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Sample records for subcutaneous implantation model

  1. Host inflammatory response to polypropylene implants: insights from a quantitative immunohistochemical and birefringence analysis in a rat subcutaneous model

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    Alessandro Prudente

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To describe acute and sub acute aspects of histological and immunohistochemical response to PP implant in a rat subcutaneous model based on objective methods. Materials and Methods Thirty rats had a PP mesh subcutaneously implanted and the same dissection on the other side of abdomen but without mesh (sham. The animals were euthanized after 4 and 30 days. Six slides were prepared using the tissue removed: one stained with hematoxylin-eosin (inflammation assessment; one unstained (birefringence evaluation and four slides for immunohistochemical processing: IL-1 and TNF-α (pro-inflammatory cytokines, MMP-2 (collagen metabolism and CD-31 (angiogenesis. The area of inflammation, the birefringence index, the area of immunoreactivity and the number of vessels were objectively measured. Results A larger area of inflammatory reaction was observed in PP compared to sham on the 4th and on the 30th day (p=0.0002. After 4 days, PP presented higher TNF (p=0.0001 immunoreactivity than sham and no differences were observed in MMP-2 (p=0.06 and IL-1 (p=0.08. After 30 days, a reduction of IL-1 (p=0.010 and TNF (p=0.016 for PP and of IL-1 (p=0.010 for sham were observed. Moreover, area of MMP-2 immunoreactivity decreased over time for PP group (p=0.018. Birefringence index and vessel counting showed no differences between PP and sham (p=0.27 and p=0.58, respectively. Conclusions The implantation of monofilament and macroporous polypropylene in the subcutaneous of rats resulted in increased inflammatory activity and higher TNF production in the early post implant phase. After 30 days, PP has similar cytokines immunoreactivity, vessel density and extracellular matrix organization.

  2. Device-based local delivery of siRNA against mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a murine subcutaneous implant model to inhibit fibrous encapsulation.

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    Takahashi, Hironobu; Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W

    2010-11-01

    Fibrous encapsulation of surgically implanted devices is associated with elevated proliferation and activation of fibroblasts in tissues surrounding these implants, frequently causing foreign body complications. Here we test the hypothesis that inhibition of the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in fibroblasts can mitigate the soft tissue implant foreign body response by suppressing fibrotic responses around implants. In this study, mTOR was knocked down using small interfering RNA (siRNA) conjugated with branched polyethylenimine (bPEI) in fibroblastic lineage cells in serum-based cell culture as shown by both gene and protein analysis. This mTOR knock-down led to an inhibition in fibroblast proliferation by 70% and simultaneous down-regulation in the expression of type I collagen in fibroblasts in vitro. These siRNA/bPEI complexes were released from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel coatings surrounding model polymer implants in a subcutaneous rodent model in vivo. No significant reduction in fibrous capsule thickness and mTOR expression in the foreign body capsules were observed. The siRNA inefficacy in this in vivo implant model was attributed to siRNA dosing limitations in the gel delivery system, and lack of targeting ability of the siRNA complex specifically to fibroblasts. While in vitro data supported mTOR knock-down in fibroblast cultures, in vivo siRNA delivery must be further improved to produce clinically relevant effects on fibrotic encapsulation around implants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chordoma with postoperative subcutaneous implantation and meningeal dissemination: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, T.; Okudera, T.; Shimosegawa, E.; Hatazawa, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Yasui, N.; Ogawa, T.

    2001-01-01

    Chordomas are histologically benign tumours which are locally invasive. We present an unusual case of recurrent chordoma with subcutaneous implantation and widespread meningeal dissemination after surgery. Contrast-enhanced MRI was useful for determining the extent of the tumour. (orig.)

  4. Histological and histomorphometrical analysis of a silica matrix embedded nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute using the subcutaneous implantation model in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanaati, Shahram; Orth, Carina; Barbeck, Mike; Kirkpatrick, Charles James [Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55101 Mainz (Germany); Willershausen, Ines [Institute for Dental Material Sciences and Technology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Anselm-Franz-von-Bentzel-Weg 14, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Thimm, Benjamin W [Institute for Biomechanics, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str.10, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Booms, Patrick [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Section of Medicine, Surgery and Anaesthesia, University of Leeds (United Kingdom); Stuebinger, Stefan; Landes, Constantin; Sader, Robert Anton, E-mail: ghanaati@uni-mainz.d [Department for Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Theodor-Stein-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-06-01

    The clinical suitability of a bone substitute material is determined by the ability to induce a tissue reaction specific to its composition. The aim of this in vivo study was to analyze the tissue reaction to a silica matrix-embedded, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute. The subcutaneous implantation model in Wistar rats was chosen to assess the effect of silica degradation on the vascularization of the biomaterial and its biodegradation within a time period of 6 months. Already at day 10 after implantation, histomorphometrical analysis showed that the vascularization of the implantation bed reached its peak value compared to all other time points. Both vessel density and vascularization significantly decreased until day 90 after implantation. In this time period, the bone substitute underwent a significant degradation initiated by TRAP-positive and TRAP-negative multinucleated giant cells together with macrophages and lymphocytes. Although no specific tissue reaction could be related to the described silica degradation, the biomaterial was close to being fully degraded without a severe inflammatory response. These characteristics are advantageous for bone regeneration and remodeling processes.

  5. Histological and histomorphometrical analysis of a silica matrix embedded nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute using the subcutaneous implantation model in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanaati, Shahram; Orth, Carina; Barbeck, Mike; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Willershausen, Ines; Thimm, Benjamin W; Booms, Patrick; Stuebinger, Stefan; Landes, Constantin; Sader, Robert Anton

    2010-01-01

    The clinical suitability of a bone substitute material is determined by the ability to induce a tissue reaction specific to its composition. The aim of this in vivo study was to analyze the tissue reaction to a silica matrix-embedded, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute. The subcutaneous implantation model in Wistar rats was chosen to assess the effect of silica degradation on the vascularization of the biomaterial and its biodegradation within a time period of 6 months. Already at day 10 after implantation, histomorphometrical analysis showed that the vascularization of the implantation bed reached its peak value compared to all other time points. Both vessel density and vascularization significantly decreased until day 90 after implantation. In this time period, the bone substitute underwent a significant degradation initiated by TRAP-positive and TRAP-negative multinucleated giant cells together with macrophages and lymphocytes. Although no specific tissue reaction could be related to the described silica degradation, the biomaterial was close to being fully degraded without a severe inflammatory response. These characteristics are advantageous for bone regeneration and remodeling processes.

  6. Worldwide experience with a totally subcutaneous implantable defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambiase, Pier D; Barr, Craig; Theuns, Dominic A M J

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The totally subcutaneous implantable-defibrillator (S-ICD) is a new alternative to the conventional transvenous ICD system to minimize intravascular lead complications. There are limited data describing the long-term performance of the S-ICD. This paper presents the first large internationa...

  7. Nanomaterial N-CP/DLPLG as potent1onal tissue graft in osteoreparation in combination with bone marrow cells on subcutaneous implantation model

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    Janićijević Jelena M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for bone graft materials in osteoreparation is tremendous. Many researches have shown that calcium-phosphate bioceramics have good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. We used nanocomposite biomaterial calcium phosphate coated with poly (dl-lactide-co-glycolide or N-CP/DLPLG. The goal of this investigation was to examine weather N-CP/DLPLG has ability to sustain growth of bone marrow cells after subcutaneous implantation in Balb/c mice. For that purpose N-CP/DLPLG implants with and without bone marrow cells (control were made. Implants were extracted after eight days and eight weeks. In implants loaded with bone marrow cells after eight days and eight weeks we observed fields rich in cells, angiogenesis and collagen genesis. These results showed that N-CP/DLPLG has property of tissue scaffold which sustain bone marrow cells growth and collagen production. This represents a good way for further examination of N-CP/DLPLG as potentional tissue scaffold in osteoreparation.

  8. Biocompatibility of Subcutaneously Implanted Plant-Derived Cellulose Biomaterials.

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    Modulevsky, Daniel J; Cuerrier, Charles M; Pelling, Andrew E

    2016-01-01

    There is intense interest in developing novel biomaterials which support the invasion and proliferation of living cells for potential applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Decellularization of existing tissues have formed the basis of one major approach to producing 3D scaffolds for such purposes. In this study, we utilize the native hypanthium tissue of apples and a simple preparation methodology to create implantable cellulose scaffolds. To examine biocompatibility, scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in wild-type, immunocompetent mice (males and females; 6-9 weeks old). Following the implantation, the scaffolds were resected at 1, 4 and 8 weeks and processed for histological analysis (H&E, Masson's Trichrome, anti-CD31 and anti-CD45 antibodies). Histological analysis revealed a characteristic foreign body response to the scaffold 1 week post-implantation. However, the immune response was observed to gradually disappear by 8 weeks post-implantation. By 8 weeks, there was no immune response in the surrounding dermis tissue and active fibroblast migration within the cellulose scaffold was observed. This was concomitant with the deposition of a new collagen extracellular matrix. Furthermore, active blood vessel formation within the scaffold was observed throughout the period of study indicating the pro-angiogenic properties of the native scaffolds. Finally, while the scaffolds retain much of their original shape they do undergo a slow deformation over the 8-week length of the study. Taken together, our results demonstrate that native cellulose scaffolds are biocompatible and exhibit promising potential as a surgical biomaterial.

  9. Biocompatibility of Subcutaneously Implanted Plant-Derived Cellulose Biomaterials

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    Pelling, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    There is intense interest in developing novel biomaterials which support the invasion and proliferation of living cells for potential applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Decellularization of existing tissues have formed the basis of one major approach to producing 3D scaffolds for such purposes. In this study, we utilize the native hypanthium tissue of apples and a simple preparation methodology to create implantable cellulose scaffolds. To examine biocompatibility, scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in wild-type, immunocompetent mice (males and females; 6–9 weeks old). Following the implantation, the scaffolds were resected at 1, 4 and 8 weeks and processed for histological analysis (H&E, Masson’s Trichrome, anti-CD31 and anti-CD45 antibodies). Histological analysis revealed a characteristic foreign body response to the scaffold 1 week post-implantation. However, the immune response was observed to gradually disappear by 8 weeks post-implantation. By 8 weeks, there was no immune response in the surrounding dermis tissue and active fibroblast migration within the cellulose scaffold was observed. This was concomitant with the deposition of a new collagen extracellular matrix. Furthermore, active blood vessel formation within the scaffold was observed throughout the period of study indicating the pro-angiogenic properties of the native scaffolds. Finally, while the scaffolds retain much of their original shape they do undergo a slow deformation over the 8-week length of the study. Taken together, our results demonstrate that native cellulose scaffolds are biocompatible and exhibit promising potential as a surgical biomaterial. PMID:27328066

  10. The learning curve associated with the introduction of the subcutaneous implantable defibrillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knops, Reinoud E.; Brouwer, Tom F.; Barr, Craig S.; Theuns, Dominic A.; Boersma, Lucas; Weiss, Raul; Neuzil, Petr; Scholten, Marcoen; Lambiase, Pier D.; Leon, Angel R.; Hood, Margaret; Jones, Paul W.; Wold, Nicholas; Grace, Andrew A.; Olde Nordkamp, Louise R. A.; Burke, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) was introduced to overcome complications related to transvenous leads. Adoption of the S-ICD requires implanters to learn a new implantation technique. The aim of this study was to assess the learning curve for S-ICD implanters

  11. The learning curve associated with the introduction of the subcutaneous implantable defibrillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.E. Knops (Reinoud); T.F. Brouwer (Tom F.); C.S. Barr (Craig); D.A.M.J. Theuns (Dominic); L. Boersma (Lucas); R. Weiss (Ram); P. Neuzil (Petr); M.F. Scholten (Marcoen); P.D. Lambiase (Pier); A. Leon (Angel); A.M. Hood (Margaret); P. Jones; Wold, N. (Nicholas); Grace, A.A. (Andrew A.); L.R.A. Olde Nordkamp (Louise R.A.); M.C. Burke (Martin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAims: The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) was introduced to overcome complications related to transvenous leads. Adoption of the S-ICD requires implanters to learn a new implantation technique. The aim of this study was to assess the learning curve for S-ICD

  12. Current state of knowledge and experts' perspective on the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

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    Santini, Massimo; Cappato, Riccardo; Andresen, Dietrich; Brachmann, Johannes; Davies, D Wyn; Cleland, John; Filippi, Alessandro; Gronda, Edoardo; Hauer, Richard; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Steinhaus, David

    2009-06-01

    ICD implantation is today a well-recognized therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death. The available implantable devices at present need the use of permanent endocavitary leads which may cause, in some instances, serious troubles to the patients (lead dislodgement, ventricular perforation, lead infections, etc.). A new implantable defibrillator provided by only a subcutaneous lead is at present under evaluation. Its potential indications, usefulness benefits, and problems represent an interesting field of investigation and discussion. This paper describes the conclusions recently reached by a panel of experts, with regard to the potential role of an implantable subcutaneous defibrillator in the prevention of sudden cardiac death.

  13. Device-based local delivery of siRNA against mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a murine subcutaneous implant model to inhibit fibrous encapsulation

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    Takahashi, Hironobu; Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrous encapsulation of surgically implant devices is associated with elevated proliferation and activation of fibroblasts in tissues surrounding these implants, frequently causing foreign body complications. Here we test the hypothesis that inhibition of the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in fibroblasts can mitigate the soft tissue implant foreign body response by suppressing fibrotic responses around implants. In this study, mTOR was knocked down using small interfering...

  14. Long-term amnioinfusion through a subcutaneously implanted amniotic fluid replacement port system for treatment of PPROM in humans.

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    Tchirikov, Michael; Steetskamp, Joscha; Hohmann, Manfred; Koelbl, Heinz

    2010-09-01

    To introduce a novel method for the treatment of PPROM (preterm premature rupture of membranes) using continuous amnioinfusion via a subcutaneously implanted port system. After development and testing since 2001 in a fetal sheep model, the port system has been successfully implanted in two humans with PPROM. In the first case, the subcutaneous port system was implanted during the 23rd week of gestation in a 39-year-old 5th-gravida with PPROM since the 18th week of gestation; in the second case, the port system was implanted during the 24th week of gestation in a 27-year-old 3rd gravida with PPROM since the 21st week of gestation. After port implantation, 100ml/h saline solution was infused intermittently into the amniotic cavity. The whole course of treatment was supported by tocolysis. In the cases presented, gestation was terminated by cesarean section, in one case in the 29th week of gestation, and in the other case in the 30th week. The newborns showed no signs of lung hypoplasia and were successfully extubated on the 1st or 2nd day after delivery. Six months later the children did not exhibit any deviation from the normal development. Long-term amnioinfusion via a subcutaneously implanted port system could be used in humans with PPROM for prolongation of pregnancy and to avoid lung hypoplasia. Prospective randomized studies are ongoing. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator: A Practical Review and Real-World Use and Application

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    Mark E. Panna Jr, MD, FACC, FHRS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD is a novel technology using a subcutaneous (extrathoracic system for treatment of potential lethal ventricular arrhythmias. It avoids many of the risks of transvenous ICD implantation. It may be considered in patients having an ICD indication who do not have a pacing and/or cardiac resynchronization therapy indication, and who are unlikely to benefit from antitachycardia pacing therapy. We review patient selection, system components, the implantation technique, and screening considerations for subcutaneous ICD implantation. Its uses in specific patient populations, including children, patients with congenital heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or end-stage renal disease, and patients with preexisting pacemakers, are highlighted. Areas of future investigation are reviewed, including potential use with leadless pacing and magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Feasibility of subcutaneously implanted magnetic microarrays for site specific drug and gene targeting

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    M. Babincová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic nanoparticles play a crucial role as a drug carriers in the human body. The wedge like magnetic arrays creatinga strongly non-homogeneous magnetic field are considered as a useful way to focus magnetic nanoparticles functionalizedwith various drugs or genes to desired sites. The goal of this study is to develop a numerical model of drug targetingusing subcutaneously implanted magnetic microarrays. The Finite Element Method is applied to solve partial differentialequations describing electromagnetic field (Maxwell equations and motion of these particles in a given magnetic field isobtained solving set of ordinary differential equations expressed by Newton law of motion. The results are encouragingshowing the potential to target drug to the tumour cell locally, without unwanted side effects.

  17. Complications after implantation of subcutaneous central venous ports (PowerPortⓇ

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    Takatoshi Nakamura

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: PowerPort is a multifunctional port. Benign disease was a risk factor for postoperative complications. Because many types of subcutaneously implanted ports are used in our hospital, we had to inform the hospital staff about the functions of PowerPort.

  18. Long-Term Clinical Outcomes of Subcutaneous Versus Transvenous Implantable Defibrillator Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Tom F.; Yilmaz, Dilek; Lindeboom, Robert; Buiten, Maurits S.; Olde Nordkamp, Louise R. A.; Schalij, Martin J.; Wilde, Arthur A.; van Erven, Lieselot; Knops, Reinoud E.

    2016-01-01

    Transvenous implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (TV-ICDs) improve survival in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death, but complications remain an important drawback. The subcutaneous ICD (S-ICD) was developed to overcome lead-related complications. Comparison of clinical outcomes of both

  19. Combined leadless pacemaker and subcutaneous implantable defibrillator therapy: feasibility, safety, and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjong, F. V. Y.; Brouwer, T. F.; Smeding, L.; Kooiman, K. M.; de Groot, J. R.; Ligon, D.; Sanghera, R.; Schalij, M. J.; Wilde, A. A. M.; Knops, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) and leadless pacemaker (LP) are evolving technologies that do not require intracardiac leads. However, interactions between these two devices are unexplored. We investigated the feasibility, safety, and performance of combined LP and

  20. Subcutaneous Photovoltaic Infrared Energy Harvesting for Bio-Implantable Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Eunseong; Blaauw, David; Phillips, Jamie D

    2017-05-01

    Wireless biomedical implantable devices on the mm-scale enable a wide range of applications for human health, safety, and identification, though energy harvesting and power generation are still looming challenges that impede their widespread application. Energy scavenging approaches to power biomedical implants have included thermal [1-3], kinetic [4-6], radio-frequency [7-11] and radiative sources [12-14]. However, the achievement of efficient energy scavenging for biomedical implants at the mm-scale has been elusive. Here we show that photovoltaic cells at the mm-scale can achieve a power conversion efficiency of more than 17 % for silicon and 31 % for GaAs under 1.06 μW/mm 2 infrared irradiation at 850 nm. Finally, these photovoltaic cells demonstrate highly efficient energy harvesting through biological tissue from ambient sunlight, or irradiation from infrared sources such as used in present-day surveillance systems, by utilizing the near infrared (NIR) transparency window between the 650 nm and 950 nm wavelength range [15-17].

  1. The effects of subcutaneous injection of nicotine on osseointegration of machined and anodized implants in rabbits.

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    Linden, Maria Salete Sandini; Bittencourt, Marcos Eugênio de; Carli, João Paulo De; Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; Santos, Pâmela Letícia Dos; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of subcutaneous injection nicotine in osseointegration process on different implant surfaces. Twenty-two male rabbits were distributed into two groups according to the subcutaneous injections: (1) nicotine 3 mg/day/kg and (2) 0.9 % NaCI 3 mL/day/kg, three times a day; subgroups were then designated-machined and anodized implants were placed in the right and left tibia bones, respectively. The animals were submitted euthanasia after periods of eight weeks to determine nicotine and cotinine levels, alkaline phosphatase and biomechanical analysis. The plasmatic levels of nicotine and cotinine were 0.5 ± 0.28 ng/mL and 9.5 ± 6.51 ng/mL, respectively. The alkaline phosphatase analyses in blood levels in control group were observed 40.8 ± 11.88 UI/L and 40.75 ± 12.46 UI/L, for the surfaces machined and anodized, respectively. In the test group was observed levels 37.9 ± 4.84 UI/L, for both implant surfaces. No significant differences were observed between control and test groups and between the implant surfaces regarding alkaline phosphatase blood levels. For biomechanics, no significant differences were observed in control group between the machined (25±8.46 Ncm) or anodized (31.2 ± 6.76 Ncm) implants. However, the treatment with nicotine induced higher torque than control in both machined (38.3 ± 13.52 Ncm) and anodized (35.5 ± 14.17 Ncm) implants, with p = 0.0024 and p = 0.0121, respectively. Subcutaneous injection of nicotine following implant insertion didn't have effect on osseointegration, independently from the implant surface.

  2. Involvement of COX-2 in nickel elution from a wire implanted subcutaneously in mice.

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    Sato, Taiki; Kishimoto, Yu; Asakawa, Sanki; Mizuno, Natsumi; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2016-07-01

    Many types of medical alloys include nickel (Ni), and the elution of Ni ions from these materials causes toxicities and inflammation. We have previously reported that inflammation enhances Ni elution, although the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. In this study, we investigated how inflammatory responses enhanced Ni elution in a wire-implantation mouse model. Subcutaneous implantation of Ni wire induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) mRNA in the surrounding tissues. Immunostaining analysis showed that cells expressing COX-2 were mainly fibroblast-like cells 8h after implantation of a Ni wire, but were mainly infiltrated leukocytes at 24h. NiCl2 induced the expression of COX-2 mRNA in primary fibroblasts, neutrophils, RAW 264 cells, and THP-1 cells, indicating that Ni ions can induce COX-2 expression in various types of cells. The elution of Ni ions from the implanted Ni wire at 8h was reduced by dexamethasone (Dex), indomethacin (Ind), or celecoxib (Cel) treatment. Ni wire implantation induced an increase in mRNA levels for anaerobic glycolytic pathway components glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), hexokinase 2 (HK2), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), and monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4); the expression of these genes was also inhibited by Dex, Ind, and Cel. In primary fibroblasts, the expression of these mRNAs and the production of lactate were induced by NiCl2 and further potentiated by PGE2. Furthermore, Ni wire-induced infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes was significantly reduced by Dex, Ind, or Cel. Depletion of neutrophils with a specific antibody caused reduction of both leukocyte infiltration and Ni elution. These results indicate that Ni ions eluted from wire induced COX-2 expression, which further promoted elution of Ni ions by increasing lactate production and leukocyte infiltration. Since COX inhibitors and Dex reduced the elution of Ni ions, these drugs may be

  3. Pharmacokinetics of nebulized and subcutaneously implanted terbinafine in cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus).

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    Kane, L P; Allender, M C; Archer, G; Leister, K; Rzadkowska, M; Boers, K; Souza, M; Cox, S

    2017-10-01

    Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, the causative agent of snake fungal disease, is proposed as a serious threat to the conservation of several snake populations. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of terbinafine administered through nebulization and a sustained subcutaneous implant as potential treatments of Ophidiomyces in reptiles. Seven adult cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus) were used in single-dose trials. Each snake was nebulized with terbinafine (2 mg/ml) for 30 min and had blood collected before nebulization and up to 12 hr after nebulization. Following a 5-month washout, the same snakes were administered a subcutaneous implant containing 24.5 mg terbinafine; blood was collected at baseline, 1 day postimplant placement, and then once weekly for 9 weeks. Plasma for both studies was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The mean plasma concentrations of nebulized terbinafine peaked between 0.5 and 4 hr. The subcutaneously implanted terbinafine reached therapeutic concentrations on day 1 and maintained therapeutic for over 6 weeks. These methods and doses are recommended as potential treatment options for snake fungal disease in reptiles. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Subcutaneously Placed Breast Implants after a Skin-Sparing Mastectomy: Do We Always Need ADM?

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    Apresh Singla, MBBS, MSc

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:. Immediate breast reconstruction is an acceptable treatment option after mastectomy for prophylaxis of early breast cancer. Different options exist for implant placement, incision technique, patient suitability, and institutional experience. This article is a case series exploring the feasibility and outcomes of patients undergoing immediate breast reconstruction using skin-sparing mastectomy without mesh or acellular dermal matrix (ADM and with a vertical inframammary incision. Methods:. A single-institution retrospective analysis was performed for all patients who underwent immediate single-stage reconstruction with subcutaneous silicon implants without ADM between 2009 and 2014 inclusive. Patient, operative and treatment variables were extracted. All patients with viable mastectomy skin flaps intraoperatively and at least 5 mm of subcutaneous tissue were eligible except for patients who were deemed too slim by the senior surgeon preoperatively and thus at risk of implant visibility or skin rippling. Results:. There were 26 patients (bilateral n = 12 and unilateral n = 14 eligible for analysis, with a median long-term follow-up of 51.5 months. The majority of complications were classified as minor affecting 46.2% of the cohort (n = 12. There were 20 episodes of complications overall. The most frequent episodes were contour defects (x = 5, minor seroma (x = 4, and malrotation and minor infection (x = 3. There was 1 episode of capsular contracture. Conclusion:. Skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate subcutaneous silicon implant reconstruction with a vertical incision and without the need for mesh or ADM is an acceptable and safe treatment option. Accurate patient selection and skin flap viability is the key to achieving optimal outcomes with this approach.

  5. Warfarin affects acute inflammatory response induced by subcutaneous polyvinyl sponge implantation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkov, Ivana; Popov Aleksandrov, Aleksandra; Demenesku, Jelena; Ninkov, Marina; Mileusnic, Dina; Kataranovski, Dragan; Kataranovski, Milena

    2017-09-01

    Warfarin (WF) is an anticoagulant which also affects physiological processes other than hemostasis. Our previous investigations showed the effect of WF which gained access to the organism via skin on resting peripheral blood granulocytes. Based on these data, the aim of the present study was to examine whether WF could modulate the inflammatory processes as well. To this aim the effect of WF on the inflammatory response induced by subcutaneous sponge implantation in rats was examined. Warfarin-soaked polyvinyl sponges (WF-sponges) were implanted subcutaneously and cell infiltration into sponges, the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production by sponge cells were measured as parameters of inflammation. T cell infiltration and cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-17 (IL-17) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were measured at day 7 post implantation. Warfarin exerted both stimulatory and suppressive effects depending on the parameter examined. Flow cytometry of cells recovered from sponges showed higher numbers of granulocytes (HIS48 + cells) at days 1 and 3 post implantation and CD11b + cells at day 1 compared to control sponges. Cells from WF-sponges had an increased NO production (Griess reaction) at days 1 and 7. In contrast, lower levels of TNF (measured by ELISA) production by cells recovered from WF-soaked sponges were found in the early (day one) phase of reaction with unchanged levels at other time points. While IL-6 production by cells recovered from WF-soaked sponges was decreased at day 1, it was increased at day 7. Higher T cell numbers were noted in WF sponges at day 7 post implantation, and recovered cells produced more IFN-γ and IL-17, while IL-10 production remained unchanged. Warfarin affects some of the parameters of inflammatory reaction induced by subcutaneous polyvinyl sponge implantation. Differential (both stimulatory as well as inhibitory) effects of WF on

  6. Effect of defibrillation threshold testing on effectiveness of the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddareddy, Lakshmi; Merchant, Faisal M; Leon, Angel R; Smith, Paige; Patel, Akshar; El-Chami, Mikhael F

    2018-06-12

    Defibrillation threshold (DFT) testing is recommended with the subcutaneous ICD (SICD). To describe first shock efficacy for appropriate SICD therapies stratified by the presence of implant DFT testing. We reviewed all patients receiving SICDs at our institution and stratified them based on whether implant DFT testing was performed. Appropriate shocks were reviewed to see if ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) terminated with a single shock. First shock efficacy was stratified by implant DFT status. 178 patients implanted with SICDs and followed in our center were included in this study. Of these, 135 (76 %) underwent DFT testing (DFT (+) group). In the DFT (+) 80 appropriate shocks were needed to treat 69 episodes of VT/VF. The first shock was effective in 61 out of 69 episodes (88.4 %), whereas multiple shocks were required to terminate VT/VF in the remaining 8 episodes. Among 43 patients without implant DFT testing (DFT (-) group), 20 appropriate shocks to treat 17 episodes of VT/VF occurred in 7 patients. VT/VF was successfully terminated with the first shock in 16 out of 17 episodes (first shock efficacy 94.1 %). There was no significant difference in first shock effectiveness between those with and without implant DFT testing (p = 0.97). A strategy that omits DFT testing at implant did not appear to compromise the effictiveness of the SICD. These data suggest that routine DFT testing at SICD implant might not be necessary. Randomized trials are needed to confirm this finding. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Biocompatibility of a new nanomaterial based on calcium silicate implanted in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Violeta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate rat connective tissue response to a new calcium silicate system 7, 15, 30 and 60 days after implantation. Twenty Wistar albino male rats received two tubes half-filled with a new calcium silicate system (NCSS or MTA in subcutaneous tissue. The empty half of the tubes served as controls. Five animals were sacrificed after 7, 15, 30 and 60 days and samples of the subcutaneous tissue around implanted material were submitted to histological analysis. The intensity of inflammation was evaluated based on the number of inflammatory cells present. Statistical analysis was performed using one way ANOVA and Holm Sidak's multiple comparison tests. Mild to moderate inflammatory reaction was observed after 7, 15 and 30 days around a NCSS while mild inflammatory reaction was detected after 60 days of implantation. In the MTA group, mild to moderate inflammatory reaction was found after 7 and 15 days while mild inflammatory reaction was present after 30 and 60 days. There was no statistically significant difference in the intensity of inflammatory reactions between the tested materials and control groups in any experimental period (ANOVA p>0.05. Regarding the intensity of inflammatory reactions at different experimental periods, a statistically significant difference was observed between 7 and 30 days, 7 and 60 days and 15 to 60 days for both materials. For the controls, a statistically significant difference was found between 7 and 60 days and 15 and 60 days of the experiment (Holm Sidak < p 0.001. Subcutaneous tissue of rats showed good tolerance to a new calcium silicate system. Inflammatory reaction was similar to that caused by MTA. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172026

  8. In Vitro Investigation of a Terbinafine Impregnated Subcutaneous Implant for Veterinary Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A terbinafine impregnated subcutaneous implant was evaluated to determine if drug was released into isotonic saline over the course of 6 months at two different temperatures, 37°C and 4°C. These temperatures were chosen to simulate the nonhibernating (37°C and hibernating body (4°C temperatures of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus. Insectivorous bats of North America, including little brown bats, have been devastated by white nose syndrome, a fungal infection caused by Geomyces destructans. No treatments exist for bats infected with G. destructans. Implants were placed into isotonic saline; samples were collected once per week and analyzed with HPLC to determine terbinafine concentrations. The mean amount of terbinafine released weekly across the 28 weeks was approximately 1.7 μg at 4°C and 4.3 μg at 37°C. Although significant differences in the amount released did occur at some time points, these differences were not consistently greater or less at either of the temperatures. This study showed that terbinafine was released from an impregnated implant over the course of 6 months at concentrations ranging from 0.02 to 0.06 μg/mL depending on temperature, which may be appropriate for little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus infected with Geomyces destructans, the etiologic agent of white nose syndrome.

  9. Long-term evaluation of degradation and foreign-body reaction of subcutaneously implanted poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    denDunnen, WFA; Robinson, PH; vanWessel, R; Pennings, AJ; vanLeeuwen, MBM; Schakenraad, JM

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degradation and foreign-body reaction of poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLA(85)CL(50)) bars. This specific biomaterial is used for the construction of nerve guides, which can be used in the reconstruction of short nerve gaps. Subcutaneously implanted

  10. A subcutaneous cellular implant for passive immunization against amyloid-β reduces brain amyloid and tau pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Laversenne, Vanessa; Astolfo, Alberto; Kopetzki, Erhard; Jacobsen, Helmut; Stampanoni, Marco; Bohrmann, Bernd; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Passive immunization against misfolded toxic proteins is a promising approach to treat neurodegenerative disorders. For effective immunotherapy against Alzheimer's disease, recent clinical data indicate that monoclonal antibodies directed against the amyloid-β peptide should be administered before the onset of symptoms associated with irreversible brain damage. It is therefore critical to develop technologies for continuous antibody delivery applicable to disease prevention. Here, we addressed this question using a bioactive cellular implant to deliver recombinant anti-amyloid-β antibodies in the subcutaneous tissue. An encapsulating device permeable to macromolecules supports the long-term survival of myogenic cells over more than 10 months in immunocompetent allogeneic recipients. The encapsulated cells are genetically engineered to secrete high levels of anti-amyloid-β antibodies. Peripheral implantation leads to continuous antibody delivery to reach plasma levels that exceed 50 µg/ml. In a proof-of-concept study, we show that the recombinant antibodies produced by this system penetrate the brain and bind amyloid plaques in two mouse models of the Alzheimer's pathology. When encapsulated cells are implanted before the onset of amyloid plaque deposition in TauPS2APP mice, chronic exposure to anti-amyloid-β antibodies dramatically reduces amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels in the brain, decreases amyloid plaque burden, and most notably, prevents phospho-tau pathology in the hippocampus. These results support the use of encapsulated cell implants for passive immunotherapy against the misfolded proteins, which accumulate in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Modelling the Molecular Transportation of Subcutaneously Injected Salubrinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the subcutaneous administration of a chemical agent (salubrinal, we constructed a mathematical model of molecule transportation and subsequently evaluated the kinetics of diffusion, convection, and molecular turnover. Salubrinal is a potential therapeutic agent that can reduce cellular damage and death. The understanding of its temporal profiles in local tissue as well as in a whole body is important to develop a proper strategy for its administration. Here, the diffusion and convection kinetics was formulated using partial and ordinary differential equations in one- and three-dimensional (semi-spherical coordinates. Several key parameters including an injection velocity, a diffusion coefficient, thickness of subcutaneous tissue, and a permeability factor at the tissue-blood boundary were estimated from experimental data in rats. With reference to analytical solutions in a simplified model without convection, numerical solutions revealed that the diffusion coefficient and thickness of subcutaneous tissue determined the timing of the peak concentration in the plasma, and its magnitude was dictated by the permeability factor. Furthermore, the initial velocity, induced by needle injection, elevated an immediate transport of salubrinal at t < 1h. The described analysis with a combination of partial and ordinary differential equations contributes to the prediction of local and systemic effects and the understanding of the transportation mechanism of salubrinal and other agents.

  12. Device orientation of a leadless pacemaker and subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in canine and human subjects and the effect on intrabody communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quast, Anne-Floor B. E.; Tjong, Fleur V. Y.; Koop, Brendan E.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Knops, Reinoud E.; Burke, Martin C.

    2018-01-01

    The development of communicating modular cardiac rhythm management systems relies on effective intrabody communication between a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) and a leadless pacemaker (LP), using conducted communication. Communication success is affected by the LP and

  13. Experience with the once-yearly histrelin (GnRHa subcutaneous implant in the treatment of central precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Lewis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Katherine A Lewis, Erica A EugsterDepartment of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, USAAbstract: In 2007, a hydrogel histrelin implant was approved for the treatment of children with central precocious puberty (CPP. Children with CPP commonly have reduced height potential due to premature closure of the epiphyseal growth plates from exposure to sex steroids. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa treatment halts puberty and allows for improvement of adult height. A hydrogel implant delivery system utilizing the potent GnRHa, histrelin, was first developed for use in men with prostate cancer. A once yearly histrelin subcutaneous implant was subsequently developed for the treatment of children with CPP. Studies to date have demonstrated safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of this treatment option in patients treated up to 2 years. The most common adverse effects of the implant relate to implant site pain or bruising. Cost of this treatment seems comparable to somewhat higher than the commonly used GnRHa treatment option, depot leuprolide. While long term studies are needed to establish continued efficacy and safety beyond 2 years of treatment, the histrelin implant appears to be an attractive option for GnRHa treatment in patients with CPP.Keywords: central precocious puberty, histrelin, implant, gonadotropin-releasing-hormone analogs

  14. Plasma Concentrations of Itraconazole, Voriconazole, and Terbinafine When Delivered by an Impregnated, Subcutaneous Implant in Japanese Quail ( Coturnix japonica ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marcy J; Redig, Patrick; Cox, Sherry K

    2017-06-01

    Aspergillosis is a common fungal infection in both wild and pet birds. Although effective antifungal medications are available, treatment of aspergillosis can require months of medication administration, which entails stressful handling one or more times per day. This study examined the delivery of the antifungal drugs itraconazole, voriconazole, and terbinafine to Japanese quail ( Coturnix japonica ) via an impregnated implant. Implants contained 0.5, 3, 8, or 24 mg of itraconazole, voriconazole, or terbinafine. The implants were administered subcutaneously over the dorsum and between the scapulae. Blood was collected from birds before and 2, 7, 21, 42, and 56 days after implant placement. Plasma was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography for concentrations of itraconazole, voriconazole, or terbinafine, as appropriate. During the course of the study, targeted terbinafine concentrations were achieved in some birds at various time points, but concentrations were inconsistent. Itraconazole and voriconazole concentrations were also inconsistent and did not reach targeted concentrations. Currently, the implant examined in this study cannot be recommended for treatment of aspergillosis in avian species.

  15. Tissue response to a new type of biomaterial implanted subcutaneously in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boennelycke, Marie; Christensen, Lise; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov

    2011-01-01

    -cellular matrix (ECM) or estrogen. Methods Ten implants of each type were tested for 3 and 8 weeks, respectively. Histological assessment of connective tissue organization, inflammation, vascularization, and thickness of regenerated tissue was undertaken. Results All implants had a high degree of biocompatibility....... ECM-enriched implants had significantly higher inflammatory scores compared to pure implants at 3 weeks. At 8 weeks, neither of the parameters differed significantly. No trace of the implants remained. Conclusions The MPEG-PLGA is highly biocompatible, degrades quickly, and seems inert in the process...

  16. Evaluation of pharmacokinetic model designs for subcutaneous infusion of insulin aspart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansell, Erin J.; Schmidt, Signe; Docherty, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Effective mathematical modelling of continuous subcutaneous infusion pharmacokinetics should aid understanding and control in insulin therapy. Thorough analysis of candidate model performance is important for selecting the appropriate models. Eight candidate models for insulin pharmacokinetics...... included a range of modelled behaviours, parameters and complexity. The models were compared using clinical data from subjects with type 1 diabetes with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Performance of the models was compared through several analyses: R2 for goodness of fit; the Akaike Information...

  17. Model Study of the Pressure Build-Up during Subcutaneous Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria; Hernandez Garcia, Anier; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    In this study we estimate the subcutaneous tissue counter pressure during drug infusion from a series of injections of insulin in type 2 diabetic patients using a non-invasive method. We construct a model for the pressure evolution in subcutaneous tissue based on mass continuity and the flow laws...

  18. Biocompatibility of RealSeal, its primer and AH Plus implanted in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Soares Grecca

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study tested rat connective tissue response to RealSeal, RealSeal primer or AH Plus after 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days of implantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty Wistar rats had subcutaneous sockets created on their back and received four implants each of polyethylene tubes containing one of the materials tested according to the groups: AH (AH Plus Sealer; RS (RealSeal Sealer; RP (RealSeal Primer; CG (control group - empty tube. After histological processing, sections were analyzed to identify the presence of neutrophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells, eosinophils, macrophages and giant cells, as well as fibrous capsule and abscesses, by an examiner using light microscope. Kruskal-Wallis and multiple-comparisons test were used for statistical analysis. Significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: Lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate scores significantly higher than those of the control group were observed at 14 and 60 days in AH group, and at 90 days in RS group (p<0.05. There were no differences in terms of presence of macrophages, giant cells, eosinophils, neutrophils or fibrosis. AH Plus group scored higher for abscesses at 7 days than after any other period (p=0.031. RP group scored higher for lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate at 14 days than at 90 days (p=0.04. CONCLUSION: The main contribution of this study was to demonstrate that issues involved with tissue tolerance of a Resilon-containing sealer, RealSeal Sealer, cannot be attributed to its primer content.

  19. Evaluation of acute cardiac and chest wall damage after shocks with a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator in Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Cheryl R; Melnick, Sharon B; Litovsky, Silvio H; Ideker, Raymond E; Walcott, Gregory P

    2013-10-01

    A subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) could ease placement and reduce complications of transvenous ICDs, but requires more energy than transvenous ICDs. Therefore we assessed cardiac and chest wall damage caused by the maximum energy shocks delivered by both types of clinical devices. During sinus rhythm, anesthetized pigs (38 ± 6 kg) received an S-ICD (n = 4) and five 80-Joule (J) shocks, or a transvenous ICD (control, n = 4) and five 35-J shocks. An inactive S-ICD electrode was implanted into the same control pigs to study implant trauma. All animals survived 24 hours. Troponin I and creatine kinase muscle isoenzyme (CK-MM) were measured as indicators of myocardial and skeletal muscle injury. Histopathological injury of heart, lungs, and chest wall was assessed using semiquantitative scoring. Troponin I was significantly elevated at 4 hours and 24 hours (22.6 ± 16.3 ng/mL and 3.1 ± 1.3 ng/mL; baseline 0.07 ± 0.09 ng/mL) in control pigs but not in S-ICD pigs (0.12 ± 0.11 ng/mL and 0.13 ± 0.13 ng/mL; baseline 0.06 ± 0.03 ng/mL). CK-MM was significantly elevated in S-ICD pigs after shocks (6,544 ± 1,496 U/L and 9,705 ± 6,240 U/L; baseline 704 ± 398 U/L) but not in controls. Electrocardiogram changes occurred postshock in controls but not in S-ICD pigs. The myocardium and lungs were histologically normal in both groups. Subcutaneous injury was greater in S-ICD compared to controls. Although CK-MM suggested more skeletal muscle injury in S-ICD pigs, significant cardiac, lung, and chest wall histopathological changes were not detected in either group. Troponin I data indicate significantly less cardiac injury from 80-J S-ICD shocks than 35-J transvenous shocks. ©2013, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of acute cardiac and chest wall damage after shocks with a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    KILLINGSWORTH, CHERYL R.; MELNICK, SHARON B.; LITOVSKY, SILVIO H.; IDEKER, RAYMOND E.; WALCOTT, GREGORY P.

    2013-01-01

    Background A subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) could ease placement and reduce complications of transvenous ICDs, but requires more energy than transvenous ICDs. Therefore we assessed cardiac and chest wall damage caused by the maximum energy shocks delivered by both types of clinical devices. Methods During sinus rhythm, anesthetized pigs (38±6 kg) received an S-ICD (n = 4) and five 80-Joule (J) shocks, or a transvenous ICD (control, n = 4) and five 35-J shocks. An inactive S-ICD electrode was implanted into the same control pigs to study implant trauma. All animals survived 24-hours. Troponin I and creatine kinase muscle isoenzyme (CK-MM) were measured as indicators of myocardial and skeletal muscle injury. Histopathological injury of heart, lungs, and chest wall was assessed using semi-quantitative scoring. Results Troponin I was significantly elevated at 4- and 24-hours (22.6±16.3 and 3.1±1.3 ng/ml; baseline 0.07±0.09 ng/ml) in control pigs but not in S-ICD pigs (0.12±0.11 and 0.13±0.13 ng/ml; baseline 0.06±0.03 ng/ml). CK-MM was significantly elevated in S-ICD pigs after shocks (6544±1496 and 9705±6240 U/L; baseline 704±398 U/L) but not in controls. ECG changes occurred post-shock in controls but not in S-ICD pigs. The myocardium and lungs were histologically normal in both groups. Subcutaneous injury was greater in S-ICD compared to controls. Conclusion Although CK-MM suggested more skeletal muscle injury in S-ICD pigs, significant cardiac, lung, and chest wall histopathological changes were not detected in either group. Troponin I data indicate significantly less cardiac injury from 80-J S-ICD shocks than 35-J transvenous shocks. PMID:23713608

  1. Improvement of wireless power transmission efficiency of implantable subcutaneous devices by closed magnetic circuit mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sung-Eun; Joung, Sanghoon; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2012-09-01

    Induction coils were fabricated based on flexible printed circuit board for inductive transcutaneous power transmission. The coil had closed magnetic circuit (CMC) structure consisting of inner and outer magnetic core. The power transmission efficiency of the fabricated device was measured in the air and in vivo condition. It was confirmed that the CMC coil had higher transmission efficiency than typical air-core coil. The power transmission efficiency during a misalignment between primary coil and implanted secondary coil was also evaluated. The decrease of mutual inductance between the two coils caused by the misalignment led to a low efficiency of the inductive link. Therefore, it is important to properly align the primary coil and implanted secondary coil for effective power transmission. To align the coils, a feedback coil was proposed. This was integrated on the backside of the primary coil and enabled the detection of a misalignment of the primary and secondary coils. As a result of using the feedback coil, the primary and secondary coils could be aligned without knowledge of the position of the implanted secondary coil.

  2. A prospective study comparing endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy plus immediate reconstruction with implants and breast conserving surgery for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lin-Jun; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xing-Gang; Chen, Xian-Chun; Zhong, Ling

    2009-12-20

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) has been the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of early breast cancer. Endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy (ESM) plus immediate reconstruction with implants is an emerging procedure. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of these two surgical procedures in our clinical setting. From March 2004 to October 2007, 43 patients with breast cancer underwent ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants, while 54 patients underwent BCS. The clinical and pathological characteristics, surgical safety, and therapeutic effects were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences in the age, clinical stage, histopathologic type of tumor, operative blood loss, postoperative drainage time, and postoperative complications between the two groups (P > 0.05). The postoperative complications were partial necrosis of the nipple and superficial skin flap in the ESM patients, and hydrops in the axilla and residual cavity in the BCS patients. There was no significant difference in the rate of satisfactory postoperative cosmetic outcomes between the ESM (88.4%, 38/43) and BCS (92.6%, 50/54) patients (P > 0.05). During follow-up of 6 months to 4 years, all patients treated with ESM were disease-free, but 3 patients who underwent BCS had metastasis or recurrence -one of these patients died of multiple organ metastasis. After considering the wide indications for use, high surgical safety, and favorable cosmetic outcomes, we conclude that ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants - the new surgery of choice for breast cancer - warrants serious consideration as the prospective next standard surgical procedure.

  3. The rat subcutaneous air sac model. A new and simple method for in vivo screening of antiangiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberg, J.; Abildgaard Hansen, C.; Skak-Nielsen, T.; Bay, C.; Thing Mortensen, J.; Binderup, L.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental rat model, the Subcutaneous Air Sac (SAS) model, was developed to provide an animal model in which neo-vascularisation can be easily assessed in situ and quantified using a radiolabelled plasma marker. The SAS model was designed to replace a previous model where neo-vascularisation was induced by chemical injury of rat or rabbit cornea or by implantation of tumour cells intracorneally, a methodology which is believed to cause severe pain to the animals. In the SAS model the air sac replaces the cornea as a transparent avascular substratum in which vascularisation can be observed. The air sac is induced by injection of air subcutaneously on the back of the animal. After 8 to 10 days a sufficient air sac has been established. The animal is anaesthesized and by a minor operation the cellulose sponge is implanted upon the air sac under the skin. The vaso-proliferative effect of the cellulose sponge caused formation of new vessels which are macroscopically visible 10 days after implantation. The ability of the in vivo SAS model to show an anti-angiogenic effect of a systemically applied test compound was investigated using the fumagilline analogue TNP-470 (o-chloro-acetylcarbomoyl-fumagillol) as a positive control at dose levels of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg/day given subcutaneously for 10 days. The neo-angio genesis was scored both in situ using a subjective point system and by measuring the 125 I-activity of the implant and the membrane after an intravenous injection of 125 I-labelled antibodies. The neo-angio genesis was reduced by approximately 45-50% in animals treated with 5 or 10 mg/kg/day of TNP-470 compared to animals treated with the vehicle. The animals treated with 10 mg/kg/day TNP-470 showed signs of toxicity. The SAS model is considered highly relevant for in vivo testing of potential anti-angiogenci drugs on humane grounds. The high reproducibility, the low cost and the technical simplicity of the method makes it attractive. (au)

  4. Phase separation of in situ forming poly (lactide-co-glycolide acid) implants investigated using a hydrogel-based subcutaneous tissue surrogate and UV-vis imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Jensen, Henrik; Petersen, Nickolaj J; Larsen, Susan W; Østergaard, Jesper

    2017-10-25

    Phase separation of in situ forming poly (lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) implants with agarose hydrogels as the provider of nonsolvent (water) mimicking subcutaneous tissue was investigated using a novel UV-vis imaging-based analytical platform. In situ forming implants of PLGA-1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and PLGA-triacetin representing fast and slow phase separating systems, respectively, were evaluated using this platform. Upon contact with the agarose hydrogel, the phase separation of the systems was followed by the study of changes in light transmission and absorbance as a function of time and position. For the PLGA-1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone system, the rate of spatial phase separation was determined and found to decrease with increasing the PLGA concentration from 20% to 40% (w/w). Hydrogels with different agarose concentrations (1% and 10% (w/v)) were prepared for providing the nonsolvent, water, to the in situ forming PLGA implants simulating the injection site environment. The resulting implant morphology depended on the stiffness of hydrogel matrix, indicating that the matrix in which implants are formed is of importance. Overall, the work showed that the UV-vis imaging-based platform with an agarose hydrogel mimicking the subcutaneous tissue holds potential in providing bio-relevant and mechanistic information on the phase separation processes of in situ forming implants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Subcutaneous implant with etonogestrel (Implanon®) for catamenial exacerbations in a patient with cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Adelaida; Máiz, Luis; Ruiz de Valbuena, Marta; González-Casbas, José Manuel; Suárez, Lucrecia

    2014-10-24

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease with equal prevalence across sexes. However, women present worse lung function with faster function decline, earlier onset of bacterial colonization, more frequent pulmonary exacerbations (PE), greater bronchial hyper-responsiveness, and higher mortality rates after puberty than men. The etiology of this gender disparity remains elusive but female hormones have been implicated in several studies. A 20-year-old female with CF with severe recurrent PE, always related to the menstrual cycle since menarche, combined with lung function decline requiring multiple courses of intravenous antibiotics. We report the cessation of PE and recovery of pulmonary function following the insertion of a subcutaneous implant with 68 mg of etonogestrel (Implanon®, Organon Española S.A. Laboratories, Madrid, Spain). Our case report supports the key role of female hormones in the development of PE and in the decline of lung function in a woman with CF. When appropriate, hormonal manipulation through contraceptive methods should be considered as potential treatment.

  6. Treatment of PPROM with anhydramnion in humans: first experience with different amniotic fluid substitutes for continuous amnioinfusion through a subcutaneously implanted port system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchirikov, Michael; Bapayeva, Gauri; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay Sh; Dridi, Yasmina; Harnisch, Ralf; Herrmann, Angelika

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to treat patients with preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM) and anhydramnion using continuous amnioinfusion through a subcutaneously implanted port system. An amniotic fluid replacement port system was implanted in seven patients with PPROM and anhydramnion starting at the 20th week of gestation (range, 14-26 weeks) for long-term amnioinfusion. Saline solutions (2 L/day; Jonosteril(®), Sterofundin(®), isotonic NaCl 0.9% solution, lactated Ringer's solution) and a hypotonic aqueous composition with reduced chloride content similar to the electrolyte concentration of human amniotic fluid were used for the continuous amnioinfusion. The mean duration of the PPROM delivery interval continued for 49 days (range, 9-69 days), with 3 weeks of amnioinfusion via the port system (range, 4-49). The newborns showed no signs of lung hypoplasia. Long-term lavage of the amniotic cavity via a subcutaneously implanted port system in patients with PPROM and anhydramnion may help prolong the pregnancy and avoid fetal lung hypoplasia. A hypotonic aqueous composition with reduced chloride content similar to human amniotic fluid can be safely used for amnioinfusion. Prospective randomized studies are ongoing.

  7. [Subcutaneous implantation type central venous port management in patients with malignant tumors effect of different antiseptic agents on central venous port-related infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junya; Kumagai, Masumi; Kato, Kenichi; Akahane, Akio; Suzuki, Michiko; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Sone, Miyuki; Kudo, Kenzo

    2014-08-01

    Subcutaneous implantation type central venous ports(CV ports)are used in chemotherapy. Here, we prospectively examined the frequency of CV port-related infections when the disinfectant was changed from 10% povidone iodine to 1% chlorhexidine ethanol or 70% ethanol. The subjects were patients with malignant tumors, who had newly been implanted with CV ports. We examined CV port-related infections at 1 week after CV port implantation and every 2 weeks thereafter, following sterilization upon insertion of a Huber needle to the CV port. CV port evulsion due to CV port-related infection was noted in 3 patients(4.8%)in whom 15%chlorhexidine ethanol was used(n=62)and in 2 patients(3.3%)in whom 70% ethanol was used(n=60). Infection rates per 1,000 days of CV port use were 1.48% and 1.01%, respectively. Thus, the outcomes of sterilization using 1% chlorhexidine ethanol and 70% ethanol did not differ significantly from those on using 10% povidone iodine for sterilization, based on preliminary results at our institution(3 of 59 patients[5.1%]had port evulsion due to CV port-related infection and the infection rate per 1,000 days of CV port use was 1.47%, Akahane et al, 2012). Chlorhexidine ethanol and ethanol are very convenient to use because they dry quickly and do not need discoloration. Accordingly, chlorhexidine ethanol and ethanol might be useful in CV port management.

  8. Characterization of poly (L-co-D,L Lactic Acid and a study of polymer-tissue interaction in subcutaneous implants in wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Serafino Ciambelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly (L-co-D,L lactic acid (PLDLA is an important biomaterial because of its biocompatibility properties that promote cellular regeneration and growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymer-tissue interaction of PLDLA implants in the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of male Wistar rats at various intervals (2, 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after implantation. Physical properties such as the glass transition point (Tg, degradation behavior and other mechanical properties were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and tension tests. Analysis of the degradation of PLDLA membranes in vitro showed that the polymer became crystalline as a function of the degradation time. Mechanical tension tests showed that the polymer behaved like a ductile material: when subjected to constant tension it initially suffered deformation, then elongation and finally ruptured. TGA/MEV provided evidence of PLDLA membrane degradation. For histological analysis, samples from each group were processed in xylol/paraffin, except for the 60 - and 90 - day samples. Each of the latter samples was divided in two: one half was treated with xylol/paraffin and the other with historesin. Light microscopy showed the adhesion of cells to the biomaterial, the formation of a conjunctive capsule around the implant, the presence of epithelioid cells, the formation of foreign body giant cells and angiogenesis. During degradation, the polymer showed a 'lace' - like appearance when processed in xylol/paraffin compared to the formation of "centripetal cracks in the form of glove fingers" when embedded in historesin.

  9. Subcutaneous Injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria

    This thesis is about visualization and characterization of the tissue-device interaction during subcutaneous injection. The tissue pressure build-up during subcutaneous injections was measured in humans. The insulin pen FlexTouchr (Novo Nordisk A/S) was used for the measurements and the pressure ...

  10. Establishment of reproducible osteosarcoma rat model using orthotopic implantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhe; Sun, Honghui; Fan, Qingyu; Long, Hua; Yang, Tongtao; Ma, Bao'an

    2009-05-01

    In experimental musculoskeletal oncology, there remains a need for animal models that can be used to assess the efficacy of new and innovative treatment methodologies for bone tumors. Rat plays a very important role in the bone field especially in the evaluation of metabolic bone diseases. The objective of this study was to develop a rat osteosarcoma model for evaluation of new surgical and molecular methods of treatment for extremity sarcoma. One hundred male SD rats weighing 125.45+/-8.19 g were divided into 5 groups and anesthetized intraperitoneally with 10% chloral hydrate. Orthotopic implantation models of rat osteosarcoma were performed by injecting directly into the SD rat femur with a needle for inoculation with SD tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, 2x10(5) to 1x10(6) UMR106 cells in 50 microl were injected intraosseously into median or distal part of the femoral shaft and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from ultrasound with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. In the third stage, the orthotopically implanted tumors and lung nodules were resected entirely, sectioned, and then counter stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathologic evaluation. The tumor take rate was 100% for implants with 8x10(5) tumor cells or more, which was much less than the amount required for subcutaneous implantation, with a high lung metastasis rate of 93.0%. Ultrasound and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.942; p<0.01), which demonstrated that Doppler ultrasonography is a convenient and reliable technique for measuring cancer at any stage. Tumor growth curve showed that orthotopically implanted tumors expanded vigorously with time-lapse, especially in the first 3 weeks. The median time of survival was 38 days and surgical mortality was 0%. The UMR106 cell line has strong carcinogenic capability and high lung metastasis frequency. The present rat

  11. Subcutaneous infection model facilitates treatment assessment of secondary Alveolar echinococcosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Küster

    Full Text Available Alveolar echinococcosis (AE in humans is a parasitic disease characterized by severe damage to the liver and occasionally other organs. AE is caused by infection with the metacestode (larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, usually infecting small rodents as natural intermediate hosts. Conventionally, human AE is chemotherapeutically treated with mebendazole or albendazole. There is, however still the need for improved chemotherapeutical options. Primary in vivo studies on drugs of interest are commonly performed in small laboratory animals such as mice and Mongolian jirds, and in most cases, a secondary infection model is used, whereby E. multilocularis metacestodes are directly injected into the peritoneal cavity or into the liver. Disadvantages of this methodological approach include risk of injury to organs during the inoculation and, most notably, a limitation in the macroscopic (visible assessment of treatment efficacy. Thus, in order to monitor the efficacy of chemotherapeutical treatment, animals have to be euthanized and the parasite tissue dissected. In the present study, mice were infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes through the subcutaneous route and were then subjected to chemotherapy employing albendazole. Serological responses to infection were comparatively assessed in mice infected by the conventional intraperitoneal route. We demonstrate that the subcutaneous infection model for secondary AE facilitates the assessment of the progress of infection and drug treatment in the live animal.

  12. Nonlinear model of high-dose implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilyuk, A.

    2001-01-01

    The models of high-dose implantation, using the distribution functions, are relatively simple. However, they must take into account the variation of the function of distribution of the implanted ions with increasing dose [1-4]. This variation takes place owing to the fact that the increase of the concentration of the implanted ions results in a change of the properties of the target. High-dose implantation is accompanied by sputtering, volume growth, diffusion, generation of defects, formation of new phases, etc. The variation of the distribution function is determined by many factors and is not known in advance. The variation within the framework of these models [1-4] is taken into account in advance by the introduction of intuitive assumptions on the basis of implicit considerations. Therefore, these attempts should be regarded as incorrect. The model prepared here makes it possible to take into account the sputtering of the target, volume growth and additional declaration on the implanted ions. Without any assumptions in relation to the variation of the distribution function with increasing dose. In our model it is assumed that the type of distribution function for small doses in a pure target substance is the same as in substances with implanted ions. A second assumption relates to the type of the distribution function valid for small doses in the given substances. These functions are determined as a result of a large number of theoretical and experimental investigations and are well-known at the present time. They include the symmetric and nonsymmetric Gauss distribution, the Pearson distribution, and others. We examine implantation with small doses of up to 10 14 - 10 15 cm -2 when the accurately known distribution is valid

  13. Device orientation of a leadless pacemaker and subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in canine and human subjects and the effect on intrabody communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Anne-Floor B E; Tjong, Fleur V Y; Koop, Brendan E; Wilde, Arthur A M; Knops, Reinoud E; Burke, Martin C

    2018-02-14

    The development of communicating modular cardiac rhythm management systems relies on effective intrabody communication between a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) and a leadless pacemaker (LP), using conducted communication. Communication success is affected by the LP and S-ICD orientation. This study is designed to evaluate the orientation of the LP and S-ICD in canine subjects and measure success and threshold of intrabody communication. To gain more human insights, we will explore device orientation in LP and S-ICD patients. Canine subjects implanted with a prototype S-ICD and LP (both Boston Scientific, MA, USA) with anterior-posterior fluoroscopy images were included in this analysis. For comparison, a retrospective analysis of human S-ICD and LP patients was performed. The angle of the long axis of the LP towards the vertical axis of 0°, and distance between the coil and LP were measured. Twenty-three canine subjects were analysed. Median angle of the LP was 29° and median distance of the S-ICD coil to LP was 0.8 cm. All canine subjects had successful communication. The median communicating threshold was 2.5 V. In the human retrospective analysis, 72 LP patients and 100 S-ICD patients were included. The mean angle of the LP was 56° and the median distance between the S-ICD coil and LP was 4.6 cm. Despite the less favourable LP orientation in canine subjects, all communication attempts were successful. In the human subjects, we observed a greater and in theory more favourable LP angle towards the communication vector. These data suggests suitability of human anatomy for conductive intrabody communication.

  14. Increased expression of Interleukin-13 and connective tissue growth factor, and their potential roles during foreign body encapsulation of subcutaneous implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, W Kenneth; Li, Allen G; Siddiqui, Yasmin; Federiuk, Isaac F; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand whether interleukin-13 (IL-13) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) are highly expressed during foreign body encapsulation of subcutaneous devices. Mock biosensors were implanted into rats for three lengths of time (7-, 21- and 48-55 days) to address different stages of the foreign body response. Using quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence, the expression of IL13, CTGF, collagen 1, decorin and fibronectin were measured in this tissue. IL-13, a product of Th2 cells, was highly expressed at all time points, with greatest expression at day 21. The IL-13 expression was paralleled by increased presence of T-cells at all time points. CTGF was also found to be more highly expressed in foreign body tissue than in controls. Collagen and decorin were highly expressed at the middle and later stages. Given the increased expression of IL-13 and CTGF in foreign body tissue, and their roles in other fibrotic disorders, these cytokines may well contribute to the formation of the foreign body capsule. Since the peak gene expression of IL-13 occurred later than the previously-reported TGFbeta expression peak, IL-13 is probably not the major stimulus to TGFbeta expression during foreign body encapsulation and may contribute to fibrosis independently.

  15. The role of subcutaneous tissue stiffness on microneedle performance in a representative in vitro model of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moronkeji, K; Todd, S; Dawidowska, I; Barrett, S D; Akhtar, R

    2017-11-10

    There has been growing interest in the mechanical behaviour of skin due to the rapid development of microneedle devices for drug delivery applications into skin. However, most in vitro experimentation studies that are used to evaluate microneedle performance do not consider the biomechanical properties of skin or that of the subcutaneous layers. In this study, a representative experimental model of skin was developed which was comprised of subcutaneous and muscle mimics. Neonatal porcine skin from the abdominal and back regions was used, with gelatine gels of differing water content (67, 80, 88 and 96%) to represent the subcutaneous tissue, and a type of ballistic gelatine, Perma-Gel®, as a muscle mimic. Dynamic nanoindentation was used to characterize the mechanical properties of each of these layers. A custom-developed impact test rig was used to apply dense polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microneedles to the skin models in a controlled and repeatable way with quantification of the insertion force and velocity. Image analysis methods were used to measure penetration depth and area of the breach caused by microneedle penetration following staining and optical imaging. The nanoindentation tests demonstrated that the tissue mimics matched expected values for subcutaneous and muscle tissue, and that the compliance of the subcutaneous mimics increased linearly with water content. The abdominal skin was thinner and less stiff as compared to back skin. The maximum force decreased with gel water content in the abdominal skin but not in the back skin. Overall, larger and deeper perforations were found in the skin models with increasing water content. These data demonstrate the importance of subcutaneous tissue on microneedle performance and the need for representative skin models in microneedle technology development. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Diabetes Is Reversed in a Murine Model by Marginal Mass Syngeneic Islet Transplantation Using a Subcutaneous Cell Pouch Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Andrew R; Pawlick, Rena; Gala-Lopez, Boris; MacGillivary, Amanda; Mazzuca, Delfina M; White, David J G; Toleikis, Philip M; Shapiro, A M James

    2015-11-01

    Islet transplantation is a successful β-cell replacement therapy for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Although high rates of early insulin independence are achieved routinely, long-term function wanes over time. Intraportal transplantation is associated with procedural risks, requires multiple donors, and does not afford routine biopsy. Stem cell technologies may require potential for retrievability, and graft removal by hepatectomy is impractical. There is a clear clinical need for an alternative, optimized transplantation site. The subcutaneous space is a potential substitute, but transplantation of islets into this site has routinely failed to reverse diabetes. However, an implanted device, which becomes prevascularized before transplantation, may alter this equation. Syngeneic mouse islets were transplanted subcutaneously within Sernova Corp's Cell Pouch (CP). All recipients were preimplanted with CPs 4 weeks before diabetes induction and transplantation. After transplantation, recipients were monitored for glycemic control and glucose tolerance. Mouse islets transplanted into the CP routinely restored glycemic control with modest delay and responded well to glucose challenge, comparable to renal subcapsular islet grafts, despite a marginal islet dose, and normoglycemia was maintained until graft explantation. In contrast, islets transplanted subcutaneously alone failed to engraft. Islets within CPs stained positively for insulin, glucagon, and microvessels. The CP is biocompatible, forms an environment suitable for islet engraftment, and offers a potential alternative to the intraportal site for islet and future stem cell therapies.

  17. Implante subcutáneo de un carcinoma hepatocelular tras la punción aspiración con aguja fina Subcutaneous seeding of hepatocellular carcinoma after fine-needle percutaneous biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martínez Ramos

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Los implantes subcutáneos son una complicación rara tras la punción aspiración con aguja fina de los carcinomas hepatocelulares. Los autores describen un caso de implante subcutáneo neoplásico en una mujer de 70 años con cirrosis hepática por virus C complicada con un carcinoma hepatocelular. Se efectuó una punción aspiración con aguja fina en el segmento II hepático. El implante tumoral se desarrolló en el trayecto de la punción aspiración. La tumoración subcutánea fue extirpada quirúrgicamente y el estudio anatomopatológico confirmó que se trataba de un carcinoma hepatocelular bien diferenciado.Subcutaneous tumor seeding after fine-needle percutaneous biopsy for hepatocellular carcinoma is a rarely seen complication. The authors describe a case of subcutaneous neoplastic seeding in a 70-year-old woman with chronic hepatitis C virus complicated by hepatocellular carcinoma. Ultrasonically guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy was performed in segment II of the liver. The neoplastic seeding developed along the needle track used to carry out the fine-needle biopsy. The subcutaneous tumor was excised, and histological examination revealed a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma.

  18. Pretargeting vs. direct targeting of human betalox5 islet cells subcutaneously implanted in mice using an anti-human islet cell antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guozheng; Dou Shuping; Akalin, Ali; Rusckowski, Mary; Streeter, Philip R.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: We previously demonstrated MORF/cMORF pretargeting of human islets and betalox 5 cells (a human beta cell line) transplanted subcutaneously in mice with the anti-human islet antibody, HPi1. We now compare pretargeting with direct targeting in the beta cell transplant model to evaluate the degree to which target/non-target (T/NT) ratios may be improved by pretargeting. Methods: Specific binding of an anti-human islet antibody HPi1 to the beta cells transplanted subcutaneously in mice was examined against a negative control antibody. We then compared pretargeting by MORF-HPi1 plus 111 In-labeled cMORF to direct targeting by 111 In-labeled HPi1. Results: HPi1 binding to betalox5 human cells in the transplant was shown by immunofluorescence. Normal organ 111 In backgrounds by pretargeting were always lower, although target accumulations were similar. More importantly, the transplant to pancreas and liver ratios was, respectively, 26 and 10 by pretargeting as compared to 9 and 0.6 by direct targeting. Conclusions: Pretargeting greatly improves the T/NT ratios, and based on the estimated endocrine to exocrine ratio within a pancreas, pretargeting may be approaching the sensitivity required for successful imaging of human islets within this organ.

  19. SU-G-IeP4-11: Monitoring Tumor Growth in Subcutaneous Murine Tumor Model in Vivo: A Comparison Between MRI and Small Animal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B; He, W; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Fan, J; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to compare the volume measurement of subcutaneous tumors in mice with different imaging platforms, namely a GE MRI and a Sofie-Biosciences small animal CT scanner. Methods: A549 human lung carcinoma cells and FaDu human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into flanks of nude mice. Three FaDu tumors and three A549 tumors were included in this study. The MRI scans were done with a GE Signa 1.5 Tesla MR scanner using a fast T2-weighted sequence (70mm FOV and 1.2mm slice thickness), while the CT scans were done with the CT scanner on a Sofie-Biosciences G8 PET/CT platform dedicated for small animal studies (48mm FOV and 0.2mm slice thickness). Imaging contrast agent was not used in this study. Based on the DICOM images from MRI and CT scans, the tumors were contoured with Philips DICOM Viewer and the tumor volumes were obtained by summing up the contoured area and multiplied by the slice thickness. Results: The volume measurements based on the CT scans agree reasonably with that obtained with MR images for the subcutaneous tumors. The mean difference in the absolute tumor volumes between MRI- and CT-based measurements was found to be −6.2% ± 1.0%, with the difference defined as (VMR – VCT)*100%/VMR. Furthermore, we evaluated the normalized tumor volumes, which were defined for each tumor as V/V{sub 0} where V{sub 0} stands for the volume from the first MR or CT scan. The mean difference in the normalized tumor volumes was found to be 0.10% ± 0.96%. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the difference between normal and abnormal tissues is often less clear on small animal CT images than on MR images, one can still obtain reasonable tumor volume information with the small animal CT scans for subcutaneous murine xenograft models.

  20. Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discriminator functions and lacks antitachycardia pacing. Expanded Programmability Programming that allows lower shock energies and the ability ... 2014 American Heart Association, Inc. References 1. ↵ Weiss R , Knight BP , Gold MR , Leon AR , Herre JM , ...

  1. Modelling of ion implantation in SiC crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakarov, Ivan [SILVACO International, 4701 Patrick Henry Drive, Building 2, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)]. E-mail: ivan.chakarov@silvaco.com; Temkin, Misha [SILVACO International, 4701 Patrick Henry Drive, Building 2, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)

    2006-01-15

    An advanced electronic stopping model for ion implantation in SiC has been implemented within the binary collision approximation. The model has been thoroughly tested and validated for Al implantation into 4H-, 6H-SiC under different initial implant conditions. A very good agreement between calculated and experimental profiles has been achieved. The model has been integrated in an industrial technology CAD process simulator.

  2. Modelling of ion implantation in SiC crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarov, Ivan; Temkin, Misha

    2006-01-01

    An advanced electronic stopping model for ion implantation in SiC has been implemented within the binary collision approximation. The model has been thoroughly tested and validated for Al implantation into 4H-, 6H-SiC under different initial implant conditions. A very good agreement between calculated and experimental profiles has been achieved. The model has been integrated in an industrial technology CAD process simulator

  3. Effect of polyurethane scaffold architecture on ingrowth speed and collagen orientation in a subcutaneous rat pocket model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Mulder, E L W; Hannink, G; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P

    2013-01-01

    Clinically used scaffolds are suboptimal in regenerating the highly oriented meniscus fiber structure in full meniscal defects. The objective of this study was to test whether anisotropic porous scaffolds with channels resulted in a more meniscus like matrix organization compared to isotropic porous scaffolds. Isotropic polyurethane scaffolds were made via standard solvent leaching techniques. Anisotropic porous scaffolds with channels were made via modified thermal induced phase separation. Both scaffold types were analyzed with light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and computed nano-tomography. Finally, isotropic and anisotropic scaffolds were bilaterally and subcutaneously implanted on the back of 32 Wistar rats for 1, 4, 8 and 24 weeks to assess tissue ingrowth and matrix organization. Isotropic scaffolds had a pore diameter of 35±14.7 μm and a degree of anisotropy of 0.18, while anisotropic scaffolds had a channel diameter of 20±6.0 μm and a degree of anisotropy of 0.39. After implantation full tissue ingrowth was achieved after 8 and 24 weeks for isotropic and anisotropic, respectively. Isotropic scaffolds had a random tissue infiltration with unorganized collagen deposition, whereas anisotropic scaffolds showed tissue infiltration and collagen alignment in the direction of the channels. Anisotropic scaffolds resulted in a matrix organization that resembled the tissue in the vascularized zone of the meniscus, while isotropic scaffolds resembled the tissue in the avascular zone of the meniscus. (paper)

  4. Effect of polyurethane scaffold architecture on ingrowth speed and collagen orientation in a subcutaneous rat pocket model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mulder, E L W; Hannink, G; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P

    2013-04-01

    Clinically used scaffolds are suboptimal in regenerating the highly oriented meniscus fiber structure in full meniscal defects. The objective of this study was to test whether anisotropic porous scaffolds with channels resulted in a more meniscus like matrix organization compared to isotropic porous scaffolds. Isotropic polyurethane scaffolds were made via standard solvent leaching techniques. Anisotropic porous scaffolds with channels were made via modified thermal induced phase separation. Both scaffold types were analyzed with light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and computed nano-tomography. Finally, isotropic and anisotropic scaffolds were bilaterally and subcutaneously implanted on the back of 32 Wistar rats for 1, 4, 8 and 24 weeks to assess tissue ingrowth and matrix organization. Isotropic scaffolds had a pore diameter of 35±14.7 μm and a degree of anisotropy of 0.18, while anisotropic scaffolds had a channel diameter of 20±6.0 μm and a degree of anisotropy of 0.39. After implantation full tissue ingrowth was achieved after 8 and 24 weeks for isotropic and anisotropic, respectively. Isotropic scaffolds had a random tissue infiltration with unorganized collagen deposition, whereas anisotropic scaffolds showed tissue infiltration and collagen alignment in the direction of the channels. Anisotropic scaffolds resulted in a matrix organization that resembled the tissue in the vascularized zone of the meniscus, while isotropic scaffolds resembled the tissue in the avascular zone of the meniscus.

  5. Dynamic FDG-PET Imaging to Differentiate Malignancies from Inflammation in Subcutaneous and In Situ Mouse Model for Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Zan, Yunlong; Zheng, Xiujuan; Hai, Wangxi; Chen, Kewei; Huang, Qiu; Xu, Yuhong; Peng, Jinliang

    2015-01-01

    [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been widely used in oncologic procedures such as tumor diagnosis and staging. However, false-positive rates have been high, unacceptable and mainly caused by inflammatory lesions. Misinterpretations take place especially when non-subcutaneous inflammations appear at the tumor site, for instance in the lung. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the use of dynamic PET imaging procedure to differentiate in situ and subcutaneous non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) from inflammation, and estimate the kinetics of inflammations in various locations. Dynamic FDG-PET was performed on 33 female mice inoculated with tumor and/or inflammation subcutaneously or inside the lung. Standardized Uptake Values (SUVs) from static imaging (SUVmax) as well as values of influx rate constant (Ki) of compartmental modeling from dynamic imaging were obtained. Static and kinetic data from different lesions (tumor and inflammations) or different locations (subcutaneous, in situ and spontaneous group) were compared. Values of SUVmax showed significant difference in subcutaneous tumor and inflammation (pPET based SUVmax, both subcutaneous and in situ inflammations and malignancies can be differentiated via dynamic FDG-PET based Ki. Moreover, Values of influx rate constant Ki from compartmental modeling can offer an assessment for inflammations at different locations of the body, which also implies further validation is necessary before the replacement of in situ inflammation with its subcutaneous counterpart in animal experiments.

  6. Implant healing in experimental animal models of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nga N; Rose, Michael B; Levinson, Howard; Klitzman, Bruce

    2011-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide. Additionally, there is an increasing number of patients receiving implantable devices such as glucose sensors and orthopedic implants. Thus, it is likely that the number of diabetic patients receiving these devices will also increase. Even though implantable medical devices are considered biocompatible by the Food and Drug Administration, the adverse tissue healing that occurs adjacent to these foreign objects is a leading cause of their failure. This foreign body response leads to fibrosis, encapsulation of the device, and a reduction or cessation of device performance. A second adverse event is microbial infection of implanted devices, which can lead to persistent local and systemic infections and also exacerbates the fibrotic response. Nearly half of all nosocomial infections are associated with the presence of an indwelling medical device. Events associated with both the foreign body response and implant infection can necessitate device removal and may lead to amputation, which is associated with significant morbidity and cost. Diabetes mellitus is generally indicated as a risk factor for the infection of a variety of implants such as prosthetic joints, pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, penile implants, and urinary catheters. Implant infection rates in diabetic patients vary depending upon the implant and the microorganism, however, for example, diabetes was found to be a significant variable associated with a nearly 7.2% infection rate for implantable cardioverter defibrillators by the microorganism Candida albicans. While research has elucidated many of the altered mechanisms of diabetic cutaneous wound healing, the internal healing adjacent to indwelling medical devices in a diabetic model has rarely been studied. Understanding this healing process is crucial to facilitating improved device design. The purpose of this article is to summarize the physiologic factors that

  7. Challenges facing academic research in commercializing event-detector implantable devices for an in-vivo biomedical subcutaneous device for biomedical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanola-Feliu, E.; Colomer-Farrarons, J.; Miribel-Català, P.; Samitier, J.; Valls-Pasola, J.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely recognized that the welfare of the most advanced economies is at risk, and that the only way to tackle this situation is by controlling the knowledge economies and dealing with. To achieve this ambitious goal, we need to improve the performance of each dimension in the "knowledge triangle": education, research and innovation. Indeed, recent findings point to the importance of strategies of adding-value and marketing during R+D processes so as to bridge the gap between the laboratory and the market and so ensure the successful commercialization of new technology-based products. Moreover, in a global economy in which conventional manufacturing is dominated by developing economies, the future of industry in the most advanced economies must rely on its ability to innovate in those high-tech activities that can offer a differential added-value, rather than on improving existing technologies and products. It seems quite clear, therefore, that the combination of health (medicine) and nanotechnology in a new biomedical device is very capable of meeting these requisites. This work propose a generic CMOS Front-End Self-Powered In-Vivo Implantable Biomedical Device, based on a threeelectrode amperometric biosensor approach, capable of detecting threshold values for targeted concentrations of pathogens, ions, oxygen concentration, etc. Given the speed with which diabetes can spread, as diabetes is the fastest growing disease in the world, the nano-enabled implantable device for in-vivo biomedical analysis needs to be introduced into the global diabetes care devices market. In the case of glucose monitoring, the detection of a threshold decrease in the glucose level it is mandatory to avoid critic situations like the hypoglycemia. Although the case study reported in this paper is complex because it involves multiple organizations and sources of data, it contributes to extend experience to the best practices and models on nanotechnology applications and

  8. Principles of subcutaneous port placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Shaun J; Li, Ruizong

    2011-12-01

    The introduction of totally implantable subcutaneous devices in the early 1980s provided patients with secure, reliable venous access and also gave them the ability to move more freely and have a more normal lifestyle with these devices in place. The most common totally implantable device used today is the subcutaneous port. These ports consist of an injection port connected to a catheter. Ports provide a number of advantages compared with other venous catheters; the most important is the reduced risk of infection. These devices have significantly lower rates of infection than nontunneled and tunneled catheters. Additional advantages include less frequent irrigation and minimal home care, and they are less prone to environmental or cutaneous contamination when not being accessed. This article will focus on the placement of these ports. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mental models of women with breast implants : local complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Byram, S.; Fischhoff, B.; Embrey, M.; Bruine de Bruin, W.J.A.; Thorne, S.

    2001-01-01

    Twenty-five women with breast implants participated in semistructured interviews designed to reveal their "mental models" of the processes potentially causing local (ie, nonsystemic) problems. The authors analyzed their responses in terms of an "expert model," circumscribing scientifically relevant

  10. Automatic Model Generation Framework for Computational Simulation of Cochlear Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangado Lopez, Nerea; Ceresa, Mario; Duchateau, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    . To address such a challenge, we propose an automatic framework for the generation of patient-specific meshes for finite element modeling of the implanted cochlea. First, a statistical shape model is constructed from high-resolution anatomical μCT images. Then, by fitting the statistical model to a patient......'s CT image, an accurate model of the patient-specific cochlea anatomy is obtained. An algorithm based on the parallel transport frame is employed to perform the virtual insertion of the cochlear implant. Our automatic framework also incorporates the surrounding bone and nerve fibers and assigns......Recent developments in computational modeling of cochlear implantation are promising to study in silico the performance of the implant before surgery. However, creating a complete computational model of the patient's anatomy while including an external device geometry remains challenging...

  11. Model of the Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Dynamics after Subcutaneous Administration of a Glucagon Rescue Bolus in Healthy Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Haidar, Ahmad

    In healthy individuals, insulin and glucagon work in a complex fashion to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. This regulation is distorted in patients with diabetes. The hepatic glucose response due to an elevated glucagon level depends on the current insulin concentration and thus...... endogenous glucose production (EGP) can not be modelled without knowledge of the concentration of both hormones in plasma. Furthermore, literature suggests an upper limit to EGP irrespective of glucagon levels. We build a simulation model of the glucose-insulin-glucagon dynamics in man including saturation...... effect of EGP. Ten healthy subjects received a 1 mg subcutaneous (SC) glucagon bolus (GlucaGen®). Plasma samples were collected until 300 minutes post dose and analyzed for glucagon, insulin, and glucose concentrations. All observations were used to fit a physiological model of the glucose...

  12. Automatic Model Generation Framework for Computational Simulation of Cochlear Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangado, Nerea; Ceresa, Mario; Duchateau, Nicolas; Kjer, Hans Martin; Vera, Sergio; Dejea Velardo, Hector; Mistrik, Pavel; Paulsen, Rasmus R; Fagertun, Jens; Noailly, Jérôme; Piella, Gemma; González Ballester, Miguel Ángel

    2016-08-01

    Recent developments in computational modeling of cochlear implantation are promising to study in silico the performance of the implant before surgery. However, creating a complete computational model of the patient's anatomy while including an external device geometry remains challenging. To address such a challenge, we propose an automatic framework for the generation of patient-specific meshes for finite element modeling of the implanted cochlea. First, a statistical shape model is constructed from high-resolution anatomical μCT images. Then, by fitting the statistical model to a patient's CT image, an accurate model of the patient-specific cochlea anatomy is obtained. An algorithm based on the parallel transport frame is employed to perform the virtual insertion of the cochlear implant. Our automatic framework also incorporates the surrounding bone and nerve fibers and assigns constitutive parameters to all components of the finite element model. This model can then be used to study in silico the effects of the electrical stimulation of the cochlear implant. Results are shown on a total of 25 models of patients. In all cases, a final mesh suitable for finite element simulations was obtained, in an average time of 94 s. The framework has proven to be fast and robust, and is promising for a detailed prognosis of the cochlear implantation surgery.

  13. Modeling the relative impact of capsular tissue effects on implanted glucose sensor time lag and signal attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Matthew T; Yuan, Fan; Reichert, William M

    2010-10-01

    Little is known mechanistically about why implanted glucose sensors lag behind blood glucose levels in both the time to peak sensor response and the magnitude of peak sensor response. A mathematical model of glucose transport from capillaries through surrounding tissue to the sensor surface was constructed to address how different aspects of the tissue affect glucose transport to an implanted sensor. Physiologically relevant values of capsule diffusion coefficient, capsule porosity, cellular glucose consumption, capsule thickness, and subcutaneous vessel density were used as inputs to create simulated sensor traces that mimic experimental instances of time lag and concentration attenuation relative to a given blood glucose profile. Using logarithmic sensitivity analysis, each parameter was analyzed to study the effect of these variables on both lag and attenuation. Results identify capsule thickness as the strongest determinant of sensor time lag, while subcutaneous vessel density and capsule porosity had the largest effects on attenuation of glucose that reaches the sensor surface. These findings provide mechanistic insight for the rational design of sensor modifications that may alleviate the deleterious consequences of tissue effects on implanted sensor performance.

  14. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Mangas, J M; Enriquez, L E; Bailon, L; Barbolla, J; Jaraiz, M

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  15. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Lazaro, J.; Enriquez, L.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J.; Jaraiz, M.

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided

  16. Comparison of two multiaxial fatigue models applied to dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM. Ayllon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two multiaxial fatigue life prediction models applied to a commercial dental implant. One model is called Variable Initiation Length Model and takes into account both the crack initiation and propagation phases. The second model combines the Theory of Critical Distance with a critical plane damage model to characterise the initiation and initial propagation of micro/meso cracks in the material. This paper discusses which material properties are necessary for the implementation of these models and how to obtain them in the laboratory from simple test specimens. It also describes the FE models developed for the stress/strain and stress intensity factor characterisation in the implant. The results of applying both life prediction models are compared with experimental results arising from the application of ISO-14801 standard to a commercial dental implant.

  17. A Cellular Automata Model of Infection Control on Medical Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Langarica, Alicia; Kojouharov, Hristo; Chen-Charpentier, Benito; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    S. epidermidis infections on medically implanted devices are a common problem in modern medicine due to the abundance of the bacteria. Once inside the body, S. epidermidis gather in communities called biofilms and can become extremely hard to eradicate, causing the patient serious complications. We simulate the complex S. epidermidis-Neutrophils interactions in order to determine the optimum conditions for the immune system to be able to contain the infection and avoid implant rejection. Our cellular automata model can also be used as a tool for determining the optimal amount of antibiotics for combating biofilm formation on medical implants. PMID:23543851

  18. Predicting and monitoring response to chemotherapy by 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea in subcutaneously implanted 9L glioma using the apparent diffusion coefficient of water and 23Na MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babsky, Andriy M; Hekmatyar, S K; Zhang, Hong; Solomon, James L; Bansal, Navin

    2006-07-01

    To examine the effects of the alkylating anticancer drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) on (23)Na MRI and the water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in subcutaneously- (sc-) implanted 9L glioma in rats. (23)Na MRI and (1)H water ADC measurements were performed on sham-treated control (N = 6) and BCNU-treated (N = 15) Fisher rats one day before BCNU injection and then one, three, and five days after BCNU injection. The BCNU-treated tumors were divided into BCNU-responsive (R(BCNU)) and BCNU-nonresponsive (NR(BCNU)) groups depending on the tumor volume changes that occurred after therapy. The pretreatment (23)Na MRI signal intensity (SI) and water ADC values were higher in R(BCNU) tumors compared to NR(BCNU) tumors. (23)Na MRI SI and water ADC increased with tumor growth in control and NR(BCNU) groups, but these changes were interrupted by BCNU therapy in R(BCNU) group. (23)Na MRI and water ADC measurements may be useful for predicting and monitoring response to chemotherapy in some tumors. However, the changes that occurred in (23)Na MRI SI and water ADC in sc-implanted 9L tumors are in contrast to previously published results for BCNU therapy of orthotopic 9L tumors. This may have important implications for monitoring therapy response in tumors. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Double site-bond percolation model for biomaterial implants

    OpenAIRE

    Mely, H.; Mathiot, J. -F.

    2011-01-01

    9 figures - 10 pages; We present a double site-bond percolation model to account, on the one hand, for the vascularization and/or resorption of biomaterial implant in bones, and on the other hand, for its mechanical continuity. The transformation of the implant into osseous material, and the dynamical formation/destruction of this osseous material is accounted for by creation and destruction of links and sites in two, entangled, networks. We identify the relevant parameters to describe the im...

  20. Incorporating a Generic Model of Subcutaneous Insulin Absorption into the AIDA v4 Diabetes Simulator 3. Early Plasma Insulin Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Eldon D.; Tarín, Cristina; Bondia, Jorge; Teufel, Edgar; Deutsch, Tibor

    2009-01-01

    Introduction AIDA is an interactive educational diabetes simulator that has been available without charge via the Internet for over 12 years. Recent articles have described the incorporation of a novel generic model of insulin absorption into AIDA as a way of enhancing its capabilities. The basic model components to be integrated have been overviewed, with the aim being to provide simulations of regimens utilizing insulin analogues, as well as insulin doses greater than 40 IU (the current upper limit within the latest release of AIDA [v4.3a]). Some preliminary calculated insulin absorption results have also recently been described. Methods This article presents the first simulated plasma insulin profiles from the integration of the generic subcutaneous insulin absorption model, and the currently implemented model in AIDA for insulin disposition. Insulin absorption has been described by the physiologically based model of Tarín and colleagues. A single compartment modeling approach has been used to specify how absorbed insulin is distributed in, and eliminated from, the human body. To enable a numerical solution of the absorption model, a spherical subcutaneous depot for the injected insulin dose has been assumed and spatially discretized into shell compartments with homogeneous concentrations, having as its center the injection site. The number of these compartments will depend on the dose and type of insulin. Insulin inflow arises as the sum of contributions to the different shells. For this report the first bench testing of plasma insulin determinations has been done. Results Simulated plasma insulin profiles are provided for currently available insulin preparations, including a rapidly acting insulin analogue (e.g., lispro/Humalog or aspart/Novolog), a short-acting (regular) insulin preparation (e.g., Actrapid), intermediate-acting insulins (both Semilente and neutral protamine Hagedorn types), and a very long-acting insulin analogue (e.g., glargine/Lantus), as

  1. A mathematical model for interpreting in vitro rhGH release from laminar implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoveña, A; García, J T; Oliva, A; Llabrés, M; Fariña, J B

    2006-02-17

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), used mainly for the treatment of growth hormone deficiency in children, requires daily subcutaneous injections. The use of controlled release formulations with appropriate rhGH release kinetics reduces the frequency of medication, improving patient compliance and quality of life. Biodegradable implants are a valid alternative, offering the feasibility of a regular release rate after administering a single dose, though it exists the slight disadvantage of a very minor surgical operation. Three laminar implant formulations (F(1), F(2) and F(3)) were produced by different manufacture procedures using solvent-casting techniques with the same copoly(D,L-lactic) glycolic acid (PLGA) polymer (Mw=48 kDa). A correlation in vitro between polymer matrix degradation and drug release rate from these formulations was found and a mathematical model was developed to interpret this. This model was applied to each formulation. The obtained results where explained in terms of manufacture parameters with the aim of elucidate whether drug release only occurs by diffusion or erosion, or by a combination of both mechanisms. Controlling the manufacture method and the resultant changes in polymer structure facilitates a suitable rhGH release profile for different rhGH deficiency treatments.

  2. Osseointegration of biochemically modified implants in an osteoporosis rodent model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Stadlinger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the impact of implant surface modifications on osseointegration in an osteoporotic rodent model. Sandblasted, acid-etched titanium implants were either used directly (control or were further modified by surface conditioning with NaOH or by coating with one of the following active agents: collagen/chondroitin sulphate, simvastatin, or zoledronic acid. Control and modified implants were inserted into the proximal tibia of aged ovariectomised (OVX osteoporotic rats (n = 32/group. In addition, aged oestrogen competent animals received either control or NaOH conditioned implants. Animals were sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks post-implantation. The excised tibiae were utilised for biomechanical and morphometric readouts (n = 8/group/readout. Biomechanical testing revealed at both time points dramatically reduced osseointegration in the tibia of oestrogen deprived osteoporotic animals compared to intact controls irrespective of NaOH exposure. Consistently, histomorphometric and microCT analyses demonstrated diminished bone-implant contact (BIC, peri-implant bone area (BA, bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV and bone-mineral density (BMD in OVX animals. Surface coating with collagen/chondroitin sulphate had no detectable impact on osseointegration. Interestingly, statin coating resulted in a transient increase in BIC 2 weeks post-implantation; which, however, did not correspond to improvement of biomechanical readouts. Local exposure to zoledronic acid increased BIC, BA, BV/TV and BMD at 4 weeks. Yet this translated only into a non-significant improvement of biomechanical properties. In conclusion, this study presents a rodent model mimicking severely osteoporotic bone. Contrary to the other bioactive agents, locally released zoledronic acid had a positive impact on osseointegration albeit to a lesser extent than reported in less challenging models.

  3. Computational stochastic model of ions implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zmievskaya, Galina I., E-mail: zmi@gmail.ru; Bondareva, Anna L., E-mail: bal310775@yandex.ru [M.V. Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics RAS, 4,Miusskaya sq., 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Levchenko, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatlevchenko@mail.ru [VNII Geosystem Russian Federal Center, Varshavskoye roadway, 8, Moscow (Russian Federation); Maino, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.maino@enea.it [Scuola di Lettere e BeniCulturali, University di Bologna, sede di Ravenna, via Mariani 5, 48100 Ravenna (Italy)

    2015-03-10

    Implantation flux ions into crystal leads to phase transition /PT/ 1-st kind. Damaging lattice is associated with processes clustering vacancies and gaseous bubbles as well their brownian motion. System of stochastic differential equations /SDEs/ Ito for evolution stochastic dynamical variables corresponds to the superposition Wiener processes. The kinetic equations in partial derivatives /KE/, Kolmogorov-Feller and Einstein-Smolukhovskii, were formulated for nucleation into lattice of weakly soluble gases. According theory, coefficients of stochastic and kinetic equations uniquely related. Radiation stimulated phase transition are characterized by kinetic distribution functions /DFs/ of implanted clusters versus their sizes and depth of gas penetration into lattice. Macroscopic parameters of kinetics such as the porosity and stress calculated in thin layers metal/dielectric due to Xe{sup ++} irradiation are attracted as example. Predictions of porosity, important for validation accumulation stresses in surfaces, can be applied at restoring of objects the cultural heritage.

  4. A novel implantation model for evaluation of bone healing response to dental implants: the goat iliac crest.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, C.; Meijer, G.J.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite the availability of numerous animal models for testing the biological performance of dental and orthopedic implants, the selection of a suitable model is complex. This paper presents a new model for objective and standardized evaluation of bone responses to implants using the

  5. Effects of continual intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone on implant stability in the presence of osteoporosis: an in vivo study using resonance frequency analysis in a rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Oki

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of continual intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH on implant stability in the presence of osteoporosis, using rabbit models. Material and Methods: Fifteen female New Zealand white rabbits underwent ovariectomy and were administered glucocorticoids to induce osteoporosis, following which they were divided into three groups. The first group received intermittent subcutaneous PTH for 4 weeks until implant placement (PTH1, while the second and third groups received PTH (PTH2 and saline (control, respectively, for 4 weeks before and after implant placement. After intermittent administration of PTH or saline, titanium implants were inserted into the left femoral epiphyses of all animals, and the implant stability quotient (ISQ was measured immediately after placement to assess the primary stability and at 2 and 4 weeks after implant placement to assess osseointegration. At 4 weeks after implant placement, histological and histomorphometric evaluations were conducted and the bone area around the implant socket was measured as a ratio of the total bone area to the total tissue area. Results: Regarding primary stability, the ISQ values for the PTH1 and PTH2 groups were significantly higher than those for the control group (p<0.05. Concerning osseointegration, the ISQ values at 2 and 4 weeks were significantly higher for the PTH2 group than for the PTH1 and control (p<0.05 groups. Histological assessments showed a thicker and more trabecular bone around the implant sockets in the PTH2 specimens than in the PTH1 and control specimens. The bone area around the implant socket was significantly greater in the PTH2 group than in the PTH1 and control groups (p<0.05. Conclusions: Our results suggest that continual intermittent PTH administration before and after dental implant placement is effective for the achievement of favorable stability and osseointegration in the presence of

  6. Modelling dental implant extraction by pullout and torque procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A; Shemtov-Yona, K

    2017-07-01

    Dental implants extraction, achieved either by applying torque or pullout force, is used to estimate the bone-implant interfacial strength. A detailed description of the mechanical and physical aspects of the extraction process in the literature is still missing. This paper presents 3D nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations of a commercial implant extraction process from the mandible bone. Emphasis is put on the typical load-displacement and torque-angle relationships for various types of cortical and trabecular bone strengths. The simulations also study of the influence of the osseointegration level on those relationships. This is done by simulating implant extraction right after insertion when interfacial frictional contact exists between the implant and bone, and long after insertion, assuming that the implant is fully bonded to the bone. The model does not include a separate representation and model of the interfacial layer for which available data is limited. The obtained relationships show that the higher the strength of the trabecular bone the higher the peak extraction force, while for application of torque, it is the cortical bone which might dictate the peak torque value. Information on the relative strength contrast of the cortical and trabecular components, as well as the progressive nature of the damage evolution, can be revealed from the obtained relations. It is shown that full osseointegration might multiply the peak and average load values by a factor 3-12 although the calculated work of extraction varies only by a factor of 1.5. From a quantitative point of view, it is suggested that, as an alternative to reporting peak load or torque values, an average value derived from the extraction work be used to better characterize the bone-implant interfacial strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes with Oligo-/Anhydramnion Colonized by Multiresistant Bacteria with Continuous Amnioinfusion and Antibiotic Administrations through a Subcutaneously Implanted Intrauterine Port System: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchirikov, Michael; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Winarno, Andreas Suhartoyo; Haase, Roland; Buchmann, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial infection is one of the main causes of preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) leading to preterm delivery, pulmonary hypoplasia, sepsis and joint deformities. Expectant management, broad-spectrum antibiotics and antenatal corticosteroids are routinely used in this condition with very limited success to prevent bacteremia, chorioamnionitis, funisitis and intra-amniotic infection syndrome. Here, we report a case in which we attempted to treat PPROM at 26+3 weeks of gestation with anhydramnion colonized by multiresistant Klebsiella. A perinatal port system was implanted subcutaneously at 28+0 weeks of gestation, enabling long-term continuous lavage of the amniotic cavity with a hypotonic aqueous composition similar to human amniotic fluid combined with intra-amniotic antibiotic application. The patient gave birth to a preterm female infant at 31+1 weeks without any signs of infection. The girl was discharged with a weight of 2,730 g in very good condition. In the follow-up examinations at 5 months and 1 year of age, there was no apparent neurological disturbance, developmental delay or Klebsiella colonization. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Peri-Implant Strain in an In Vitro Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussaini, Souheil; Vaidyanathan, Tritala K; Wadkar, Abhinav P; Quran, Firas A Al; Ehrenberg, David; Weiner, Saul

    2015-10-01

    An in vitro experimental model was designed and tested to determine the influence that peri-implant strain may have on the overall crestal bone. Strain gages were attached to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) models containing a screw-type root form implant at sites 1 mm from the resin-implant interface. Three different types of crown superstructures (cemented, 1-screw [UCLA] and 2-screw abutment types) were tested. Loading (1 Hz, 200 N load) was performed using a MTS Mechanical Test System. The strain gage data were stored and organized in a computer for statistical treatment. Strains for all abutment types did not exceed the physiological range for modeling and remodeling of cancellous bone, 200-2500 με (microstrain). For approximately one-quarter of the trials, the strain values were less than 200 με the zone for bone atrophy. The mean microstrain obtained was 517.7 με. In conclusion, the peri-implant strain in this in vitro model did not exceed the physiologic range of bone remodeling under axial occlusal loading.

  9. Bone compaction enhances implant fixation in a canine gap model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Søren; Rahbek, Ole; Toft, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    A new bone preparation technique, compaction, has increased fixation of implants inserted with exact-fit or press-fit to bone. Furthermore, a demonstrated spring-back effect of compacted bone might be of potential value in reducing the initial gaps that often exist between clinical inserted...... implants and bone. However, it is unknown whether the compression and breakage of trabeculae during the compaction procedure results in impaired gap-healing of compacted bone. Therefore, we compared compaction with conventional drilling in a canine gap model. Grit-blasted titanium implants (diameter 6 mm...... that the beneficial effect of reduced gap size, as compacted bone springs back, is not eliminated by an impaired gap-healing of compacted bone....

  10. Fibroblasts accelerate islet revascularization and improve long-term graft survival in a mouse model of subcutaneous islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Perez-Basterrechea

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet transplantation has been considered for many years a promising therapy for beta-cell replacement in patients with type-1 diabetes despite that long-term clinical results are not as satisfactory. This fact points to the necessity of designing strategies to improve and accelerate islets engraftment, paying special attention to events assuring their revascularization. Fibroblasts constitute a cell population that collaborates on tissue homeostasis, keeping the equilibrium between production and degradation of structural components as well as maintaining the required amount of survival factors. Our group has developed a model for subcutaneous islet transplantation using a plasma-based scaffold containing fibroblasts as accessory cells that allowed achieving glycemic control in diabetic mice. Transplanted tissue engraftment is critical during the first days after transplantation, thus we have gone in depth into the graft-supporting role of fibroblasts during the first ten days after islet transplantation. All mice transplanted with islets embedded in the plasma-based scaffold reversed hyperglycemia, although long-term glycemic control was maintained only in the group transplanted with the fibroblasts-containing scaffold. By gene expression analysis and histology examination during the first days we could conclude that these differences might be explained by overexpression of genes involved in vessel development as well as in β-cell regeneration that were detected when fibroblasts were present in the graft. Furthermore, fibroblasts presence correlated with a faster graft re-vascularization, a higher insulin-positive area and a lower cell death. Therefore, this work underlines the importance of fibroblasts as accessory cells in islet transplantation, and suggests its possible use in other graft-supporting strategies.

  11. Fibroblasts accelerate islet revascularization and improve long-term graft survival in a mouse model of subcutaneous islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Basterrechea, Marcos; Esteban, Manuel Martinez; Alvarez-Viejo, Maria; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Sanchez Pitiot, Marta; Otero, Jesus; Obaya, Alvaro Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation has been considered for many years a promising therapy for beta-cell replacement in patients with type-1 diabetes despite that long-term clinical results are not as satisfactory. This fact points to the necessity of designing strategies to improve and accelerate islets engraftment, paying special attention to events assuring their revascularization. Fibroblasts constitute a cell population that collaborates on tissue homeostasis, keeping the equilibrium between production and degradation of structural components as well as maintaining the required amount of survival factors. Our group has developed a model for subcutaneous islet transplantation using a plasma-based scaffold containing fibroblasts as accessory cells that allowed achieving glycemic control in diabetic mice. Transplanted tissue engraftment is critical during the first days after transplantation, thus we have gone in depth into the graft-supporting role of fibroblasts during the first ten days after islet transplantation. All mice transplanted with islets embedded in the plasma-based scaffold reversed hyperglycemia, although long-term glycemic control was maintained only in the group transplanted with the fibroblasts-containing scaffold. By gene expression analysis and histology examination during the first days we could conclude that these differences might be explained by overexpression of genes involved in vessel development as well as in β-cell regeneration that were detected when fibroblasts were present in the graft. Furthermore, fibroblasts presence correlated with a faster graft re-vascularization, a higher insulin-positive area and a lower cell death. Therefore, this work underlines the importance of fibroblasts as accessory cells in islet transplantation, and suggests its possible use in other graft-supporting strategies.

  12. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare are reported. Clinical presentation was in the form of hard subcutaneous nodules, histopathology confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The cases were unique because of onset in adult age, occurrence over unusual sites and absence of classical lesions of granuloma annulare elsewhere.

  13. Evaluating the efficacy of subcutaneous C1-esterase inhibitor administration for use in rat models of inflammatory diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmens, Reindert W.; Naaijkens, Benno A.; Roem, Dorina; Kramer, Klaas; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; van Ham, Marieke S.; Niessen, Hans W.; Krijnen, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh) therapy is currently administered to patients with C1-inh deficiency through intravenous injections. The possibility of subcutaneous administration is currently being explored since this would alleviate need for hospitalization and increase mobility and

  14. Modeling of Auditory Neuron Response Thresholds with Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Venail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the prosthetic-neural interface is a critical point for cochlear implant efficiency. It depends not only on technical and anatomical factors such as electrode position into the cochlea (depth and scalar placement, electrode impedance, and distance between the electrode and the stimulated auditory neurons, but also on the number of functional auditory neurons. The efficiency of electrical stimulation can be assessed by the measurement of e-CAP in cochlear implant users. In the present study, we modeled the activation of auditory neurons in cochlear implant recipients (nucleus device. The electrical response, measured using auto-NRT (neural responses telemetry algorithm, has been analyzed using multivariate regression with cubic splines in order to take into account the variations of insertion depth of electrodes amongst subjects as well as the other technical and anatomical factors listed above. NRT thresholds depend on the electrode squared impedance (β = −0.11 ± 0.02, P<0.01, the scalar placement of the electrodes (β = −8.50 ± 1.97, P<0.01, and the depth of insertion calculated as the characteristic frequency of auditory neurons (CNF. Distribution of NRT residues according to CNF could provide a proxy of auditory neurons functioning in implanted cochleas.

  15. Probabilistic predictive modelling of carbon nanocomposites for medical implants design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Matthew; Chui, Chee-Kong

    2015-04-01

    Modelling of the mechanical properties of carbon nanocomposites based on input variables like percentage weight of Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) inclusions is important for the design of medical implants and other structural scaffolds. Current constitutive models for the mechanical properties of nanocomposites may not predict well due to differences in conditions, fabrication techniques and inconsistencies in reagents properties used across industries and laboratories. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of the designed products are not deterministic, but exist as a probabilistic range. A predictive model based on a modified probabilistic surface response algorithm is proposed in this paper to address this issue. Tensile testing of three groups of different CNT weight fractions of carbon nanocomposite samples displays scattered stress-strain curves, with the instantaneous stresses assumed to vary according to a normal distribution at a specific strain. From the probabilistic density function of the experimental data, a two factors Central Composite Design (CCD) experimental matrix based on strain and CNT weight fraction input with their corresponding stress distribution was established. Monte Carlo simulation was carried out on this design matrix to generate a predictive probabilistic polynomial equation. The equation and method was subsequently validated with more tensile experiments and Finite Element (FE) studies. The method was subsequently demonstrated in the design of an artificial tracheal implant. Our algorithm provides an effective way to accurately model the mechanical properties in implants of various compositions based on experimental data of samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A collisional model for plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahedi, V.; Lieberman, M.A.; Alves, M.V.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1990-01-01

    In plasma immersion ion implantation, a target is immersed in a plasma and a series of negative short pulses are applied to it to implant the ions. A new analytical model is being developed for the high pressure regimes in which the motion of the ions is highly collisional. The model provides values for ion flux, average ion velocity at the target, and sheath edge motion as a function of time. These values are being compared with those obtained from simulation and show good agreement. A review is also given (for comparison) of the earlier work done at low pressures, where the motion of ions in the sheath is collisionless, also showing good agreement between analysis and simulation. The simulation code is PDP1 which utilizes particle-in-cell techniques plus Monte-Carlo simulation of electron-neutral (elastic, excitation and ionization) and ion-neutral (scattering and charge-exchange) collisions

  17. Implants delivering bisphosphonate locally increase periprosthetic bone density in an osteoporotic sheep model. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GVA Stadelmann

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available It is a clinical challenge to obtain a sufficient orthopaedic implant fixation in weak osteoporotic bone. When the primary implant fixation is poor, micromotions occur at the bone-implant interface, activating osteoclasts, which leads to implant loosening. Bisphosphonate can be used to prevent the osteoclastic response, but when administered systemically its bioavailability is low and the time it takes for the drug to reach the periprosthetic bone may be a limiting factor. Recent data has shown that delivering bisphosphonate locally from the implant surface could be an interesting solution. Local bisphosphonate delivery increased periprosthetic bone density, which leads to a stronger implant fixation, as demonstrated in rats by the increased implant pullout force. The aim of the present study was to verify the positive effect on periprosthetic bone remodelling of local bisphosphonate delivery in an osteoporotic sheep model. Four implants coated with zoledronate and two control implants were inserted in the femoral condyle of ovariectomized sheep for 4 weeks. The bone at the implant surface was 50% higher in the zoledronate-group compared to control group. This effect was significant up to a distance of 400µm from the implant surface. The presented results are similar to what was observed in the osteoporotic rat model, which suggest that the concept of releasing zoledronate locally from the implant to increase the implant fixation is not species specific. The results of this trial study support the claim that local zoledronate could increase the fixation of an implant in weak bone.

  18. Peri-implant stress correlates with bone and cement morphology: Micro-FE modeling of implanted cadaveric glenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Hwabok; Armstrong, April D; Flint, Wesley W; Kunselman, Allen R; Lewis, Gregory S

    2015-11-01

    Aseptic loosening of cemented joint replacements is a complex biological and mechanical process, and remains a clinical concern especially in patients with poor bone quality. Utilizing high resolution finite element analysis of a series of implanted cadaver glenoids, the objective of this study was to quantify relationships between construct morphology and resulting mechanical stresses in cement and trabeculae. Eight glenoid cadavers were implanted with a cemented central peg implant. Specimens were imaged by micro-CT, and subject-specific finite element models were developed. Bone volume fraction, glenoid width, implant-cortex distance, cement volume, cement-cortex contact, and cement-bone interface area were measured. Axial loading was applied to the implant of each model and stress distributions were characterized. Correlation analysis was completed across all specimens for pairs of morphological and mechanical variables. The amount of trabecular bone with high stress was strongly negatively correlated with both cement volume and contact between the cement and cortex (r = -0.85 and -0.84, p implant-cortex distance. Contact between the cement and underlying cortex may dramatically reduce trabecular bone stresses surrounding the cement, and this contact depends on bone shape, cement amount, and implant positioning. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Protection of skin with subcutaneous administration of 5% dextrose in water during superficial radiofrequency ablation in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui; Liu, Xia-Lei; Wang, Yu-Ling; Li, Jing-Yi; Lu, Wu-Zhu; Xian, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Bai-Meng; Li, Jian

    2014-06-01

    This study was to evaluate the efficacy of subcutaneous administration of 5% dextrose in water (D5W), to prevent skin injury during radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Twenty-four rabbits were divided into three groups: a pre-injection group, a perfusion group, and a control group. Ablative zones were created in the superficial part of the thigh muscle for 6 min. A needle was placed subcutaneously for injection of D5W, and a thermal sensor was positioned nearby for real-time temperature monitoring. The sizes of the ablative zones were measured by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, and severity of the observed skin injury were scored semi-quantitatively and compared. The highest temperature, the duration of the temperature above 50 °C, and the rise time of the post-procedure temperature were all highest in the control group (p skin injury was most severe in the control group (p skin injury of the pre-injection group and the perfusion group (p = 0.091), while the skin injury of the perfusion group was less severe than that of the pre-injection group on post-procedure day 14 (p = 0.004). No significant difference was found in the sizes of the ablative zones among the groups (p = 0.720). Subcutaneous perfusion with D5W is effective in protecting the skin against burns during RF ablation without compromising the effect of ablation.

  20. Accuracy of computer-guided implantation in a human cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatzkair, Gustavo; Cheng, Alice; Brodie, Stan; Raviv, Eli; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2015-10-01

    To examine the accuracy of computer-guided implantation using a human cadaver model with reduced experimental variability. Twenty-eight (28) dental implants representing 12 clinical cases were placed in four cadaver heads using a static guided implantation template. All planning and surgeries were performed by one clinician. All radiographs and measurements were performed by two examiners. The distance of the implants from buccal and lingual bone and mesial implant or tooth was analyzed at the apical and coronal levels, and measurements were compared to the planned values. No significant differences were seen between planned and implanted measurements. Average deviation of an implant from its planning radiograph was 0.8 mm, which is within the range of variability expected from CT analysis. Guided implantation can be used safely with a margin of error of 1 mm. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical Oral Implants Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Mathematical modeling of chemotaxis and glial scarring around implanted electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silchenko, Alexander N; Tass, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation or microelectrode probes for the recording of neuronal activity is always accompanied by the response of the brain’s immune system leading to the formation of a glial scar around the implantation sites. The implantation of electrodes causes massive release of adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) and different cytokines into the extracellular space and activates the microglia. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y 2,12 as well as A3A/A2A adenosine receptors. The size and density of an insulating sheath around the electrode, formed by microglial cells, are important criteria for the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio during microelectrode recordings or parameters of electrical current delivered to the brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards implanted electrodes as well as the possible impact of an anti-inflammatory coating consisting of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. We present a model describing the formation of a stable aggregate around the electrode due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP and the mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The bioactive coating is modeled as a source of chemo-repellent located near the electrode surface. The obtained analytical and numerical results allowed us to reveal the dependences of size and spatial location of the insulating sheath on the amount of released ATP and estimate the impact of immune suppressive coating on the scarring process. (paper)

  2. Effect of joining the sectioned implant-supported prosthesis on the peri-implant strain generated in simulated mandibular model

    OpenAIRE

    Ipsha Singh; K Chandrasekharan Nair; Jayakar Shetty

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the strain developed in simulated mandibular model before and after the joining of an implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis by different joining techniques, namely, arc welding, laser welding, and soldering. Materials and Methods: A specimen simulating a mandibular edentulous ridge was fabricated in heat-cured acrylic resin. 4-mm holes were drilled in the following tooth positions; 36, 33, 43, 46. Implant analogs were placed in the holes. Un...

  3. Animal Models for Evaluation of Bone Implants and Devices: Comparative Bone Structure and Common Model Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wancket, L M

    2015-09-01

    Bone implants and devices are a rapidly growing field within biomedical research, and implants have the potential to significantly improve human and animal health. Animal models play a key role in initial product development and are important components of nonclinical data included in applications for regulatory approval. Pathologists are increasingly being asked to evaluate these models at the initial developmental and nonclinical biocompatibility testing stages, and it is important to understand the relative merits and deficiencies of various species when evaluating a new material or device. This article summarizes characteristics of the most commonly used species in studies of bone implant materials, including detailed information about the relevance of a particular model to human bone physiology and pathology. Species reviewed include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, dogs, sheep, goats, and nonhuman primates. Ultimately, a comprehensive understanding of the benefits and limitations of different model species will aid in rigorously evaluating a novel bone implant material or device. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Osteoporotic rat models for evaluation of osseointegration of bone implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alghamdi, H.S.A.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Osseointegration of dental and orthopedic bone implants is the important process that leads to mechanical fixation of implants and warrants implant functionality. In view of increasing numbers of osteoporotic patients, bone implant surface optimization strategies with instructive and drug-loading

  5. Reliability of implant surgical guides based on soft-tissue models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maney, Pooja; Simmons, David E; Palaiologou, Archontia; Kee, Edwin

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of implant surgical guides fabricated on diagnostic casts. Guides were fabricated with radiopaque rods representing implant positions. Cone beam computerized tomograms were taken with guides in place. Accuracy was evaluated using software to simulate implant placement. Twenty-two sites (47%) were considered accurate (13 of 24 maxillary and 9 of 23 mandibular sites). Soft-tissue models do not always provide sufficient accuracy for fabricating implant surgical guides.

  6. Modeling of interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, O.I.; Knyazheva, N.V.

    2009-01-01

    A model of the interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron during rapid thermal annealing of silicon layers previously amorphized by implantation of germanium has been proposed. It is supposed that the boron interstitials are created continuously during annealing due to generation, dissolution, or rearrangement of the clusters of impurity atoms which are formed in the ion-implanted layers with impurity concentration above the solubility limit. The local elastic stresses arising due to the difference of boron atomic radius and atomic radius of silicon also contribute to the generation of boron interstitials. A simulation of boron redistribution during thermal annealing for 60 s at a temperature of 850 C has been carried out. The calculated profile agrees well with the experimental data. A number of the parameters of interstitial diffusion have been derived. In particular, the average migration length of nonequilibrium boron interstitials is equal to 12 nm. It was also obtained that approximately 1.94% of boron atoms were converted to the interstitial sites, participated in the fast interstitial migration, and then became immobile again transferring into a substitutional position or forming the electrically inactive complexes with crystal lattice defects. (authors)

  7. Histologic Changes of Implanted Gore Bio-A in an Experimental Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan Koo Yeo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gore Bio-A has been reported to be an ideal synthetic bioabsorbable scaffold material for hernia repair. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Gore Bio-A in soft tissue augmentation. Six New Zealand white rabbits were used in the study. Five subcutaneous pockets were created on the back of the rabbit, and 20×20 mm sized square shaped Gore Bio-A sheets, each 1.5 mm, 3 mm, 4.5 mm, 6 mm, and 7.5 mm in thickness, were implanted into each pocket (1 layer to 5 layers. To analyze the morphologic and histologic changes, the implants were harvested 1, 3, and 6 months after implantation. Following the gross analysis, absorption rate was accelerated with increased implant duration and decreased thickness. Histological analysis of the implants demonstrated progressive neovascularization, fibroblast infiltration, and neocollagenation over time. Six months after implantation, Gore Bio-A was almost absorbed and degenerated, not maintaining its volume. Based on this study, Gore Bio-A was revealed as a biocompatible material; however, it is not suitable for soft tissue augmentation because it is absorbed in the process of changing into soft tissue without maintaining its own volume. Therefore, this material is incomplete and needs more study to overcome this limitation.

  8. Comparison of two dental implant surface modifications on implants with same macrodesign: an experimental study in the pelvic sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Sabrina; Stübinger, Stefan; Schüpbach, Peter; Sidler, Michéle; Klein, Karina; Ferguson, Stephen J; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two different surfaces of one uniform macro-implant design in order to focus exclusively on the osseointegration properties after 2, 4 and 8 weeks and to discuss the animal model chosen. In six mature sheep, n = 36 implants with a highly crystalline and phosphate-enriched anodized titanium oxide surface (TiU) and n = 36 implants with a hydrophilic, sandblasted, large grit and acid-etched surface (SLA) were placed in the pelvic bone. TiU implants were custom-made to match the SLA implant design. The implant stability and bone-to-implant contact (BIC) were assessed by resonance frequency (ISQ), backscatter scanning electron microscopy (B-SEM), light microscopy (LM), micro-CT and intravital fluorochrome staining. Biomechanical removal torque testing was performed. Overall, no statistically significant differences in BIC total (trabecular + cortical) between TiU and SLA were found via LM and B-SEM. BIC values (B-SEM; LM) in both groups revealed a steady rise in trabecular bone attachment to the implant surface after 2, 4 and 8 weeks. In the 2- to 4-week time interval in the TiU group (P = 0.005) as well as in the SLA group (P = 0.01), a statistically significant increase in BIC trabecular could be observed via LM. B-SEM values confirmed the statistically significant increase for TiU (P = 0.001). In both groups, BIC trabecular values after 8 weeks were significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) than after 2 weeks (B-SEM; LM). Biomechanical data confirmed the histological data. The two surfaces proved comparable osseointegration in this sheep model. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Stable subcutaneous cartilage regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells directed by chondrocyte sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Zhu, Lian; Liu, Yu; Yin, Zongqi; Liu, Yi; Liu, Fangjun; He, Aijuan; Feng, Shaoqing; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wenjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Zhou, Guangdong

    2017-05-01

    In vivo niche plays an important role in regulating differentiation fate of stem cells. Due to lack of proper chondrogenic niche, stable cartilage regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in subcutaneous environments is always a great challenge. This study explored the feasibility that chondrocyte sheet created chondrogenic niche retained chondrogenic phenotype of BMSC engineered cartilage (BEC) in subcutaneous environments. Porcine BMSCs were seeded into biodegradable scaffolds followed by 4weeks of chondrogenic induction in vitro to form BEC, which were wrapped with chondrocyte sheets (Sheet group), acellular small intestinal submucosa (SIS, SIS group), or nothing (Blank group) respectively and then implanted subcutaneously into nude mice to trace the maintenance of chondrogenic phenotype. The results showed that all the constructs in Sheet group displayed typical cartilaginous features with abundant lacunae and cartilage specific matrices deposition. These samples became more mature with prolonged in vivo implantation, and few signs of ossification were observed at all time points except for one sample that had not been wrapped completely. Cell labeling results in Sheet group further revealed that the implanted BEC directly participated in cartilage formation. Samples in both SIS and Blank groups mainly showed ossified tissue at all time points with partial fibrogenesis in a few samples. These results suggested that chondrocyte sheet could create a chondrogenic niche for retaining chondrogenic phenotype of BEC in subcutaneous environment and thus provide a novel research model for stable ectopic cartilage regeneration based on stem cells. In vivo niche plays an important role in directing differentiation fate of stem cells. Due to lack of proper chondrogenic niche, stable cartilage regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in subcutaneous environments is always a great challenge. The current study demonstrated that chondrocyte sheet generated by

  10. A comparative study on the stress distribution around dental implants in three arch form models for replacing six implants using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Maryam; Jahangirnezhad, Mahmoud; Yousefimanesh, Hojatollah; Robati, Maryam; Robati, Hossein

    2018-01-01

    Dental implant is a method to replacement of missing teeth. It is important for replacing the missed anterior teeth. In vitro method is a safe method for evaluation of stress distribution. Finite element analysis as an in vitro method evaluated stress distribution around replacement of six maxillary anterior teeth implants in three models of maxillary arch. In this in vitro study, using ABAQUS software (Simulia Corporation, Vélizy-Villacoublay, France), implant simulation was performed for reconstruction of six maxillary anterior teeth in three models. Two implants were placed on both sides of the canine tooth region (A model); two implants on both sides of the canine tooth region and another on one side of the central incisor region (B model); and two implants on both sides of the canine tooth region and two implants in the central incisor area (C model). All implants evaluated in three arch forms (tapered, ovoid, and square). Data were analyzed by finite analysis software. Von Mises stress by increasing of implant number was reduced. In a comparison of A model in each maxillary arch, the stress created in the cortical and cancellous bones in the square arch was less than ovoid and tapered arches. The stress created in implants and cortical and cancellous bones in C model was less than A and B models. The C model (four-implant) reduced the stress distribution in cortical and cancellous bones, but this pattern must be evaluated according to arch form and cost benefit of patients.

  11. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  12. A Pharmacokinetic Model of a Tissue Implantable Cortisol Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael A; Bakh, Naveed; Bisker, Gili; Brown, Emery N; Strano, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Cortisol is an important glucocorticoid hormone whose biochemistry influences numerous physiological and pathological processes. Moreover, it is a biomarker of interest for a number of conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder, Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, and others. An implantable biosensor capable of real time monitoring of cortisol concentrations in adipose tissue may revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders, as well as provide an invaluable research tool. Toward this end, a mathematical model, informed by the physiological literature, is developed to predict dynamic cortisol concentrations in adipose, muscle, and brain tissues, where a significant number of important processes with cortisol occur. The pharmacokinetic model is applied to both a prototypical, healthy male patient and a previously studied Cushing's disease patient. The model can also be used to inform the design of an implantable sensor by optimizing the sensor dissociation constant, apparent delay time, and magnitude of the sensor output versus system dynamics. Measurements from such a sensor would help to determine systemic cortisol levels, providing much needed insight for proper medical treatment for various cortisol-related conditions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. In Vivo Model to Test Implanted Biosensors for Blood pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Somps, Chris J.; Madou, Marc; Hines, John; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Biosensors for monitoring physiologic data continuously through telemetry are available for heart rate, respiration, and temperature but not for blood pH or ions affected by hydrogen ion concentration. A telemetric biosensor for monitoring blood pH on-line could be used to identify and manage problems in fluid and electrolyte metabolism, cardiac and respiratory function during space flight and the acid-base status of patients without the need for venipuncture in patients on Earth. Critical to the development of biosensors is a method for evaluating their performance after implantation. Mature rats, prepared with jugular, cannulas for repeated blood samples, were exposed to a gas mixture containing high levels of carbon dioxide (7%) in a closed environment to induce mild respiratory acidosis. Serial blood gas and pH measurements in venous blood were compared with electrical responses from sensors implanted in the subcutaneous tissue. Animals became slightly tachypneic after exposure to excess CO2, but remained alert and active. After 5 minutes, basal blood pH decreased from 7.404 +/- 0.013 to 7.289 +/- 0.010 (p less than 0.001)and PC02 increased from 45 +/- 6 to 65 +/- 4 mm. Hg (p les than 0.001). Thereafter pH and blood gas parameters remained stable. Implanted sensors showed a decrease in millivolts (mV) which paralleled the change in pH and averaged 5-6 mV per 0.1 unit pH. Implanted sensors remained sensitive to modest changes in tissue pH for one week. A system for inducing acidosis in rats was developed to test the in vivo performance of pH biosensors. The system provides a method which is sensitive, rapid and reproducible in the same and different animals with full recovery, for testing the performance of sensors implanted in subcutaneous tissues.

  14. Exposure‐Response Model of Subcutaneous C1‐Inhibitor Concentrate to Estimate the Risk of Attacks in Patients With Hereditary Angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorici, Michael A.; Pawaskar, Dipti; Pragst, Ingo; Machnig, Thomas; Hutmacher, Matthew; Zuraw, Bruce; Cicardi, Marco; Craig, Timothy; Longhurst, Hilary; Sidhu, Jagdev

    2018-01-01

    Subcutaneous C1‐inhibitor (HAEGARDA, CSL Behring), is a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)‐approved, highly concentrated formulation of a plasma‐derived C1‐esterase inhibitor (C1‐INH), which, in the phase III Clinical Studies for Optimal Management in Preventing Angioedema with Low‐Volume Subcutaneous C1‐inhibitor Replacement Therapy (COMPACT) trial, reduced the incidence of hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks when given prophylactically. Data from the COMPACT trial were used to develop a repeated time‐to‐event model to characterize the timing and frequency of HAE attacks as a function of C1‐INH activity, and then develop an exposure–response model to assess the relationship between C1‐INH functional activity levels (C1‐INH(f)) and the risk of an attack. The C1‐INH(f) values of 33.1%, 40.3%, and 63.1% were predicted to correspond with 50%, 70%, and 90% reductions in the HAE attack risk, respectively, relative to no therapy. Based on trough C1‐INH(f) values for the 40 IU/kg (40.2%) and 60 IU/kg (48.0%) C1‐INH (SC) doses, the model predicted that 50% and 67% of the population, respectively, would see at least a 70% decrease in the risk of an attack. PMID:29316335

  15. Sheep Hip Arthroplasty Model of Failed Implant Osseointegration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Thomas; Kold, Søren; Baas, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    femoral condyles in ten sheep. The micromotion device consists of an anchor bearing a PMMA implant and a PE plug. During each gait cycle the PE plug will make the PMMA implant axially piston 0.5 mm. After 12 weeks of observation the bone specimens were harvested and a post-mortem control implant......Early secure stability of an implant is important for long-term survival. We examined whether micromotion of implants consistently would induce bone resorption and formation of a fibrous membrane and thereby prevent osseointegration. One micromotion implant was inserted into one of the medial...... was inserted into the contra-lateral medial femoral condyle. Histomorphometrical evaluation showed that the surface on the implant observed for 12 weeks was covered by fibrous tissue. The control implants were covered by lamellar bone. No difference was found with respect to the volume fraction of lamellar...

  16. Efficacious Cefazolin Prophylactic Dose for Morbidly Obese Women Undergoing Bariatric Surgery Based on Evidence from Subcutaneous Microdialysis and Populational Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Eduardo Celia; Meinhardt, Nelson Guardiola; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Heineck, Isabela; Fischer, Maria Isabel; de Araújo, BibianaVerlindo; Dalla Costa, Teresa

    2018-04-11

    To determine the efficacious cefazolin prophylactic dose for bariatric surgery using free subcutaneous concentrations accessed by microdialysis after 2 g or 3 g i.v. bolus dosing to morbidly obese women and POPPK modeling. A POPPK model with variable plasma and subcutaneous tissue protein binding was developed to simultaneously describe plasma and tissue data sets. The outcomes was predicted for common surgical site infection (SSI) bacteria over 3, 4, 5 and 6 h periods postdose, as probability of target attainment (PTA) using Monte Carlo simulation. CFZ 2 g warrant up to 5 h SSI prophylaxis for bacteria with MICs ≤1 mg/L such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. For species such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, which present MIC distribution frequency of 2 mg/L, the maintenance of PTA ≥ 90% occurs with a 3 g dose for surgeries lasting up to 5 h, and 2 g dose provide an adequate response up to 4 h (PTA of 89%). Effectiveness of CFZ 2 g is similar to 3 g against bacteria with a MIC up to 2 mg/L, especially if the surgery does not last for more than 4 h.

  17. Differential effects of subcutaneous electrical stimulation (SQS) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in rodent models of chronic neuropathic or inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Portocarrero, Louis P; Cordero, Toni; Billstrom, Tina; Swearingen, Kim; Wacnik, Paul W; Johanek, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used for many years for the treatment of pain. Present-day research demonstrates that stimulation targets and parameters impact the induction of specific pain-modulating mechanisms. New targets are increasingly being investigated clinically, but the scientific rationale for a particular target is often not well established. This present study compares the behavioral effects of targeting peripheral axons by electrode placement in the subcutaneous space vs. electrode placement on the surface of the skin in a rodent model. Rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain were used to investigate subcutaneous electrical stimulation (SQS) vs. transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Electrical parameters and relative location of the leads were held constant under each condition. SQS had cumulative antihypersensitivity effects in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain rodent models, with significant inhibition of mechanical hypersensitivity observed on days 3-4 of treatment. In contrast, reduction of thermal hyperalgesia in the inflammatory model was observed during the first four days of treatment with SQS, and reduction of cold allodynia in the neuropathic pain model was seen only on the first day with SQS. TENS was effective in the inflammation model, and in agreement with previous studies, tolerance developed to the antihypersensitivity effects of TENS. With the exception of a reversal of cold hypersensitivity on day 1 of testing, TENS did not reveal significant analgesic effects in the neuropathic pain rodent model. The results presented show that TENS and SQS have different effects that could point to unique biologic mechanisms underlying the analgesic effect of each therapy. Furthermore, this study is the first to demonstrate in an animal model that SQS attenuates neuropathic and inflammatory-induced pain behaviors. © 2013 Medtronic, Inc.

  18. Antioxidative and Neuroprotective Effects of Curcumin in an Alzheimer's Disease Rat Model Co-Treated with Intracerebroventricular Streptozotocin and Subcutaneous D-Galactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Han-Chang; Zheng, Bo-Wen; Guo, Yu; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Jiang-Yan; Ma, Xiao-Wei; Jiang, Zhao-Feng

    2016-04-05

    Epidemiological data imply links between the increasing incidences of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, an AD rat model was established by combining treatments with intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (icv-STZ) and subcutaneous D-galactose, and the effects of curcumin on depressing AD-like symptoms were investigated. In the AD model group, rats were treated with icv-STZ in each hippocampus with 3.0 mg/kg of bodyweight once and then were subcutaneously injected with D-galactose daily (125 mg/kg of bodyweight) for 7 weeks. In the curcumin-protective group, after icv-STZ treatment, rats were treated with D-galactose (the same as in the AD model group) and intraperitoneally injected with curcumin daily (10 mg/kg of bodyweight) for 7 weeks. Vehicle-treated rats were treated as control. Compared with the vehicle control, the amount of protein carbonylation and glutathione in liver, as well as malondialdehyde in serum, were upregulated but glutathione peroxidase activity in blood was downregulated in the AD model group. The shuttle index and locomotor activity of rats in the AD model group were decreased compared with the vehicle control group. Furthermore, AD model rats showed neuronal damage and neuron loss with formation of amyloid-like substances and neurofibrillary tangles, and the levels of both β-cleavage of AβPP and phosphorylation of tau (Ser396) were significantly increased compared with the vehicle control group. Notably, compared with the AD model group, oxidative stress was decreased and the abilities of active avoidance and locomotor activity were improved, as well as attenuated neurodegeneration, in the curcumin-protective group. These results imply the applications of this animal model for AD research and of curcumin in the treatment of AD.

  19. Subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Berg, Jais O

    2016-01-01

    We have described subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis, which is benign, usually asymptomatic and underreported. Images have only been published on two earlier occasions, in which the necrotic nodules appear "pearly" than the cloudy yellow surface in present case. The presented image may help...

  20. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of subcutaneos granuloma annulare are reported. Clinical presentation was in the form of hard subcutaneous nodules; histopathology confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The cases were unique because of onset in adult hood, occurrence over unusual sites and absence of classical lesions of granuloma annulare elsewhere.

  1. Air Abrasive Disinfection of Implant Surfaces in a Simulated Model of Peri-Implantitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    may be higher in patients diagnosed with periodontal disease, systemic chronic disease such as diabetes or patients who smoke tobacco.9,10 One of...flora associated with peri-implantitis is similar to that found in chronic periodontitis .14 Gram-positive, facultative bacteria are normally...9):1490-5. 20. Heitz-Mayfield LJ, Lang NP. Comparative biology of chronic and aggressive periodontitis vs. peri-implantitis. Periodontol 2000

  2. Effect of joining the sectioned implant-supported prosthesis on the peri-implant strain generated in simulated mandibular model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipsha Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the strain developed in simulated mandibular model before and after the joining of an implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis by different joining techniques, namely, arc welding, laser welding, and soldering. Materials and Methods: A specimen simulating a mandibular edentulous ridge was fabricated in heat-cured acrylic resin. 4-mm holes were drilled in the following tooth positions; 36, 33, 43, 46. Implant analogs were placed in the holes. University of California, Los Angeles, abutment was attached to the implant fixture. Eight strain gauges were attached to the acrylic resin model. Six similar models were made. Implant-supported screw-retained fixed prosthesis was fabricated in nickel-chromium alloy. A load of 400 N was applied on the prosthesis using universal testing machine. Resultant strain was measured in each strain gauge. All the prostheses were sectioned at the area between 36 and 33, 33 and 43, and 43 and 46 using 35 micrometer carborundum disc, and strain was measured in each strain gauge after applying a load of 400 N on the prosthesis. Specimens were joined by arc welding, soldering, and laser welding. After joining, a load of 400 N was applied on each prosthesis and the resultant strain was measured in each strain gauge. Results: Highest mean strain values were recorded before sectioning of the prostheses (889.9 microstrains. Lowest mean strain values were recorded after sectioning the prosthesis and before reuniting it (225.0 microstrains. Conclusions: Sectioning and reuniting the long-span implant prosthesis was found to be a significant factor in influencing the peri-implant strain.

  3. Effect of joining the sectioned implant-supported prosthesis on the peri-implant strain generated in simulated mandibular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ipsha; Nair, K Chandrasekharan; Shetty, Jayakar

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the strain developed in simulated mandibular model before and after the joining of an implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis by different joining techniques, namely, arc welding, laser welding, and soldering. A specimen simulating a mandibular edentulous ridge was fabricated in heat-cured acrylic resin. 4-mm holes were drilled in the following tooth positions; 36, 33, 43, 46. Implant analogs were placed in the holes. University of California, Los Angeles, abutment was attached to the implant fixture. Eight strain gauges were attached to the acrylic resin model. Six similar models were made. Implant-supported screw-retained fixed prosthesis was fabricated in nickel-chromium alloy. A load of 400 N was applied on the prosthesis using universal testing machine. Resultant strain was measured in each strain gauge. All the prostheses were sectioned at the area between 36 and 33, 33 and 43, and 43 and 46 using 35 micrometer carborundum disc, and strain was measured in each strain gauge after applying a load of 400 N on the prosthesis. Specimens were joined by arc welding, soldering, and laser welding. After joining, a load of 400 N was applied on each prosthesis and the resultant strain was measured in each strain gauge. Highest mean strain values were recorded before sectioning of the prostheses (889.9 microstrains). Lowest mean strain values were recorded after sectioning the prosthesis and before reuniting it (225.0 microstrains). Sectioning and reuniting the long-span implant prosthesis was found to be a significant factor in influencing the peri-implant strain.

  4. Pre implanted mouse embryos as model for uranium toxicology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundt, Miriam S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The search of 'in vitro' toxicology model that can predict toxicology effects 'in vivo' is a permanent challenge. A toxicology experimental model must to fill to certain requirements: to have a predictive character, an appropriate control to facilitate the interpretation of the data among the experimental groups, and to be able to control the independent variables that can interfere or modify the results that we are analyzing. The preimplantation embryos posses many advantages in this respect: they are a simple model that begins with the development of only one cell. The 'in vitro' model reproduces successfully the 'in vivo' situation. Due to the similarity that exists among the embryos of mammals during this period the model is practically valid for other species. The embryo is itself a stem cell, the toxicology effects are early observed in his clonal development and the physical-chemical parameters are easily controllable. The purpose of the exhibition is to explain the properties of the pre implanted embryo model for toxicology studies of uranium and to show our experimental results. The cultivation 'in vitro' of mouse embryos with uranylo nitrate demonstrated that the uranium causes from the 13 μgU/ml delay of development, decrease the number of cells per embryo and hipoploidy in the embryonic blastomere. (author)

  5. A conceptual knowledge-link model for supporting dental implant process

    OpenAIRE

    Szejka , Anderson Luis; Canciglieri , Osiris ,; Rudek , Marcelo; Panetto , Hervé

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Computer aided techniques widely used as diagnostic and surgical procedures tools are scarcely applied in implantology, which continues using visualization of CT images to define the parameters for dental implant process leaving to the dentist discretion the implant determination, since only the images analysis is non-deterministic. Thus, this research proposes the development of a knowledge-link model integrated to a reasoner system to support dental implant process t...

  6. Artery Soft-Tissue Modelling for Stent Implant Training System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Aloisio

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality technology can be utilised to provide new systematic training methods for surgical procedures. Our aim is to build a simulator that allows medical students to practice the coronary stent implant procedure and avoids exposing patients to risks. The designed simulation system consists of a virtual environment and a haptic interface, in order to provide both the visualization of the coronary arteries and the tactile and force feedback generated during the interactions of the surgical instruments in the virtual environment. Since the arteries are soft tissues, their shape may change during an operation; for this reason physical modelling of the organs is necessary to render their behaviour under the influence of surgeon's instruments. The idea is to define a model that computes the displacement of the tissue versus time; from the displacement it is possible to calculate the response of the tissue to the surgical tool external stimuli. Information about tools displacements and tissue responses are also used to graphically model the artery wall and virtual surgical instrument deformations generated as a consequence of their coming into contact. In order to obtain a realistic simulation, the Finite Element Method has been used to model the soft tissues of the artery, using linear elasticity to reduce computational time and speed up interaction rates.

  7. A contact mechanics model for ankle implants with inclusion of surface roughness effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodaei, M; Farhang, K; Maani, N

    2014-01-01

    Total ankle replacement is recognized as one of the best procedures to treat painful arthritic ankles. Even though this method can relieve patients from pain and reproduce the physiological functions of the ankle, an improper design can cause an excessive amount of metal debris due to wear, causing toxicity in implant recipient. This paper develops a contact model to treat the interaction of tibia and talus implants in an ankle joint. The contact model describes the interaction of implant rough surfaces including both elastic and plastic deformations. In the model, the tibia and the talus surfaces are viewed as macroscopically conforming cylinders or conforming multi-cylinders containing micrometre-scale roughness. The derived equations relate contact force on the implant and the minimum mean surface separation of the rough surfaces. The force is expressed as a statistical integral function of asperity heights over the possible region of interaction of the roughness of the tibia and the talus implant surfaces. A closed-form approximate equation relating contact force and minimum separation is used to obtain energy loss per cycle in a load–unload sequence applied to the implant. In this way implant surface statistics are related to energy loss in the implant that is responsible for internal void formation and subsequent wear and its harmful toxicity to the implant recipient. (paper)

  8. A contact mechanics model for ankle implants with inclusion of surface roughness effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodaei, M.; Farhang, K.; Maani, N.

    2014-02-01

    Total ankle replacement is recognized as one of the best procedures to treat painful arthritic ankles. Even though this method can relieve patients from pain and reproduce the physiological functions of the ankle, an improper design can cause an excessive amount of metal debris due to wear, causing toxicity in implant recipient. This paper develops a contact model to treat the interaction of tibia and talus implants in an ankle joint. The contact model describes the interaction of implant rough surfaces including both elastic and plastic deformations. In the model, the tibia and the talus surfaces are viewed as macroscopically conforming cylinders or conforming multi-cylinders containing micrometre-scale roughness. The derived equations relate contact force on the implant and the minimum mean surface separation of the rough surfaces. The force is expressed as a statistical integral function of asperity heights over the possible region of interaction of the roughness of the tibia and the talus implant surfaces. A closed-form approximate equation relating contact force and minimum separation is used to obtain energy loss per cycle in a load-unload sequence applied to the implant. In this way implant surface statistics are related to energy loss in the implant that is responsible for internal void formation and subsequent wear and its harmful toxicity to the implant recipient.

  9. Effect of premedication with subcutaneous adrenaline on the pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity of equine whole IgG antivenom in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, María; Sánchez, Melvin; Machado, Anderson; Ramírez, Nils; Vargas, Mariángela; Villalta, Mauren; Sánchez, Andrés; Segura, Álvaro; Gómez, Aarón; Solano, Gabriela; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo

    2017-06-01

    Subcutaneous administration of a low dose of adrenaline is used to prevent the early adverse reactions (EARs) induced by snake antivenoms. We used a rabbit model to study the effect of premedication with adrenaline on the potential of antivenoms to exert therapeutic effects and to induce late adverse reactions. We found that premedication with adrenaline did not change the heart rate or blood pressure of normal rabbits, but reduced the rise in temperature in rabbits previously sensitized with antivenom. Pharmacokinetic studies suggest that premedication with adrenaline does not affect the ability of the antivenom to exert the initial control of envenomation nor the susceptibility of rabbits to develop recurrence of antigenemia and envenomation. Our results also indicate that it is unlikely that premedication with adrenaline decreases the incidence of late reactions induced by the antivenom administration, although it reduces the extent of early reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Inappropriate shocks in the subcutaneous ICD: Incidence, predictors and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R. A.; Brouwer, Tom F.; Barr, Craig; Theuns, Dominic A. M. J.; Boersma, Lucas V. A.; Johansen, Jens B.; Neuzil, Petr; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Carter, Nathan; Husby, Michael; Lambiase, Pier D.; Knops, Reinoud E.

    2015-01-01

    The entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) eliminates the need for transvenous leads, and therefore has the potential to improve lead-longevity and reduce lead-related complications. The S-ICD has a morphology-based sensing algorithm of which inappropriate shocks have

  11. Remote programming of cochlear implants: a telecommunications model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElveen, John T; Blackburn, Erin L; Green, J Douglas; McLear, Patrick W; Thimsen, Donald J; Wilson, Blake S

    2010-09-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of remote programming for cochlear implants. Retrospective review of the cochlear implant performance for patients who had undergone mapping and programming of their cochlear implant via remote connection through the Internet. Postoperative Hearing in Noise Test and Consonant/Nucleus/Consonant word scores for 7 patients who had undergone remote mapping and programming of their cochlear implant were compared with the mean scores of 7 patients who had been programmed by the same audiologist over a 12-month period. Times required for remote and direct programming were also compared. The quality of the Internet connection was assessed using standardized measures. Remote programming was performed via a virtual private network with a separate software program used for video and audio linkage. All 7 patients were programmed successfully via remote connectivity. No untoward patient experiences were encountered. No statistically significant differences could be found in comparing postoperative Hearing in Noise Test and Consonant/Nucleus/Consonant word scores for patients who had undergone remote programming versus a similar group of patients who had their cochlear implant programmed directly. Remote programming did not require a significantly longer programming time for the audiologist with these 7 patients. Remote programming of a cochlear implant can be performed safely without any deterioration in the quality of the programming. This ability to remotely program cochlear implant patients gives the potential to extend cochlear implantation to underserved areas in the United States and elsewhere.

  12. Effects of the implant design on peri-implant bone stress and abutment micromovement: three-dimensional finite element analysis of original computer-aided design models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Yasufumi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Imazato, Satoshi; Nakano, Tamaki; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-09-01

    Occlusal overloading causes peri-implant bone resorption. Previous studies examined stress distribution in alveolar bone around commercial implants using three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. However, the commercial implants contained some different designs. The purpose of this study is to reveal the effect of the target design on peri-implant bone stress and abutment micromovement. Six 3D implant models were created for different implant-abutment joints: 1) internal joint model (IM); 2) external joint model (EM); 3) straight abutment (SA) shape; 4) tapered abutment (TA) shapes; 5) platform switching (PS) in the IM; and 6) modified TA neck design (reverse conical neck [RN]). A static load of 100 N was applied to the basal ridge surface of the abutment at a 45-degree oblique angle to the long axis of the implant. Both stress distribution in peri-implant bone and abutment micromovement in the SA and TA models were analyzed. Compressive stress concentrated on labial cortical bone and tensile stress on the palatal side in the EM and on the labial side in the IM. There was no difference in maximum principal stress distribution for SA and TA models. Tensile stress concentration was not apparent on labial cortical bone in the PS model (versus IM). Maximum principal stress concentrated more on peri-implant bone in the RN than in the TA model. The TA model exhibited less abutment micromovement than the SA model. This study reveals the effects of the design of specific components on peri-implant bone stress and abutment displacement after implant-supported single restoration in the anterior maxilla.

  13. Primary stability of a hybrid self-tapping implant compared to a cylindrical non-self-tapping implant with respect to drilling protocols in an ex vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Takeshi; Wagner, Wilfried; Klein, Marcus Oliver; Stender, Elmar; Wieland, Marco; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2011-03-01

    Modifications of implant design have been intending to improve primary stability. However, little is known about investigation of a hybrid self-tapping implant on primary stability. The aims of this study were to evaluate the primary stability of two hybrid self-tapping implants compared to one cylindrical non-self-tapping implant, and to elucidate the relevance of drilling protocols on primary stability in an ex vivo model. Two types of hybrid self-tapping implants (Straumann® Bone Level implant [BL], Straumann® Tapered Effect implant [TE]) and one type of cylindrical non-self-tapping implant (Straumann® Standard Plus implant [SP]) were investigated in the study. In porcine iliac cancellous bones, 10 implants each were inserted either using standard drilling or under-dimensioned drilling protocol. The evaluation of implant-bone interface stability was carried out by records of maximum insertion torque, the Periotest® (Siemens, Bensheim, Germany), the resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and the push-out test. In each drilling group, the maximum insertion torque values of BL and TE were significantly higher than SP (p=.014 and p=.047, respectively). In each group, the Periotest values of TE were significantly lower than SP (p=.036 and p=.033, respectively). The Periotest values of BL and TE were significantly lower in the group of under-dimensioned drilling than standard drilling (p=.002 and p=.02, respectively). In the RFA, no statistical significances were found in implants between two groups and between implants in each group. In each group, the push-out values of BL and TE were significantly higher than SP (p=.006 and p=.049, respectively). Hybrid self-tapping implants could achieve a high primary stability which predicts them for use in low-density bone. However, there is still a debate to clarify the influence of under-dimensioned drilling on primary stability. © 2009, Copyright the Authors. Journal Compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Testosterone replacement alters the cell size in visceral fat but not in subcutaneous fat in hypogonadal aged male rats as a late-onset hypogonadism animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhamed A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Amr Abdelhamed,1,2 Shin-ichi Hisasue,1 Masato Shirai,3 Kazuhito Matsushita,1 Yoshiaki Wakumoto,1 Akira Tsujimura,1 Taiji Tsukamoto,4 Shigeo Horie1 1Department of Urology, Juntendo University, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Andrology, Sohag University, Graduate School of Medicine, Sohag, Egypt; 3Department of Urology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu, Japan; 4Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, Japan Background: Patients with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH benefit from testosterone replacement by improvement in the parameters of the metabolic syndrome, but fat cell morphology in these patients is still unclear. This study aims to determine the effect of testosterone replacement on the morphology of fat cells in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue and on erectile function in hypogonadal aged male rats as a model of LOH. Methods: Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 20–22 months were randomly allocated to two groups, ie, aged male controls (control group, n=5 and aged males treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT group, n=5. Testosterone enanthate 25 mg was injected subcutaneously every 2 weeks for 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the intracavernous pressure (ICP and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP ratio was assessed. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue specimens were collected and analyzed using Image-J software. Results: Body weight at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after TRT was 800.0±35.4 g, 767.5±46.3 g, and 780±40.4 g, respectively (not statistically significant. The ICP/MAP ratio was 0.341±0.015 in the TRT group and 0.274±0.049 in the control group (not statistically significant. The median subcutaneous fat cell size was 4.85×103 (range 0.85–12.53×103 µm2 in the control group and 4.93×103 (range 6.42–19.7×103 µm2 in the TRT group (not statistically significant. In contrast, median visceral fat cell size was significantly

  15. Histologic Assessment of Drug-Eluting Grafts Related to Implantation Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Tille

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug-eluting vascular prostheses represent a new direction in vascular surgery to reduce early thrombosis and late intimal hyperplasia for small calibre grafts. Subcutaneous implantation in rats is a rapid and cost-effective screening model to assess the drug-elution effect and could, to some extent, be useful to forecast results for vascular prostheses. We compared biological and histological responses to scaffolds in different implantation sites. Polycaprolactone (PCL, paclitaxel-loaded PCL (PCL-PTX and dexamethasone-loaded PCL (PCL-DXM electrospun scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously and in an infrarenal abdominal aortic model in rats for up to 12 weeks. At the conclusion of the study, a histological analysis was performed. Cellular graft invasion revealed differences in the progression of cellular infiltration between PCL-PTX and PCL/PCL-DXM groups in both models. Cell infiltration increased over time in the aortic model compared to the subcutaneous model for all groups. Cell counting revealed major differences in fibroblast, macrophage and giant cell graft colonisation in all groups and models over time. Macrophages and giant cells increased in the PCL aortic model; whereas in the subcutaneous model these cell types increased only after three weeks or even decreased in the drug-eluting PCL groups. Other major findings were observed only in the aortic replacement such as extracellular matrix deposition and neo-angiogenesis. The subcutaneous implant model can be used for screening, especially when drug-eluting effects are studied. However, major histological differences were observed in cell type reaction and depth of cell penetration compared to the aortic model. Our results demonstrate that the implantation site is a critical determinant of the biological response.

  16. Antimicrobial and bone-forming activity of a copper coated implant in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Cornelia; Elhensheri, Mohamed; Rychly, Joachim; Neumann, Hans-Georg

    2017-08-01

    Current strategies in implant technology are directed to generate bioactive implants that are capable to activate the regenerative potential of the surrounding tissue. On the other hand, implant-related infections are a common problem in orthopaedic trauma patients. To meet both challenges, i.e. to generate a bone implant with regenerative and antimicrobial characteristics, we tested the use of copper coated nails for surgical fixation in a rabbit model. Copper acetate was galvanically deposited with a copper load of 1 µg/mm 2 onto a porous oxide layer of Ti6Al4V nails, which were used for the fixation of a tibia fracture, inoculated with bacteria. After implantation of the nail the concentration of copper ions did not increase in blood which indicates that copper released from the implant was locally restricted to the fracture site. After four weeks, analyses of the extracted implants revealed a distinct antimicrobial effect of copper, because copper completely prevented both a weak adhesion and firm attachment of biofilm-forming bacteria on the titanium implant. To evaluate fracture healing, radiographic examination demonstrated an increased callus index in animals with copper coated nails. This result indicates a stimulated bone formation by releasing copper ions. We conclude that the use of implants with a defined load of copper ions enables both prevention of bacterial infection and the stimulation of regenerative processes.

  17. Vitamin E Phosphate Coating Stimulates Bone Deposition in Implant-related Infections in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovati, Arianna B; Bottagisio, Marta; Maraldi, Susanna; Violatto, Martina B; Bortolin, Monica; De Vecchi, Elena; Bigini, Paolo; Drago, Lorenzo; Romanò, Carlo L

    2018-06-01

    Implant-related infections are associated with impaired bone healing and osseointegration. In vitro antiadhesive and antibacterial properties and in vivo antiinflammatory effects protecting against bone loss of various formulations of vitamin E have been demonstrated in animal models. However, to the best of our knowledge, no in vivo studies have demonstrated the synergistic activity of vitamin E in preventing bacterial adhesion to orthopaedic implants, thus supporting the bone-implant integration. The purpose of this study was to test whether a vitamin E phosphate coating on titanium implants may be able to reduce (1) the bacterial colonization of prosthetic implants and (2) bone resorption and osteomyelitis in a rat model of Staphylococcus aureus-induced implant-related infection. Twelve rats were bilaterally injected in the femurs with S aureus UAMS-1-Xen40 and implanted with uncoated or vitamin E phosphate-coated titanium Kirschner wires without local or systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. Eight rats represented the uninfected control group. A few hours after surgery, two control and three infected animals died as a result of unexpected complications. With the remaining rats, we assessed the presence of bacterial contamination with qualitative bioluminescence imaging and Gram-positive staining and with quantitative bacterial count. Bone changes in terms of resorption and osteomyelitis were quantitatively analyzed through micro-CT (bone mineral density) and semiquantitatively through histologic scoring systems. Six weeks after implantation, we found only a mild decrease in bacterial count in coated versus uncoated implants (Ti versus controls: mean difference [MD], -3.705; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.416 to -2.994; p E-treated group compared with uncoated implants (knee joint: MD, -11.88; 95% CI, -16.100 to -7.664; p E-coated nails compared with the uncoated nails. These preliminary findings indicate that vitamin E phosphate implant coatings can exert a

  18. Modelling the Effect of Exercise on Insulin Pharmacokinetics in "Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion" Treated Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Juhl, Rune; Schmidt, Signe

    Introduction: The artificial pancreas is believed to ease the burden of constant management of type 1 diabetes for the patients substantially. An important aspect of the artificial pancreas development is the mathematical models used for control, prediction or simulation. A major challenge...... infusion (CSII) treated patients by modelling the absorption rate as a function of exercise. Methods: Three models are estimated from 17 data sequences. All of them are based on a linear three-compartment base model. The models are based on stochastic differential equations to allow noise to enter...... of the measurement variance. Conclusion: A model to predict the insulin appearance in plasma during exercise in CSII treated patients is identified. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm the increase in insulin plasma concentration during exercise in type 1 diabetes patients. These studies should include...

  19. Patterns of subcutaneous fat deposition and the relationship between body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio: implications for models of physical attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Piers L; Toveé, Martin J; Bateson, Melissa

    2009-02-07

    Body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) are two widely used anthropometric indices of body shape argued to convey different information about health and fertility. Both indices have also been shown to affect attractiveness ratings of female bodies. However, BMI and WHR are naturally positively correlated, complicating studies designed to identify their relative importance in predicting health and attractiveness outcomes. We show that the correlation between BMI and WHR depends on the assumed model of subcutaneous fat deposition. An additive model, whereby fat is added to the waist and hips at a constant rate, predicts a correlation between BMI and WHR because with increasing fat, the difference between the waist and hips becomes smaller relative to total width. This model is supported by longitudinal and cross-sectional data. We parameterized the function relating WHR to BMI for white UK females of reproductive age, and used this function to statistically decompose body shape into two independent components. We show that judgements of the attractiveness of female bodies are well explained by the component of curvaceousness related to BMI but not by residual curvaceousness. Our findings resolve a long-standing dispute in the attractiveness literature by confirming that although WHR appears to be an important predictor of attractiveness, this is largely explained by the direct effect of total body fat on WHR, thus reinforcing the conclusion that total body fat is the primary determinant of female body shape attractiveness.

  20. Modelling the glucose-insulin-glucagon dynamics after subcutaneous administration of native glucagon and a novel glucagon analogue in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Boye Knudsen, Carsten; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    Zealand Pharma has invented a glucagon analogue, ZP-GA-1, with increased stability in liquid formulation for treatment of hypoglycemia. A pharmacodynamic (PD) model is needed to compare ZP-GA-1 with marketed glucagon. We aim to develop a model of the complex glucose-insulin-glucagon dynamics based...... on physiology and data....

  1. Subcutaneous adipose tissue classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sbarbati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The developments in the technologies based on the use of autologous adipose tissue attracted attention to minor depots as possible sampling areas. Some of those depots have never been studied in detail. The present study was performed on subcutaneous adipose depots sampled in different areas with the aim of explaining their morphology, particularly as far as regards stem niches. The results demonstrated that three different types of white adipose tissue (WAT can be differentiated on the basis of structural and ultrastructural features: deposit WAT (dWAT, structural WAT (sWAT and fibrous WAT (fWAT. dWAT can be found essentially in large fatty depots in the abdominal area (periumbilical. In the dWAT, cells are tightly packed and linked by a weak net of isolated collagen fibers. Collagenic components are very poor, cells are large and few blood vessels are present. The deep portion appears more fibrous then the superficial one. The microcirculation is formed by thin walled capillaries with rare stem niches. Reinforcement pericyte elements are rarely evident. The sWAT is more stromal; it is located in some areas in the limbs and in the hips. The stroma is fairly well represented, with a good vascularity and adequate staminality. Cells are wrapped by a basket of collagen fibers. The fatty depots of the knees and of the trochanteric areas have quite loose meshes. The fWAT has a noteworthy fibrous component and can be found in areas where a severe mechanic stress occurs. Adipocytes have an individual thick fibrous shell. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates evident differences among subcutaneous WAT deposits, thus suggesting that in regenerative procedures based on autologous adipose tissues the sampling area should not be randomly chosen, but it should be oriented by evidence based evaluations. The structural peculiarities of the sWAT, and particularly of its microcirculation, suggest that it could represent a privileged source for

  2. The effects of implant surface roughness and surgical technique on implant fixation in an in vitro model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shalabi, M.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between implant surface parameters, surgical approach and initial implant fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty tapered, conical, screw-shaped implants with machined or etched surface topography were implanted into the

  3. Sex differences in the outcomes of stent implantation in mini-swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunio, Mie; Wong, Gee; Markham, Peter M; Edelman, Elazer R

    2018-01-01

    Sex-related differences have been noted in cardiovascular anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment responses, yet we continued to drive evaluation of vascular device development in animal models without consideration of animal sex. We aimed to understand sex-related differences in the vascular responses to stent implantation by analyzing the pooled data of endovascular interventions in 164 Yucatan mini-swine (87 female, 77 male). Bare metal stents (BMS) or drug-eluting stents (DES) were implanted in 212 coronary arteries (63 single BMS implantation, 68 single DES implantation, 33 overlapped BMS implantation, and 48 overlapped DES implantation). Histomorphological parameters were evaluated from vascular specimens at 3-365 days after stent implantation and evaluated values were compared between female and male groups. While neointima formation at all times after implantation was invariant to sex, statistically significant differences between female and male groups were observed in injury, inflammation, adventitial fibrosis, and neointimal fibrin deposition. These differences were observed independently, i.e., for different procedure types and at different follow-up timings. Only subtle temporal sex-related differences were observed in extent and timing of resolution of inflammation and fibrin clearance. These subtle sex-related differences may be increasingly important as interventional devices meld novel materials that erode and innovations in drug delivery. Erodible materials may act differently if inflammation has a different temporal sequence with sex, and drug distribution after balloon or stent delivery might be different if the fibrin clearance speaks to different modes of pharmacokinetics in male and female swine.

  4. Unsupervised Assessment of Subcutaneous and Visceral Fat by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Larsen, Rasmus; Wraae, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a. method for unsupervised assessment of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue in the abdominal region by MRI. The identification of the subcutaneous and the visceral regions were achieved by dynamic programming constrained by points acquired from an active shape model...

  5. stausartikel: behandling af subcutane abscesser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardgrib, Nina; Petersen, Klaus Kjær

    2017-01-01

    Simple subcutaneous abscesses are common, and we have examined the literature concerning the ideal treatment of subcutaneous abscesses. We recommend radical debridement with removal of all pus, the abscess wall and any necrosis. If primary suture is chosen, preoperative antibiotics should be admi...

  6. Model of the Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Dynamics after Subcutaneous Administration of a Glucagon Rescue Bolus in Healthy Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Haidar, Ahmad; Bysted, Britta V.; Knudsen, Carsten B.; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, insulin and glucagon work in a complex fashion to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. This regulation is distorted in patients with diabetes. The hepatic glucose response due to an elevated glucagon level depends on the current insulin concentration and thus endogenous glucose production (EGP) can not be modelled without knowledge of the concentration of both hormones in plasma. Furthermore, literature suggests an upper limit to EGP irrespective of glu...

  7. Modeling of electrodes and implantable pulse generator cases for the analysis of implant tip heating under MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acikel, Volkan; Atalar, Ergin; Uslubas, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors’ purpose is to model the case of an implantable pulse generator (IPG) and the electrode of an active implantable medical device using lumped circuit elements in order to analyze their effect on radio frequency induced tissue heating problem during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Methods: In this study, IPG case and electrode are modeled with a voltage source and impedance. Values of these parameters are found using the modified transmission line method (MoTLiM) and the method of moments (MoM) simulations. Once the parameter values of an electrode/IPG case model are determined, they can be connected to any lead, and tip heating can be analyzed. To validate these models, both MoM simulations and MR experiments were used. The induced currents on the leads with the IPG case or electrode connections were solved using the proposed models and the MoTLiM. These results were compared with the MoM simulations. In addition, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor. The dissipated power on the electrode was calculated using the MoTLiM by changing the inductance and the results were compared with the specific absorption rate results that were obtained using MoM. Then, MRI experiments were conducted to test the IPG case and the electrode models. To test the IPG case, a bare lead was connected to the case and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the lead was measured by changing the lead length. The power at the lead tip for the same scenario was also calculated using the IPG case model and MoTLiM. Then, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the electrode was measured by changing the inductance and compared with the dissipated power on the electrode resistance. Results: The induced currents on leads with the IPG case or electrode connection were solved for using the combination of the MoTLiM and

  8. EFFICACY EVALUATION OF A MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY AGAINST THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTORS RECEPTOR IN THE MODEL OF SUBCUTANEOUS XENOGRAFT IN IMMUNODEFICIENT MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. Yu. Ustyugov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the comparative antitumor efficacy study of two test articles of therapeutic humanized monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR manufactured by Russian biopharmaceutical company CJSC “Biocad” and the commercial drug “Erbitux®” (Merck, Germany in subcutaneous xenografts model using human epidermoid carcinoma A431NS cell line. EGFR overexpression in epithelial tumor cells is a commonly known fact that determines use of this receptor as a target for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. The basic mechanism of action of such drugs is blocking of epithelial cells proliferation through competitive binding to EGFR. Evaluation of tumor growth dynamics in immunodeficient (Nu/Nu mice was performed during in vivo experiment using two parameters: tumor growth index and tumor growth inhibition (TGI, %. The results received with used study design show that antitumor effects of the test articles manufactured by CJSC “Biocad” and the commercial comparator drug “Erbitux®” estimated by values of TGI and tumor growth index are comparable.

  9. Biological response to titanium implants coated with nanocrystals calcium phosphate or type 1 collagen in a dog model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alghamdi, H.S.A.; Oirschot, B.A. van; Bosco, R.; Beucken, J.J. van den; Aldosari, A.A.; Anil, S.; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to evaluate the osteogenic potential of electrosprayed organic and non-organic surface coatings in a gap-implant model over 4 and 12 weeks of implantation into the dog mandible. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen Beagle dogs received experimental titanium implants in

  10. [Principles of bone tissue structures interaction with full removable dentures fixed on intraosseous implantates modelling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashmurina, V R; Chumachenko, E N; Olesova, V N; Volozhin, A I

    2008-01-01

    Math modelling "removable dentures-implantate-bone" with size and density of bone tissue as variables was created. It allowed to study biomechanical bases of mandibular bone tissue structures interaction with full removable dentures of different constructions and fixed on intraosseous implantates. Analysis of the received data showed that in the majority of cases it was expedient to recommend 3 bearing (abutments) system of denture making. Rest on 4 and more implantates was appropriate for patients with reduced density of spongy bone and significant mandibular bone atrophy. 2 abutment system can be used in patients with high density of spongy bone and absence of mandibular bone atrophy.

  11. A one-dimensional collisional model for plasma-immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahedi, V.; Lieberman, M.A.; Alves, M.V.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma-immersion ion implantation (also known as plasma-source ion implantation) is a process in which a target is immersed in a plasma and a series of large negative-voltage pulses are applied to it to extract ions from the plasma and implant them into the target. A general one-dimensional model is developed to study this process in different coordinate systems for the case in which the pressure of the neutral gas is large enough that the ion motion in the sheath can be assumed to be highly collisional

  12. The effect of melatonin implants administered from December until ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2016-06-28

    Jun 28, 2016 ... implantation had no effect on the growth rate of cashmere, except from ... The treated goats received subcutaneous melatonin implants (Beijing Kangtai Biological Technology .... 2 Litter size = mean number of kids per birth.

  13. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    KAUST Repository

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan

    2012-07-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O(2)) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O(2)-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O(2) pressure (pO(2)) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO(2) to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases.

  14. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    KAUST Repository

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan; Moldovan, Nicanor I.; Byrne, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O(2)) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O(2)-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O(2) pressure (pO(2)) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO(2) to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases.

  15. Modeling Stem/Progenitor Cell-Induced Neovascularization and Oxygenation Around Solid Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Nicanor I.; Byrne, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering constructs and other solid implants with biomedical applications, such as drug delivery devices or bioartificial organs, need oxygen (O2) to function properly. To understand better the vascular integration of such devices, we recently developed a novel model sensor containing O2-sensitive crystals, consisting of a polymeric capsule limited by a nanoporous filter. The sensor was implanted in mice with hydrogel alone (control) or hydrogel embedded with mouse CD117/c-kit+ bone marrow progenitor cells in order to stimulate peri-implant neovascularization. The sensor provided local partial O2 pressure (pO2) using noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance signal measurements. A consistently higher level of peri-implant oxygenation was observed in the cell-treatment case than in the control over a 10-week period. To provide a mechanistic explanation of these experimental observations, we present in this article a mathematical model, formulated as a system of coupled partial differential equations, that simulates peri-implant vascularization. In the control case, vascularization is considered to be the result of a foreign body reaction, while in the cell-treatment case, adipogenesis in response to paracrine stimuli produced by the stem cells is assumed to induce neovascularization. The model is validated by fitting numerical predictions of local pO2 to measurements from the implanted sensor. The model is then used to investigate further the potential for using stem cell treatment to enhance the vascular integration of biomedical implants. We thus demonstrate how mathematical modeling combined with experimentation can be used to infer how vasculature develops around biomedical implants in control and stem cell-treated cases. PMID:22224628

  16. Comparison of experimental target currents with analytical model results for plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    En, W.G.; Lieberman, M.A.; Cheung, N.W.

    1995-01-01

    Ion implantation is a standard fabrication technique used in semiconductor manufacturing. Implantation has also been used to modify the surface properties of materials to improve their resistance to wear, corrosion and fatigue. However, conventional ion implanters require complex optics to scan a narrow ion beam across the target to achieve implantation uniformity. An alternative implantation technique, called Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII), immerses the target into a plasma. The ions are extracted from the plasma directly and accelerated by applying negative high-voltage pulses to the target. An analytical model of the voltage and current characteristics of a remote plasma is presented. The model simulates the ion, electron and secondary electron currents induced before, during and after a high voltage negative pulse is applied to a target immersed in a plasma. The model also includes analytical relations that describe the sheath expansion and collapse due to negative high voltage pulses. The sheath collapse is found to be important for high repetition rate pulses. Good correlation is shown between the model and experiment for a wide variety of voltage pulses and plasma conditions

  17. [3D printing personalized implant manufactured via fused deposition modeling: an accuracy research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liu, Gang; Liu, Bin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of personalized implant fabricated via 3D printing and fused deposition modeling technique (FDM) and to compare the results with a real tooth. Six prepared extracted orthodontic teeth (in vivo) were scanned via cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to obtain 3D data and to build the data models by using Mimics 15.0 software. The extracted orthodontic teeth (in vitro) and the personalized implants designed via 3D printing and FDM were scanned via CBCT to obtain data and to build the data models at the same parameters. The 3D deviations were compared among the in vivo teeth data models, in vitro teeth data models, and printing personalized implant data models by using the Geomagic studio software. The average deviations of high and low areas between date models of in vivo teeth and personalized implants were 0.19 mm and -0.16 mm, respectively, and the average deviations between in vitro and in vivo teeth were 0.14 mm and -0.07 mm, respectively. The independent t test showed that no statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups (P>0.05). 1) The personalized dental implants were manufactured via 3D printing and FDM with a high degree of precision. 2) Errors between the data models of in vitro and in vivo teeth were observed at the same CBCT parameters.

  18. Diabetic mouse model of orthopaedic implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovati, Arianna B; Drago, Lorenzo; Monti, Lorenzo; De Vecchi, Elena; Previdi, Sara; Banfi, Giuseppe; Romanò, Carlo L

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic bacterial infections represent one of the most challenging orthopaedic complications that often require implant removal and surgical debridement and carry high social and economical costs. Diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors of implant-related infection and its clinical occurrence is growing worldwide. The aim of the present study was to test a model of implant-related infection in the diabetic mouse, with a view to allow further investigation on the relative efficacy of prevention and treatment options in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. A cohort of diabetic NOD/ShiLtJ mice was compared with non-diabetic CD1 mice as an in vivo model of S. aureus orthopaedic infection of bone and soft tissues after femur intramedullary pin implantation. We tested control and infected groups with 1×10(3) colony-forming units of S. aureus ATCC 25923 strain injected in the implant site. At 4 weeks post-inoculation, host response to infection, microbial biofilm formation, and bone damage were assessed by traditional diagnostic parameters (bacterial culture, C-reactive protein and white blood cell count), histological analysis and imaging techniques (micro computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy). Unlike the controls and the CD1 mice, all the diabetic mice challenged with a single inoculum of S. aureus displayed severe osteomyelitic changes around the implant. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the diabetic mouse can be successfully used in a model of orthopaedic implant-related infection. Furthermore, the same bacteria inoculum induced periprosthetic infection in all the diabetic mice but not in the controls. This animal model of implant-related infection in diabetes may be a useful tool to test in vivo treatments in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals.

  19. Diabetic mouse model of orthopaedic implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna B Lovati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic bacterial infections represent one of the most challenging orthopaedic complications that often require implant removal and surgical debridement and carry high social and economical costs. Diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors of implant-related infection and its clinical occurrence is growing worldwide. The aim of the present study was to test a model of implant-related infection in the diabetic mouse, with a view to allow further investigation on the relative efficacy of prevention and treatment options in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. METHODOLOGY: A cohort of diabetic NOD/ShiLtJ mice was compared with non-diabetic CD1 mice as an in vivo model of S. aureus orthopaedic infection of bone and soft tissues after femur intramedullary pin implantation. We tested control and infected groups with 1×10(3 colony-forming units of S. aureus ATCC 25923 strain injected in the implant site. At 4 weeks post-inoculation, host response to infection, microbial biofilm formation, and bone damage were assessed by traditional diagnostic parameters (bacterial culture, C-reactive protein and white blood cell count, histological analysis and imaging techniques (micro computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Unlike the controls and the CD1 mice, all the diabetic mice challenged with a single inoculum of S. aureus displayed severe osteomyelitic changes around the implant. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the diabetic mouse can be successfully used in a model of orthopaedic implant-related infection. Furthermore, the same bacteria inoculum induced periprosthetic infection in all the diabetic mice but not in the controls. This animal model of implant-related infection in diabetes may be a useful tool to test in vivo treatments in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals.

  20. A new computationally-efficient two-dimensional model for boron implantation into single-crystal silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, K.M.; Park, C.; Yang, S.; Morris, S.; Do, V.; Tasch, F.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a new computationally-efficient two-dimensional model for boron implantation into single-crystal silicon. This paper reports that this new model is based on the dual Pearson semi-empirical implant depth profile model and the UT-MARLOWE Monte Carlo boron ion implantation model. This new model can predict with very high computational efficiency two-dimensional as-implanted boron profiles as a function of energy, dose, tilt angle, rotation angle, masking edge orientation, and masking edge thickness

  1. A novel knee prosthesis model of implant-related osteo- myelitis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Niels H.; Jensen, Nina Vendel; Nürnberg, Birgit Meinecke

    2012-01-01

    There have been numerous reports of animal models of osteomyelitis. Very few of these have been prosthesis models that imitate human conditions. We have developed a new rat model of implant-related osteomyelitis that mimics human osteomyelitis, to investigate the pathology of infection after...

  2. A detailed physical model for ion implant induced damage in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, S.; Morris, M.F.; Morris, S.J.; Obradovic, B.; Wang, G.; Tasch, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    A unified physically based ion implantation damage model has been developed which successfully predicts both the impurity profiles and the damage profiles for a wide range of implant conditions for arsenic, phosphorus, BF 2 , and boron implants into single-crystal silicon. In addition, the amorphous layer thicknesses predicted by this new damage model are also in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. This damage model is based on the physics of point defects in silicon, and explicitly simulates the defect production, diffusion, and their interactions which include interstitial-vacancy recombination, clustering of same type of defects, defect-impurity complex formation, emission of mobile defects from clusters, and surface effects for the first time. New computationally efficient algorithms have been developed to overcome the barrier of the excessive computational requirements. In addition, the new model has been incorporated in the UT-MARLOWE ion implantation simulator, and has been developed primarily for use in engineering workstations. This damage model is the most physical model in the literature to date within the framework of the binary collision approximation (BCA), and provides the required, accurate as-implanted impurity profiles and damage profiles for transient enhanced diffusion (TED) simulation

  3. In vivo characterisation of the inflammatory reaction following mesh implantation in transgenic mice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fet, N; Alizai, P H; Fragoulis, A; Wruck, C; Pufe, T; Tolba, R H; Neumann, U P; Klinge, U

    2014-06-01

    Hernia repair with prosthetic meshes represents one of the most common surgical procedures in the field of surgery. This intervention is always associated with an ensuing inflammatory response, angiogenesis and fibrotic encapsulation forming a foreign body granuloma (FBG) around the mesh fibres. Several studies have described this inflammatory reaction by characterising inflammatory cell infiltrate around the FBG after mesh explantation. However, very little is known about the real-time progression of such an inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of monitoring the ongoing inflammatory response to mesh implantation using bioluminescence in vivo. Three luciferase transgenic mice strains (FVB/N-Tg(Vegfr2-luc)-Xen, BALB/C-Tg(NFκB-RE-luc)-Xen and Tg(INS/EpRE-Luc)T20Rbl) were used. Mice were anaesthetized with 2 % isoflurane, and two incisions were made on the left and right sides of the abdomen of the mice. A 1-cm(2) propylene mesh was implanted subcutaneously in the right incision wound of each mouse, and the left wound served as control. Two hundred microliters of D-luciferin was injected into the mice, and bioluminescence measurements were done prior to the surgical intervention and subsequently every 3 days. After mesh explantation, histological analysis was done. Statistical analysis was done using prism GraphPad software. Bioluminescence results revealed different time points of maximum signal for the different mice strains. VEGFR2 gene expression peaked on day 6, NFkB on day 12 and ARE on day 3 post mesh implantation. We also observed much higher bioluminescent signal around the FBG surrounding the mesh as compared to the control wound, with p response over a given period of time.

  4. The development of a composite bone model for training on placement of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhodary, Mohamed Ahmed; Abdelraheim, Abdelraheim Emad Eldin; Elsantawy, Abd Elaleem Hassan; Al Dahman, Yousef Hamad; Al-Mershed, Mohammed

    2015-04-01

    It takes a lot of training on patients for both undergraduate to develop clinical sense as regards to the placement of dental implants in the jaw bones, also, the models provided by the dental implant companies for training are usually made of strengthened synthetic foams, which are far from the composition, and tactile sense provided by natural bone during drilling for clinical placement of dental implants. This is an in-vitro experimental study which utilized bovine femur bone, where the shaft of the femur provided the surface compact layer, and the head provided the cancellous bone layer, to provide a training model similar to jaw bones macroscopic anatomy. Both the compact and cancellous bone samples were characterized using mechanical compressive testing. The elastic moduli of the cancellous and cortical femur bone were comparable to those of the human mandible, and the prepared training model provided a more lifelike condition during the drilling and placement of dental implants. The composite bone model developed simulated the macroscopic anatomy of the jaw bones having a surface layer of compact bone, and a core of cancellous bone, and provided a better and a more natural hands-on experience for placement of dental implants as compared to plastic models made of polyurethane.

  5. Susceptibility of metallic magnesium implants to bacterial biofilm infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Rohde, Manfred; Rais, Bushra; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Mueller, Peter P

    2016-06-01

    Magnesium alloys have promising mechanical and biological properties as biodegradable medical implant materials for temporary applications during bone healing or as vascular stents. Whereas conventional implants are prone to colonization by treatment resistant microbial biofilms in which bacteria are embedded in a protective matrix, magnesium alloys have been reported to act antibacterial in vitro. To permit a basic assessment of antibacterial properties of implant materials in vivo an economic but robust animal model was established. Subcutaneous magnesium implants were inoculated with bacteria in a mouse model. Contrary to the expectations, bacterial activity was enhanced and prolonged in the presence of magnesium implants. Systemic antibiotic treatments were remarkably ineffective, which is a typical property of bacterial biofilms. Biofilm formation was further supported by electron microscopic analyses that revealed highly dense bacterial populations and evidence for the presence of extracellular matrix material. Bacterial agglomerates could be detected not only on the implant surface but also at a limited distance in the peri-implant tissue. Therefore, precautions may be necessary to minimize risks of metallic magnesium-containing implants in prospective clinical applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1489-1499, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Subcutaneous and intrahepatic growth of human hepatoblastoma in immunodeficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnater, J. Marco; Bruder, Elisabeth; Bertschin, Sibylle; Woodtli, Thomas; de Theije, Chiel; Pietsch, Torsten; Aronson, Daniel C.; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Lamers, Wouter H.; Köhler, Eleonore S.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Hepatoblastoma is the most frequent malignant pediatric liver tumor. Approximately 25% of hepatoblastoma patients cannot be cured with current treatment protocols. Additional treatment options must, therefore, be developed. Subcutaneous animal models for hepatoblastoma exist, but a

  7. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare: radiologic appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kransdorf, M.J.; Murphey, M.D.; Temple, H.T.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. Granuloma annulare is an uncommon benign inflammatory dermatosis characterized by the formation of dermal papules with a tendency to form rings. There are several clinically distinct forms. The subcutaneous form is the most frequently encountered by radiologists, with the lesion presenting as a superficial mass. There are only a few scattered reports of the imaging appearance of this entity in the literature. We report the radiologic appearance of five cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. Design and patients. The radiologic images of five patients (three male, two female) with subcutaneous granuloma annulare were retrospectively studied. Mean patient age was 6.4 years (range, 2-13 years). The lesions occurred in the lower leg (two), foot, forearm, and hand. MR images were available for all lesions, gadolinium-enhanced imaging in three cases, radiographs in four, and bone scintigraphy in one. Results. Radiographs showed unmineralized nodular masses localized to the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The size range, in greatest dimension on imaging studies, was 1-4 cm. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with variable but generally relatively well defined margins. There was extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Conclusion. The radiologic appearance of subcutaneous granuloma annulare is characteristic, typically demonstrating a nodular soft-tissue mass involving the subcutaneous adipose tissue. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences and variable but generally well defined margins. There is extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Radiographs show a soft-tissue mass or soft-tissue swelling without evidence of bone involvement or mineralization. This radiologic appearance in a young individual is highly suggestive of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. (orig.)

  8. A study on the resistance at bone-implant interface during implant insertion in a cadaver goat jaw model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutam Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study is to determine the resistance at bone-implant interface during insertion of dental implant. Materials and Methods: Freshly procured cadaver goat mandibles were collected from slaughterhouses. Four dental implants of two different diameters were inserted into osteotomized sites of the goat mandibles. The gradual changes in resonance frequency (RF were recorded in RF analyzer for the five consecutive turns of implant insertion. Results and Observations: RF was found to be positively correlated with diameter of dental implants. Conclusion: RF analysis can be used to determine the type of resistance the implant faces during insertion and the kind of bone density through which it passes. It gives a forecast of expected initial stability.

  9. A model for calculating EM field in layered medium with application to biological implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi-Reyhani, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Modern wireless telecommunication devices (GSM Mobile system) (cellular telephones and wireless modems on laptop computers) have the potential to interfere with implantable medical devices/prostheses and cause possible malfunction. An implant of resonant dimensions within a homogeneous dielectric lossy sphere can enhance local values of SAR (the specific absorption rate). Also antenna radiation pattern and other characteristics are significantly altered by the presence of the composite dielectric entities such as the human body. Besides, the current safety limits do not take into account the possible effect of hot spots arising from metallic implants resonant at mobile phone frequencies. Although considerable attention has been given to study and measurement of scattering from a dielectric sphere, no rigorous treatment using electromagnetic theory has been given to the implanted dielectric spherical head/cylindrical body. This thesis aims to deal with the scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave from a perfectly conducting or dielectric spherical/cylindrical implant of electrically small radius (of resonant length), embedded eccentrically into a dielectric spherical head model. The method of dyadic Green's function (DGF) for spherical vector wave functions is used. Analytical expressions for the scattered fields of both cylindrical and spherical implants as well as layered spherical head and cylindrical torso models are obtained separately in different chapters. The whole structure is assumed to be uniform along the propagation direction. To further check the accuracy of the proposed solution, the numerical results from the analytical expressions computed for the problem of implanted head/body are compared with the numerical results from the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method using the EMU-FDTD Electromagnetic simulator. Good agreement is observed between the numerical results based on the proposed method and the FDTD numerical technique. This research

  10. A speech processing study using an acoustic model of a multiple-channel cochlear implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying

    1998-10-01

    A cochlear implant is an electronic device designed to provide sound information for adults and children who have bilateral profound hearing loss. The task of representing speech signals as electrical stimuli is central to the design and performance of cochlear implants. Studies have shown that the current speech- processing strategies provide significant benefits to cochlear implant users. However, the evaluation and development of speech-processing strategies have been complicated by hardware limitations and large variability in user performance. To alleviate these problems, an acoustic model of a cochlear implant with the SPEAK strategy is implemented in this study, in which a set of acoustic stimuli whose psychophysical characteristics are as close as possible to those produced by a cochlear implant are presented on normal-hearing subjects. To test the effectiveness and feasibility of this acoustic model, a psychophysical experiment was conducted to match the performance of a normal-hearing listener using model- processed signals to that of a cochlear implant user. Good agreement was found between an implanted patient and an age-matched normal-hearing subject in a dynamic signal discrimination experiment, indicating that this acoustic model is a reasonably good approximation of a cochlear implant with the SPEAK strategy. The acoustic model was then used to examine the potential of the SPEAK strategy in terms of its temporal and frequency encoding of speech. It was hypothesized that better temporal and frequency encoding of speech can be accomplished by higher stimulation rates and a larger number of activated channels. Vowel and consonant recognition tests were conducted on normal-hearing subjects using speech tokens processed by the acoustic model, with different combinations of stimulation rate and number of activated channels. The results showed that vowel recognition was best at 600 pps and 8 activated channels, but further increases in stimulation rate and

  11. A wide-field suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis is stable and well tolerated following chronic implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Joel; Nayagam, David A X; Allen, Penelope J; McKelvie, Penelope; Luu, Chi D; Ayton, Lauren N; Freemantle, Alexia L; McPhedran, Michelle; Basa, Meri; McGowan, Ceara C; Shepherd, Robert K; Williams, Chris E

    2013-05-01

    The safety of chronic implantation of a retinal prosthesis in the suprachoroidal space has not been established. This study aimed to determine the safety of a wide-field suprachoroidal electrode array following chronic implantation using histopathologic techniques and electroretinography. A platinum electrode array in a wide silicone substrate was implanted unilaterally in the suprachoroidal space in adult cats (n = 7). The lead and connector were tunneled out of the orbit and positioned subcutaneously. Postsurgical recovery was assessed using fundus photography and electroretinography (ERG). Following 3 months of passive implantation, the animals were terminated and the eyes assessed for the pathologic response to implantation. The implant was mechanically stable in the suprachoroidal space during the course of the study. The implanted eye showed a transient increase in ERG response amplitude at 2 weeks, which returned to normal by 3 months. Pigmentary changes were observed at the distal end of the implant, near the optic disc. Histopathologic assessment revealed a largely intact retina and a thin fibrous capsule around the suprachoroidal implant cavity. The foreign body response was minimal, with sporadic presence of macrophages and no active inflammation. All implanted eyes were negative for bacterial or fungal infections. A midgrade granuloma and thick fibrous buildup surrounded the extraocular cable. Scleral closure was maintained in six of seven eyes. There were no staphylomas or choroidal incarceration. A wide-field retinal prosthesis was stable and well tolerated during long-term suprachoroidal implantation in a cat model. The surgical approach was reproducible and overall safe.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of an equine fracture model containing stainless steel metal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pownder, S L; Koff, M F; Shah, P H; Fortier, L A; Potter, H G

    2016-05-01

    Post operative imaging in subjects with orthopaedic implants is challenging across all modalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is preferred to assess human post operative musculoskeletal complications, as soft tissue and bones are evaluated without using ionising radiation. However, with conventional MRI pulse sequences, metal creates susceptibility artefact that distorts anatomy. Assessment of the post operative equine patient is arguably more challenging due to the volume of metal present, and MRI is often not performed in horses with implants. Novel pulse sequences such as multiacquisition variable resonance image combination (MAVRIC) now provide improved visibility in the vicinity of surgical-grade implants and offer an option for imaging horses with metal implants. To compare conspicuity of regional anatomy in an equine fracture-repair model using MAVRIC, narrow receiver bandwidth (NBW) fast spin echo (FSE), and wide receiver bandwidth (WBW) FSE sequences. Nonrandomised in vitro experiment. MAVRIC, NBW FSE and WBW FSE were performed on 9 cadaveric distal limbs with fractures and stainless steel implants in the third metacarpal bone and proximal phalanx. Objective measures of artefact reduction were performed by calculating the total artefact area in each transverse image as a percentage of the total anatomic area. The number of transverse images in which fracture lines were visible was tabulated for each sequence. Regional soft tissue conspicuity was assessed subjectively. Overall anatomic delineation was improved using MAVRIC compared with NBW FSE; delineation of structures closest to the metal implants was improved using MAVRIC compared with WBW FSE and NBW FSE. Total artefact area was the highest for NBW FSE and lowest for MAVRIC; the total number of transverse slices with a visible fracture line was highest in MAVRIC and lowest in NBW FSE. MAVRIC and WBW FSE are feasible additions to minimise artefact around implants. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  13. [Cellular subcutaneous tissue. Anatomic observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart-Elbaz, C; Varnaison, E; Sick, H; Grosshans, E; Cribier, B

    2001-11-01

    We showed in a companion paper that the definition of the French "subcutaneous cellular tissue" considerably varied from the 18th to the end of the 20th centuries and has not yet reached a consensus. To address the anatomic reality of this "subcutaneous cellular tissue", we investigated the anatomic structures underlying the fat tissue in normal human skin. Sixty specimens were excised from the surface to the deep structures (bone, muscle, cartilage) on different body sites of 3 cadavers from the Institut d'Anatomie Normale de Strasbourg. Samples were paraffin-embedded, stained and analysed with a binocular microscope taking x 1 photographs. Specimens were also excised and fixed after subcutaneous injection of Indian ink, after mechanic tissue splitting and after performing artificial skin folds. The aspects of the deep parts of the skin greatly varied according to their anatomic localisation. Below the adipose tissue, we often found a lamellar fibrous layer which extended from the interlobular septa and contained horizontally distributed fat cells. No specific tissue below the hypodermis was observed. Artificial skin folds concerned either exclusively the dermis, when they were superficial or included the hypodermis, but no specific structure was apparent in the center of the fold. India ink diffused to the adipose tissue, mainly along the septa, but did not localise in a specific subcutaneous compartment. This study shows that the histologic aspects of the deep part of the skin depend mainly on the anatomic localisation. Skin is composed of epidermis, dermis and hypodermis and thus the hypodermis can not be considered as being "subcutaneous". A difficult to individualise, fibrous lamellar structure in continuity with the interlobular septa is often found under the fat lobules. This structure is a cleavage line, as is always the case with loose connective tissues, but belongs to the hypodermis (i.e. fat tissue). No specific tissue nor any virtual space was

  14. A CMOS self-powered front-end architecture for subcutaneous event-detector devices

    CERN Document Server

    Colomer-Farrarons, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    A CMOS Self-Powered Front-End Architecture for Subcutaneous Event-Detector Devices presents the conception and prototype realization of a Self-Powered architecture for subcutaneous detector devices. The architecture is designed to work as a true/false (event detector) or threshold level alarm of some substances, ions, etc. that are detected through a three-electrodes amperometric BioSensor approach. The device is conceived as a Low-Power subcutaneous implantable application powered by an inductive link, one emitter antenna at the external side of the skin and the receiver antenna under the ski

  15. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)]. E-mail: jesus.hernandez.mangas@tel.uva.es; Arias, J. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Marques, L.A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Ruiz-Bueno, A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Bailon, L. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results.

  16. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Arias, J.; Marques, L.A.; Ruiz-Bueno, A.; Bailon, L.

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results

  17. Penile Subcutaneous Fibrolipoma Postaugmentative Phalloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizio Vicini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrolipomas are a rare subtype of lipomas. We describe a case of a man suffering from subcutaneous penile fibrolipoma, who three months earlier has been submitted to an augmentative phalloplasty due to aesthetic dysmorphophobia. After six months from the excision of the mass, the penile elongation and penile enlargement were stable, and the patient was satisfied with his sexual intercourse and sexual life. To our knowledge, this is the first reported penile subcutaneous fibrolipoma case in the literature. The diagnostics and surgical features of this case are discussed.

  18. Tumor hypoxia - A confounding or exploitable factor in interstitial brachytherapy? Effects of tissue trauma in an experimental rat tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, AP; van Geel, CAJF; van Hooije, CMC; van der Kleij, AJ; Visser, AG

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential effects of tumor hypoxia induced by afterloading catheter implantation on the effectiveness of brachytherapy in a rat tumor model. Methods and Materials: Afterloading catheters (4) Here implanted in subcutaneously growing R1M rhabdomyosarcoma in female Wag/Rij

  19. Hearing loss patterns after cochlear implantation via the round window in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Joseph; Hod, Roy; Raveh, Eyal; Mizrachi, Aviram; Avraham, Karen B; Lenz, Danielle R; Nageris, Ben I

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and the type of hearing loss induced by cochlear implants are mostly unknown. Therefore, this study evaluated the impact and type of hearing loss induced by each stage of cochlear implantation surgery in an animal model. Original basic research animal study. The study was conducted in a tertiary, university-affiliated medical center in accordance with the guidelines of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Cochlear implant electrode array was inserted via the round window membrane in 17 ears of 9 adult-size fat sand rats. In 7 ears of 5 additional animals round window incision only was performed, followed by patching with a small piece of periosteum (control). Hearing thresholds to air (AC) and bone conduction (BC), clicks, 1 kHz and 6 kHz tone bursts were measured by auditory brainstem evoked potential, before, during each stage of surgery and one week post-operatively. In addition, inner ear histology was performed. The degree of hearing loss increased significantly from baseline throughout the stages of cochlear implantation surgery and up to one week after (plosses were found for 1-kHz and 6-kHz frequencies. The hearing loss was not associated with significant changes in inner ear histology. Hearing loss following cochlear implantation in normal hearing animals is progressive and of mixed type, but mainly conductive. Changes in the inner-ear mechanism are most likely responsible for the conductive hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of implanted deep brain stimulation electrodes and brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabran, S R I; Saad, J H; Salama, M M A; Mansour, R R

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the electromagnetic modeling and simulation of an implanted Medtronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode using finite difference time domain (FDTD). The model is developed using Empire XCcel and represents the electrode surrounded with brain tissue assuming homogenous and isotropic medium. The model is created to study the parameters influencing the electric field distribution within the tissue in order to provide reference and benchmarking data for DBS and intra-cortical electrode development.

  1. Atomistic modeling of defect evolution in Si for amorphizing and subamorphizing implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Solid phase epitaxial regrowth of pre-amorphizing implants has received significant attention as a method to achieve high dopant activation with minimal diffusion at low implant temperatures and suppress channelling. Therefore, a good understanding of the amorphization and regrowth mechanisms is required in process simulators. We present an atomistic amorphization and recrystallization model that uses the interstitial-vacancy (I-V) pair as a building block to describe the amorphous phase. I-V pairs are locally characterized by the number of neighbouring I-V pairs. This feature captures the damage generation and the dynamical annealing during ion implantation, and also explains the annealing behaviour of amorphous layers and amorphous pockets

  2. MicroPET/CT imaging of patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically in NOD-scid mice using 64Cu-NOTA-panitumumab F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, Amanda J.; Cao, Ping-Jiang; Hedley, David W.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Winnik, Mitchell A.; Reilly, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Our objective was to study microPET/CT imaging of patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts in NOD-scid mice using F(ab') 2 fragments of the fully-human anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, panitumumab (Vectibix) labeled with 64 Cu. More than 90% of pancreatic cancers are EGFR-positive. Methods: F(ab') 2 fragments were produced by proteolytic digestion of panitumumab IgG or non-specific human IgG, purified by ultrafiltration then modified with NOTA chelators for complexing 64 Cu. Panitumumab IgG and Fab fragments were similarly labeled with 64 Cu. EGFR immunoreactivity was determined in competition and direct (saturation) cell binding assays. The biodistribution of 64 Cu-labeled panitumumab IgG, F(ab') 2 and Fab was compared in non-tumor-bearing Balb/c mice. MicroPET/CT and biodistribution studies were performed in NOD-scid mice engrafted subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically with patient-derived OCIP23 pancreatic tumors, or in NOD-scid with s.c. PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer xenografts. Results: Panitumumab F(ab') 2 fragments were produced in high purity (> 90%), derivitized with 3.2 ± 0.7 NOTA/F(ab') 2 , and labeled with 64 Cu (0.3–3.6 MBq/μg). The binding of 64 Cu-NOTA-panitumumab F(ab') 2 to OCIP23 or PANC-1 cells was decreased significantly by an excess of panitumumab IgG. The K d for binding of 64 Cu-NOTA-panitumumab F(ab') 2 to EGFR on PANC-1 cells was 0.14 ± 0.05 nmol/L. F(ab') 2 fragments exhibited more suitable normal tissue distribution for tumor imaging with 64 Cu than panitumumab IgG or Fab. Tumor uptake at 48 h post injection (p.i.) of 64 Cu-NOTA-panitumumab F(ab') 2 was 12.0 ± 0.9% injected dose/g (ID/g) in s.c. and 11.8 ± 0.9% ID/g in orthotopic OCIP23 tumors vs. 6.1 ± 1.1% ID/g in s.c. PANC-1 xenografts. Tumor/Blood (T/B) ratios were 5:1 to 9:1 for OCIP23 and 2.4:1 for PANC-1 tumors. Tumor uptake of 64 Cu-NOTA-non-specific F(ab') 2 in OCIP23 xenografts was 5-fold lower than 64

  3. Characterization of the Pathogenicity of Streptococcus intermedius TYG1620 Isolated from a Human Brain Abscess Based on the Complete Genome Sequence with Transcriptome Analysis and Transposon Mutagenesis in a Murine Subcutaneous Abscess Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Noriko; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Yutaka; Kawakami, Nobuhiro; Ogasawara, Yumiko; Kato, Kengo; Yamashita, Akifumi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Makoto

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is known to cause periodontitis and pyogenic infections in the brain and liver. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain TYG1620 (genome size, 2,006,877 bp; GC content, 37.6%; 2,020 predicted open reading frames [ORFs]) isolated from a brain abscess in an infant. Comparative analysis of S. intermedius genome sequences suggested that TYG1620 carries a notable type VII secretion system (T7SS), two long repeat regions, and 19 ORFs for cell wall-anchored proteins (CWAPs). To elucidate the genes responsible for the pathogenicity of TYG1620, transcriptome analysis was performed in a murine subcutaneous abscess model. The results suggest that the levels of expression of small hypothetical proteins similar to phenol-soluble modulin β1 (PSMβ1), a staphylococcal virulence factor, significantly increased in the abscess model. In addition, an experiment in a murine subcutaneous abscess model with random transposon (Tn) mutant attenuation suggested that Tn mutants with mutations in 212 ORFs in the Tn mutant library were attenuated in the murine abscess model (629 ORFs were disrupted in total); the 212 ORFs are putatively essential for abscess formation. Transcriptome analysis identified 37 ORFs, including paralogs of the T7SS and a putative glucan-binding CWAP in long repeat regions, to be upregulated and attenuated in vivo This study provides a comprehensive characterization of S. intermedius pathogenicity based on the complete genome sequence and a murine subcutaneous abscess model with transcriptome and Tn mutagenesis, leading to the identification of pivotal targets for vaccines or antimicrobial agents for the control of S. intermedius infections. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. A novel porcine model of implant associated osteomyelitis: a comprehensive analysis of local, regional and systemic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Kruse; Koch, Janne; Dich-Jorgensen, Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    Pigs are favorable experimental animals for infectious diseases in humans. However, implant associated osteomyelitis (IAO) models in pigs have only been evaluated using high-inoculum infection (>108 CFU) models in 1975 and 1993. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to present a new low inoculum...... porcine model of human IAO based on 42 experimental pigs. The model was created by drilling an implant cavity in the tibial bone followed by insertion of a small steel implant and simultaneous inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (n = 32) or saline (n = 10). The infected pigs were either...... inoculated with 104 CFU (n = 26) or 102 and 103 CFU (n = 6). All animals were euthanized five days after insertion of implants. Pigs receiving the high-inoculum infections showed a significantly higher volume of bone lesion, number of neutrophils around the implant, concentrations of acute phase proteins...

  5. Chronic behavior evaluation of a micro-machined neural implant with optimized design based on an experimentally derived model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Alexandru; Welkenhuysen, Marleen; Ameye, Lieveke; Nuttin, Bart; Eberle, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical interactions between implants and the surrounding tissue is known to have an important role for improving the bio-compatibility of such devices. Using a recently developed model, a particular micro-machined neural implant design aiming the reduction of insertion forces dependence on the insertion speed was optimized. Implantations with 10 and 100 μm/s insertion speeds showed excellent agreement with the predicted behavior. Lesion size, gliosis (GFAP), inflammation (ED1) and neuronal cells density (NeuN) was evaluated after 6 week of chronic implantation showing no insertion speed dependence.

  6. A Bone-Implant Interaction Mouse Model for Evaluating Molecular Mechanism of Biomaterials/Bone Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenlong; Dan, Xiuli; Wang, Ting; Lu, William W; Pan, Haobo

    2016-11-01

    The development of an optimal animal model that could provide fast assessments of the interaction between bone and orthopedic implants is essential for both preclinical and theoretical researches in the design of novel biomaterials. Compared with other animal models, mice have superiority in accessing the well-developed transgenic modification techniques (e.g., cell tracing, knockoff, knockin, and so on), which serve as powerful tools in studying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we introduced the establishment of a mouse model, which was specifically tailored for the assessment of bone-implant interaction in a load-bearing bone marrow microenvironment and could potentially allow the molecular mechanism study of biomaterials by using transgenic technologies. The detailed microsurgery procedures for developing a bone defect (Φ = 0.8 mm) at the metaphysis region of the mouse femur were recorded. According to our results, the osteoconductive and osseointegrative properties of a well-studied 45S5 bioactive glass were confirmed by utilizing our mouse model, verifying the reliability of this model. The feasibility and reliability of the present model were further checked by using other materials as objects of study. Furthermore, our results indicated that this animal model provided a more homogeneous tissue-implant interacting surface than the rat at the early stage of implantation and this is quite meaningful for conducting quantitative analysis. The availability of transgenic techniques to mechanism study of biomaterials was further testified by establishing our model on Nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the distribution of Nestin + cells was demonstrated to be recruited to the surface of 45S5 glass as early as 3 days postsurgery, indicating that Nestin + lineage stem cells may participate in the subsequent regeneration process. In summary, the bone-implant interaction mouse model could serve as a potential candidate to evaluate the early stage tissue

  7. Realistic modeling of deep brain stimulation implants for electromagnetic MRI safety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Bastien; Serano, Peter; Iacono, Maria Ida; Herrington, Todd M; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Angelone, Leonardo M; Wald, Lawrence L

    2018-05-04

    We propose a framework for electromagnetic (EM) simulation of deep brain stimulation (DBS) patients in radiofrequency (RF) coils. We generated a model of a DBS patient using post-operative head and neck computed tomography (CT) images stitched together into a 'virtual CT' image covering the entire length of the implant. The body was modeled as homogeneous. The implant path extracted from the CT data contained self-intersections, which we corrected automatically using an optimization procedure. Using the CT-derived DBS path, we built a model of the implant including electrodes, helicoidal internal conductor wires, loops, extension cables, and the implanted pulse generator. We also built four simplified models with straight wires, no extension cables and no loops to assess the impact of these simplifications on safety predictions. We simulated EM fields induced by the RF birdcage body coil in the body model, including at the DBS lead tip at both 1.5 Tesla (64 MHz) and 3 Tesla (123 MHz). We also assessed the robustness of our simulation results by systematically varying the EM properties of the body model and the position and length of the DBS implant (sensitivity analysis). The topology correction algorithm corrected all self-intersection and curvature violations of the initial path while introducing minimal deformations (open-source code available at http://ptx.martinos.org/index.php/Main_Page). The unaveraged lead-tip peak SAR predicted by the five DBS models (0.1 mm resolution grid) ranged from 12.8 kW kg -1 (full model, helicoidal conductors) to 43.6 kW kg -1 (no loops, straight conductors) at 1.5 T (3.4-fold variation) and 18.6 kW kg -1 (full model, straight conductors) to 73.8 kW kg -1 (no loops, straight conductors) at 3 T (4.0-fold variation). At 1.5 T and 3 T, the variability of lead-tip peak SAR with respect to the conductivity ranged between 18% and 30%. Variability with respect to the position and length of the DBS implant ranged between 9.5% and 27.6%.

  8. Realistic modeling of deep brain stimulation implants for electromagnetic MRI safety studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Bastien; Serano, Peter; Iacono, Maria Ida; Herrington, Todd M.; Widge, Alik S.; Dougherty, Darin D.; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Angelone, Leonardo M.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2018-05-01

    We propose a framework for electromagnetic (EM) simulation of deep brain stimulation (DBS) patients in radiofrequency (RF) coils. We generated a model of a DBS patient using post-operative head and neck computed tomography (CT) images stitched together into a ‘virtual CT’ image covering the entire length of the implant. The body was modeled as homogeneous. The implant path extracted from the CT data contained self-intersections, which we corrected automatically using an optimization procedure. Using the CT-derived DBS path, we built a model of the implant including electrodes, helicoidal internal conductor wires, loops, extension cables, and the implanted pulse generator. We also built four simplified models with straight wires, no extension cables and no loops to assess the impact of these simplifications on safety predictions. We simulated EM fields induced by the RF birdcage body coil in the body model, including at the DBS lead tip at both 1.5 Tesla (64 MHz) and 3 Tesla (123 MHz). We also assessed the robustness of our simulation results by systematically varying the EM properties of the body model and the position and length of the DBS implant (sensitivity analysis). The topology correction algorithm corrected all self-intersection and curvature violations of the initial path while introducing minimal deformations (open-source code available at http://ptx.martinos.org/index.php/Main_Page). The unaveraged lead-tip peak SAR predicted by the five DBS models (0.1 mm resolution grid) ranged from 12.8 kW kg‑1 (full model, helicoidal conductors) to 43.6 kW kg‑1 (no loops, straight conductors) at 1.5 T (3.4-fold variation) and 18.6 kW kg‑1 (full model, straight conductors) to 73.8 kW kg‑1 (no loops, straight conductors) at 3 T (4.0-fold variation). At 1.5 T and 3 T, the variability of lead-tip peak SAR with respect to the conductivity ranged between 18% and 30%. Variability with respect to the position and length of the DBS implant ranged between 9

  9. Energy Harvesting by Subcutaneous Solar Cells: A Long-Term Study on Achievable Energy Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereuter, L; Williner, S; Pianezzi, F; Bissig, B; Buecheler, S; Burger, J; Vogel, R; Zurbuchen, A; Haeberlin, A

    2017-05-01

    Active electronic implants are powered by primary batteries, which induces the necessity of implant replacement after battery depletion. This causes repeated interventions in a patients' life, which bears the risk of complications and is costly. By using energy harvesting devices to power the implant, device replacements may be avoided and the device size may be reduced dramatically. Recently, several groups presented prototypes of implants powered by subcutaneous solar cells. However, data about the expected real-life power output of subcutaneously implanted solar cells was lacking so far. In this study, we report the first real-life validation data of energy harvesting by subcutaneous solar cells. Portable light measurement devices that feature solar cells (cell area = 3.6 cm 2 ) and continuously measure a subcutaneous solar cell's output power were built. The measurement devices were worn by volunteers in their daily routine in summer, autumn and winter. In addition to the measured output power, influences such as season, weather and human activity were analyzed. The obtained mean power over the whole study period was 67 µW (=19 µW cm -2 ), which is sufficient to power e.g. a cardiac pacemaker.

  10. In silico modeling of structural and porosity properties of additive manufactured implants for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brünler, Ronny; Aibibu, Dilbar; Wöltje, Michael; Anthofer, Anna-Maria; Cherif, Chokri

    2017-07-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies are a promising technology towards patient-specific implants for applications in regenerative medicine. The Net-Shape-Nonwoven technology is used to manufacture structures from short fibers with interconnected pores and large functional surfaces that are predestined for cell adhesion and growth. The present study reports on a modeling approach with a particular focus on the specific structural properties. The overall porosities and mean pore-sizes of the digital models are simulated according to liquid-displacement porosity in a tool implemented in the modeling software. This allows adjusting the process parameters fiber length and fiber diameter to generate biomimetic structures with pore-sizes adapted to the requirements of the tissue that is to be replaced. Modeling the structural and porosity properties of scaffolds and implants leads to an efficient use of the processed biomaterials as the trial-and-error method is avoided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Time Course of Peri-Implant Bone Regeneration around Loaded and Unloaded Implants in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariwala, Shailly H.; Wee, Hwabok; Roush, Evan P.; Whitcomb, Tiffany L.; Murter, Christopher; Kozlansky, Gery; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Kunselman, Allen R.; Donahue, Henry J.; Armstrong, April D.; Lewis, Gregory S.

    2018-01-01

    The time-course of cancellous bone regeneration surrounding mechanically loaded implants affects implant fixation, and is relevant to determining optimal rehabilitation protocols following orthopaedic surgeries. We investigated the influence of controlled mechanical loading of titanium-coated polyether-ether ketone (PEEK) implants on osseointegration using time-lapsed, non-invasive, in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scans. Implants were inserted into proximal tibial metaphyses of both limbs of eight female Sprague-Dawley rats. External cyclic loading (60 μm or 100 μm displacement, 1 Hz, 60 seconds) was applied every other day for 14 days to one implant in each rat, while implants in contralateral limbs served as the unloaded controls. Hind limbs were imaged with high-resolution micro-CT (12.5 μm voxel size) at 2, 5, 9, and 12 days post-surgery. Trabecular changes over time were detected by 3D image registration allowing for measurements of bone-formation rate (BFR) and bone-resorption rate (BRR). At day 9, mean %BV/TV for loaded and unloaded limbs were 35.5 ± 10.0 % and 37.2 ± 10.0 %, respectively, and demonstrated significant increases in bone volume compared to day 2. BRR increased significantly after day 9. No significant differences between bone volumes, BFR, and BRR were detected due to implant loading. Although not reaching significance (p = 0.16), an average 119 % increase in pull-out strength was measured in the loaded implants. PMID:27381807

  12. The consequences of neural degeneration regarding optimal cochlear implant position in scala tympani: a model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briaire, Jeroen J; Frijns, Johan H M

    2006-04-01

    Cochlear implant research endeavors to optimize the spatial selectivity, threshold and dynamic range with the objective of improving the speech perception performance of the implant user. One of the ways to achieve some of these goals is by electrode design. New cochlear implant electrode designs strive to bring the electrode contacts into close proximity to the nerve fibers in the modiolus: this is done by placing the contacts on the medial side of the array and positioning the implant against the medial wall of scala tympani. The question remains whether this is the optimal position for a cochlea with intact neural fibers and, if so, whether it is also true for a cochlea with degenerated neural fibers. In this study a computational model of the implanted human cochlea is used to investigate the optimal position of the array with respect to threshold, dynamic range and spatial selectivity for a cochlea with intact nerve fibers and for degenerated nerve fibers. In addition, the model is used to evaluate the predictive value of eCAP measurements for obtaining peri-operative information on the neural status. The model predicts improved threshold, dynamic range and spatial selectivity for the peri-modiolar position at the basal end of the cochlea, with minimal influence of neural degeneration. At the apical end of the array (1.5 cochlear turns), the dynamic range and the spatial selectivity are limited due to the occurrence of cross-turn stimulation, with the exception of the condition without neural degeneration and with the electrode array along the lateral wall of scala tympani. The eCAP simulations indicate that a large P(0) peak occurs before the N(1)P(1) complex when the fibers are not degenerated. The absence of this peak might be used as an indicator for neural degeneration.

  13. Design and simulation of printed spiral coil used in wireless power transmission systems for implant medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Fang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Printed Spiral Coil (PSC) is a coil antenna for near-field wireless power transmission to the next generation implant medical devices. PSC for implant medical device should be power efficient and low electromagnetic radiation to human tissues. We utilized a physical model of printed spiral coil and applied our algorithm to design PSC operating at 13.56 MHz. Numerical and electromagnetic simulation of power transfer efficiency of PSC in air medium is 77.5% and 71.1%, respectively. The simulation results show that the printed spiral coil which is optimized for air will keep 15.2% power transfer efficiency in human subcutaneous tissues. In addition, the Specific Absorption Ratio (SAR) for this coil antenna in subcutaneous at 13.56 MHz is below 1.6 W/Kg, which suggests this coil is implantable safe based on IEEE C95.1 safety guideline.

  14. Patient-specific in silico models can quantify primary implant stability in elderly human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Juri A; Hofmann, Urs A T; Christen, Patrik; Favre, Jean M; Ferguson, Stephen J; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2018-03-01

    Secure implant fixation is challenging in osteoporotic bone. Due to the high variability in inter- and intra-patient bone quality, ex vivo mechanical testing of implants in bone is very material- and time-consuming. Alternatively, in silico models could substantially reduce costs and speed up the design of novel implants if they had the capability to capture the intricate bone microstructure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to validate a micro-finite element model of a multi-screw fracture fixation system. Eight human cadaveric humerii were scanned using micro-CT and mechanically tested to quantify bone stiffness. Osteotomy and fracture fixation were performed, followed by mechanical testing to quantify displacements at 12 different locations on the instrumented bone. For each experimental case, a micro-finite element model was created. From the micro-finite element analyses of the intact model, the patient-specific bone tissue modulus was determined such that the simulated apparent stiffness matched the measured stiffness of the intact bone. Similarly, the tissue modulus of a small damage region around each screw was determined for the instrumented bone. For validation, all in silico models were rerun using averaged material properties, resulting in an average coefficient of determination of 0.89 ± 0.04 with a slope of 0.93 ± 0.19 and a mean absolute error of 43 ± 10 μm when correlating in silico marker displacements with the ex vivo test. In conclusion, we validated a patient-specific computer model of an entire organ bone-implant system at the tissue-level at high resolution with excellent overall accuracy. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:954-962, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Assessment side light effects in patients after implantation of different models IOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Chuprov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the side effects of light in patients after implantation of IOLs of different models.Methods: the study involved 192 patients (216 eyes operated for cataract (3 groups of patients. the average age of patients was 63±0.78 years. Follow-up was 12 months. the first group included 63 patients (72 eyes after cataract extraction and implantation of the national refractive-diffractive trifocal IOL MIOL-Record 3. the second group included 64 patients (70 eyes after cataract extraction and implantation of domestic bifocal IOL refractive-diffractive MIOL-Acсord. the third group consisted of 65 patients (74 eyes after cataract extraction and IOL implantation domestic monofocal MIOL-2. the postoperative questionnaire (using a detailed oral interview was conducted after 1 week, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. the patient is asked about the presence of these light effects: flashes of light, circles of light scatter at the sight of the light source, flash, glitter, glimmer, blindingly bright light.Results: At 2.77% (2 patients of cases in patients with MIOL-Record 3 in a detailed survey in the postoperative period revealed light effects. In patients with MIOL-Accord and MIOL-2 light effects were 2.85% (2 patients and 1.35% (1 patient. the difference between the groups was not statistically reliable.Conclusion: this study found no statistically significant increase of side light effects in patients with multifocal IOLs comparedwith monofocal IOLs.

  16. Assessment side light effects in patients after implantation of different models IOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Chuprov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the side effects of light in patients after implantation of IOLs of different models.Methods: the study involved 192 patients (216 eyes operated for cataract (3 groups of patients. the average age of patients was 63±0.78 years. Follow-up was 12 months. the first group included 63 patients (72 eyes after cataract extraction and implantation of the national refractive-diffractive trifocal IOL MIOL-Record 3. the second group included 64 patients (70 eyes after cataract extraction and implantation of domestic bifocal IOL refractive-diffractive MIOL-Acсord. the third group consisted of 65 patients (74 eyes after cataract extraction and IOL implantation domestic monofocal MIOL-2. the postoperative questionnaire (using a detailed oral interview was conducted after 1 week, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. the patient is asked about the presence of these light effects: flashes of light, circles of light scatter at the sight of the light source, flash, glitter, glimmer, blindingly bright light.Results: At 2.77% (2 patients of cases in patients with MIOL-Record 3 in a detailed survey in the postoperative period revealed light effects. In patients with MIOL-Accord and MIOL-2 light effects were 2.85% (2 patients and 1.35% (1 patient. the difference between the groups was not statistically reliable.Conclusion: this study found no statistically significant increase of side light effects in patients with multifocal IOLs comparedwith monofocal IOLs.

  17. Chlorhexidine-releasing implant coating on intramedullary nail reduces infection in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Shiels

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of internal intramedullary nails for long bone fracture fixation is a common practice among surgeons. Bacteria naturally attach to these devices, increasing the risk for wound infection, which can result in non- or malunion, additional surgical procedures and extended hospital stays. Intramedullary nail surface properties can be modified to reduce bacterial colonisation and potentially infectious complications. In the current study, a coating combining a non-fouling property with leaching chlorhexidine for orthopaedic implantation was tested. Coating stability and chlorhexidine release were evaluated in vitro. Using a rat model of intramedullary fixation and infection, the effect of the coating on microbial colonisation and fracture healing was evaluated in vivo by quantitative microbiology, micro-computed tomography, plain radiography, three-point bending and/or histology. Low dose systemic cefazolin was administered to increase the similarities to clinical practice, without overshadowing the effect of the anti-infective coating. When introduced into a contaminated wound, the non-fouling chlorhexidine-coated implant reduced the overall bacteria colonisation within the bone and on the implant, reduced the osteolysis and increased the radiographic union, confirming its potential for reducing complications in wounds at high risk of infection. However, when implanted into a sterile wound, non-union increased. Further studies are required to best optimise the anti-microbial effectiveness, while not sacrificing fracture union.

  18. The effects of implant composition on extensor tenosynovitis in a canine distal radius fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinicropi, Stefano M; Su, Brian W; Raia, Frank J; Parisien, May; Strauch, Robert J; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2005-03-01

    Dorsal plating of distal radius fractures with titanium plates has resulted in clinically observed tenosynovitis and tendon rupture. The goal of this study was to investigate whether titanium-based implants result in more extensor tendon inflammation than matched stainless-steel implants in a canine fracture model. An osteotomy was created in the distal radius of 18 beagles and fixed with 2.7-mm 4-hole plates composed of commercially pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-Al6-V4), or 316L stainless steel. Animals were killed at an average of 4 months. Tendon gliding was assessed by applying a force at the extensor musculotendinous junction and noting gliding. Histologic grading (mild, moderate, severe) was based on cellular hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and leukocytic infiltration. Tendons glided freely in 100% stainless-steel specimens, 75% of titanium alloy, and 43% of commercially pure titanium groups. A severe inflammatory reaction was identified in 60% of the titanium alloy (Ti-A16-V4) group, 57% of the pure titanium group, and 0% of the stainless-steel group. Dorsal plating of the canine radius with commercially pure titanium or titanium alloy implants produced a greater inflammatory peritendinous response than matched stainless-steel implants.

  19. Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on endometrial implants in an experimental rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pınar, Neslihan; Soylu Karapınar, Oya; Özcan, Oğuzhan; Özgür, Tümay; Bayraktar, Suphi

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) in the treatment of endometriosis in an experimental rat model by evaluating biochemical and histopathologic parameters. Experimental endometriosis was induced by the peritoneal implantation of autologous endometrial tissue. The rats were randomly divided into two groups with eight rats each. Group I was intraperitoneally administered ALA 100 mg/kg/day for 14 days. Group II was intraperitoneally administered saline solution at the same dosage and over the same period. Endometrial implant volume was measured in both groups both pre- and post-treatment. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was measured in peritoneal fluid. Total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were assessed in serum. The implants were histopathologically evaluated. In the ALA group, the serum TOS and OSI levels, the endometrial implant volumes, the TNF-α levels in serum and peritoneal fluid, and the histopathologic scores were significantly lower compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Alpha-lipoic acid may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of endometriosis due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. © 2017 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  20. Rapid-relocation model for describing high-fluence retention of rare gases implanted in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, K.

    2009-09-01

    It has been known for a long time that the maximum areal density of inert gases that can be retained in solids after ion implantation is significantly lower than expected if sputter erosion were the only limiting factor. The difference can be explained in terms of the idea that the trapped gas atoms migrate towards the surface in a series of detrapping-trapping events so that reemission takes place well before the receding surface has advanced to the original depth of implantation. Here it is shown that the fluence dependent shift and shape of implantation profiles, previously determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), can be reproduced surprisingly well by extending a simple retention model originally developed to account only for the effect of surface recession by sputtering ('sputter approximation'). The additional migration of inert gas atoms is formally included by introducing an effective shift parameter Yeff as the sum of the sputtering yield Y and a relocation efficiency Ψrel. The approach is discussed in detail for 145 keV Xe + implanted in Si at normal incidence. Yeff was found to increase with increasing fluence, to arrive at a maximum equivalent to about twice the sputtering yield. At the surface one needs to account for Xe depletion and the limited depth resolution of RBS. The (high-fluence) effect of implanted Xe on the range distributions is discussed on the basis of SRIM calculations for different definitions of the mean target density, including the case of volume expansion (swelling). To identify a 'range shortening' effect, the implanted gas atoms must be excluded from the definition of the depth scale. The impact-energy dependence of the relocation efficiency was derived from measured stationary Xe concentrations. Above some characteristic energy (˜20 keV for Ar, ˜200 keV for Xe), Y exceeds Ψrel. With decreasing energy, however, Ψrel increases rapidly. Below 2-3 keV more than 90% of the reemission of Ar and Xe is estimated

  1. Subcutaneous administration of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II/IGF binding protein-2 complex stimulates bone formation and prevents loss of bone mineral density in a rat model of disuse osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Cheryl A.; Johnstone, Edward W.; Turner, Russell T.; Evans, Glenda L.; John Ballard, F. John; Doran, Patrick M.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2002-01-01

    Elevated serum levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) and a precursor form of IGF-II are associated with marked increases in bone formation and skeletal mass in patients with hepatitis C-associated osteosclerosis. In vitro studies indicate that IGF-II in complex with IGFBP-2 has high affinity for bone matrix and is able to stimulate osteoblast proliferation. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of the IGF-II/IGFBP-2 complex to increase bone mass in vivo. Osteopenia of the femur was induced by unilateral sciatic neurectomy in rats. At the time of surgery, 14-day osmotic minipumps containing vehicle or 2 microg IGF-II+9 microg IGFBP-2/100g body weight/day were implanted subcutaneously in the neck. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were taken the day of surgery and 14 days later using a PIXImus small animal densitometer. Neurectomy of the right hindlimb resulted in a 9% decrease in right femur BMD (Ploss in BMD was completely prevented by treatment with IGF-II/IGFBP-2. On the control limb, there was no loss of BMD over the 14 days and IGF-II/IGFBP-2 treatment resulted in a 9% increase in left femur BMD (Ploss of BMD associated with disuse osteoporosis and stimulate bone formation in adult rats. Furthermore, they provide proof of concept for a novel anabolic approach to increasing bone mass in humans with osteoporosis.

  2. Injectable agents affecting subcutaneous fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Lk; Cohen, Joel L; Green, Jeremy B

    2015-09-01

    Mesotherapy is an intradermal or subcutaneous injection of therapeutic agents to induce local effects, and was pioneered in Europe during the 1950s. For the past 2 decades, there has been significant interest in the use of mesotherapy for minimally invasive local fat contouring. Based on the theorized lipolytic effects of the agent phosphatidylcholine, initial attempts involved its injection into subcutaneous tissue. With further studies, however, it became apparent that the activity attributed to phosphatidylcholine mesotherapy was due to the adipolytic effects of deoxycholate, a detergent used to solubilize phosphatidylcholine. Since then, clinical trials have surfaced that demonstrate the efficacy of a proprietary formulation of deoxycholate for local fat contouring. Current trials on mesotherapy with salmeterol, a b-adrenergic agonist and lipolysis stimulator, are underway-with promising preliminary results as well. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  3. Subcutaneous sarcoidosis associated with sarcoid tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzenauer, R J; Waterhouse, W J; West, S G

    1996-10-01

    Subcutaneous sarcoidosis and sarcoid tenosynovitis are unusual manifestations of systemic sarcoidosis. We report two Japanese women with disseminated sarcoidosis presenting with subcutaneous and tenosynovial involvement demonstrated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Sarcoidosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained subcutaneous nodulosis or tenosynovitis in patients with or without a previous diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

  4. Individual titanium zygomatic implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhoroshev, M. V.; Ryabov, K. N.; Avdeev, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    Custom individual implants for the reconstruction of craniofacial defects have gained importance due to better qualitative characteristics over their generic counterparts – plates, which should be bent according to patient needs. The Additive Manufacturing of individual implants allows reducing cost and improving quality of implants. In this paper, the authors describe design of zygomatic implant models based on computed tomography (CT) data. The fabrication of the implants will be carried out with 3D printing by selective laser melting machine SLM 280HL.

  5. Subcutaneous emphysema during status astmaticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.

    1985-01-01

    Spontaneous subcutaneous accumulations of air in the soft parts of the thorax during an asthmatic crisis (status asthmaticus) are rarely seen. The pathomechanism of the phenomenon, which may lead to the formation of an emphysema of the soft parts via the pneumomediastinum, is discussed, and the possible complications which must be taken into account are pointed out. The value of radiological examination of the thorax in children suffering from asthma bronchiale, is explained briefly. (orig.) [de

  6. A critical review of cell culture strategies for modelling intracortical brain implant material reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, A D; Woolley, A J; Poole-Warren, L A; Thomson, C E; Green, R A

    2016-06-01

    The capacity to predict in vivo responses to medical devices in humans currently relies greatly on implantation in animal models. Researchers have been striving to develop in vitro techniques that can overcome the limitations associated with in vivo approaches. This review focuses on a critical analysis of the major in vitro strategies being utilized in laboratories around the world to improve understanding of the biological performance of intracortical, brain-implanted microdevices. Of particular interest to the current review are in vitro models for studying cell responses to penetrating intracortical devices and their materials, such as electrode arrays used for brain computer interface (BCI) and deep brain stimulation electrode probes implanted through the cortex. A background on the neural interface challenge is presented, followed by discussion of relevant in vitro culture strategies and their advantages and disadvantages. Future development of 2D culture models that exhibit developmental changes capable of mimicking normal, postnatal development will form the basis for more complex accurate predictive models in the future. Although not within the scope of this review, innovations in 3D scaffold technologies and microfluidic constructs will further improve the utility of in vitro approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Systematic understanding of corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AZ31 magnesium alloy using a mouse model of subcutaneous implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongseok; Tan, Zongqing; Jurey, Chris; Collins, Boyce; Badve, Aditya; Dong, Zhongyun; Park, Chanhee; Kim, Cheol Sang; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the differences between corrosion rates, corrosion types, and corrosion products in different physiological environments for AZ31 magnesium alloy and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated AZ31 magnesium alloy. In vitro and in vivo tests were performed in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and mice for 12 weeks, respectively. The corrosion rates of both AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy were calculated based on DC polarization curves, volume of hydrogen evolution, and the thickness of corrosion products formed on the surface. Micro X-ray computed tomography (Micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze morphological and chemical characterizations of corrosion products. The results show that there is more severe localized corrosion after in vitro test in HBSS; however, the thicknesses of corrosion products formed on the surface for AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy in vivo were about 40% thicker than the thickness of corrosion products generated in vitro. The ratio of Ca and P (Ca/P) in the corrosion products also differed. The Ca deficient region and higher content of Al in corrosion product than AZ31 magnesium alloy were identified after in vivo test in contrast with the result of in vitro test. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic understanding of corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AZ31 magnesium alloy using a mouse model of subcutaneous implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yongseok; Tan, Zongqing; Jurey, Chris; Collins, Boyce; Badve, Aditya; Dong, Zhongyun; Park, Chanhee; Kim, Cheol Sang; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the differences between corrosion rates, corrosion types, and corrosion products in different physiological environments for AZ31 magnesium alloy and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated AZ31 magnesium alloy. In vitro and in vivo tests were performed in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and mice for 12 weeks, respectively. The corrosion rates of both AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy were calculated based on DC polarization curves, volume of hydrogen evolution, and the thickness of corrosion products formed on the surface. Micro X-ray computed tomography (Micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze morphological and chemical characterizations of corrosion products. The results show that there is more severe localized corrosion after in vitro test in HBSS; however, the thicknesses of corrosion products formed on the surface for AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy in vivo were about 40% thicker than the thickness of corrosion products generated in vitro. The ratio of Ca and P (Ca/P) in the corrosion products also differed. The Ca deficient region and higher content of Al in corrosion product than AZ31 magnesium alloy were identified after in vivo test in contrast with the result of in vitro test. - Highlights: • Effects of plasma electrolytic oxidation on AZ31 in vitro and in vivo • Retardation of degradation via plasma electrolytic oxidation in vitro and in vivo • Differentiation of in vitro and in vivo corrosion types and products

  9. Systematic understanding of corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AZ31 magnesium alloy using a mouse model of subcutaneous implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yongseok [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States); Tan, Zongqing [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, OH 45211 (United States); Jurey, Chris [Luke Engineering, Wadsworth, OH 44282 (United States); Collins, Boyce [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States); Badve, Aditya [Business and Biology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27514 (United States); Dong, Zhongyun [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, OH 45211 (United States); Park, Chanhee; Kim, Cheol Sang [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Sankar, Jagannathan [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States); Yun, Yeoheung, E-mail: yyun@ncat.edu [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the differences between corrosion rates, corrosion types, and corrosion products in different physiological environments for AZ31 magnesium alloy and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated AZ31 magnesium alloy. In vitro and in vivo tests were performed in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and mice for 12 weeks, respectively. The corrosion rates of both AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy were calculated based on DC polarization curves, volume of hydrogen evolution, and the thickness of corrosion products formed on the surface. Micro X-ray computed tomography (Micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze morphological and chemical characterizations of corrosion products. The results show that there is more severe localized corrosion after in vitro test in HBSS; however, the thicknesses of corrosion products formed on the surface for AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy in vivo were about 40% thicker than the thickness of corrosion products generated in vitro. The ratio of Ca and P (Ca/P) in the corrosion products also differed. The Ca deficient region and higher content of Al in corrosion product than AZ31 magnesium alloy were identified after in vivo test in contrast with the result of in vitro test. - Highlights: • Effects of plasma electrolytic oxidation on AZ31 in vitro and in vivo • Retardation of degradation via plasma electrolytic oxidation in vitro and in vivo • Differentiation of in vitro and in vivo corrosion types and products.

  10. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cell implantation and endothelial function in a rabbit ischemic limb model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Mikami

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs implantation improves endothelial dysfunction in a rabbit ischemic limb model. METHODS: We evaluated the effect of MSC implantation on limb blood flow (LBF responses to acetylcholine (ACh, an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an endothelium-independent vasodilator, in rabbits with limb ischemia in which cultured MSCs were implanted (n = 20 or saline was injected as a control group (n = 20. LBF was measured using an electromagnetic flowmeter. A total of 10(6 MSCs were implanted into each ischemic limb. RESULTS: Histological sections of ischemic muscle showed that capillary index (capillary/muscle fiber was greater in the MSC implantation group than in the control group. Laser Doppler blood perfusion index was significantly increased in the MSC implantation group compared with that in the control group. LBF response to ACh was greater in the MSC group than in the control group. After administration of N(G-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, LBF response to ACh was similar in the MSC implantation group and control group. Vasodilatory effects of SNP in the two groups were similar. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that MSC implantation induces angiogenesis and augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in a rabbit ischemic model through an increase in nitric oxide production.

  11. Mechanical verification of soft-tissue attachment on bioactive glasses and titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Desheng; Moritz, Niko; Vedel, Erik; Hupa, Leena; Aro, Hannu T

    2008-07-01

    Soft-tissue attachment is a desired feature of many clinical biomaterials. The aim of the current study was to design a suitable experimental method for tensile testing of implant incorporation with soft-tissues. Conical implants were made of three compositions of bioactive glass (SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-B(2)O(3)-Na(2)O-K(2)O-CaO-MgO) or titanium fiber mesh (porosity 84.7%). The implants were surgically inserted into the dorsal subcutaneous soft-tissue or back muscles in the rat. Soft-tissue attachment was evaluated by pull-out testing using a custom-made jig 8 weeks after implantation. Titanium fiber mesh implants had developed a relatively high pull-out force in subcutaneous tissue (12.33+/-5.29 N, mean+/-SD) and also measurable attachment with muscle tissue (2.46+/-1.33 N). The bioactive glass implants failed to show mechanically relevant soft-tissue bonding. The experimental set-up of mechanical testing seems to be feasible for verification studies of soft-tissue attachment. The inexpensive small animal model is beneficial for large-scale in vivo screening of new biomaterials.

  12. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  13. The fabrication of bioresorbable implants for bone defects replacement using computer tomogram and 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. G.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Goreninskii, S. I.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Popkov, A. V.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Grigoryev, E. G.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2017-09-01

    The present work demonstrates the possibility of production of personalized implants from bioresorbable polymers designed for replacement of bone defects. The stages of creating a personalized implant are described, which include the obtaining of 3D model from a computer tomogram, development of the model with respect to shape of bone fitment bore using Autodesk Meshmixer software, and 3D printing process from bioresorbable polymers. The results of bioresorbable polymer scaffolds implantation in pre-clinical tests on laboratory animals are shown. The biological properties of new bioresorbable polymers based on poly(lactic acid) were studied during their subcutaneous, intramuscular, bone and intraosseous implantation in laboratory animals. In all cases, there was a lack of a fibrous capsule formation around the bioresorbable polymer over time. Also, during the performed study, conclusions were made on osteogenesis intensity depending on the initial state of bone tissue.

  14. Histatin 1 Enhances Cell Adhesion to Titanium in an Implant Integration Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, I A; Beker, A F; Jellema, W; Nazmi, K; Wu, G; Wismeijer, D; Krawczyk, P M; Bolscher, J G M; Veerman, E C I; Stap, J

    2017-04-01

    Cellular adhesion is essential for successful integration of dental implants. Rapid soft tissue integration is important to create a seal around the implant and prevent infections, which commonly cause implant failure and can result in bone loss. In addition, soft tissue management is important to obtain good dental aesthetics. We previously demonstrated that the salivary peptide histatin 1 (Hst1) causes a more than 2-fold increase in the ability of human adherent cells to attach and spread on a glass surface. Cells treated with Hst1 attached more rapidly and firmly to the substrate and to each other. In the current study, we examine the potential application of Hst1 for promotion of dental implant integration. Our results show that Hst1 enhances the attachment and spreading of soft tissue cell types (oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts) to titanium (Ti) and hydroxyapatite (HAP), biomaterials that have found wide applications as implant material in dentistry and orthopedics. For improved visualization of cell adhesion to Ti, we developed a novel technique that uses sputtering to deposit a thin, transparent layer of Ti onto glass slides. This approach allows detailed, high-resolution analysis of cell adherence to Ti in real time. Furthermore, our results suggest that Hst1 has no negative effects on cell survival. Given its natural occurrence in the oral cavity, Hst1 could be an attractive agent for clinical application. Importantly, even though Hst1 is specific for saliva of humans and higher primates, it stimulated the attachment and spreading of canine cells, paving the way for preclinical studies in canine models.

  15. Subcutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemp, P.

    1985-01-01

    The simultaneously recorded disappearance rates of 133 xe from subcutaneous adipose tissue in the crus were studied in 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris using atraumatic labeling of the tissue in lesional skin (LS) areas and symmetrical, nonlesional skin (NLS) areas. Control experiments were performed bilaterally in 10 younger, healthy subjects. The subcutaneous washout rate constant was significantly higher in LS, 0.79 +/- 0.05 min-1 x 10(2) compared to the washout rate constant of NLS, 0.56 +/- 0.07 min-1. 10(2), or the washout rate constant in the normal subjects, 0.46 +/- 0.17 min-1 x 10(2). The mean washout rate constant in NLS was 25% higher than the mean washout rate constant in the normal subjects. The difference was, however, not statistically significant. Differences in the washout rate constants might be due to abnormal subcutaneous tissue-to-blood partition (lambda) in the LS--and therefore not reflecting the real differences in the subcutaneous blood flow (SBF). The lambda for 133 Xe was therefore measured--using a double isotope washout method ( 133 Xe and [ 131 I]antipyrine)--in symmetrical sites of the lateral crus in LS and NLS of 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and in 10 legs of normal subjects. In LS the lambda was 4.52 +/- 1.67 ml/g, which was not statistically different from that of NLS, 5.25 +/- 2.19 ml/g, nor from that of normal subcutaneous tissue, 4.98 +/- 1.04 ml/g. Calculations of the SBF using the obtained lambda values gave a significantly higher SBF in LS, 3.57 +/- 0.23 ml/100 g/min, compared to SBF in the NLS, 2.94 +/- 0.37 ml/100 g/min. There was no statistically significant difference between SBF in NLS and SBF in the normal subjects. The increased SBF in LS of psoriatics might be a secondary phenomenon to an increased heat loss in the lesional skin

  16. Injectable and inherently vascularizing semi-interpenetrating polymer network for delivering cells to the subcutaneous space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahou, Redouan; Zhang, David K Y; Vlahos, Alexander E; Sefton, Michael V

    2017-07-01

    Injectable hydrogels are suitable for local cell delivery to the subcutaneous space, but the lack of vasculature remains a limiting factor. Previously we demonstrated that biomaterials containing methacrylic acid promoted vascularization. Here we report the preparation of a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (SIPN), and its evaluation as an injectable carrier to deliver cells and generate blood vessels in a subcutaneous implantation site. The SIPN was prepared by reacting a blend of vinyl sulfone-terminated polyethylene glycol (PEG-VS) and sodium polymethacrylate (PMAA-Na) with dithiothreitol. The swelling of SIPN was sensitive to the PMAA-Na content but only small differences in gelation time, permeability and stiffness were noted. SIPN containing 20 mol% PMAA-Na generated a vascular network in the surrounding tissues, with 2-3 times as many vessels as was obtained with 10 mol% PMAA-Na or PEG alone. Perfusion studies showed that the generated vessels were perfused and connected to the host vasculature as early as seven days after transplantation. Islets embedded in SIPN were viable and responsive to glucose stimulation in vitro. In a proof of concept study in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model, a progressive return to normoglycemia was observed and the presence of insulin positive islets was confirmed when islets were embedded in SIPN prior to delivery. Our approach proposes a biomaterial-mediated strategy to deliver cells while enhancing vascularization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of Stress Distribution of Mini Dental Implant-Supported Overdentures in Complete Cleft Palate Models: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soğancı, Gökçe; Yazıcıoğlu, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Mini dental implants could be an alternative treatment method for prosthetic treatment of edentulous cleft palate. The aim of this study was to analyze stress distribution around the cortical bone and different plans using a varied number of mini dental implants in edentulous unilateral complete cleft palates. Three edentulous maxillary models were modified to create unilateral complete cleft palates. Mini dental implants (2.4 × 15 mm) were located as two mini implants at the premolar region, four mini implants at the premolar and molar region, and six mini implants at the first premolar, second premolar, and first molar regions in the models, respectively. Mucosa, o-ring/ball attachments, and overdentures were simulated. Vertical and horizontal loads of 100 N were applied on both the right and left molar teeth of the overdenture for each model. Maximum and minimum principal stress values and the distribution at cortical bone around the implants and cleft palates were evaluated by finite element analysis. Stress values under vertical loads were lower than values under horizontal loadings for all models. Stress values were found to be lower in the first model than in the second and third models. The highest stress values were found around implants in the second model. The unilateral feature of a complete cleft pattern affected the stress distribution. Stresses occured mostly around implants when the overdenture was supported by six implants; however, the stress distribution around implants was low with two implants because of tissue support.

  18. Stress Distribution in Single Dental Implant System: Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Based on an In Vitro Experimental Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Carlos Eduardo Edwards; Chase-Diaz, Melody; Costa, Max Doria; Albarracin, Max Laurent; Paschoeto, Gabriela; Sousa, Edson Antonio Capello; Rubo, José Henrique; Borges, Ana Flávia Sanches

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze the stress distribution in single implant system and to evaluate the compatibility of an in vitro model with finite element (FE) model. The in vitro model consisted of Brånemark implant; multiunit set abutment of 5 mm height; metal-ceramic screw-retained crown, and polyurethane simulating the bone. Deformations were recorded in the peri-implant region in the mesial and distal aspects, after an axial 300 N load application at the center of the occlusal aspect of the crown, using strain gauges. This in vitro model was scanned with micro CT to design a three-dimensional FE model and the strains in the peri-implant bone region were registered to check the compatibility between both models. The FE model was used to evaluate stress distribution in different parts of the system. The values obtained from the in vitro model (20-587 με) and the finite element analysis (81-588 με) showed agreement among them. The highest stresses because of axial and oblique load, respectively were 5.83 and 40 MPa for the cortical bone, 55 and 1200 MPa for the implant, and 80 and 470 MPa for the abutment screw. The FE method proved to be effective for evaluating the deformation around single implant. Oblique loads lead to higher stress concentrations.

  19. SOLAR WIND IMPLANTATION MODEL FOR 10Be IN CALCIUM-ALUMINUM INCLUSIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricker, Glynn E.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a model for the incorporation of 10 Be within calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites. In this model, 10 Be is produced by energetic particle reactions in the proto-solar atmosphere of a more active proto-Sun characterized by energetic particle fluxes higher than contemporary particle fluxes. This 10 Be is incorporated into the solar wind that is then implanted into CAI precursor material. This production mechanism is operational in the contemporary solar system implanting 10 Be in lunar materials. The contemporary production rate of 10 Be at the surface of the Sun is ∼0.1 10 Be cm -2 s -1 . Scaling up the contemporary 10 Be production in the proto-Sun by a factor of 10 5 would increase the production rate to 10 410 Be cm -2 s -1 . Using this enhanced production value in conjunction with refractory mass inflow rates at 0.06 AU from the proto-Sun we model 10 Be concentrations in CAI precursors. We calculate the content of solar-wind-implanted 10 Be would have been of the order of 10 1210 Be g -1 in CAIs, consistent with initial 10 Be content found from boron-beryllium isotopic systematics in CAIs.

  20. Parametric model of the scala tympani for haptic-rendered cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Catherine; Naghdy, Fazel

    2005-01-01

    A parametric model of the human scala tympani has been designed for use in a haptic-rendered computer simulation of cochlear implant surgery. It will be the first surgical simulator of this kind. A geometric model of the Scala Tympani has been derived from measured data for this purpose. The model is compared with two existing descriptions of the cochlear spiral. A first approximation of the basilar membrane is also produced. The structures are imported into a force-rendering software application for system development.

  1. Influence of Orthotropy on Biomechanics of Peri-Implant Bone in Complete Mandible Model with Full Dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The study was to investigate the impact of orthotropic material on the biomechanics of dental implant, based on a detailed mandible with high geometric and mechanical similarity. Materials and Methods. Multiple data sources were used to elaborate detailed biological structures and implant CAD models. In addition, an extended orthotropic material assignment methodology based on harmonic fields was used to handle the alveolar ridge region to generate compatible orthotropic fields. The influence of orthotropic material was compared with the commonly used isotropic model and simplified orthotropic model. Results. The simulation results showed that the values of stress and strain on the implant-bone interface almost increased in the orthotropic model compared to the isotropic case, especially for the cancellous bone. However, the local stress concentration was more obvious in the isotropic case compared to that in orthotropic case. The simple orthotropic model revealed irregular stress and strain distribution, compared to the isotropic model and the real orthotropic model. The influence of orthotropy was little on the implant, periodontal ligament, tooth enamel, and dentin. Conclusion. The orthotropic material has significant effect on stress and strain of implant-bone interface in the mandible, compared with the isotropic simulation. Real orthotropic mechanical properties of mandible should be emphasized in biomechanical studies of dental implants.

  2. Phosphate conversion coating reduces the degradation rate and suppresses side effects of metallic magnesium implants in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Tavares, Ana; Evertz, Florian; Kieke, Marc; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Eifler, Rainer; Weizbauer, Andreas; Willbold, Elmar; Jürgen Maier, Hans; Glasmacher, Birgit; Behrens, Peter; Hauser, Hansjörg; Mueller, Peter P

    2017-08-01

    Magnesium alloys have promising mechanical and biological properties for the development of degradable implants. However, rapid implant corrosion and gas accumulations in tissue impede clinical applications. With time, the implant degradation rate is reduced by a highly biocompatible, phosphate-containing corrosion layer. To circumvent initial side effects after implantation it was attempted to develop a simple in vitro procedure to generate a similarly protective phosphate corrosion layer. To this end magnesium samples were pre-incubated in phosphate solutions. The resulting coating was well adherent during routine handling procedures. It completely suppressed the initial burst of corrosion and it reduced the average in vitro magnesium degradation rate over 56 days almost two-fold. In a small animal model phosphate coatings on magnesium implants were highly biocompatible and abrogated the appearance of gas cavities in the tissue. After implantation, the phosphate coating was replaced by a layer with an elemental composition that was highly similar to the corrosion layer that had formed on plain magnesium implants. The data demonstrate that a simple pre-treatment could improve clinically relevant properties of magnesium-based implants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1622-1635, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Prefabrication of a vascularized nerve graft by vessel implantation: preliminary report of an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadas, P C; Vera-Sempere, F J

    1994-01-01

    Regeneration through vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) seems to be better than nonvascularized nerve grafts (NVNG), especially in hostile beds. We report on an experimental technique of prefabrication of VNG by direct vessel implantation. An arteriovenous fistula was created in the groin region with autologous vein grafts in the Wistar rat model, and implanted into the sciatic nerve. Five weeks later the sciatic VNG was elevated on the prefabricated pedicle. The flap was free-transferred orthotopically over a silicone sheet to impede plasmatic imbibition. Flap viability at 3 days was complete. India ink injection of the AV fistula resulted in capillary ink filling within the nerve and surrounding tissues. Histologic sections of the flap were examined, revealing its neovascularity. In an ongoing study, the regeneration through this prefabricated VNG is being compared to native VNG.

  4. PHAEOHYPHOMYCOSIS: CUTANEOUS, SUBCUTANEOUS, NASOPHARYNGEAL LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rasoolinejad

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is an amalgam of clinical diseases caused by a wide variety of dematiaceous fungi. We are reporting on a 16 year-old patient from Amol with subcutaneous cervical nodes and nasopharyngeal lesions of phaeohypho"nmycosis that were confirmed by pathological examination, direct smear, and culture. After treatment with an oral triazole (Itraconazole for 4 months, all nodes and lesions disappeared and treatment was stopped A new lesion appeared on his chest wall 8 months, therapy with itraconazole was restarted and commuted for a long time.

  5. SMAS Fusion Zones Determine the Subfascial and Subcutaneous Anatomy of the Human Face: Fascial Spaces, Fat Compartments, and Models of Facial Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessa, Joel E

    2016-05-01

    Fusion zones between superficial fascia and deep fascia have been recognized by surgical anatomists since 1938. Anatomical dissection performed by the author suggested that additional superficial fascia fusion zones exist. A study was performed to evaluate and define fusion zones between the superficial and the deep fascia. Dissection of fresh and minimally preserved cadavers was performed using the accepted technique for defining anatomic spaces: dye injection combined with cross-sectional anatomical dissection. This study identified bilaminar membranes traveling from deep to superficial fascia at consistent locations in all specimens. These membranes exist as fusion zones between superficial and deep fascia, and are referred to as SMAS fusion zones. Nerves, blood vessels and lymphatics transition between the deep and superficial fascia of the face by traveling along and within these membranes, a construct that provides stability and minimizes shear. Bilaminar subfascial membranes continue into the subcutaneous tissues as unilaminar septa on their way to skin. This three-dimensional lattice of interlocking horizontal, vertical, and oblique membranes defines the anatomic boundaries of the fascial spaces as well as the deep and superficial fat compartments of the face. This information facilitates accurate volume augmentation; helps to avoid facial nerve injury; and provides the conceptual basis for understanding jowls as a manifestation of enlargement of the buccal space that occurs with age. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Localized immunosuppressive environment in the foreign body response to implanted biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, David M; Basaraba, Randall J; Hohnbaum, April C; Lee, Eric J; Grainger, David W; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes

    2009-07-01

    The implantation of synthetic biomaterials initiates the foreign body response (FBR), which is characterized by macrophage infiltration, foreign body giant cell formation, and fibrotic encapsulation of the implant. The FBR is orchestrated by a complex network of immune modulators, including diverse cell types, soluble mediators, and unique cell surface interactions. The specific tissue locations, expression patterns, and spatial distribution of these immune modulators around the site of implantation are not clear. This study describes a model for studying the FBR in vivo and specifically evaluates the spatial relationship of immune modulators. We modified a biomaterials implantation in vivo model that allowed for cross-sectional in situ analysis of the FBR. Immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the localization of soluble mediators, ie, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, IL-10, IL-6, transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, and MCP-1; specific cell types, ie, macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes; and cell surface markers, ie, F4/80, CD11b, CD11c, and Ly-6C, at early, middle, and late stages of the FBR in subcutaneous implant sites. The cytokines IL-4, IL-13, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-beta were localized to implant-adherent cells that included macrophages and foreign body giant cells. A better understanding of the FBR in vivo will allow the development of novel strategies to enhance biomaterial implant design to achieve better performance and safety of biomedical devices at the site of implant.

  7. Subcutaneous administration of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II/IGF binding protein-2 complex stimulates bone formation and prevents loss of bone mineral density in a rat model of disuse osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Cheryl A.; Johnstone, Edward W.; Turner, Russell T.; Evans, Glenda L.; John Ballard, F. John; Doran, Patrick M.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2002-01-01

    Elevated serum levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) and a precursor form of IGF-II are associated with marked increases in bone formation and skeletal mass in patients with hepatitis C-associated osteosclerosis. In vitro studies indicate that IGF-II in complex with IGFBP-2 has high affinity for bone matrix and is able to stimulate osteoblast proliferation. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of the IGF-II/IGFBP-2 complex to increase bone mass in vivo. Osteopenia of the femur was induced by unilateral sciatic neurectomy in rats. At the time of surgery, 14-day osmotic minipumps containing vehicle or 2 microg IGF-II+9 microg IGFBP-2/100g body weight/day were implanted subcutaneously in the neck. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were taken the day of surgery and 14 days later using a PIXImus small animal densitometer. Neurectomy of the right hindlimb resulted in a 9% decrease in right femur BMD (P<0.05 vs. baseline). This loss in BMD was completely prevented by treatment with IGF-II/IGFBP-2. On the control limb, there was no loss of BMD over the 14 days and IGF-II/IGFBP-2 treatment resulted in a 9% increase in left femur BMD (P<0.05). Bone histomorphometry indicated increases in endocortical and cancellous bone formation rates and in trabecular thickness. These results demonstrate that short-term administration of the IGF-II/IGFBP-2 complex can prevent loss of BMD associated with disuse osteoporosis and stimulate bone formation in adult rats. Furthermore, they provide proof of concept for a novel anabolic approach to increasing bone mass in humans with osteoporosis.

  8. Surgical positioning of orthodontic mini-implants with guides fabricated on models replicated with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Hun; Choi, Yong-Suk; Hwang, Eui-Hwan; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Nelson, Gerald

    2007-04-01

    This article illustrates a new surgical guide system that uses cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to replicate dental models; surgical guides for the proper positioning of orthodontic mini-implants were fabricated on the replicas, and the guides were used for precise placement. The indications, efficacy, and possible complications of this method are discussed. Patients who were planning to have orthodontic mini-implant treatment were recruited for this study. A CBCT system (PSR 9000N, Asahi Roentgen, Kyoto, Japan) was used to acquire virtual slices of the posterior maxilla that were 0.1 to 0.15 mm thick. Color 3-dimensional rapid prototyping was used to differentiate teeth, alveolus, and maxillary sinus wall. A surgical guide for the mini-implant was fabricated on the replica model. Proper positioning for mini-implants on the posterior maxilla was determined by viewing the CBCT images. The surgical guide was placed on the clinical site, and it allowed precise pilot drilling and accurate placement of the mini-implant. CBCT imaging allows remarkably lower radiation doses and thinner acquisition slices compared with medical computed tomography. Virtually reproduced replica models enable precise planning for mini-implant positions in anatomically complex sites.

  9. Loudness growth observed under partially tripolar stimulation: model and data from cochlear implant listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, Leonid M; Spahr, Anthony J; Emadi, Gulam

    2007-08-01

    Most cochlear implant strategies utilize monopolar stimulation, likely inducing relatively broad activation of the auditory neurons. The spread of activity may be narrowed with a tripolar stimulation scheme, wherein compensating current of opposite polarity is simultaneously delivered to two adjacent electrodes. In this study, a model and cochlear implant subjects were used to examine loudness growth for varying amounts of tripolar compensation, parameterized by a coefficient sigma, ranging from 0 (monopolar) to 1 (full tripolar). In both the model and the subjects, current required for threshold activation could be approximated by I(sigma)=Ithr(0)(1-sigmaK), with fitted constants Ithr(0) and K. Three of the subjects had a "positioner," intended to place their electrode arrays closer to their neural tissue. The values of K were smaller for the positioner users and for a "close" electrode-to-tissue distance in the model. Above threshold, equal-loudness contours for some subjects deviated significantly from a linear scale-up of the threshold approximations. The patterns of deviation were similar to those observed in the model for conditions in which most of the neurons near the center electrode were excited.

  10. EEG Signal Quality of a Subcutaneous Recording System Compared to Standard Surface Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Duun-Henriksen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We provide a comprehensive verification of a new subcutaneous EEG recording device which promises robust and unobtrusive measurements over ultra-long time periods. The approach is evaluated against a state-of-the-art surface EEG electrode technology. Materials and Methods. An electrode powered by an inductive link was subcutaneously implanted on five subjects. Surface electrodes were placed at sites corresponding to the subcutaneous electrodes, and the EEG signals were evaluated with both quantitative (power spectral density and coherence analysis and qualitative (blinded subjective scoring by neurophysiologists analysis. Results. The power spectral density and coherence analysis were very similar during measurements of resting EEG. The scoring by neurophysiologists showed a higher EEG quality for the implanted system for different subject states (eyes open and eyes closed. This was most likely due to higher amplitude of the subcutaneous signals. During periods with artifacts, such as chewing, blinking, and eye movement, the two systems performed equally well. Conclusions. Subcutaneous measurements of EEG with the test device showed high quality as measured by both quantitative and more subjective qualitative methods. The signal might be superior to surface EEG in some aspects and provides a method of ultra-long term EEG recording in situations where this is required and where a small number of EEG electrodes are sufficient.

  11. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosten, Astrid W; Abrantes, João A; Jönsson, Siv; de Bruijn, Peter; Kuip, Evelien J M; Falcão, Amílcar; van der Rijt, Carin C D; Mathijssen, Ron H J

    2016-04-01

    Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl. Furthermore, we evaluated rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route. Fifty-two patients treated with subcutaneous and/or transdermal fentanyl for moderate to severe cancer-related pain participated. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed and evaluated using non-linear mixed-effects modelling. For rotations from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, a 1:1 dose conversion ratio was used while the subcutaneous infusion was continued for 12 h (with a 50 % tapering after 6 h). A 6-h scheme with 50 % tapering after 3 h was simulated using the final model. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and separate first-order absorption processes for each route adequately described the data. The estimated apparent clearance of fentanyl was 49.6 L/h; the absorption rate constant for subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl was 0.0358 and 0.0135 h(-1), respectively. Moderate to large inter-individual and inter-occasion variability was found. Around rotation from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, measured and simulated plasma fentanyl concentrations rose and increasing side effects were observed. We describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl in one patient cohort and report several findings that are relevant for clinical practice. Further research is warranted to study the optimal scheme for rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route.

  12. Factors associated with hearing loss in a normal-hearing guinea pig model of Hybrid cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Chiemi; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh; Loera, Katherine; Stark, Gemaine; Reiss, Lina

    2014-10-01

    The Hybrid cochlear implant (CI), also known as Electro-Acoustic Stimulation (EAS), is a new type of CI that preserves residual acoustic hearing and enables combined cochlear implant and hearing aid use in the same ear. However, 30-55% of patients experience acoustic hearing loss within days to months after activation, suggesting that both surgical trauma and electrical stimulation may cause hearing loss. The goals of this study were to: 1) determine the contributions of both implantation surgery and EAS to hearing loss in a normal-hearing guinea pig model; 2) determine which cochlear structural changes are associated with hearing loss after surgery and EAS. Two groups of animals were implanted (n = 6 per group), with one group receiving chronic acoustic and electric stimulation for 10 weeks, and the other group receiving no direct acoustic or electric stimulation during this time frame. A third group (n = 6) was not implanted, but received chronic acoustic stimulation. Auditory brainstem response thresholds were followed over time at 1, 2, 6, and 16 kHz. At the end of the study, the following cochlear measures were quantified: hair cells, spiral ganglion neuron density, fibrous tissue density, and stria vascularis blood vessel density; the presence or absence of ossification around the electrode entry was also noted. After surgery, implanted animals experienced a range of 0-55 dB of threshold shifts in the vicinity of the electrode at 6 and 16 kHz. The degree of hearing loss was significantly correlated with reduced stria vascularis vessel density and with the presence of ossification, but not with hair cell counts, spiral ganglion neuron density, or fibrosis area. After 10 weeks of stimulation, 67% of implanted, stimulated animals had more than 10 dB of additional threshold shift at 1 kHz, compared to 17% of implanted, non-stimulated animals and 0% of non-implanted animals. This 1-kHz hearing loss was not associated with changes in any of the cochlear measures

  13. Axial displacement of external and internal implant-abutment connection evaluated by linear mixed model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Hyon-Woo; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Kim, Shin-Koo

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the axial displacement of external and internal implant-abutment connection after cyclic loading. Three groups of external abutments (Ext group), an internal tapered one-piece-type abutment (Int-1 group), and an internal tapered two-piece-type abutment (Int-2 group) were prepared. Cyclic loading was applied to implant-abutment assemblies at 150 N with a frequency of 3 Hz. The amount of axial displacement, the Periotest values (PTVs), and the removal torque values(RTVs) were measured. Both a repeated measures analysis of variance and pattern analysis based on the linear mixed model were used for statistical analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the surface of the implant-abutment connection. The mean axial displacements after 1,000,000 cycles were 0.6 μm in the Ext group, 3.7 μm in the Int-1 group, and 9.0 μm in the Int-2 group. Pattern analysis revealed a breakpoint at 171 cycles. The Ext group showed no declining pattern, and the Int-1 group showed no declining pattern after the breakpoint (171 cycles). However, the Int-2 group experienced continuous axial displacement. After cyclic loading, the PTV decreased in the Int-2 group, and the RTV decreased in all groups. SEM imaging revealed surface wear in all groups. Axial displacement and surface wear occurred in all groups. The PTVs remained stable, but the RTVs decreased after cyclic loading. Based on linear mixed model analysis, the Ext and Int-1 groups' axial displacements plateaued after little cyclic loading. The Int-2 group's rate of axial displacement slowed after 100,000 cycles.

  14. Effects of Untreated Periodontitis on Osseointegration of Dental Implants in a Beagle Dog Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daehyun; Sohn, Byungjin; Kim, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Sungtae; Koo, Ki-Tae; Kim, Tae-Il; Seol, Yang-Jo; Lee, Yong-Moo; Rhyu, In-Chul; Ku, Young

    2016-10-01

    There have been previous studies on the relationship between periodontitis and peri-implantitis, but limited information is available on how periodontitis affects osseointegration and wound healing of newly placed dental implants adjacent to natural teeth. The objective of the present experiment is to evaluate healing around dental implants adjacent to teeth with untreated experimental periodontitis. The study included six male beagle dogs. Scaling and plaque control procedures were performed on three dogs (control group). In the other three dogs (experimental group), retraction cords and ligature wires were placed subgingivally around all premolars and the first molars. Induced experimental periodontitis was confirmed after 3 months. Each control or experimental group was divided into two subgroups depending on the timing of implant placement (immediate/delayed). Twelve dental implants (two implants for each dog) were placed immediately, and the other 12 dental implants (two implants for each dog) were placed 2 months after extraction. The animals were sacrificed 2 months after implant placement. Histologic and histometric analyses were performed. Four implants (three from the immediate placement group and one from the delayed placement group) failed in the experimental group. There were significant differences in the percentage of bone-to-implant contact and marginal bone volume density between the control and experimental groups. Both parameters were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P implants is associated with a higher failure rate compared with delayed placement. Untreated experimental periodontitis was correlated with compromised osseointegration in the implants with delayed placement.

  15. Evaluation of Strain Distribution in Bone around Implant in Treatment Design of Overdentures Using Computer and Modeling of Finite Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Khoshhal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Introduction: Few studies have investigated the distribution of stress around implants. In this study the distribution of stress in bones around implants was investigated in five overdenture (OD treatment designs including OD-1, OD-2, OD-3, OD-4 and OD-5. Materials and methods: The Catia modeling software was used in order to simulate the tooth/implant model and bone. First, the borders of cancellous and cortical bone in each section of the CT images were attained by Photoshop software. Then, modeling softwares SolidWorks and NUMBER were applied to make the final three-dimensional model of jaw. Finally, the amount of stress on the surface of bone/implant was studied by means of stress analysis software (Ansys v11.0. Results: Protrusive movements of implants B and D in OD-1 showed the highest amount of strain, 2435 εµ. Also, high amounts of strain, 1668 and 1557 εµwere observed in OD-1 and OD-2 designs in lateral movements respectively. Conclusion: The bottom line is that no forces to the extent of destruction based on the Ferost model were found for these designs. The highest amount of strain occurred in OD-1 design, which is held in mild overload window. Moreover, the amounts of strain in the rest of designs investigated were in adaptive window.

  16. Evaluation of Strain Distribution in Bone around Implant in Treatment Design of Overdentures Using Computer and Modeling of Finite Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Khoshhal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Introduction: Few studies have investigated the distribution of stress around implants. In this study the distribution of stress in bones around implants was investigated in five overdenture (OD treatment designs including OD-1, OD-2, OD-3, OD-4 and OD-5. Materials and methods: The Catia modeling software was used in order to simulate the tooth/implant model and bone. First, the borders of cancellous and cortical bone in each section of the CT images were attained by Photoshop software. Then, modeling softwares SolidWorks and NUMBER were applied to make the final three-dimensional model of jaw. Finally, the amount of stress on the surface of bone/implant was studied by means of stress analysis software (Ansys v11.0. Results: Protrusive movements of implants B and D in OD-1 showed the highest amount of strain, 2435 εµ. Also, high amounts of strain, 1668 and 1557 εµwere observed in OD-1 and OD-2 designs in lateral movements respectively. Conclusion: The bottom line is that no forces to the extent of destruction based on the Ferost model were found for these designs. The highest amount of strain occurred in OD-1 design, which is held in mild overload window. Moreover, the amounts of strain in the rest of designs investigated were in adaptive window.

  17. An animal model to evaluate skin-implant-bone integration and gait with a prosthesis directly attached to the residual limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Brad J; Prilutsky, Boris I; Kistenberg, Robert S; Dalton, John F; Pitkin, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Despite the number of advantages of bone-anchored prostheses, their use in patients is limited due to the lack of complete skin-implant integration. The objective of the present study was to develop an animal model that would permit both detailed investigations of gait with a bone-anchored limb prosthesis and histological analysis of the skin-implant-bone interface after physiological loading of the implant during standing and walking. Full-body mechanics of walking in two cats were recorded and analyzed before and after implantation of a percutaneous porous titanium pylon into the right tibia and attachment of a prosthesis. The rehabilitation procedures included initial limb casting, progressively increasing loading on the implant, and standing and locomotor training. Detailed histological analysis of bone and skin ingrowth into implant was performed at the end of the study. The two animals adopted the bone-anchored prosthesis for standing and locomotion, although loads on the prosthetic limb during walking decreased by 22% and 62%, respectively, 4months after implantation. The animals shifted body weight to the contralateral side and increased propulsion forces by the contralateral hindlimb. Histological analysis of the limb implants demonstrated bone and skin ingrowth. The developed animal model to study prosthetic gait and tissue integration with the implant demonstrated that porous titanium implants may permit bone and skin integration and prosthetic gait with a bone-anchored prosthesis. Future studies with this model will help optimize the implant and prosthesis properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of a Three-Dimensional Model to Optimize a MEDPOR Implant for Delayed Reconstruction of a Suprastructure Maxillectomy Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echo, Anthony; Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William; McKnight, Aisha; Izaddoost, Shayan

    2013-01-01

    The use of a three-dimensional (3-D) model has been well described for craniomaxillofacial reconstruction, especially with the preoperative planning of free fibula flaps. This article reports the application of an innovative 3-D model approach for the calculation of the exact contours, angles, length, and general morphology of a prefabricated MEDPOR 2/3 orbital implant for reconstruction of a suprastructure maxillectomy defect. The 3-D model allowed intraoperative modification of the MEDPOR implant which decreased the risk of iatrogenic harm, contamination while also improving aesthetic results and function. With the aid of preoperative 3-D models, porous polypropylene facial implants can be contoured efficiently intraoperatively to precisely reconstruct complex craniomaxillofacial defects. PMID:24436774

  19. Understanding corrosion behavior of Mg-Zn-Ca alloys from subcutaneous mouse model: effect of Zn element concentration and plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongseok; Tan, Zongqing; Jurey, Chris; Xu, Zhigang; Dong, Zhongyun; Collins, Boyce; Yun, Yeoheung; Sankar, Jagannathan

    2015-03-01

    Mg-Zn-Ca alloys are considered as suitable biodegradable metallic implants because of their biocompatibility and proper physical properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of Zn concentration of Mg-xZn-0.3Ca (x=1, 3 and 5wt.%) alloys and surface modification by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on corrosion behavior in in vivo environment in terms of microstructure, corrosion rate, types of corrosion, and corrosion product formation. Microstructure analysis of alloys and morphological characterization of corrosion products were conducted using x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Elemental composition and crystal structure of corrosion products were determined using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that 1) as-cast Mg-xZn-0.3Ca alloys are composed of Mg matrix and a secondary phase of Ca2Mg6Zn3 formed along grain boundaries, 2) the corrosion rate of Mg-xZn-0.3Ca alloys increases with increasing concentration of Zn in the alloy, 3) corrosion rates of alloys treated by PEO sample are decreased in in vivo environment, and 4) the corrosion products of these alloys after in vivo tests are identified as brucite (Mg(OH)2), hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), and magnesite (MgCO3·3H2O). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration (fSCIg)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Conlon, Niall; Petermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    and diverse medical needs that treatments for SID management should strive to meet. In this special report, we study the opportunities provided by facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration (fSCIg) to treat patients for whom the conventional routes (intravenous and subcutaneous) are sub...

  1. Kinetics modeling of precipitation with characteristic shape during post-implantation annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Dar Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the precipitation with characteristic shape in the microstructure during post-implantation annealing via a theoretical modeling approach. The processes of precipitates formation and evolution during phase separation were based on a nucleation and growth mechanism of atomic diffusion. Different stages of the precipitation, including the nucleation, growth and coalescence, were distinctly revealed in the numerical simulations. In addition, the influences of ion dose, temperature and crystallographic symmetry on the processes of faceted precipitation were also demonstrated. To comprehend the kinetic mechanism, the simulation results were further analyzed quantitatively by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA equation. The Avrami exponents obtained from the regression curves varied from 1.47 to 0.52 for different conditions. With the increase of ion dose and temperature, the nucleation and growth of precipitations were expedited in accordance with the shortened incubation time and the raised coefficient of growth rate. A miscellaneous shape of precipitates in various crystallographic symmetry systems could be simulated through this anisotropic model. From the analyses of the kinetics, more fundamental information about the nucleation and growth mechanism of faceted precipitation during post-implantation annealing was acquired for future application.

  2. Mathematical model of mechanical testing of bone-implant (4.5 mm LCP construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Urbanová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the possibility of substituting time- and material-demanding mechanical testing of a bone defect fixation by mathematical modelling. Based on the mechanical model, a mathematical model of bone-implant construct stabilizing experimental segmental femoral bone defect (segmental ostectomy in a miniature pig ex vivo model using 4.5 mm titanium LCP was created. It was subsequently computer-loaded by forces acting parallel to the long axis of the construct. By the effect of the acting forces the displacement vector sum of individual construct points occurred. The greatest displacement was noted in the end segments of the bone in close proximity to ostectomy and in the area of the empty central plate hole (without screw at the level of the segmental bone defect. By studying the equivalent von Mises stress σEQV on LCP as part of the tested construct we found that the greatest changes of stress occur in the place of the empty central plate hole. The distribution of this strain was relatively symmetrical along both sides of the hole. The exceeding of the yield stress value and irreversible plastic deformations in this segment of LCP occurred at the acting of the force of 360 N. These findings are in line with the character of damage of the same construct loaded during its mechanic testing. We succeeded in creating a mathematical model of the bone-implant construct which may be further used for computer modelling of real loading of similar constructs chosen for fixation of bone defects in both experimental and clinical practice.

  3. Understanding corrosion behavior of Mg–Zn–Ca alloys from subcutaneous mouse model: Effect of Zn element concentration and plasma electrolytic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yongseok [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Tan, Zongqing [Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Jurey, Chris [Luke Engineering, Wadsworth, OH 44282 (United States); Xu, Zhigang [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Dong, Zhongyun [Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Collins, Boyce [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Yun, Yeoheung, E-mail: yyun@ncat.edu [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Sankar, Jagannathan [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Mg–Zn–Ca alloys are considered as suitable biodegradable metallic implants because of their biocompatibility and proper physical properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of Zn concentration of Mg–xZn–0.3Ca (x = 1, 3 and 5 wt.%) alloys and surface modification by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on corrosion behavior in in vivo environment in terms of microstructure, corrosion rate, types of corrosion, and corrosion product formation. Microstructure analysis of alloys and morphological characterization of corrosion products were conducted using x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Elemental composition and crystal structure of corrosion products were determined using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that 1) as-cast Mg–xZn–0.3Ca alloys are composed of Mg matrix and a secondary phase of Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 6}Zn{sub 3} formed along grain boundaries, 2) the corrosion rate of Mg–xZn–0.3Ca alloys increases with increasing concentration of Zn in the alloy, 3) corrosion rates of alloys treated by PEO sample are decreased in in vivo environment, and 4) the corrosion products of these alloys after in vivo tests are identified as brucite (Mg(OH){sub 2}), hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O). - Highlights: • Effects of PEO and Zn concentration in Mg–xZn–0.3Ca alloys on biodegradation • Corrosion rate of Mg–xZn–0.3Ca alloys increases with increasing Zn concentration. • Plasma electrolytic oxidation retards the biodegradation of Mg–xZn–0.3Ca alloys.

  4. Constant strain rate and peri-implant bone modeling: an in vivo longitudinal micro-CT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Els; Jaecques, Siegfried V N; Wevers, Martine; Sloten, Jos Vander; Naert, Ignace E

    2013-06-01

    Strain, frequency, loading time, and strain rate, among others, determine mechanical parameters in osteogenic loading. We showed a significant osteogenic effect on bone mass (BM) by daily peri-implant loading at 1.600µε.s(-1) after 4 weeks. To study the peri-implant osteogenic effect of frequency and strain in the guinea pig tibia by in vivo longitudinal micro-computed tomography (CT) analysis. One week after implant installation in both hind limb tibiae, one implant was loaded daily for 10' during 4 weeks, while the other served as control. Frequencies (3, 10, and 30Hz) and strains varied alike in the three series to keep the strain rate constant at 1.600µε.s(-1) . In vivo micro-CT scans were taken of both tibiae: 1 week after implantation but before loading (v1) and after 2 (v2) and 4 weeks (v3) of loading as well as postmortem (pm). BM (BM (%) bone-occupied area fraction) was calculated as well as the difference between test and control sides (delta BM) RESULTS: All implants (n=78) were clinically stable at 4 weeks. Significant increase in BM was measured between v1 and v2 (pimplant marrow 500 Region of Interest already 2 weeks after loading (p=.01) and was significantly larger (11%) in series 1 compared with series 2 (p=.006) and 3 (p=.016). Within the constraints of constant loading time and strain rate, the effect of early implant loading on the peri-implant bone is strongly dependent on strain and frequency. This cortical bone model has shown to be most sensitive for high force loading at low frequency. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. An extended five-stream model for diffusion of ion-implanted dopants in monocrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khina, B.B.

    2007-01-01

    Low-energy high-dose ion implantation of different dopants (P, Sb, As, B and others) into monocrystalline silicon with subsequent thermal annealing is used for the formation of ultra-shallow p-n junctions in modern VLSI circuit technology. During annealing, dopant activation and diffusion in silicon takes place. The experimentally observed phenomenon of transient enhanced diffusion (TED), which is typically ascribed to the interaction of diffusing species with non-equilibrium point defects accumulated in silicon due to ion damage, and formation of small clusters and extended defects, hinders further down scaling of p-n junctions in VLSI circuits. TED is currently a subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigation in many binary and multicomponent systems. However, the state-of-the-art mathematical models of dopant diffusion, which are based on the so-called 'five-stream' approach, and modern TCAD software packages such as SUPREM-4 (by Silvaco Data Systems, Ltd.) that implement these models encounter severe difficulties in describing TED. Solving the intricate problem of TED suppression and development of novel regimes of ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing is impossible without elaboration of new mathematical models and computer simulation of this complex phenomenon. In this work, an extended five-stream model for diffusion in silicon is developed which takes into account all possible charge states of point defects (vacancies and silicon self-interstitials) and diffusing pairs 'dopant atom-vacancy' and 'dopant atom-silicon self-interstitial'. The model includes the drift terms for differently charged point defects and pairs in the internal electric field and the kinetics of interaction between unlike 'species' (generation and annihilation of pairs and annihilation of point defects). Expressions for diffusion coefficients and numerous sink/source terms that appear in the non-linear, non-steady-state reaction-diffusion equations are derived

  6. The use of UML activity diagrams and the i* language in the modeling of the balanced scorecard implantation process

    OpenAIRE

    Haya, Mariela; Franch, Xavier; Mayol, Enric

    2005-01-01

    Business management is a complex task that can be facilitated using different methodologies and models. One of their most relevant purposes is to align the organization strategy with the daily functioning of the organization. One of these models is the Balanced Scorecard (BSC). In this paper, we propose a modeling strategy for the BSC implantation process. We will model it using UML Activity Diagrams and Strategy Dependency models of the language i*. The Activity Diagrams allow determining th...

  7. Quantifying shape changes of silicone breast implants in a murine model using in vivo micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily E; Perilli, Egon; Carati, Colin J; Reynolds, Karen J

    2017-08-01

    A major complication of silicone breast implants is the formation of a capsule around the implant known as capsular contracture which results in the distortion of the implant. Recently, a mouse model for studying capsular contracture was examined using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), however, only qualitative changes were reported. The aim of this study was to develop a quantitative method for comparing the shape changes of silicone implants using in vivo micro-CT. Mice were bilaterally implanted with silicone implants and underwent ionizing radiation to induce capsular contracture. On day 28 post-surgery mice were examined in vivo using micro-CT. The reconstructed cross-section images were visually inspected to identify distortion. Measurements were taken in 2D and 3D to quantify the shape of the implants in the normal (n = 11) and distorted (n = 5) groups. The degree of anisotropy was significantly higher in the distorted implants in the transaxial view (0.99 vs. 1.19, p = 0.002) and the y-axis lengths were significantly shorter in the sagittal (9.27 mm vs. 8.55 mm, p = 0.015) and coronal (9.24 mm vs. 8.76 mm, p = 0.031) views, indicating a deviation from the circular cross-section and shortening of the long axis. The 3D analysis revealed a significantly lower average thickness (sphere-fitting method) in distorted implants (6.86 mm vs. 5.49 mm, p = 0.002), whereas the volume and surface area did not show significant changes. Statistically significant differences between normal and distorted implants were found in 2D and 3D using distance measurements performed via micro-CT. This objective analysis method can be useful for a range of studies involving deformable implants using in vivo micro-CT. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1447-1452, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. PK/PD modelling of glucose-insulin-glucagon dynamics in healthy dogs after a subcutaneous bolus administration of native glucagon or a novel glucagon analogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Boye Knudsen, Carsten

    by Zealand Pharma A/S. Research Design and Methods We expanded a physiological model of endogenous glucose production with multiplicative effects of insulin and glucagon and combined it with the Hovorka glucoregulatory model. We used a Bayesian framework to perform multidimensional MAP estimation of model...

  9. Modeling of extrinsic extended defect evolution in ion-implanted silicon upon thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, C.J.; Cristiano, F.; Colombeau, B.; Claverie, A.; Cowern, N.E.B.

    2004-01-01

    A physically motivated model that accounts for the spatial and temporal evolution of extended defect distribution in ion-implanted Si is presented. Free physical parameters are extracted from experimental data and by means of a genetic algorithm (GA). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data and self-interstitial oversaturation measurements are combined in the same fitting procedure to eliminate unphysical solutions and find the optimum set of parameters. The calibration of parameters shows that binding energies of small self-interstitial clusters exhibit strong minima, as reported in other investigations. It is demonstrated that the calibrated model we propose is able to predict a wide variety of physical phenomena, from the oversaturation of self-interstitials via the mean-size distribution of {1 1 3} defects to the depth distribution of the density of the latter

  10. Stereo imaging and cytocompatibility of a model dental implant surface formed by direct laser fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Carlo; Raspanti, Mario; Traini, Tonino; Piattelli, Adriano; Sammons, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    Direct laser fabrication (DLF) allows solids with complex geometry to be produced by sintering metal powder particles in a focused laser beam. In this study, 10 Ti6Al4V alloy model dental root implants were obtained by DLF, and surface characterization was carried out using stereo scanning electron microscopy to produce 3D reconstructions. The surfaces were extremely irregular, with approximately 100 microm deep, narrow intercommunicating crevices, shallow depressions and deep, rounded pits of widely variable shape and size, showing ample scope for interlocking with the host bone. Roughness parameters were as follows: R(t), 360.8 microm; R(z), 358.4 microm; R(a), 67.4 microm; and R(q), 78.0 microm. Disc specimens produced by DLF with an identically prepared surface were used for biocompatibility studies with rat calvarial osteoblasts: After 9 days, cells had attached and spread on the DLF surface, spanning across the crevices, and voids. Cell density was similar to that on a commercial rough microtextured surface but lower than on commercial smooth machined and smooth-textured grit-blasted, acid-etched surfaces. Human fibrin clot extension on the DLF surface was slightly improved by inorganic acid etching to increase the microroughness. With further refinements, DLF could be an economical means of manufacturing implants from titanium alloys. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Iris-fixated phakic intraocular lens implantation to correct myopia and a predictive model of endothelial cell loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouheraoua, Nacim; Bonnet, Clemence; Labbé, Antoine; Sandali, Otman; Lecuen, Nicolas; Ameline, Barbara; Borderie, Vincent; Laroche, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    To report long-term results of Artisan phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) to correct myopia and to propose a model predicting endothelial cell loss after pIOL implantation. Quinze-Vingts National Ophthalmology Hospital, Paris, France. Retrospective, interventional case series. Uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), and central endothelial cell count (ECC) were determined before and at yearly intervals up to 5 years after pIOL implantation. Linear model analysis was performed to present a model that describes endothelial cell loss as a linear decrease and an additional decrease depending on postoperative loss. A total of 49 patients (68 eyes) implanted with pIOLs from January 2000 to January 2009 were evaluated. The mean preoperative and final spherical equivalent (SE) were -13 ± 4.10 and -0.75 ± 0.74 diopters (D), respectively. The mean preoperative and final central ECC were 2629 ± 366 and 2250 ± 454 cells/mm(2), respectively. There were no intraoperative complications for any of the eyes. One eye required surgery for repositioning the pIOL, and 1 eye required pIOL exchange for postoperative refractive error. The model predicted that for patients with preoperative ECC of 3000, 2500, and 2000 cells/mm(2), a critical ECC of 1500 cells/mm(2) will be reached at 39, 28, and 15 years after implantation, respectively. Implantation of the pIOL was an effective and stable procedure after 5 years of follow-up. The presented model predicted EC loss after pIOL implantation, which can assist ophthalmologists in patient selection and follow-up. The authors report no conflict of interest. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, Geoffrey

    1975-01-01

    First, ion implantation in semiconductors is discussed: ion penetration, annealing of damage, gettering, ion implanted semiconductor devices, equipement requirements for ion implantation. The importance of channeling for ion implantation is studied. Then, some applications of ion implantation in metals are presented: study of the corrosion of metals and alloys; influence or ion implantation on the surface-friction and wear properties of metals; hyperfine interactions in implanted metals

  13. MRI-Based Multiscale Model for Electromagnetic Analysis in the Human Head with Implanted DBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ida Iacono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an established procedure for the treatment of movement and affective disorders. Patients with DBS may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to evaluate injuries or comorbidities. However, the MRI radio-frequency (RF energy may cause excessive tissue heating particularly near the electrode. This paper studies how the accuracy of numerical modeling of the RF field inside a DBS patient varies with spatial resolution and corresponding anatomical detail of the volume surrounding the electrodes. A multiscale model (MS was created by an atlas-based segmentation using a 1 mm3 head model (mRes refined in the basal ganglia by a 200 μm2 ex-vivo dataset. Four DBS electrodes targeting the left globus pallidus internus were modeled. Electromagnetic simulations at 128 MHz showed that the peak of the electric field of the MS doubled (18.7 kV/m versus 9.33 kV/m and shifted 6.4 mm compared to the mRes model. Additionally, the MS had a sixfold increase over the mRes model in peak-specific absorption rate (SAR of 43.9 kW/kg versus 7 kW/kg. The results suggest that submillimetric resolution and improved anatomical detail in the model may increase the accuracy of computed electric field and local SAR around the tip of the implant.

  14. Mathematic study and numerical implantation of the Vlasov-Darwin model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnendrucker, E.

    1994-12-01

    Numerical simulation of some phenomena in plasma physics, or more generally in electromagnetism, can be more easily done using approximate models of Maxwell equations such as the Darwin model in which the transverse part of the displacement current in the Ampere equation is neglected, or such as the static model in which the time derivatives are neglected. In this note, the Darwin model is presented first, and then an asymptotic analysis of Maxwell equations is given with limit conditions of perfect conductor on one part of the side, and Silver-Muller absorbing conditions on the other part. This allows to obtain a variational formulation for the Darwin model which is a good approximation of Maxwell equations. A variational formulation for the quasi-static model is also obtained. In a second part this implantation is described using a 2-D finite element method coupled with a particulate method for the Vlasov equations which leads to numerical results allowing a determination of the different models application. (J.S.). 2 refs

  15. Peripheral subcutaneous vulvar stimulation in the management of severe and refractory vulvodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andres, Jose; Sanchis-Lopez, Nerea; Asensio-Samper, Juan Marcos; Fabregat-Cid, Gustavo; Dolz, Vicente Molsalve

    2013-02-01

    Vulvodynia is a complex and multifactorial clinical condition with severe pain that occurs in the absence of visible infectious, inflammatory, neoplastic, or neurological findings. A 35-year-old woman with 3 years of dysesthetic vulvodynia tried conventional and interventional medical treatment with inadequate relief. She was offered peripheral subcutaneous vulvar field stimulation and underwent implantation of two vulvar subcutaneous electrodes. At 15 days after treatment and during 1-year follow-up, the patient scored 1 out of 15 on Friedrich scale, 1 out of 10 on the visual analog scale, and 1 out of 10 on the tampon test. The patient no longer requires oral medication. Stimulation with subcutaneous electrodes provided relief from vulvodynia to a patient in whom all previous therapeutic approaches had failed.

  16. Influence of Palatal Coverage and Implant Distribution on Implant Strain in Maxillary Implant Overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshihito; Gonda, Tomoya; Mizuno, Yoko; Fujinami, Yozo; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary implant overdentures are often used in clinical practice. However, there is no agreement or established guidelines regarding prosthetic design or optimal implant placement configuration. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of palatal coverage and implant number and distribution in relation to impact strain under maxillary implant overdentures. A maxillary edentulous model with implants and experimental overdentures with and without palatal coverage was fabricated. Four strain gauges were attached to each implant, and they were positioned in the anterior, premolar, and molar areas. A vertical occlusal load of 98 N was applied through a mandibular complete denture, and the implant strains were compared using one-way analysis of variance (P = .05). The palatolabial strain was much higher on anterior implants than on other implants in both denture types. Although there was no significant difference between the strain under dentures with and without palatal coverage, palateless dentures tended to result in higher implant strain than dentures with palatal coverage. Dentures supported by only two implants registered higher strain than those supported by four or six implants. Implants under palateless dentures registered higher strain than those under dentures with palatal coverage. Anterior implants exhibited higher palatolabial strain than other implants regardless of palatal coverage and implant configuration; it is therefore recommended that maxillary implant overdentures should be supported by six implants with support extending to the distal end of the arch.

  17. Multi-scale modeling of photopolymerization for medical hydrogel-implant design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmocker, Andreas; Khoushabi, Azadeh; Farahi, Salma; Pioletti, Dominique; Bourban, Pierre-Etienne; Manson, Jan A.; Moser, Christophe

    2013-02-01

    We report on the modeling of a photopolymerizable hydrogel and its application as a replacement of the interior of the intervertebral disc (so called Nucleus Pulposus). The hydrogel is initially injected in its liquid form and then photopolymerized via a small catheter. Therefore, also the light necessary for the photopolymerization is constrained to a small light guide to keep the surgical procedure as minimally invasive as possible. Hence, the hydrogel is photopolymerized inside. For applications with restricted physical access and illumination time, such as an Nucleus Pulposus replacement, photopolymerization of volumes with a large volume/illumination-area ratio becomes highly challenging. During polymerization, the material's absorption and scattering coefficients change and directly influence local polymerization rates. By understanding and controlling such polymerization patterns, local material properties can be engineered (e.g. elastic modulus, swelling ratio), to match the set of mechanical requirements for the implant. Thus, it is essential to better understand and model photopolymerization reactions. Experiments were conducted by polymerizing a hydrogel in a column-like volume using an optical fiber for light delivery. Quantitative scattering and absorption values as well as monomer conversion rates of the hydrogel sample were validated using a newly established Monte Carlo model for photopolymerization. The results were used to study and predict 3D polymerization patterns for different illumination configurations. In particular, we show an example of a lumbar intervertebral disc replacement where the jelly core of the intervertebral disc (Nucleus Pulposus) is replaced by an in situ photopolymerized hydrogel. The results provide insights for the development of novel endoscopic light-scattering polymerization probes paving the way for a new generation of implantable hydrogels.

  18. Development of a DIPG Orthotopic Model in Mice Using an Implantable Guide-Screw System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Marigil

    Full Text Available In this work we set to develop and to validate a new in vivo frameless orthotopic Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG model based in the implantation of a guide-screw system.It consisted of a guide-screw also called bolt, a Hamilton syringe with a 26-gauge needle and an insulin-like 15-gauge needle. The guide screw is 2.6 mm in length and harbors a 0.5 mm central hole which accepts the needle of the Hamilton syringe avoiding a theoretical displacement during insertion. The guide-screw is fixed on the mouse skull according to the coordinates: 1mm right to and 0.8 mm posterior to lambda. To reach the pons the Hamilton syringe is adjusted to a 6.5 mm depth using a cuff that serves as a stopper. This system allows delivering not only cells but also any kind of intratumoral chemotherapy, antibodies or gene/viral therapies.The guide-screw was successfully implanted in 10 immunodeficient mice and the animals were inoculated with DIPG human cell lines during the same anesthetic period. All the mice developed severe neurologic symptoms and had a median overall survival of 95 days ranging the time of death from 81 to 116 days. Histopathological analysis confirmed tumor into the pons in all animals confirming the validity of this model.Here we presented a reproducible and frameless DIPG model that allows for rapid evaluation of tumorigenicity and efficacy of chemotherapeutic or gene therapy products delivered intratumorally to the pons.

  19. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by cladophialophora boppii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Rickson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is an infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, caused by dematiaceous fungi. An adult male presented with a history of multiple reddish nodules over the face and hands. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsies showed a dense granulomatous infiltrate of macrophages, containing intracytoplasmic basophilic bodies throughout the dermis. Gomori methenamine-silver stained sections revealed yeast cells within macrophages. Multiple cultures on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar grew Cladophialophora boppii. The patient was treated with oral itraconazole for a year and the response monitored with dermal ultrasound. This is the first case report of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by Cl. boppii in India.

  20. Massive Preperitoneal Hematoma after a Subcutaneous Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Katagiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preperitoneal hematomas are rare and can develop after surgery or trauma. A 74-year-old woman, receiving systemic anticoagulation, developed a massive preperitoneal hematoma after a subcutaneous injection of teriparatide using a 32-gauge, 4 mm needle. In this patient, there were two factors, the subcutaneous injection of teriparatide and systemic anticoagulation, associated with development of the hematoma. These two factors are especially significant, because they are widely used clinically. Although extremely rare, physicians must consider this potentially life-threatening complication after subcutaneous injections, especially in patients receiving anticoagulation.

  1. Hydroxyapatite coating on PEEK implants: Biomechanical and histological study in a rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, John W. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Montelongo, Sergio A.; Ong, Joo L.; Guda, Teja [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Allen, Matthew J. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Rabiei, Afsaneh, E-mail: arabiei@ncsu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    A bioactive two-layer coating consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated on cylindrical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). Post-deposition heat treatments via variable frequency microwave annealing with and without subsequent autoclaving were used to crystallize the as-deposited amorphous HA layer. Microstructural analysis, performed by TEM and EDS, showed that these methods were capable of crystallizing HA coating on PEEK. The in vivo response to cylindrical PEEK samples with and without coating was studied by implanting uncoated PEEK and coated PEEK implants in the lateral femoral condyle of 18 rabbits. Animals were studied in two groups of 9 for observation at 6 or 18 weeks post surgery. Micro-CT analysis, histology, and mechanical pull-out tests were performed to determine the effect of the coating on osseointegration. The heat-treated HA/YSZ coatings showed improved implant fixation as well as higher bone regeneration and bone-implant contact area compared to uncoated PEEK. The study offers a novel method to coat PEEK implants with improved osseointegration. - Highlights: • Method for improving osseointegration of PEEK implants is analyzed in vivo. • Uniform multilayer coatings were deposited on cylindrical PEEK implants. • Microwave and hydrothermal heat treatments crystallized the hydroxyapatite coating. • Healing response shows coated implants increase bone growth and implant fixation.

  2. Hydroxyapatite coating on PEEK implants: Biomechanical and histological study in a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, John W.; Montelongo, Sergio A.; Ong, Joo L.; Guda, Teja; Allen, Matthew J.; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    A bioactive two-layer coating consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated on cylindrical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). Post-deposition heat treatments via variable frequency microwave annealing with and without subsequent autoclaving were used to crystallize the as-deposited amorphous HA layer. Microstructural analysis, performed by TEM and EDS, showed that these methods were capable of crystallizing HA coating on PEEK. The in vivo response to cylindrical PEEK samples with and without coating was studied by implanting uncoated PEEK and coated PEEK implants in the lateral femoral condyle of 18 rabbits. Animals were studied in two groups of 9 for observation at 6 or 18 weeks post surgery. Micro-CT analysis, histology, and mechanical pull-out tests were performed to determine the effect of the coating on osseointegration. The heat-treated HA/YSZ coatings showed improved implant fixation as well as higher bone regeneration and bone-implant contact area compared to uncoated PEEK. The study offers a novel method to coat PEEK implants with improved osseointegration. - Highlights: • Method for improving osseointegration of PEEK implants is analyzed in vivo. • Uniform multilayer coatings were deposited on cylindrical PEEK implants. • Microwave and hydrothermal heat treatments crystallized the hydroxyapatite coating. • Healing response shows coated implants increase bone growth and implant fixation.

  3. [Digital signal processing of a novel neuron discharge model stimulation strategy for cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiwei; Xu, Yuejin; Miu, Jichang; Zhou, Linghong; Xiao, Zhongju

    2012-10-01

    To apply the classic leakage integrate-and-fire models, based on the mechanism of the generation of physiological auditory stimulation, in the information processing coding of cochlear implants to improve the auditory result. The results of algorithm simulation in digital signal processor (DSP) were imported into Matlab for a comparative analysis. Compared with CIS coding, the algorithm of membrane potential integrate-and-fire (MPIF) allowed more natural pulse discharge in a pseudo-random manner to better fit the physiological structures. The MPIF algorithm can effectively solve the problem of the dynamic structure of the delivered auditory information sequence issued in the auditory center and allowed integration of the stimulating pulses and time coding to ensure the coherence and relevance of the stimulating pulse time.

  4. Reliability of Soft Tissue Model Based Implant Surgical Guides; A Methodological Mistake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabour, Siamak; Dastjerdi, Elahe Vahid

    2012-08-20

    Abstract We were interested to read the paper by Maney P and colleagues published in the July 2012 issue of J Oral Implantol. The authors aimed to assess the reliability of soft tissue model based implant surgical guides reported that the accuracy was evaluated using software. 1 I found the manuscript title of Maney P, et al. incorrect and misleading. Moreover, they reported twenty-two sites (46.81%) were considered accurate (13 of 24 maxillary and 9 of 23 mandibular sites). As the authors point out in their conclusion, Soft tissue models do not always provide sufficient accuracy for implant surgical guide fabrication.Reliability (precision) and validity (accuracy) are two different methodological issues in researches. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, likelihood ratio positive (true positive/false negative) and likelihood ratio negative (false positive/ true negative) as well as odds ratio (true results\\false results - preferably more than 50) are among the tests to evaluate the validity (accuracy) of a single test compared to a gold standard.2-4 It is not clear that the reported twenty-two sites (46.81%) which were considered accurate related to which of the above mentioned estimates for validity analysis. Reliability (repeatability or reproducibility) is being assessed by different statistical tests such as Pearson r, least square and paired t.test which all of them are among common mistakes in reliability analysis 5. Briefly, for quantitative variable Intra Class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and for qualitative variables weighted kappa should be used with caution because kappa has its own limitation too. Regarding reliability or agreement, it is good to know that for computing kappa value, just concordant cells are being considered, whereas discordant cells should also be taking into account in order to reach a correct estimation of agreement (Weighted kappa).2-4 As a take home message, for reliability and validity analysis, appropriate tests should be

  5. Primary Kaposi sarcoma of the subcutaneous tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezube Bruce J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Involvement of the subcutis by Kaposi sarcoma (KS occurs primarily when cutaneous KS lesions evolve into deep penetrating nodular tumors. Primary KS of the subcutaneous tissue is an exceptional manifestation of this low-grade vascular neoplasm. Case presentation We present a unique case of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-associated KS manifesting primarily in the subcutaneous tissue of the anterior thigh in a 43-year-old male, which occurred without overlying visible skin changes or concomitant KS disease elsewhere. Radiological imaging and tissue biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of KS. Conclusion This is the first documented case of primary subcutaneous KS occurring in the setting of AIDS. The differential diagnosis of an isolated subcutaneous lesion in an human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individual is broad, and requires both imaging and a histopathological diagnosis to guide appropriate therapy.

  6. Modeling of the Near Field Coupling Between an External Loop and an Implantable Spiral Chip Antennas in Biosensor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the near field coupling between an external hand-held loop antenna and an implantable miniature (1x1 mm) printed square spiral chip antenna used in bio-MEMS sensors for contact-less powering and RF telemetry is investigated. The loop and the spiral are inductively coupled and effectively form a transformer. The numerical results include the quasi-stationary magnetic field pattern of the implanted antenna, near zone wave impedance as a function of the radial distance and the values of the lumped elements in the equivalent circuit model for the transformer.

  7. Experimental and computational analysis of micromotions of an uncemented femoral knee implant using elastic and plastic bone material models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berahmani, Sanaz; Janssen, Dennis; Verdonschot, Nico

    2017-01-01

    It is essential to calculate micromotions at the bone-implant interface of an uncemented femoral total knee replacement (TKR) using a reliable computational model. In the current study, experimental measurements of micromotions were compared with predicted micromotions by Finite Element Analysis

  8. Recurrent, giant subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the thigh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Chuanping, MD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of recurrent, massive subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma involving the left thigh in a 29-year-old male from Madagascar. The patient had earlier undergone local resection of subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma a half year before. After surgical intervention, local recurrence developed at this site and was rapidly growing. The patient was surgically treated with a 2-cm-wide margin local excision in our hospital. The patient has remained recurrence free at 1-year follow-up.

  9. Drug-releasing nano-engineered titanium implants: therapeutic efficacy in 3D cell culture model, controlled release and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulati, Karan [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Kogawa, Masakazu; Prideaux, Matthew; Findlay, David M. [Discipline of Orthopaedics and Trauma, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Atkins, Gerald J., E-mail: gerald.atkins@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Orthopaedics and Trauma, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Losic, Dusan, E-mail: dusan.losic@adelaide.edu.au [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2016-12-01

    There is an ongoing demand for new approaches for treating localized bone pathologies. Here we propose a new strategy for treatment of such conditions, via local delivery of hormones/drugs to the trauma site using drug releasing nano-engineered implants. The proposed implants were prepared in the form of small Ti wires/needles with a nano-engineered oxide layer composed of array of titania nanotubes (TNTs). TNTs implants were inserted into a 3D collagen gel matrix containing human osteoblast-like, and the results confirmed cell migration onto the implants and their attachment and spread. To investigate therapeutic efficacy, TNTs/Ti wires loaded with parathyroid hormone (PTH), an approved anabolic therapeutic for the treatment of severe bone fractures, were inserted into 3D gels containing osteoblast-like cells. Gene expression studies revealed a suppression of SOST (sclerostin) and an increase in RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand) mRNA expression, confirming the release of PTH from TNTs at concentrations sufficient to alter cell function. The performance of the TNTs wire implants using an example of a drug needed at relatively higher concentrations, the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin, is also demonstrated. Finally, the mechanical stability of the prepared implants was tested by their insertion into bovine trabecular bone cores ex vivo followed by retrieval, which confirmed the robustness of the TNT structures. This study provides proof of principle for the suitability of the TNT/Ti wire implants for localized bone therapy, which can be customized to cater for specific therapeutic requirements. - Highlights: • Ti wire with titania nanotubes (TNTs) are proposed as ‘in-bone’ therapeutic implants. • 3D cell culture model is used to confirm therapeutic efficacy of drug releasing implants. Osteoblasts migrated and firmly attached to the TNTs and the micro-scale cracks. • Tailorable drug loading from few nanograms to several hundred

  10. Frontal subcutaneous blood flow, and epi- and subcutaneous temperatures during scalp cooling in normal man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Friberg, L; Gaardsting, O

    1985-01-01

    Cooling of the scalp has been found to prevent hair loss following cytostatic treatment, but in order to obtain the hair preserving effect the subcutaneous temperature has to be reduced below 22 degrees C. In order to establish the relationship between epicutaneous and subcutaneous temperatures...... epicutaneous and subcutaneous temperatures could be demonstrated with the regression equation: s = 0.9 c + 4.9 (r = 0.99). In eight of the 10 subjects the subcutaneous temperature could be reduced below 22 degrees C with the applied technique. It is concluded that the hair preserving effect of scalp cooling...

  11. Semi-empirical model for the threshold voltage of a double implanted MOSFET and its temperature dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, N D

    1987-05-01

    A simple and accurate semi-empirical model for the threshold voltage of a small geometry double implanted enhancement type MOSFET, especially useful in a circuit simulation program like SPICE, has been developed. The effect of short channel length and narrow width on the threshold voltage has been taken into account through a geometrical approximation, which involves parameters whose values can be determined from the curve fitting experimental data. A model for the temperature dependence of the threshold voltage for the implanted devices has also been presented. The temperature coefficient of the threshold voltage was found to change with decreasing channel length and width. Experimental results from various device sizes, both short and narrow, show very good agreement with the model. The model has been implemented in SPICE as part of the complete dc model.

  12. Nanostructured titanium-based materials for medical implants: Modeling and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny; Valiev, Ruslan Z.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructuring of titanium-based implantable devices can provide them with superior mechanical properties and enhanced biocompatibity. An overview of advanced fabrication technologies of nanostructured, high strength, biocompatible Ti and shape memory Ni-Ti alloy for medical implants is given. C...

  13. Influences of serum from ozone-exposed pregnant rats in an in vitro model of implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In our previous studies, ozone (O3) exposure during implantation [gestational day (GD) 5 and 6)] in rats resulted in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), suggesting impairment of implantation with exposure. The aim of this study was to (1) determine if serum collected from pre...

  14. Browning of Subcutaneous White Adipose Tissue in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Sidossis, Labros S.; Porter, Craig; Saraf, Manish K.; Børsheim, Elisabet; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S.; Chao, Tony; Ali, Arham; Chondronikola, Maria; Mlcak, Ronald; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Hawkins, Hal K.; Toliver-Kinsky, Tracy; Herndon, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Since the presence of brown adipose tissue (BAT) was confirmed in adult humans, BAT has become a therapeutic target for obesity and insulin resistance. We examined whether human subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT) can adopt a BAT-like phenotype using a clinical model of prolonged and severe adrenergic stress. sWAT samples were collected from severely burned and healthy individuals. A subset of burn victims were prospectively followed during their acute hospitalization. Browning of sWAT w...

  15. Ion implantation technology

    CERN Document Server

    Downey, DF; Jones, KS; Ryding, G

    1993-01-01

    Ion implantation technology has made a major contribution to the dramatic advances in integrated circuit technology since the early 1970's. The ever-present need for accurate models in ion implanted species will become absolutely vital in the future due to shrinking feature sizes. Successful wide application of ion implantation, as well as exploitation of newly identified opportunities, will require the development of comprehensive implant models. The 141 papers (including 24 invited papers) in this volume address the most recent developments in this field. New structures and possible approach

  16. Surface topography of silicon nitride affects antimicrobial and osseointegrative properties of tibial implants in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masahiro; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L; McEntire, Bryan J; Bal, B Sonny; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2017-12-01

    While silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) is an antimicrobial and osseointegrative orthopaedic biomaterial, the contribution of surface topography to these properties is unknown. Using a methicillin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), this study evaluated Si 3 N 4 implants in vitro utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with colony forming unit (CFU) assays, and later in an established in vivo murine tibia model of implant-associated osteomyelitis. In vitro, the "as-fired" Si 3 N 4 implants displayed significant reductions in adherent bacteria versus machined Si 3 N 4 (2.6 × 10 4 vs. 8.7 × 10 4 CFU, respectively; p SEM imaging demonstrated that MRSA cannot directly adhere to native as-fired Si 3 N 4 . Subsequently, a cross-sectional study was completed in which sterile or MRSA contaminated as-fired and machined Si 3 N 4 implants were inserted into the tibiae of 8-week old female Balb/c mice, and harvested on day 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 14 post-operatively for SEM. The findings demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity of the as-fired implants resulted from macrophage clearance of the bacteria during biofilm formation on day 1, followed by osseointegration through the apparent recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells on days 3-5, which differentiated into osteoblasts on days 7-14. In contrast, the antimicrobial behavior of the machined Si 3 N 4 was due to repulsion of the bacteria, a phenomenon that also limited osteogenesis, as host cells were also unable to adhere to the machined surface. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vivo biological behavior of Si 3 N 4 orthopaedic implants is driven by critical features of their surface nanotopography. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 3413-3421, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Intermittent Parathyroid Hormone Enhances Cancellous Osseointegration of a Novel Murine Tibial Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Ricciardi, Benjamin F.; Dvorzhinskiy, Aleksey; Brial, Caroline; Lane, Zachary; Bhimani, Samrath; Burket, Jayme C.; Hu, Bin; Sarkisian, Alexander M.; Ross, F. Patrick; van der Meulen, Marjolein C.H.; Bostrom, Mathias P.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term fixation of uncemented joint implants requires early mechanical stability and implant osseointegration. To date, osseointegration has been unreliable and remains a major challenge in cementless total knee arthroplasty. We developed a murine model in which an intra-articular proximal tibial titanium implant with a roughened stem can be loaded through the knee joint. Using this model, we tested the hypothesis that intermittent injection of parathyroid hormone (iPTH) would increase proximal tibial cancellous osseointegration. Methods: Ten-week-old female C57BL/6 mice received a subcutaneous injection of PTH (40 μg/kg/day) or a vehicle (n = 45 per treatment group) five days per week for six weeks, at which time the baseline group was killed (n = 6 per treatment group) and an implant was inserted into the proximal part of the tibiae of the remaining mice. Injections were continued until the animals were killed at one week (n = 7 per treatment group), two weeks (n = 14 per treatment group), or four weeks (n = 17 per treatment group) after implantation. Outcomes included peri-implant bone morphology as analyzed with micro-computed tomography (microCT), osseointegration percentage and bone area fraction as shown with backscattered electron microscopy, cellular composition as demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis, and pullout strength as measured with mechanical testing. Results: Preimplantation iPTH increased the epiphyseal bone volume fraction by 31.6%. When the data at post-implantation weeks 1, 2, and 4 were averaged for the iPTH-treated mice, the bone volume fraction was 74.5% higher in the peri-implant region and 168% higher distal to the implant compared with the bone volume fractions in the same regions in the vehicle-treated mice. Additionally, the trabecular number was 84.8% greater in the peri-implant region and 74.3% greater distal to the implant. Metaphyseal osseointegration and bone area fraction were 28.1% and 70.1% higher

  18. An ovine model of cerebral catheter venography for implantation of an endovascular neural interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Thomas James; Opie, Nicholas Lachlan; Rind, Gil Simon; Liyanage, Kishan; John, Sam Emmanuel; Ronayne, Stephen; McDonald, Alan James; Dornom, Anthony; Lovell, Timothy John Haynes; Mitchell, Peter John; Bennett, Iwan; Bauquier, Sebastien; Warne, Leon Norris; Steward, Chris; Grayden, David Bruce; Desmond, Patricia; Davis, Stephen M; O'Brien, Terence John; May, Clive N

    2018-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Neural interface technology may enable the development of novel therapies to treat neurological conditions, including motor prostheses for spinal cord injury. Intracranial neural interfaces currently require a craniotomy to achieve implantation and may result in chronic tissue inflammation. Novel approaches are required that achieve less invasive implantation methods while maintaining high spatial resolution. An endovascular stent electrode array avoids direct brain trauma and is able to record electrocorticography in local cortical tissue from within the venous vasculature. The motor area in sheep runs in a parasagittal plane immediately adjacent to the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). The authors aimed to develop a sheep model of cerebral venography that would enable validation of an endovascular neural interface. METHODS Cerebral catheter venography was performed in 39 consecutive sheep. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain was performed on 13 animals. Multiple telescoping coaxial catheter systems were assessed to determine the largest wide-bore delivery catheter that could be delivered into the anterior SSS. Measurements of SSS diameter and distance from the motor area were taken. The location of the motor area was determined in relation to lateral and superior projections of digital subtraction venography images and confirmed on MRI. RESULTS The venous pathway from the common jugular vein (7.4 mm) to the anterior SSS (1.2 mm) was technically challenging to selectively catheterize. The SSS coursed immediately adjacent to the motor cortex (SSS. Attempted access with 5-Fr and 6-Fr delivery catheters was associated with longer procedure times and higher complication rates. A 4-Fr catheter (internal lumen diameter 1.1 mm) was successful in accessing the SSS in 100% of cases with no associated complications. Complications included procedure-related venous dissection in two major areas: the torcular herophili, and the anterior formation of the SSS. The

  19. Immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable plastic skull model and laser welding. A technical note on the screw-retained type: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotake, Yoritoki; Ishida, Osamu; Kanitani, Hideo; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a new procedure for immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable resin skull model and a laser-welding apparatus. Preoperatively, the framework was fabricated on a photocurable resin skull model produced from a CT scan and individually designed guide template. The implants were immediately placed using the guide template; laser welding connected the components of framework. Despite the custom-made prosthesis, the total treatment from implant placement to superstructure placement can be completed within only 1 day. This procedure for immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable resin skull model and a laser-welding apparatus may be useful for any implant system and patient.

  20. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  1. A new rabbit model of implant-related biofilm infection: development and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Cheng-Bing; Zeng, Hong; Shen, Ding-Xia; Wang, Hui; Wang, Ji-Fang; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2016-03-01

    This study is to establish a rabbit model for human prosthetic joint infection and biofilm formation. Thirty-two healthy adult rabbits were randomly divided into four groups and implanted with stainless steel screws and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) washers in the non-articular surface of the femoral lateral condyle of the right hind knees. The rabbit knee joints were inoculated with 1 mL saline containing 0, 102, 103, 104 CFU of Staphylococcus epidermidis ( S. epidermidis) isolated from the patient with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) infection, respectively. On the 14th postoperative day, the UHMWPE washers from the optimal 103 CFU group were further examined. The SEM examination showed a typical biofilm construction that circular S. epidermidis were embedded in a mucous-like matrix. In addition, the LCSM examination showed that the biofilm consisted of the polysaccharide stained bright green fluorescence and S. epidermidis radiating red fluorescence. Thus, we successfully create a rabbit model for prosthetic joint infection and biofilm formation, which should be valuable for biofilm studies.

  2. Model of the recrystallization mechanism of amorphous silicon layers created by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosd, R.M.

    1979-11-01

    The recrystallization behavior during annealing of thin films of amorphous (α) silicon, in contact with a single crystal silicon substrate (referred to as C), has been studied in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The amorphous film is created during high dose phosphorus ion implantation at 100 keV. It was found that the crystal substrate orientation and the implantation temperature have dramatic effects on the recrystallizaton rate, and the defect microstructure produced during annealing. Specifically, (100) wafers implanted at 77 0 K contain only a low density of dislocation loops, but when the same wafer is implanted at room temperature the dislocation density is increased drastically. (111) wafers, when implanted at 77 0 K show a high density of microtwins, but as the implantation temperature is increased a gradual increase in the density of dislocation loops is observed along with a reduction of the microtwins. At an implantation temperature of about 100 0 C both orientations give an identical defect microstructure when annealed, which is a dense tangle of dislocations

  3. Association of subcutaneous testosterone pellet therapy with developing secondary polycythemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotker, Katherine Lang; Alavian, Michael; Nelson, Bethany; Baird, Grayson L; Miner, Martin M; Sigman, Mark; Hwang, Kathleen

    2018-01-01

    A variety of methods for testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) exist, and the major potential risks of TRT have been well established. The risk of developing polycythemia secondary to exogenous testosterone (T) has been reported to range from 0.4% to 40%. Implantable T pellets have been used since 1972, and secondary polycythemia has been reported to be as low as 0.4% with this administration modality. However, our experience has suggested a higher rate. We conducted an institutional review board-approved, single-institution, retrospective chart review (2009–2013) to determine the rate of secondary polycythemia in 228 men treated with subcutaneously implanted testosterone pellets. Kaplan–Meyer failure curves were used to estimate time until the development of polycythemia (hematocrit >50%). The mean number of pellets administered was 12 (range: 6–16). The mean follow-up was 566 days. The median time to development of polycythemia whereby 50% of patients developed polycythemia was 50 months. The estimated rate of polycythemia at 6 months was 10.4%, 12 months was 17.3%, and 24 months was 30.2%. We concluded that the incidence of secondary polycythemia while on T pellet therapy may be higher than previously established. PMID:29205178

  4. X-ray appearance of subcutaneous gemstones as part of alternative/holistic medicine: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Jerri; Hallengren, Aaron L

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a case of a deceased man with numerous subcutaneous nodules identified as foreign bodies on radiographic films. The foreign bodies were gemstones inserted underneath the skin as a form of holistic medicine. The X-ray findings of this case and a review of the literature for similar subcutaneously implanted foreign bodies used in holistic, alternative, or folk medicine are presented. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A three dimensional in vitro glial scar model to investigate the local strain effects from micromotion around neural implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kevin C; Sy, Jay C; Falcón-Banchs, Roberto; Cima, Michael J

    2017-02-28

    Glial scar formation remains a significant barrier to the long term success of neural probes. Micromotion coupled with mechanical mismatch between the probe and tissue is believed to be a key driver of the inflammatory response. In vitro glial scar models present an intermediate step prior to conventional in vivo histology experiments as they enable cell-device interactions to be tested on a shorter timescale, with the ability to conduct broader biochemical assays. No established in vitro models have incorporated methods to assess device performance with respect to mechanical factors. In this study, we describe an in vitro glial scar model that combines high-precision linear actuators to simulate axial micromotion around neural implants with a 3D primary neural cell culture in a collagen gel. Strain field measurements were conducted to visualize the local displacement within the gel in response to micromotion. Primary brain cell cultures were found to be mechanically responsive to micromotion after one week in culture. Astrocytes, as determined by immunohistochemical staining, were found to have significantly increased in cell areas and perimeters in response to micromotion compared to static control wells. These results demonstrate the importance of micromotion when considering the chronic response to neural implants. Going forward, this model provides advantages over existing in vitro models as it will enable critical mechanical design factors of neural implants to be evaluated prior to in vivo testing.

  6. Image-Based Macro-Micro Finite Element Models of a Canine Femur with Implant Design Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Krishnan, Ganapathi; Dyce, Jonathan

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive model of a bone-cement-implant assembly is developed for a canine cemented femoral prosthesis system. Various steps in this development entail profiling the canine femur contours by computed tomography (CT) scanning, computer aided design (CAD) reconstruction of the canine femur from CT images, CAD modeling of the implant from implant blue prints and CAD modeling of the interface cement. Finite element analysis of the macroscopic assembly is conducted for stress analysis in individual components of the system, accounting for variation in density and material properties in the porous bone material. A sensitivity analysis is conducted with the macroscopic model to investigate the effect of implant design variables on the stress distribution in the assembly. Subsequently, rigorous microstructural analysis of the bone incorporating the morphological intricacies is conducted. Various steps in this development include acquisition of the bone microstructural data from histological serial sectioning, stacking of sections to obtain 3D renderings of void distributions, microstructural characterization and determination of properties and, finally, microstructural stress analysis using a 3D Voronoi cell finite element method. Generation of the simulated microstructure and analysis by the 3D Voronoi cell finite element model provides a new way of modeling complex microstructures and correlating to morphological characteristics. An inverse calculation of the material parameters of bone by combining macroscopic experiments with microstructural characterization and analysis provides a new approach to evaluating properties without having to do experiments at this scale. Finally, the microstructural stresses in the femur are computed using the 3D VCFEM to study the stress distribution at the scale of the bone porosity. Significant difference is observed between the macroscopic stresses and the peak microscopic stresses at different locations.

  7. Subcutaneous tissue flaps for hallux covering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaienti, Luca; Urzola, Victor; Scotti, Andrea; Masetto, L

    2010-03-01

    With the understanding of the extensive vascular supply of the subcutaneous tissue, of its efficacy in the protection of the anatomical structures and of its capability of promoting the adequate functioning of very stressed regions of the human body, the use of subcutaneous adipose flaps has become a valid and sometimes the only reasonable therapeutic weapon in the treatment of small and medium-sized tissue loss. Such a defect represents a common complication of great toe injuries and surgery. Here subcutaneous flap reconstruction is proposed for the treatment of dorsal and medial soft tissue losses of the hallux complicated with infection. Two case are reported. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this application has not been reported in this anatomical site so far. The technique might be worth knowing both for orthopedic and plastic surgeons, as it may represent a safe, less invasive solution for most tegumentary problems of the dorso-medial side of the first ray.

  8. Spinal shape modulation in a porcine model by a highly flexible and extendable non-fusion implant system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Martijn; Hekman, Edsko E G; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Castelein, RM; Homminga, Jasper J.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In vivo evaluation of scoliosis treatment using a novel approach in which two posterior implants are implanted: XSLAT (eXtendable implant correcting Scoliosis in LAT bending) and XSTOR (eXtendable implant correcting Scoliosis in TORsion). The highly flexible and extendable implants use only

  9. Does PGE₁ vasodilator prevent orthopaedic implant-related infection in diabetes? Preliminary results in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovati, Arianna B; Romanò, Carlo L; Monti, Lorenzo; Vassena, Christian; Previdi, Sara; Drago, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Implant-related infections are characterized by bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on the prosthesis. Diabetes represents one of the risk factors that increase the chances of prosthetic infections because of related severe peripheral vascular disease. Vasodilatation can be a therapeutic option to overcome diabetic vascular damages and increase the local blood supply. In this study, the effect of a PGE₁ vasodilator on the incidence of surgical infections in diabetic mice was investigated. A S. aureus implant-related infection was induced in femurs of diabetic mice, then differently treated with a third generation cephalosporin alone or associated with a PGE₁ vasodilator. Variations in mouse body weight were evaluated as index of animal welfare. The femurs were harvested after 28 days and underwent both qualitative and quantitative analysis as micro-CT, histological and microbiological analyses. The analysis performed in this study demonstrated the increased host response to implant-related infection in diabetic mice treated with the combination of a PGE₁ and antibiotic. In this group, restrained signs of infections were identified by micro-CT and histological analysis. On the other hand, the diabetic mice treated with the antibiotic alone showed a severe infection and inability to successfully respond to the standard antimicrobial treatment. The present study revealed interesting preliminary results in the use of a drug combination of antibiotic and vasodilator to prevent implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infections in a diabetic mouse model.

  10. Does PGE1 Vasodilator Prevent Orthopaedic Implant-Related Infection in Diabetes? Preliminary Results in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovati, Arianna B.; Romanò, Carlo L.; Monti, Lorenzo; Vassena, Christian; Previdi, Sara; Drago, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background Implant-related infections are characterized by bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on the prosthesis. Diabetes represents one of the risk factors that increase the chances of prosthetic infections because of related severe peripheral vascular disease. Vasodilatation can be a therapeutic option to overcome diabetic vascular damages and increase the local blood supply. In this study, the effect of a PGE1 vasodilator on the incidence of surgical infections in diabetic mice was investigated. Methodology A S. aureus implant-related infection was induced in femurs of diabetic mice, then differently treated with a third generation cephalosporin alone or associated with a PGE1 vasodilator. Variations in mouse body weight were evaluated as index of animal welfare. The femurs were harvested after 28 days and underwent both qualitative and quantitative analysis as micro-CT, histological and microbiological analyses. Results The analysis performed in this study demonstrated the increased host response to implant-related infection in diabetic mice treated with the combination of a PGE1 and antibiotic. In this group, restrained signs of infections were identified by micro-CT and histological analysis. On the other hand, the diabetic mice treated with the antibiotic alone showed a severe infection and inability to successfully respond to the standard antimicrobial treatment. Conclusions The present study revealed interesting preliminary results in the use of a drug combination of antibiotic and vasodilator to prevent implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infections in a diabetic mouse model. PMID:24718359

  11. Does PGE₁ vasodilator prevent orthopaedic implant-related infection in diabetes? Preliminary results in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna B Lovati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Implant-related infections are characterized by bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on the prosthesis. Diabetes represents one of the risk factors that increase the chances of prosthetic infections because of related severe peripheral vascular disease. Vasodilatation can be a therapeutic option to overcome diabetic vascular damages and increase the local blood supply. In this study, the effect of a PGE₁ vasodilator on the incidence of surgical infections in diabetic mice was investigated. METHODOLOGY: A S. aureus implant-related infection was induced in femurs of diabetic mice, then differently treated with a third generation cephalosporin alone or associated with a PGE₁ vasodilator. Variations in mouse body weight were evaluated as index of animal welfare. The femurs were harvested after 28 days and underwent both qualitative and quantitative analysis as micro-CT, histological and microbiological analyses. RESULTS: The analysis performed in this study demonstrated the increased host response to implant-related infection in diabetic mice treated with the combination of a PGE₁ and antibiotic. In this group, restrained signs of infections were identified by micro-CT and histological analysis. On the other hand, the diabetic mice treated with the antibiotic alone showed a severe infection and inability to successfully respond to the standard antimicrobial treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The present study revealed interesting preliminary results in the use of a drug combination of antibiotic and vasodilator to prevent implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infections in a diabetic mouse model.

  12. Early Healing Events around Titanium Implant Devices with Different Surface Microtopography: A Pilot Study in an In Vivo Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Orsini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present pilot study, the authors morphologically investigated sandblasted, acid-etched surfaces (SLA at very early experimental times. The tested devices were titanium plate-like implants with flattened wide lateral sides and jagged narrow sides. Because of these implant shape and placement site, the device gained a firm mechanical stability but the largest portion of the implant surface lacked direct contact with host bone and faced a wide peri-implant space rich in marrow tissue, intentionally created in order to study the interfacial interaction between metal surface and biological microenvironment. The insertion of titanium devices into the proximal tibia elicited a sequence of healing events. Newly formed bone proceeded through an early distance osteogenesis, common to both surfaces, and a delayed contact osteogenesis which seemed to follow different patterns at the two surfaces. In fact, SLA devices showed a more osteoconductive behavior retaining a less dense blood clot, which might be earlier and more easily replaced, and leading to a surface-conditioning layer which promotes osteogenic cell differentiation and appositional new bone deposition at the titanium surface. This model system is expected to provide a starting point for further investigations which clarify the early cellular and biomolecular events occurring at the metal surface.

  13. Computer simulation model of the structure of ion implanted impurities in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, E.; Majlis, N.

    1983-02-01

    A system of ion implanted impurities in a semiconductor is described by a Monte Carlo simulation of a non-equilibrium system of random distributed hard spheres. The radial distribution function of this system is found. The comparison is made with the fluid hard sphere case. The assumption of the absence either of annealing or diffusion of the impurities after the implantation process is also made. (author)

  14. Podoplanin immunopositive lymphatic vessels at the implant interface in a rat model of osteoporotic fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Susanne Lips

    Full Text Available Insertion of bone substitution materials accelerates healing of osteoporotic fractures. Biodegradable materials are preferred for application in osteoporotic patients to avoid a second surgery for implant replacement. Degraded implant fragments are often absorbed by macrophages that are removed from the fracture side via passage through veins or lymphatic vessels. We investigated if lymphatic vessels occur in osteoporotic bone defects and whether they are regulated by the use of different materials. To address this issue osteoporosis was induced in rats using the classical method of bilateral ovariectomy and additional calcium and vitamin deficient diet. In addition, wedge-shaped defects of 3, 4, or 5 mm were generated in the distal metaphyseal area of femur via osteotomy. The 4 mm defects were subsequently used for implantation studies where bone substitution materials of calcium phosphate cement, composites of collagen and silica, and iron foams with interconnecting pores were inserted. Different materials were partly additionally functionalized by strontium or bisphosphonate whose positive effects in osteoporosis treatment are well known. The lymphatic vessels were identified by immunohistochemistry using an antibody against podoplanin. Podoplanin immunopositive lymphatic vessels were detected in the granulation tissue filling the fracture gap, surrounding the implant and growing into the iron foam through its interconnected pores. Significant more lymphatic capillaries were counted at the implant interface of composite, strontium and bisphosphonate functionalized iron foam. A significant increase was also observed in the number of lymphatics situated in the pores of strontium coated iron foam. In conclusion, our results indicate the occurrence of lymphatic vessels in osteoporotic bone. Our results show that lymphatic vessels are localized at the implant interface and in the fracture gap where they might be involved in the removal of

  15. Podoplanin Immunopositive Lymphatic Vessels at the Implant Interface in a Rat Model of Osteoporotic Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Katrin Susanne; Kauschke, Vivien; Hartmann, Sonja; Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Kampschulte, Marian; Langheinrich, Alexander; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Heinemann, Sascha; Hanke, Thomas; Kautz, Armin R.; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Schnettler, Reinhard; Heiss, Christian; Alt, Volker; Kilian, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of bone substitution materials accelerates healing of osteoporotic fractures. Biodegradable materials are preferred for application in osteoporotic patients to avoid a second surgery for implant replacement. Degraded implant fragments are often absorbed by macrophages that are removed from the fracture side via passage through veins or lymphatic vessels. We investigated if lymphatic vessels occur in osteoporotic bone defects and whether they are regulated by the use of different materials. To address this issue osteoporosis was induced in rats using the classical method of bilateral ovariectomy and additional calcium and vitamin deficient diet. In addition, wedge-shaped defects of 3, 4, or 5 mm were generated in the distal metaphyseal area of femur via osteotomy. The 4 mm defects were subsequently used for implantation studies where bone substitution materials of calcium phosphate cement, composites of collagen and silica, and iron foams with interconnecting pores were inserted. Different materials were partly additionally functionalized by strontium or bisphosphonate whose positive effects in osteoporosis treatment are well known. The lymphatic vessels were identified by immunohistochemistry using an antibody against podoplanin. Podoplanin immunopositive lymphatic vessels were detected in the granulation tissue filling the fracture gap, surrounding the implant and growing into the iron foam through its interconnected pores. Significant more lymphatic capillaries were counted at the implant interface of composite, strontium and bisphosphonate functionalized iron foam. A significant increase was also observed in the number of lymphatics situated in the pores of strontium coated iron foam. In conclusion, our results indicate the occurrence of lymphatic vessels in osteoporotic bone. Our results show that lymphatic vessels are localized at the implant interface and in the fracture gap where they might be involved in the removal of lymphocytes, macrophages

  16. Lithium-manganese dioxide cells for implantable defibrillator devices - Discharge voltage models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Root, Michael J. [Cardiac Rhythm Management Research and Development, Boston Scientific Corp., 4100 Hamline Ave. N., St. Paul, MN 55112 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The discharge potential behavior of lithium-manganese dioxide cells designed for implantable cardiac defibrillators was characterized as a function of extent of cell depletion for tests designed to discharge the cells for times between 1 and 7 years. The discharge potential curves may be separated into two segments from 0 {<=} x {<=} {proportional_to}0.51 and {proportional_to}0.51 {<=} x {<=} 1.00, where x is the dimensionless extent of discharge referenced to the rated cell capacity. The discharge potentials conform to Tafel kinetics in each segment. This behavior allows the discharge potential curves to be predicted for an arbitrary discharge load and long term discharge performance may be predicted from short term test results. The discharge potentials may subsequently be modeled by fitting the discharge curves to empirical functions like polynomials and Pade approximants. A function based on the Nernst equation that includes a term accounting for nonideal interactions between lithium ions and the cathode host material, such as the Redlich-Kister relationship, also may be used to predict discharge behavior. (author)

  17. Dynamics of soft tissue healing at implants and teeth: a study in a dog model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukekava, Flávia; Pannuti, Claudio M; Lima, Luiz A; Tormena, Mariana; Araújo, Mauricio G

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and to compare some characteristics of the soft tissue healing process around teeth and implants after flap surgery. Five adult beagle dogs had their third and fourth lower premolars extracted. After 3 months, four implants per dog were placed on the healed alveolar ridge and allowed to heal non-submerged during 3 months. After 3 months, four regions characterized by one implant and one adjacent tooth were identified in each dog. One region was randomly selected and soft tissue ressective flap surgery was performed at its buccal aspect. The remaining three regions were randomly treated in an identical manner, and the dogs were sacrificed to provide biopsies representing healing intervals of 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks. The biopsies were prepared for histological and morphological analyses. Morphometric and histometric analyses have shown that the gingival tissues surrounding teeth were completely healed after a 4-week interval. However, it took from 4 to 12 weeks for the peri-implant mucosa to heal completely. The healing process around teeth and implants follows a similar sequence of events. Nevertheless, the complete process of healing and maturation of the peri-implant tissues takes longer than around teeth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Hydroxyapatite coating on PEEK implants: Biomechanical and histological study in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, John W; Montelongo, Sergio A; Ong, Joo L; Guda, Teja; Allen, Matthew J; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2016-11-01

    A bioactive two-layer coating consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated on cylindrical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). Post-deposition heat treatments via variable frequency microwave annealing with and without subsequent autoclaving were used to crystallize the as-deposited amorphous HA layer. Microstructural analysis, performed by TEM and EDS, showed that these methods were capable of crystallizing HA coating on PEEK. The in vivo response to cylindrical PEEK samples with and without coating was studied by implanting uncoated PEEK and coated PEEK implants in the lateral femoral condyle of 18 rabbits. Animals were studied in two groups of 9 for observation at 6 or 18weeks post surgery. Micro-CT analysis, histology, and mechanical pull-out tests were performed to determine the effect of the coating on osseointegration. The heat-treated HA/YSZ coatings showed improved implant fixation as well as higher bone regeneration and bone-implant contact area compared to uncoated PEEK. The study offers a novel method to coat PEEK implants with improved osseointegration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-tumor effects of 125I radioactive particles implantation on transplantated tumor model of human breast cancer cells in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zhongdi; Liang Chunlin; Zhang Guoli; Jing Yue; Zhang Yucheng; Gai Baodong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the anti-tumor effects of 125 I radioactive particles implantation on transplantated tumor model of human breast cancer cells in nude mice and clarify their anti-tumor mechanisms. Methods 120 nude mice transplantated with human breast cancer cells MCF-7 were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=40): 125 I radioactive particles implanted group, non-radioactive particles implanted group and non-particles implanted group. The articles were implanted into mice according to Pairs system principle. The expressions of Fas mRNA and protein and the activaties of caspase-3 and caspase-8 enzyme were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The changes of cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. Results: Compared with non-radioactive particles implanted group and non-particles implanted group, the size of cancer tissues in 125 I radioactive particles implanted group was reduced significantly (P 0 /G 1 phase was significantly increased (P 125 I radioactive particles into transplantated tumor model of human breast cancer cells can kill tumor cells, inhibit the growth cycle of tumor cells and induce the apoptosis of tumor cells in nude mice. (authors)

  20. The correlation between difference in foreign body reaction between implant locations and cytokine and MMP expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, Daniel T.; van Amerongen, Machteld J.; de Feijter, Pieter C.; Petersen, Arien H.; Harmsen, Martin C.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.

    2006-01-01

    The foreign body reaction (FBR) differs between subcutaneously and supra-epicardially implanted materials. We hypothesize that this is a result of differences in cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MNIP) dynamics. Therefore we applied collagen disks subcutaneously and on the epicardium

  1. Evaluation of standardized porcine bone models to test primary stability of dental implants, using biomechanical tests and Micro-CT. An in vitro pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delmondes Freitas Dantas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim This study evaluated a new porcine bone model to test the primary stability of different implants, analyzing Micro-CT, insertion torque, and pull-out strength. Materials and methods Bone cylinders were prepared from porcine bone and separated into 2 groups: 10 high density bone cylinders (HDB, and 10 low density bone cylinders (LDB. Then, 3D pre-implant analyses were performed, evaluating tridimensional bone density (ratio of trabecular bone volume and total tomographic volume, BV/TV, trabecular separation; percentage of closed pores; percentage of open pores; percentage of total porosity, in 3 bone levels (L1 bone volume corresponding to the internal part of the threads; L2 corresponding to the area between 0 to 0.5 mm from the end of threads; L3 corresponding to the area between 0.5 to 1.5 mm from the end of threads. Twenty implants of two different macrostructures were inserted in the bone cylinders, and divided into 4 groups (5 implants each: Group 1, e-Fix HE implant placed in HDB cylinder; Group 2, e-Fix HE implant in LDB cylinder; Group 3, e-Fix HE Silver implant placed in HDB cylinder; Group 4, e-Fix HE Silver implant in LDB cylinder. The insertion torque was recorded and bone cylinders were re-evaluated by Micro-CT (post-implant analysis. Then a pull-out strength test was performed. Results 3D analysis showed that pre- and post-implants intra-groups evaluation had statistically significant differences in Group 3 and 4, for all tomographic parameters assessed. Group 3 showed the best values for biomechanical tests (Friedman Test, p<0.05. Conclusion This methodology can produce standardized bone cylinders of high and low bone density, in which different implant designs are able to promote different effects, evidenced by biomechanical and image analysis.

  2. In vitro culture of pre-implanted mouse embryos. A model system for studying combined effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.; Beuningen, D. van; Molls, M.; Pon, A.; Schulz, S.; Zamboglou, N.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on combined effects, e.g. interaction between chemical toxicants and ionizing radiation, are difficult to perform, as they are dependent on many factors (substance concentration, radiation dose, sequence of treatments, etc.). In order to obtain data from such studies it is necessary to establish a comparatively simple experimental model system. We have established such a model system by studying combined effects on pre-implanted mouse embryos cultured in vitro. This system has the following advantages: (1) The embryos can be cultivated for several days in vitro; (2) Their physiological intactness can be tested; and (3) Cell proliferation, cell killing and chromosomal damage can be investigated comparatively easily. The embryos are isolated at the 2-cell stage and incubated in a culture medium in vitro. The development of the embryos is followed under the microscope until the development of blastocysts or the hatching of blastocysts is observed. These blastocysts can be transplanted to fostered mice and the development of normal animals determined. The proliferation kinetics can be studied easily, and the methods are described. A method has also been developed to measure the DNA content of individual cells by microscope fluorometry. After treatment of the embryos with ionizing radiation or drugs the release of micronuclei has been observed from the cell nuclei, which is an expression for chromosomal damage. Substances or radionuclides can be added to the culture medium or external irradiation can be performed during the culture period. Also the combined effects of radiation and heating can be studied. The effects of X-rays and tritiated compounds have also been investigated. The combined effects of radiation with antibiotics such as actinomycin D, and environmental toxicants such as lead, have been determined. The system described has been useful to evaluate cytological, teratogenic and cytogenetic effects

  3. Ultrasonographic Findings of Subcutaneous and Muscular Sparganosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Jin; Park, Noh Hyuck; Lee, Eun Ja; Park, Chan Sub; Lee, Sung Moon; Park, Sung Il

    2009-01-01

    This study was deigned to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of subcutaneous and intramuscular sparganosis. Nine cases of histologically proven subcutaneous and intramuscular sparganosis lesions in seven patients (mean patient age, 59 years; M:F = 6:1) were reviewed retrospectively. Two patients had recurrent sparganosis. A color Doppler examination was performed in all cases. A prior history of ingestion of raw snake meat was noted for two patients. Patients presented with a palpable mass and induration (n = 7) and dull pain (n = 4). Lesion locations were in the thigh (n = 4), lower leg (n = 2), chest wall (n = 1), an inguinal location (n = 1) and the neck (n = 1). Five lesions were in the subcutaneous fat layer and four lesions had intramuscular locations. Calcification was noted in two cases. All cases showed heterogeneous hypoechoic serpiginous tubular-and-oval lesions. The lesions were conglomerated or discrete in appearance. All nine cases showed the presence of lesions with a multi-layered wall with variable intraluminal echogenicity, at least in one segment of the lesion. Increased vascularity was noted on color Doppler examinations in two patients with pain. Subcutaneous or intramuscular sparganosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when a serpiginous tubular-and-oval lesion is noted that is seen with a multi-layered wall with variable intraluminal echogenicity

  4. Case Report Pneumomediastinum and Subcutaneous Emphysema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oxygen may enhance faster absorption of air from extra-pulmonary tissues while needle aspiration and/ or surgical decompression may be useful if mediastinal structures are compressed [2,9,]. Conclusion. Extra-pulmonary extravasations of air manifested as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum.

  5. Subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Saeko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Oshitani, Takashi; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Takada, Yoshiki; Kono, Michio; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 233 cases of patients who had undergone whole neck irradiation with 4-MV X-ray or 8-10-MeV electrons, or both, and had been followed with regard to their skin condition for at least 1 year. The prescribed dose to the whole neck ranged from 19.2 to 72.4 Gy (median 50). The skin-absorbed dose was specified as that at a depth of 4.1 mm (d4.1-mm depth ), and a biologically equivalent dose (BED) of d4.1-mm depth was also estimated (BED 1.8 4.1-mm depth ). Results: Univariate analysis revealed that previous neck dissection, concurrent chemotherapy, corticosteroid administration as a part of chemotherapy, fractionation, and BED 1.8 4.1-mm depth were significant prognostic variables. Multivariate analysis showed that BED 1.8 4.1-mm depth and previous neck dissection were the only prognostic variables for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis. Conclusion: A high dose to a 4.1-mm depth of the skin and a history of neck dissection were identified as the predominant risk factors for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation. A subcutaneous dose should be considered in radiotherapy treatment planning involving the whole neck, especially in cases in which patients have undergone previous neck dissection

  6. Subcutaneous endoscopically assisted ligation using miniport for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    miniport for the treatment of girls with inguinal hernia. Akinari Hinoki*, Ikeda ... method using subcutaneous endoscopically assisted ligation (SEAL) for the ... the open technique and an additional 2 mm miniport). A ... (unilateral, n = 9) or 42 ± 8 min (bilateral, n = 5). The mean .... Methods of laparoscopic repair have recently ...

  7. Subcutaneous emphysema, a different way to diagnose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno José da Costa Medeiros

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Subcutaneous emphysema (SE is a clinical condition that occurs when air gets into soft tissues under the skin. This can occur in any part of the body depending on the type of pathology. The most common site is under the skin that covers the chest wall or neck. It is characterized by painless swelling of tissues. The classic clinical sign is a crackling sensation upon touch, resembling that of touching a sponge beneath your fingers. Objective: To describe a new way to diagnose subcutaneous emphysema. Method: Our finding was a matter of serendipity while inspecting a patient with subcutaneous emphysema using a stethoscope. Instead only hearing the patient's chest, the stethoscope was gently pressed against the skin with SE and so we were able to detect a different sound. Results: This new way to diagnose subcutaneous emphysema consists in pressing the diaphragm part of stethoscope against the patient's skin where SE is supposed to be. Thus, we are able to hear a sound of small bubbles bursting. Crackle noise has an acoustic emission energy that varies between 750-1,200 Hz, considered high frequency. Conclusion: Although currently the use of imaging methods is widespread worldwide, we would like to strengthen the value of clinical examination. Auscultation is an essential diagnostic method that has become underestimated with the advances of healthcare and medicine as a whole. We therefore propose a different approach to diagnose SE.

  8. Elephantine but not elephantiasis: Subcutaneous zygomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Meenakshi; Arora, Amit; Bhalla, Lucky; Salodkar, Atul

    2011-09-01

    Subcutaneous zygomycosis is an unusual disorder caused by a rare fungus, Basidiobolus ranarum. We report this entity in a 4- yr- old boy. Biopsy showed the Splendore Hoeppli phenomenon and the culture yielded Basidiobolus ranarum. The child responded to saturated solution of potassium iodide within 1 month of starting treatment.

  9. Subcutaneous endoscopically assisted ligation using miniport for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background This report describes the first miniport method using subcutaneous endoscopically assisted ligation (SEAL) for the treatment of girls with inguinal hernia. To validate its safety and efficacy, the authors evaluated their early experiences. Methods Between April 2014 and December 2014, 19 SEALs using miniport ...

  10. Case Report: Pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous cervical emphysema as complications of childhood pneumonia is very unusual. They results most often from respiratory manoeuvres that produce high intrathoracic pressure. Although they are largely benign, pneumomediastinum can cause compression of major ...

  11. Anthropometrical Profile, Skinfold Tickness and Subcutaneous Fat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The threatening health problems resulting from excess subcutaneous fat depositions have been reported by the world Health Organization. Also noteworthy is that childhood obesity is a pointer to adult obesity. This necessitated a study on the anthropometrical profiles of adolescents of Southeast Nigeria using ...

  12. Towards a subcutaneous optical biosensor based on thermally hydrocarbonised porous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wing Yin; Sweetman, Martin J; Marzouk, Ezzat R; Fraser, Cara; Kuchel, Tim; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2016-01-01

    Advanced biosensors in future medicine hinge on the evolvement of biomaterials. Porous silicon (pSi), a generally biodegradable and biocompatible material that can be fabricated to include environment-responsive optical characteristics, is an excellent candidate for in vivo biosensors. However, the feasibility of using this material as a subcutaneously implanted optical biosensor has never been demonstrated. Here, we investigated the stability and biocompatibility of a thermally-hydrocarbonised (THC) pSi optical rugate filter, and demonstrated its optical functionality in vitro and in vivo. We first compared pSi films with different surface chemistries and observed that the material was cytotoxic despite the outstanding stability of the THC pSi films. We then showed that the cytotoxicity correlates with reactive oxygen species levels, which could be mitigated by pre-incubation of THC pSi (PITHC pSi). PITHC pSi facilitates normal cellular phenotypes and is biocompatible in vivo. Importantly, the material also possesses optical properties capable of responding to microenvironmental changes that are readable non-invasively in cell culture and subcutaneous settings. Collectively, we demonstrate, for the first time, that PITHC pSi rugate filters are both biocompatible and optically functional for lab-on-a-chip and subcutaneous biosensing scenarios. We believe that this study will deepen our understanding of cell-pSi interactions and foster the development of implantable biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of embedded dexamethasone in cochlear implant array on insertion forces in an artificial model of scala tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Yann; Bernardeschi, Daniele; Kazmitcheff, Guillaume; Miroir, Mathieu; Vauchel, Thomas; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Loading otoprotective drug into cochlear implant might change its mechanical properties, thus compromising atraumatic insertion. This study evaluated the effect of incorporation of dexamethasone (DXM) in the silicone of cochlear implant arrays on insertion forces. Local administration of DXM with embedded array can potentially reduce inflammation and fibrosis after cochlear implantation procedure to improve hearing preservation and reduce long-term impedances. Four models of arrays have been tested: 0.5-mm distal diameter array (n = 5) used as a control, drug-free 0.4-mm distal diameter array (n = 5), 0.4-mm distal diameter array with 1% eluded DXM silicone (n = 5), and 0.4-mm distal diameter array with 10% eluded DXM silicone (n = 5). Via a motorized insertion bench, each array has been inserted into an artificial scala tympani model. The forces were recorded by a 6-axis force sensor. Each array was tested seven times for a total number of 140 insertions. During the first 10-mm insertion, no difference between the four models was observed. From 10- to 24-mm insertion, the 0.5-mm distal diameter array presented higher insertion forces than the drug-free 0.4-mm distal diameter arrays, with or without DXM. Friction forces for drug-free 0.4-mm distal diameter array and 0.4-mm distal diameter DXM eluded arrays were similar on all insertion lengths. Incorporation of DXM in silicone for cochlear implant design does not change electrode array insertion forces. It does not raise the risk of trauma during array insertion, making it suitable for long-term in situ administration to the cochlea.

  14. Peripheral white blood cells profile of biodegradable metal implant in mice animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramitha, Devi; Noviana, Deni; Estuningsih, Sri; Ulum, Mokhamad Fakhrul; Nasution, Ahmad Kafrawi; Hermawan, Hendra

    2015-09-01

    Biocompatibility or safety of the medical device is considered important. It can be determined by blood profile examination. The aim of this study was to assess the biocompatibility of biodegradable metal implant through peripheral white blood cells (WBCs) profile approach. Forty eight male ddy mice were divided into four groups according to the materials implanted: iron wire (Fe), magnesium rod (Mg), stainless steel surgical wire (SS316L) and control with sham (K). Implants were inserted and attached onto the right femoral bone on latero-medial region. In this study, peripheral white blood cells and leukocyte differentiation were the parameters examined. The result showed that the WBCs value of all groups were decreased at the first day after implantation, increased at the 10th day and continued increasing at the 30th day of observation, except Mg group which has decreased. Neutrophil, as an inflammatory cells, was increased at the early weeks and decreased at the day-30 after surgery in all groups. Despite, these values during the observation were still within the normal range. As a conclus ion, biodegradable metal implants lead to an inflammatory reaction, with no adverse effect on WBC value found.

  15. Peripheral white blood cells profile of biodegradable metal implant in mice animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramitha, Devi; Noviana, Deni, E-mail: deni@ipb.ac.id; Estuningsih, Sri [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), Bogor (Indonesia); Ulum, Mokhamad Fakhrul [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), Bogor (Indonesia); Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Nasution, Ahmad Kafrawi [Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering, Muhammadiyah University of Riau (UMRI), Pekanbaru (Indonesia); Hermawan, Hendra [Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering & CHU de Québec Research Center, Laval University (ULaval) (Canada)

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility or safety of the medical device is considered important. It can be determined by blood profile examination. The aim of this study was to assess the biocompatibility of biodegradable metal implant through peripheral white blood cells (WBCs) profile approach. Forty eight male ddy mice were divided into four groups according to the materials implanted: iron wire (Fe), magnesium rod (Mg), stainless steel surgical wire (SS316L) and control with sham (K). Implants were inserted and attached onto the right femoral bone on latero-medial region. In this study, peripheral white blood cells and leukocyte differentiation were the parameters examined. The result showed that the WBCs value of all groups were decreased at the first day after implantation, increased at the 10th day and continued increasing at the 30th day of observation, except Mg group which has decreased. Neutrophil, as an inflammatory cells, was increased at the early weeks and decreased at the day-30 after surgery in all groups. Despite, these values during the observation were still within the normal range. As a conclus ion, biodegradable metal implants lead to an inflammatory reaction, with no adverse effect on WBC value found.

  16. Subcutaneous testosterone-letrozole therapy before and concurrent with neoadjuvant breast chemotherapy: clinical response and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Rebecca L; York, Anne E; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2017-07-01

    Hormone receptor-positive breast cancers respond favorably to subcutaneous testosterone combined with an aromatase inhibitor. However, the effect of testosterone combined with an aromatase inhibitor on tumor response to chemotherapy was unknown. This study investigated the effect of testosterone-letrozole implants on breast cancer tumor response before and during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A 51-year-old woman on testosterone replacement therapy was diagnosed with hormone receptor-positive invasive breast cancer. Six weeks before starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the patient was treated with subcutaneous testosterone-letrozole implants and instructed to follow a low-glycemic diet. Clinical status was followed. Tumor response to "testosterone-letrozole" and subsequently, "testosterone-letrozole with chemotherapy" was monitored using serial ultrasounds and calculating tumor volume. Response to therapy was determined by change in tumor volume. Cost of therapy was evaluated. There was a 43% reduction in tumor volume 41 days after the insertion of testosterone-letrozole implants, before starting chemotherapy. After the initiation of concurrent chemotherapy, the tumor responded at an increased rate, resulting in a complete pathologic response. Chemotherapy was tolerated. Blood counts and weight remained stable. There were no neurologic or cardiac complications from the chemotherapy. Cost of therapy is reported. Subcutaneous testosterone-letrozole was an effective treatment for this patient's breast cancer and did not interfere with chemotherapy. This novel combination implant has the potential to prevent side effects from chemotherapy, improve quality of life, and warrants further investigation.

  17. Localized morphea after breast implant for breast cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, A; Bianchi, F; Abbate, I V; Gherardi, G; Bonavita, M; Passoni, E; Nazzaro, G; Bramati, A; Dazzani, M C; Piva, S; Paternò, E; Frungillo, N; Farina, G; La Verde, N

    2018-03-01

    Early breast cancer follow-up guidelines for patients who underwent surgery suggest a regular and accurate clinical examination of the breast area, for an early identification of cutaneous or subcutaneous breast cancer relapse. Nonetheless, breast skin lesions arising in patients treated with mastectomy for breast cancer can be caused by several diseases. A series of diagnostic hypotheses should be considered, not only focusing on cutaneous metastasis, but also on dermatologic and systemic diseases. In February 2015, a 37-year-old patient underwent a right subcutaneous mastectomy for stage IIA breast cancer. Five months after beginning adjuvant chemotherapy, she noted hyperpigmentation and thickening of the skin on the right breast. Differential diagnosis included local relapse, skin infection, lymphoma, or primary cutaneous disease, and a skin biopsy was performed. The histopathologic specimen showed full-thickness sclerosis, with features of localized morphea. Therapy with clobetasol was prescribed, with progressive resolution of the thickness. The collaboration between many professionals in a multidisciplinary team (oncologist, dermatologist, plastic surgeon, and pathologist) was crucial to achieving the diagnosis. In the literature, some articles describe correlation between connective tissue diseases and silicone breast implants, but the pathogenetic mechanisms are unknown. We report a rare case of breast morphea after positioning a silicone implant in a patient who had undergone mastectomy. This clinical report represents an interesting model of multidisciplinary management of a patient with breast cancer who developed an uncommon dermatologic disease. Further studies are needed to clarify the association between silicone implants and breast morphea.

  18. Modeling of X-ray rocking curves for layers after two-stage ion-implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Liubchenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we consider the approach for simulation of X-ray rocking curves inherent to InSb(111 crystals implanted with Be+ ions with various energies and doses. The method is based on the semi-kinematical theory of X-ray diffraction in the case of Bragg geometry. A fitting procedure that relies on the Hooke–Jeeves direct search algorithm was developed to determine the depth profiles of strain and structural disorders in the ion-modified layers. The thickness and maximum value of strain of ion-modified InSb(111 layers were determined. For implantation energies 66 and 80 keV, doses 25 and 50 µC, the thickness of the strained layer is about 500 nm with the maximum value of strain close to 0.1%. Additionally, an amorphous layer with significant thickness was found in the implantation region.

  19. Implantation of 3D-Printed Patient-Specific Aneurysm Models into Cadaveric Specimens: A New Training Paradigm to Allow for Improvements in Cerebrovascular Surgery and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnau Benet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the feasibility of implanting 3D-printed brain aneurysm model in human cadavers and to assess their utility in neurosurgical research, complex case management/planning, and operative training. Methods. Two 3D-printed aneurysm models, basilar apex and middle cerebral artery, were generated and implanted in four cadaveric specimens. The aneurysms were implanted at the same anatomical region as the modeled patient. Pterional and orbitozygomatic approaches were done on each specimen. The aneurysm implant, manipulation capabilities, and surgical clipping were evaluated. Results. The 3D aneurysm models were successfully implanted to the cadaveric specimens’ arterial circulation in all cases. The features of the neck in terms of flexibility and its relationship with other arterial branches allowed for the practice of surgical maneuvering characteristic to aneurysm clipping. Furthermore, the relationship of the aneurysm dome with the surrounding structures allowed for better understanding of the aneurysmal local mass effect. Noticeably, all of these observations were done in a realistic environment provided by our customized embalming model for neurosurgical simulation. Conclusion. 3D aneurysms models implanted in cadaveric specimens may represent an untapped training method for replicating clip technique; for practicing certain approaches to aneurysms specific to a particular patient; and for improving neurosurgical research.

  20. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... implant, including: • How long a person has been deaf, •The number of surviving auditory nerve fibers, and • ... Implant, Severe Sensoryneurial Hearing Loss Get Involved Professional Development Practice Management ENT Careers Marketplace Privacy Policy Terms ...

  1. A radioactive seed implant on a rabbit's liver following a voxel model representation for dosimetric proposals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Andrade, Joao Paulo Lopes de; Costa, Igor Temponi; Teixeira, Cleuza H. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg

    2005-07-01

    Animal models have been used in experimentation with ionizing radiation. The evaluation of the energy absorbed per unit tissue mass in vivo transported by nuclear particles is a task to be performed before experimentation. Stochastic or deterministic methodology can be applied, however the dosimetric protocols applied in radiotherapy center cannot be applied directly due to the inherent small geometry and chemical composition of the animal distinct from human. The present article addresses a method in development that will predict the dose distribution into the rabbit thorax based on the solution of the transport phenomena in a voxel model. The model will be applied to simulate a seed implant experiment on a rabbit. Herein, the construction of the three-dimensional voxel model anthropomorphic -anthropometrics to the rabbit is presented. The model is assembling from a set of computer tomography of the rabbit. The computational phantom of the thorax starts at the digitalisation of the CT images, tissue definition, and color image representation of each tissue and organ. The chemical composition and mass density of each tissue is evaluated as similar date presented by ICRU-44. To treat the images, a code namely SISCODES, developed in house, was used. The in vivo experiment that will be simulated is also described. That is a implant of five seeds of 1.6x2 mm performed in a rabbit's liver. The perspective of this work is the application of the model in dosimetric studies predicting the dose distribution around the seed's implanted in vivo experiments. (author)

  2. Role of Liposuction Combined with Subcutaneous Mastectomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    deformity in two other patients. Conclusions: Liposuction combined with subcutaneous mastectomy is a reliable, versatile, less time consuming and valid procedure for the treatment of gynecomastia. This procedure provides satisfactory aesthetic results. KEY WORDS: Gynecomastia, liposuction, subcutaneous mastectomy.

  3. Real Time Noninvasive Monitoring of Contaminating Bacteria in a Soft Tissue Implant Infection Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsman, Anton F.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Francis, Kevin P.; Busscher, Henk J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.

    Infection is the main cause of biomaterials-related failure. A simple technique to test in-vivo new antimicrobial and/or nonadhesive implant coatings is unavailable. Current in vitro methods for studying bacterial adhesion and growth on biomaterial surfaces lack the influence of the host immune

  4. Lung regeneration by fetal lung tissue implantation in a mouse pulmonary emphysema model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyama, Koh; Sakiyama, Shoji; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kenzaki, Koichiro; Toba, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Yukikiyo; Okumura, Kazumasa; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Kondo, Kazuya; Tangoku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are high. However, no radical therapy has been developed to date. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether fetal mouse lung tissue can grow and differentiate in the emphysematous lung. Fetal lung tissue from green fluorescent protein C57BL/6 mice at 16 days' gestation was used as donor material. Twelve-month-old pallid mice were used as recipients. Donor lungs were cut into small pieces and implanted into the recipient left lung by performing thoracotomy under anesthesia. The recipient mice were sacrificed at day 7, 14, and 28 after implantation and used for histological examination. Well-developed spontaneous pulmonary emphysema was seen in 12-month-old pallid mice. Smooth and continuous connection between implanted fetal lung tissue and recipient lung was recognized. Air space expansion and donor tissue differentiation were observed over time. We could clearly distinguish the border zones between injected tissue and native tissue by the green fluorescence of grafts. Fetal mouse lung fragments survived and differentiated in the emphysematous lung of pallid mice. Implantation of fetal lung tissue in pallid mice might lead to further lung regeneration research from the perspective of respiratory and exercise function. J. Med. Invest. 63: 182-186, August, 2016.

  5. Utilizing a Rat Delayed Implantation Model to Teach Integrative Endocrinology and Reproductive Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisert, Rodney D.; Smith, Michael F.; Schmelzle, Amanda L.; Green, Jonathan A.

    2018-01-01

    In this teaching laboratory, the students are directed in an exercise that involves designing and performing an experiment to determine estrogen's role in regulating delayed implantation (diapause) in female rats. To encourage active participation by the students, a discussion question is provided before the laboratory exercise in which each…

  6. Single-Dose Bone Pharmacokinetics of Vancomycin in a Porcine Implant-Associated Osteomyelitis Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bue, Mats; Hanberg, Pelle; Koch, Janne

    2018-01-01

    , vancomycin bone and soft tissue penetration during infection remains unclear. In eight pigs, implant-associated osteomyelitis was induced on day 0, using a Staphylococcus aureus strain. Following administration of 1,000 mg of vancomycin on day 5, vancomycin concentrations were obtained with microdialysis...

  7. Radiological and micro-computed tomography analysis of the bone at dental implants inserted 2, 3 and 4 mm apart in a minipig model with platform switching incorporated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elian, Nicolas; Bloom, Mitchell; Dard, Michel; Cho, Sang-Choon; Trushkowsky, Richard D; Tarnow, Dennis

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of inter-implant distance on interproximal bone utilizing platform switching. Analysis of interproximal bone usually depends on traditional two-dimensional radiographic assessment. Although there has been increased reliability of current techniques, there has been an inability to track bone level changes over time and in three dimensions. Micro-CT has provided three-dimensional imaging that can be used in conjunction with traditional two-dimensional radiographic techniques. This study was performed on 24 female minipigs. Twelve animals received three implants with an inter-implant distance of 3 mm on one side of the mandible and another three implants on the contra-lateral side, where the implants were placed 2 mm apart creating a split mouth design. Twelve other animals received three implants with an inter-implant distance of 3 mm on one side of the mandible and another three implants on the contra-lateral side, where the implants were placed 4 mm apart creating a split mouth design too. The quantitative evaluation was performed comparatively on radiographs taken at t 0 (immediately after implantation) and at t 8 weeks (after termination). The samples were scanned by micro-computed tomography (μCT) to quantify the first bone to implant contact (fBIC) and bone volume/total volume (BV/TV). Mixed model regressions using the nonparametric Brunner-Langer method were used to determine the effect of inter-implant distance on the measured outcomes. The change in bone level was determined using radiography and its mean was 0.05 mm for an inter-implant distance of 3 and 0.00 mm for a 2 mm distance (P = 0.7268). The mean of this outcome was 0.18 mm for the 3 mm and for 4 mm inter-implant distance (P = 0.9500). Micro-computed tomography showed that the fBIC was always located above the reference, 0.27 and 0.20 mm for the comparison of 2-3 mm (P = 0.4622) and 0.49 and 0.34 mm for the inter-implant distance of 3 and 4 mm (P

  8. Influence of Trabecular Bone on Peri-Implant Stress and Strain Based on Micro-CT Finite Element Modeling of Beagle Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sheng-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Hao; Xie, Jing; Sohodeb, Vikesh Kumar; Ding, Xi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to analyze the influence of trabecular microstructure modeling on the biomechanical distribution of the implant-bone interface. Two three-dimensional finite element mandible models, one with trabecular microstructure (a refined model) and one with macrostructure (a simplified model), were built. The values of equivalent stress at the implant-bone interface in the refined model increased compared with those of the simplified model and strain on the contrary. The distributions of stress and strain were more uniform in the refined model of trabecular microstructure, in which stress and strain were mainly concentrated in trabecular bone. It was concluded that simulation of trabecular bone microstructure had a significant effect on the distribution of stress and strain at the implant-bone interface. These results suggest that trabecular structures could disperse stress and strain and serve as load buffers.

  9. A Rat Model of Thrombosis in Common Carotid Artery Induced by Implantable Wireless Light-Emitting Diode Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Chao Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work has developed a novel approach to form common carotid artery (CCA thrombus in rats with a wireless implantable light-emitting diode (LED device. The device mainly consists of an external controller and an internal LED assembly. The controller was responsible for wirelessly transmitting electrical power. The internal LED assembly served as an implant to receive the power and irradiate light on CCA. The thrombus formation was identified with animal sonography, 7T magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathologic examination. The present study showed that a LED assembly implanted on the outer surface of CCA could induce acute occlusion with single irradiation with 6 mW/cm2 LED for 4 h. If intermittent irradiation with 4.3–4.5 mW/cm2 LED for 2 h was shut off for 30 min, then irradiation for another 2 h was applied; the thrombus was observed to grow gradually and was totally occluded at 7 days. Compared with the contralateral CCA without LED irradiation, the arterial endothelium in the LED-irradiated artery was discontinued. Our study has shown that, by adjusting the duration of irradiation and the power intensity of LED, it is possible to produce acute occlusion and progressive thrombosis, which can be used as an animal model for antithrombotic drug development.

  10. Subcutaneous emphysema in cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis without pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Dixit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-alveolar air in the form of subcutaneous tissue emphysema is observed in a variety of clinical settings. Spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema in the absence of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum is very rare. We report a case of spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema secondary to cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis in the absence of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum.

  11. Cervicofacial subcutaneous air emphysema after dental extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznick, J B; Ardary, W C

    1990-04-01

    A patient was seen by a general practitioner for surgical removal of his third molar. A standard high-speed handpiece was used to remove the tooth. During the procedure, subcutaneous emphysema developed. Later the same day, the patient's swelling increased and his airway was compromised. The patient's condition, the differential diagnosis, etiological factors, and treatment of this condition are all detailed within this clinical report.

  12. One-Piece Zirconia Ceramic versus Titanium Implants in the Jaw and Femur of a Sheep Model: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, A; Duncan, W J; De Silva, R K; Zafar, S

    2016-01-01

    Reports have documented titanium (Ti) hypersensitivity after dental implant treatment. Alternative materials have been suggested including zirconia (Zr) ceramics, which have shown predictable osseointegration in animal studies and appear free of immune responses. The aim of the research was to investigate the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of one-piece Zr, compared with one-piece Ti implants, placed in the jaws and femurs of domestic sheep. Ten New Zealand mixed breed sheep were used. A One-piece prototype Ti (control) and one Zr (test) implant were placed in the mandible, and one of each implant (Ti and Zr) was placed into the femoral epicondyle of each animal. The femur implants were submerged and unloaded; the mandibular implants were placed using a one-stage transgingival protocol and were nonsubmerged. After a healing period of 12 weeks, %BIC was measured. The overall survival rate for mandibular and femur implants combined was 87.5%. %BIC was higher for Zr implants versus Ti implants in the femur (85.5%, versus 78.9%) ( p = 0.002). Zirconia implants in the mandible showed comparable %BIC to titanium implants (72.2%, versus 60.3%) ( p = 0.087). High failure rate of both Zr and Ti one-piece implants in the jaw could be attributed to the one-piece design and surface characteristics of the implant that could have influenced osseointegration. Further clinical trials are recommended to evaluate the performance of zirconia implants under loading conditions.

  13. An evaluation of the effectiveness of different techniques for intraoperative infiltration of antibiotics into alloplastic implants for use in facial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Morgan S; Keefe, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction in the head and neck can be difficult owing to the size of the defect or characteristics of the tissue that needs to be replaced. Facial wounds or reconstruction sites can be subject to contamination, thereby risking infection of any implanted material even under ideal circumstances. Particular areas of concern are sites where minimizing the bacterial contamination prior to placing an implant is difficult (eg, the oral cavity and internal nose). Reconstruction involves the facial subcutaneous soft tissue and/or bone, and the ideal implant provides support and natural feel, as well as a low risk of infection. The biocompatibility of alloplastic implants depends on the tissue inertness of the implant and the porosity, allowing connective tissue ingrowth, which in turn decreases the susceptibility to infection. Scalafani et al demonstrated that alloplastic implants contaminated prior to fibrovascular ingrowth had a much higher incidence of infection and rejection. To examine the effectiveness of several techniques for infiltrating antibiotics into alloplastic implants of different porosity using 2 commonly used alloplastic implants, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE, or GORE-TEX) and porous high-density polyethylene (Medpor). Using an in vitro bacterial growth inhibition model, we found that suction infiltration of the implant with antibiotics was the most effective technique, with a statistically significant advantage over other techniques used. The advantages of the suction impregnation were seen to be most effective using alloplasts with a smaller pore size (20-30 microm) (P < .001), but there was a statistically significant difference even with implants with a larger pore size (150-200 microm) (P < .001). Suction infiltration of antibiotics into porous implants seems to be the most effective method identified using an in vitro testing protocol. Further experiments will be needed to confirm the effectiveness in reducing the perioperative risk

  14. In vitro fatigue tests and in silico finite element analysis of dental implants with different fixture/abutment joint types using computer-aided design models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Yamanishi, Yasufumi; Machado, Lucas S; Matsumoto, Shuji; Tovar, Nick; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P; Imazato, Satoshi

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fatigue resistance of dental fixtures with two different fixture-abutment connections by in vitro fatigue testing and in silico three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) using original computer-aided design (CAD) models. Dental implant fixtures with external connection (EX) or internal connection (IN) abutments were fabricated from original CAD models using grade IV titanium and step-stress accelerated life testing was performed. Fatigue cycles and loads were assessed by Weibull analysis, and fatigue cracking was observed by micro-computed tomography and a stereomicroscope with high dynamic range software. Using the same CAD models, displacement vectors of implant components were also analyzed by 3D FEA. Angles of the fractured line occurring at fixture platforms in vitro and of displacement vectors corresponding to the fractured line in silico were compared by two-way ANOVA. Fatigue testing showed significantly greater reliability for IN than EX (pimplant fixture platforms. FEA demonstrated that crack lines of both implant systems in vitro were observed in the same direction as displacement vectors of the implant fixtures in silico. In silico displacement vectors in the implant fixture are insightful for geometric development of dental implants to reduce complex interactions leading to fatigue failure. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling and Optimization of Class-E Amplifier at Subnominal Condition in a Wireless Power Transfer System for Biomedical Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Shao, Qi; Fang, Xuelin

    2017-02-01

    For the class-E amplifier in a wireless power transfer (WPT) system, the design parameters are always determined by the nominal model. However, this model neglects the conduction loss and voltage stress of MOSFET and cannot guarantee the highest efficiency in the WPT system for biomedical implants. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel circuit model of the subnominal class-E amplifier. On a WPT platform for capsule endoscope, the proposed model was validated to be effective and the relationship between the amplifier's design parameters and its characteristics was analyzed. At a given duty ratio, the design parameters with the highest efficiency and safe voltage stress are derived and the condition is called 'optimal subnominal condition.' The amplifier's efficiency can reach the highest of 99.3% at the 0.097 duty ratio. Furthermore, at the 0.5 duty ratio, the measured efficiency of the optimal subnominal condition can reach 90.8%, which is 15.2% higher than that of the nominal condition. Then, a WPT experiment with a receiving unit was carried out to validate the feasibility of the optimized amplifier. In general, the design parameters of class-E amplifier in a WPT system for biomedical implants can be determined with the proposed optimization method in this paper.

  16. Subcutaneous versus subcutaneous and intraperitoneal local anaesthetic in the management of post appendicectomy pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, K.Z.; Gondal, Z.I.; Raza, A.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of subcutaneous only and combined subcutaneous and peritoneal infiltration of 0.5% bupivacaine during appendicectomy for the management of early post operative pain. Study Design: Randomized controlled study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery, CMH Kohat from 13th December 2007 to 20th December 2008. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients of a cute appendicitis, divided into two groups of 30 each, were included in the study. Group A was given 0.5% bupivacaine subcutaneously, whereas group B was given the anaesthetic subcutaneously as well as intraperitoneally during appendectomy. Results: In group A, 24 (80%) were VAS (visual analoguescoring) 3 (uncomfortable) and 6 (20%) were VAS 2 (mild pain) whereas in study group B, 11 (36.6%) were VAS 3, 19 (63.3%) were VAS 2 and 19 (63.3%) were VAS 2 during 1st 12 hrs postoperatively (p=0.001). In 12-24 hrs post operatively, 15 (50%) patients were VAS 3 in group A and same number was VAS 2 and in group B, only 3 (10%) were in VAS 3 and 27 (90%) were VAS 2 (p=0.001). Conclusion: A combination of subcutaneous and peritoneal infiltration with bupivacaine is superior in relieving post appendectomy pain so patients require less dosage of analgesics in early post operative period along with early mobilization. (author)

  17. The unsuitability of implantable Doppler probes for the early detection of renal vascular complications - a porcine model for prevention of renal transplant loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdisen, Chris; Jespersen, Bente; Møldrup, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Vascular occlusion is a rare, but serious complication after kidney transplantation often resulting in graft loss. We therefore aimed to develop an experimental porcine model for stepwise reduction of the renal venous blood flow and to compare an implantable Doppler probe...... and microdialysis for fast detection of vascular occlusion. Methods: In 20 pigs, implantable Doppler probes were placed on the renal artery and vein and a microdialysis catheter was placed in the renal cortex. An arterial flowprobe served as gold standard. Following two-hour baseline measurements, the pigs were....../3 (66%) reduction in renal blood flow. The implantable Doppler probe was not able to detect flow changes until there was total venous occlusion. Microdialysis detected changes in local metabolism after both arterial and venous occlusion; the implantable Doppler probe could only detect vascular...

  18. Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, G C; Montes, L F; Cassady, G

    1978-08-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn (SFNN) developed in a 1-week-old black boy. His mother had received numerous medications for eclampsia. Birth was by Caesarean section and complicated by meconium aspiration. There were numerous nodules over the back, buttocks and extremities that yielded a caseous-like material. Microscopically, these nodules showed crystallization and necrosis of the fat. Hypoglycemia, pneumonia, oliguria, thrombocytopenia, seizures and urinary infection were associated with the cutaneous problem and led to a fatal outcome 2 weeks after birth.

  19. Gigantic subcutaneous lipoma – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lyngsaa Lang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipomas are the most common benign mesenchymal tumour. The solitary subcutaneous lipoma accounts for approximately one-quarter to one-half of all soft tissue tumours. The preferred locations include the trunk, shoulder, upper arm, and the neck. In this case report, we present a gigantic axillary lipoma weighing 23.35 kg. Due to the tumour mass and its long-term presence, the lipoma caused anatomical changes in the axilla making its removal challenging and difficult.

  20. Cost-minimization analysis of subcutaneous abatacept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ariza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the cost of treating rheumatoid arthritis patients that have failed an initial treatment with methotrexate, with subcutaneous aba - tacept versus other first-line biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Method: Subcutaneous abatacept was considered comparable to intravenous abatacept, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab and tocilizumab, based on indirect comparison using mixed treatment analysis. A cost-minimization analysis was therefore considered appropriate. The Spanish Health System perspective and a 3 year time horizon were selected. Pharmaceutical and administration costs (, 2013 of all available first-line biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were considered. Administration costs were obtained from a local costs database. Patients were considered to have a weight of 70 kg. A 3% annual discount rate was applied. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results: Subcutaneous abatacept proved in the base case to be less costly than all other biologic antirrheumatic drugs (ranging from -831.42 to -9,741.69 versus infliximab and tocilizumab, respectively. Subcutaneous abatacept was associated with a cost of 10,760.41 per patient during the first year of treatment and 10,261.29 in subsequent years. The total 3-year cost of subcutaneous abatacept was 29,953.89 per patient. Sensitivity analyses proved the model to be robust. Subcutaneous abatacept remained cost-saving in 100% of probabilistic sensitivity analysis simulations versus adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept and golimumab, in more than 99.6% versus intravenous abatacept and tocilizumab and in 62.3% versus infliximab. Conclusions: Treatment with subcutaneous abatacept is cost-saving versus intravenous abatacept, adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab and tocilizumab in the management of rheumatoid arthritis patients initiating

  1. Tophaceous Gout simulating infected Ankle Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis K

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a well known metabolic disorder characterized by the formation of urate crystals in joints resulting in recurrent attacks of acute inflammatory arthritis following which tophi can occur in joints or subcutaneous tissues. We report a rare localization of gouty tophi in a 52 years old male. The tophi had formed over the stainless steel implant used for the fixation of a lateral malleolus fracture 20 years ago.

  2. Modeling the electrode-neuron interface of cochlear implants: effects of neural survival, electrode placement, and the partial tripolar configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwyn, Joshua H; Bierer, Steven M; Bierer, Julie Arenberg

    2010-09-01

    The partial tripolar electrode configuration is a relatively novel stimulation strategy that can generate more spatially focused electric fields than the commonly used monopolar configuration. Focused stimulation strategies should improve spectral resolution in cochlear implant users, but may also be more sensitive to local irregularities in the electrode-neuron interface. In this study, we develop a practical computer model of cochlear implant stimulation that can simulate neural activation in a simplified cochlear geometry and we relate the resulting patterns of neural activity to basic psychophysical measures. We examine how two types of local irregularities in the electrode-neuron interface, variations in spiral ganglion nerve density and electrode position within the scala tympani, affect the simulated neural activation patterns and how these patterns change with electrode configuration. The model shows that higher partial tripolar fractions activate more spatially restricted populations of neurons at all current levels and require higher current levels to excite a given number of neurons. We find that threshold levels are more sensitive at high partial tripolar fractions to both types of irregularities, but these effects are not independent. In particular, at close electrode-neuron distances, activation is typically more spatially localized which leads to a greater influence of neural dead regions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Hydrogel Coating Does Not Affect Bone Apposition at the Implant Surface in a Rabbit Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, W.; Gawlitta, Debby; Nikkels, P. G J; Pouran, B.; van Rijen, M. H P; Dhert, W. J A; Vogely, H. C.

    Background: Uncemented orthopaedic implants rely on the bone-implant interface to provide stability, therefore it is essential that a coating does not interfere with the bone-forming processes occurring at the implant interface. In addition, local application of high concentrations of antibiotics

  4. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Hydrogel Coating Does Not Affect Bone Apposition at the Implant Surface in a Rabbit Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, W; Gawlitta, D; Nikkels, P G J; Pouran, B; van Rijen, M H P; Dhert, W J A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10261847X; Vogely, H Ch

    BACKGROUND: Uncemented orthopaedic implants rely on the bone-implant interface to provide stability, therefore it is essential that a coating does not interfere with the bone-forming processes occurring at the implant interface. In addition, local application of high concentrations of antibiotics

  5. Cost Effectiveness of Childhood Cochlear Implantation and Deaf Education in Nicaragua: A Disability Adjusted Life Year Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, James E; Barrs, David M; Gong, Wenfeng; Wilson, Blake S; Mojica, Karen; Tucci, Debara L

    2015-09-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) is a common intervention for severe-to-profound hearing loss in high-income countries, but is not commonly available to children in low resource environments. Owing in part to the device costs, CI has been assumed to be less economical than deaf education for low resource countries. The purpose of this study is to compare the cost effectiveness of the two interventions for children with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in a model using disability adjusted life years (DALYs). Cost estimates were derived from published data, expert opinion, and known costs of services in Nicaragua. Individual costs and lifetime DALY estimates with a 3% discounting rate were applied to both two interventions. Sensitivity analysis was implemented to evaluate the effect on the discounted cost of five key components: implant cost, audiology salary, speech therapy salary, number of children implanted per year, and device failure probability. The costs per DALY averted are $5,898 and $5,529 for CI and deaf education, respectively. Using standards set by the WHO, both interventions are cost effective. Sensitivity analysis shows that when all costs set to maximum estimates, CI is still cost effective. Using a conservative DALY analysis, both CI and deaf education are cost-effective treatment alternatives for severe-to-profound SNHL. CI intervention costs are not only influenced by the initial surgery and device costs but also by rehabilitation costs and the lifetime maintenance, device replacement, and battery costs. The major CI cost differences in this low resource setting were increased initial training and infrastructure costs, but lower medical personnel and surgery costs.

  6. Model of 1/f noise in ion implanted resistors as a function of the resistance, determined by a reverse bias voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, H.G.E.

    1979-01-01

    A model is presented for the 1/f noise in ion-implanted resistors. The resistance was changed by a reverse bias voltage. The model explains the experimentally found square dependence between the relative 1/f noise intensity C/C 0 and the relative change in resistance R/R 0 . (author)

  7. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.

    1986-01-01

    It is the purpose of the present paper to give a review of surface alloy processing by ion implantation. However, rather than covering this vast subject as a whole, the survey is confined to a presentation of the microstructures that can be found in metal surfaces after ion implantation. The presentation is limited to alloys processed by ion implantation proper, that is to processes in which the alloy compositions are altered significantly by direct injection of the implanted ions. The review is introduced by a presentation of the processes taking place during development of the fundamental event in ion implantation - the collision cascade, followed by a summary of the various microstructures which can be formed after ion implantation into metals. This is compared with the variability of microstructures that can be achieved by rapid solidification processing. The microstructures are subsequently discussed in the light of the processes which, as the implantations proceed, take place during and immediately after formation of the individual collision cascades. These collision cascades define the volumes inside which individual ions are slowed down in the implanted targets. They are not only centres for vigorous agitation but also the sources for formation of excess concentrations of point defects, which will influence development of particular microstructures. A final section presents a selection of specific structures which have been observed in different alloy systems. (orig./GSCH)

  8. 3-D trajectory model for MDT using micro-spheres implanted within large blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choomphon-anomakhun, Natthaphon; Natenapit, Mayuree

    2016-09-01

    Implant assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) using ferromagnetic spherical targets implanted within large blood vessels and subjected to a uniform externally applied magnetic field (H0) has been investigated and reported for the first time. The capture areas (As) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) were determined from the analysis of particle trajectories simulated from equations of motion. Then, the effects of various parameters, such as types of ferromagnetic materials in the targets and MDCPs, blood flow rates, mass fraction of the ferromagnetic material in the MDCPs, average radii of MDCPs (Rp) and the strength of H0 on the As were obtained. Furthermore, the effects of saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic materials in the MDCPs and within the targets on the As were analyzed. After this, the suitable strengths of H0 and Rp for IA-MDT designs were reported. Dimensionless As, ranging from 2 to 7, was obtained with Rp ranging from 500 to 2500 nm, μ0H0 less than 0.8 T and a blood flow rate of 0.1 m s-1. The target-MDCP materials considered are iron-iron, iron-magnetite and SS409-magnetite, respectively.

  9. Analytical threshold voltage modeling of ion-implanted strained-Si double-material double-gate (DMDG) MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ekta; Singh, Balraj; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Kunal; Jit, Satyabrata

    2017-04-01

    Two dimensional threshold voltage model of ion-implanted strained-Si double-material double-gate MOSFETs has been done based on the solution of two dimensional Poisson's equation in the channel region using the parabolic approximation method. Novelty of the proposed device structure lies in the amalgamation of the advantages of both the strained-Si channel and double-material double-gate structure with a vertical Gaussian-like doping profile. The effects of different device parameters (such as device channel length, gate length ratios, germanium mole fraction) and doping parameters (such as projected range, straggle parameter) on threshold voltage of the proposed structure have been investigated. It is observed that the subthreshold performance of the device can be improved by simply controlling the doping parameters while maintaining other device parameters constant. The modeling results show a good agreement with the numerical simulation data obtained by using ATLAS™, a 2D device simulator from SILVACO.

  10. Modelling the metal–semiconductor band structure in implanted ohmic contacts to GaN and SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Tomás, A; Fontserè, A; Placidi, M; Jennings, M R; Gammon, P M

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a method to model the metal–semiconductor (M–S) band structure to an implanted ohmic contact to a wide band gap semiconductor (WBG) such as GaN and SiC. The performance and understanding of the M–S contact to a WBG semiconductor is of great importance as it influences the overall performance of a semiconductor device. In this work we explore in a numerical fashion the ohmic contact properties to a WBG semiconductor taking into account the partial ionization of impurities and analysing its dependence on the temperature, the barrier height, the impurity level band energy and carrier concentration. The effect of the M–S Schottky barrier lowering and the Schottky barrier inhomogeneities are discussed. The model is applied to a fabricated ohmic contact to GaN where the M–S band structure can be completely determined. (paper)

  11. Implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting in permeable microvessels: Comparison of two-fluid statistical transport model with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ChiBin, Zhang; XiaoHui, Lin, E-mail: lxh60@seu.edu.cn; ZhaoMin, Wang; ChangBao, Wang

    2017-03-15

    In experiments and theoretical analyses, this study examines the capture efficiency (CE) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) for implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) in microvessels. It also proposes a three-dimensional statistical transport model of MDCPs for IA-MDT in permeable microvessels, which describes blood flow by the two-fluid (Casson and Newtonian) model. The model accounts for the permeable effect of the microvessel wall and the coupling effect between the blood flow and tissue fluid flow. The MDCPs move randomly through the microvessel, and their transport state is described by the Boltzmann equation. The regulated changes and factors affecting the CE of the MDCPs in the assisted magnetic targeting were obtained by solving the theoretical model and by experimental testing. The CE was negatively correlated with the blood flow velocity, and positively correlated with the external magnetic field intensity and microvessel permeability. The predicted CEs of the MDCPs were consistent with the experimental results. Additionally, under the same external magnetic field, the predicted CE was 5–8% higher in the IA-MDT model than in the model ignoring the permeability effect of the microvessel wall. - Highlights: • A model of MDCPs for IA-MDT in permeable microvessels was established. • An experimental device was established, the CE of MDCPs was measured. • The predicted CE of MDCPs was 5–8% higher in the IA-MDT model.

  12. Subcutaneous tissue reaction to castor oil bean and calcium hydroxide in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Esteves Afonso Camargo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Castor oil bean cement (COB is a new material that has been used as an endodontic sealer, and is a candidate material for direct pulp capping. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of a new formulation of COB compared to calcium hydroxide cement (CH and a control group without any material, in the subcutaneous tissue of rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The materials were prepared, packed into polyethylene tubes, and implanted in the rat dorsal subcutaneous tissue. Animals were sacrificed at the 7th and 50th days after implantation. A quantitative analysis of inflammatory cells was performed and data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests at 5% significance level. RESULTS: Comparing the mean number of inflammatory cells between the two experimental groups (COB and CH and the control group, statistically significant difference (p=0.0001 was observed at 7 and 50 days. There were no significant differences (p=0.111 between tissue reaction to CH (382 inflammatory cells and COB (330 inflammatory cells after 7 days. After 50 days, significantly more inflammatory cells (p=0.02 were observed in the CH group (404 inflammatory cells than in the COB group (177 inflammatory cells. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that the COB cement induces less inflammatory response within long periods.

  13. Recurrent subcutaneous emphysema of the face: a challenging clinical problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjati, Hossein; Davani, Sam Zeraatian Nejad; Johari, Hamed Ghoddusi

    2007-01-01

    In the neck or face, there are different causes for subcutaneous emphysema such as injury to the sinuses, the hypopharynx, the laryngotracheal complex, the pulmonary parenchyma, the esophagus or the presence of gas-forming organisms. However, factitious subcutaneous emphysema, a rare cause, must be considered in the differential diagnosis. In this clinical report, we discuss a 20-year-old girl who was under follow-up because of recurrent subcutaneous emphysema of the face and periorbital area. After 2 years of work-ups, including a period of close observation in the intensive care unit, self air injection by syringe was found as the cause of recurrent subcutaneous emphysema of the face, and the patient was labeled as having factitious recurrent subcutaneous emphysema. Therefore, when a patient presents with unexplained recurrent subcutaneous emphysema, one should suspect self-infliction and examine for puncture marks.

  14. Evaluation of Subcutaneous Phenobarbital Administration in Hospice Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosgood, Jessica Richards; Kimbrel, Jason M; McCrate Protus, Bridget; Grauer, Phyllis A

    2016-04-01

    Phenobarbital is used in hospice and palliative care to treat refractory symptoms. In end-of-life care, Food and Drug Administration approved routes of administration may be unreasonable based on patients' status. In these cases, phenobarbital may be administered subcutaneously for symptom management. However, according to the American Hospital Formulary Service, subcutaneous administration of commercially available injectable phenobarbital is cautioned due to possible skin reactions. This study evaluates the tolerability of phenobarbital administered subcutaneously. Of 69 patients and 774 distinct subcutaneous phenobarbital injections, 2 site reactions were recorded (2.9% of patients; 0.3% of injections). Both were mild, grade 1 reactions. Each patient continued to receive subcutaneous phenobarbital via newly placed ports with no additional reactions. Based on these findings, phenobarbital appears to be well tolerated when administered subcutaneously. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Impacts of a care process model and inpatient electrophysiology service on cardiovascular implantable electronic device infections: a preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eugene M; Nagpal, Avish; DeSimone, Daniel C; Anderson, Brenda; Linderbaum, Jane; De Ziel, Thomas; Li, Zhuo; Sohail, Muhammad R; Cha, Yong-Mei; Loomis, Erica; Espinosa, Raul; Friedman, Paul A; Greason, Kevin; Schiller, Henry; Virk, Abinash; Wilson, Walter R; Steckelberg, James M; Baddour, Larry M

    2017-10-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic device infection (CIEDI) rates are rising. To improve outcomes, our institution developed an online care process model (CPM) and a specialized inpatient heart rhythm service (HRS). This retrospective review compared hospital length of stay (LOS), mortality, and times to subspecialty consultation and procedures before and after CPM and HRS availability. CPM use was associated with shortened time to surgical consultation (median 2 days post-CPM vs. 3 days pre-CPM, p = 0.0152), pocket closure (median 4 vs. 5 days, p < 0.0001), and days to new CIED implant (median 7 vs. 8 days, p = 0.0126). Post-HRS patients were more likely to have a surgical consultation (OR 7.01, 95% CI 1.56-31.5, p = 0.011) and shortened time to pocket closure (coefficient - 2.21 days, 95% CI - 3.33 to - 1.09, p < 0.001), compared to pre-HRS. The CPM and HRS were associated with favorable outcomes, but further integration of CPM features into hospital workflow is needed.

  16. Study of UO2 mechanical behaviour implanted with helium ions using X-ray micro-diffraction and mechanical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Marcelle

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the mechanical behavior of nuclear fuel during direct long term storage, UO 2 polycrystals were implanted with Helium ions at a thin surface layer (1 μm approximately), which leads to stress and strain fields in the layer. Strains were measured, at the grains scale, by X-ray micro-diffraction, using synchrotron radiation (ESRF). Image analysis methods were developed for an automatic analysis of the large number of diffraction patterns. Applying statistical tools to Laue patterns allows an automatic detection of low quality images, and enhances the measurement precision. At low layer thickness, the mechanical interaction between grains can be neglected. At higher thickness, experimental results showed a higher mechanical interaction near grain boundaries that can be modeled using finite elements method. Geostatistical tools were used to quantify these interactions. The swelling and the elastic constants in the implanted layer can be estimated through the measured strains on a large number of grains with different orientations. This work allows the determination of the swelling of nuclear fuel in irradiation conditions, as well as the modification of its elastic properties. (author) [fr

  17. Biochemical Monitoring of Spinal Cord Injury by FT-IR Spectroscopy—Effects of Therapeutic Alginate Implant in Rat Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckermann, Ortrud; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Later, Robert; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Doberenz, Falko; Gelinsky, Michael; Leipnitz, Elke; Schackert, Gabriele; Koch, Edmund; Sablinskas, Valdas; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces complex biochemical changes, which result in inhibition of nervous tissue regeneration abilities. In this study, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was applied to assess the outcomes of implants made of a novel type of non-functionalized soft calcium alginate hydrogel in a rat model of spinal cord hemisection (n = 28). Using FT-IR spectroscopic imaging, we evaluated the stability of the implants and the effects on morphology and biochemistry of the injured tissue one and six months after injury. A semi-quantitative evaluation of the distribution of lipids and collagen showed that alginate significantly reduced injury-induced demyelination of the contralateral white matter and fibrotic scarring in the chronic state after SCI. The spectral information enabled to detect and localize the alginate hydrogel at the lesion site and proved its long-term persistence in vivo. These findings demonstrate a positive impact of alginate hydrogel on recovery after SCI and prove FT-IR spectroscopic imaging as alternative method to evaluate and optimize future SCI repair strategies. PMID:26559822

  18. Biochemical Monitoring of Spinal Cord Injury by FT-IR Spectroscopy--Effects of Therapeutic Alginate Implant in Rat Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Tamosaityte

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI induces complex biochemical changes, which result in inhibition of nervous tissue regeneration abilities. In this study, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy was applied to assess the outcomes of implants made of a novel type of non-functionalized soft calcium alginate hydrogel in a rat model of spinal cord hemisection (n = 28. Using FT-IR spectroscopic imaging, we evaluated the stability of the implants and the effects on morphology and biochemistry of the injured tissue one and six months after injury. A semi-quantitative evaluation of the distribution of lipids and collagen showed that alginate significantly reduced injury-induced demyelination of the contralateral white matter and fibrotic scarring in the chronic state after SCI. The spectral information enabled to detect and localize the alginate hydrogel at the lesion site and proved its long-term persistence in vivo. These findings demonstrate a positive impact of alginate hydrogel on recovery after SCI and prove FT-IR spectroscopic imaging as alternative method to evaluate and optimize future SCI repair strategies.

  19. Diffusion modelling of low-energy ion-implanted BF{sub 2} in crystalline silicon: Study of fluorine vacancy effect on boron diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcon, J. [Laboratoire Electronique Microtechnologie et Instrumentation (LEMI), University of Rouen, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan (France)], E-mail: Jerome.Marcon@univ-rouen.fr; Merabet, A. [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux Metalliques, Departement d' O.M.P., Faculte des Sciences de l' Ingenieur, Universite de Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria)

    2008-12-05

    We have investigated and modelled the diffusion of boron implanted into crystalline silicon in the form of boron difluoride BF{sub 2}{sup +}. We have used published data for BF{sub 2}{sup +} implanted with an energy of 2.2 keV in crystalline silicon. Fluorine effects are considered by using vacancy-fluorine pairs which are responsible for the suppression of boron diffusion in crystalline silicon. Following Uematsu's works, the simulations satisfactory reproduce the SIMS experimental profiles in the 800-1000 deg. C temperature range. The boron diffusion model in silicon of Uematsu has been improved taking into account the last experimental data.

  20. Simulation of measurement absorbed dose on prostate brachytherapy with radius of prostate 2 cm using MCNP5 with seed implant model isoaid AdvantageTM IAPd-103A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poundra Setiawan; Suharyana; Riyatun

    2015-01-01

    Simulation of measurement absorbed dose on prostate brachytherapy with radius of prostate 2 cm using MCNP5 with seed implant model IsoAid Advantage TM IAPd-103A has been conducted. 103 Pd used as a radioactive source in the seed implant and it has energy gamma emission 20,8 keV with half live 16,9 days and has activity 4 mCi. The prostate cancer is modeled with spherical and it has radius 3 cm, after planting the seed implant 103 Pdover 24,4 days, prostate cancer has absorbed dose 2,172Gy. Lethal dose maximum use 103 Pd is 125 Gy and it was reached with 59 seeds. (author)

  1. Modeling studies on the precipitation of Kr after implantation into metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.

    1988-02-01

    A rate-theory approach is applied to interpreting observations on the precipitation of Kr injected into Ni at temperatures between 25 and 560/degree/C. At temperatures of 400/degree/C or higher, the implanted Kr precipitates evolve into a bi-modal size distribution containing small solid precipitates and an additional population of larger, faceted bubbles. The calculations explore the dependence of the observed bi-modal distribution on the maximum size of the solid Kr precipitates and the effect of this dependence on bubble mobility. The analysis suggests that during the irradiation, whereas the large bubbles move by surface diffusion, the solid Kr precipitates are immobile. The relevance of the Kr-Ni interaction on the solid Kr precipitates size cutoff is discussed. 18 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Locally delivered ethyl-2,5-dihydroxybenzoate using 3D printed bone implant for promotion of bone regeneration in a osteoporotic animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B-J Kwon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass, most commonly caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not matched by sufficient bone formation. The most common complications of postmenopausal osteoporosis are bone-related defects and fractures. Fracture healing is a multifactorial bone regeneration process, influenced by both biological and mechanical factors related to age, osteoporosis and stability of the osteosynthesis. During the treatment of bone defects in osteoporotic conditions, imbalanced bone remodeling is the leading cause for implant failure. To overcome these problems, ethyl-2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (E-2,5-DHB, a drug that promotes bone formation and inhibits bone resorption, was used. E-2,5-DHB-incorporating titanium (Ti implants using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA coating for local delivery of E-2,5-DHB were developed and the effects on bone healing of femoral defects were evaluated in an osteoporotic model. The release of E-2,5-DHB resulted in decreased bone resorption and increased bone formation around the implant. Thus, it was confirmed that, in the osteoporotic model, bone healing was increased and implant fixation was enhanced. These results suggested that E-2,5-DHB-coated Ti implants have great potential as an ultimate local drug delivery system for bone tissue scaffolds.

  3. Comparison of Regenerative Tissue Quality following Matrix-Associated Cell Implantation Using Amplified Chondrocytes Compared to Synovium-Derived Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model for Cartilage Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Kowal, Justyna M; Kassem, Moustapha

    2018-01-01

    Known problems of the autologous chondrocyte implantation motivate the search for cellular alternatives. The aim of the study was to test the potential of synovium-derived stem cells (SMSC) to regenerate cartilage using a matrix-associated implantation. In an osteochondral defect model of the med......Known problems of the autologous chondrocyte implantation motivate the search for cellular alternatives. The aim of the study was to test the potential of synovium-derived stem cells (SMSC) to regenerate cartilage using a matrix-associated implantation. In an osteochondral defect model...... of the medial femoral condyle in a rabbit, a collagen membrane was seeded with either culture-expanded allogenic chondrocytes or SMSC and then transplanted into the lesion. A tailored piece synovium served as a control. Rabbit SMSC formed typical cartilage in vitro. Macroscopic evaluation of defect healing...... and the thickness of the regenerated tissue did not reveal a significant difference between the intervention groups. However, instantaneous and shear modulus, reflecting the biomechanical strength of the repair tissue, was superior in the implantation group using allogenic chondrocytes (p

  4. Improving release completeness from PLGA-based implants for the acid-labile model protein ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Luisa; Körber, Martin; Bodmeier, Roland

    2018-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of hot melt extrusion (HME) for the preparation of PLGA-based ovalbumin-loaded implants as well as to characterize and improve protein release from the implants. Ovalbumin (OVA) was stable during extrusion, which was attributed to a protective effect of the biodegradable matrix. OVA release was characterized by a low burst, a slow release up to day 21, which plateaued thereafter resulting in incomplete release for all evaluated protein loadings. Release incompleteness was accompanied by the formation of an insoluble residual mass. Further characterization of this mass indicated that it consisted of non-covalent protein aggregates and polymer, where ovalbumin was ionically bound as the pH inside the degrading matrix decreased below the pI of the protein. Although higher protein release was obtained with the inclusion of weak bases because of their neutralizing effect, OVA aggregation and release incompleteness were not fully avoided. With the use of shellac, a well-known enteric and biocompatible polymer, as protective excipient, a distinct late release phase occurred and release completeness was increased to more than 75% cumulative release. Shellac apparently protected the protein against the acidic microclimate due to its low solubility at low pH. Protected OVA was thus released once the pH increased due to a declining PLGA-oligomer formation. The result was a triphasic release profile consisting of an initial burst, a slow diffusion phase over about 7 weeks, and an erosion-controlled dissolution phase over the next 3 weeks. An acid-labile protein like OVA was thus feasibly protected from interactions with PLGA and its degradation products, resulting in a controlled delivery of more than 85% of the original payload. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Switching between intravenous and subcutaneous trastuzumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gligorov, Joseph; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Müller, Volkmar

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety and tolerability of switching between subcutaneous (SC) and intravenous (IV) trastuzumab in the PrefHer study (NCT01401166). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer completed (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy and were randomised to receive four...... cycles of SC trastuzumab, via single-use injection device (SID; Cohort 1) or hand-held syringe (Cohort 2), followed by four cycles of IV, or vice versa (the crossover period presented here) as part of their 18 standard cycles of adjuvant trastuzumab treatment. Adverse events (AEs) were reported using....... Rates of clinically important events, including grade ≥3 AEs, serious AEs, AEs leading to study drug discontinuation and cardiac AEs, were low and similar between treatment arms (trastuzumab were observed. CONCLUSIONS: PrefHer revealed...

  6. Potential hazards to embryo implantation: A human endometrial in vitro model to identify unwanted antigestagenic actions of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, L.; Deppert, W.R.; Pfeifer, D.; Stanzel, S.; Weimer, M.; Hanjalic-Beck, A.; Stein, A.; Straßer, M.; Zahradnik, H.P.; Schaefer, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a crucial step in human reproduction and depends on the timely development of a receptive endometrium. The human endometrium is unique among adult tissues due to its dynamic alterations during each menstrual cycle. It hosts the implantation process which is governed by progesterone, whereas 17β-estradiol regulates the preceding proliferation of the endometrium. The receptors for both steroids are targets for drugs and endocrine disrupting chemicals. Chemicals with unwanted antigestagenic actions are potentially hazardous to embryo implantation since many pharmaceutical antiprogestins adversely affect endometrial receptivity. This risk can be addressed by human tissue-specific in vitro assays. As working basis we compiled data on chemicals interacting with the PR. In our experimental work, we developed a flexible in vitro model based on human endometrial Ishikawa cells. Effects of antiprogestin compounds on pre-selected target genes were characterized by sigmoidal concentration–response curves obtained by RT-qPCR. The estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) was identified as the most responsive target gene by microarray analysis. The agonistic effect of progesterone on SULT1E1 mRNA was concentration-dependently antagonized by RU486 (mifepristone) and ZK137316 and, with lower potency, by 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol A and apigenin. The negative control methyl acetoacetate showed no effect. The effects of progesterone and RU486 were confirmed on the protein level by Western blotting. We demonstrated proof of principle that our Ishikawa model is suitable to study quantitatively effects of antiprogestin-like chemicals on endometrial target genes in comparison to pharmaceutical reference compounds. This test is useful for hazard identification and may contribute to reduce animal studies. -- Highlights: ► We compare progesterone receptor-mediated endometrial effects of chemicals and drugs. ► 4-Nonylphenol, bisphenol A and apigenin exert weak

  7. Potential hazards to embryo implantation: A human endometrial in vitro model to identify unwanted antigestagenic actions of chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, L.; Deppert, W.R. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Pfeifer, D. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Stanzel, S.; Weimer, M. [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Hanjalic-Beck, A.; Stein, A.; Straßer, M.; Zahradnik, H.P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Schaefer, W.R., E-mail: wolfgang.schaefer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    Embryo implantation is a crucial step in human reproduction and depends on the timely development of a receptive endometrium. The human endometrium is unique among adult tissues due to its dynamic alterations during each menstrual cycle. It hosts the implantation process which is governed by progesterone, whereas 17β-estradiol regulates the preceding proliferation of the endometrium. The receptors for both steroids are targets for drugs and endocrine disrupting chemicals. Chemicals with unwanted antigestagenic actions are potentially hazardous to embryo implantation since many pharmaceutical antiprogestins adversely affect endometrial receptivity. This risk can be addressed by human tissue-specific in vitro assays. As working basis we compiled data on chemicals interacting with the PR. In our experimental work, we developed a flexible in vitro model based on human endometrial Ishikawa cells. Effects of antiprogestin compounds on pre-selected target genes were characterized by sigmoidal concentration–response curves obtained by RT-qPCR. The estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) was identified as the most responsive target gene by microarray analysis. The agonistic effect of progesterone on SULT1E1 mRNA was concentration-dependently antagonized by RU486 (mifepristone) and ZK137316 and, with lower potency, by 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol A and apigenin. The negative control methyl acetoacetate showed no effect. The effects of progesterone and RU486 were confirmed on the protein level by Western blotting. We demonstrated proof of principle that our Ishikawa model is suitable to study quantitatively effects of antiprogestin-like chemicals on endometrial target genes in comparison to pharmaceutical reference compounds. This test is useful for hazard identification and may contribute to reduce animal studies. -- Highlights: ► We compare progesterone receptor-mediated endometrial effects of chemicals and drugs. ► 4-Nonylphenol, bisphenol A and apigenin exert weak

  8. Implant-based oral rehabilitation of a variant model of type I dentinal dysplasia: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Nettem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentin dysplasia is an exceptionally rare, autosomal-dominant, hereditary condition, primarily characterized by defective dentin formation affecting both the deciduous and permanent dentitions. The etiology remains imprecise to date, in spite of the numerous hypotheses put forward and the constant updates on this condition. This case report of type I dentin dysplasia exhibits radiographic findings that are unique and diverse from the classical findings of various subtypes of this disease reported to date. This article also depicts the implant-based oral rehabilitation of the young patient diagnosed with this variant model of dentin dysplasia type I. Early diagnosis and implementation of this preventive and curative therapy is vital for avoiding premature exfoliation of deciduous and permanent dentition and the associated residual ridge resorption, thereby overcoming functional and esthetic deficits and ensuring protection of the remaining dentition from further harm.

  9. Quantitative ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gries, W.H.

    1976-06-01

    This is a report of the study of the implantation of heavy ions at medium keV-energies into electrically conducting mono-elemental solids, at ion doses too small to cause significant loss of the implanted ions by resputtering. The study has been undertaken to investigate the possibility of accurate portioning of matter in submicrogram quantities, with some specific applications in mind. The problem is extensively investigated both on a theoretical level and in practice. A mathematical model is developed for calculating the loss of implanted ions by resputtering as a function of the implanted ion dose and the sputtering yield. Numerical data are produced therefrom which permit a good order-of-magnitude estimate of the loss for any ion/solid combination in which the ions are heavier than the solid atoms, and for any ion energy from 10 to 300 keV. The implanted ion dose is measured by integration of the ion beam current, and equipment and techniques are described which make possible the accurate integration of an ion current in an electromagnetic isotope separator. The methods are applied to two sample cases, one being a stable isotope, the other a radioisotope. In both cases independent methods are used to show that the implantation is indeed quantitative, as predicted. At the same time the sample cases are used to demonstrate two possible applications for quantitative ion implantation, viz. firstly for the manufacture of calibration standards for instrumental micromethods of elemental trace analysis in metals, and secondly for the determination of the half-lives of long-lived radioisotopes by a specific activity method. It is concluded that the present study has advanced quantitative ion implantation to the state where it can be successfully applied to the solution of problems in other fields

  10. Carmustine Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells in your body. ... are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while receiving carmustine implant, call your doctor. Carmustine may harm the fetus.

  11. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIDCD A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense ... Hearing Aids Retinitis Pigmentosa - National Eye Institute Telecommunications Relay Services Usher Syndrome Your Baby's Hearing Screening News ...

  12. The Cost-Effectiveness of Dual Mobility Implants for Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Computer-Based Cost-Utility Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Brian T; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Westrich, Geoffrey H

    2017-05-03

    Dislocation remains a clinically important problem following primary total hip arthroplasty, and it is a common reason for revision total hip arthroplasty. Dual mobility (DM) implants decrease the risk of dislocation but can be more expensive than conventional implants and have idiosyncratic failure mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of DM implants compared with conventional bearings for primary total hip arthroplasty. Markov model analysis was conducted from the societal perspective with use of direct and indirect costs. Costs, expressed in 2013 U.S. dollars, were derived from the literature, the National Inpatient Sample, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Effectiveness was expressed in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The model was populated with health state utilities and state transition probabilities derived from previously published literature. The analysis was performed for a patient's lifetime, and costs and effectiveness were discounted at 3% annually. The principal outcome was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY. Sensitivity analyses were performed to explore relevant uncertainty. In the base case, DM total hip arthroplasty showed absolute dominance over conventional total hip arthroplasty, with lower accrued costs ($39,008 versus $40,031 U.S. dollars) and higher accrued utility (13.18 versus 13.13 QALYs) indicating cost-savings. DM total hip arthroplasty ceased being cost-saving when its implant costs exceeded those of conventional total hip arthroplasty by $1,023, and the cost-effectiveness threshold for DM implants was $5,287 greater than that for conventional implants. DM was not cost-effective when the annualized incremental probability of revision from any unforeseen failure mechanism or mechanisms exceeded 0.29%. The probability of intraprosthetic dislocation exerted the most influence on model results. This model

  13. EXPERIMENTAL SUBCUTANEOUS CYSTICERCOSIS BY Taenia crassiceps IN BALB/c AND C57BL/6 MICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Íria Márcia; Lima, Sarah Buzaim; Freitas, Aline de Araújo; Vinaud, Marina Clare; Junior, Ruy de Souza Lino

    2016-07-11

    Human cysticercosis is one of the most severe parasitic infections affecting tissues. Experimental models are needed to understand the host-parasite dynamics involved throughout the course of the infection. The subcutaneous experimental model is the closest to what is observed in human cysticercosis that does not affect the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to evaluate macroscopically and microscopically the experimental subcutaneous cysticercosis caused by Taenia crassiceps cysticerci in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Animals were inoculated in the dorsal subcutaneous region and macroscopic and microscopic aspects of the inflammatory process in the host-parasite interface were evaluated until 90 days after the inoculation (DAI). All the infected animals presented vesicles containing cysticerci in the inoculation site, which was translucent at 7 DAI and then remained opaque throughout the experimental days. The microscopic analysis showed granulation tissue in BALB/c mice since the acute phase of infection evolving to chronicity without cure, presenting 80% of larval stage cysticerci at 90 DAI. While C57BL/6 mice presented 67% of final stage cysticerci at 90 DAI, the parasites were surrounded by neutrophils evolving to the infection control. It is possible to conclude that the genetic features of susceptibility (BALB/c) or resistance (C57BL/6) were confirmed in an experimental subcutaneous model of cysticercosis.

  14. Do Bone Graft and Cracking of the Sclerotic Cavity Improve Fixation of Titanium and Hydroxyapatite-coated Revision Implants in an Animal Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmengaard, Brian; Baas, Joergen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Kold, Soren; Jensen, Thomas B; Bechtold, Joan E; Soballe, Kjeld

    2017-02-01

    We previously introduced a manual surgical technique that makes small perforations (cracks) through the sclerotic bone shell that typically forms during the process of aseptic loosening ("crack" revision technique). Perforating just the shell (without violating the proximal cortex) can maintain overall bone continuity while allowing marrow and vascular elements to access the implant surface. Because many revisions require bone graft to fill defects, we wanted to determine if bone graft could further increase implant fixation beyond what we have experimentally shown with the crack technique alone. Also, because both titanium (Ti6Al4V) and hydroxyapatite (HA) implant surfaces are used in revisions, we also wanted to determine their relative effectiveness in this model. We hypothesized that both (1) allografted plasma-sprayed Ti6Al4V; and (2) allografted plasma-sprayed HA-coated implants inserted with a crack revision technique have better fixation compared with a noncrack revision technique in each case. Under approval from our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, a female canine animal model was used to evaluate the uncemented revision technique (crack, noncrack) using paired contralateral implants while implant surface (Ti6Al4V, HA) was qualitatively compared between the two (unpaired) series. All groups received bone allograft tightly packed around the implant. This revision model includes a cylindrical implant pistoning 500 μm in a 0.75-mm gap, with polyethylene particles, for 8 weeks. This engenders a bone and tissue response representative of the metaphyseal cancellous region of an aseptically loosened component. At 8 weeks, the original implants were revised and followed for an additional 4 weeks. Mechanical fixation was assessed by load, stiffness, and energy to failure when loaded in axial pushout. Histomorphometry was used to determine the amount and location of bone and fibrous tissue in the grafted gap. The grafted crack revision improved

  15. Subcutaneous blood flow during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Sestoft, L

    1982-01-01

    Subcutaneous blood flow was measured preceding insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms and 2 h later in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy and in normal males. In all groups subcutaneous blood flow decreased at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptom...

  16. The comparison of the intestinal adaptation effects of subcutaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: Insulin has been reported to have positive effects on intestinal adaptation after short bowel syndrome when applicated oral or subcutaneously. The purpose of this study is to compare the intestinal adaptation effects of subcutaneous and oral routes of insulin in rats with short bowel syndrome. Materials and Methods: ...

  17. Cost-minimization of mabthera intravenous versus subcutaneous administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, P.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To identify and compare all costs related to preparing and administrating MabThera for the intravenous and subcutaneous formulations in Dutch hematological patients. The a priori notion is that the costs of subcutaneous MabThera injections are lower compared to intravenous infusion due

  18. Absorption Kinetics of Subcutaneously Administered Ceftazidime in Hypoperfused Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ebihara, MS

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The application of MWCs or WCs enhanced subcutaneous CAZ absorption by increasing blood flow. MWCs and WCs are considered to be safe and routine methods to induce defecation after surgery on the digestive system; thus, the combination of these methods and subcutaneous CAZ administration is a potential method for treating pneumonia in patients with SMID.

  19. No positive effect of Acid etching or plasma cleaning on osseointegration of titanium implants in a canine femoral condyle press-fit model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saksø, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Vestergaard; Mortensen, Mikkel Saksø

    2013-01-01

    Implant surface treatments that improve early osseointegration may prove useful in long-term survival of uncemented implants. We investigated Acid Etching and Plasma Cleaning on titanium implants.......Implant surface treatments that improve early osseointegration may prove useful in long-term survival of uncemented implants. We investigated Acid Etching and Plasma Cleaning on titanium implants....

  20. Experimental model of biofilm implant-related osteomyelitis to test combination biomaterials using biofilms as initial inocula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dustin L; Haymond, Bryan S; Woodbury, Kassie L; Beck, J Peter; Moore, David E; Epperson, R Tyler; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2012-07-01

    Currently, the majority of animal models that are used to study biofilm-related infections use planktonic bacterial cells as initial inocula to produce positive signals of infection in biomaterials studies. However, the use of planktonic cells has potentially led to inconsistent results in infection outcomes. In this study, well-established biofilms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were grown and used as initial inocula in an animal model of a Type IIIB open fracture. The goal of the work was to establish, for the first time, a repeatable model of biofilm implant-related osteomyelitis, wherein biofilms were used as initial inocula to test combination biomaterials. Results showed that 100% of animals that were treated with biofilms developed osteomyelitis, whereas 0% of animals not treated with biofilm developed infection. The development of this experimental model may lead to an important shift in biofilm and biomaterials research by showing that when biofilms are used as initial inocula, they may provide additional insights into how biofilm-related infections in the clinic develop and how they can be treated with combination biomaterials to eradicate and/or prevent biofilm formation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Modeling of time dependent localized flow shear stress and its impact on cellular growth within additive manufactured titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziyu; Yuan, Lang; Lee, Peter D; Jones, Eric; Jones, Julian R

    2014-11-01

    Bone augmentation implants are porous to allow cellular growth, bone formation and fixation. However, the design of the pores is currently based on simple empirical rules, such as minimum pore and interconnects sizes. We present a three-dimensional (3D) transient model of cellular growth based on the Navier-Stokes equations that simulates the body fluid flow and stimulation of bone precursor cellular growth, attachment, and proliferation as a function of local flow shear stress. The model's effectiveness is demonstrated for two additive manufactured (AM) titanium scaffold architectures. The results demonstrate that there is a complex interaction of flow rate and strut architecture, resulting in partially randomized structures having a preferential impact on stimulating cell migration in 3D porous structures for higher flow rates. This novel result demonstrates the potential new insights that can be gained via the modeling tool developed, and how the model can be used to perform what-if simulations to design AM structures to specific functional requirements. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A dynamic model for the estimation of optimum timing of computed tomography scan for dose evaluation of 125I or 103Pd seed implant of prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ning; Dicker, Adam P.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Nath, Ravinder; Waterman, Frank M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The dosimetric evaluation of permanent 125 I or 103 Pd prostate implant is based on the assumption that both prostate and seeds are static throughout the entire treatment time which lasts months. However, the prostate is often edematous after the surgical implantation of seeds. Therefore, both the volume of the prostate and the seed locations change dynamically as the edema resolves. This effect has impact on the validity of postimplant analysis based upon a CT scan. If a CT scan is taken too early after implantation while there is edema in the prostate, the dose delivered by the implant may be underestimated. If the imaging is delayed too long, the dose may be overestimated. The magnitude of this effect depends on both of the half-life of the isotope used and the half-life and magnitude of the edema. This study describes a dynamic biomathematical model which takes edema into account in calculating the dose delivered by the implant and is used to investigate the optimum time to obtain the postimplant CT scan. Materials and Methods: The dynamic biomathematical model is a numerical integration of the accumulated dose in which the prostate dimensions, the seed locations, and the source strength are all functions of time. The function which describes the change in prostate dimensions and seed locations as a function of time was determined in a separate study by analysis of serial postimplant CT scans. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the prostate for the total dose generated by the dynamic model are compared to DVHs generated by CT scans simulated for postimplant intervals ranging from 0 to 300 days after the implantation for 30 different combinations of the magnitude and duration of edema. Results: DVHs of the prostate calculated by taking edema into account show that the time of obtaining a CT scan for postimplant analysis is critical to the accuracy of dose evaluations. The comparison of the DVHs generated by the dynamic model to those generated by

  3. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    The implantation and sputtering mechanisms which are relevant to ion bombardment of surfaces are described. These are: collision, thermal, electronic and photon-induced sputtering. 135 refs.; 36 figs.; 9 tabs

  4. Artificial muscle for reanimation of the paralyzed face: durability and biocompatibility in a gerbil model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledgerwood, Levi G; Tinling, Steven; Senders, Craig; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Prahlad, Harsha; Tollefson, Travis T

    2012-11-01

    Current management of permanent facial paralysis centers on nerve grafting and muscle transfer; however, limitations of those procedures call for other options. To determine the durability and biocompatibility of implanted artificial muscle in a gerbil model and the degree of inflammation and fibrosis at the host tissue-artificial muscle interface. Electroactive polymer artificial muscle (EPAM) devices engineered in medical-grade silicone were implanted subcutaneously in 13 gerbils. The implanted units were stimulated with 1 kV at 1 Hz, 24 h/d via a function generator. Electrical signal input/output was recorded up to 40 days after implantation. The animals were euthanized between 23 and 65 days after implantation, and the host tissue-implant interface was evaluated histologically. The animals tolerated implantation of the EPAM devices well, with no perioperative deaths. The muscle devices created motion for a mean of 30.3 days (range, 19-40 days), with a mean of 2.6 × 106 cycles (range, 1.6 × 106 to 3.5 × 106 cycles). Histologic examination of the explanted devices revealed the development of a minimal fibrous capsule surrounding the implants, with no evidence of bacterial infection or inflammatory infiltrate. No evidence of device compromise, corrosion, or silicone breakdown was noted. Artificial muscle implanted in this short-term animal model was safe and functional in this preliminary study. We believe that EPAM devices will be a safe and viable option for restoration of facial motions in patients with irreversible facial paralysis.

  5. Recombinant human hyaluronidase-enabled subcutaneous pediatric rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Coburn H; Etzwiler, Lisa S; Miller, Melissa K; Maher, George; Mace, Sharon; Hostetler, Mark A; Smith, Sharon R; Reinhardt, Neil; Hahn, Barry; Harb, George

    2009-11-01

    The Increased Flow Utilizing Subcutaneously-Enabled (INFUSE)-Pediatric Rehydration Study was designed to assess efficacy, safety, and clinical utility of recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20)-facilitated subcutaneous rehydration in children 2 months to 10 years of age. Patients with mild/moderate dehydration requiring parenteral treatment in US emergency departments were eligible for this phase IV, multicenter, single-arm study. They received subcutaneous injection of 1 mL rHuPH20 (150 U), followed by subcutaneous infusion of 20 mL/kg isotonic fluid over the first hour. Subcutaneous rehydration was continued as needed for up to 72 hours. Rehydration was deemed successful if it was attributed by the investigator primarily to subcutaneous fluid infusion and the child was discharged without requiring an alternative method of rehydration. Efficacy was evaluated in 51 patients (mean age: 1.9 years; mean weight: 11.2 kg). Initial subcutaneous catheter placement was achieved with 1 attempt for 46/51 (90.2%) of patients. Rehydration was successful for 43/51 (84.3%) of patients. Five patients (9.8%) were hospitalized but deemed to be rehydrated primarily through subcutaneous therapy, for a total of 48/51 (94.1%) of patients. No treatment-related systemic adverse events were reported, but 1 serious adverse event occurred (cellulitis at infusion site). Investigators found the procedure easy to perform for 96% of patients (49/51 patients), and 90% of parents (43/48 parents) were satisfied or very satisfied. rHuPH20-facilitated subcutaneous hydration seems to be safe and effective for young children with mild/moderate dehydration. Subcutaneous access is achieved easily, and the procedure is well accepted by clinicians and parents.

  6. Inappropriate shocks in the subcutaneous ICD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Brouwer, Tom F; Barr, Craig

    2015-01-01

    shocks have been reported. METHODS: We analyzed the incidence, predictors and management of inappropriate shocks in the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Registry, which collects S-ICD implantation information and follow-up data from clinical centers in Europe and New Zealand. RESULTS: During a follow-up of 21 ± 13...... xyphoid to V6) reduced the risk. Reprogramming or optimization of SVT treatment after the first clinical event of inappropriate shock was successful in preventing further inappropriate shocks for cardiac oversensing and SVT events. CONCLUSIONS: Inappropriate shocks, mainly due to cardiac oversensing...

  7. Computed-tomography modeled polyether ether ketone (PEEK) implants in revision cranioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Eamon B; Barnett, Sam; Madden, Christopher; Welch, Babu; Mickey, Bruce; Rozen, Shai

    2015-03-01

    Traditional cranioplasty methods focus on pre-operative or intraoperative hand molding. Recently, CT-guided polyether ether ketone (PEEK) plate reconstruction enables precise, time-saving reconstruction. This case series aims to show a single institution experience with use of PEEK cranioplasty as an effective, safe, precise, reusable, and time-saving cranioplasty technique in large, complex cranial defects. We performed a 6-year retrospective review of cranioplasty procedures performed at our affiliated hospitals using PEEK implants. A total of nineteen patients underwent twenty-two cranioplasty procedures. Pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative data was collected. Nineteen patients underwent twenty-two procedures. Time interval from injury to loss of primary cranioplasty averaged 57.7 months (0-336 mo); 4.0 months (n=10, range 0-19) in cases of trauma. Time interval from primary cranioplasty loss to PEEK cranioplasty was 11.8 months for infection (n=11, range 6-25 mo), 12.2 months for trauma (n=5, range 2-27 mo), and 0.3 months for cosmetic or functional reconstructions (n=3, range 0-1). Similar surgical techniques were used in all patients. Drains were placed in 11/22 procedures. Varying techniques were used in skin closure, including adjacent tissue transfer (4/22) and free tissue transfer (1/22). The PEEK plate required modification in four procedures. Three patients had reoperation following PEEK plate reconstruction. Cranioplasty utilizing CT-guided PEEK plate allows easy inset, anatomic accuracy, mirror image aesthetics, simplification of complex 3D defects, and potential time savings. Additionally, it's easily manipulated in the operating room, and can be easily re-utilized in cases of intraoperative course changes or infection. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling and Characterization of Capacitive Elements With Tissue as Dielectric Material for Wireless Powering of Neural Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfani, Reza; Marefat, Fatemeh; Sodagar, Amir M; Mohseni, Pedram

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports on the modeling and characterization of capacitive elements with tissue as the dielectric material, representing the core building block of a capacitive link for wireless power transfer to neural implants. Each capacitive element consists of two parallel plates that are aligned around the tissue layer and incorporate a grounded, guarded, capacitive pad to mitigate the adverse effect of stray capacitances and shield the plates from external interfering electric fields. The plates are also coated with a biocompatible, insulating, coating layer on the inner side of each plate in contact with the tissue. A comprehensive circuit model is presented that accounts for the effect of the coating layers and is validated by measurements of the equivalent capacitance as well as impedance magnitude/phase of the parallel plates over a wide frequency range of 1 kHz-10 MHz. Using insulating coating layers of Parylene-C at a thickness of and Parylene-N at a thickness of deposited on two sets of parallel plates with different sizes and shapes of the guarded pad, our modeling and characterization results accurately capture the effect of the thickness and electrical properties of the coating layers on the behavior of the capacitive elements over frequency and with different tissues.

  9. Dissolution ad uptake of cadmium from dental gold solder alloy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, B.; Bergman, M.; Soeremark, R.

    1977-01-01

    Pure metallic cadmium was irradiated by means of thermal neutrons. The irradiated cadmium ( 115 Cd) was placed in bags of gold foil and the bags were implanted subcutaneously in the neck region of mice. Two and 3 d respectively after implantation the mice were killed, the bags removed and the animals subjected to whole-body autoradiography. The autoradiograms revealed an uptake of 115 Cd in liver and kidney. In another experiment specimens of a cadmium-containing dental gold solder alloy, a cadmium-free dental casting gold alloy and soldered assemblies made of these two alloys were implanted subcutaneously in the neck region of mice. The animals were killed after 6 months; cadmium analysis showed significant increases in the cadmium concentration in liver and kidney of those mice which had been given implants of gold solder alloy. The study clearly shows that due to electrochemical corrosion cadmium can be released from implants and accumulated in the kidneys and the liver. (author)

  10. Plasmonic photothermal heating of intraperitoneal tumors through the use of an implanted near-infrared source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Alexander F; Hill, Samuel; Rogers, Gary S; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2013-09-24

    Plasmonic nanomaterials including gold nanorods are effective agents for inducing heating in tumors. Because near-infrared (NIR) light has traditionally been delivered using extracorporeal sources, most applications of plasmonic photothermal therapy have focused on isolated subcutaneous tumors. For more complex models of disease such as advanced ovarian cancer, one of the primary barriers to gold nanorod-based strategies is the adequate delivery of NIR light to tumors located at varying depths within the body. To address this limitation, a series of implanted NIR illumination sources are described for the specific heating of gold nanorod-containing tissues. Through computational modeling and ex vivo studies, a candidate device is identified and validated in a model of orthotopic ovarian cancer. As the therapeutic, imaging, and diagnostic applications of plasmonic nanomaterials progress, effective methods for NIR light delivery to challenging anatomical regions will complement ongoing efforts to advance plasmonic photothermal therapy toward clinical use.

  11. Safety of subcutaneous microinjections (mesotherapy) in musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarte, Danik Arana; Rosset-Llobet, Jaume

    2011-06-01

    Determine the safety and tolerance of mesotherapy as a technique for the treatment of musculoskeletal complaints in musicians. 67 patients (55.2% women) were subjected to a total of 267 mesotherapy sessions. A mesotherapy needle or normal needle was used randomly. The drugs employed were thiocolchicoside and diazepam as muscular relaxants, pentoxifylline or buflomedil as vasodilators, and piroxicam as an anti-inflammatory, as directed. A visual analogue scale was used to quantify the pain produced by the microinjections as well as the degree of immediate and midterm side effects as reported on a standard questionnaire. A mean of 155.5 microinjections were performed per session, of which 45.6% were perceived as painful by the patient with a mean severity of 4.3 out of 10. The pain reduced to 0.5 out of 10 after 24 hours. The most sensitive areas were the levator scapulae and splenius muscles. Systemic symptoms were reported by 5.99% of the musicians after the mesotherapy sessions (muscular weakness 1.5%, rash 1.5%, drowsiness 1.1% and itching 1.1%, being the most frequent). The mean severity of these symptoms was 2.77 out of 10. In all cases the symptoms had completely disappeared after 24 hours. No patient referred to signs of local or systemic infection. The application of drugs by means of subcutaneous injections (mesotherapy) in musicians is a technique that is safe, well tolerated, and without any severe complications.

  12. A novel continuous subcutaneous lactate monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscia, A; Messeri, D; Moscone, D; Ricci, F; Valgimigli, F

    2005-05-15

    A novel continuous lactate monitoring system has been developed modifying the GlucoDay portable medical device (A. Menarini Diagnostics), already present in the European market, and used to continuously measure glucose levels. Lactate oxidase based biosensors have been developed immobilising the enzyme on nylon net and placing it on a Pt electrode. The biosensor was connected to the portable device provided with a micro-pump and coupled to a microdialysis system. It is capable to record subcutaneous lactate every 3 min. In vitro analytical results confirmed that the sensors respond linearly in the interval of concentration between 0.1 and 10 mmol/L, covering the whole physiological range. During prolonged monitoring periods, the response of the biosensors remained stable, showing a limited drift of 8%, within 60 h. Stability tests are still on route. However, preliminary results have shown a shelf life of about 10 months. In vivo experiments performed on healthy rabbits have demonstrated the good accuracy and reproducibility of the system. A correlation coefficient equal to 0.9547 (N=80) was found, which represents a good correlation between the GlucoDay and the laboratory reference analyser. A 16 h in vivo monitoring on a healthy volunteer has been also performed.

  13. Characterization of alendronic- and undecylenic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles for the targeted delivery of rosiglitazone to subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, Katayoun; Tod, Sarah E; Leung, Donna; Nicholson, Kenton E; Andreu, Irene; Buchwalder, Christian; Schmitt, Veronika; Häfeli, Urs O; Gray, Sarah L

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is a state of positive energy balance where excess white adipose tissue accumulates to the detriment of metabolic health. Improving adipocyte function with systemic administration of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) improves metabolic outcomes in obesity, however TZD use is limited clinically due to undesirable side effects. Here we evaluate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a tool to target rosiglitazone (Rosi) specifically to adipose tissue. Results show Rosi can be adsorbed to MNPs (Rosi-MNPs) with hydrophobic coatings for which we present binding and release kinetics. Rosi adsorbed to MNPs retained the ability to induce PPARγ target gene expression in cells. Biodistribution analysis of radiolabeled Rosi-MNPs revealed a fat-implanted magnet significantly enhanced localization of Rosi to the targeted adipose tissue when administered by subcutaneous injection to obese mice. We propose MNPs for targeted delivery of anti-diabetic agents to superficially located subcutaneous adipose tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hip Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Hip implants are medical devices intended to restore mobility ...

  15. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... harder to find a tumor if your breast cancer comes back. Getting breast implants does not take as long as breast reconstruction ...

  16. Assessment of thermal effects in a model of the human head implanted with a wireless active microvalve for the treatment of glaucoma creating a filtering bleb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumburg, F.; Guarnieri, F. A.

    2017-05-01

    A 3D anatomical computational model is developed to assess thermal effects due to exposure to the electromagnetic field required to power a new investigational active implantable microvalve for the treatment of glaucoma. Such a device, located in the temporal superior eye quadrant, produces a filtering bleb, which is included in the geometry of the model, together with the relevant ocular structures. The electromagnetic field source—a planar coil—as well as the microvalve antenna and casing are also included. Exposure to the electromagnetic field source of an implanted and a non-implanted subject are simulated by solving a magnetic potential formulation, using the finite element method. The maximum SAR10 is reached in the eyebrow and remains within the limits suggested by the IEEE and ICNIRP standards. The anterior chamber, filtering bleb, iris and ciliary body are the ocular structures where more absorption occurs. The temperature rise distribution is also obtained by solving the bioheat equation with the finite element method. The numerical results are compared with the in vivo measurements obtained from four rabbits implanted with the microvalve and exposed to the electromagnetic field source.

  17. Posttransplant oxygen inhalation improves the outcome of subcutaneous islet transplantation: A promising clinical alternative to the conventional intrahepatic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, H; Rawson, J; Barriga, A; Gonzalez, N; Mendez, D; Li, J; Omori, K; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2018-04-01

    Subcutaneous tissue is a promising site for islet transplantation, due to its large area and accessibility, which allows minimally invasive procedures for transplantation, graft monitoring, and removal of malignancies as needed. However, relative to the conventional intrahepatic transplantation site, the subcutaneous site requires a large number of islets to achieve engraftment success and diabetes reversal, due to hypoxia and low vascularity. We report that the efficiency of subcutaneous islet transplantation in a Lewis rat model is significantly improved by treating recipients with inhaled 50% oxygen, in conjunction with prevascularization of the graft bed by agarose-basic fibroblast growth factor. Administration of 50% oxygen increased oxygen tension in the subcutaneous site to 140 mm Hg, compared to 45 mm Hg under ambient air. In vitro, islets cultured under 140 mm Hg oxygen showed reduced central necrosis and increased insulin release, compared to those maintained in 45 mm Hg oxygen. Six hundred syngeneic islets subcutaneously transplanted into the prevascularized graft bed reversed diabetes when combined with postoperative 50% oxygen inhalation for 3 days, a number comparable to that required for intrahepatic transplantation; in the absence of oxygen treatment, diabetes was not reversed. Thus, we show oxygen inhalation to be a simple and promising approach to successfully establishing subcutaneous islet transplantation. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  18. New horizon for infection prevention technology and implantable device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kondo, MD, PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in the number of patients receiving cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED over the last two decades. CIED infection represents a serious complication after CIED implantation and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, newly advanced technologies have offered attractive and suitable therapeutic alternatives. Notably, the leadless pacemaker and anti-bacterial envelope decrease the potential risk of CIED infection and the resulting mortality, when it does occur. A completely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator is also an alternative to the transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD, as it does not require implantation of any transvenous or epicardial leads. Among the patients who require ICD removal and subsequent antibiotics secondary to infection, the wearable cardioverter defibrillator represents an alternative approach to inpatient monitoring for the prevention of sudden cardiac death. In this review paper, we aimed to introduce the advanced technologies and devices for prevention of CIED infection.

  19. Elevation of transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) and its downstream mediators in subcutaneous foreign body capsule tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Allen G; Quinn, Matthew J; Siddiqui, Yasmin; Wood, Michael D; Federiuk, Isaac F; Duman, Heather M; Ward, W Kenneth

    2007-08-01

    Foreign body encapsulation represents a chronic fibrotic response and has been a major obstacle that reduces the useful life of implanted biomedical devices. The precise mechanism underlying such an encapsulation is still unknown. We hypothesized that, considering its central role in many other fibrotic conditions, transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) may play an important role during the formation of foreign body capsule (FBC). In the present study, we implanted mock sensors in rats subcutaneously and excised FBC samples at day 7, 21, and 48-55 postimplantation. The most abundant TGFbeta isoform in all tissues was TGFbeta1, which was expressed minimally in control tissue. The expression of both TGFbeta1 RNA and protein was significantly increased in FBC tissues at all time points, with the highest level in day 7 FBC. The number of cells stained for phosphorylated Smad2, an indication of activated TGFbeta signaling, paralleled the expression of TGFbeta. A similar dynamic change was also observed in the numbers of FBC myofibroblasts, which in response to TGFbeta, differentiate from quiescent fibroblasts and synthesize collagen. Type I collagen, the most prominent downstream target of TGFbeta in fibrosis, was found in abundance in the FBC, especially during the latter time periods. We suggest that TGFbeta plays an important role in the FBC formation. Inhibition of TGFbeta signaling could be a promising strategy in the prevention of FBC formation, thereby extending the useful life of subcutaneous implants.

  20. Establishment of diffuse type stomach carcinoma orthotopic-implanted model and study on apoptosis induced by X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yi; Qian Haixin

    2003-01-01

    To observe whether ionizing radiation could induce up - regulation of Fas receptor expression and apoptosis in diffuse type stomach carcinoma. To investigate the relationship among ionizing radiation, apoptosis and the expression of Fas in stomach carcinoma. Methods: Firstly, the experimental model of SGC - 7901 cell lines was set up and diffuse type stomach carcinoma orthotopically implanted in nude mice. Then 21 model mice were randomized into three groups equally i.e., the control group ( group A ) and two irradiation groups ( group B and group C, executed at 24 hours and 48 hours after irradiation respectively ). The mice in group B and group C were irradiated with 6 MV X-rays at a dose of 20 Gy. By using the methods of TUNEL and immunohistochemical staining, the changes of apoptosis index and Fas expression in tumor tissues were examined. Results: (1) The spontaneous apoptosis index (AI) of tumor tissues was significantly lower than that of mucosa tissues (P 0.05). (3) The Fas LI of tumor tissues increased after irradiation compared with the control group (P<0.05). (4) The changes of AI and Fas LI in all groups with similar tendency showed positive correlation (P<0.01). Conclusion: The apoptosis of diffuse type stomach carcinoma is seriously restrained. Ionizing radiation can induce apoptosis and up - regulate the expression of Fas in diffuse type stomach carcinoma. The apoptosis induced by irradiation maybe depend on the up - regulating of Fas after irradiation

  1. A pro-angiogenic degradable Mg-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) implant combined with rhbFGF in a rat limb ischemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hanmei; Lv, Feng; Liu, Tianjun

    2017-12-01

    Site-specific controlled release of exogenous angiogenic growth factors, such as recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF), has become a promising approach to improve peripheral vascular disease. Here, we have developed an implant composed of spiral magnesium (Mg) and a coating made using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) with encapsulated rhbFGF (Mg-PLGA-rhbFGF). The encapsulated protein could release continually for 4weeks with well preserved bioactivity. We compared the angiogenic effect produced by Mg-PLGA-rhbFGF with that of a PLGA implant loaded with rhbFGF (PLGA-rhbFGF). The incorporation of Mg in the implant raised the microclimate pH in the polymer, which preserved the stability of rhbFGF. Mg-PLGA-rhbFGF exhibited advantages over PLGA-rhbFGF implant in terms of a cytocompatibility evaluation. An in vivo angiogenesis test further confirmed the efficacy of released rhbFGF. HE, CD31 and α-SMA staining revealed that the controlled release of rhbFGF from the Mg-PLGA-rhbFGF implant was superior in promoting angiogenesis compared with that of the PLGA-rhbFGF implant. Four weeks post-implantation, the capillary density of the Mg-PLGA-rhbFGF group was significantly higher than that of the PLGA-rhbFGF, control and the normal group (pspiral magnesium and a coating made using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) with encapsulated rhbFGF (Mg-PLGA-rhbFGF). The preparation method does not involve any complex processes and results in a high encapsulation efficiency (approximately 100%). The degradation of metal Mg raise the microclimate pH in the PLGA polymer, which could well preserve the bioactivity of rhbFGF incorporated in the implant. Mg-PLGA-based, sustained local delivery of rhbFGF promotes post-ischemic angiogenesis and blood flow recovery in rat limb ischemic model. This work marks the first report for controlled release of rhbFGF in combination with metal Mg, and suggests potential therapeutic usefulness of Mg-PLGA-rhbFGF for tissue ischemia

  2. The effect of montelukast and antiadhesion barrier solution on the capsule formation after insertion of silicone implants in a white rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J-D; Kwon, O-H; Lee, J-W; Chung, H-Y; Cho, B-C; Park, H-Y; Kim, T-G

    2013-01-01

    myofibroblast content of the peri-implant capsules around silicone implants in this white rat model. They lowered the expression of the fibrotic mediator, TGF-β, and inhibited the peri-implant capsular fibrosis. Therefore, montelukast and AABS are effective in the reduction of silicone-induced peri-implant capsular formation.

  3. Comparison of Mucosal, Subcutaneous and Intraperitoneal Routes of Rat Leptospira Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilber, Anne-Laure; Belli, Patrick; Grezel, Delphine; Artois, Marc; Kodjo, Angeli; Djelouadji, Zoheira

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis found worldwide that is caused by a spirochete. The main reservoirs of Leptospira, which presents an asymptomatic infection, are wild rodents, including the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus). Experimental studies of the mechanisms of its renal colonization in rats have previously used an intraperitoneal inoculation route. However, knowledge of rat-rat transmission requires the use of a natural route of inoculation, such as a mucosal or subcutaneous route. We investigated for the first time the effects of subcutaneous and mucosal inoculation routes compared to the reference intraperitoneal route during Leptospira infection in adult rats. Infection characteristics were studied using Leptospira renal isolation, serology, and molecular and histological analyses. Leptospira infection was asymptomatic using each inoculation route, and caused similar antibody production regardless of renal colonization. The observed renal colonization rates were 8 out of 8 rats, 5 out of 8 rats and 1 out of 8 rats for the intraperitoneal, mucosal and subcutaneous inoculation routes, respectively. Thus, among the natural infection routes studied, mucosal inoculation was more efficient for renal colonization associated with urinary excretion than the subcutaneous route and induced a slower-progressing infection than the intraperitoneal route. These results can facilitate understanding of the infection modalities in rats, unlike the epidemiological studies conducted in wild rats. Future studies of other natural inoculation routes in rat models will increase our knowledge of rat-rat disease transmission and allow the investigation of infection kinetics. PMID:27031867

  4. Prolonged Survival of Subcutaneous Allogeneic Islet Graft by Donor Chimerism without Immunosuppressive Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brend Ray-Sea Hsu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether tolerance-induced protection of islets in the renal subcapsular space can also prevent subcutaneous allogeneic islets from being rejected. We used bone marrow stem cells from C57BL/6 (H2b mice to construct donor chimerism in conditioned diabetic BALB/c (H2d mice and investigated the effect of donor chimerism on engraftment and survival of subcutaneously transplanted allogeneic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. We also studied the anti-inflammatory effect of mesenchymal stem cell on islet engraftment. Full but not low-grade or no donor chimerism was associated with successful engraftment of allogeneic islets and restoration of normoglycemia in the treated diabetic mice. The temporary hyperglycemia was 11 ± 1 versus 19 ± 5 days (p<0.05 for the mice with full donor chimerism with transplanted islets in the renal subcapsular space versus the subcutaneous space, respectively. Cotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cell did not enhance alloislet engraftment. Full multilineage donor chimerism was associated with a higher transient expansion of CD11b+ and Gr-1+ myeloid progenitor cells and effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cells. In conclusion, full donor chimerism protected both renal subcapsular and subcutaneous allogeneic islets in this rodent transplantation model.

  5. Dysregulated LIF-STAT3 pathway is responsible for impaired embryo implantation in a Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Song Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide with the trend of patients being young and creating a significant burden on health systems, including reproductive problems, but the effects of diabetes on embryo implantation are still poorly understood. Our study was to examine effects of diabetes on mouse embryo implantation, providing experimental basis for treating diabetes and its complications. Streptozotocin (STZ was applied to induce type 1 diabetes from day 2 of pregnancy or pseudopregnancy in mice. Embryo transfer was used to analyze effects of uterine environment on embryo implantation. Our results revealed that the implantation rate is significantly reduced in diabetic mice compared to controls, and the change of uterine environment is the main reason leading to the decreased implantation rate. Compared to control, the levels of LIF and p-STAT3 are significantly decreased in diabetic mice on day 4 of pregnancy, and serum estrogen level is significantly higher. Estrogen stimulates LIF expression under physiological level, but the excessive estrogen inhibits LIF expression. LIF, progesterone or insulin supplement can rescue embryo implantation in diabetic mice. Our data indicated that the dysregulated LIF-STAT3 pathway caused by the high level of estrogen results in the impaired implantation in diabetic mice, which can be rescued by LIF, progesterone or insulin supplement.

  6. The surgical viability and radiological monitoring of brain implants of bioactive micro-seeds in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Giane X.O.; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Siqueira, Savio Lana; Maciel, Marcelo B.

    2005-01-01

    The interstitial implant is a therapeutic modality in brachytherapy of the head and neck. Presently, the seeds implanted in tumors in the central nervous system are metallic I-125. After the full emission of the radionuclide, the seed remains inert in the implanted area. Bioactive ceramic seeds have been prepared for this research group incorporating Sm-152 to be active in Sm-153. The main goal of the present study is the development of a the surgical technique for implanting the biodegradable radioactive micro-seeds in the brains of rabbits, as well as the observation of the clinical reactions of the animal after implantation of two sets of three seeds. The surgical procedure consisted of performing two separate perforations 10 mm from each other in the skull, permitting the implantation of two groups of three seeds, totaling six seeds. The results of the pilot study showed the effectiveness of the surgical procedure and of the biocompatibility of the seeds and the lack of presence of adverse reactions, functional sequels, or inflammation in a follow up 50 days post-surgery. Such seeds of reduced volume, 0.2 x 1.6 mm, could be monitored by computerized tomography 30 days after implanting. (author)

  7. Ultrasonic Enhancement of Antibiotic Action on Escherichia coli Biofilms: an In Vivo Model

    OpenAIRE

    Rediske, Andrea M.; Roeder, Beverly L.; Brown, Maren K.; Nelson, Jared L.; Robison, Rachel L.; Draper, David O.; Schaalje, G. Bruce; Robison, Richard A.; Pitt, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Biofilm infections are a common complication of prosthetic devices in humans. Previous in vitro research has determined that low-frequency ultrasound combined with aminoglycoside antibiotics is an effective method of killing biofilms. We report the development of an in vivo model to determine if ultrasound enhances antibiotic action. Two 24-h-old Escherichia coli (ATCC 10798) biofilms grown on polyethylene disks were implanted subcutaneously on the backs of New Zealand White female rabbits, o...

  8. Modelling of the Human Inner Ear Anatomy and Variability for Cochlear Implant Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin

    of statistical deformation models. The thesis results in a series of applications relating to CIs. The shape model can be used by CI-manufacturers for virtual product development and testing. At the same time, it can be applied to estimate the detailed inner ear shape from a clinical patient CT scan. This opens...... several challenges concerning data processing and analysis. Our approach is to describe the inner ear as a statistical shape model. The thesis covers our work with regards to data segmentation, shape characterization, development of image registration model suited for the inner ear and construction...

  9. Implantation for tribological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leutenecker, R.; Cao-Minh, U.; Overbeck, R.

    1992-08-01

    Empirical results on the strength enhancement of steels by N- and B-implantation should be explained from a materials science point of view. The methods applied were X-ray diffractometry and element depth profiling. The investigations of N-implanted steels focussed on the nitride formation in selected model materials and, with respect to applications, in: X90 CrMoV and S 6-5-2 tool steels, austenite X10 CrNiTi189 as well as in hard chromium plates. Main topic in B-implanted steels were the transformations: crystalline Fe-phase - amorphous Fe-B-phase - crystalline boride phases. The result is an improvement in process control by first an insight into the strength enhancing mechanisms and second in into their generation depending on the materials microstructure and the process parameter. (orig.). 101 figs., 16 tabs., 15 refs [de

  10. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelien Dinh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  11. Targeted two-photon photodynamic therapy for the treatment of subcutaneous tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Charles W.; Starkey, Jean R.; Meng, Fanqing; Gong, Aijun; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Rebane, Aleksander; Moss, B.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has developed into a mature technology over the past several years, and is currently being exploited for the treatment of a variety of cancerous tumors, and more recently for age-related wet macular degeneration of the eye. However, there are still some unresolved problems with PDT that are retarding a more general acceptance in clinical settings, and thus, for the most part, the treatment of most cancerous rumors still involves some combination of invasive surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatment, particularly subcutaneous tumors. Currently approved PDT agents are activated in the Visible portion of the spectrum below 700 nm, Laser light in this spectral region cannot penetrate the skin more than a few millimeters, and it would be more desirable if PDT could be initiated deep in the Near-infrared (NIR) in the tissue transparency window (700-1000 nm). MPA Technologies, Inc. and Rasiris, Inc. have been co-developing new porphyrin PDT designed to have greatly enhanced intrinsic two-photon cross-sections (>800 GM units) whose two-photon absorption maxima lie deep in the tissue transparency window (ca. 780-850 nm), and have solubility characteristics that would allow for direct IV injection into animal models. Classical PDT also suffers from the lengthy time necessary for accumulation at the tumor site, a relative lack of discrimination between healthy and diseased tissue, particularly at the tumor margins, and difficulty in clearing from the system in a reasonable amount of time post-PDT. We have recently discovered a new design paradigm for the delivery of our two-photon activated PDT agents by incorporating the porphyrins into a triad ensemble that includes a small molecule targeting agent that directs the triad to over-expressed tumor receptor sites, and a NIR one-photon imaging agent that allows the tracking of the triad in terms of accumulation and clearance rates. We are currently using these new two-photon PDT triads in efficacy

  12. Extended charge banking model of dual path shocks for implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosdall, Derek J; Sweeney, James D

    2008-08-01

    Single path defibrillation shock methods have been improved through the use of the Charge Banking Model of defibrillation, which predicts the response of the heart to shocks as a simple resistor-capacitor (RC) circuit. While dual path defibrillation configurations have significantly reduced defibrillation thresholds, improvements to dual path defibrillation techniques have been limited to experimental observations without a practical model to aid in improving dual path defibrillation techniques. The Charge Banking Model has been extended into a new Extended Charge Banking Model of defibrillation that represents small sections of the heart as separate RC circuits, uses a weighting factor based on published defibrillation shock field gradient measures, and implements a critical mass criteria to predict the relative efficacy of single and dual path defibrillation shocks. The new model reproduced the results from several published experimental protocols that demonstrated the relative efficacy of dual path defibrillation shocks. The model predicts that time between phases or pulses of dual path defibrillation shock configurations should be minimized to maximize shock efficacy. Through this approach the Extended Charge Banking Model predictions may be used to improve dual path and multi-pulse defibrillation techniques, which have been shown experimentally to lower defibrillation thresholds substantially. The new model may be a useful tool to help in further improving dual path and multiple pulse defibrillation techniques by predicting optimal pulse durations and shock timing parameters.

  13. Neutrophil Responses to Sterile Implant Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Jhunjhunwala

    Full Text Available In vivo implantation of sterile materials and devices results in a foreign body immune response leading to fibrosis of implanted material. Neutrophils, one of the first immune cells to be recruited to implantation sites, have been suggested to contribute to the establishment of the inflammatory microenvironment that initiates the fibrotic response. However, the precise numbers and roles of neutrophils in response to implanted devices remains unclear. Using a mouse model of peritoneal microcapsule implantation, we show 30-500 fold increased neutrophil presence in the peritoneal exudates in response to implants. We demonstrate that these neutrophils secrete increased amounts of a variety of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, we observe that they participate in the foreign body response through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs on implant surfaces. Our results provide new insight into neutrophil function during a foreign body response to peritoneal implants which has implications for the development of biologically compatible medical devices.

  14. Ultrasound and Histologic Examination after Subcutaneous Injection of Two Volumizing Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Stéphanie; Sarazin, Didier; Quinodoz, Pierre; Elias, Badwi; Safa, Marva; Vandeputte, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study examined the influence of hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinking technology on the ultrasound and histologic behavior of HA fillers designed for subcutaneous injection. Methods: One subject received subcutaneous injections of 0.25 ml Cohesive Polydensified Matrix (CPM) and Vycross volumizing HA in tissue scheduled for abdominoplasty by bolus and retrograde fanning techniques. Ultrasound analyses were performed on days 0 and 8 and histologic analyses on days 0 and 21 after injection. A series of simple rheologic tests was also performed. Results: Day 0 ultrasound images after bolus injection showed CPM and Vycross as hypoechogenic papules in the hypodermis. CPM appeared little changed after gentle massage, whereas Vycross appeared more hyperechogenic and diminished in size. Ultrasound images at day 8 were similar. On day 0, both gels appeared less hypoechogenic after retrograde fanning than after bolus injection. Vycross was interspersed with hyperechogenic areas (fibrous septa from the fat network structure) and unlike CPM became almost completely invisible after gentle massage. On day 8, CPM appeared as a hypoechogenic pool and Vycross as a long, thin rod. Day 0 histologic findings confirmed ultrasound results. Day 21 CPM histologic findings showed a discrete inflammatory reaction along the injection row after retrograde fanning. Vycross had a more pronounced inflammatory reaction, particularly after retrograde fanning, with macrophages and giant cells surrounding the implant. Rheologic tests showed CPM to have greater cohesivity and resistance to traction forces than Vycross. Conclusions: CPM HA volumizer appears to maintain greater tissue integrity than Vycross after subcutaneous injection with less inflammatory activity. PMID:28280664

  15. combined with either subcutaneous or intravenous administration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the time of sponge withdrawal, PMSG was administered either subcutaneously or ... Only the season of treatment had an effect on the percentage ... gestogen and Pregnant Mare Serum Gonackttrophin. (PMSG). ... artificial insemination.

  16. Pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema secondary to blunt chest injury

    OpenAIRE

    Porhomayon, Jahan; Doerr, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This is the case of a patient with a history of blunt chest trauma associated with subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax. The patient complained of inspiratory stridor on presentation. Anatomical relationships can explain the pathophysiological process.

  17. Ion implantation and amorphous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmuth, K.; Rauschenbach, B.

    1981-01-01

    This review deals with ion implantation of metals in the high concentration range for preparing amorphous layers (>= 10 at%, implantation doses > 10 16 ions/cm 2 ). Different models are described concerning formation of amorphous phases of metals by ion implantation and experimental results are given. The study of amorphous phases has been carried out by the aid of Rutherford backscattering combined with the channeling technique and using transmission electron microscopy. The structure of amorphous metals prepared by ion implantation has been discussed. It was concluded that amorphous metal-metalloid compounds can be described by a dense-random-packing structure with a great portion of metal atoms. Ion implantation has been compared with other techniques for preparing amorphous metals and the adventages have been outlined

  18. The Tissue Response and Degradation of Electrospun Poly(ε-caprolactone/Poly(trimethylene-carbonate Scaffold in Subcutaneous Space of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the advantage of controllability on the mechanical property and the degradation rates, electrospun PCL/PTMC nanofibrous scaffold could be appropriate for vascular tissue engineering. However, the tissue response and degradation of electrospun PCL/PTMC scaffold in vivo have never been evaluated in detail. So, electrospun PCL/PTMC scaffolds with different blend ratios were prepared in this study. Mice subcutaneous implantation showed that the continuous degradation of PCL/PTMC scaffolds induced a lasted macrophage-mediated foreign body reaction, which could be in favor of the tissue regeneration in graft.

  19. Adapted preparation technique for screw-type implants: explorative in vitro pilot study in a porcine bone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Andreas; Gahleitner, André; Holm, Anders; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Homolka, Peter

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of adapted preparation on the insertion torque of self-tapping implants in cancellous bone. In adapted preparation, bone condensation - and thus, insertion torque - is controlled by changing the diameter of the drilling. After preparation of cancellous porcine vertebral bone with drills of 2.85, 3, 3.15 or 3.35 mm final diameters, Brånemark sytem Mk III implants (3.75 x 11.5 mm) were inserted in 141 sites. During implantation, the insertion torque was recorded. Prior to implant insertion, bone mineralization (bone mineral density (BMD)) was measured with dental quantative computed tomography. The BMD values measured at the implant position were correlated with insertion torque for varying bone condensation. Based on the average torque recorded during implant insertion into the pre-drilled canals with a diameter of 3 mm, torque increased by approximately 17% on reducing the diameter of the drill by 5% (to 2.85 mm). On increasing the diameter of the osteotomy to 3.15 mm (5%) or 3.35 mm (12%), torque values decreased by approximately 21% and 50%, respectively. The results demonstrate a correlation between primary stability (average insertion torque) and the diameter of the implant bed on using a screw-shaped implant. Thus, using an individualized bone mineralization-dependent drilling technique, optimized torque values could be achieved in all tested bone qualities with BMDs ranging from 330 to 500 mg/cm(3). The results indicate that using a bone-dependent drilling technique, higher torque values can also be achieved in poor bone using an individualized drilling resulting in higher bone condensation. As immediate function is dependent on primary stability (high insertion torque), this indicates that primary stability can be increased using a modified drilling technique in lesser mineralized bone.

  20. Acute urinary retention as a late complication of subcutaneous liquid silicone injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Luongo de Matos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute urinary retention is characterized by a sudden interruption of urinary output; urine is retained in the bladder due to either functional or obstructive anatomic factors, and cannot be voided. The main causes of acute urinary obstruction are benign prostatic hyperplasia, constipation, prostate adenocarcinoma, urethral stenosis, clot retention, neurological disorders, following surgery, calculi, drugs, or urinary tract infections. A transvestite patient, aged 55 years, described having had liquid silicone subcutaneously injected in various parts of the body, the last one four years ago. He complained of absent urinary output during the last 14 hours. The physical examination revealed skin deformation due to migration of implants; a hard nodule (characterized as a foreign body was present in the preputium and a diagnosis of acute urinary retention was made; an unsuccessful attempt to exteriorize the glans for urinary catheterization, was followed by therapeutic cystostomy. Acute urinary retention has not been mentioned in the medical literature as a complication of liquid silicone subcutaneous injection.

  1. Stereotactic intracranial implantation and in vivo bioluminescent imaging of tumor xenografts in a mouse model system of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Brian C; Dorsey, Jay F; Benci, Joseph L; Joh, Daniel Y; Kao, Gary D

    2012-09-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a high-grade primary brain cancer with a median survival of only 14.6 months in humans despite standard tri-modality treatment consisting of surgical resection, post-operative radiation therapy and temozolomide chemotherapy. New therapeutic approaches are clearly needed to improve patient survival and quality of life. The development of more effective treatment strategies would be aided by animal models of GBM that recapitulate human disease yet allow serial imaging to monitor tumor growth and treatment response. In this paper, we describe our technique for the precise stereotactic implantation of bio-imageable GBM cancer cells into the brains of nude mice resulting in tumor xenografts that recapitulate key clinical features of GBM. This method yields tumors that are reproducible and are located in precise anatomic locations while allowing in vivo bioluminescent imaging to serially monitor intracranial xenograft growth and response to treatments. This method is also well-tolerated by the animals with low perioperative morbidity and mortality.

  2. Layer-by-layer self-assembled multilayers on PEEK implants improve osseointegration in an osteoporosis rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xilin; Han, Fei; Zhao, Peng; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Ye, Xiaojian

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to fabricate and deposit nanoscale multilayers on polyetheretherketone (PEEK) to improve cell adhesion and osseointegration. Bio-activated PEEK constructs were designed with prepared surface of different layers of polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) multilayers. Irregular morphology was found on the 5 and 10-layer PEEK surfaces, while "island-like" clusters were observed for 20-layer (20 L) multilayers. Besides, the 20 L PEEK showed more hydrophilic feature than native PEEK, and the surface contact angle reduced from 39.7° to 21.7° as layers increased from 5 to 20. In vitro, modified PEEK allowed excellent adhesion and proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells, and induced higher cell growth rate and alkaline phosphatase level. In vivo, this bio-active PEEK exhibited significantly enhanced integration with bone tissue in an osteoporosis rabbit model. This work highlights layer-by-layer self-assembly as a practical method to construct bio-active PEEK implants for enhanced osseointegration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Auditory steady state responses and cochlear implants: Modeling the artifact-response mixture in the perspective of denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Faten; Attina, Virginie; Duroc, Yvan; Veuillet, Evelyne; Truy, Eric; Thai-Van, Hung

    2017-01-01

    Auditory steady state responses (ASSRs) in cochlear implant (CI) patients are contaminated by the spread of a continuous CI electrical stimulation artifact. The aim of this work was to model the electrophysiological mixture of the CI artifact and the corresponding evoked potentials on scalp electrodes in order to evaluate the performance of denoising algorithms in eliminating the CI artifact in a controlled environment. The basis of the proposed computational framework is a neural mass model representing the nodes of the auditory pathways. Six main contributors to auditory evoked potentials from the cochlear level and up to the auditory cortex were taken into consideration. The simulated dynamics were then projected into a 3-layer realistic head model. 32-channel scalp recordings of the CI artifact-response were then generated by solving the electromagnetic forward problem. As an application, the framework's simulated 32-channel datasets were used to compare the performance of 4 commonly used Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithms: infomax, extended infomax, jade and fastICA in eliminating the CI artifact. As expected, two major components were detectable in the simulated datasets, a low frequency component at the modulation frequency and a pulsatile high frequency component related to the stimulation frequency. The first can be attributed to the phase-locked ASSR and the second to the stimulation artifact. Among the ICA algorithms tested, simulations showed that infomax was the most efficient and reliable in denoising the CI artifact-response mixture. Denoising algorithms can induce undesirable deformation of the signal of interest in real CI patient recordings. The proposed framework is a valuable tool for evaluating these algorithms in a controllable environment ahead of experimental or clinical applications.

  4. Auditory steady state responses and cochlear implants: Modeling the artifact-response mixture in the perspective of denoising.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Mina

    Full Text Available Auditory steady state responses (ASSRs in cochlear implant (CI patients are contaminated by the spread of a continuous CI electrical stimulation artifact. The aim of this work was to model the electrophysiological mixture of the CI artifact and the corresponding evoked potentials on scalp electrodes in order to evaluate the performance of denoising algorithms in eliminating the CI artifact in a controlled environment. The basis of the proposed computational framework is a neural mass model representing the nodes of the auditory pathways. Six main contributors to auditory evoked potentials from the cochlear level and up to the auditory cortex were taken into consideration. The simulated dynamics were then projected into a 3-layer realistic head model. 32-channel scalp recordings of the CI artifact-response were then generated by solving the electromagnetic forward problem. As an application, the framework's simulated 32-channel datasets were used to compare the performance of 4 commonly used Independent Component Analysis (ICA algorithms: infomax, extended infomax, jade and fastICA in eliminating the CI artifact. As expected, two major components were detectable in the simulated datasets, a low frequency component at the modulation frequency and a pulsatile high frequency component related to the stimulation frequency. The first can be attributed to the phase-locked ASSR and the second to the stimulation artifact. Among the ICA algorithms tested, simulations showed that infomax was the most efficient and reliable in denoising the CI artifact-response mixture. Denoising algorithms can induce undesirable deformation of the signal of interest in real CI patient recordings. The proposed framework is a valuable tool for evaluating these algorithms in a controllable environment ahead of experimental or clinical applications.

  5. Characteristics of Women Who Have Had Cosmetic Breast Implants That Could Be Associated with Increased Suicide Risk: A Systematic Review, Proposing a Suicide Prevention Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Manoloudakis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Literature indicates an increased risk of suicide among women who have had cosmetic breast implants. An explanatory model for this association has not been established. Some studies conclude that women with cosmetic breast implants demonstrate some characteristics that are associated with increased suicide risk while others support that the breast augmentation protects from suicide. A systematic review including data collection from January 1961 up to February 2014 was conducted. The results were incorporated to pre-existing suicide risk models of the general population. A modified suicide risk model was created for the female cosmetic augmentation mammaplasty candidate. A 2-3 times increased suicide risk among women that undergo cosmetic breast augmentation has been identified. Breast augmentation patients show some characteristics that are associated with increased suicide risk. The majority of women reported high postoperative satisfaction. Recent research indicates that the Autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants and fibromyalgia syndrome are associated with silicone implantation. A thorough surgical, medical and psycho-social (psychiatric, family, reproductive, and occupational history should be included in the preoperative assessment of women seeking to undergo cosmetic breast augmentation. Breast augmentation surgery can stimulate a systematic stress response and increase the risk of suicide. Each risk factor of suicide has poor predictive value when considered independently and can result in prediction errors. A clinical management model has been proposed considering the overlapping risk factors of women that undergo cosmetic breast augmentation with suicide.

  6. Modeling susceptibility difference artifacts produced by metallic implants in magnetic resonance imaging with point-based thin-plate spline image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchard, Y; Smith, M; Mintchev, M

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suffers from geometric distortions arising from various sources. One such source are the non-linearities associated with the presence of metallic implants, which can profoundly distort the obtained images. These non-linearities result in pixel shifts and intensity changes in the vicinity of the implant, often precluding any meaningful assessment of the entire image. This paper presents a method for correcting these distortions based on non-rigid image registration techniques. Two images from a modelled three-dimensional (3D) grid phantom were subjected to point-based thin-plate spline registration. The reference image (without distortions) was obtained from a grid model including a spherical implant, and the corresponding test image containing the distortions was obtained using previously reported technique for spatial modelling of magnetic susceptibility artifacts. After identifying the nonrecoverable area in the distorted image, the calculated spline model was able to quantitatively account for the distortions, thus facilitating their compensation. Upon the completion of the compensation procedure, the non-recoverable area was removed from the reference image and the latter was compared to the compensated image. Quantitative assessment of the goodness of the proposed compensation technique is presented.

  7. Evaluation of a New Dental Implant Cervical Design in Comparison with a Conventional Design in an Experimental American Foxhound Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Albacete Martínez, Maria Ángeles; Pérez-Albacete Martínez, Carlos; Maté Sánchez De Val, José Eduardo; Ramos Oltra, María Luisa; Fernández Domínguez, Manuel; Calvo Guirado, Jose Luis

    2018-03-21

    The aim of this study was to evaluate osseointegration and crestal bone height in implants with a triangular cervical design in comparison with a standard rounded cervical design. The control group consisted of 24 implants with a standard cervical design, and the test group of 24 implants with a triangular cervical design. The implants were inserted in healed bone in six American Foxhounds. Crestal bone height and tissue thickness in the cervical portion were measured after 12 weeks healing. Data analysis found mean crestal bone loss of: 0.31 ± 0.24 mm on the buccal side, 0.35 ± 0.14 mm on the lingual in the test group, and 0.71 ± 0.28 mm buccal loss, and 0.42 ± 0.30 mm lingual in the control group; with statistically significant differences on the buccal aspect ( p = 0.0019). Mean tissue thickness in the test group was 1.98 ± 0.17 mm on the buccal aspect, and 2.43 ± 0.93 mm in the lingual; in the control group it was 2.48 ± 0.61 mm buccal thickness, and 2.88 ± 0.14 mm lingual, with significant differences on both aspects ( p = 0.0043; p = 0.0029). The results suggest that greater thickness of peri-implant tissue can be expected when the triangular cervical implant design is used rather than the standard cervical design.

  8. Bone modelling at fresh extraction sockets: immediate implant placement versus spontaneous healing: an experimental study in the beagle dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoletti, Fabio; Discepoli, Nicola; Müller, Anna; de Sanctis, Massimo; Muñoz, Fernando; Sanz, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to describe histologically the undisturbed healing of fresh extraction sockets when compared to immediate implant placement. In eight beagle dogs, after extraction of the 3P3 and 4P4, implants were inserted into the distal sockets of the premolars, while the mesial sockets were left to heal spontaneously. Each animal provided four socket sites (control) and four implant sites (test). After 6 weeks, animals were sacrificed and tissue blocks were dissected, prepared for ground sectioning. The relative vertical buccal bone resorption in relation to the lingual bone was similar in both test and control groups. At immediate implant sites, however, the absolute buccal bone loss observed was 2.32 (SD 0.36) mm, what may indicate that while an apical shift of both the buccal and lingual bone crest occurred at the implant sites, this may not happen in naturally healing sockets. The results from this investigation showed that after tooth extraction the buccal socket wall underwent bone resorption at both test and control sites. This resorption appeared to be more pronounced at the implant sites, although the limitations of the histological evaluation method utilized preclude a definite conclusion. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Evaluation of a New Dental Implant Cervical Design in Comparison with a Conventional Design in an Experimental American Foxhound Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ángeles Pérez-Albacete Martínez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate osseointegration and crestal bone height in implants with a triangular cervical design in comparison with a standard rounded cervical design. The control group consisted of 24 implants with a standard cervical design, and the test group of 24 implants with a triangular cervical design. The implants were inserted in healed bone in six American Foxhounds. Crestal bone height and tissue thickness in the cervical portion were measured after 12 weeks healing. Data analysis found mean crestal bone loss of: 0.31 ± 0.24 mm on the buccal side, 0.35 ± 0.14 mm on the lingual in the test group, and 0.71 ± 0.28 mm buccal loss, and 0.42 ± 0.30 mm lingual in the control group; with statistically significant differences on the buccal aspect (p = 0.0019. Mean tissue thickness in the test group was 1.98 ± 0.17 mm on the buccal aspect, and 2.43 ± 0.93 mm in the lingual; in the control group it was 2.48 ± 0.61 mm buccal thickness, and 2.88 ± 0.14 mm lingual, with significant differences on both aspects (p = 0.0043; p = 0.0029. The results suggest that greater thickness of peri-implant tissue can be expected when the triangular cervical implant design is used rather than the standard cervical design.

  10. Subcutaneous metastasis from endometrial cancer; case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolae Bacalbasa; Irina Balescu; Alexandru Filipescu

    2018-01-01

    Subcutaneous metastases from endometrial cancer are rare situations, only few cases being described so far. The main incriminated mechanisms leading to the apparition of such lesions include hematogenous and lymphatic spread. We present the case of a 66-year-old patient known with previous history of stage IIIA endometroid endometrial carcinoma initially treated by surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy who developed at 18 months follow-up a distant subcutaneous oligometastasis. At this time the p...

  11. Reconstruction of implanted marker trajectories from cone-beam CT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyekyun; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Keall, Paul J.; Cho, Seungryong; Cho, Byungchul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used imaging modality for image-guided radiotherapy. Most vendors provide CBCT systems that are mounted on a linac gantry. Thus, CBCT can be used to estimate the actual 3-dimensional (3D) position of moving respiratory targets in the thoracic/abdominal region using 2D projection images. The authors have developed a method for estimating the 3D trajectory of respiratory-induced target motion from CBCT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling. Methods: Because the superior–inferior (SI) motion of a target can be easily analyzed on projection images of a gantry-mounted CBCT system, the authors investigated the interdimensional correlation of the SI motion with left–right and anterior–posterior (AP) movements while the gantry is rotating. A simple linear model and a state-augmented model were implemented and applied to the interdimensional correlation analysis, and their performance was compared. The parameters of the interdimensional correlation models were determined by least-square estimation of the 2D error between the actual and estimated projected target position. The method was validated using 160 3D tumor trajectories from 46 thoracic/abdominal cancer patients obtained during CyberKnife treatment. The authors’ simulations assumed two application scenarios: (1) retrospective estimation for the purpose of moving tumor setup used just after volumetric matching with CBCT; and (2) on-the-fly estimation for the purpose of real-time target position estimation during gating or tracking delivery, either for full-rotation volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in 60 s or a stationary six-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a beam delivery time of 20 s. Results: For the retrospective CBCT simulations, the mean 3D root-mean-square error (RMSE) for all 4893 trajectory segments was 0.41 mm (simple linear model) and 0.35 mm (state-augmented model). In the on-the-fly simulations, prior

  12. Reconstruction of implanted marker trajectories from cone-beam CT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hyekyun [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, South Korea and Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Poulsen, Per Rugaard [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cho, Seungryong [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Byungchul, E-mail: cho.byungchul@gmail.com, E-mail: bcho@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used imaging modality for image-guided radiotherapy. Most vendors provide CBCT systems that are mounted on a linac gantry. Thus, CBCT can be used to estimate the actual 3-dimensional (3D) position of moving respiratory targets in the thoracic/abdominal region using 2D projection images. The authors have developed a method for estimating the 3D trajectory of respiratory-induced target motion from CBCT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling. Methods: Because the superior–inferior (SI) motion of a target can be easily analyzed on projection images of a gantry-mounted CBCT system, the authors investigated the interdimensional correlation of the SI motion with left–right and anterior–posterior (AP) movements while the gantry is rotating. A simple linear model and a state-augmented model were implemented and applied to the interdimensional correlation analysis, and their performance was compared. The parameters of the interdimensional correlation models were determined by least-square estimation of the 2D error between the actual and estimated projected target position. The method was validated using 160 3D tumor trajectories from 46 thoracic/abdominal cancer patients obtained during CyberKnife treatment. The authors’ simulations assumed two application scenarios: (1) retrospective estimation for the purpose of moving tumor setup used just after volumetric matching with CBCT; and (2) on-the-fly estimation for the purpose of real-time target position estimation during gating or tracking delivery, either for full-rotation volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in 60 s or a stationary six-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a beam delivery time of 20 s. Results: For the retrospective CBCT simulations, the mean 3D root-mean-square error (RMSE) for all 4893 trajectory segments was 0.41 mm (simple linear model) and 0.35 mm (state-augmented model). In the on-the-fly simulations, prior

  13. [Significance of various implantate localizations of Sparks prostheses, experimental studies in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieler, H S; Parwaresch, R; Thiede, A

    1976-01-01

    Our investigations show that Sparks prostheses after subcutaneous implantation are suitable for vascular grafting. At the end of the organization period the connective tissue becomes strong, and after the third and fourth weeks collagenous and elastic fibers can be seen. Ten weeks after s.c. implantation, collagenous fibers predominate. After this the Sparks prostheses can be used as a vascular graft. Intraperitoneal implantation, however, shows a histologically different picture with characteristic findings: only fat cells can be observed, a strong granulation tissue with elastic and collagenous fibers is not present. After intraperitoneal implantation Sparks prostheses are therefore unsuitable for vascular grafts.

  14. Abnormal bone formation induced by implantation of osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance in the X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, H.; Masuhara, K.; Takaoka, K.; Ono, K.; Tanaka, H.; Seino, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse (Hyp) has been proposed as a model for the human familial hypophosphatemia (the most common form of vitamin D-resistant rickets). An osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance was subcutaneously implanted into the Hyp mouse. The implant was consistently replaced by cartilage tissue at 2 weeks after implantation. The cartilage matrix seemed to be normal, according to the histological examination, and 35sulphur ( 35 S) uptake was also normal. Up to 4 weeks after implantation the cartilage matrix was completely replaced by unmineralized bone matrix and hematopoietic bone marrow. Osteoid tissue arising from the implantation of bone inducing substance in the Hyp mouse showed no radiologic or histologic sign of calcification. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of endochondral ossification in the Hyp mouse might be characterized by the failure of mineralization in cartilage and bone matrix. Analysis of the effects of bone-inducing substance on the Hyp mouse may help to give greater insight into the mechanism and treatment of human familial hypophosphatemia

  15. Right versus left parasternal electrode position in the entirely subcutaneous ICD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettin, Markus; Dechering, Dirk; Frommeyer, Gerrit; Larbig, Robert; Löher, Andreas; Reinke, Florian; Köbe, Julia; Eckardt, Lars

    2018-05-01

    The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD ® ) has been established as an alternative to conventional transvenous ICD for the prevention of sudden cardiac death. Initial studies have shown safety and efficacy of the system with a left parasternal (LP) electrode. However, several case studies reported a right parasternal (RP) position. The purpose of this study was to analyze shock efficacy and safety of an RP electrode position. Between June 2010 and May 2016, 120 S-ICD ® were implanted at our institution. On the basis of the heart location on preoperative chest radiography (CXR), the investigators decided on an RP (n = 52) or LP electrode position (n = 68). All perioperative induced VF episodes, and spontaneous appropriate and inappropriate episodes during follow-up were analyzed. Patients with an RP electrode did not differ in terms of age, sex, or ejection fraction. A statistically significant difference in underlying cardiac disease was observed between the RP and LP electrode group, with more patients with channelopathies in the RP electrode group and more patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy in the LP electrode group. During a mean follow-up of 24.3 ± 19.5 months, 27 appropriate (19 in the LP group and 8 in the RP group) and 28 inappropriate (18 LP and 10 RP) ICD shocks occurred (p value = NS). In the present study, an RP electrode position was chosen on the basis of chest radiographic characteristics and was efficient in terms of sensing and shock efficacy. Thus, a right-sided electrode implant might be an alternative if a left-sided electrode implant is inadequate. It might also be favorable for young patients with narrow heart silhouettes in the midsagittal position.

  16. Effect of implant position, angulation, and attachment height on peri-implant bone stress associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hae Ryong; Pae, Ahran; Kim, Yooseok; Paek, Janghyun; Kim, Hyeong-Seob; Kwon, Kung-Rock

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the level and distribution of peri-implant bone stresses associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures with different implant positions. Mathematical models of mandibles and overdentures were designed using finite element analysis software. Two intraosseous implants and ball attachment systems were placed in the interforaminal region. The overdenture, which was supported by the two implants, was designed to withstand bilateral and unilateral vertical masticatory loads (total 100 N). In all, eight types of models, which differed according to assigned implant positions, height of attachments, and angulation, were tested: MI (model with implants positioned in the lateral incisor sites), MC (implants in canine sites), MP (implants in premolar sites), MI-Hi (greater height of attachments), MC-M (canine implants placed with mesial inclination), MC-D (canine implants placed with distal inclination), MC-B (canine implants placed with buccal inclination), and MC-L (canine implants placed with lingual inclination). Peri-implant bone stress levels associated with overdentures retained by lateral incisor implants resulted in the lowest stress levels and the highest efficiency in distributing peri-implant stress. MI-Hi showed increased stress levels and decreased efficiency in stress distribution. As the implants were inclined, stress levels increased and the efficiency of stress distribution decreased. Among the inclined models, MC-B showed the lowest stress level and best efficiency in stress distribution. The lowest stress and the best stability of implants in mandibular two-implant overdentures were obtained when implants were inserted in lateral incisor areas with shorter attachments and were placed parallel to the long axes of the teeth.

  17. CoCrMo alloy vs. UHMWPE Particulate Implant Debris Induces Sex Dependent Aseptic Osteolysis Responses In Vivo using a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraeber, Stefan; Samelko, Lauryn; McAllister, Kyron; Putz, Sebastian; Jacobs, Joshua.J.; Hallab, Nadim James

    2018-01-01

    Background: The rate of revision for some designs of total hip replacements due to idiopathic aseptic loosening has been reported as higher for women. However, whether this is environmental or inherently sex-related is not clear. Objective: Can particle induced osteolysis be sex dependent? And if so, is this dependent on the type of implant debris (e.g. metal vs polymer)? The objective of this study was to test for material dependent inflammatory osteolysis that may be linked to sex using CoCrMo and implant grade conventional polyethylene (UHMWPE), using an in vivo murine calvaria model. Methods: Healthy 12 week old female and male C57BL/6J mice were treated with UHMWPE (1.0um ECD) or CoCrMo particles (0.9um ECD) or received sham surgery. Bone resorption was assessed by micro-computed tomography, histology and histomorphometry on day 12 post challenge. Results: Female mice that received CoCrMo particles showed significantly more inflammatory osteolysis and bone destruction compared to the females who received UHMWPE implant debris. Moreover, females challenged with CoCrMo particles exhibited 120% more inflammatory bone loss compared to males (p<0.01) challenged with CoCrMo implant debris (but this was not the case for UHMWPE particles). Conclusion: We demonstrated sex-specific differences in the amount of osteolysis resulting from CoCrMo particle challenge. This suggests osteo-immune responses to metal debris are preferentially higher in female compared to male mice, and supports the contention that there may be inherent sex related susceptibility to some types of implant debris. PMID:29785221

  18. Pedicle screws with a thin hydroxyapatite coating for improving fixation at the bone-implant interface in the osteoporotic spine: experimental study in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohe, Makoto; Moridaira, Hiroshi; Inami, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Daisaku; Nohara, Yutaka; Taneichi, Hiroshi

    2018-03-30

    OBJECTIVE Instrumentation failure caused by the loosening of pedicle screws (PSs) in patients with osteoporosis is a serious problem after spinal surgery. The addition of a thin hydroxyapatite (HA) surface coating applied by using a sputtering process was reported recently to be a promising method for providing bone conduction around an implant without a significant risk of coating-layer breakage. In this study, the authors evaluated the biomechanical and histological features of the bone-implant interface (BII) of PSs with a thin HA coating in an in vivo porcine osteoporotic spine model. METHODS Three types of PSs (untreated/standard [STPS], sandblasted [BLPS], and HA-coated [HAPS] PSs) were implanted into the thoracic and lumbar spine (T9-L6) of 8 mature Clawn miniature pigs (6 ovariectomized [osteoporosis group] and 2 sham-operated [control group] pigs). The spines were harvested from the osteoporosis group at 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, or 24 weeks after PS placement and from the control group at 0 or 24 weeks. Their bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by peripheral quantitative CT. Histological evaluation of the BIIs was conducted by performing bone volume/tissue volume and bone surface/implant surface measurements. The strength of the BII was evaluated with extraction torque testing. RESULTS The BMD decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group (p < 0.01). HAPSs exhibited the greatest mean extraction peak torque at 8 weeks, and HAPSs and BLPSs exhibited significantly greater mean torque than the STPSs at 12 weeks (p < 0.05). The bone surface/implant surface ratio was significantly higher for HAPSs than for STPSs after 2 weeks (p < 0.05), and bonding between bone and the implant surface was maintained until 24 weeks with no detachment of the coating layer. In contrast, the bone volume/tissue volume ratio was significantly higher for HAPSs than for BLPSs or STPSs only at 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS Using PSs with a thin HA coating applied using a sputtering process

  19. Validation of an experimental polyurethane model for biomechanical studies on implant supported prosthesis - tension tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Miyashiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The complexity and heterogeneity of human bone, as well as ethical issues, frequently hinder the development of clinical trials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the modulus of elasticity of a polyurethane isotropic experimental model via tension tests, comparing the results to those reported in the literature for mandibular bone, in order to validate the use of such a model in lieu of mandibular bone in biomechanical studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five polyurethane test specimens were divided into 3 groups of 15 specimens each, according to the ratio (A/B of polyurethane reagents (PU-1: 1/0.5, PU-2: 1/1, PU-3: 1/1.5. RESULTS: Tension tests were performed in each experimental group and the modulus of elasticity values found were 192.98 MPa (SD=57.20 for PU-1, 347.90 MPa (SD=109.54 for PU-2 and 304.64 MPa (SD=25.48 for PU-3. CONCLUSION: The concentration of choice for building the experimental model was 1/1.

  20. Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-Chitosan implant for endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relleve, Lorna S.; Abad, Lucille V.; Aranilla, Charito T.; Dela Rosa, A.M.; Bolong, David T.; Bisnar, Carlo C.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation-crosslinked poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP)-Chitosan was prepared as a potential injectable implant for endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). The physical and histological properties of PVP-Chitosan implant in comparison with the commercial dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux) have been evaluated in vivo by subcutaneous and abdominal injection in rats over a period of 6 months. The PVP-Chitosan implant was easily injected through 26-gauge needle. Monthly gross examination of the implanted sites showed no significant decrease in volume of implant and no local inflammatory reaction. Histological findings indicated no evidence of migration to the distant organs after 6 months of implantation. Results of this study indicated that PVP-Chitosan implant has properties of a good tissue augmenting substance such as stability, biocompatibility and non-migration but long-term studies are needed to evaluate its therapeutic efficiency. (author)

  1. Structural-chemical characteristics of implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozejkin, B.V.; Pavlov, P.V.; Pitirimova, E.A.; Frolov, A.I.

    1988-01-01

    Corrosion and structural characteristics of metallic layers implanted by ions of chemically active impurities and noble gases are studied. Dependence of experimental results on parameters of initial materials and technological conditions of implantation is established. In studying corrosion characteristics of implanted metals a strong dependence of chemical passivation effect on technological conditions of ion-implantation and structure of initial material is stated. On the basis of developed mathematical model of chemical passivation effect it is shown that increase of corrosion characteristics of implanted metals is defined by superposition of surface and volumetric mechanisms

  2. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  3. Amperometric cell for subcutaneous detection of hydrogen sulfide in anesthetized experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, L; Nagy, G; Filotás, D; Boros, M; Pozsgai, G; Pintér, E

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a toxic gas. It has been recognized that H 2 S evolving in biochemical reactions in living organisms has an important role in different physiologic processes. Nowadays, H 2 S is known as an endogenous messenger molecule. Natural sulfurous spring water has been proved beneficial in the therapy of diseases of the skin and other organs (Boros et al 2013). In vivo real-time detection of local H 2 S concentration is an important but challenging task. We developed a two-electrode amperometric cell for selective subcutaneous detection of H 2 S in anesthetized mice. The cell is a small size implantable gas sensor containing a platinum disc anode and a silver cathode. The selectivity is provided by a membrane permeable only by gases. There is a buffered reversible electrochemical mediator solution in an oxidized form inside the cell. As gaseous H 2 S penetrates into the cell the mediator is reduced, and +0.4 V versus the reference is employed on the platinum working electrode. The reduced mediator is oxidized on the anode surface. The current provides an analytical signal representing the concentration of H 2 S. Appropriate shape, size and membrane material were selected, and optimal working parameters—such as mediator concentration, pH and cell voltage—were determined in vitro. The lower limit of detection in the stirred sample solution at pH = 5.5 was as small as 9.4  ×  10 −7  M and a dynamic concentration range of 0–6  ×  10 –4  M could be achieved. The detecting surfaces of the cell were covered with freshly dissected mouse skin to test dermal H 2 S permeability. In other experiments, the cell was implanted subcutaneously in an anesthetized mouse and the animal was submerged in a buffer solution containing different concentrations of H 2 S so that the skin surface over the sensor was covered by the solution. Measurements of subcutaneous H 2 S concentration were taken. The experiments clearly proved that H 2 S

  4. The surgical viability and radiological monitoring of brain implants of bioactive micro-seeds in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giane X. O. Silva

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The interstitial implant is a therapeutic modality in brachytherapy of the head and neck. Presently, the seeds implanted in tumors in the central nervous system are metallic I-125. After the full emission of the radionuclide, the seed remains inert in the implanted area. Bioactive ceramic seeds have been prepared for this research group incorporating Sm-152 to be active in Sm-153. The main goal of the present study is the development of a the surgical technique for implanting the biodegradable radioactive micro-seeds in the brains of rabbits, as well as the observation of the clinical reactions of the animal after implantation of two sets of three seeds. The surgical procedure consisted of performing two separate perforations 10 mm from each other in the skull, permitting the implantation of two groups of three seeds, totaling six seeds. The results of the pilot study showed the effectiveness of the surgical procedure and of the biocompatibility of the seeds and the lack of presence of adverse reactions, functional sequels, or inflammation in a follow up 50 days post-surgery. Such seeds of reduced volume, 0.2 x 1.6 mm, could be monitored by computerized tomography 30 days after implanting.Os implantes intersticiais podem ser utilizados em braquiterapia de cabeça e pescoço. Atualmente as sementes implantadas no CNS são de I-125 metálicas. Após o decaimento do radioisótopo, a semente fica inerte na região implantada. Sementes cerâmicas bioativas tem sido preparadas pelo grupo de pesquisa incorporando Sm-152. O presente estudo tem o objetivo de viabilizar a técnica cirúrgica de implantes de microsementes biodegradáveis não radioativas no cérebro de coelhos, bem como verificar as reações clínicas e funcionais do animal ao corpo estranho implantado. O procedimento cirúrgico compreendeu em proceder duas perfurações separadas em 10mm na calota craniana onde foi possível a implantação de dois conjuntos de três sementes

  5. Effect of topical anaesthetics on interstitial colloid osmotic pressure in human subcutaneous tissue sampled by wick technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jørgen Timm Guthe

    Full Text Available To measure colloid osmotic pressure in interstitial fluid (COP(i from human subcutaneous tissue with the modified wick technique in order to determine influence of topical application of anaesthetics, dry vs. wet wick and implantation time on COP(i.In 50 healthy volunteers interstitial fluid (IF was collected by subcutaneous implantation of multi-filamentous nylon wicks. Study subjects were allocated to two groups; one for comparing COP(i obtained from dry and saline soaked wicks, and one for comparing COP(i from unanaesthetized skin, and skin after application of a eutectic mixture of local anaesthetic (EMLA®, Astra Zeneca cream. IF was sampled from the skin of the shoulders, and implantation time was 30, 60, 75, 90 and 120 min. Colloid osmotic pressure was measured with a colloid osmometer. Pain assessment during the procedure was compared for EMLA cream and no topical anaesthesia using a visual analogue scale (VAS in a subgroup of 10 subjects.There were no significant differences between COP(i obtained from dry compared to wet wicks, except that the values after 75 and 90 min. were somewhat higher for the dry wicks. Topical anaesthesia with EMLA cream did not affect COP(i values. COP(i decreased from 30 to 75 min. of implantation (23.2 ± 4.4 mmHg to 19.6 ± 2.9 mmHg, p = 0.008 and subsequently tended to increase until 120 min. EMLA cream resulted in significant lower VAS score for the procedure.COP(i from subcutaneous tissue was easily obtained and fluid harvesting was well tolerated when topical anaesthetic was used. The difference in COP(i assessed by dry and wet wicks between 75 min. and 90 min. of implantation was in accordance with previous reports. The use of topical analgesia did not influence COP(i and topical analgesia may make the wick technique more acceptable for subjects who dislike technical procedures, including children.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01044979.

  6. Reaction of rat subcutaneous tissue to mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement: a secondary level biocompatibility test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, P; Manjunath, M K; Kuriakose, E S

    2013-01-01

    This secondary-level animal study was conducted to assess and compare the subcutaneous tissue reaction to implantation of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and white Portland cement. Polyethylene tubes filled with either freshly mixed white MTA (Group I) or white Portland cement (Group II) were implanted subcutaneously into 12 Wistar Albino rats. Each animal also received an empty polyethylene tube as the control (Group III). After 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, the implants, together with surrounding tissues were excised. Two pathologists blinded to the experimental procedure, evaluated sections taken from the biopsy specimens for the severity of the inflammatory response, calcification and the presence and thickness of fibrous capsule surrounding the implant. Statistical analysis was performed using the Cross-tabs procedure, Univariate analysis of the variance two-way and the Pearson product moment correlation to assess inter-rater variability between the two evaluators. At 7 days, there was no significant difference in the severity of inflammation between the control group, white MTA, and white Portland cement groups. In the 14 day, 21 day and 30 day test periods, control group had significantly less inflammation than white MTA and white Portland cement. There was no significant difference in the grading of inflammation between white MTA and white Portland cement. All materials exhibited thick capsule at 7 days and thin capsule by 30 days. Both white MTA and white Portland cement were not completely non-irritating at the end of 30 days as evidenced by the presence of mild inflammation. However, the presence of a thin capsule around the materials, similar to the control group, indicates good tissue tolerance. White MTA and white Portland cement seem to be materials of comparable biocompatibility.

  7. Effect of Using Melatonin Implants on Postpartum Reproductive Indices in Tigaia Sheep Breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Padeanu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out in a commercial farm from Turnu, Arad County, on a number of 110 indigenous adultewes from the Tigaia breed. It is estimated by some authors that administration of subcutaneous melatonin implantsduring a period of 30 days, in lactating or dry ewes, would improve the reproductive performances in some sheepbreeds. Subcutaneous melatonin implants (Melovin were inserted to the ewes in doses of 18 mg. Current research,emphasized treated that from indigenous Tigaia breed, can be obtained superior reproduction indexes if the animalsare treated with melatonin implants with 35 days before the mating season, differences from the untreated groupbeing significantly (p<0.001. However, in sheep treated used melatonin implants, the lambing interval were reducedwith 40 to 50%. It seems that use of melatonin implants Melovin type near the beginning of normal breeding season,increases the reproductive performance of adult ewes from the Tigaia breed.

  8. Fully Implantable Deep Brain Stimulation System with Wireless Power Transmission for Long-term Use in Rodent Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Man Seung; Moon, Hyun Seok; Kim, Hee Chan; Park, Hyung Woo; Lim, Young Hoon; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study to develop new deep-brain stimulation system for long-term use in animals, in order to develop a variety of neural prostheses. Our system has two distinguished features, which are the fully implanted system having wearable wireless power transfer and ability to change the parameter of stimulus parameter. It is useful for obtaining a variety of data from a long-term experiment. To validate our system, we performed pre-clinical test in Parkinson's disease-rat models for 4 weeks. Through the in vivo test, we observed the possibility of not only long-term implantation and stability, but also free movement of animals. We confirmed that the electrical stimulation neither caused any side effect nor damaged the electrodes. We proved possibility of our system to conduct the long-term pre-clinical test in variety of parameter, which is available for development of neural prostheses.

  9. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    Underlying ion-beam modification of surfaces is the more basic subject of particle-surface interaction. The ideas can be grouped into forward and backward features, i.e. those affecting the interior of the target and those leading to particle expulsion. Forward effects include the stopping of the incident particles and the deposition of energy, both governed by integral equations which are easily set up but difficult to solve. Closely related is recoil implantation where emphasis is placed not on the stopping of the incident particles but on their interaction with target atoms with resulting implantation of these atoms. Backward effects, all of which are denoted as sputtering, are in general either of collisional, thermal, electronic, or exfoliational origin. (Auth.)

  10. Tribology of flexible and sliding spinal implants: Development of experimental and numerical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cann, Sophie; Chaves-Jacob, Julien; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Linares, Jean-Marc; Chabrand, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    New fusionless devices are being developed to get over the limits of actual spinal surgical treatment, based on arthrodesis. However, due to their recentness, no standards exist to test and validate those devices, especially concerning the wear. A new tribological first approach to the definition of an in vitro wear protocol to study wear of flexible and sliding spinal devices is presented in this article, and was applied to a new concept. A simplified synthetic spine portion (polyethylene) was developed to reproduce a simple supra-physiological spinal flexion (10° between two vertebrae). The device studied with this protocol was tested in wet environment until 1 million cycles (Mc). We obtained an encouraging estimated wear volume of same order of magnitude compared to similar devices. An associated finite element (FE) numerical model has permitted to access contact information and study the effect of misalignment of one screw. First results could point out how to improve the design and suggest that a vertical misalignment of a screw (under or over-screwing) has more impact than a horizontal one. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 104-111, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, N; Xu, C; Beaulieu, L; Thomson, R M

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  12. Selective laser melting of titanium alloy enables osseointegration of porous multi-rooted implants in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Xu, Liangwei; You, Jia; Fang, Lihua; Zhang, Qing

    2016-07-21

    Osseointegration refers to the direct connection between living bone and the surface of a load-bearing artificial implant. Porous implants with well-controlled porosity and pore size can enhance osseointegration. However, until recently implants were produced by machining solid core titanium rods. The aim of this study was to develop a multi-rooted dental implant (MRI) with a connected porous surface structure to facilitate osseointegration. MRIs manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM) and commercial implants with resorbable blasting media (RBM)-treated surfaces were inserted into the hind limbs of New Zealand white rabbits. Osseointegration was evaluated periodically over 12 weeks by micro-computerized tomography (CT) scanning, histological analysis, mechanical push-out tests, and torque tests. Bone volume densities were consistently higher in the MRI group than in the RBM group throughout the study period, ultimately resulting in a peak value of 48.41 % for the MRI group. Histological analysis revealed denser surrounding bone growth in the MRIs; after 4 and 8 weeks, bone tissue had grown into the pore structures and root bifurcation areas, respectively. Biomechanics tests indicated binding of the porous MRIs to the neobone tissues, as push-out forces strengthened from 294.7 to 446.5 N and maximum mean torque forces improved from 81.15 to 289.57 N (MRI), versus 34.79 to 87.8 N in the RBM group. MRIs manufactured by SLM possess a connected porous surface structure that improves the osteogenic characteristics of the implant surface.

  13. Studies Using an in Vitro Model Show Evidence of Involvement of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Human Endometrial Epithelial Cells in Human Embryo Implantation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Nishikawa-Uchida, Sayaka; Oda, Hideyuki; Miyazaki, Kaoru; Yamasaki, Akiko; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    Human embryo implantation is a critical multistep process consisting of embryo apposition/adhesion, followed by penetration and invasion. Through embryo penetration, the endometrial epithelial cell barrier is disrupted and remodeled by an unknown mechanism. We have previously developed an in vitro model for human embryo implantation employing the human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR and the human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line Ishikawa. Using this model we have shown that stimulation with ovarian steroid hormones (17β-estradiol and progesterone, E2P4) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances the attachment and adhesion of JAR spheroids to Ishikawa. In the present study we showed that the attachment and adhesion of JAR spheroids and treatment with E2P4 or SAHA individually induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in Ishikawa cells. This was evident by up-regulation of N-cadherin and vimentin, a mesenchymal cell marker, and concomitant down-regulation of E-cadherin in Ishikawa cells. Stimulation with E2P4 or SAHA accelerated Ishikawa cell motility, increased JAR spheroid outgrowth, and enhanced the unique redistribution of N-cadherin, which was most prominent in proximity to the adhered spheroids. Moreover, an N-cadherin functional blocking antibody attenuated all events but not JAR spheroid adhesion. These results collectively provide evidence suggesting that E2P4- and implanting embryo-induced EMT of endometrial epithelial cells may play a pivotal role in the subsequent processes of human embryo implantation with functional control of N-cadherin. PMID:22174415

  14. Intermittent subcutaneous methadone administration in the management of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Carlos; Vara, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Methadone is a strong opioid analgesic that has been used successfully in cancer pain management. The oral route of administration is generally preferred for opioid analgesics. However that route sometimes cannot be used. Experience with continuous subcutaneous methadone infusions has produced local intolerance. The aim of this study was to analyze the use of intermittent subcutaneous methadone injections. Ten patients whose pain was well-controlled with oral methadone (average dose 30 mg, range 10 to 120 mg) participated in the study. A subcutaneous small vein needle (butterfly) was used exclusively for administration of methadone. Over a period of seven days the local discomfort of each injection was evaluated by means of a Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and the site of infusion was observed. When any degree of erythema or inflammation was seen, the infusion site was changed. The initial subcutaneous dose was the same as the previously administered oral dose. A daily record was kept of the dose used, level of pain, and toxicity symptoms. This close vigilance was aimed at avoiding dosage errors due to variations among individuals in acceptance to previous oral medication. Changes in dosage were allowed according to standard medical criteria. Two patients were withdrawn from the study due to non-painful irritation at the infusion point. Another eight patients tolerated repeated administration of subcutaneous methadone over seven days. Any local irritation from subcutaneous methadone that occurred was managed satisfactorily by changing the infusion site and limiting doses to 30 mg. In seven of 182 repeat administration, injection site changes were necessitated by local irritation. The NRS for local discomfort was 2/10. The two patients who were intolerant of the subcutaneous injections were receiving injected doses which were significantly higher than the others (42 mg as compared to 25 mg). Dose adjustments needed when changing from the oral to the

  15. Fabrication of subcutaneous veins phantom for vessel visualization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai; Narita, Kazuyuki; Morita, Yusuke; Nakamachi, Eiji; Honda, Norihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2013-09-01

    The technique of subcutaneous veins imaging by using NIR (Near Infrared Radiation) is widely used in medical applications, such as the intravenous injection and the blood sampling. In the previous study, an automatic 3D blood vessel search and automatic blood sampling system was newly developed. In order to validate this NIR imaging system, we adopted the subcutaneous vein in the human arm and its artificial phantom, which imitate the human fat and blood vessel. The human skin and subcutaneous vein is characterized as the uncertainty object, which has the individual specificity, non-accurate depth information, non-steady state and hardly to be fixed in the examination apparatus. On the other hand, the conventional phantom was quite distinct from the human's characteristics, such as the non-multilayer structure, disagreement of optical property. In this study, we develop a multilayer phantom, which is quite similar with human skin, for improvement of NIR detection system evaluation. The phantom consists of three layers, such as the epidermis layer, the dermis layer and the subcutaneous fat layer. In subcutaneous fat layer, we built a blood vessel. We use the intralipid to imitate the optical scattering characteristics of human skin, and the hemoglobin and melanin for the optical absorption characteristics. In this study, we did two subjects. First, we decide the fabrication process of the phantom. Second, we compared newly developed phantoms with human skin by using our NIR detecting system, and confirm the availability of these phantoms.

  16. Surface modification of implants in long bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Yvonne; Rentsch, Claudia; Schneiders, Wolfgang; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Simon, Jan C; Worch, Hartmut; Rammelt, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Coatings of orthopedic implants are investigated to improve the osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties of the implant surfaces and thus to enhance periimplant bone formation. By applying coatings that mimic the extracellular matrix a favorable environment for osteoblasts, osteoclasts and their progenitor cells is provided to promote early and strong fixation of implants. It is known that the early bone ongrowth increases primary implant fixation and reduces the risk of implant failure. This review presents an overview of coating titanium and hydroxyapatite implants with components of the extracellular matrix like collagen type I, chondroitin sulfate and RGD peptide in different small and large animal models. The influence of these components on cells, the inflammation process, new bone formation and bone/implant contact is summarized.

  17. The development of skin immersion clearing method for increasing of laser exposure efficiency on subcutaneous objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozina, Alexandra M.; Genina, Elina A.; Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Terentyuk, Artem G.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we have studied effect of a hyperosmotic optical clearing agent (OCA), such as polyethylene glycol, on the fluorescence intensity from a target located in subcutaneous area in the model experiments. As a fluorescence agent the nanocomposite including gold nanorods with hematophorphyrin was used. The remitted fluorescent signal traveling to the tissue surface was monitored over time as the tissue was treated with the OCA. The detected fluorescent signal increased as the scattering in tissue samples was substantially reduced. The study has shown how OCA can be used to improve the detected signal at localization of subcutaneous target tissue at the photothermal or photodynamic therapy. Immersion clearing of skin can be also useful for improvement of laser exposure efficiency due to the increasing of light penetration depth.

  18. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  19. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  20. Kinetics of Leptospira interrogans infection in hamsters after intradermal and subcutaneous challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana L Coutinho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by highly motile, helically shaped bacteria that penetrate the skin and mucous membranes through lesions or abrasions, and rapidly disseminate throughout the body. Although the intraperitoneal route of infection is widely used to experimentally inoculate hamsters, this challenge route does not represent a natural route of infection.Here we describe the kinetics of disease and infection in hamster model of leptospirosis after subcutaneous and intradermal inoculation of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni, strain Fiocruz L1-130. Histopathologic changes in and around the kidney, including glomerular and tubular damage and interstitial inflammatory changes, began on day 5, and preceded deterioration in renal function as measured by serum creatinine. Weight loss, hemoconcentration, increased absolute neutrophil counts (ANC in the blood and hepatic dysfunction were first noted on day 6. Vascular endothelial growth factor, a serum marker of sepsis severity, became elevated during the later stages of infection. The burden of infection, as measured by quantitative PCR, was highest in the kidney and peaked on day 5 after intradermal challenge and on day 6 after subcutaneous challenge. Compared to subcutaneous challenge, intradermal challenge resulted in a lower burden of infection in both the kidney and liver on day 6, lower ANC and less weight loss on day 7.The intradermal and subcutaneous challenge routes result in significant differences in the kinetics of dissemination and disease after challenge with L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 at an experimental dose of 2×106 leptospires. These results provide new information regarding infection kinetics in the hamster model of leptospirosis.

  1. Histological evaluation of different biodegradable and non-biodegradable membranes implanted subcutaneously in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, S; Pinholt, E M; Madsen, J E

    2000-01-01

    Different types of biodegradable membranes have become available for guided tissue regeneration. The purpose of this study was to evaluate histologically three different biodegradable membranes (Bio-Gide, Resolut and Vicryl) and one non-biodegradable membrane (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene/e-PTFE...... that e-PTFE was well tolerated and encapsulated by a fibrous connective tissue capsule. There was capsule formation around Resolut and Vicryl and around Bio-Gide in the early phase there was a wide inflammatory zone already. e-PTFE and Vicryl were stable materials while Resolut and Bio-Gide fragmented...

  2. Morphological correlates of hearing loss after cochlear implantation and electro-acoustic stimulation in a hearing-impaired Guinea pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Lina A J; Stark, Gemaine; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T; Spear, Kayce A; Zhang, Hongzheng; Tanaka, Chiemi; Li, Hongzhe

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid or electro-acoustic stimulation (EAS) cochlear implants (CIs) are designed to provide high-frequency electric hearing together with residual low-frequency acoustic hearing. However, 30-50% of EAS CI recipients lose residual hearing after implantation. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms of EAS-induced hearing loss in an animal model with high-frequency hearing loss. Guinea pigs were exposed to 24 h of noise (12-24 kHz at 116 dB) to induce a high-frequency hearing loss. After recovery, two groups of animals were implanted (n = 6 per group), with one group receiving chronic acoustic and electric stimulation for 10 weeks, and the other group receiving no stimulation during this time frame. A third group (n = 6) was not implanted, but received chronic acoustic stimulation. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded biweekly to monitor changes in hearing. The organ of Corti was immunolabeled with phalloidin, anti-CtBP2, and anti-GluR2 to quantify hair cells, ribbons and post-synaptic receptors. The lateral wall was immunolabeled with phalloidin and lectin to quantify stria vascularis capillary diameters. Bimodal or trimodal diameter distributions were observed; the number and location of peaks were objectively determined using the Aikake Information Criterion and Expectation Maximization algorithm. Noise exposure led to immediate hearing loss at 16-32 kHz for all groups. Cochlear implantation led to additional hearing loss at 4-8 kHz; this hearing loss was negatively and positively correlated with minimum and maximum peaks of the bimodal or trimodal distributions of stria vascularis capillary diameters, respectively. After chronic stimulation, no significant group changes in thresholds were seen; however, elevated thresholds at 1 kHz in implanted, stimulated animals were significantly correlated with decreased presynaptic ribbon and postsynaptic receptor counts. Inner and outer hair cell counts did not differ between groups and

  3. Edema-induced increase in tumour cell survival for 125I and 103Pd prostate permanent seed implants - a bio-mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ning; Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2002-01-01

    Edema caused by the surgical procedure of prostate seed implantation expands the source-to-point distances within the prostate and hence decreases the dose coverage. The decrease of dose coverage results in an increase in tumour cell survival. To investigate the effects of edema on tumour cell survival, a bio-mathematical model of edema and the corresponding cell killing by continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) was developed so that tumour cell surviving fractions can be estimated in an edematous prostate for both 125 I and 103 Pd seed implants. The dynamic nature of edema and its resolution were modelled with an exponential function V(T)=V p (1+M exp(-0.693T/T e )) where V p is the prostate volume before implantation, M is the edema magnitude and T e is edema half-life (EHL). The dose rate of a radioactive seed was calculated according to AAPM TG43, i.e. D radical S k Δg(r) φ-bar an /r 2 , where r is the distance between a seed and a given point. The distance r is now a function of time because of edema. The g(r) was approximated as 1/r 0.4 and 1/r 0.8 for 125 I and 103 Pd, respectively. By expanding the mathematical expression of the resultant dose rate in a Taylor series of exponential functions of time, the dose rate was made equivalent to that produced from multiple fictitious radionuclides of different decay constants and strengths. The biologically effective dose (BED) for an edematous prostate implant was then calculated using a generalized Dale equation. The cell surviving fraction was computed as exp(-αBED), where α is the linear coefficient of the survival curve. The tumour cell survival was calculated for both 125 I and 103 Pd seed implants and for different tumour potential doubling time (TPDT) (from 5 days to 30 days) and for edemas of different magnitudes (from 0% to 95%) and edema half-lives (from 4 days to 30 days). Tumour cell survival increased with the increase of edema magnitude and EHL. For a typical edema of a half-life of 10 days

  4. Sacroiliac joint stability: Finite element analysis of implant number, orientation, and superior implant length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Derek P; Kiapour, Ali; Yerby, Scott A; Goel, Vijay K

    2018-03-18

    To analyze how various implants placement variables affect sacroiliac (SI) joint range of motion. An experimentally validated finite element model of the lumbar spine and pelvis was used to simulate a fusion of the SI joint using various placement configurations of triangular implants (iFuse Implant System ® ). Placement configurations were varied by changing implant orientation, superior implant length, and number of implants. The range of motion of the SI joint was calculated using a constant moment of 10 N-m with a follower load of 400 N. The changes in motion were compared between the treatment groups to assess how the different variables affected the overall motion of the SI joint. Transarticular placement of 3 implants with superior implants that end in the middle of the sacrum resulted in the greatest reduction in range of motion (flexion/extension = 73%, lateral bending = 42%, axial rotation = 72%). The range of motions of the SI joints were reduced with use of transarticular orientation (9%-18%) when compared with an inline orientation. The use of a superior implant that ended mid-sacrum resulted in median reductions of (8%-14%) when compared with a superior implant that ended in the middle of the ala. Reducing the number of implants, resulted in increased SI joint range of motions for the 1 and 2 implant models of 29%-133% and 2%-39%, respectively, when compared with the 3 implant model. Using a validated finite element model we demonstrated that placement of 3 implants across the SI joint using a transarticular orientation with superior implant reaching the sacral midline resulted in the most stable construct. Additional clinical studies may be required to confirm these results.

  5. Computational modelling of long bone fractures fixed with locking plates - How can the risk of implant failure be reduced?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nassiri, M

    2013-03-01

    The Locking Compression Plate (LCP) is part of a new plate generation requiring an adapted surgical technique and new thinking about commonly used concepts of internal fixation using plates. Knowledge of the fixation stability provided by these new plates is very limited and clarification is still necessary to determine how the mechanical stability and the risk of implant failure can best be controlled.

  6. A review of economic evaluation models for cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter defibrillators in patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomini, F.; van Asselt, A. D.

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiac resynchronization therapy with biventricular pacemaker (CRT-P) is considered an effective treatment for heart failure (HF). Adding implantable cardioverter defibrillators (CRT-D) may further reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, economic evaluations have shown

  7. A review of economic evaluation models for cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter defibrillators in patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomini, F.; van Asselt, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiac resynchronization therapy with biventricular pacemaker (CRT-P) is considered an effective treatment for heart failure (HF). Adding implantable cardioverter defibrillators (CRT-D) may further reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, economic evaluations have shown

  8. Specific material effects of wear-particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis at the bone–implant interface: A rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Longhofer

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Different biomaterials in particulate form exert different forms of adverse effects in terms of the amount of osteolysis and inflammatory reactions on bone tissue at the bone–implant interface. It provides information for engineering more appropriate materials for arthroplasty components.

  9. Biocompatibility and Systemic Safety of a Novel Implantable Annuloplasty Ring for the Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation in a Minipig Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramot, Yuval; Rousselle, Serge D; Yellin, Nadav; Willenz, Udi; Sabag, Itai; Avner, Avi; Nyska, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    Prosthetic annuloplasty rings are a common treatment modality for mitral regurgitation, and recently, percutaneous implantation techniques have gained popularity due to their favorable safety profile. Although in common use, biocompatibility of annuloplasty rings has been reported only sparsely in the literature, and none of these reports used the percutaneous technique of implantation. We report on the biocompatibility and the systemic safety of a novel transcatheter mitral valve annuloplasty ring (AMEND™) in 6 minipigs. This device is composed of a nitinol tube surrounded by a braided polyethylene terephthalate fabric tube. The device produced no adverse inflammatory response, showing gradual integration between the metal ring and the fabric by normal host fibrocellular response, leading to complete neoendocardium coverage. There was no evidence for adverse reactions, rejection, or intolerance in the valvular structure. In 2 animals, hemopericardium resulted from the implantation procedure, leading to right-sided cardiac insufficiency with pulmonary edema and liver congestion. The findings reported herein can serve as a case study for the expected healing pathology reactions after implantation of transcatheter mitral valve annuloplasty rings. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. [Researches on biomechanics of micro-implant-bone interface and optimum design of micro implant's neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Feng; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Yi; Song, Jin-lin; Fan, Yuboa

    2007-07-01

    To compare and analyze the stress distribution at the micro-implant-bone interface based on the different micro-implant-bone conditioned under orthodontic load, and to optimize the design of micro implant's neck. An adult skull with all tooth was scanned by spiral CT, and the data were imported into computer for three-dimensional reconstruction with software Mimics 9.0. The three dimensional finite element models of three micro-implant-bone interfaces(initial stability, full osseointegration and fibrous integration) were analyzed by finite element analysis software ABAQUS6.5. The primary stress distributions of different micro-implant-bone conditions were evaluated when 2N force was loaded. Then the diameter less than 1.5 mm of the micro implant's neck was added with 0.2 mm, to compare the stress distribution of the modified micro-implant-bone interface with traditional type. The stress mostly concentrated on the neck of micro implant and the full osseointegration interface in all models showed the lowest strain level. Compared with the traditional type, the increasing diameter neck of the micro implant obviously decreased the stress level in all the three conditions. The micro-implant-bone interface and the diameter of micro implant's neck both are the important influence factors to the stress distribution of micro implant.

  11. Subcutaneous mercury injection by a child: A histopathology case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Sukheeja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intentional subcutaneous injection of mercury by mentally healthy children is rare. Usually, it is seen as a part of suicidal attempt in severely depressed patients or by athletes to enhance their performance. We report a case of a 15-year-old child, inspired by a movie, who deliberately self-injected mercury subcutaneously into his forearm that led to the formation of a non-healing ulcer. Histopathology of the biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. A surgical procedure was thereby performed to treat the ulcer and reduce the blood and urinary levels of mercury. However, the patient did not develop clinical signs of chronic poisoning, proving that subcutaneous mercury injection has a low risk of systemic toxicity, and that histopathology plays an important role in diagnosis.

  12. Computer-aided design and computer-aided modeling (CAD/CAM) generated surgical splints, cutting guides and custom-made implants: Which indications in orthognathic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolozzi, P

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present report was to describe our indications, results and complications of computer-aided design and computer-aided modeling CAD/CAM surgical splints, cutting guides and custom-made implants in orthognathic surgery. We analyzed the clinical and radiological data of ten consecutive patients with dentofacial deformities treated using a CAD/CAM technique. Four patients had surgical splints and cutting guides for correction of maxillomandibular asymmetries, three had surgical cutting guides and customized internal distractors for correction of severe maxillary deficiencies and three had custom-made implants for additional chin contouring and/or mandibular defects following bimaxillary osteotomies and sliding genioplasty. We recorded age, gender, dentofacial deformity, surgical procedure and intra- and postoperative complications. All of the patients had stable cosmetic results with a high rate of patient satisfaction at the 1-year follow-up examination. No intra- and/or postoperative complications were encountered during any of the different steps of the procedure. This study demonstrated that the application of CAD/CAM patient-specific surgical splints, cutting guides and custom-made implants in orthognathic surgery allows for a successful outcome in the ten patients presented in this series. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. An experimental test of stroke recovery by implanting a hyaluronic acid hydrogel carrying a Nogo receptor antibody in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jun; Tian Weiming; Hou Shaoping; Xu Qunyuan; Spector, Myron; Cui Fuzhai

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a hyaluronic-acid-based (HA-based) hydrogel implant, carrying a polyclonal antibody to the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR), on adult rats that underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Behavioral tests of a forelimb-reaching task suggested that the disabled function of the impaired forelimb in this stroke model was ameliorated by the implant to a certain extent. These behavioral findings were correlated with immunohistochemical results of investigating the distribution of NgR antibody, neurofilaments (NF) and neuron-specific class III β-tubulin (TuJ1) in the brain sections. The porous hydrogel functioned as a scaffold to deliver the NgR antibody, support cell migration and development. In addition, it was found NF-positive and TuJ1-positive expressions were distributed in the implanted hydrogel. Collectively, the results demonstrate the promise of the HA hydrogel as a scaffold material and the delivery vehicle of the NgR antibody for the repair of defects and the support of neural regeneration in the brain

  14. An experimental test of stroke recovery by implanting a hyaluronic acid hydrogel carrying a Nogo receptor antibody in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Jun [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tian Weiming [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Hou Shaoping [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100054 (China); Xu Qunyuan [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100054 (China); Spector, Myron [Tissue Engineering, VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cui Fuzhai [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2007-12-15

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a hyaluronic-acid-based (HA-based) hydrogel implant, carrying a polyclonal antibody to the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR), on adult rats that underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Behavioral tests of a forelimb-reaching task suggested that the disabled function of the impaired forelimb in this stroke model was ameliorated by the implant to a certain extent. These behavioral findings were correlated with immunohistochemical results of investigating the distribution of NgR antibody, neurofilaments (NF) and neuron-specific class III {beta}-tubulin (TuJ1) in the brain sections. The porous hydrogel functioned as a scaffold to deliver the NgR antibody, support cell migration and development. In addition, it was found NF-positive and TuJ1-positive expressions were distributed in the implanted hydrogel. Collectively, the results demonstrate the promise of the HA hydrogel as a scaffold material and the delivery vehicle of the NgR antibody for the repair of defects and the support of neural regeneration in the brain.

  15. An accurate mobility model for the I-V characteristics of n-channel enhancement-mode MOSFETs with single-channel boron implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chingyuan Wu; Yeongwen Daih

    1985-01-01

    In this paper an analytical mobility model is developed for the I-V characteristics of n-channel enhancement-mode MOSFETs, in which the effects of the two-dimensional electric fields in the surface inversion channel and the parasitic resistances due to contact and interconnection are included. Most importantly, the developed mobility model easily takes the device structure and process into consideration. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the developed model, the structure- and process-oriented parameters in the present mobility model are calculated explicitly for an n-channel enhancement-mode MOSFET with single-channel boron implantation. Moreover, n-channel MOSFETs with different channel lengths fabricated in a production line by using a set of test keys have been characterized and the measured mobilities have been compared to the model. Excellent agreement has been obtained for all ranges of the fabricated channel lengths, which strongly support the accuracy of the model. (author)

  16. Stress and strain distribution in three different mini dental implant designs using in implant retained overdenture: a finite element analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunmeungtong, W; Khongkhunthian, P; Rungsiyakull, P

    2016-01-01

    Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used for prediction of stress and strain between dental implant components and bone in the implant design process. Purpose of this study was to characterize and analyze stress and strain distribution occurring in bone and implants and to compare stress and strain of three different implant designs. Three different mini dental implant designs were included in this study: 1. a mini dental implant with an internal implant-abutment connection (MDIi); 2. a mini dental implant with an external implant-abutment connection (MDIe); 3. a single piece mini dental implant (MDIs). All implant designs were scanned using micro-CT scans. The imaging details of the implants were used to simulate models for FEA. An artificial bone volume of 9×9 mm in size was constructed and each implant was placed separately at the center of each bone model. All bone-implant models were simulatively loaded under an axial compressive force of 100 N and a 45-degree force of 100 N loading at the top of the implants using computer software to evaluate stress and strain distribution. There was no difference in stress or strain between the three implant designs. The stress and strain occurring in all three mini dental implant designs were mainly localized at the cortical bone around the bone-implant interface. Oblique 45° loading caused increased deformation, magnitude and distribution of stress and strain in all implant models. Within the limits of this study, the average stress and strain in bone and implant models with MDIi were similar to those with MDIe and MDIs. The oblique 45° load played an important role in dramatically increased average stress and strain in all bone-implant models. Mini dental implants with external or internal connections have similar stress distribution to single piece mini dental implants. In clinical situations, the three types of mini dental implant should exhibit the same behavior to chewing force.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Bone Stress for Miniscrew Implant Proximal to Root Under Occlusal Force and Implant Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Li-Hua; Guo, Na; Zhou, Guan-jun; Qie, Hui; Li, Chen-Xi; Lu, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Because of the narrow interradicular spaces and varying oral anatomies of individual patients, there is a very high risk of root proximity during the mini implants inserting. The authors hypothesized that normal occlusal loading and implant loading affected the stability of miniscrew implants placed in proximity or contact with the adjacent root. The authors implemented finite element analysis (FEA) to examine the effectiveness of root proximity and root contact. Stress distribution in the bone was assessed at different degrees of root proximity by generating 4 finite element models: the implant touches the root surface, the implant was embedded in the periodontal membrane, the implant touches the periodontal surface, and the implant touches nothing. Finite element analysis was then carried out with simulations of 2 loading conditions for each model: condition A, involving only tooth loading and condition B, involving both tooth and implant loading. Under loading condition A, the maximum stress on the bone for the implant touching the root was the distinctly higher than that for the other models. For loading condition B, peak stress areas for the implant touching the root were the area around the neck of the mini implant and the point of the mini implant touches the root. The results of this study suggest that normal occlusal loading and implant loading contribute to the instability of the mini implant when the mini implant touches the root.

  18. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  19. Subcutaneous administration of carrier erythrocytes: slow release of entrapped agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, J.R.; Corrier, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Carrier erythrocytes administered subcutaneously in mice release encapsulated molecules at the injection site and through cells that escape the injection site. One day postinjection, the efflux of encapsulated [ 14 C]sucrose, [ 3 H]inulin, and 51 Cr-hemoglobin from the injection site was 45, 55, and 65%, respectively. Intact carrier erythrocytes escaped the injection s