland several hundred kilometers. In northwestern SA the CAR subducts east-southeast at low angle under northern Colombia and western Venezuela. The subducting CAR is at least 200 km wide, extending from northernmost Colombia as far south as the Bucaramanga nest seismicity. The CAR descends steeply under Lake Maracaibo and the Merida Andes. This flat slab is associated with three Neogene basement cored, Laramide-style uplifts: the Santa Marta

  8. Pediatric Distal Radius Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Karan; Abzug, Joshua M; Sesko Bauer, Andrea; Cornwall, Roger; Wyrick, Theresa O

    2017-02-15

    Distal radius fractures are the most common orthopaedic injury that occur in the pediatric population. The annual incidence of distal radius fractures has increased as a result of earlier participation in sporting activities, increased body mass index, and decreased bone mineral density. Most distal radius fractures are sustained after a fall onto an outstretched arm that results in axial compression on the extremity or from direct trauma to the extremity. Physeal fractures of the distal radius are described based on the Salter-Harris classification system. Extraphyseal fractures of the distal radius are described as incomplete or complete based on the amount of cortical involvement. A thorough physical examination of the upper extremity is necessary to rule out any associated injuries. PA and lateral radiographs of the wrist usually are sufficient to diagnose a distal radius fracture. The management of distal radius fractures is based on several factors, including patient age, fracture pattern, and the amount of growth remaining. Nonsurgical management is the most common treatment option for patients who have distal radius fractures because marked potential for remodeling exists. If substantial angulation or displacement is present, closed reduction maneuvers with or without percutaneous pinning should be performed. Patients with physeal fractures of the distal radius that may result in malunion who present more than 10 days postinjury should not undergo manipulation of any kind because of the increased risk for physeal arrest.

  9. Plume-induced roll back subduction around Venus large coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaille, A.; Smrekar, S. E.; Tomlinson, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    On Venus, possible subduction trenches are mainly associated with large coronae, eventhough the latter are thought to be produced by hot mantle plumes. The mechanism of assocation between subduction and plume has long remained elusive. However, we recently observe the same association in laboratory experiments on thermal convection in colloidal aqueous dispersions of silica nanoparticles, which deform in the Newtonian regime at low solid particle fraction φp, and transition to strain-rate weakening, plasticity, elasticity, and brittle properties as φp increases. Hence, a dense skin akin to a planetary lithosphere grows on the surface when the system is dried from above. When a hot plume rises under the skin, the latter undergoes a flexural deformation which puts it under tension. Cracks then develop, sometimes using pre-existing weaknesses. Plume material (being more buoyant that the laboratory lithosphere) upwells through the cracks and spreads as a axisymmetric gravity current above the broken denser skin. The latter bends and sinks under the conjugate action of its own weight and the plume gravity current. The brittle character of the top experimental lithosphere forbids it to deform viscously to accomodate the sinking motions. Instead, the plate continues to tear as a sheet of paper would do upon intrusion. Several slabs are therefore produced, associated with trenches localized along partial circles on the plume, and strong roll-back is always observed. Depending on the lithospheric strength, roll-back can continue and triggers a complete resurfacing, or it stops when the plume stops spreading. Scalings derived from the experiments suggest that a weaker lithosphere than that present on Earth today is required for such a convective regime. We identified two candidates on Venus. At Artemis and Quetzelpetlatl Coronae, the radar image observations and subsurface density variations inferred from modeling the gravity and topography agree with the predictions from

  10. Melting carbonated epidote eclogites: carbonatites from subducting slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    Current knowledge on the solidus temperature for carbonated eclogites suggests that carbonatitic liquids should not form from a subducted oceanic lithosphere at sub-arc depth. However, the oceanic crust includes a range of gabbroic rocks, altered on rifts and transforms, with large amounts of anorthite-rich plagioclase forming epidote on metamorphism. Epidote disappearance with pressure depends on the normative anorthite content of the bulk composition; we therefore expect that altered gabbros might display a much wider pressure range where epidote persists, potentially affecting the solidus relationships. A set of experimental data up to 4.6 GPa, and 1000 °C, including new syntheses on mafic eclogites with 36.8 % normative anorthite, is discussed to unravel the effect of variable bulk and volatile compositions in model eclogites, enriched in the normative anorthite component ( An 37 and An 45). Experiments are performed in piston cylinder and multianvil machines. Garnet, clinopyroxene, and coesite form in all syntheses. Lawsonite was found to persist at 3.7 GPa, 750 °C, with both dolomite and magnesite; at 3.8 GPa, 775-800 °C, fluid-saturated conditions, epidote coexists with kyanite, dolomite, and magnesite. The anhydrous assemblage garnet, omphacite, aragonite, and kyanite is found at 4.2 GPa, 850 °C. At 900 °C, a silicate glass of granitoid composition, a carbonatitic precipitate, and Na-carbonate are observed. Precipitates are interpreted as evidence of hydrous carbonatitic liquids at run conditions; these liquids produced are richer in Ca compared to experimental carbonatites from anhydrous experiments, consistently with the dramatic role of H2O in depressing the solidus temperature for CaCO3. The fluid-absent melting of the assemblage epidote + dolomite, enlarged in its pressure stability for An-rich gabbros, is expected to promote the generation of carbonatitic liquids. The subsolidus breakdown of epidote in the presence of carbonates at depths

  11. Isotopic Characteristics of Thermal Fluids from Mexican Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Y.; Inguaggiato, S.

    2007-05-01

    Chemical (major and trace elements) and isotopic (H,O,N,C,He) composition of waters and gases from thermal springs and geothermal wells of Mexican subduction zone have been measured. Three main geochemical profiles have been realized: (1) along the frontal Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) zone through high- temperature Acoculco, Los Humeros, Los Azufres and La Primavera hydrothermal systems, Colima and Ceboruco volcanoes; (2) along the for-arc region of Pacific coast (12 groups of hot springs); (3) across the zone, from Pacific coast to TMVB, through the Jalisco Block. Fluids from El Chichon volcano in Chiapanecan arc system and Tacana volcano from the Central America Volcanic Arc have also been sampled. The frontal zone of TMVB is characterized by high 3He/4He ratios, from 7.2Ra in Ceboruco fumaroles to 7.6Ra in gases from Acoculco and Los Humeros calderas (Ra is atmospheric value of 1.4x10-6). These values are significantly higher than those published earlier in 80-s (up to 6.8Ra). Gases from coastal springs are low in 3He, usually < 1Ra with a minimum value of 0.2Ra in the northernmost submarine Punta Mita hot springs and a maximum value of 2.4Ra in La Tuna springs at the southern board of the Colima graben. An important feature of the TMVB thermal fluids is the absence of excess nitrogen in gases and, as a consequence, close to zero d15N values. In contrast, some coastal for-arc gases and gases from the Jalisco Block have high N2/Ar ratios and d15N up to +5 permil. Isotopic composition of carbon of CO2 along TMVB is close to typical "magmatic" values from -3 permil to -5 permil, but d13C of methane varies significantly indicating multiple sources of CH4 in geothermal fluids and a partial temperature control. High 3He/4He ratios and pure atmospheric nitrogen may indicate a low contribution of subducted sediments into the TMVB magmas and magmatic fluids. In contrast, El Chichon and Tacana fluids show some excess nitrogen (N2/Ar up to 500) and variable d15N, but

  12. Dehydration reactions in subducting oceanic crust: implications for arc volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forneris, J. F.; Holloway, J. R.

    2003-04-01

    In subduction zones, oceanic lithosphere progressively dehydrates as it sinks deep into the underlying mantle. Fluids released from the subducting slab are thought to trigger partial melting in the overlying mantle wedge, leading to the formation of volcanic arcs. Experiments were conducted in the ranges of 2.2--3.4 GPa (70 to 100 km) and 625--750^oC to determine the dehydration reactions that control fluid release from the basaltic layer of the subducting slab. The experimental duration was typically one month, although some experiments were replicated with a shorter run duration (one to two weeks) in order to identify potentially metastable phases. A mixture of a natural mid-ocean ridge basalt glass and mineral seeds was used as the starting material. Oxygen fugacity was buffered within ±1.3 log units of nickel-bunsenite (NiNiO). The results obtained indicate that the transformation of a hydrated eclogite into a nominally dry eclogite occurs through the decomposition of three hydrous phases: amphibole, lawsonite, and zoisite. Chloritoid, a mineral described as an H_2O carrier in previous experimental studies, is found to be metastable in the examined pressure-temperature (P-T) range and therefore should not be involved in the global fluid release from the basaltic crust. A detailed chemical analysis reveals that amphiboles are sodic-calcic (barroisite) at low pressures (2.2 to 2.4 GPa), but become sodic (glaucophane) with increasing pressure. This observation is the first experimental confirmation of the high-pressure stability of glaucophane in metabasalt compositions. At pressures above the stability field of amphibole, zoisite/clinozoisite becomes the stable hydrous phase at temperatures above 645^oC, whereas lawsonite is stable at lower temperatures. H_2O contents of eclogitic assemblages have been estimated based on modal abundance of minerals calculated from electron microprobe analyses. These results indicate that a slab following an intermediate

  13. Odontoid Fracture: Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Peña

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An 84-year-old male presented with left-sided posterior head, neck, and back pain after a ground level fall. Exam was notable for left parietal scalp laceration and midline cervical spine tenderness with no obvious deformities. He was neurovascularly intact, and placed in an Aspen Collar with strict spine precautions. Significant findings: Computed Tomography (CT of the cervical spine showed a stable, acute, non-displaced fracture of the odontoid process extending into the body of C2, consistent with a Type III Odontoid Fracture. He was evaluated by orthopedic spine service who recommended conservative, non-operative management. Discussion: The cervical spine is composed of seven vertebrae, with C1 and C2 commonly referred to as the Atlas and Axis, respectively. Unique to C2 is a bony prominence, the Odontoid Process (Dens. Hyperextension or hyperflexion injuries can induce significant stress causing fractures. Odontoid fractures comprise approximately 10% of vertebral fractures, and there are three types with varying stability.1 Type 1 is the rarest and is a fracture involving the superior segment of the Dens. It is considered a stable fracture. Type 2 is the most common and is a fracture involving the base of the odontoid process, below the transverse component of the cruciform ligament. This fracture is unstable and requires operative stabilization. 2 Type 3 odontoid fractures are classified by a fracture of the Odontoid process, as well as the lateral masses of the C2. Determining the stability of a Type III Odontoid fracture requires radiographic evaluation. Strict cervical spine precautions must be adhered to until adequate imaging and surgical consultation is obtained. CT of the of cervical spine fractures poses several advantages to plain film radiography due to the ability to view the anatomy in three planes. 3 However, if there is concern for ligamentous injury, MRI is the preferred modality.3

  14. Does subduction zone magmatism produce average continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellam, R. M.; Hawkesworth, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether present day subduction zone magmatism produces material of average continental crust composition, which perhaps most would agree is andesitic, is addressed. It was argued that modern andesitic to dacitic rocks in Andean-type settings are produced by plagioclase fractionation of mantle derived basalts, leaving a complementary residue with low Rb/Sr and a positive Eu anomaly. This residue must be removed, for example by delamination, if the average crust produced in these settings is andesitic. The author argued against this, pointing out the absence of evidence for such a signature in the mantle. Either the average crust is not andesitic, a conclusion the author was not entirely comfortable with, or other crust forming processes must be sought. One possibility is that during the Archean, direct slab melting of basaltic or eclogitic oceanic crust produced felsic melts, which together with about 65 percent mafic material, yielded an average crust of andesitic composition.

  15. Geoid anomalies in the vicinity of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcadoo, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    In the considered investigation, attention is given to the line source model, a surface source model, an application of the model, and a model of the thermal lithosphere associated with marginal basins. It is found that undulations in the altimetrically observed geoid of the southwest Pacific are strongly controlled by positive density anomalies in the subducting slabs of the region and the effects of elevation of the geotherm in behind arc lithosphere (corresponding to young marginal basins). Finer details of slab geometry do not obviously manifest themselves in the observed geoid. Such gravitational effects are quite attenuated at sea level and are apparently mixed with crustal effects, oceanographic noise, etc. It appears that slabs in global composite may contribute substantially to intermediate and long wavelength portions (down to spherical harmonic degree 3 or 4) of the earth's gravity field.

  16. Subduction of the Daiichi Kashima Seamount in the Japan Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallemand, S.; Culotta, R.; Von Huene, R.

    1989-01-01

    In 1984-1985, the Kaiko consortium collected Seabeam, single-channel seismic and submersible sampling data in the vicinity of the Daiichi-Kashima seamount and the southern Japan trench. We performed a prestack migration of a Shell multichannel seismic profile, that crosses this area, and examined it in the light of this unusually diverse Kaiko dataset. Unlike the frontal structure of the northern Japan trench, where mass-wasting appears to be the dominant tectonic process, the margin in front of the Daiichi-Kashima shows indentation, imbrication, uplift and erosion. Emplacement of the front one-third of the seamount beneath the margin front occurs without accretion. We conclude that the Daiichi-Kashima seamount exemplifies an intermediate stage between the initial collision and subduction of a seamount at a continental margin. ?? 1989.

  17. Experimental Determination of Chloritoid Stability in Subducting Oceanic Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forneris, J.; Holloway, J. R.

    2001-12-01

    Dehydration of subducting oceanic lithosphere is the key process for understanding arc magma generation and transport of H2O into the mantle. To establish when and how H2O may be released from the slab into the overlying mantle it is necessary to determine the stability of hydrous phases in the subducting lithosphere. In the past 10 years, experimental investigations of phase relationships in basaltic compositions representing the crustal component of the slab have led to controversial results. Results obtained by Schmidt and Poli (1998) and Pawley and Holloway (1993) on basaltic compositions under H2O saturated conditions showed the potential importance of hydrous phases other than amphibole (such as chloritoid, epidote and lawsonite) in the dehydration process. However, these results are in disagreement with the experiments of Liu et al. (1996), which showed that no hydrous phases are stable beyond the amphibole breakdown reaction at or above 650° C. In our study, piston-cylinder experiments were conducted between 2.2 GPa and 2.8 GPa at 650° C. The starting material consisted of a natural basaltic glass with blueschist/eclogite seeds and H2O. Samples were pressure-sealed in a thick-walled silver capsule with a gold lining designed to prevent hydrogen diffusion in long-duration experiments. The oxygen fugacity was fixed at or near Ni+NiO. These experiments have been focused on determining the stability field of chloritoid by running long-duration experiments (up to 1 month). Our results are in agreement with results by Liu et al. (1996): Chloritoid appears in short-duration runs (144 hours or less at 2.6 GPa and 650° C) but is not present in longer-duration experiments (696 hours or more under the same conditions). The amphiboles obtained in our run products have a glaucophane composition and seem to be stable up to higher pressures (at least 2.6 GPa) than the more calcic amphiboles obtained by the three other groups. Epidote/zoisite is present up to at least

  18. -Lesser known stress fractures-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybier, M; Hamze, B; Champsaur, P; Parlier, C

    1997-01-01

    Stress fractures of the tibia may disclose a longitudinal orientation which is obvious at bone scanning; a mild periostosis may appear on plain films; CT demonstrates a radially-oriented fracture in one aspect of the diaphyseal cortex. A cortical dissection-like vertically oriented insufficiency fracture may involve the medial aspect of the femoral shaft underlying the lesser trochanter; the fracture is concentric to the femoral cortex at CT. Insufficiency fractures of the sacrum may be misdiagnosed on plain films; bone scanning displays a typical H-shaped increased uptake which is a specific pattern. Insufficiency fractures of the pubis may appear as tumoral bone destruction; however no soft tissue mass is present at CT which in addition demonstrates normal fat tissue abutting the osseous lesion.

  19. Dynamical effects of subducting ridges: Insights from 3-D laboratory models

    CERN Document Server

    Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio; Labanieh, Shasa; Regard, Vincent; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2005.02797.x

    2010-01-01

    We model the subduction of buoyant ridges and plateaus to study their effect on slab dynamics. Oceanic ridges parallel to the trench have a stronger effect on the process of subduction because they simultaneously affect a longer trench segment. Large buoyant slab segments sink more slowly into the asthenosphere, and their subduction result in a diminution of the velocity of subduction of the plate. We observe a steeping of the slab below those buoyant anomalies, resulting in smaller radius of curvature of the slab, that augments the energy dissipated in folding the plate and further diminishes the velocity of subduction. When the 3D geometry of a buoyant plateau is modelled, the dip of the slab above the plateau decreases, as a result of the larger velocity of subduction of the dense "normal" oceanic plate on both sides of the plateau. Such a perturbation of the dip of the slab maintains long time after the plateau has been entirely incorporated into the subduction zone. We compare experiments with the presen...

  20. Nitrogen recycling at the Costa Rican subduction zone: The role of incoming plate structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunwoo; Fischer, Tobias P; de Moor, J Maarten; Sharp, Zachary D; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji

    2017-10-24

    Efficient recycling of subducted sedimentary nitrogen (N) back to the atmosphere through arc volcanism has been advocated for the Central America margin while at other locations mass balance considerations and N contents of high pressure metamorphic rocks imply massive addition of subducted N to the mantle and past the zones of arc magma generation. Here, we report new results of N isotope compositions with gas chemistry and noble gas compositions of forearc and arc front springs in Costa Rica to show that the structure of the incoming plate has a profound effect on the extent of N subduction into the mantle. N isotope compositions of emitted arc gases (9-11 N°) imply less subducted pelagic sediment contribution compared to farther north. The N isotope compositions (δ(15)N = -4.4 to 1.6‰) of forearc springs at 9-11 N° are consistent with previously reported values in volcanic centers (δ(15)N = -3.0 to 1.9‰). We advocate that subduction erosion enhanced by abundant seamount subduction at 9-11 N° introduces overlying forearc crustal materials into the Costa Rican subduction zone, releasing fluids with lighter N isotope signatures. This process supports the recycling of heavier N into the deep mantle in this section of the Central America margin.

  1. Where does subduction initiate and die? Insights from global convection models with continental drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvrova, Martina; Williams, Simon; Coltice, Nicolas; Tackley, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Plate tectonics is a prominent feature on Earth. Together with the underlying convecting mantle, plates form a self-organized system. In order to understand the dynamics of the coupled system, subduction of the lithospheric plates plays the key role since it links the exterior with the interior of the planet. In this work we study subduction initiation and death with respect to the position of the continental rafts. Using thermo-mechanical numerical calculations we investigate global convection models featuring self-consistent plate tectonics and continental drifting employing a pseudo-plastic rheology and testing the effect of a free surface. We consider uncompressible mantle convection in Boussinesq approximation that is basaly and internaly heated. Our calculations indicate that the presence of the continents alterns stress distribution within a certain distance from the margins. Intra-oceanic subudction initiation is favorable during super-continent cycles while the initiation at passive continental margin prevails when continents are dispersed. The location of subduction initiation is additionally controlled by the lithospheric strength. Very weak lithosphere results in domination of intra-oceanic subduction initiation. The subduction zones die more easily in the vicinity of the continent due to the strong rheological contrast between the oceanic and continental lithosphere. In order to compare our findings with subduction positions through time recorded on Earth, we analyse subduction birth in global plate reconstruction back to 410 My.

  2. Convective Removal of Continental Margin Lithosphere at the Edges of Subducting Oceanic Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Palomeras, I.; Masy, J.; Humphreys, E.; Niu, F.

    2013-12-01

    Although oceanic lithosphere is continuously recycled to the deeper mantle by subduction, the rates and manner in which different types of continental lithospheric mantle are recycled is unclear. Cratonic mantle can be chemically reworked and essentially decratonized, although the frequency of decratonization is unclear. Lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts can be lost to the deeper mantle by convective downwellings and delamination phenomena. Here we describe how subduction related processes at the edges of oceanic plates adjacent to passive continental margins removes the mantle lithosphere from beneath the margin and from the continental interior. This appears to be a widespread means of recycling non-cratonic continental mantle. Lithospheric removal requires the edge of a subducting oceanic plate to be at a relatively high angle to an adjacent passive continental margin. From Rayleigh wave and body wave tomography, and receiver function images from the BOLIVAR and PICASSO experiments, we infer large-scale removal of continental margin lithospheric mantle from beneath 1) the northern South American plate margin due to Atlantic subduction, and 2) the Iberian and North African margins due to Alboran plate subduction. In both cases lithospheric mantle appears to have been removed several hundred kilometers inland from the subduction zones. This type of ';plate-edge' tectonics either accompanies or pre-conditions continental margins for orogenic activity by thinning and weakening the lithosphere. These processes show the importance of relatively small convective structures, i.e. small subducting plates, in formation of orogenic belts.

  3. Why Do We Need 3-d Numerical Models of Subduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, G.; Faccenna, C.; Funiciello, F.; Giardini, D.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    We use a set of 2-D and 3-D numerical fluid dynamic experiments, modeled with different strain rate dependent rheologies (viscous, visco-plastic, power law) to ana- lyze the long-term dynamics of the subduction of an oceanic slab into an iso-viscous or stratified mantle. For the lithosphere a fluid dynamic approach has been bench- marked with our previous solid mechanical approach with the aim of overcoming the coherency problem of fluid dynamic calculations. The solid mechanical dichotomy Sstrong before failure and weak where it failsT has been cast into a specialized non- & cedil;linear fluid rheology. Analog 2-D and 3-D experiments are finally compared with the numerical experiments. 2-D numerical experiments are considered with and without free surface to investigate the limitations induced by a closed top boundary. The effect of asymmetric boundary conditions (with and without overriding plate) is analyzed with respect to the possibility of trench retreat. We clearly state the importance for the free surface analysis. 2-D experiments have inherent weaknesses: first they provide an unrealistic simulation of mantle flow (suppression of toroidal flow), second they give rise to the Sclosed boxT problem (interaction of the slab with a boundary, i.e. & cedil;660 km and the left and right box boundaries). 3-D numerical experiments permit to overcome these problems. A natural analysis of the behavior of the mantle flow during subduction and the three-dimensional behavior of the slab is thus possible. Physical observables like trench retreat and toroidal and poloidal flow are compared with the results of our companion analog 3-D experiments.

  4. Earth's first stable continents did not form by subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tim E; Brown, Michael; Gardiner, Nicholas J; Kirkland, Christopher L; Smithies, R Hugh

    2017-03-09

    The geodynamic environment in which Earth's first continents formed and were stabilized remains controversial. Most exposed continental crust that can be dated back to the Archaean eon (4 billion to 2.5 billion years ago) comprises tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite rocks (TTGs) that were formed through partial melting of hydrated low-magnesium basaltic rocks; notably, these TTGs have 'arc-like' signatures of trace elements and thus resemble the continental crust produced in modern subduction settings. In the East Pilbara Terrane, Western Australia, low-magnesium basalts of the Coucal Formation at the base of the Pilbara Supergroup have trace-element compositions that are consistent with these being source rocks for TTGs. These basalts may be the remnants of a thick (more than 35 kilometres thick), ancient (more than 3.5 billion years old) basaltic crust that is predicted to have existed if Archaean mantle temperatures were much hotter than today's. Here, using phase equilibria modelling of the Coucal basalts, we confirm their suitability as TTG 'parents', and suggest that TTGs were produced by around 20 per cent to 30 per cent melting of the Coucal basalts along high geothermal gradients (of more than 700 degrees Celsius per gigapascal). We also analyse the trace-element composition of the Coucal basalts, and propose that these rocks were themselves derived from an earlier generation of high-magnesium basaltic rocks, suggesting that the arc-like signature in Archaean TTGs was inherited from an ancestral source lineage. This protracted, multistage process for the production and stabilization of the first continents-coupled with the high geothermal gradients-is incompatible with modern-style plate tectonics, and favours instead the formation of TTGs near the base of thick, plateau-like basaltic crust. Thus subduction was not required to produce TTGs in the early Archaean eon.

  5. Migration of teleseismically triggered tremor in southwestern Japan subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, R.; Obara, K.; Maeda, T.; Takeo, A.

    2016-12-01

    Deep low frequency tremor in subduction zone is sometimes triggered by surface waves from teleseismic earthquakes. In southwestern Japan, a sequence of triggered tremor was reported for the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Miyazawa and Mori, 2006). Such triggered tremor was observed in the ambient tremor zone where the short-term slow slip events episodically occur. However, the triggered tremor is not distributed in the entire source area of ambient tremor, but is concentrated in several fixed spots. In this study, we tried to reveal accurate location of triggered tremor and investigate the spatiotemporal characteristics for understandings of condition and occurrence mechanism of triggered tremor. We detected low frequency earthquakes in tremor sequence triggered by teleseismic wave by using matched filter technique. The data were obtained at 10 NIED Hi-net stations. We used low frequency earthquakes occurred in 2014 detected by JMA as template events. Time duration of the templates is five seconds. We analyzed continuous waveform data for one hour from the origin times of 2004 Sumatra, 2008 Wenchuan, 2012 Sumatra and 2015 Nepal earthquakes. In western Shikoku, detected triggered tremor is concentrated at distant fixed two spots with an average separation of 20 km for analyzed four teleseismic events. Particularly, southwestern spot has a streak-like distribution along the dip direction of the subducting plate. In this spot, we detected along-dip migration of triggered tremor. The migration speed is about 300 km/h for 2008 Wenchuan earthquake and about 20 km/h for 2015 Nepal earthquake. Shelly et al. (2007) reported similar along-dip migration of ambient tremor at velocity from 25 to 150 km/h. Therefore, migrations of triggered tremor detected in this study suggest that the triggered tremor is also associated by slow slip event like as ambient tremor.

  6. Discrete Fracture Network Characterization of Fractured Shale Reservoirs with Implications to Hydraulic Fracturing Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, G.

    2016-12-01

    Shales are important petroleum source rocks and reservoir seals. Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing technology have facilitated high gas production rates from shale and have had a strong impact on the U.S. gas supply and markets. Modeling of effective permeability for fractured shale reservoirs has been challenging because the presence of a fracture network significantly alters the reservoir hydrologic properties. Due to the frequent occurrence of fracture networks, it is of vital importance to characterize fracture networks and to investigate how these networks can be used to optimize the hydraulic fracturing. We have conducted basic research on 3-D fracture permeability characterization and compartmentization analyses for fractured shale formations, which takes the advantages of the discrete fracture networks (DFN). The DFN modeling is a stochastic modeling approach using the probabilistic density functions of fractures. Three common scenarios of DFN models have been studied for fracture permeability mapping using our previously proposed techniques. In DFN models with moderately to highly concentrated fractures, there exists a representative element volume (REV) for fracture permeability characterization, which indicates that the fractured reservoirs can be treated as anisotropic homogeneous media. Hydraulic fracturing will be most effective if the orientation of the hydraulic fracture is perpendicular to the mean direction of the fractures. A DFN model with randomized fracture orientations, on the other hand, lacks an REV for fracture characterization. Therefore, a fracture permeability tensor has to be computed from each element. Modeling of fracture interconnectivity indicates that there exists no preferred direction for hydraulic fracturing to be most effective oweing to the interconnected pathways of the fracture network. 3-D fracture permeability mapping has been applied to the Devonian Chattanooga Shale in Alabama and the results suggest that an

  7. Avaliação da contaminação e poluição ambiental na área de influência do aterro controlado do Morro do Céu, Niterói, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisinno Cristina L. S.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available As áreas utilizadas como depósito final de lixo ­ normalmente representadas pelos "lixões" e aterros controlados ­ configuram-se como focos potenciais de poluição, influenciando negativamente a qualidade da saúde humana e ambiental nas regiões sob sua influência. Neste trabalho são avaliadas as concentrações de Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb e Zn no líquido percolado (chorume e em compartimentos ambientais (águas superficiais e subterrâneas, solos e sedimentos da área do aterro controlado do Morro do Céu (Niterói ­ RJ. A qualidade dos corpos d'água localizados nas proximidades desse aterro foi também avaliada com base na análise de outros parâmetros físico-químicos e microbiológicos complementares (pH, DBO, DQO, colimetria etc.. Os resultados encontrados mostram que as maiores concentrações dos metais são observadas no solo do sítio limítrofe ao aterro e no sedimento da vala do aterro, indicando tendência à retenção destes elementos nesses segmentos. Da mesma forma, a qualidade das águas superficiais e subterrâneas é ruim, destacando-se a presença de coliformes nas amostras analisadas, além da evidência ­ nas águas superficiais ­ de grande carga de compostos orgânicos expressos pelos valores de DQO (5.200 mg/l e DBO (2.800 mg/l, e das concentrações de Fe (6,4 mg/l, Mn (2,4 mg/l, Ni (0,12 mg/l e Zn (0,23 mg/l acima dos limites permissíveis pela legislação ambiental.

  8. Proximal humeral fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro, Craig S.

    2011-01-01

    Proximal humeral fractures may present with many different configurations in patients with varying co-morbities and expectations. As a result, the treating physician must understand the fracture pattern, the quality of the bone, other patient-related factors, and the expanding range of reconstructive options to achieve the best functional outcome and to minimize complications. Current treatment options range from non-operative treatment with physical therapy to fracture fixation using percuta...

  9. Sphenotemporal buttress fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jend, H.H.; Jend-Rossmann, I.

    1984-09-01

    A new fracture type visible of CT images of the base of the skull is described. In this fracture the sphenoidal connection to the zygomatic and temporal bone breaks off all its three extensions. It was recognized in five patients with severe head injuries. In three surviving patients it was associated with ipsilateral persistent amaurosis. This fracture should alert the investigator to the possible sequelae of the head injury.

  10. Fracture-related intracrystalline transformation of olivine to ringwoodite in the shocked Sixiangkou meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Li, Hui; El Goresy, Ahmed; Liu, Jing; Xie, Xiande

    2006-05-01

    Magnesium-iron olivine in the Sixiangkou L6 chondrite contains abundant fractures induced by plastic deformation during shock metamorphism. This study reports the discovery of lamellar ringwoodite that incoherently nucleated and grew along planar and irregular fractures in olivine. Magnesium-iron interdiffusion took place between olivine matrix and crystallizing ringwoodite at high pressures and high temperatures, which resulted in higher FeO content in ringwoodite lamellae than in olivine. This suggests that a quasi-hydrostatic high pressure lasting for several minutes should have been produced in the shock veins of the meteorite. The intracrystalline transformation of olivine to ringwoodite also has implications for phase transitions in subducting lithospheric slabs because planar and irregular fractures are commonly produced in olivine that suffered plastic deformation.

  11. Assessment of Optimum Value for Dip Angle and Locking Rate Parameters in Makran Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, A.; Abolghasem, A. M.; Abedini, N.; Mousavi, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Makran subduction zone is one of the convergent areas that have been studied by spatial geodesy. Makran zone is located in the South Eastern of Iran and South of Pakistan forming the part of Eurasian-Arabian plate's border where oceanic crust in the Arabian plate (or in Oman Sea) subducts under the Eurasian plate ( Farhoudi and Karig, 1977). Due to lack of historical and modern tools in the area, a sampling of sparse measurements of the permanent GPS stations and temporary stations (campaign) has been conducted in the past decade. Makran subduction zone from different perspectives has unusual behaviour: For example, the Eastern and Western parts of the region have very different seismicity and also dip angle of subducted plate is in about 2 to 8 degrees that this value due to the dip angle in other subduction zone is very low. In this study, we want to find the best possible value for parameters that differs Makran subduction zone from other subduction zones. Rigid block modelling method was used to determine these parameters. From the velocity vectors calculated from GPS observations in this area, block model is formed. These observations are obtained from GPS stations that a number of them are located in South Eastern Iran and South Western Pakistan and a station located in North Eastern Oman. According to previous studies in which the locking depth of Makran subduction zone is 38km (Frohling, 2016), in the preparation of this model, parameter value of at least 38 km is considered. With this function, the amount of 2 degree value is the best value for dip angle but for the locking rate there is not any specified amount. Because the proposed model is not sensitive to this parameter. So we can not expect big earthquakes in West of Makran or a low seismicity activity in there but the proposed model definitely shows the Makran subduction layer is locked.

  12. Implications for metal and volatile cycles from the pH of subduction zone fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Matthieu E; Connolly, James A D; Manning, Craig E

    2016-11-17

    The chemistry of aqueous fluids controls the transport and exchange-the cycles-of metals and volatile elements on Earth. Subduction zones, where oceanic plates sink into the Earth's interior, are the most important geodynamic setting for this fluid-mediated chemical exchange. Characterizing the ionic speciation and pH of fluids equilibrated with rocks at subduction zone conditions has long been a major challenge in Earth science. Here we report thermodynamic predictions of fluid-rock equilibria that tie together models of the thermal structure, mineralogy and fluid speciation of subduction zones. We find that the pH of fluids in subducted crustal lithologies is confined to a mildly alkaline range, modulated by rock volatile and chlorine contents. Cold subduction typical of the Phanerozoic eon favours the preservation of oxidized carbon in subducting slabs. In contrast, the pH of mantle wedge fluids is very sensitive to minor variations in rock composition. These variations may be caused by intramantle differentiation, or by infiltration of fluids enriched in alkali components extracted from the subducted crust. The sensitivity of pH to soluble elements in low abundance in the host rocks, such as carbon, alkali metals and halogens, illustrates a feedback between the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere-ocean system and the speciation of subduction zone fluids via the composition of the seawater-altered oceanic lithosphere. Our findings provide a perspective on the controlling reactions that have coupled metal and volatile cycles in subduction zones for more than 3 billion years(7).

  13. Investigating the Subduction History of the Southwest Pacific using Coupled Plate Tectonic-Mantle Convection Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, K. J.; Flament, N. E.; Williams, S.; Müller, D.; Gurnis, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene (~85-45 Ma) evolution of the southwest Pacific has been the subject of starkly contrasting plate reconstruction models, reflecting sparse and ambiguous data. Disparate models of (1) west-dipping subduction and back-arc basin opening to the east of the Lord Howe Rise, (2) east-dipping subduction and back-arc basin closure to the east of the Lord Howe Rise, and (3) tectonic quiescence with no subduction have all been proposed for this time frame. To help resolve this long-standing problem we test a new southwest Pacific reconstruction using global mantle flow models with imposed plate motions. The kinematic model incorporates east to northeast directed rollback of a west-dipping subduction zone between 85 and 55 Ma, accommodating opening of the South Loyalty back-arc basin to the east of New Caledonia. At 55 Ma there is a plate boundary reorganization in the region. West-dipping subduction and back-arc basin spreading end, and there is initiation of northeast dipping subduction within the back-arc basin. Consumption of South Loyalty Basin seafloor continues until 45 Ma, when obduction onto New Caledonia begins. West-dipping Tonga-Kermadec subduction initiates at this time at the relict Late Cretaceous-earliest Eocene subduction boundary. We use the 3D spherical mantle convection code CitcomS coupled to the plate reconstruction software GPlates, with plate motions and evolving plate boundaries imposed since 230 Ma. The predicted present-day mantle structure is compared to S- and P-wave seismic tomography models, which can be used to infer the presence of slab material in the mantle at locations where fast velocity anomalies are imaged. This workflow enables us to assess the forward-modeled subduction history of the region.

  14. Scaphoid fractures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajdobranski Đorđe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Scaphoid fractures are rare in childhood. Diagnosis is very difficult to establish because carpal bones are not fully ossified. In suspected cases comparative or delayed radiography is used, as well as computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and bone scintigraphy. Majority of scaphoid fractures are treated conservatively with good results. In case of delayed fracture healing various types of treatment are available. Objective. To determine the mechanism of injury, clinical healing process, types and outcome of treatment of scaphoid fractures in children. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed patients with traumatic closed fracture of the scaphoid bone over a ten-year period (2002-2011. The outcome of the treatment of “acute” scaphoid fracture was evaluated using the Mayo Wrist Score. Results. There were in total 34 patients, of mean age 13.8 years, with traumatic closed fracture of the scaphoid bone, whose bone growth was not finished yet. Most common injury mechanism was fall on outstretched arm - 76% of patients. During the examined period 31 children with “acute” fracture underwent conservative treatment, with average immobilization period of 51 days. Six patients were lost to follow-up. In the remaining 25 patients, after completed rehabilitation, functional results determined by the Mayo Wrist Score were excellent. Conclusion. Conservative therapy of “acute” scaphoid fractures is an acceptable treatment option for pediatric patients with excellent functional results.

  15. Hip fracture after hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulley, G.; Espley, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    In a series of 57 hemiplegic patients who subsequently fractured their hips, it was found that hip fracture occurred significantly more often on the hemiplegic side. Hip fracture was equally common in right- and left-sided hemiplegia, and often occurred within one year of the stroke. Two factors seem to be important in the genesis of hip fractures in hemiplegic patients: the tendency of stroke patients to fall to the affected side as a result of impaired locomotor function, and the development of disuse osteoporosis in the hemiplegic limb. PMID:471862

  16. [Fractures of the midfoot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boack, D H

    2004-07-01

    The immediate reduction of luxations and severe dislocations is necessary to protect the soft tissue. The soft tissue lesions determine the timing and partially the options of the operative treatment too. The conventional standard X-rays are sufficient to classify most of the fractures. Conservative treatment or minimal-invasive intramedullary techniques of fixation are sufficient in the treatment in most of the fractures. Screw- and plate-osteosynthesis are a good choice only in intra-articular fractures or sometimes in fractures of the first or fifth metatarsals. The clinical outcome is almost good and the rate of complications is low.

  17. Pathological fractures in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mattos, C. B. R.; Binitie, O.; Dormans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological fractures in children can occur as a result of a variety of conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases and infection to tumours. Fractures through benign and malignant bone tumours should be recognised and managed appropriately by the treating orthopaedic surgeon. The most common benign bone tumours that cause pathological fractures in children are unicameral bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts, non-ossifying fibromas and fibrous dysplasia. Although pathological fractures through a primary bone malignancy are rare, these should be recognised quickly in order to achieve better outcomes. A thorough history, physical examination and review of plain radiographs are crucial to determine the cause and guide treatment. In most benign cases the fracture will heal and the lesion can be addressed at the time of the fracture, or after the fracture is healed. A step-wise and multidisciplinary approach is necessary in caring for paediatric patients with malignancies. Pathological fractures do not have to be treated by amputation; these fractures can heal and limb salvage can be performed when indicated. PMID:23610658

  18. Treatment of forearm fractures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Macintyre, N R; Ilyas, A M; Jupiter, J B

    2009-01-01

    Fractures of the forearm represent common injuries. Understanding the anatomy and function of the radius, ulna, interosseous membrane, proximal and distal radioulnar joints is critical to appropriate management...

  19. Bracing for thoracolumbar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Victor; Holly, Langston T

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic fractures of the thoracolumbar spine are relatively common occurrences that can be a source of pain and disability. Similarly, osteoporotic vertebral fractures are also frequent events and represent a significant health issue specific to the elderly. Neurologically intact patients with traumatic thoracolumbar fractures can commonly be treated nonoperatively with bracing. Nonoperative treatment is not suitable for patients with neurological deficits or highly unstable fractures. The role of operative versus nonoperative treatment of burst fractures is controversial, with high-quality evidence supporting both options. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures can be managed with bracing or vertebral augmentation in most cases. There is, however, a lack of high-quality evidence comparing operative versus nonoperative fractures in this population. Bracing is a low-risk, cost-effective method to treat certain thoracolumbar fractures and offers efficacy equivalent to that of surgical management in many cases. The evidence for bracing of osteoporotic-type fractures is less clear, and further investigation will be necessary to delineate its optimal role.

  20. Pediatric Scaphoid Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Beverlie; Sesko Bauer, Andrea; Abzug, Joshua M; Cornwall, Roger; Wyrick, Theresa O; Bae, Donald S

    2017-02-15

    Scaphoid fractures are the most common type of carpal injuries that occur in children and adolescents. The injury pattern seen in children and adolescents who have scaphoid fractures has recently shifted to resemble that of adults who have scaphoid fractures, with scaphoid waist fractures being the most common injury pattern. This shift has been attributed to increased body mass index in children and adolescents as well as more intense participation in extreme sports by both children and adolescents. The diagnosis of scaphoid fractures is based on both a clinical examination and radiographic fi ndings. If a scaphoid fracture is clinically suspected but initial radiographs are negative, cast immobilization followed by repeat imaging can lead to accurate diagnosis of the injury. MRI can aid in the diagnosis of a scaphoid injury in pediatric patients with incomplete ossifi cation of the scaphoid. Acute nondisplaced scaphoid fractures have a high rate of healing with cast immobilization; however, surgery should be considered in patients who have displaced scaphoid fractures with delayed presentation. In general, patients with scaphoid fractures who undergo appropriate treatment and achieve successful union have excellent long-term functional outcomes.

  1. Fracture of the styloid process associated with the mandible fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Dubey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture of the styloid process (SP of temporal bone is an uncommon injuries. Fracture of the SP can be associated with the facial injuries including mandible fracture. However, injury to the SP may be concealed and missed diagnosis may lead to the improper or various unnecessary treatments. A rare case of SP fracture associated with the ipsilateral mandibular fracture and also the diagnostic and management considerations of the SP fracture are discussed.

  2. To what depth can continental crust be subducted: numerical predictions and critical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T.; Faccenda, M.

    2006-12-01

    We performed systematic two-dimensional numerical modeling of continental collision associated with subduction of the lithospheric mantle. Results of our experiments suggest that two contrasting modes of lithospheric subduction below an orogen can exist: one-sided and double-sided. One-sided subduction brings continental crust subducting atop the slab to the contact with hot asthenosperic mantle wedge below the overriding plate. This can result in strong heating, partial melting and rheological weakening of the crust triggering its delamination from subducting mantle lithosphere in form of compositionally buoyant structures (cold plumes) propagating away from subducting plate, passing through the hot mantle wedge, underplating the overriding lithosphere and producing large amount of relatively felsic syn-orogenic magmas at sub-lithospheric depths. One-sided subduction of the buoyant continental crust can also result in a transient "hot channel effect" triggering formation and exhumation of coesite- and diamond- bearing rocks metamorphosed at 700 to 900oC. Anomalously high temperature is caused by intense viscous and radiogenic heating in the channel composed of deeply subducted radiogenic upper-crustal rocks. Low effective viscosity of the channel subsequent to increased temperature and partial melting permits profound mixing of mantle and crustal rocks. The hot channel exists during few million years only but rapidly produces and exhumes large amounts of ultrahigh-pressure, high-temperature rocks within the orogen. Double-sided subduction can follow the one-sided mode at later stages of orogeny when significant rheological coupling between two plates occurs during the collision. In this case the orogen is characterized by double- verging structure, the layer of subducting continental crust is embedded between two negatively buoyant lithospheric slabs and delamination of the crust does not occur. This mode of subduction can bring crustal rocks from the bottom of an

  3. The Calabrian Arc: three-dimensional modelling of the subduction interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesano, Francesco E; Tiberti, Mara M; Basili, Roberto

    2017-08-21

    The Calabrian Arc is a one-of-a-kind subduction zone, featuring one of the shortest slab segments (subduction zone, we first made a geological reconstruction of the shallower slab interface (subduction interface, its lateral terminations and down-dip curvature, and a slab tear at 70-100 km depth. Our 3D slab model of the Calabrian Arc will contribute to understanding of the geodynamics of a cornerstone in the Mediterranean tectonic puzzle and estimates of seismic and tsunami hazards in the region.

  4. Uplift in the Fiordland region, New Zealand: implications for incipient subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, M A; Gurnis, M; Kamp, P J J; Sutherland, R

    2002-09-20

    Low-temperature thermochronometry reveals regional Late Cenozoic denudation in Fiordland, New Zealand, consistent with geodynamic models showing uplift of the overriding plate during incipient subduction. The data show a northward progression of exhumation in response to northward migration of the initiation of subduction. The locus of most recent uplift coincides with a large positive Bouguer gravity anomaly within Fiordland. Thermochronometrically deduced crustal thinning, anomalous gravity, and estimates of surface uplift are all consistent with approximately 2 kilometers of dynamic support. This amount of dynamic support is in accord with geodynamic predictions, suggesting that we have dated the initiation of subduction adjacent to Fiordland.

  5. Numerical Modelling of Subduction Plate Interface, Technical Advances for Outstanding Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pourhiet, L.; Ruh, J.; Pranger, C. C.; Zheng, L.; van Dinther, Y.; May, D.; Gerya, T.; Burov, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    The subduction zone interface is the place of the largest earthquakes on earth. Compared to the size of a subduction zone itself, it constitutes a very thin zone (few kilometers) with effective rheological behaviour that varies as a function of pressure, temperature, loading, nature of the material locally embedded within the interface as well as the amount of water, melts and CO2. Capturing the behaviour of this interface and its evolution in time is crucial, yet modelling it is not an easy task. In the last decade, thermo-mechanical models of subduction zone have flourished in the literature. They mostly focused on the long-term dynamics of the subduction; e.g. flat subduction, slab detachment or exhumation. The models were validated models against PTt path of exhumed material as well as topography. The models that could reproduce the data all included a mechanically weak subduction channel made of extremely weak and non cohesive material. While this subduction channel model is very convenient at large scale and might apply to some real subduction zones, it does not capture the many geological field evidences that point out the exhumation of very large slice of almost pristine oceanic crust along localised shear zone. Moreover, modelling of sismological and geodetic data using short term tectonic modelling approach also point out that large localised patches rupture within the subduction interface, which is in accordance with geological data but not with large-scale long-term tectonic models. I will present how high resolution models permit to produce slicing at the subduction interface and give clues on how the plate coupling and effective location of the plate interface vary over a few millions of year time scale. I will then discuss the implication of these new high-resolution long-term models of subduction zone on earthquake generation, report progress in the development of self-consistent thermomechanical codes which can handle large strain, high resolution

  6. Blueschist facies pseudotachylytes from Corsica: First account of fossil earthquakes from a subduction complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T. B.; Austrheim, H.

    2003-04-01

    Pseudotachylytes (PST) are products of deformation at extreme slip-rates along faults or in impact structures. Fault-plane PSTs are considered to represent fossil earthquakes. Tectonics in subduction zones, generate >80% of the seismic energy. Earthquake rocks should therefore also be common in old subduction complexes. Blueschist terrains are formed in the upper 15 to 50 km by tectonic burial in accreationary complexes and subduction zones. In spite of the very common earthquakes recorded from present-day subduction complexes, we are unaware of previous accounts of fossil earthquakes from exhumed subduction complexes. With a working hypothesis predicting fossil earthquakes to be preserved in subduction complexes, we have re-examined parts of the Alpine blueschist-eclogite terrain in Corsica. Within blueschist facies ophiolite gabbro and peridotite of Cape Corse, we discovered a number of faults decorated with ultra-fine fault rocks including PSTs. Detailed probe and SEM-studies reveal that some of the PSTs have quench textures proving the former presence of a melt. Quenched minerals, including fassaitic pyroxene are found as spherulites and dendrites. Fassaite has previously been described from UHP complexes and from PSTs formed in HP experiments. Other devitrification minerals include glaucophane, barroisite and zoisite as well as pumpellyite and albite. Our hypothesis -- fossil earthquakes in the form of frictional heat generated PST and ultra-cataclasite may be preserved within subduction complexes -- has been confirmed. Whilst most models view the properties of subducted lithosphere as a function of temperature, it is increasingly recognized that the rheological properties of rocks depend on their metamorphic status and importantly on fluids. Fluids from dehydration reactions in subduction complexes may reduce the effective stress to allow rapid brittle failure, which in turn may produce frictional heating and additional dehydration. It is, however, also

  7. Hip Fractures among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online training for health care providers. Learn More Hip Fractures Among Older Adults Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... get older. What You Can Do to Prevent Hip Fractures You can prevent hip fractures by taking steps ...

  8. Compression fractures of the back

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most effective way to prevent compression or insufficiency fractures. Getting regular load-bearing exercise (such as walking) can help you avoid bone loss. Alternative Names Vertebral compression fractures Images Compression fracture References Cosman F, de Beur ...

  9. The Process of Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydraulic fracturing, know as fracking or hydrofracking, produces fractures in a rock formation by pumping fluids (water, proppant, and chemical additives) at high pressure down a wellbore. These fractures stimulate the flow of natural gas or oil.

  10. Garnet cannibalism provides clues to extensive hydration of lower crustal fragments in a subduction channel (Sesia Zone, Northwestern Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntoli, Francesco; Lanari, Pierre; Engi, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The extent to which granulites are transformed to eclogites is thought to impose critical limits on the subduction of continental lower crust. Although it is seldom possible to document such densification processes in detail, the transformation is believed to depend on fluid access and deformation. Remarkably complex garnet porphyroblasts are widespread in eclogite facies micaschists in central parts of the Sesia Zone (Western Italian Alps). They occur in polydeformed samples in assemblages involving phengite+quartz+rutile ±paragonite, Na-amphibole, Na-pyroxene, chloritoid. Detailed study of textural and compositional types reveals a rich inventory of growth and partial resorption zones in garnet. These reflect several stages of the polycyclic metamorphic evolution. A most critical observation is that the relict garnet cores indicate growth at 900 °C and 0.9 GPa. This part of the Eclogitic Micaschist Complex thus derived from granulite facies metapelites of Permian age. These dry rocks must have been extensively hydrated during Cretaceous subduction, and garnet records the conditions of these processes. Garnet from micaschist containing rutile, epidote, paragonite and phengite were investigated in detail. Two types of garnet crystals are found in many thin sections: mm-size porphyroclasts and smaller atoll garnets, some 100 µm in diameter. X-ray maps of the porphyroclasts show complex zoning in garnet: a late Paleozoic HT-LP porphyroclastic core is overgrown by several layers of HP-LT Alpine garnet, these show evidence of growth at the expense of earlier garnet generations. Textures indicate 1-2 stages of resorption, with garnet cores that were fractured and then sealed by garnet veins, rimmed by multiple Alpine overgrowth rims with lobate edges. Garnet rim 1 forms peninsula and embayment structures at the expense of the core. Rim 2 surrounds rim 1, both internally and externally, and seems to have grown mainly at the expense of the core. Rim 3 grew mainly at

  11. Displaced patella fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rocca, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Displaced patella fractures often result in disruption of the extensor mechanism of the knee. An intact extensor mechanism is a requirement for unassisted gait. Therefore, operative treatment of the displaced patella fracture is generally recommended. The evaluation of the patella fracture patient includes examination of extensor mechanism integrity. Operative management of patella fractures normally includes open reduction with internal fixation, although partial patellectomy is occasionally performed, with advancement of quadriceps tendon or patellar ligament to the fracture bed. Open reduction with internal fixation has historically been performed utilizing anterior tension band wiring, although comminution of the fracture occasionally makes this fixation construct inadequate. Supplementation or replacement of the tension band wire construct with interfragmentary screws, cerclage wire or suture, and/or plate-and-screw constructs may add to the stability of the fixation construct. Arthrosis of the patellofemoral joint is very common after healing of patella fractures, and substantial functional deficits may persist long after fracture healing has occurred. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Vertebral Fracture Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Vertebral Fracture Prediction A method of processing data derived from an image of at least part of a spine is provided for estimating the risk of a future fracture in vertebraeof the spine. Position data relating to at least four neighbouring vertebrae of the spine is processed. The curvature...

  13. Atypical femoral fractures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-24

    Jan 24, 2013 ... A 73 year-old female patient was admitted to the orthogeriatrics unit at Helen Joseph Hospital in 2012 with a fracture of her right femur, following a fall from standing height. She was known to have severe osteoporosis, having sustained multiple previous fragility fractures involving her right distal radius, left ...

  14. Reconstructing Farallon plate subduction beneath North America back to the Late Cretaceous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Spasojevic, Sonja; Gurnis, Michael

    2008-11-07

    Using an inverse mantle convection model that assimilates seismic structure and plate motions, we reconstruct Farallon plate subduction back to 100 million years ago. Models consistent with stratigraphy constrain the depth dependence of mantle viscosity and buoyancy, requiring that the Farallon slab was flat lying in the Late Cretaceous, consistent with geological reconstructions. The simulation predicts that an extensive zone of shallow-dipping subduction extended beyond the flat-lying slab farther east and north by up to 1000 kilometers. The limited region of flat subduction is consistent with the notion that subduction of an oceanic plateau caused the slab to flatten. The results imply that seismic images of the current mantle provide more constraints on past tectonic events than previously recognized.

  15. Observing mesoscale eddy effects on mode-water subduction and transport in the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lixiao; Li, Peiliang; Xie, Shang-Ping; Liu, Qinyu; Liu, Cong; Gao, Wendian

    2016-02-01

    While modelling studies suggest that mesoscale eddies strengthen the subduction of mode waters, this eddy effect has never been observed in the field. Here we report results from a field campaign from March 2014 that captured the eddy effects on mode-water subduction south of the Kuroshio Extension east of Japan. The experiment deployed 17 Argo floats in an anticyclonic eddy (AC) with enhanced daily sampling. Analysis of over 3,000 hydrographic profiles following the AC reveals that potential vorticity and apparent oxygen utilization distributions are asymmetric outside the AC core, with enhanced subduction near the southeastern rim of the AC. There, the southward eddy flow advects newly ventilated mode water from the north into the main thermocline. Our results show that subduction by eddy lateral advection is comparable in magnitude to that by the mean flow--an effect that needs to be better represented in climate models.

  16. Oblique subduction modelling indicates along-trench tectonic transport of sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, Cristina; Gerya, Taras; Crispini, Laura; Federico, Laura; Capponi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Convergent plate margins are currently distinguished as 'accretional' or 'erosional', depending on the tendency to accumulate sediments, or not, at the trench. Accretion and erosion can coexist along the same margin and we have noticed that this mostly occurs where subduction is oblique. Here we show that at oblique subduction zones, sediments that enter the trench are first buried, and later migrate laterally parallel to the trench and at various depths. Lateral migration of sediments continues until they reach a physical barrier where they begin to accumulate. The accretionary wedge size decreases along the trench moving away from the barrier. We therefore suggest that the gradual variation of the accretionary wedge size and sediment amount at the trench along one single subduction zone, as observed in many active plate margins worldwide, can be explained by the lateral tectonic migration of sediments driven by obliquity of subduction as well.

  17. A Computer-Based Subduction-Zone-Earthquake Exercise for Introductory-Geology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, James Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Describes the author's computer-based program for a subduction-zone-earthquake exercise. Instructions for conducting the activity and obtaining the program from the author are provided. Written in IBM QuickBasic. (PR)

  18. Origin and consequences of western Mediterranean subduction, rollback, and slab segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269263624; Vissers, R.L.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068789203; Spakman, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074103164

    2014-01-01

    The western Mediterranean recorded subduction rollback, slab segmentation and separation. Here we address the questions of what caused Oligocene rollback initiation, and how its subsequent evolution split up an originally coherent fore arc into circum-southwest Mediterranean segments. We

  19. Chromium isotope signature during continental crust subduction recorded in metamorphic rocks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shen, Ji; Liu, Jia; Qin, Liping; Wang, Shui‐Jiong; Li, Shuguang; Xia, Jiuxing; Ke, Shan; Yang, Jingsui

    2015-01-01

    The chromium isotope compositions of 27 metamorphic mafic rocks with varying metamorphic degrees from eastern China were systematically measured to investigate the Cr isotope behavior during continental crust subduction...

  20. Probing the transition between seismically coupled and decoupled segments along an ancient subduction interface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Angiboust, Samuel; Kirsch, Josephine; Oncken, Onno; Glodny, Johannes; Monié, Patrick; Rybacki, Erik

    2015-01-01

    ... as the focus site of episodic tremor and slip features. Exhumed remnants of the former Alpine subduction zone found in the Swiss Alps allow analyzing fluid and deformation processes near the transition zone region (30–40 km paleodepth...

  1. Frictional behaviour of megathrust fault gouges under in-situ subduction zone conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, S.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Subduction zone megathrusts generate the largest earthquakes and tsunamis known. Understanding and modelling “seismogenesis” on such faults requires an understanding of the frictional processes that control nucleation and propagation of seismic slip. However, experimental data on the frictional

  2. Dating fractures in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, K.E., E-mail: kath.halliday@nuh.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Broderick, N.J.; Somers, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Hawkes, R. [Department of Radiology, Paul O' Gorman Building, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To document the timing of the appearance of the radiological features of fracture healing in a group of infants in which the date of injury was known and to assess the degree of interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: Three paediatric radiologists independently assessed 161 images of 37 long bone fractures in 31 patients aged 0-44 months. The following features were assessed: soft-tissue swelling, subperiosteal new bone formation (SPNBF), definition of fracture line, presence or absence of callus, whether callus was well or ill defined, and the presence of endosteal callus. Results: Agreement between observers was only moderate for all discriminators except SPNBF. SPNBF was invariably seen after 11 days but was uncommon before this time even in the very young. In one case SPNBF was seen at 4 days. Conclusion: With the exception of SPNBF, the criteria relied on to date fractures are either not reproducible or are poor discriminators of fracture age.

  3. Proximal femoral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Teixidor, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    -displaced femoral neck fractures and prosthesis for displaced among the elderly; and sliding hip screw for stabile- and intramedullary nails for unstable- and sub-trochanteric fractures) but they are based on a variety of criteria and definitions - and often leave wide space for the individual surgeons' subjective...... guidelines for hip fracture surgery and discuss a method for future pathway/guideline implementation and evaluation. METHODS: By a PubMed search in March 2015 six studies of surgical treatment pathways covering all types of proximal femoral fractures with publication after 1995 were identified. Also we...... searched the homepages of the national heath authorities and national orthopedic societies in West Europe and found 11 national or regional (in case of no national) guidelines including any type of proximal femoral fracture surgery. RESULTS: Pathway consensus is outspread (internal fixation for un...

  4. Tibial Plateau Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsøe, Rasmus

    This PhD thesis reported an incidence of tibial plateau fractures of 10.3/100,000/year in a complete Danish regional population. The results reported that patients treated for a lateral tibial plateau fracture with bone tamp reduction and percutaneous screw fixation achieved a satisfactory level...... with only the subgroup Sport significantly below the age matched reference population. The thesis reports a level of health related quality of life (Eq5d) and disability (KOOS) significantly below established reference populations for patients with bicondylar tibial plateau fracture treated with a ring...... fixator, both during treatment and at 19 months following injury. In general, the thesis demonstrates that the treatment of tibial plateau fractures are challenging and that some disabilities following these fractures must be expected. Moreover, the need for further research in the area, both with regard...

  5. Electrical conductivity imaging in the western Pacific subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Hisashi; Baba, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi

    2010-05-01

    Oceanic plate subduction is an important process for the dynamics and evolution of the Earth's interior, as it is regarded as a typical downward flow of the mantle convection that transports materials from the near surface to the deep mantle. Recent seismological study showed evidence suggesting the transportation of a certain amount of water by subduction of old oceanic plate such as the Pacific plate down to 150-200 km depth into the back arc mantle. However it is not well clarified how deep into the mantle the water can be transported. The electromagnetic induction method to image electrical conductivity distribution is a possible tool to answer this question as it is known to be sensitive to the presence of water. Here we show recent result of observational study from the western Pacific subduction zone to examine the electrical conductivity distribution in the upper mantle and in the mantle transition zone (MTZ), which will provide implications how water distributes in the mantle. We take two kinds of approach for imaging the mantle conductivity, (a) semi-global and (b) regional induction approaches. Result may be summarized as follows: (a) Long (5-30 years) time series records from 8 submarine cables and 13 geomagnetic observatories in the north Pacific region were analyzed and long period magnetotelluric (MT) and geomagnetic deep sounding (GDS) responses were estimated in the period range from 1.7 to 35 days. These frequency dependent response functions were inverted to 3-dimensional conductivity distribution in the depth range between 350 and 850 km. Three major features are suggested in the MTZ depth such as, (1) a high conductivity anomaly beneath the Philippine Sea, (2) a high conductivity anomaly beneath the Hawaiian Islands, and (3) a low conductivity anomaly beneath and in the vicinity of northern Japan. (b) A three-year long deployment of ocean bottom electro-magnetometers (OBEM's) was conducted in the Philippine Sea and west Pacific Ocean from 2005

  6. Dating Subduction Zone Metamorphism with Garnet and Lawsonite Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, S. R.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Lawsonite [CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2 H2O] is a critical index mineral for high- to ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism associated with subduction. Lawsonite is an important carrier of water into the mantle, a likely contributor to subduction zone seismicity, and a bearer of trace elements that link metamorphism to arc magmatism. Due to its limited pressure-temperature stability, lawsonite can serve as a powerful petrogenetic indicator of specific metamorphic events. Lu-Hf dating of lawsonite, therefore provides a potentially powerful new tool for constraining subduction zone processes in a pressure-temperature window where few successful geochronometers exist. Broad application of lawsonite Lu-Hf geochronology requires constraining the role of pressure-temperature path, lawsonite forming reactions, and the Lu and Hf systematics within lawsonite and other blueschist facies minerals. We are working to address the role of the metamorphic path on the applicability of lawsonite Lu-Hf geochronology within the Franciscan Complex of California. The Franciscan Complex preserves mafic high-grade exotic blocks in melange that underwent a counterclockwise pressure-temperature path wherein garnet, which strongly partitions heavy rare-earth elements, formed prior to lawsonite. Coherent mafic rocks within the Franciscan Complex, however, underwent a clockwise pressure-temperature path and lawsonite growth occurred prior to garnet. We sampled exotic blocks of garnet-hornblendite, garnet-epidote amphibolite, garnet-epidote blueschist, and lawsonite blueschist from the Berkeley Hills and Tiburon Peninsula of California. We collected four samples from coherent lawsonite blueschist across the lawsonite-pumpellyite-epidote isograds in Ward Creek, near Cazadero California. High-grade blocks give ages similar to existing Franciscan geochronology: multi-stage garnet in hornblendite gives the following ages: 171×1.3 Ma (MSWD 2.8) for the core and 159.4×0.9 Ma (MSWD 2.0) for the corresponding rim; 166

  7. Trading Time with Space - Development of subduction zone parameter database for a maximum magnitude correlation assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2017-04-01

    Subduction zones are generally the sources of the earthquakes with the highest magnitudes. Not only in Japan or Chile, but also in Pakistan, the Solomon Islands or for the Lesser Antilles, subduction zones pose a significant hazard for the people. To understand the behavior of subduction zones, especially to identify their capabilities to produce maximum magnitude earthquakes, various physical models have been developed leading to a large number of various datasets, e.g. from geodesy, geomagnetics, structural geology, etc. There have been various studies to utilize this data for the compilation of a subduction zone parameters database, but mostly concentrating on only the major zones. Here, we compile the largest dataset of subduction zone parameters both in parameter diversity but also in the number of considered subduction zones. In total, more than 70 individual sources have been assessed and the aforementioned parametric data have been combined with seismological data and many more sources have been compiled leading to more than 60 individual parameters. Not all parameters have been resolved for each zone, since the data completeness depends on the data availability and quality for each source. In addition, the 3D down-dip geometry of a majority of the subduction zones has been resolved using historical earthquake hypocenter data and centroid moment tensors where available and additionally compared and verified with results from previous studies. With such a database, a statistical study has been undertaken to identify not only correlations between those parameters to estimate a parametric driven way to identify potentials for maximum possible magnitudes, but also to identify similarities between the sources themselves. This identification of similarities leads to a classification system for subduction zones. Here, it could be expected if two sources share enough common characteristics, other characteristics of interest may be similar as well. This concept

  8. Subduction and Slab Advance at Orogen Syntaxes: Predicting Exhumation Rates and Thermochronometric Ages with Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettesheim, Matthias; Ehlers, Todd A.; Whipp, David M.

    2017-04-01

    The change in plate boundary orientation and subducting plate geometry along orogen syntaxes may have major control on the subduction and exhumation dynamics at these locations. Previous work documents that the curvature of subducting plates in 3D at orogen syntaxes forces a buckling and flexural stiffening of the downgoing plate. The geometry of this stiffened plate region, also called indenter, can be observed in various subduction zones around the world (e.g. St. Elias Range, Alaska; Cascadia, USA; Andean syntaxis, South America). The development of a subducting, flexurally stiffened indenter beneath orogen syntaxes influences deformation in the overriding plate and can lead to accelerated and focused rock uplift above its apex. Moreover, the style of deformation in the overriding plate is influenced by the amount of trench or slab advance, which is the amount of overall shortening not accommodated by underthrusting. While many subduction zones exhibit little to no slab advance, the Nazca-South America subduction and especially the early stages of the India-Eurasia collision provide end-member examples. Here, we use a transient, lithospheric-scale, thermomechanical 3D model of an orogen syntaxis to investigate the effects of subducting a flexurally stiffened plate geometry and slab advance on upper plate deformation. A visco-plastic upper-plate rheology is used, along with a buckled, rigid subducting plate. The free surface of the thermomechanical model is coupled to a landscape evolution model that accounts for erosion by fluvial and hillslope processes. The cooling histories of exhumed rocks are used to predict the evolution of low-temperature thermochronometer ages on the surface. With a constant overall shortening for all simulations, the magnitude of slab advance is varied stepwise from no advance, with all shortening accommodated by underthrusting, to full slab advance, i.e. no motion on the megathrust. We show that in models where most shortening is

  9. Bone fractures after menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Every year 30% of individuals above age 65 fall, and falls are the principal cause of bone fractures. To reduce fracture incidence requires both prevention of falls and maintenance of bone strength. PubMed searches were performed, for studies of the epidemiology of fractures, bone physiology, endocrine effects, osteoporosis measurement, genetics, prevention and effectiveness. Topic summaries were presented to the Workshop Group and omissions or disagreements were resolved by discussion. Ageing reduces bone strength in post-menopausal women because estrogen deficiency causes accelerated bone resorption. Bone mineral density (BMD) decreased more than 2.5 standard deviation below the mean of healthy young adults defines osteoporosis, a condition associated with an increased risk of fractures. Risk factors such as age and previous fracture are combined with BMD for a more accurate prediction of fracture risk. The most widely used assessment tool is FRAX™ which combines clinical risk factors and femoral neck BMD. General preventive measures include physical exercise to reduce the risk of falling and vitamin D to facilitate calcium absorption. Pharmacological interventions consist mainly in the administration of inhibitors of bone resorption. Randomized controlled trials show treatment improves BMD, and may reduce the relative fracture risk by about 50% for vertebral, 20-25% for non-vertebral and up to 40% for hip fractures although the absolute risk reductions are much lower. Although diagnosis of osteoporosis is an important step, the threshold for treatment to prevent fractures depends on additional clinical risk factors. None of the presently available treatment options provide complete fracture prevention.

  10. Influence of Initial Geometry and Boundary Conditions on Flat Subduction Models and Resulting Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P.; Moucha, R.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical investigations of surface deformation in response to flat slab subduction began with seminal papers by Bird (1988) and Mitrovica et al. (1989). Recently, a number of numerical studies have begun to explore the complexity in the dynamics of flat-slab subduction initiation and continuation, but did not address the corresponding surface deformation (English et al., 2003; Pérez-Campos et al., 2008; Liu et al., 2010; Jones et al., 2011; Arrial and Billen, 2013; Vogt and Gerya, 2014). Herein, we explore the conditions that lead to flat-slab subduction and characterize the resulting surface deformation using a 2D finite-difference marker-in-cell method. We specifically explore how initial model geometry and boundary conditions affect the evolution of the angle at which a slab subducts in the presence/absence of a buoyant oceanic plateau and the resulting surface topography. In our simulations, the surface is tracked through time as an internal erosion/sedimentation surface. The top boundary of the crust is overlaid by a "sticky" (viscous 10^17 Pa.s) water/air layer with correspondingly stratified densities. We apply a coupled surface processes model that solves the sediment transport/diffusion erosion equation at each time step to account for the corresponding crustal mass flux and its effect on crustal deformation. Model results show the initial angle of subduction has a substantial impact on the subduction angle of the slab and hence the evolution of topography. The results also indicate plate velocity and the presence of an oceanic plateau in a forced subduction only have a moderate effect on the angle of subduction.

  11. May eclogite dehydration cause slab fracturation ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loury, Chloé; Lanari, Pierre; Rolland, Yann; Guillot, Stéphane; Ganino, Clément

    2015-04-01

    prograde path, leading to a complete dehydration at the pressure peak conditions, (25 kbar and 510°C). The amount of water released during this stage is about 20 g/dm3. In this example, no hydration event is recorded during the exhumation, explaining the good preservation of the anhydrous eclogite. This study shows that garnet thermobarometry in eclogite may be used as a proxy for progressive oceanic crust dehydration as suggested by the models of Baxter & Caddick (2014). In contrast to such models, the estimations proposed in the present study are based on the measured composition of local domains in rock-samples and not on average bulk rock compositions. Complete dehydration of eclogites around 75 km corresponds to the maximum depth of most exhumed oceanic eclogites except for a few special cases. Moreover the distribution of seismicity along the slab shows that only few earthquakes do occur in the crust beyond this limit as compared to the seismicity above it. Consequently this example from a natural sample strongly suggests that the eclogite dehydration at this depth can cause slab fracturation and consequently enhance eclogite exhumation. Baxter, E.F. & Caddick, M.J. 2013. Garnet growth as a proxy for progressive subduction zone dehydration. Geology, 41, 643-646 Lanari, P., Vidal, O., De Andrade, V., Dubacq, B., Lewin, E., Grosch, E.G. & Schwartz, S. 2014. XMapTools: A MATLAB©-based program for electron microprobe X-ray image processing and geothermobarometry. Computers & Geosciences, 62, 227-240 Loury, C., Rolland, Y., Guillot, S., Mikolaichuk, A., Lanari, P., Bruguier, O. & Bosch, D. in press. Crustal-scale structure of South Tien Shan : implications for subduction polarity and Cenozoic reactivation. Geological Society of London, special publications

  12. Lower slab boundary in the Japan subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, Takashi; Hirahara, Kazuro; Shibutani, Takuo; Fujii, Naoyuki

    2006-07-01

    We have successfully detected the lower boundary of a subducting slab. The successive imaging of the lower slab boundary beneath northeastern (NE) Japan is attained by receiver function (RF) depth conversion analysis using a recent 3D tomographic velocity model. We use waveforms from 249 teleseismic events collected by Hi-net and J-array short-period stations in NE Japan. RFs are calculated through frequency domain division of radial components by vertical ones with a water level of 0.001 and a 1.0 Hz low-pass Gaussian filter. Assuming that all later phases in the radial RFs are due to Ps phases converted at discontinuities beneath stations, we calculate depth-converted RFs, mapped onto the cross-section with the CCP (common conversion point) stacking. In a cross section, the slab surface and the oceanic Moho can be imaged down to 120 km depth. For the greater depths, the RF amplitudes corresponding to them cannot be seen, because, in the oceanic crust, basalt would be completely metamorphosed to eclogite below this depth. The lower boundary of the Pacific slab can also be traced down to 200 km depth or more. It is parallel to the slab surface and the oceanic Moho, and the thickness between the slab surface and the lower boundary is ˜ 80 km. Finally, we estimate a top-to-bottom slab velocity model that explains the RFs observed at broadband stations with the synthetic RFs. This model exhibits a 13% velocity reduction downwards the lower slab boundary, which would relatively sharp for the base of the thermal boundary layer. Therefore, this sharp discontinuity is presumably considered to be the subducting G (Gutenberg) discontinuity that is formed by the change of the amount of H 2O (water), meaning that the G discontinuity is the chemical boundary at the bottom of the oceanic lithosphere. The G discontinuity depth is controlled by the potential temperature of the asthenospheric mantle beneath the mid-ocean ridge, and hence the observed thickness of 80 km, i.e. the

  13. Episodic tremor and slip in Northern Sumatra subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sianipar, Dimas; Subakti, Hendri

    2017-07-01

    The first reported observation of non-volcanic tremor in Sunda Arc in Sumbawa, Indonesia open a possibility of discovery of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) from out of Pacific Rim. Non-volcanic tremor gives some important information about dynamic of plate boundaries. The characteristics of these tremors are visually as non-impulsive, high frequency, long-duration and low-amplitude signals. Tectonic tremor occurred in a transition part of brittle-ductile of a fault and frequently associated with the shearing mechanism of slow slip. Tectonic tremor is a seismic case that also very interested, because it shows strong sensitivity to stress changes. Deep non-volcanic tremor is usually associated with episodic slow-slip events. Tectonic tremor is found in close association with geodetically observed slow-slip events (SSE) in subduction zones. One research found that there is possibility of SSE occurrence on Banyak Islands, North Sumatra revealed from coral observation. The SSE occurred on the Banyak Islands portion of the megathrust at 30-55 km depth, within the downdip transition zone. We do a systematic search of episodic tremor and its possible relationship with slow-slip phenomena in Northern Sumatra subduction zone. The spectrogram analysis is done to analyze the potential tremor signals. We use three component broadband seismic stations with 20, 25, and 50 sampling per second (BH* and SH* channels). We apply a butterworth 5 Hz highpass filter to separate the signal as local tremor and teleseismic/regional earthquakes. Before computing spectrogram to avoid high-frequency artifacts to remote triggering, we apply a 0.5 Hz filter. We also convert the binary seismic data into sound waves to make sure that these events meet the tectonic tremor criterion. We successfully examine 3 seismic stations with good recording i.e. GSI, SNSI and KCSI. We find there are many evidences of high frequency episodic tremor like signals. This include an analysis of potential triggered

  14. Lithium Isotopic Fractionation in Subduction Zones: Clues From Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L. B.; Hervig, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    Lithium isotope ratios show such large variations in nature (>30 per mil), that many areas of geosciences are exploring the usefulness of this system in explaining the evolution of particular rocks. Here we show how the lithium isotope ratios change during the transformation of smectite clay minerals to illite during burial metamorphism. Such a transition may be a common feature in the shallow regions of subduction zones and may ultimately affect the Li isotope compositions of fluids contributing to arc magmatism. Lithium is a ubiquitous trace element in natural formation waters that, like B, shows large isotopic fractionation especially during interactions with clay minerals. Lithium is adsorbed in the interlayer region of expandable clay minerals but is easily exchanged. Lithium is also incorporated into the octahedral sites. The substitutions of Li in two crystallographic sites of clay minerals may complicate interpretations of bulk Li-isotope ratios. We suggest that the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of Li between fluid and clay is different in the interlayer sites of clay minerals than in the octahedral sites of clay minerals. Examination of Li contents and isotope variations in experimental reactions of smectite to illite (300C, 100MPa) shows changes with structural re-arrangement of the clay layers. The Li-isotope trend declines (from ~+6 to -13 per mil, expressed as ratios of 7/6) throughout R1-ordering of the mixed-layered illite smectite (I/S). However, the equilibrium end products of the reaction have R3-ordering and show a heavier isotope ratio (~0 per mil). This observation is very similar to the trends we observed for B-isotopes, where the interlayer B initially overprinted the tetrahedral-layer B isotope composition, but as the interlayer sites were collapsed during illitization, the equilibrium isotope composition was approached. The significant Li and B isotopic changes that occur during ordering of I/S coincides with the temperatures

  15. 3D geodynamic models for the development of opposing continental subduction zones: The Hindu Kush-Pamir example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras; Thielmann, Marcel; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Kufner, Sofia-Katerina; Yin, An

    2017-12-01

    The development of opposing continental subduction zones remains scantly explored in three dimensions. The Hindu Kush-Pamir orogenic system at the western end of the Himalayan orogen provides a rare example of continental collision linked to two opposing intra-continental subduction zones. The subducted plates feature a peculiar 3D geometry consisting of two distinct lithospheric fragments with different polarities, subduction angles and slab-curvatures beneath the Hindu Kush and Pamir, respectively. Using 3D geodynamic modeling, we simulate possible development of two opposing continental subduction zones to understand the dynamic evolution of the Hindu Kush-Pamir orogenic system. Our geodynamic model reproduces the major tectonic elements observed: (1) the deeper subduction depth, the steeper dip angle and the southward offset of the Hindu Kush subduction zone relative to the Pamir naturally occur if convergence direction of the subducting Indian plate and dip-direction of the Hindu Kush subduction zone match. (2) The formation of the highly asymmetrically curved Pamir region and the south-dipping subduction is promoted by the initial geometry of the indenting Indian lithosphere together with the existence of a major strike-slip fault on the eastern margin of the Pamir region. (3) Subduction of only the lower continental crust during continental collision can occur if the coupling between upper and lower crusts is weak enough to allow a separation of these two components, and that (4) the subduction of mainly lower crust then facilitates that conditions for intermediate-depth seismicity can be reached. (5) The secondary tectonic features modeled here such as strike-slip-fault growth, north-northwest striking extension zone, and lateral flow of the thickened ductile upper crust are comparable to the current tectonics of the region. (6) Model results are further compared to the potentially similar orogenic system, i.e., the Alpine orogen, in terms of the curved

  16. Multiple subduction imprints in the mantle below Italy detected in a single lava flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikogosian, Igor; Ersoy, Özlem; Whitehouse, Martin; Mason, Paul R. D.; de Hoog, Jan C. M.; Wortel, Rinus; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2016-09-01

    Post-collisional magmatism reflects the regional subduction history prior to collision but the link between the two is complex and often poorly understood. The collision of continents along a convergent plate boundary commonly marks the onset of a variety of transitional geodynamic processes. Typical responses include delamination of subducting lithosphere, crustal thickening in the overriding plate, slab detachment and asthenospheric upwelling, or the complete termination of convergence. A prominent example is the Western-Central Mediterranean, where the ongoing slow convergence of Africa and Europe (Eurasia) has been accommodated by a variety of spreading and subduction systems that dispersed remnants of subducted lithosphere into the mantle, creating a compositionally wide spectrum of magmatism. Using lead isotope compositions of a set of melt inclusions in magmatic olivine crystals we detect exceptional heterogeneity in the mantle domain below Central Italy, which we attribute to the presence of continental material, introduced initially by Alpine and subsequently by Apennine subduction. We show that superimposed subduction imprints of a mantle source can be tapped during a melting episode millions of years later, and are recorded in a single lava flow.

  17. Dry Juan de Fuca slab revealed by quantification of water entering Cascadia subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nedimović, M. R.; Carton, H.

    2017-11-01

    Water is carried by subducting slabs as a pore fluid and in structurally bound minerals, yet no comprehensive quantification of water content and how it is stored and distributed at depth within incoming plates exists for any segment of the global subduction system. Here we use seismic data to quantify the amount of pore and structurally bound water in the Juan de Fuca plate entering the Cascadia subduction zone. Specifically, we analyse these water reservoirs in the sediments, crust and lithospheric mantle, and their variations along the central Cascadia margin. We find that the Juan de Fuca lower crust and mantle are drier than at any other subducting plate, with most of the water stored in the sediments and upper crust. Variable but limited bend faulting along the margin limits slab access to water, and a warm thermal structure resulting from a thick sediment cover and young plate age prevents significant serpentinization of the mantle. The dryness of the lower crust and mantle indicates that fluids that facilitate episodic tremor and slip must be sourced from the subducted upper crust, and that decompression rather than hydrous melting must dominate arc magmatism in central Cascadia. Additionally, dry subducted lower crust and mantle can explain the low levels of intermediate-depth seismicity in the Juan de Fuca slab.

  18. The Terminal Stage of Subduction: the Hindu Kush Slab Break-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufner, S. K.; Schurr, B.; Sippl, C.; Yuan, X.; Ratschbacher, L.; Akbar, A. S. M.; Ischuk, A.; Murodkulov, S.; Schneider, F.; Mechie, J.; Tilmann, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    The terminal stage of subduction arrives when the ocean basin is closed and the continental margin arrives at the trench. The opposite forces of the sinking slab and buoyant continent ultimately leads to break-off of the subducted slab. This process, although common in geological history, is rarely observed, because it is short-lived. Here we report new precise earthquake hypocenters, detailed tomographic images and earthquake source mechanisms from the Hindu Kush region in Central Asia, which hint at continental subduction and plate necking. Our images provide a rare glimpse at the ephemeral process of slab break-off: the Hindu Kush slablet in its uppermost section is thinned or already severed and that intermediate depth earthquakes cluster at the neck connecting it to the deeper slab. From a strain rate analysis, we deduce that the deep portion of the slab is in the process of detaching from the shallower fragment at much higher rates than the current convergence rate at the surface. The increased strain rate might arise as the buoyant continental crust, which is dragged into the subduction system in its terminal stage, resists subduction, whereas the earlier subducted mantle lithosphere pulls from underneath.

  19. Connecting the Surface and the Deep: Evolving Role of Subduction Zone Fluids Through Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Matthieu Emmanuel

    2017-04-01

    The speciation of aqueous fluids controls the transport and exchange of metals and volatile elements on Earth. Subduction zones are the most important geodynamic setting for this fluid-mediated chemical exchange. Characterizing the ionic speciation and pH of fluids equilibrated with rocks at subduction zone conditions has been a major challenge in Earth science. I will first present thermodynamic predictions of fluid-rock equilibria that tie together models of mineralogy and fluid speciation along a range of model P-T paths. The pH of fluids in subducted crustal lithologies is uniform and confined to a mildly alkaline range, controlled by rock volatile and chlorine contents. In contrast, the pH of mantle wedge fluids exhibits marked sensitivity to minor variations in rock chemistry. These variations may be caused by intramantle differentiation, or by infiltration of fluids enriched in alkali components extracted from the subducted crust. The sensitivity of pH to carbon, alkali and halogens illustrates a top-down control of Earth's atmosphere - ocean chemistry on the speciation of subduction zone fluids via the hydrothermally altered oceanic lithosphere. These results provide a perspective on the physicochemical mechanisms that have coupled metal and volatile cycles in subduction zones for over 2.5 billion years.

  20. Femoral Neck Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 74-year-old male presented to the emergency department with left hip pain after falling off his bicycle. Pain is 3/10 in severity and exacerbated by movement. Patient denied head trauma. Exam showed left hip tenderness, 3/5 left lower extremity strength secondary to pain, and 5/5 right lower extremity strength. Sensation and pulses were intact in bilateral lower extremities. Left hip X-ray and pelvic CT revealed comminuted, impacted transcervical and subcapital fracture of the left femoral neck. Significant findings: In the anteroposterior view bilateral hip x-ray, there is an evident loss of Shenton’s line on the left (red line when compared to the normal right (white line, indicative of a fracture in the left femoral neck. This correlates with findings seen on pelvic CT, which reveals both a subcapital fracture (blue arrow and transcervical fracture (yellow arrow. The neck of the femur is displaced superiorly relative to the head of the femur while the head of the femur remains in its anatomical position within the acetabulum. Discussion: Femoral neck fractures are one of the most common types of hip fractures, accounting for 49.4% of all hip fractures.1 Diagnosing a femoral neck fracture can be made with plain x-ray, CT, or MRI. Plain film radiographs have been found to be at least 90% sensitive for hip fractures CT’s have been found to be 87%-100% sensitive and 100% specific for occult hip fractures in which plain radiographs were read as negative, but the patient still complained of hip pain Although MRI is currently the gold standard for detecting occult hip fractures (sensitivity and specificity = 100%, given MRI’s limited accessibility in the ED as well as the high sensitivity and specificity of CT scans for occult hip fractures, it is generally recommended to obtain CT scans for patients with suspected occult hip fractures as a first-line investigation

  1. Spontaneous rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrancioglu, Ozgur; Akkas, Yucel; Arslan, Sulhattin; Sahin, Ekber

    2015-07-01

    Other than trauma, rib fracture can occur spontaneously due to a severe cough or sneeze. In this study, patients with spontaneous rib fractures were analyzed according to age, sex, underlying pathology, treatment, and complications. Twelve patients who presented between February 2009 and February 2011 with spontaneous rib fracture were reviewed retrospectively. The patients' data were evaluated according to anamnesis, physical examination, and chest radiographs. The ages of the patients ranged from 34 to 77 years (mean 55.91 ± 12.20 years), and 7 (58.4%) were male. All patients had severe cough and chest pain. The fractures were most frequently between 4th and 9th ribs; multiple rib fractures were detected in 5 (41.7%) patients. Eight (66.7%) patients had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 2 (16.7%) had bronchial asthma, and 2 (16.7%) had osteoporosis. Bone densitometry revealed a high risk of bone fracture in all patients. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or bronchial asthma had been treated with high-dose steroids for over a year. Spontaneous rib fracture due to severe cough may occur in patients with osteoporosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or bronchial asthma, receiving long-term steroid therapy. If these patients have severe chest pain, chest radiography should be performed to check for bone lesions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Primary carbonatite melt from deeply subducted oceanic crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, M.J.; Bulanova, G.P.; Armstrong, L.S.; Keshav, S.; Blundy, J.D.; Gudfinnesson, G.; Lord, O.T.; Lennie, A.R.; Clark, S.M.; Smith, C.B.; Gobbo, L.

    2008-07-01

    Partial melting in the Earth's mantle plays an important part in generating the geochemical and isotopic diversity observed in volcanic rocks at the surface. Identifying the composition of these primary melts in the mantle is crucial for establishing links between mantle geochemical 'reservoirs' and fundamental geodynamic processes. Mineral inclusions in natural diamonds have provided a unique window into such deep mantle processes. Here they provide exper8imental and geochemical evidence that silicate mineral inclusions in diamonds from Juina, Brazil, crystallized from primary and evolved carbonatite melts in the mantle transition zone and deep upper mantle. The incompatible trace element abundances calculated for a melt coexisting with a calcium-titanium-silicate perovskite inclusion indicate deep melting of carbonated oceanic crust, probably at transition-zone depths. Further to perovskite, calcic-majorite garnet inclusions record crystallization in the deep upper mantle from an evolved melt that closely resembles estimates of primitive carbonatite on the basis of volcanic rocks. Small-degree melts of subducted crust can be viewed as agents of chemical mass-transfer in the upper mantle and transition zone, leaving a chemical imprint of ocean crust that can possibly endure for billions of years.

  3. Plume-subduction interaction forms large auriferous provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassara, Santiago; González-Jiménez, José M; Reich, Martin; Schilling, Manuel E; Morata, Diego; Begg, Graham; Saunders, Edward; Griffin, William L; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y; Grégoire, Michel; Barra, Fernando; Corgne, Alexandre

    2017-10-10

    Gold enrichment at the crustal or mantle source has been proposed as a key ingredient in the production of giant gold deposits and districts. However, the lithospheric-scale processes controlling gold endowment in a given metallogenic province remain unclear. Here we provide the first direct evidence of native gold in the mantle beneath the Deseado Massif in Patagonia that links an enriched mantle source to the occurrence of a large auriferous province in the overlying crust. A precursor stage of mantle refertilisation by plume-derived melts generated a gold-rich mantle source during the Early Jurassic. The interplay of this enriched mantle domain and subduction-related fluids released during the Middle-Late Jurassic resulted in optimal conditions to produce the ore-forming magmas that generated the gold deposits. Our study highlights that refertilisation of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle is a key factor in forming large metallogenic provinces in the Earth's crust, thus providing an alternative view to current crust-related enrichment models.The lithospheric controls on giant gold deposits remain unclear. Here, the authors show evidence for native gold in the mantle from the Deseado Massif in Patagonia demonstrating that refertilisation of the lithospheric mantle is key in forming metallogenic provinces.

  4. The thermodynamic regime of metamorphism in the ancient subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchuk, L. L.; Aranovich, L. Ya.

    1981-02-01

    Based on mineralogical themometry and baroraetry and computation of mineral reactions modelling metamorphic sequence, a geotherm for metamorphic belts of the subduction zones has been deduced. Relatively low PT-values (3 kbar/200° C) correspond to zeolite and prehnite-pumpellyite metasediments and at higher pressures and temperatures (10 kbar/400 °C) lawsonite-glaucophane assemblages become unstable. The PT-curve achieves maximum at 11 kbar and 470° C to drop down to normal geotherm (Perchuk 1977). High concentration of H2O in the metamorphic fluid has been revealed, the difference between Pf1 and P_{{text{H}}_{text{2}} {text{O}}} being less than 2 kbar. Consideration has also been given to specific thermodynamic regime of zeolite and prehnite-pumpellyite zones of the younger island arcs, where lawsoniteglaucophane zones are absent. Here the geotherm has been found to rise from 0.2kbar/120° C up to 4 kbar/350° C and P_{{text{H}}_{text{2}} {text{O}}}-regime similar to that of glaucophane schists formations.

  5. Pediatric Supracondylar Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Peña

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 7-year-old left-handed male presented with left arm pain and deformity after being tackled while playing. On exam, there appeared to be dorsal displacement of the distal segment of the upper extremity. He had two-plus radial and ulnar pulses, and normal capillary refill. Sensation was intact to axillary, radial, ulnar, and median nerve distributions. Compartments were soft. Significant findings: Plain film radiography showed a displaced supracondylar fracture with disrupted anterior and posterior periostea, consistent with a type 3 supracondylar fracture. Discussion: Supracondylar fractures are the most common pediatric elbow fracture.1 Approximately 95% are due to a fall onto an outstretched hand while the elbow is in extension. Direct trauma to the posterior aspect of a flexed elbow accounts for the remainder.2 There are three classifications of supracondylar fractures: type 1 is non-displaced, type 2 is displaced, but has an intact posterior periosteum, and type 3 is displaced with disrupted anterior and posterior periostea. Careful examination assessing for pulses, perfusion, neurologic integrity, and elevated compartment pressures are important in the evaluation.3 The brachial artery is often injured in posterior lateral displaced fractures.4 Neurologic deficits to the median, ulnar, or radial nerves are seen in as many of 49% of Type 3 supracondylar fractures; however, neuropraxias often resolve within two to three months.5 Untimely treated compartment syndrome may lead to Volkmann ischemic contractors, which are characterized by flexion of the elbow, pronation of the forearm, flexion of the wrist, and extension of the metacarpal phalangeal joints.6 Plain film radiography oriented in the anterior-posterior (AP and lateral fashions are typically sufficient for diagnosis; however, a fracture may exist without overt signs on X-ray.7 Given the high morbidity associated with Type 3 fractures, emergent Orthopedic

  6. A Rare Nasal Bone Fracture: Anterior Nasal Spine Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egemen Kucuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anterior nasal spine fractures are a quite rare type of nasal bone fractures. Associated cervical spine injuries are more dangerous than the nasal bone fracture. A case of the anterior nasal spine fracture, in a 18-year-old male was presented. Fracture of the anterior nasal spine, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the midface injuries and also accompanying cervical spine injury should not be ignored.

  7. Fracture eponyms: personal names

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Zolotov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the origin of bone fracture eponyms. The authors compiled a list of 60 most established fracture names proposed by physicians in 16th-20th centuries who mainly were skilled, mature and outstanding experts from countries with advanced conventional medicine and often represented the recognized surgical schools. Eponym records are important for understanding the history and subject of the chosen profession as well as knowledge of eponymic fractures facilitates communication between physicians of allied disciplines.

  8. Associação de magnetometria, gamaespectrometria, geoquímica e petrografia para modelamento tridimencional da mineralização de nióbio do depósito Morro do Padre, Goiás, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Jácomo, Marta Henriques

    2011-01-01

    A Província Ígnea do Alto Paranaíba é um conjunto de rochas alcalinas cretáceas, com direção NW, que intrudem as rochas neoproterozóicas da Faixa Brasília, entre a borda sudoeste do Cráton do São Francisco e Bacia do Paraná. Essa província compreende os complexos Catalão I e II no sul de Goiás e Serra Negra, Salitre I, II e III, Araxá e Tapira, no oeste de Minas Gerais. O depósito de Nb do Morro do Padre, no Complexo de Catalão II, consiste em nelsonitos, apatititos, carbonatitos ...

  9. Transfer of subduction fluids into the deforming mantle wedge during nascent subduction: Evidence from trace elements and boron isotopes (Semail ophiolite, Oman)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, C.; Guillot, S.; Agard, P.; Lemarchand, D.; Soret, M.; Ulrich, M.

    2018-02-01

    The basal part of the Semail ophiolitic mantle was (de)formed at relatively low temperature (LT) directly above the plate interface during "nascent subduction" (the prelude to ophiolite obduction). This subduction-related LT deformation was associated with progressive strain localization and cooling, resulting in the formation of porphyroclastic to ultramylonitic shear zones prior to serpentinization. Using petrological and geochemical analyses (trace elements and B isotopes), we show that these basal peridotites interacted with hydrous fluids percolating by porous flow during mylonitic deformation (from ∼850 down to 650 °C). This process resulted in 1) high-T amphibole crystallization, 2) striking enrichments of minerals in fluid mobile elements (FME; particularly B, Li and Cs with concentrations up to 400 times those of the depleted mantle) and 3) peridotites with an elevated δ11B of up to +25‰. These features indicate that the metasomatic hydrous fluids are most likely derived from the dehydration of subducting crustal amphibolitic materials (i.e., the present-day high-T sole). The rapid decrease in metasomatized peridotite δ11B with increasing distance to the contact with the HT sole (to depleted mantle isotopic values in slab-derived elements to the locus of partial melting in subduction zones.

  10. Analyzing One-Sided vs. Two-Sided Subduction Arising from Mantle Convection Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M. S.; Becker, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Purely thermal plate tectonic generation models struggle to consistently reproduce one-sided subduction as is observed on Earth (Tackley 2000; Van Heck and Tackley 2008; Foley and Becker 2009), and instead produce two-sided subduction where the subducting slab contains a significant flux of material from both plates. The models of Crameri et al. (2012) demonstrate that the implementation of a free upper surface boundary condition and the inclusion of a weak hydrated crust can facilitate one-sided subduction. We employ a similar model configuration to Crameri et al. (2012) to further investigate the dynamics and energetics which are associated with one-sided vs. two-sided subduction. We use a 2D finite difference code based off of the algorithms of I2ELVIS (Gerya and Yuen 2007) where material parameters are tracked on Lagrangian markers and the Stokes and Energy equations are solved on a Cartesian grid. A free surface is implemented by a low viscosity and density 'sticky air layer' (Schmeling et al., 2008; Crameri et al., 2012) with the stabilization routine of Duretz et al. (2011) to prevent the 'drunken seaman' instability (Kaus et al., 2010). The effects of a weak crust, shear heating, a free surface or free slip upper mechanical boundary condition, plasticity as a function of depth or pressure, and the sticky air layer thermal conductivity on one-sided vs. two-sided subduction are investigated. When we observe one-sided subduction it is transient and can smoothly evolve back to a two-sided configuration. In our models, 'sidedness' is a spectrum, rather than either discretely one or two sided, and the models move between the two regimes throughout the model runs. We observe that the thermal conductivity of the sticky air layer can influence the dynamics of the convective domain. Elevated values of thermal conductivity compared to those of rock must be implemented in the sticky air layer in order to maintain a constant temperature at the surface of the convective

  11. Defining Incipient Subduction by Detecting Serpentenised Mantle in the Regional Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Rui; Clark, Stuart; Reis, Rui

    2017-04-01

    Keywords: Subduction initiation, Incipient Subduction, Active Margins, Southeast Asia, Mantle wedge The mechanisms of subduction initiation are poorly understood. One idea is to look for incipient subduction zones in the present day and see what features are common in these zones. However, incipient subduction zones are very difficult to detect and debate surrounds particular cases as to whether they qualify as incipient or not. In the analysis conducted in this work, we use the signal of the presence of a mantle wedge in the magnetic anomaly field as an indicator of incipient subduction. Each subduction zone exhibits variations in the particular responses of the system, such as slab-dip angle, maximum earthquake depths and volcanism to various parameters. So far, attempts to reduce the system to a dominate controlling parameter have failed, probably as a result of the limited number of cases and the large variety of controlling parameters. Parameters such as down-going and overriding plate morphology and velocity, mantle flow, the presence of plumes or not, sediment transport into the trench are a few of the parameters that have been studied in the literature. However, one of the characteristics associated with a subduction zones is the presence of a mantelic wedge as a result of the partial melt of the subducting plate and the development of a mantle wedge between the subducting plate and the overriding plate. The wedge is characterised by the presence of water (coming from sediments in the down-going plate) as well as lower temperatures (because the wedge is between two relatively cold lithospheres). As a results a serpentinized mantle wedge is formed that contains hydrous minerals, of which magnetite is an example, that alter the composition and properties of this region. According to Blakely et.al. (2005), this region exhibits both higher magnetic susceptibility and lower densities than the surrounding medium. We analysed five active margin boundaries located

  12. Kinematics of Late Cretaceous subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructed from ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria

    OpenAIRE

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J.J.; de Gelder, Giovanni I.N.O.; van der Goes, Freek C.; Morris, Antony

    2017-01-01

    Formation of new subduction zones represents one of the cornerstones of plate tectonics, yet both the kinematics and geodynamics governing this process remain enigmatic. A major subduction initiation event occurred in the Late Cretaceous, within the Neo-Tethys Ocean between Gondwana and Eurasia. Suprasubduction zone ophiolites (i.e., emerged fragments of ancient oceanic lithosphere formed at suprasubduction spreading centers) were generated during this subduction event and are today distribut...

  13. Subduction zone processes and continental crust formation in the southern Central Andes: insights from geochemistry and geochronology

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Rosemary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Subduction zones, such as the Andean convergent margin, are the sites at which new continental crust is generated, and where subducting material is either recycled to the crust via arc magmatism or transferred to the deep mantle. The composition of arc magmas and associated new continental crust reflects variable contributions from mantle, crustal and subducted reservoirs. Insights into crustal growth and recycling processes in the southern Central Andes, specifically in the ...

  14. Tibial shaft fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter

    The overall purpose of the present PhD thesis was to provide up-to-date information of the epidemiology of tibial shaft fractures and to investigate the development in quality of life, pain and functional outcomes from surgery and onwards, following a tibial shaft fracture treated...... with intramedullary nailing. Study I reported an incidence of 16.9/100,000/year from a complete population. Study II reported the long-term patient-reported outcomes and showed that approximately 8 years after the fracture patients reported significantly worse outcome for 4 of the 5 KOOS subscales compared...... suggested that regaining pre injured QOL and muscle strength following a tibial shaft fracture takes considerable time....

  15. Paediatric talus fracture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Ann-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Paediatric talus fractures are rare injuries resulting from axial loading of the talus against the anterior tibia with the foot in dorsiflexion. Skeletally immature bone is less brittle, with higher elastic resistance than adult bone, thus the paediatric talus can sustain higher forces before fractures occur. However, displaced paediatric talus fractures and those associated with high-energy trauma have been associated with complications including avascular necrosis, arthrosis, delayed union, neurapraxia and the need for revision surgery. The authors present the rare case of a talar neck fracture in a skeletally immature young girl, initially missed on radiological review. However, clinical suspicion on the part of the emergency physician, repeat examination and further radiographic imaging revealed this rare paediatric injury.

  16. Clavicle Fracture (Broken Collarbone)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... birth canal. Symptoms Clavicle fractures can be very painful and may make it hard to move your arm. Additional symptoms include: • Sagging shoulder (down and forward) • Inability to li the arm ...

  17. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... begin using your elbow. You may need physical therapy if you have a severe fracture. Your doctor or physical therapist will tell you when you can start playing sports or using your elbow for other activities.

  18. Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Doug [Baker-Hughes Oilfield Operation Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Leggett, Jim [Baker-Hughes Oilfield Operation Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-07-29

    The Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager project has a goal to develop a wireline ultrasonic imager that is capable of operating in temperatures up to 300°C (572°F) and depths up to 10 km (32,808 ft). This will address one of the critical needs in any EGS development of understanding the hydraulic flow paths in the reservoir. The ultrasonic imaging is well known in the oil and gas industry as one of the best methods for fracture evaluation; providing both high resolution and complete azimuthal coverage of the borehole. This enables fracture detection and characterization, both natural and induced, providing information as to their location, dip direction and dip magnitude. All of these factors are critical to fully understand the fracture system to enable the optimization of the thermal drainage through injectors and producers in a geothermal resource.

  19. Origin and consequences of western Mediterranean subduction, rollback, and slab segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Vissers, Reinoud L. M.; Spakman, Wim

    2014-04-01

    The western Mediterranean recorded subduction rollback, slab segmentation and separation. Here we address the questions of what caused Oligocene rollback initiation, and how its subsequent evolution split up an originally coherent fore arc into circum-southwest Mediterranean segments. We kinematically reconstruct western Mediterranean geology from subduction initiation to present, using Atlantic plate reconstructions as boundary condition. We test possible reconstructions against remnants of subducted lithosphere imaged by seismic tomography. Transform motion between Africa and Iberia (including the Baleares) between 120 and 85 Ma was followed by up to 150 km convergence until 30 Ma. Subduction likely initiated along the transform fault that accommodated pre-85 Ma translation. By the 30 Ma inception of rollback, up to 150 km of convergence had formed a small slab below the Baleares. Iberia was disconnected from Sardinia/Calabria through the North Balearic Transform Zone (NBTZ). Subduction below Sardinia/Calabria was slightly faster than below the Baleares, the difference being accommodated in the Pyrenees. A moving triple junction at the trench-NBTZ intersection formed a subduction transform edge propagator fault between the Baleares and Calabria slab segments. Calabria rolled back eastward, whereas the Baleares slab underwent radial (SW-S-SE) rollback. After Kabylides-Africa collision, the western slab segment retreated toward Gibraltar, here reconstructed as the maximum rollback end-member model, and a Kabylides slab detached from Africa. Opening of a slab window below the NBTZ allowed asthenospheric rise to the base of the fore arc creating high-temperature metamorphism. Western Mediterranean rollback commenced only after sufficient slab-pull was created from 100 to 150 km of slow, forced subduction before 30 Ma.

  20. Effect of a weak layer at the base of an oceanic plate on subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carluccio, Roberta; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The plate tectonics model relies on the concept of a relatively rigid lithospheric lid moving over a weaker asthenosphere. In this frame, the lithosphere asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is a first-order discontinuity that accommodates differential motions between tectonic plates and the underlying mantle. Recent seismic studies have revealed the existence of a low velocity and high electrical conductivity layer at the base of subducting tectonic plates. This thin layer has been interpreted as being weak and slightly buoyant and was suggested to affect the dynamics of subducting plates. However, geodynamically, the role of a weak layer at the base of the lithosphere remains poorly studied, especially at subduction zones. Therefore, we here use numerical models to investigate the first-order effects of a weak buoyant layer at the LAB on subduction dynamics. We employ both 2-D and 3-D models in which the slab and mantle are either linear viscous or have a more realistic temperature-dependent visco-elastic-plastic rheology. Results show that a weak layer affects the dynamics of the plates, foremost by increasing the subduction speed. The impact of this effect depends on the thickness of the layer and the viscosity contrast between the mantle and the weak layer. For moderate viscosity contrasts (1000), it can also change the morphology of the subduction itself, perhaps because this changes the overall effective viscosity contrast between the slab the and the mantle. For thinner layers, the overall effect is reduced. Yet, if seismological observations are correct that suggests that this layer is 10 km thick and partially molten, such that the viscosity is 1000 times lower than that of the mantle, our models suggest that this effect should be measurable. Some of our models also show a pile-up of weak material in the bending zone of the subducting plate, consistent with recent seismological observations.

  1. Long distance transport of eclogite and blueschist during early Pacific Ocean subduction rollback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamblyn, Renee; Hand, Martin; Kelsey, David; Phillips, Glen; Anczkiewicz, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The Tasmanides in eastern Australia represent a period of continental crustal growth on the western margin of the Pacific Ocean associated with slab rollback from the Cambrian until the Triassic. During rollback numerical models predict that subduction products can become trapped in the forearc (Geyra et al., 2002), and can migrate with the trench as it retreats. In a long-lived subduction controlled regime such as the Tasmanides, this should result in an accumulation of subduction products with protracted geochronological and metamorphic histories. U-Pb, Lu-Hf, Sm-Nd and Ar-Ar geochronology and phase equilibria modelling of lawsonite-eclogite and garnet blueschist in the Southern New England Fold Belt in Australia demonstrate that high-P low-T rocks remained within a subduction setting for c. 40 Ma, from c. 500 to 460 Ma. High-P metamorphic rocks initially formed close to the Australian cratonic margin during the late Cambrian, and were subsequently transported over 1500 Ma oceanward, during which time subducted material continued to accumulate, resulting in the development of complex mélange which records eclogite and blueschist metamorphism and partial exhumation over 40 Ma. The duration of refrigerated metamorphism approximates the extensional evolution of the upper plate which culminated in the development of the Lachlan Fold Belt. The protracted record of eclogite and blueschist metamorphism indicates that rapid exhumation is not necessarily required for preservation of high-pressure metamorphic rocks from subduction systems. Reference: Gerya, T. V., Stockhert, B., & Perchuk, A. L. (2002). Exhumation of high-pressure metamorphic rocks in a subduction channel: A numerical simulation. Tectonics, 21(6), 6-1-6-19. doi:10.1029/2002tc001406

  2. Seismic anisotropy in the Hellenic subduction zone: Effects of slab segmentation and subslab mantle flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelidis, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    The segmentation and differentiation of subducting slabs have considerable effects on mantle convection and tectonics. The Hellenic subduction zone is a complex convergent margin with strong curvature and fast slab rollback. The upper mantle seismic anisotropy in the region is studied focusing at its western and eastern edges in order to explore the effects of possible slab segmentation on mantle flow and fabrics. Complementary to new SKS shear-wave splitting measurements in regions not adequately sampled so far, the source-side splitting technique is applied to constrain the depth of anisotropy and to densify measurements. In the western Hellenic arc, a trench-normal subslab anisotropy is observed near the trench. In the forearc domain, source-side and SKS measurements reveal a trench-parallel pattern. This indicates subslab trench-parallel mantle flow, associated with return flow due to the fast slab rollback. The passage from continental to oceanic subduction in the western Hellenic zone is illustrated by a forearc transitional anisotropy pattern. This indicates subslab mantle flow parallel to a NE-SW smooth ramp that possibly connects the two subducted slabs. A young tear fault initiated at the Kefalonia Transform Fault is likely not entirely developed, as this trench-parallel anisotropy pattern is observed along the entire western Hellenic subduction system, even following this horizontal offset between the two slabs. At the eastern side of the Hellenic subduction zone, subslab source-side anisotropy measurements show a general trench-normal pattern. These are associated with mantle flow through a possible ongoing tearing of the oceanic lithosphere in the area. Although the exact geometry of this slab tear is relatively unknown, SKS trench-parallel measurements imply that the tear has not reached the surface yet. Further exploration of the Hellenic subduction system is necessary; denser seismic networks should be deployed at both its edges in order to achieve

  3. Relative permeability through fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  4. Radial Head Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Robert W.; Jones, Alistair DR.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Radial head fractures are common elbow injuries in adults and are frequently associated with additional soft tissue and bone injuries. Methods: A literature search was performed and the authors’ personal experiences are reported. Results: Mason type I fractures are treated non-operatively with splinting and early mobilisation. The management of Mason type II injuries is less clear with evidence supporting both non-operative treatment and internal fixation. The degree of intra-arti...

  5. Shear wave splitting and the dynamics of the hydrated mantle wedge in subduction regions constrained by the example of the Ryukyu subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, T.; Walker, A.; Wookey, J. M.; Wallis, S.; Ishii, K.; Kendall, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    H2O-rich subduction fluids are a key component of convergent plate margin dynamics, essential to earthquake initiation and magma formation. These fluids in the wedge mantle are dominantly derived from antigorite dragged down by plate motion. However, the accurate distribution of antigorite-rich serpentinite related to the fluid transport in subduction zones has thus far been difficult to determine. Our approach is to model the S-wave splitting of the Ryukyu arc in order to constrain the distribution, amount and orientation of antigorite, while taking into account the geometry of seismic ray paths and the elastic anisotropy of deformed antigorite-bearing mantle. We have also carried out a full assessment of uncertainties associated with our analysis including time delay estimates from the seismic waves themselves, crustal anisotropy, averaging schemes for CPO, and the strength of antigorite CPO patterns. The results suggest the presence of a large-scale flow in the hydrous mantle with a low viscosity and more than 54% of this domain consists of antigorite. Other geophysical observations in the forearc mantle including the low seismic velocity and gravity anomaly are also compatible with our inference of the presence of induced flow in an antigorite-rich, hydrated mantle wedge in the Ryukyu arc. We have also constructed a geodynamic model to examine flow patterns in the hydrated shallow wedge mantle using the distribution and proportion of serpentinite derived from our seismic model and subduction parameters that are close to those of the arc. The results clearly show that convection occurs in the serpentinized mantle wedge and that this domain is associated with a low surface heat flow. S-wave splitting observations in other subduction zones implies this large-scale serpentinization and hydrous mantle flow is likely to be more widespread than generally recognized and the view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones lacks significant zones of hydration needs

  6. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  7. A Fracture Decoupling Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroujkova, A. F.; Bonner, J. L.; Leidig, M.; Ferris, A. N.; Kim, W.; Carnevale, M.; Rath, T.; Lewkowicz, J.

    2012-12-01

    Multiple observations made at the Semipalatinsk Test Site suggest that conducting nuclear tests in the fracture zones left by previous explosions results in decreased seismic amplitudes for the second nuclear tests (or "repeat shots"). Decreased seismic amplitudes reduce both the probability of detection and the seismically estimated yield of a "repeat shot". In order to define the physical mechanism responsible for the amplitude reduction and to quantify the degree of the amplitude reduction in fractured rocks, Weston Geophysical Corp., in collaboration with Columbia University's Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, conducted a multi-phase Fracture Decoupling Experiment (FDE) in central New Hampshire. The FDE involved conducting explosions of various yields in the damage/fracture zones of previously detonated explosions. In order to quantify rock damage after the blasts we performed well logging and seismic cross-hole tomography studies of the source region. Significant seismic velocity reduction was observed around the source regions after the initial explosions. Seismic waves produced by the explosions were recorded at near-source and local seismic networks, as well as several regional stations throughout northern New England. Our analysis confirms frequency dependent seismic amplitude reduction for the repeat shots compared to the explosions in un-fractured rocks. The amplitude reduction is caused by pore closing and/or by frictional losses within the fractured media.

  8. Geodynamical Analysis of Plate Reconstructions based on Subduction History Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, L. E.; Butterworth, N. P.; Matthews, K. J.; Morra, G.; Müller, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    We present a novel method to produce global subduction history models from plate reconstructions and use their predicted geodynamic behaviour as a quality metric for the physical consistency of absolute motions. We show that modelled slabs constructed by advecting material into the mantle according to absolute and relative plate motions given by a particular reconstruction are better correlated with the present day slab dips observed in mantle tomography than instantaneous kinematic quantities like present convergence rate. A complete simulation incorporating lithospheric thickness derived from oceanic age and a rheological model of the lithosphere was run using the Boundary Element Method-based software BEMEarth to infer the global pattern of mantle flow. The predicted plate motion orientations in the form of Euler pole location for the present day and mid-Cretaceous (125 Ma) were compared with the kinematic model for a set of rheologies and mantle structures, and found to be a robust and efficient indicator of the physical consistency of kinematic reconstructions based on their effect on the balance of plate driving forces. As an application example, during the Early Cretaceous, the predicted motion of the Farallon plate was found to be more consistent with the regional geology of the Western North American Cordillera system than the instantaneous motion suggested by a reconstruction at 125 Ma based on sparse hotspot track data on the Pacific Plate. This suggests that a methodology based on forward geodynamic modellling could be used to predict absolute plate motions in reconstructions for times that are ill-constrained by observations constraining absolute plate motions.

  9. The Southern Tyrrhenian subduction system: recent evolution and neotectonic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Argnani

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Geological and geophysical data have been integrated with the aim of presenting a new evolutionary model for the Southern Tyrrhenian and adjacent regions. The Southern Tyrrhenian backarc basin opened within a plate convergence regime because of sinking and rollback of the oceanic Ionian lithosphere. On the basis of seismological observations, I infer that the sinking slab was torn apart on either side in the last 2 Ma and this process controlled the neotectonics of the Southern Apennines - Tyrrhenian region. On the north-eastern side the slab broke off from NW to SE and this process triggered volcanism and NW-SE extension along the Eastern Tyrrhenian margin, and strike-slip tectonics along NW-SE trending faults in Northern Calabria. On the south-western side the slab broke off from W to E along the Aeolian Island alignment, although the tear has currently been reoriented along the NNW-SSE Malta escarpment. During its sinking the subducted slab also detached from the overriding plate, favouring the wedging of the asthenosphere between the two plates and the regional uplift of the Calabrian arc and surroundings. This regional uplift promoted gravitational instability within the orogenic wedge, particularly towards low topography areas; the large-scale sliding of the Calabrian arc towards the Ionian basin can be the cause of CW rotation and graben formation in Calabria. Also the E-dipping extensional faults of the Southern Apennines can be related to accommodation of vertical motions within the fold-and-thrust belt. The pattern of recent seismicity reflects this neotectonics where crustal-scale gravity deformation within the orogenic wedge is responsible for extensional earthquakes in Calabria and the Southern Apennines, whereas Africa plate convergence can account for compressional earthquakes in Sicily.

  10. Constraints on Subduction Zone Processes from Low Frequency Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of tectonic tremor and constituent low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) offers seismologists new opportunities to study both deformational processes and structure within the subduction zone forearc. This assertion is especially true for northern Cascadia where i) regular seismicity is sparse, and ii) a relatively transparent overriding plate inflicts minimal distortion upon direct P and S wave arrivals from LFEs. Despite low signal-to-noise ratios, LFEs are highly repetitive and signal can be enhanced through construction of stacked templates. Studies in both Cascadia and Nankai reveal an association between LFE hypocenters and a high Vp/Vs, low-velocity zone (LVZ) that is inferred to represent overpressured upper oceanic crust. Scattered signals within Vancouver Island templates, interpreted to originate at boundaries of the LVZ, place LFEs within the LVZ and suggest that this structure may define a distributed (several km) zone of deformation. A recent analysis of LFE magnitudes indicates that LFEs exhibit scaling relations distinct from both regular earthquakes and longer period (10's of seconds to days) phenomena associated with slow slip. Regular earthquakes generally obey a scaling of moment proportional to duration cubed consistent with self similarity, whereas long period slow slip phenomena exhibit a linear scaling between moment and duration that can be accommodated through constant slip or constant stress drop models. In contrast, LFE durations are nearly constant suggesting that moment is governed by slip alone and that asperity size remains approximately constant. The implied dimensions (~1 km2), the persistance of LFEs in time and their stationarity in space point to structural heterogeneity, perhaps related to pockets of upper oceanic crust impervious to hydrothermal circulation, as a fundamental control.

  11. Deformation Patterns and Subduction Behavior of Continental Lithosphere Entering a Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steedman, C. E.; Kaus, B. J.; Becker, T. W.; Okaya, D.

    2007-05-01

    We perform 2-D numerical simulations of continental lithosphere entering a subduction zone, to better understand deformation patterns resulting from subduction of a continental margin. The model consists of a subduction zone in which an attached slab drives subduction of a passive continental margin beneath an oceanic plate. A particle-based 2-D visco-elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical finite element code is employed to study the dynamics of the system. A novel feature of the code is that the resolution of the model can be significantly increased in selected parts of the domain, which allows for self-consistent modelling of mantle-lithosphere interaction. In the present study we employ this feature to study how lithospheric-scale deformation around and within the subduction zone is influenced by surface processes such as erosion, and by flow in the upper mantle. Using systematic 2-D numerical simulations, we explore the parameters that are dominant in controlling near- surface structures, both with regards to changes in topography and trench location, and subsurface features such as Moho undulations. The main parameters that have been varied are: the lithospheric density structure; the lithospheric age and temperature structure; the strength of the lower crust; the presence of a weak zone at the plate interface; the amounts of erosion; the upper boundary condition (free surface versus free slip); rheology (non-Newtonian versus Newtonian, viscous, visco-elasto-plastic); and finally the effect of an imposed slab breakoff. In all cases we track surface uplift, subduction evolution and rock exhumation history. We find that the strength of the overriding plate influences surface uplift and the shape of subsurface deformation, and that the density and thermal structure of the subducting plate affects trench motion. Denser slab roll back, and younger, lighter slabs advance, while neither slab rheology nor the presence of erosion greatly affect trench location. For all cases

  12. Mantle hydration and Cl-rich fluids in the subduction forearc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynard, Bruno

    2016-12-01

    In the forearc region, aqueous fluids are released from the subducting slab at a rate depending on its thermal state. Escaping fluids tend to rise vertically unless they meet permeability barriers such as the deformed plate interface or the Moho of the overriding plate. Channeling of fluids along the plate interface and Moho may result in fluid overpressure in the oceanic crust, precipitation of quartz from fluids, and low Poisson ratio areas associated with tremors. Above the subducting plate, the forearc mantle wedge is the place of intense reactions between dehydration fluids from the subducting slab and ultramafic rocks leading to extensive serpentinization. The plate interface is mechanically decoupled, most likely in relation to serpentinization, thereby isolating the forearc mantle wedge from convection as a cold, potentially serpentinized and buoyant, body. Geophysical studies are unique probes to the interactions between fluids and rocks in the forearc mantle, and experimental constrains on rock properties allow inferring fluid migration and fluid-rock reactions from geophysical data. Seismic velocities reveal a high degree of serpentinization of the forearc mantle in hot subduction zones, and little serpentinization in the coldest subduction zones because the warmer the subduction zone, the higher the amount of water released by dehydration of hydrothermally altered oceanic lithosphere. Interpretation of seismic data from petrophysical constrain is limited by complex effects due to anisotropy that needs to be assessed both in the analysis and interpretation of seismic data. Electrical conductivity increases with increasing fluid content and temperature of the subduction. However, the forearc mantle of Northern Cascadia, the hottest subduction zone where extensive serpentinization was first demonstrated, shows only modest electrical conductivity. Electrical conductivity may vary not only with the thermal state of the subduction zone, but also with time for

  13. Laboratory models of the thermal evolution of the mantle during rollback subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, C; Griffiths, R W

    2003-09-04

    The subduction of oceanic lithosphere plays a key role in plate tectonics, the thermal evolution of the mantle and recycling processes between Earth's interior and surface. Information on mantle flow, thermal conditions and chemical transport in subduction zones come from the geochemistry of arc volcanoes, seismic images and geodynamic models. The majority of this work considers subduction as a two-dimensional process, assuming limited variability in the direction parallel to the trench. In contrast, observationally based models increasingly appeal to three-dimensional flow associated with trench migration and the sinking of oceanic plates with a translational component of motion (rollback). Here we report results from laboratory experiments that reveal fundamental differences in three-dimensional mantle circulation and temperature structure in response to subduction with and without a rollback component. Without rollback motion, flow in the mantle wedge is sluggish, there is no mass flux around the plate and plate edges heat up faster than plate centres. In contrast, during rollback subduction flow is driven around and beneath the sinking plate, velocities increase within the mantle wedge and are focused towards the centre of the plate, and the surface of the plate heats more along the centreline.

  14. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record crust-mantle interaction during continental deep subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2013-12-04

    Findings of coesite and microdiamond in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal protolith led to the recognition of continental subduction to mantle depths. The crust-mantle interaction is expected to take place during subduction of the continental crust beneath the subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge. This is recorded by postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its adjacent continental margin in the North China Block. These rocks exhibit the geochemical inheritance of whole-rock trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes from felsic melts derived from the subducted continental crust. Reaction of such melts with the overlying wedge peridotite would transfer the crustal signatures to the mantle sources for postcollisional mafic magmatism. Therefore, postcollisonal mafic igneous rocks above continental subduction zones are an analog to arc volcanics above oceanic subduction zones, providing an additional laboratory for the study of crust-mantle interaction at convergent plate margins.

  15. Seismic reflection imaging of two megathrust shear zones in the northern Cascadia subduction zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Andrew J

    2004-03-11

    At convergent continental margins, the relative motion between the subducting oceanic plate and the overriding continent is usually accommodated by movement along a single, thin interface known as a megathrust. Great thrust earthquakes occur on the shallow part of this interface where the two plates are locked together. Earthquakes of lower magnitude occur within the underlying oceanic plate, and have been linked to geochemical dehydration reactions caused by the plate's descent. Here I present deep seismic reflection data from the northern Cascadia subduction zone that show that the inter-plate boundary is up to 16 km thick and comprises two megathrust shear zones that bound a >5-km-thick, approximately 110-km-wide region of imbricated crustal rocks. Earthquakes within the subducting plate occur predominantly in two geographic bands where the dip of the plate is inferred to increase as it is forced around the edges of the imbricated inter-plate boundary zone. This implies that seismicity in the subducting slab is controlled primarily by deformation in the upper part of the plate. Slip on the shallower megathrust shear zone, which may occur by aseismic slow slip, will transport crustal rocks into the upper mantle above the subducting oceanic plate and may, in part, provide an explanation for the unusually low seismic wave speeds that are observed there.

  16. Subduction zones dynamics and structure from coupled geodynamic and seismological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenda, Manuele

    2017-04-01

    The present-day structure of subduction settings is mainly determined by means of seismological methods. The interpretation of seismological data (e.g., isotropic and anisotropic velocity anomalies) is however non-unique, as different processes occurring simultaneously at subduction zones can be invoked to explain the observations. A further complication arises when regional tomographic seismic models ignore seismic anisotropy, in which case apparent seismic anomalies due to non-uniform sampling of anisotropic areas will appear. In order to decrease the uncertainties related to the interpretation of seismological observations, geodynamic modelling can be exploited to reproduce the micro and macro scale dynamics and structure of subduction settings, yielding a valuable first-order approximation of the rock isotropic and anisotropic elastic properties. The model output can be subsequently tested against observations by performing seismological synthetics (e.g., SKS splitting, travel-time tomography, receiver functions, azimuthal and radial anisotropy). When the misfit between the modelled and measured seismic parameters is low, the geodynamic model likely provides a good approximation of the recent dynamics and present-day structure of the subduction setting. Such a model can then be used to give a more robust and thermomechanically-based interpretation of the observables and/or further improve the seismological model by providing a-priori information for subsequent inversions. The methodology is still in its infancy, but we envisage that future developments could substantially improve seismological models and, overall, our understanding of complex subduction settings.

  17. Necessity of the Ridge for the Flat Slab Subduction: Insights from the Peruvian Flat Slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Long, M. D.; Zandt, G.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    Flattening of the subducting plate has been linked to the formation of various geological features, including basement-cored uplifts, the cessation of arc volcanism, ignimbrite flare-ups, and the formation of high plateaus and ore deposits [Humphreys et al., 2003; Gutscher et al., 2000; Rosenbaum et al., 2005]. However, the mechanism responsible for the slab flattening is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the Peruvian flat slab, where the Nazca plate starts to bend at ~80 km depth and travels horizontally for several hundred kilometers, at which point steep subduction resumes. Based on a 1500 km long volcanic gap and intermediate depth seismicity patterns, the Peruvian flat slab appears to have the greatest along-strike extent and, therefore, has been suggested as a modern analogue to the putative flat slab during the Laramide orogeny in the western United States (~80-55 Ma). Combining 3D shear wave velocity structure and Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy between ~10° and 18° S, we find that the subducting Nazca plate is not uniformly flat along the entire region, but fails to the north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. Our results show that, in combination with trench retreat, rapid overriding plate motion, and/or presence of a thick cratonic root, the subduction of buoyant overthickened oceanic crust, such as the Nazca Ridge, is necessary for the formation and sustainability of flat slabs. This finding has important implications for the formation of flat slabs both past and present.

  18. Neotectonics of a subduction/strike-slip transition: the northeastern Dominican Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winslow, M.A.; McCann, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Septentrional fault system in the northeastern Dominican Republic marks the zone where the North American-Carribean plate boundary is evolving from subduction to strike-slip motion, and where terranes appear to be forming and migrating laterally in a subduction complex/forearc region. On the Island of Hispaniola, slip vectors are oblique to the strike of the Puerto Rico trench, and oblique subduction thrusts the upper plate over normal seafloor. The offshore geology and seismicity of the northern Caribbean suggest that uplift, broad crustal warping, thrusting, and strike-slip faulting (ie. collisional tectonics) should be present in the northern part of the Dominican Republic. The high topography (>1000m), high levels of seismicity, and large earthquakes support the hypothesis of contemporary deformation in Hispaniola. In this region, the subduction regime dies out toward the west, and deformation is transferred to onshore, oblique-slip faults. As this change in tectonic style has occurred in Neogene to Recent times, we are investigating the modern evolution of a plate boundary. We have already documented: (1) the presence of a strike-slip faulting in the northeastern Dominican Republic; (2) an anomalous push-up structure; and (3) a region of numerous splay faults. In conclusion, recent seismicity suggest a wide zone of deformation and variations in interplate motions near Hispaniola. This island lies at the western limit of active underthrusting and at the eastern limit of onshore faulting, i.e., at an important transition from a subduction to strike-slip regime.

  19. Coincidence of mandibular fractures with isolated posterior maxillary sinus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Sebastian; Rahimi-Nedjat, Roman; Sagheb, Keyvan; Piechowiak, Lisa; Walter, Christian; Brüllmann, Dan

    2017-10-01

    There are no data available to show whether there is a relationship between mandibular fractures and isolated fractures of the posterior and/or lateral walls of the maxillary sinus. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a coincidence between these fracture patterns. Four hundred large volume cone beam computed tomography scans (CBCT) of patients with a fracture of the mandible between 2008 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with multiple midfacial fractures were excluded. The radiographic findings were correlated with epidemiological and clinical data of the patients such as gender, age, treatment methods, or complications. The most frequent fracture sites of the mandible were the jaw angle, the parasymphysis region, and the condyle. Nineteen of the 400 patients (4.75%) had an isolated fracture of the lateral and/or posterior maxillary sinus. Odds-ratio analysis revealed a high tendency for significant correlation of condylar process fractures with isolated maxillary sinus fractures. Chi-square test demonstrated a P-value near statistical significance (P=.054). No other fracture site of the mandible could be associated with an isolated fracture of the maxillary sinus. A condylar process fracture of the mandible after trauma without any further injury of the midface may be associated with an isolated fracture of the lateral and/or posterior maxillary sinus. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. H2O and CO2 devolatilization in subduction zones: implications for the global water and carbon cycles (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keken, P. E.; Hacker, B. R.; Syracuse, E. M.; Abers, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    Subduction of sediments and altered oceanic crust functions as a major carbon sink. Upon subduction the carbon may be released by progressive metamorphic reactions, which can be strongly enhanced by free fluids. Quantification of the CO2 release from subducting slabs is important to determine the provenance of CO2 that is released by the volcanic arc and to constrain the flux of carbon to the deeper mantle. In recent work we used a global set of high resolution thermal models of subduction zones to predict the flux of H2O from the subducting slab (van Keken, Hacker, Syracuse, Abers, Subduction factory 4: Depth-dependent flux of H2O from subducting slabs worldwide, J. Geophys. Res., under review) which provides a new estimate of the dehydration efficiency of the global subducting system. It was found that mineralogically bound water can pass efficiently through old and fast subduction zones (such as in the western Pacific) but that warm subduction zones (such as Cascadia) see nearly complete dehydration of the subducting slab. The top of the slab is sufficiently hot in all subduction zones that the upper crust dehydrates significantly. The degree and depth of dehydration is highly diverse and strongly depends on (p,T) and bulk rock composition. On average about one third of subducted H2O reaches 240 km depth, carried principally and roughly equally in the gabbro and peridotite sections. The present-day global flux of H2O to the deep mantle translates to an addition of about one ocean mass over the age of the Earth. We extend the slab devolatilization work to carbon by providing an update to Gorman et al. (Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst, 2006), who quantified the effects of free fluids on CO2 release. The thermal conditions were based on three end-member subduction zones with linear interpolation to provide a global CO2 flux. We use the new high resolution and global set of models to provide higher resolution predictions for the provenance and pathways of CO2 release to

  1. Polymer liquids fracture like solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Hassager, Ole

    2017-01-01

    While fracture in brittle solids has been studied for centuries until today, there are few studies on fracture in polymer liquids. Recent developments in experimental techniques, especially the combination of controlled filament stretching rheometry and high speed imaging, have opened new windows...... into the detailed study of fracture processes for polymer liquids. High speed imaging shows that polymer liquids fracture like solids with initiation and propagation of an edge fracture. However, remarkable features such as highly reproducible critical stress, independent appearance of multiple fractures...

  2. CT classification of acetabular fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marincek, B.; Porcellini, B.; Robotti, G.

    1984-05-01

    The contribution of computed tomography (CT) in classifying acetabular fractures was analysed retrospectively in 33 cases. CT and plain radiography classification agreed in 27 cases (82%). CT revealed more extensive fractures in 6 patients (thereof 5 patients with associated fractures). In 10 patients (thereof 9 patients with associated fractures) CT showed intraarticular fragments; radiographically intraarticular fragments were seen only in 2 patients and suspected in 4. CT is of considerable aid in defining the fracture pattern. It should be used mainly in patients with radiographically difficult interpretable associated fractures in order to assess preoperatively the weight-bearing part of the acetabulum, the degree of displacement and the presence of intraarticular fragments.

  3. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, Jens Peder

    Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high-strength......Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high......-strength concrete. Chapter 2 A description of the factors which influence the strength and cracking of concrete and high strength concrete is made. Then basic linear fracture mechanics is outlined followed by a description and evaluation of the models used to describe concrete fracture in tension. The chapter ends...... to describe fracture in concrete are presented. Two of the methods are combined into a power method which is stable for all brittleness numbers and which is able of calculating the entire load-displacement curve even for very ductile beams. This method is used extensively in the rest of the thesis. Chapter 4...

  4. Pediatric calcaneal fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hobie Summers

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although operative treatment of displaced, intra-articular fractures of the calcaneus in adults is generally accepted as standard practice, operative treatment for the same fractures in the skeletally immature remains controversial, potentially because the outcome for fracture types (intra- vs. extra-articular and severity (displaced vs. nondisplaced have been confounded in studies of children. We review herein the results of 21 displaced, intra-articular fractures in 18 skeletally immature patients, who were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using a standard surgical approach and protocol developed for adults. The average pre-operative Böhler's angle on the injured side was -5° (range: -35 - +35 compared to 31° (range: +22 - +47 on the uninjured side, indicating substantial displacement. There were no post-operative infections or wound healing problems, and all but one patient was followed to union (average follow-up: 1.5 years; range: 0.30-4.3 years. Maintenance of reduction was confirmed on follow-up radiographs with an average Böhler's angle of 31° (range: +22 - +49. We demonstrate that results for operative fixation of displaced, intra-articular calcaneal fractures in the skeletally immature are comparable to those in adults when the treatment protocol is the same.

  5. Frontal bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinheiro, Bruno Henrique; de Medeiros, Eduardo Henrique Pantosso; Sverzut, Cássio Edvard; Trivellato, Alexandre Elias

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the epidemiology, treatment, and complications of frontal bone fractures associated, or not, with other facial fractures. This evaluation also sought to minimize the influence of the surgeon's skills and the preference for any rigid internal fixation system. The files from 3758 patients who attended the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, from March 2004 to November 2011 and presented with facial trauma were scanned, and 52 files were chosen for the review. Eleven (21.15%) of these patients had pure fractures of the frontal bone, and trauma incidence was more prevalent in men (92.3%), whites (61.53%), and adults (50%). Despite the use of helmets at the moment of the trauma, motorcycle crashes were the most common etiological factor (32.69%). Fracture of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus with displacement was the main injury observed (54.9%), and the most common treatment was internal fixation with a plate and screws (45.09%). Postoperative complications were observed in 35.29% of the cases. The therapy applied was effective in handling this type of fracture, and the success rate was comparable to that reported in other published studies.

  6. Development of a binder fracture test to determine fracture energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    It has been found that binder testing methods in current specifications do not accurately predict cracking performance at intermediate temperatures. Fracture energy has been determined to be strongly correlated to fracture resistance of asphalt mixtu...

  7. Subducting slab ultra-slow velocity layer coincident with silent earthquakes in southern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Teh-Ru Alex; Helmberger, Donald V; Brudzinski, Michael R; Clayton, Robert W; Davis, Paul; Pérez-Campos, Xyoli; Singh, Shri K

    2009-04-24

    Great earthquakes have repeatedly occurred on the plate interface in a few shallow-dipping subduction zones where the subducting and overriding plates are strongly locked. Silent earthquakes (or slow slip events) were recently discovered at the down-dip extension of the locked zone and interact with the earthquake cycle. Here, we show that locally observed converted SP arrivals and teleseismic underside reflections that sample the top of the subducting plate in southern Mexico reveal that the ultra-slow velocity layer (USL) varies spatially (3 to 5 kilometers, with an S-wave velocity of approximately 2.0 to 2.7 kilometers per second). Most slow slip patches coincide with the presence of the USL, and they are bounded by the absence of the USL. The extent of the USL delineates the zone of transitional frictional behavior.

  8. The subduction zone flow field from seismic anisotropy: a global view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Maureen D; Silver, Paul G

    2008-01-18

    Although the morphologies of subducting slabs have been relatively well characterized, the character of the mantle flow field that accompanies subduction remains poorly understood. To analyze this pattern of flow, we compiled observations of seismic anisotropy, as manifested by shear wave splitting. Data from 13 subduction zones reveal systematic variations in both mantle-wedge and subslab anisotropy with the magnitude of trench migration velocity |V(t)|. These variations can be explained by flow along the strike of the trench induced by trench motion. This flow dominates beneath the slab, where its magnitude scales with |V(t)|. In the mantle wedge, this flow interacts with classical corner flow produced by the convergence velocity V(c); their relative influence is governed by the relative magnitude of |V(t)| and V(c).

  9. High-pressure creep of serpentine, interseismic deformation, and initiation of subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilairet, Nadege; Reynard, Bruno; Wang, Yanbin; Daniel, Isabelle; Merkel, Sebastien; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Petitgirard, Sylvain

    2007-12-21

    The supposed low viscosity of serpentine may strongly influence subduction-zone dynamics at all time scales, but until now its role could not be quantified because measurements relevant to intermediate-depth settings were lacking. Deformation experiments on the serpentine antigorite at high pressures and temperatures (1 to 4 gigapascals, 200 degrees to 500 degrees C) showed that the viscosity of serpentine is much lower than that of the major mantle-forming minerals. Regardless of the temperature, low-viscosity serpentinized mantle at the slab surface can localize deformation, impede stress buildup, and limit the downdip propagation of large earthquakes at subduction zones. Antigorite enables viscous relaxation with characteristic times comparable to those of long-term postseismic deformations after large earthquakes and slow earthquakes. Antigorite viscosity is sufficiently low to make serpentinized faults in the oceanic lithosphere a site for subduction initiation.

  10. Topography of the Overriding Plate During Progressive Subduction: A Dynamic Model to Explain Forearc Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, João. C.; Strak, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Overriding plate topography provides constraints on subduction zone geodynamics. We investigate its evolution using fully dynamic laboratory models of subduction with techniques of stereoscopic photogrammetry and particle image velocimetry. Model results show that the topography is characterized by an area of forearc dynamic subsidence, with a magnitude scaling to 1.44-3.97 km in nature, and a local topographic high between the forearc subsided region and the trench. These topographic features rapidly develop during the slab free-sinking phase and gradually decrease during the steady state slab rollback phase. We propose that they result from the variation of the vertical component of the trench suction force along the subduction zone interface, which gradually increases with depth and results from the gradual slab steepening during the initial transient slab sinking phase. The downward mantle flow in the nose of the mantle wedge plays a minor role in driving forearc subsidence.

  11. Subduction of the oceanic Hikurangi Plateau and its impact on the Kermadec arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Christian; Davy, Bryan; Haase, Karsten; Hoernle, Kaj A; Graham, Ian J; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Woodhead, Jon; Bassett, Dan; Hauff, Folkmar; Mortimer, Nick; Seebeck, Hannu C; Wysoczanski, Richard J; Caratori-Tontini, Fabio; Gamble, John A

    2014-09-17

    Large igneous province subduction is a rare process on Earth. A modern example is the subduction of the oceanic Hikurangi Plateau beneath the southern Kermadec arc, offshore New Zealand. This segment of the arc has the largest total lava volume erupted and the highest volcano density of the entire Kermadec arc. Here we show that Kermadec arc lavas south of ~32°S have elevated Pb and Sr and low Nd isotope ratios, which argues, together with increasing seafloor depth, forearc retreat and crustal thinning, for initial Hikurangi Plateau-Kermadec arc collision ~250 km north of its present position. The combined data set indicates that a much larger portion of the Hikurangi Plateau (the missing Ontong Java Nui piece) than previously believed has already been subducted. Oblique plate convergence caused southward migration of the thickened and buoyant oceanic plateau crust, creating a buoyant 'Hikurangi' mélange beneath the Moho that interacts with ascending arc melts.

  12. Thermal effects of variable material properties and metamorphic reactions in a three-component subducting slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Dolejš, David; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    We explore the effects of variable material properties, phase transformations, and metamorphic devolatilization reactions on the thermal structure of a subducting slab using thermodynamic phase equilibrium calculations combined with a thermal evolution model. The subducting slab is divided...... within the slab is limited. Two extreme scenarios are considered for a newly forming fluid phase: complete retention in the rock pore space or instantaneous fluid escape due to porosity collapse. Internal heat generation or consumption due to variable heat capacity, compressional work, and energetics...... of progressive metamorphic and devolatilization reactions contribute to the thermal evolution of the slab in addition to the dominating heat flux from the surrounding mantle. They can be considered as a perturbation on the temperature profile obtained in dynamic or kinematic subduction models. Our calculations...

  13. Breaking the oceanic lithosphere of a subducting slab: the 2013 Khash, Iran earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, William D.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Samsonov, S.; Fielding, E.; Seidman, L.

    2014-01-01

    [1] Large intermediate depth, intraslab normal faulting earthquakes are a common, dangerous, but poorly understood phenomenon in subduction zones owing to a paucity of near field geophysical observations. Seismological and high quality geodetic observations of the 2013 Mw7.7 Khash, Iran earthquake reveal that at least half of the oceanic lithosphere, including the mantle and entire crust, ruptured in a single earthquake, confirming with unprecedented resolution that large earthquakes can nucleate in and rupture through the oceanic mantle. A rupture width of at least 55 km is required to explain both InSAR observations and teleseismic waveforms, with the majority of slip occurring in the oceanic mantle. Combining our well-constrained earthquake slip distributions with the causative fault orientation and geometry of the local subduction zone, we hypothesize that the Khash earthquake likely occurred as the combined result of slab bending forces and dehydration of hydrous minerals along a preexisting fault formed prior to subduction.

  14. Depth-dependent rupture mode along the Ecuador-Colombia subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Acero, Wilson; Ponce, Gabriela; Vásconez, Freddy; Arrais, Santiago; Ruiz, Mario; Alvarado, Alexandra; Pedraza García, Patricia; Dionicio, Viviana; Chamorro, Orlando; Maeda, Yuta; Nakano, Masaru

    2017-03-01

    A large earthquake (Mw 7.7) occurred on 16 April 2016 within the source region of the 1906 earthquake in the Ecuador-Colombia subduction zone. The 1906 event has been interpreted as a megathrust earthquake (Mw 8.8) that ruptured the source regions of smaller earthquakes in 1942, 1958, and 1979 in this subduction. Our seismic analysis indicated that the spatial distribution of the 2016 earthquake and its aftershocks correlated with patches of high interplate coupling strength and was similar to those of the 1942 earthquake and its aftershocks, suggesting that the 2016 and 1942 earthquakes ruptured the same asperity. Our analysis of tsunami waveforms of the 1906 event indicated Mw around 8.4 and showed that large slip occurred near the trench off the source regions of the above three historical and the 2016 earthquakes, suggesting that a depth-dependent complex rupture mode exists along this subduction zone.

  15. Smectite reactions and slip instabilities in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadenne, Leslie; Raimbourg, Hugues; Champallier, Remi; Yamamoto, Yuzuru

    2015-04-01

    instabilities in natural conditions, as (1) smectite is a major component of subducted sediments and (2) its transformation into illite may occur over a large depth range.

  16. Transstyloid, transscaphoid, transcapitate fracture: a variant of scaphocapitate fractures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2014-01-01

    Transstyloid, transscaphoid, transcapitate fractures are uncommon. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who sustained this fracture following direct trauma. The patient was successfully treated by open reduction internal fixation of the scaphoid and proximal capitate fragment, with a good clinical outcome at 1-year follow-up. This pattern is a new variant of scaphocapitate fracture as involves a fracture of the radial styloid as well.

  17. Seamount subduction underneath an accretionary wedge: modelling mass wasting and wedge collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannu, Utsav; Ueda, Kosuke; Willett, Sean; Gerya, Taras; Strasser, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Seamounts (h >1 km) and knolls (h = 500 m-1000 m) cover about one-fifth of the total ocean floor area. These topographical highs of the ocean floor eventually get subducted. Subduction of these topographical features leads to severe deformation of the overriding plate and can cause extensive tectonic erosion and mass wasting of the frontal prism, which can ultimately cause a forearc wedge collapse. Large submarine landslides and the corresponding wedge collapse have previously been reported, for instance, in the northern part of the Hikurangi margin where the landslide is known as the giant Ruatoria debris avalanche, and have also been frequently reported in several seismic sections along the Costa Rica margin. Size and frequency relation of landslides suggest that the average size of submarine landslides in margins with rough subducting plates tends to be larger. However, this observation has not yet been tested or explained by physical models. In numerical subduction models, landslides take place, if at all, on a much larger timescale (in the order of 104-105 years, depending on the time steps of the model) than in natural cases. On the other hand, numerical models simulating mass wasting events such as avalanches and submarine landslides, typically model single events at a much smaller spatio-temporal domain, and do not consider long-term occurrence patterns of freely forming landslides. In this contribution, we present a multi-scale nested numerical approach to emulate short-term landslides within long-term progressive subduction. The numerical approach dynamically produces instantaneous submarine landslides and the resulting debris flow in the spatially and temporally refined inner model. Then we apply these convoluted changes in topography (e.g. due to the submarine landslide etc.) back to an outer larger-scale model instance that addresses wedge evolution. We use this approach to study the evolution of the accretionary wedge during seamount subduction.

  18. Record of mid-Archaean subduction from metamorphism in the Barberton terrain, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyen, Jean-François; Stevens, Gary; Kisters, Alexander

    2006-08-03

    Although plate tectonics is the central geological process of the modern Earth, its form and existence during the Archaean era (4.0-2.5 Gyr ago) are disputed. The existence of subduction during this time is particularly controversial because characteristic subduction-related mineral assemblages, typically documenting apparent geothermal gradients of 15 degrees C km(-1) or less, have not yet been recorded from in situ Archaean rocks (the lowest recorded apparent geothermal gradients are greater than 25 degrees C km(-1)). Despite this absence from the rock record, low Archaean geothermal gradients are suggested by eclogitic nodules in kimberlites and circumstantial evidence for subduction processes, including possible accretion-related structures, has been reported in Archaean terrains. The lack of spatially and temporally well-constrained high-pressure, low-temperature metamorphism continues, however, to cast doubt on the relevance of subduction-driven tectonics during the first 1.5 Gyr of the Earth's history. Here we report garnet-albite-bearing mineral assemblages that record pressures of 1.2-1.5 GPa at temperatures of 600-650 degrees C from supracrustal amphibolites from the mid-Archaean Barberton granitoid-greenstone terrain. These conditions point to apparent geothermal gradients of 12-15 degrees C-similar to those found in recent subduction zones-that coincided with the main phase of terrane accretion in the structurally overlying Barberton greenstone belt. These high-pressure, low-temperature conditions represent metamorphic evidence for cold and strong lithosphere, as well as subduction-driven tectonic processes, during the evolution of the early Earth.

  19. Characterizing Mega-Earthquake Related Tsunami on Subduction Zones without Large Historical Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. R.; Lee, R.; Astill, S.; Farahani, R.; Wilson, P. S.; Mohammed, F.

    2014-12-01

    Due to recent large tsunami events (e.g., Chile 2010 and Japan 2011), the insurance industry is very aware of the importance of managing its exposure to tsunami risk. There are currently few tools available to help establish policies for managing and pricing tsunami risk globally. As a starting point and to help address this issue, Risk Management Solutions Inc. (RMS) is developing a global suite of tsunami inundation footprints. This dataset will include both representations of historical events as well as a series of M9 scenarios on subductions zones that have not historical generated mega earthquakes. The latter set is included to address concerns about the completeness of the historical record for mega earthquakes. This concern stems from the fact that the Tohoku Japan earthquake was considerably larger than had been observed in the historical record. Characterizing the source and rupture pattern for the subduction zones without historical events is a poorly constrained process. In many case, the subduction zones can be segmented based on changes in the characteristics of the subducting slab or major ridge systems. For this project, the unit sources from the NOAA propagation database are utilized to leverage the basin wide modeling included in this dataset. The length of the rupture is characterized based on subduction zone segmentation and the slip per unit source can be determined based on the event magnitude (i.e., M9) and moment balancing. As these events have not occurred historically, there is little to constrain the slip distribution. Sensitivity tests on the potential rupture pattern have been undertaken comparing uniform slip to higher shallow slip and tapered slip models. Subduction zones examined include the Makran Trench, the Lesser Antilles and the Hikurangi Trench. The ultimate goal is to create a series of tsunami footprints to help insurers understand their exposures at risk to tsunami inundation around the world.

  20. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.; Johnson, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/ d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of average active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Probing the transition between seismically coupled and decoupled segments along an ancient subduction interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiboust, Samuel; Kirsch, Josephine; Oncken, Onno; Glodny, Johannes; Monié, Patrick; Rybacki, Erik

    2015-06-01

    The transition zone at the downdip end of seismic coupling along subduction interfaces is often the site of megathrust earthquake nucleation and concentrated postseismic afterslip, as well as the focus site of episodic tremor and slip features. Exhumed remnants of the former Alpine subduction zone found in the Swiss Alps allow analyzing fluid and deformation processes near the transition zone region (30-40 km paleodepth). The Dent Blanche Thrust (DBT) is a lower blueschist-facies shear zone interpreted as a fossilized subduction interface where granitic mylonites overlie a metamorphosed accretionary wedge. We report field observations from the DBT region where multiple, several tens of meters thick foliated cataclastic networks are interlayered within the basal DBT mylonites. Petrological results and microstructural observations indicate that the various cataclasis events took place at near-peak metamorphic conditions (400-500°C, 1.1-1.3 GPa) during subduction of the Tethyan seafloor in Eocene times (42-48 Ma). Some of these networks exhibit mutual crosscutting relationships between mylonites, foliated cataclasites, and vein systems indicating mutual overprinting between brittle deformation and ductile creep. Whole-rock chemical compositions, in situ 40Ar-39Ar age data of recrystallized phengite, and Sr isotopic signatures reveal that DBT rocks also underwent multiple hydrofracturing and metasomatic events via the infiltration of fluids mainly derived from the oceanic metasediments underneath the DBT. From the rock fabrics, we infer strain rate fluctuations of several orders of magnitude beyond subduction strain rates (˜10-12 s-1) accompanied by fluctuation of supralithostatic and quasi-lithostatic fluid pressures (1 ≥ λ > 0.95). DBT brittle-plastic deformation switches highlight the diversity of deformation processes and fluid-rock interactions in the transition zone region of the subduction interface.

  2. Foal Fractures: Osteochondral Fragmentation, Proximal Sesamoid Bone Fractures/Sesamoiditis, and Distal Phalanx Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesink, Heidi L

    2017-08-01

    Foals are susceptible to many of the same types of fractures as adult horses, often secondary to external sources of trauma. In addition, some types of fractures are specific to foals and occur routinely in horses under 1 year of age. These foal-specific fractures may be due to the unique musculoskeletal properties of the developing animal and may present with distinct clinical signs. Treatment plans and prognoses are tailored specifically to young animals. Common fractures not affecting the long bones in foals are discussed in this article, including osteochondral fragmentation, proximal sesamoid bone fractures/sesamoiditis, and distal phalanx fractures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Boning [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Herbold, Eric B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homel, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Regueiro, Richard A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  4. Geometrically Frustrated Fracture Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Noah; Koning, Vinzenz; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    When a flat elastic sheet is forced to conform to a surface with Gaussian curvature, stresses arise in the sheet. The mismatch between initial and final metrics gives rise to new fracture behavior which cannot be achieved by boundary loading alone. Using experiments of PDMS sheets frustrated on 3D-printed surfaces and a linearized analytical model, we demonstrate the ability of curvature to govern the sheets' fracture phenomenology. In this talk, we first show that curvature can both stimulate and suppress fracture initiation, depending on the position and orientation of the initial slit. Secondly, we show that curvature can steer the path of a crack as it propagates through the material. Lastly, the curvature can arrest cracks which would otherwise continue to propagate.

  5. open fractures - effect of infection on fracture fixation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stability, soft tissue cover, union of the fracture and above all prevent infection. Therefore various methods ... Also soft tissue cover should be done as soon as possible following the fix and flap-protocal (7) for open fractures ... and flap: the radical orthopaedic and plastic treatment of severe open fractures of the tibia.

  6. Optimizing fracture prevention: the fracture liaison service, an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekman, D.A.; van Helden, S.H.; Huisman, A.M.; Verhaar, H.J.J.; Bultink, I.E.M.; Geusens, P.P.; Lips, P.T.A.M.; Lems, W.F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: The response rate to the invitation to the fracture liaison service and reasons for non-response were evaluated in 2,207 fragility fracture patients. Fifty-one percent responded; non-responders were most often not interested (38%) or were hip fracture patients. After 1 year of treatment,

  7. Kinematics of Late Cretaceous subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructed from ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J.J.; de Gelder, Giovanni I.N.O.; van der Goes, Freek C.; Morris, Antony

    Formation of new subduction zones represents one of the cornerstones of plate tectonics, yet both the kinematics and geodynamics governing this process remain enigmatic. A major subduction initiation event occurred in the Late Cretaceous, within the Neo-Tethys Ocean between Gondwana and Eurasia.

  8. Geodynamic models of continental subduction and obduction of overriding plate forearc oceanic lithosphere on top of continental crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, Sarah J.; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, Joao C.

    2015-01-01

    Continental subduction takes place in the final stage of subduction when all oceanic lithosphere is consumed and continental passive margin is pulled into the mantle. When the overriding plate is oceanic, dense forearc oceanic lithosphere might be obducted onto light continental crust forming an

  9. Strength of stick-slip and creeping subduction megathrusts from heat flow observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Kelin

    2014-08-29

    Subduction faults, called megathrusts, can generate large and hazardous earthquakes. The mode of slip and seismicity of a megathrust is controlled by the structural complexity of the fault zone. However, the relative strength of a megathrust based on the mode of slip is far from clear. The fault strength affects surface heat flow by frictional heating during slip. We model heat-flow data for a number of subduction zones to determine the fault strength. We find that smooth megathrusts that produce great earthquakes tend to be weaker and therefore dissipate less heat than geometrically rough megathrusts that slip mainly by creeping. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Geophysical detection of relict metasomatism from an Archean (approximately 3.5 Ga) subduction zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Wu; Rondenay, Stéphane; Evans, Rob L; Snyder, David B

    2009-11-20

    When plate tectonics started on Earth has been uncertain, and its role in the assembly of early continents is not well understood. By synthesizing coincident seismic and electrical profiles, we show that subduction processes formed the Archean Slave craton in Canada. The spatial overlap between a seismic discontinuity and a conductive anomaly at approximately 100 kilometers depth, in conjunction with the occurrence of mantle xenoliths rich in secondary minerals representative of a metasomatic front, supports cratonic assembly by subduction and accretion of lithospheric fragments. Although evidence of cratonic assembly is rarely preserved, these results suggest that plate tectonics was operating as early as Paleoarchean times, approximately 3.5 billion years ago (Ga).

  11. Transient uplift after a 17th-century earthquake along the Kuril subduction zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Yuki; Satake, Kenji; Kamataki, Takanobu; Nasu, Hiroo; Shishikura, Masanobu; Atwater, Brian F; Horton, Benjamin P; Kelsey, Harvey M; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Yamaguchi, Masaaki

    2004-12-10

    In eastern Hokkaido, 60 to 80 kilometers above a subducting oceanic plate, tidal mudflats changed into freshwater forests during the first decades after a 17th-century tsunami. The mudflats gradually rose by a meter, as judged from fossil diatom assemblages. Both the tsunami and the ensuing uplift exceeded any in the region's 200 years of written history, and both resulted from a shallow plate-boundary earthquake of unusually large size along the Kuril subduction zone. This earthquake probably induced more creep farther down the plate boundary than did any of the region's historical events.

  12. Li isotopic constraints from the Erro-Tobbio serpentinites on Alpine subduction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, M.-F.; Scambelluri, M.; Griffin, W. L.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Pearson, N. J.

    2012-04-01

    Subduction zones represent a unique feature of the dynamic Earth and provide important constraints on how plate tectonics works. Subduction of serpentinized oceanic lithosphere, characterized by releasing water into the mantle wedge via dehydration, i.e. breakdown of hydrous minerals, plays a critical role in not only the generation of continental crust but also the Earth's water cycle. To track the recycling of water or fluid released by subduction, the stable isotope system of Li, a lithophile and mobile element, shows its high potential because 7Li, relative to 6Li, preferentially moves into the fluid phase when fractionation occurs. Here we present new Li abundance and isotopic compositions of the Erro-Tobbio serpentinized peridotite complex, a remnant mantle slice of the Alpine subduction. Our data indicate that most of the serpentinized ultramafic rocks have uniform Li concentrations, around 1 ppm. These rocks, however, show variable Li isotopic compositions. Among them, the high-pressure antigorite-bearing metaperidotites, formed under a low-strain condition, have a limited range in Li isotopic values, with δ7Li = +1.5 to +4.0, similar to those of serpentinized peridotites. In contrast, apparently heavier Li isotopes, up to +10.0, are observed in the high-pressure serpentinite mylonites that also contain antigorite but formed in high-strain domains. We note that O-H isotope ratios of the high-pressure ultramafic rocks reported in previous study (Früh-Green et al., 2001, Contrib. Mineral Petrol. 141: 145-159) show insignificant variations between the low- and high-strain domains. This demonstrates the superiority of Li isotope than conventional stable isotope systems in offering critical information about fluid-releasing processes in subduction zones. Moreover, our new data unsupport the general assumption that fluid released from subducted slabs is in favor of extracting 7Li than 6Li, thus capable of forming the much lighter δ7Li values observed in

  13. Odontoid fracture biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Paul C

    2014-11-15

    In vitro biomechanical study. To investigate mechanisms of odontoid fracture. Odontoid fractures in younger adults occur most often due to high-energy trauma including motor vehicle crashes and in older adults due to fall from standing height. Horizontally aligned head impacts into a padded barrier were simulated using a human upper cervical spine specimen (occiput through C3) mounted to a surrogate torso mass on a sled and carrying a surrogate head. We divided 13 specimens into 3 groups on the basis of head impact location: upper forehead in the midline, upper lateral side of the forehead, and upper lateral side of the head. Post-impact fluoroscopy and anatomical dissection documented the injuries. Time-history biomechanical responses were determined. Four of the 5 specimens subjected to impact to the upper forehead in the midline sustained type II or high type III odontoid fractures due to abrupt deceleration of the head and continued forward torso momentum. Average peak force reached 1787.1 N at the neck at 50.3 milliseconds. Subsequently, the motion peaks occurred for the head relative to C3 reaching 15.2° for extension, 2.1 cm for upward translation, and 5.3 cm for horizontal compression, between 62 and 68 milliseconds. We identified impact to the upper forehead in the midline as a mechanism that produced odontoid fracture and associated atlas and ligamentous injuries similar to those observed in real-life trauma. We were not able to create odontoid fractures during impacts to the upper lateral side of the forehead or upper lateral side of the head. Dynamic odontoid fracture was caused by rapid deceleration of the head, which transferred load inferiorly combined with continued torso momentum, which caused spinal compression and anterior shear force and forward displacement of the axis relative to the atlas.

  14. Bilateral Femoral Neck Fracture-Related Hyperparathyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Ezirmik, Naci; Yildiz, Kadri; Cadirci, Kenan

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral femoral neck fracture is not common as unilateral femoral fracture. Femoral neck fracture generally occurs by the high energized traumas. Traffic accidents and fallings are the most common reason for this fracture kind. But suddenly and minor traumatic fractures is not common. Especially, in the hormonal and pathogenic fractures is not common. In this case minor traumatic bilateral femoral fracture is presented. The fracture occurs in the background of critical medical condition by ...

  15. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... osteolysis. Symptoms The most common symptoms of periprosthetic hip fracture include: • Pain around the hip or thigh • Swelling ... o en very painful, someone with a periprosthetic hip fracture will most likely go directly to the emergency ...

  16. [Fractures of the thumb ray].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehling, I M; Schillo, K; Arsalan-Werner, A; Seegmüller, J; Langheinrich, A C; Sauerbier, M

    2016-12-01

    Fractures of the first thumb ray are common and need accurate differential treatment to restore gripping hand functions. Displaced fractures of the distal and proximal phalanx of the thumb are often treated with screws or Kirschner wires. Stable fractures can also be treated non-operatively. Fractures of the base of the first metacarpal should be differentiated into extra-articular Winterstein fractures and intra-articular Bennett or Rolando fractures. Traction forces by the abductor pollicis longus tendon regularly lead to displacement of the shaft of the first metacarpal; therefore, these fractures usually require reduction and fixation. Good functional results can be achieved by operative treatment. Fractures of the trapezium are rare. If they are displaced, operative treatment is recommended to prevent osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint.

  17. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and break.How are spinal fractures treated?Most fractures of the spine are treated with bed rest until the pain goes away. Pain medicines, back braces and physical therapy may also be used. For some patients, doctors ...

  18. Pediatric Orbital Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Monson, Laura A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    It is wise to recall the dictum “children are not small adults” when managing pediatric orbital fractures. In a child, the craniofacial skeleton undergoes significant changes in size, shape, and proportion as it grows into maturity. Accordingly, the craniomaxillofacial surgeon must select an appropriate treatment strategy that considers both the nature of the injury and the child's stage of growth. The following review will discuss the management of pediatric orbital fractures, with an emphasis on clinically oriented anatomy and development. PMID:24436730

  19. Fractured Petroleum Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firoozabadi, Dr. Abbas

    2000-01-18

    In this report the results of experiments of water injection in fractured porous media comprising a number of water-wet matrix blocks are reported for the first time. The blocks experience an advancing fracture-water level (FWL). Immersion-type experiments are performed for comparison; the dominant recovery mechanism changed from co-current to counter-current imbibition when the boundary conditions changed from advancing FWL to immersion-type. Single block experiments of co-current and counter-current imbibition was performed and co-current imbibition leads to more efficient recovery was found.

  20. Diapir versus along-channel ascent of crustal material during plate convergence: Constrained by the thermal structure of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Qi; Li, Zhong-Hai; Yang, Shao-Hua

    2017-09-01

    Subduction channel processes are crucial for understanding the material and energy exchange between the Earth's crust and mantle. Crustal rocks can be subducted to mantle depths, interact with the mantle wedge, and then exhume to the crustal depth again, which is generally considered as the mechanism for the formation of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks in nature. In addition, the crustal rocks generally undergo dehydration and melting at subarc depths, giving rise to fluids that metasomatize and weaken the overlying mantle wedge. There are generally two ways for the material ascent from subarc depths: one is along subduction channels; the other is through the mantle wedge by diapir. In order to study the conditions and dynamics of these contrasting material ascent modes, systematic petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical models are constructed with variable thicknesses of the overriding and subducting continental plates, ages of the subducting oceanic plate, as well as the plate convergence rates. The model results suggest that the thermal structures of subduction zones control the thermal condition and fluid/melt activity at the slab-mantle interface in subcontinental subduction channels, which further strongly affect the material transportation and ascent mode. The thick overriding continental plate and the low-angle subduction style induced by young subducting oceanic plate both contribute to the formation of relatively cold subduction channels with strong overriding mantle wedge, where the along-channel exhumation occurs exclusively to result in the exhumation of HP-UHP metamorphic rocks. In contrast, the thin overriding lithosphere and the steep subduction style induced by old subducting oceanic plate are the favorable conditions for hot subduction channels, which lead to significant hydration and metasomatism, melting and weakening of the overriding mantle wedge and thus cause the ascent of mantle wedge-derived melts by diapir through the mantle wedge

  1. Accessory minerals and subduction zone metasomatism: a geochemical comparison of two mélanges (Washington and California, U.S.A.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Sorena S.; Grossman, Jeffrey N.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of a subducted slab or subducted sediment to contribute many incompatible trace elements to arc source regions may depend on the stabilities of accessory minerals within these rocks, which can only be studied indirectly. In contrast, the role of accessory minerals in lower-T and -P metasomatic processes within paleo-subduction zones can be studied directly in subduction-zone metamorphic terranes.

  2. Robotic Long Bone Fracture Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, A. E.; Xie, S. Q.; Aw, K. C.; Xu, W.L.; Mukherjee, S.

    2008-01-01

    This research into a medical robot for realigning fractured bones aims to develop the interface, robot, and database technologies to improve the working situation for users and outcome for recipients. Compared with other approaches to fracture reduction, the system being developed here has a number of novel features. The geometric modeling has been effective in allowing a surgeon to visualize the fractured bone and has not been reported elsewhere for fracture reduction to the authors knowledg...

  3. MANAGEMENT OF PELVIC FRACTURES IN DOG

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

    Fracture of ilium, the most common fracture seen in the pelvis account for 46% of all pelvic fracture (Henry, 1985; De Camp, 2005). Whereas, acetabular fracture comprises 12 % of pelvic fractures in dogs (De Camp, 2005). In smaller dogs, most of the pelvic fractures recover without surgery. But immediate surgery is.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Naturally Fractured Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.; Olson, J. E.; Schultz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing consists of injecting fluid at high pressure and high flowrate to the wellbore for the purpose of enhancing production by generating a complex fracture network. Both tensile failure and shear failure occur during the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shear event can be caused by slip on existing weak planes such as faults or natural fractures. From core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented opening mode natural fractures, often with considerable thickness are widely present. Hydraulic fractures can propagate either within the natural fracture (tensile failure) or along the interface between the natural fracture and the rock matrix (tensile/shear failure), depending on the relative strength of cement and rock matrix materials, the bonding strength of interface, as well as the presence of any heterogeneities. In this study, we evaluate the fracture propagation both experimentally and numerically. We embed one or multiple inclusions of different mechanical properties within synthetic hydrostone samples in order to mimic cemented natural fractures and rock. A semi-circular bending test is performed for each set of properties. A finite element model built with ABAQUS is used to mimic the semi-circular bending test and study the fracture propagation path, as well as the matrix-inclusion bonding interface status. Mechanical properties required for the numerical model are measured experimentally. The results indicate that the match between experiment and modeling fracture path are extremely sensitive to the chosen interface (bonding) model and related parameters. The semi-circular bending test is dry and easily conducted, providing a good platform for validating numerical approaches. A validated numerical model will enable us to add pressurized fluid within the crack and simulate hydraulic fracture-natural fracture interaction in the reservoir conditions, ultimately providing insights into the extent of the fracture network.

  5. Efficiency and accuracy of equivalent fracture models for predicting fractured geothermal reservoirs: the influence of fracture network patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Clauser, Christoph; Marquart, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    Frequently, flow and transport in fractured geothermal reservoirs are modeled using discrete and continuum fracture models. In discrete fracture models, each fracture is represented explicitly based on unstructured grids, which increases greatly the computational effort. In continuum models, e.g., equivalent fracture models, the hydraulic properties of fractures are averaged on coarse grids, which are often applied for the field-scale modeling. We use and compare both discrete and equivalent fracture models for predicting the field-scale temperature distribution in fractured geothermal reservoirs. We assess the efficiency and the accuracy of the equivalent fracture models regarding the influence of fracture network pattern: In one model fractures are parallel to the axes of the model, another one contains also non-parallel fractures. We use the OpenGeoSys and SHEMAT-Suite codes for discrete fracture modeling and for equivalent fracture modeling, respectively. For equivalent fracture modeling, both the classical finite volume scheme and the mimetic finite difference scheme are used for solving the flow equation. The Oda method is used for computing permeability for equivalent fracture models. For the non-parallel fracture network, the equivalent permeability tensor contains off-diagonal components. Our simulations show that the equivalent fracture models remain computationally efficient with changing fracture pattern. The temperature at the production well turns out to be less sensitive to fracture pattern variations compared to the discrete fracture model. And the equivalent fracture model yields efficient and accurate results in case of dominating parallel fractures.

  6. Oceanic-style Subduction Controls Late Cenozoic Deformation of the Northern Pamir and Alai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, E. R.; Chen, J.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Thiede, R. C.; Stockli, D. F.; Sudo, M.; Strecker, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Pamir - Alai represents the preeminent example of an active intracontinental subduction zone in the early stages of continent-continent collision. Such zones are the least understood type of plate boundary because modern examples are few and of limited access, and ancient analogs have been extensively overprinted by subsequent continent-continent collision and erosion processes. In the Pamir, at least 300 km of convergence has apparently occurred between the North Pamir and the South Tien Shan. Published P-wave tomography and earthquake epicenters suggest subduction of a ~300 km-long slab. The MPT and Pamir Frontal Thrusts (PFT) correspond to the updip projection of this subduction zone. We have compiled ca. 260 published and 18 new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and fission track, and biotite and muscovite Argon cooling ages from basement samples as well as several detrital samples from key areas in the Pamir region. Our synopsis shows that the hanging wall of the MPT experienced relatively minor amounts of late Cenozoic exhumation. This is incompatible with a model of a huge overthrust such as the Himalayan Main Central Thrust. Rather, the bulk of the convergence is apparently accommodated by underthrusting. The Pamir orogen as a whole is an integral part of the overriding plate in a subduction system, while the remnant basin to the north constitutes the downgoing plate. Herein, we demonstrate that the observed deformation of the upper and lower plates within the Pamir-Alai convergence zone resembles highly arcuate oceanic subduction systems characterized by slab rollback, subduction erosion, subduction accretion, and marginal slab-tear faults. We suggest that the curvature of the North Pamir is genetically linked to the short width and rollback of the south-dipping Alai slab; northward motion (indentation) of the Pamir is accommodated by crustal processes related to slab rollback and intracontinental subduction. Our model relates late Oligocene - early Miocene

  7. Calcaneal fractures • In children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-07-15

    Jul 15, 1989 ... Eight patients with 9 calcaneal fractures were reviewed. Of the fractures 6 were intra-articular and 3 extra-articular but in children this distinction appears to have little relevan~e to treatment or prognosis. While these fractures are relatively uncommon in children, clinical suspicion is important in making the ...

  8. An Equivalent Fracture Modeling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaohua; Zhang, Shujuan; Yu, Gaoming; Xu, Aiyun

    2017-12-01

    3D fracture network model is built based on discrete fracture surfaces, which are simulated based on fracture length, dip, aperture, height and so on. The interesting area of Wumishan Formation of Renqiu buried hill reservoir is about 57 square kilometer and the thickness of target strata is more than 2000 meters. In addition with great fracture density, the fracture simulation and upscaling of discrete fracture network model of Wumishan Formation are very intense computing. In order to solve this problem, a method of equivalent fracture modeling is proposed. First of all, taking the fracture interpretation data obtained from imaging logging and conventional logging as the basic data, establish the reservoir level model, and then under the constraint of reservoir level model, take fault distance analysis model as the second variable, establish fracture density model by Sequential Gaussian Simulation method. Increasing the width, height and length of fracture, at the same time decreasing its density in order to keep the similar porosity and permeability after upscaling discrete fracture network model. In this way, the fracture model of whole interesting area can be built within an accepted time.

  9. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum: The Subduction Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penniston-Dorland, S.; Stern, R. J.; Edwards, B. R.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate fundamental results from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. Three Subduction Factory (SubFac) mini-lessons were developed as part of this project. These include hands-on examinations of data sets representing 3 key components of the subduction zone system: 1) Heat transfer in the subducted slab; 2) Metamorphic processes happening at the plate interface; and 3) Typical magmatic products of arc systems above subduction zones. Module 1: "Slab Temperatures Control Melting in Subduction Zones, What Controls Slab Temperature?" allows students to work in groups using beads rolling down slopes as an analog for the mathematics of heat flow. Using this hands-on, exploration-based approach, students develop an intuition for the mathematics of heatflow and learn about heat conduction and advection in the subduction zone environment. Module 2: "Subduction zone metamorphism" introduces students to the metamorphic rocks that form as the subducted slab descends and the mineral reactions that characterize subduction-related metamorphism. This module includes a suite of metamorphic rocks available for instructors to use in a lab, and exercises in which students compare pressure-temperature estimates obtained from metamorphic rocks to predictions from thermal models. Module 3: "Central American Arc Volcanoes, Petrology and Geochemistry" introduces students to basic concepts in igneous petrology using the Central American volcanic arc, a MARGINS Subduction Factory focus site, as an example. The module relates data from two different volcanoes - basaltic Cerro Negro (Nicaragua) and andesitic Ilopango (El Salvador) including hand sample observations and major element geochemistry - to explore processes of mantle and crustal melting and differentiation in arc volcanism.

  10. Fracture Patterns Differ Between Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Routine Pediatric Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddada, Kranti V; Sullivan, Brian T; Margalit, Adam; Sponseller, Paul D

    2018-01-19

    It is important to estimate the likelihood that a pediatric fracture is caused by osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), especially the least severe type of OI (type 1). We reviewed records of 29,101 pediatric patients with fractures from 2003 through 2015. We included patients with closed fractures not resulting from motor vehicle accidents, gunshot wounds, nonaccidental trauma, or bone lesions. Patients with OI of any type were identified through International Classification of Diseases-9 code. We randomly sampled 500 pediatric patients in whom OI was not diagnosed to obtain a control (non-OI) group. We reviewed age at time of fracture, sex, fracture type, laterality, and bone and bone region fractured. Bisphosphonate use and OI type were documented for OI patients. Subanalysis of patients with type-1 OI was performed. The Fisher exact and χ tests were used to compare fracture rates between groups. P<0.05 was considered significant. Positive likelihood ratios for OI were calculated by fracture pattern. The non-OI group consisted of 500 patients with 652 fractures. The OI group consisted of 52 patients with 209 fractures. Non-OI patients were older at the time of fracture (mean, 9.0±5.0 y) than OI patients (mean, 5.5±4.4 y) (P<0.001). OI patients had more oblique, transverse, diaphyseal, and bilateral long-bone fractures than non-OI patients (all P<0.001). Non-OI patients had more buckle (P=0.013), metaphyseal (P<0.001), and physeal (P<0.001) fractures than OI patients. For patients with type-1 OI and long-bone fractures (n=18), rates of transverse and buckle fractures were similar compared with controls. Transverse humerus (15.2), olecranon (13.8), and diaphyseal humerus (13.0) fractures had the highest positive likelihood ratios for OI, and physeal (0.09) and supracondylar humerus (0.1) fractures had the lowest. Transverse and diaphyseal humerus and olecranon fractures were most likely to indicate OI. Physeal and supracondylar humerus fractures were least likely

  11. Ultramafic-derived arsenic in a fractured bedrock aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Peter C., E-mail: pryan@middlebury.edu [Geology Department, Middlebury College, 276 Bicentennial Way, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States); Kim, Jonathan [Vermont Geological Survey, Waterbury, VT 05671 (United States); Wall, Andrew J. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Moen, Jonathan C.; Corenthal, Lilly G.; Chow, Daniel R.; Sullivan, Colleen M.; Bright, Kevin S. [Geology Department, Middlebury College, 276 Bicentennial Way, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: > Arsenic is elevated in groundwater from a fractured bedrock aquifer system in northern Vermont, USA. > The arsenic source is serpentinized ultramafic rock. > Antigorite, magnetite (MgCO{sub 3}) and magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) appear to be the main mineralogical hosts of arsenic in the ultramafic rock. > Arsenic appears to be introduced to the ultramafic rock when As-bearing fluids are driven out of sediments during subduction. >. > The occurrence of serpentinized ultramafic rocks in many orogenic belts suggests that similar arsenic anomalies may occur in geologically-similar terranes globally. - Abstract: In the fractured bedrock aquifer of northern Vermont, USA, As concentrations in groundwater range from <1 to 327 {mu}g/L (<13-4360 nm/L) and these elevated occurrences have a general spatial association with ultramafic rock bodies. The ultramafic rocks in this region are comprised mainly of serpentinites and talc-magnesite rocks with average As concentration of 93 ppm and a range from 1 to 1105 ppm. By comparison, the other main lithologies in the study area are depleted in As relative to the ultramafics: the average As concentration in metabasaltic rocks is 4.1 ppm with a range of <1-69 ppm, and mean As concentration in meta-sedimentary phyllites and schists is 22 ppm with a range of <1-190 ppm. In the ultramafic rocks, As is correlated with Sb and light rare earth elements, indicating that As was introduced to the ultramafic rocks during metasomatism by fluids derived from the subducting slab. Evidence from sequential chemical extraction, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and stoichiometric analysis indicates that the majority of the As is located in antigorite and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) with lesser amounts in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Hydrochemistry of monitoring wells drilled into fractured ultramafic rock in a groundwater recharge area with no anthropogenic As source reveals above background As (2-9 {mu}g/L) and an Mg-HCO{sub 3} hydrochemical

  12. Mantle constraints on the plate tectonic evolution of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction zone and the South Fiji Basin region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Spakman, W.

    The Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction zone is a major plate boundary in the Southwest Pacific region, where the Pacific plate subducts westward underneath the Australian plate. Considerable controversy exists regarding the Cenozoic evolution of this subduction zone, its connection with the

  13. Mantle constraints on the plate tectonic evolution of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction zone and the South Fiji Basin region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W.P.; Spakman, W.

    2012-01-01

    The Tonga–Kermadec–Hikurangi subduction zone is a major plate boundary in the Southwest Pacific region, where the Pacific plate subducts westward underneath the Australian plate. Considerable controversy exists regarding the Cenozoic evolution of this subduction zone, its connection with

  14. Fracture mechanics and parapsychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, G. P.

    2010-08-01

    The problem of postcritical deformation of materials beyond the ultimate strength is considered a division of fracture mechanics. A simple example is used to show the relationship between this problem and parapsychology, which studies phenomena and processes where the causality principle fails. It is shown that the concept of postcritical deformation leads to problems with no solution

  15. Inclusion Requires Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anila, Swarupa

    2017-01-01

    Inclusion strategies and approaches in interpretive planning processes for exhibitions are often resisted because they challenge precedents in museum practice. Maintaining traditional models may seem more comfortable for many museum professionals than to do the work of closely examining, fracturing, and transforming the practices that prioritize…

  16. Colles wrist fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    The initial recovery from a wrist fracture can take 3 to 4 months or more. You may need physical therapy. You should start working with a physical therapist as soon as your provider recommends. The work may seem hard and at times ...

  17. Vertebral Compression Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should be avoided. Steps to take after the fracture has healed include: • Chair cushions to provide support to the lower spine • Getting up out of a desk chair at least a few minutes every hour • A gradual return to exercise such as walking and/or swimming 2007; reviewed ...

  18. Neglected hangman fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Kumar Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute management of hangman fracture is well described; however the surgical management of neglected hangman fracture has not been described in literature. We report the surgical management of an untreated hangman′s fracture. A 30-year-old male had fallen from a tree 12 weeks back. Patient presented with cervical myelopathy and restricted neck movements. Radiographs and computed tomography (CT scan revealed fracture of pars interarticularis of axis with Grade III C2-C3 spondylolisthesis with localized kyphosis of 33°. Gentle reduction under general anesthesia (GA failed to improve the alignment. Patient was operated in three stages in a single setting. In Stage I, release of contracted anterior structures and C2-C3 discectomy was done in supine position followed by C2-C3 posterior fixation and fusion in Stage II. C2-C3 interbody bone grafting and anterior plating completed the third stage. C2-C3 interbody fusion was seen at 5 months and a CT scan at 18 months postoperative confirmed fusion and maintenance of alignment. The satisfactory outcome in our patient leads us to believe that anterior-posterior-anterior is the appropriate surgical approach for treatment of such patients.

  19. Pipkin Fractures: Fracture of the Head of Femur A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pipkin fracture is the fracture of the head of the femur. It can be associated with neck of femur fracture or / and posterior dislocation of the hip. This fracture is very rare fracture and has not been reported at our sub- region. We present this fracture in a 26 year old with a type I Pipkin fracture treated with closed reduction and ...

  20. Correlation of hip fracture with other fracture types: Toward a rational composite hip fracture endpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W; Adler, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between 1999 and 2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regard to the timing of the events. 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, the rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, pfractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider the use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. STRESS FRACTURES IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đivo Ban

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescents today, all before starting with regular sports activities and involvement in semi-professional and top professional sport, so it increases the num- ber of discovered stress fractures in this age. This type of injury can occur as a consequence of action one strong force, or the many repeated small force strength, to be exact, when the load (stress transcend ability reparations bones. Stress fractures are recorded and described up to the lower limbs. Research has been confirmed that the bones of lower leg are mostly made in injury, and with the el- derly and with the population of children and young adolescents. Occur in many sports, something to them is greater when the frequency of running and often are present in the female population. According to the results of numerous investigations, mistakes in the training are the most common cause of the emergence of stress fracture. In a direct comparison with complemented these injuries is the condition of muscles, so it is important that at the sa- me time carry out exercises strengthen muscles and stretching. Typical clinical signs of stress fractures are localized painful sensitivity to palpa- tion and runoff in a small number of cases. The basic diagnostic procedure is a medical check, it is the small, radiology and scintigraphyc diagnostics (most accurate and mag- netic resonance imaging. Treatment is usually without surgery and conservative, with rest and reducing stress, and its activity athlete breaks mainly between four and eight weeks. Only the very need surgical treatment The most important thing is that attention is focused on the proper prevention and to take all that it ever occurred to stress fractures that athletes ramble of the courts and the competition (better education of sports workers, separation of groups with increa- sed risk of the formation of an injury, adaptation activities age and abilities of athletes, adequate sports equipment, high-quality sports

  2. Surgical Management of Patellar Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakazu, Rafael; Archdeacon, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    The patella plays a crucial role in the extensor mechanism to increase the mechanical advantage of the quadriceps. Fractures can be classified based on displacement, comminution, and fracture pattern, which often guide treatment. Modern treatment options include internal fixation using tension bands with Kirschner wires or cannulated screws, lag screw fixation, partial patellectomy, and rarely total patellectomy. Nondisplaced, closed patellar fractures or fractures with less than 2-mm articular steps can be successfully treated conservatively. Open fractures, articular step of 2 mm or greater, and loss of knee extension are indications for surgical intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fracture Phenomena in Amorphous Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard-Andersen, Asger; Dahle, Birgit

    1966-01-01

    Fracture surfaces of amorphous selenium broken in flexure at room temperature have been studied. The fracture velocity was found to vary in different regions of the fracture surface. Peculiar features were observed in a transition zone between fast and slower fracture. In this zone cleavage steps...... with a nearly constant spacing of approximately 1 µ were found. Occasionally long cleavage whiskers—up to some millimeters long—were observed. Within certain regions the cleavage steps were crossed and interrupted by two line systems. The maximum fracture velocity has been measured to 350 m/sec. Further...

  4. Stress rotation across the Cascadia megathrust requires a weak subduction plate boundary at seismogenic depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Liu, Yajing; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2018-01-01

    The Mendocino Triple Junction region is the most seismically active part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The northward moving Pacific plate collides with the subducting Gorda plate causing intense internal deformation within it. Here we show that the stress field rotates rapidly with depth across the thrust interface from a strike-slip regime within the subducting plate, reflecting the Pacific plate collision, to a thrust regime in the overriding plate. We utilize a dense focal mechanism dataset, including observations from the Cascadia Initiative ocean bottom seismograph experiment, to constrain the stress orientations. To quantify the implications of this rotation for the strength of the plate boundary, we designed an inversion that solves for the absolute stress tensors in a three-layer model subject to assumptions about the strength of the subducting mantle. Our results indicate that the shear stress on the plate boundary fault is likely no more than about ∼50 MPa at ∼20 km depth. Regardless of the assumed mantle strength, we infer a relatively weak megathrust fault with an effective friction coefficient of ∼0 to 0.2 at seismogenic depths. Such a low value for the effective friction coefficient requires a combination of high fluid pressures and/or fault-zone minerals with low inherent friction in the region where a great earthquake is expected in Cascadia.

  5. Intra-Panthalassa Ocean subduction zones revealed by fossil arcs and mantle structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, D.G. van der; Torsvik, T.H.; Spakman, W.; Hinsbergen, D.J.J. van; Amaru, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    The vast Panthalassa Ocean once surrounded the supercontinent Pangaea. Subduction has since consumed most of the oceanic plates that formed the ocean floor, so classic plate reconstructions based on magnetic anomalies can be used only to constrain the ocean’s history since the Cretaceous period, and

  6. Thermal structure and intermediate-depth seismicity in the Tohoku-Hokkaido subduction zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Keken, P.E. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Kita, S.; Nakajima, J. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Center for Prediction of Earthquakes and Volcanic Eruptions

    2012-07-01

    The cause of intermediate-depth (>40 km) seismicity in subduction zones is not well understood. The viability of proposed mechanisms, which include dehydration embrittlement, shear instabilities and the presence of fluids in general, depends significantly on local conditions, including pressure, temperature and composition. The wellinstrumented and well-studied subduction zone below Northern Japan (Tohoku and Hokkaido) provides an excellent testing ground to study the conditions under which intermediate-depth seismicity occurs. This study combines new finite element models that predict the dynamics and thermal structure of the Japan subduction system with a high-precision hypocenter data base. The upper plane of seismicity is principally contained in the crustal portion of the subducting slab and appears to thin and deepen within the crust at depths >80 km. The disappearance of seismicity overlaps in most of the region with the predicted phase change of blueschist to hydrous eclogite, which forms a major dehydration front in the crust. The correlation between the thermally predicted blueschist-out boundary and the disappearance of seismicity breaks down in the transition from the northern Japan to Kurile arc below western Hokkaido. Adjusted models that take into account the seismically imaged modified upper mantle structure in this region fail to adequately recover the correlation that is seen below Tohoku and eastern Hokkaido. We conclude that the thermal structure below Western Hokkaido is significantly affected by timedependent, 3-D dynamics of the slab. This study generally supports the role of fluids in the generation of intermediate-depth seismicity. (orig.)

  7. A role for subducted super-hydrated kaolinite in Earth’s deep water cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Huijeong; Seoung, Donghoon; Lee, Yongjae; Liu, Zhenxian; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Cynn, Hyunchae; Vogt, Thomas; Kao, Chi-Chang; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2017-11-20

    Water is the most abundant volatile component in the Earth. It continuously enters the mantle through subduction zones, where it reduces the melting temperature of rocks to generate magmas. The dehydration process in subduction zones, which determines whether water is released from the slab or transported into the deeper mantle, is an essential component of the deep water cycle. Here we use in situ and time-resolved high-pressure/high-temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction and infrared spectra to characterize the structural and chemical changes of the clay mineral kaolinite. At conditions corresponding to a depth of about 75 km in a cold subducting slab (2.7 GPa and 200 °C), and in the presence of water, we observe the pressure-induced insertion of water into kaolinite. This super-hydrated phase has a unit cell volume that is about 31% larger, a density that is about 8.4% lower than the original kaolinite and, with 29 wt% H2O, the highest water content of any known aluminosilicate mineral in the Earth. As pressure and temperature approach 19 GPa and about 800 °C, we observe the sequential breakdown of super-hydrated kaolinite. The formation and subsequent breakdown of super-hydrated kaolinite in cold slabs subducted below 200 km leads to the release of water that may affect seismicity and help fuel arc volcanism at the surface.

  8. Fossil intermediate-depth earthquakes in subducting slabs linked to differential stress release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scambelluri, Marco; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Gilio, Mattia; Bestmann, Michel; Plümper, Oliver; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2017-12-01

    The cause of intermediate-depth (50-300 km) seismicity in subduction zones is uncertain. It is typically attributed either to rock embrittlement associated with fluid pressurization, or to thermal runaway instabilities. Here we document glassy pseudotachylyte fault rocks—the products of frictional melting during coseismic faulting—in the Lanzo Massif ophiolite in the Italian Western Alps. These pseudotachylytes formed at subduction-zone depths of 60-70 km in poorly hydrated to dry oceanic gabbro and mantle peridotite. This rock suite is a fossil analogue to an oceanic lithospheric mantle that undergoes present-day subduction. The pseudotachylytes locally preserve high-pressure minerals that indicate an intermediate-depth seismic environment. These pseudotachylytes are important because they are hosted in a near-anhydrous lithosphere free of coeval ductile deformation, which excludes an origin by dehydration embrittlement or thermal runaway processes. Instead, our observations indicate that seismicity in cold subducting slabs can be explained by the release of differential stresses accumulated in strong dry metastable rocks.

  9. Influence of subduction zone conditions and gouge composition on frictional slip stability of megathrust faults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, S.A.M.; Spiers, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the temperature/depth distribution of destructive earthquakes in subduction megathrusts, and the mechanisms of nucleation of these events, data on the frictional behaviour of phyllosilicate/quartz-rich megathrust fault gouges under in-situ conditions are needed. We performed rotary

  10. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J-Michael

    2016-07-20

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed.

  11. Ediacaran 2,500-km-long synchronous deep continental subduction in the West Gondwana Orogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganade de Araujo, Carlos E; Rubatto, Daniela; Hermann, Joerg; Cordani, Umberto G; Caby, Renaud; Basei, Miguel A S

    2014-10-16

    The deeply eroded West Gondwana Orogen is a major continental collision zone that exposes numerous occurrences of deeply subducted rocks, such as eclogites. The position of these eclogites marks the suture zone between colliding cratons, and the age of metamorphism constrains the transition from subduction-dominated tectonics to continental collision and mountain building. Here we investigate the metamorphic conditions and age of high-pressure and ultrahigh-pressure eclogites from Mali, Togo and NE-Brazil and demonstrate that continental subduction occurred within 20 million years over at least a 2,500-km-long section of the orogen during the Ediacaran. We consider this to be the earliest evidence of large-scale deep-continental subduction and consequent appearance of Himalayan-scale mountains in the geological record. The rise and subsequent erosion of such mountains in the Late Ediacaran is perfectly timed to deliver sediments and nutrients that are thought to have been necessary for the subsequent evolution of sustainable life on Earth.

  12. Age of the subducting Pacific slab beneath East Asia and its geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Dapeng; Li, Sanzhong; Wei, Wei

    2017-04-01

    We study the age of the subducting Pacific slab beneath East Asia using a high-resolution model of P-wave tomography and paleo-age data of ancient seafloor. Our results show that the lithosphere age of the subducting slab becomes younger from the Japan Trench (∼130 Ma) to the slab's western edge (∼90 Ma) beneath East China, and the flat (stagnant) slab in the mantle transition zone (MTZ) is the subducted Pacific plate rather than the proposed Izanagi plate which should have already collapsed into the lower mantle. The flat Pacific slab has been in the MTZ for no more than ∼10-20 million years, considerably less than the age of the big mantle wedge beneath East Asia (>110 million years). Hence, the present flat Pacific slab in the MTZ has contributed to the Cenozoic destruction of the East Asian continental lithosphere with extensive intraplate volcanism and back-arc spreading, whereas the destruction of the North China Craton during the Early Cretaceous (∼140-110 Ma) was caused by the subduction of the Izanagi (or the Paleo-Pacific) plate.

  13. Are subduction zones invading the atlantic? Evidence from the southwest iberia margin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, João C.; Rosas, Filipe M.; Terrinha, Pedro; Schellart, Wouter P.; Boutelier, David; Gutscher, Marc André; Ribeiro, António

    Subduction initiation at passive margins plays a central role in the plate tectonics theory. However, the process by which a passive margin becomes active is not well understood. In this paper we use the southwest Iberia margin (SIM) in the Atlantic Ocean to study the process of passive margin

  14. Dehydration of lawsonite could directly trigger earthquakes in subducting oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Keishi; Hirth, Greg

    2016-02-01

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes in cold subduction zones are observed within the subducting oceanic crust, as well as the mantle. In contrast, intermediate-depth earthquakes in hot subduction zones predominantly occur just below the Mohorovičić discontinuity. These observations have stimulated interest in relationships between blueschist-facies metamorphism and seismicity, particularly through dehydration reactions involving the mineral lawsonite. Here we conducted deformation experiments on lawsonite, while monitoring acoustic emissions, in a Griggs-type deformation apparatus. The temperature was increased above the thermal stability of lawsonite, while the sample was deforming, to test whether the lawsonite dehydration reaction induces unstable fault slip. In contrast to similar tests on antigorite, unstable fault slip (that is, stick-slip) occurred during dehydration reactions in the lawsonite and acoustic emission signals were continuously observed. Microstructural observations indicate that strain is highly localized along the fault (R1 and B shears), and that the fault surface develops slickensides (very smooth fault surfaces polished by frictional sliding). The unloading slope during the unstable slip follows the stiffness of the apparatus at all experimental conditions, regardless of the strain rate and temperature ramping rate. A thermomechanical scaling factor for the experiments is within the range estimated for natural subduction zones, indicating the potential for unstable frictional sliding within natural lawsonite layers.

  15. The Othris Ophiolite, Greece: A snapshot of subduction initiation at a mid-ocean ridge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, M.G.; Mason, P.R.D.; Davies, G.R.; Drury, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    The mantle section of the Tethyan-type Othris Ophiolite, Greece, records tectono-magmatic processes characteristic of both mid-ocean ridges and supra-subduction zones. The Othris Ophiolite is a remnant of the Jurassic Neotethys Ocean, which existed between Eurasia and Gondwanaland. Othris

  16. Structure and evolution of subducted lithosphere beneath the Sunda arc, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widiyantoro, Sri; Hilst, R.D. van der

    1996-01-01

    Tomographic imaging reveals seismic anomalies beneath the Sunda island arc, Indonesia, that suggest that the lithospheric slab penetrates to a depth of at least 1500 kilometers. The Sunda slab forms the eastern end of a deep anomaly associated with the past subduction of the plate underlying the

  17. Slab detachment in laterally varying subduction zones: 3-D numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duretz, T.; Gerya, T.V.; Spakman, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074103164

    Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D) dynamics of subduction-collision systems is a longstanding challenge in geodynamics. We investigate the impact of slab detachment in collision systems that are subjected to along-trench variations. High-resolution thermomechanical numerical models,

  18. Mantle wedge infiltrated with saline fluids from dehydration and decarbonation of subducting slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Yoshikawa, Masako; Kumagai, Yoshitaka; Mirabueno, Ma Hannah T; Okuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2013-06-11

    Slab-derived fluids play an important role in heat and material transfer in subduction zones. Dehydration and decarbonation reactions of minerals in the subducting slab have been investigated using phase equilibria and modeling of fluid flow. Nevertheless, direct observations of the fluid chemistry and pressure-temperature conditions of fluids are few. This report describes CO2-bearing saline fluid inclusions in spinel-harzburgite xenoliths collected from the 1991 Pinatubo pumice deposits. The fluid inclusions are filled with saline solutions with 5.1 ± 1.0% (wt) NaCl-equivalent magnesite crystals, CO2-bearing vapor bubbles, and a talc and/or chrysotile layer on the walls. The xenoliths contain tremolite amphibole, which is stable in temperatures lower than 830 °C at the uppermost mantle. The Pinatubo volcano is located at the volcanic front of the Luzon arc associated with subduction of warm oceanic plate. The present observation suggests hydration of forearc mantle and the uppermost mantle by slab-derived CO2-bearing saline fluids. Dehydration and decarbonation take place, and seawater-like saline fluids migrate from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. The presence of saline fluids is important because they can dissolve more metals than pure H2O and affect the chemical evolution of the mantle wedge.

  19. Tectonic implications of tomographic images of subducted lithosphere beneath northwestern South America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, R.D. van der; Mann, P.

    1994-01-01

    We used seismic tomography to investigate the complex structure of the upper mantle below northwestern South America. Images of slab structure not delineated by previous seismicity studies help us to refine existing tectonic models of subducted Caribbean-Pacific lithosphere beneath the study area.

  20. Subduction of the Tethys Oceans reconstructed from plate kinematics and mantle tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafkenscheid, Edith

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the large-scale history of subduction within the Tethyan region, the Alpine-Himalayan mountain chain that stretches from the Mediterranean to the Indonesian archipelago. We investigate whether we can contribute to a better understanding of the Tethyan evolution by

  1. Stress rotation across the Cascadia megathrust requires a weak subduction plate boundary at seismogenic depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Liu, Yajing; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2018-03-01

    The Mendocino Triple Junction region is the most seismically active part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The northward moving Pacific plate collides with the subducting Gorda plate causing intense internal deformation within it. Here we show that the stress field rotates rapidly with depth across the thrust interface from a strike-slip regime within the subducting plate, reflecting the Pacific plate collision, to a thrust regime in the overriding plate. We utilize a dense focal mechanism dataset, including observations from the Cascadia Initiative ocean bottom seismograph experiment, to constrain the stress orientations. To quantify the implications of this rotation for the strength of the plate boundary, we designed an inversion that solves for the absolute stress tensors in a three-layer model subject to assumptions about the strength of the subducting mantle. Our results indicate that the shear stress on the plate boundary fault is likely no more than about ∼50 MPa at ∼20 km depth. Regardless of the assumed mantle strength, we infer a relatively weak megathrust fault with an effective friction coefficient of ∼0 to 0.2 at seismogenic depths. Such a low value for the effective friction coefficient requires a combination of high fluid pressures and/or fault-zone minerals with low inherent friction in the region where a great earthquake is expected in Cascadia.

  2. Shallow and buoyant lithospheric subduction : causes and implications from thermo-chemical numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunen, Jeroen van

    2001-01-01

    Where two lithospheric plates converge on the Earth, one of them disappears into the mantle. The dominant driving mechanism for plate motion is regarded to be `slab pull': the subducted plate, the slab, exerts a pulling force on the attached plate at the surface. However, what has been puzzling

  3. Megathrust and accretionary wedge properties and behaviour in the Makran subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Camilla; Tavakoli, Farokh; Saadat, Abdolreza; Nankali, Hamid Reza; Sedighi, Morteza; Khorrami, Fateme; Sobouti, Farhad; Rafi, Zahid; Copley, Alex; Jackson, James; Priestley, Keith

    2017-06-01

    We study the Makran subduction zone, along the southern coasts of Iran and Pakistan, to gain insights into the kinematics and dynamics of accretionary prism deformation. By combining techniques from seismology, geodesy and geomorphology, we are able to put constraints on the shape of the subduction interface and the style of strain across the prism. We also address the long-standing tectonic problem of how the right-lateral shear taken up by strike-slip faulting in the Sistan Suture Zone in eastern Iran is accommodated at the zone's southern end. We find that the subduction interface in the western Makran may be locked, accumulating elastic strain, and move in megathrust earthquakes. Such earthquakes, and associated tsunamis, present a significant hazard to populations around the Arabian Sea. The time-dependent strain within the accretionary prism, resulting from the megathrust earthquake cycle, may play an important role in the deformation of the Makran region. By considering the kinematics of the 2013 Balochistan and Minab earthquakes, we infer that the local gravitational and far-field compressive forces in the Makran accretionary prism are in balance. This force balance allows us to calculate the mean shear stress and effective coefficient of friction on the Makran megathrust, which we find to be 5-35 MPa and 0.01-0.03, respectively. These values are similar to those found in other subduction zones, showing that the abnormally high sediment thickness in the offshore Makran does not significantly reduce the shear stress on the megathrust.

  4. Friction on subduction megathrust faults: Beyond the illite-muscovite transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, S.A.M.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Spiers, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous experimental studies addressing subduction megathrust friction have focused on shallow fault gouges, dominated by smectite, illite and quartz. Here, we aim to determine the effect of the transition to muscovite-rich fault rock at depths beyond the illite-dominated region of the seismogenic

  5. Interplay between deformation, fluid release and migration across a nascent subduction interface: evidence from Oman-UAE and implications for warm subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agard, Philippe; Prigent, Cécile; Soret, Mathieu; Guillot, Stéphane; Dubacq, Benoît

    2017-04-01

    Frozen-in subduction plate interfaces preserving the first 1-2 My of the subduction history are found beneath ophiolites. These contacts are a key target to study the inception of mantle wedge metasomatism and the mechanical coupling between the upper plate and the top part of the sinking slab shortly after subduction initiation. Combining structural field and EBSD data, detailed petrology, thermodynamic modelling and geochemistry on both sides, i.e. the base of the mantle wedge (Oman-UAE basal peridotites) and the underlying accreted crustal fragments from the subducting slab (metamorphic soles), this study documents the continuous evolution of the plate contact from 1 GPa 900-750°C to 0.6 GPa 750-600°C, with emphasis on strain localization and feedbacks between deformation and fluid migration. In the mantle wedge, the (de)formation of proto-ultramylonitic peridotites is coeval with mantle metasomatism by focused hydrous fluid migration. Peridotite metasomatism results in the precipitation of new minerals (clinopyroxene, amphibole and spinel ± olivine and orthopyroxene) and their enrichment in FMEs (particularly B, Li and Cs, with concentrations up to 40 times that of the PM). Boron concentrations and isotopes (δ11B of metasomatized peridotites up to +25‰) suggest that these fluids with a "subduction signature" are probably sourced from the dehydrating amphibolitic metamorphic sole. Concomitantly, deformation in the lower plate results in the stepwise formation, detachment and accretion to the mylonitic s.l. mantle of successive slices of HT metabasalts from the downgoing slab, equilibrated at amphibolite/granulite conditions (900-750°C). Two major stages may be outlined: - between 900 and 750°C, the garnet-clinopyroxene-amphibole bearing sinking crust (with melting < 6 vol%) gets juxtaposed and mechanically coupled to the mantle, leading to the transfer of subduction fluids and metasomatism (possibly into the arc zone ultimately). Deformation is

  6. Mantle Wedge formation during Subduction Initiation: evidence from the refertilized base of the Oman ophiolitic mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, C.; Guillot, S.; Agard, P.; Godard, M.; Lemarchand, D.; Ulrich, M.

    2015-12-01

    Although the Oman ophiolite is classically regarded as being the direct analog of oceanic lithosphere created at fast spreading ridges, the geodynamic context of its formation is still highly debated. The other alternative end-member model suggests that this ophiolite entirely formed in a supra-subduction zone setting. The latter one is supported by studies on volcanic sequences whereas studies dealing on the mantle section do not involve a significant influence of subduction processes on its structure and composition. We herein focus on basal peridotites from all along the ophiolite strike in order to decipher and characterize potential fluid/melt transfers relate to subduction processes. Samples were taken across the basal banded unit directly overlying the amphibolitic/granulitic metamorphic sole which represents an accreted part of the lower plate. We carried out a petrological, structural and geochemical study on these rocks and their constitutive minerals. Our results show that basal peridotites range from lherzolites to highly depleted harzburgites in composition. Clinopyroxenes (cpx) display melt impregnation textures and co-crystallized with HT/HP amphiboles (amph), spinels and sulfurs. Major and trace elements of the constitutive minerals indicate that these minerals represent trapped incremental partial melt after hydrous melting. Different cpx-bearing lithologies then result from varying degrees of partial melting and melt extraction. Combined with Boron isotopic data, we demonstrate that fluids responsible for hydrous melting of these ophiolitic basal peridotites are subduction-related, most likely derived from dehydration of the metamorphic sole during its formation in subduction initiation. From these observations and thermal constraints, we interpret the occurrence of these basal lherzolites as representing a freezing front developed by thermal re-equilibration (cooling) during subduction processes: subduction-related hydrous partial melts were

  7. Seismotectonics in the Pamir: An oblique transpressional shear and south-directed deep-subduction model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiasheng Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3-D geometry of the seismicity in Hindu Kush–Pamir–western China region has been defined by seismic records for 1975–1999 from the National Earthquake Information Center, the U.S. Geological Survey, and over 16,000 relocated earthquakes since 1975 recorded by the Xinjiang seismic network of China. The results show that most Ms ≥ 5.0 hypocenters in the area are confined to a major intracontinental seismic shear zone (MSSZ. The MSSZ, which dips southwards in Pamir has a north-dipping counterpart in the Hindu Kush to the west; the two tectonic realms are separated by the sinistral Chaman transform fault of the India–Asia collisional zone. We demonstrate that the MSSZ constitutes the upper boundary of a south-dipping, actively subducting Pamir continental plate. Three seismic concentrations are recognized just above the Pamir MSSZ at depths between 45–65 km, 95–120 km, and 180–220 km, suggesting different structural relationships where each occurs. Results from focal mechanism solutions in all three seismological concentrations show orientations of the principal maximum stress to be nearly horizontal in an NNW–SSE direction. The south-dipping Pamir subduction slab is wedge-shaped with a wide upper top and a narrow deeper bottom; the slab has a gentle angle of dip in the upper part and steeper dips in the lower part below an elbow depth of ca. 80–120 km. Most of the deformation related to the earthquakes occurs within the hanging wall of the subducting Pamir slab. Published geologic data and repeated GPS measurements in the Pamir document a broad supra-subduction, upper crustal zone of evolving antithetic (i.e. north-dipping back-thrusts that contribute to north-south crustal shortening and are responsible for exhumation of some ultrahigh-pressure rocks formed during earlier Tethyan plate convergence. An alternating occurrence in activity of Pamir and Chaman seismic zones indicates that there is interaction between

  8. Seismotectonics of the southern boundary of Anatolia, eastern Mediterranean region: Subduction, collision, and arc jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, Yair; Kafka, Alan L.

    1982-09-01

    The pattern of seismicity and fault plane solutions of earthquakes are used to outline the tectonic features of the southern boundary of Anatolia in the eastern Mediterranean and southeastern Turkey. The results of this study show that this boundary is composed of two distinct parts. One, in southeastern Turkey and Syria, is a wide and complex zone of continental collision. The other, in the Levantine basin of the eastern Mediterranean, is a zone of oceanic subduction. In the region of continental collision three zones of seismicity are observed. Most of the seismic activity in this region follows the Bitlis zone and is associated with a zone of thrusting and mountain building. This appears to be the zone of most active deformation and plate consumption in the plate boundary region between Arabia and Turkey. A less active zone of seismicity to the north of the Bitlis zone is interpreted to have been more active in the past whereas another active zone of seismicity to the south is interpreted to be a zone which may be more active in the future as the main zone of plate consumption jumps to the south. In the subduction zone of the eastern Mediterranean the depth of the subducted slab and the rate of seismicity generally increase from east to west. The zone of present-day convergence between Africa and Turkey in the Levantine basin can be best outlined by the northern edge of the Mediterranean ridge. The subduction zone in this area sequentially jumps to the south as small continental fragments collide with existing zones of subduction. Deep seismic activity near the Gulf of Antalya is associated with a detached subducted slab north of the Anaximander Mountains that is distinctly different from the seismic trend which is associated with present-day active subduction. The plate boundary between Africa and Turkey at the center of the Levantine basin appears to have shifted to the south of the Anaximander Mountains and Florence rise. Most of the focal mechanisms of the

  9. Subduction Zone Concepts and the 2010 Chile Earthqake (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Huene, Roland

    2010-05-01

    Knowledge of convergent margin systems evolved from hypothesis testing with marine geophysical technology that improved over decades. Wegener's drift hypothesis, Holmes mantle convection, and marine magnetic anomaly patterns were integrated into an ocean spreading concept that won wide acceptance after ocean drilling confirmed the crustal younging trend toward the Mid-Atlantic ridge. In contrast, the necessary disposal of oceanic and trench sediment at convergent margins remained largely hypothetical. Fresh interpretations of some coastal mountains as exposing ancient convergent margin rock assemblages and the seismologist's "Wadati-Benioff" zone were combined into a widely-accepted hypothesis. A convergent margin upper plate was pictured as an imbricate fan of ocean sediment thrust slices detached from the lower plate. During the 1980s ocean drilling to test the hypothesis revealed what then were counter-intuitive processes of sediment subduction and subduction erosion. Rather than the proposed seaward growth by accretion, many margins had lost material from erosion. In current concepts, individual margins are shaped by the net consequences of subduction accretion, sediment subduction, and subduction erosion. Similarly, recently acquired age data from ancient subduction complexes reveal periods dominated by accretion separated by periods dominated by tectonic erosion. Globally, the recycling of continental crustal material at subduction zones appears largely balanced by magmatic addition at volcanic arcs. The longevity of the original imbricate fan model in text books confirms its pictorial simplicity, because geophysical images and drill core evidence show that it commonly applies to only a relatively small frontal prism. A better understanding of convergent margin dynamics is of urgent societal importance as coastal populations increase rapidly and as recent disastrous earthquakes and tsunamis verify. The shift in convergent margin concepts has developed through

  10. Quantitative Study of Seismogenic Potential Along Manila Trench: Effects of Scaborough Seamount Chain Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Liu, Y.; Li, D.; Ning, J.; Matsuzawa, T.; Shibazaki, B.; Hsu, Y. J.

    2014-12-01

    Modern seismicity record along the Manila Trench shows only infrequent Mw7 earthquakes, the lack of great earthquakes may indicate the subduction fault is either aseismically slipping or is accumulating strain energy toward rapid release in a megathrust earthquake. We conduct numerical simulations of the plate coupling, earthquake nucleation and dynamic rupture propagation processes along the Manila subduction fault (15-19.5ºN), taking into consideration the effects of plate geometry (including subducted seamounts), fault strength, rate-state frictional properties and pore pressure variations. Specifically, we use the bathymetry to depict the outline of Manila trench along its strike, 2681 background seismicity (1970/02/13 to 2013/09/06) from Chinese Earthquake Network Center and 540 focal mechanism solutions (1976/01/01 to 2013/01/27) from Global CMT project to constrain the geometry of the subducting Sunda/Eurasian slab. The compilation of seismicity and focal mechanism indicates the plate dipping angle gradually changes from 28º (south of the Scaborough Seamount Chain) to 12º (north of it). This geometric anomaly may due to the subducted part of the seamount chain. Preliminary modeling results using gabbro gouge friction data show that the Scaborough Seamount Chain could be a barrier to earthquake rupture propagation. Only earthquakes larger than Mw7 can overcome the barrier to rupture the entire Manila trench. Smaller earthquakes would cease rupturing when it encounters the seamount chain. Moreover, we propose that Manila trench subduction zone has the potential of rupturing in a Mw8 megathrust earthquake, if the simulation period is long enough for an Mw8 earthquake cycle and dynamic rupture overcomes the subducted Scaborough Seamount Chain. Our model parameters will be further constrained by laboratory rock mechanics experiments conducted on IODP Expedition 349, South China Sea (SCS), drilling samples (work in progress at China Earthquake Administration

  11. Counter-intuitive Behavior of Subduction Zones: Weak Faults Rupture, Strong Faults Creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Gao, X.; Bilek, S. L.; Brown, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction interfaces that produce great earthquakes are often said to be "strongly coupled", and those that creep are said to be "weakly coupled". However, the relation between the strength and seismogenic behavior of subduction faults is far from clear. Seismological and geodetic observations of earthquake rupture usually provide information only on stress change, not fault strength. In this study, we infer fault strength by calculating frictional heating along megathrusts and comparing results with heat flow measurements. We find that stick-slip megathrusts that have produced great earthquakes such as at Japan Trench and northern Sumatra have very low apparent friction coefficients (~ 0.02 - 0.03), but megathrusts that creep such as at Northern Hikurangi and Manila Trench have higher values (up to ~0.13). The differnce cannot be explained by coseismic dynamic weakening of the stick-slip megathrusts, because the average stress drop in great earthquakes is usually less than 5 MPa, equivalent to a coseismic reduction of apparent friction coefficient by less than ~0.01. Therefore our results indicate differences in the static strength of different subduction faults. Why are the creeping faults stronger? We think it is related to their creeping mechanism. Very rugged subducting seafloor tends to cause creep and hinder great earthquake rupture (Wang and Bilek, 2014). In contrast, all giant earthquakes have occurred at subduction zones with relatively smooth subducting seafloor. Large geometrical irregularities such as seamounts generate heterogeneous structure and stresses that promote numerous small and medium size earthquakes and aseismic creep. The creeping is a process of breaking and wearing of geometrical irregularities in a deformation zone and is expected to be against relatively large resistance (strong creep). This is different from the creeping of smooth faults due to the presence of weak fault gouge (weak creep) such as along the creeping segment of the

  12. Modeling mantle circulation and density distributions in subduction zones: Implications for seismic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, C. R.; Druken, K. A.; Griffiths, R. W.; Long, M. D.; Behn, M. D.; Hirth, G.

    2009-12-01

    Subduction of ocean lithosphere drives plate tectonics, large-scale mantle circulation and thermal-chemical recycling processes through arcs. Seismologists have made important advances in our ability to map circulation patterns in subduction zones though anisotropy data/methods and in providing detailed images of mantle density fields. Increasingly, seismic and geodynamic disciplines are combining to extend our understanding of time varying subduction processes and associated vertical mass and energy fluxes. We use laboratory experiments to characterize three-dimensional flow fields in convergent margins for a range in plate forcing conditions and background, buoyancy-driven flow scenarios. Results reveal basic patterns in circulation, buoyant flow morphologies and density distributions that have implications for reconciling seismic data with mantle convection models. Models utilize a glucose working fluid with a temperature dependent viscosity to represent the upper 2000km of the mantle. Subducting lithosphere is modeled with a Phenolic plate and back-arc extension is produced using Mylar sheets. We recreate basic subduction styles observed in previous dynamic subduction models using simplified, kinematic forcing. Slab plate segments, driven by hydraulic pistons, move with various combinations of downdip, rollback and steepening motion. Neutral density finite strain markers are distributed throughout the fluid and used as proxies for tracking the evolution of olivine alignment through space and time in the evolving flow fields. Particle image velocimetry methods are also used to track time varying 3D velocity fields for use in directly calculating anisotropy patterns. Results show that complex plate motions (rollback, steepening, back-arc extension) in convergent margins produce relatively simple anisotropy patterns (e.g., trench-normal alignments) and underscore the importance of initial strain marker orientations on alignment patterns in the wedge. Results also

  13. Zagros blueschists: Episodic underplating and long-lived cooling of a subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiboust, Samuel; Agard, Philippe; Glodny, Johannes; Omrani, Jafar; Oncken, Onno

    2016-06-01

    Pressure-temperature-time (P- T- t) trajectories of high-pressure rocks provide important constraints to understand the tectonic evolution of convergent margins. New field observations and P- T- t constraints for the evolution of the only known blueschist-facies exposure along the Zagros suture zone in Southern Iran are reported here. These blueschists, now exposed in tectonic windows under the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (upper plate), constitute accreted fragments of the Tethyan domain during N-directed Cretaceous subduction. Three units were identified in the field: from top to bottom, the Ashin unit (mafic and felsic gneisses), the Seghin complex (mafic tuffs and ultramafics) and the Siah Kuh massif (coherent volcanic edifice). Microstructural observations, P- T estimates and Rb-Sr deformation ages indicate that the Ashin unit possibly underwent burial down to 30-35 km and 550 °C along a relatively warm P- T gradient (c. 17°/km) and was ultimately deformed between 85 and 100 Ma. The Seghin complex exhibits remarkably well-preserved HP-LT assemblages comprising lawsonite, glaucophane, aragonite, omphacite and garnet. P- T- t reconstruction indicates that this slice was subducted down to c. 50 km at temperatures of c. 500 °C along a very cold subduction gradient (c. 7°/km). Deformation in the Seghin complex stopped at around 65 Ma, close to peak metamorphic conditions. Field relationships and estimates of the P- T trajectory followed by the Siah Kuh volcanic edifice indicate that this massif was lately subducted down to 15 km depth along the same very cold gradient. This slice-stack represents a well-preserved field example (i) highlighting the existence of transient underplating processes juxtaposing pluri-kilometric tectonic slices along the subduction channel and (ii) imaging the discontinuous down-stepping of the active main subduction thrust with ongoing accretion. The Zagros blueschists also record an apparent cooling of the Zagros subduction zone between 90

  14. [Osteoporotic fractures of the pelvis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, J; Höch, A; Josten, C

    2012-10-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic pelvic fractures is rapidly increasing. Following low energy trauma fractures are frequently classified as pelvic girdle fractures. Based on the pelvic expert group database of the German Trauma Society the estimated rate of osteoporotic pelvic ring fractures is about 51%. In cases of fractured pubic rami standard X-ray in anterior-posterior, inlet and outlet views should be carried out by computed tomography (CT) scanning to identify fractures of the sacrum. Only if pain persists and no fracture is evident with CT is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated. Therapy should be carried out under biomechanical instability aspects. Pubic rami fractures are stable and treated conservatively with sufficient pain medication, thromboembolic prophylaxis and physiotherapy. In cases of persisting pain or biomechanical instability operative treatment is indicated and stabilization methods should be chosen under biomechanical aspects. Therefore external fixator for pubic rami fractures and iliosacral screws, optionally with cement augmentation for posterior pelvic girdle fractures are the preferred techniques. Sacral fractures with severe osteolysis should be stabilized by lumbopelvic fixation techniques.

  15. Controls on continental strain partitioning above an oblique subduction zone, Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Jorina M.; Whipp, David M., Jr.

    2016-04-01

    Strain partitioning is a common process at obliquely convergent plate margins dividing oblique convergence into margin-normal slip on the plate-bounding fault and horizontal shearing on a strike-slip system parallel to the subduction margin. In subduction zones, strain partitioning in the upper continental plate is mainly controlled by the shear forces acting on the plate interface and the strength of the continental crust. The plate interface forces are influenced by the subducting plate dip angle and the obliquity angle between the normal to the plate margin and the convergence velocity vector, and the crustal strength of the continent is strongly affected by the presence or absence of a volcanic arc, with the presence of the volcanic arcs being common at steep subduction zones. Along the ˜7000 km western margin of South America the convergence obliquity, subduction dip angles and presence of a volcanic arc all vary, but strain partitioning is only observed along parts of it. This raises the questions, to what extent do subduction zone characteristics control strain partitioning in the overriding continental plate, and which factors have the largest influence? We address these questions using lithospheric-scale 3D numerical geodynamic experiments to investigate the influence of subduction dip angle, convergence obliquity, and weaknesses in the crust owing to the volcanic arc on strain partitioning behavior. We base the model design on the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andes (5° N - 2° S), characterized by steep subduction (˜ 35°), a convergence obliquity between 31° -45° and extensive arc volcanism, and where strain partitioning is observed. The numerical modelling software (DOUAR) solves the Stokes flow and heat transfer equations for a viscous-plastic creeping flow to calculate velocity fields, thermal evolution, rock uplift and strain rates in a 1600 km x 1600 km box with depth 160 km. Subduction geometry and material properties are based on a

  16. Pelvic fractures resulting from snowboarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Sumi, Hiroshi; Sumi, Yasuhiko; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2010-03-01

    Information regarding pelvic fractures sustained during snowboarding is scant. To analyze the epidemiologic data, injury patterns, and types of pelvic fractures sustained during snowboarding. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. We analyzed the epidemiologic factors, injury patterns, and types of pelvic fractures in 145 patients with snowboarding-related pelvic fractures who were admitted to our institution from the 1998-1999 to the 2006-2007 ski season. The incidence of snowboarding-related pelvic fractures was 0.102 per 10 000 ski lift tickets, which amounted to 2% of all snowboarding-related fractures (fifth most common type of fracture among all snowboarding-related fractures). Of the pelvic fractures, 85.5% were stable (type A according to the Tile classification) and 14.5% were unstable (types B and C according to the Tile classification). Isolated sacral fractures had the second-highest incidence (24.1%) after pubic bone and/or ischium fractures (46.9%). A distinct female prevalence was seen (52.4%). Jumps and isolated falls were the main mechanisms of injury (80%), and the incidence of collision was significantly higher in the unstable group than in the stable group (P = .037). In all, 57.9% patients classified their skill level as "intermediate," and only 9.7% of patients had received professional snowboarding lessons. A total of 30 subjects (20.8%) had other injuries along with pelvic fractures; the patients with multiple injuries were significantly more frequent in the unstable group than in the stable group (P = .035). Pelvic fractures resulting from snowboarding accidents included a higher proportion with isolated sacral fractures in the stable group and a lower prevalence of associated injuries in the unstable group compared with those resulting from other causes.

  17. Multiphysics of Fractures across Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2016-12-01

    Remote monitoring of fluid flow in fractured rock faces challenges because fractures are topologically complex, span a range of length scales, and are routinely altered due to physical and chemical processes. A long-standing goal has been to find a link between fluid flow supported by a fracture and the seismic response of that fracture. This link requires a relationship between intrinsic fracture properties and macroscopic scattered wave fields. Furthermore, such a link among multiphysical properties of fracture should be retained as the scale of observation changes. Recently, Pyrak-Nolte and Nolte (Nature Comm., 2016) demonstrated, numerically, that a scaling relationship exists between fluid flow and fracture specific stiffness, linked through the topology of the fracture void geometry (i.e. fracture void space and contact area spatial distributions). This scaling relationship holds for fractures with either random or spatially correlated aperture distributions. To extend these results, a heuristic numerical study was performed to determine if fracture specific stiffness determined from seismic wave attenuation (defined through a displacement-discontinuity boundary condition) corresponds to static stiffness based on deformation measurements. In the long wavelength limit, static and dynamic stiffness are closely connected. As the scattering conditions of the fracture move out of the long-wavelength limit, a frequency-dependent stiffness is defined that captures low-order corrections, extending the regime of applicability of the displacement discontinuity model. The displacement discontinuity theory has a built-in scaling parameter that ensures some set of discontinuities will be optimal for detection as different wavelengths sample different subsets of fractures. Future studies will extend these concepts to fracture networks. Acknowledgments: The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences

  18. SubductionGenerator: A program to build three-dimensional plate configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadamec, M. A.; Kreylos, O.; Billen, M. I.; Turcotte, D. L.; Knepley, M.

    2016-12-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data from subduction zones indicate that a two-dimensional paradigm for plate tectonic boundaries is no longer adequate to explain the observations. Many open source software packages exist to simulate the viscous flow of the Earth, such as the dynamics of subduction. However, there are few open source programs that generate the three-dimensional model input. We present an open source software program, SubductionGenerator, that constructs the three-dimensional initial thermal structure and plate boundary structure. A 3D model mesh and tectonic configuration are constructed based on a user specified model domain, slab surface, seafloor age grid file, and shear zone surface. The initial 3D thermal structure for the plates and mantle within the model domain is then constructed using a series of libraries within the code that use a half-space cooling model, plate cooling model, and smoothing functions. The code maps the initial 3D thermal structure and the 3D plate interface onto the mesh nodes using a series of libraries including a k-d tree to increase efficiency. In this way, complicated geometries and multiple plates with variable thickness can be built onto a multi-resolution finite eleme