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Sample records for subcutaneous nc treatments

  1. Symptomatic Tarlov Cysts: Surgical Treatment by Subcutaneous Infusion Port.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Zhu, Tong; Lin, Hongyi; Li, Jing; Zeng, Tao; Lin, Jian

    2018-05-01

    The treatment of Tarlov cysts is challenging and difficult. The objective of our study was to describe the security and efficacy of the subcutaneous infusion port for drainage of symptomatic Tarlov cysts. The authors executed a retrospective review of data from 5 symptomatic Tarlov cysts patients who were treated using a subcutaneous infusion port from June 2014 to July 2017. Numerical Rating Scale scores and the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores of back pain were analyzed. Complications and adverse effects on postoperative days 1, 7, 14, and 28 were also analyzed. The mean follow-up was 12.6 months. Five adults (3 females and 2 males) who had been symptomatic received a subcutaneous infusion port. After treatment, all patients experienced pain relief and pain alleviation lasted from 1 day to 3 years without complications and adverse effects. A subcutaneous infusion port is a useful treatment option for symptomatic Tarlov cysts. When the patients' symptoms returned and the cysts repressurized, we quickly and simply drained the cysts by using the infusion port. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Surgical treatment of gynecomastia: liposuction combined with subcutaneous mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boljanovic, S; Axelsson, C K; Elberg, J J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present work has been to evaluate surgical treatment of gynecomastia performed by liposuction combined with subcutaneous mastectomy. It was designed as a prospective consecutive registration of 21 patients (28 breasts) operated in a four month period. Treatment was done in local anaesthesia in the out-patient clinic. Treatment was in one patient complicated with a haematoma. In 86% of cases the patients were satisfied with the postoperative result. Liposuction combined with surgical excision of the gland performed as an out-patient treatment in local anaesthesia is followed by few complications and good cosmetic results.

  3. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, A.W.; Abrantes, J.A.; Jonsson, S.; Bruijn, P. de; Kuip, E.J.M.; Falcao, A.; Rijt, C.C. van der; Mathijssen, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the

  4. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: Results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. Oosten (Astrid); J.A. Abrantes (João A.); S. Jönsson (Siv); P. de Bruijn (Peter); E.J.M. Kuip (Evelien); A. Falcão (Amílcar); C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we

  5. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosten, Astrid W; Abrantes, João A; Jönsson, Siv; de Bruijn, Peter; Kuip, Evelien J M; Falcão, Amílcar; van der Rijt, Carin C D; Mathijssen, Ron H J

    2016-04-01

    Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl. Furthermore, we evaluated rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route. Fifty-two patients treated with subcutaneous and/or transdermal fentanyl for moderate to severe cancer-related pain participated. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed and evaluated using non-linear mixed-effects modelling. For rotations from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, a 1:1 dose conversion ratio was used while the subcutaneous infusion was continued for 12 h (with a 50 % tapering after 6 h). A 6-h scheme with 50 % tapering after 3 h was simulated using the final model. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and separate first-order absorption processes for each route adequately described the data. The estimated apparent clearance of fentanyl was 49.6 L/h; the absorption rate constant for subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl was 0.0358 and 0.0135 h(-1), respectively. Moderate to large inter-individual and inter-occasion variability was found. Around rotation from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, measured and simulated plasma fentanyl concentrations rose and increasing side effects were observed. We describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl in one patient cohort and report several findings that are relevant for clinical practice. Further research is warranted to study the optimal scheme for rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route.

  6. Spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema of the scalp following hair coloring/treatment

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    Sanjit O. Tewari, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous emphysema of the scalp is a process often attributed to secondary factors such as trauma, infection, or a myriad of iatrogenic etiologies. Here, we are presenting a case report of an adult patient with spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema of the scalp following a hair coloring/treatment. We performed an extensive review of literature on this topic, however, could not find a single case with similar presentation of subcutaneous emphysema. This case demonstrates an unreported etiology for this diagnosis and is thus being reported for its uniqueness and to raise clinical awareness.

  7. Differential Activation of Peritoneal Cells by Subcutaneous Treatment of Rats with Cryptococcal Antigens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Baronetti, José L.; Chiapello, Laura S.; Garro, Ana P.; Masih, Diana T.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that the subcutaneous pretreatment of rats with heat-killed cells (HKC) of Cryptococcus neoformans emulsified in complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) promotes protective immunity against an intraperitoneal challenge with C. neoformans. In contrast, subcutaneous treatment with the capsular polysaccharide (PSC) emulsified in CFA exacerbates the cryptococcal infection. The purpose of this study was to analyze the mechanisms involved in these phenomena. Adh...

  8. Cost-minimization analysis of subcutaneous abatacept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Spain

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    R. Ariza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the cost of treating rheumatoid arthritis patients that have failed an initial treatment with methotrexate, with subcutaneous aba - tacept versus other first-line biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Method: Subcutaneous abatacept was considered comparable to intravenous abatacept, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab and tocilizumab, based on indirect comparison using mixed treatment analysis. A cost-minimization analysis was therefore considered appropriate. The Spanish Health System perspective and a 3 year time horizon were selected. Pharmaceutical and administration costs (, 2013 of all available first-line biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were considered. Administration costs were obtained from a local costs database. Patients were considered to have a weight of 70 kg. A 3% annual discount rate was applied. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results: Subcutaneous abatacept proved in the base case to be less costly than all other biologic antirrheumatic drugs (ranging from -831.42 to -9,741.69 versus infliximab and tocilizumab, respectively. Subcutaneous abatacept was associated with a cost of 10,760.41 per patient during the first year of treatment and 10,261.29 in subsequent years. The total 3-year cost of subcutaneous abatacept was 29,953.89 per patient. Sensitivity analyses proved the model to be robust. Subcutaneous abatacept remained cost-saving in 100% of probabilistic sensitivity analysis simulations versus adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept and golimumab, in more than 99.6% versus intravenous abatacept and tocilizumab and in 62.3% versus infliximab. Conclusions: Treatment with subcutaneous abatacept is cost-saving versus intravenous abatacept, adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab and tocilizumab in the management of rheumatoid arthritis patients initiating

  9. Regulation of local subcutaneous blood flow in patients with psoriasis and effects of antipsoriatic treatment on subcutaneous blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemp, P.

    1985-01-01

    Local regulation of the doubled subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) rates in psoriatic lesional skin was studied in 8 patients using a traumatic epicutaneous 133 Xe labeling washout technique. Venous stasis of 40 mm Hg induced a significant reduction in the SBF (-34%, p less than 0.01), i.e., a normal vasoconstrictor response. Limb elevation of 40 cm above heart level induced no statistical changes in the SBF (p = 0.50), i.e., a normal local autoregulation response. This indicates normal, local regulation mechanisms of SBF in psoriasis. In another 8 patients, the effect on SBF of a 4-week antipsoriatic treatment with tar was studied in lesional and symmetrically nonlesional skin areas. One patient was clear of psoriasis on day 22, and was followed only to that time. The mean pretreatment SBF in lesional skin areas was 3.87 +/- SD 0.78 ml X (100 g X min)-1, which was not statistically different from measurements on days 3, 7, 14, and 21 after treatment had started. Between day 21 and day 28, the SBF decreased significantly to 3.38 +/- SD 0.78 ml X (100 g X min)-1, p less than 0.05. The difference between the pretreatment SBF and SBF at the end of treatment was statistically significant, p less than 0.05. The changes in SBF in symmetrically nonlesional skin areas were statistically nonsignificant during the period of treatment. Pretreatment SBF was 2.60 +/- SD 1.08 (N = 8), and on day 28 was 1.91 +/- SD 0.74 ml X (100 g X min)-1 (N = 7). However, the tendency of a decreasing SBF at the end of treatment was a clear trend, since SBF in 6 of 7 patients decreased during the third week and in the patient who was discharged on day 22, a decrease in the SBF was observed on days 14 and 21

  10. Histological study of subcutaneous fat at NIR laser treatment of the rat skin in vivo

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    Yanina, I. Y.; Svenskaya, Yu. I.; Navolokin, N. A.; Matveeva, O. V.; Bucharskaya, A. B.; Maslyakova, G. N.; Gorin, D. A.; Sukhorukov, G. B.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this work is to quantify impact of in vivo photochemical treatment using indocyanine green (ICG) or encapsulated ICG and NIR laser irradiation through skin of rat with obesity by the follow up tissue sampling and histochemistry. After 1 hour elapsed since 1-min light exposure samples of rat skin with subcutaneous tissue of thickness of 1.5-2.5 mm were taken by surgery from rats within marked 4-zones of the skin site. For hematoxylin-eosin histological examination of excised tissue samples, fixation was carried out by 10%-formaldehyde solution. For ICG and encapsulated ICG subcutaneous injection and subsequent 1-min diode laser irradiation with power density of 8 W/cm2, different necrotic regions with lipolysis of subcutaneous fat were observed. The obtained data can be used for safe layer-by-layer laser treatment of obesity and cellulite.

  11. Immunological comparison of allergen immunotherapy tablet treatment and subcutaneous immunotherapy against grass allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, K; Backer, V; Lund, G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IgE-mediated allergic rhinitis to grass pollen can successfully be treated with either allergen immunotherapy tablets (SLIT tablet) or SQ-standardized subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). The efficacy of these two treatment modalities for grass allergy is comparable, but the immunological...

  12. Treatment of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus in premature infants with subcutaneous reservoir drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Li, Shasha; Lin, Zhenlang; Zhang, Nu

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of subcutaneous reservoir drainage as a treatment for the different types of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus in premature infants. 11 premature infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus underwent subcutaneous reservoir embedment surgery, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained via the reservoir intermittently for 8 weeks. During the period of drainage, ultrasound and computerized tomography were used to measure ventricle size. CSF examinations were performed routinely to assess the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and/or infection. (1) Five infants were diagnosed as having obstructive hydrocephalus; 2 had nearly normal ventricle sizes with treatment and drainage was stopped after 8 weeks, 2 had nearly normal ventricle sizes after 4 more weeks of drainage, and 1 underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt (V-P shunt) surgery due to failure of ventricle size reduction. (2) Six infants were diagnosed as having communicating hydrocephalus; 4 had further enlarged ventricle size after 8 weeks and underwent V-P shunt surgery, 1 had treatment aborted at week 8 of drainage, and only 1 had moderate reduction of ventricle size after 8 weeks. (3) None of the 11 infants had progressive IVH and/or intracranial infection during drainage. Subcutaneous reservoir drainage is a suitable and safe treatment for posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus in premature infants. It is more effective for obstructive hydrocephalus than for communicating hydrocephalus. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Hypersensitivity reaction with intravenous GnRH after pulsatile subcutaneous GnRH treatment in male hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    OpenAIRE

    Popović, V.; Milosević, Z.; Djukanović, R.; Micić, D.; Nesović, M.; Manojlović, D.; Djordjević, P.; Mićić, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic pulsatile subcutaneous administration of low doses of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) is an effective therapy for men with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Hypersensitivity reactions to GnRH are rare. We wish to report hypersensitivity reactions with intravenous GnRH after low dose subcutaneous pulsatile GnRH treatment in two men with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism due to suprasellar disease.

  14. USE OF SUBCUTANEOUS METHOTREXATE FOR THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: THE REMARCA TRIAL

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    D. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The early administration of methotrexate (MTX and the use of its high (by the rheumatology practice standards doses contribute to the enhanced efficiency of therapy and the reduced severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. One of the important merits of MTX in the treatment of RA is the possibility of adjusting its dose and choosing its (oral or subcutaneous administration routes, which makes it possible to individualize treatment. Particular emphasis has been recently placed just on a subcutaneous MTX formulation that creates prerequisites for substantially improving the efficiency of RA therapy. The paper gives the data of the REMARCA (Russian investigation of methotrexate and biologicals for early active arthritis trial assessing the results of RA treatment in the use of the subcutaneous MTX dosage form as a first-line drug and in the elaboration of management tactics for this disease.Subjects and methods. The investigation included 191 patients (34 men and 157 women with active RA; of whom 51.8% had very early RA (< 6 months' disease duration. 115 patients with RA completed a 24-month follow-up period; and their data were analyzed in more detail.Results and discussion. The findings may substantiate treatment policy based on the prescription of subcutaneous MTX (without previously administering its oral formulation in patients with early RA and high disease activity, starting the drug at 15 mg/week and rapidly escalating with the highest tolerable doses during 4-8 weeks, which allows remission (or low disease activity in the majority of patients without using glucocorticoids and biological agents.

  15. Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Titrated Subcutaneous Ketamine in Older Patients with Treatment-Resistant Depression.

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    George, Duncan; Gálvez, Verònica; Martin, Donel; Kumar, Divya; Leyden, John; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Harper, Simon; Brodaty, Henry; Glue, Paul; Taylor, Rohan; Mitchell, Philip B; Loo, Colleen K

    2017-11-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous ketamine for geriatric treatment-resistant depression. Secondary aims were to examine if repeated treatments were safe and more effective in inducing or prolonging remission than a single treatment. In this double-blind, controlled, multiple-crossover study with a 6-month follow-up (randomized controlled trial [RCT] phase), 16 participants (≥60 years) with treatment-resistant depression who relapsed after remission or did not remit in the RCT were administered an open-label phase. Up to five subcutaneous doses of ketamine (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 mg/kg) were administered in separate sessions (≥1 week apart), with one active control (midazolam) randomly inserted (RCT phase). Twelve ketamine treatments were given in the open-label phase. Mood, hemodynamic, and psychotomimetic outcomes were assessed by blinded raters. Remitters in each phase were followed for 6 months. Seven of 14 RCT-phase completers remitted with ketamine treatment. Five remitted at doses below 0.5 mg/kg. Doses ≥ 0.2 mg/kg were significantly more effective than midazolam. Ketamine was well tolerated. Repeated treatments resulted in higher likelihood of remission or longer time to relapse. Results provide preliminary evidence for the efficacy and safety of ketamine in treating elderly depressed. Dose titration is recommended for optimizing antidepressant and safety outcomes on an individual basis. Subcutaneous injection is a practical method for giving ketamine. Repeated treatments may improve remission rates (clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01441505). Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of pretibial myxedema with dexamethazone injected subcutaneously by mesotherapy needles.

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    Vannucchi, Guia; Campi, Irene; Covelli, Danila; Forzenigo, Laura; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Salvi, Mario

    2013-05-01

    Pretibial myxedema (PTM) is a rare extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease that requires treatment when the clinical picture is markedly evident. In addition to topical treatment with steroid ointments, there have been previous reports of subcutaneous injections of steroids. This procedure may cause nodular degeneration of the skin due to fat atrophy when standard needles are used. In the present study, we have tried a novel modality of treatment of PTM by injecting a solution of dexamethasone in the subcutaneous tissue using needles employed for mesotherapy. These needles are ≤4 mm long and deliver the medication within the dermis or the first layer of the subcutaneous fat. We have treated five patients, four with diffuse and one with elephanthiasic PTM. We utilized multiple injections of a solution of dexamethasone, lidocaine, and saline in the PTM plaque and in the pretibial area, both in the PTM plaque and in the area surrounding the lesions, once a week for three consecutive weeks. Two patients with a more severe form of PTM underwent another two cycles four to six weeks after initial treatment. Patients were studied before and after treatment by clinical assessment and ultrasound of the pretibial skin. The treatment was well-tolerated, with only moderate pain upon injection of the solution. One month after treatment, all patients showed improvement of PTM at clinical assessment and a reduction of the thickness of the lesions at ultrasound of ∼15%, involving mostly the dermis. Moreover, all patients reported amelioration of the leg appearance. The present study, although preliminary, shows that intralesion steroid injection with mesotherapy needles in PTM is effective and well tolerated, and does not cause undesired long-term modifications of the skin. More studies are warranted to standardize such treatment in larger groups of patients.

  17. Treatment relapsed subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma together HPS by Cyclosporin A

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    Ren'an Chen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old man was diagnosised subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL through biopsy of a nodule from the anterior chest. After the treatment with prednisone 90 mg 3 weeks and tapered off in 1 month, the disease released, but relapsed together with symptions of hemophagocytic syndrome eight months after the termination of prednisone. CHOEP recipe was given but with unsatisfactory result until cyclosporine was prescribed. Cyclosporine was removed 6 months later. There is no evidence of clinical relapse 1 year later. This case suggest that cyclosporine could be a selectable treatment even in relapsed SPTCL.

  18. Subcutaneous infection model facilitates treatment assessment of secondary Alveolar echinococcosis in mice.

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    Tatiana Küster

    Full Text Available Alveolar echinococcosis (AE in humans is a parasitic disease characterized by severe damage to the liver and occasionally other organs. AE is caused by infection with the metacestode (larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, usually infecting small rodents as natural intermediate hosts. Conventionally, human AE is chemotherapeutically treated with mebendazole or albendazole. There is, however still the need for improved chemotherapeutical options. Primary in vivo studies on drugs of interest are commonly performed in small laboratory animals such as mice and Mongolian jirds, and in most cases, a secondary infection model is used, whereby E. multilocularis metacestodes are directly injected into the peritoneal cavity or into the liver. Disadvantages of this methodological approach include risk of injury to organs during the inoculation and, most notably, a limitation in the macroscopic (visible assessment of treatment efficacy. Thus, in order to monitor the efficacy of chemotherapeutical treatment, animals have to be euthanized and the parasite tissue dissected. In the present study, mice were infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes through the subcutaneous route and were then subjected to chemotherapy employing albendazole. Serological responses to infection were comparatively assessed in mice infected by the conventional intraperitoneal route. We demonstrate that the subcutaneous infection model for secondary AE facilitates the assessment of the progress of infection and drug treatment in the live animal.

  19. Treatment of frozen shoulder with subcutaneous TNF-alpha blockade compared with local glucocorticoid injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schydlowsky, Pierre; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of subcutaneous adalimumab injections with intraarticular glucocorticoid injections on frozen shoulder of 18 patients with unilateral joint involvement. Ten patients were randomised to subcutaneous injections with adalimumab and eight to intraarticular glucocorticoid inject...

  20. Immunological comparison of allergen immunotherapy tablet treatment and subcutaneous immunotherapy against grass allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, K; Backer, V; Lund, G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IgE-mediated allergic rhinitis to grass pollen can successfully be treated with either allergen immunotherapy tablets (SLIT tablet) or SQ-standardized subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). The efficacy of these two treatment modalities for grass allergy is comparable, but the immunological...... mechanisms may differ. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01889875. OBJECTIVES: To compare the immunological changes induced by SQ-standardized SCIT and SLIT tablet. METHODS: We randomized 40 individuals with grass pollen rhinitis into groups receiving SCIT, SLIT tablet, or neither and followed them for 15 months...... differed significantly in both SCIT and SLIT-tablet treatment groups when compared to the control group. Both SCIT and SLIT-tablet groups were significantly different from the control group after 1–3 months of treatment. In general, the changes induced by SCIT reached twice that of SLIT tablet...

  1. Scleromyxedema with Subcutaneous Nodules: Successful Treatment with Thalidomide and Intravenous Immunoglobulin

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    M. Dolenc-Voljč

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Scleromyxedema is a rare cutaneous mucinosis, usually presenting with generalized papular eruption and sclerodermoid induration, monoclonal gammopathy and systemic manifestations. An atypical clinical presentation with cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules has been reported rarely. In recent years, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg appears to be the therapy of choice for scleromyxedema. Treatment experiences in atypical manifestations with mucinous nodules are limited to sporadic reports. We report the case of male patient with atypical scleromyxedema without underlying paraproteinemia, presenting with generalized papular and sclerodermoid skin eruption and multiple nodular mucinous lesions on the fingers and face as well as on the eyelids, and associated systemic symptoms. Complete regression of all cutaneous lesions and extracutaneous symptoms with sustained remission was achieved by combined treatment with thalidomide and IVIg.

  2. Scleromyxedema with Subcutaneous Nodules: Successful Treatment with Thalidomide and Intravenous Immunoglobulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc-Voljč, M.; Jurčić, V.; Hočevar, A.; Tomšič, M.

    2013-01-01

    Scleromyxedema is a rare cutaneous mucinosis, usually presenting with generalized papular eruption and sclerodermoid induration, monoclonal gammopathy and systemic manifestations. An atypical clinical presentation with cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules has been reported rarely. In recent years, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) appears to be the therapy of choice for scleromyxedema. Treatment experiences in atypical manifestations with mucinous nodules are limited to sporadic reports. We report the case of male patient with atypical scleromyxedema without underlying paraproteinemia, presenting with generalized papular and sclerodermoid skin eruption and multiple nodular mucinous lesions on the fingers and face as well as on the eyelids, and associated systemic symptoms. Complete regression of all cutaneous lesions and extracutaneous symptoms with sustained remission was achieved by combined treatment with thalidomide and IVIg. PMID:24348379

  3. Subanesthetic, Subcutaneous Ketamine Infusion Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain.

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    Zekry, Olfat; Gibson, Stephen B; Aggarwal, Arun

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to describe the efficacy and toxicity of subcutaneous ketamine infusions and sublingual ketamine lozenges for the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain. Data were collected prospectively on 70 subjects managed in an academic, tertiary care hospital between 2007 and 2012 who received between 3 and 7 days of subanesthetic, subcutaneous ketamine infusion. Data were analyzed for efficacy, adverse effects, and reduction in use of opioid medication. We also analyzed whether subsequent treatment with sublingual ketamine lozenges resulted in longer-term efficacy of the beneficial effects of the initial ketamine infusion. There was a significant reduction in pain intensity measured by numerical rating scale (NRS) from mean of 6.38 before ketamine to 4.60 after ketamine (P ketamine infusion from a mean morphine equivalent dose (MMED) of 216 mg/day before ketamine to 89 mg/day after ketamine (P ketamine infusion was 59%. No subjects increased their use of opioids during their hospitalization for the ketamine infusion. A small proportion of subjects who responded to the infusion were continued on ketamine lozenges. This group was followed for between 3 months and 2 years. The use of ketamine lozenges after the infusion resulted in 31% of these subjects being able to cease their use of opioids compared with only 6% who did not receive ketamine lozenges. Eleven percent of subjects who received lozenges subsequently increased their opioid usage. Adverse effects were fairly common, but only mild, with 46% of patients experiencing light-headedness and dizziness, 25% tiredness and sedation, 12% headaches, 12% hallucinations, and 8% vivid dreams. Adverse effects were easily managed by reducing the rate of the ketamine infusion. The administration of subanesthetic, subcutaneous ketamine infusion was well tolerated, with mostly mild adverse effects and no serious adverse effects. The infusion provided significant pain relief in subjects who had failed a wide

  4. Subcutaneous fluid collection: An imaging marker for treatment response of infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis

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    Kakigi, Takahide, E-mail: tkakigi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Okada, Tomohisa, E-mail: tomokada@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Sakai, Osamu, E-mail: osamu.sakai@bmc.org [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Iwamoto, Yoshitaka, E-mail: iwacame@hotmail.co.jp [Department of General Internal Medicine, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, 2 Otowachoinji-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8062 (Japan); Kubo, Soichi, E-mail: kubo-s@mbox.kyoto-inet.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, 2 Otowachoinji-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8062 (Japan); Yamamoto, Akira, E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Togashi, Kaori, E-mail: nmdioffice@kuhp.kyoto-ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • No imaging marker for treatment response of spondylodiscitis (SD) has been proposed. • Volume changes of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) had significant correlation with changes of C-reactive protein (CRP). • SFC can be used as an imaging marker for treatment response of SD on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate prevalence of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) in infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis (SD) compared with control patients and to investigate correlation between volume changes of SFC and treatment response of SD. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board. From April 2011 to March 2012, 49 patients (24 SD and 25 non-SD patients) were enrolled. Prevalence of SFC was evaluated respectively for SD and non-SD patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the sagittal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging or fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and compared. In SD patients with SFC, correlation was investigated between SFC volume on the 1st MRI and initial clinical status. The same analysis was conducted also for SFC volume changes from the 1st to 2nd or last MRI. Results: SFC was found in 20 patients with SD (83.3%) and 3 non-SD patients (12%) with significant difference (p < .001). In 20 SD patients with SFC, 17 patients had follow-up MRI. For the 1st MRI, no significant correlation was found between volume of SFC and initial status of patients, including body weight, body mass index (BMI), white blood cell (WBC), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). However, significant positive correlations were found between changes of C-reactive protein (CRP) and SFC volume from the 1st to 2nd as well as from the 1st to the last MRI (each p < .05). Conclusion: SD patients had significantly higher prevalence of SFC than non-SD patients. Volume changes of SFC had significant correlation with changes of CRP, which can be used as an imaging

  5. Subcutaneous fluid collection: An imaging marker for treatment response of infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakigi, Takahide; Okada, Tomohisa; Sakai, Osamu; Iwamoto, Yoshitaka; Kubo, Soichi; Yamamoto, Akira; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • No imaging marker for treatment response of spondylodiscitis (SD) has been proposed. • Volume changes of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) had significant correlation with changes of C-reactive protein (CRP). • SFC can be used as an imaging marker for treatment response of SD on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate prevalence of subcutaneous fluid collection (SFC) in infectious thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis (SD) compared with control patients and to investigate correlation between volume changes of SFC and treatment response of SD. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board. From April 2011 to March 2012, 49 patients (24 SD and 25 non-SD patients) were enrolled. Prevalence of SFC was evaluated respectively for SD and non-SD patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the sagittal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging or fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and compared. In SD patients with SFC, correlation was investigated between SFC volume on the 1st MRI and initial clinical status. The same analysis was conducted also for SFC volume changes from the 1st to 2nd or last MRI. Results: SFC was found in 20 patients with SD (83.3%) and 3 non-SD patients (12%) with significant difference (p < .001). In 20 SD patients with SFC, 17 patients had follow-up MRI. For the 1st MRI, no significant correlation was found between volume of SFC and initial status of patients, including body weight, body mass index (BMI), white blood cell (WBC), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). However, significant positive correlations were found between changes of C-reactive protein (CRP) and SFC volume from the 1st to 2nd as well as from the 1st to the last MRI (each p < .05). Conclusion: SD patients had significantly higher prevalence of SFC than non-SD patients. Volume changes of SFC had significant correlation with changes of CRP, which can be used as an imaging

  6. Comparison of Intra-arterial and Subcutaneous Testicular Hyaluronidase Injection Treatments and the Vascular Complications of Hyaluronic Acid Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Muyao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Weidong; Wang, Hang

    2017-02-01

    Hyaluronidase is a key preventative treatment against vascular complications of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler injection, but the degradation profile of HA to hyaluronidase is limited, and the comparison between intra-arterial and subcutaneous injections of hyaluronidase has not been studied. To evaluate HA degradation to hyaluronidase and compare different treatments between intra-arterial and subcutaneous testicular hyaluronidase injections. The authors observed HA degradation to hyaluronidase in vitro via microscopic examination and particle analysis. Rabbit ears were used for the in vivo study. There were 2 control groups receiving ligation or HA-induced embolism in the arteries, respectively, and 2 intervention groups receiving hyaluronidase treatments in different regions. The laser Doppler blood perfusion monitoring measurements were made at defined time points, and biopsies were taken on Day 2. Nearly, all of the HAs degraded in vitro at the 1-hour time point. Subcutaneous hyaluronidase treatment showed better recovery of blood perfusion. Histology showed severe inflammation in the embolism group and mild inflammation in the intervention groups. A complete enzymatic degradation of HA filler to hyaluronidase needs a certain time, and subcutaneous hyaluronidase treatment may be the better option.

  7. Clinical Prospective Study on the Use of Subcutaneous Carboxytherapy in the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiat, Lynda; Leibaschoff, Gustavo H

    2018-03-22

    Diabetic footfoot ulcer (DFU) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus, and possibly the major morbidity of the diabetic foot. It is the most common foot injury in diabetic patients and can lead to lower-extremity amputation. Management of DFU requires a systematic knowledge of the major risk factors for amputation, frequent routine evaluation, scrupulous preventive maintenance, and correction of peripheral arterial insufficiency. Carboxytherapy refers to the subcutaneous injection of CO2 to improve the microcirculation and promote wound-healing by stimulating the microcirculation. Since optimal ulcer-healing requires adequate tissue perfusion, it is considered that carboxytherapy could be useful in the treatment of DFU. The present prospective clinical study included 40 patients with different sizes and types of chronic DFU. In addition to cleaning of the wound, antibiotics and debridement as necessary, the treatment protocol included blood sugar control, medication, healthy habits, no weight-bearing, and carboxytherapy. The results showed that this treatment that included carboxytherapy promoted wound-healing and prevented amputation. These positive effects should be confirmed through a complete study that includes different clinical and instrumental parameters.

  8. Treatment of pyonephrosis with a subcutaneous ureteral bypass device in four cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, Megan; Berent, Allyson C; Weisse, Chick W; Bagley, Demetrius

    2018-03-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION 4 cats were examined because of ureteral obstruction. CLINICAL FINDINGS Clinical and clinicopathologic abnormalities were nonspecific and included anorexia, lethargy, weight loss, anemia, leukocytosis, neutrophilia, lymphopenia, and azotemia. A diagnosis of pyonephrosis was made in all cats. The presence of bacteriuria was confirmed by means of urinalysis in 2 cats, bacterial culture of a urine sample obtained by means of preoperative cystocentesis in 2 cats, and bacterial culture of samples obtained from the renal pelvis intraoperatively in 3 cats. Ureteral obstruction was caused by a urolith in 3 cats; ureteral stricture associated with a circumcaval ureter was identified in 1 cat. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME All 4 cats underwent renal pelvis lavage and placement of a subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device for treatment of obstructive pyonephrosis. Postoperatively, the cystostomy tube became occluded with purulent material in 1 cat, requiring exchange. The procedure was successful in relieving the obstruction and pyonephrosis in all cats. Three of 4 cats had documented resolution of urinary tract infection. One cat had persistent bacteriuria without clinical signs 1 month after SUB device placement. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this small series suggested that renal pelvis lavage with placement of an SUB device may be a treatment option for cats with obstructive pyonephrosis.

  9. Negative-pressure in treatment of persistent post-traumatic subcutaneous emphysema with respiratory failure: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakov Mihanović

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous emphysema may aggravate traumatic pneumothorax treatment, especially when mechanical ventilation is required. Expectative management usually suffices, but when respiratory function is impaired surgical treatment might be indicated. Historically relevant methods are blowhole incisions and placement of various drains, often with related wound complications. Since the first report of negative pressure wound therapy for the treatment of severe subcutaneous emphysema in 2009, only few publications on use of commercially available sets were published. We report on patient injured in a motor vehicle accident who had serial rib fractures and bilateral pneumothorax managed initially in another hospital. Due to respiratory deterioration, haemodynamic instability and renal failure patient was transferred to our Intensive Care Unit. Massive and persistent subcutaneous emphysema despite adequate thoracic drainage with respiratory deterioration and potentially injurious mechanical ventilation with high airway pressures was the indication for active surgical treatment. Negative-pressure wound therapy dressing was applied on typical blowhole incisions which resulted in swift emphysema regression and respiratory improvement. Negative pressure wound therapy for decompression of severe subcutaneous emphysema represents simple, effective and relatively unknown technique that deserves wider attention.

  10. A refined surgical treatment modality for bromhidrosis: Subcutaneous scissor with micropore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yeqin; Xu, Ai-E; He, Junhua

    2017-05-01

    Axillary bromhidrosis has a strong negative effect on one's social life. A high success rate and few complications are criteria for a surgical treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate a new surgical treatment modality for bromhidrosis: subcutaneous scissor with micropore. Twenty patients with bromhidrosis were treated. Patients were placed in a supine position with their treated arms abducted to 110°. After injection of 60 mL of tumescent solution into each axilla, one small incision was made at the middle axillary of the hair-bearing area. The whole hair-bearing skin was undermined at the level of the superficial fat to obtain adequate skin eversion. The flaps were everted to offer full exposure of the apocrine glands, and meticulous excision of each gland was performed. Both sides were punctured with scalpel. The micropore was used for drainage, and whose width was just 3 mm. Finally, the incisions were re-approximated, and bulky compressive dressings were applied to the area for 72 hours. Of the 40 axillae (20 patients), 34 (85.0%) showed excellent results, and six (15.0%) had good results. Malodor was significantly decreased. There were no serious complications. This technique can produce excellent results with a lower complication rate than most other surgical modalities and can be performed without costly equipment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Reasons for discontinuation of subcutaneous biologic therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: a patient perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolge SC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Susan C Bolge,1 Amir Goren,2 Neeta Tandon1 1Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USA; 2Health Outcomes Practice, Kantar Health, New York, NY, USA Objective: To examine reasons why rheumatoid arthritis patients discontinued subcutaneous (SQ anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF treatment in the past 12 months, so as to help inform successful, uninterrupted therapy.Methods: Data were collected in March and April 2011 using self-reported, internet-based questionnaires. Study inclusion criteria comprised: rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis; discontinuation of SQ anti-TNF medication (adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, or golimumab within the past 12 months; aged ≥18 years; United States residency; and consent to participate. Patients reported primary and other reasons for discontinuation of their most recently discontinued anti-TNF.Results: Questionnaires from 250 patients were analyzed; 72.8% were female, 80.8% were white, and median age was 51 years. Patients had discontinued etanercept (n=109, adalimumab (n=98, certolizumab (n=24, or golimumab (n=19 within the past 12 months. When prompted about their primary reason for discontinuation, lack of effectiveness (40.8% was cited most often, followed by injection experience (18.4%. Combining prompted primary and other reasons for discontinuation, 60.8% of patients reported lack of effectiveness, while 40.8% reported injection experience, which included: pain/burning/discomfort after injection (14.4%; pain/burning/discomfort during injection (13.2%; injection reactions such as redness/swelling after injection (12.4%; dislike of self-injection (11.6%; dislike of frequency of injection (10.4%; and fear of injection/needles (6.8%. Conclusion: From the patient perspective, there are unmet needs with regard to the effectiveness and injection experience associated with SQ anti-TNF medications, which may lead to discontinuation. Treatment options with a

  12. The course of diabetic retinopathy during treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the effect of normalization of blood sugar regulation by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) on the course of diabetic retinopathy in insulin-dependent (type I) diabetic patients. Zie: Summary

  13. Treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is associated with lower arterial stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Rosenlund, Signe; Theilade, Simone; Hansen, Tine Willum

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the relationship between arterial stiffness and insulin treatment mode [continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) versus multiple daily injections (MDI)] in type 1 diabetes patients. METHODS: Cross-sectional study, from 2009 to 2011, including 601 Caucasian type 1...... diabetes patients, 58 and 543 treated with CSII and MDI, respectively. Arterial stiffness was measured as pulse wave velocity (PWV) (SphygmoCor, AtCor Medical). Adjustment included gender, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, P-creatinine, urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER......-treated patients were 48 versus 57 % men, 51 ± 11 versus 54 ± 13 years old (mean ± SD), had 33 ± 12 versus 32 ± 16 years diabetes duration and HbA1c 7.8 ± 0.9 % (62 ± 10 mmol/mol) versus 8.0 ± 1.2 % (64 ± 13 mmol/mol) (P ≥ 0.08 for all). PWV was lower in CSII- versus MDI-treated patients (9.3 ± 2.8 vs. 10.4 ± 3...

  14. Targeted two-photon PDT photo-sensitizers for the treatment of subcutaneous tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, C. W.; Rebane, A.; Starkey, J.; Drobizhev, M.

    2009-06-01

    New porphyrin-based photo-sensitizers have been designed, synthesized and characterized that exhibit greatly enhanced intrinsic two-photon absorption. These new photo-sensitizers have been incorporated into triad formulations that also incorporate Near-infrared (NIR) imaging agents, and small-molecule targeting agents that direct the triads to cancerous tumors' over-expressed receptor sites. PDT can be initiated deep into the tissue transparency window at 780-800 nm utilizing a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser using 100-150 fs pulses of 600-800 mW. Human tumor xenografts of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and both small SCLC (NCI-H69) and NSCLC (A-459) have been successfully treated using octreotate targeting of over-expressed SST2 receptors. In particular, the lung cancer xenografts can be successfully treated by irradiating from the side of the mouse opposite the implanted tumor, thereby passing through ca. 2 cm of mouse skin, tissue and organs with no discernible damage to healthy tissue while causing regression in the tumors. These results suggest a new PDT paradigm for the noninvasive treatment of subcutaneous tumors, including the possibility that the targeting moiety could be matched to individual patient genetic profiles (patient-specific therapeutics).

  15. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin as first-line therapy in treatment-naive patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, L H; Sindrup, S H; Christiansen, I

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is effective as maintenance treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We investigated whether multiple subcutaneous infusions are as effective as conventional therapy with intravenous loading doses in treatment...... treatment arm and followed for a further 10 weeks. All participants were evaluated at weeks 0, 2, 5 and 10 during both therapies. Primary outcome was combined isokinetic muscle strength (cIKS). Secondary outcomes were disability, clinical evaluation of muscle strength and the performance of various function...... tests. RESULTS: All participants received both therapies, 14 completing the protocol. Overall, cIKS increased by 7.4 ± 14.5% (P = 0.0003) during SCIG and by 6.9 ± 16.8% (P = 0.002) during IVIG, the effect being similar (P = 0.80). Improvement of cIKS peaked 2 weeks after IVIG and 5 weeks after SCIG...

  16. Targeted two-photon photodynamic therapy for the treatment of subcutaneous tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Charles W.; Starkey, Jean R.; Meng, Fanqing; Gong, Aijun; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Rebane, Aleksander; Moss, B.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has developed into a mature technology over the past several years, and is currently being exploited for the treatment of a variety of cancerous tumors, and more recently for age-related wet macular degeneration of the eye. However, there are still some unresolved problems with PDT that are retarding a more general acceptance in clinical settings, and thus, for the most part, the treatment of most cancerous rumors still involves some combination of invasive surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatment, particularly subcutaneous tumors. Currently approved PDT agents are activated in the Visible portion of the spectrum below 700 nm, Laser light in this spectral region cannot penetrate the skin more than a few millimeters, and it would be more desirable if PDT could be initiated deep in the Near-infrared (NIR) in the tissue transparency window (700-1000 nm). MPA Technologies, Inc. and Rasiris, Inc. have been co-developing new porphyrin PDT designed to have greatly enhanced intrinsic two-photon cross-sections (>800 GM units) whose two-photon absorption maxima lie deep in the tissue transparency window (ca. 780-850 nm), and have solubility characteristics that would allow for direct IV injection into animal models. Classical PDT also suffers from the lengthy time necessary for accumulation at the tumor site, a relative lack of discrimination between healthy and diseased tissue, particularly at the tumor margins, and difficulty in clearing from the system in a reasonable amount of time post-PDT. We have recently discovered a new design paradigm for the delivery of our two-photon activated PDT agents by incorporating the porphyrins into a triad ensemble that includes a small molecule targeting agent that directs the triad to over-expressed tumor receptor sites, and a NIR one-photon imaging agent that allows the tracking of the triad in terms of accumulation and clearance rates. We are currently using these new two-photon PDT triads in efficacy

  17. Subcutaneous Injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria

    This thesis is about visualization and characterization of the tissue-device interaction during subcutaneous injection. The tissue pressure build-up during subcutaneous injections was measured in humans. The insulin pen FlexTouchr (Novo Nordisk A/S) was used for the measurements and the pressure ...

  18. Prolonged Survival of Subcutaneous Allogeneic Islet Graft by Donor Chimerism without Immunosuppressive Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brend Ray-Sea Hsu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether tolerance-induced protection of islets in the renal subcapsular space can also prevent subcutaneous allogeneic islets from being rejected. We used bone marrow stem cells from C57BL/6 (H2b mice to construct donor chimerism in conditioned diabetic BALB/c (H2d mice and investigated the effect of donor chimerism on engraftment and survival of subcutaneously transplanted allogeneic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. We also studied the anti-inflammatory effect of mesenchymal stem cell on islet engraftment. Full but not low-grade or no donor chimerism was associated with successful engraftment of allogeneic islets and restoration of normoglycemia in the treated diabetic mice. The temporary hyperglycemia was 11 ± 1 versus 19 ± 5 days (p<0.05 for the mice with full donor chimerism with transplanted islets in the renal subcapsular space versus the subcutaneous space, respectively. Cotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cell did not enhance alloislet engraftment. Full multilineage donor chimerism was associated with a higher transient expansion of CD11b+ and Gr-1+ myeloid progenitor cells and effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cells. In conclusion, full donor chimerism protected both renal subcapsular and subcutaneous allogeneic islets in this rodent transplantation model.

  19. Ivermectin excreted in cattle dung after subcutaneous injection or pour-on treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, C.; Steffansen, B.; Nielsen, B. Overgaard

    1992-01-01

    Heifers were treated with the recommended doses of ivermectin: 0.2 mg/kg bw by subcutaneous injection or 0.5 mg/kg bw by pour-on. An analytic procedure is described and used for the detection of ivermectin residues excreted in dung. A large amount of the higher pour-on dose was excreted during th...

  20. Long-term amnioinfusion through a subcutaneously implanted amniotic fluid replacement port system for treatment of PPROM in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchirikov, Michael; Steetskamp, Joscha; Hohmann, Manfred; Koelbl, Heinz

    2010-09-01

    To introduce a novel method for the treatment of PPROM (preterm premature rupture of membranes) using continuous amnioinfusion via a subcutaneously implanted port system. After development and testing since 2001 in a fetal sheep model, the port system has been successfully implanted in two humans with PPROM. In the first case, the subcutaneous port system was implanted during the 23rd week of gestation in a 39-year-old 5th-gravida with PPROM since the 18th week of gestation; in the second case, the port system was implanted during the 24th week of gestation in a 27-year-old 3rd gravida with PPROM since the 21st week of gestation. After port implantation, 100ml/h saline solution was infused intermittently into the amniotic cavity. The whole course of treatment was supported by tocolysis. In the cases presented, gestation was terminated by cesarean section, in one case in the 29th week of gestation, and in the other case in the 30th week. The newborns showed no signs of lung hypoplasia and were successfully extubated on the 1st or 2nd day after delivery. Six months later the children did not exhibit any deviation from the normal development. Long-term amnioinfusion via a subcutaneously implanted port system could be used in humans with PPROM for prolongation of pregnancy and to avoid lung hypoplasia. Prospective randomized studies are ongoing. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Psychological insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients regarding oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, Frank; Herpertz, Stephan; Stridde, Elmar; Pfützner, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    "Psychological insulin resistance" (PIR) is an obstacle to insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes, and patients' expectations regarding alternative ways of insulin delivery are poorly understood. PIR and beliefs regarding treatment alternatives were analyzed in patients with type 2 diabetes (n=532; mean glycated hemoglobin, 68±12 mmol/mol [8.34±1.5%]) comparing oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin. Questionnaires were used to assess barriers to insulin treatment (BIT), generic and diabetes-specific quality of life (Short Form 36 and Problem Areas in Diabetes, German version), diabetes knowledge, locus of control (Questionnaire for the Assessment of Diabetes-Specific Locus of Control, in German), coping styles (Freiburg Questionnaire of Illness Coping, 15-Items Short Form), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, German version), and mental disorders (Patient Health Questionnaire, German version). Patients discussed treatment optimization options with a physician and were asked to make a choice about future diabetes therapy options in a two-step treatment choice scenario. Step 1 included oral antidiabetes drugs or subcutaneous insulin injection (SCI). Step 2 included an additional treatment alternative of inhaled insulin (INH). Subgroups were analyzed according to their treatment choice. Most patients perceived their own diabetes-related behavior as active, problem-focused, internally controlled, and oriented toward their doctors' recommendations, although their diabetes knowledge was limited. In Step 1, rejection of the recommended insulin was 82%, and in Step 2, it was 57%. Fear of hypoglycemia was the most important barrier to insulin treatment. Patients choosing INH (versus SCI) scored higher regarding fear of injection, expected hardship from insulin therapy, and BIT-Sumscore. The acceptance of insulin is very low in type 2 diabetes patients. The option to inhale insulin increases the acceptability for some but

  2. Subcutaneous Administration of Bortezomib in Combination with Thalidomide and Dexamethasone for Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the efficacy and safety of the treatment of the newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM patients with the therapy of subcutaneous (subQ administration of bortezomib and dexamethasone plus thalidomide (VTD regimen. Methods. A total of 60 newly diagnosed MM patients were analyzed. 30 patients received improved VTD regimen (improved VTD group with the subQ injection of bortezomib and the other 30 patients received conventional VTD regimen (VTD group.The efficacy and safety of two groups were analyzed retrospectively. Results. The overall remission (OR after eight cycles of treatment was 73.3% in the VTD group and 76.7% in the improved VTD group (P>0.05. No significant differences in time to 1-year estimate of overall survival (72% versus 75%, P=0.848 and progression-free survival (median 22 months versus 25 months; P=0.725 between two groups. The main toxicities related to therapy were leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, asthenia, fatigue, and renal and urinary disorders. Grade 3 and higher adverse events were significantly less common in the improved VTD group (50% than VTD group (80%, P=0.015. Conclusions. The improved VTD regimen by changing bortezomib from intravenous administration to subcutaneous injection has noninferior efficacy to standard VTD regimen, with an improved safety profile and reduced adverse events.

  3. Experience with the once-yearly histrelin (GnRHa subcutaneous implant in the treatment of central precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Lewis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Katherine A Lewis, Erica A EugsterDepartment of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, USAAbstract: In 2007, a hydrogel histrelin implant was approved for the treatment of children with central precocious puberty (CPP. Children with CPP commonly have reduced height potential due to premature closure of the epiphyseal growth plates from exposure to sex steroids. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa treatment halts puberty and allows for improvement of adult height. A hydrogel implant delivery system utilizing the potent GnRHa, histrelin, was first developed for use in men with prostate cancer. A once yearly histrelin subcutaneous implant was subsequently developed for the treatment of children with CPP. Studies to date have demonstrated safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of this treatment option in patients treated up to 2 years. The most common adverse effects of the implant relate to implant site pain or bruising. Cost of this treatment seems comparable to somewhat higher than the commonly used GnRHa treatment option, depot leuprolide. While long term studies are needed to establish continued efficacy and safety beyond 2 years of treatment, the histrelin implant appears to be an attractive option for GnRHa treatment in patients with CPP.Keywords: central precocious puberty, histrelin, implant, gonadotropin-releasing-hormone analogs

  4. Bleeding risk during treatment of acute thrombotic events with subcutaneous LMWH compared to intravenous unfractionated heparin; a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Costantino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low Molecular Weight Heparins (LMWH are at least as effective antithrombotic drugs as Unfractionated Heparin (UFH. However, it is still unclear whether the safety profiles of LMWH and UFH differ. We performed a systematic review to compare the bleeding risk of fixed dose subcutaneous LMWH and adjusted dose UFH for treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE or acute coronary syndromes (ACS. Major bleeding was the primary end point. METHODS: Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched up to May 2010 with no language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials in which subcutaneous LMWH were compared to intravenous UFH for the treatment of acute thrombotic events were selected. Two reviewers independently screened studies and extracted data on study design, study quality, incidence of major bleeding, patients' characteristics, type, dose and number of daily administrations of LMWH, co-treatments, study end points and efficacy outcome. Pooled odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using the random effects model. RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies were included. A total of 14,002 patients received UFH and 14,635 patients LMWH. Overall, no difference in major bleeding was observed between LMWH patients and UFH (OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.60-1.04. In patients with VTE LMWH appeared safer than UFH, (OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.47-1.00. CONCLUSION: The results of our systematic review suggest that the use of LMWH in the treatment of VTE might be associated with a reduction in major bleeding compared with UFH. The choice of which heparin to use to minimize bleeding risk must be based on the single patient, taking into account the bleeding profile of different heparins in different settings.

  5. [PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENT IN PALLIATIVE CARE. DRUG ADMINISTRATION ROUTE, CONTINUOUS SUBCUTANEOUS INFUSION, ADVERSE SIDE EFFECTS, SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez Álvarez, Rocío; Calderón Carrasco, Justo; García Colchero, Francisco; Postigo Mota, Salvador; Alburquerque Medina, Eulalia

    2015-01-01

    To achieve well-being in patients in Palliative Care is required to know which are the most common symptoms, which are the drugs used for relief, which are the routes of administration of drugs that are suitable, how effective the drugs are and what incompatibilities, interactions and adverse effects occur. The aim of this article is to review the relevant issues in the management of the drugs commonly used by nursing in Palliative Care and presenting recommendations to clinical practice. Management interventions drugs for nurses in Palliative Care recommended by the scientific literature after a search of Scopus, CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, UpToDate and Google Scholar are selected. The oral route is the choice for patients in palliative situation and subcutaneous route when the first is not available. The symptoms, complex, intense and moody, should be systematically reevaluated by the nurse, to predict when a possible decompensation of it needing extra dose of medication. Nurses must be able to recognize the imbalance of well-being and act quickly and effectively, to get relief to some unpleasant situations for the patient as the pain symptoms, dyspnea or delirium. For the proper administration of rescue medication, the nurse should know the methods of symptomatic evaluation, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, the time intervals to elapse between different rescues and nccocc rocnnnco t thocm

  6. stausartikel: behandling af subcutane abscesser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardgrib, Nina; Petersen, Klaus Kjær

    2017-01-01

    Simple subcutaneous abscesses are common, and we have examined the literature concerning the ideal treatment of subcutaneous abscesses. We recommend radical debridement with removal of all pus, the abscess wall and any necrosis. If primary suture is chosen, preoperative antibiotics should be admi...

  7. Effect of hydrogen plasma treatment on the surface morphology, microstructure and electronic transport properties of nc-Si:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, P.; Paul, S.; Galipeau, D.; Bommisetty, V.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) films, deposited by reactive radio-frequency sputtering with 33% hydrogen dilution in argon at 200 o C, were treated with low-power hydrogen plasma at room temperature at various power densities (0.1-0.5 W/cm 2 ) and durations (10 s-10 min). Plasma treatment reduced the surface root mean square roughness and increased the average grain size. This was attributed to the mass transport of Si atoms on the surface by surface and grain boundary diffusion. Plasma treatment under low power density (0.1 W/cm 2 ) for short duration (10 s) caused a significant enhancement of crystalline volume fraction and electrical conductivity, compared to as-deposited film. While higher power (0.5 W/cm 2 ) hydrogen plasma treatment for longer durations (up to 10 min) caused moderate improvement in crystalline fraction and electrical properties; however, the magnitude of improvement is not significant compared to low-power (0.1 W/cm 2 )/short-duration (10 s) plasma exposure. The results indicate that low-power hydrogen plasma treatment at room temperature can be an effective tool to improve the structural and electrical properties of nc-Si:H.

  8. An observational 7-year study of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papargyri, Panagiota; Ojeda Rodríguez, Sylvie; Corrales Hernández, Juan José; Mories Álvarez, María Teresa; Recio Córdova, José María; Delgado Gómez, Manuel; Sánchez Marcos, Ana Isabel; Iglesias López, Rosa Ana; Herrero Ruiz, Ana; Beaulieu Oriol, Myriam; Miralles García, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the experience with use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in 112 type 1 diabetic patients followed up for 7 years and previously treated with multiple daily insulin injections (MDII). A retrospective, observational study in 112 patients with diabetes mellitus treated with CSII from 2005 to 2012, previously treated with MDII and receiving individualized diabetic education with a specific protocol. Variables analyzed included: prevalence of the different indications of pump treatment; mean annual HbA1c and fructosamine values before and after CSII treatment; and hypoglycemia frequency and symptoms. The most common reason for pump treatment was brittle diabetes (74.1%), followed by frequent or severe hypoglycemia or hypoglycemia unawareness (44.6%). Other indications were irregular food intake times for professional reasons (20.2%), dawn phenomenon (15.7%), pregnancy (12.3%), requirement of very low insulin doses (8.9%), and gestational diabetes (0.9%). HbA1c decreased by between 0.6% and 0.9%, and fructosamine by between 5.1% and 12.26%. Nine percent of patients experienced hypoglycemia weekly, 24% every two weeks, and 48% monthly. No hypoglycemia occurred in 19% of patients. Only 10% had neuroglycopenic symptoms. Hypoglycemia unawareness was found in 21%. Hypoglycemia was more common at treatment start, and its frequency rapidly decreased thereafter. CSII therapy provides a better glycemic control than MDII treatment. Specific patient training and fine adjustment of insulin infusion doses are required to prevent hypoglycemic episodes, which are the most common complications, mainly at the start of treatment. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Health-Related Quality of Life, Treatment Satisfaction, and Costs Associated With Intraperitoneal Versus Subcutaneous Insulin Administration in Type 1 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Susan J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Gans, Reinold O.; Bilo, Henk J.

    OBJECTIVE - To investigate the effects of continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) compared with subcutaneous insulin on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and treatment satisfaction, and to perform a cost analysis in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We used an

  10. Successful treatment of young infants presenting neonatal diabetes mellitus with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion before genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbone, Ivana; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Marigliano, Marco; Bonfanti, Riccardo; Piccinno, Elvira; Ortolani, Federica; Ignaccolo, Giovanna; Maffeis, Claudio; Confetto, Santino; Cerutti, Franco; Zanfardino, Angela; Iafusco, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is defined as hyperglycemia and impaired insulin secretion with onset within 6 months of birth. While rare, NDM presents complex challenges regarding the management of glycemic control. The availability of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pumps (CSII) in combination with continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGM) provides an opportunity to monitor glucose levels more closely and deliver insulin more safely. We report four cases of young infants with NDM successfully treated with CSII and CGM. Moreover, in two cases with Kir 6.2 mutation, we describe the use of CSII in switching therapy from insulin to sulfonylurea treatment. Insulin pump requirement for the 4 neonatal diabetes cases was the same regardless of disease pathogenesis and c-peptide levels. No dilution of insulin was needed. The use of an integrated CGM system helped in a more precise control of BG levels with the possibility of several modifications of insulin basal rates. Moreover, as showed in the first two case-reports, when the treatment was switched from insulin to glibenclamide, according to identification of Kir 6.2 mutation and diagnosis of NPDM, the CSII therapy demonstrated to be helpful in allowing gradual insulin suspension and progressive introduction of sulfonylurea. During the neonatal period, the use of CSII therapy is safe, more physiological, accurate and easier for the insulin administration management. Furthermore, CSII therapy is safe during the switch of therapy from insulin to glibenclamide for infants with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus.

  11. Systemic treatment with CAR-engineered T cells against PSCA delays subcutaneous tumor growth and prolongs survival of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillerdal, Victoria; Ramachandran, Mohanraj; Leja, Justyna; Essand, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically engineered with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has successfully been used to treat both chronic and acute lymphocytic leukemia as well as other hematological cancers. Experimental therapy with CAR-engineered T cells has also shown promising results on solid tumors. The prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a protein expressed on the surface of prostate epithelial cells as well as in primary and metastatic prostate cancer cells and therefore a promising target for immunotherapy of prostate cancer. We developed a third-generation CAR against PSCA including the CD28, OX-40 and CD3 ζ signaling domains. T cells were transduced with a lentivirus encoding the PSCA-CAR and evaluated for cytokine production (paired Student’s t-test), proliferation (paired Student’s t-test), CD107a expression (paired Student’s t-test) and target cell killing in vitro and tumor growth and survival in vivo (Log-rank test comparing Kaplan-Meier survival curves). PSCA-CAR T cells exhibit specific interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 secretion and specific proliferation in response to PSCA-expressing target cells. Furthermore, the PSCA-CAR-engineered T cells efficiently kill PSCA-expressing tumor cells in vitro and systemic treatment with PSCA-CAR-engineered T cells significantly delays subcutaneous tumor growth and prolongs survival of mice. Our data confirms that PSCA-CAR T cells may be developed for treatment of prostate cancer

  12. Meal fat storage in subcutaneous adipose tissue: comparison of pioglitazone and glipizide treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ananda; Basu, Rita; Pattan, Vishwanath; Rizza, Robert A; Jensen, Michael D

    2010-10-01

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) with pioglitazone changes abdominal fat in the opposite direction as treatment with glipizide. To determine whether these two medications affect adipose tissue meal fatty acid storage differently we studied 19 T2DM treated with either pioglitazone (n = 8) or glipizide (n = 11) and 11 non-DM control subjects matched for age, BMI, abdominal and leg fat. A breakfast mixed meal containing [1-(14)C]triolein was given and abdominal and femoral subcutaneous (sc) adipose tissue biopsies were collected 6 and 24 h later to measure meal fatty acid storage. The portion of meal fatty acids stored in upper body sc and lower body sc adipose tissue did not differ between non-DM and T2DM subjects either at 6 or 24 h. Likewise, meal fatty acid storage did not differ between the T2DM participants treated with pioglitazone or glipizide. We conclude that meal fatty acid storage in upper body and lower body sc adipose tissue is not abnormal in T2DM patients treated with pioglitazone or glipizide.

  13. A single center experience of methotrexate in the treatment of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis: a case for subcutaneous administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Debbie M; Iser, John H; Gibson, Peter R

    2008-06-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is used as a second-line immuno-modulator in patients with inflammatory bowel disease when purine analogs are not tolerated or lack efficacy. High-level evidence indicates efficacy for intramuscular administration in Crohn's disease, but there are few reports of experience with subcutaneous delivery. This study aimed to evaluate the response to and tolerance of MTX where subcutaneous administration was the preferred option. The records of all patients treated with MTX were evaluated with regard to the dose, duration, response, and tolerance to MTX. Remission was defined as improvement in symptoms with no corticosteroid requirement for 3 months or ability to wean off steroids. MTX was initiated in 45 patients with Crohn's disease and 23 ulcerative colitis (median age, 46 years; range, 20-80 years; 54% men) because of intolerance (69%) or resistance (31%) to purine analogues. MTX was initiated in 74% of patients in doses of 25 mg (33) or 20 mg (17), administered by subcutaneous self-injection in 90% of subjects. Remission was achieved in 24 of 45 (53%) with Crohn's disease and 11 of 23 (48%) with ulcerative colitis. An additional four (9%) patients with Crohn's disease and three patients (13%) with ulcerative colitis demonstrated symptomatic improvement and/or ability to decrease corticosteroid dose. While nine patients ceased therapy and nine successfully reduced their doses due to intolerance, three of four patients had no adverse effects. Subcutaneous delivery was well accepted. Subcutaneously administered MTX exhibits apparent efficacy, acceptance, tolerance, and safety in patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis who are steroid-dependent and where purine analogs have been ineffective or intolerable.

  14. Subcutaneous self-injections of C1 inhibitor: an effective and safe treatment in a patient with hereditary angio-oedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, K; Krüger, R; Maurer, M; Magerl, M

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman presented to our clinic with a history of recurrent swelling and abdominal symptoms for > 20 years. The patient's father was similarly affected. The patient was diagnosed with hereditary angio-oedema (HAE) due to C1 inhibitor deficiency. This was initially managed with systemic androgens, but the symptoms of hyperandrogenism eventually became intolerable. Treatment with icatibant (an antagonist of bradykinin B2 receptors) was partially successful. We changed the therapy to prophylactic treatment with C1 inhibitor. Although the patient became completely symptom-free under this regimen, she found the repeated intravenous injections unacceptable. Therefore, we changed the route of administration to subcutaneous injections of C1 inhibitor 1000 U in 10 mL twice weekly, using a subcutaneous infusion kit. Since that time (December 2013), she has remained completely free of symptoms under this regimen. To our knowledge, this is the first report documenting the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous injections of C1 inhibitor in a patient with HAE. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Apomorphine subcutaneous infusion, duodenal infusion of levodopa and deep brain stimulation – three advanced treatment options for the advanced Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Flisar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced stage of Parkinson's disease is associated with motor complications: motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. The disease can no longer be satisfactorily treated with oral therapy that is based on treatment with levodopa. Dying of dopamine neurons, a short half-life of levodopa and pulsatile stimulation of dopamine receptors are the main reasons for these complications. Currently, there are three options available to treat the advanced stage of Parkinson's disease: subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine, intrajejunal infusion of levodopa and deep brain stimulation. It is necessary to choose the optimal method of treatment that is most suitable for the individual patient.

  16. Subcutaneous interferon β-1a in pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis: Regional differences in clinical features, disease management, and treatment outcomes in an international retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, Lauren B; Pohl, Daniela; Ghezzi, Angelo; Boyko, Alexey; Tenembaum, Silvia; Chen, Liang; Aycardi, Ernesto; Banwell, Brenda

    2016-04-15

    To further understand management of pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), we examined disease features, clinical practice patterns, and response to treatment in the United States (US) and seven other countries ('rest of World'; ROW). Anonymized data, recorded as part of routine clinical practice, were obtained from medical records (1997-2009) of study participants (who received subcutaneous interferon β-1a before age 18 years) from the US and ROW. Samples were stratified by age (preadolescents [managed differently, compared with ROW patients. Future prospective studies are needed to confirm these observations and ascertain their clinical significance. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration (fSCIg)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Conlon, Niall; Petermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    and diverse medical needs that treatments for SID management should strive to meet. In this special report, we study the opportunities provided by facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration (fSCIg) to treat patients for whom the conventional routes (intravenous and subcutaneous) are sub...

  18. Role of Liposuction Combined with Subcutaneous Mastectomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    deformity in two other patients. Conclusions: Liposuction combined with subcutaneous mastectomy is a reliable, versatile, less time consuming and valid procedure for the treatment of gynecomastia. This procedure provides satisfactory aesthetic results. KEY WORDS: Gynecomastia, liposuction, subcutaneous mastectomy.

  19. Fish oil prevents excessive accumulation of subcutaneous fat caused by an adverse effect of pioglitazone treatment and positively changes adipocytes in KK mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzuru Iizuka

    Full Text Available Pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD, is widely used as an insulin sensitizer in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, body weight gain is frequently observed in TZD-treated patients. Fish oil improves lipid metabolism dysfunction and obesity. In this study, we demonstrated suppression of body weight gain in response to pioglitazone administration by combination therapy of pioglitazone and fish oil in type 2 diabetic KK mice. Male KK mice were fed experimental diets for 8 weeks. In safflower oil (SO, safflower oil/low-dose pioglitazone (S/PL, and safflower oil/high-dose pioglitazone (S/PH diets, 20% of calories were provided by safflower oil containing 0%, 0.006%, or 0.012% (wt/wt pioglitazone, respectively. In fish oil (FO, fish oil/low-dose pioglitazone (F/PL, and fish oil/high-dose pioglitazone (F/PH diets, 20% of calories were provided by a mixture of fish oil and safflower oil. Increased body weight and subcutaneous fat mass were observed in the S/PL and S/PH groups; however, diets containing fish oil were found to ameliorate these changes. Hepatic mRNA levels of lipogenic enzymes were significantly decreased in fish oil-fed groups. These findings demonstrate that the combination of pioglitazone and fish oil decreases subcutaneous fat accumulation, ameliorating pioglitazone-induced body weight gain, through fish oil-mediated inhibition of hepatic de novo lipogenesis. Keywords: Fish oil, Pioglitazone, Adverse effect

  20. Randomized, double-blind, crossover study comparing DFN-11 injection (3 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan) with 6 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan for the treatment of rapidly-escalating attacks of episodic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Roger K; Munjal, Sagar; Cady, Ryan J; Manley, Heather R; Brand-Schieber, Elimor

    2017-12-01

    A 6-mg dose of SC sumatriptan is the most efficacious and fast-acting acute treatment for migraine, but a 3-mg dose of SC sumatriptan may improve tolerability while maintaining efficacy. This randomized, double-blind, crossover study compared the efficacy and tolerability of 3 mg subcutaneous (SC) sumatriptan (DFN-11) with 6 mg SC sumatriptan in 20 adults with rapidly-escalating migraine attacks. Eligible subjects were randomized (1:1) to treat 1 attack with DFN-11 and matching placebo autoinjector consecutively or 2 DFN-11 autoinjectors consecutively and a second attack similarly but with the alternative dose (3 mg or 6 mg). The proportions of subjects who were pain-free at 60 min postdose, the primary endpoint, were similar following treatment with 3 mg SC sumatriptan and 6 mg SC sumatriptan (50% vs 52.6%, P  =  .87). The proportions of subjects experiencing pain relief (P  ≥  .48); reductions in migraine pain intensity (P  ≥  .78); and relief from nausea, photophobia, or phonophobia (P  ≥  .88) with 3 mg SC sumatriptan and 6 mg SC sumatriptan were similar, as were the mean scores for satisfaction with treatment (M  =  2.6 vs M  =  2.4, P  =  .81) and the mean number of rescue medications used (M  =  .11 vs M  =  .26, P  =  .32). The most common adverse events with the 3- and 6-mg doses were triptan sensations - paresthesia, neck pain, flushing, and involuntary muscle contractions of the neck - and the incidence of adverse events with both doses was similar (32 events total: 3 mg, n  =  14 [44%]; 6 mg, n  =  18 [56%], P  =  .60). Triptan sensations affected 4 subjects with the 6-mg dose only, 1 subject with the 3-mg dose only, and 7 subjects with both sumatriptan doses. Chest pain affected 2 subjects (10%) treated with the 6-mg dose and no subjects (0%) treated with the 3-mg dose of DFN-11. There were no serious adverse events. The 3-mg SC dose

  1. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare are reported. Clinical presentation was in the form of hard subcutaneous nodules, histopathology confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The cases were unique because of onset in adult age, occurrence over unusual sites and absence of classical lesions of granuloma annulare elsewhere.

  2. Frontal subcutaneous blood flow, and epi- and subcutaneous temperatures during scalp cooling in normal man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Friberg, L; Gaardsting, O

    1985-01-01

    Cooling of the scalp has been found to prevent hair loss following cytostatic treatment, but in order to obtain the hair preserving effect the subcutaneous temperature has to be reduced below 22 degrees C. In order to establish the relationship between epicutaneous and subcutaneous temperatures...... epicutaneous and subcutaneous temperatures could be demonstrated with the regression equation: s = 0.9 c + 4.9 (r = 0.99). In eight of the 10 subjects the subcutaneous temperature could be reduced below 22 degrees C with the applied technique. It is concluded that the hair preserving effect of scalp cooling...

  3. [Long-term treatment with a low-molecular-weight heparin administered subcutaneously compared with a vitamin K antagonist: subanalysis of patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera-Villegas, Antonio; Martí Mestre, Xavier; Vila Coll, Ramón; Colomé Nafría, Esteve

    2015-01-01

    We performed a subanalysis of cancer patients enrolled in a clinical trial that compared long-term (6 months) treatment with a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) administered subcutaneously or with acenocoumarol. The subanalysis assessed whether the characteristics of the tumor had an influence on the clinical response. A randomized open trial included 69 patients with cancer and symptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis of the lower limbs. The tumor characteristics and treatment type were recorded. The main assessment criterion was the 12-month incidence of recurrent symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE). Sixty-one patients (88.4%) were analyzed. At the time of inclusion, the cancer characteristics and treatment were comparable between the 2 groups. Over the course of 12 months, the recurrent VTE was significantly greater in the elderly patients (71.5 ± 6.4 vs. 62.0 ± 15.1; p=.006). The logistic regression analysis showed no association between VTE recurrence and the location or extent of the tumor. However, the use of thrombogenic chemotherapy (p=.045) was independently associated with VTE recurrence, and longterm treatment with tinzaparin was almost a protective factor (p=.15). In this small sample, we observed an association between thrombogenic chemotherapy and recurrent VTE. The tendency towards a reduction in VTE recurrence at 12 months in patients with cancer in the LMWH group could be attributed to the effect of the full LMWH dosage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical Strategies in the Treatment of Gynecomastia Grade I-II: The Combination of Liposuction and Subcutaneous Mastectomy Provides Excellent Patient Outcome and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Lars; Rudlowski, Christian; Walgenbach-Brünagel, Gisela; Leutner, Claudia; Kuhn, Walther; Walgenbach, Klaus-Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Gynecomastia (GM) is a benign condition with glandular tissue enlargement of the male breast. GM is classified into 4 grades of increasing severity. We describe a series of GM grade I-II, diagnosed, treated surgically and analyzed regarding feasibility, complication rate, and satisfaction. From 2005 to 2012, a chart review was performed for 53 patients. Preoperative examination included endocrine and urological examination and exclusion of other pathological conditions. The surgical technique consisted of liposuction through an inframammarian-fold incision and excision of the glandular tissue by a minimal periareolar approach. A total number of 53 male patients with 104 breasts were available for analysis. By liposuction, a median of 300 ml (range: 10-1000 ml) was aspirated from each breast and 25.1 g (range: 3-233 g) gland tissue was resected. Surgery lasted between 25 and 164 min per patient (median: 72 min). 2 postoperative hemorrhages occurred (n = 2, 3.8%). 2 patients underwent re-operation due to cosmetic reasons (n = 2, 3.8%). This analysis demonstrates that treatment of GM grade I-II can easily be performed by liposuction combined with subcutaneous resection of the glandular tissue as a minimally invasive and low-impact surgical treatment with a low rate of complications and excellent patient satisfaction. Preoperative workup is important to rule out specific diseases or malignancy causing the GM.

  5. PHAEOHYPHOMYCOSIS: CUTANEOUS, SUBCUTANEOUS, NASOPHARYNGEAL LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rasoolinejad

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is an amalgam of clinical diseases caused by a wide variety of dematiaceous fungi. We are reporting on a 16 year-old patient from Amol with subcutaneous cervical nodes and nasopharyngeal lesions of phaeohypho"nmycosis that were confirmed by pathological examination, direct smear, and culture. After treatment with an oral triazole (Itraconazole for 4 months, all nodes and lesions disappeared and treatment was stopped A new lesion appeared on his chest wall 8 months, therapy with itraconazole was restarted and commuted for a long time.

  6. Preclinical Development of a Subcutaneous ALAS1 RNAi Therapeutic for Treatment of Hepatic Porphyrias Using Circulating RNA Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Chan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute hepatic porphyrias are caused by inherited enzymatic deficiencies in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Induction of the first enzyme 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1 by triggers such as fasting or drug exposure can lead to accumulation of neurotoxic heme intermediates that cause disease symptoms. We have demonstrated that hepatic ALAS1 silencing using siRNA in a lipid nanoparticle effectively prevents and treats induced attacks in a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria. Herein, we report the development of ALN-AS1, an investigational GalNAc-conjugated RNAi therapeutic targeting ALAS1. One challenge in advancing ALN-AS1 to patients is the inability to detect liver ALAS1 mRNA in the absence of liver biopsies. We here describe a less invasive circulating extracellular RNA detection assay to monitor RNAi drug activity in serum and urine. A striking correlation in ALAS1 mRNA was observed across liver, serum, and urine in both rodents and nonhuman primates (NHPs following treatment with ALN-AS1. Moreover, in donor-matched human urine and serum, we demonstrate a notable correspondence in ALAS1 levels, minimal interday assay variability, low interpatient variability from serial sample collections, and the ability to distinguish between healthy volunteers and porphyria patients with induced ALAS1 levels. The collective data highlight the potential utility of this assay in the clinical development of ALN-AS1, and in broadening our understanding of acute hepatic porphyrias disease pathophysiology.

  7. Treatment of central precocious puberty by subcutaneous injections of leuprorelin 3-month depot (11.25 mg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carel, Jean-Claude; Lahlou, Najiba; Jaramillo, Orlando; Montauban, Vincent; Teinturier, Cécile; Colle, Michel; Lucas, Christel; Chaussain, Jean Louis

    2002-09-01

    Depot GnRH agonists are widely used for the treatment of precocious puberty. Leuprorelin 3-month depot is currently used in adults but has not been evaluated in children. We evaluated the efficacy of this new formulation (11.25 mg every 3 months), for the suppression of gonadotropic activation and pubertal signs in children with central precocious puberty. We included 44 children (40 girls) with early-onset pubertal development in a 6-month open trial. The inclusion criteria were clinical pubertal development before the age of 8 (girls) or 10 (boys), advanced bone age, enlarged uterus (>36 mm), testosterone more than 1.7 nmol/liter (boys), and pubertal response of LH to GnRH (peak >5 IU/liter). The principal criterion for efficacy assessment, GnRH-stimulated LH peak less than 3 IU/liter, was met in 81 of 85 (95%) of the tests performed at months 3 and 6. The remaining four values were slightly above the threshold. The levels of sex steroids were also significantly reduced and clinical pubertal development was arrested. Plasma leuprorelin levels, measured every 30 d, were essentially stable after d 60. Local intolerance was noted after 10 of 86 injections (12%), and was mild in four cases, moderate in five cases, and severe in one. Among these 10 events, 4 consisted in local pain at injection's site. In conclusion, leuprorelin 3-month depot efficiently inhibits the gonadotropic axis in 95% of children with central precocious puberty studied for a 6-month period. This regimen allows the reduction of the number of yearly injections from 12 to 4.

  8. Validation of a treatment satisfaction questionnaire in non-Hodgkin lymphoma: assessing the change from intravenous to subcutaneous administration of rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore-Oklota, Christina; Humphrey, Louise; Wiesner, Christof; Schnetzler, Gabriel; Hudgens, Stacie; Campbell, Alicyn

    2016-01-01

    A subcutaneous (SC) formulation of rituximab (MabThera ® /Rituxan ® ) has been developed that could reduce administration time and improve patient satisfaction with treatment. The Rituximab Administration Satisfaction Questionnaire (RASQ) was created to assess patients' perceptions and satisfaction with rituximab SC (RASQ-SC) or rituximab intravenous (RASQ-IV). We assessed the content validity and psychometric properties of RASQ in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Face and content validity of RASQ-SC and RASQ-IV were qualitatively assessed using 60-minute combined concept elicitation and cognitive debriefing interviews. Psychometric validation of RASQ (item performance and reliability) was assessed quantitatively against the established Cancer Therapy Satisfaction Questionnaire (CTSQ), using questionnaire data from the PrefMab (NCT01724021) and MabCute (NCT01461928) clinical studies. RASQ-IV demonstrated excellent coverage of concepts relevant to patients' (n=10) own treatment experiences and no new concepts were identified. Patients' expectations of rituximab SC were conceptually consistent with items included in the RASQ-SC, suggesting that the tool is also conceptually adequate. In 1,051 patients from PrefMab and MabCute, correlations with domains such as "RASQ: Physical Impacts" and "CTSQ: Feelings About Side Effects", "RASQ: Physical Impacts" and "CTSQ: Satisfaction With Therapy", and "RASQ: Satisfaction" and "CTSQ: Satisfaction With Therapy", achieved moderate-to-high correlations (>0.4) for convergent domains and <0.3 for divergent domains. This study supports the qualitative face and content validity and psychometric validity of RASQ-IV and RASQ-SC. Minor revisions were made to the questionnaires to enhance clarity and aid consistent reporting.

  9. Subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Berg, Jais O

    2016-01-01

    We have described subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis, which is benign, usually asymptomatic and underreported. Images have only been published on two earlier occasions, in which the necrotic nodules appear "pearly" than the cloudy yellow surface in present case. The presented image may help...

  10. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of subcutaneos granuloma annulare are reported. Clinical presentation was in the form of hard subcutaneous nodules; histopathology confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The cases were unique because of onset in adult hood, occurrence over unusual sites and absence of classical lesions of granuloma annulare elsewhere.

  11. Comparison of treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily insulin injections with bolus calculator in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, L; Goñi-Iriarte, M J; García-Mouriz, M

    2015-01-01

    A study of the glycemic control, quality of life, and fear and perception of hypoglycemia by comparing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) group with multiple daily inyections (MDI) with bolus calculator group. This is a retrospective cohort study with following up during the first 12 months that CSII group (n=30) begins the use of "bolus wizard" and the MDI-calculator (n=30) group begins the use of the bolus calculator (Accu-Chek(®) Aviva Expert). HbA1c (3, 6 and 12 months). Questionnaires used: EsDQOL (quality of life), FH-15 (fear of hypoglycemia), and Clarke (perception of hypoglycemia). T Student and nonparametric tests. The average reduction in HbA1c during the study was significantly higher in CSII group (-0.56±0.84%) compared with the MDI group (0.097±0.94%), P=.028. The average basal insulin dose was significantly higher in the MDI group (at baseline, 6 and 12 months). No significant differences were found between the 2 treatment groups after analyzing the EsDQOL, FH-15 and Clarke questionnaires. In the CSII group, perceived quality of life assessed by the EsDQOL questionnaire was found to be better at the end of the study than at the beginning of using the insulin pump. The average reduction in HbA1c was significantly higher in the CSII group. In the CSII group, perceived quality of life was better at the end of the study than at the beginning. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Hataedock treatment has preventive therapeutic effects for atopic dermatitis through skin barrier protection in Dermatophagoides farinae-induced NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ho-Yeol; Ahn, Sang-Hyun; Cheon, Jin-Hong; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Kibong

    2017-07-12

    Hataedock treatment is traditionally used for the purpose of preventing the future skin disease by feeding herbal extracts to the newborn in traditional Chinese and Korean medicine. This study investigated the preventive therapeutic effects of Hataedock (HTD) treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD) through skin barrier protection in Dermatophagoides farinae-induced NC/Nga mice. To the HTD treatment group, the extract of Coptis japonica Makino and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fischer, which analyzed with High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)-fingerprint for quality consistency, was administered orally to the 3-week-old mice before inducing AD. After that, Dermatophagoides farinae was applied except the control group to induce AD-like skin lesions. We confirmed the effects of HTD on morphological changes, protection of skin barrier, regulation of Th2 differentiation, inflammation regulation and induction of apoptosis through histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. HTD effectively reduced edema, angiogenesis and skin lesion. HTD also increased the levels of liver X receptor (LXR) and filaggrin but decreased the level of protein kinase C (PKC) (pprotection of skin barrier. Therefore, HTD may have potential applications for alternative and preventive treatment in the management of AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Subcutaneous tissue flaps for hallux covering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaienti, Luca; Urzola, Victor; Scotti, Andrea; Masetto, L

    2010-03-01

    With the understanding of the extensive vascular supply of the subcutaneous tissue, of its efficacy in the protection of the anatomical structures and of its capability of promoting the adequate functioning of very stressed regions of the human body, the use of subcutaneous adipose flaps has become a valid and sometimes the only reasonable therapeutic weapon in the treatment of small and medium-sized tissue loss. Such a defect represents a common complication of great toe injuries and surgery. Here subcutaneous flap reconstruction is proposed for the treatment of dorsal and medial soft tissue losses of the hallux complicated with infection. Two case are reported. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this application has not been reported in this anatomical site so far. The technique might be worth knowing both for orthopedic and plastic surgeons, as it may represent a safe, less invasive solution for most tegumentary problems of the dorso-medial side of the first ray.

  14. Patient subgroup analyses of the treatment effect of subcutaneous interferon beta-1a on development of multiple sclerosis in the randomized controlled REFLEX study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freedman, M.S.; De Stefano, N.; Barkhof, F.; Polman, C.H.; Comi, G.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Casset-Semanaz, F.; Hennessy, B.; Lehr, L.; Stubinski, B.; Jack, D.L.; Kappos, L.

    2014-01-01

    The REFLEX study (NCT00404352) established that subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a reduced the risks of McDonald MS (2005 criteria) and clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) in patients with a first clinical demyelinating event suggestive of MS. The aim of this subgroup analysis was to

  15. Validation of a treatment satisfaction questionnaire in non-Hodgkin lymphoma: assessing the change from intravenous to subcutaneous administration of rituximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore-Oklota C

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Christina Theodore-Oklota,1 Louise Humphrey,2 Christof Wiesner,1 Gabriel Schnetzler,3 Stacie Hudgens,4 Alicyn Campbell1 1Genentech, South San Francisco, CA, USA; 2Adelphi Values, Macclesfield, Cheshire, UK; 3F. Hoffmann La-Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland; 4Clinical Outcomes Solutions, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: A subcutaneous (SC formulation of rituximab (MabThera®/Rituxan® has been developed that could reduce administration time and improve patient satisfaction with treatment. The Rituximab Administration Satisfaction Questionnaire (RASQ was created to assess patients’ perceptions and satisfaction with rituximab SC (RASQ-SC or rituximab intravenous (RASQ-IV. We assessed the content validity and psychometric properties of RASQ in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.Methods: Face and content validity of RASQ-SC and RASQ-IV were qualitatively assessed using 60-minute combined concept elicitation and cognitive debriefing interviews. Psychometric validation of RASQ (item performance and reliability was assessed quantitatively against the established Cancer Therapy Satisfaction Questionnaire (CTSQ, using questionnaire data from the PrefMab (NCT01724021 and MabCute (NCT01461928 clinical studies.Results: RASQ-IV demonstrated excellent coverage of concepts relevant to patients’ (n=10 own treatment experiences and no new concepts were identified. Patients’ expectations of rituximab SC were conceptually consistent with items included in the RASQ-SC, suggesting that the tool is also conceptually adequate. In 1,051 patients from PrefMab and MabCute, correlations with domains such as “RASQ: Physical Impacts” and “CTSQ: Feelings About Side Effects”, “RASQ: Physical Impacts” and “CTSQ: Satisfaction With Therapy”, and “RASQ: Satisfaction” and “CTSQ: Satisfaction With Therapy”, achieved moderate-to-high correlations (>0.4 for convergent domains and <0.3 for divergent domains.Conclusion: This study supports the qualitative face and

  16. Subcutaneous and intrahepatic growth of human hepatoblastoma in immunodeficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnater, J. Marco; Bruder, Elisabeth; Bertschin, Sibylle; Woodtli, Thomas; de Theije, Chiel; Pietsch, Torsten; Aronson, Daniel C.; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Lamers, Wouter H.; Köhler, Eleonore S.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Hepatoblastoma is the most frequent malignant pediatric liver tumor. Approximately 25% of hepatoblastoma patients cannot be cured with current treatment protocols. Additional treatment options must, therefore, be developed. Subcutaneous animal models for hepatoblastoma exist, but a

  17. Subcutaneous endoscopically assisted ligation using miniport for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    miniport for the treatment of girls with inguinal hernia. Akinari Hinoki*, Ikeda ... method using subcutaneous endoscopically assisted ligation (SEAL) for the ... the open technique and an additional 2 mm miniport). A ... (unilateral, n = 9) or 42 ± 8 min (bilateral, n = 5). The mean .... Methods of laparoscopic repair have recently ...

  18. Elephantine but not elephantiasis: Subcutaneous zygomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Meenakshi; Arora, Amit; Bhalla, Lucky; Salodkar, Atul

    2011-09-01

    Subcutaneous zygomycosis is an unusual disorder caused by a rare fungus, Basidiobolus ranarum. We report this entity in a 4- yr- old boy. Biopsy showed the Splendore Hoeppli phenomenon and the culture yielded Basidiobolus ranarum. The child responded to saturated solution of potassium iodide within 1 month of starting treatment.

  19. Subcutaneous endoscopically assisted ligation using miniport for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background This report describes the first miniport method using subcutaneous endoscopically assisted ligation (SEAL) for the treatment of girls with inguinal hernia. To validate its safety and efficacy, the authors evaluated their early experiences. Methods Between April 2014 and December 2014, 19 SEALs using miniport ...

  20. Subcutaneous adipose tissue classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sbarbati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The developments in the technologies based on the use of autologous adipose tissue attracted attention to minor depots as possible sampling areas. Some of those depots have never been studied in detail. The present study was performed on subcutaneous adipose depots sampled in different areas with the aim of explaining their morphology, particularly as far as regards stem niches. The results demonstrated that three different types of white adipose tissue (WAT can be differentiated on the basis of structural and ultrastructural features: deposit WAT (dWAT, structural WAT (sWAT and fibrous WAT (fWAT. dWAT can be found essentially in large fatty depots in the abdominal area (periumbilical. In the dWAT, cells are tightly packed and linked by a weak net of isolated collagen fibers. Collagenic components are very poor, cells are large and few blood vessels are present. The deep portion appears more fibrous then the superficial one. The microcirculation is formed by thin walled capillaries with rare stem niches. Reinforcement pericyte elements are rarely evident. The sWAT is more stromal; it is located in some areas in the limbs and in the hips. The stroma is fairly well represented, with a good vascularity and adequate staminality. Cells are wrapped by a basket of collagen fibers. The fatty depots of the knees and of the trochanteric areas have quite loose meshes. The fWAT has a noteworthy fibrous component and can be found in areas where a severe mechanic stress occurs. Adipocytes have an individual thick fibrous shell. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates evident differences among subcutaneous WAT deposits, thus suggesting that in regenerative procedures based on autologous adipose tissues the sampling area should not be randomly chosen, but it should be oriented by evidence based evaluations. The structural peculiarities of the sWAT, and particularly of its microcirculation, suggest that it could represent a privileged source for

  1. [The use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) with personal insulin pumps in the treatment of children and adolescents with diabetes type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2004-01-01

    This paper sums up recently published researches on the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) with the use of insulin pump in children and adolescents with diabetes type 1. Obtaining a balance in the organism metabolism in childhood and adolescence diabetology is nowadays one of the most important rules of the diabetes management in children. One of the modern ways to achieve that goal is the intensive insulin therapy model with use of the insulin pump. In this paper the advantages and disadvantages as well as the indications and contraindications for the CSII in children and adolescents with diabetes are widely discussed.

  2. Treatment of PPROM with anhydramnion in humans: first experience with different amniotic fluid substitutes for continuous amnioinfusion through a subcutaneously implanted port system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchirikov, Michael; Bapayeva, Gauri; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay Sh; Dridi, Yasmina; Harnisch, Ralf; Herrmann, Angelika

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to treat patients with preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM) and anhydramnion using continuous amnioinfusion through a subcutaneously implanted port system. An amniotic fluid replacement port system was implanted in seven patients with PPROM and anhydramnion starting at the 20th week of gestation (range, 14-26 weeks) for long-term amnioinfusion. Saline solutions (2 L/day; Jonosteril(®), Sterofundin(®), isotonic NaCl 0.9% solution, lactated Ringer's solution) and a hypotonic aqueous composition with reduced chloride content similar to the electrolyte concentration of human amniotic fluid were used for the continuous amnioinfusion. The mean duration of the PPROM delivery interval continued for 49 days (range, 9-69 days), with 3 weeks of amnioinfusion via the port system (range, 4-49). The newborns showed no signs of lung hypoplasia. Long-term lavage of the amniotic cavity via a subcutaneously implanted port system in patients with PPROM and anhydramnion may help prolong the pregnancy and avoid fetal lung hypoplasia. A hypotonic aqueous composition with reduced chloride content similar to human amniotic fluid can be safely used for amnioinfusion. Prospective randomized studies are ongoing.

  3. Subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Saeko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Oshitani, Takashi; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Takada, Yoshiki; Kono, Michio; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 233 cases of patients who had undergone whole neck irradiation with 4-MV X-ray or 8-10-MeV electrons, or both, and had been followed with regard to their skin condition for at least 1 year. The prescribed dose to the whole neck ranged from 19.2 to 72.4 Gy (median 50). The skin-absorbed dose was specified as that at a depth of 4.1 mm (d4.1-mm depth ), and a biologically equivalent dose (BED) of d4.1-mm depth was also estimated (BED 1.8 4.1-mm depth ). Results: Univariate analysis revealed that previous neck dissection, concurrent chemotherapy, corticosteroid administration as a part of chemotherapy, fractionation, and BED 1.8 4.1-mm depth were significant prognostic variables. Multivariate analysis showed that BED 1.8 4.1-mm depth and previous neck dissection were the only prognostic variables for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis. Conclusion: A high dose to a 4.1-mm depth of the skin and a history of neck dissection were identified as the predominant risk factors for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation. A subcutaneous dose should be considered in radiotherapy treatment planning involving the whole neck, especially in cases in which patients have undergone previous neck dissection

  4. combined with either subcutaneous or intravenous administration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the time of sponge withdrawal, PMSG was administered either subcutaneously or ... Only the season of treatment had an effect on the percentage ... gestogen and Pregnant Mare Serum Gonackttrophin. (PMSG). ... artificial insemination.

  5. Recombinant human hyaluronidase-enabled subcutaneous pediatric rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Coburn H; Etzwiler, Lisa S; Miller, Melissa K; Maher, George; Mace, Sharon; Hostetler, Mark A; Smith, Sharon R; Reinhardt, Neil; Hahn, Barry; Harb, George

    2009-11-01

    The Increased Flow Utilizing Subcutaneously-Enabled (INFUSE)-Pediatric Rehydration Study was designed to assess efficacy, safety, and clinical utility of recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20)-facilitated subcutaneous rehydration in children 2 months to 10 years of age. Patients with mild/moderate dehydration requiring parenteral treatment in US emergency departments were eligible for this phase IV, multicenter, single-arm study. They received subcutaneous injection of 1 mL rHuPH20 (150 U), followed by subcutaneous infusion of 20 mL/kg isotonic fluid over the first hour. Subcutaneous rehydration was continued as needed for up to 72 hours. Rehydration was deemed successful if it was attributed by the investigator primarily to subcutaneous fluid infusion and the child was discharged without requiring an alternative method of rehydration. Efficacy was evaluated in 51 patients (mean age: 1.9 years; mean weight: 11.2 kg). Initial subcutaneous catheter placement was achieved with 1 attempt for 46/51 (90.2%) of patients. Rehydration was successful for 43/51 (84.3%) of patients. Five patients (9.8%) were hospitalized but deemed to be rehydrated primarily through subcutaneous therapy, for a total of 48/51 (94.1%) of patients. No treatment-related systemic adverse events were reported, but 1 serious adverse event occurred (cellulitis at infusion site). Investigators found the procedure easy to perform for 96% of patients (49/51 patients), and 90% of parents (43/48 parents) were satisfied or very satisfied. rHuPH20-facilitated subcutaneous hydration seems to be safe and effective for young children with mild/moderate dehydration. Subcutaneous access is achieved easily, and the procedure is well accepted by clinicians and parents.

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Subcutaneous Amifostine in Minimizing Radiation-Induced Toxicities in Patients Receiving Combined-Modality Treatment for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Amy; Kennedy, Thomas; Pellitteri, Phillip; Wood, Craig; Christie, Douglas; Yumen, Omar

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report long-term data from a prospective trial of subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in patients who received chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods and Materials: Patients ≥18 years of age with previously untreated Stage III/IV SCCHN received fractionated radiotherapy, 1.8-2.0 Gy/day, 5 days per week, to a total dose of 70-72 Gy, plus weekly paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (100 mg/m 2 ) administered intravenously (i.v.) for 6 weeks. All patients received 500 mg s.c. amifostine 30-60 min before radiotherapy with antihistamine and antiemetic prophylaxis. Results: Twenty patients were evaluable (median age, 55 years). The incidence of Grade 2 xerostomia was 42% and 29% at 12 and 18 months, respectively; there were no reports of Grade ≥3 xerostomia. Grade ≥3 mucositis occurred in 30% of patients, with median time to resolution of 12.5 weeks (range, 5-17 weeks). Survival estimates at 1 and 2 years were 95% and 71%, respectively. All patients experienced Grade 2 weight loss; 7 patients (35%) experienced Grade ≤2 nausea/vomiting. There were no reports of Grade ≥3 amifostine-related adverse events. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine was well tolerated by patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for SCCHN, with lower rates of nausea/vomiting than reported in trials with i.v. amifostine. Xerostomia and mucositis rates were similar to those reported in trials with i.v. amifostine

  7. Cervicofacial subcutaneous air emphysema after dental extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznick, J B; Ardary, W C

    1990-04-01

    A patient was seen by a general practitioner for surgical removal of his third molar. A standard high-speed handpiece was used to remove the tooth. During the procedure, subcutaneous emphysema developed. Later the same day, the patient's swelling increased and his airway was compromised. The patient's condition, the differential diagnosis, etiological factors, and treatment of this condition are all detailed within this clinical report.

  8. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare: radiologic appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kransdorf, M.J.; Murphey, M.D.; Temple, H.T.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. Granuloma annulare is an uncommon benign inflammatory dermatosis characterized by the formation of dermal papules with a tendency to form rings. There are several clinically distinct forms. The subcutaneous form is the most frequently encountered by radiologists, with the lesion presenting as a superficial mass. There are only a few scattered reports of the imaging appearance of this entity in the literature. We report the radiologic appearance of five cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. Design and patients. The radiologic images of five patients (three male, two female) with subcutaneous granuloma annulare were retrospectively studied. Mean patient age was 6.4 years (range, 2-13 years). The lesions occurred in the lower leg (two), foot, forearm, and hand. MR images were available for all lesions, gadolinium-enhanced imaging in three cases, radiographs in four, and bone scintigraphy in one. Results. Radiographs showed unmineralized nodular masses localized to the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The size range, in greatest dimension on imaging studies, was 1-4 cm. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with variable but generally relatively well defined margins. There was extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Conclusion. The radiologic appearance of subcutaneous granuloma annulare is characteristic, typically demonstrating a nodular soft-tissue mass involving the subcutaneous adipose tissue. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences and variable but generally well defined margins. There is extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Radiographs show a soft-tissue mass or soft-tissue swelling without evidence of bone involvement or mineralization. This radiologic appearance in a young individual is highly suggestive of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. (orig.)

  9. [Cellular subcutaneous tissue. Anatomic observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart-Elbaz, C; Varnaison, E; Sick, H; Grosshans, E; Cribier, B

    2001-11-01

    We showed in a companion paper that the definition of the French "subcutaneous cellular tissue" considerably varied from the 18th to the end of the 20th centuries and has not yet reached a consensus. To address the anatomic reality of this "subcutaneous cellular tissue", we investigated the anatomic structures underlying the fat tissue in normal human skin. Sixty specimens were excised from the surface to the deep structures (bone, muscle, cartilage) on different body sites of 3 cadavers from the Institut d'Anatomie Normale de Strasbourg. Samples were paraffin-embedded, stained and analysed with a binocular microscope taking x 1 photographs. Specimens were also excised and fixed after subcutaneous injection of Indian ink, after mechanic tissue splitting and after performing artificial skin folds. The aspects of the deep parts of the skin greatly varied according to their anatomic localisation. Below the adipose tissue, we often found a lamellar fibrous layer which extended from the interlobular septa and contained horizontally distributed fat cells. No specific tissue below the hypodermis was observed. Artificial skin folds concerned either exclusively the dermis, when they were superficial or included the hypodermis, but no specific structure was apparent in the center of the fold. India ink diffused to the adipose tissue, mainly along the septa, but did not localise in a specific subcutaneous compartment. This study shows that the histologic aspects of the deep part of the skin depend mainly on the anatomic localisation. Skin is composed of epidermis, dermis and hypodermis and thus the hypodermis can not be considered as being "subcutaneous". A difficult to individualise, fibrous lamellar structure in continuity with the interlobular septa is often found under the fat lobules. This structure is a cleavage line, as is always the case with loose connective tissues, but belongs to the hypodermis (i.e. fat tissue). No specific tissue nor any virtual space was

  10. Penile Subcutaneous Fibrolipoma Postaugmentative Phalloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizio Vicini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrolipomas are a rare subtype of lipomas. We describe a case of a man suffering from subcutaneous penile fibrolipoma, who three months earlier has been submitted to an augmentative phalloplasty due to aesthetic dysmorphophobia. After six months from the excision of the mass, the penile elongation and penile enlargement were stable, and the patient was satisfied with his sexual intercourse and sexual life. To our knowledge, this is the first reported penile subcutaneous fibrolipoma case in the literature. The diagnostics and surgical features of this case are discussed.

  11. The impact on coagulation of an intravenous loading dose in addition to a subcutaneous regimen of low-molecular-weight heparin in the initial treatment of acute coronary syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijsterveld, Nick R.; Moons, Arno H.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Levi, Marcel; Büller, Harry R.; Peters, Ron J. G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We sought to quantify the impact of adding an intravenous loading dose to a subcutaneous regimen of enoxaparin in patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). BACKGROUND It is unclear whether an intravenous (M loading dose of enoxaparin should be added to a subcutaneous (SQ) regimen in

  12. Comparison of three rapamycin dosing schedules in A/J Tsc2+/- mice and improved survival with angiogenesis inhibitor or asparaginase treatment in mice with subcutaneous tuberous sclerosis related tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabora Sandra L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant tumor disorder characterized by the growth of hamartomas in various organs including the kidney, brain, skin, lungs, and heart. Rapamycin has been shown to reduce the size of kidney angiomyolipomas associated with TSC; however, tumor regression is incomplete and kidney angiomyolipomas regrow after cessation of treatment. Mouse models of TSC2 related tumors are useful for evaluating new approaches to drug therapy for TSC. Methods In cohorts of Tsc2+/- mice, we compared kidney cystadenoma severity in A/J and C57BL/6 mouse strains at both 9 and 12 months of age. We also investigated age related kidney tumor progression and compared three different rapamycin treatment schedules in cohorts of A/J Tsc2+/- mice. In addition, we used nude mice bearing Tsc2-/- subcutaneous tumors to evaluate the therapeutic utility of sunitinib, bevacizumab, vincristine, and asparaginase. Results TSC related kidney disease severity is 5-10 fold higher in A/J Tsc2+/- mice compared with C57BL/6 Tsc2+/- mice. Similar to kidney angiomyolipomas associated with TSC, the severity of kidney cystadenomas increases with age in A/J Tsc2+/- mice. When rapamycin dosing schedules were compared in A/J Tsc2+/- cohorts, we observed a 66% reduction in kidney tumor burden in mice treated daily for 4 weeks, an 82% reduction in mice treated daily for 4 weeks followed by weekly for 8 weeks, and an 81% reduction in mice treated weekly for 12 weeks. In the Tsc2-/- subcutaneous tumor mouse model, vincristine is not effective, but angiogenesis inhibitors (sunitinib and bevacizumab and asparaginase are effective as single agents. However, these drugs are not as effective as rapamycin in that they increased median survival only by 24-27%, while rapamycin increased median survival by 173%. Conclusions Our results indicate that the A/J Tsc2+/- mouse model is an improved, higher through-put mouse model for future TSC

  13. A prospective clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cellulite treatment using the combination of optical and RF energies for subcutaneous tissue heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadick, Neil S; Mulholland, R Stephen

    2004-12-01

    There have not been any published studies on the use of radiofrequency (RF)-light-based technologies for the treatment of cellulite. Only preliminary results have recently been reported (ASDS Proceedings, September 2004). This two-center study investigated the safety and effectiveness of combined energies for cellulite treatment using the VelaSmoothtrade mark system. Thirty-five female subjects with cellulite and/or skin irregularities on the thighs and/or buttocks were treated with the VelaSmooth device. Patients received from eight to 16 treatments twice weekly. All patients maintained their normal lifestyle, and diet and fluid consumption. The circumference of the right and left medial thighs was measured at both baseline and approximately 4 weeks after the last treatment. During the last follow-up visit, the physician graded the level of improvement in skin smoothing and/or cellulite improvement using pre- and post-treatment photographs. Three patients provided biopsy specimens for histological assessment. All study patients showed some level of reduction in thigh circumference after 8 weeks of treatment; indeed, 70% of all patients showed such a reduction after 4 weeks of treatment. Also, 100% of all patients showed some level of improvement in skin texture and cellulite. The mean decrease in circumference was 0.8 inches. Some patients demonstrated reductions of more than 2 inches. There were minimal complications associated with treatment. This preliminary study demonstrates that the VelaSmooth system can have a beneficial effect on cellulite appearance. Further studies are needed to better define the mechanisms by which RF and light energies affect subdermal tissues and develop a method of quantified cellulite analysis.

  14. Effect of 4 years subcutaneous insulin infusion treatment on albuminuria, kidney function and HbA1c compared with multiple daily injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Rosenlund, Signe; Hansen, Tine Willum; Andersen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    injections (MDI) in a single-centre clinical setting. METHODS: All patients initiating CSII treatment from 2004 to 2010 and followed for at least 4 years were included in the study: 193 people with Type 1 diabetes were matched (1 : 2) with 386 patients treated with MDI in the same period. Matching was based...

  15. Ultrasound-guided drainage of subcutaneous abscesses on the trunk is feasible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Søren; Rud, Bo; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Subcutaneous trunk abscesses are frequent, and current treatment options generally involve incision. By contrast, the standard care for breast abcesses is ultrasound-guided drainage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ultrasound-guided drainage combined with antibiotics...... in the treatment of subcutaneous abscesses on the trunk....

  16. Injectable agents affecting subcutaneous fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Lk; Cohen, Joel L; Green, Jeremy B

    2015-09-01

    Mesotherapy is an intradermal or subcutaneous injection of therapeutic agents to induce local effects, and was pioneered in Europe during the 1950s. For the past 2 decades, there has been significant interest in the use of mesotherapy for minimally invasive local fat contouring. Based on the theorized lipolytic effects of the agent phosphatidylcholine, initial attempts involved its injection into subcutaneous tissue. With further studies, however, it became apparent that the activity attributed to phosphatidylcholine mesotherapy was due to the adipolytic effects of deoxycholate, a detergent used to solubilize phosphatidylcholine. Since then, clinical trials have surfaced that demonstrate the efficacy of a proprietary formulation of deoxycholate for local fat contouring. Current trials on mesotherapy with salmeterol, a b-adrenergic agonist and lipolysis stimulator, are underway-with promising preliminary results as well. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  17. Principles of subcutaneous port placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Shaun J; Li, Ruizong

    2011-12-01

    The introduction of totally implantable subcutaneous devices in the early 1980s provided patients with secure, reliable venous access and also gave them the ability to move more freely and have a more normal lifestyle with these devices in place. The most common totally implantable device used today is the subcutaneous port. These ports consist of an injection port connected to a catheter. Ports provide a number of advantages compared with other venous catheters; the most important is the reduced risk of infection. These devices have significantly lower rates of infection than nontunneled and tunneled catheters. Additional advantages include less frequent irrigation and minimal home care, and they are less prone to environmental or cutaneous contamination when not being accessed. This article will focus on the placement of these ports. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Subcutaneous sarcoidosis associated with sarcoid tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzenauer, R J; Waterhouse, W J; West, S G

    1996-10-01

    Subcutaneous sarcoidosis and sarcoid tenosynovitis are unusual manifestations of systemic sarcoidosis. We report two Japanese women with disseminated sarcoidosis presenting with subcutaneous and tenosynovial involvement demonstrated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Sarcoidosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained subcutaneous nodulosis or tenosynovitis in patients with or without a previous diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

  19. Temperature of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue during the application of aerosols in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Andre de Oliveira Teixeira; Cassio Noronha Martins; Antônio Marcos Vargas da Silva; Alexandro Marques Tozetti; Rodrigo Della Méa Plentz; Luis Ulisses Signori

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the thermal changes of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues exposed to different aerosols. Thirty-six adults Wistar rats were arranged in two treatment groups, one exposed to methyl salicylate (GSM; n = 9 skin and n = 9 subcutaneous) and the other exposed to diclofenac diethylammonium (GDD; n = 9 skin and n = 9 subcutaneous) aerosols. Five jets were applied for one-second through an apparatus to reduce spray dispersion (3 cmdiameter) in the lateral left thigh of the animals....

  20. Subcutaneous emphysema during status astmaticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.

    1985-01-01

    Spontaneous subcutaneous accumulations of air in the soft parts of the thorax during an asthmatic crisis (status asthmaticus) are rarely seen. The pathomechanism of the phenomenon, which may lead to the formation of an emphysema of the soft parts via the pneumomediastinum, is discussed, and the possible complications which must be taken into account are pointed out. The value of radiological examination of the thorax in children suffering from asthma bronchiale, is explained briefly. (orig.) [de

  1. Subcutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemp, P.

    1985-01-01

    The simultaneously recorded disappearance rates of 133 xe from subcutaneous adipose tissue in the crus were studied in 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris using atraumatic labeling of the tissue in lesional skin (LS) areas and symmetrical, nonlesional skin (NLS) areas. Control experiments were performed bilaterally in 10 younger, healthy subjects. The subcutaneous washout rate constant was significantly higher in LS, 0.79 +/- 0.05 min-1 x 10(2) compared to the washout rate constant of NLS, 0.56 +/- 0.07 min-1. 10(2), or the washout rate constant in the normal subjects, 0.46 +/- 0.17 min-1 x 10(2). The mean washout rate constant in NLS was 25% higher than the mean washout rate constant in the normal subjects. The difference was, however, not statistically significant. Differences in the washout rate constants might be due to abnormal subcutaneous tissue-to-blood partition (lambda) in the LS--and therefore not reflecting the real differences in the subcutaneous blood flow (SBF). The lambda for 133 Xe was therefore measured--using a double isotope washout method ( 133 Xe and [ 131 I]antipyrine)--in symmetrical sites of the lateral crus in LS and NLS of 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and in 10 legs of normal subjects. In LS the lambda was 4.52 +/- 1.67 ml/g, which was not statistically different from that of NLS, 5.25 +/- 2.19 ml/g, nor from that of normal subcutaneous tissue, 4.98 +/- 1.04 ml/g. Calculations of the SBF using the obtained lambda values gave a significantly higher SBF in LS, 3.57 +/- 0.23 ml/100 g/min, compared to SBF in the NLS, 2.94 +/- 0.37 ml/100 g/min. There was no statistically significant difference between SBF in NLS and SBF in the normal subjects. The increased SBF in LS of psoriatics might be a secondary phenomenon to an increased heat loss in the lesional skin

  2. Estimates of the effect on hepatic iron of oral deferiprone compared with subcutaneous desferrioxamine for treatment of iron overload in thalassemia major: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caro J

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta thalassemia major requires regular blood transfusions and iron chelation to alleviate the harmful accumulation of iron. Evidence on the efficacy and safety of the available agents, desferrioxamine and deferiprone, is derived from small, non-comparative, heterogeneous observational studies. This evidence was reviewed to quantitatively compare the ability of these chelators to reduce hepatic iron. Methods The literature was searched using Medline and all reports addressing the effect of either chelator on hepatic iron were considered. Data were abstracted independently by two investigators. Analyses were performed using reported individual patient data. Hepatic iron concentrations at study end and changes over time were compared using ANCOVA, controlling for initial iron load. Differences in the proportions of patients improving were tested using χ2. Results Eight of 11 reports identified provided patient-level data relating to 30 desferrioxamine- and 68 deferiprone-treated patients. Desferrioxamine was more likely than optimal dose deferiprone to decrease hepatic iron over the average follow-up of 45 months (odds ratio, 19.0, 95% CI, 2.4 to 151.4. The degree of improvement was also larger with desferrioxamine. Conclusions This analysis suggests that desferrioxamine is more effective than deferiprone in lowering hepatic iron. This comparative analysis – despite its limitations – should prove beneficial to physicians faced with the challenge of selecting the optimal treatment for their patients.

  3. Switching between intravenous and subcutaneous trastuzumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gligorov, Joseph; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Müller, Volkmar

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety and tolerability of switching between subcutaneous (SC) and intravenous (IV) trastuzumab in the PrefHer study (NCT01401166). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer completed (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy and were randomised to receive four...... cycles of SC trastuzumab, via single-use injection device (SID; Cohort 1) or hand-held syringe (Cohort 2), followed by four cycles of IV, or vice versa (the crossover period presented here) as part of their 18 standard cycles of adjuvant trastuzumab treatment. Adverse events (AEs) were reported using....... Rates of clinically important events, including grade ≥3 AEs, serious AEs, AEs leading to study drug discontinuation and cardiac AEs, were low and similar between treatment arms (trastuzumab were observed. CONCLUSIONS: PrefHer revealed...

  4. Subcutaneous Injection of Adalimumab Trial compared with Control (SCIATiC): a randomised controlled trial of adalimumab injection compared with placebo for patients receiving physiotherapy treatment for sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nefyn H; Jenkins, Alison; Goulden, Nia; Hoare, Zoe; Hughes, Dyfrig A; Wood, Eifiona; Foster, Nadine E; Walsh, David A; Carnes, Dawn; Sparkes, Valerie; Hay, Elaine M; Isaacs, John; Konstantinou, Kika; Morrissey, Dylan; Karppinen, Jaro; Genevay, Stephane; Wilkinson, Clare

    2017-10-01

    Biological treatments such as adalimumab (Humira ® ; AbbVie Ltd, Maidenhead, UK) are antibodies targeting tumour necrosis factor alpha, released from ruptured intervertebral discs, which might be useful in sciatica. Recent systematic reviews concluded that they might be effective, but that a definitive randomised controlled trial was needed. Usual care in the NHS typically includes a physiotherapy intervention. To test whether or not injections of adalimumab plus physiotherapy are more clinically effective and cost-effective than injections of saline plus physiotherapy for patients with sciatica. Pragmatic, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial with blinded participants and clinicians, and an outcome assessment and statistical analysis with concurrent economic evaluation and internal pilot. Participants were referred from primary care and musculoskeletal services to outpatient physiotherapy clinics. Adults with persistent symptoms of sciatica of 1-6 months' duration and with moderate to high levels of disability. Eligibility was assessed by research physiotherapists according to clinical criteria for diagnosing sciatica. After a second eligibility check, trial participants were randomised to receive two doses of adalimumab (80 mg and then 40 mg 2 weeks later) or saline injections. Both groups were referred for a course of physiotherapy. Outcomes were measured at the start, and after 6 weeks' and 6 months' follow-up. The main outcome measure was the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Other outcomes: leg pain version of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Sciatica Bothersomeness Index, EuroQol-5 Dimensions, 5-level version, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, resource use, risk of persistent disabling pain, pain trajectory based on a single question, Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia and adverse effects. To detect an effect size of 0.4 with 90% power, a 5% significance level for a two-tailed t -test and 80% retention

  5. Pneumoperitoneum with Subcutaneous Emphysema after Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Iscan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is a safe way for enteral nutrition in selected patients. Generally, complications of this procedure are very rare but due to patients general health condition, delayed diagnosis and treatment of complications can be life threatening. In this study, we present a PEG-related massive pneumoperitoneum and subcutaneous emphysema in a patient with neuro-Behçet.

  6. Relapse outcomes, safety, and treatment patterns in patients diagnosed with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and initiated on subcutaneous interferon β-1a or dimethyl fumarate: a real-world study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Frank R; Barr, Peri; Elmor, Riad; Wong, Schiffon L

    2017-12-01

    To estimate real-world treatment patterns, safety, and relapse outcomes of subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a (Rebif) vs dimethyl fumarate (DMF; Tecfidera), to treat relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). A US retrospective chart review of 450 randomly selected adults newly diagnosed with RRMS who received sc IFN β-1a (n = 143) or DMF (n = 307) was conducted. Patients were either (a) treatment-naïve, initiating first-line treatment with sc IFN β-1a or DMF, or (b) previously treated, switching to sc IFN β-1a or DMF. Two years' follow-up data were captured. Patient characteristics, persistence, and adverse events between treatment groups were compared using t-tests or Chi-square tests. Kaplan-Meier curves with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare time to, and risk of non-persistence. Annualized Relapse Rates (ARR) were calculated using a robust variance Poisson model adjusting for covariates. Propensity scores were used to address possible selection bias. One hundred and twelve patients became non-persistent, most commonly due to an adverse event (n = 37). No difference was observed in time to overall non-persistence between sc IFN β-1a and DMF patients. Among treatment-naïve patients, those receiving DMF had 2.4-times the risk (HR = 2.439, 95% CI = 1.007-5.917, p = .0483) of experiencing a discontinuation than patients receiving sc IFN β-1a. Non-persistent patients receiving DMF had 2.3-times the risk (HR = 2.311, 95% CI = 1.350-3.958, p = .0023) of experiencing an adverse event at a given time point than patients prescribed sc IFN β-1a. No differences in relapse risk or ARR between sc IFN β-1a- and DMF-treated patients were observed. sc IFN β-1a-treated patients had comparable persistence and relapse outcomes, and better safety outcomes vs DMF-treated patients across 2 years.

  7. Management of extensive surgical emphysema with subcutaneous drain: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quoc Tran

    Full Text Available Introduction: Subcutaneous emphysema (SE is a frequent and often self-limiting complication of tube thoracostomy or other cardiothoracic procedures. On rare occasions, severe and extensive surgical emphysema marked by palpable cutaneous tension, dysphagia, dysphonia, palpebral closure or associated with pneumoperitoneum, airway compromise, “tension phenomenon” and respiratory failure require treatment. Presentation of case: A 67 year old lady presented with a large spontaneous pneumothorax on the background of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and newly diagnosed lung cancer, developed extensive surgical emphysema following insertion of a chest drain. Immediate improvement was observed after insertion of a large-bore, 26 French (Fr. intercostal catheter, subcutaneous drain which was maintained under low suction (−5 cm H2O for a further 24 h. Discussion: Several methods have been described in the literature for the treatment of extensive subcutaneous emphysema, including: emergency tracheostomy, multisite subcutaneous drainage, infraclavicular “blow holes” incisions and subcutaneous drains or simply increasing suction on an in situ chest drain. Here a large-bore, fenestrated, subcutaneous drain maintained on low negative pressure also provided the necessary decompression. Conclusion: In the absence of a comparative study to identify the most effective method to manage extensive subcutaneous emphysema, this case highlights an effective, simple and safe management option. Keywords: Pneumothorax, Subcutaneous emphysema, Drain, Low suction, Intercostal catheter, Case report

  8. Subcutaneous metastasis from endometrial cancer; case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Bacalbasa

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous metastases from endometrial cancer are rare situations, only few cases being described so far. The main incriminated mechanisms leading to the apparition of such lesions include hematogenous and lymphatic spread. We present the case of a 66-year-old patient known with previous history of stage IIIA endometroid endometrial carcinoma initially treated by surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy who developed at 18 months follow-up a distant subcutaneous oligometastasis. At this time the patient was resubmitted to surgery, the lesion being successfully removed. The histopathological result confirmed the endometrial cancer origin of this lesion. Subcutaneous and cutaneous metastases from endometrial cancer are rare eventualities which are usually diagnosed as part of systemic dissemination of this malignancy; in these cases, the patient is only candidate for oncological treatment with palliative intent. In some cases, in which the lesions occur as oligometastatic disease, surgery might be performed with curative intent. In our case the diagnostic of the subcutaneous lesion as oligometastatic disease transformed the patient in a perfect candidate for curative oncological surgery.

  9. FAST: Towards safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy of persistent life-threatening food allergies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.; Neubauer, Angela; Asturias, Juan; Blom, Lars; Boye, Joyce; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Clausen, Michael; Ferrara, Rosa; Garosi, Paula; Huber, Hans; Jensen, Bettina M.; Koppelman, Stef; Kowalski, Marek L.; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Maillere, Bernard; Mari, Adriano; Martinez, Alberto; Mills, Clare En; Nicoletti, Claudio; Opstelten, Dirk-Jan; Papadopoulos, Nikos G.; Portoles, Antonio; Rigby, Neil; Scala, Enrico; Schnoor, Heidi J.; Sigursdottir, Sigurveig; Stavroulakis, Georg; Stolz, Frank; Swoboda, Ines; Valenta, Rudolf; van den Hout, Rob; Versteeg, Serge A.; Witten, Marianne; van Ree, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections with

  10. Characterizing ncRNAs in human pathogenic protists using high-throughput sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Joan Collins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are key genes in many human diseases including cancer and viral infection, as well as providing critical functions in pathogenic organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses and protists. Until now the identification and characterization of ncRNAs associated with disease has been slow or inaccurate requiring many years of testing to understand complicated RNA and protein gene relationships. High-throughput sequencing now offers the opportunity to characterize miRNAs, siRNAs, snoRNAs and long ncRNAs on a genomic scale making it faster and easier to clarify how these ncRNAs contribute to the disease state. However, this technology is still relatively new, and ncRNA discovery is not an application of high priority for streamlined bioinformatics. Here we summarize background concepts and practical approaches for ncRNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing, and how it relates to understanding human disease. As a case study, we focus on the parasitic protists Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, where large evolutionary distance has meant difficulties in comparing ncRNAs with those from model eukaryotes. A combination of biological, computational and sequencing approaches has enabled easier classification of ncRNA classes such as snoRNAs, but has also aided the identification of novel classes. It is hoped that a higher level of understanding of ncRNA expression and interaction may aid in the development of less harsh treatment for protist-based diseases.

  11. Characterizing ncRNAs in Human Pathogenic Protists Using High-Throughput Sequencing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Lesley Joan

    2011-01-01

    ncRNAs are key genes in many human diseases including cancer and viral infection, as well as providing critical functions in pathogenic organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and protists. Until now the identification and characterization of ncRNAs associated with disease has been slow or inaccurate requiring many years of testing to understand complicated RNA and protein gene relationships. High-throughput sequencing now offers the opportunity to characterize miRNAs, siRNAs, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), and long ncRNAs on a genomic scale, making it faster and easier to clarify how these ncRNAs contribute to the disease state. However, this technology is still relatively new, and ncRNA discovery is not an application of high priority for streamlined bioinformatics. Here we summarize background concepts and practical approaches for ncRNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing, and how it relates to understanding human disease. As a case study, we focus on the parasitic protists Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, where large evolutionary distance has meant difficulties in comparing ncRNAs with those from model eukaryotes. A combination of biological, computational, and sequencing approaches has enabled easier classification of ncRNA classes such as snoRNAs, but has also aided the identification of novel classes. It is hoped that a higher level of understanding of ncRNA expression and interaction may aid in the development of less harsh treatment for protist-based diseases. PMID:22303390

  12. A phase I study of concurrent 9-nitro-20(s)-camptothecin (9NC/Orathecin) and radiation therapy in the treatment of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedesco, Karen L.; Berlin, Jordan; Rothenberg, Mace; Choy, Hak; Wyman, Ken; Scott Pearson, Adrian; Daniel Beauchamp, Robert; Merchant, Nipun; Craig Lockhart, A.; Shyr, Yu; Caillouette, Carol; Chakravarthy, Bapsi

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: In vitro studies have suggested that 9-nitro-20(s)-Camptothecin (9NC/Orathecin/Rubitecan) can enhance the effects of radiation. We conducted a phase I study to assess the toxicity and determine the maximum tolerated dose of 9NC when combined with radiation in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Patients and methods: Eleven patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas received 9NC, orally during radiation. Radiation therapy consisted of 45 Gy in 25 fractions given over 5 weeks. The starting dose of 9NC was 1 mg/m 2 /day. Results: Eight patients received 9NC at a dose of 1 mg/m 2 /day and three patients received a dose of 1.25 mg/m 2 /day. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as ≥grade 3 non-hematologic toxicity and ≥grade 4 hematologic toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity of grade 3 nausea/vomiting developed in one patient at the first dose level. At dose level 2, two of three patients developed DLT. Both developed grade 3 nausea, fatigue, and anorexia. Additionally, one of these patients had grade 3 dehydration and the other had grade 4 leukopenia, grade 3 vomiting, and grade 3 weakness. Conclusions: 9NC, 1 mg/m 2 /day, can be given concurrently with radiation with acceptable toxicity

  13. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by cladophialophora boppii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Rickson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is an infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, caused by dematiaceous fungi. An adult male presented with a history of multiple reddish nodules over the face and hands. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsies showed a dense granulomatous infiltrate of macrophages, containing intracytoplasmic basophilic bodies throughout the dermis. Gomori methenamine-silver stained sections revealed yeast cells within macrophages. Multiple cultures on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar grew Cladophialophora boppii. The patient was treated with oral itraconazole for a year and the response monitored with dermal ultrasound. This is the first case report of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by Cl. boppii in India.

  14. Massive Preperitoneal Hematoma after a Subcutaneous Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Katagiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preperitoneal hematomas are rare and can develop after surgery or trauma. A 74-year-old woman, receiving systemic anticoagulation, developed a massive preperitoneal hematoma after a subcutaneous injection of teriparatide using a 32-gauge, 4 mm needle. In this patient, there were two factors, the subcutaneous injection of teriparatide and systemic anticoagulation, associated with development of the hematoma. These two factors are especially significant, because they are widely used clinically. Although extremely rare, physicians must consider this potentially life-threatening complication after subcutaneous injections, especially in patients receiving anticoagulation.

  15. Primary Kaposi sarcoma of the subcutaneous tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezube Bruce J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Involvement of the subcutis by Kaposi sarcoma (KS occurs primarily when cutaneous KS lesions evolve into deep penetrating nodular tumors. Primary KS of the subcutaneous tissue is an exceptional manifestation of this low-grade vascular neoplasm. Case presentation We present a unique case of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-associated KS manifesting primarily in the subcutaneous tissue of the anterior thigh in a 43-year-old male, which occurred without overlying visible skin changes or concomitant KS disease elsewhere. Radiological imaging and tissue biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of KS. Conclusion This is the first documented case of primary subcutaneous KS occurring in the setting of AIDS. The differential diagnosis of an isolated subcutaneous lesion in an human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individual is broad, and requires both imaging and a histopathological diagnosis to guide appropriate therapy.

  16. Recurrent, giant subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the thigh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Chuanping, MD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of recurrent, massive subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma involving the left thigh in a 29-year-old male from Madagascar. The patient had earlier undergone local resection of subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma a half year before. After surgical intervention, local recurrence developed at this site and was rapidly growing. The patient was surgically treated with a 2-cm-wide margin local excision in our hospital. The patient has remained recurrence free at 1-year follow-up.

  17. Safety of subcutaneous microinjections (mesotherapy) in musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarte, Danik Arana; Rosset-Llobet, Jaume

    2011-06-01

    Determine the safety and tolerance of mesotherapy as a technique for the treatment of musculoskeletal complaints in musicians. 67 patients (55.2% women) were subjected to a total of 267 mesotherapy sessions. A mesotherapy needle or normal needle was used randomly. The drugs employed were thiocolchicoside and diazepam as muscular relaxants, pentoxifylline or buflomedil as vasodilators, and piroxicam as an anti-inflammatory, as directed. A visual analogue scale was used to quantify the pain produced by the microinjections as well as the degree of immediate and midterm side effects as reported on a standard questionnaire. A mean of 155.5 microinjections were performed per session, of which 45.6% were perceived as painful by the patient with a mean severity of 4.3 out of 10. The pain reduced to 0.5 out of 10 after 24 hours. The most sensitive areas were the levator scapulae and splenius muscles. Systemic symptoms were reported by 5.99% of the musicians after the mesotherapy sessions (muscular weakness 1.5%, rash 1.5%, drowsiness 1.1% and itching 1.1%, being the most frequent). The mean severity of these symptoms was 2.77 out of 10. In all cases the symptoms had completely disappeared after 24 hours. No patient referred to signs of local or systemic infection. The application of drugs by means of subcutaneous injections (mesotherapy) in musicians is a technique that is safe, well tolerated, and without any severe complications.

  18. The first reported case of canine subcutaneous Cryptococcus flavescens infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Rui; Ishida, Rinei; Nakane, Shinsuke; Sekiguchi, Maiko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    This report describes the first documented case of subcutaneous infection due to Cryptococcus flavescens in a dog. The chief symptoms of the patient dog were abscessed lesions on the dorsal muzzle, right eyelid, and lower jaw. Biopsy specimens from the lesions on the dorsal muzzle and lower jaw showed pyogranulomatous inflammation with numerous yeast cells. The patient dog was diagnosed with a subcutaneous fungal infection and orally received 5 mg/kg itraconazole once a day for 2 months, the abscesses disappeared. After 1 month at the end of treatment, the skin lesions did not redevelop. Isolates from the biopsy specimens were identified as C. flavescens by molecular analysis as well as morphologic and biochemical examination, indicating that C. flavescens is a potential canine pathogen.

  19. A Rare Case Report of Subcutaneous Mycoses by Rhytidhysteron Rufulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Sarita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is a term to describe cutaneous and systemic or disseminated mycoses caused by a variety of dematiaceous fungi. Rhytidhysteron rufulum is a poorly known, common, pantropical phaeoid fungal species, and are rare human pathogens. Here, we describe a clinical case report of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis; to the best of our knowledge, this is the fourth report of infection with the Rhytidhysteron rufulum. A 54-year-old male presented to medicine outpatient department with complaints of respiratory distress. The patient was diagnosed as a case of chronic bronchitis with acute exacerbation. On examination, a well-defined soft subcutaneous swelling was detected on anterior aspect of right leg. The molecular identification revealed its homology with Rhytidhysteron rufulum. The phaeohyphomycotic infections are increasingly reported globally. This case highlights the need of awareness and high degree of suspicion for fungal aetiology, so that an early and adequate treatment can be given in such cases.

  20. Surgical Management of Gynecomastia: Subcutaneous Mastectomy and Liposuction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hwa; Byun, Il Hwan; Lee, Won Jai; Rah, Dong Kyun; Kim, Ji Ye; Lee, Dong Won

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of gynecomastia depends on multiple factors, and the best modality is controversial. In this study, we aimed to determine the best management approach by comparing outcomes of two groups of patients with gynecomastia who received subcutaneous mastectomy combined with liposuction and liposuction only. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 64 patients who underwent surgery for gynecomastia. We divided the patients into two groups: group A, patients who underwent liposuction only; and group B, patients who underwent liposuction and subcutaneous mastectomy. The serial photographs of all patients were clinically evaluated with respect to size, shape, scarring, and overall outcome by three plastic surgeons, and patient satisfaction was surveyed with regard to palpable lumps, size, shape, scarring, and overall outcome. Of the 64 subjects, 16 received liposuction only, and 48 received the combination procedure. A total of 125 breasts were involved. The doctors' scores for size and overall outcome were significantly better in the combination group, whereas scarring was better in the liposuction-only group. Similarly, patient satisfaction regarding size was significantly higher in the combination group, and satisfaction regarding scarring was significantly higher in the liposuction-only group. The scores for scarring in the combination treatment group were acceptable. Our study shows that combination treatment with liposuction and subcutaneous mastectomy results in satisfactory outcomes, including the extent of scarring. We conclude that this combination treatment should be recommended as the standard surgical treatment for gynecomastia and can provide excellent results in cases where glandular tissue needs to be removed. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www

  1. Intramuscular versus Subcutaneous Administration of Iron Dextran in Suckling Piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Svoboda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare the development of red blood cell indices after subcutaneous versus intramuscular administration of iron dextran to suckling piglets during early postnatal period. The piglets in group I (n = 17 were injected subcutaneously (into groin with 200 mg Fe3+ as iron dextran on day 3 of life. In group II (n = 16, the piglets received intramuscular injection (into gluteal muscles of 200 mg Fe3+ as iron dextran on day 3 of life. In group III (n = 10, the piglets did not receive any iron till the age of 3 days. The blood was taken and analyzed (Hb, PCV, RBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC, Fe on days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. Haematological indices of piglets in group III were characteristic for hypochromic anaemia. Anaemia in group III had a detrimental effect on the growth rate of piglets. The development of red blood cell indices and iron concentration in blood plasma in subcutaneously treated piglets did not differ significantly from that of intramuscularly-treated group. Both treatments prevented development of anaemia.

  2. Subcutaneous emphysema of the upper extremity following penetrating blackthorn injury to the wrist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, W H C

    2009-02-01

    SUMMARY: Noninfective subcutaneous emphysema of the upper extremity, albeit rare, has to be borne in mind when treating patients with subcutaneous emphysema. The misdiagnosis of this condition as its serious infective counterpart often leads to unnecessary aggressive treatment. Noninfective subcutaneous emphysema often accompanies a patient who has no systemic symptoms of illness. Unfortunately, the distinction is not always easy especially when history of injury suggests involvement of an infective or reactive element. Penetrating blackthorn injury is common, especially in rural communities, and often occurs from farming or gardening activities. Blackthorn penetration can cause numerous tissue reactions once embedded under the skin and they are often contaminated with soil. Here we present, for the first time, a case where penetrating blackthorn injury to the wrist resulted in noninfective subcutaneous emphysema involving the whole upper limb and neck, and its subsequent management.

  3. 33 CFR 80.525 - Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.525 Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear... southeast side of the Inlet. (g) Except as provided elsewhere in this section from Cape Lookout to Cape Fear...

  4. Ultrasonographic Findings of Subcutaneous and Muscular Sparganosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Jin; Park, Noh Hyuck; Lee, Eun Ja; Park, Chan Sub; Lee, Sung Moon; Park, Sung Il

    2009-01-01

    This study was deigned to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of subcutaneous and intramuscular sparganosis. Nine cases of histologically proven subcutaneous and intramuscular sparganosis lesions in seven patients (mean patient age, 59 years; M:F = 6:1) were reviewed retrospectively. Two patients had recurrent sparganosis. A color Doppler examination was performed in all cases. A prior history of ingestion of raw snake meat was noted for two patients. Patients presented with a palpable mass and induration (n = 7) and dull pain (n = 4). Lesion locations were in the thigh (n = 4), lower leg (n = 2), chest wall (n = 1), an inguinal location (n = 1) and the neck (n = 1). Five lesions were in the subcutaneous fat layer and four lesions had intramuscular locations. Calcification was noted in two cases. All cases showed heterogeneous hypoechoic serpiginous tubular-and-oval lesions. The lesions were conglomerated or discrete in appearance. All nine cases showed the presence of lesions with a multi-layered wall with variable intraluminal echogenicity, at least in one segment of the lesion. Increased vascularity was noted on color Doppler examinations in two patients with pain. Subcutaneous or intramuscular sparganosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when a serpiginous tubular-and-oval lesion is noted that is seen with a multi-layered wall with variable intraluminal echogenicity

  5. Case Report Pneumomediastinum and Subcutaneous Emphysema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oxygen may enhance faster absorption of air from extra-pulmonary tissues while needle aspiration and/ or surgical decompression may be useful if mediastinal structures are compressed [2,9,]. Conclusion. Extra-pulmonary extravasations of air manifested as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum.

  6. Subcutaneous emphysema, a different way to diagnose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno José da Costa Medeiros

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Subcutaneous emphysema (SE is a clinical condition that occurs when air gets into soft tissues under the skin. This can occur in any part of the body depending on the type of pathology. The most common site is under the skin that covers the chest wall or neck. It is characterized by painless swelling of tissues. The classic clinical sign is a crackling sensation upon touch, resembling that of touching a sponge beneath your fingers. Objective: To describe a new way to diagnose subcutaneous emphysema. Method: Our finding was a matter of serendipity while inspecting a patient with subcutaneous emphysema using a stethoscope. Instead only hearing the patient's chest, the stethoscope was gently pressed against the skin with SE and so we were able to detect a different sound. Results: This new way to diagnose subcutaneous emphysema consists in pressing the diaphragm part of stethoscope against the patient's skin where SE is supposed to be. Thus, we are able to hear a sound of small bubbles bursting. Crackle noise has an acoustic emission energy that varies between 750-1,200 Hz, considered high frequency. Conclusion: Although currently the use of imaging methods is widespread worldwide, we would like to strengthen the value of clinical examination. Auscultation is an essential diagnostic method that has become underestimated with the advances of healthcare and medicine as a whole. We therefore propose a different approach to diagnose SE.

  7. Case Report: Pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous cervical emphysema as complications of childhood pneumonia is very unusual. They results most often from respiratory manoeuvres that produce high intrathoracic pressure. Although they are largely benign, pneumomediastinum can cause compression of major ...

  8. Anthropometrical Profile, Skinfold Tickness and Subcutaneous Fat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The threatening health problems resulting from excess subcutaneous fat depositions have been reported by the world Health Organization. Also noteworthy is that childhood obesity is a pointer to adult obesity. This necessitated a study on the anthropometrical profiles of adolescents of Southeast Nigeria using ...

  9. Subcutaneous infusion in palliative care: a focus on the neria soft 90 infusion set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Janice

    2014-11-01

    Subcutaneous administration of medications and/or fluids can play a crucial part in supporting patients at home and thereby avoiding the need for hospitalisation. It is an area of patient care that has received little attention compared with other types of parenteral therapies. However, it is an effective and safe route for continuous administration for individuals requiring palliative care. Technological advancements have led to improved subcutaneous infusion devices, such as fine-gauge cannulae with integral sharps protection, as well as integral hypoallergenic dressings. These design features not only help to increase patient comfort but also minimise the potential for needlestick injuries, as well as providing the health professional with one sterile package containing all of the components needed to establish subcutaneous infusion. However, technological developments alone are insufficient to improve patient outcomes. Knowledge of the individual patient, together with their diagnosis and intended treatment, will influence the choice of subcutaneous infusion device, with the overall aim of minimising the potential for complications and improving comfort. This paper provides an overview of subcutaneous infusion, including the importance of patient assessment and the education and training needs of health professionals, and then focuses on one specific subcutaneous infusion device: the neria soft 90 infusion set.

  10. Temperature of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue during the application of aerosols in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre de Oliveira Teixeira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the thermal changes of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues exposed to different aerosols. Thirty-six adults Wistar rats were arranged in two treatment groups, one exposed to methyl salicylate (GSM; n = 9 skin and n = 9 subcutaneous and the other exposed to diclofenac diethylammonium (GDD; n = 9 skin and n = 9 subcutaneous aerosols. Five jets were applied for one-second through an apparatus to reduce spray dispersion (3 cmdiameter in the lateral left thigh of the animals. Temperatures were measured every minute (min. during 30 min., with a digital thermometer. In the skin tissue the sensor was positioned manually, in the subcutaneous tissue it was surgically inserted through the rear face and positioned in the lateral thigh. The skin temperature has homogeneously reduced in both groups. In the subcutaneous tissue the GDD has induced hypothermia from the 2nd to 20th min., the lowest temperature was recorded on the 7th min. (-3.6 ± 0.2ºC in relation to basal. Lowering the temperature by GSM took place from the 1st to 21st min, and the lowest temperature occurred on the 1st min (-9.7 ± 0.5ºC in relation to basal. In the three initial minutes the GSM had temperatures 25, 10 and 5% lower than the GDD. Aerosols have induced hypothermia in the tissues, while the GSM has decreased faster and reached lower values of temperature shown in the subcutaneous tissue.

  11. Treatment of Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes with Oligo-/Anhydramnion Colonized by Multiresistant Bacteria with Continuous Amnioinfusion and Antibiotic Administrations through a Subcutaneously Implanted Intrauterine Port System: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchirikov, Michael; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Winarno, Andreas Suhartoyo; Haase, Roland; Buchmann, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial infection is one of the main causes of preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) leading to preterm delivery, pulmonary hypoplasia, sepsis and joint deformities. Expectant management, broad-spectrum antibiotics and antenatal corticosteroids are routinely used in this condition with very limited success to prevent bacteremia, chorioamnionitis, funisitis and intra-amniotic infection syndrome. Here, we report a case in which we attempted to treat PPROM at 26+3 weeks of gestation with anhydramnion colonized by multiresistant Klebsiella. A perinatal port system was implanted subcutaneously at 28+0 weeks of gestation, enabling long-term continuous lavage of the amniotic cavity with a hypotonic aqueous composition similar to human amniotic fluid combined with intra-amniotic antibiotic application. The patient gave birth to a preterm female infant at 31+1 weeks without any signs of infection. The girl was discharged with a weight of 2,730 g in very good condition. In the follow-up examinations at 5 months and 1 year of age, there was no apparent neurological disturbance, developmental delay or Klebsiella colonization. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Different fattening systems of Iberian pigs according to the 1-alkene hydrocarbon content in the subcutaneous fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera-Alcaide, I.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The n-Alkene content in samples of subcutaneous fat corresponding to 755 castrated male Iberian pigs has been determined by an off-line combination of HPLC and GC method. The samples corresponded to three groups based on the type of feeding during the finish fattening period (“Montanera”, fed on acorns and pasture; “Recebo”, fed on acorns, feed and pasture; and “Cebo”, fed on feed and pasture. By using the n-alkenes as chemical descriptors, multivariate statistical techniques were applied to differentiate between the three fattening diet types for Iberian pigs. The most differentiating variables were n-C16:1, n-C18:1, n-C22:1 and n-C24:1. However, a clear classification of the samples was not achieved. The level of classification was improved when the data corresponding to the animals fed with the “Recebo” fattening diet was removed from the analysis. A relationship between n-C14:1, n-C16:1 and n-C18:1 levels and the slaughter period was found to be very low for the animals fed with the “Cebo” fattening diet when the animals had not been closely managed and pasture had not been included in their fattening diet.El contenido de n-alquenos de la grasa subcutánea de 755 muestras procedentes de cerdos ibéricos machos, se ha determinado mediante combinación off-line de los métodos HPLC y GC. Las muestras correspondían a tres grupos según el tipo de alimentación en el período final de engorde (“Montanera”, alimentados con bellota y pasto; “Recebo”, alimentados con bellota, pasto y pienso; y “Cebo”, alimentados con pienso y pasto. Usando los n-alquenos como descriptores químicos, se aplicaron técnicas de análisis multivariante para diferenciar entre los tres tipos de alimentación de cerdo ibérico. Se encontró que las variables más diferenciadores fueron n-C16:1, n-C18:1, n-C22:1 y n-C24:1. Sin embargo, el total de las muestras no están clasificadas, mejorando el nivel de clasificación cuando se eliminan

  13. [Using the subcutaneous approach for symptoms control in a health center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual López, L; Portaceli Armiñana, A; Ros Sáez, A

    2001-01-01

    To describe the use of the subcutaneous tract for symptoms control in patients those are in phase of palliative treatment of their illness. Observational study. Primary care. Patients seen in a health center, in phase of palliative treatment of their illness, that needed for symptoms control the subcutaneous administration of drugs. Most of the patients were in terminal phase (19), the fundamental cause (17 cases) that justified the use of the subcutaneous tract was the difficulty to take drugs by oral tract in the last days of life, attention on death throes. The infusion continuous through injector type travenol, at an infusion speed of 2 ml/h, it was the most common way of drug administration (19 patients). The drugs and initial average dose most used were: morphine 19 patients dose 100 mg/24 h, hyoscine butylbromide (Buscapina), 13 patients, 60 mg/24 h, haloperidol 12 patients, 4 mg/24 h. The patients death was the main cause that justified the retirement of the continuous infusion (17 people sick), happening in its own home. Symptoms control was good or very good in the most of patients (14). The experience on using the subcutaneous tract for symptoms control in our health center is positive, being the fundamental cause for its use symptoms control in the last days of the patients life. The continuous subcutaneous infusion should be used in primary attention, as an usual technique for the symptoms control in patients that are in phase of palliative treatment of their illness.

  14. Subcutaneous emphysema in cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis without pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Dixit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-alveolar air in the form of subcutaneous tissue emphysema is observed in a variety of clinical settings. Spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema in the absence of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum is very rare. We report a case of spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema secondary to cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis in the absence of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum.

  15. Peripheral subcutaneous vulvar stimulation in the management of severe and refractory vulvodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andres, Jose; Sanchis-Lopez, Nerea; Asensio-Samper, Juan Marcos; Fabregat-Cid, Gustavo; Dolz, Vicente Molsalve

    2013-02-01

    Vulvodynia is a complex and multifactorial clinical condition with severe pain that occurs in the absence of visible infectious, inflammatory, neoplastic, or neurological findings. A 35-year-old woman with 3 years of dysesthetic vulvodynia tried conventional and interventional medical treatment with inadequate relief. She was offered peripheral subcutaneous vulvar field stimulation and underwent implantation of two vulvar subcutaneous electrodes. At 15 days after treatment and during 1-year follow-up, the patient scored 1 out of 15 on Friedrich scale, 1 out of 10 on the visual analog scale, and 1 out of 10 on the tampon test. The patient no longer requires oral medication. Stimulation with subcutaneous electrodes provided relief from vulvodynia to a patient in whom all previous therapeutic approaches had failed.

  16. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - Demo (Parent)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Durham, NC EnviroAtlas Area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  17. Subcutaneous versus subcutaneous and intraperitoneal local anaesthetic in the management of post appendicectomy pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, K.Z.; Gondal, Z.I.; Raza, A.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of subcutaneous only and combined subcutaneous and peritoneal infiltration of 0.5% bupivacaine during appendicectomy for the management of early post operative pain. Study Design: Randomized controlled study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery, CMH Kohat from 13th December 2007 to 20th December 2008. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients of a cute appendicitis, divided into two groups of 30 each, were included in the study. Group A was given 0.5% bupivacaine subcutaneously, whereas group B was given the anaesthetic subcutaneously as well as intraperitoneally during appendectomy. Results: In group A, 24 (80%) were VAS (visual analoguescoring) 3 (uncomfortable) and 6 (20%) were VAS 2 (mild pain) whereas in study group B, 11 (36.6%) were VAS 3, 19 (63.3%) were VAS 2 and 19 (63.3%) were VAS 2 during 1st 12 hrs postoperatively (p=0.001). In 12-24 hrs post operatively, 15 (50%) patients were VAS 3 in group A and same number was VAS 2 and in group B, only 3 (10%) were in VAS 3 and 27 (90%) were VAS 2 (p=0.001). Conclusion: A combination of subcutaneous and peritoneal infiltration with bupivacaine is superior in relieving post appendectomy pain so patients require less dosage of analgesics in early post operative period along with early mobilization. (author)

  18. Cutaneous and subcutaneous Ewing's sarcoma: an indolent disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, Edward; Merchant, Thomas E.; Pappo, Alberto; Jenkins, Jesse J.; Shah, Amit B.; Kun, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    has developed local recurrence or distant metastasis. Several of the patients developed treatment-related sequelae, including veno-occlusive disease of the lung and hemorrhagic cystitis (1), myelodysplastic syndrome (1), chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure (1), moist desquamation (1), and dermatofibroma within the radiotherapy volumes (1). Conclusions: Cutaneous and subcutaneous ES are associated with an indolent course and a favorable prognosis when treated with combined modality therapy. Elimination of radiation therapy following complete resection has been tested in the POG 9354 trial. The high rate of local control, low rate of metastatic disease, and excellent overall outcome may suggest a role for less intensive chemotherapy, as well as tailoring to diminish or avoid radiation therapy in completely resected cases, with a goal to minimize toxicity while maintaining a high cure rate

  19. Cutaneous Involvement in the Deep Mycoses: A Literature Review. Part I-Subcutaneous Mycoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Zuber, J E; Navarrete-Dechent, C; Bonifaz, A; Fich, F; Vial-Letelier, V; Berroeta-Mauriziano, D

    2016-12-01

    The deep mycoses are uncommon in our setting. These fungal infections occur mainly in immunosuppressed patients or in tropical climates, and include subcutaneous infections and systemic infections. The skin is always involved in the former. In the first part of this review, we describe the main subcutaneous mycoses: sporotrichosis, chromoblastomycosis, mycetoma, phaeohyphomycosis, hyalohyphomycosis, and lacaziosis. Early recognition and treatment is important, as these infections are frequently associated with high morbidity. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, G C; Montes, L F; Cassady, G

    1978-08-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn (SFNN) developed in a 1-week-old black boy. His mother had received numerous medications for eclampsia. Birth was by Caesarean section and complicated by meconium aspiration. There were numerous nodules over the back, buttocks and extremities that yielded a caseous-like material. Microscopically, these nodules showed crystallization and necrosis of the fat. Hypoglycemia, pneumonia, oliguria, thrombocytopenia, seizures and urinary infection were associated with the cutaneous problem and led to a fatal outcome 2 weeks after birth.

  1. Gigantic subcutaneous lipoma – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lyngsaa Lang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipomas are the most common benign mesenchymal tumour. The solitary subcutaneous lipoma accounts for approximately one-quarter to one-half of all soft tissue tumours. The preferred locations include the trunk, shoulder, upper arm, and the neck. In this case report, we present a gigantic axillary lipoma weighing 23.35 kg. Due to the tumour mass and its long-term presence, the lipoma caused anatomical changes in the axilla making its removal challenging and difficult.

  2. The Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator: A Practical Review and Real-World Use and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Panna Jr, MD, FACC, FHRS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD is a novel technology using a subcutaneous (extrathoracic system for treatment of potential lethal ventricular arrhythmias. It avoids many of the risks of transvenous ICD implantation. It may be considered in patients having an ICD indication who do not have a pacing and/or cardiac resynchronization therapy indication, and who are unlikely to benefit from antitachycardia pacing therapy. We review patient selection, system components, the implantation technique, and screening considerations for subcutaneous ICD implantation. Its uses in specific patient populations, including children, patients with congenital heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or end-stage renal disease, and patients with preexisting pacemakers, are highlighted. Areas of future investigation are reviewed, including potential use with leadless pacing and magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin preserves muscle strength in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Harbo, Thomas; Sindrup, Søren Hein

    2014-01-01

    evaluated after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary end-points were changes in muscle strength evaluated by isokinetic dynamometry in four affected muscle groups and a composite score of muscle performance and function tests, including Medical Research Council (MRC) score, grip strength, 40-m walking test (40-MWT......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is superior to placebo treatment for maintenance of muscle strength during 12 weeks in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The present study evaluated whether SCIG preserves muscle strength for 1 year......) and nine-hole peg test (9-HPT). Secondary end-points were changes of each of the listed parameters at each time point as well as an overall disability sum score (ODSS). RESULTS: The dose of SCIG was significantly unaltered during the follow-up period. Overall the isokinetic dynamometry value increased by 7...

  4. Testosterone therapy decreases subcutaneous fat and adiponectin in aging men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, L.; Højlund, K.; Hougaard, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Testosterone therapy increases lean body mass and decreases total fat mass in aging men with low normal testosterone levels. The major challenge is, however, to determine whether the metabolic consequences of testosterone therapy are overall positive. We have previously reported that 6......-month testosterone therapy did not improve insulin sensitivity. We investigated the effect of testosterone therapy on regional body fat distribution and on the levels of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin, in aging men with low normal bioavailable testosterone levels. DESIGN: A randomized......, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study on 6-month testosterone treatment (gel) in 38 men, aged 60–78 years, with bioavailable testosterone 94 cm. METHODS: Central fat mass (CFM) and lower extremity fat mass (LEFM) were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT...

  5. Subcutaneous mucor zygomycosis with potential life-threatening visceral complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A mass in right supraclavicular fossa in a diabetic patient mimicking tuberculosis (TB adenitis that ultimately proved to be subcutaneous zygomycosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is needed for diagnosis especially when these lesions occur at typical sites for the more common indolent infections like TB. This case is being presented not only because of its rarity, but to emphasize the role of early diagnosis and appropriate treatment to prevent serious complications due to proximity to major structures. Fluconazole was used despite not being the ideal drug, solely due to cost constraints. Our patient responded well. However, we do emphasize that response to fluconazole is the exception rather than the rule.

  6. [Continuous subcutaneous infusion in palliative care, an undervalued method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marum, R J; de Vogel, E M; Zylicz, Z

    2002-11-23

    Three patients, 2 men aged 55 and 54 years and a woman aged 86 years, were admitted to hospital for treatment of symptoms resulting from terminal disease (pain, agitation, nausea etc.). In all three patients, continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSI) of medication was successfully used to control the symptoms. Compared with intravenous infusion, the technique of CSI is easy to learn and is associated with fewer complications. Its reliability and ease-of-use make it a technique that can be used not only in a hospital setting, but also in general practice and nursing homes. Medication used in palliative care (e.g. morphine, haloperidol, metoclopramide, levomepromazine, midazolam) can often be administered safely by CSI. In palliative care, where goals should be accomplished with minimal burden to the patient, CSI must be considered the technique of choice in patients who are unable to swallow their medication.

  7. Simultaneous Treatment with Subcutaneous Injection of Golimumab and Intra-articular Injection of Triamcinolone Acetonide (K-Method in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Undergoing Switching of Biologics: Retrospective Case–Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Kanbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Tight control of severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA in patients with high disease activity, even when using biologics, is sometimes difficult using a treat-to-target strategy. Switching from one biologic to another is associated with lower efficacy than that in treatment-naive cases. We developed the K-method that involves simultaneous treatment with golimumab and intra-articular joint injection of triamcinolone acetonide (TA in patients undergoing switching of biologics. We performed this retrospective case–control study to investigate the efficacy of achieving an immediate treatment response using the K-method. Methods This study involved 20 patients with RA (control group, 10 patients; K-method group, 10 patients. Patients in the control group were switched to golimumab from other biologics without intra-articular injection of TA. The K-method involved injection of 1 mL of TA (40 mg/mL and 2 mL of 1% lidocaine hydrochloride into swollen or painful joints on the same day as golimumab treatment. A quick response one day after treatment was compared between the two groups according to the disease activity score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28 CRP, clinical disease activity index (CDAI, simplified disease activity index (SDAI, European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR response, and remission rate. These parameters were investigated for 24 weeks. Results The K-method group showed significant improvements in DAS28 CRP, CDAI, and SDAI at one day, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks compared with the control group. The number of swollen and tender joints and the patient and doctor global visual analog scale scores were also significantly different between the two groups. The remission rates based on DAS28 CRP were 30% at one day, 50% at 12 weeks, and 60% at 24 weeks in the K-method group. The EULAR good/moderate response rates were 80% at one day, 90% at 12 weeks, and 90% at 24 weeks in the K-method group; however, these rates were only 10%, 40

  8. Recurrent subcutaneous emphysema of the face: a challenging clinical problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjati, Hossein; Davani, Sam Zeraatian Nejad; Johari, Hamed Ghoddusi

    2007-01-01

    In the neck or face, there are different causes for subcutaneous emphysema such as injury to the sinuses, the hypopharynx, the laryngotracheal complex, the pulmonary parenchyma, the esophagus or the presence of gas-forming organisms. However, factitious subcutaneous emphysema, a rare cause, must be considered in the differential diagnosis. In this clinical report, we discuss a 20-year-old girl who was under follow-up because of recurrent subcutaneous emphysema of the face and periorbital area. After 2 years of work-ups, including a period of close observation in the intensive care unit, self air injection by syringe was found as the cause of recurrent subcutaneous emphysema of the face, and the patient was labeled as having factitious recurrent subcutaneous emphysema. Therefore, when a patient presents with unexplained recurrent subcutaneous emphysema, one should suspect self-infliction and examine for puncture marks.

  9. Evaluation of Subcutaneous Phenobarbital Administration in Hospice Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosgood, Jessica Richards; Kimbrel, Jason M; McCrate Protus, Bridget; Grauer, Phyllis A

    2016-04-01

    Phenobarbital is used in hospice and palliative care to treat refractory symptoms. In end-of-life care, Food and Drug Administration approved routes of administration may be unreasonable based on patients' status. In these cases, phenobarbital may be administered subcutaneously for symptom management. However, according to the American Hospital Formulary Service, subcutaneous administration of commercially available injectable phenobarbital is cautioned due to possible skin reactions. This study evaluates the tolerability of phenobarbital administered subcutaneously. Of 69 patients and 774 distinct subcutaneous phenobarbital injections, 2 site reactions were recorded (2.9% of patients; 0.3% of injections). Both were mild, grade 1 reactions. Each patient continued to receive subcutaneous phenobarbital via newly placed ports with no additional reactions. Based on these findings, phenobarbital appears to be well tolerated when administered subcutaneously. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Side effects during subcutaneous immunotherapy in children with allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tophof, Max A; Hermanns, Anne; Adelt, Thomas; Eberle, Peter; Gronke, Christine; Friedrichs, Frank; Knecht, Roland; Mönter, Ernst; Schöpfer, Helmut; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Steinbach, Jörg; Umpfenbach, Hans-Ulrich; Weißhaar, Christian; Wilmsmeyer, Brigitte; Bufe, Albrecht

    2018-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only causal form of therapy for IgE-mediated allergic diseases. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is considered safe and well tolerated in adults, yet there is less evidence of safety in the pediatric population. A non-interventional prospective observing longitudinal study was carried out to determine the incidence of local and systemic side effects by SCIT, routinely performed in pediatric patients. A total of 581 pediatric patients were observed in 18 study centers between March 2012 and October 2014, recording 8640 treatments and 10 015 injections. A total of 54.6% of the patients experienced immediate local side effects at least once; delayed local side effects were seen in 56.1%. Immediate systemic adverse reactions occurred in 2.2% of patients; 7.4% experienced delayed systemic side effects. However, severe systemic side effects (grade III in the classification of Ring and Messmer) were seen in 0.03% of all treatments, all appearing within 30 minutes after the injections. No grade IV reactions were observed. In addition, many potential risk factors were investigated, yet only a few were found to be associated with the occurrence of side effects. Subcutaneous immunotherapy is a safe form of therapy in pediatric patients, with similar rates of local side effects compared to adult patients and low rates of severe systemic side effects. However, local and systemic reactions occurring later than 30 minutes after injection were observed more often than expected, which makes it essential to be attentive on behalf of pediatricians, patients, and parents. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  11. Review of the Mechanisms and Effects of Noninvasive Body Contouring Devices on Cellulite and Subcutaneous Fat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Zahra; Halabchi, Farzin; Mazaheri, Reza; Abolhasani, Maryam; Tabesh, Mastaneh

    2016-01-01

    Context Today, different kinds of non-invasive body contouring modalities, including cryolipolysis, radiofrequency (RF), low-level laser therapy (LLLT), and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) are available for reducing the volume of subcutaneous adipose tissue or cellulite. Each procedure has distinct mechanisms for stimulating apoptosis or necrosis adipose tissue. In addition to the mentioned techniques, some investigations are underway for analyzing the efficacy of other techniques such as whole body vibration (WBV) and extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT). In the present review the mechanisms, effects and side effects of the mentioned methods have been discussed. The effect of these devices on cellulite or subcutaneous fat reduction has been assessed. Evidence Acquisition We searched pubmed, google scholar and the cochrane databases for systemic reviews, review articles, meta-analysis and randomized clinical trials up to February 2015. The keywords were subcutaneous fat, cellulite, obesity, noninvasive body contouring, cryolipolysis, RF, LLLT, HIFU, ESWT and WBV with full names and abbreviations. Results We included seven reviews and 66 original articles in the present narrative review. Most of them were applied on normal weight or overweight participants (body mass index cellulite in some body areas. However, the clinical effects are mild to moderate, for example 2 - 4 cm circumference reduction as a sign of subcutaneous fat reduction during total treatment sessions. Overall, there is no definitive noninvasive treatment method for cellulite. Additionally, due to the methodological differences in the existing evidence, comparing the techniques is difficult. PMID:28123436

  12. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in responders to intravenous therapy with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Debost, J-C; Harbo, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We hypothesized that subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulins (SCIG) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is feasible, safe and superior to treatment with saline for the performance of muscle strength. METHODS: Thirty patients with motor...... Research Council (MRC) score, grip strength, standardized electrophysiological recordings from three nerves, and plasma IgG levels were evaluated. RESULTS: SCIG treatment was well tolerated in all 14 patients. Six patients complained of mild side-effects at the injection site. In the SCIG group...

  13. ORF Sequence: NC_002695 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002695 gi|15830145 >gi|15830145|ref|NP_308918.1| putative transmembrane subunit...IFVPIGALQAGEALWHWSVIPLGLAVAILSTALPYSLEMIALTRLPTRTFGTLMSMEPALAAVSGMIFLGETLTPIQLLALGAIIAASMGSTLTVRKESKIKELDIN

  14. ORF Sequence: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004307 gi|23464690 >gi|23464690|ref|NP_695293.1| hypothetical transmembrane pro...LVQLCAMGFIIGYVIRSNNVWMVFSLMAVMLVAAVQIVMSRARGIPKGLAGPIFLSLVITMLLMLALVTELIVRPHPWYAPQLVVPLTGMLLGNTVSALAVGLSRFYESME

  15. ORF Sequence: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32471017 >gi|32471017|ref|NP_864010.1| hypothetical protein-transmemb...HALISRLRIWGRETLTEMPSWLVSMVVHLTLLLVLALIGRSTSKVGQIELLFRQSSESSSMELAEFTIAAAAPLESFERSMEEERIATTQLVSIDVIDAEAEMFSLVP

  16. ORF Sequence: NC_002942 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002942 gi|52840424 >gi|52840424|ref|YP_094223.1| probable transmembrane protein...EYKRAQKQTFVMFFKGSLKGLVTTAPVTYRGVKIGEVKVIEITENKEHSKVLIPVYVQFFVERTYGFSQDPIHLLIDNGYVANITKPNLLTGVAEIELIKPTPAVKYKQTYYHSYPVFPTHNSAEKYTSME

  17. ORF Sequence: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32476407 >gi|32476407|ref|NP_869401.1| hypothetical protein-transmemb...IYPDDRPGWIDQPIVNDGKDYSLVVTAGPSGSMEEADELIGVYARGAVQSYVDELVSEQEWATEPEMIPLDIDWIRDELVVRRYEGVVQVGDEQQFEKAILIRIEPEDKKVFETAIADMKLKERLAATGIVILGGFSLLVGGSIVLGGLASRQKQPTAAA

  18. Subcutaneous emphysema during root canal therapy: endodontic accident by sodium hypoclorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenore, Gianluca; Palaia, Gaspare; Ciolfi, Chiara; Mohsen, Mohamed; Battisti, Andrea; Romeo, Umberto

    2017-01-01

    Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is defined as the abnormal introduction of air in the subcutaneous tissues of the head and neck. It is mainly caused by trauma, head and neck surgery, general anesthesia, and coughing or habitual performance of Valsalva manoeuvre. The occurrence of subcutaneous emphysema after dental treatment is rare, and diffusion of gas into the mediastinum is much rarer, especially when the procedure is a nonsurgical treatment. Presented here is a case of subcutaneous emphysema that occurred after sodium hypochlorite irrigation during endodontic treatment, and the description of its etiologies and prevention during nonsurgical endodontic treatment. Endodontic success can be essentially achieved via good debridement of a root canal, and an ideal endodontic irrigant is effective in removing the smear layer, opening the dentinal tubules, and producing a clean surface for closer obturation. A 60-years-old woman had an abnormal swelling and pain during an endodontic treatment accompanied by her dentist to the emergency room and was referred to our observation for complaining of severe pain, ecchymosis and severe swelling on the left side of her face. The aforementioned symptoms appeared after sodium hypochlorite irrigation and aggressive use of air spray for drying the root canal during the endodontic treatment of the upper left lateral incisor. An extrusion during an inappropriate endodontic treatment may occasionally be reported and can cause tissue damage. NaOCl is one of the best and most commonly used irrigating solutions because of its efficacy, but it can also negatively affect the periapical tissues. Determining the correct working length, even when performing an intraoperative periapical radiograph and confirming the root canal integrity, could help avoid these kinds of accidents.

  19. High negative pressure subcutaneous suction drain for managing debilitating subcutaneous emphysema secondary to tube thoracostomy for an iatrogenic post computed tomography guided transthoracic needle biopsy pneumothorax: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Patel, Pinakin; Singh, Suresh; Sharma, Raj Govind; Somani, Pankaj; Gouri, Abdul Rauf; Singh, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous emphysema is a common complication of tube thoracostomy. Though self-limiting, it should be treated when it causes palpebral closure, dyspnea, dysphagia or undue disfigurement resulting in anxiety and distress to the patient. A 72year old man who was a known case of COPD on bronchodilators developed a large pneumothorax and respiratory distress after a CT guided transthoracic lung biopsy done for a lung opacity (approx. 3×3cm) at the right hilar region on Chest X-ray. Within 24h of an urgent tube thoracostomy, patient developed intractable subcutaneous emphysema with closure of palpebral fissure and dyspnea unresponsive to increasing suction on chest tube. A subcutaneous fenestrated drain was placed mid-way between the nipple and clavicle in the mid-clavicular line bilaterally. Continuous negative suction (-150mmHg) resulted in immediate, sustained relief and complete resolution within 5days. Extensive and debilitating SE (subcutaneous emphysema) has to be treated promptly to relieve patient discomfort, dysphagia or imminent respiratory compromise. A variety of treatment have been tried including infraclavicular blow-hole incisions, subcutaneous drains +/- negative pressure suction, fenestrated angiocatheters, Vacuum assisted dressings and increasing suction on a pre-existing chest tube. We describe a high negative pressure subcutaneous suction drain which provides immediate and sustained relief in debilitating SE. Debilitating subcutaneous emphysema which causes distress, anxiety, palpebral closure, dyspnoea or dysphagia requires intervention. High negative pressure subcutaneous suction drain provides immediate and sustained relief in extensive and debilitating SE. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. 78 FR 24071 - Safety Zone; Pasquotank River; Elizabeth City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Pasquotank River; Elizabeth City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary... Pasquotank River in Elizabeth City, NC in support of the Fireworks display for the Potato Festival. This... Guard is establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Pasquotank River in Elizabeth City, NC...

  1. 78 FR 72009 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Star, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ...-0440; Airspace Docket No. 13-ASO-10] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Star, NC AGENCY: Federal... at Star, NC, to accommodate a new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to establish Class E airspace at Star, NC (78 FR 54413...

  2. Subcutaneous blood flow during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Sestoft, L

    1982-01-01

    Subcutaneous blood flow was measured preceding insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms and 2 h later in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy and in normal males. In all groups subcutaneous blood flow decreased at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptom...

  3. Unsupervised Assessment of Subcutaneous and Visceral Fat by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Larsen, Rasmus; Wraae, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a. method for unsupervised assessment of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue in the abdominal region by MRI. The identification of the subcutaneous and the visceral regions were achieved by dynamic programming constrained by points acquired from an active shape model...

  4. The comparison of the intestinal adaptation effects of subcutaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: Insulin has been reported to have positive effects on intestinal adaptation after short bowel syndrome when applicated oral or subcutaneously. The purpose of this study is to compare the intestinal adaptation effects of subcutaneous and oral routes of insulin in rats with short bowel syndrome. Materials and Methods: ...

  5. Cost-minimization of mabthera intravenous versus subcutaneous administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, P.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To identify and compare all costs related to preparing and administrating MabThera for the intravenous and subcutaneous formulations in Dutch hematological patients. The a priori notion is that the costs of subcutaneous MabThera injections are lower compared to intravenous infusion due

  6. Absorption Kinetics of Subcutaneously Administered Ceftazidime in Hypoperfused Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ebihara, MS

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The application of MWCs or WCs enhanced subcutaneous CAZ absorption by increasing blood flow. MWCs and WCs are considered to be safe and routine methods to induce defecation after surgery on the digestive system; thus, the combination of these methods and subcutaneous CAZ administration is a potential method for treating pneumonia in patients with SMID.

  7. Posttransplant oxygen inhalation improves the outcome of subcutaneous islet transplantation: A promising clinical alternative to the conventional intrahepatic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, H; Rawson, J; Barriga, A; Gonzalez, N; Mendez, D; Li, J; Omori, K; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2018-04-01

    Subcutaneous tissue is a promising site for islet transplantation, due to its large area and accessibility, which allows minimally invasive procedures for transplantation, graft monitoring, and removal of malignancies as needed. However, relative to the conventional intrahepatic transplantation site, the subcutaneous site requires a large number of islets to achieve engraftment success and diabetes reversal, due to hypoxia and low vascularity. We report that the efficiency of subcutaneous islet transplantation in a Lewis rat model is significantly improved by treating recipients with inhaled 50% oxygen, in conjunction with prevascularization of the graft bed by agarose-basic fibroblast growth factor. Administration of 50% oxygen increased oxygen tension in the subcutaneous site to 140 mm Hg, compared to 45 mm Hg under ambient air. In vitro, islets cultured under 140 mm Hg oxygen showed reduced central necrosis and increased insulin release, compared to those maintained in 45 mm Hg oxygen. Six hundred syngeneic islets subcutaneously transplanted into the prevascularized graft bed reversed diabetes when combined with postoperative 50% oxygen inhalation for 3 days, a number comparable to that required for intrahepatic transplantation; in the absence of oxygen treatment, diabetes was not reversed. Thus, we show oxygen inhalation to be a simple and promising approach to successfully establishing subcutaneous islet transplantation. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. Anterior subcutaneous transposition of the ulnar nerve improves neurological function in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several surgical procedures exist for treating cubital tunnel syndrome, the best surgical option remains controversial. To evaluate the efficacy of anterior subcutaneous transposition of the ulnar nerve in patients with moderate to severe cubital tunnel syndrome and to analyze prognostic factors, we retrospectively reviewed 62 patients (65 elbows diagnosed with cubital tunnel syndrome who underwent anterior subcutaneous transposition. Preoperatively, the initial severity of the disease was evaluated using the McGowan scale as modified by Goldberg: 18 patients (28% had grade IIA neuropathy, 20 (31% had grade IIB, and 27 (42% had grade III. Postoperatively, according to the Wilson & Krout criteria, treatment outcomes were excellent in 38 patients (58%, good in 16 (25%, fair in 7 (11%, and poor in 4 (6%, with an excellent and good rate of 83%. A negative correlation was found between the preoperative McGowan grade and the postoperative Wilson & Krout score. The patients having fair and poor treatment outcomes had more advanced age, lower nerve conduction velocity, and lower action potential amplitude compared with those having excellent and good treatment outcomes. These results suggest that anterior subcutaneous transposition of the ulnar nerve is effective and safe for the treatment of moderate to severe cubital tunnel syndrome, and initial severity, advancing age, and electrophysiological parameters can affect treatment outcome.

  9. Virtual NC machine model with integrated knowledge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenko, Sofija; Dukovski, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The concept of virtual NC machining was established for providing a virtual product that could be compared with an appropriate designed product, in order to make NC program correctness evaluation, without real experiments. This concept is applied in the intelligent CAD/CAM system named VIRTUAL MANUFACTURE. This paper presents the first intelligent module that enables creation of the virtual models of existed NC machines and virtual creation of new ones, applying modular composition. Creation of a virtual NC machine is carried out via automatic knowledge data saving (features of the created NC machine). (Author)

  10. NC10 bacteria in marine oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padilla, Cory C; Bristow, Laura A; Sarode, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the NC10 phylum link anaerobic methane oxidation to nitrite denitrification through a unique O2-producing intra-aerobic methanotrophy pathway. A niche for NC10 in the pelagic ocean has not been confirmed. We show that NC10 bacteria are present and transcriptionally active in oceanic....... rRNA and mRNA transcripts assignable to NC10 peaked within the OMZ and included genes of the putative nitrite-dependent intra-aerobic pathway, with high representation of transcripts containing the unique motif structure of the nitric oxide (NO) reductase of NC10 bacteria, hypothesized...

  11. A novel continuous subcutaneous lactate monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscia, A; Messeri, D; Moscone, D; Ricci, F; Valgimigli, F

    2005-05-15

    A novel continuous lactate monitoring system has been developed modifying the GlucoDay portable medical device (A. Menarini Diagnostics), already present in the European market, and used to continuously measure glucose levels. Lactate oxidase based biosensors have been developed immobilising the enzyme on nylon net and placing it on a Pt electrode. The biosensor was connected to the portable device provided with a micro-pump and coupled to a microdialysis system. It is capable to record subcutaneous lactate every 3 min. In vitro analytical results confirmed that the sensors respond linearly in the interval of concentration between 0.1 and 10 mmol/L, covering the whole physiological range. During prolonged monitoring periods, the response of the biosensors remained stable, showing a limited drift of 8%, within 60 h. Stability tests are still on route. However, preliminary results have shown a shelf life of about 10 months. In vivo experiments performed on healthy rabbits have demonstrated the good accuracy and reproducibility of the system. A correlation coefficient equal to 0.9547 (N=80) was found, which represents a good correlation between the GlucoDay and the laboratory reference analyser. A 16 h in vivo monitoring on a healthy volunteer has been also performed.

  12. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelien Dinh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  13. Continuous subcutaneous use of levetiracetam: a retrospective review of tolerability and clinical effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémi, Constanze; Lorenzl, Stefan; Vyhnalek, Birgit; Rastorfer, Karin; Feddersen, Berend

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the tolerability and clinical effects of subcutaneous (SC) levetiracetam for the treatment of epileptic seizures in a palliative care setting, we conducted a retrospective chart review of patients treated with subcutaneous levetiracetam in the Department of Palliative Medicine at the University Munich, between September 2006 and March 2013. The following parameters were extracted from the charts: reason for antiepileptic drug treatment, daily dose, concentration, infusion rate, co-administration of other drugs, and clinical effects. Furthermore, the charts were screened for signs of adverse drug reactions, e.g., irritation or pain at the infusion site. We identified 20 patients that were treated with levetiracetam SC in the inpatient (n = 7) and outpatient (n = 13) settings. Most patients (n = 17) tolerated the subcutaneous infusion well. Nineteen patients (95%) received levetiracetam in combination with other drugs. These were mainly metamizol (80%), midazolam (75%), and morphine (45%). The median dose of levetiracetam was 95.8 mg/h (SD 37 mg/h), median osmolarity of the infusion solution 2203 mOsmol/L (SD 717 mOsmol/L), and infusion rate 2 mL/h (SD 2.4 ml/h). In 16 patients (80%), seizures were controlled and status epilepticus were interrupted, respectively. We conclude that SC levetiracetam is an effective treatment and well tolerated in the palliative care setting.

  14. Chordoma with postoperative subcutaneous implantation and meningeal dissemination: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, T.; Okudera, T.; Shimosegawa, E.; Hatazawa, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Yasui, N.; Ogawa, T.

    2001-01-01

    Chordomas are histologically benign tumours which are locally invasive. We present an unusual case of recurrent chordoma with subcutaneous implantation and widespread meningeal dissemination after surgery. Contrast-enhanced MRI was useful for determining the extent of the tumour. (orig.)

  15. Pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema secondary to blunt chest injury

    OpenAIRE

    Porhomayon, Jahan; Doerr, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This is the case of a patient with a history of blunt chest trauma associated with subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax. The patient complained of inspiratory stridor on presentation. Anatomical relationships can explain the pathophysiological process.

  16. Subcutaneous metastasis from endometrial cancer; case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolae Bacalbasa; Irina Balescu; Alexandru Filipescu

    2018-01-01

    Subcutaneous metastases from endometrial cancer are rare situations, only few cases being described so far. The main incriminated mechanisms leading to the apparition of such lesions include hematogenous and lymphatic spread. We present the case of a 66-year-old patient known with previous history of stage IIIA endometroid endometrial carcinoma initially treated by surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy who developed at 18 months follow-up a distant subcutaneous oligometastasis. At this time the p...

  17. Selection of patients for sublingual versus subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larenas Linnemann, Désirée E S; Blaiss, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is the sole treatment for IgE-mediated allergic diseases directed at the underlying mechanism. The two widely accepted administration routes are sublingual (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT). We reviewed how patients should best be selected for immunotherapy and how the optimal administration route can be defined. Before deciding SCIT or SLIT, appropriate selection of patients for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is mandatory. To be eligible for AIT, subjects must have a clear medical history of allergic disease, with exacerbation of symptoms on exposure to one or more allergens and a corresponding positive skin or in vitro test. Then the route of administration should be based on: published evidence of clinical and immunologic efficacy (which varies per allergic disease and per allergen); mono- or multi-allergen immunotherapy, for SLIT multi-allergen immunotherapy was not effective; safety: adverse events with SLIT are more frequent, but less severe; and, costs and patient preferences, closely related to adherence issues. All these are discussed in the article.

  18. A centralized storage system for the delivery of subcutaneous infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Peter; Lee, Jane; Arnold, Gill; Davis, Melanie

    Symptom control is an important part of maintaining a palliative patient's comfort and dignity, particularly in the end stages of their illness. Within the discipline of palliative care, the use of continuous subcutaneous syringe drivers is an important way of administering drugs at the end stages of a patient's illness to maintain symptom control. This study identified that ward staff had difficulty in obtaining the correct equipment, such as administration sets and Luer-lock syringes, leading to significant delays in patients being given drugs, affecting patient care and, when unable to obtain the correct equipment, the incorrect equipment was used. It was also identified that there was no consistent approach to the use or maintenance of syringe drivers, with a clear risk to patient safety. The study aim was to identify whether the introduction of a centralized storage system of set boxes containing all the relevant equipment would resolve these issues and improve patient care and safety. The audit showed that a centralized storage system enhanced practice by ensuring that there was a standardized approach to the initiation and care of syringe drivers, including equipment when used in the palliative care setting. The system also provided easy access to the correct equipment, reducing in the delay of commencing treatment, as well as the risk of any adverse events.

  19. Sumatriptan (subcutaneous route of administration) for acute migraine attacks in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a highly disabling condition for the individual and also has wide-reaching implications for society, healthcare services, and the economy. Sumatriptan is an abortive medication for migraine attacks, belonging to the triptan family. Subcutaneous administration may be preferable to oral for individuals experiencing nausea and/or vomiting Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of subcutaneous sumatriptan compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine attacks in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, online databases, and reference lists for studies through 13 October 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using subcutaneous sumatriptan to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Thirty-five studies (9365 participants) compared subcutaneous sumatriptan with placebo or an active comparator. Most of the data were for the 6 mg dose. Sumatriptan surpassed placebo for all efficacy outcomes. For sumatriptan 6 mg versus placebo the NNTs were 2.9, 2.3, 2.2, and 2.1 for pain-free at one and two hours, and headache relief at one and two hours, respectively, and 6.1 for sustained pain-free at 24 hours. Results for the 4 mg and 8 mg doses were similar to the 6 mg dose, with 6 mg significantly better than 4 mg only for pain-free at one hour, and 8 mg significantly better than 6 mg only for headache relief at one hour. There was no evidence of increased migraine relief if a second dose of sumatriptan 6

  20. Pharmacokinetics of nebulized and subcutaneously implanted terbinafine in cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, L P; Allender, M C; Archer, G; Leister, K; Rzadkowska, M; Boers, K; Souza, M; Cox, S

    2017-10-01

    Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, the causative agent of snake fungal disease, is proposed as a serious threat to the conservation of several snake populations. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of terbinafine administered through nebulization and a sustained subcutaneous implant as potential treatments of Ophidiomyces in reptiles. Seven adult cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus) were used in single-dose trials. Each snake was nebulized with terbinafine (2 mg/ml) for 30 min and had blood collected before nebulization and up to 12 hr after nebulization. Following a 5-month washout, the same snakes were administered a subcutaneous implant containing 24.5 mg terbinafine; blood was collected at baseline, 1 day postimplant placement, and then once weekly for 9 weeks. Plasma for both studies was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The mean plasma concentrations of nebulized terbinafine peaked between 0.5 and 4 hr. The subcutaneously implanted terbinafine reached therapeutic concentrations on day 1 and maintained therapeutic for over 6 weeks. These methods and doses are recommended as potential treatment options for snake fungal disease in reptiles. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Non-leptonic kaon decays at large Nc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, Andrea; Hernández, Pilar; Pena, Carlos; Romero-López, Fernando

    2018-03-01

    We study the scaling with the number of colors Nc of the weak amplitudes mediating kaon mixing and decay, in the limit of light charm masses (mu = md = ms = mc). The amplitudes are extracted directly on the lattice for Nc = 3 - 7 (with preliminar results for Nc = 8 and 17) using twisted mass QCD. It is shown that the (sub-leading) 1 /Nc corrections to B\\hatk are small and that the naive Nc → ∞ limit, B\\hatk = 3/4, seems to be recovered. On the other hand, the O (1/Nc) corrections in K → ππ amplitudes (derived from K → π matrix elements) are large and fully anti-correlated in the I = 0 and I = 2 channels. This may have some implications for the understanding of the ΔI = 1/2 rule.

  2. Generalized subcutaneous edema as a rare manifestation of dermatomyositis: clinical lesson from a rare feature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-04-01

    Generalized subcutaneous edema is a very rare manifestation of inflammatory myopathies. A 61-year-old woman presented with classic signs and symptoms of dermatomyositis. She was also noted to have generalized edema that was so florid that an alternative diagnosis was considered. Her disease was resistant to corticosteroids, azathioprine, and mycophenolate mofetil. Intravenous administration of immunoglobulins was started because of marked worsening of her disease-muscle weakness, generalized anasarca, and involvement of her bulbar muscles. This led to dramatic resolution of her subcutaneous edema and significant improvement of her skin and muscle disease. As the initial screen for malignancy was negative, a positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was requested, which interestingly showed a metabolically active cervical tumor. Anasarca is an unusual manifestation of dermatomyositis. In treatment-refractory cases, it seems reasonable to consider positron emission tomography scan in excluding underlying malignant disease.

  3. Multifocal scalp abscess with subcutaneous fat necrosis and scarring alopecia as a complication of scalp mesotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadry, Razan; Hamadah, Issam; Al-Issa, Abdullah; Field, Lawrence; Alrabiah, Fahad

    2008-01-01

    Over the past several years, there has been a growing interest in the treatment method termed mesotherapy. Marketed for nonsurgical fat melting, skin rejuvenation, and hair regrowth, this technique has become increasingly popular and, in the public's view, it is considered to be a relatively benign intervention method. Mesotherapy was introduced over 50 years ago by M. Pistor, a French physician who utilized this technique initially as a novel analgesic therapeutic method for a variety of rheumatologic disorders. Since its introduction, the basic principal of locally injecting subcutaneous doses of varying chemicals has been expanded and is now utilized for the aforementioned cosmetic concerns. With its increased popularity, there has been an increase in the number of reported side effects resulting from mesotherapeutic intervention. We report multifocal scalp abscesses with subcutaneous fat necrosis as a direct result of mesotherapy; therefore, requiring extensive surgical repair.

  4. Shift from intravenous or 16% subcutaneous replacement therapy to 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with primary antibody deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canessa, Clementina; Iacopelli, Jessica; Pecoraro, Antonio; Spadaro, Giuseppe; Matucci, Andrea; Milito, Cinzia; Vultaggio, Alessandra; Agostini, Carlo; Cinetto, Francesco; Danieli, Maria Giovanna; Gambini, Simona; Marasco, Carolina; Trizzino, Antonino; Vacca, Angelo; De Mattia, Domenico; Martire, Baldassarre; Plebani, Alessandro; Di Gioacchino, Mario; Gatta, Alessia; Finocchi, Andrea; Licciardi, Francesco; Martino, Silvana; De Carli, Marco; Moschese, Viviana; Azzari, Chiara

    2017-03-01

    In patients with primary antibody deficiencies, subcutaneous administration of IgG (SCIG) replacement is effective, safe, well-tolerated, and can be self-administered at home. A new SCIG replacement at 20% concentration (Hizentra ® ) has been developed and has replaced Vivaglobin ® (SCIG 16%). An observational prospective multi-centric open-label study, with retrospective comparison was conducted in 15 Italian centers, in order to investigate whether and to what extent switching to Hizentra ® would affect frequency of infusions, number of infusion sites, patients' satisfaction, and tolerability in patients previously treated with Vivaglobin ® or intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). Any variations of dosage, frequency and duration of the infusions, and of number of infusion sites induced by Hizentra ® with respect to the former treatment were recorded. Practical advantages and disadvantages of Hizentra ® , with respect to the medicinal product formerly used, and the variations in patients' therapy-related satisfaction were monitored by means of the TSQM (Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication); number, frequency, and duration of infectious events and adverse effects were recorded. Eighty-two patients switched to Hizentra ® : 19 (23.2%) from IVIG and 63 (76.8%) from Vivaglobin ® . The mean interval between infusions was not affected by the shift (7.0 ± 2.0 days with previous treatment versus 7.1 ± 1.2 during Hizentra ® ). A decrease in the number of infusion sites with Hizentra ® was recorded in 12 out of 56 patients for whom these data were available. At 6 months, 89.7% of patients were satisfied with Hizentra ® ; no difference in terms of effectiveness, side effects, convenience, and global satisfaction was observed. No difference in the incidence of adverse events was reported.

  5. TRATAMENTO DE ABSCESSOS SUBCUTÂNEOS COM ÁCIDO METACRESOLSULFÔNICO ASSOCIADO À NITROFURAZONA E À APLICAÇÃO PARENTERAL DE ENROFLOXACINA TREATMENT OF SUBCUTANEOUS ABSCESSES WITH METHACRESOLSULPHONIC ACID ASSOCIATED WITH NITROFURAZONE AND THE PARENTERAL APPLICATION OF ENROFLOXACIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Teixeira Borges

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Descreveu-se a utilização local do ácido metacresolsufônico associado à nitrofurazona em adição à aplicação parenteral de enrofloxacina, no tratamento de abscessos subcutâneos em 36 animais (22 bovinos, 4 caprinos, 5 eqüinos, 2 suínos, 1 ovino, 1 muar e 1 bubalino. O tratamento medicamentoso foi instituído após incisão, drenagem e lavagem com solução antisséptica para a retirada de quaisquer materiais ainda presentes no sítio da lesão. Apenas dois animais apresentaram recidivas, atribuídas à utilização inadequada da terapêutica e à não-manutenção das regras de higiene no pós-operatório. A associação em questão provou ser eficaz, as incisões para drenagem devem ser realizadas na parte mais ventral da lesão e a resolução do processo patológico deve ocorrer entre o 10° e 15° dias.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Abscesso; ácido metacresolsulfônico; nitrofurazona.

    The utilization of methacresolsulphonic acid topically, associated with nitrofurazone, in addition to the parenteral application of enrofloxacin was described in the treatment of subcutaneous abscesses in 36 animals (22 bovines, four caprines, five equines, two swines, one ovine, one mule and one buffalo. Medical treatment was initiated after incision; drainage and lavage of the abscess with an antiseptic solution were made in order to remove any foreign material which might still be in the lesion. Only two animals showed relapses, attributed both to the inadequate utilization of the therapeutic procedures and to the non-observation of post-operatory hygienic measures. The association of these drugs proved to be effective and the drainage should be attempted in the more ventral area of the

  6. ORF Sequence: NC_003909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003909 gi|42782207 >gi|42782207|ref|NP_979454.1| BclA protein [Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987] MANRLNFTGP...LGCCGISGKTGPTGPTGPTGVTGSTGPTGPTGATGFTGPTGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGPTGPTGATGFTGPTGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGP...TGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGFTGPTGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGSTGP

  7. ORF Sequence: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005363 gi|42523756 >gi|42523756|ref|NP_969136.1| membrane protein necessary for nodulation/competitivene...ss [Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100] MKSLMLILFVSLLSVVAKADCTTAITINEAISASTSDYLERAEKR

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_003078 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available etitiveness [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MQLSACARRREAVRYRRRMARILILLFSLLSAFAFPVTPVP... NC_003078 gi|16264863 >gi|16264863|ref|NP_437655.1| probable membrane protein necessary for nodulation comp

  9. ORF Sequence: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002678 gi|13471138 >gi|13471138|ref|NP_102707.1| transcriptional regulatory protein, nodulation competit...iveness determinant [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] MTNESDTRSAELAELTADIVSAYVSNNPLPV

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_005296 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005296 gi|39933242 >gi|39933242|ref|NP_945518.1| possible nicotinate-nucleotide adn...WWLVSPGNPLKDISSLREIDARVAAAQAIADDPRIQVSRLEAVIGTRYTADTLRYLRRHCPGARFVWIMGADNLAQFHRWQQWQQIAAEIPIAVIDRPPTSFRALAAPAAQRLMRMRIPNNKAATLADREPPAWVYLTGLKSLVSSTALRNPDGSWKT

  11. ORF Sequence: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15964332 >gi|15964332|ref|NP_384685.1| PROBABLE PYRAZINAMIDASE/NICOTINAMIDAS...E (INCLUDES: PYRAZINAMIDASE, NICOTINAMIDASE) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MADAARPDLREAMADEAL

  12. ORF Sequence: NC_006155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g protein (involved in environmental [Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP 32953] MTKTDYLMRLRKCTTIDTLERVIEKNKYELSDDELELFYSAADHRLAELTMNKLYDKIPPTVWQHVK ... NC_006155 gi|51595328 >gi|51595328|ref|YP_069519.1| hemolysin expression modulatin

  13. ORF Sequence: NC_003279 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003279 gi|17507795 >gi|17507795|ref|NP_493043.1| putative protein, with at least 2 transme...YLNIQIADETTDLPVSIDRANVDMRIYRAFEMSMEKDIISLSTSNTSHAEISTPKSRKKKSRKLGLKNLEEVINSKYNSCQKQDNSMSIQ

  14. ORF Sequence: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32475512 >gi|32475512|ref|NP_868506.1| hypothetical protein-signal peptide and transme...VLVGLLLPAVQAAREAARRMSCSNNIAQLTLATHNYEFSMEHLPPGTTNPTGPIVNTPNGEHISFLVRLLPYIEQQGTADDFDLTASVYAPANAKVRAYQISAFLCPS

  15. ORF Sequence: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003070 gi|18407972 >gi|18407972|ref|NP_564823.1| no apical meristem (NAM) famil...y protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] MQAEEIICRVSDEEIIENYLRPKINGETSSIPRYVVELAEELYTVEPWLLPRQTAPILNPGEWFYFGKRNRKYSN

  16. ORF Sequence: NC_003280 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003280 gi|17533935 >gi|17533935|ref|NP_496777.1| ZYXin (zyx-1) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MNQIFHVDC...FAPRCALCSKPIVPQDGEKESVRVVAMDKSFHVDCYKCEDCGMQLSSKLEGQGCYPIDNHLLCKTCNGNRLRVVSST

  17. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13358092 >gi|13358092|ref|NP_078366.1| cytosine-specific methyltransferase [Ureap...RILFDLQKLNQLPQFLLLENVNNMLSKQHKLDYDMWTKSLKQLGYSTCTFQLNALDYGSAQRRKRVYAISILNYDGLIDSNGNILDLEAPIFDGKQKQLKDVLKTNYK

  18. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13358063 >gi|13358063|ref|NP_078337.1| hypothetical protein UU500 [Ureap...MGNHTWDHPDIFEILTTKTNIIRPYNIINTHQYHLVGSGSRVFYCNKKMIRVTNLLGNSIDMKGLQTNPFESLDKIIAFNEAPIHIVDFHAETTSEKNALFLDFKSKL

  19. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13358146 >gi|13358146|ref|NP_078420.1| transcription antitermination factor [Ureap...lasma parvum serovar 3 str. ATCC 700970] MAYKIKDLDSKLLSDLKIDFNHRHQWYIVTVVSGNEQKVIENIKDKLNGYGYGDKLSDLKIIKEKIKEVKIYEPSEAP

  20. Accelerated subcutaneous immunotherapy in pediatric population – Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Gomes dos Reis Pimentel

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accelerated subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT schedules represent an alternative to conventional SCIT, providing immunotherapy benefits in a shorter period of time. The objectives of this systematic review were to assess clinical and immunological efficacy as well as safety of accelerated SCIT build-up schedules for the treatment of respiratory allergy in pediatric patients. Methods: Studies were located by searching PubMed, using “immunotherapy” and “desensitization” as keywords. The selection of studies, published from January 1st, 2006, to December 31th, 2015, was performed in two stages: screening of titles and abstracts, and assessment of the full papers identified as relevant, considering the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted in a standardized way and synthesized qualitatively to assess efficacy and safety of accelerated schedules in respiratory allergy. Results: Eleven trials were included: two evaluated rush SCIT and nine assessed cluster SCIT. This review demonstrated that rush and cluster schedules are clinically and immunological efficacious, with faster effect than conventional schedules. No relevant difference with respect to clinical outcomes was noticed between subgroups (pediatric, adult and mixed populations. Regarding safety, most local adverse reactions were mild and there were neither life-threatening systemic reactions nor fatal events. No relevant differences in the incidence and severity of either local or systemic reactions between the accelerated schedule group and control group were registered. Conclusions: Accelerated SCIT build-up schedules are effective in the treatment of respiratory allergy in pediatric patients, representing a safe alternative to the conventional schedules with the advantage of achieving clinical effectiveness sooner. Keywords: Allergy, Immunotherapy, Pediatrics

  1. Polarized luminescence of nc-Si-SiO x nanostructures on silicon substrates with patterned surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailovska, Katerina; Mynko, Viktor; Indutnyi, Ivan; Shepeliavyi, Petro

    2018-05-01

    Polarization characteristics and spectra of photoluminescence (PL) of nc-Si-SiO x structures formed on the patterned and plane c-Si substrates are studied. The interference lithography with vacuum chalcogenide photoresist and anisotropic wet etching are used to form a periodic relief (diffraction grating) on the surface of the substrates. The studied nc-Si-SiO x structures were produced by oblique-angle deposition of Si monoxide in vacuum and the subsequent high-temperature annealing. The linear polarization memory (PM) effect in PL of studied structure on plane substrate is manifested only after the treatment of the structures in HF and is explained by the presence of elongated Si nanoparticles in the SiO x nanocolumns. But the PL output from the nc-Si-SiO x structure on the patterned substrate depends on how this radiation is polarized with respect to the grating grooves and is much less dependent on the polarization of the exciting light. The measured reflection spectra of nc-Si-SiO x structure on the patterned c-Si substrate confirmed the influence of pattern on the extraction of polarized PL.

  2. Intermittent subcutaneous methadone administration in the management of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Carlos; Vara, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Methadone is a strong opioid analgesic that has been used successfully in cancer pain management. The oral route of administration is generally preferred for opioid analgesics. However that route sometimes cannot be used. Experience with continuous subcutaneous methadone infusions has produced local intolerance. The aim of this study was to analyze the use of intermittent subcutaneous methadone injections. Ten patients whose pain was well-controlled with oral methadone (average dose 30 mg, range 10 to 120 mg) participated in the study. A subcutaneous small vein needle (butterfly) was used exclusively for administration of methadone. Over a period of seven days the local discomfort of each injection was evaluated by means of a Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and the site of infusion was observed. When any degree of erythema or inflammation was seen, the infusion site was changed. The initial subcutaneous dose was the same as the previously administered oral dose. A daily record was kept of the dose used, level of pain, and toxicity symptoms. This close vigilance was aimed at avoiding dosage errors due to variations among individuals in acceptance to previous oral medication. Changes in dosage were allowed according to standard medical criteria. Two patients were withdrawn from the study due to non-painful irritation at the infusion point. Another eight patients tolerated repeated administration of subcutaneous methadone over seven days. Any local irritation from subcutaneous methadone that occurred was managed satisfactorily by changing the infusion site and limiting doses to 30 mg. In seven of 182 repeat administration, injection site changes were necessitated by local irritation. The NRS for local discomfort was 2/10. The two patients who were intolerant of the subcutaneous injections were receiving injected doses which were significantly higher than the others (42 mg as compared to 25 mg). Dose adjustments needed when changing from the oral to the

  3. Fabrication of subcutaneous veins phantom for vessel visualization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai; Narita, Kazuyuki; Morita, Yusuke; Nakamachi, Eiji; Honda, Norihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2013-09-01

    The technique of subcutaneous veins imaging by using NIR (Near Infrared Radiation) is widely used in medical applications, such as the intravenous injection and the blood sampling. In the previous study, an automatic 3D blood vessel search and automatic blood sampling system was newly developed. In order to validate this NIR imaging system, we adopted the subcutaneous vein in the human arm and its artificial phantom, which imitate the human fat and blood vessel. The human skin and subcutaneous vein is characterized as the uncertainty object, which has the individual specificity, non-accurate depth information, non-steady state and hardly to be fixed in the examination apparatus. On the other hand, the conventional phantom was quite distinct from the human's characteristics, such as the non-multilayer structure, disagreement of optical property. In this study, we develop a multilayer phantom, which is quite similar with human skin, for improvement of NIR detection system evaluation. The phantom consists of three layers, such as the epidermis layer, the dermis layer and the subcutaneous fat layer. In subcutaneous fat layer, we built a blood vessel. We use the intralipid to imitate the optical scattering characteristics of human skin, and the hemoglobin and melanin for the optical absorption characteristics. In this study, we did two subjects. First, we decide the fabrication process of the phantom. Second, we compared newly developed phantoms with human skin by using our NIR detecting system, and confirm the availability of these phantoms.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin following oral and subcutaneous administration in the common ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheelings, T F; Devi, J L; Woodward, A P; Whittem, T

    2015-10-01

    [Correction added on 23 March 2015, after first online publication: Terminal half-life values of enrofloxacin is corrected in the fourth sentence of the abstract] Clinically healthy common ringtail possums (n = 5) received single doses of 10 mg/kg enrofloxacin orally and then 2 weeks later subcutaneously. Serial plasma samples were collected over 24 h for each treatment phase, and enrofloxacin concentrations were determined using a validated HPLC assay. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental analysis. Following oral administration, plasma concentrations were of therapeutic relevance (Cmax median 5.45 μg/mL, range 2.98-6.9 μg/mL), with terminal-phase half-life (t½ ) shorter than in other species (median 3.09 h, range 1.79-5.30 h). In contrast, subcutaneous administration of enrofloxacin did not achieve effective plasma concentrations, with plasma concentrations too erratic to fit the noncompartmental model except in one animal. On the basis of the AUC:MIC, enrofloxacin administered at 10 mg/kg orally, but not subcutaneously, is likely to be effective against a range of bacterial species that have been reported in common ringtail possums. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Ivermectin disposition kinetics after subcutaneous and intramuscular administration of an oil-based formulation to cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifschitz, A; Virkel, G; Pis, A; Imperiale, F; Sanchez, S; Alvarez, L; Kujanek, R; Lanusse, C

    1999-10-01

    Slight differences in formulation may change the plasma kinetics and ecto-endoparasiticide activity of endectocide compounds. This work reports on the disposition kinetics and plasma availability of ivermectin (IVM) after subcutaneous (SC) and intramuscular (IM) administration as an oil-based formulation to cattle. Parasite-free Aberdeen Angus calves (n = 24; 240-280 kg) were divided into three groups (n = 8) and treated (200 microg/kg) with either an IVM oil-based pharmaceutical preparation (IVM-TEST formulation) (Bayer Argentina S.A.) given by subcutaneous (Group A) and intramuscular (Group B) injections or the IVM-CONTROL (non-aqueous formulation) (Ivomec, MSD Agvet) subcutaneously administered (Group C). Blood samples were taken over 35 days post-treatment and the recovered plasma was extracted and analyzed by HPLC using fluorescence detection. IVM was detected in plasma between 12 h and 35 days post-administration of IVM-TEST (SC and IM injections) and IVM-CONTROL formulations. Prolonged IVM absorption half-life (p oil-based formulation examined in this trial, compared to the standard preparation, may positively impact on its strategic use in cattle.

  6. Cutaneous Metastasis of Medullary Carcinoma Thyroid Masquerading as Subcutaneous Nodules Anterior Chest and Mandibular Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Mannan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastasis of underlying primary malignancies can present to dermatologist with chief complaints of cutaneous lesions. The underlying malignancy is generally diagnosed much later after a complete assessment of the concerned case. Medullary carcinoma thyroid (MCT is a relatively uncommon primary neoplasia of the thyroid. Very few cases presenting as cutaneous metastases of MCT have been reported in the literature. Most of the cases which have been reported are of the papillary and the follicular types. We here report a case of a patient who presented in the dermatology clinic with the primary complaint of multiple subcutaneous nodules in anterior chest wall and left side of body of mandible. By systematic application of clinical and diagnostic skills these nodules were diagnosed as cutaneous metastasis of MCT bringing to the forefront a history of previously operated thyroid neoplasm. So clinically, the investigation of a flesh coloured subcutaneous nodule, presenting with a short duration, particularly in scalp, jaw, or anterior chest wall should include possibility of metastastic deposits. A dermatologist should keep a possibility of an internal organ malignancy in patients while investigating a case of flesh coloured subcutaneous nodules, presenting with short duration. A systematic application of clinical and diagnostic skills will eventually lead to such a diagnosis even when not suspected clinically at its primary presentation. A prompt and an emphatic diagnosis and treatment will have its bearing on the eventual outcome in all these patients.

  7. Clinical Trial of Subcutaneous Steroid Injection in Patients with Migraine Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nikkhah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurologic literature on therapeutic effect of subcutaneous corticosteroids in patients with migrainous chronic daily headache is scarce. The aim of this research is to assess the therapeutic effects of this management in such patients. Methods: Consecutive patients with migrainous chronic daily headache enrolled a prospective before-after therapeutic study during 2010-2013. Methylprednisolone 40 mg was divided into four subcutaneous injection doses. Two injections were administered in the right and left suboccipital area (exactly at retromastoid cervicocranial junction and the other two injections in the lower medial frontal area (exactly at medial right and left eyebrows. A daily headache diary was filled out by the patients before and one month after the intervention. The severity of pain was classified based on a pain intensity instrument using numeric rating scale from 0-10 point scale. Paired t-test and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Results: 504 patients (378 females, 126 males with migrainous chronic daily headache were enrolled in the study. Dramatic, significant, moderate, mild, or no improvements respectively constituted 28.6%, 33.3%, 23.8%, and 14.3% of the post treatment courses. Therapeutic effect of intervention on mean pain scores was significant; t=7.38, df=20, P=0.000. Two cases developed subcutaneous fat atrophy in frontal injection site and three cases experienced syncope during injection. Conclusion: Subcutaneous corticosteroids could be used as an adjunct therapy in patients with migrainous chronic daily headache.

  8. Fear of repeated injections in children younger than 4 years receiving subcutaneous allergy immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Gabriele; Shankar, Viswanathan; Nazari, Ramin; Kooragayalu, Shravan; Smith, Mitchell; Wiznia, Andrew; Rosenstreich, David

    2012-12-01

    Allergy immunotherapy during early childhood may have potential benefits for the prevention of asthma and allergy morbidity. However, subcutaneous immunotherapy has not yet been prospectively researched in children younger than 4 years, primarily because of safety concerns, including the fear and psychological distress young children may experience with repeated needle injections. To quantify fear in atopic children younger than 4 years with a history of wheezing who are receiving subcutaneous immunotherapy. Fear of injection was graded during a total of 788 immunotherapy injection visits in 18 children (age, 37 months; SD, 9 months) receiving subcutaneous allergy immunotherapy. The parent and the injection nurse assigned fear scores on a scale of 0 to 10 after each injection visit. At the time of analysis, children had a median of 49 injection visits (range, 12-88) during a median study period of 81.5 weeks (range, 15-165 weeks). Fifteen children (83%) lost their fear of injections during the study. A fear score of 0 was achieved after a mean of 8.4 visits (SD, 7.4). The more injection visits were missed, the more likely children were to retain fear of injections (hazard ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-1.02; P=.05). Age, adverse events, number of injections at each visit, and change of injection personnel were not associated with increased fear. Our analysis suggests that most children receiving weekly subcutaneous immunotherapy lose their fear of injections during the treatment course. Children with increased intervals between visits may be at higher risk of experiencing fear of injections. clinicaltrial.gov identifier NCT01028560. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 76 FR 29645 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... the main span US 70/Morehead City--Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC. This safety... Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, North Carolina in the Federal Register (33 FR 165). We received no...

  10. 76 FR 18669 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... River under the main span US 70/Morehead City--Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC... Newport River at Morehead City, North Carolina. The contract provides for cleaning, painting, and steel...

  11. 76 FR 38018 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... the main span US 70/Morehead City-Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC. This safety...) entitled Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, North Carolina in the Federal Register (33 FR 165). We...

  12. 76 FR 23227 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... River under the main span US 70/Morehead City--Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC... Newport River at Morehead City, North Carolina. The contract provides for cleaning, painting, and steel...

  13. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  14. Inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity in NC mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuto Kobayashi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the airway physiology of NC mice, the following experiments were carried out. To investigate inherent airway reactivity, we compared tracheal reactivity to various chemical mediators in NC, BALB/c, C57BL/6 and A/J mice in vitro. NC mice showed significantly greater reactivity to acetylcholine than BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and a reactivity comparable to that of A/J mice, which are known as high responders. Then, airway reactivity to acetylcholine was investigated in those strains in vivo. NC mice again showed comparable airway reactivity to that seen in A/J mice and a significantly greater reactivity than that seen in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. To investigate the effects of airway inflammation on airway reactivity to acetylcholine in vivo, NC and BALB/c mice were sensitized to and challenged with antigen. Sensitization to and challenge with antigen induced accumulation of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, in lung and increased airway reactivity in NC and BALB/c mice. These results indicate that NC mice exhibit inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Therefore, NC mice are a suitable strain to use in investigating the mechanisms underlying airway hyperreactivity and such studies will provide beneficial information for understanding the pathophysiology of asthma.

  15. On pseudorandom generators in NC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cryan, Mary; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we consider the question of whether NC 0 circuits can generate pseudorandom distributions. While we leave the general question unanswered, we show – • Generators computed by NC 0 circuits where each output bit depends on at most 3 input bits (i.e, DNC 3 0 circuits) and with stretch ...

  16. Subcutaneous mercury injection by a child: A histopathology case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Sukheeja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intentional subcutaneous injection of mercury by mentally healthy children is rare. Usually, it is seen as a part of suicidal attempt in severely depressed patients or by athletes to enhance their performance. We report a case of a 15-year-old child, inspired by a movie, who deliberately self-injected mercury subcutaneously into his forearm that led to the formation of a non-healing ulcer. Histopathology of the biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. A surgical procedure was thereby performed to treat the ulcer and reduce the blood and urinary levels of mercury. However, the patient did not develop clinical signs of chronic poisoning, proving that subcutaneous mercury injection has a low risk of systemic toxicity, and that histopathology plays an important role in diagnosis.

  17. Subcutaneous Infiltration of Carbon Dioxide (Carboxytherapy) for Abdominal Fat Reduction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Murad; Sadhwani, Divya; Geisler, Amelia; Aslam, Imran; Makin, Inder Raj S; Schlessinger, Daniel I; Disphanurat, Wareeporn; Pongprutthipan, Marisa; Voravutinon, Nataya; Weil, Alexandra; Chen, Brian R; West, Dennis P; Veledar, Emir; Poon, Emily

    2018-04-23

    Non-invasive fat removal is preferred because of decreased downtime and lower perceived risk. It is important to seek new non-invasive fat removal treatments that are both safe and efficacious. To assess the extent to which carboxytherapy, the insufflation of carbon dioxide gas into subcutaneous fat, results in reduction of fat volume. Randomized, sham-controlled, split-body study. Adults (BMI 22-29) were randomized to receive five weekly infusions of 1000 cc CO 2 to one side of the abdomen, and five sham treatments to the contralateral side. Primary outcome measures were ultrasound measurement of fat layer thickness, as well as total circumference before and after treatment. Sixteen participants completed the study. Ultrasound measurement indicated less fat volume on the sides treated with carboxytherapy one week after the last treatment, (p=0.011), but was not maintained at 28 weeks. Total circumference decreased nominally but not significantly at Week 5 compared to baseline (p=0.0697). Participant body weights did not change over the entire course of the study (p=1.00) LIMITATIONS: Limitations included modest sample size and some sources of error in circumference and fat layer measurements. Carboxytherapy provides a transient decrease in subcutaneous fat that may not persist. Treatment is well-tolerated. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Cutaneous and subcutaneous blood flow measurements in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemp, P.

    1987-01-01

    The experiments - published in 7 papers in The Journal of Investigative Dermatology 1983-86 - have demonstrated: 1. The accuracy of the local 133 Xe washout method is about 15% for estimation of the cutaneous blood flow (CBF), and about 10% for subcutaneous blood flow measurements (SBF). In measurements of absolute CBF values a graphic curve resolution of the washout curve should alwaus be performed. Otherwise the CBF might be considerably underestimated. 2. CdTe(Cl) mini-detectors can be attached directly to the skin, and might yield measurements of both CBF and SBF that can substitute for those made with conventional detectors. 3. The laser Doppler measurements could not be correlated to quantitative measurements of the CBF. 4. The tissue-to-blood partition coefficient for 133 Xe of lesional psoriatic skin (LS) is increased. 5. In untreated, LS of patients with active psoriasis the CBF is about a factor of 10 times higher than the CBF of normal individuals. In non-lesional skin (NLS) of patients with active psoriasis the CBF is about a factor of 2 higher than the CBF of normal individuals. However, the CBF did not differ in NLS of patients with minimal skin manifestations. The high CBF decreases gradualy during antipsoriatic treatment. 6. A paradoxical autoregulation of the CBF was observed in LS. 7. The high CBF is not due to a maximally dilated vascular bed. 8. The SBF in LS areas was a factor of higher than the SBF in normal individuals. 9. A normal, local regulation of the SBF was found. (author)

  19. Subcutaneous administration of carrier erythrocytes: slow release of entrapped agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, J.R.; Corrier, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Carrier erythrocytes administered subcutaneously in mice release encapsulated molecules at the injection site and through cells that escape the injection site. One day postinjection, the efflux of encapsulated [ 14 C]sucrose, [ 3 H]inulin, and 51 Cr-hemoglobin from the injection site was 45, 55, and 65%, respectively. Intact carrier erythrocytes escaped the injection site and entered the blood circulation carrying with them the encapsulated molecules. Most of the encapsulated [ 3 H]inulin that reached whole blood circulated within erythrocytes. Small but measurable numbers of encapsulated molecules were trapped within lymph nodes. Subcutaneous injection of carrier erythrocytes may allow for limited extravascular tissue targeting of drugs

  20. NC CATCH: Advancing Public Health Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, James; Fisher, John W; Eichelberger, Christopher; Bridger, Colleen; Angelon-Gaetz, Kim; Nelson, Debi

    2010-01-01

    The North Carolina Comprehensive Assessment for Tracking Community Health (NC CATCH) is a Web-based analytical system deployed to local public health units and their community partners. The system has the following characteristics: flexible, powerful online analytic processing (OLAP) interface; multiple sources of multidimensional, event-level data fully conformed to common definitions in a data warehouse structure; enabled utilization of available decision support software tools; analytic capabilities distributed and optimized locally with centralized technical infrastructure; two levels of access differentiated by the user (anonymous versus registered) and by the analytical flexibility (Community Profile versus Design Phase); and, an emphasis on user training and feedback. The ability of local public health units to engage in outcomes-based performance measurement will be influenced by continuing access to event-level data, developments in evidence-based practice for improving population health, and the application of information technology-based analytic tools and methods.

  1. Inappropriate shocks in the subcutaneous ICD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Brouwer, Tom F; Barr, Craig

    2015-01-01

    shocks have been reported. METHODS: We analyzed the incidence, predictors and management of inappropriate shocks in the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Registry, which collects S-ICD implantation information and follow-up data from clinical centers in Europe and New Zealand. RESULTS: During a follow-up of 21 ± 13...... xyphoid to V6) reduced the risk. Reprogramming or optimization of SVT treatment after the first clinical event of inappropriate shock was successful in preventing further inappropriate shocks for cardiac oversensing and SVT events. CONCLUSIONS: Inappropriate shocks, mainly due to cardiac oversensing...

  2. Physico-chemical Stability of MabThera Drug-product Solution for Subcutaneous Injection under in-use Conditions with Different Administration Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Claudia; Dietel, Elke; Heynen, Severin R; Nalenz, Heiko; Goldbach, Pierre; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Schmidt, Johannes; Grauschopf, Ulla; Schoenhamnmer, Karin

    2015-01-01

    MabThera is an essential component of the standard-of-care regimens in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia. MabThera for subcutaneous injection is a novel line extension that has been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of patients with follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This study aimed to evaluate in-use stability data of MabThera subcutaneous drug-product solution in single-use syringes for subcutaneous administration according to the European Medicines Agency guideline. The drug-product solution was exposed to material contact surfaces of five different administration setups commonly used in subcutaneous drug delivery. MabThera subcutaneous was transferred under aseptic conditions into polypropylene and polycarbonate syringes and stored for 1, 2, and 4 weeks at 2°C to 8°C followed by 24 hours at 30°C. After storage, subcutaneous administration was simulated and MabThera subcutaneous drug-product solution quality attributes were evaluated by using compendial physico-chemical tests, as well as suitable and validated molecule- and formulation-specific analytical methods. MabThera subcutaneous vials were treated and analyzed in parallel. The physico-chemical results of MabThera subcutaneous in the different setups were comparable to the control for all timepoints. No change in drug-product quality after storage and simulated administration was found compared to the control. However, since single-dose products do not contain preservatives, microbial contamination and growth needs to be avoided and product sterility needs to be ensured. The results showed that MabThera subcutaneous remains compatible and stable, from a physico-chemical perspective, for up to 4 weeks at 2°C to 8°C followed by 24 hours at 30°C with the contact materials tested in this study. In order to avoid and minimize microbial growth, MabThera subcutaneous should be used immediately after removal from the original

  3. Therapeutic efficacy of monthly subcutaneous injection of daclizumab in relapsing multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohan, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of multiple disease-modifying therapies for relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS), there remains a need for highly efficacious targeted therapy with a favorable benefit–risk profile and attributes that encourage a high level of treatment adherence. Daclizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against CD25, the α subunit of the high-affinity interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, that reversibly modulates IL-2 signaling. Daclizumab treatment leads to antagonism of proinflammatory, activated T lymphocyte function and expansion of immunoregulatory CD56bright natural killer cells, and has the potential to, at least in part, rectify the imbalance between immune tolerance and autoimmunity in relapsing MS. The clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of subcutaneous daclizumab have been evaluated extensively in a large clinical study program. In pivotal studies, daclizumab demonstrated superior efficacy in reducing clinical and radiologic measures of MS disease activity compared with placebo or intramuscular interferon beta-1a, a standard-of-care therapy for relapsing MS. The risk of hepatic disorders, cutaneous events, and infections was modestly increased. The monthly subcutaneous self-injection dosing regimen of daclizumab may be advantageous in maintaining patient adherence to treatment, which is important for optimal outcomes with MS disease-modifying therapy. Daclizumab has been approved in the US and in the European Union and represents an effective new treatment option for patients with relapsing forms of MS, and is currently under review by other regulatory agencies. PMID:27672308

  4. Subcutaneously Placed Breast Implants after a Skin-Sparing Mastectomy: Do We Always Need ADM?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apresh Singla, MBBS, MSc

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:. Immediate breast reconstruction is an acceptable treatment option after mastectomy for prophylaxis of early breast cancer. Different options exist for implant placement, incision technique, patient suitability, and institutional experience. This article is a case series exploring the feasibility and outcomes of patients undergoing immediate breast reconstruction using skin-sparing mastectomy without mesh or acellular dermal matrix (ADM and with a vertical inframammary incision. Methods:. A single-institution retrospective analysis was performed for all patients who underwent immediate single-stage reconstruction with subcutaneous silicon implants without ADM between 2009 and 2014 inclusive. Patient, operative and treatment variables were extracted. All patients with viable mastectomy skin flaps intraoperatively and at least 5 mm of subcutaneous tissue were eligible except for patients who were deemed too slim by the senior surgeon preoperatively and thus at risk of implant visibility or skin rippling. Results:. There were 26 patients (bilateral n = 12 and unilateral n = 14 eligible for analysis, with a median long-term follow-up of 51.5 months. The majority of complications were classified as minor affecting 46.2% of the cohort (n = 12. There were 20 episodes of complications overall. The most frequent episodes were contour defects (x = 5, minor seroma (x = 4, and malrotation and minor infection (x = 3. There was 1 episode of capsular contracture. Conclusion:. Skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate subcutaneous silicon implant reconstruction with a vertical incision and without the need for mesh or ADM is an acceptable and safe treatment option. Accurate patient selection and skin flap viability is the key to achieving optimal outcomes with this approach.

  5. Inappropriate shocks in the subcutaneous ICD: Incidence, predictors and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R. A.; Brouwer, Tom F.; Barr, Craig; Theuns, Dominic A. M. J.; Boersma, Lucas V. A.; Johansen, Jens B.; Neuzil, Petr; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Carter, Nathan; Husby, Michael; Lambiase, Pier D.; Knops, Reinoud E.

    2015-01-01

    The entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) eliminates the need for transvenous leads, and therefore has the potential to improve lead-longevity and reduce lead-related complications. The S-ICD has a morphology-based sensing algorithm of which inappropriate shocks have

  6. Worldwide experience with a totally subcutaneous implantable defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambiase, Pier D; Barr, Craig; Theuns, Dominic A M J

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The totally subcutaneous implantable-defibrillator (S-ICD) is a new alternative to the conventional transvenous ICD system to minimize intravascular lead complications. There are limited data describing the long-term performance of the S-ICD. This paper presents the first large internationa...

  7. miRNAs in Human Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Malene M.; Davidsen, Peter K.; Vigelso, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Objective Obesity is central in the development of insulin resistance. However, the underlying mechanisms still need elucidation. Dysregulated microRNAs (miRNAs; post-transcriptional regulators) in adipose tissue may present an important link. Methods The miRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose ...

  8. Subcutaneous face and neck surgical emphysema secondary to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subcutaneous face and neck surgical emphysema secondary to presumed spider bite. W Mulwafu. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  9. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of opiates at end-of-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stacey L; Shreve, Scott T

    2004-06-01

    To review pertinent controlled trials using the continuous subcutaneous infusion of opioids (CSIO) at end-of-life and offer insight to pharmacists and clinicians into the appropriate use of this route of administration. A MEDLINE search for information regarding the subcutaneous administration of opioids in terminally ill patients (1975-December 2002) was conducted using the key words subcutaneous, narcotics, morphine, hydromorphone, fentanyl, pain, hospices, and palliative care. Additional references were located through review of bibliographies of the articles cited. Case reports and postsurgical studies were excluded. Searches were limited to English-language studies using humans. Experimental and observational studies were evaluated, using prospective trials as the evidence base for conclusions and including pertinent retrospective trials as they relate to the subcutaneous infusion of opioids at end-of-life. CSIO is effective and safe for use in terminal illness. Appropriate situations for consideration of CSIO are when difficulties arise in using the oral route, standard oral opiate therapy has failed adequate trials, the patient has limited intravenous access, adequate supervision of the CSIO is present, and CSIO will not unduly limit the functional activity of the patient. CSIO has a proven role in the management of pain at end-of-life. CSIO should not be considered the first route for administration of opiates, but does offer distinct advantages in the appropriate setting. CSIO continues to be a choice for end-of-life patients and is gradually becoming a standard practice in palliative medicine.

  10. Subcutaneous emphysema during third molar surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Umberto; Galanakis, Alexandros; Lerario, Francesco; Daniele, Gabriele Maria; Tenore, Gianluca; Palaia, Gaspare

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of third molars is the most common surgical procedure performed in oral surgery on a daily basis and, despite surgical skills and expertise, complications may occur. Complications observed during or after third molar removal may include pain, swelling, bleeding, infection, sinus perforation and nerve damage. Fortunately, with a proper management and a good surgical technique, the incidence of such events is low. Subcutaneous emphysema associated with dental extraction occurs when the air from the high-speed dental handpiece is forced into the soft tissue through the reflected flap and invades the adjacent tissues, leading to swelling, crepitus on palpation and occasionally spreading through the tissue spaces of the fascial planes. Although rare, iatrogenic subcutaneous emphysema can have serious and potentially life-threatening consequences. Care should be taken when using air-driven handpieces. The access of air into the facial tissues is not limited to tooth extractions, but may also occur through other portals of entrance, such as endodontically treated teeth, periodontium and lacerations of intraoral soft tissues. When subcutaneous emphysema occurs, it must be quickly diagnosed and properly managed to reduce the risk of further complications. This report presents a case of subcutaneous emphysema occurred during extraction of a mandibular third molar extraction with the use of an air turbine handpiece. Case management is described and issues relative to the diagnosis and prevention of this surgical complication are discussed.

  11. The effect of breed on fatty acid composition of subcutaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2015-02-23

    Feb 23, 2015 ... FA, total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and n-6PUFA contents were observed in the subcutaneous adipose .... frozen at −20 ºC, pending FA analysis. Samples of the .... The synthesis and metabolism of FAs in the ruminant ...

  12. Fatty acid composition of subcutaneous and kidney fat depots of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    60. Fatty acid composition of subcutaneous and kidney fat depots of Boer goats and the response to varying levels of maize meal. N.H. Casey" and W.A. van Niekerk. Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture,. University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0002 Republic of South Africa. xTo whom correspondence should be ...

  13. Microcosting Study of Rituximab Subcutaneous Injection Versus Intravenous Infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajloviç, Jovan; Bax, Pieter; van Breugel, Erwin; Blommestein, Hedwig M.; Hoogendoorn, Mels; Hospes, Wobbe; Postma, Maarten J.

    Purpose: The goal of this study is to identify and compare all direct costs of intravenous and subcutaneous rituximab given to patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the Netherlands.  Methods: Using a prospective, observational, bottom-up microcosting study, we collected primary data on the

  14. Roentgenography of the skin and subcutaneous fat in postmastectomy edema of the upper limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshenko, Yu.T.; Moroz, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of radiography of the forearm and shoulder soft tissues in 47 patients with postmastectomy syndrome before and after conservative treatment and in 6 controls made it possible to determine differences in x-ray imaging of a skin and subcutaneous fat layer in limb edema. These differences were determined by lymph flow disorders and the formation of a connective tissue of a connective tissue component in subsutaneous fat and could be used for objective assessment of a degree of edema, determination of tactics of rehabilitation activities and assessment of their effectiveness

  15. Effect of Postoperative Diclofenac on Anastomotic Healing, Skin Wounds and Subcutaneous Collagen Accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, M; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Kongsbak, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Retrospective studies have drawn attention to possible detrimental effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the anastomotic leakage rate after colorectal resection. In this study, we examined the effects of the NSAID diclofenac on the breaking strength...... diclofenac treatment significantly inhibited collagen deposition in subcutaneous granulation tissue. Anastomotic strength and skin wound strength were not significantly affected. The ePTFE model is suitable for assessing the effect of various drugs on collagen formation and thus on wound healing....

  16. Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow in the forefoot during 24 hours. Labeling pattern and reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Bülow, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1987-01-01

    Wash-out of 133xenon from a local depot in the subcutaneous adipose tissue in the forefoot was measured continuously during 24 hours on subsequent recordings in 51 feet (normal circulation: 10, intermittent claudication: 22 and ischaemic nocturnal rest pain: 19) with a mean time interval of 26 da...... was calculated to 10%, and for the ratio of blood flow from day to night to 5%. The method is thus considered apt as a monitor in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease, for example, surgery and medical therapy. As predominant source of error is the formation of oedema....

  17. An Unusual Complication After the Extraction of a Maxillary Third Molar: Extensive Subcutaneous Emphysema. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Soylu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Third molar surgery is one of the most frequently performed procedures in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Various complications including pain, bleeding, infection, edema, hematoma, perforation of the maxillary sinus, and subcutaneous emphysema (SE can occur after third molar surgery. Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema (CSE most often occurs after the extraction of third molars, especially when using high-speed air-turbine drills and air syringes, or during dental laser treatment or even after endodontic treatment. This report presents the diagnosis and treatment protocol of a CSE in a 42-year-old healthy male patient that occurred after extraction of a totally erupted upper third molar with just a straight elevator and extraction forceps.

  18. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment and screening for hypocretin neuron-specific autoantibodies in recent onset childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, S; Mikkelsen, J D; Bang, B

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) is caused by substantial loss of hypocretin neurons. NC patients carry the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele suggesting that hypocretin neuron loss is due to an autoimmune attack. We tested intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment in early onset NC.......Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) is caused by substantial loss of hypocretin neurons. NC patients carry the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele suggesting that hypocretin neuron loss is due to an autoimmune attack. We tested intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment in early onset NC....

  19. Influence of circulating epinephrine on absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernqvist, E.; Gunnarsson, R.; Linde, B.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of epinephrine (Epi) infusion on the absorption of subcutaneously injected 125I-labeled soluble human insulin (10 U) from the thigh or the abdomen were studied in 16 healthy subjects and from the thigh in 10 insulin-dependent diabetic (IDDM) patients. Epi was infused at 0.3 (high dose) or 0.1 (low dose; healthy subjects) nmol.kg-1.min-1 i.v., resulting in arterial plasma Epi levels of approximately 6 and 2 nM, respectively. Saline was infused on a control day. Insulin absorption was measured as disappearance of radioactivity from the injection site and as appearance of plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI). Adipose tissue blood flow was measured with the 133Xe clearance technique. First-order disappearance rate constants of 125I from the thigh depot decreased approximately 40-50% during the high dose of Epi compared with control (P less than .001). The corresponding decrease from the abdominal depot was approximately 40% (P less than .001), whereas no significant change was found during the low Epi dose. IRI fell compared with control in all groups at the high Epi dose. The Epi-induced depression of insulin absorption occurred despite unaltered or even slightly increased subcutaneous blood flow. The results indicate that circulating Epi at levels seen during moderate physical stress depresses the absorption of soluble insulin from subcutaneous injection sites to an extent that might be important for glycemic control in IDDM patients. Furthermore, dissociation is found between changes in insulin absorption and subcutaneous blood flow during Epi infusion, suggesting that factors other than blood flow may also influence the absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin

  20. Subcutaneous Fascial Bands—A Qualitative and Morphometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weihui; Ahn, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although fascial bands within the subcutaneous (SQ) layer are commonly seen in ultrasound images, little is known about their functional role, much less their structural characteristics. This study's objective is to describe the morphological features of SQ fascial bands and to systematically evaluate the bands using image analyses tools and morphometric measures. Methods In 28 healthy volunteers, ultrasound images were obtained at three body locations: the lateral aspect of the upper arm, medial aspect of the thigh and posterior aspect of lower leg. Using image analytical techniques, the total SQ band area, fascial band number, fascial band thickness, and SQ zone (layer) thickness were determined. In addition, the SQ spatial coherence was calculated based on the eigenvalues associated with the largest and smallest eigenvectors of the images. Results Fascial bands at these sites were contiguous with the dermis and the epimysium forming an interconnected network within the subcutaneous tissue. Subcutaneous blood vessels were also frequently encased by these fascial bands. The total SQ fascial band area was greater at the thigh and calf compared to the arm and was unrelated to SQ layer (zone) thickness. The thigh was associated with highest average number of fascial bands while calf was associated with the greatest average fascial band thickness. Across body regions, greater SQ zone thickness was associated with thinner fascial bands. SQ coherence was significantly associated with SQ zone thickness and body location (calf with statistically greater coherence compared to arm). Conclusion Fascial bands are structural bridges that mechanically link the skin, subcutaneous layer, and deeper muscle layers. This cohesive network also encases subcutaneous vessels and may indirectly mediate blood flow. The quantity and morphological characteristics of the SQ fascial band may reflect the composite mechanical forces experienced by the body part. PMID:21931632

  1. Inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity in NC mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuto Kobayashi; Toru Miura; Tomoko Haba; Miyuki Sato; Masao Takei; Isao Serizawa

    1999-01-01

    In order to clarify the airway physiology of NC mice, the following experiments were carried out. To investigate inherent airway reactivity, we compared tracheal reactivity to various chemical mediators in NC, BALB/c, C57BL/6 and A/J mice in vitro. NC mice showed significantly greater reactivity to acetylcholine than BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and a reactivity comparable to that of A/J mice, which are known as high responders. Then, airway reactivity to acetylcholine was investigated in those st...

  2. Effects of chelating agent CBMIDA on the toxicity of depleted uranium administered subcutaneously in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Satoshi; Ikeda, Mizuyo; Nakamaura, Mariko

    2008-01-01

    We examined the acute toxicity of depleted uranium (DU) after subcutaneous injection as a simulated wounds model, and the effects of the chelating agent catechol-3,6-bis(methyliminodiacetic acid) (CBMIDA), by local treatment in rats. First, to examine the initial behavior and toxicity of uranium of different chemical forms, male Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected with 4 and 16 mg/kg DU (pH 1) in a solution of pH 1 and 7, respectively, and were killed 1, 3, 6 and 24 hours later. After the injection of DU(pH1), about 60% of the uranium was retained for first 1-3 hours at the injected sites, and then decreased to 16% at 24 hours in the 4 mg/kg DU group; however, the uranium did not change significantly in the 16 mg/kg DU group. Urinary excretion rates of uranium increased in a time-independent manner after the injection Depositions of uranium in the liver, kidneys and femur were found at 1 hour after DU injection, with significant increases in serum and urinary biochemical markers indicating acute and severe damage. The results of the DU (pH 7) injection were useful for estimating the toxicity of uranium by the chemical changes in the body. Second, CBMIDA (480 mg/kg) was infused into the DU-injected site at 0, 10, 30, 60 min and 24 hours after the subcutaneous injection of 4 mg/kg DU (pH 1 and 7). When CBMIDA was administered within 120 min after DU (pH 1) injection, the uranium at the injected sites decreased to 4-17% of that in the no-treatment DU (pH 1) group, and was excreted effectively in the urine and feces, with decreased levels in the kidneys and femur. The results indicated that the subcutaneously injected uranium acutely induced severe damage in the DU-injected sites and organs after DU intake, relating to chemical forms of uranium by pH and that local treatment of CBMIDA was effective in decreasing the acute toxicity of uranium if carried out as early as possible (at least within 2 hours) after DU administration. (author)

  3. Effect of continuous subcutaneous insulin pump infusion on glucolipid metabolism as well as inflammation and oxidative stress in placenta of patients with GDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of continuous subcutaneous insulin pump infusion on glucolipid metabolism as well as inflammation and oxidative stress in placenta of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Methods: Patients with GDM who received insulin therapy between March 2013 and May 2016 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into multiple subcutaneous insulin injection (MSII group and continuous subcutaneous insulin pump infusion (CSII group. Before and after treatment, serum glucolipid metabolism as well as inflammation and oxidative stress inexes in placenta were determined respectively. Results: 2 weeks and 4 weeks after treatment, FBG, 1hPBG, 2hPBG, Chemerin, Vaspin and Visfatin levels of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those before treatment and FBG, 1hPBG, 2hPBG, Chemerin, Vaspin and Visfatin levels of CSII group were significantly lower than those of MSII group; after delivery, TNF-α, IL-6, ROS and AGEs levels in placenta of CSII group were significantly lower than those of MSII group. Conclusion: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion can more effectively improve the glucolipid metabolism and inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress in placenta of patients with GDM than multiple subcutaneous insulin injection.

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_003902 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003902 gi|21232942 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003919 gi|21242877 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_004663 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_004663 gi|29348666 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_004578 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_004578 gi|28867366 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_005139 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_005139 gi|37678876 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003919 gi|21241391 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_006177 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006177 gi|51892124 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_006349 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006349 gi|53716793 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_006840 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006840 gi|59711756 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006370 gi|54310137 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003919 gi|21243399 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003869 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003869 gi|20807352 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_006351 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006351 gi|53722013 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_004459 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_004459 gi|27363966 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_006834 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006834 gi|58583632 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  19. ORF Sequence: NC_001139 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001139 gi|6321518 >gi|6321518|ref|NP_011595.1| Protein of unknown function; deletion... mutant has synthetic fitness defect with an sgs1 deletion mutant; Slx9p [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] MVA

  20. Observations of NC stop nets for bottlenose dolphin takes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To observe the NC stop net fishery to document the entanglement of bottlenose dolphins and movement of dolphins around the nets.

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002947 gi|26988182 >1rwrA 1 265 36 293 1e-50 ... ref|NP_743607.1| surface colonization... ... gb|AAN67071.1| surface colonization protein, putative ... [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] ...

  2. ORF Sequence: NC_003281 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003281 gi|25151987 >gi|25151987|ref|NP_499440.2| TRAnsformer : XX animals trans...formed into males TRA-1, HERmaphrodization of XO animals HER-2, sex determination zinc-finger protein, alter

  3. ORF Sequence: NC_003282 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inization of XX and XO animals FEM-3 (46.2 kD) (fem-3) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MEVDPGSDDVEADRETRAQKLKLKRNVK... NC_003282 gi|17540880 >gi|17540880|ref|NP_501587.1| sex determination protein, FEM

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_003282 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003282 gi|17540144 >gi|17540144|ref|NP_500824.1| feminization 1 homolog a, FEMinization of XX and XO ani...mals FEM-1 (fem-1) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MTPNGHHFRTVIYNAAAVGNLQRIKVFTINSRNDRQWII

  5. ORF Sequence: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31792282 >gi|31792282|ref|NP_854775.1| PROBABLE CELLULASE CELA2A (ENDO-1,4-BETA-GLUCA...NASE) (ENDOGLUCANASE) (CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULASE) [Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97] MNGAAPTNGAPLSYPSICEGVHWGHLVGGHQPAY

  6. ORF Sequence: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000962 gi|57116825 >gi|57116825|ref|YP_177638.1| PROBABLE CELLULASE CELA2A (ENDO-1,4-BETA-GLUCA...NASE) (ENDOGLUCANASE) (CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULASE) [Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv] MNGAAPTNGAPLSYPSICEGVHWGHLVGGHQPAY

  7. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|16131649 >gi|16131649|ref|NP_418241.1| TDP-Fuc4NAc:lipidII transferase; synthesis of enterobac...terial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli K12] MSLLQFSGLFVVWLLCTLFIATLTWFEFRRVR

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erobacterial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli K12] MKVLTVFGTRPEAIKMAPLVHALAKD... NC_000913 gi|49176409 >gi|49176409|ref|YP_026253.1| UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine -2-epimerase; synthesis of ent

  9. ORF Sequence: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erobacterial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] MSAKALAAYSKRIDV... NC_002655 gi|15804377 >gi|15804377|ref|NP_290417.1| UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine -2-epimerase; synthesis of ent

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of cations and cationic drugs [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis str. SC-B67] MQQFEWI... NC_006905 gi|62180071 >gi|62180071|ref|YP_216488.1| putative membrane transporter

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_002977 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002977 gi|53804693 >1fgjA 20 492 48 517 e-179 ... gb|AAU92745.1| hydroxylamine oxy...doreductase [Methylococcus capsulatus str. Bath] ... ref|YP_113436.1| hydroxylamine oxydoreductase ...

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_006569 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006569 gi|56708985 >1fgjA 5 498 32 521 0.0 ... ref|YP_165030.1| hydroxylamine oxid...oreductase [Silicibacter pomeroyi DSS-3] ... gb|AAV97335.1| hydroxylamine oxidoreductase ... [

  13. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of cations and cationic drugs [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis str. SC-B67] MFYWILL... NC_006905 gi|62180070 >gi|62180070|ref|YP_216487.1| putative membrane transporter

  14. Explorations of the extended ncKP hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimakis, Aristophanes; Mueller-Hoissen, Folkert

    2004-01-01

    A recently obtained extension (xncKP) of the Moyal-deformed KP hierarchy (ncKP hierarchy) by a set of evolution equations in the Moyal-deformation parameters is further explored. Formulae are derived to compute these equations efficiently. Reductions of the xncKP hierarchy are treated, in particular to the extended ncKdV and ncBoussinesq hierarchies. Furthermore, a good part of the Sato formalism for the KP hierarchy is carried over to the generalized framework. In particular, the well-known bilinear identity theorem for the KP hierarchy, expressed in terms of the (formal) Baker-Akhiezer function, extends to the xncKP hierarchy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that N-soliton solutions of the ncKP equation are also solutions of the first few deformation equations. This is shown to be related to the existence of certain families of algebraic identities

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003295 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003295 gi|17546028 >1fjgR 2 71 22 91 5e-16 ... emb|CAD15011.1| PROBABLE PRIMOSOMAL REPLICATION... PROTEIN [Ralstonia solanacearum] ... ref|NP_519430.1| PROBABLE PRIMOSOMAL REPLICATION ...

  16. ORF Sequence: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available se/invertase); possible inulinase [Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705] MTDFTPETPVLTPIHDHAAELAKAEAGVAEMAANRNNRWYP... NC_004307 gi|23464731 >gi|23464731|ref|NP_695334.1| beta-fructofuranosidase (sucra

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_006371 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006371 gi|54302237 >1r690 2 63 15 79 7e-05 ... ref|YP_132230.1| hypotethical trans...criptional regulator [Photobacterium profundum ... SS9] emb|CAG22430.1| hypotethical transcriptional ...

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_005296 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005296 gi|39936477 >1kmoA 7 661 92 753 2e-72 ... emb|CAE28855.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris... ... putative hydroxamate-type ferrisiderophore receptor ... [Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009] ...

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_006155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006155 gi|51597538 >1kmoA 5 661 59 714 9e-71 ... ref|YP_071729.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...ive ... hydroxamate-type ferrisiderophore receptor. [Yersinia ... pseudotuberculosis IP 32953

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004307 gi|23465117 >1g5aA 80 628 2 589 5e-59 ... gb|AAL05573.1| alpha-glucosidase [Bifidobacterium adolesce...ntis] ... Length = 588 ... Query: 1 ... MTANNLNDDWWKQAVVYQIYPRSFKDVNGDGLGDIAGVTEK

  1. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006905 gi|62181272 >gi|62181272|ref|YP_217689.1| H inversion: regulation of fla...gellar gene expression by site-specific inversion of DNA [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choler

  2. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|16128606 >gi|16128606|ref|NP_415156.1| RNA chaperone, transcription antiterm...inator, affects expression of rpoS and uspA [Escherichia coli K12] MSKIKGNVKWFNESKGFGFITPEDGSKDVFVHFSAIQTNGFKTLAEGQRVEFEITNGAKGPSAANVIAL

  3. ORF Sequence: NC_001147 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001147 gi|6324442 >gi|6324442|ref|NP_014511.1| Plasma membrane Mg(2+) transporter, expression and turnov...er are regulated by Mg(2+) concentration; overexpression confers increased toleranc

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_004605 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein) (involved in swarmer cell regulation) [Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD 2210633] MKKAVKKISSKKIITISAIIV... NC_004605 gi|28901366 >gi|28901366|ref|NP_801021.1| ScrC (sensory box/GGDEF family

  5. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g protein (involved in environmental regulation of virulence factors) [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica s... NC_006905 gi|62179085 >gi|62179085|ref|YP_215502.1| hemolysin expression modulatin

  6. ORF Sequence: NC_003283 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003283 gi|17563066 >gi|17563066|ref|NP_506462.1| putative protein family member, with a transme...mbrane domain (5O433) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MWNLVSPIHISSKFSMEMAEVNVVAVPEENRQTYLETDNDRLVMAIIWLIMPPMAVFFKCRGCTKHVFINFLLYLLLVLPAYKHATWFCFVKGREFEAEDGFVRAR

  7. ORF Sequence: NC_003280 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003280 gi|17535455 >gi|17535455|ref|NP_495314.1| putative endoplasmic reticulum protein, with a transme...mbrane domain (2G788) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MTDVRFIIWNCIALLVALMMALTSIIILSDAPHNSME

  8. 76 FR 78331 - Environmental Impact Statement: Jackson County, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... following purpose description: ``The purpose of this project is to relieve traffic congestion in the Sylva... that improves the NC 107 north/south vehicular mobility by increasing average speeds for through...

  9. ORF Sequence: NC_001137 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ull mutation has global effects on transcription; Yer064cp [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] MIDDTENSKIHLEGSHKTGKYT... NC_001137 gi|6320907 >gi|6320907|ref|NP_010986.1| Non-essential nuclear protein; n

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_001145 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001145 gi|6323710 >gi|6323710|ref|NP_013781.1| Protein required for nuclear mem...brane fusion during karyogamy, localizes to the membrane with a soluble portion in the endoplasmic reticulum

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003888 gi|21219041 >1pv1A 14 282 20 256 6e-05 ... emb|CAE53384.1| hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes... teichomyceticus] emb|CAG15045.1| ... hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes teichomyce

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tide synthetase [Actinoplanes teichomyceticus] ... Length = 427 ... Query: 12 ... LSPLQEGMLFHNLFDEEELDAYNVQ... NC_003888 gi|32141196 >1l5aA 1 423 12 438 2e-57 ... emb|CAE53352.1| non-ribosomal pep

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003306 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003306 gi|17938860 >1pv1A 14 282 20 256 6e-05 ... emb|CAE53384.1| hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes... teichomyceticus] emb|CAG15045.1| ... hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes teichomyce

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005363 gi|42523916 >1a12A 35 375 64 376 3e-39 ... emb|CAE53335.1| putative RCC1 repeats protein [Actinoplan...es teichomyceticus] ... Length = 313 ... Query: 425 GVGFACALYDNNDLKCFGANDYGQLGD

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003064 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003064 gi|16119505 >1pv1A 14 282 20 256 6e-05 ... emb|CAE53384.1| hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes... teichomyceticus] emb|CAG15045.1| ... hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes teichomyce

  16. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13357802 >gi|13357802|ref|NP_078076.1| ribosomal protein L24 [Ureapla...sma parvum serovar 3 str. ATCC 700970] MNRIKKGDTVVVISGKNKNKSGVVIQVNPKEQTALVEGVNKIKRHQKKDQTHEQSGIIEKEAPIRLCKLALVDPKGKDKGKATKVKYLLKDNKKVRVARKSGSELDVNKK

  17. 77 FR 46631 - Television Broadcasting Services; Greenville, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ...] Television Broadcasting Services; Greenville, NC AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final... acceptance of full power television rulemaking petitions requesting channel substitutions in May 2011, it... Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television. Federal Communications Commission. Barbara A. Kreisman, Chief, Video...

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_005090 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005090 gi|34558174 >1wcv1 4 239 4 244 2e-25 ... ref|NP_907989.1| SEPTUM SITE-DETERMINING...| SEPTUM ... SITE-DETERMINING PROTEIN MIND CELL DIVISION INHIBITOR ... MIND [Wolinella succino

  19. ORF Sequence: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15965329 >gi|15965329|ref|NP_385682.1| PROBABLE CARBAMOYL-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE LARGE CHAIN (AMMO...NIA CHAIN ARGININE BIOSYNTHESIS) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MPKRQDIKSILI

  20. ORF Sequence: NC_001134 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ivery of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins to the nucleoplasm, binds rg-nucl... NC_001134 gi|6319491 >gi|6319491|ref|NP_009573.1| Transportin, cytosolic karyopherin beta 2 involved in del

  1. BChPT x 1/Nc: masses and currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goity, Jose L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Fernando, Ishara P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2018-04-01

    A summary of the implementation of the combined BChPT X 1/Nc expansion for three flavors is presented, along with its applications to the octet and decuplet baryon masses, SU(3) charges and axial couplings.

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003919 gi|21242752 >1iwlA 2 180 23 207 3e-47 ... gb|AAM36870.1| outer-membrane lipoproteins... ... outer-membrane lipoproteins carrier protein precursor ... [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citr

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54308356 >1iwlA 4 181 22 199 2e-52 ... ref|YP_129376.1| hypothetical outer membrane lipoproteins... ... hypothetical outer membrane lipoproteins carrier protein ... [Photobacterium profundum] ... L

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002655 gi|15800754 >gi|15800754|ref|NP_286768.1| periplasmic protein effects translocation of lipoprotei...ns from inner membrane to outer [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] MMKKIAITCALLSSLVA

  5. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|16128858 >gi|16128858|ref|NP_415411.1| periplasmic chaperone effects translocation of lipoprot...eins from inner membrane to outer membrane [Escherichia coli K12] MMKKIAITCALLSSLVA

  6. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006905 gi|62179485 >gi|62179485|ref|YP_215902.1| periplasmic protein effects translocation of lipoprotei...ns from inner membrane to outer membrane [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serov

  7. precision deburring using NC and robot equipment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-05-01

    Deburring precision miniature components is often time consuming and inconsistent. Although robots are available for deburring parts, they are not precise enough for precision miniature parts. Numerical control (NC) machining can provide edge break consistencies to meet requirements such as 76.2-..mu..m maximum edge break (chamfer). Although NC machining has a number of technical limitations which prohibits its use on many geometries, it can be an effective approach to features that are particularly difficult to deburr.

  8. No antiinflammatory effect of short-term topical and subcutaneous administration of local anesthetics on postburn inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Brennum, J

    1993-01-01

    , development of blister and ulcerations, or the intensity of inflammation after burn injury between the control legs and EMLA- or bupivacaine-treated legs, respectively. CONCLUSION. No antiinflammatory effect of short-term preinjury and postinjury topical 5% EMLA or subcutaneous 0.5% bupivacaine could...... and left calves with a 15 x 25 mm rectangular thermode. Eight subjects had topical 5% EMLA applied before and after burn injury, and another eight subjects were administered subcutaneous 0.5% bupivacaine infiltration before burn injury on the right or left leg. No treatment was applied to the contralateral...... leg in either group because this served as the control. The dermal response after burn injury in test areas with EMLA or bupivacaine and without treatment was compared 24 hours, 72 hours, 168 hours, and 14 days after burn injury. RESULTS. No significant difference was found in the area of flare...

  9. Pharmacokinetics of a new subcutaneous diclofenac formulation administered to three body sites: quadriceps, gluteus, and abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Salvatore; Piazza, Cateno; Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Cardì, Francesco; Gugliotta, Barbara; Drago, Filippo

    2014-02-01

    To assess the relative bioavailability of a new subcutaneous (SC) diclofenac hydroxypropyl b-cyclodextrin (HPbCD) formulation administered to three body sites: quadriceps, gluteus, and abdomen. This was a pilot, single-dose, randomized, three-way crossover relative bioavailability study. A total of 12 healthy subjects received a single SC injection of diclofenac HPbCD 50 mg/1 mL in the quadriceps, gluteus, or abdomen. The AUC was comparable after SC diclofenac HPbCD in the quadriceps, gluteus, and abdomen. The Cmax was comparable after SC administration in the quadriceps or abdomen, and ~ 17% higher in the gluteus. The absorption was rapid (30 minutes) after administration of the treatment at any site. The treatment was well tolerated. The relative bioavailability of SC diclofenac HPbCD was comparable when administered to the quadriceps, gluteus, and abdomen. The new diclofenac formulation can therefore be administered subcutaneously to any of these sites without clinically significant differences. A further adequately powered study would be necessary to reveal any differences among injection sites in terms of peak plasma concentration.

  10. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion preserves axonal function in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwai, Natalie; Arnold, Ria; Poynten, Ann M; Lin, Cindy S-Y; Kiernan, Matthew C; Krishnan, Arun V

    2015-02-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common and debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus. Although strict glycaemic control may reduce the risk of developing diabetic peripheral neuropathy, the neurological benefits of different insulin regimens remain relatively unknown. In the present study, 55 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent clinical neurological assessment. Subsequently, 41 non-neuropathic patients, 24 of whom were receiving multiple daily insulin injections (MDII) and 17 receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), underwent nerve excitability testing, a technique that assesses axonal ion channel function and membrane potential in human nerves. Treatment groups were matched for glycaemic control, body mass index, disease duration and gender. Neurophysiological parameters were compared between treatment groups and those taken from age and sex-matched normal controls. Prominent differences in axonal function were noted between MDII-treated and CSII-treated patients. Specifically, MDII patients manifested prominent abnormalities when compared with normal controls in threshold electrotonus (TE) parameters including depolarizing TE(10-20ms), undershoot and hyperpolarizing TE (90-100 ms) (P type 1 diabetes is maintained within normal limits in patients treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and not with multiple daily insulin injections. This raises the possibility that CSII therapy may have neuroprotective potential in patients with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Subcutaneous emphysema as a complication of tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacić Aca

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication in dentistry, which may lead to diagnostic errors and inadequate therapy. A 17 years old female patient, in whom the separation of tooth roots was performed by the use of air-powered drill during the extraction of the first right lower molar, is presented in this paper. During the intervention, swelling of the right half of the face and the lower eyelid suddenly occurred, accompanied with simultaneous feeling of choking, and pressure in the neck and chest. Because of the suspicion of the allergic reaction, the patient was administered antihistaminic agent, together with parenteral corticosteroid, and was sent to an institution where she was treated as an in-patient. During hospitalization, subcutaneous emphysema of the face and neck was diagnosed by physical and x-ray examination. The emphysema completely disappeared after the use of oxygen and antibiotics.

  12. Protein 53 expression in a mixed Labrador subcutaneous lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annahita Rezaie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An 11 year – old mixed female Labrador was presented with two masses in trunk and neck. The tumoral masses were excised and sent for histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses. Histopathological examination of masses revealed diffuse infiltration of small sized lymphoid cells in subcutaneous tissue which were intense around the blood vessels. More than 10% lymphoid cells were CD3 positive in the immunohistochemical staining and most of them were accumulated around vessels. Protein 53 (p53 expression was detected by brown nuclei in immunohistochemical staining. Subcutaneous lymphoma was diagnosed according to histopathological results. After 6 months the case was referred with multicentric lymphoma and based on the owner request euthanasia was performed. These findings emphasize on poor prognosis for tumors with p53 mutation.

  13. Localized Subcutaneous Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin Schoellhorn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog was presented with a five-day history of hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and fever. On physical examination, the dog was lethargic and clinically dehydrated. The skin of the entire ventral abdomen extending to both flanks was erythematous, swollen and painful on palpation. Histopathological examination of skin biopsies revealed a severe diffuse neutrophilic dermatitis and panniculitis, resembling the subcutaneous form of Sweet’s syndrome in humans. A large part of the skin lesion developed full-thickness necrosis. After intensive care, three surgical wound debridements and wound adaptations, the wound healed by secondary intention within ten weeks. In the absence of infection of the skin or neoplasia, a diagnosis of neutrophilic dermatosis and panniculitis, resembling the subcutaneous form of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, was made.

  14. Productive performance and economic analysis of Santa Inês sheep slaughtered at different subcutaneous fat levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa de Oliveira Queiroz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the productive and economic performance of feedlot-finished Santa Inês lambs slaughtered at three subcutaneous fat levels. Twenty-four uncastrated male lambs with 100 ± 10 days of age and an initial body weight of 22.6 ± 3.9 kg were randomly assigned to three treatments and slaughtered at a subcutaneous fat thickness of 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 mm. A completely randomized design consisting of three treatments and eight repetitions per treatment was adopted. Productivity parameters included final body weight, dry matter intake, daily and total weight gains, and feed conversion. For the determination of economically viable fat thickness for slaughter, only direct production costs such as lamb purchase costs, feed costs and cost of labor were considered, and revenue, expenses and profit were analyzed. The final body weight and total weight gain differed significantly (P<0.05 between treatments. Lambs slaughtered at a subcutaneous fat thickness of 3.0 and 4.0 mm had a higher final body weight (33.84 ± 1.71 and 34.65 ± 1.79 kg, respectively and total weight gain (9.06 ± 1.04 and 11.82 ± 1.02 kg. However, lambs with 3.0 mm fat thickness exhibited better economic results (profit of US$ 3.10 per kg cold carcass. The slaughter of Santa Inês lambs at 3.0 mm subcutaneous fat thickness is recommended since it provides better productive performance, higher profit per kilogram carcass, and greater profitability.

  15. Micro-Economics of Apoptosis in Cancer: ncRNAs Modulation of BCL-2 Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanova, Lidia; Careccia, Silvia; De Maria, Ruggero; Fiori, Micol E

    2018-03-23

    In the last few years, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been a hot topic in cancer research. Many ncRNAs were found to regulate the apoptotic process and to play a role in tumor cell resistance to treatment. The apoptotic program is on the frontline as self-defense from cancer onset, and evasion of apoptosis has been classified as one of the hallmarks of cancer responsible for therapy failure. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family members are key players in the regulation of apoptosis and mediate the activation of the mitochondrial death machinery in response to radiation, chemotherapeutic agents and many targeted therapeutics. The balance between the pro-survival and the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins is strictly controlled by ncRNAs. Here, we highlight the most common mechanisms exerted by microRNAs, long non-coding RNAs and circular RNAs on the main mediators of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade with particular focus on their significance in cancer biology.

  16. The effect of breed on fatty acid composition of subcutaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the fatty acid (FA) profile of subcutaneous adipose tissue and tailfat of two fat-tailed sheep breeds under identical feeding conditions. Twelve male lambs from two breeds, Sanjabi (n = 6), weighing 23.3 ± 0.48 kg, and Mehraban (n = 6), weighing 26.1 ± 2.14 kg, were used in this ...

  17. Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Abel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a 38 year-old lady with the clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical (IHC changes of subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL. The IHC findings revealed CD8 + and CD56 - cells, which are indicative of tumors which have an indolent course. Our patient is being managed with tapering doses of corticosteroids for the last nine months with good improvement.

  18. Subcutaneous emphysema during third molar surgery: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Romeo, Umberto; Galanakis, Alexandros; Lerario, Francesco; Daniele, Gabriele Maria; Tenore, Gianluca; Palaia, Gaspare

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of third molars is the most common surgical procedure performed in oral surgery on a daily basis and, despite surgical skills and expertise, complications may occur. Complications observed during or after third molar removal may include pain, swelling, bleeding, infection, sinus perforation and nerve damage. Fortunately, with a proper management and a good surgical technique, the incidence of such events is low. Subcutaneous emphysema associated with dental extraction occurs when t...

  19. Contrast of artificial subcutaneous hematomas in MRI over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Eva Maria; Ogris, Kathrin; Petrovic, Andreas; Neumayer, Bernhard; Widek, Thomas; Yen, Kathrin; Scheurer, Eva

    2015-03-01

    In clinical forensic medicine, hematomas and other externally visible injuries build the basis for the reconstruction of events. However, dating of subcutaneous hematomas based on their external aspect is difficult. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven its use in dating intracranial hemorrhage. Thus, the aim was to investigate if MRI can also be used for dating subcutaneous hematomas and to analyze an eventual influence of the hematoma shape. In 20 healthy volunteers (11 females, 9 males, aged 26.9 ± 3.8 years), 4 ml of autologous blood were injected subcutaneously in the thigh. The hematoma was scanned immediately after the injection, after 3 and 24 h and 3, 7, and 14 days using three sequences with different contrast. Data was analyzed by measuring signal intensities of the hematoma, the muscle, and the subcutaneous tissue over time, and the Michelson contrast coefficients between the tissues were calculated. In the analysis, hematoma shape was considered. Signal intensity of blood in the proton density-weighted sequence reached its maximum 3 h after the injection with a subsequent decrease, whereas the signal intensities of muscle and fatty tissue remained constant. The time course of the Michelson coefficient of blood versus muscle decreased exponentially with a change from hyperintensity to hypointensity at 116.9 h, depending on hematoma shape. In the other sequences, either variability was large or contrast coefficients stayed constant over time. The observed change of contrast of blood versus muscle permits a quick estimate of a hematoma's age. The consideration of the hematoma shape is expected to further enhance dating using MRI.

  20. Browning of Subcutaneous White Adipose Tissue in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Sidossis, Labros S.; Porter, Craig; Saraf, Manish K.; Børsheim, Elisabet; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S.; Chao, Tony; Ali, Arham; Chondronikola, Maria; Mlcak, Ronald; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Hawkins, Hal K.; Toliver-Kinsky, Tracy; Herndon, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Since the presence of brown adipose tissue (BAT) was confirmed in adult humans, BAT has become a therapeutic target for obesity and insulin resistance. We examined whether human subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT) can adopt a BAT-like phenotype using a clinical model of prolonged and severe adrenergic stress. sWAT samples were collected from severely burned and healthy individuals. A subset of burn victims were prospectively followed during their acute hospitalization. Browning of sWAT w...

  1. Nursing knowledge and practices regarding subcutaneous fluid administration

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Nathália Silva; Silva, Andrea Mara Bernardes da; Zago, Luana Barbosa; Silva, Érica Carneiro de Lima e; Barichello, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the evidence in the literature regarding the knowledge and practices of the nursing team about subcutaneous administration of drugs and fluids in adults. Method: Integrative review of the literature using the descriptors “nursing”, “hypodermoclysis”, “drug administration routes”, “adult health,” and “knowledge,” in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, with no publication deadline. Of the 569 articles found, eight made up the sample. Results: A predominance of i...

  2. Meckel’s diverticulum manifested by a subcutaneous abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatepe, Oguzhan; Adas, Gokhan; Altıok, Merih; Ozcan, Deniz; Kamali, Sedat; Karahan, Servet

    2009-01-01

    This case report describes an extremely rare complication of a Meckel’s diverticulum: enterocutaneous fistula of the diverticulum. The presence of Meckel’s diverticulum is a well known entity, but subcutaneous perforation of the diverticulum is very rare. Here we report the case of a patient with the complaint of a right lower quadrant abscess, preoperatively diagnosed as enterocutaneous fistula, which was determined intraoperatively to be a fistula resulting from Meckel’s diverticulum. PMID:20027688

  3. Diffuse-type giant cell tumor of the subcutaneous thigh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghvi, D.A.; Purandare, N.C.; Jambhekar, N.A.; Agarwal, A.; Agarwal, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse-type giant cell tumor is an extra-articular form of pigmented villonodular synovitis. The localized form of this lesion (tenosynovial giant cell tumor) is frequent, representing the most common subset arising from the synovium of a joint, bursa or tendon sheath, with 85% of cases occurring in the fingers. The less frequent diffuse-type giant cell tumors are commonly located in the periarticular soft tissues, but on rare occasions these lesions can be purely intramuscular or subcutaneous We report the case of a 26-year-old female with diffuse-type giant cell tumor of the subcutaneous thigh, remote from a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. A review of the literature did not reveal any similar description of a diffuse-type giant cell tumor completely within the subcutaneous thigh, remote from a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. These lesions were initially regarded as inflammatory or reactive processes, but since the identification of clonal abnormalities in these patients, and in view of their capacity for autonomous growth, they are now widely considered to represent benign neoplasms. (orig.)

  4. Modelling the Molecular Transportation of Subcutaneously Injected Salubrinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the subcutaneous administration of a chemical agent (salubrinal, we constructed a mathematical model of molecule transportation and subsequently evaluated the kinetics of diffusion, convection, and molecular turnover. Salubrinal is a potential therapeutic agent that can reduce cellular damage and death. The understanding of its temporal profiles in local tissue as well as in a whole body is important to develop a proper strategy for its administration. Here, the diffusion and convection kinetics was formulated using partial and ordinary differential equations in one- and three-dimensional (semi-spherical coordinates. Several key parameters including an injection velocity, a diffusion coefficient, thickness of subcutaneous tissue, and a permeability factor at the tissue-blood boundary were estimated from experimental data in rats. With reference to analytical solutions in a simplified model without convection, numerical solutions revealed that the diffusion coefficient and thickness of subcutaneous tissue determined the timing of the peak concentration in the plasma, and its magnitude was dictated by the permeability factor. Furthermore, the initial velocity, induced by needle injection, elevated an immediate transport of salubrinal at t < 1h. The described analysis with a combination of partial and ordinary differential equations contributes to the prediction of local and systemic effects and the understanding of the transportation mechanism of salubrinal and other agents.

  5. Ultrarush schedule of subcutaneous immunotherapy with modified allergen extracts is safe in paediatric age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais-Almeida, Mário; Arêde, Cristina; Sampaio, Graça; Borrego, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Traditional subcutaneous immunotherapy up dosing with allergenic extracts has been shown to be associated with frequent adverse reactions. In recent studies it has been demonstrated that using modified extracts, namely allergoids, it is a safe and effective procedure particularly on accelerated schedules. However data assessing its safety in paediatric age is scarce. To evaluate the safety profile in paediatric population of using modified allergen extracts, in an ultrarush schedule, to reach the maintenance dose in the first day. We included children undergoing treatment with subcutaneous immunotherapy during a five-year period, using modified aeroallergen extracts, depigmented, polymerized with glutaraldehyde and adsorbed on aluminium hydroxide using an ultrarush induction phase. The type of adverse reactions during the ultrarush protocol was recorded. We studied 100 paediatric patients (57 males) with a mean age of 11.6 years (5 to 18 years; standard deviation, 3.3), all with moderate to severe persistent rhinitis, with or without allergic conjunctivitis, asthma and atopic eczema, sensitized to mites and/or pollens. All reached the maintenance dose of 0.5 mL in the first day, except 1 child. During the ultrarush protocol the total number of injections was 199. There were 21 local adverse reactions in 11 patients, 11 immediate and 10 delayed; from those, had clinical relevance 1 immediate and 4 delayed. Systemic reactions were recorded in 2 cases, both immediate and mild. The ultrarush protocol, without premedication, was a safe alternative to be used in paediatric age during the induction phase of subcutaneous immunotherapy using allergoid depigmented extracts.

  6. The effects of subcutaneous injection of nicotine on osseointegration of machined and anodized implants in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Maria Salete Sandini; Bittencourt, Marcos Eugênio de; Carli, João Paulo De; Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; Santos, Pâmela Letícia Dos; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of subcutaneous injection nicotine in osseointegration process on different implant surfaces. Twenty-two male rabbits were distributed into two groups according to the subcutaneous injections: (1) nicotine 3 mg/day/kg and (2) 0.9 % NaCI 3 mL/day/kg, three times a day; subgroups were then designated-machined and anodized implants were placed in the right and left tibia bones, respectively. The animals were submitted euthanasia after periods of eight weeks to determine nicotine and cotinine levels, alkaline phosphatase and biomechanical analysis. The plasmatic levels of nicotine and cotinine were 0.5 ± 0.28 ng/mL and 9.5 ± 6.51 ng/mL, respectively. The alkaline phosphatase analyses in blood levels in control group were observed 40.8 ± 11.88 UI/L and 40.75 ± 12.46 UI/L, for the surfaces machined and anodized, respectively. In the test group was observed levels 37.9 ± 4.84 UI/L, for both implant surfaces. No significant differences were observed between control and test groups and between the implant surfaces regarding alkaline phosphatase blood levels. For biomechanics, no significant differences were observed in control group between the machined (25±8.46 Ncm) or anodized (31.2 ± 6.76 Ncm) implants. However, the treatment with nicotine induced higher torque than control in both machined (38.3 ± 13.52 Ncm) and anodized (35.5 ± 14.17 Ncm) implants, with p = 0.0024 and p = 0.0121, respectively. Subcutaneous injection of nicotine following implant insertion didn't have effect on osseointegration, independently from the implant surface.

  7. Three cases of systemic amyloidosis successfully diagnosed by subcutaneous fat tissue biopsy of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arahata M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Masahisa Arahata,1 Shigeru Shimadoi,1 Satosi Yamatani,1 Shin-ichi Hayashi,2 Shigeharu Miwa,2 Hidesaku Asakura,3 Shinji Nakao4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Nanto Municipal Hospital, Nanto, 2Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, 3Department of Internal Medicine (III, 4Department of Cellular Transplantation Biology, Division of Cancer Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan Abstract: Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the abdominal fat pad is considered to be a minimally invasive procedure for diagnosing systemic amyloidosis. However, this procedure is sometimes difficult and can be dangerous for elderly patients whose abdominal fat layer is thin because of malnutrition. In such cases, alternative diagnostic methods are required. We report three elderly patients with heart failure complicated by malnutrition. In all cases, electrocardiogram showed low voltage in the limb leads and a pseudoinfarct pattern in the chest leads, and echocardiography showed left ventricular wall thickening with granular sparkling appearance. These patients were suspected of having amyloid cardiomyopathy but could not undergo myocardial biopsies because of their poor conditions. After failed attempts at biopsy of the abdominal fat pad or the other organs, subcutaneous fat tissue biopsy over the hip led to the diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis with cardiomyopathy. The resultant diagnosis guided us to choose the appropriate treatment for the patients. This article illustrates that subcutaneous fat tissue biopsy of the hip could be a useful procedure for diagnosing systemic amyloidosis in elderly patients, particularly when a fat tissue biopsy of the abdomen is associated with a high risk of complications because of malnutrition. Keywords: systemic amyloidosis, amyloid cardiomyopathy, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, subcutaneous fat tissue, hip

  8. Structural studies of n-type nc-Si-QD thin films for nc-Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debajyoti; Kar, Debjit

    2017-12-01

    A wide optical gap nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) dielectric material is a basic requirement at the n-type window layer of nc-Si solar cells in thin film n-i-p structure on glass substrates. Taking advantage of the high atomic-H density inherent to the planar inductively coupled low-pressure (SiH4 + CH4)-plasma, development of an analogous material in P-doped nc-Si-QD/a-SiC:H network has been tried. Incorporation of C in the Si-network extracted from the CH4 widens the optical band gap; however, at enhanced PH3-dilution of the plasma spontaneous miniaturization of the nc-Si-QDs below the dimension of Bohr radius (∼4.5 nm) further enhances the band gap by virtue of the quantum size effect. At increased flow rate of PH3, dopant induced continuous amorphization of the intrinsic crystalline network is counterbalanced by the further crystallization promoted by the supplementary atomic-H extracted from PH3 (1% in H2) in the plasma, eventually holding a moderately high degree of crystallinity. The n-type wide band gap (∼1.93 eV) window layer with nc-Si-QDs in adequate volume fraction (∼52%) could furthermore be instrumental as an effective seed layer for advancing sequential crystallization in the i-layer of nc-Si solar cells with n-i-p structure in superstrate configuration.

  9. Improving Earth Science Metadata: Modernizing ncISO

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, K.; Schweitzer, R.; Neufeld, D.; Burger, E. F.; Signell, R. P.; Arms, S. C.; Wilcox, K.

    2016-12-01

    ncISO is a package of tools developed at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI) that facilitates the generation of ISO 19115-2 metadata from NetCDF data sources. The tool currently exists in two iterations: a command line utility and a web-accessible service within the THREDDS Data Server (TDS). Several projects, including NOAA's Unified Access Framework (UAF), depend upon ncISO to generate the ISO-compliant metadata from their data holdings and use the resulting information to populate discovery tools such as NCEI's ESRI Geoportal and NOAA's data.noaa.gov CKAN system. In addition to generating ISO 19115-2 metadata, the tool calculates a rubric score based on how well the dataset follows the Attribute Conventions for Dataset Discovery (ACDD). The result of this rubric calculation, along with information about what has been included and what is missing is displayed in an HTML document generated by the ncISO software package. Recently ncISO has fallen behind in terms of supporting updates to conventions such updates to the ACDD. With the blessing of the original programmer, NOAA's UAF has been working to modernize the ncISO software base. In addition to upgrading ncISO to utilize version1.3 of the ACDD, we have been working with partners at Unidata and IOOS to unify the tool's code base. In essence, we are merging the command line capabilities into the same software that will now be used by the TDS service, allowing easier updates when conventions such as ACDD are updated in the future. In this presentation, we will discuss the work the UAF project has done to support updated conventions within ncISO, as well as describe how the updated tool is helping to improve metadata throughout the earth and ocean sciences.

  10. Subcutaneous immunization with inactivated bacterial components and purified protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes prevents puerperal metritis in Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Vinícius Silva; Bicalho, Marcela Luccas de Souza; Meira Junior, Enoch Brandão de Souza; Rossi, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Lima, Svetlana; Santos, Thiago; Kussler, Arieli; Foditsch, Carla; Ganda, Erika Korzune; Oikonomou, Georgios; Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert Owen; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the efficacy of five vaccine formulations containing different combinations of proteins (FimH; leukotoxin, LKT; and pyolysin, PLO) and/or inactivated whole cells (Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Trueperella pyogenes) in preventing postpartum uterine diseases. Inactivated whole cells were produced using two genetically distinct strains of each bacterial species (E. coli, F. necrophorum, and T. pyogenes). FimH and PLO subunits were produced using recombinant protein expression, and LKT was recovered from culturing a wild F. necrophorum strain. Three subcutaneous vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 1 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; Vaccine 2 was composed of proteins only; and Vaccine 3 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells only. Two intravaginal vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 4 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; and Vaccine 5 was composed of PLO and LKT. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, a randomized clinical trial was conducted at a commercial dairy farm; 371 spring heifers were allocated randomly into one of six different treatments groups: control, Vaccine 1, Vaccine 2, Vaccine 3, Vaccine 4 and Vaccine 5. Late pregnant heifers assigned to one of the vaccine groups were each vaccinated twice: at 230 and 260 days of pregnancy. When vaccines were evaluated grouped as subcutaneous and intravaginal, the subcutaneous ones were found to significantly reduce the incidence of puerperal metritis. Additionally, subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced rectal temperature at 6±1 days in milk. Reproduction was improved for cows that received subcutaneous vaccines. In general, vaccination induced a significant increase in serum IgG titers against all antigens, with subcutaneous vaccination again being more effective. In conclusion, subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated bacterial components and/or protein subunits of E. coli, F. necrophorum and T. pyogenes

  11. The number of FceRI receptors on basophils decreases during subcutaneous immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, J. M.; Dahl, R.; Hoffmann, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only disease modifying treatment of allergic diseases. It induces complex cellular and humoral changes leading to an inhibition of type-1 allergic reactions. Method: Twenty four young grass pollen allergic adults suffering from seasonal rhino......-conjunctivitis were randomized to receive standard subcutaneous immunotherapy (n = 18) or to an open control group (n = 6). The number of FceRI receptors on basophils was measured by quantitative analysis of indirect immunofluorescence by flow cytometry. Grass binding to basophils was measured by staining with grass......)/basophil in the treatment group (n = 0.016), while it remained constant in the control group (pre: 102424; post: 103753). We found only minor changes in maximal grass binding on the basophils. The allergen concentration leading to halfmaximum grass binding decreased slightly during SCIT, whereas the EC50...

  12. Histological changes to the skin of Merino sheep following deep dermal and subcutaneous injections of sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E J; Rothwell, J T

    2010-04-01

    To characterise the changes caused to sheep skin by deep dermal and subcutaneous injections of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and describe the subsequent healing process. On 6 sheep 20 small areas of skin were each given deep dermal and subcutaneous injections of 0.2 mL of 7% SLS. Biopsies were collected at intervals up to 28 days after treatment and the histological changes in each of the treated skin samples were assessed and graded. There was no evidence of alterations in behaviour, weight gain or appetite of the sheep following the injections. Initial swelling of the treated site subsided by day 14, leaving a firm, slightly raised crust. At day 21, the treated area was depressed and covered by a scab, which sloughed completely by day 28. There was necrosis of the subcutis and deep dermis 2 min after treatment, followed by inflammation, fibroplasia, angiogenesis and tissue remodelling. Injection of SLS caused almost immediate local necrosis followed by eschar formation, sloughing and scarring of treated skin. Deep dermal and subcutaneous SLS is potentially useful as a chemical alternative to mulesing.

  13. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of glucagon-like peptide 1 lowers plasma glucose and reduces appetite in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Nielsen, M B; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, J J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The gut hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has insulinotropic and anorectic effects during intravenous infusion and has been proposed as a new treatment for type 2 diabetes and obesity. The effect of a single subcutaneous injection is brief because of rapid degradation. We therefo....... CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that 48-h continuous subcutaneous infusion of GLP-1 in type 2 diabetic patients 1) lowers fasting as well as meal-related plasma glucose, 2) reduces appetite, 3) has no gastrointestinal side effects, and 4) has no negative effect on blood pressure.......OBJECTIVE: The gut hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has insulinotropic and anorectic effects during intravenous infusion and has been proposed as a new treatment for type 2 diabetes and obesity. The effect of a single subcutaneous injection is brief because of rapid degradation. We therefore......, previously shown to lower blood glucose effectively in type 2 diabetic patients. Fasting plasma glucose (day 2) decreased from 14.1 +/- 0.9 (saline) to 12.2 +/- 0.7 mmol/l (GLP-1), P = 0.009, and 24-h mean plasma glucose decreased from 15.4 +/- 1.0 to 13.0 +/- 1.0 mmol/l, P = 0.0009. Fasting and total area...

  14. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide has impaired effect on abdominal, subcutaneous adipose tissue metabolism in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, M; Simonsen, L; Arngrim, N

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) appears to have a role in lipid metabolism. Recently, we showed that GIP in combination with hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia increases triglyceride uptake in abdominal, subcutaneous adipose tissue in lean humans. It has been suggested...... that increased GIP secretion in obesity will promote lipid deposition in adipose tissue. In light of the current attempts to employ GIP antagonists in the treatment and prevention of human obesity, the present experiments were performed in order to elucidate whether the adipose tissue lipid metabolism would...... to an oral glucose challenge: (i) NGT and (ii) IGT. Abdominal, subcutaneous adipose tissue lipid metabolism was studied by conducting measurements of arteriovenous concentrations of metabolites and regional adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) during GIP (1.5 pmol kg(-1) min(-1)) in combination with a HI...

  15. An overview on STEP-NC compliant controller development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, M. A.; Minhat, M.; Jamaludin, Z.

    2017-10-01

    The capabilities of conventional Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machine tools as termination organiser to fabricate high-quality parts promptly, economically and precisely are undeniable. To date, most CNCs follow the programming standard of ISO 6983, also called G & M code. However, in fluctuating shop floor environment, flexibility and interoperability of current CNC system to react dynamically and adaptively are believed still limited. This outdated programming language does not explicitly relate to each other to have control of arbitrary locations other than the motion of the block-by-block. To address this limitation, new standard known as STEP-NC was developed in late 1990s and is formalized as an ISO 14649. It adds intelligence to the CNC in term of interoperability, flexibility, adaptability and openness. This paper presents an overview of the research work that have been done in developing a STEP-NC controller standard and the capabilities of STEP-NC to overcome modern manufacturing demands. Reviews stated that most existing STEP-NC controller prototypes are based on type 1 and type 2 implementation levels. There are still lack of effort being done to develop type 3 and type 4 STEP-NC compliant controller.

  16. Comparison of Intramuscular or Subcutaneous Injections vs. Castration in Pigs—Impacts on Behavior and Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McGlone

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical castration (PC is painful and stressful for nursing piglets. One alternative to PC is immunological castration (IC, but the pain and stress of handling associated with injections have not been assessed. The objectives of this study were to measure the pain and distress of subcutaneous (SQ and intramuscular (IM injections compared to PC in piglets, and to compare SQ or IM injections in finishing pigs. After farrowing, 3 to 5 d old male piglets were randomly assigned to (control no handling treatment (NO, sham-handling (SHAM, IM, SQ, or PC. Finishing pigs were assigned to NO, SHAM, IM, or SQ. Behavior was monitored for 1 h prior and 1 h post treatment in each age group. Social, feeding behaviors, and signs of pain were recorded. Finishing pigs treated with SQ injections had higher feeding behaviors pre-treatment than they did post-treatment. Overall, physical castrations caused measurable pain-like behaviors and general behavioral dysregulation at a much higher level than the other treatment groups. SQ and IM injections did not cause either significant behavioral or physiological alterations in piglets. SQ injections caused a decrease in finishing pig feed behaviors post treatment ( p = 0.02 and SHAM treated finishing pigs spent significantly more time lying than the other treatment groups. In general IM and SQ injections did not cause any other significant changes in behavior or physiology.

  17. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) does not reduce subcutaneous adipose tissue by local adipocyte injury but rather by modulation of systemic lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Marek; Gawrych, Mariusz; Adamska, Urszula; Ciescinski, Jakub; Serafin, Zbigniew; Czajkowski, Rafal

    2017-02-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been applied recently to body contouring. However the mechanism of LLLT-induced reduction of subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness has not been elucidated and proposed hypotheses are highly controversial. Non-obese volunteers were subject to 650nm LLLT therapy. Each patient received 6 treatments 2-3 days apart to one side of the abdomen. The contralateral side was left untreated and served as control. Subjects' abdominal adipose tissue thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging at baseline and 2 weeks post-treatment. Our study is to the best of our knowledge, the largest split-abdomen study employing subcutaneous abdominal fat imaging. We could not show a statistically significant reduction of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue by LLLT therapy. Paradoxically when the measurements of the loss of fat thickness on treated side was corrected for change in thickness on non treated side, we have observed that in 8 out of 17 patients LLLT increased adipose tissue thickness. In two patients severe side effect occurred as a result of treatment: one patient developed ulceration within appendectomy scar, the other over the posterior superior iliac spine. The paradoxical net increase in subcutaneous fat thickness observed in some of our patients is a rationale against liquefactive and transitory pore models of LLLT-induced adipose tissue reduction. LLLT devices with laser diode panels applied directly on the skin are not as safe as devices with treatment panels separated from the patient's skin.

  18. Subcutaneous versus intravenous immunoglobulin in multifocal motor neuropathy: a randomized, single-blinded cross-over trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, Thomas; Andersen, Henning; Hess, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    at the injection sites for a few weeks. All other adverse effects during SCIG were mild and transient. No differences between treatments of health-related quality of life occurred. Conclusion: In MMN, short-term subcutaneous infusion of immunoglobulin is feasible, safe and as effective as intravenous infusion...

  19. Long-term survival of subcutaneous anti-tumor necrosis factor biological drugs administered between 2008 and 2012 in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Rivas, Noelia; Vazquez Rodriguez, Tomas R; Miranda Filloy, Jose A; Garcia-Porrua, Carlos; Sanchez-Andrade Fernández, Amalia

    2017-05-25

    To compare the survival of subcutaneous anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) drugs used between 2008 and 2012 prescribed in accordance with clinical practice. Retrospective, observational study of the patients in our center diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We included patients who had received a subcutaneous anti-TNF agent for at least 6 months. The data were analyzed using the SPSS V17.0 statistical package. Forty-nine RA patients started subcutaneous biological treatment with an anti-TNF agent (32 with etanercept and 17 with adalimumab). The mean age was 45.94 years (75.5% female). The mean disease duration prior to starting anti-TNF administration was 2.67 years. The mean age at the start of treatment was 51.84 years, and the average Disease Activity Score 28 was 4.93. The median survival of the anti-TNF treatment was 8.40 years; the survival of etanercept was the longer of the two. The main reason for discontinuation was secondary failure (90.9%). In routine clinical practice, the survival of subcutaneous anti-TNF treatment was extensive and was independent of whether or not the patients received concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  20. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated.

  1. Orthorexia nervosa with hyponatremia, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastimum, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Jeong Yup; Go, Gang Ji; Jeon, Eun Sil; Pyo, Heui Jung; Kwon, Young Joo

    2011-06-01

    30-year-old male was admitted with general weakness and drowsy mental status. He had eaten only 3-4 spoons of brown rice and fresh vegetable without salt for 3 months to treat his tic disorder, and he had been in bed-ridden state. He has had weight loss of 14 kg in the last 3 months. We report a patient with orthorexia nervosa who developed hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, subcutaneous emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia and we will review the literature. Also, we mention to prevent refeeding syndrome, and to start and maintain feeding in malnourished patients.

  2. Subcutaneous drug infusions: a review of problems and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, T

    2001-02-01

    Subcutaneous drug infusion using a portable syringe driver has had a significant impact on patient comfort in palliative care. It permits the continuous delivery of a range of drug therapies, so bypassing problems of dysphagia, weakness and the inability of many patients in the terminal phase to take oral medication. The devices are not problem-free, however. Mechanical problems, reactions at the infusion site and difficulties with the mixing of drugs in the syringe are all widely recognized. This article reviews some general issues with the operation of portable syringe drivers, and discusses a range of potential problems and their solutions.

  3. Comparison of mechanical behavior of TiN, TiNC, CrN/TiNC, TiN/TiNC films on 9Cr18 steel by PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xingguo; Zhang, Yanshuai; Hu, Hanjun; Zheng, Yugang; Zhang, Kaifeng; Zhou, Hui

    2017-11-01

    TiN, TiNC, CrN/TiNC and TiN/TiNC films were deposited on 9Cr18 steel using magnetron sputtering technique. The morphology, composition, chemical state and crystalline structure of the films were observed and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hardness and adhesion force were tested by nanoindentation and scratch tester, respectively. The friction and wear behavior of TiN, TiNC, CrN/TiNC and TiN/TiNC films sliding against GCr15 balls were investigated and compared synthetically using ball-on-disk tribometer. It was found that Tisbnd N, Tisbnd C, Tisbnd Nsbnd C and Csbnd C bonds were formed. The TiN/TiNC film was composed of TiN, TiC and TiNC phases. Hardness and adhesion force results indicated that although the TiN film possessed the highest hardness, its adhesion force was lowest among all the films. Tribological test results showed that the friction coefficient of TiN/TiNC was much lower than that of TiN and the wear rate decreases remarkably from 2.3 × 10-15 m3/Nm to 7.1 × 10-16 m3/Nm, which indicated the TiN/TiNC film has better wear resistance.

  4. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment and screening for hypocretin neuron-specific autoantibodies in recent onset childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, S; Mikkelsen, J D; Bang, B

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) is caused by substantial loss of hypocretin neurons. NC patients carry the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele suggesting that hypocretin neuron loss is due to an autoimmune attack. We tested intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment in early onset NC....

  5. Metformin Mitigates Fibrosis and Glucose Intolerance Induced by Doxorubicin in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana A. Biondo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (DX is a chemotherapeutic drug that is used in clinical practice that promotes deleterious side effects in non-tumor tissues such as adipose tissue. We showed that DX leads to extensive damage in adipose tissue via a disruption in 5′-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK and PPAR-gamma signaling. Thus, we investigated whether co-treatment with the biguanide drug metformin (MET could prevent the side effects of DX through the activation of AMPK in adipose tissue. The goal of the present study was to verify the effects of DX and adjuvant MET treatment in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT and to determine whether MET could protect against chemotherapy-induced side effects. C57/BL6 mice received DX hydrochloride (2.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally 2 times per week for 2 weeks (DX, concomitantly or not, with MET administration (300 mg/kg oral daily (DX + MET. The control group (CTRL was pair-fed according to the food consumption of the DX group. After euthanasia, adipose tissue fat pads were collected, and SAT was extracted so that adipocytes could be isolated. Glucose uptake was then measured, and histological, gene, and protein analyses were performed. One-way analysis of variance was also performed, and significance was set to 5%. DX reduced retroperitoneal fat mass and epididymal pads and decreased glycemia. In cultured primary subcutaneous adipocytes, mice in the DX group had lower glucose uptake when stimulated with insulin compared with mice in the CTRL group. Adipocytes in the DX group exhibited a reduced area, perimeter, and diameter; decreased adiponectin secretion; and decreased fatty acid synthase gene expression. SAT from MET-treated mice also showed a reduction in collagen deposition. Treatment with MET prevented fibrosis and restored glucose uptake in SAT after insulin stimulation, yet the drug was unable to prevent other side effects of DX such as tissue loss and inflammatory response.

  6. Augmented reality based real-time subcutaneous vein imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Danni; Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Zhao, Yitian; Song, Xianzheng; Shen, Jianbing; Shao, Ling; Wang, Yongtian

    2016-07-01

    A novel 3D reconstruction and fast imaging system for subcutaneous veins by augmented reality is presented. The study was performed to reduce the failure rate and time required in intravenous injection by providing augmented vein structures that back-project superimposed veins on the skin surface of the hand. Images of the subcutaneous vein are captured by two industrial cameras with extra reflective near-infrared lights. The veins are then segmented by a multiple-feature clustering method. Vein structures captured by the two cameras are matched and reconstructed based on the epipolar constraint and homographic property. The skin surface is reconstructed by active structured light with spatial encoding values and fusion displayed with the reconstructed vein. The vein and skin surface are both reconstructed in the 3D space. Results show that the structures can be precisely back-projected to the back of the hand for further augmented display and visualization. The overall system performance is evaluated in terms of vein segmentation, accuracy of vein matching, feature points distance error, duration times, accuracy of skin reconstruction, and augmented display. All experiments are validated with sets of real vein data. The imaging and augmented system produces good imaging and augmented reality results with high speed.

  7. A Case of Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum with Subcutaneous Emphysema in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Benlamkaddem

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is defined as free air or gas contained within the mediastinum, which almost invariably originates from the alveolar space or the conducting airways. It is rare in pediatric patients; however, occasional cases are reported to result from forced Valsalva’s maneuver due to cough, emesis, a first attack of wheeze, or asthma exacerbations. We report the case of a 7-year-old previously healthy girl, with a history of persistent dry cough one day before, who was brought to our unit with face, neck and chest swelling. The chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT scan showed subcutaneous emphysema with pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium without evidence of the origin of this air leak. Laboratory tests and the bronchoscopy were normal. The patient was admitted in the pediatric critical care and received noninvasive monitoring, analgesia, oxygen, and omeprazole as a prophylaxis for a gastric ulcer. The patient improved, subcutaneous emphysema resolved, and she was discharged on the third day.

  8. Pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema complicating MIS herniorrhaphy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Videoscopic herniorrhaphy is being performed more frequently with advantages claimed over the conventional open approach. This clinical report describes a pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema occurring at the end of an extraperitoneal videoscopic herniorrhaphy. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 25 yr old ASA I man presented for elective extraperitoneal videoscopic hernia repair. Following intravenous induction with fentanyl, midazolam and propofol a balanced anesthetic technique using enflurane in N2O and O2 was used. Apart from a prolonged operating time (195 min), the procedure and anesthetic was uneventful. At the conclusion of the operation, prior to reversal of neuromuscular blockade extensive subcutaneous emphysema was noted on removal of the surgical drapes. Chest radiography revealed a pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. A 25 FG intercostal tube was inserted and connected to an underwater seal drain. Sedation and positive pressure ventilation was maintained overnight to permit resolution and avoid airway compromise. The clinical and radiological features had resolved by the next morning and the patient\\'s trachea was extubated. His subsequent recovery was uneventful. CONCLUSION: Pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum are well recognised complications of laparoscopic techniques but have not been described following extraperitoneal herniorrhaphy. In this report we postulate possible mechanisms which may have contributed to their development, including inadvertent breach of the peritoneum and leakage of gas around the diaphragmatic herniae or tracking of gas retroperitoneally. The case alerts us to the possibility of this complication occurring in patients undergoing videoscopic herniorrhaphy.

  9. Newly developed controlled release subcutaneous formulation for tramadol hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mabrouk

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a drug delivery system of poly (Ɛ-caprolactone (PCL ribbons to optimize the pharmaceutical action of tramadol for the first time according to our knowledge. PCL ribbons were fabricated and loaded with tramadol HCl. Ribbons were prepared by slip casting technique and coated with dipping technique with β-cyclodextrin. The chemical integrity and surface morphology of the ribbons were confirmed using FTIR and SEM coupled with EDX. In addition, thermodynamic behavior of the fabricated ribbons was investigated using DSC/TGA. Tramadol loading into PCL ribbons, biodegradation of ribbons and tramadol release kinetics were studied in PBS.The results revealed that the formulated composition did not affect the chemical integrity of the drug. Furthermore, SEM/EDX confirmed the inclusion of tramadol into the PCL matrix in homogenous distribution pattern without any observation of porous structure. The particle size of loaded tramadol was found to be in the range of (2–4 nm. The formulated composition did not affect the chemical integrity of the drug and should be further investigated for bioavailability. Tramadol exhibited controlled release behavior from PCL ribbons up to 45 days governed mainly by diffusion mechanism. The fabricated ribbons have a great potentiality to be implemented in the long term subcutaneous delivery of tramadol. Keywords: Tramadol, Polycaprolcatone, Subcutaneous membrane, Ribbons, β-Cyclodextrin, Controlled release

  10. Measurement of subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness by near-infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu; Ying, Zeqiang; Hao, Dongmei; Zhang, Song; Yang, Yimin; Zeng, Yanjun

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with the risks of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and there is a need to measure the subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) layer thickness and to understand the distribution of body fat. A device was designed to illuminate the body parts by near-infrared (NIR), measure the backscattered light, and predict the SAT layer thickness. The device was controlled by a single-chip microcontroller (SCM), and the thickness value was presented on a liquid crystal display (LCD). There were 30 subjects in this study, and the measurements were performed on 14 body parts for each subject. The paper investigated the impacts of pressure and skin colour on the measurement. Combining with principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector regression (SVR), the measurement accuracy of SAT layer thickness was 89.1 % with a mechanical caliper as reference. The measuring range was 5–11 mm. The study provides a non-invasive and low-cost technique to detect subcutaneous fat thickness, which is more accessible and affordable compared to other conventional techniques. The designed device can be used at home and in community.

  11. Improvement of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus by 3-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong-Xia; Zhou, Xiao-Ling; Kou, Hong-Ju; Ni, Xian-Wei; Wu, Qing; Zou, Chun-Peng; Wu, Dao-Zhu; Liu, Yong-Fang

    2018-03-01

    Three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE) was used to evaluate the improvement of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on the left ventricular (LV) systolic function of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitu (T2DM). We recruited T2DM patients (38 cases, diabetic group) and healthy volunteers (35 cases, control group) to collect LV full volume imaging. TomTec software was used for calculating LV global longitudinal strain (LVGLS), global circumferential strain (LVGCS), peak twist (LVTW), peak apical rotation (LVPAR), ejection fraction (LVEF), and torsion (LVT). All indices were re-tested 2 weeks later after intensive treatment of insulin pump. LVGLS, LVGCS, LVTW and LVPAR in diabetic group were significantly decreased than control group. LVGLS and LVGCS in pre-treatment diabetic group were significantly increased than post-treatment. LVGLS, LVGCS, LVTW and LVPAR had correlations among control, pre-treatment and post-treatment diabetic groups. There were no significant differences in LVEDV, LVESV, LVEF, LVT and R-R. LV systolic function of patients with T2DM complicated with microangiopathy was improved after treatment of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. In addition, therapeutic effect could be accurately evaluated by 3D-STE which had vital clinical application.

  12. Administrative risk quantification of subcutaneous and intravenous therapies in Italian centers utilizing the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponzetti C

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Clemente Ponzetti,1 Monica Canciani,2 Massimo Farina,2 Sara Era,3 Stefan Walzer4,5 1Gruppo Policlinico di Monza, Alessandria, ANMDO National Association of Hospital Physicians, Bologna, 2Studio EmmEffe Srl, Milan, 3Roche Spa, Monza, Italy; 4MArS Market Access & Pricing Strategy GmbH, Weil am Rhein, 5State University Baden-Wuerttemberg, Health Care Management, Loerrach, Germany Background: In oncology, an important parameter of safety is the potential treatment error in hospitals. The analyzed hypothesis is that of subcutaneous therapies would provide a superior safety benefit over intravenous therapies through fixed-dose administrations, when analyzed with trastuzumab and rituximab.Methods: For the calculation of risk levels, the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis approach was applied. Within this approach, the critical treatment path is followed and risk classification for each individual step is estimated. For oncology and hematology administration, 35 different risk steps were assessed. The study was executed in 17 hematology and 16 breast cancer centers in Italy. As intravenous and subcutaneous were the only injection routes in medical available for trastuzumab and rituximab in oncology at the time of the study, these two therapies were chosen.Results: When the risk classes were calculated, eight high-risk areas were identified for the administration of an intravenous therapy in hematology or oncology; 13 areas would be defined as having a median-risk classification and 14 areas as having a low-risk classification (total risk areas: n=35. When the new subcutaneous formulation would be applied, 23 different risk levels could be completely eliminated (65% reduction. Important high-risk classes such as dose calculation, preparation and package labeling, preparation of the access to the vein, pump infusion preparation, and infusion monitoring were included in the eliminations. The overall risk level for the intravenous administration was estimated

  13. CT densimetry for graduating subcutaneous fibrosis after photon/neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eich, H.T.; Eich, P.D.; Mueller, R.D.; Stuschke, M.; Sack, H.

    1999-01-01

    Background: To evaluate alternative treatment regimen e.g. neutron therapy determination of treatment efficacy as well as side effects is important. Sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) in detecting changes of connective tissue after neutron therapy was examined. Patients and Methods: In the course of their follow-up period (median 45 months) 12 patients with malignant salivary gland tumors who had postoperatively received neutron (1/12) or photon/neutron therapy (11/12) were examined by means of CT densimetry on 3 representative scans in the area of radiotherapy. In 3 ROI (regions of interest) in subcutaneous fatty tissue the density at the irradiated and the non-irradiated side was determined according to Hounsfield units (HU) and the average density was calculated. The average density of both sides was compared and correlated with the clinical grade of fibrosis according to LENT SOMA. Results: All CT measurements (216 ROI, 18 ROI per patient) showed higher density levels on the irradiated side than on the non-irradiated side. The average density on the irradiated side was -57.7±4.7 HU and on the non-irradiated side -69.4±5.8 HU (p=0.002). In 3/12 patients a clinical fibrosis was not seen; however, the relative density measured on the irradiated and non-irradiated side deviated by up to 8%. This could have been caused by minimal changes not being noticed by either patient and examiner. In patients with determined fibrosis Grade 1 (8/12) the relative density deviation was 4 to 39%. In 1/12 patients with determined fibrosis Grade 2 the relative density deviation was 50%. Fibrosis Grade 3 and 4 did not occur. Conclusions: Fibrosis is correlated with an increasing value of HU of the tissue density in CT. With the described method it is possible to graduate radiation induced subcutaneous fibrosis in correlation to the clinical fibrosis grade according to LENT SOMA. In the patients we examined subcutaneous fibroses after photon/neutron therapy were moderate

  14. Aluminium in allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy--a German perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-07-16

    We are living in an "aluminium age" with increasing bioavailability of the metal for approximately 125 years, contributing significantly to the aluminium body burden of humans. Over the course of life, aluminium accumulates and is stored predominantly in the lungs, bones, liver, kidneys and brain. The toxicity of aluminium in humans is briefly summarised, highlighting links and possible causal relationships between a high aluminium body burden and a number of neurological disorders and disease states. Aluminium salts have been used as depot-adjuvants successfully in essential prophylactic vaccinations for almost 100 years, with a convincing positive benefit-risk assessment which remains unchanged. However, allergen-specific immunotherapy commonly consists of administering a long-course programme of subcutaneous injections using preparations of relevant allergens. Regulatory authorities currently set aluminium limits for vaccines per dose, rather than per treatment course. Unlike prophylactic vaccinations, numerous injections with higher proportions of aluminium-adjuvant per injection are applied in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and will significantly contribute to a higher cumulative life dose of aluminium. While the human body may cope robustly with a daily aluminium overload from the environment, regulatory cumulative threshold values in immunotherapy need further addressing. Based on the current literature, predisposing an individual to an unusually high level of aluminium, such as through subcutaneous immunotherapy, has the potential to form focal accumulations in the body with the propensity to exert forms of toxicity. Particularly in relation to longer-term health effects, the safety of aluminium adjuvants in immunotherapy remains unchallenged by health authorities - evoking the need for more consideration, guidance, and transparency on what is known and not known about its safety in long-course therapy and what measures can be taken to prevent or

  15. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Characteristics of Subcutaneously Applied PTH-1-37

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf-Georg Forssmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Parathyroid hormone (PTH derivatives exert pronounced renal and osteoanabolic properties when given intermittently. The current study was performed to assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties as well as safety of subcutaneously applied PTH-1-37 after repeated dosing in healthy subjects. Methods: This randomized, double-blind, dose-escalating, placebo and active comparator controlled study was conducted in 33 healthy postmenopausal women. Subjects were allocated to one of five treatment options: 10, 20, or 40 µg PTH-1-37, 20 µg PTH-1-34 or placebo, administered as once daily subcutaneous doses for three days. Plasma drug concentrations and serum levels of endogenous PTH-1-84, and calcium as markers of biological activity were monitored during the treatment. Results: PTH was absorbed rapidly from the subcutaneous tissue with a median tmax of 30 minutes for 20 and 40 µg of PTH-1-37. tmax was 45 minutes for 20 µg PTH-1-34. Elimination half-lives were estimated as 76 ± 34 min and 70 ± 13 min for 20 µg and 40 µg PTH-1-37 (mean ± SD, and 78 ± 34 for 20 µg PTH-1-34. Both PTH fragments (PTH-1-37 and PTH-1-34 increased serum calcium. For PTH-1-37 the effect on serum calcium was dose-dependent. Suppression of endogenous PTH-1-84 was seen after the application of both PTH-1-37 and PTH-1-34. During the study period, the subjects experienced no unexpected or serious adverse events. Conclusions: PTH-1-37 is rapidly absorbed after s.c. injection, has a short plasma elimination half-life, and does not accumulate during multiple dosing. Biological activity was demonstrated by rising serum calcium and decreasing endogenous PTH-1-84 in blood plasma. The study drugs were well tolerated and safe. Our investigation presents data that PTH-1-37 is an excellent drug candidate for intervening with syndromes of dysregulation of calcium metabolism.

  16. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy for Type 1 diabetes mellitus in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavinkurve, M; Quinn, A; O'Gorman, C S

    2016-05-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin pump therapy (CSII or pump therapy) is a well-recognised treatment option for Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in paediatrics. It is especially suited to children because it optimises control by improving flexibility across age-specific lifestyles. The NICE guidelines (2008) recognise that pump therapy is advantageous and that it should be utilised to deliver best practice. In Ireland, the National Clinical Program for Diabetes will increase the availability and uptake of CSII in children and thus more clinicians are likely to encounter children using CSII therapy. This is a narrative review which discusses the basic principles of pump therapy and focuses on aspects of practical management. Insulin pump management involves some basic yet important principles which optimise the care of diabetes in children. This review addresses the principles of insulin pump management in children which all health care professionals involved in caring for the child with diabetes, shoud be familiar with.

  17. Rare case of subcutaneous mycosis with intrathoracic extension due to Chaetomium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, R; Vasudevan, B; Badwal, S; Sriram, R; Neema, S; Kharayat, V

    2015-08-01

    A 47-year-old man presented with a 10-year history of multiple lumps over his left upper arm and shoulder and the adjoining left side of his chest and upper back. His medical history included diabetes mellitus type 2. The patient was a farmer and used to lift sacks of grains and fertilizers onto his shoulders as part of his work, although he did not recollect any history of specific trauma. Skin biopsy revealed granulomatous reaction with Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon, while periodic-acid-Schiff and Grocott-Gomori stains confirmed fungal elements. Sabouraud agar grew Chaetomium species, and lactophenol blue mount confirmed the fungus as Chaetomium strumarium. Radiography and computed tomography of the chest revealed intrathoracic extension of the mycetoma. The patient responded well to treatment with oral Itraconazole. Subcutaneous mycosis due to C. strumarium is rarely reported in the literature, and the intrathoracic extension makes it an even rarer entity. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Costs of subcutaneous and intravenous administration of trastuzumab for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jens; Jensen, Kenneth Forsstrøm; Olesen, Daniel Sloth

    2018-01-01

    AIM: Trastuzumab is available in an intravenous (iv.) and a subcutaneous (sc.) formulation. The objective of this study was to estimate the costs of administration of iv. and sc. trastuzumab treatment. MATERIALS & METHODS: Via interviews, we identified all the activities associated with iv. and sc....... administration. The outcome was time estimates. To estimate the administration costs, the time estimates were valued by average gross wages. RESULTS: The iv. administration takes longer time as infusion time is longer (25 or 85 min). The iv. administration is associated with higher cost for 17 cycles; €971...... (€1858 vs €887). CONCLUSION: sc. administration is associated with lower administration costs. Switching patients from iv. to sc. would make it possible to treat more patients without increasing the personnel resources....

  19. Nocardia abscessus-Associated Subcutaneous Infection in a Patient with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Karakas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes primary subcutaneous infection caused by N. abscessus in a 60-year-old male patient with the history of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The patient was presented with pain and swelling in his left thigh for 45 days. Soft tissue ultrasonography showed a heterogeneous and hypoechoic mass consistent with an abscess. Gram-positive and branched filamentous bacilli, along with neutrophils, were identified in gram-stained smears of the pus. Pus culture was positive for Gram-positive bacilli, which identified as N. abscessus. Initially, the patient was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Due to insufficient clinical response, ceftriaxone was added for two weeks. Then, the patient was prescribed a 3-month course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. It is important to start appropriate and effective treatment as soon as possible in patients with immunosuppression. [Dis Mol Med 2016; 4(3.000: 31-33

  20. Subcutaneous testosterone-letrozole therapy before and concurrent with neoadjuvant breast chemotherapy: clinical response and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Rebecca L; York, Anne E; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2017-07-01

    Hormone receptor-positive breast cancers respond favorably to subcutaneous testosterone combined with an aromatase inhibitor. However, the effect of testosterone combined with an aromatase inhibitor on tumor response to chemotherapy was unknown. This study investigated the effect of testosterone-letrozole implants on breast cancer tumor response before and during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A 51-year-old woman on testosterone replacement therapy was diagnosed with hormone receptor-positive invasive breast cancer. Six weeks before starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the patient was treated with subcutaneous testosterone-letrozole implants and instructed to follow a low-glycemic diet. Clinical status was followed. Tumor response to "testosterone-letrozole" and subsequently, "testosterone-letrozole with chemotherapy" was monitored using serial ultrasounds and calculating tumor volume. Response to therapy was determined by change in tumor volume. Cost of therapy was evaluated. There was a 43% reduction in tumor volume 41 days after the insertion of testosterone-letrozole implants, before starting chemotherapy. After the initiation of concurrent chemotherapy, the tumor responded at an increased rate, resulting in a complete pathologic response. Chemotherapy was tolerated. Blood counts and weight remained stable. There were no neurologic or cardiac complications from the chemotherapy. Cost of therapy is reported. Subcutaneous testosterone-letrozole was an effective treatment for this patient's breast cancer and did not interfere with chemotherapy. This novel combination implant has the potential to prevent side effects from chemotherapy, improve quality of life, and warrants further investigation.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Ultrafiltration/Microfiltration Membranes for Removal of Nitrocellulose (NC) Fines from Wastewater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Byung

    1997-01-01

    .... In Phase II, a pilot-scale crossflow membrane filtration system was constructed to: (1) investigate the concentration polarization and fouling mechanism caused by NC fines during crossflow filtration of NC wastewater, (2...

  2. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in diabetes: patient populations, safety, efficacy, and pharmacoeconomics

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Battelino, Tadej; Danne, Thomas; Hovorka, Roman; Jarosz?Chobot, Przemyslawa; Renard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The level of glycaemic control necessary to achieve optimal short?term and long?term outcomes in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) typically requires intensified insulin therapy using multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. For continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, the insulins of choice are the rapid?acting insulin analogues, insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine. The advantages of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion ...

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002678 gi|13474471 >1gkpA 2 454 5 422 3e-10 ... ref|NP_106039.1| creatinine deamin...ase [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB51825.1| creatinine deaminase [Mesorhizobium loti ...

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_002570 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002570 gi|15612789 >1v7zA 3 254 1 238 1e-53 ... dbj|BAB03945.1| creatinine amidohy...drolase [Bacillus halodurans C-125] ... ref|NP_241092.1| creatinine amidohydrolase [Bacillus ...

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_002952 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002952 gi|49483221 >1pwgA 4 329 74 373 1e-38 ... ref|YP_040445.1| autolysis and me...thicillin resistant-related protein [Staphylococcus ... aureus subsp. aureus MRSA252] emb|CAG40034.1| autolysis

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_004461 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004461 gi|27467672 >1pwgA 4 344 72 389 1e-36 ... ref|NP_764309.1| autolysis and me...thicillin resistant-related protein [Staphylococcus ... epidermidis ATCC 12228] gb|AAO04351.1| autolysis

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003098 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003098 gi|15902282 >1in4A 3 311 20 328 5e-98 ... ref|NP_357832.1| Branch migration of Holliday structures... [Streptococcus pneumoniae ... R6] gb|AAK99042.1| Branch migration of Holliday ... structures... [Streptococcus pneumoniae R6] pir||F97901 ... branch migration of Holliday structures

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005363 gi|42524871 >1tjlA 27 144 16 133 6e-10 ... ref|NP_970251.1| dnaK deletion s...uppressor protein [Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100] ... emb|CAE78310.1| dnaK deletion suppressor pro

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27380945 >1tjlA 26 141 1 116 7e-32 ... ref|NP_772474.1| dnaK deletion su...ppressor protein [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA ... 110] dbj|BAC51099.1| dnaK deletion suppressor pro

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_003317 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... regulator, internal deletion [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] pir||A87693 transcription regulato... NC_003317 gi|17988031 >1etoB 1 97 211 307 4e-07 ... ref|NP_422373.1| transcriptional regulator, internal delet...r, internal ... deletion [imported] - Caulobacter crescentus ... Len...ion [Caulobacter ... crescentus CB15] gb|AAK25541.1| transcriptional ...

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... regulator, internal deletion [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] pir||A87693 transcription regulato... NC_002696 gi|16127809 >1etoB 1 97 211 307 4e-07 ... ref|NP_422373.1| transcriptional regulator, internal delet...r, internal ... deletion [imported] - Caulobacter crescentus ... Len...ion [Caulobacter ... crescentus CB15] gb|AAK25541.1| transcriptional ...

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002696 gi|16124962 >1mgtA 4 167 79 239 2e-25 ... ref|NP_419526.1| ada regulatory protein, internal deletion... [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] gb|AAK22694.1| ada regulatory protein, internal ... deletio...n [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] pir||B87337 ada ... regulatory protein, internal deletion

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002696 gi|16124962 >1adn0 1 76 1 75 1e-17 ... ref|NP_419526.1| ada regulatory protein, internal deletion... [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] gb|AAK22694.1| ada regulatory protein, internal ... deletion... [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] pir||B87337 ada ... regulatory protein, internal deletion

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_004431 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004431 gi|26247437 >1j9iA 1 68 1 68 7e-21 ... ref|NP_753477.1| Prophage Qin DNA packaging... protein NU1 homolog [Escherichia coli ... CFT073] gb|AAN80037.1| Prophage Qin DNA packaging ... ...teriophage ... 21] pir||A49849 DNA-packaging protein Nu1 - phage 21 ...

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006905 gi|62179784 >1j9iA 1 68 1 68 5e-21 ... ref|YP_216201.1| Gifsy-1 prophage DNA packaging... ... gb|AAX65120.1| Gifsy-1 prophage DNA packaging protein ... [Phage Gifsy-1] ... Length = 68 ... Q

  16. ORF Sequence: NC_001136 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001136 gi|6320573 >gi|6320573|ref|NP_010653.1| Nucleolar protein involved in pre-rRNA processing; deplet...ion causes severely decreased 18S rRNA levels; Esf1p [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] MAG

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_006840 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006840 gi|59712585 >1bxwA 8 170 21 215 9e-07 ... ref|NP_800205.1| accessory colonization... factor AcfA [Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD ... 2210633] dbj|BAC62038.1| accessory colonization

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_004605 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004605 gi|28900550 >1bxwA 8 170 21 215 9e-07 ... ref|NP_800205.1| accessory colonization... factor AcfA [Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD ... 2210633] dbj|BAC62038.1| accessory colonization

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002929 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002929 gi|33592330 >1uynX 1 299 352 647 5e-40 ... ref|NP_879974.1| tracheal colonization... factor precursor [Bordetella pertussis Tohama ... I] emb|CAA08832.2| tracheal colonization fac...tor ... [Bordetella pertussis] emb|CAE41497.1| tracheal ... colonization factor precursor [Bor

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003070 gi|18397761 >1wocC 2 96 2 97 5e-15 ... ref|YP_063428.1| ssb1 [Campylobacter... ... gb|EAL55921.1| single-strand binding protein, putative ... [Campylobacter coli RM2228] gb|AAR29517.1| ssb1

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_003075 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003075 gi|30692533 >3ullA 5 115 1 104 8e-18 ... ref|YP_063478.1| ssb1 [Campylobact...er jejuni] gb|AAR29567.1| ssb1 [Campylobacter ... jejuni] ... Length = 104 ... Query: 31 ... GQDSDVS

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003282 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003282 gi|17540144 >1n0rA 2 124 89 212 5e-26 ... gb|AAA96093.1| Feminization of xx and xo animals... ... homolog a, FEMinization of XX and XO animals FEM-1 ... (fem-1) [Caenorhabditis elegans] pir||

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_004605 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004605 gi|28900808 >1l3wA 6 536 1265 1798 3e-11 ... ref|NP_800463.1| putative biofilm...-associated surface protein [Vibrio parahaemolyticus ... RIMD 2210633] dbj|BAC62296.1| putative biofilm

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002655 gi|15804385 >gi|15804385|ref|NP_290425.1| TDP-Fuc4NAc:lipidII transferase; synthesis of enterobac...terial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] MSLLQFSGLFVVWLLCTLFIA

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003070 gi|15221381 >1bq00 2 77 15 90 4e-20 ... ref|NP_177004.1| gravity-responsive... protein / altered response to gravity protein ... (ARG1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gb|AAD13758.1| Altere

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27377041 >1xewY 1 130 1026 1153 2e-37 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669839 >1ii8A 3 194 4 202 2e-10 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669839 >1gxlA 2 204 475 685 1e-34 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003237 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003237 gi|19075000 >1xewY 1 130 1026 1153 2e-37 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669839 >1xewY 1 130 1026 1153 2e-37 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus jannaschii ... DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome segreta

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1| ... acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ferrulic acid biotransformation ... protein, putative [Pseudomo...ransformation protein, ... putative [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] gb|AAN68958.... NC_002947 gi|26990069 >1u8vA 9 432 4 458 7e-34 ... ref|NP_745494.1| acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ferrulic acid biot

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002947 gi|26990072 >1uzbA 37 513 3 472 6e-68 ... ref|NP_745497.1| vanillin dehydro...genase [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] gb|AAN68961.1| ... vanillin dehydrogenase [Pseudomonas putida KT24

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27381528 >1uzbA 40 515 6 475 3e-74 ... ref|NP_773057.1| vanillin: NAD ox...idoreductase [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110] ... dbj|BAC51682.1| vanillin: NAD oxidoreductase ...

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27377799 >1uzbA 40 515 5 474 3e-69 ... ref|NP_769328.1| vanillin: NAD ox...idoreductase [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110] ... dbj|BAC47953.1| vanillin: NAD oxidoreductase ...

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002696 gi|16126641 >1uzbA 58 515 12 462 8e-77 ... ref|NP_421205.1| vanillin dehydr...ogenase [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] gb|AAK24373.1| ... vanillin dehydrogenase [Caulobacter crescent...us CB15] ... pir||A87547 vanillin dehydrogenase [imported] - ... Caulobacter crescentus ...

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_005090 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005090 gi|34557929 >1kmoA 12 661 39 664 3e-52 ... ref|NP_907744.1| RECEPTOR PRECURSOR-Most...ly Fe transport [Wolinella succinogenes DSM ... 1740] emb|CAE10644.1| RECEPTOR PRECURSOR-Most

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_006085 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006085 gi|50842772 >1qr0A 1 205 2 202 3e-27 ... ref|YP_055999.1| biosurfactants pr...oduction protein [Propionibacterium acnes ... KPA171202] gb|AAT83041.1| biosurfactants production ...

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_000917 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000917 gi|11498546 >1yozA 1 116 1 116 6e-47 ... pdb|1YOZ|B Chain B, Predicted Coding... Region Af0941 From Archaeoglobus Fulgidus ... pdb|1YOZ|A Chain A, Predicted Coding Region Af0941 F

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_003283 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003283 gi|17561408 >1bor0 2 53 282 342 3e-04 ... ref|NP_757385.1| synoviolin 1 iso...form b [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH30530.1| Synoviolin 1, ... isoform b [Homo sapiens] ... Length = 61

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_006841 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006841 gi|59714046 >1gntA 1 552 1 553 0.0 ... ref|YP_206821.1| hydroxylamine reduc...tase [Vibrio fischeri ES114] gb|AAW87933.1| ... hydroxylamine reductase [Vibrio fischeri ES114] ...

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_003228 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003228 gi|60681683 >1gntA 1 551 3 543 0.0 ... emb|CAH07898.1| hydroxylamine reduct...ase [Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343] ... ref|YP_211827.1| hydroxylamine reductase [Bacteroides ...

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_000963 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000963 gi|15604438 >1xvqA 17 163 47 203 4e-07 ... ref|NP_220956.1| SCO2 PROTEIN PRECURSOR (sco2...) [Rickettsia prowazekii str. Madrid E] ... emb|CAA15032.1| SCO2 PROTEIN PRECURSOR (sco2...) ... [Rickettsia prowazekii] pir||F71663 sco2 protein ... precursor (sco2) RP587 - Rickettsia

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_006142 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006142 gi|51473766 >1xvqA 17 163 40 196 7e-07 ... ref|YP_067523.1| Sco2-like prote...in [Rickettsia typhi str. Wilmington] gb|AAU04041.1| ... Sco2-like protein [Rickettsia typhi str. Wil

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_003911 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003911 gi|56698151 >1wy2A 3 347 27 396 7e-44 ... gb|AAV96554.1| creatinase [Silici...bacter pomeroyi DSS-3] ref|YP_168523.1| ... creatinase [Silicibacter pomeroyi DSS-3] ... Length

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_003366 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003366 gi|18309739 >1v7zA 1 255 3 250 3e-61 ... dbj|BAB80463.1| creatinase [Clostr...idium perfringens str. 13] ref|NP_561673.1| ... creatinase [Clostridium perfringens str. 13] ...

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002947 gi|26990378 >1wy2A 3 347 23 393 2e-45 ... ref|NP_745803.1| creatinase [Pseu...domonas putida KT2440] gb|AAN69267.1| creatinase ... [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] ... Length = 3

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003030 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003030 gi|15895740 >1w3oA 13 174 5 153 2e-30 ... ref|NP_349089.1| Possible 5-Nitroimidazole antibiotics... ... gb|AAK80429.1| Possible 5-Nitroimidazole antibiotics ... resistance protein, NimA-family [Clost...ridium ... acetobutylicum ATCC 824] pir||B97205 probable ... 5-Nitroimidazole antibiotics

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_000964 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000964 gi|16078891 >1jmkC 6 230 1056 1270 2e-59 ... ref|NP_389712.1| plipastatin s...ynthetase [Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168] ... emb|CAB13713.1| plipastatin synthetase [B

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003921 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003921 gi|21264213 >1ub4C 1 63 1 63 4e-10 ... gb|AAM39232.1| plasmid stable inheritance... protein I [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. ... citri str. 306] ref|NP_644714.1| plasmid stable ... inheritance

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_002946 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002946 gi|59800954 >1ub4B 4 109 2 113 3e-22 ... ref|YP_207666.1| putative plasmid stable inheritance... ... gb|AAW89254.1| putative plasmid stable inheritance ... protein putative phage associated prote

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pothetical stbA Plasmid stable inheritance protein ... [Photobacterium profundum] ... Length = ... NC_006370 gi|54307287 >1mwmA 2 317 24 344 3e-96 ... ref|YP_128307.1| Hypothetical stbA Plasmid stable inherita...nce protein ... [Photobacterium profundum SS9] emb|CAG18505.1| ... Hy

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_003921 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003921 gi|21264212 >1m1fA 1 109 2 110 1e-34 ... gb|AAM39231.1| plasmid stable inheritance... protein K [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. ... citri str. 306] ref|NP_644713.1| plasmid stable ... inheritance

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_005791 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005791 gi|45358156 >1wcv1 4 241 4 235 5e-21 ... ref|NP_987713.1| walker type ATPas...e [Methanococcus maripaludis S2] emb|CAF30149.1| ... walker type ATPase [Methanococcus maripaludis S2

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_004547 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004547 gi|50121646 >1kmoA 14 661 37 705 8e-56 ... ref|YP_050813.1| exogenous ferri...c siderophore TonB-dependent receptor [Erwinia ... carotovora subsp. atroseptica SCRI1043] emb|CAG75622.1| ... exogenou

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003305 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003305 gi|17937619 >1kmoA 2 661 49 702 6e-54 ... ref|NP_534408.1| exogenous ferric... siderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] gb|AAL44724.1| exogenous ferric sidero...phore ... receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. C58] ... pir||AF3038 exogenous ferric sider

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_003063 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003063 gi|15891046 >1kmoA 2 661 49 702 6e-54 ... ref|NP_534408.1| exogenous ferric... siderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] gb|AAL44724.1| exogenous ferric sidero...phore ... receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. C58] ... pir||AF3038 exogenous ferric sider

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_002927 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002927 gi|33603734 >1kmoA 3 661 60 754 2e-50 ... ref|NP_891294.1| exogenous ferric... siderophore receptor [Bordetella bronchiseptica ... RB50] gb|AAB51774.1| exogenous ferric siderophor...e ... receptor emb|CAE35124.1| exogenous ferric siderophore ... receptor [Bordetella bronchise

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_005085 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005085 gi|34497787 >1f39A 3 98 107 198 1e-23 ... gb|AAQ60004.1| SOS mutagenesis [C...hromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472] ... ref|NP_902002.1| SOS mutagenesis [Chromobacterium ...

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_005861 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005861 gi|46446610 >1f39A 5 95 55 141 1e-16 ... ref|YP_007975.1| probable SOS mutagenesis... and repair protein UmuD [Parachlamydia sp. ... UWE25] emb|CAF23700.1| probable SOS mutagenesis

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_005070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005070 gi|33865578 >1f39A 4 97 54 143 4e-22 ... ref|NP_897137.1| putative SOS mutagenesis... protein UmuD [Synechococcus sp. WH 8102] ... emb|CAE07559.1| putative SOS mutagenesis protein

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_003233 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003233 gi|19074284 >1ltlE 10 233 29 251 7e-31 ... emb|CAD25394.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM5 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_585790.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003236 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003236 gi|19074669 >1ewiA 5 113 54 161 1e-18 ... emb|CAD25779.1| DNA REPLICATION F...ACTOR A PROTEIN 1 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ... ref|NP_586175.1| DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A PROT

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_003238 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003238 gi|19173253 >1a5t0 17 316 29 298 4e-25 ... emb|CAD27104.1| REPLICATION FACT...OR C (ACTIVATOR 1) 37kDa SUBUNIT [Encephalitozoon ... cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597056.1| REPLICATION FA

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_003238 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003238 gi|19173256 >1g8pA 7 311 329 597 1e-04 ... emb|CAD27107.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM7 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597059.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31791180 >1ii8A 1 187 1 168 2e-14 ... ref|NP_853673.1| DNA REPLICATION A...D92865.1| ... DNA REPLICATION AND REPAIR PROTEIN RECF (SINGLE-STRAND ... DNA BINDING PROTEIN)

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_003238 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003238 gi|19173256 >1ltlE 44 240 100 302 2e-23 ... emb|CAD27107.1| DNA REPLICATION... LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM7 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597059.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003364 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003364 gi|18312259 >1g8pA 7 306 385 684 6e-05 ... emb|CAD25272.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR MCM2 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi ... GB-M1] ref|NP_584768.1| DNA REPLICATION LICENSING

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003236 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003236 gi|19074669 >1jmcA 1 238 213 445 1e-62 ... emb|CAD25779.1| DNA REPLICATION ...FACTOR A PROTEIN 1 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ... ref|NP_586175.1| DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A PRO

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_005787 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005787 gi|45198873 >1g8pA 7 311 329 597 1e-04 ... emb|CAD27107.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM7 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597059.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_002607 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002607 gi|15791012 >1g8pA 7 306 385 684 6e-05 ... emb|CAD25272.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR MCM2 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi ... GB-M1] ref|NP_584768.1| DNA REPLICATION LICENSING

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_003317 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003317 gi|17987645 >1j1vA 4 94 20 109 8e-10 ... gb|AAL52543.1| CHROMOSOMAL REPLICATION... INITIATOR PROTEIN DNAA [Brucella melitensis ... 16M] ref|NP_540279.1| CHROMOSOMAL REPLICATION IN

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_003229 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003229 gi|19074034 >1ltlE 2 242 49 290 7e-40 ... emb|CAD25144.1| DNA REPLICATION L...ICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY (MCM4) ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_584640.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003236 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003236 gi|19074669 >1l1oC 2 175 456 623 1e-43 ... emb|CAD25779.1| DNA REPLICATION ...FACTOR A PROTEIN 1 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ... ref|NP_586175.1| DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A PRO

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_003229 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003229 gi|19073988 >1a5t0 2 324 6 283 2e-17 ... emb|CAD25098.1| DNA REPLICATION FA...CTOR (ACTIVATOR 1) 36 kDa SUBUNIT ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_584594.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003232 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003232 gi|19173617 >1ltlE 7 224 22 242 3e-38 ... ref|NP_597420.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY (MCM6) ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi] emb|CAD26597.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  16. Stepping Motor - Hydraulic Motor Servo Drives for an NC Milling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper the retrofit design of the control system of an NC milling machine with a stepping motor and stepping motor - actuated hydraulic motor servo mechanism on the machines X-axis is described. The servo designed in the course of this study was tested practically and shown to be linear - the velocity following errors ...

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_000117 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000117 gi|15605324 >1jgmA 39 326 7 260 4e-33 ... ref|NP_220110.1| PHP superfamily hydrolase [Chlamydia trachomatis D/UW-3/CX] ... gb|AAC68196.1| PHP... ... trachomatis D/UW-3/CX] pir||G71494 probable php ... hydrolase - Chlamydia trachomatis (sero

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_003902 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003902 gi|21229523 >1p6rA 5 81 4 80 4e-10 ... ref|NP_635440.1| methicillin resista...nce protein [Xanthomonas campestris pv. ... campestris str. ATCC 33913] gb|AAM39364.1| methicillin ...

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_006582 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006582 gi|56962048 >1sd4A 2 99 6 103 1e-24 ... ref|YP_173770.1| methicillin resist...ance regulatory protein MecI [Bacillus clausii ... KSM-K16] dbj|BAD62809.1| methicillin resistance ...

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003919 gi|21240843 >1p6rA 5 81 4 80 8e-10 ... gb|AAM34961.1| methicillin resistanc...e protein [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ... str. 306] ref|NP_640425.1| methicillin resistance ...

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002678 gi|13472874 >1b4uB 49 289 86 299 5e-14 ... ref|NP_104441.1| encapsulation p...rotein CapA [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB50227.1| encapsulation protein; CapA ...

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_006177 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006177 gi|51893967 >1b4uB 49 289 86 299 5e-14 ... ref|NP_104441.1| encapsulation p...rotein CapA [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB50227.1| encapsulation protein; CapA ...

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_002967 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002967 gi|42528039 >1b4uB 49 289 86 299 5e-14 ... ref|NP_104441.1| encapsulation p...rotein CapA [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB50227.1| encapsulation protein; CapA ...

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31792055 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31793631 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_002755 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002755 gi|15841974 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_002755 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002755 gi|15840280 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000962 gi|15609587 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003155 gi|29830077 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000962 gi|15608007 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_004331 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004331 gi|23619306 >1wfiA 3 125 209 328 1e-34 ... ref|NP_705268.1| nuclear movement... protein, putative [Plasmodium falciparum 3D7] ... emb|CAD52505.1| nuclear movement protein, putativ

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_003071 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003071 gi|18403860 >1rl1A 4 90 215 300 7e-09 ... ref|NP_705268.1| nuclear movement... protein, putative [Plasmodium falciparum 3D7] ... emb|CAD52505.1| nuclear movement protein, putative

  13. Large-Nc quantum chromodynamics and harmonic sums

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-08

    Jun 8, 2012 ... This has led us to consider a class of analytic number theory .... The self-energy function LR(Q2) in the chiral limit vanishes order by order in QCD ... the 1/Nc expansion, the Goldstone loop corrections are subleading and, ...

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_004310 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004310 gi|23502014 >1y7mA 26 161 48 214 1e-16 ... gb|AAL52029.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE... OPERON OXIDOREDUCTASE CAIA [Brucella melitensis ... 16M] ref|NP_539765.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE OPERON

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003317 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003317 gi|17987131 >1y7mA 26 161 48 214 1e-16 ... gb|AAL52029.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE... OPERON OXIDOREDUCTASE CAIA [Brucella melitensis ... 16M] ref|NP_539765.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE OPERON

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_002771 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002771 gi|15829246 >1nm8A 15 579 43 592 3e-82 ... ref|NP_326606.1| CARNITINE O-ACE...TYLTRANSFERASE [Mycoplasma pulmonis UAB CTIP] ... emb|CAC13948.1| CARNITINE O-ACETYLTRANSFERASE ...

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f|NP_289264.1| PTS system enzyme II ABC (asc), ... cryptic, transports specific beta-glucosides ... ...ABC (asc), cryptic, transports specific ... beta-glucosides [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] ... ... NC_002655 gi|15803232 >1iba0 1 77 8 85 7e-10 ... gb|AAG57822.1| PTS system enzyme II

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54310050 >1r0wC 43 281 30 288 6e-50 ... ref|YP_131070.1| putative ABC-type oligopeptide transport...putative ... ABC-type oligopeptide transportsystem, ATPase component ... [Photobacterium profu

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54310056 >1r0wC 45 273 39 283 1e-54 ... ref|YP_131076.1| putative ABC-type metal ion transports...ative ... ABC-type metal ion transportsystem, ATPase component ... [Photobacterium profundum

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f|NP_289264.1| PTS system enzyme II ABC (asc), ... cryptic, transports specific beta-glucosides ... ...ABC (asc), cryptic, transports specific ... beta-glucosides [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] ... ... NC_000913 gi|49176263 >1iba0 1 77 8 85 7e-10 ... gb|AAG57822.1| PTS system enzyme II

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_002695 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f|NP_289264.1| PTS system enzyme II ABC (asc), ... cryptic, transports specific beta-glucosides ... ...ABC (asc), cryptic, transports specific ... beta-glucosides [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] ... ... NC_002695 gi|15832825 >1iba0 1 77 8 85 7e-10 ... gb|AAG57822.1| PTS system enzyme II

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_006361 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006361 gi|54022220 >1y7yA 7 68 12 73 3e-05 ... ref|YP_132230.1| hypotethical trans...criptional regulator [Photobacterium profundum ... SS9] emb|CAG22430.1| hypotethical transcriptional ...

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_002758 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002758 gi|15923033 >1sd4A 3 117 7 121 9e-28 ... dbj|BAB56205.1| methicillin resist...ance regulatory protein [Staphylococcus aureus ... subsp. aureus Mu50] sp|Q932L5|MECI_STAAM Methicill...in ... resistance regulatory protein mecI ref|NP_370567.1| ... methicillin resistance regulato

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_002506 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002506 gi|15600953 >1cqxA 1 398 1 388 e-107 ... gb|AAF96096.1| ferrisiderophore re...ductase [Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. ... N16961] ref|NP_232583.1| ferrisiderophore reductase... ... [Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. N16961] ... pir||F82491 ferrisiderophore reductase

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available outer ... membrane receptor for iron transport; outer membrane ... porin protein, putative ferris...porin protein, putative ferrisiderophore receptor ... [Escherichia coli K12] gb|AAC73892.1| putative ... NC_000913 gi|16128773 >1kmoA 12 661 63 760 6e-50 ... ref|NP_415326.1| outer membrane

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_002928 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002928 gi|33596933 >1kmoA 7 661 65 702 8e-60 ... ref|NP_884576.1| putative ferrisi...derophore receptor [Bordetella parapertussis 12822] ... emb|CAE37631.1| putative ferrisiderophore rec

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_002929 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002929 gi|33592999 >1kmoA 7 661 65 702 1e-60 ... ref|NP_880643.1| putative ferrisi...derophore receptor [Bordetella pertussis Tohama I] ... emb|CAE42244.1| putative ferrisiderophore rece

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003143 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003143 gi|16121259 >1kmoA 5 661 44 699 5e-70 ... emb|CAC89799.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia ... pestis CO92] ref|NP_404572.1| putative hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia pestis CO92] ... pir||AD0117 probable hydroxamate-type ferris

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_006677 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006677 gi|58039110 >1kmoA 11 661 79 730 2e-52 ... ref|YP_191074.1| Hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Gluconobacter oxydans ... 621H] gb|AAW60418.1| Hydroxamate-type ferrisid

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_003063 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003063 gi|15890948 >1kmoA 11 661 74 716 3e-76 ... ref|NP_534507.1| hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium ... tumefaciens str. C58] gb|AAL44823.1| hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] pir||AI3050 hydroxamate-type ferris

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_005810 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005810 gi|45443224 >1kmoA 5 661 44 699 5e-70 ... emb|CAC89799.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia ... pestis CO92] ref|NP_404572.1| putative hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia pestis CO92] ... pir||AD0117 probable hydroxamate-type ferris

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_002927 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002927 gi|33600770 >1kmoA 7 661 65 702 2e-60 ... ref|NP_888330.1| putative ferrisi...derophore receptor [Bordetella bronchiseptica RB50] ... emb|CAE32282.1| putative ferrisiderophore rec

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_004088 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004088 gi|22127219 >1kmoA 5 661 44 699 5e-70 ... emb|CAC89799.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia ... pestis CO92] ref|NP_404572.1| putative hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia pestis CO92] ... pir||AD0117 probable hydroxamate-type ferris

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_006677 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006677 gi|58039006 >1kmoA 12 661 92 773 1e-43 ... ref|YP_190970.1| Hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Gluconobacter oxydans ... 621H] gb|AAW60314.1| Hydroxamate-type ferrisid

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003305 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003305 gi|17937718 >1kmoA 11 661 74 716 3e-76 ... ref|NP_534507.1| hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium ... tumefaciens str. C58] gb|AAL44823.1| hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] pir||AI3050 hydroxamate-type ferris

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003888 gi|21225320 >1k12A 3 151 580 722 8e-15 ... dbj|BAC69434.1| putative mycodextrana...se [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] ... ref|NP_822899.1| putative mycodextranase [Streptomyces

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003888 gi|21225300 >1k12A 3 151 580 722 8e-15 ... dbj|BAC69434.1| putative mycodextrana...se [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] ... ref|NP_822899.1| putative mycodextranase [Streptomyces

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_003284 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003284 gi|17551448 >1rw3A 32 443 156 555 3e-25 ... gb|AAF64414.1| Pol [equine foam...y virus] ref|NP_054716.1| Pol [equine foamy virus] ... Length = 400 ... Query: 980 ... KLRIVLD--ASSPPGPEPSL

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002655 gi|15800390 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_004741 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004741 gi|30062138 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_004431 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004431 gi|26246664 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_002695 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002695 gi|15829972 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_004337 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004337 gi|56479698 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_004337 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004337 gi|24115225 >1e94E 1 443 7 449 e-162 ... pdb|1E94|F Chain F, Hslv-Hslu From E.Coli... pdb|1E94|E Chain E, Hslv-Hslu From ... E.Coli pdb|1HQY|F Chain F, Nucleotide-Dependent ...

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_004337 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004337 gi|56480239 >1us0A 2 305 26 295 5e-61 ... pdb|1MZR|B Chain B, Structure Of Dkga From E.Coli...re ... Of Dkga From E.Coli At 2.13 A Resolution Solved By ... Molecular Replacement ...

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|49176300 >1us0A 2 305 26 295 5e-61 ... pdb|1MZR|B Chain B, Structure Of Dkga From E.Coli...re ... Of Dkga From E.Coli At 2.13 A Resolution Solved By ... Molecular Replacement ...

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_005085 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005085 gi|34495619 >1t06A 1 193 1 205 2e-24 ... gb|AAQ57843.1| DNA alkylation repa...ir enzyme [Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472] ... ref|NP_899834.1| DNA alkylation repair enzyme ...

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004307 gi|23466169 >1u94A 19 326 67 387 5e-28 ... ref|NP_696772.1| alkylation dama...ge repair protein [Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705] ... gb|AAN25408.1| alkylation damage repair protei

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_006087 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006087 gi|50955643 >1u94A 24 325 68 337 3e-32 ... ref|YP_062931.1| alkylation dama...ge DNA repair protein [Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli ... str. CTCB07] gb|AAT89826.1| alkylation damage D

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32477023 >1t06A 1 191 9 220 1e-24 ... ref|NP_870017.1| probable DNA alkylation... repair enzyme [Rhodopirellula baltica SH 1] ... emb|CAD79170.1| probable DNA alkylation repair

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_004350 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004350 gi|24378587 >1t06A 1 191 11 210 3e-32 ... gb|AAN57848.1| DNA alkylation rep...air enzyme [Streptococcus mutans UA159] ... ref|NP_720542.1| DNA alkylation repair enzyme ...

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_006348 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006348 gi|53726196 >1umqA 5 59 22 76 8e-06 ... ref|ZP_00216666.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion...ef|ZP_00221526.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion ... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator ...

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_000907 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000907 gi|16272918 >1etoB 1 97 1 98 9e-28 ... ref|ZP_00320663.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion... ... ref|ZP_00156839.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion ... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator [Hae

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_002528 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002528 gi|15617004 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 1e-23 ... ref|NP_240217.1| factor-for-inversion... ... DNA-binding protein fis dbj|BAB13103.1| ... factor-for-inversion stimulation protein [Buchnera ... ... aphidicola str. APS (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] pir||G84976 ... factor-for-inversion

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_004459 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004459 gi|27364633 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_004603 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004603 gi|28899659 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_004061 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004061 gi|21672661 >1etoB 1 98 1 99 3e-23 ... ref|NP_660728.1| factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Buchnera aphidicola ... str. Sg (Schizaphis graminum)] gb|AAM67939.1| ... factor-for-inversion

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_006512 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006512 gi|56461389 >1etoB 1 98 1 97 7e-25 ... ref|YP_156670.1| Factor for inversion... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator ... [Idiomarina loihiensis L2TR] gb|AAV83121.1| Factor for ... inversion

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_006350 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006350 gi|53720503 >1umqA 5 59 22 76 8e-06 ... ref|ZP_00216666.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion...ef|ZP_00221526.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion ... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator ...

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_005139 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005139 gi|37681323 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion