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Sample records for subcutaneous immunotherapy scit

  1. Clinical efficacy of sublingual and subcutaneous birch pollen allergen-specific immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khinchi, M S; Poulsen, Lars K.; Carat, F

    2004-01-01

    Both sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy (SLIT) and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) have a documented clinical efficacy, but only few comparative studies have been performed.......Both sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy (SLIT) and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) have a documented clinical efficacy, but only few comparative studies have been performed....

  2. Subcutaneous and Sublingual Immunotherapy in Allergic Asthma in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Tsabouri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This review presents up-to-date understanding of immunotherapy in the treatment of children with allergic asthma. The principal types of allergen immunotherapy (AIT are subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT. Both of them are indicated for patients with allergic rhinitis and/or asthma, who have evidence of clinically relevant allergen-specific IgE, and significant symptoms despite reasonable avoidance measures and/or maximal medical therapy. Studies have shown a significant decrease in asthma symptom scores and in the use of rescue medication, and a preventive effect on asthma onset. Although the safety profile of SLIT appears to be better than SCIT, the results of some studies and meta-analyses suggest that the efficacy of SCIT is better and that SCIT has an earlier onset than SLIT in children with allergic asthma. Severe, not controlled asthma, and medical error were the most frequent causes of SCIT-induced adverse events.

  3. Association of subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy with incidence of autoimmune disease, ischemic heart disease, and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Jespersen, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    Subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (SCIT) is a well-documented treatment of IgE-mediated allergic disease. Little is known about potential effects of SCIT on the risk of other chronic immune-related diseases. Over the years, a few casuistic reports have caused concern that SCIT might ac...... as a trigger of autoimmune disease.......Subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (SCIT) is a well-documented treatment of IgE-mediated allergic disease. Little is known about potential effects of SCIT on the risk of other chronic immune-related diseases. Over the years, a few casuistic reports have caused concern that SCIT might act...

  4. Association of subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy with incidence of autoimmune disease, ischemic heart disease, and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Jespersen, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    Subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (SCIT) is a well-documented treatment of IgE-mediated allergic disease. Little is known about potential effects of SCIT on the risk of other chronic immune-related diseases. Over the years, a few casuistic reports have caused concern that SCIT might act...

  5. Immunological comparison of allergen immunotherapy tablet treatment and subcutaneous immunotherapy against grass allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, K; Backer, V; Lund, G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IgE-mediated allergic rhinitis to grass pollen can successfully be treated with either allergen immunotherapy tablets (SLIT tablet) or SQ-standardized subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). The efficacy of these two treatment modalities for grass allergy is comparable, but the immunological...

  6. Diurnal variations in subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy reactions.

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    Bavishi, Aakash A; Grammer, Leslie C; Pongracic, Jacqueline; Rychlik, Karen; Kumar, Rajesh; Zee, Phyllis; Greenberger, Paul A; Fishbein, Anna B

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms underlie many immune responses and allergic diseases. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) can result in adverse reactions; however, it is unclear whether such reactions have a diurnal pattern. To assess whether the timing of SCIT affects the rate of adverse reactions. This study was a retrospective medical record review of adult patients (n = 289) who received SCIT at the Northwestern Medical Faculty Foundation, Chicago, Illinois, during a 10-year period (2004-2014). Injections were given in the outpatient setting. There were a total of 17,457 injections with 574 reactions. Covariates included age, sex, median income, asthma status, vial contents, number of injections, and previous immunotherapy reactions. Logistical regression was used to calculate the odds of having a reaction with time of SCIT administration as the primary determinate. Immunotherapy reactions occurred more frequently after afternoon or evening (pm) injections (328/8721 = 3.8%) vs morning (am) injections (246/8736 = 2.8%), (χ2 = 12.26, P < .01). Systemic reactions, defined as World Allergy Organization grade 1 or higher, did not have diurnal variation (59/8721 = 0.67% for pm vs am 56/8736 = 0.64% for morning; χ2 = 0.08; P = .77). pm injections resulted in higher odds of reaction compared with am injection in a fully adjusted logistic regression model (odds ratio = 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-1.70; P < .01). When considering time as 4 categories, the highest odds of reaction were noted for the period from 15:01 to 17:30 (odds ratio, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-2.00; P < .01). pm injections of SCIT are associated with increased cutaneous reaction rates when compared with am injections. In patients experiencing bothersome local reactions, it may be beneficial to administer SCIT in the morning. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost-minimization analysis of sublingual immunotherapy versus subcutaneous immunotherapy for house dust mite respiratory allergic disease in Denmark.

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    Rønborg, Steen; Johnsen, Claus R; Theilgaard, Sune; Winther, Anders; Hahn-Pedersen, Julie; Andreasen, Jakob Nørgaard; Olsen, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Currently, patients with persistent moderate-to-severe house dust mite (HDM) allergic rhinitis despite use of symptom-relieving medication can be offered subcutaneously administered allergy immunotherapy (SQ SCIT; Alutard SQ) as standard care of treatment in Denmark. Recently, a HDM sublingually administered allergy immunotherapy tablet (SQ SLIT-tablet; ACARIZAX) has been developed for at-home treatment. The purpose of this analysis is to compare the costs related to treatment and administration of SQ SLIT-tablet and SQ SCIT. Methods Assuming equal efficacy between ther SQ SLIT-tablet and SQ SCIT, the cost-minimization analysis was the most appropriate for the comparison. According to guidelines and Summary of Product Characteristics, the treatment duration of SQ SLIT-tablet is 3 years and 3-5 years for SQ SCIT. The courses of treatment vary among patients and, therefore, the costs of treatment have been calculated for an average patient with HDM respiratory allergic disease (RAD) receiving either SQ SLIT-tablet or SQ SCIT. All costs associated with allergy immunotherapy were collected, i.e., cost of medication, administration and treatment setting, and discounted according to Danish guidelines. Comprehensive univariate sensitivity analyses were carried out. Results The treatment costs for an average patient with HDM RAD are €3094 for SQ SLIT-tablet and €3799 for SQ SCIT; however, when adding indirect costs to the calculations the total costs of the treatments are €3697 and €6717 for SQ SLIT-tablet and SQ SCIT, respectively. Therefore, if 2500 patients with HDM RAD were treated with SQ SLIT-tablet instead of SQ SCIT, it would elicit a saving to the healthcare system of ∼€1.8 million. The conclusion was robust to any changes in the sensitivity analysis. Conclusion With regards to the cost of treating Danish patients with HDM RAD, it is clearly cost-saving to treat patients with SQ SLIT-tablet compared to SQ SCIT.

  8. Selection of patients for sublingual versus subcutaneous immunotherapy.

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    Larenas Linnemann, Désirée E S; Blaiss, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is the sole treatment for IgE-mediated allergic diseases directed at the underlying mechanism. The two widely accepted administration routes are sublingual (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT). We reviewed how patients should best be selected for immunotherapy and how the optimal administration route can be defined. Before deciding SCIT or SLIT, appropriate selection of patients for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is mandatory. To be eligible for AIT, subjects must have a clear medical history of allergic disease, with exacerbation of symptoms on exposure to one or more allergens and a corresponding positive skin or in vitro test. Then the route of administration should be based on: published evidence of clinical and immunologic efficacy (which varies per allergic disease and per allergen); mono- or multi-allergen immunotherapy, for SLIT multi-allergen immunotherapy was not effective; safety: adverse events with SLIT are more frequent, but less severe; and, costs and patient preferences, closely related to adherence issues. All these are discussed in the article.

  9. A systematic review and economic evaluation of subcutaneous and sublingual allergen immunotherapy in adults and children with seasonal allergic rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Meadows, A.; Kaambwa, B.; Novielli, N.; Huissoon, A.; Fry-Smith, A; Meads, C; P. Barton; Dretzke, J

    2013-01-01

    © Queen’s Printer and Controller of HMSO 2013 Severe allergic rhinitis uncontrolled by conventional medication can substantially affect quality of life. Immunotherapy involves administering increasing doses of a specific allergen, with the aim of reducing sensitivity and symptomatic reactions. Recent meta-analyses have concluded that both subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) are more effective than placebo in reducing symptoms. It is uncertain which route o...

  10. Distinct modulation of allergic T cell responses by subcutaneous versus sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulten, Véronique; Tripple, Victoria; Andersen, Kristian Aasbjerg

    2016-01-01

    mechanisms involved have not been fully explored. OBJECTIVE: To compare changes in the allergen-specific T cell response induced by subcutaneous versus sublingual administration of allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT). METHODS: Grass pollen allergic patients were randomized into groups receiving either SCIT......: The most dominant immunological changes on a cellular level was a decrease in IL-5 in the SCIT group and a significant, transient increase of IL-10 observed after 10 months of treatment in both treated groups. The distinct routes of AIT administration may induce different immune-modulatory mechanisms...

  11. Clinical Efficacy of Subcutaneous Allergen Immunotherapy in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis.

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    Nahm, Dong Ho; Kim, Myoung Eun; Kwon, Byul; Cho, Su Mi; Ahn, Areum

    2016-11-01

    The clinical usefulness of subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) is still controversial. We analyzed the clinical efficacy of SCIT in patients with AD and the clinical characteristics of patients showing a favorable clinical response to the treatment. Two hundred and fifty one patients with AD sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated by SCIT using HDM extract. The clinical severity of AD was measured using the standardized clinical severity scoring system for AD (SCORAD) at baseline and 12 months. A favorable clinical response to SCIT was defined as a decrease in SCORAD value at 12 months greater than 50% compared to baseline value. Severe AD was defined as a baseline SCORAD value above 50. A favorable clinical response to SCIT was observed in 73.6% of patients. The proportion of patients showing a favorable clinical response to SCIT was significantly higher in patients with severe AD (90.6%) than patients with mild to moderated AD (63.7%) (p<0.001). Patients with severe AD showing a favorable clinical response had a significantly shorter duration of AD (12.3±8.5 years; mean±SD) than patients with severe AD showing no significant clinical response (20.6±10.9 years) (p<0.05) at baseline. SCIT could be a clinically useful therapeutic option for patients with severe AD sensitized to HDM. Early initiation of SCIT might provide a favorable clinical outcome in patients with severe AD sensitized to HDM.

  12. Distinct modulation of allergic T cell responses by subcutaneous versus sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulten, Véronique; Tripple, Victoria; Andersen, Kristian Aasbjerg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only curative treatment for type I allergy. It can be administered subcutaneously (SCIT) or sublingually (SLIT). The clinical efficacy of these two treatment modalities appears to be similar, but potential differences in the immunological...... mechanisms involved have not been fully explored. OBJECTIVE: To compare changes in the allergen-specific T cell response induced by subcutaneous versus sublingual administration of allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT). METHODS: Grass pollen allergic patients were randomized into groups receiving either SCIT...... was observed starting 10 months after treatment was commenced. At 24 months, T cell responses showed IL-5 levels significantly below the before treatment baseline. No significant reduction of IL-5 was observed in the SLIT or untreated group. However, a significant transient increase in IL-10 production after...

  13. Cluster subcutaneous allergen specific immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Feng, Shaoyan; Xu, Ying; Ma, Renqiang; Sun, Yueqi; Luo, Xi; Li, Huabin

    2014-01-01

    Although allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) represents the only immune- modifying and curative option available for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), the optimal schedule for specific subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is still unknown. The objective of this study is to systematically assess the efficacy and safety of cluster SCIT for patients with AR. By searching PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane clinical trials database from 1980 through May 10th, 2013, we collected and analyzed the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of cluster SCIT to assess its efficacy and safety. Eight trials involving 567 participants were included in this systematic review. Our meta-analysis showed that cluster SCIT have similar effect in reduction of both rhinitis symptoms and the requirement for anti-allergic medication compared with conventional SCIT, but when comparing cluster SCIT with placebo, no statistic significance were found in reduction of symptom scores or medication scores. Some caution is required in this interpretation as there was significant heterogeneity between studies. Data relating to Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) in 3 included studies were analyzed, which consistently point to the efficacy of cluster SCIT in improving quality of life compared to placebo. To assess the safety of cluster SCIT, meta-analysis showed that no differences existed in the incidence of either local adverse reaction or systemic adverse reaction between the cluster group and control group. Based on the current limited evidence, we still could not conclude affirmatively that cluster SCIT was a safe and efficacious option for the treatment of AR patients. Further large-scale, well-designed RCTs on this topic are still needed.

  14. Short-term subcutaneous grass pollen immunotherapy under the umbrella of anti-IL-4: A randomized controlled trial.

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    Chaker, Adam M; Shamji, Mohamed H; Dumitru, Florentina A; Calderon, Moises A; Scadding, Guy W; Makatsori, Melina; Jones, Ieuan; He, Qiuling A; Subramanian, Kulandayan K; Arm, Jonathan P; Durham, Stephen R; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is currently the only disease-modifying treatment available for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. We sought to evaluate the induction of sustained tolerance to allergen when anti-IL-4 was combined with a suboptimal course of grass pollen subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) using the allergen-induced skin late-phase response (LPR) and exploratory immune monitoring as surrogate markers of therapeutic response. In this randomized, double-blind, 3-group parallel design trial, 37 participants with seasonal allergic rhinitis received suboptimal SCIT (30,000 standardized quality units) in combination with anti-IL-4 (VAK694) and suboptimal SCIT (30,000 standardized quality units) plus placebo antibody or double placebo (placebo SCIT and placebo antibody) restricted to 13 weeks before the grass pollen season. The primary end point was the size of the LPR at 12 months. Exploratory end points included measures of the immunomodulatory activity of treatment by using IL-4 and IL-10 FluoroSpot assays, flow cytometry of T cells, and measurement of IgE, IgG4, and facilitated antigen binding. Both active treatment arms led to a substantial and sustained reduction of the LPR with no additional suppression with addition of anti-IL-4. Treatment with anti-IL-4 and SCIT compared with SCIT alone led to a sustained reduction in allergen-specific IL-4-producing cell counts (P pollen season. The combination of anti-IL-4 with SCIT provided no additional benefit over SCIT alone in suppressing the allergen-induced skin LPR. A larger trial is needed to assess whether the observed ex vivo downregulation of TH2 responses might translate into clinical benefit. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy versus topical treatment in vernal keratoconjunctivitis.

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    Mahdy, Reda Abdel Rahman; Nada, Waled M; Marei, Ayman A

    2012-05-01

    The study evaluated the treatment of cases with vernal keratoconjunctivitis by subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (SCIT) versus topical treatment according to clinical improvement and total serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E. Prospective randomized study. The study included 64 patients with bilateral vernal keratoconjunctivitis. Cases were divided into 2 groups: group 1, 32 patients who were subjected to topical treatment; and group 2, 32 patients who were subjected to intradermal skin reactions to different allergens. Prepared subcutaneous injections of different allergens were administered. Follow-up was performed to detect criteria of improvement according to clinical data and total serum IgE. The study revealed that the treatment by SCIT was more effective in improving the clinical symptoms and reducing the serum IgE than topical treatment because there was a greater reduction in symptoms in group 1 of immunotherapy (72%) than in group 2 of medical treatment (59%) (P vernal keratoconjunctivitis by SCIT was more effective than topical treatment in improving the clinical symptoms and reducing the total serum IgE.

  16. Hypoallergenic molecules for subcutaneous immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongejan, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-01-01

    Although a large part of the population suffers from allergies, a cure is not yet available. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) offers promise for these patients. AIT has proven successful in insect and venom allergies; however, for food allergy this is still unclear. In this editorial we focus...... on the recent advances in a proof of concept study in food allergy, FAST (Food allergy specific immunotherapy), which may increase interest within the biomolecular and pharmaceutical industry to embark on similar projects of immunology driven precision medicine within the allergy field....

  17. A Cost-Minimisation Analysis Comparing Sublingual Immunotherapy to Subcutaneous Immunotherapy for the Treatment of House Dust Mite Allergy in a Swedish Setting.

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    Björstad, Åse; Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Hahn-Pedersen, Julie; Svärd, Mikael

    2017-06-01

    In Sweden, approximately 6% of children and 10% of adults suffer from house dust mite (HDM) allergy with symptoms of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. Treatment is aimed at reducing HDM exposure and to control the symptoms of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma by symptom-relieving pharmacotherapy. This pharmacotherapy is often effective, but some patients remain inadequately controlled. For these patients, allergy immunotherapy (AIT, subcutaneous or sublingual) with repeated administration of HDM allergen should be considered. The objective of this study was to compare the costs for sublingual AIT (SLIT; SQ® SLIT-tablet) to the costs for subcutaneous AIT (SCIT; SQ® SCIT) for the treatment of HDM allergy in a cost-minimisation analysis (CMA). The CMA included resources (and costs) for treatment, healthcare visits, travelling and lost productivity. Resource use based on Swedish clinical treatment practice and costs were obtained from medical price lists. Analyses were conducted from the societal, as well as healthcare perspective, by use of a time horizon of 3 years. The results show that SQ® SLIT-tablet is a cost-saving treatment as compared to SQ® SCIT for the treatment of HDM allergy (€6800 over 3 years). The results are mainly driven by the cost of healthcare visits and the frequency of SCIT administrations. In conclusion, cost-savings of €6800 over 3 years are expected from treating HDM allergy with SQ® SLIT-tablet as compared to SQ® SCIT, including costs for treatment, healthcare visits, travelling and lost productivity. The reduced number of healthcare visits compensates for higher medication costs.

  18. Sublingual versus subcutaneous immunotherapy: patient adherence at a large German allergy center

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    Lemberg M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marie-Luise Lemberg,1 Till Berk,2 Kija Shah-Hosseini,1 Elena-Manja Kasche,1,3 Ralph Mösges1 1Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Center for Dermatology, Specific Allergology and Environmental Medicine, Hamburg, Germany Background: Many placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy (AIT is an effective therapy for treating allergies. Both commonly used routes, subcutaneous (SCIT and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT, require high patient adherence to be successful. In the literature, numbers describing adherence vary widely; this investigation compares these two routes of therapy directly.Methods: All data were retrieved from the patient data management system of a center for dermatology, specific allergology, and environmental medicine in Germany. All 330 patients (aged 13–89 years included in this study had commenced AIT between 2003 and 2011, thus allowing a full 3-year AIT cycle to be considered for each investigated patient.Results: In this specific center, SCIT was prescribed to 62.7% and SLIT to 37.3% of all included patients. The total dropout rate of the whole patient cohort was 34.8%. Overall, SLIT patients showed a higher dropout rate (39.0% than did SCIT patients (32.4%; however, the difference between these groups was not significant. Also, no significant difference between the overall dropout rates for men and for women was observed. A Kaplan–Meier curve of the patient collective showed a remarkably high dropout rate for the first year of therapy.Conclusion: The analysis presented in this single-center study shows that most patients who discontinue AIT do so during the first year of therapy. Patients seem likely to finish the 3-year therapy cycle if they manage to adhere to treatment throughout the first year. Strategies for preventing

  19. Aluminium in allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy--a German perspective.

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    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-07-16

    We are living in an "aluminium age" with increasing bioavailability of the metal for approximately 125 years, contributing significantly to the aluminium body burden of humans. Over the course of life, aluminium accumulates and is stored predominantly in the lungs, bones, liver, kidneys and brain. The toxicity of aluminium in humans is briefly summarised, highlighting links and possible causal relationships between a high aluminium body burden and a number of neurological disorders and disease states. Aluminium salts have been used as depot-adjuvants successfully in essential prophylactic vaccinations for almost 100 years, with a convincing positive benefit-risk assessment which remains unchanged. However, allergen-specific immunotherapy commonly consists of administering a long-course programme of subcutaneous injections using preparations of relevant allergens. Regulatory authorities currently set aluminium limits for vaccines per dose, rather than per treatment course. Unlike prophylactic vaccinations, numerous injections with higher proportions of aluminium-adjuvant per injection are applied in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and will significantly contribute to a higher cumulative life dose of aluminium. While the human body may cope robustly with a daily aluminium overload from the environment, regulatory cumulative threshold values in immunotherapy need further addressing. Based on the current literature, predisposing an individual to an unusually high level of aluminium, such as through subcutaneous immunotherapy, has the potential to form focal accumulations in the body with the propensity to exert forms of toxicity. Particularly in relation to longer-term health effects, the safety of aluminium adjuvants in immunotherapy remains unchallenged by health authorities - evoking the need for more consideration, guidance, and transparency on what is known and not known about its safety in long-course therapy and what measures can be taken to prevent or

  20. Administration and Burden of Subcutaneous Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinitis in U.S. and Canadian Clinical Practice.

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    Blume, Steven W; Yeomans, Karen; Allen-Ramey, Felicia; Smith, Nancy; Kim, Harold; Lockey, Richard F; Nichol, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    Allergy immunotherapy (AIT) is the only available treatment that alters the natural course of allergies and has possible disease-modifying effects. AIT is administered primarily via subcutaneous injection delivered in a physician's office. Few studies have been conducted in the United States or Canada to evaluate the costs of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). To (a) describe SCIT administration processes, resources, and costs and (b) characterize the patient population receiving SCIT. A multisite, prospective, observational time and motion study was conducted. Injection and wait times were collected by a third-party observer on 1 visit for each patient. Extract preparation processes were also observed. Site staff reported on treatment protocols, administrative time, supplies, and patient medical history. Patients responded to questionnaires on demographics, reasons for treatment, medication use, productivity, and travel time. Costs were estimated by applying unit costs to the time observations and the patient- and staff-reported data. A total of 670 SCIT patients were enrolled at 6 sites in the United States and 6 sites in Canada. Average age in the United States was 41 years (SD = 18) and 44 years (15) in Canada, with 10% of the patients aged ≥ 65 years. Annual incomes were over $100,000 for 40% of U.S. patients and 30% of Canadian patients. U.S. patients had over 4 times as many different allergens in their SCIT treatments as Canadian patients, with a mean of 18 versus 4. The most common reasons reported for starting SCIT was a "desire to cure allergies once and for all" (73%) and that "symptoms are not improved by allergy medications" (60%). Percentages of patients taking allergy medications in the 4 weeks prior to observation were 86% in the United States and 66% in Canada: antihistamines 75% United States, 54% Canada; inhaled corticosteroids 32% United States, 22% Canada. The predominant comorbidity was asthma, 43% United States, 24% Canada. Site

  1. Quality assurance ofallergen-specific immunotherapy during a national outbreak of anaphylaxis: results of a continuous sentinel event surveillance system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, F; Frølund, L; Christensen, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (SCIT) is an effective treatment for patients with allergic asthma and rhinitis. SCIT may be performed in many different ways and good safety profiles have been published. Other studies, however, have reported high frequencies...

  2. FAST: towards safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy of persistent life-threatening food allergies

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    Zuidmeer-Jongejan Laurian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT, using subcutaneous injections with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused by a single major allergen, parvalbumin (Cyp c 1 and lipid transfer protein (Pru p 3, respectively. Two approaches are being evaluated for achieving hypoallergenicity, i.e. site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. The most promising hypoallergens will be produced under GMP conditions. After pre-clinical testing (toxicology testing and efficacy in mouse models, SCIT with alum-absorbed hypoallergens will be evaluated in phase I/IIa and IIb randomized double-blind placebo-controlled (DBPC clinical trials, with the DBPC food challenge as primary read-out. To understand the underlying immune mechanisms in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold for fish or peach intake, thereby decreasing their anxiety and dependence on rescue medication.

  3. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, M A; Simons, F E R; Malling, Hans-Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    -presenting cells (mostly Langerhans and myeloid dendritic cells) exhibit a tolerogenic phenotype, despite constant exposure to danger signals from food and microbes. This reduces the induction of pro-inflammatory immune responses leading to systemic allergic reactions. Oral tissues contain relatively few mast......To cite this article: Calderón MA, Simons FER, Malling H-J, Lockey RF, Moingeon P, Demoly P. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy: mode of action and its relationship with the safety profile. Allergy 2012; 67: 302-311. ABSTRACT: Allergen immunotherapy reorients inappropriate immune responses...... in allergic patients. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) has been approved, notably in the European Union, as an effective alternative to subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) for allergic rhinitis patients. Compared with SCIT, SLIT has a better safety profile. This is possibly because oral antigen...

  4. Changing the route of immunotherapy administration: an 18-year survey in pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma.

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    Pajno, Giovanni B; Caminiti, Lucia; Passalacqua, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy can be administered either sublingually (sublingual immunotherapy [SLIT]) or subcutaneously (subcutaneous immunotherapy [SCIT]). The rate of route switching, required by patients, can provide an indirect evaluation of patients' preferences and adherence. The authors retrospectively reviewed patients' files over an 18-year period to quantify the changes in the route of administration. The clinical records of children referred for respiratory allergy between 1994 and 2011 and prescribed with SLIT or SCIT were reviewed. The specific causes of the shift from SLIT to SCIT and vice versa were always assessed, with a special attention to adverse events. The records of 4933 children (2289 male patients, aged 4-18 years) were reviewed. Six hundred forty-eight patients received SCIT and 4285 patients received SLIT. Of the 4285 SLIT patients, 340 (7.9%) shifted to SCIT, mainly with Parietaria judaica and grasses. The 85.8% of the changes were caused by a perceived low efficacy. None of the parents required the route change for side effects. Of the 648 patients initially treated with SCIT, 54 (8.3%) shifted to SLIT, 85% of them for local or systemic side effects, but none for poor efficacy. The rate of SCIT/SLIT changes is, overall, low and because of poor efficacy for SLIT and side effects for SCIT.

  5. Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Improves the Symptomatology of Allergic Rhinitis

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    Lourenço, Edmir Américo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The relevance of allergic rhinitis is unquestionable. This condition affects people's quality of life and its incidence has increased over the last years. Objective Thus, this study aims to analyze the effectiveness of subcutaneous injectable immunotherapy in cases of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea and nasal congestion in allergic rhinitis patients. Methods In the present study, the same researcher analyzed the records of 281 patients. Furthermore, the researchers identified allergens through puncture cutaneous tests using standardized extracts containing acari, fungi, pet hair, flower pollen, and feathers. Then, the patients underwent treatment with subcutaneous specific immunotherapy, using four vaccine vials for desensitization, associated with environmental hygiene. The authors analyzed conditions of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea, and nasal congestion throughout the treatment, and assigned them with a score ranging from zero (0, meaning absence of these symptoms to three (3, for severe cases. The symptoms were statistically compared in the beginning, during, and after treatment. Results In this study, authors analyzed the cases distribution according to age and the evolution of symptomatology according to the scores, comparing all phases of treatment. The average score for the entire population studied was 2.08 before treatment and 0.44 at the end. These results represent an overall improvement of ∼79% in symptomatology of allergic rhinitis in the studied population. Conclusion The subcutaneous immunotherapy as treatment of allergic rhinitis led to a reduction in all symptoms studied, improving the quality of life of patients, proving itself as an important therapeutic tool for these pathological conditions.

  6. Benefit of SLIT and SCIT for Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma.

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    Passalacqua, Giovanni; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Bagnasco, Diego

    2016-11-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been in use since more than one century, when Leonard Noon experimentally proved its efficacy in hayfever (Noon, in Lancet 1:1572-3, 1911). Since then, AIT was administered only as subcutaneous injections (SCIT) until the sublingual route (SLIT) was proposed in 1986. The use of SLIT was proposed following several surveys from the USA and UK that repeatedly reported fatalities due to SCIT (Lockey et al. in J Allergy Clin Immunol 75(1): 166, 1985; Lockey et al. in J Allergy Clin Immunol 660-77, 1985; Committee on the safety of medicines. CSM update. Desensitizing vaccines. Br Med J, 293: 948, 1986). These reports raised serious concerns about the safety and the risk/benefit ratio of AIT. Many cases of life-threatening events with SCIT were due to avoidable human errors in administration, but a relevant fraction of them remained unexplained and unpredictable (Aaronson and Gandhi in J Allergy Clin Immunol 113: 1117-21, 2014). Subsequently, in a few years, SLIT gained credibility and was included in the official documents and guidelines (Table 1) (Bousquet et al. in J Allergy Clin Immunol 108(5 Supp):S146-S150, 2001; Canonica et al. in Allergy 64 (Supp 91):1-59, 2009) as a viable alternative to traditional SCIT. Of note, the local bronchial (aerosol) and the intranasal route of administration were attempted after the 1970s as alternatives to SCIT: the bronchial route was soon abandoned due to the poor efficacy and/or side effects, and the local nasal route, although effective and safe, was judged substantially impractical (Canonica and Passalacqua in J Allergy Clin Immunol 111: 437-48, 2003). In contrast to SCIT, SLIT was tested in very large clinical trials (need references), including hundreds of patients and with dose-ranging experimental designs, so that some products (tablets) for grass, mite, and ragweed were officially approved as commercial drugs by regulatory agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration and the European

  7. Treatment of respiratory allergy with allergy immunotherapy tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachert, C

    2011-07-01

    Allergy immunotherapy tablets (AIT) have expanded the treatment options for patients suffering from respiratory allergies. Efficacy is established in adults and children for two different commercially available grass AITs. The ALK grass AIT has an efficacy comparable to subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT), with a proven disease-modifying effect after treatment completion. Safety profiles favour AIT over SCIT. Studies suggest that tablets in all aspects are superior to sublingual drops. AITs for other allergies including house dust mite and birch and ragweed pollen are in development. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Development of a hypoallergenic recombinant parvalbumin for first-in-man subcutaneous immunotherapy of fish allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Huber, Hans; Swoboda, Ines; Rigby, Neil; Versteeg, Serge A.; Jensen, Bettina M.; Quaak, Suzanne; Akkerdaas, Jaap H.; Blom, Lars; Asturias, Juan; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Bernardi, Maria L.; Clausen, Michael; Ferrara, Rosa; Hauer, Martina; Heyse, Jet; Kopp, Stephan; Kowalski, Marek L.; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Maderegger, Bernhard; Maillere, Bernard; Mari, Adriano; Martinez, Alberto; Mills, E. N. Clare; Neubauer, Angela; Nicoletti, Claudio; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Portoles, Antonio; Ranta-Panula, Ville; Santos-Magadan, Sara; Schnoor, Heidi J.; Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig T.; Stahl-Skov, Per; Stavroulakis, George; Stegfellner, Georg; Vázquez-Cortés, Sonia; Witten, Marianne; Stolz, Frank; Poulsen, Lars K.; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Valenta, Rudolf; van Ree, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The FAST (food allergy-specific immunotherapy) project aims at developing safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy for fish allergy, using recombinant hypoallergenic carp parvalbumin, Cyp c 1. Preclinical characterization and good manufacturing practice (GMP) production of mutant Cyp (mCyp) c

  9. Development of a Hypoallergenic Recombinant Parvalbumin for First-in-Man Subcutaneous Immunotherapy of Fish Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Huber, Hans; Swoboda, Ines

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The FAST (food allergy-specific immunotherapy) project aims at developing safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy for fish allergy, using recombinant hypoallergenic carp parvalbumin, Cyp c 1. OBJECTIVES: Preclinical characterization and good manufacturing practice (GMP) production...... chromatography and mass spectrometry. Allergenicity was assessed by ImmunoCAP inhibition and basophil histamine release assay, immunogenicity by immunization of laboratory animals and stimulation of patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Reference molecules were purified wild-type Cyp c 1 (natural.......e. hypoallergenicity with retained immunogenicity. These results have warranted first-in-man immunotherapy studies to evaluate the safety of this innovative vaccine. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel....

  10. Allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy in allergic asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... efficacy in asthmatic patients. Herein, the immunoregulatory mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of SIT are discussed with the ultimate aim to improve its treatment efficacy. Keywords: allergic asthma; immunotherapy; dendritic cell; regulatory T cells; Th2 lymphocytes; hyperresponsiveness; eosinophilia; IgE; IL-10 ...

  11. New Horizons in Allergen Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    importance as the allergen that is most often implicated as a trigger for asthma and perennial allergic rhinitis on aworldwide basis. Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) using HDM allergen for both asthma and allergic rhinitis,4-6 and a smallernumberof studies......,theresults ofthestudybyVirchow et al are important and clinically relevant. In particular, instead of themorecommonapproach of studying patientswith milder asthma or those with only allergic rhinitis, this trial focused on themore challenging subset of patientswith asthma, thosewith inadequatesymptomcontrol despite......, these adherence rates are similar to those seen with SCIT and even with long-term pharmacotherapy for allergic disease and asthma.17 SLIT is currently approved for numerous allergens by the European regulatory authorities and is inwide use throughout Europe. In 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration announced...

  12. Long-term effects of allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy for house dust mite induced allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, E; Dizdar, D; Dinc, M E; Cirik, A A

    2017-10-17

    Allergic rhinitis is strongly associated with the presence of house dust mites. This study investigated the long-term effects of allergen-specific immunotherapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was applied over three years. The study was based on a 10-year follow up of patients with allergic rhinitis. The study was conducted between 2001 and 2015. Skin prick test results and symptom scores were evaluated before (26 patients) and after 3 years (20 patients) of allergen-specific immunotherapy (using data from a previously published study), and 10 years after allergen-specific immunotherapy had ended (20 of 26 patients). The symptom scores before allergen-specific immunotherapy were significantly higher than those obtained after 3 years of allergen-specific immunotherapy and 10 years after allergen-specific immunotherapy (p 0.0175). Subcutaneous immunotherapy is an effective treatment for house dust mite induced allergic rhinitis.

  13. Adverse Events During Immunotherapy Against Grass Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Dalhoff, Kim Peder; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) triggered by grass pollen is a common disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. Treatment consists of symptom-alleviating drugs, such as topical corticosteroids or antihistamines. Another option is potentially curative immunotherapy, currently available as sublingual...... and subcutaneous treatment. We investigated the potential differences in the prevalence and severity of adverse events related to subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) against grass pollen-induced AR. A thorough literature search was performed with PubMed and EMBASE. The findings were compared...... no systematically collected safety data. No sufficiently powered randomized trials comparing sublingual and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) were available, but general safety assessments indicate that sublingual tablet treatment is safer than subcutaneous treatment. Not all commonly used immunotherapy drugs...

  14. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic respiratory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Antonio; Durham, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy involves the repeated administration of allergen products in order to induce clinical and immunologic tolerance to the offending allergen. Immunotherapy is the only etiology-based treatment that has the potential for disease modification, as reflected by longterm remission following its discontinuation and possibly prevention of disease progression and onset of new allergic sensitizations. Whereas subcutaneous immunotherapy is of proven value in allergic rhinitis and asthma there is a risk of untoward side effects including rarely anaphylaxis. Recently the sublingual route has emerged as an effective and safer alternative. Whereas the efficacy of SLIT in seasonal allergy is now well-documented in adults and children, the available data for perennial allergies and asthma is less reliable and particularly lacking in children. This review evaluates the efficacy, safety and longterm benefits of SCIT and SLIT and highlights new findings regarding mechanisms, potential biomarkers and recent novel approaches for allergen immunotherapy. PMID:23095870

  15. Basophil sensitivity through CD63 or CD203c is a functional measure for specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahl Ronald

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subcutaneous Immunotherapy (SCIT modifies the allergic response and relieves allergic symptoms. SCIT is the only and a very effective treatment for insect venom allergy. We hypothesized that basophil sensitivity, measured through the basophil activation test, would decrease during SCIT up dosing. Expression of CD203c was compared to CD63 as marker for basophil activation, using a Bland Altman plot and ROC curves. Methods Patients (n = 18 starting subcutaneous SCIT for wasp allergy with an up dosing scheme of 7 to 11 weeks were enrolled. Heparinised blood samples were drawn at weeks 1-4, 7 and at the first maintenance visit. Basophils were stimulated at 7 log dilutions of V. vespula allergen for 15 min, and were stained with CD203c and CD63. Basophils were identified as CD203c+ leukocytes, and the proportion of CD63+ and CD203c+ cells were plotted against allergen concentration. A sigmoid curve was fitted to the points, and the allergen concentration at which half of the maximal activation was achieved, LC50, was calculated. In another series of experiments, LC50 calculated in whole blood (AP was subtracted from LC50 calculated with basophils suspended in plasma from a nonatopic donor (HS to determine the protective effect of soluble factors in blood of patients treated with SCIT. Results Heparin blood basophil activation was similar through CD63 and CD203c. Basophils were significantly more sensitized three weeks after initiation of SCIT compared to baseline (p Conclusion Basophil activation is a versatile and sensitive tool that measures changes in the humoral immune response to allergen during SCIT.

  16. Savings associated with high-dose hypoallergenic house dust mite immunotherapy in rhinitis and/or asthma patients in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Robaina JC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available José Carlos García Robaina,1 Carlos Polanco Sánchez,2 Elvira Estella Pérez,2 1Allergy Department, University Hospital Nuestra Señora de Candelaria, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, 2Health Economics & Outcomes Research, Corporate Affairs, Merck S.L., Madrid, Spain Objectives: To quantify the cost difference between conventional symptomatic treatment of mite allergy and specific subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT. Methods: Observational, retrospective, and multicenter study was carried out in Spain in 2013. The medical records of 419 patients diagnosed with rhinitis and/or bronchial asthma for mite allergy were retrieved. Mean age was 24.9 years (standard deviation 14.4. The use of symptomatic medication (rescue and daily, diagnostic tests, unscheduled medical care, and sick leave days associated with SCIT treatment versus no-SCIT treatment was compared. Also measured was the SCIT treatment to no-SCIT treatment costs ratio: used resources (symptomatic medication, unscheduled medical care, diagnostic tests, and 3 years SCIT treatment and sick leave days were quantified in euros. Efficacy (decreased resource usage of first-year treatment was assumed during the remaining 2 years and also during the 3-year follow-up period. Results: After a single year of SCIT, all quantified resources diminished significantly (P<0.05 from baseline. Estimated reduction in cost items included hospital resources (100% in hospitalizations, 82% in visits to the allergist, and 79% in emergency room visits, therapies (56% in rescue medication and 63% in daily medication, diagnostic tests (77%, and sick leave days (94%. Ratio of comparative calculation described as SCIT treatment versus non-SCIT treatment (or conventional symptomatic treatment is 0.8. Conclusion: Direct costs are reduced by 64% and indirect costs by 94%. SCIT of hypoallergenic preparation of dust mite (Acaroid® allows cost savings versus conventional treatment. Estimated savings for the public National Health

  17. Allergen immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and/or asthma: an umbrella review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jesse; Kelly, Shannon E; Johnston, Amy; Skidmore, Becky; Gomes, Tara; Wells, George A

    2017-05-10

    Allergic rhinitis and asthma are important public health concerns, yet there is no consensus about the benefits and harms of allergen-specific immunotherapy to treat these conditions. We performed an umbrella review of systematic reviews summarizing the current evidence for the benefits and harms of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library and the grey literature from Jan. 1, 2010 to Nov. 20, 2016 for systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials or prospectively controlled studies involving children or adults with allergic rhinitis or asthma. Outcomes were summarized narratively (benefits: total combined symptom-medication score, symptom score, medication score, disease-specific quality of life, adherence; harms: anaphylaxis, death, local and systemic reactions). Twenty-three systematic reviews were included. SCIT and SLIT were more effective than placebo for most outcomes. SCIT was better than SLIT at improving medication and symptom scores, with no differences in quality of life; however, data were limited for this comparison. Anaphylaxis and death were infrequently reported. Few reviews assessed benefits or harms among children. Allergen immunotherapy appears to be effective among patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. The safety of allergen immunotherapy is not conclusively established, although death and anaphylaxis appear to be rare. PROSPERO no.: CRD42015024590. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  18. Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Immunotherapy to Treat Cancer Immunotherapy is a type of ... from living organisms to treat cancer. What is Immunotherapy? View this video on YouTube. Types of Immunotherapy ...

  19. Basophil expression of diamine oxidase: a novel biomarker of allergen immunotherapy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohamed H; Layhadi, Janice A; Scadding, Guy W; Cheung, Delica K M; Calderon, Moises A; Turka, Laurence A; Phippard, Deborah; Durham, Stephen R

    2015-04-01

    Immunotherapy inhibits basophil histamine release, but the assay is cumbersome, and no one has studied the effects of immunotherapy withdrawal. Intracellular fluorochrome-labeled diamine oxidase (DAO) was used as a novel functional readout of basophil histamine release after immunotherapy. Results were compared with conventional basophil surface expression of activation markers. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT)-treated patients (n = 14), sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT)-treated patients (n = 12), participants who completed 3 years of treatment with grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy (the SLIT-TOL group; n = 6), patients with untreated seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR; n = 24), and nonatopic control subjects (n = 12) were studied. Intracellularly labeled DAO(+) and surface expression of CD203c(bright), CD63(+), and CD107a(+) on chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 lymphocytes (CRTh2)-positive basophils were measured by means of flow cytometry. Serum IgG4 levels and serum inhibitory activity for IgE-allergen complex binding to B cells (IgE-FAB) and basophil histamine release were also determined. Proportions of allergen-stimulated DAO(+)CRTh2(+) basophils were higher in participants in the SCIT, SLIT, and SLIT-TOL groups (all P pollen immunotherapy. Intracellularly labeled DAO expression by basophils merits further investigation as a surrogate biomarker for monitoring efficacy and tolerance after immunotherapy. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Benefits and risks of the subcutaneous immunotherapy with acari extracts in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpio Rodríguez-Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The records of patients from the Allergology Service in the Previsora Policlinic, Camagüey were revised to evaluate benefits and risks of the subcutaneous immunotherapy (ITSC with extracts of acari. The study was observational, analytic and retrospective of cases and controls in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma. A total of 160 subjects, older than 18 years old, were chosen. Eighty out of them had already received ITSC with dose increase during 13 weeks and maintenance with monthly injections during 18 months. A total of 80 patients who only received prevention measures and medications during the crises were paired. Questionnaires were applied for quality of rhinoconjunctivitis life and asthma, about the consumption of medications and the frequency of the crises. The adverse events were measured, as they were local and systemic to the cutaneous tests, to the ITSC and the different pharmacological treatments. There was a significant increase of the punctuation of life quality questionnaires, (p=0.011. The consumption of medications decreased in both the cases and the controls, without significant differences (p=0.083. The frequency of the rhinitis and asthma crises decrease in the group of ITSC (p=0.029. Slight local and systemic reactions were reported in both groups with Odds ratio (OR=2.029 in the ITSC group, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.114–3.967 (p=0.019. The results show that the subcutaneous immunotherapy with acari offers benefits and few risks to patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma.

  1. Safety of accelerated schedules of subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy with house dust mite extract in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Sung, Joon-Mo; Lee, Jin-Woo; Choi, Gil-Soon; Nahm, Dong-Ho

    2011-09-01

    The safety of accelerated schedules of allergen immunotherapy (ASAI) in patients with bronchial asthma (BA) has been reported but there are little data on the safety of ASAI for patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). In this study, we investigated the safety of ASAI in patients with AD. Sixty patients with AD and 18 patients with BA sensitized to house dust mites (HDM) were studied. A maximum maintenance dose of HDM extract, adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide, was administered to patients by subcutaneous injection with either a 3-day protocol (rush immunotherapy) or 1-day protocol (ultra-rush immunotherapy). Systemic reactions were observed 4 of 15 patients (26.7%) with AD during rush immunotherapy, 13 of 45 patients (28.9%) with AD during ultra-rush immunotherapy, and 4 of 18 patients (22.2%) with BA during rush immunotherapy (P > 0.05). No severe or near fatal systemic reactions occurred in 78 subjects of this study. Systemic reactions developed within 4 hr after administration of the maximum allergen dose in 20 of 21 patients (95.2%) with AD and BA who showed systemic reactions during rush or ultra-rush immunotherapy. In conclusion, ASAI was safe and well tolerated in patients with AD. ASAI can be a useful therapeutic option for AD.

  2. Citizens Science for Sustainability (SuScit) Project Briefing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eames, Malcolm; Mortensen, Jonas Egmose; Adebowale, Maria

    This project briefing gives a short overview of the Citizens Science for Sustainability (SuScit) Project.......This project briefing gives a short overview of the Citizens Science for Sustainability (SuScit) Project....

  3. Network meta-analysis shows commercialized subcutaneous and sublingual grass products have comparable efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Harold; Cartier, Shannon; Allen-Ramey, Felicia; Lawton, Simon; Calderon, Moises A

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) have been shown to effectively treat grass pollen allergies, although direct comparisons are sparse. To estimate the relative efficacy of SLIT tablets compared with SCIT and SLIT drops in commercially available products though network meta-analysis. A literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library publications. Randomized, double-blind clinical trials of SCIT, SLIT drops, and SLIT tablets for grass pollen were included. Bayesian network meta-analyses estimated the standardized mean difference (SMD) across 3 immunotherapy modalities on allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptom and medication score data from publications or received from authors. Both fixed and random effects models were investigated. Thirty-seven studies were included in meta-analyses for symptom scores and 31 studies for medication scores. In the random effects model, SCIT and SLIT tablets were significantly different from placebo for symptom scores: SMDs (95% CI) of -0.32 (-0.45 to -0.18) and -0.32 (-0.41 to -0.23), respectively. No significant difference was identified for SLIT drops compared with placebo (SMD, -0.17; -0.37 to 0.04). For medication scores, significant differences compared with placebo were observed for SCIT (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.52 to -0.13), SLIT tablets (SMD, -0.23; 95% CI, -0.29 to -0.17), and SLIT drops (SMD, -0.44; 95% CI, -0.83 to -0.06). Network meta-analysis revealed no significant differences in SMDs (95% credible interval) for symptom scores (0.0145 [-0.19 to 0.23]) or medication scores (0.133 [-0.31 to 0.57]) between SLIT tablets and SCIT, or for symptom scores (-0.175 [-0.37 to 0.02]) and medication scores (0.188 [-0.18 to 0.56]) between SLIT tablets and SLIT drops. The comparisons for grass pollen immunotherapy products commercialized in at least 1 country indicate comparable reductions in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms and supplemental medication use for SLIT tablets

  4. Persistence and evolution of allergen-specific IgE repertoires during subcutaneous specific immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Mattias; King, Jasmine J.; Glanville, Jacob; Jackson, Katherine J. L.; Looney, Timothy J.; Hoh, Ramona A.; Mari, Adriano; Andersson, Morgan; Greiff, Lennart; Fire, Andrew Z.; Boyd, Scott D.; Ohlin, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Background Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment with proven long-term curative potential in allergic disease. Allergen-specific IgE is the causative agent of allergic disease, and antibodies contribute to SIT, but the effects of SIT on aeroallergen-specific B cell repertoires are not well understood. Objective To characterize the IgE sequences expressed by allergen-specific B cells, and track the fate of these B cell clones during SIT. Methods We have used high-throughput antibody gene sequencing and identification of allergen-specific IgE using combinatorial antibody fragment library technology to analyze immunoglobulin repertoires of blood and nasal mucosa of aeroallergen-sensitized individuals before and during the first year of subcutaneous SIT. Results Of 52 distinct allergen-specific IgE heavy chains from eight allergic donors, 37 were also detected by high-throughput antibody gene sequencing of blood, nasal mucosa, or both sample types. The allergen-specific clones had increased persistence, higher likelihood of belonging to clones expressing other switched isotypes, and possibly larger clone size than the rest of the IgE repertoire. Clone members in nasal tissue showed close mutational relationships. Conclusion Combining functional binding studies, deep antibody repertoire sequencing, and information on clinical outcomes in larger studies may in the future aid assessment of SIT mechanisms and efficacy. PMID:26559321

  5. Allergen immunotherapy for house dust mite: clinical efficacy and immunological mechanisms in allergic rhinitis and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifan, Aarif O; Calderon, Moises A; Durham, Stephen R

    2013-11-01

    There is an increasing prevalence of atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma with house dust mite (HDM) being the common allergen that is highly associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma. Allergen avoidance and pharmacotherapy are part of treatment but it has proved difficult to change the course of HDM-related allergic diseases. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been in use for the past century and has been shown to be effective in the treatment of allergic respiratory disease. This review exclusively focuses on HDM-AIT and discusses the differences in clinical efficacy and safety, long-term effect after discontinuation and immunological changes observed in both HDM-subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and HDM-sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma in both pediatric and adult populations. The majority of studies involved small numbers of patients, variable doses of major allergens and are of variable quality. There is good evidence for HDM-SCIT efficacy and its long-term effect in adults and children, whereas at the present time, evidence for HDM-SLIT is unconvincing, particularly in children. In carefully selected patients, HDM-SCIT is effective and safe. More definitive trials are needed before HDM-SLIT can be recommended in routine practice for rhinitis and/or asthma.

  6. IN SUBJECTS ALLERGIC TO GRASS POLLEN, BASOPHIL SENSITIVITY DECREASES DURING SUBCUTANEOUS IMMUNOTHERAPY DUE TO BOTH HUMORAL FACTORS AND CELLULAR DESENSITIZATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Johannes Martin; Dahl, Ronald; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Johannes Martin Schmid, Ronald Dahl, and Hans Juergen Hoffmann Department of Respiratory Medicine, Aarhus, Denmark Background: The major effect of SCIT is a change in allergen specific immunoglobulin. We measure the contribution of competing immunoglobulin to the effect of SCIT in patients......X with an about six-fold decrease in cellular sensitivity. Conclusion: We found an increasing protective effect of SCIT after 1 year of treatment measured by basophil activation test. During the early treatment period, this effect is primarily based on a shift towards protecting IgX, while there seems...

  7. [Role of allergen-specific immunotherapy (desensitization) for the treatment of allergies in Germany. Current situation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine-Tebbe, J; Ackermann-Simon, J; Hanf, G

    2012-03-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT, desensitization) is applied monthly with subcutaneous injections (SCIT) or sublingually (SLIT) with droplets or tablets on a daily basis. Numerous immunological changes during SIT induce long-lasting tolerance. Efficacy has been demonstrated by a number of controlled studies for insect venom hypersensitivity (SCIT), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (SCIT, SLIT particularly in grass pollen allergy), and allergic asthma (SCIT > SLIT). SIT is indicated in children and adults with severe allergic reactions from insect venoms (e.g., bee, wasp) or cumbersome symptoms from pollen, house dust mites or mold allergens and proven immediated-type allergy. Contraindications must be considered individually. SIT is performed for 3 years, in case of venom allergy 3-5 years. Severe systemic reactions are rare after SCIT. After SLIT rather local allergic symptoms of short duration occur in the mouth and throat. At present, the number prescriptions for SIT has decreased due to inadequate reimbursement of allergy-related services (diagnostics, therapies, monitoring). In the future, inferior medical care of allergic patients in Germany is expected, who until now have benefited from the preventive effects of SIT (reduced risk of developing asthma and new allergic sensitizations).

  8. Specific immunotherapy-indications and mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehler, Randolf; Klimek, Ludger; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar; Christian Virchow, Johann

    2013-03-01

    It is estimated that up to 24% of the population in Germany suffers from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and 5% from allergic asthma. Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is closely related to other atopic diseases. This review is based on pertinent publications retrieved by a selective search of the Medline database, guidelines from Germany and abroad, and Cochrane meta-analyses. Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only diseases-modifying treatment option for allergies. Meta-analysis reveals standardized mean differences in allergic rhinitis symptom scores of -0.73 for subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and -0.49 for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT); the corresponding mean differences in medication scores are -0.57 and -0.32, respectively. The treatment should be carried out for at least three years. It is indicated when the symptoms are severe and allergen avoidance is not a realistic option. The efficacy of treatment depends on the allergen dose; thus, every allergen preparation should be evaluated individually, independent of route of administration. SCIT can cause systemic adverse effects, including anaphylaxis. SLIT is safer but often causes allergic symptoms of the oral mucosa at the beginning of treatment. Even though the efficacy of SIT is well documented, it is still underused. SIT should be offered as standard treatment to patients suffering from allergic rhinitis.

  9. Efficacy and safety of subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy with depigmented polymerized mite extract in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Natalija; Bieber, Thomas; Hoffmann, Matthias; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Homey, Bernhard; Werfel, Thomas; Sager, Angelika; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2012-10-01

    Exposure to house dust mites (HDMs) aggravates the course of atopic dermatitis (AD) in patients sensitized to HDMs. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy with the use of depigmented polymerized mite extract as an add-on therapy to basic (ie, topical and, as necessary, systemic) medication. Patients (n = 168) were recruited in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel group phase III study conducted in Germany (21 sites), in adult patients with AD aggravated by HDMs. The primary end points of the study were the assessments of the area under the curves of the total Severity Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) score and of the use of basic medication during the 18-month treatment period. Post hoc subgroup analyses were also performed. Overall efficacy analysis of the intention-to-treat and per-protocol study populations showed no statistically significant differences between the active treatment and placebo groups. However, the subgroup of patients with severe AD (SCORAD > 50) showed a statistically significant reduction of the median total SCORAD by 18% (P = .02) compared with placebo. The frequency of adverse reactions was similar in both groups, suggesting the safety of the active treatment. Although subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy showed no statistically significant difference in the overall population of patients with AD, statistically significant reduction of the total SCORAD could be achieved in a subgroup of patients with severe AD. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of effectiveness of specific subcutaneous immunotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Zandkarimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergen immunotherapy involves the administration of gradually increasing quantities of specific allergens to patients with IgE-mediated conditions until a dose is reached that is effective in reducing disease severity from natural exposure. This study evaluated the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy with extracts of common aeroallergens North-East of Iran in asthma and allergic rhinitis. Material and Methods: In this prospective study 156 cases were chosen randomley. The mean age of patients was 37 years (range 5-65 years. The patients with mild to moderate asthma and allergic rhinitis and history of atopy were selected for immunotherapy when they showed no effective response to medical treatment.Immunotherapy materials were made from common aeroallergens in north-eastern region of Iran by Dome Hollister US company. Immunotherapy schedule for injection of the extract with vial dilution of 1:10000pg was one injection every week for ten weeks and one injection with dilution of 1:1000pg every other week for the other ten weeks and one injection monthly from dilution of 1:100pg for two years. Results: One hundred twenty (77% of cases had allergic rhinitis 29(18.5% cases had allergic asthma and 7(4.5% cases were mixed. Mean age of patients were 37 years old. 48(30.8% cases were male. Analysis of efficacy of treatment showed that immunotherapy significantlyimproved the signs and symptoms of all the groups. In allergic rhinitis group 84(70% cases completely improved, 22(18.4% patients moderately responded and no response to immunotherapy was observed in 14(11.6% patients. In allergic asthma group, 22(75% cases completely improved 4(13.6% cases moderately responded and no response to immunotherapy was detected in 3(11.4% cases. In mixed group, 3(42.8% cases completely improved, 3(42.8% cases moderately responded and no response was observed in 1(14.4% case. Conclusion: Specific allergen immunotherapy for patients with allergic persistent

  11. Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kirsten Skamstrup; Khinchi, Marianne Søndergaard; Skov, Per Stahl

    2004-01-01

    Conflicting results concerning the effect of specific pollen immunotherapy (SIT) on allergy to plant foods have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SIT using a birch pollen extract on food allergy with focus on allergy to apple. Seventy-four birch pollen......-allergic patients were included in a double-blind, double-dummy, and placebo-controlled comparison of sublingual-swallow (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT) administration of a birch pollen extract. Sixty-nine percent of these patients reported allergy to apple. The clinical reactivity to apple was evaluated by open....... Therefore, oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to apple should not be considered as a main criterion for selecting patients for birch pollen immunotherapy at present....

  12. The number of FceRI receptors on basophils decreases during subcutaneous immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, J. M.; Dahl, R.; Hoffmann, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only disease modifying treatment of allergic diseases. It induces complex cellular and humoral changes leading to an inhibition of type-1 allergic reactions. Method: Twenty four young grass pollen allergic adults suffering from seasonal rhino...

  13. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Driskill, Brent R; Clenney, Timothy L; Gessler, Eric M

    2015-10-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a condition that has an allergic basis caused by exposure to fungi in the sinonasal tract leading to chronic inflammation. Despite standard treatment modalities, which typically include surgery and medical management of allergies, patients still have a high rate of recurrence. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been used as adjuvant treatment for AFS. Evidence exists to support the use of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) as a safe and efficacious method of treating allergies, but no studies have assessed the utility of SLIT in the management of allergic fungal sinusitis. A record review of cases of AFS that are currently or previously treated with sublingual immunotherapy from 2007 to 2011 was performed. Parameters of interest included serum IgE levels, changes in symptoms, Lund-McKay scores, decreased sensitization to fungal allergens associated with AFS, and serum IgE levels. Ten patients with diagnosed AFS were treated with SLIT. No adverse effects related to the use of SLIT therapy were identified. Decreases in subjective complaints, exam findings, Lund-McKay scores, and serum IgE levels were observed. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy appears to be a safe adjunct to the management of AFS that may improve patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Budget impact analysis of two immunotherapy products for treatment of grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rønborg SM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Steen M Rønborg,1 Ulrik G Svendsen,2 Jesper S Micheelsen,3 Lars Ytte,4 Jakob N Andreasen,5 Lars Ehlers61The Pulmonology and Allergy Clinic of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 2Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, 3Private ENT practice, Aalborg, 4General Practice Aalborg, 5ALK, Hørsholm, 6Aalborg University, Aalborg, DenmarkBackground: Grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis constitutes a large burden for society. Up to 20% of European and United States (US populations suffer from respiratory allergies, including grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. The majority of patients are treated with symptomatic medications; however, a large proportion remains uncontrolled despite use of such treatments. Specific immunotherapy is the only treatment documented to target the underlying cause of the disease, leading to a sustained effect after completion of treatment. The aim of this study was to compare the economic consequences of treating patients suffering from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with either a grass allergy immunotherapy tablet (AIT or subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT.Methods: A budget impact analysis was applied comparing SQ-standardized grass AIT (Grazax®; Phleum pratense, 75,000 SQ-T/2,800 BAU; ALK, Denmark with SCIT (Alutard®; P. pratense, 100,000 SQ-U/mL; ALK, Denmark. Budget impact analysis included health care utilization measured in physical units based on systematic literature reviews, guidelines, and expert opinions, as well as valuation in unit costs based on drug tariffs, physician fees, and wage statistics. Budget impact analysis was conducted from a Danish health care perspective.Results: Treating patients suffering from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with grass AIT instead of grass SCIT resulted in a total reduction in treatment costs of €1291 per patient during a treatment course. This cost saving implies that approximately 40% more patients could be treated with grass AIT per year without influencing the cost of

  15. The safety and efficacy of subcutaneous birch pollen immunotherapy - a one-year, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtger, Uffe; Poulsen, L K; Jacobi, H H

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is only very limited documentation of the efficacy and safety of high-dose subcutaneous birch pollen immunotherapy (IT) in double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) studies. Birch pollen is a major cause of allergic morbidity in northern Europe and in eastern parts of North America...

  16. The safety and efficacy of subcutaneous birch pollen immunotherapy - a one-year, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtger, U; Poulsen, Lars K.; Jacobi, H H

    2002-01-01

    There is only very limited documentation of the efficacy and safety of high-dose subcutaneous birch pollen immunotherapy (IT) in double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) studies. Birch pollen is a major cause of allergic morbidity in northern Europe and in eastern parts of North America....

  17. Immunotherapy with subcutaneous immunogenic autologous tumor lysate increases murine glioblastoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmans, Jochen; Van Woensel, Matthias; Creyns, Brecht; Dejaegher, Joost; Bullens, Dominique M; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2017-10-24

    Immunotherapeutic strategies for glioblastoma, the most frequent malignant primary brain tumor, aim to improve its disastrous consequences. On top of the standard treatment, one strategy uses T cell activation by autologous dendritic cells (DC) ex vivo loaded with tumor lysate to attack remaining cancer cells. Wondering whether 'targeting' in vivo DCs could replace these ex vivo ones, immunogenic autologous tumor lysate was used to treat glioma-inoculated mice in the absence of ex vivo loaded DCs. Potential immune mechanisms were studied in two orthotopic, immunocompetent murine glioma models. Pre-tumoral subcutaneous lysate treatment resulted in a survival benefit comparable to subcutaneous DC therapy. Focussing on the immune response, glioma T cell infiltration was observed in parallel with decreased amounts of regulatory T cells. Moreover, these results were accompanied by the presence of strong tumor-specific immunological memory, shown by complete survival of a second glioblastoma tumor, inoculated 100 days after the first one. Finally, in combination with temozolomide, survival of established glioma in mice could be increased. Our results show the potential of immunogenic autologous tumor lysate used to treat murine glioblastoma, which will be worthwhile to study in clinical trials as it has potential as a cost-efficient adjuvant treatment strategy for gliomas.

  18. Immunotherapy is allergen-specific: a double-blind trial of mite or timothy extract in mite and grass dual-allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreborg, S; Lee, T H; Kay, A B; Durham, S R

    2012-01-01

    One hundred years ago, Noon [Lancet 1911;1:1572-1573], using conjunctival provocation testing (CPT), was the first to demonstrate the effectiveness of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) in grass-allergic subjects with hay fever. In this centenary year, we present data that, by use of CPT and allergen-specific IgG, replicate this observation and additionally confirm the allergen specificity of SCIT by using a double-blind design employing either grass or mite SCIT in dual grass- and mite-allergic individuals. Twenty adults (11 females) with perennial rhinoconjunctivitis and exacerbation of symptoms during the grass pollen season and in the autumn had immediate skin and conjunctival sensitivity and raised specific IgE to both Dermatophagoides farinae and Phleum pratense. Participants were randomly assigned to either timothy or D. farinae immunotherapy for 3 years. CPT and specific IgG tests to both allergens were performed annually. After 3 years, subjects gave their blinded overall evaluation. Six mild-to-moderate general reactions occurred in 2 timothy- and 4 mite-treated patients. Four of these patients and 2 other patients withdrew from the study. Seven patients in each group completed the study. After 3 years of immunotherapy, the timothy CPT threshold concentration had increased 16- fold in timothy-treated patients (p < 0.05; between-group change, p < 0.05). The increase in the mite CPT threshold in mite- compared to grass-treated patients was 31-fold (p < 0.05). The overall assessment of conjunctival sensitivity was highly significant in favour of treatment (p < 0.015), as was that of allergen-specific IgG (p < 0.0001). Allergen immunotherapy is allergen species-specific, as judged by decreased conjunctival sensitivity and changes in allergen-specific IgG concentrations. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Position paper prepared by the Section of Immunotherapy, Polish Society of Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Jutel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available SLIT ([i]sublingual immunotherapy[/i], induces allergen-specific immune tolerance by sublingual administration of a gradually increasing dose of an allergen. The mechanism of SLIT is comparable to those during SCIT (subcutaneous immunotherapy, with the exception of local oral dendritic cells, pre-programmed to elicit tolerance. In the SLIT dose, to achieve the same efficacy as in SCIT, it should be 50–100 times higher with better safety profile. The highest quality evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT lasting 1 – 3 years has been provided by the large scale double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC trials for grass pollen extracts, both in children and adults with allergic rhinitis. Current indications for SLIT are allergic rhinitis (and conjunctivitis in both children and adults sensitized to pollen allergens (trees, grass, [i]Parietaria[/i], house dust mites ([i]Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae[/i], cat fur, as well as mild to moderate controlled atopic asthma in children sensitized to house dust mites. There are positive findings for both asthma and new sensitization prevention. Severe adverse events, including anaphylaxis, are very rare, and no fatalities have been reported. Local adverse reactions develop in up to 70 – 80% of patients. Risk factors for SLIT adverse events have not been clearly identified. Risk factors of non-adherence to treatment might be dependent on the patient, disease treatment, physician-patient relationship, and variables in the health care system organization.

  20. Optimal duration of allergen immunotherapy in children with dust mite respiratory allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroabarren, Esozia; Tabar, Ana I; Echechipía, Susana; Cambra, Koldo; García, Blanca E; Alvarez-Puebla, Maria J

    2015-02-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) discontinuation data in children remain scarce. We sought for differences in the clinical efficacy of 3 vs. 5 yr of SCIT in children with dust mite respiratory allergy. We performed a 5-yr, phase IV prospective study. After the first year, the patients were randomized to 3 (IT3) or 5 yr of treatment (IT5). Efficacy was assessed at 3rd and 5th year by symptom and medication scores and visual analog scales (VAS). Skin tests with common allergens and in vitro assessments were also performed. Eighty-one children (mean age: 9 yr) were randomly assigned to 3 (IT3: 41) or 5 yr (IT5: 40) of immunotherapy. After 3 years, rhinitis global scores decreased in IT3 (44%; p = 0.002) and in IT5 (50%; p = 0.001). Asthma global, symptom and medication scores decreased by 100% in IT3 (p = 0.001) and IT5 (p = 0.001). VAS scores also diminished significantly (IT3: 70%, p = 0.001; IT5: 62.5%; p = 0.001). At 5th year, global rhinitis scores were reduced an additional 30% in IT5 children. Comparisons between both groups did not show differences in rhinitis (p = 0.055), asthma global scores (p = 0.948) or VAS scores at 5th year. Twenty percent of IT5 (p = 0.002) and 7% of IT3 children (p = 0.705) developed new sensitizations. At 5th year, sIgG4 determinations decreased in IT3 without significant variations in IT5. Three years of SCIT induced significant improvement in children with dust mite respiratory allergy, but a 5-yr course added clinical improvement in rhinitis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A network dedicated to sciences dissemination : Scité

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botman, M.; Scité Network

    2005-11-01

    The activities of the network Scité are destined for the schools and the general public and include laboratories visits, training periods, seminars, conferences, adult courses specially designed for teachers, etc. Since 2002, collaborations between universities and enterprises are enhanced and developed to bring to light the variety of jobs linked to science and the multi-disciplinary process leading to industrial application of scientific findings. Activities will include, enterprises visits preparation of CD and video support presenting "passionate" jobs, and the set up of interactive workshops for students. Systematic relations and interactions with scientific as well as global media are established and formalised. Activities enhancing such interactions include the development of media-universities interface assuring the quality and the adequacy of scientific information transfer and vulgarisation. Based on the wide expertise accumulated through recent projects, Scité Network develop innovative activities involving a wide range of actors: universities, enterprises, media, schools, general public.

  2. Specific immunotherapy (SIT in the treatment of allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorenoi, Vitali

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Allergic rhinitis (AR exhibits a prevalence of approx. 20% in Germany and causes enormous costs in the health care system. Specific immunotherapy (SIT is considered to be the only potentially causal therapy for AR and mainly administered by two routes, subcutaneous (SCIT and sublinguale (SLIT. SIT promises a reduction of symptoms and the need for medication in patients with AR. Research questions: The question arises, to what extent is SIT effective and cost effective in the treatment of AR and which ethical-social and legal aspects have to be considered regarding its application. Methods: The literature search was accomplished in the electronic data bases MEDLINE, EMBASE etc. in February 2008. The medical evaluation was based on systematic reviews of blinded, randomised controlled studies (RCT. The economic evaluation included health-economic studies on the basis of RCT. Additionally, it was also searched for publications explicitly addressing ethical-social and legal aspects of the use of SIT. Results: Medical evaluationTwo reviews on SCIT and three on SLIT were included in the medical evaluation. For the evaluation of SIT with grass pollen results for short and medium-term effects are considered from several studies, for SIT with other seasonal allergens (e. g. tree pollen and with house dust mite allergens from clearly fewer studies and for SIT with other perennial allergens only from a few. The reviews report a significant reduction of the symptom and medication score in favour of SCIT with seasonal allergens and recognise the effectiveness at least for grass pollen allergens. Also for other seasonal allergens SCIT is appraised as effective. The reviews about SLIT determine a significant reduction of the symptom and the medication score in favour of SLIT vs. placebo in short and medium term follow-up in evaluations across all allergens. The subgroup analyses show a significant reduction of the symptom and medication

  3. First report of angio-oedema subsequent to the administration of allergen specific sublingual immunotherapy for the management of equine hypersensitivity dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Fiona M; Burrows, Amanda K; Muse, Russell

    2016-10-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) offers an alternative mode of allergen delivery to subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) with the aim of inducing immunological tolerance. Currently, there are no published reports regarding the efficacy or safety of SLIT in horses. To describe the first case of several adverse events occurring in a horse subsequent to the repeat administration of SLIT. A seven-year-old, warmblood mare with a confirmed diagnosis of equine hypersensitivity dermatitis (EHD). Immunotherapy was recommended for management of EHD. Due to the temperament of the horse, the owner elected to proceed with SLIT. Thirty six hours after commencing SLIT, the mare developed scleral oedema, moderate dyspnoea and abdominal discomfort. SLIT was withdrawn for 10 days and re instituted using a ten-fold dilution of the original vaccine. Localized oedema and swelling of the tongue developed within 12 h of administration. At this juncture, SLIT was withdrawn. The horse was rechallenged with the SLIT allergen vehicle, 50% glycerine and no adverse reactions occurred. SCIT was commenced using the same allergens and no adverse events occurred with repeated administration. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of adverse reactions developing subsequent to the administration of SLIT for the management of EHD. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  4. Math-free guides for glycerin and allergens at variable subcutaneous injection volumes: How's my dosing? Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Thomas J; Converse, Lorie M; Rekkerth, Donna J; Renahan, Kevin E

    2016-05-01

    Current summaries of effective maintenance dose ranges for subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) are based on administration of 0.5-mL volumes. Extract formulations delivering equivalent dose ranges for practices using different injection volumes have not been reported, and calculation of the final glycerin concentrations in these solutions remains an inconvenient and repetitive process. To create math-free guides for allergen doses and glycerin concentrations that identify the extract concentrate volumes required to deliver doses within the ranges cited in the 2011 immunotherapy practice parameters for clinicians using 5.0-mL maintenance vials and injection volumes ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 mL. Algebraic calculations were performed to determine the specific combinations of extract concentrate strengths, volumes of these products in patient vaccines, and injection volumes needed for administration of target allergen doses spanning the current SCIT practice parameter recommendations. For each product or group (nonstandardized extracts), tables were constructed to define the allergen doses provided by various combinations of extract concentrate volumes and injection volumes. The values within the effective dose ranges for each product were highlighted to facilitate comparisons of specific conditions relevant to allergy specialists. Glycerin tables were also created to permit convenient assessments of the final concentrations of this stabilizer in patient prescriptions. SCIT dosing and glycerin tables are useful tools to assist allergists with practice decisions that involve variable patient formulas and injection volumes and can help identify suitable conditions for treatment of patients presenting with diverse allergen sensitivities and specificity profiles. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dust Mite-Induced Perennial Allergic Rhinitis in Pediatric Patients and Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Halie M; Wood, Robert A; Busse, William W

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common illness in children and can impair their quality of life. Furthermore, many children remain symptomatic despite maximizing systemic antihistamine and topical therapies. It is at this clinical juncture that immunotherapy may be considered. The efficacy and safety associated with both subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual (SLIT) approaches are reviewed and positioned as treatment options for pediatric patients, with specific focus on current literature as it relates to SLIT in children, including those with perennial allergic rhinitis. Although there is more extensive experience with SLIT treatment in Europe, grass and ragweed tablet forms of SLIT are approved in the US. Approaches to the care of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis are presented. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Allergen immunotherapy: clinical and practical education of Italian trainees in allergy and clinical immunology schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolo, E; Incorvaia, C; Senna, G E; Montagni, M; Olivieri, E; Canonica, G W

    2013-10-01

    We performed a survey, based on a questionnaire including 20 items, submitted anonymously to Italian trainees in Allergology and Clinical Immunology, in order to obtain information about their specific allergen immunotherapy (AIT) practices. The questionnaire was sent to 40 trainees, who had attended the last two years of the training course. Thirty-four subjects (mean age: 27 years, 65% females) adequately completed the survey. The answers to the questionnaire showed that only 60% of the training programs included lectures on AIT. Among the trainees using AIT, only 40% declared being able to prescribe it independently, while 60% were guided by a tutor. Of the trainees who were able to prescribe AIT autonomously, 60% were familiar with both routes of administration, i.e. subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), while 25% of these used only SLIT. In 80% of the training institutions involved, the trainees could attend a dedicated AIT outpatient ward for SCIT administration; only 40% administered AIT personally, and in half of these cases, they were guided by a tutor. Only 70% of trainees had experience in the follow-up of patients still under treatment and of patients who had completed treatment. Analysis of the answers obtained for questions on venom immunotherapy (VIT) showed that, in 90% of cases, the trainees attended a dedicated outpatients ward where VIT is administered, but with a role limited to observation/cooperation. Only 30% were involved in the follow-up of patients who were under treatment or who had completed VIT. Only 20% of the trainees felt confident enough about VIT to prescribe this treatment independently, 80% knew there were several administration protocols, and the majority prescribed products from three different manufacturers. These findings suggest that there is significant room for improving the instructions provided regarding allergology and clinical immunology to trainees in Italy with respect to AIT.

  7. New visions in specific immunotherapy in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, Susanne; Lau, Susanne; Valovirta, Erkka

    2008-01-01

    immunotherapy (SLIT) has also been investigated in children. SCIT, especially with grass and birch pollens but also house dust mites, is an effective treatment in children with allergic rhinitis and asthma when a significant part of their symptoms are caused by these allergens. A long-term effect up to 12 yr...... after discontinuation of SCIT with timothy allergen has been shown. Efficacy and safety of SLIT in pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis have been demonstrated in adults. The evidence in children is a little less convincing, and more data is needed. The clinical relevance, long-term results and the size...... of the effect, as well as the dose, the treatment regimen and duration has not been sufficiently elaborated. It is demonstrated that SCIT has the potential for preventing the development of asthma in children with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Also one randomized study indicates a preventive effect of SLIT...

  8. Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) for Adults with Psychotic Disorders: A Feasibility Study in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, Greta; Kouhia, Tiina; Roberts, David L; Oksanen, Jorma

    2016-11-01

    Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) is a psychosocial treatment designed to improve social functioning in schizophrenia by improving social cognition. Positive results have been reported from several studies, mainly from the USA, but more studies are needed to determine the feasibility of SCIT in different cultural contexts. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the Finnish translation of SCIT in Finland. This was an uncontrolled, within-group study. Thirty-three patients with psychotic disorders participated in SCIT groups and also received the standard services provided at their respective care facilities. We measured participant attendance, attrition and responses on feedback surveys. Participants also completed measures of emotion perception, Theory of Mind (ToM), attributional bias and metacognitive overconfidence both before and after SCIT. The attendance rate was high, attrition was low, and the patients expressed satisfaction with SCIT. Preliminary efficacy analyses showed a statistically significant pre to posttest improvement in emotion perception and ToM, but not attributional bias or overconfidence. SCIT is feasible and well accepted and may remediate social cognitive dysfunction in people with psychotic disorders in Finland.

  9. Allergen-specific immunotherapy provides immediate, long-term and preventive clinical effects in children and adults: the effects of immunotherapy can be categorised by level of benefit -the centenary of allergen specific subcutaneous immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsen Lars

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergen Specific Immunotherapy (SIT for respiratory allergic diseases is able to significantly improve symptoms as well as reduce the need for symptomatic medication, but SIT also has the capacity for long-term clinical effects and plays a protective role against the development of further allergies and symptoms. The treatment acts on basic immunological mechanisms, and has the potential to change the pathological allergic immune response. In this paper we discuss some of the most important achievements in the documentation of the benefits of immunotherapy, over the last 2 decades, which have marked a period of extensive research on the clinical effects and immunological background of the mechanisms involved. The outcome of immunotherapy is described as different levels of benefit from early reduction in symptoms over progressive clinical effects during treatment to long-term effects after discontinuation of the treatment and prevention of asthma. The efficacy of SIT increases the longer it is continued and immunological changes lead to potential long-term benefits. SIT alone and not the symptomatic treatment nor other avoidance measures has so far been documented as the therapy with long-term or preventive potential. The allergic condition is driven by a subset of T-helper lymphocytes (Th2, which are characterised by the production of cytokines like IL-4, and IL-5. Immunological changes following SIT lead to potential curative effects. One mechanism whereby immunotherapy suppresses the allergic response is through increased production of IgG4 antibodies. Induction of specific IgG4 is able to influence the allergic response in different ways and is related to immunological effector mechanisms, also responsible for the reduced late phase hyperreactivity and ongoing allergic inflammation. SIT is the only treatment which interferes with the basic pathophysiological mechanisms of the allergic disease, thereby creating the potential for

  10. Specific immunotherapy can greatly reduce the need for systemic steroids in allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Torp-Pedersen, C; Backer, V

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 400 million individuals have allergic rhinitis, which has a significant impact on the individual's general health. Most patients self-medicate with over-the-counter drugs, but severe cases need treatment with topical corticosteroids and/or immunotherapy (SCIT). Although...

  11. Immunotherapy in Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Anil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis is an immunologic disorder that develops in individuals who have produced allergen-specific immunoglobulin E in response to environmental exposures (most commonly to pollens, animal dander, insect debris, and molds. For patients with a severe allergy that is not responsive to environmental controls and pharmacotherapy or for those who do not wish to use medication for a lifetime, immunotherapy may be offered. Specific immunotherapy as practiced since hundred years in Western Europe and the USA. Different routes for specific immunotherapy have been evaluated, such as the subcutaneous, sublingual, oral, nasal, bronchial, and intra-lymphatic, the first 2 of these routes being the most commonly used today in clinical practice. In this article, subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis is reviewed.

  12. Enhanced efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy by liposome-mediated delivery of allergen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aliu, Have; Rask, Carola; Brimnes, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy by sublingual administration of allergens provides high patient compliance and has emerged as an alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy for the - treatment of IgE-associated allergic diseases. However, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) can cause adverse events. Development...

  13. EFFECTIVENESS OF SUBCUTANEOUS ALLERGEN-SPECIFIC IMMUNOTHERAPY WITH TREE POLLEN ALLERGEN EXTRACT ADSORBED ON CALCIUM PHOSPHATE IN CHILDREN WITH ALLERGIC RHINOCONJUNCTIVITIS: RESULTS OF A 2 YEAR-LONG OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Shakhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at evaluating effectiveness and safety of subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (scASIT with tree pollen allergen extract adsorbed on calcium phosphate at allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in children. Patients and methods: open-label prospective study of 50 children and adolescents (5-17 years of age with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis caused by high sensitivity to tree pollen allergens. The first group involved the patients undergoing scASIT for 2 years 6 months (n = 23, the control group – the patients (n = 27 not undergoing any specific immunotherapy. Results: scASIT was accompanied by a statistically significant (in comparison with the control group reduction in intensity of rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms (6.1 ± 3.1; 11.8 ± 4.5; p = 0.00002, reduction in the use of symptomatic drugs (1.0 ± 0.4; 1.8 ± 0.3; p = 0.000004 and improvement of quality of all spheres of children’s life – physical (p = 0.001, social (p = 0.04, emotional (p = 0.001 and role functioning (p = 0.03. Systemic side reactions were not observed in the patients. Local reactions were observed in 23% of all allergen injections. Conclusions: the authors established high effectiveness and safety of scASIT with tree pollen allergen extract adsorbed on calcium phosphate suspension at allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in children. 

  14. Sublingual grass pollen immunotherapy is associated with increases in sublingual Foxp3-expressing cells and elevated allergen-specific immunoglobulin G4, immunoglobulin A and serum inhibitory activity for immunoglobulin E-facilitated allergen binding to B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scadding, G W; Shamji, M H; Jacobson, M R; Lee, D I; Wilson, D; Lima, M T; Pitkin, L; Pilette, C; Nouri-Aria, K; Durham, S R

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) are less well understood than those of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). To determine the effects of grass-pollen SLIT on oral mucosal immune cells, local regulatory cytokines, serum allergen-specific antibody subclasses and B cell IgE-facilitated allergen binding (IgE-FAB). Biopsies from the sublingual mucosa of up to 14 SLIT-treated atopics, nine placebo-treated atopics and eight normal controls were examined for myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) (CD1c), plasmacytoid dendritic cells (CD303), mast cells (AA1), T cells (CD3) and Foxp3 using immunofluorescence microscopy. IL-10 and TGF-beta mRNA expression were identified by in situ hybridization. Allergen-specific IgG and IgA subclasses and serum inhibitory activity for binding of allergen-IgE complexes to B cells (IgE-FAB) were measured before, during and on the completion of SLIT. Foxp3(+) cells were increased in the oral epithelium of SLIT- vs. placebo-treated atopics (P=0.04). Greater numbers of subepithelial mDCs were present in placebo-treated, but not in SLIT-treated, atopics compared with normal controls (P=0.05). There were fewer subepithelial mast cells and greater epithelial T cells in SLIT- compared with placebo-treated atopics (P=0.1 for both). IgG(1) and IgG(4) were increased following SLIT (Ppollen extract is associated with increased Foxp3(+) cells in the sublingual epithelium and systemic humoral changes as observed previously for SCIT.

  15. Immunotherapy with concurrent subcutaneous GM-CSF, low-dose IL-2 and IFN-alpha in patients with progressive metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verra, N.; Jansen, R.; Groenewegen, G.; Mallo, H.; Kersten, M. J.; Bex, A.; Vyth-Dreese, F. A.; Sein, J.; van de Kasteele, W.; Nooijen, W. J.; de Waal, M.; Horenblas, S.; de Gast, G. C.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine toxicity, efficacy and immunologic effects of concurrent subcutaneous injections of low-dose interleukin-2 (LD-IL-2), granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interferon-alpha 2b (IFNalpha) in progressive metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  16. Efficacy and safety of subcutaneous immunotherapy with a biologically standardized extract of Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirone, C; Albert, F; Tosi, A; Mocchetti, F; Mosca, S; Giorgino, M; Pecora, S; Parmiani, S; Ortolani, C

    2004-09-01

    The allergological relevance of Ambrosia in Europe is growing but the efficacy of the injective immunotherapy for this allergen has been documented only in Northern America. We sought to study the safety and efficacy of injective immunotherapy in European patients sensitized to Ambrosia artemisiifolia. Thirty-two patients (18 M/14 F, mean age 36.78, range 23-60 years) suffering from rhinoconjunctivitis and/or asthma and sensitized to Ambrosia were enrolled and randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) study lasting 1 year. A maintenance dose corresponding to 7.2 microg of Amb a 1 was administered at 4-week intervals after the build-up. During the second and the third year, all patients were under active therapy in an open fashion. Symptom and medication scores, skin reactivity to Ambrosia (parallel line biological assay), and pollen counts were assessed throughout the trial. Twenty-three patients completed the trial. No severe adverse event was observed. During the DBPC phase, actively treated patients showed an improvement in asthmatic symptoms (P=0.02) and drug (P=0.0068) scores days with asthmatic symptoms (P=0.003), days with rhinitis symptoms (P=0.05), and days with intake of drugs (P=0.0058), as compared to before therapy. No improvement for any of these parameters was detected in the placebo group. Moreover, the number of days with rhinitis and asthma was significantly higher in the placebo as compared to the active group (P=0.048 and PAmbrosia.

  17. Clinical practice recommendations for allergen-specific immunotherapy in children: the Italian consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajno, Giovanni Battista; Bernardini, Roberto; Peroni, Diego; Arasi, Stefania; Martelli, Alberto; Landi, Massimo; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Muraro, Antonella; La Grutta, Stefania; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Indinnimeo, Luciana; Caffarelli, Carlo; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Comberiati, Pasquale; Duse, Marzia

    2017-01-23

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is currently recognized as a clinically effective treatment for allergic diseases, with a unique disease-modifying effect. AIT was introduced in clinical practice one century ago, and performed in the early years with allergenic extracts of poor quality and definition. After the mechanism of allergic reaction were recognized, the practice of AIT was refined, leading to remarkable improvement in the efficacy and safety profile of the treatment. Currently AIT is accepted and routinely prescribed worldwide for respiratory allergies and hymenoptera venom allergy. Both the subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual (SLIT) routes of administration are used in the pediatric population.AIT is recommended in allergic rhinitis/conjunctivitis with/without allergic asthma, with an evidence of specific IgE-sensitization towards clinically relevant inhalant allergens. Long-term studies provided evidence that AIT can also prevent the onset of asthma and of new sensitizations. The favorable response to AIT is strictly linked to adherence to treatment, that lasts 3-5 years. Therefore, several factors should be carefully evaluated before starting this intervention, including the severity of symptoms, pharmacotherapy requirements and children and caregivers' preference and compliance.In recent years, there have been increasing interest in the role of AIT for the treatment of IgE-associated food allergy and extrinsic atopic dermatitis. A growing body of evidence shows that oral immunotherapy represents a promising treatment option for IgE-associated food allergy. On the contrary, there are still controversies on the effectiveness of AIT for patients with atopic dermatitis.This consensus document was promoted by the Italian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (SIAIP) to provide evidence-based recommendations on AIT in order to implement and optimize current prescription practices of this treatment for allergic children.

  18. Debates in allergy medicine: specific immunotherapy efficiency in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A. Slavyanakaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT has been the only pathogenetically relevant treatment of IgE-mediated allergic diseases (ADs for many years. The use of AIT for atopic dermatitis (AD treatment is dubious and has both followers and opponents. The improvement of subcutaneous AIT (SCIT and introduction of Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT gives prospects of their application both for adults and children suffering from AD. This review presents results of scientific research, system and meta-analyses that confirm the clinical efficacy of AIT for children with AD who has the sensitization to allergens of house dust mite, grass and plant pollen suffering from co-occurring respiratory ADs and with moderate and severe course of allergic AD. There have been analyzed the most advanced achievements in AIT studies as well as there have been specified the unmet needs in AD. The preliminary diagnostics of IgE-mediated AD and pathophysiological disorders, including immune ones, will allow a doctor to develop appropriate comprehensive treatment algorithm for children’s AD aimed at its correction. The including of AIT to the children’s comprehensive therapy program is reasonable only if AD has the allergic form. It is necessary better to design the randomized research studies and to acquire extended clinical practice in children with AD. Use of the successes of molecular-based allergy diagnostics will help to optimize and personalize the process of selecting the necessary allergens to determine the most appropriate vaccines for children considering the results of the allergen component diagnostics. The strategy of treatment of children with AD in future will be based on individual target therapy.

  19. Tinnitus after administration of sublingual immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Sublingual immunotherapy was first described in 1986. Since then, its use has been increased as an alternative to subcutaneously administered immunotherapy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The most common side effects are of oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal in natur...

  20. A randomized, controlled trial of Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) for outpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David L; Combs, Dennis R; Willoughby, Michael; Mintz, Jim; Gibson, Clare; Rupp, Betty; Penn, David L

    2014-09-01

    In schizophrenia, the ability to adaptively infer the thoughts and feelings of others (i.e., social cognition) is strongly associated with community functioning. Researchers have designed psychosocial interventions to improve social cognition with the aim of improving downstream social functioning. Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) is one such intervention. Previous research on SCIT has been promising, but has consisted largely of smaller trials with insufficient experimental control. Randomized, controlled trial. The current article reports on a controlled trial of 66 adults with schizophrenia randomized to receive either SCIT (n = 33), delivered in weekly group sessions, or treatment as usual (n = 33) for 6 months. Participants completed assessments of social cognition, social functioning, neurocognition and symptoms at baseline, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Primary analyses suggest that SCIT may improve social functioning, negative symptoms, and possibly hostile attributional bias. Post-hoc analyses suggest a dose-response effect. Findings are discussed in the context of continuing to refine and improve social cognitive interventions for schizophrenia. Social cognitive intervention is a feasible and promising approach to improving social functioning among individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Dose-response findings suggest that delivering social cognitive interventions with greater frequency may maximize their benefit to patients. Research on social cognitive interventions is still young and effects from well-controlled trials have been inconsistent. It is not yet clear which components of social cognitive training may be the key active ingredients. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunotherapy is a cancer treatment that helps your immune system fight cancer. It is a type of biological therapy. Biological therapy uses substances ... t yet use immunotherapy as often as other cancer treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. ...

  2. Immunotherapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy Healthy Food Shopping Healthy Drinks for Kids Immunotherapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Immunotherapy Print A A A ... Immunity Types of Immunotherapy Side Effects Outlook About Immunotherapy Immunotherapy, also known as targeted therapy or biotherapy, ...

  3. Clinical Applications of Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas S; Wise, Sarah K

    2017-12-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is effective for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma in adults and children. In a limited number of studies, SLIT efficacy has been demonstrated for the treatment of food allergy. SLIT has a higher safety profile versus subcutaneous immunotherapy, although some systemic reactions have been reported. Appropriate patient selection, meticulous patient education, and routine follow-up are key for the safe and effective administration of SLIT. With organization and attention to detail, adding SLIT to one's practice can provide a highly valued patient service. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Grass pollen immunotherapy: where are we now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtzen, Peter A; Gupta, Shashank; Brand, Stephanie; Andersen, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    During allergen immunotherapy (AIT), the allergic patient is exposed to the disease-inducing antigens (allergens) in order to induce clinical and immunological tolerance and obtain disease modification. Large trials of grass AIT with highly standardized subcutaneous and sublingual tablet vaccines have been conducted to document the clinical effect. Induction of blocking antibodies as well as changes in the balance between T-cell phenotypes, including induction of regulatory T-cell subtypes, have been demonstrated for both treatment types. These observations increase the understanding of the immunological mechanism behind the clinical effect and may make it possible to use the immunological changes as biomarkers of clinical effect. The current review describes the recent mechanistic findings for subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy/tablet treatment and discusses how the observed immunological changes translate into a scientific foundation for the observed clinical effects of grass pollen immunotherapy and lead to new treatment strategies for grass AIT.

  5. Long-lasting effect of a monophosphoryl lipid-adjuvanted immunotherapy to parietaria. A controlled field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarra, A; Bignardi, D; Troise, C; Passalacqua, G

    2010-06-01

    The clinical efficacy of Monophosphoryl lipid A-adjuvanted immunotherapy (MPLA-SCIT) is ascertained, but there are no data on its possible long-lasting effect. We assessed in a real-life setting the persistence of the clinical effect five years after discontinuation. Patients with parietaria-induced respiratory allergy and fulfilling the criteria for immunotherapy prescription were evaluated at baseline, after the third year of MPLA-SCIT and five years after discontinuation. Visual analog scores, severity of the disease, pulmonary function and skin reactivity were assessed. Matched subjects who refused immunotherapy served as controls. Twenty nine patients received MPLA-SCIT and 28 were the control group. There was a significant clinical improvement, as assessed by VAS only in the active group after 3 years that remained significant at 5 years versus baseline and controls. The distribution of severity of rhinitis was overall decreased at 3 and 8years as well. The number of patients with conjunctivitis in the active group decreased from 19 to 6 at the end of the treatment and to 9 after 5 years. There was also a decrease in the number of patients with asthma symptoms (from 6 to 2 to 4), which doubled in the control group. A significant reduction in the wheal of the Parietaria skin test was seen in the active group at the end of the treatment (9.5 +/- 2.1 mm vs. 6.4 +/- 2.6 mm; p = .01), but this reduction was lost at the 5-year. No relevant change was overall detected in pulmonary function. MPLA-SCIT is effective, and the clinical efficacy is maintained after 5 years of discontinuation.

  6. Cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cairns, Linda; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Anichini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This report covers the Immunotherapy sessions of the 2016 Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) Oncology Days meeting, which was held on 15th-17th June 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. Immunotherapy is a potential cancer treatment that uses an individual's immune system to fight the tumour....... In recent years significant advances have been made in this field in the treatment of several advanced cancers. Cancer immunotherapies include monoclonal antibodies that are designed to attack a very specific part of the cancer cell and immune checkpoint inhibitors which are molecules that stimulate...... or block the inhibition of the immune system. Other cancer immunotherapies include vaccines and T cell infusions. This report will summarise some of the research that is going on in this field and will give us an update on where we are at present....

  7. Debut of Gastroesophageal Reflux Concomitant with Administration of Sublingual Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, J.

    2017-01-01

    , and dysphagia. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was first described in 1986. Following this description, the use has greatly increased in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, as an alternative to subcutaneously administered immunotherapy. Side effects are commonly of oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal nature...... to administration of sublingual immunotherapy for house dust mite in allergic rhinitis. The patient had to stop the SLIT after two weeks of administration due to GORD. The cessation resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms....

  8. Subcutaneous Injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria

    This thesis is about visualization and characterization of the tissue-device interaction during subcutaneous injection. The tissue pressure build-up during subcutaneous injections was measured in humans. The insulin pen FlexTouchr (Novo Nordisk A/S) was used for the measurements and the pressure...... build-up was evaluated indirectly from the changes in the flow rate between subcutaneous injections and air injections. This method enabled the tissue counter pressure to be evaluated without a formal clinical study approval. The measurements were coupled to a model for the pressure evolution...... in subcutaneous tissue, based on mass conservation and flow in a porous medium. From the measurements the flow permeability and bulk modulus of the tissue were determined. In the adipose tissue the drug forms a bolus from where it is absorbed by the blood capillaries. The spatial distribution of the injected...

  9. Sarcoma Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouw, Launce G., E-mail: launce.gouw@hsc.utah.edu [Departments of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Jones, Kevin B. [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Departments of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Randall, R. Lor [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    Much of our knowledge regarding cancer immunotherapy has been derived from sarcoma models. However, translation of preclinical findings to bedside success has been limited in this disease, though several intriguing clinical studies hint at the potential efficacy of this treatment modality. The rarity and heterogeneity of tumors of mesenchymal origin continues to be a challenge from a therapeutic standpoint. Nonetheless, sarcomas remain attractive targets for immunotherapy, as they can be characterized by specific epitopes, either from their mesenchymal origins or specific alterations in gene products. To date, standard vaccine trials have proven disappointing, likely due to mechanisms by which tumors equilibrate with and ultimately escape immune surveillance. More sophisticated approaches will likely require multimodal techniques, both by enhancing immunity, but also geared towards overcoming innate mechanisms of immunosuppression that favor tumorigenesis.

  10. Sarcoma Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lor Randall

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Much of our knowledge regarding cancer immunotherapy has been derived from sarcoma models. However, translation of preclinical findings to bedside success has been limited in this disease, though several intriguing clinical studies hint at the potential efficacy of this treatment modality. The rarity and heterogeneity of tumors of mesenchymal origin continues to be a challenge from a therapeutic standpoint. Nonetheless, sarcomas remain attractive targets for immunotherapy, as they can be characterized by specific epitopes, either from their mesenchymal origins or specific alterations in gene products. To date, standard vaccine trials have proven disappointing, likely due to mechanisms by which tumors equilibrate with and ultimately escape immune surveillance. More sophisticated approaches will likely require multimodal techniques, both by enhancing immunity, but also geared towards overcoming innate mechanisms of immunosuppression that favor tumorigenesis.

  11. Health economic analysis of allergen immunotherapy for the management of allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy and venom allergy: A systematic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaria, M; Dhami, S; van Ree, R; Gerth van Wijk, R; Muraro, A; Roberts, G; Sheikh, A

    2018-02-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is developing guidelines for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) for the management of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, IgE-mediated food allergy and venom allergy. To inform the development of clinical recommendations, we undertook systematic reviews to critically assess evidence on the effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of AIT for these conditions. This study focusses on synthesizing data and gaps in the evidence on the cost-effectiveness of AIT for these conditions. We produced summaries of evidence in each domain, and then, synthesized findings on health economic data identified from four recent systematic reviews on allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy and venom allergy, respectively. The quality of these studies was independently assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool for health economic evaluations. Twenty-three studies satisfied our inclusion criteria. Of these, 19 studies investigated the cost-effectiveness of AIT in allergic rhinitis, of which seven were based on data from randomized controlled trials with economic evaluations conducted from a health system perspective. This body of evidence suggested that sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) would be considered cost-effective using the (English) National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) cost-effectiveness threshold of £20 000/quality-adjusted life year (QALY). However, the quality of the studies and the general lack of attention to characterizing uncertainty and handling missing data should be taken into account when interpreting these results. For asthma, there were three eligible studies, all of which had significant methodological limitations; these suggested that SLIT, when used in patients with both asthma and allergic rhinitis, may be cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £10 726 per QALY. We found one economic modelling

  12. Biomarkers for Monitoring Clinical Efficacy of Allergen Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Allergic Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamji, M H; Kappen, J H; Akdis, M

    2017-01-01

    be administered either subcutaneously (SCIT) or sublingually (SLIT) (3-12). Although AIT is effective, the degree of remission strongly varies depending on the complex interaction between patient, allergy, symptomatology and vaccines used for AIT (3-9). Clinical management of patients receiving AIT and efficacy...... in randomised controlled trials for drug development could be significantly enhanced if there were means to identify those who are most likely to respond, when to stop treatment, how to predict relapse and when to perform booster AIT. Furthermore, biomarkers in AIT can play a central role in personalized...

  13. Allergen immunotherapy practice patterns: a worldwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponda, Punita; Mithani, Sima; Kopyltsova, Yelena; Sison, Cristina; Gupta, Payel; Larenas, Désirée; Bonagura, Vincent R

    2012-06-01

    Allergists around the world have different practice styles when administering subcutaneous aeroallergen immunotherapy (IT) in peak pollen seasons, especially when changing doses or frequency of IT. The Immunotherapy practice parameters do not specifically address this issue. Given the paucity of good data about adjustment of allergen immunotherapy during the pollen seasons, we examined whether a significant difference is present in the way allergists administer immunotherapy during allergy seasons. To quantify the practice styles of allergists who are members of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), a self-reported electronic survey was disseminated in September 2010 with the help of the AAAAI Needs Assessment Committee. The responses were tallied and analyzed according to demographic information. A total of 1,201 allergists in the AAAAI responded to the survey. Most responders practice in an urban or suburban nonacademic practice in the United States and have been in practice for more than 10 years. The size of their practice was variable. Those in practice for more than 10 years were more likely to adjust the dose and frequency of immunotherapy in pollen seasons. This survey highlights the differences in the practice styles of AAAAI member allergists, and these differences may be associated with their demographic characteristics. Given the wide variability in how allergists adjust dose and frequency of immunotherapy during pollen seasons, establishing guidelines regarding this routine dilemma might help standardize the delivery of treatment to patients. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient’s daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure...

  15. Intralesional immunotherapy as a strategy to treat melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Noura; Garbe, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Intralesional immunotherapy supplements systemic treatments and often achieves higher remission rates as compared to systemic therapy. Its indication is metastatic melanoma with limited tumor burden, particularly in loco-regional metastasis and distant soft tissue metastasis. This review describes intralesional immunotherapy with talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), with velimogene aliplasmid (Allovectin-7) and with intralesional interleukin-2. These therapies function exclusively by activating the immune system. Furthermore, Rose Bengal and electrochemotherapy have been included, as bystander effects have been observed with these treatments. Objective remissions are achieved in a higher percentage with intralesional immunotherapies, such as intralesional interleukin-2 with up to 69% of complete remissions, as compared to systemic treatment. Therefore, intralesional immunotherapy may act as supplement in the armament against metastatic melanoma. In particular, for patients with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases (20—≥ 100) and in patients with subcutaneous bulky disease intralesional immunotherapy can improve the disease outcome. The exact role of intralesional immunotherapy in the age of immune checkpoint blockade has still to be determined. A number of clinical trials are on the way in order to better understand synergistic actions of intralesional and systemic immunotherapy.

  16. Sublingual immunotherapy not effective in house dust mite-allergic children in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Cindy M. A.; Moed, Heleen; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Roder, Esther; Hop, Wim C. J.; de Groot, Hans; de Jongste, Johan C.; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; Bindels, Patrick J. E.; van der Wouden, Johannes C.

    Background: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) as a therapy for the treatment of allergic rhinitis in children might be acceptable as an alternative for subcutaneous immunotherapy. However, the efficacy of SLIT with house dust mite extract is not well established. Objective: To investigate whether SLIT

  17. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of sublingual immunotherapy in children with house dust mite allergy in primary care: Study design and recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.A. de Bot (Cindy); H. Moed (Heleen); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein); E. Röder (Esther); H. de Groot (Hans); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. For respiratory allergic disorders in children, sublingual immunotherapy has been developed as an alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Sublingual immunotherapy is more convenient, has a good safety profile and might be an attractive option for use in primary care. A

  18. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of sublingual immunotherapy in children with house dust mite allergy in primary care : study design and recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Cindy M. A.; Moed, Heleen; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Roder, Esther; de Groot, Hans; de Jongste, Johan C.; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; van der Wouden, Johannes C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: For respiratory allergic disorders in children, sublingual immunotherapy has been developed as an alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Sublingual immunotherapy is more convenient, has a good safety profile and might be an attractive option for use in primary care. A randomized

  19. Immunotherapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000903.htm Immunotherapy for cancer To use the sharing features on ... 4 treat melanoma of the skin. Non-specific Immunotherapies These therapies boost the immune system in more ...

  20. The current state of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauli, Gabrielle; Malling, H-J

    2010-01-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy is a well documented treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. The majority of the disadvantages of the treatment are related to the poor quality of the natural allergen extracts which can contain varying amounts of individual allergens including allergens to which...

  1. Sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Ridolo, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1980s as a safer option to subcutaneous immunotherapy and in the latest decade achieved significant advances. Its efficacy in allergic rhinitis is supported by a number of meta-analyses. The development of SLIT preparations in tablets to fulfill the requirements of regulatory agencies for quality of allergen extracts made available optimal products for grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinitis. Preparations of other allergens based on the same production methods are currently in progress. A notable outcome of SLIT, that is shared with subcutaneous immunotherapy, is the evident cost-effectiveness, showing significant cost savings as early as 3 months from starting the treatment, that become as high as 80% compared with drug treatment in the ensuing years.

  2. Immunotherapy for mold allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding mold immunotherapy. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to mold immunotherapy using the following keywords: mold, allergy, asthma, and immunotherapy. In addition, references cited within these articles were also reviewed. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic. Allergic responses to inhaled mold antigens are a recognized factor in allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are significant problems with respect to the production of relevant allergen material for the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergy with immunotherapy. Mold allergens contain proteases and should not be mixed with other allergens for immunotherapy. Most of the immunotherapy studies focus on two molds, Alternaria and Cladosporium. There is a lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials when evaluating the efficacy of mold immunotherapy with trials only focusing on immunotherapy to Alternaria and Cladosporium. Additional studies are needed regarding mold allergy and immunotherapy focusing on which molds are important for causing allergic disease.

  3. Immunotherapy in allergic conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash O

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty patients with allergic conjunctivitis were treated with immunotherapy employing specific allergens. Sixty-two percent of these showed beneficial response. In cases of vernal conjunctivitis needing topical steroid preparations frequently for control of symptoms, immunotherapy is worth attempting to cause remission of symptoms.

  4. Development of nanoparticle based delivery systems for sublingual immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alija, Hava; Rask, Carola; Brimnes, Jens

    The prevalence of IgE mediated allergic diseases is increasing dramatically in industrialized countries. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been demonstrated to be a safe and efficacious treatment for IgE mediated allergic diseases, but requires protracted treatment duration. Even though SLIT...... is considered to have a better safety profile than subcutaneous immunotherapy, SLIT can still cause adverse events requiring clinical supervision for the first administration. Optimization of SLIT, by reducing the administration dose and treatment duration, would improve safety profile. For this purpose...

  5. Immunotherapy: Who Is Eligible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daniel; Gilbert, Jill; Kim, Young J

    2017-08-01

    Recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer portends a poor prognosis with traditional treatments, but current immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors has the potential to improve these clinical outcomes. This review focuses on the major breakthroughs that have led to the current understanding of immunotherapy in head and neck cancer as well as the future direction of the field. Ultimately, this understanding will guide clinicians on the selection of patients with head and neck cancer and practical considerations before starting immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Veterinary Oncology Immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2018-03-01

    The ideal cancer immunotherapy agent should be able to discriminate between cancer and normal cells, be potent enough to kill small or large numbers of tumor cells, and be able to prevent recurrence of the tumor. Tumor immunology and immunotherapy are among the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields; cancer immunotherapy is now recognized as a pillar of treatment alongside traditional modalities. This article highlights approaches that seem to hold particular promise in human clinical trials and many that have been tested in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect on quality of life of the mixed house dust mite/weed pollen extract immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lisha; Guan, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Although many patients with allergic rhinitis have symptoms due to sensitization to more than one kind of allergens, and mixed allergen extracts are widely used for immunotherapy, there are few published trials. Our study aimed to evaluate the effect of multiple-allergen immunotherapy on improving the symptoms and quality of life of allergic rhinitis patients. We performed a 1-year single-center observation study of subcutaneous immunotherapy using house dust mite extract (n = 12), weed pollen extract (n = 21), or mixed house dust mite/weed pollen extract (n = 11) in 44 allergic rhinitis patients. All the allergens responsible for the symptom of each patient were included in his immunotherapy. Symptom score, medication score, and quality of life of the patients were evaluated before and after 1-year immunotherapy. Quality of life was evaluated with the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire. In all 3 groups receiving subcutaneous immunotherapy, significant improvement of symptom score, medication score, and quality of life was found vs. baseline at 1 year, irrespective of the allergen used. In the weed pollen season, the changes of quality of life questionnaire score after 1-year treatment were not significantly different between the weed pollen group (1.55 ± 1.24) and the mixed house dust mite/weed pollen group (1.14 ± 1.01). The same happened in the nonpollen seasons, during which dust mite immunotherapy (1.23 ± 1.63) and mixed immunotherapy (0.60 ± 0.47) did not show significantly different effect on the quality of life. The multiple-allergen immunotherapy might be effective in polysensitized allergic rhinitis patients, and could improve their quality of life. Our result did not show significant difference between the effects of multiple-allergen immunotherapy and mono-allergen immunotherapy.

  8. Requirements for acquiring a high-quality house dust mite extract for allergen immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frati F

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Franco Frati,1 Cristoforo Incorvaia,2 Marie David,3 Silvia Scurati,3 Simona Seta,4 Guglielmo Padua,4 Eleonora Cattaneo,1 Carlo Cavaliere,5 Alessia Di Rienzo,6 Ilaria Dell'Albani,1 Paola Puccinelli11Medical and Scientific and Regulatory Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 2Allergy/Pulmonary Rehabilitation, ICP Hospital, Milan, Italy; 3Laboratoire Stallergenes, Antony, France; 4Marketing Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 5Ear, Nose and Throat Department, University Sapienza, Rome, Italy; 6Azienda Sanitaria Locale, Allergology Service, Frosinone, ItalyAbstract: The house dust mite is a major cause of respiratory allergy worldwide. The management of mite allergy is based on avoidance measures, drug treatment, and allergen immunotherapy, but only allergen immunotherapy is able to modify the natural history of the disease. Injectable subcutaneous immunotherapy was introduced a century ago, while sublingual immunotherapy was proposed in the 1980s and emerged in the ensuing years as an effective and safe option to subcutaneous immunotherapy. However, the quality of the extracts to be used in allergen immunotherapy is crucial for the success of treatment. The mite extract for sublingual immunotherapy known as Staloral 300 was developed to offer optimal characteristics concerning the mite culture medium, standardization, and allergen dose. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with Staloral 300 have provided a substantial part of the clinical evidence analyzed in a meta-analysis of the efficacy of allergen immunotherapy in mite-induced rhinitis and asthma. Safety and tolerability are very good, mild local reactions in the mouth being the most common side effect. This makes it feasible to carry out sublingual immunotherapy for the 3–5-year duration needed to achieve long-lasting tolerance to the specific allergen. The performance of Staloral 300 may provide optimal conditions for an effective and safe sublingual immunotherapy in patients with

  9. Controlled clinical trial of adjuvant immunotherapy with BCG and neuraminidase-treated autologous tumour cells in large bowel cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B N; Walker, C; Andrewartha, L; Freeman, S; Bennett, R C

    1989-01-01

    A controlled, randomised clinical trial of immunotherapy was performed in 301 patients with stage B or C colorectal cancer. The immunotherapy treatment consisted of 18 vaccinations over a 2 year period following surgery with a combination of BCG given by scarification plus subcutaneous injection of Vibrio cholera neuraminidase (VCN)-modified autologous tumour cells. Five year follow-up has now been completed in all patients. The immunotherapy did not alter either the disease-free interval or the overall survival of patients in comparison with a control group of patients not receiving immunotherapy.

  10. Cancer immunotherapy in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    More often than not, cancer immunotherapies that work in adults are used in modified ways in children. Seldom are new therapies developed just for children, primarily because of the small number of pediatric patients relative to the adult cancer patient

  11. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  12. Specific immunotherapy has long-term preventive effect of seasonal and perennial asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, L; Niggemann, B; Dreborg, S

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 3-year subcutaneous specific immunotherapy (SIT) in children with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis reduced the risk of developing asthma during treatment and 2 years after discontinuation of SIT (5-year follow-up) indicating long-term preventive effect of SIT. OBJECTIVE: We......: Specific immunotherapy has long-term clinical effects and the potential of preventing development of asthma in children with allergic rhino conjunctivitis up to 7 years after treatment termination....

  13. Immunotherapy in Allergic Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hulya Anil; Koray Harmanci

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an immunologic disorder that develops in individuals who have produced allergen-specific immunoglobulin E in response to environmental exposures (most commonly to pollens, animal dander, insect debris, and molds). For patients with a severe allergy that is not responsive to environmental controls and pharmacotherapy or for those who do not wish to use medication for a lifetime, immunotherapy may be offered. Specific immunotherapy as practiced since hundred years in Wester...

  14. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare are reported. Clinical presentation was in the form of hard subcutaneous nodules, histopathology confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The cases were unique because of onset in adult age, occurrence over unusual sites and absence of classical lesions of granuloma annulare elsewhere.

  15. Treating allergic rhinitis by sublingual immunotherapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoforo Incorvaia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Allergic rhinitis (AR is a disease with high and increasing prevalence. The management of AR includes allergen avoidance, anti-allergic drugs, and allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT, but only the latter works on the causes of allergy and, due to its mechanisms of action, modifies the natural history of the disease. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT was proposed in the 1990s as an option to traditional, subcutaneous immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We reviewed all the available controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of SLIT. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Thus far, more than 60 trials, globally evaluated in 6 meta-analyses, showed that SLIT is an effective and safe treatment for AR. However, it must be noted that to expect clinical efficacy in the current practice SLIT has to be performed following the indications from controlled trials, that is, sufficiently high doses to be regularly administered for at least 3 consecutive years.

  16. Therapeutic Effects and Biomarkers in Sublingual Immunotherapy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Fujimura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is considered to be the only curative treatment for allergic diseases such as pollinosis, perennial rhinitis, asthma, and food allergy. The sublingual route is widely applied for immunotherapy for allergy, instead of the conventional administration by subcutaneous route. A recent meta-analysis of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT has shown that this approach is safe, has positive clinical effects, and provides prolonged therapeutic effects after discontinuation of treatment. However, the mechanism of SLIT and associated biomarkers are not fully understood. Biomarkers that change after or during SLIT have been reported and may be useful for response monitoring or as prognostic indicators for SLIT. In this review, we focus on the safety, therapeutic effects, including prolonged effects after treatment, and new methods of SLIT. We also discuss response monitoring and prognostic biomarkers for SLIT. Finally, we discuss immunological mechanisms of SLIT with a focus on oral dendritic cells and facilitated antigen presentation.

  17. Immunological comparison of allergen immunotherapy tablet treatment and subcutaneous immunotherapy against grass allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, K; Backer, V; Lund, G

    2014-01-01

    with regular serum measurements of specific IgE, IgG4, IgE-blocking factor, facilitated antigen presentation (FAP), and basophil activation test (BAT). Nasal challenges were used to assess changes in nasal sensitivity. RESULTS: After 15 months of treatment IgG4, IgE-blocking factor, FAP, and BAT values...

  18. Developing Precision Immunotherapies - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite remarkable progress, cancer immunotherapies can be toxic to some patients. Learn how NCI-funded research will extend the benefits of immunotherapy to more patients through biomarker research and collaboration.

  19. Immunotherapy for Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily F. Goode

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Survival for patients with advanced oesophageal and stomach cancer is poor; together these cancers are responsible for more than a million deaths per year globally. As chemotherapy and targeted therapies such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab result in modest improvements in survival but not long-term cure for such patients, development of alternative treatment approaches is warranted. Novel immunotherapy drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors have been paradigm changing in melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and urothelial cancers. In this review, we assess the early evidence for efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with gastroesophageal cancer in addition to considering biomarkers associated with response to these treatments. Early results of Anti- Programmed Cell Death Protein-1 (anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1 and anti-Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assosciated protein-4 (anti-CTLA4 trials are examined, and we conclude with a discussion on the future direction for immunotherapy for gastroesophageal cancer patients.

  20. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larché Mark

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cross link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils, due to lack of tertiary structure. Murine pre-clinical studies have established the feasibility of this approach and clinical studies are currently in progress in both allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  1. Immunotherapy for gastrointestinal malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Paul G; Vohra, Nasreen A; Ghansah, Tomar; Sarnaik, Amod A; Pilon-Thomas, Shari A

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are the most common human tumors encountered worldwide. The majority of GI cancers are unresectable at the time of diagnosis, and in the subset of patients undergoing resection, few are cured. There is only a modest improvement in survival with the addition of modalities such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Due to an increasing global cancer burden, it is imperative to integrate alternative strategies to improve outcomes. It is well known that cancers possess diverse strategies to evade immune detection and destruction. This has led to the incorporation of various immunotherapeutic strategies, which enable reprogramming of the immune system to allow effective recognition and killing of GI tumors. A review was conducted of the results of published clinical trials employing immunotherapy for esophageal, gastroesophageal, gastric, hepatocellular, pancreatic, and colorectal cancers. Monoclonal antibody therapy has come to the forefront in the past decade for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Immunotherapeutic successes in solid cancers such as melanoma and prostate cancer have led to the active investigation of immunotherapy for GI malignancies, with some promising results. To date, monoclonal antibody therapy is the only immunotherapy approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for GI cancers. Initial trials validating new immunotherapeutic approaches, including vaccination-based and adoptive cell therapy strategies, for GI malignancies have demonstrated safety and the induction of antitumor immune responses. Therefore, immunotherapy is at the forefront of neoadjuvant as well as adjuvant therapies for the treatment and eradication of GI malignancies.

  2. Sublingual immunotherapy with grass pollen is not effective in symptomatic youngsters in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roder, Esther; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Hop, Wim C. J.; Bernsen, Roos M. D.; de Groot, Hans; van Wijk, Roy Gerth

    Background: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is considered safer and more convenient than subcutaneous therapy and therefore has been proposed as especially suitable for children and in primary care. Most efficacy studies in children lack power to be conclusive, and all have been performed in

  3. Antigen-Specific Immunotherapy against Allergic Rhinitis: The State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Fujimura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis is the most prevalent type I allergy in industrialized countries. Pollen scattering from trees or grasses often induces seasonal allergic rhinitis, which is known as pollinosis or hay fever. The causative pollen differs across different areas and times of the year. Impaired performance due to pollinosis and/or medication used for treating pollinosis is considered to be an important reason for the loss of concentration and productivity in the workplace. Antigen-specific immunotherapy is an only available curative treatment against allergic rhinitis. Subcutaneous injection of allergens with or without adjuvant has been commonly used as an immunotherapy; however, recently, sublingual administration has come to be considered a safer and convenient alternative administration route of allergens. In this review, we focus on the safety and protocol of subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy against seasonal allergic rhinitis. We also describe an approach to selecting allergens for the vaccine so as to avoid secondary sensitization and adverse events. The biomarkers and therapeutic mechanisms for immunotherapy are not fully understood. We discuss the therapeutic biomarkers that are correlated with the improvement of clinical symptoms brought about by immunotherapy as well as the involvement of Tr1 and regulatory T cells in the therapeutic mechanisms. Finally, we focus on the current immunotherapeutic approach to treating Japanese cedar pollinosis, the most prevalent pollinosis in Japan, including sublingual immunotherapy with standardized extract, a transgenic rice-based edible vaccine, and an immunoregulatory liposome encapsulating recombinant fusion protein.

  4. Subcutaneous Zygomycosis Basidiobolomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous zygomycosis, also known as basidiobolomycosis, is a rare disease caused by the fungus Basidiobolus ranarum. Since its first description in 1954, may cases have been reported. In India, so far only few cases have been described. We report this entity in a 3 year- old female child who had firm to hard swelling of the right upper extremely and chest. Histopathology showed short aseptate hyphae surrounded by eosinophilic material within the granulomatous tissue response, in the subcutaneous tissue. She responded dramatically to saturated solution of potassium iodide.

  5. Subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Berg, Jais O

    2016-01-01

    We have described subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis, which is benign, usually asymptomatic and underreported. Images have only been published on two earlier occasions, in which the necrotic nodules appear "pearly" than the cloudy yellow surface in present case. The presented image may help...

  6. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of subcutaneos granuloma annulare are reported. Clinical presentation was in the form of hard subcutaneous nodules; histopathology confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The cases were unique because of onset in adult hood, occurrence over unusual sites and absence of classical lesions of granuloma annulare elsewhere.

  7. Immunotherapy in food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Toral; Bryce, Paul J

    2010-05-01

    Food allergies are caused by immune responses to food proteins and represent a breakdown of oral tolerance. They can range from mild pruritus to life-threatening anaphylaxis. The only current consensus for treatment is food avoidance, which is fraught with compliance issues. For this reason, there has been recent interest in immunotherapy, which may induce desensitization and possibly even tolerance. Through these effects, immunotherapy may decrease the potential for adverse serious reactions with accidental ingestions while potentially leading to an overall health benefit. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of food allergy and give an overview of the various immunotherapeutic options and current supporting evidence, as well as look towards the future of potential novel therapeutic modalities.

  8. EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Gunter J; Varga, Eva-Maria; Roberts, Graham

    2017-01-01

    and adults to prevent further moderate to severe systemic sting reactions. Venom immunotherapy is also recommended in adults with only generalized skin reactions as it results in significant improvements in quality of life compared to carrying an adrenaline auto-injector. This guideline aims to give...... immunotherapy. This guideline has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology's (EAACI) Taskforce on Venom Immunotherapy as part of the EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy initiative. The guideline aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of venom...... practical advice on performing venom immunotherapy. Key sections cover general considerations before initiating venom immunotherapy, evidence-based clinical recommendations, risk factors for adverse events and for relapse of systemic sting reaction, and a summary of gaps in the evidence. This article...

  9. Bladder cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1982-11-01

    A randomized controlled prospective evaluation of intravesical and percutaneous bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy was done in 57 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. In addition, 9 patients at high risk for tumor recurrence were treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin produced a self-limited cystitis and 1 complication (hydronephrosis) of immunotherapy was observed. Of the 57 randomized patients 54 were followed for 3 to 30 months. Tumor recurrence was documented in 13 of 26 controls (50 per cent) and only 6 of 28 patients (21 per cent) treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (p equals 0.027, chi-square). The interval free of disease was prolonged significantly with bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment (p equals 0.014, generalized Wilcoxon test). Importantly, a simple purified protein derivative skin test distinguished those patients who responded to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy from those who did not. Only 1 of 17 treated patients (6 per cent) whose purified protein derivative test converted from negative to positive had tumor recurrence compared to 5 recurrences (38 per cent) among the 13 patients whose test remained negative or had been positive before treatment (p equals 0.022, chi-square). Bacillus Calmette-Guerin was given to 10 patients with stage B transitional cell carcinoma who were not candidates for cystectomy and 7 are free of disease. Of 5 patients with carcinoma in situ 3 remain free of tumor after bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment and 5 of 6 who had multiple recurrences after intravesical chemotherapy responded favorably to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy.

  10. Immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathan Mehta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treatment of cancer patients involves a multidisciplinary approach including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Traditionally, patients with metastatic disease are treated with combination chemotherapies or targeted agents. These cytotoxic agents have good response rates and achieve palliation; however, complete responses are rarely seen. The field of cancer immunology has made rapid advances in the past 20 years. Recently, a number of agents and vaccines, which modulate the immune system to allow it to detect and target cancer cells, are being developed. The benefit of these agents is twofold, it enhances the ability the body’s own immune system to fight cancer, thus has a lower incidence of side effects compared to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Secondly, a small but substantial number of patients with metastatic disease are cured by immunotherapy or achieve durable responses lasting for a number of years. In this article, we review the FDA-approved immunotherapy agents in the field of genitourinary malignancies. We also summarize new immunotherapy agents being evaluated in clinical studies either as single agents or as a combination.

  11. Metastatic melanoma and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Benjamin; Fisher, David E

    2016-11-01

    Harnessing the immune system to attack cancer cells has represented a holy grail for greater than 100years. While prospects of tumor-selective durable immune based therapies have provided small clinical signals for many decades, recent years have demonstrated a virtual explosion in progress. Melanoma has led the field of cancers in which immunotherapy has produced major clinical inroads. The most significant and impactful immunotherapies for melanoma utilize immune checkpoint inhibition to stimulate T cell mediated tumor killing. The major targets of checkpoint blockade have thus far been CTLA4 and PD1, two key receptors for central and peripheral immune tolerance. This review discusses current understanding of how these checkpoint blockade therapeutics have led to major clinical responses in patients with advanced melanoma. It is likely that we are poised to see significantly greater anti-cancer immunotherapy efficacy, both in improving response rates and durability for melanoma, and for other less immunogenic malignancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Allergen-specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moote William

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergen-specific immunotherapy is a potentially disease-modifying therapy that is effective for the treatment of allergic rhinitis/conjunctivitis, allergic asthma and stinging insect hypersensitivity. However, despite its proven efficacy in these conditions, it is frequently underutilized in Canada. The decision to proceed with allergen-specific immunotherapy should be made on a case-by-case basis, taking into account individual patient factors such as the degree to which symptoms can be reduced by avoidance measures and pharmacological therapy, the amount and type of medication required to control symptoms, the adverse effects of pharmacological treatment, and patient preferences. Since this form of therapy carries the risk of anaphylactic reactions, it should only be prescribed by physicians who are adequately trained in the treatment of allergy. Furthermore, injections must be given under medical supervision in clinics that are equipped to manage anaphylaxis. In this article, the authors review the indications and contraindications, patient selection criteria, and the administration, safety and efficacy of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  13. Immunotherapy in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Aly-Khan A; Bossé, Dominick; McGregor, Bradley A; Choueiri, Toni K

    2017-11-25

    Immunotherapy has historic and contemporary presence in prostate, urothelial (UC), and renal cell (RCC) carcinomas. However, robust data on utility and generalizability of these treatments in older patients are lacking. To systematically evaluate evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of immunotherapy in elderly patients with prostate cancer, UC, or RCC. PubMed/Medline, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Library databases were searched up to October 2017 and according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses statement. A narrative review of studies was performed. Twenty-one reports were included regarding prostate cancer (four studies), UC (eight), and RCC (nine). In prostate cancer, sipuleucel-T improves survival (median age >70 yr) and similar results were seen in the PROSTVAC phase 2 trial. Ipilimumab has not improved survival independent of age; data for programmed cell death 1 inhibition is evolving. In metastatic UC, ≥50% of patients enrolled in pivotal checkpoint inhibitor studies were aged ≥65 yr. Three studies reported similar objective response rates (ORRs) in patients aged <65 versus ≥65 yr, whereas one study reported comparable ORRs in patients <80 versus ≥80 yr. In metastatic RCC, cytokine studies showed no efficacy difference by age; one study reported more ≥grade 3 toxicity in patients aged ≥65 yr. One vaccine-based study suggests that older age was associated with shorter survival. The benefit of nivolumab in second-line therapy was more apparent for patients aged 65-<75 yr than for those aged ≥75 yr. Across tumor subtypes, immunotherapy was well tolerated with minimal data stratifying toxicity by age. Contemporary immunotherapy has informed practice in genitourinary malignancies independent of patient age. Trial reporting of outcomes by age will be important to understand the generalizability of ongoing investigations for elderly patients. With the growing use of immunotherapy in genitourinary

  14. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-02-08

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient's daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure allergic respiratory diseases, by modulating the immune system activity. This review clearly summarizes and analyzes the available randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials, which aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and the safety of grass pollen and house dust mite SLIT for the specific treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis. Our analysis demonstrates the good evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT for allergic rhinitis to grass pollens in children, whereas trials regarding pediatric allergic rhinitis to house dust mites present lower quality, although several studies supported its usefulness.

  15. Massive subcutaneous emphysema with pneumoscrotopenis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chest injury commonly leads to subcutaneous emphysema of the chest, neck and face. It is usually non-life threatening. Massive subcutaneous emphysema may occur and very rarely may spread to involve the scrotal sac and subcutaneous tissue planes of the penis to cause pneumoscrotopenis. This case report presents ...

  16. Subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Manchanda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchogenic cysts occur due to the anomalous development of the primitive tracheobronchial tree early in fetal life. They are usually present in middle mediastinum. Rarely, they have been found in other locations. We describe two patients with subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts located over manubrium sterni with special emphasis on the difficulties in pre-operative diagnosis. The two boys were managed by complete excision of the cysts. The children are well on follow-up.

  17. Immunotherapy of Genitourinary Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Inamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cancer patients are treated with some combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in local therapy with curative intent, chemotherapeutic treatments for metastatic disease often remain unsatisfying due to severe side effects and incomplete long-term remission. Therefore, the evaluation of novel therapeutic options is of great interest. Conventional, along with newer treatment strategies target the immune system that suppresses genitourinary (GU malignancies. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma and non-muscle-invasive bladder caner represent the most immune-responsive types of all human cancer. This review examines the rationale and emerging evidence supporting the anticancer activity of immunotherapy, against GU malignancies.

  18. CCL21 Cancer Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yuan, E-mail: yuanlin@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Head and Neck Cancer Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 37-131 CHS, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Sharma, Sherven [Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 37-131 CHS, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Veterans’ Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA 90073 (United States); John, Maie St. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Head and Neck Cancer Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Cancer, a major health problem, affects 12 million people worldwide every year. With surgery and chemo-radiation the long term survival rate for the majority of cancer patients is dismal. Thus novel treatments are urgently needed. Immunotherapy, the harnessing of the immune system to destroy cancer cells is an attractive option with potential for long term anti-tumor benefit. Cytokines are biological response modifiers that stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. In this review, we discuss the anti-tumor efficacy of the chemotactic cytokine CCL21 and its pre-clinical and clinical application in cancer.

  19. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. EAACI Guidelines on allergen immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajno, G B; Fernandez-Rivas, M; Arasi, S

    2017-01-01

    Food allergy can result in considerable morbidity, impairment of quality of life, and healthcare expenditure. There is therefore interest in novel strategies for its treatment, particularly food allergen immunotherapy (FA-AIT) through the oral (OIT), sublingual (SLIT), or epicutaneous (EPIT) routes....... This Guideline, prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Task Force on Allergen Immunotherapy for IgE-mediated Food Allergy, aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for active treatment of IgE-mediated food allergy with FA-AIT. Immunotherapy relies on the delivery...

  1. Conference Scene: novelties in immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsias, Dimitris I; Kalogiros, Lampros A; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G

    2013-10-01

    The only method aiming to permanently cure allergic disorders is allergen immunotherapy. Over the last 20 years there has been great progress in understanding the mechanisms that govern allergen immunotherapy in order to meet three basic prerequisites: safety, effectiveness and compliance. In the present summary report from the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology-World Allergy Organization Congress held last June in Milan, we review key points concerning the main axes as diagnosis, novel modalities, routes and protocols, as well as two important immunotherapy fields: food and insect venom allergy.

  2. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuge O

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Oliver Fuge,1 Nikhil Vasdev,1 Paula Allchorne,2 James SA Green2 1Department of Urology, Lister Hospital, Stevenage, UK; 2Department of Urology, Bartshealth NHS Trust, Whipps Cross Rd, London, UK Abstract: It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest

  3. Effectiveness of regionally-specific immunotherapy for the management of canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Jon D; Neradilek, Moni B

    2017-01-05

    Canine atopic dermatitis is a common pruritic skin disease often treated with allergen immunotherapy (AIT). AIT in dogs traditionally begins with attempting to identify clinically relevant environmental allergens. Current allergen testing methodologies and immunotherapy techniques in dogs are not standardized. Immunotherapy with a mixture of allergenic extracts selected based on regional aerobiology rather than intradermal tests or serum IgE assays has been described. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of regionally-specific immunotherapy in dogs with atopic dermatitis. The medical records of a veterinary dermatology referral clinic were searched for dogs with atopic dermatitis that began regionally-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy from June, 2010 to May, 2013. An overall assessment of treatment effectiveness (excellent, good, fair, or poor) was assigned based upon changes in pruritus severity, lesion severity, and the reduction in concurrent medication(s) during a follow-up period of at least 270 days. Baseline characteristics that might predict treatment success were analyzed with the Spearman's correlation and the Kruskal-Wallis tests. Of the 286 dogs that began regionally-specific immunotherapy (RESPIT) during a 3 year period, 103 met the inclusion criteria. The overall response to RESPIT was classified as excellent in 19%, good in 38%, fair in 25%, and poor in 18% of dogs. The response classification correlated significantly with a reduction in pruritus severity (r = 0.72, p atopic dermatitis in dogs.

  4. Subcutaneous Phycomycosis in a Child

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    Manjiri R. Naniwadekar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous phycomycosis is a rare entity. We hereby report a case of subcutaneous phycomycosis in 18 months old female child who presented with a painless, non-tender swelling on the thigh. Skin biopsy showed eosinophilic granuloma lying deep in the subcutaneous tissue, with sparse hyphae. Culture on Sabouraud's dextrose agar showed characteristic colonies. Patient was started on oral potassium iodide. The swelling was completely resolved after one month of treatment.

  5. Allergen Immunotherapy and Tolerance

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    Tomokazu Matsuoka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT is associated with a marked decrease in symptoms on allergen exposure, a reduced requirement for 'rescue' anti-allergic drugs and improvement in patients' quality of life. These benefits persist for at least several years following discontinuation of immunotherapy - the hallmark of clinical and immunological tolerance. AIT has been shown to modulate both innate and adaptive immunological responses. Early suppression of innate effector cells of allergic inflammation (mast cells, basophils, regulation of pro-allergic T helper 2 type (Th 2 responses and IgE+ B cell responses have been shown to occur both in the tissue and in the peripheral blood during AIT. The allergen-tolerant state is associated with local and systemic induction of distinct populations of allergen-specific T regulatory cells including IL-10+ Tregs (Tr1 cells, TGF-P+ Tregs and FoxP3+ memory T regs. B cells are switched in favour of producing IgG (particularly IgG4 antibodies and associated blocking activity for IgE-dependent events, including basophil activation and IgE-facilitated allergen binding to B cells. An induction of IL-10+ B regulatory cells and alterations in dendritic cell subsets have also recently been described. These events are followed by the induction of T regulatory cells, suppression of allergen-specific T cell proliferation and immune deviation from Th2 in favour of Th1 responses. Alternative mechanisms of tolerance include apoptosis/deletion of antigen-specific memory Th2 cells and/or a failure of co-stimulation leading to T cell anergy.

  6. Gut Bacteria Affect Immunotherapy Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three new studies have identified intestinal bacteria that appear to influence the response to checkpoint inhibitors. This Cancer Currents blog post explains how the researchers think their findings could be used to improve patients’ responses to these immunotherapy drugs.

  7. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Dhami, Sangeeta; Arasi, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    Background: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is developing Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). To inform the development of recommendations, we sought to critically assess the systematic review evidence on the effective...

  8. 3D Models of Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This collaborative grant is developing 3D models of both mouse and human biology to investigate aspects of therapeutic vaccination in order to answer key questions relevant to human cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Subcutaneous adipose tissue classification

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    A. Sbarbati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The developments in the technologies based on the use of autologous adipose tissue attracted attention to minor depots as possible sampling areas. Some of those depots have never been studied in detail. The present study was performed on subcutaneous adipose depots sampled in different areas with the aim of explaining their morphology, particularly as far as regards stem niches. The results demonstrated that three different types of white adipose tissue (WAT can be differentiated on the basis of structural and ultrastructural features: deposit WAT (dWAT, structural WAT (sWAT and fibrous WAT (fWAT. dWAT can be found essentially in large fatty depots in the abdominal area (periumbilical. In the dWAT, cells are tightly packed and linked by a weak net of isolated collagen fibers. Collagenic components are very poor, cells are large and few blood vessels are present. The deep portion appears more fibrous then the superficial one. The microcirculation is formed by thin walled capillaries with rare stem niches. Reinforcement pericyte elements are rarely evident. The sWAT is more stromal; it is located in some areas in the limbs and in the hips. The stroma is fairly well represented, with a good vascularity and adequate staminality. Cells are wrapped by a basket of collagen fibers. The fatty depots of the knees and of the trochanteric areas have quite loose meshes. The fWAT has a noteworthy fibrous component and can be found in areas where a severe mechanic stress occurs. Adipocytes have an individual thick fibrous shell. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates evident differences among subcutaneous WAT deposits, thus suggesting that in regenerative procedures based on autologous adipose tissues the sampling area should not be randomly chosen, but it should be oriented by evidence based evaluations. The structural peculiarities of the sWAT, and particularly of its microcirculation, suggest that it could represent a privileged source for

  10. Allergen immunotherapy, when and why?

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    Díez Zuluaga, Libia Susana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergen specific immunotherapy is currently the only treatment that modifies the natural course of allergic diseases. Its present indications are asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis and hymenoptera venom allergy. However, there still is some controversy regarding its safety and clinical utility. In this article, we present a review about the molecular mechanisms, indications, contraindications, safety and efficacy of immunotherapy in each one of these diseases, by means of illustrative cases.

  11. Targeted immunotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Rothe et al introduce a new principle of targeted Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) immunotherapy in their report from a phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13.......In this issue of Blood, Rothe et al introduce a new principle of targeted Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) immunotherapy in their report from a phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13....

  12. Novel Combinatorial Immunotherapy for Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0587 TITLE: Novel Combinatorial Immunotherapy for Melanoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Li Wang CONTRACTING...Novel Combinatorial Immunotherapy for Melanoma 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0587 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Li...recognizing melanoma antigens, we have confirmed the synergistic activation of T cells in response to combinatorial therapy. These results form the

  13. Immunotherapy of allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2011-08-01

    The term 'immunotherapy' refers to treating diseases by inducing, enhancing or suppressing immune responses. As allergy is an excessive, detrimental immune reaction to otherwise harmless environmental substances, immunotherapy of allergic disease is aimed at the induction of tolerance toward sensitizing antigens. This article focuses on the historical developments, present state and future outlook for immunotherapy with haptens as a therapeutic modality for allergic contact dermatitis. Inspired by the effectiveness of immunotherapy in respiratory allergies, attempts were undertaken at curing allergic contact dermatitis by means of controlled administration of the sensitizing haptens. Animal and human experiments confirmed that tolerance to haptens can be induced most effectively when the induction of tolerance precedes attempted sensitization. In real life, however, therapy is sought by people who are already sensitized and an effective reversal of hypersensitivity seems more difficult to achieve. Decades of research on Rhus hypersensitivity led to a conclusion that immunotherapy can suppress Rhus dermatitis, however, only to a limited degree, for a short period of time, and at a high risk of side effects, which makes this method therapeutically unprofitable. Methodological problems with most available studies of immunotherapy of contact allergy to nickel make any definite conclusions impossible at this stage.

  14. Local Side Effects of Sublingual and Oral Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Giovanni; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is increasingly used worldwide, and several products have been recently registered as drugs for respiratory allergy by the European Medicine Agency and the Food and Drug Administration. Concerning inhalant allergens, the safety of SLIT is overall superior to that of subcutaneous immunotherapy in terms of systemic adverse events. No fatality has been ever reported, and episodes of anaphylaxis were described only exceptionally. Looking at the historical and recent trials, most (>90%) adverse events are "local" and confined to the site of administration. For this reason, a specific grading system has been developed by the World Allergy Organization to classify and describe local adverse events. There is an increasing amount of literature concerning oral desensitization for food allergens, referred to as oral immunotherapy. Also, in this case, local side effects are predominant, although systemic adverse events are more frequent than with inhalant allergens. We review herein the description of local side effects due to SLIT, with a special focus on large trials having a declared sample size calculation. The use of the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities nomenclature for adverse events is mentioned in this context, as recommended by regulatory agencies. It is expected that a uniform classification/grading of local adverse events will improve and harmonize the surveillance and reporting on the safety of SLIT. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synchronous Immune Alterations Mirror Clinical Response During Allergen Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renand, Amedee; Shamji, Mohamed H; Harris, Kristina M; Qin, Tielin; Wambre, Erik; Scadding, Guy W; Wurtzen, Peter A; Till, Stephen J; Togias, Alkis; Nepom, Gerald T; Kwok, William W; Durham, Stephen R

    2017-11-08

    Three years treatment with either sublingual or subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy has been shown to be effective and to induce long-term tolerance. The GRASS(∗) trial demonstrated that two years treatment via either route was effective in suppressing the response to nasal allergen challenge, although was insufficient for inhibition one year after discontinuation. To examine in the GRASS trial the time-course of immunologic changes during two years sublingual and subcutaneous immunotherapy and for one year after treatment discontinuation. We performed multi-modal immunomonitoring to assess allergen-specific CD4 T cell properties, in parallel with analysis of local mucosal cytokine responses induced by nasal allergen exposure and humoral immune responses that included IgE-dependent basophil activation and measurement of serum inhibitory activity for allergen-IgE binding to B cells (IgE-Facilitated Allergen Binding). All three of these distinct arms of the immune response displayed significant and coordinate alterations during 2 years allergen desensitization, followed by reversal at 3 years, reflecting a lack of a durable immunological effect. Whereas frequencies of antigen-specific Th2 cells in peripheral blood determined by HLA class II tetramer analysis most closely paralleled clinical outcomes, IgE-antibody dependent functional assays remained partially inhibited one year following discontinuation. Two years of allergen immunotherapy were effective but insufficient for long-term tolerance. Allergen-specific Th2 cells most closely paralleled the transient clinical outcome and it is likely that recurrence of the T cell 'drivers' of allergic immunity abrogated the potential for durable tolerance. On the other hand, persistence of IgE-blocking antibody one year after discontinuation may be an early indicator of a pro-tolerogenic mechanism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Cancer Immunotherapy: A Review

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    Anna Meiliana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The goals of treating patients with cancer are to cure the disease, prolong survival, and improve quality of life. Immune cells in the tumor microenvironment have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Therefore, stimulating immune reactions to tumors can be an attractive therapeutic and prevention strategy. CONTENT: During immune surveillance, the host provides defense against foreign antigens, while ensuring it limits activation against self antigens. By targeting surface antigens expressed on tumor cells, monoclonal antibodies have demonstrated efficacy as cancer therapeutics. Recent successful antibody-based strategies have focused on enhancing antitumor immune responses by targeting immune cells, irrespective of tumor antigens. The use of antibodies to block pathways inhibiting the endogenous immune response to cancer, known as checkpoint blockade therapy, has stirred up a great deal of excitement among scientists, physicians, and patients alike. Clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of antibodies that block the T cell inhibitory molecules cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4 and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1 have reported success in treating subsets of patients. Adoptive cell transfer (ACT is a highly personalized cancer therapy that involve administration to the cancer-bearing host of immune cells with direct anticancer activity. In addition, the ability to genetically engineer lymphocytes to express conventional T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors has further extended the successful application of ACT for cancer treatment. SUMMARY: For cancer treatment, 2011 marked the beginning of a new era. The underlying basis of cancer immunotherapy is to activate a patient’s own T cells so that they can kill their tumors. Reports of amazing recoveries abound, where patients remain cancer-free many years after receiving the therapy. The idea of harnessing immune cells to fight cancer is

  17. Combining talimogene laherparepvec with immunotherapies in melanoma and other solid tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Dummer, R; Hoeller, C.; Gruter, I.P.; Michielin, O.

    2017-01-01

    Talimogene laherparepvec is a first-in-class intralesional oncolytic immunotherapy. In a recent Phase III trial (OPTiM), talimogene laherparepvec significantly improved durable response rate compared with subcutaneous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Overall response rate was also higher in the talimogene laherparepvec arm, and the greatest efficacy was demonstrated in patients with earlier-stage (IIIB, IIIC, or IVM1a) melanoma. Talimogene laherparepvec was well tole...

  18. Pharmacoeconomics of allergen immunotherapy compared with symptomatic drug treatment in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariano, Renato; Berto, Patrizia; Tracci, Daniela; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Frati, Franco

    2006-01-01

    Only a few studies analyzed the pharmacoeconomics of allergen immunotherapy compared with drug treatment in subjects with allergic rhinitis and asthma. This study was aimed at evaluating whether allergen immunotherapy has an economic advantage on standard antiallergic drugs in patients with pollen-induced rhinitis and asthma. Thirty patients with rhinitis and asthma caused by Parietaria pollen were included in the study, 20 (11 men and 9 women; mean age, 35.45 +/- 10.45 years) were treated with subcutaneous immunotherapy by a Parietaria judaica extract (Alustal, Stallergénes, Antony, France) by a conventional build-up schedule in 12 weeks and a maintenance treatment every 4 weeks for 3 years, and 10 (6 men and 4 women; mean age, 31.90 +/- 10.97 years) were treated with antiallergic drugs. Each patient was evaluated before starting the treatment and annually for 6 years in the pollen period of Parietaria by means of nose, eyes, and lung symptom scores, along with drug consumption registered in diary cards. In other specifically designated cards general practitioner's or specialist's visits, the number of desensitizing injections and the number of boxes of antiallergic drugs were registered. A significant difference in favor of immunotherapy plus drug treatment versus drug treatment alone was observed, reaching a cost reduction of approximately 15% the second year and 48% the third year, with a highly statistical significance that was maintained up to the sixth year, i.e., 3 years after stopping immunotherapy, when an 80% reduction was found. The net saving for each patient at the final evaluation corresponded to euros 623 (dollars 830)/year. These findings confirm some previous observations in studies from Germany and the United States that subcutaneous immunotherapy has significant economic advantages over antiallergic drug treatment in the long term.

  19. Allergen specific immunotherapy has no influence on standard chemistry and hematology laboratory parameters in clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Dietrich; Gödicke, Viola; Narkus, Annemie

    2014-01-01

    A set of standard clinical chemistry and hematology parameters are usually measured during clinical studies. The major outcome of these standard tests is to control that the drug investigated does not lead to pathophysiological changes in respective organs or blood. In some cases based on scientific rationale such tests may not be needed. In this paper we report on a standard set of clinical chemistry and hematology laboratory parameters measured before and after treatment in three different immunotherapy studies, representing different routes of administration and different formulations. Thirteen hematological laboratory parameters and eight clinical chemistry parameters were evaluated from three double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, multi-centre, phase III studies. The three studies include one with sublingual immunotherapy (n = 185), one subcutaneous immunotherapy trial with an aluminium hydroxide-adsorbed recombinant hypoallergenic Bet v1-FV (n = 211) and one with pre-seasonal subcutaneous immunotherapy with a 6-grass pollen allergoid (n = 154). Allergen specific immunotherapy with both administration forms and formulations respectively did not show any influence on any of the 21 laboratory parameters analyzed. Few patients had a change in laboratory parameters from within normal range at baseline to either below or above at end-of-treatment. No differences between active and placebo were seen with respect to number of patients with such a change. This study with different preparations and routes of application indicates that the value of repeated measurements of standard clinical chemistry and hematology parameters during allergen immunotherapy should be discussed further.

  20. Small cell lung cancer transformation during immunotherapy with nivolumab: A case report

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    Takuma Imakita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of transformation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC to small cell lung cancer (SCLC, without epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutation, during immunotherapy treatment with nivolumab. A 75-year-old man was referred to our hospital following the observation of a 64 mm mass in a chest computed tomography (CT scan. A transbronchial biopsy of the mass identified the pathological presence of poorly differentiated NSCLC, with no histological signs of SCLC. No mutations were identified in the EGFR gene. A clinical diagnosis of NSCLC (cT3N3M1a, stage IV was made following a positron emission tomography (PET–CT scan and enhanced brain magnetic resonance imaging. Docetaxel and bevacizumab were selected as the first-line chemotherapy regimen; however, after two cycles, the patient developed a gastrointestinal perforation, and discontinuation of cytotoxic chemotherapy was recommended. Owing to gradual disease progression, immunotherapy with nivolumab was selected as the second-line regimen. During the immunotherapy, the tumor continued to progress and some subcutaneous tumors emerged. Biopsy of a subcutaneous tumor revealed SCLC, with positive immunostaining for cluster of differentiation 56, synaptophysin, and thyroid transcription factor-1. Serum tumor markers of SCLC were also elevated. Based on these results, we concluded that in this case NSCLC had transformed to SCLC during immunotherapy with nivolumab.

  1. Development of cancer immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Yeon Sook; Chung, H. Y.; Yi, S. Y.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, B. K.; Chung, I. S.; Park, J. Y

    1999-04-01

    To increase the curative rate of cancer patients, we developed ideal biological response modifier from medicinal plants: Ginsan, KC68IId-8, KC-8Ala, KG-30. Ginsan activated natural killer cell activity of spleen cells more than 5.4 times than lentinan, 1.4 times than picibanil. Radioprotective activity of Ginsan is stronger than WR2721, glucan, and selenium. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of A20 tumor cells was also augmented by transfection with B7.1 gene. The immunosuppression of gamma-irradiation was due to the reduction of Th1 sytokine gene expression through STAT pathway. These research will devote to develop new cancer immunotherapy and to reduce side effect of cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  2. Effect of Two Years of Treatment with Sublingual Grass Pollen Immunotherapy on Nasal Response to Allergen Challenge at Three Years among Patients with Moderate to Severe Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scadding, Guy W.; Calderon, Moises A.; Shamji, Mohamed H.; Eifan, Aarif O.; Penagos, Martin; Dumitru, Florentina; Sever, Michelle L.; Bahnson, Henry T; Lawson, Kaitie; Harris, Kristina M.; Plough, Audrey G.; Panza, Joy Laurienzo; Qin, Tielin; Lim, Noha; Tchao, Nadia K.; Togias, Alkis; Durham, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Sublingual immunotherapy and subcutaneous immunotherapy are effective in seasonal allergic rhinitis. Three years of continuous treatment with subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy has been shown to improve symptoms for at least two years following discontinuation of treatment. Objective To assess whether 2 years of treatment with grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy compared with placebo provides improved nasal response to allergen challenge at 3 year follow-up. Design, Setting, Participants A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-parallel group study performed in a single academic centre, Imperial College London, including adult patients with moderate-to-severe seasonal allergic rhinitis (interfering with usual daily activities or sleep). First enrolment was March 2011, last follow-up February 2015. Intervention Thirty-six participants received 2 years sublingual immunotherapy (daily tablets containing 15 microgram of major allergen Phleum p 5 and monthly placebo injections), 36 received subcutaneous immunotherapy (monthly injections containing 20 micrograms of Phleum p 5 and daily placebo tablets) and 34 received matched double-placebo. Nasal allergen challenge was performed before treatment, at 1 and 2 years and at 3 years (1 year after treatment discontinuation). Main outcomes and measures Total nasal symptom scores (TNSS, range 0 (best) to 12 (worst) were recorded during 0–10 hours after challenge. The minimum clinically important difference for change in TNSS within an individual is 1.08. The primary outcome was TNSS comparing sublingual immunotherapy to placebo at year 3. Subcutaneous immunotherapy was included as a positive control. The study was not powered to compare sublingual immunotherapy with subcutaneous immunotherapy. Results Among 106 participants who were randomized (mean age 33.5 years, 32.1% female), 92 completed the study at 3 years. Imputed TNSS scores [mean (95% confidence intervals)] pre-treatment and

  3. Effect of 2 Years of Treatment With Sublingual Grass Pollen Immunotherapy on Nasal Response to Allergen Challenge at 3 Years Among Patients With Moderate to Severe Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis: The GRASS Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scadding, Guy W; Calderon, Moises A; Shamji, Mohamed H; Eifan, Aarif O; Penagos, Martin; Dumitru, Florentina; Sever, Michelle L; Bahnson, Henry T; Lawson, Kaitie; Harris, Kristina M; Plough, Audrey G; Panza, Joy Laurienzo; Qin, Tielin; Lim, Noha; Tchao, Nadia K; Togias, Alkis; Durham, Stephen R

    2017-02-14

    Sublingual immunotherapy and subcutaneous immunotherapy are effective in seasonal allergic rhinitis. Three years of continuous treatment with subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy has been shown to improve symptoms for at least 2 years following discontinuation of treatment. To assess whether 2 years of treatment with grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy, compared with placebo, provides improved nasal response to allergen challenge at 3-year follow-up. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-parallel-group study performed in a single academic center, Imperial College London, of adult patients with moderate to severe seasonal allergic rhinitis (interfering with usual daily activities or sleep). First enrollment was March 2011, last follow-up was February 2015. Thirty-six participants received 2 years of sublingual immunotherapy (daily tablets containing 15 µg of major allergen Phleum p 5 and monthly placebo injections), 36 received subcutaneous immunotherapy (monthly injections containing 20 µg of Phleum p 5 and daily placebo tablets) and 34 received matched double-placebo. Nasal allergen challenge was performed before treatment, at 1 and 2 years of treatment, and at 3 years (1 year after treatment discontinuation). Total nasal symptom scores (TNSS; range; 0 [best] to 12 [worst]) were recorded between 0 and 10 hours after challenge. The minimum clinically important difference for change in TNSS within an individual is 1.08. The primary outcome was TNSS comparing sublingual immunotherapy vs placebo at year 3. Subcutaneous immunotherapy was included as a positive control. The study was not powered to compare sublingual immunotherapy with subcutaneous immunotherapy. Among 106 randomized participants (mean age, 33.5 years; 34 women [32.1%]), 92 completed the study at 3 years. In the intent-to-treat population, mean TNSS score for the sublingual immunotherapy group was 6.36 (95% CI, 5.76 to 6.96) at pretreatment and 4.73 (95% CI, 3.97 to 5

  4. Emerging nanotechnologies for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-05-01

    Founded on the growing insight into the complex cancer-immune system interactions, adjuvant immunotherapies are rapidly emerging and being adapted for the treatment of various human malignancies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, for example, have already shown clinical success. Nevertheless, many approaches are not optimized, require frequent administration, are associated with systemic toxicities and only show modest efficacy as monotherapies. Nanotechnology can potentially enhance the efficacy of such immunotherapies by improving the delivery, retention and release of immunostimulatory agents and biologicals in targeted cell populations and tissues. This review presents the current status and emerging trends in such nanotechnology-based cancer immunotherapies including the role of nanoparticles as carriers of immunomodulators, nanoparticles-based cancer vaccines, and depots for sustained immunostimulation. Also highlighted are key translational challenges and opportunities in this rapidly growing field. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  5. Current status of cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kono K

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To prove clinical benefits of cancer vaccine is currently difficult, except for one phase III trial has documented improved overall survival with the vaccine, Sipuleucel‑T, although induction of anti-tumor immune responses through cancer vaccine is theoretically promising and would be straightforward. In contrast, immune checkpoint blockade with anti-CTLA4 mAb and anti-PD‑1 mAb has demonstrated clear evidence of objective responses including improved overall survival and tumor shrinkage, driving renewed enthusiasm for cancer immunotherapy in multi­ple cancer types. In addition, there is a promising novel cancer immunotherapy, CAR therapy—a personalized treatment that involves genetically modifying a patient’s T- cells to make them target tumor cells. We are now facing new era of cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Surgical adjuvant immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enker, W.E.; Jacobitz, J.L.; Craft, K.; Wissler, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    One hundred forty-four Wistar-Furth rats in 12 therapeutic groups have been studied in a long-term comparison of the effectiveness of nonspecific immunotherapy with MER (methanol extraction residue) vs active-specific immunotherapy with neuraminidase-modified tumor cells. Six months after surgical adjuvant immunotherapy a 100% improvement in survival was achieved with MER immunotherapy compared to untreated control animals. In addition, the use of MER enhanced the value of active-specific immunotherapy where both modalities were combined in sequence. The predicted value of MER-BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) for the immunotherapy of solid tumors was borne out by these results suggesting that present ongoing clinical trials of MER as adjuvant therapy for large bowel cancer should prove to be successful if properly controlled. The pattern of survival in these experiments suggests that surgical adjuvant immunotherapy is cytostatic rather than cytocidal, and implies the need for long-term, repeated immunizations.

  7. Immunotherapy for tuberculosis: future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abate G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Getahun Abate,1 Daniel F Hoft1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology, 2Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Tuberculosis (TB is still a major global health problem. A third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only ~10% of infected individuals develop TB but there are 9 million TB cases with 1.5 million deaths annually. The standard prophylactic treatment regimens for latent TB infection take 3–9 months, and new cases of TB require at least 6 months of treatment with multiple drugs. The management of latent TB infection and TB has become more challenging because of the spread of multidrug-resistant and extremely drug-resistant TB. Intensified efforts to find new TB drugs and immunotherapies are needed. Immunotherapies could modulate the immune system in patients with latent TB infection or active disease, enabling better control of M. tuberculosis replication. This review describes several types of potential immunotherapies with a focus on those which have been tested in humans. Keywords: tuberculosis, HDT, immunotherapy, treatment

  8. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  9. International consensus on allergy immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jutel, Marek; Agache, Ioana; Bonini, Sergio; Burks, A. Wesley; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, Walter; Cox, Linda; Demoly, Pascal; Frew, Antony J.; O'Hehir, Robin; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Muraro, Antonella; Lack, Gideon; Larenas, Désirée; Levin, Michael; Nelson, Harald; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; van Ree, Ronald; Sampson, Hugh; Santos, Alexandra F.; Du Toit, George; Werfel, Thomas; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Zhang, Luo; Akdis, Cezmi A.

    2015-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been used to treat allergic disease since the early 1900s. Despite numerous clinical trials and meta-analyses proving AIT efficacious, it remains underused and is estimated to be used in less than 10% of patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma worldwide. In

  10. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare: radiologic appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kransdorf, M.J. [Saint Mary`s Hospital, Richmond, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiol.]|[Department of Radiologic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); Murphey, M.D. [Department of Radiologic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States)]|[Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)]|[Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Temple, H.T. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)]|[Department of Orthopedic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Objective. Granuloma annulare is an uncommon benign inflammatory dermatosis characterized by the formation of dermal papules with a tendency to form rings. There are several clinically distinct forms. The subcutaneous form is the most frequently encountered by radiologists, with the lesion presenting as a superficial mass. There are only a few scattered reports of the imaging appearance of this entity in the literature. We report the radiologic appearance of five cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. Design and patients. The radiologic images of five patients (three male, two female) with subcutaneous granuloma annulare were retrospectively studied. Mean patient age was 6.4 years (range, 2-13 years). The lesions occurred in the lower leg (two), foot, forearm, and hand. MR images were available for all lesions, gadolinium-enhanced imaging in three cases, radiographs in four, and bone scintigraphy in one. Results. Radiographs showed unmineralized nodular masses localized to the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The size range, in greatest dimension on imaging studies, was 1-4 cm. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with variable but generally relatively well defined margins. There was extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Conclusion. The radiologic appearance of subcutaneous granuloma annulare is characteristic, typically demonstrating a nodular soft-tissue mass involving the subcutaneous adipose tissue. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences and variable but generally well defined margins. There is extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Radiographs show a soft-tissue mass or soft-tissue swelling without evidence of bone involvement or mineralization. This radiologic appearance in a young individual is highly suggestive of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. (orig.) With 3 figs., 17 refs.

  11. Allergen immunotherapy inhibits airway eosinophilia and hyperresponsiveness associated with decreased IL-4 production by lymphocytes in a murine model of allergic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosterhout, A. J.; van Esch, B.; Hofman, G.; Hofstra, C. L.; van Ark, I.; Nijkamp, F. P.; Kapsenberg, M. L.; Savelkoul, H. F.; Weller, F. R.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether allergen immunotherapy is effective in a murine model with immunologic and pathophysiologic features reminiscent of allergic asthma. Ovalbumin-sensitized mice received increasing (1 microgram to 1 mg) subcutaneous doses of ovalbumin twice a week for 8 wk

  12. Quality assurance ofallergen-specific immunotherapy during a national outbreak of anaphylaxis: results of a continuous sentinel event surveillance system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, F; Frølund, L; Christensen, M

    2009-01-01

    was calculated at 1.3 per 10 000 injections. DISCUSSION: Our results confirm the good safety profile of SCIT. We applied a sentinel SCIT surveillance system that may offer a means of guaranteeing safety by providing online feedback to all participating clinics when SAEs occur in order to explore their causes...

  13. Nanoscale artificial antigen presenting cells for T cell immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perica, Karlo; De León Medero, Andrés; Durai, Malarvizhi; Chiu, Yen Ling; Bieler, Joan Glick; Sibener, Leah; Niemöller, Michaela; Assenmacher, Mario; Richter, Anne; Edidin, Michael; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC), which deliver stimulatory signals to cytotoxic lymphocytes, are a powerful tool for both adoptive and active immunotherapy. Thus far, aAPC have been synthesized by coupling T cell activating proteins such as CD3 or MHC-peptide to micron-sized beads. Nanoscale platforms have different trafficking and biophysical interaction properties and may allow development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. We therefore manufactured aAPC based on two types of nanoscale particle platforms: biocompatible iron-dextran paramagnetic particles (50-100 nm in diameter) and avidin-coated quantum dot nanocrystals (~30 nm). Nanoscale aAPC induced antigen-specific T cell proliferation from mouse splenocytes and human peripheral blood T cells. When injected in vivo, both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhanced tumor rejection in a subcutaneous mouse melanoma model. This is the first description of nanoscale aAPC that induce antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vitro and lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Artifical antigen presenting cells could revolutionize the field of cancer-directed immunotherapy. This team of investigators have manufactured two types of nanoscale particle platform-based aAPCs and demonstrates that both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhance tumor rejection in a melanoma model, providing the first description of nanoscale aAPCs that lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth. © 2013.

  14. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Nivolumab: Immunotherapy in Malignant Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, Heather; Schneider, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Although patients diagnosed with melanoma that is confined to the skin have a five-year survival rate of 98%, this number drops to 16% with widely metastatic disease. Melanoma rates have been steadily increasing since the 1970s, but cytotoxic chemotherapy generally prolongs survival by about four months. Nivolumab is an effective immunotherapy agent. This article discusses the use of nivolumab for metastatic melanoma. Clinical trial and early postmarketing data were reviewed. In clinical trials, patients with advanced melanoma experienced partial sustained responses to nivolumab, a new targeted immunotherapy agent, for more than one year. Nivolumab helps the immune system mobilize lymphocytes that have been inactivated by melanoma cells, enhancing the body's ability to recognize the cancer as abnormal. Compared to conventional chemotherapy, nivolumab has been shown to greatly improve survival in widespread, inoperable malignant melanoma. Oncology nurses will administer, monitor, and educate patients about nivolumab.

  16. Long-term tolerance after allergen immunotherapy is accompanied by selective persistence of blocking antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Louisa K; Shamji, Mohamed H; Walker, Samantha M; Wilson, Duncan R; Wachholz, Petra A; Francis, James N; Jacobson, Mikila R; Kimber, Ian; Till, Stephen J; Durham, Stephen R

    2011-02-01

    Grass pollen immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis is a disease-modifying treatment that results in long-term clinical tolerance lasting years after treatment discontinuation. Active treatment is associated with generation of inhibitory grass pollen-specific IgG antibodies capable of blocking allergen-IgE interactions. We sought to investigate the involvement of IgG-associated inhibitory antibodies with long-term clinical tolerance after discontinuation of grass pollen immunotherapy. We conducted a 4-year study in which patients who had moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis underwent a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled discontinuation of subcutaneous grass pollen immunotherapy. All subjects received grass pollen immunotherapy injections for 2 years (n = 13), followed by a further 2 years of either active (n = 7) or placebo (n = 6) injections. Clinical outcomes included seasonal symptoms and use of rescue medication. Serum specimens were collected at baseline and after 2 and 4 years for quantification of allergen-specific IgG antibodies. Sera were also tested for IgG-dependent inhibitory bioactivity against IgE-allergen binding in cellular assays by using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to detect binding of IgE-grass pollen allergen complexes to B cells. Clinical improvement was maintained after 2 years of discontinuation. Although immunotherapy-induced grass pollen-specific IgG1 and IgG4 levels decreased to near-preimmunotherapy levels during discontinuation, inhibitory bioactivity of allergen-specific IgG antibodies was maintained unchanged. Grass pollen immunotherapy induces a subpopulation of allergen-specific IgG antibodies with potent inhibitory activity against IgE that persists after treatment discontinuation and that could account for long-term clinical tolerance. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SUBCUTANEOUS BASIDIOBOLOMYCOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-09

    Jul 9, 2013 ... E-mail: sackey@sky.com. Conflict of interest: None declared. SUMMARY. Basidiobolomycosis is an uncommon chronic deep fungal infection in which gradually enlarging granulomas form, usually in the subcutaneous fat tissues of the limbs, chest or trunk of immunocompetent hosts, primarily children.

  18. Pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous cervical emphysema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2012-09-08

    Sep 8, 2012 ... department with a history of increasing difficulty with breathing and ... ward and commenced on intravenous antibiotics and high flow oxygen. He made remarkable improvement with complete resolution of subcutaneous emphysema on the 4th day ... the left lateral decubitus position.18 Our patient met most.

  19. Pyrexial therapy in subcutaneous phycomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy BSN

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of subcutaneous phycomycosis occurring in a 2 ½ year old child is reported for its rarity, clinical interest and paucity of literature. The condition failed to resolve with conventional antimycotics but improved with the administration of concomitant pyrexial therapy.

  20. Pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous cervical emphysema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2012-09-08

    Sep 8, 2012 ... to trauma or pathological disease state3, with gastroin- testinal and respiratory diseases most commonly impli- cated.4,5. The respiratory disease commonly associated with pneu- momediastinum and subcutaneous cervical emphysema is bronchial asthma.6 Pneumonia, though a very com- mon childhood ...

  1. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...... and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along...

  2. Oncolytic virus immunotherapy for melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmadhikari, Neal; Mehnert, Janice M; Kaufman, Howard L

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is a type of skin cancer arising from melanocytes and is increasing in incidence. Although complete surgical excision of early stage lesions may be curative, metastatic melanoma continues to be a major therapeutic challenge. Advances in understanding the molecular pathways that promote tumorigenesis and the interactions between melanoma cells and the immune system have resulted in the approval of several newly targeted agents and immunotherapy strategies for the treatment of advanced disease. Oncolytic virus immunotherapy is a new approach that uses native or attenuated live viruses to selectively kill melanoma cells and induce systemic tumor-specific immune responses. A variety of viruses are now in clinical development with the attenuated oncolytic herpesvirus encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, known as talimogene laherparepvec, recently demonstrating an improvement in durable response rate in patients with advanced melanoma compared with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor alone. A major advantage of talimogene laherparepvec and related agents is the limited toxicity and ability to use each individual tumor as a source of antigen to generate a highly specific antitumor immune response. These agents are easily administered in the out-patient setting and may be a reasonable option for patients with limited metastatic tumor burden, those with a good performance status and without extensive prior treatment, and in those who cannot tolerate more difficult therapeutic regimens. Further investigation into the impact on overall survival as monotherapy and combination of oncolytic virus immunotherapy with other forms of immunotherapy merit high priority for further clinical application of these novel agents for the treatment of melanoma and perhaps other cancers as well.

  3. The efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergy is not affected by different dosage regimens in the induction phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambugaro, R; Puccinelli, P; Burastero, S E; Di Rienzo, V

    2003-01-01

    Sublingual administration of allergens is a safe and effective alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy in patients with respiratory allergies. A drawback to this therapeutic approach is the relatively long and complex management of the induction phase. To determine whether different induction regimens affect the outcome of sublingual immunotherapy. Adult and pediatric patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and/or asthma were included in the study. Ten subjects served as controls and received symptomatic treatments. Forty-three subjects were allocated to sublingual immunotherapy, with three different induction protocols (8-, 15- and 20-day, respectively). Symptom and medication scores, skin test results and (in asthmatic patients) FEV1 values were monitored for two years. Adverse effects were recorded. All induction regimens produced a significant improvement in symptom and medication usage (p protocol is safe and effective. Our results encourage the usage of shorter induction regimens, which produce better compliance with this therapy.

  4. House dust allergy and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Wayne R

    2012-10-01

    HDM allergy is associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. In many countries childhood asthma is predominantly found in HDM-allergic children with their probability of developing disease being proportional to their IgE antibody titers and the early development of Th2 responses. While the pathogenesis is complex and increasingly linked to infection the immunologically-based allergen immunotherapy and anti-IgE antibody therapy are highly beneficial. Immunotherapy could be a short-term treatment providing lifelong relief but the current regimens depend on repeated administration of allergen over years. Immunological investigations point to a contribution of responses outside the Th2 pathway and multiple potential but unproven control mechanisms. Over half of the IgE antibodies are directed to the group 1 and 2 allergens with most of remainder to the group 4, 5, 7 and 21 allergens. This hierarchy found in high and low responders provides a platform for introducing defined allergens into immunotherapy and defined reagents for investigation.

  5. Sequential transcriptional changes dictate safe and effective antigen-specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Bronwen R; Britton, Graham J; Fang, Hai; Verhagen, Johan; Smithers, Ben; Sabatos-Peyton, Catherine A; Carney, Laura J; Gough, Julian; Strobel, Stephan; Wraith, David C

    2014-09-03

    Antigen-specific immunotherapy combats autoimmunity or allergy by reinstating immunological tolerance to target antigens without compromising immune function. Optimization of dosing strategy is critical for effective modulation of pathogenic CD4(+) T-cell activity. Here we report that dose escalation is imperative for safe, subcutaneous delivery of the high self-antigen doses required for effective tolerance induction and elicits anergic, interleukin (IL)-10-secreting regulatory CD4(+) T cells. Analysis of the CD4(+) T-cell transcriptome, at consecutive stages of escalating dose immunotherapy, reveals progressive suppression of transcripts positively regulating inflammatory effector function and repression of cell cycle pathways. We identify transcription factors, c-Maf and NFIL3, and negative co-stimulatory molecules, LAG-3, TIGIT, PD-1 and TIM-3, which characterize this regulatory CD4(+) T-cell population and whose expression correlates with the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10. These results provide a rationale for dose escalation in T-cell-directed immunotherapy and reveal novel immunological and transcriptional signatures as surrogate markers of successful immunotherapy.

  6. Injectable agents affecting subcutaneous fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Lk; Cohen, Joel L; Green, Jeremy B

    2015-09-01

    Mesotherapy is an intradermal or subcutaneous injection of therapeutic agents to induce local effects, and was pioneered in Europe during the 1950s. For the past 2 decades, there has been significant interest in the use of mesotherapy for minimally invasive local fat contouring. Based on the theorized lipolytic effects of the agent phosphatidylcholine, initial attempts involved its injection into subcutaneous tissue. With further studies, however, it became apparent that the activity attributed to phosphatidylcholine mesotherapy was due to the adipolytic effects of deoxycholate, a detergent used to solubilize phosphatidylcholine. Since then, clinical trials have surfaced that demonstrate the efficacy of a proprietary formulation of deoxycholate for local fat contouring. Current trials on mesotherapy with salmeterol, a b-adrenergic agonist and lipolysis stimulator, are underway-with promising preliminary results as well. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  7. Principles of subcutaneous port placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Shaun J; Li, Ruizong

    2011-12-01

    The introduction of totally implantable subcutaneous devices in the early 1980s provided patients with secure, reliable venous access and also gave them the ability to move more freely and have a more normal lifestyle with these devices in place. The most common totally implantable device used today is the subcutaneous port. These ports consist of an injection port connected to a catheter. Ports provide a number of advantages compared with other venous catheters; the most important is the reduced risk of infection. These devices have significantly lower rates of infection than nontunneled and tunneled catheters. Additional advantages include less frequent irrigation and minimal home care, and they are less prone to environmental or cutaneous contamination when not being accessed. This article will focus on the placement of these ports. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Subcutaneous emphysema during status astmaticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, E.

    1985-09-01

    Spontaneous subcutaneous accumulations of air in the soft parts of the thorax during an asthmatic crisis (status asthmaticus) are rarely seen. The pathomechanism of the phenomenon, which may lead to the formation of an emphysema of the soft parts via the pneumomediastinum, is discussed, and the possible complications which must be taken into account are pointed out. The value of radiological examination of the thorax in children suffering from asthma bronchiale, is explained briefly. (orig.).

  9. Epidural, paraspinal, and subcutaneous lipomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R. Nuri [Department of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2003-09-01

    A unique case of idiopathic diffuse lipomatosis is reported. The patient was an 11-year-old boy with diffuse lipomatosis in the epidural space, paraspinal muscles, and thoracolumbar subcutaneous regions. Epidural lipomatosis involved the entire thoracolumbar spine and was associated with filar thickening and lipoma. In addition, paraspinal muscles, especially the erector spinae group, had diffuse fatty infiltration. The ultimate clinical effect of this fatty tissue was urinary dysfunction, radicular pain and hypoesthesia in both legs and difficulty walking. (orig.)

  10. Polymeric particulate systems for immunotherapy of cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimian, S.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been established as a groundbreaking approach to treat cancer. It involves modulation of the host’s immune response to fight cancer. This is achieved by either enhancing tumor-specific T cell responses or inhibition of the tumor-induced immune suppression. Immunotherapy, however

  11. Laser immunotherapy for advanced solid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Mark; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Alleruzzo, Lu; Raker, Joseph; Lam, Siu Kit; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Immunologically oriented therapy (immunotherapy) has arguably proved to be the most effective method for treating advanced melanoma, the prototypical chemotherapy-resistant solid tumor. The efficacy and benefit of immunotherapy for other tumors, including those that are at least partly responsive to chemotherapy, is less well established. Breast cancer, one of the most common of the solid tumors in humans, is partially responsive to traditional chemotherapy. We believe that breast cancer patients, like melanoma patients, will benefit from the application of immunotherapy techniques. Here we review the different forms of laser immunotherapy (LIT), a key type of immunologically oriented therapy, discuss its use in melanoma and in breast cancer, and discuss its potentially pivotal role in the immunotherapy armamentarium.

  12. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities.

  13. [The metastatic tumor and immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchimoto, S; Orita, K

    1989-04-01

    Metastasis is one of the great characteristics of malignant tumors. On the basis of our data, we reported here the immunotherapy for hematogenous metastasis. A randomized controlled study of preoperative transendoscopic intratumoral injection of BRM into gastro-intestinal cancer, which was performed in our Department, revealed a decreasing tendency of distant metastases in lymph node for the injection group, suggesting the disappearance of micro-metastasis due to the injection, namely, systemic immuno-enhancement due to the local effect, leading to diminution of hematogenous metastasis. Next, a mixture of natural human TNF-alpha (nHuTNF-alpha) and natural human IFn-alpha(nHuIFN-alpha), the so-called OH-1, was described. The results of a clinical study dealing with the antitumor effect on advanced and recurrent malignant tumors made it clear that all of the effective results (72 cases) such as CR and PR were obtained by an administration schedule with a maintenance dose of more than 200 X 10(4)U; rate of efficacy was 19.4% (4 cases of CR, 10 of PR and 4 of MR). By disease, breast cancer, renal cancer and liver cancer evidenced the most remarkable effects. Examination of the antitumor effect by metastatic organ revealed the effectiveness on hematogenous metastasic tumor of lung, bone and liver, though dependent upon underlying diseases. Finally, being based on our in vitro and in vivo results, we discussed the role of these immunotherapies for metastatic tumors.

  14. Immunotherapy advances for mesothelioma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Emyr; Guazzelli, Alice; Ashtiani, Firozeh; Demonacos, Constantinos; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Mutti, Luciano

    2017-09-01

    Mesothelioma is a rare type of cancer that is strongly tied to asbestos exposure. Despite application of different modalities such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, patient prognosis remains very poor and therapies are ineffective. Much research currently focuses on the application of novel approaches such as immunotherapy towards this disease. Areas covered: The types, stages and aetiology of mesothelioma are detailed, followed by a discussion of the current treatment options such as radiotherapy, surgery, and chemotherapy. A description of innate and adaptive immunity and the principles and justification of immunotherapy is also included. Clinical trials for different immunotherapeutic modalities are described, and lastly the article closes with an expert commentary and five-year view, the former of which is summarised below. Expert commentary: Current efforts for novel mesothelioma therapies have been limited by attempting to apply treatments from other cancers, an approach which is not based on a solid understanding of mesothelioma biology. In our view, the influence of the hostile, hypoxic microenvironment and the gene expression and metabolic changes that resultantly occur should be characterised to improve therapies. Lastly, clinical trials should focus on overall survival rather than surrogate endpoints to avoid bias and inaccurate reflections of treatment effects.

  15. DETECTION OF ALLERGEN SPECIFIC PLASMA CELLS IN ALLERGIC PATIENTS TREATED WITH SUBCUTANEOUS IMMUNOTHERAPY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Johannes Martin; Dahl, Ronald; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen

    the immune response in allergic patients and results in an inhibition of the specific type 1 allergic response. This inhibition is mainly brought about by a change in the immunoglobulin response pattern from allergen specific IgE towards predominantly IgG. Seven days after vaccination with tetanus vaccine...

  16. Subcutaneous Leiomyosarcoma of the Frenulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mendis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyosarcomas of the penis are rare, with only 29 reported cases to date. We record the case of a patient who presented with a 2-year history of a seemingly indolent penile skin lesion. On histopathology of the local resection, a diagnosis of subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma was made. Specifically, leiomyosarcoma of the penile frenulum has not been clearly reported previously. The patient underwent a further excision to ensure an adequate resection margin and has had no disease recurrence at subsequent follow-up. Our case was of a lesion that, although clinically benign, was malignant and this possibility should be borne in mind when assessing patients.

  17. Improved Endpoints for Cancer Immunotherapy Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; Janetzki, Sylvia; Hodi, F. Stephen; Ibrahim, Ramy; Anderson, Aparna; Humphrey, Rachel; Blumenstein, Brent; Wolchok, Jedd

    2010-01-01

    Unlike chemotherapy, which acts directly on the tumor, cancer immunotherapies exert their effects on the immune system and demonstrate new kinetics that involve building a cellular immune response, followed by changes in tumor burden or patient survival. Thus, adequate design and evaluation of some immunotherapy clinical trials require a new development paradigm that includes reconsideration of established endpoints. Between 2004 and 2009, several initiatives facilitated by the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute and partner organizations systematically evaluated an immunotherapy-focused clinical development paradigm and created the principles for redefining trial endpoints. On this basis, a body of clinical and laboratory data was generated that supports three novel endpoint recommendations. First, cellular immune response assays generate highly variable results. Assay harmonization in multicenter trials may minimize variability and help to establish cellular immune response as a reproducible biomarker, thus allowing investigation of its relationship with clinical outcomes. Second, immunotherapy may induce novel patterns of antitumor response not captured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors or World Health Organization criteria. New immune-related response criteria were defined to more comprehensively capture all response patterns. Third, delayed separation of Kaplan–Meier curves in randomized immunotherapy trials can affect results. Altered statistical models describing hazard ratios as a function of time and recognizing differences before and after separation of curves may allow improved planning of phase III trials. These recommendations may improve our tools for cancer immunotherapy trials and may offer a more realistic and useful model for clinical investigation. PMID:20826737

  18. Presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst in adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung Mo; Lee, Sang Min; Kang, Haeyoun; Choi, Hye Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts have been described rarely, particularly among adolescents. Only a few reports have described the ultrasonographic features of bronchogenic cysts, characterizing them as nonspecific cystic masses with or without internal echogenic foci or debris. Therefore, it is hard to differentiate subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts from other subcutaneous cystic tumors ultrasonographically. We report a case of presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst in an 18-year-old man with unusual ultrasonographic findings. Ultrasonography revealed a small, oval, cystic mass containing a well-circumscribed, heterogeneously hypoechoic, egg-shaped lesion in the dependent portion of the mass within the subcutaneous fat layer overlying the sternum. Surgical excision was performed, and the cystic mass was diagnosed as a bronchogenic cyst. On pathological examination, the internal, heterogeneously hypoechoic, ball-like lesion was found to be mucous material within the cyst. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst presenting with a ball-like lesion inside of the cyst. This unusual ultrasonographic feature can be a clue to the diagnosis of subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst. In conclusion, if an anechoic cyst containing an internal, well-circumscribed, hypoechoic ball-like lesion is seen in the presternal subcutaneous fat layer, subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous cystic masses. PMID:28151916

  19. Radio-immunotherapy and chemo-immunotherapy as a novel treatment paradigm in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Licun

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive neoplasm with poor outcome. Novel radical radiation techniques using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have become an important component of therapy in mesothelioma. Immunotherapy also provides new therapeutic options. However, how best to integrate immunotherapy with standard therapy such as radiation, chemotherapy and surgery remains unknown. A change of paradigm from adjuvant normofractionation to induction accelerated hypofractionated hemithoracic radiation could provide a platform to combine immunotherapy due to the potential benefit of short course high dose radiation on the immune system. Immunotherapy can also be combined with chemotherapy. Although chemotherapy is generally considered immunosuppressive, some chemotherapeutic agents do induce cell death that can be immunogenic and stimulate a specific immune response against the tumor. Immunotherapy could also be used in between cycles of chemotherapy to limit tumor cell repopulation and optimize the results of both treatments. The integration of immunotherapy into a multimodality approach is opening new avenue of treatment for mesothelioma. PMID:28713677

  20. Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate Menu About LLS Who We Are Mission Leadership Financials History News Network Our Partners National Awards Nomination What ... Shop Donate About LLS Who We Are Mission Leadership Financials History News Network Our Partners National Awards Nomination What ...

  1. [Subcutaneous teicoplanin for children with infectious endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, E; Roméo, B; El Samad, Y; Geslin-Lichtenberger, L; Maingourd, Y; Tourneux, P

    2013-07-01

    Infectious endocarditis in children requires prolonged antibiotic therapy. In adults, antibiotics administrated subcutaneously such as teicoplanin are an alternative to intravenous treatment. We report the use of subcutaneous teicoplanin, after an initial antibiotic treatment administrated intravenously, for 2 children treated for infectious endocarditis following an initial cardiac surgery. Serum concentrations of teicoplanin were within the target range after the adaptation in the teicoplanin subcutaneous dosages. The treatment was effective for both cases. No specific side effects related to the treatment were reported. Subcutaneous administration could be used for prolonged antibiotic therapy for the treatment of infectious endocarditis in children, after an initial intravenous treatment. Variability of the bioavailability of antibiotics administrated subcutaneously requires regular testing. Prospective, randomized trials comparing intravenous and subcutaneous administration of teicoplanin should be conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of this treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuille, Elizabeth; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a promising investigational therapy for food allergy. Clinical trials in peanut, milk, egg, and wheat allergy provide evidence that OIT can effectively desensitize a majority of individuals to a food allergen. While a portion of subjects demonstrate sustained unresponsiveness, the majority regain sensitivity with allergen avoidance. The safety and tolerability of OIT continue to limit its use in some patients. Virtually all studies report adverse reactions that are more frequent during dose escalation but may also occur during maintenance therapy. Recent studies have identified adjunctive therapies (such as omalizumab) which may mitigate adverse effects. There is a paucity of data on the long-term safety and efficacy of OIT. Further study is required before OIT is ready for routine clinical practice. This review is intended to provide the reader with an up-to-date understanding of OIT, including its mechanisms, efficacy, safety profile, and potential utility in clinical practice. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. [Exosome: Trojan horse in immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Dan-Lei; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Bai, Xue-Fan

    2005-04-01

    Exosomes are small membrane-bound vesicles that are secreted by a multitude of eukaryocytes as a consequence of fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. Exosomes can play critical roles in different physiological processes depending on their origins. Exosomes secreted from professional antigen-presenting cells are enriched in MHC class I and II complexes, costimulatory molecules, hsp 70 and hsp 90 chaperones, therefore exosomes, like Trojan horse, are of importance of immunoregulation in vivo and in vitro. The review will present current trends of research on the fundamental properties, production and purification of exosomes, and will focus on their implementation in cancer and virus immunotherapy as a novel cell-free peptide-based vaccine.

  4. Immunotherapy of distant metastatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schadendorf, D; Algarra, S M; Bastholt, L

    2009-01-01

    vaccines based on dendritic cells and peptides is driven by advances in understanding antigen presentation and processing, and by new techniques of vaccine preparation, stabilisation and delivery. Several agents that have shown promising activity in metastatic melanoma including IL-21 and monoclonal......Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma consists of various approaches leading to specific or non-specific immunomodulation. The use of FDA-approved interleukin (IL)-2 alone, in combination with interferon alpha, and/or with various chemotherapeutic agents (biochemotherapy) is associated...... with significant toxicity and poor efficacy that does not improve overall survival of 96% of patients. Many studies with allogeneic and autologous vaccines have demonstrated no clinical benefit, and some randomised trials even showed a detrimental effect in the vaccine arm. The ongoing effort to develop melanoma...

  5. Subcutaneous Emphysema—Beyond the Pneumoperitoneum

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Subcutaneous emphysema and gas extravasation outside of the peritoneal cavity during laparoscopy has consequences. Knowledge of the circumstances that increase the potential for subcutaneous emphysema is necessary for safe laparoscopy. Methods: A literature review and a PubMed search are the basis for this review. Conclusions: The known risk factors leading to subcutaneous emphysema during laparoscopy are multiple attempts at abdominal entry, improper cannula placement, loose fitt...

  6. Combining Immunotherapy with Standard Glioblastoma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This clinical trial is testing standard therapy (surgery, radiation and temozolomide) plus immunotherapy with pembrolizumab with or without a cancer treatment vaccine for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, a common and deadly type of brain tumor.

  7. Who Will Benefit from Cancer Immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a “genetic signature” in the tumors of patients with advanced melanoma who responded to a form of immunotherapy called checkpoint blockade. The results could be the basis for a test that identifies likely responders.

  8. Dendritic cell immunotherapy in uterine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coosemans, An; Tuyaerts, Sandra; Vanderstraeten, Anke; Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frédéric; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2014-01-01

    Uterine cancer is the most common pelvic gynecological malignancy. Uterine sarcomas and relapsed uterine carcinomas have limited treatment options. The search for new therapies is urgent. Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy holds much promise, though has been poorly explored in uterine cancer. This commentary gives an insight in existing DC immunotherapy studies in uterine cancer and summarizes the possibilities and the importance of the loading of tumor antigens onto DC and their subsequent maturation. However, the sole application of DC immunotherapy to target uterine cancer will be insufficient because of tumor-induced immunosuppression, which will hamper the establishment of an effective anti-tumor immune response. The authors give an overview on the limited existing immunosuppressive data and propose a novel approach on DC immunotherapy in uterine cancer.

  9. Nanoparticle Design Strategies for Effective Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpurisiva, Praveena; Gad, Aniket; Piel, Brandon; Jadia, Rahul; Rai, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving and paradigm shifting treatment modality that adds a strong tool to the collective cancer treatment arsenal. It can be effective even for late stage diagnoses and has already received clinical approval. Tumors are known to not only avoid immune surveillance but also exploit the immune system to continue local tumor growth and metastasis. Because of this, most immunotherapies, particularly those directed against solid cancers, have thus far only benefited a small minority of patients. Early clinical substantiation lends weight to the claim that cancer immunotherapies, which are adaptive and enduring treatment methods, generate much more sustained and robust anticancer effects when they are effectively formulated in nanoparticles or scaffolds than when they are administered as free drugs. Engineering cancer immunotherapies using nanomaterials is, therefore, a very promising area worthy of further consideration and investigation. This review focuses on the recent advances in cancer immunoengineering using nanoparticles for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of a diverse range of immunotherapies. The delivery of immunostimulatory agents to antitumor immune cells, such as dendritic or antigen presenting cells, may be a far more efficient tactic to eradicate tumors than delivery of conventional chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In addition to its immense therapeutic potential, immunoengineering using nanoparticles also provides a valuable tool for unearthing and understanding the basics of tumor biology. Recent research using nanoparticles for cancer immunotherapy has demonstrated the advantage of physicochemical manipulation in improving the delivery of immunostimulatory agents. In vivo studies have tested a range of particle sizes, mostly less than 300 nm, and particles with both positive and negative zeta potentials for various applications. Material composition and surface modifications have been shown to

  10. Steroids vs immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Backer, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for seasonal allergic rhinitis induced by airborne allergens can be divided into two major groups: symptom-dampening drugs, such as antihistamines and corticosteroids, and disease-modifying drugs in the form of immunotherapy. It has been speculated that depot-injection corticosteroids...... given once or twice a year are a safe and patient-friendly alternative to the time-consuming immunotherapy. Our data indicate otherwise....

  11. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer. PMID:22168571

  12. Current Studies of Immunotherapy on Glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Neena Stephanie; Miller, Rickey; Lal, Richa; Mahanti, Harshini; Dixon-Mah, Yaenette N.; Decandio, Michele L.; Vandergrift, W Alex; Varma, Abhay K.; Patel, Sunil J.; Banik, Naren L.; Lindhorst, Scott M.; Giglio, Pierre; Das, Arabinda

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a form of brain tumor with a very high morbidity and mortality. Despite decades of research, the best treatments currently in clinical practice only extend survival by a number of months. A promising alternative to conventional treatment for glioblastomas is immunotherapy. Although proposed over a century ago, the field of cancer immunotherapy has historically struggled to translate it into effective clinical treatments. Better understanding is needed of the various regulatory...

  13. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Bernard A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC, convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer.

  14. Safety and efficacy of ant rush immunotherapy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Benjaponpitak, Suwat; Kamchaisatian, Wasu; Sasisakulporn, Cherapat; Jotikasthira, Wanlapa

    2017-09-01

    The Rush Immunotherapy (RIT) protocol is a valid alternative in order to reach the maintenance phase early. However, there are scarce studies in the literature that have evaluated the safety and the efficacy of an ant RIT process in children. To evaluate the safety and the efficacy of an ant RIT protocol and to identify the risk factors for systemic reactions (SRs) during an RIT procedure in children. A retrospective review was conducted for those children who were receiving an ant RIT procedure. The 3-day RIT protocol consisted of hourly subcutaneous injections in order to achieve a 0.5 ml maintenance dose of a 1:100 weight/ volume (wt/vol) of the Solenopsis invicta whole body extract. The safety for an RIT procedure was monitored by using the World Allergy Organization Subcutaneous Immunology Systemic Reaction Grading System. The efficacy was assessed by the reactions after a field ant re-sting. A total of 20 children who were receiving an ant RIT therapy were reviewed. The mean age was 9.5±3.07 years. There were 6 systemic reactions (SRs) from 324 injections during the RIT procedure (1.85%). All of the systemic reactions were Grade 1-2. There were no associations of SRs regarding age, gender, an atopic history, or the levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitization to the ants. Among the 14 patients who experienced a field ant re-sting, 4 (28.5%) patients developed Grade 3 SRs. These Grade 3 reactions were resolved after an increase of the maintenance dose to 0.5 ml of a 1:50 wt/vol. There was a significant difference in the mean age of those children who had ant re-sting systemic reactions and those who had no reactions (6.75±0.95 year vs. 10.8±3.29, p=0.036). Rush immunotherapy with ant in children is safe and it has a low occurrence of severe systemic reactions. It is an alternative treatment for those patients requiring a rapid protection.

  15. Prevention of anaphylaxis with ant venom immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Simon G A; Heddle, Robert J

    2003-12-01

    Worldwide, eight genera of ants have been associated with sting allergy. Until recently only whole ant body extracts have been used for immunotherapy. The purpose of this review is to examine recent advances in the understanding of ant venom allergy and treatment using venom immunotherapy. Public health problems due to severe ant sting anaphylaxis are not confined to the imported fire ant of North America. Pachycondyla sennaarensis (samsum ant), Pachycondyla chinensis, and Myrmecia pilosula (jack jumper ant) also appear to pose notable threats. The risk to humans from a particular species probably depends on complex interactions between likelihood of human contact, insect aggression, efficiency of the venom delivery apparatus, and venom allergenicity. The highest population prevalence of clinical ant sting allergy so far (3.0%) was reported from south-eastern Australia, due mainly to M. pilosula. Prospective follow-up of untreated people suggests that those older than 30 years with a history of severe reactions (respiratory compromise or hypotension) will benefit most from venom immunotherapy. Whereas the efficacy of ant whole body extract immunotherapy remains to be proven, ant venom immunotherapy has been demonstrated to reduce the risk of systemic reactions to M. pilosula from 72% to 3%. Although a simple method of venom extraction has been developed, small market size means that the treatment may never become widely available. Ant venom immunotherapy is feasible and highly efficacious. However, the limited geographical distribution of each species presents a major challenge to making venom extracts available for clinical use.

  16. Grass pollen immunotherapy inhibits seasonal increases in basophils and eosinophils in the nasal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D R; Irani, A M; Walker, S M; Jacobson, M R; Mackay, I S; Schwartz, L B; Durham, S R

    2001-11-01

    Symptoms of allergic rhinitis are accompanied by infiltration of the nasal mucosa with inflammatory cells, predominantly eosinophils and metachromatic cells (basophils and mast cells). Specific immunotherapy (IT) reduces mucosal eosinophilia and numbers of metachromatic cells in the epithelium. A specific marker distinguishing basophils from mast cells was recently developed. The basophil-specific monoclonal antibody 2D7 was used to determine the influence of subcutaneous IT on numbers of nasal mucosal basophils compared with the effects of IT on neutrophils, eosinophils and mast cells. During a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of grass pollen IT in 44 adults with severe summer hay fever, nasal biopsies were taken at baseline, out of the pollen season, and at the peak of the pollen season following 2 years treatment. Biopsies were processed for immunohistochemistry for basophils (2D7+), mast cells (AA1+), eosinophils (MBP+) and neutrophils (neutrophil elastase+). In placebo-treated (PL) patients there were significant seasonal increases in basophils (P pollen immunotherapy was associated with inhibition of seasonal increases in basophils and eosinophils, but not mast cells or neutrophils within the nasal epithelium. Immunotherapy may act, at least in part, by reducing seasonal recruitment of basophils and eosinophils into the epithelium.

  17. Novel immunotherapies for immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia in dogs and people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, James W; Garden, Oliver A

    2016-01-01

    Therapy of autoimmune diseases in dogs and people currently relies on use of broad-spectrum immunosuppressive drugs, which are associated with unacceptable adverse effects in some patients. Detractions of such drugs are particularly apparent in people and animals with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), when high doses are often required and for prolonged periods. Greater understanding of the immune aberrations that occur in patients with AIHA has permitted development of several forms of novel immunotherapy, which are intended to re-establish tolerance of self-antigens rather than suppressing all parts of the immune system. Such therapies should be efficacious while still permitting normal responses to pathogens and inoculation. Immunotherapies of particular interest currently include monoclonal antibodies that produce selective depletion of the B cell compartment to decrease autoantibody production, administration of peptide antigens by subcutaneous or sublingual routes to establish tolerance, adoptive transfer of regulatory T cells (Tregs), and administration of low dose recombinant interleukin 2 to encourage proliferation and activation of Tregs. These therapies are in variable stages of development, with some being trialled in people and client-owned dogs, and others undergoing validation in experimental murine models. Continued development of these immunotherapies is likely to lead to the introduction of several novel products for the management of autoimmune disease in veterinary practice in the future.

  18. Combining talimogene laherparepvec with immunotherapies in melanoma and other solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummer, Reinhard; Hoeller, Christoph; Gruter, Isabella Pezzani; Michielin, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Talimogene laherparepvec is a first-in-class intralesional oncolytic immunotherapy. In a recent Phase III trial (OPTiM), talimogene laherparepvec significantly improved durable response rate compared with subcutaneous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Overall response rate was also higher in the talimogene laherparepvec arm, and the greatest efficacy was demonstrated in patients with earlier-stage (IIIB, IIIC, or IVM1a) melanoma. Talimogene laherparepvec was well tolerated, with the majority (89%) of adverse events being grade 1 or 2. Preclinical studies have shown that talimogene laherparepvec exerts antitumor activity by selectively replicating within and destroying cancer cells, and through the release of tumor-associated antigens and expression of GM-CSF, which facilitates a wider antitumor immune response. It is hypothesized that combining talimogene laherparepvec with a systemic immunotherapy may, by bringing together complementary mechanisms of action, further enhance the efficacy of both agents. Indeed, talimogene laherparepvec is currently being assessed in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors, including ipilimumab and pembrolizumab, in trials for melanoma and other solid tumors. Early results in melanoma indicate that the combination of talimogene laherparepvec with ipilimumab or pembrolizumab has greater efficacy than either therapy alone, without additional safety concerns above those expected for each monotherapy. In this review, we discuss the latest results from trials assessing talimogene laherparepvec in combination with other immunotherapies, provide an overview of ongoing and upcoming combination trials, and suggest future directions for talimogene laherparepvec in combination therapy for solid tumors.

  19. Frontal subcutaneous blood flow, and epi- and subcutaneous temperatures during scalp cooling in normal man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Friberg, L; Gaardsting, O

    1985-01-01

    during cooling and rewarming and to measure the effect of scalp cooling on subcutaneous scalp blood flow, subcutaneous blood flow and epi- and subcutaneous temperatures were measured in the frontal region at the hairline border before and during cooling with a cooling helmet, during spontaneous rewarming...

  20. Gentamicin concentrations in human subcutaneous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Hanne; Kallehave, Finn Lasse; Kolmos, Hans Jørn Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    in human subcutaneous adipose tissue by a microdialysis technique. Seven healthy young volunteers each had four microdialysis probes placed in the fat (subcutaneous) layer of the abdominal skin. After the administration of a 240-mg gentamicin intravenous bolus, consecutive measurements of the drug...

  1. Facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration (fSCIg)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Conlon, Niall; Petermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    and diverse medical needs that treatments for SID management should strive to meet. In this special report, we study the opportunities provided by facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration (fSCIg) to treat patients for whom the conventional routes (intravenous and subcutaneous) are sub...

  2. Gentamicin concentrations in human subcutaneous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Hanne; Kallehave, Finn Lasse; Kolmos, Hans Jørn Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    Wound infections frequently originate from the subcutaneous tissue. The effect of gentamicin in subcutaneous tissue has, however, normally been evaluated from concentrations in blood or wound fluid. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of gentamicin in hu...... the presence of sufficient concentrations in the adipose tissue to be effective against common bacteria....

  3. Subcutaneous Emphysema—Beyond the Pneumoperitoneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background: Subcutaneous emphysema and gas extravasation outside of the peritoneal cavity during laparoscopy has consequences. Knowledge of the circumstances that increase the potential for subcutaneous emphysema is necessary for safe laparoscopy. Methods: A literature review and a PubMed search are the basis for this review. Conclusions: The known risk factors leading to subcutaneous emphysema during laparoscopy are multiple attempts at abdominal entry, improper cannula placement, loose fitting cannula/skin and fascial entry points, use of >5 cannulas, use of cannulas as fulcrums, torque of the laparoscope, increased intra-abdominal pressure, procedures lasting >3.5 hours, and attention to details. New additional risk factors acting as direct factors leading to subcutaneous emphysema risk and occurrence are total gas volume, gas flow rate, valveless trocar systems, and robotic fulcrum forces. Recognizing this spectrum of factors that leads to subcutaneous emphysema will yield greater patient safety during laparoscopic procedures. PMID:24680136

  4. [An analysis of skin prick test reactivity to dust mite in overweight and normal weight children with allergic asthma before and after specific immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Xue-Li; Huang, Xia; Xu, Xiao-Wen; Liang, Fan-Mei

    2016-04-01

    To study the skin prick test (SPT) reactivity to house dust mite allergens in overweight and normal weight children with allergic asthma before and after standard subcutaneous specific immunotherapy. Two hundred and fifteen children with allergic asthma who had positive SPT responses to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) and Dermatophagoides farinae (DF) were enrolled. According to the weight index, they were classified into overweight (n=63) and normal weight groups (n=152). Skin indices (SI) to DP and DF were compared between the two groups at 6 months and 1 year after standard subcutaneous specific immunotherapy. The overweight group had a significantly larger histamine wheal diameter than the normal weight group after controlling the variation in testing time (Presponses to histamine than the normal weight patients. Specific immunotherapy can reduce the reactivity to dust mite allergens in children with allergic asthma. Within one year after specific immunotherapy, the overweight children with allergic asthma have a significantly greater decrease in the reactivity to dust mite allergens than the normal weight patients.

  5. Rush Venom Immunotherapy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Rosman, Yossi; Goldberg, Arnon

    Rush venom immunotherapy (VIT) is highly effective in Hymenoptera venom allergy. Still, specific data regarding its safety and efficiency in children are rather sparse. The objective of this study was to better evaluate the safety and efficiency of rush VIT in this specific age group. Children younger than 16 years with systemic reaction to insect sting involving, at least, one body system other than skin and children aged 16-18 years with any kind of systemic reaction were offered conventional or rush VIT with a build-up phase that lasted 3 days. Eighty-four of 127 children together with their caregivers chose to receive rush VIT. Seventy of them were allergic to bee venom only. There was no difference between the children receiving rush or conventional VIT in the incidence of systemic reactions during the build-up phase (19% and 23.2%, respectively), nor was there any difference in regard to the severity of these reactions. Efficiency was improved with rush VIT, as reflected by a higher number of patients achieving the 100 mcg maintenance dose with the primary protocol (83 of 84 patients, 98.8%, and 39 of 43, 90.7%, for rush and conventional, respectively, P = .04). Rush VIT in children is as safe as and more efficient than conventional VIT. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adverse reaction to sublingual Parietaria vaccine following an ultra-rush induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, G; Ciccarelli, A; Calabrò, C

    2014-05-01

    In the treatment of respiratory allergies Sublingual Immunotherapy (SLIT) represents a valid alternative to Subcutaneous Immunotherapy (SCIT) for its better safety profile. We describe a case of acute severe asthma following the first maintenance dose of SLIT in a boy allergic to Parietaria pollen. At the initiation of therapy, the patient was in healthy condition and his asthma appeared to be under control. An ultra-rush induction had given no reaction. Despite the good safety profile of SLIT, clinicians should be aware of the risk of adverse effects when prescribing SLIT for respiratory allergies.

  7. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W. Canonica (Giorgio Walter); L. Cox (Linda); R. Pawankar (Ruby); C.E. Baena-Cagnani (Carlos); M.S. Blaiss (Michael); S. Bonini (Sergio); J. Bousquet (Jean); M. Calderon (Moises); E. Compalati (Enrico); S.R. Durham (Stephen); R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); D. Larenas-Linnemann (Désirée); H. Nelson (Harold); G. Passalacqua (Giovanni); O. Pfaar (Oliver); K. Rosario (Karyna); D. Ryan (Dermot); L. Rosenwasser (Lanny); P. Schmid-Grendelmeier (Peter); G.E. Senna (Gianenrico); E. Valovirta (Erkka); H.P. van Bever (Hugo); P. Vichyanond (Pakit); U. Wahn (Ulrich); O.M. Yusuf (Osman)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe have prepared this document, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update", according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position

  8. Does immunotherapy reduce the recurrence rate in nasal polyposis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T A El-Samny

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion We found that immunotherapy could help in improving patients′ clinical symptoms and subsequently their quality of life; postoperative immunotherapy in addition can delay the recurrence, although it does not decrease the recurrence rate significantly.

  9. Current Studies of Immunotherapy on Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Neena Stephanie; Miller, Rickey; Lal, Richa; Mahanti, Harshini; Dixon-Mah, Yaenette N; DeCandio, Michele L; Vandergrift, W Alex; Varma, Abhay K; Patel, Sunil J; Banik, Naren L; Lindhorst, Scott M; Giglio, Pierre; Das, Arabinda

    2014-04-05

    Glioblastoma is a form of brain tumor with a very high morbidity and mortality. Despite decades of research, the best treatments currently in clinical practice only extend survival by a number of months. A promising alternative to conventional treatment for glioblastomas is immunotherapy. Although proposed over a century ago, the field of cancer immunotherapy has historically struggled to translate it into effective clinical treatments. Better understanding is needed of the various regulatory and co-stimulatory factors in the glioblastoma patient for more efficient immunotherapy treatments. The tumor microenvironment is anatomically shielded from normal immune-surveillance by the blood-brain barrier, irregular lymphatic drainage system, and it's in a potently immunosuppressive environment. Immunotherapy can potentially manipulate these forces effectively to enhance anti-tumor immune response and clinical benefit. New treatments utilizing the immune system show promise in terms of targeting and efficacy. This review article attempts to discuss current practices in glioblastoma treatment, the theory behind immunotherapy, and current research into various clinical trials.

  10. Acute dermatomyositis associated with generalized subcutaneous edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Hong; Lim, Sung-Ryoun; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Lee, Kyung-Ju; Myung, Dae-Seong; Jeong, Hae-Chang; Yoon, Woong; Lee, Shin-Seok; Park, Yong-Wook

    2008-06-01

    Generalized subcutaneous edema is an uncommon manifestation of inflammatory myopathy. We report a 48-year-old female patient who presented with severe generalized edema, an erythematous skin rash, dysphagia and proximal muscle weakness. She was diagnosed with dermatomyositis from the clinical signs, increased muscle enzymes, electromyographic findings and a muscle biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased signal intensity in the muscular and subcutaneous layers. The conditions causing generalized edema were excluded. It was concluded that the generalized edema was secondary to dermatomyositis. Aggressive treatments with high-dose glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive agents were used to control the severe subcutaneous edema.

  11. International consensus on allergy immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutel, Marek; Agache, Ioana; Bonini, Sergio; Burks, A Wesley; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, Walter; Cox, Linda; Demoly, Pascal; Frew, Antony J; O'Hehir, Robin; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Muraro, Antonella; Lack, Gideon; Larenas, Désirée; Levin, Michael; Nelson, Harald; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; van Ree, Ronald; Sampson, Hugh; Santos, Alexandra F; Du Toit, George; Werfel, Thomas; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Zhang, Luo; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2015-09-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been used to treat allergic disease since the early 1900s. Despite numerous clinical trials and meta-analyses proving AIT efficacious, it remains underused and is estimated to be used in less than 10% of patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma worldwide. In addition, there are large differences between regions, which are not only due to socioeconomic status. There is practically no controversy about the use of AIT in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, but for atopic dermatitis or food allergy, the indications for AIT are not well defined. The elaboration of a wider consensus is of utmost importance because AIT is the only treatment that can change the course of allergic disease by preventing the development of asthma and new allergen sensitizations and by inducing allergen-specific immune tolerance. Safer and more effective AIT strategies are being continuously developed both through elaboration of new allergen preparations and adjuvants and alternate routes of administration. A number of guidelines, consensus documents, or both are available on both the international and national levels. The international community of allergy specialists recognizes the need to develop a comprehensive consensus report to harmonize, disseminate, and implement the best AIT practice. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the World Allergy Organization, has decided to issue an international consensus on AIT. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Gum pigmentation: an unusual adverse effect of sublingual immunotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goh, Anne; Chiang, Wen Chin; Kang, Liew Woei; Rao, Rajeshwar; Lim, Hwee Hoon; Chng, Chai Kiat

    2014-01-01

    .... This is pigmentation of the gums which can occur anytime during the course of the immunotherapy. It resolves on stopping the immunotherapy and is likely due to a local inflammatory process occurring in the gums of these children. There is no associated pain or itching with the pigmentation. It can persist as long as the child is on the immunotherapy.

  13. Recent advances in immunotherapy for allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Qutob, David; Mencia, Gemma; Fernandez-Caldas, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases are a major health problem worldwide. The therapeutic approaches to treat allergic rhinitis (AR) and allergic asthma (AA) fall in three major categories. The first step is allergen avoidance, or reduction of exposure to the offending allergen(s). The second and most widely used therapeutic practice is the prescription of relevant medication to reduce symptoms. The third therapeutic element is specific allergy vaccination, also known as allergen specific immunotherapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only etiologic treatment of allergic disorders that can alter the natural course of the disease. In this review, recent advances in immunotherapy and relevant patents are presented. General vaccine modifications could be applied for any type of allergen. New specific modifications in allergic vaccines have been developed for a variety of allergies such as house dust mites, horse, cat, parvalbumin and from birch, ragweed and parietaria pollen.

  14. Development of Novel Immunotherapies for Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensaf M. Al-Hujaily

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a disorder of terminally differentiated plasma cells characterized by clonal expansion in the bone marrow (BM. It is the second-most common hematologic malignancy. Despite significant advances in therapeutic strategies, MM remains a predominantly incurable disease emphasizing the need for the development of new treatment regimens. Immunotherapy is a promising treatment modality to circumvent challenges in the management of MM. Many novel immunotherapy strategies, such as adoptive cell therapy and monoclonal antibodies, are currently under investigation in clinical trials, with some already demonstrating a positive impact on patient survival. In this review, we will summarize the current standards of care and discuss major new approaches in immunotherapy for MM.

  15. Anti-CD40-mediated cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Sufia Butt; Sørensen, Jesper Freddie; Olsen, Barbara Nicola

    2014-01-01

    activation and thus enhancement of immune responses. Treatment with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies has been exploited in several cancer immunotherapy studies in mice and led to the development of anti-CD40 antibodies for clinical use. Here, Dacetuzumab and Lucatumumab are in the most advanced stage...... with other cancer immunotherapies, in particular interleukin (IL)-2. An in-depth analysis of this immunotherapy is provided elsewhere. In the present review, we provide an update of the most recent clinical trials with anti-CD40 antibodies. We present and discuss recent and ongoing clinical trials...... in this field, including clinical studies which combine anti-CD40 treatment with other cancer-treatments, such as Rituximab and Tremelimumab....

  16. Research Progress of Immunotherapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-nan SHAO

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is the most common head and neck cancer in Southeast Asia and Southern China, for which simple radiotherapy or concurrent radiochemotherapy is a main treatment means, with good therapeutic effects. However, although local control rate and survival rate for NPC are improved, distant metastasis is still a main cause of treatment failure. In recent years, immunotherapy has become a focus in the field of cancer research and comprehensive treatment for cancer, and has obtained certain therapeutic effects in several tumors so far, such as melanin and lymphoma. Due to its advantages of high effcacy, good specifcity and less side effects, immunotherapy has become a new promising alternative treatment for patients with NPC. This review was mainly focused on research progress of immunotherapy in NPC, specifically including adoptive immune cell therapy, tumor vaccine, checkpoint inhibitor, and immune gene therapy.

  17. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Masanori; Koga, Noriko; Moriya, Fukuko; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-01-01

    Although treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have increased over the last decade, there remains a need for strategies that can provide durable disease control and long-term benefit. Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a viable and attractive strategy for the treatment of CRPC. To date, there are multiple strategies to target the immune system, and several approaches including therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors have been most successful in clinical trials. With regard to this, we report the results of the most recent clinical trials investigating immunotherapy in CRPC and discuss the future development of immunotherapy for CRPC, as well as the potential importance of biomarkers in the future progress of this field.

  18. Recent Advances in Immunotherapy in Metastatic NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranshu Bansal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of most common malignancies and the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Despite advances in targeted therapies, majority of NSCLC patients do not have targetable genomic alterations. Nevertheless, recent discovery that NSCLC is an immunogenic tumor type, and several breakthroughs in immunotherapies have led to rapid expansion of this new treatment modality in NSCLC with recent FDA approvals of PD-1 inhibitors, nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Here, we review promising immunotherapeutic approaches in metastatic NSCLC, including checkpoint inhibitors, agents with other mechanisms of action, and immunotherapy combinations with other drugs. With advent of immunotherapy, therapeutic options in metastatic NSCLC are rapidly expanding with the hope to further expand life expectancy in metastatic lung cancer.

  19. Immunotherapy in allergy and cellular tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirumbolo, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    The basophil activation test (BAT) is an in vitro assay where the activation of basophils upon exposure to various IgE-challenging molecules is measured by flow cytometry. It is a cellular test able to investigate basophil behavior during allergy and allergy immunotherapy. A panoply of critical issues and suggestive advances have rendered this assay a promising yet puzzling tool to endeavor a full comprehension of innate immunity of allergy desensitization and manage allergen or monoclonal anti-IgE therapy. In this review a brief state of art of BAT in immunotherapy is described focusing onto the analytical issue pertaining BAT performance in allergy specific therapy. PMID:24717453

  20. Tinnitus after administration of sublingual immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    , for example, itching, swelling, irritation, ulceration of the oropharynx and nausea, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and vomiting. More severe side effects are dominated by systemic and respiratory tract manifestations. RESULTS: In this clinical case, the author reports a right-sided transient tinnitus lasting...... for 48 h after administration of sublingual immunotherapy for house dust mite in allergic rhinitis. CONCLUSIONS: This case provide important insights for clinical practice, as tinnitus has not been previously reported as a side effect of sublingual immunotherapy with house dust mite allergens....

  1. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Cancer or Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Marcela V.; Fraietta, Joseph A.; Levine, Bruce L.; Kalos, Michael; Zhao, Yangbing; June, Carl H.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy, or the infusion of lymphocytes, is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer and certain chronic viral infections. The application of the principles of synthetic biology to enhance T cell function has resulted in substantial increases in clinical efficacy. The primary challenge to the field is to identify tumor-specific targets to avoid off-tissue, on-target toxicity. Given recent advances in efficacy in numerous pilot trials, the next steps in clinical development will require multicenter trials in order to establish adoptive immunotherapy as a mainstream technology. PMID:24423116

  2. Massive Subcutaneous Emphysema in Robotic Sacrocolpopexy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Hatice; Cremins, Angela; Jones, Keisha A.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of robotic surgery has increased the popularity of laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy. Carbon dioxide insufflation, an essential component of laparoscopy, may rarely cause massive subcutaneous emphysema, which may be coincident with life-threatening situations such as hypercarbia, pneumothorax, and pneumomediastinum. Although the literature contains several reports of massive subcutaneous emphysema after a variety of laparoscopic procedures, we were not able to identify any report of this complication associated with laparoscopic or robotic sacrocolpopexy. Massive subcutaneous emphysema occurred in 3 women after robotic sacrocolpopexy in our practice. The patients had remarkable but reversible physical deformities lasting up to 1 week. A valveless endoscopic dynamic pressure system was used in all 3 of our cases. Our objective is to define the risk of massive subcutaneous emphysema during robotic sacrocolpopexy in light of these cases and discuss probable predisposing factors including the use of valveless endoscopic dynamic pressure trocars. PMID:23925018

  3. Recurrent, giant subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the thigh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Chuanping, MD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of recurrent, massive subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma involving the left thigh in a 29-year-old male from Madagascar. The patient had earlier undergone local resection of subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma a half year before. After surgical intervention, local recurrence developed at this site and was rapidly growing. The patient was surgically treated with a 2-cm-wide margin local excision in our hospital. The patient has remained recurrence free at 1-year follow-up.

  4. Frontal subcutaneous blood flow, and epi- and subcutaneous temperatures during scalp cooling in normal man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Friberg, L; Gaardsting, O

    1985-01-01

    Cooling of the scalp has been found to prevent hair loss following cytostatic treatment, but in order to obtain the hair preserving effect the subcutaneous temperature has to be reduced below 22 degrees C. In order to establish the relationship between epicutaneous and subcutaneous temperatures...... epicutaneous and subcutaneous temperatures could be demonstrated with the regression equation: s = 0.9 c + 4.9 (r = 0.99). In eight of the 10 subjects the subcutaneous temperature could be reduced below 22 degrees C with the applied technique. It is concluded that the hair preserving effect of scalp cooling...

  5. Cancer immunotherapy : insights from transgenic animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLaughlin, PMJ; Kroesen, BJ; Harmsen, MC; de Leij, LFMH

    2001-01-01

    A wide range of strategies in cancer immunotherapy has been developed in the last decade, some of which are currently being used in clinical settings. The development of these immunotherapeutical strategies has been facilitated by the generation of relevant transgenic animal models. Since the

  6. Immunoengineering: how nanotechnology can enhance cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Michael S

    2015-04-09

    Although cancer immunotherapy can lead to durable outcomes, the percentage of patients who respond to this disruptive approach remains modest to date. Encouragingly, nanotechnology can enhance the efficacy of immunostimulatory small molecules and biologics by altering their co-localization, biodistribution, and release kinetics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Particulate based vaccines for cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosalia, Rodney Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe our studies aimed at optimizing the efficacy of synthetic long peptide (SLP) vaccines via the encapsulation in Poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)particles. Immunotherapy based on SLP-vaccines has resulted in strong tumor specific immune response and importantly,

  8. Allergen immunotherapy for insect venom allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, S; Zaman, H; Varga, E-M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the management of insect venom allergy. To inform this process, we sought to assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety...

  9. Immunity to TB and targets for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes

    2012-02-01

    For centuries the treatment of TB has presented an enormous challenge to global health. In the 20th century, the treatment of TB patients with long-term multidrug therapy gave hope that TB could be controlled and cured; however, contrary to these expectations and coinciding with the emergence of AIDS, the world has witnessed a rampant increase in hard-to-treat cases of TB, along with the emergence of highly virulent and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Unfortunately, these bacteria are now circulating around the world, and there are few effective drugs to treat them. As a result, the prospects for improved treatment and control of TB in the 21st century have worsened and we urgently need to identify new therapies that deal with this problem. The potential use of immunotherapy for TB is now of greater consideration than ever before, as immunotherapy could potentially overcome the problem of drug resistance. TB immunotherapy targets the already existing host anti-TB immune response and aims to enhance killing of the bacilli. For this purpose, several approaches have been used: the use of anti-Mycobacteria antibodies; enhancing the Th1 protective responses by using mycobacterial antigens or increasing Th1 cytokines; interfering with the inflammatory process and targeting of immunosuppressive pathways and targeting the cell activation/proliferation pathways. This article reviews our current understanding of TB immunity and targets for immunotherapy that could be used in combination with current TB chemotherapy.

  10. Intralesional and systemic immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Carrie; Khushalani, Nikhil I; Zager, Jonathan S

    2016-12-01

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of metastatic melanoma and dramatically improved patient outcomes. Ipilimumab, an inhibitor of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), was the first immunotherapeutic agent to demonstrate improved survival in advanced melanoma. More recently, other immune checkpoint inhibitors, including the programmed death-1 (PD-1) inhibitors pembrolizumab and nivolumab, have demonstrated efficacy in locally advanced unresectable and metastatic melanoma. In addition to systemically delivered immunotherapies, intralesional therapies such as talimogene laherparepvec (TVEC) play an important role in the treatment of locoregionally advanced and metastatic melanoma. Areas covered: This review provides an overview of the mechanisms behind immune checkpoint inhibitors. Clinical evidence of their efficacy is presented and discussion of new patterns of response and associated immune related adverse events associated with immunotherapy are provided. Expert opinion: Treatment options for locally advanced and metastatic melanoma are expanding with new developments in immunotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors. The utility of these novel therapies in the adjuvant setting is currently being explored. The ideal treatment of metastatic melanoma continues to be multimodal, combining systemic treatments, intralesional and regional therapies, surgery and radiotherapy to achieve optimal outcomes.

  11. Proceedings of the 2016 China Cancer Immunotherapy Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xue

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Table of contents A1 Proceedings of 2016 China Cancer Immunotherapy Workshop, Beijing, China Bin Xue, Jiaqi Xu, Wenru Song, Zhimin Yang, Ke Liu, Zihai Li A2 Set the stage: fundamental immunology in forty minutes Zihai Li A3 What have we learnt from the anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy of advanced human cancer? Lieping Chen A4 Immune checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer Edward B. Garon A5 Mechanisms of response and resistance to checkpoint inhibitors in melanoma Siwen Hu-Lieskovan A6 Checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy in lymphoid malignancies Wei Ding A7 Translational research to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies Chong-Xian Pan A8 Immune checkpoint inhibitors in gastrointestinal malignancies Weijing Sun A9 What’s next beyond PD-1/PDL1? Yong-Jun Liu A10 Cancer vaccines: new insights into the oldest immunotherapy strategy Lei Zheng A11 Bispecific antibodies for cancer immunotherapy Delong Liu A12 Updates on CAR-T immunotherapy Michel Sadelain A13 Adoptive T cell therapy: personalizing cancer treatment Cassian Yee A14 Immune targets and neoantigens for cancer immunotherapy Rongfu Wang A15 Phase I/IIa trial of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells against CD133 in patients with advanced and metastatic solid tumors Meixia Chen, Yao Wang, Zhiqiang Wu, Hanren Dai, Can Luo, Yang Liu, Chuan Tong, Yelei Guo, Qingming Yang, Weidong Han A16 Cancer immunotherapy biomarkers: progress and issues Lisa H. Butterfield A17 Shaping of immunotherapy response by cancer genomes Timothy A. Chan A18 Unique development consideration for cancer immunotherapy Wenru Song A19 Immunotherapy combination Ruirong Yuan A20 Immunotherapy combination with radiotherapy Bo Lu A21 Cancer immunotherapy: past, present and future Ke Liu A22 Breakthrough therapy designation drug development and approval Max Ning A23 Current European regulation of innovative oncology medicines: opportunities for immunotherapy Harald Enzmann, Heinz Zwierzina

  12. Subcutaneous Fat Necrosis of the Newborn: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Kyung Sik; Cho, Bum Sang; Bae, Il Hun; Lee, Seung Young; Jeon, Min Hee; Lee, Ok Jun; Kim, Mi Jung [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis in the newborn is an uncommon transient disorder of the subcutaneous adipose tissue that develops after birth. We describe the characteristic ultrasonography and CT findings of a case of pathologically confirmed subcutaneous fat necrosis located at the subcutaneous fat layer of the neck, back, and shoulders with a review of the literature

  13. Frontal subcutaneous blood flow, and epi- and subcutaneous temperatures during scalp cooling in normal man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Friberg, L; Gaardsting, O

    1985-01-01

    Cooling of the scalp has been found to prevent hair loss following cytostatic treatment, but in order to obtain the hair preserving effect the subcutaneous temperature has to be reduced below 22 degrees C. In order to establish the relationship between epicutaneous and subcutaneous temperatures d...

  14. A lipid-based nano-regulator for cancer immunotherapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuan; Qiao, Sha; Zhang, Zhihong

    2017-02-01

    In the application of nanotechnology in cancer immunotherapy, antigen presenting cells (APCs, dendritic cells and macrophages) are preferable target due to their endocytic capacity and suppressed phenotype. Recently, we developed a lipid-based core-shell nanocarrier, which is stabilized by changeable fusion peptides and possesses a sub-30 diameter. With the different peptides, the nanoparticles (NPs) could either target to dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes (LNs) or tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) in tumor environment. After subcutaneous injection, the NPs could targeted deliver the encapsulated antigen peptides (APs) and adjuvants (CpG-ODN) to dendritic cells in LNs, and lead to the antigen presenting and activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes against tumor. In other case, after systemic administration, the immune regulatory molecules were carried by NPs and targeting delivered to specific immunocytes in tumor microenvironment resulting in the immunosuppressive state broken and tumor growth inhibition.

  15. Subcutaneous epinephrine vs nebulized salbutamol in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A; Madan, A

    2001-12-01

    This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of the subcutaneous epinephrine with nebulized salbutamol. Fifty asthmatic children in the age range of 6-14 years were divided into two equal groups. Group I children were given subcutaneous epinephrine and Group II were nebulized with salbutamol. Patients were observed at 15, 20, 30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 minute intervals. Both the groups had comparable mean increase in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR %) (Group I 27.7 +/- 0.7; Group II 28.8 +/- 0.06, p >0.05). In Group I there was significant increase in systolic blood pressure, 30 minutes after the start of treatment, however it settled on its own by 60 minutes. Both the groups had satisfactory improvement in clinical parameters which continued upto 4 hours after start of treatment. Subcutaneous epinephrine can be safely used if nebulizers are not available.

  16. Anaphylaxis in the allergist's office: preparing your office and staff for medical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Dana V

    2013-01-01

    All allergists who administer subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) experience anaphylaxis in their offices and must devote proper planning, preparation, and practice to ensure that all staff members recognize the early signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis and can respond appropriately. Educating staff and patients, preparing an anaphylaxis emergency cart, developing and following selection criteria for SCIT and high-risk procedures, and customizing an "Action Plan for Anaphylaxis Management" create the foundation for mounting an adequate response to anaphylaxis. Strategies to prevent near-fatal and fatal reactions include (1) avoiding, when possible, the administration of SCIT to patients on beta-blockers; (2) using a preinjection questionnaire to review changes in the patient's medical condition, e.g., episodes of asthma since the previous injection; (3) using standardized forms and procedures for SCIT; (4) one might also consider an objective measure of airway function (e.g., peak flow measurement) for the asthmatic patient before allergy injections; (5) insisting on a 30-minute waiting time after SCIT; and (6) giving consideration to prescribing a dual-pack epinephrine autoinjector to all SCIT patients. Treatment of anaphylaxis should start with epinephrine administered intramuscularly at the first sign of anaphylaxis. Oxygen and i.v. fluids may be needed for moderate-to-severe anaphylaxis or anaphylaxis that is quickly developing or unresponsive to the first injection of epinephrine. Emergency medical services should be called for all patients who are experiencing moderate-to-severe (grade 2 or higher) anaphylaxis, if they require more than 1 dose of epinephrine and/or i.v. fluids, or if they do not immediately respond to treatment.

  17. Hypertrophic Obesity and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the past 50 years, scientists have recognized that not all adipose tissue is alike, and that health risk is associated with the location as well as the amount of body fat. Different depots are sufficiently distinct with respect to fatty-acid storage and release as to probably play unique roles in human physiology. Whether fat redistribution causes metabolic disease or whether it is a marker of underlying processes that are primarily responsible is an open question. CONTENT: The limited expandability of the subcutaneous adipose tissue leads to inappropriate adipose cell expansion (hypertrophic obesity with local inflammation and a dysregulated and insulin-resistant adipose tissue. The inability to store excess fat in the subcutaneous adipose tissue is a likely key mechanism for promoting ectopic fat accumulation in tissues and areas where fat can be stored, including the intra-abdominal and visceral areas, in the liver, epi/pericardial area, around vessels, in the myocardium, and in the skeletal muscles. Many studies have implicated ectopic fat accumulation and the associated lipotoxicity as the major determinant of the metabolic complications of obesity driving systemic insulin resistance, inflammation, hepatic glucose production, and dyslipidemia. SUMMARY: In summary, hypertrophic obesity is due to an impaired ability to recruit and differentiate available adipose precursor cells in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Thus, the subcutaneous adipose tissue may be particular in its limited ability in certain individuals to undergo adipogenesis during weight increase. Inability to promote subcutaneous adipogenesis under periods of affluence would favor lipid overlow and ectopic fat accumulation with negative metabolic consequences. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipogenesis, subcutaneous adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, adipocyte dysfunction.

  18. Combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic and abdominal splenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadrashid, Reza; Paak, Neda; Salehi, Ahad

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic, and abdominal splenosis who presented with attacks of flushing, tachycardia and vague abdominal pain. The patient's past medical history included a splenectomy due to abdominal trauma and years later, a lung lobectomy due to recurrent pneumonia. An enhancing solid mass adjacent to the upper pole of the left kidney and nodular pleural based lesions in the left hemi-thorax along with nodular lesions in subcutaneous tissue of the left chest wall suggested possible adrenal malignancy with multiple metastases. Histopathologic examination demonstrated benign lesions of ectopic splenic tissue.

  19. EAACI guidelines on allergen immunotherapy: Prevention of allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halken, Susanne; Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree; Roberts, Graham; Calderón, Moises A; Angier, Elisabeth; Pfaar, Oliver; Ryan, Dermot; Agache, Ioana; Ansotegui, Ignacio J; Arasi, Stefania; Du Toit, George; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Geerth van Wijk, Roy; Jutel, Marek; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Lau, Susanne; Matricardi, Paolo M; Pajno, Giovanni B; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Penagos, Martin; Santos, Alexandra F; Sturm, Gunter J; Timmermans, Frans; van Ree, R; Varga, Eva-Maria; Wahn, Ulrich; Kristiansen, Maria; Dhami, Sangeeta; Sheikh, Aziz; Muraro, Antonella

    2017-09-13

    Allergic diseases are common and frequently coexist. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is a disease-modifying treatment for IgE-mediated allergic disease with effects beyond cessation of AIT that may include important preventive effects. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) has developed a clinical practice guideline to provide evidence-based recommendations for AIT for the prevention of (i) development of allergic comorbidities in those with established allergic diseases, (ii) development of first allergic condition, and (iii) allergic sensitization. This guideline has been developed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE II) framework, which involved a multidisciplinary expert working group, a systematic review of the underpinning evidence, and external peer-review of draft recommendations. Our key recommendation is that a 3-year course of subcutaneous or sublingual AIT can be recommended for children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis (AR) triggered by grass/birch pollen allergy to prevent asthma for up to 2 years post-AIT in addition to its sustained effect on AR symptoms and medication. Some trial data even suggest a preventive effect on asthma symptoms and medication more than 2 years post-AIT. We need more evidence concerning AIT for prevention in individuals with AR triggered by house dust mites or other allergens and for the prevention of allergic sensitization, the first allergic disease, or for the prevention of allergic comorbidities in those with other allergic conditions. Evidence for the preventive potential of AIT as disease-modifying treatment exists but there is an urgent need for more high-quality clinical trials. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  20. Effect of grass pollen immunotherapy with Alutard SQ on quality of life in seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, R J; Frew, A J; Corrigan, C J; Durham, S R

    2007-11-01

    Treatment of allergic rhinitis with subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy is effective in terms of reductions in symptoms and seasonal use of reliever medication. Its effect on quality of life (QoL), reflecting the impact of symptoms on work/school performance and leisure activities is, however, important and often overlooked. To assess effect on QoL of specific immunotherapy with two doses of Alutard SQ Phleum pratense in patients with moderately to severe seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis inadequately controlled by standard drug therapy. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of 410 patients with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Participants were randomized (2 : 1 : 1) to receive Alutard SQ P. pratense (ALK-Abelló) at maintenance doses of 100,000 SQ-U (203 subjects), 10,000 SQ-U (104 subjects) or placebo (103 subjects) given by subcutaneous injections. The groups were well matched for demographics and baseline symptoms. Quality of life was assessed using the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire which covers seven domains of health before and in the peak of the pollen season. While all domain scores were significantly improved when comparing 100,000 SQ-U with placebo, two domain scores were significantly improved when comparing 10,000 SQ-U with placebo. When comparing 100,000 SQ-U with 10,000 SQ-U, four domain scores were significantly improved. Treatment with Alutard SQ significantly improved the seasonal QoL of patients suffering from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. The improvement was more pronounced and wider ranging in patients who received the higher 100,000 SQ-U maintenance dose.

  1. Immunotherapy: A breakthrough in cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The fast growing field of immunotherapy was one of the topics extensively discussed during the recently concluded ESMO Asia Congress 2016, held from December 16– 19th December at the Suntec Convention and Exhibition Centre in Singapore. Unlike drug-based chemotherapy, immunotherapy exploits the body’s own immune system to fight cancer and is increasingly touted as the future of cancer treatment. The concept of using the immune system as a disease-fighting tool was introduced by Dr. William Bradley Coley, the ‘Father of Cancer Immunotherapy’, in the 19th century based on his work that sought to stimulate a patient’s own immune system against bacterial infection. However, a persistent question remains since the advent of immunotherapy over a century ago – can the immune system accurately recognize malignant tumor and eliminate it effectively? The answer to this question remains hotly debated owing to the differing opinions and attitudes on the application of immunotherapy. Dr. Coley noticed that in a number of cases, patients with cancer went into spontaneous remission after developing erysipelas. In 1891, Dr. Coley injected streptococcal organisms (which cause erysipelas into a patient with inoperable cancer and observed remarkable tumor regression. Although he had treated almost 900 patients with bacterial preparations that eventually became known as “Coley’s toxins”, his treatment method was not widely accepted by the medical community possibly owing to the low cure rates and the severe fever caused by the bacteria. Some physicians also feared that the immune system might not have adapted well enough to recognize and eliminate malignant cells exclusively. As a consequence, most oncologists relied on another treatment that was rapidly gaining acceptance at that time, i.e. radiation. It was only after about a century later that the medical community observed a revived interest in immunotherapy. In 1976, a trial was conducted to

  2. Allergen-loaded strontium-doped hydroxyapatite spheres improve allergen-specific immunotherapy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbani, M; Xia, W; Rhyner, C; Prati, M; Scheynius, A; Malissen, B; Engqvist, H; Maurer, M; Crameri, R; Terhorst, D

    2017-04-01

    Immunomodulatory interventions play a key role in the treatment of infections and cancer as well as allergic diseases. Adjuvants such as micro- and nanoparticles are often added to immunomodulatory therapies to enhance the triggered immune response. Here, we report the immunological assessment of novel and economically manufactured microparticle adjuvants, namely strontium-doped hydroxyapatite porous spheres (SHAS), which we suggest for the use as adjuvant and carrier in allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the synthesis procedure developed for the production of SHAS results in a highly homogeneous population of spheres. Strontium-doped hydroxyapatite porous spheres bound and released proteins such as ovalbumin (OVA) or the major cat allergen Fel d 1. SHAS-OVA were taken up by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs) and murine DCs and did not have any necrotic or apoptotic effects even at high densities. In a murine model of ASIT for allergic asthmatic inflammation, we found that OVA released from subcutaneously injected SHAS-OVA led to a sustained stimulation of both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Allergen-specific immunotherapy with SHAS-OVA as compared to soluble OVA resulted in similar humoral responses but in a higher efficacy as assessed by symptom scoring. We conclude that SHAS may constitute a suitable carrier and adjuvant for ASIT with great potential due to its unique protein-binding properties. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in asthmatic children: from the basis to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Zahra; Compalati, Enrico; Comapalati, Enrico; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-06-01

    Atopic asthma in childhood with the tendency to persist into adult life is an important issue in pediatrics. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only curative treatment option for these children, being directed to the causes of the disease. The Th2 phenotype is a predominant immunological pattern in atopic asthma and SIT leads to apoptosis/anergy of T cells and induces immune-regulatory responses and immune deviation towards Th1. Many factors can affect the safety and efficacy of SIT, such as pattern of sensitization, allergy vaccine (allergen extracts, adjuvants and conjugated molecules), route of administration (subcutaneous or sublingual) and different treatment schedules. Overall, asthma symptoms and medication scores usually decrease following a SIT course and the most common observed side effects are restricted to local swelling, erythema and pruritus. Compared with conventional pharmacotherapy, SIT may be more cost effective, providing a benefit after discontinuation and a steroid-sparing effect. In addition, it can prevent new sensitizations in monosensitized asthmatic children. Microbial supplements such as probiotics, immunomodulatory substances like anti-IgE/leukotrienes, antibodies and newer allergen preparations such as recombinant forms have been tested to improve the efficacy and safety of SIT with inconclusive results. In conclusion, SIT provides an appropriate solution for childhood asthma that should be employed more often in clinical practice. Further studies are awaited to improve current knowledge regarding the mechanisms behind SIT and determine the most appropriate materials and schedule of immunotherapy for children with asthma.

  4. Oncolytic immunotherapy: unlocking the potential of viruses to help target cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Omid; Hoffner, Brianna; Gasal, Eduard; Hong, Jenny; Carvajal, Richard D

    2017-07-15

    Oncolytic immunotherapy is a research area of cancer immunotherapy investigating the use of modified viruses to target cancer cells. A variety of different viral backbones (e.g., adenovirus, reovirus) with a diverse range of genetic modifications are currently being investigated for the treatment of a variety of cancers. The oncolytic virus that has advanced the furthest in clinical development is talimogene laherparepvec, a recombinant HSV-1 virus expressing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In a phase 3 study in patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma, intralesional talimogene laherparepvec treatment resulted in a higher durable response rate compared with subcutaneous GM-CSF treatment (16.3 versus 2.1%; P < 0.001). Notably, responses were observed at uninjected lesions including visceral lesions, indicating a systemic antitumor response had occurred. Studies evaluating combination treatments involving oncolytic viruses and immunologic agents are ongoing. This review focuses on the mechanisms of action for oncolytic viruses and highlights select agents and combinations currently in development.

  5. Immunity to visceral leishmaniasis: implications for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, Forough; Uzonna, Jude E

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania donovani, L. infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi), is a globally widespread disease with a burden of about 400,000 new infections reported annually. It is the most dangerous form of human leishmaniasis in terms of mortality and morbidity and is spreading to several nonendemic areas because of migration, global traveling and military conflicts. The emergence of Leishmania-HIV co-infection and increased prevalence of drug-resistant strains have worsened the impact of the disease. The traditional low-cost drugs are often toxic with several adverse effects, highlighting the need for development of new therapeutic and prophylactic strategies. Therefore, a detailed understanding of mechanisms of protective immunity is extremely important in order to develop new therapeutics in the form of vaccines or immunotherapies. This review gives an overview of visceral leishmaniasis, with particular emphasis on the innate and adaptive immune responses, vaccine and vaccination strategies and their potentials for immunotherapy against the disease.

  6. Immunotherapy in the management of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Janusz Piotr

    2002-01-01

    This work presents the role of Gram-negative bacteria endotoxins, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the complex and not fully explained pathogenesis of sepsis. The so-called "respiratory burst" of neutrophils and the antioxidant mechanisms of the host are also discussed. The work focuses on possible approaches to the management of sepsis connected with immunotherapy. Neutralization of endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) therapy with monoclonal antibodies or pentoxifylline (PTXF), as well as soluble recombinant cytokine agonists and antagonists used in clinical trials are taken into consideration. In addition, cytokine manipulation therapy, anti-adhesion techniques, glucocorticoides and antioxidant barrier interference are also described. So far there has been no immunotherapy of sepsis in children of proven clinical efficacy, which prompts an aggressive examination of the immune system aimed at affecting its function.

  7. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McNamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Advances of Immunotherapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing LIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is complex heterogeneous due to unclear biological characteristics in terms of cell origin, pathogenesis and driver genes etc. Diagnosis and treatment of SCLC has been slowly improved and few breakthroughs have been discovered up to now. Therefore new strategies are urgently needed to improve the efficacy of SCLC treatment. Tumor immunotherapy has potential to restore and trigger the immune system to recognize and eliminate tumor cells, notably it has only minimal adverse impact on normal tissue. Cancer vaccine, adoptive immunotherapy, cytokines and checkpoint inhibitors have now been launched for clinical treatment of SCLC. Ipilimumab is the most promising medicine of immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is expected to bring new vision to the treatment of SCLC. And further researches are needed on such problems affecting efficacy of immunotherapy as the heterogeneity of SCLC, the uncertainty of target for immunotherapy, the immune tolerance, etc.

  9. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of sublingual immunotherapy in children with house dust mite allergy in primary care: study design and recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jongste Johan C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For respiratory allergic disorders in children, sublingual immunotherapy has been developed as an alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Sublingual immunotherapy is more convenient, has a good safety profile and might be an attractive option for use in primary care. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was designed to establish the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy with house dust mite allergen compared to placebo treatment in 6 to18-year-old children with allergic rhinitis and a proven house dust mite allergy in primary care. Described here are the methodology, recruitment phases, and main characteristics of the recruited children. Methods Recruitment took place in September to December of 2005 and 2006. General practitioners (in south-west Netherlands selected children who had ever been diagnosed with allergic rhinitis. Children and parents could respond to a postal invitation. Children who responded positively were screened by telephone using a nasal symptom score. After this screening, an inclusion visit took place during which a blood sample was taken for the RAST test. Results A total of 226 general practitioners invited almost 6000 children: of these, 51% was male and 40% Conclusion Our study was designed in accordance with recent recommendations for research on establishing the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy; 98% of the target sample size was achieved. This study is expected to provide useful information on sublingual immunotherapy with house dust mite allergen in primary care. The results on efficacy and safety are expected to be available by 2010. Trial registration the trial is registered as ISRCTN91141483 (Dutch Trial Register

  10. Local immunotherapy in experimental murine lung inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Caroline Uebel, Sonja Koch, Anja Maier, Nina Sopel, Anna Graser, Stephanie Mousset & Susetta Finotto ### Abstract Innovative local immunotherapy for severe lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or lung cancer requires a successful delivery to access the desired cellular target in the lung. An important route is the direct instillation into the airways in contrast to delivery through the digestive tract. This protocol details a method to deliver a...

  11. Bioinformatics for cancer immunotherapy target discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Campos, Benito; Barnkob, Mike Stein

    2014-01-01

    therapy target discovery in a bioinformatics analysis pipeline. We describe specialized bioinformatics tools and databases for three main bottlenecks in immunotherapy target discovery: the cataloging of potentially antigenic proteins, the identification of potential HLA binders, and the selection epitopes...... and co-targets for single-epitope and multi-epitope strategies. We provide examples of application to the well-known tumor antigen HER2 and suggest bioinformatics methods to ameliorate therapy resistance and ensure efficient and lasting control of tumors....

  12. MBCP - Approach - Immunotherapy | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunotherapy CCR investigators pioneered the use of the tuberculosis vaccine—Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)—in the treatment of bladder cancer. In cases where the tumor burden is not too high and direct contact can be made with the urothelium surface of the bladder, BCG application appears to elicit an immune response that attacks the tumor as well as the attenuated virus. Ongoing clinical trials focusing on enhancing the patient’s immune system are listed below.

  13. Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alissa A.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Fadul, Camilo E.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive primary brain tumor, thrives in a microenvironment of relative immunosuppression within the relatively immune-privileged central nervous system. Despite treatments with surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, prognosis remains poor. The recent success of immunotherapy in the treatment of other cancers has renewed interest in vaccine therapy for the treatment of gliomas. In this article, we outline various immunotherapeutic strategies, review recent clinical trials data, and discuss the future of vaccine therapy for glioblastoma. PMID:22290259

  14. Targeting NK Cells for Anticancer Immunotherapy: Clinical and Preclinical Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Carotta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. Although the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer (NK) cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells, as they ki...

  15. Immunotherapy with the storage mite lepidoglyphus destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentia-Medina, A; Tapias, J A; Martín, J F; Ventas, P; Fernández, A

    1995-01-01

    We carried out a double-blind clinical trial of immunotherapy on 35 patients sensitized to the storage mite Lepidoglyphus destructor (Ld). Before and after 12 months of specific hyposensitization (Abelló Lab., Spain) we performed in vivo (skin tests with Ld, methacholine and challenge tests), and in vitro tests (specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to their major allergen Lep dI). We also monitored the efficacy and safety of the immunotherapy with clinical and analytical controls (symptoms and medication score, detection of immune complexes). After therapy we found a significant decrease in specific skin reactivity, dose of positive challenge tests, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Sputum eosinophilia decreased. Specific IgE to Ld was increased and we also observed an increase in specific IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and Lep DI. The placebo group showed no changes in these variables. There were no severe secondary reactions after treatment with the extract. Patients-self-evaluation was favourable and their labour absence decreased. No development of circulating immune complexes was associated with this immunotherapy.

  16. Immunotherapy for Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenori Uehara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although multimodal therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy have improved clinical outcomes of patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas, the prognosis of patients has plateaued over these 20 years. Immunotherapies have shown the effectiveness for several types of advanced tumors. Immunotherapies, such as cytokine therapies, vaccinations, and adoptive cell transfers, have also been investigated for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Cytokine therapies with interleukin-2 or interferons have limited efficacy because of their cytotoxicities. Liposomal muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamine (L-MTP-PE, an activator of the innate immune system, has been approved as adjuvant therapeutics in combination with conventional chemotherapy in Europe, which has improved the 5-year overall survival of patients. Vaccinations and transfer of T cells transduced to express chimeric antigen receptors have shown some efficacy for sarcomas. Ipilimumab and nivolumab are monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit immune checkpoint mechanisms. These antibodies have recently been shown to be effective for patients with melanoma and also investigated for patients with sarcomas. In this review, we provide an overview of various trials of immunotherapies for bone and soft tissue sarcomas, and discuss their potential as adjuvant therapies in combination with conventional therapies.

  17. Transmissible Venereal Tumor with Subcutaneous and Bone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A five year old entire mixed breed dog was admitted to the University of Nairobi's small animal clinic with a 5-months history of subcutaneous masses. Physical examination revealed firm and mobile masses in the subcuticular tissues, on the mandible and the transverse processes of the lumbar vertebrae. Visual inspection ...

  18. Radiological case: subcutaneous and mediastinal enfisema

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, J.; Gomes, M.; Moreira, C.; Macedo, F.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present the case of a 5 year old asmathic girl admitted to the hospital for acute non traumatic edema and crepitus of the face, neck and upper thorax. Thoracic x-ray (not shown) and thoracic and neck CT were performed, showing extensive subcutaneous and mediastinal enfisema. These are rare complications of asthma. The imaging features are described.

  19. Case Report Pneumomediastinum and Subcutaneous Emphysema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    wheezing and neck pain. He was diagnosed asthmatic at the age of eleven and had been admitted on a few occasions for acute exacerbations in the prior ten years. He had salbutamol tablets regularly. At this index presentation, he was noted to have subcutaneous swelling and crepitus over the neck and upper anterior ...

  20. Thoracic duct lymphography by subcutaneous contrast agent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 4-year-old male Japanese Shiba Inu presented with recurrent chylothorax. The thoracic duct was successfully imaged using computed tomography after the injection of an iodine contrast agent into the subcutaneous tissue surrounding the anus. The thoracic duct was successfully ligated and pericardectomy performed via ...

  1. Anthropometrical Profile, Skinfold Tickness and Subcutaneous Fat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The threatening health problems resulting from excess subcutaneous fat depositions have been reported by the world Health Organization. Also noteworthy is that childhood obesity is a pointer to adult obesity. This necessitated a study on the anthropometrical profiles of adolescents of Southeast Nigeria using ...

  2. Case Report: Pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous cervical emphysema as complications of childhood pneumonia is very unusual. They results most often from respiratory manoeuvres that produce high intrathoracic pressure. Although they are largely benign, pneumomediastinum can cause compression of major ...

  3. [Immunotherapy: Activation of a system not a pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernichon, Emilie; Rancoule, Chloé; Vallard, Alexis; Langrand-Escure, Julien; Mery, Benoîte; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-05-01

    Immunotherapy is on the roll. After revolutionary effects in melanoma, immunotherapy is invading other locations. If current treatments, chemotherapies or targeted therapies block one pathway, immunotherapy should be understood as the activation of a whole system. Indeed, oncogenesis process is defined as an escape of the immune system and the stimulation of this system can block the carcinogenic process. The aim of the present review is to describe the place of immunotherapy in the treatment of solid cancers. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Allergen immunotherapy for IgE-mediated food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Dhami, Sangeeta; Arasi, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is developing Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for IgE-mediated Food Allergy. To inform the development of clinical recommendations, we sought to critically assess evidence on the effectiveness, safety and cost...... potentially relevant papers from which we selected 31 eligible studies, comprising of 25 RCTs and six NRS, studying a total of 1259 patients. Twenty-five trials evaluated oral immunotherapy (OIT), five studies investigated sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) and one study evaluated epicutaneous immunotherapy...

  5. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderon Moises A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy. Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals’ quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases. Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in

  6. Intradermal grass pollen immunotherapy increases TH2 and IgE responses and worsens respiratory allergic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovick, Anna; Douiri, Abdel; Muir, Rachel; Guerra, Andrea; Tsioulos, Konstantinos; Hay, Evie; Lam, Emily P S; Kelly, Joanna; Peacock, Janet L; Ying, Sun; Shamji, Mohamed H; Cousins, David J; Durham, Stephen R; Till, Stephen J

    2017-06-01

    Repeated low-dose grass pollen intradermal allergen injection suppresses allergen-induced cutaneous late-phase responses comparably with conventional subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy. We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of grass pollen intradermal immunotherapy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. We randomly assigned 93 adults with grass pollen-induced allergic rhinitis to receive 7 preseasonal intradermal allergen injections (containing 7 ng of Phl p 5 major allergen) or a histamine control. The primary end point was daily combined symptom-medication scores during the 2013 pollen season (area under the curve). Analysis was by intention to treat. Skin biopsy specimens were collected after intradermal allergen challenges, and late-phase responses were measured 4 and 7, 10, or 13 months after treatment. There was no significant difference in the primary end point between treatment arms (active, n = 46; control, n = 47; median difference, 14; 95% CI, -172.5 to 215.1; P = .80). Among secondary end points, nasal symptoms were worse in the intradermal treatment group, as measured based on daily (median difference, 35; 95% CI, 4.0-67.5; P = .03) and visual analog scale (median difference, 53; 95% CI, -11.6 to 125.2; P = .05) scores. In a per-protocol analysis intradermal immunotherapy was further associated with worse asthma symptoms and fewer symptom-free days. Intradermal immunotherapy increased serum Phleum pratense-specific IgE levels (P = .001) compared with those in the control arm. T cells cultured from biopsy specimens of subjects undergoing intradermal immunotherapy had higher expression of the TH2 surface marker CRTH2 (P = .04) and lower expression of the TH1 marker CXCR3 (P = .01), respectively. Late-phase responses remained inhibited 7 months after treatment (P = .03). Intradermal allergen immunotherapy suppressed skin late-phase responses but was not clinically effective and resulted in worsening of respiratory

  7. Subcutaneous implantable defibrillator: State-of-the art 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Akerström, Finn; Arias, Miguel A; Pachón, Marta; Puchol, Alberto; Jiménez-López, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) has recently been approved for commercial use in Europe, New Zealand and the United States. It is comprised of a pulse generator, placed subcutaneously in a left lateral position, and a parasternal subcutaneous lead-electrode with two sensing electrodes separated by a shocking coil. Being an entirely subcutaneous system it avoids important periprocedural and long-term complications associated with transvenous implantable cardiove...

  8. Subcutaneous filariasis: An unusual case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valand Arvindbhai

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wuchereria bancrofti presented in subcutaneous nodule is a very rare presentation. Wuchereria bancrofti first reported by Bancrofti in Brisbane in 1876 and the name filaria Bancrofti was given in 1877 and the generic name was given in 1878. A 15-year-old male patient′s known case of pulmonary Koch′s with incidentally detected subcutaneous nodule on right arm pit, cytology from the nodule shows many sheathed microfilaria along with segment of an adult female worm. Wet mount peripheral blood smear shows nocturnal motile microfilaria. The Wuchereria bancrofti is known to be associated with pulmonary Koch′s. Nocturnal motility and cytomorphological features differentiate Wuchereria bancrofti from Wuchereria loa loa . After giving diethyl carbamazine (DEC 6 mg/kg for 21 days without disturbing anti Koch′s treatment schedule and microfilaria disappeared from peripheral blood.

  9. Awareness and understanding of cancer immunotherapy in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellstedt, H.; Gaudernack, G.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Huber, C.; Melero, I.; Parmiani, G.; Scholl, S.; Thatcher, N.; Wagstaff, J.; Zielinski, C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunotherapy in the management of cancer is growing, and a range of new immunotherapeutic strategies is becoming available. It is important that people involved in the care of cancer understand how cancer immunotherapies differ from conventional chemotherapy and apply this knowledge to

  10. Autoimmune dementia: clinical course and predictors of immunotherapy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Eoin P; McKeon, Andrew; Lennon, Vanda A; Boeve, Bradley F; Trenerry, Max R; Tan, K Meng; Drubach, Daniel A; Josephs, Keith A; Britton, Jeffrey W; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Lowe, Val; Parisi, Joseph E; Pittock, Sean J

    2010-10-01

    To define the diagnostic characteristics and predictors of treatment response in patients with suspected autoimmune dementia. Between January 1, 2002, and January 1, 2009, 72 consecutive patients received immunotherapy for suspected autoimmune dementia. Their baseline clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics were reviewed and compared between patients who were responsive to immunotherapy and those who were not. Patients were classified as responders if the treating physician had reported improvement after immunotherapy (documented in 80% by the Kokmen Short Test of Mental Status, neuropsychological testing, or both). Initial immunotherapeutic regimens included methylprednisolone in 56 patients (78%), prednisone in 12 patients (17%), dexamethasone in 2 patients (3%), intravenous immune globulin in 1 patient (1%), and plasma exchange in 1 patient (1%). Forty-six patients (64%) improved, most in the first week of treatment. Thirty-five percent of these immunotherapy responders were initially diagnosed as having a neurodegenerative or prion disorder. Pretreatment and posttreatment neuropsychological score comparisons revealed improvement in almost all cognitive domains, most notably learning and memory. Radiologic or electroencephalographic improvements were reported in 22 (56%) of 39 patients. Immunotherapy responsiveness was predicted by a subacute onset (P100 mg/dL) or pleocytosis (P=.02). Of 26 immunotherapy-responsive patients followed up for more than 1 year, 20 (77%) relapsed after discontinuing immunotherapy. Identification of clinical and serologic clues to an autoimmune dementia allows early initiation of immunotherapy, and maintenance if needed, thus favoring an optimal outcome.

  11. Macrophages in Mesothelioma : Improving immunotherapy in pulmonary oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Lievense (Sanne)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe concept that the immune system is capable of recognizing and destroying cancer cells has lead to the development of cancer immunotherapy. Although immunotherapy is a major breakthrough in the treatment of cancer, there is still much room for improvement. One of the hurdles to

  12. Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    immune checkpoint blockade, local CTLA-4 modulation, prostate cancer immunotherapy, prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), RNA-based vaccines 16...immune checkpoint blockade, local CTLA4 modulation, prostate cancer immunotherapy, prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), and RNA-based vaccines OVERALL...months): Harvest tumors from 30-week old mice to analyze tumor weight , tumor grade, tumor apoptosis and immune infiltrates and harvest mouse organs

  13. The effect of a new communication template on anticipated willingness to initiate or resume allergen immunotherapy: an internet-based patient survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Moises A; Cox, Linda; Casale, Thomas B; Mösges, Ralph; Pfaar, Oliver; Malling, Hans-Jørgen; Sastre, Joaquin; Khaitov, Musa; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    A patient's knowledge of his/her allergic condition and treatment is a key factor in adherence and effectiveness. To assess patients' understanding of allergy and acceptance of allergen immunotherapy on the basis of (i) information given by their physician at the time of prescription and (ii) a new communication template viewed some months later, we performed an Internet-based survey of patient panels in France, Germany, Spain, the USA and Russia. The survey participants were either recent "early abandoners" (having discontinued allergen immunotherapy before the end of the prescribed course) or "non-starters" (having decided not to initiate a course of allergen immunotherapy recommended by their physician). All participants completed an on-line questionnaire immediately before and immediately after viewing the new communication template. The study's main objectives were to validate the new communication template and to assess its impact on anticipated willingness to initiate or resume allergen immunotherapy. We surveyed a total of 261 patients (France: 57; Germany: 51; Spain: 52; USA: 51; Russia: 50), comprising 127 "early abandoners" and 134 "non-starters". The mean time since symptom onset and selection for the study was 14.5 years. Subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy had been prescribed in 60 % of cases. Twenty-eight percent of the participants did not know for which allergy they were being treated. Early abandoners reported a perception of low effectiveness (39 %) and complained about expense (39 %) and practical constraints (32 %). Twenty-two percent of the non-starters feared side effects. The communication template was considered to be clear (by 92 % of the patients), convincing (by 75 %) and reassuring (by 89 %); 80 % of the participants felt better informed afterwards, and 67 % stated that viewing the communication template would have made them more likely to continue or initiate allergen immunotherapy (overall willingness score: 5.65 out of 10

  14. Primary Sonographic Diagnosis of Subcutaneous Cysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M E Shivu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 40-year-old woman with a small diffuse swelling on the left side of her face. She was diagnosed with intramuscular cysticercosis in the masseter muscle (case of disseminated cysticercosis involving the muscular system and subcutaneous tissues with surrounding phlegmon on high-resolution ultrasound and managed conservatively. To our knowledge, the imaging findings of disseminated muscular cysUcercosis have been reported before only a few numbers of times. In this case, the correct diagnosis was made on the basis of high-resolution sonography of the subcutaneous tissue and muscles. It showed multiple oval to circular, predominantly anechoic lesions, which were around 1 cm in diameter. Most of these cystic lesions showed a hyperechoic focus within suggestive of a scolex. There was no increased vascularity surrounding the lesions. Thus, sonography can primarily make the correct diagnosis of disseminated muscular cysticercosis if such lesions are seen. In endemic areas, cysticercosis should be considered one of the differential diagnosis of the subcutaneous swellings.

  15. Gum pigmentation: an unusual adverse effect of sublingual immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Anne; Chiang, Wen Chin; Kang, Liew Woei; Rao, Rajeshwar; Lim, Hwee Hoon; Chng, Chai Kiat

    2014-07-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy has gained acceptance amongst the paediatric community as it is very well tolerated and is safe. The adverse effects of this therapy is minimal consisting mainly of local side effects within the oral cavity such as itching of the mouth, swelling of the lips and less frequently abdominal pain, wheezing and urticaria has been described. This report is to highlight another local side effect of sublingual immunotherapy which has been observed in 3 of our patients. This is pigmentation of the gums which can occur anytime during the course of the immunotherapy. It resolves on stopping the immunotherapy and is likely due to a local inflammatory process occurring in the gums of these children. There is no associated pain or itching with the pigmentation. It can persist as long as the child is on the immunotherapy.

  16. Conditioning neoadjuvant therapies for improved immunotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Zachary; Manjili, Saeed H; Habibi, Mehran; Guruli, Georgi; Toor, Amir A; Payne, Kyle K; Manjili, Masoud H

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by combining conventional therapies with anti-PD1/PD-L1 immunotherapies, have renewed interests in immunotherapy of cancer. The emerging concept of conventional cancer therapies combined with immunotherapy differs from the classical concept in that it is not simply taking advantage of their additive anti-tumor effects, but it is to use certain therapeutic regimens to condition the tumor microenvironment for optimal response to immunotherapy. To this end, low dose immunogenic chemotherapies, epigenetic modulators and inhibitors of cell cycle progression are potential candidates for rendering tumors highly responsive to immunotherapy. Next generation immunotherapeutics are therefore predicted to be highly effective against cancer, when they are used following appropriate immune modulatory compounds or targeted delivery of tumor cell cycle inhibitors using nanotechnology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Harnessing the Microbiome to Enhance Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H. Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbiota plays a key role in regulating the innate and adaptive immune system. Herein, we review the immunological aspects of the microbiota in tumor immunity in mice and man, with a focus on toll-like receptor (TLR agonists, vaccines, checkpoint modulators, chemotherapy, and adoptive T cell transfer (ACT therapies. We propose innovative treatments that may safely harness the microbiota to enhance T cell-based therapies in cancer patients. Finally, we highlight recent developments in tumor immunotherapy, particularly novel ways to modulate the microbiome and memory T cell responses to human malignancies.

  18. Cellular immunotherapy for soft tissue sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Steven Eric; Fishman, Mayer; Conley, Anthony P.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry; Antonia, Scott; Chiappori, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Soft tissue sarcomas are rare neoplasms, with approximately 9,000 new cases in the United States every year. Unfortunately, there is little progress in the treatment of metastatic soft tissue sarcomas in the past two decades beyond the standard approaches of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Immunotherapy is a modality complementary to conventional therapy,. It is appealing because functional anti-tumor activity could affect both local-regional and systemic disease and act over a prolonged period of time. In this report, we review immunotherapeutic investigative strategies being developed, including several tumor vaccine, antigen vaccine, and dendritic cell vaccine strategies. PMID:22401634

  19. Immunotherapy of house dust mite allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Zhu, Rongfei

    2017-10-03

    House dust mite (HDM) is a predominant source of indoor aeroallergen worldwide, which induces allergic diseases including allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, allergic asthma, atopic eczema and other allergic skin diseases. Allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only potential disease-modifying treatment of HDM allergic subjects. However, AIT remains underused due to no universally accepted allergen standardization and a shortage of rigorous clinical studies to confirm safety and efficacy. With the effort of doctors and researchers in allergy field, efficacy, safety, standardization and strategy of AIT are being continuously developed. This review presents the updated research based on recently published trials and meta-analyses.

  20. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Archana, E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org; Vaishampayan, Ulka [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Lum, Lawrence G., E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies.

  1. Sonographic Appearance of Dermal and Subcutaneous Sarcoidosis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ja Yoon; Bae, Young A; Hong, Hyeok Jin; Kwon, Kye Won [Dept. of Radiology, Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown origin that mainly involves lung and skin, but rarely involves subcutaneous tissue. While some studies have reported on CT or MR imaging findings of subcutaneous sarcoidosis, there is only one report on sonographic findings of subcutaneous sarcoidosis, recently published in the US. Familiarity with ultrasonographic findings of subcutaneous sarcoidosis might be helpful for the early diagnosis in patient with palpable nodules and image follow-up for subcutaneous sarcoidosis. Here we report on the sonographic appearance of subcutaneous sarcoidosis involving dermal and subcutaneous tissue over axilla and sole, a case diagnosed as sarcoidosis and improved by steroid treatment, along with a review of the relevant literature.

  2. Sublingual Immunotherapy in Children: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hung Kuo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Although pharmacological therapy and allergen avoidance are effective means of managing allergic disease, allergen-specific immunotherapy is able to treat not only the symptoms, but also the underlying causes of the disease. Sublingual immuno-therapy (SLIT has been shown to be effective in patients with allergic diseases. It has demonstrated long-term clinical benefits and shown the potential to modify the course of allergic disease in children with rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and asthma. The precise mechanisms of SLIT remain unclear, but antigen-presenting cells in the oral mucosa may induce regulatory T-cells that suppress the allergic immune response by increasing production of interleukin-10. SLIT has also been shown to increase allergen-specific IgG antibodies that antagonize and block the allergic response. SLIT was well tolerated in all reported, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trials. SLIT is an ideal means of treating the pediatric population because of its excellent safety and good compliance. However, the optimal dose and duration of SLIT require further investigation.

  3. Modeling Human Leukemia Immunotherapy in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Xia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The currently available human tumor xenograft models permit modeling of human cancers in vivo, but in immunocompromised hosts. Here we report a humanized mouse (hu-mouse model made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue plus hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a leukemia-associated fusion gene MLL-AF9. In addition to normal human lymphohematopoietic reconstitution as seen in non-leukemic hu-mice, these hu-mice showed spontaneous development of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, which was transplantable to secondary recipients with an autologous human immune system. Using this model, we show that lymphopenia markedly improves the antitumor efficacy of recipient leukocyte infusion (RLI, a GVHD-free immunotherapy that induces antitumor responses in association with rejection of donor chimerism in mixed allogeneic chimeras. Our data demonstrate the potential of this leukemic hu-mouse model in modeling leukemia immunotherapy, and suggest that RLI may offer a safe treatment option for leukemia patients with severe lymphopenia.

  4. Designer vaccine nanodiscs for personalized cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Rui; Ochyl, Lukasz J.; Bahjat, Keith S.; Schwendeman, Anna; Moon, James J.

    2017-04-01

    Despite the tremendous potential of peptide-based cancer vaccines, their efficacy has been limited in humans. Recent innovations in tumour exome sequencing have signalled the new era of personalized immunotherapy with patient-specific neoantigens, but a general methodology for stimulating strong CD8α+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses remains lacking. Here we demonstrate that high-density lipoprotein-mimicking nanodiscs coupled with antigen (Ag) peptides and adjuvants can markedly improve Ag/adjuvant co-delivery to lymphoid organs and sustain Ag presentation on dendritic cells. Strikingly, nanodiscs elicited up to 47-fold greater frequencies of neoantigen-specific CTLs than soluble vaccines and even 31-fold greater than perhaps the strongest adjuvant in clinical trials (that is, CpG in Montanide). Moreover, multi-epitope vaccination generated broad-spectrum T-cell responses that potently inhibited tumour growth. Nanodiscs eliminated established MC-38 and B16F10 tumours when combined with anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 therapy. These findings represent a new powerful approach for cancer immunotherapy and suggest a general strategy for personalized nanomedicine.

  5. Advances in Cancer Immunotherapy in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitha Menon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is heralded as one of the most important advances in oncology. Until recently, only limited immunotherapeutic options were available in selected immunogenic cancers like melanoma and renal cell carcinomas. Nowadays, there is an improved understanding that anti-tumor immunity is controlled by a delicate balance in the tumor microenvironment between immune stimulatory and immune inhibitory pathways. Either by blocking the inhibitory pathways or stimulating the activating pathways that regulate cytotoxic lymphocytes, anti-tumor immunity can be enhanced leading to durable anti-tumor responses. Drugs which block the immune regulatory checkpoints namely the PD-1/PDL1 and CTLA 4 pathway have shown tremendous promise in a wide spectrum of solid and hematological malignancies, significantly improving overall survival in newly diagnosed and heavily pretreated patients alike. Hence there is renewed enthusiasm in the field of immune oncology with current research focused on augmenting responses to checkpoint inhibitors by combination therapy as well as studies looking at other immune modulators and adoptive T cell therapy. In this article, we highlight the key clinical advances and concepts in immunotherapy with particular emphasis on checkpoint inhibition as well as the future direction in this field.

  6. [Brain tumor immunotherapy: Illusion or hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Denis; Dutoit, Valérie; Walker, Paul R; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves

    2017-05-01

    Immunotherapy has proven efficient for many tumors and is now part of standard of care in many indications. What is the picture for brain tumors? The recent development of anti-CTLA-4 and PD1 immune checkpoint inhibitors, which have the ability to restore T lymphocytes activity, has gathered enthusiasm and is now paving the way towards more complex models of immune system manipulation. These models include, among others, vaccination and adoptive T cell transfer technologies. Complementary to those strategies, molecules capable of reshaping the immune tumor microenvironment are currently being investigated in early phase trials. Indeed, the tumor bed is hostile to anti-tumor immune responses due to many escape mechanisms, and this is particularly true in the context of brain tumors, a master in eliciting immunosuppressive cells and molecules. The goal of this review is to describe the hopes and challenges of brain tumors immunotherapy and to propose an inventory of the current clinical research with specific focus on the therapies targeting the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. A melanin-mediated cancer immunotherapy patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yanqi; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xudong; Hu, Quanyin; Zhang, Yuqi; Liu, Qi; Wen, Di; Milligan, Joshua; Bellotti, Adriano; Huang, Leaf; Dotti, Gianpietro; Gu, Zhen

    2017-11-10

    Melanin is capable of transforming 99.9% of the absorbed sunlight energy into heat, reducing the risk of skin cancer. We here develop a melanin-mediated cancer immunotherapy strategy through a transdermal microneedle patch. B16F10 whole tumor lysate containing melanin is loaded into polymeric microneedles that allow sustained release of the lysate upon insertion into the skin. In combination with the near-infrared light irradiation, melanin in the patch mediates the generation of heat, which further promotes tumor-antigen uptake by dendritic cells, and leads to enhanced antitumor vaccination. We found that the spatiotemporal photoresponsive immunotherapy increases infiltration of polarized T cells and local cytokine release. These immunological effects increase the survival of mice after tumor challenge and elicited antitumor effects toward established primary tumor and distant tumor. Collectively, melanin generates local heat, boosts T cell activities by transdermal vaccines, and promotes antitumor immune responses. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  8. [Immunotherapy in patients allergic to bee venom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles, Martin Becerril

    2010-01-01

    to review the main features about honey-bee venom desensitization in patients with adverse reactions to honey-bee stings. a non-systematic search was performed in the main internet medical data base looking for relevant papers related to honeybee venom allergy, patients' selection for honey-bee venom immunotherapy (HBVIT), the most effective immunotherapy, the time of application and the protection obtained by HBVIT. of a total of 1,656 articles found, 18 documents were selected and revised, with the following findings: the HBVIT is indicated in patients with a clinical history and diagnostic confirmatory tests of allergy to bee venom and with the knowledge of the natural history of the disease. The protection against systemic reactions caused by new bee stings using HBVIT is over 90%. It is advisible to apply HBVIT for continuos periods of 5 years in order to develop a long-lasting immunologic tolerance. HBVIT has well defined clinical indications, and its adequate application offers protection in the long term against new bee stings.

  9. Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bainan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies.

  10. Cancer immunotherapy: Strategies for personalization and combinatorial approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, Vishwanath; Neelapu, Sattva S

    2015-12-01

    The results of recent clinical trials using novel immunotherapy strategies such as immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy approaches including CAR T-cell therapy have clearly established immunotherapy as an important modality for the treatment of cancer besides the traditional approaches of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy or targeted therapy. However, to date immunotherapy has been shown to induce durable clinical benefit in only a fraction of the patients. The use of combination strategies is likely to increase the number of patients that might benefit from immunotherapy. Indeed, over the last decade, the characterization of multiple immune resistance mechanisms used by the tumor to evade the immune system and the development of agents that target those mechanisms has generated a lot of enthusiasm for cancer immunotherapy. But a critical issue is to determine how best to combine such agents. This review will focus on novel immunotherapy agents currently in development and discuss strategies to develop and personalize combination cancer immunotherapy strategies. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgical management of subcutaneous Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, David R; Parvez, Najma; Ranganath, Sangeetha; Jinadatha, Chetan

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old male patient with a history of sarcoidosis and over 10 years of chronic low-dose glucocorticoid use, cirrhosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with two painful, enlarging subcutaneous nodules ultimately identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Two attempts at needle aspiration of the larger nodule resulted in rapid reaccumulation. Complete surgical excision of both nodules resulted in complete resolution without the use of any concomitant antifungals. Patient had no recurrence at 2 years of follow-up. PMID:25737220

  12. Subcutaneous myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logar, J; Beović, B; Triller, C; Rakovec, S

    2001-01-01

    A case of subcutaneous myiasis caused by the larvae of the Dermatobia hominis fly is described, involving the ankle region of a 25-y-old man who had returned from Peru. After removal of 4 larvae from the affected sites, the lesions healed in 2 weeks without further treatment. Because of the increasing number of people travelling to tropical America, physicians in Slovenia will have to consider Dermatobia myiasis in the differential diagnosis of furuncular lesions in patients with a relevant travel history.

  13. Switching between intravenous and subcutaneous trastuzumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gligorov, Joseph; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Müller, Volkmar

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety and tolerability of switching between subcutaneous (SC) and intravenous (IV) trastuzumab in the PrefHer study (NCT01401166). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer completed (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy and were randomised to receive four....... Rates of clinically important events, including grade ≥3 AEs, serious AEs, AEs leading to study drug discontinuation and cardiac AEs, were low and similar between treatment arms (safety signals for trastuzumab were observed. CONCLUSIONS: PrefHer revealed...... that switching from IV to SC trastuzumab (hand-held syringe or SID) or vice versa did not impact the known safety profile of trastuzumab....

  14. Long-term clinical efficacy of grass-pollen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, S R; Walker, S M; Varga, E M; Jacobson, M R; O'Brien, F; Noble, W; Till, S J; Hamid, Q A; Nouri-Aria, K T

    1999-08-12

    Pollen immunotherapy is effective in selected patients with IgE-mediated seasonal allergic rhinitis, although it is questionable whether there is long-term benefit after the discontinuation of treatment. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the discontinuation of immunotherapy for grass-pollen allergy in patients in whom three to four years of this treatment had previously been shown to be effective. During the three years of this trial, primary outcome measures were scores for seasonal symptoms and the use of rescue medication. Objective measures included the immediate conjunctival response and the immediate and late skin responses to allergen challenge. Cutaneous-biopsy specimens obtained 24 hours after intradermal allergen challenge were examined for T-cell infiltration and the presence of cytokine-producing T helper cells (TH2 cells) (as evidenced by the presence of interleukin-4 messenger RNA). A matched group of patients with hay fever who had not received immunotherapy was followed as a control for the natural course of the disease. Scores for seasonal symptoms and the use of rescue antiallergic medication, which included short courses of prednisolone, remained low after the discontinuation of immunotherapy, and there was no significant difference between patients who continued immunotherapy and those who discontinued it. Symptom scores in both treatment groups (median areas under the curve in 1995, 921 for continuation of immunotherapy and 504 for discontinuation of immunotherapy; P=0.60) were markedly lower than those in the group that had not received immunotherapy (median value in 1995, 2863). Although there was a tendency for immediate sensitivity to allergen to return late after discontinuation, there was a sustained reduction in the late skin response and associated CD3+ T-cell infiltration and interleukin-4 messenger RNA expression. Immunotherapy for grass-pollen allergy for three to four years induces prolonged

  15. Research advances in immunotherapy for chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAO Lilin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available At present, nucleos(tide analogues and interferon-α still have limited effects in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB, and therefore, it is of vital importance to develop more effective therapeutic strategies to improve the treatment outcome of CHB patients. This article introduces the immunotherapy for CHB, including therapeutic vaccines (protein vaccines, DNA vaccines, and dendritic cell vaccines and cell regulation therapy, and points out that immunotherapy is considered a promising treatment regimen for HBV infection. With further studies on the clinical outcome after HBV infection, significant advances have been achieved in immunotherapy for CHB.

  16. Melbourne trial of adjuvant immunotherapy in operable large bowel cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B N; Walker, C; Andrewartha, L; Freeman, S; Bennett, R C

    1988-01-01

    A controlled randomized clinical trial was undertaken to assess the ability of combined non-specific and specific immunotherapy to alter the disease-free interval and overall survival of patients with Stage B or C large bowel cancer. The immunotherapy consisted of a 2 year programme of vaccinations with BCG and neuraminidase-treated autologous tumour cells. Three hundred and one patients entered the trial. At 5 years of follow-up there is no evidence that this form of immunotherapy can alter either the disease-free interval or survival in this group of patients.

  17. An EAACI “European Survey on Adverse Systemic Reactions in Allergen Immunotherapy (EASSI)”: the methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moises A; Rodríguez Del Río, Pablo; Vidal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    their first dose of either SCIT or SLIT. Patient inclusion criteria were: adults and children, with IgE mediated pollen, house dust mite, Alternaria, and/or animal dander respiratory allergies who will initiate AIT. A list of 31 symptoms terms were extracted from the MedDRA (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory...

  18. Allergen immunotherapy for the prevention of allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Dhami, Sangeeta; Netuveli, Gopal

    2017-01-01

    in relation to its longer-term effects for this outcome. There was however a reduction in the short-term risk of those with allergic rhinitis developing asthma (RR=0.40; 95%CI 0.29 to 0.54), with this finding being robust to a pre-specified sensitivity analysis. We found inconclusive evidence...... asthma in those with allergic rhinitis, but it is unclear whether this benefit was maintained over the longer-term. We are unable to comment on the cost-effectiveness of AIT.......Background: There is a need to establish the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) for the prevention of allergic disease. Methods:Two reviewers independently screened nine international biomedical databases. Studies were quantitatively synthesized using...

  19. Modulation of GITR for cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, David A; Murphy, Judith T; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of co-inhibitory and co-stimulatory receptors of the immune system has become a promising new approach for immunotherapy of cancer. With the recent FDA approval of CTLA-4 blockade serving as an important proof of principal, many new targets are now being translated into the clinic. Preclinical research has demonstrated that targeting glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor related gene (GITR), a member of TNF receptor superfamily, by agonist antibodies or natural ligand, can serve as an effective anti-tumor therapy. In this review, we will cover this research and the rationale that has led to initiation of two phase 1 clinical trials targeting GITR as a new immunotherapeutic approach for cancer. PMID:22245556

  20. Nanoparticle based-immunotherapy against allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, Carlos; Gastaminza, Gabriel; Ferrer, Marta; Sanz, María L; Irache, Juan M

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases are one of the most prevalent diseases, reaching epidemic proportions in developed countries. An allergic reaction occurs after contact with an environmental protein, such as inhalants allergens (pollen, animal dander, house dust mites), or food proteins. This response is known as part of the type 2 immunity that is counterbalanced by Type 1 immunity and Tregs. Widely used allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) is a long term treatment to induce such switch from Th2 to Th1 response. However, conventional IT requires multiple allergen injections over a long period of time and is not free of risk of producing allergic reactions. As a consequence, new safer and faster immunotherapeutic methods are required. This review deals with allergen IT using nanoparticles as allergen delivery system that will allow a different way of administration, reduce dose and diminish allergen exposure to IgE bound to mast cells or basophils.

  1. Roles for Innate Immunity in Combination Immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Kelly D; Irvine, Darrell J

    2017-10-01

    Immunity to infectious agents involves a coordinated response of innate and adaptive immune cells working in concert, with many feed-forward and regulatory interactions between both arms of the immune system. In contrast, many therapeutic strategies to augment immunity against tumors have focused predominantly on stimulation of adaptive immunity. However, a growing appreciation of the potential contributions of innate immune effectors to antitumor immunity, especially in the context of combination immunotherapy, is leading to novel strategies to elicit a more integrated immune response against cancer. Here we review antitumor activities of innate immune cells, mechanisms of their synergy with adaptive immune responses against tumors, and discuss recent studies highlighting the potential of combination therapies recruiting both innate and adaptive immune effectors to eradicate established tumors. Cancer Res; 77(19); 5215-21. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Food allergy: immune mechanisms, diagnosis and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wong; Freeland, Deborah M Hussey; Nadeau, Kari C

    2016-12-01

    Food allergy is a pathological, potentially deadly, immune reaction triggered by normally innocuous food protein antigens. The prevalence of food allergies is rising and the standard of care is not optimal, consisting of food-allergen avoidance and treatment of allergen-induced systemic reactions with adrenaline. Thus, accurate diagnosis, prevention and treatment are pressing needs, research into which has been catalysed by technological advances that are enabling a mechanistic understanding of food allergy at the cellular and molecular levels. We discuss the diagnosis and treatment of IgE-mediated food allergy in the context of the immune mechanisms associated with healthy tolerance to common foods, the inflammatory response underlying most food allergies, and immunotherapy-induced desensitization. We highlight promising research advances, therapeutic innovations and the challenges that remain.

  3. Galectin-1 and immunotherapy for brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuere, Tina; De Vleeschouwer, Steven; Lefranc, Florence; Kiss, Robert; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2011-04-01

    The prognosis of patients diagnosed with high-grade glioma continues to be dismal in spite of multimodal treatment. Active specific immunotherapy by means of dendritic cell vaccination is considered to be a new promising concept that aims at generating an anti-tumoral immune response. However, it is now widely accepted that the success of immunotherapeutic strategies to promote tumor regression will rely not only on enhancing the effector arm of the immune response but also on downregulation of the counteracting tolerogenic signals. In this article, we summarize evidence that galectin-1, an evolutionarily conserved glycan-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in high-grade glioma, is an important player in glioma-mediated immune escape.

  4. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... transfer (ACT) using expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or genetically modified cytotoxic T cells. However, despite clear clinical responses, only a fraction of patients respond to treatment and there is an urgent call for characterization of predictive biomarkers. CD8 positive T cells can...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However...

  5. Allergen immunotherapy: Current and new therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Rolland

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT involves the administration of gradually increasing amounts of an allergen extract to reduce clinical symptoms of allergy. Well-controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of SIT in the treatment of allergic diseases, including rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma, and best practice protocols have been established. Nevertheless, application of this potentially curative treatment is restricted, largely due to the risk of serious adverse events, especially in asthmatics. Although efficacy is high for venom-induced allergy, success rates for the more common aeroallergen-induced disease range from 60 to 80% depending on the allergen. The practice of SIT is currently being refined following major advances in our knowledge of basic immune mechanisms. In particular, new T cell-targeted strategies are being explored with the awareness of the pivotal role allergen-specific T cells play in initiating and regulating the immune response to allergens. Current SIT induces decreased IgE class switching and eosinophil activation by downregulating production of the T helper (Th 2-type cytokines interleukin (IL-4 and IL-5. Therefore, allergen preparations that have ablated IgE binding while retaining T cell reactivity should still be clinically effective but have substantially improved safety. These approaches include the use of small peptides based on dominant T cell epitopes of allergens and chemically modified or recombinant allergen molecules. Both approaches have already been tested, with promising results, in animal models; peptide immunotherapy has been shown effective in clinical trials. Defined hypoallergenic molecules or peptides offer ease of standardization in addition to efficacy and safety and will result in more widespread use of SIT in clinical practice. Elucidation of mechanisms for downregulating Th2-predominant responses to allergen by SIT will enable the development of laboratory assays for

  6. Immunotherapy against cancer-related viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Haruko; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 12% of all cancers worldwide are associated with viral infections. To date, eight viruses have been shown to contribute to the development of human cancers, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Hepatitis B and C viruses, and Human papilloma virus, among others. These DNA and RNA viruses produce oncogenic effects through distinct mechanisms. First, viruses may induce sustained disorders of host cell growth and survival through the genes they express, or may induce DNA damage response in host cells, which in turn increases host genome instability. Second, they may induce chronic inflammation and secondary tissue damage favoring the development of oncogenic processes in host cells. Viruses like HIV can create a more permissive environment for cancer development through immune inhibition, but we will focus on the previous two mechanisms in this review. Unlike traditional cancer therapies that cannot distinguish infected cells from non-infected cells, immunotherapies are uniquely equipped to target virus-associated malignancies. The targeting and functioning mechanisms associated with the immune response can be exploited to prevent viral infections by vaccination, and can also be used to treat infection before cancer establishment. Successes in using the immune system to eradicate established malignancy by selective recognition of virus-associated tumor cells are currently being reported. For example, numerous clinical trials of adoptive transfer of ex vivo generated virus-specific T cells have shown benefit even for established tumors in patients with EBV-associated malignancies. Additional studies in other virus-associated tumors have also been initiated and in this review we describe the current status of immunotherapy for virus-associated malignancies and discuss future prospects.

  7. Immune checkpoint‑targeted cancer immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Swatler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells may express on their surface various characteristic antigens that can induce antitumor immunity. However, cancer in human body may induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment that limits immune response to its antigens. For many years scientists have tried to develop an immunotherapy which would induce a potent antitumor immune response and lead to an elimination of the disease. One of the most promising immunotherapies is blockade of immune checkpoints, i.e. a group of costimulatory molecules negatively regulating the immune system. Their blockade would overcome immune tolerance in the tumor microenvironment and amplify antitumor immunity. What’s more, immune checkpoint blockade may turn out even more profitable, as some of immune checkpoints and their ligands are expressed on tumor surface and on tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, contributing to the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment. Phase III clinical trials have confirmed efficacy of an anti‑CTLA‑4 antibody ipilimumab, thereby leading to its acceptance for the treatment of advanced melanoma. Thanks to promising results of the phase I clinical trials, a breakthrough therapy designation and an early approval for the treatment have been granted to anti‑PD‑1 antibodies ‑ nivolumab (for the treatment of advanced melanoma and advanced non‑small cell lung cancer and pembrolizumab (for the treatment of advanced melanoma and, in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer, an anti‑PD‑L1 antibody ‑ MPDL3280A as well. Other immune checkpoints, such as LAG‑3, TIM‑3, BTLA, B7‑H3 and B7‑H4, are also under early evaluation.

  8. [Cancer immunotherapy: Rational and recent breakthroughs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier, C; Karaki, S; Roussel, H; Badoual, C; Tran, T; Anson, M; Fabre, E; Oudard, S; Tartour, E

    2016-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has occupied a marginal therapeutic option in cancer despite strong arguments documenting the role of the immune system in controlling the proliferation of cancers. The recent success of immunotherapy results from a change in the past paradigm. From now on, the goal is not only to activate the immune system against tumor, but also to take account of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment Among these mechanisms, negative costimulatory molecules (CTLA-4, PD-1, etc.) expressed by T cells in the tumor could explain their lack of effectiveness in inhibiting tumor growth. Blocking these molecules allowed the reactivation of anti-tumor T cells. Clinically, the administration of anti-CTLA-4 antibody (ipilimumab: Yervoy(®)) was granted marketing authorization for patients with metastatic melanoma. The anti-PD-1 antibodies (nivolumab: Opdivo(®), pembrolizumab: Keytruda(®)) have demonstrated clinical efficacy when compared to the standard therapy in metastatic melanomas, advanced lung cancers and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. In phase I and II clinical trials, other tumors (Hodgkin's disease, head and neck cancers, bladder cancer, gastric cancer, etc.) appear to be responsive to these immunomodulators. These treatments were associated with the occurrence of side effects dominated by autoimmunity predictable by unlocking the breaks exerted by immune system to maintain tolerance against self-antigen. The optimization of therapeutic combination based on these molecules and the search for biomarkers associated with these treatments constitute a challenge for the future for this new therapeutic class of drugs for oncology. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene-expression profiling to predict responsiveness to immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, N B; Maker, A V

    2017-03-01

    Recent clinical successes with immunotherapy have resulted in expanding indications for cancer therapy. To enhance antitumor immune responses, and to better choose specific strategies matched to patient and tumor characteristics, genomic-driven precision immunotherapy will be necessary. Herein, we explore the role that tumor gene-expression profiling (GEP) may have in the prediction of an immunotherapeutic response. Genetic markers associated with response to immunotherapy are addressed as they pertain to the tumor genomic landscape, the extent of DNA damage, tumor mutational load and tumor-specific neoantigens. Furthermore, genetic markers associated with resistance to checkpoint blockade and relapse are reviewed. Finally, the utility of GEP to identify new tumor types for immunotherapy and implications for combinatorial strategies are summarized.

  10. Immunotherapy Shown Safe in Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunotherapy Shown Safe in Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trial Next step is to see if it works ... Aug. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A small clinical trial showed an immune system therapy was safe for ...

  11. Research on Immunotherapy: Using the Immune System to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... laboratories that will be responsible for the comprehensive molecular analysis of clinical trial specimens for biomarkers associated ... Immunotherapy to Treat Cancer Biological Therapies for Cancer CAR T Cells: Engineering Patients’ Immune Cells to Treat ...

  12. Systemic Immunity Is Required for Effective Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Matthew H; Carmi, Yaron; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Kwek, Serena S; Madhireddy, Deepthi; Martins, Maria M; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Prestwood, Tyler R; Chabon, Jonathan; Bendall, Sean C; Fong, Lawrence; Nolan, Garry P; Engleman, Edgar G

    2017-01-26

    Immune responses involve coordination across cell types and tissues. However, studies in cancer immunotherapy have focused heavily on local immune responses in the tumor microenvironment. To investigate immune activity more broadly, we performed an organism-wide study in genetically engineered cancer models using mass cytometry. We analyzed immune responses in several tissues after immunotherapy by developing intuitive models for visualizing single-cell data with statistical inference. Immune activation was evident in the tumor and systemically shortly after effective therapy was administered. However, during tumor rejection, only peripheral immune cells sustained their proliferation. This systemic response was coordinated across tissues and required for tumor eradication in several immunotherapy models. An emergent population of peripheral CD4 T cells conferred protection against new tumors and was significantly expanded in patients responding to immunotherapy. These studies demonstrate the critical impact of systemic immune responses that drive tumor rejection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunotherapy for food allergies: a myth or a reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praticò, Andrea D; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is a worldwide issue, with an estimated prevalence of 2-10%. An effective treatment is not available for people affected and the only management is the avoidance of the allergen. Oral immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy have been tested by several authors, in particular for milk, egg and peanuts allergy, with significant results in term of desensitization induction. The achievement of tolerance is by the contrary doubtful, with different results obtained. In this review, we reviewed protocols of oral and sublingual immunotherapy for food allergy published in literature, mainly against milk, egg and peanut. At present, immunotherapy does not represent the gold standard in the treatment of food allergy, even if it can desensitize patients.

  14. International Consensus on Allergen Immunotherapy II: Mechanisms, standardization, and pharmacoeconomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jutel, Marek; Agache, Ioana; Bonini, Sergio; Burks, A. Wesley; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, Walter; Cox, Linda; Demoly, Pascal; Frew, Antony J.; O'Hehir, Robyn; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Muraro, Antonella; Lack, Gideon; Larenas, Désirée; Levin, Michael; Martin, Bryan L.; Nelson, Harald; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; van Ree, Ronald; Sampson, Hugh; Sublett, James L.; Sugita, Kazunari; Du Toit, George; Werfel, Thomas; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Zhang, Luo; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A.

    2016-01-01

    This article continues the comprehensive international consensus (ICON) statement on allergen immunotherapy (AIT). The initial article also recently appeared in the Journal. The conclusions below focus on key mechanisms of AIT-triggered tolerance, requirements in allergen standardization, AIT

  15. Brain Tumor Immunotherapy: What have We Learned so Far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gool, Stefaan Willy

    2015-01-01

    High grade glioma is a rare brain cancer, incurable in spite of modern neurosurgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Novel approaches are in research, and immunotherapy emerges as a promising strategy. Clinical experiences with active specific immunotherapy demonstrate feasibility, safety and most importantly, but incompletely understood, prolonged long-term survival in a fraction of the patients. In relapsed patients, we developed an immunotherapy schedule and we categorized patients into clinically defined risk profiles. We learned how to combine immunotherapy with standard multimodal treatment strategies for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme patients. The developmental program allows further improvements related to newest scientific insights. Finally, we developed a mode of care within academic centers to organize cell-based therapies for experimental clinical trials in a large number of patients.

  16. Brain tumor immunotherapy. What have we learned so far ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefaan Willy Van Gool

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High grade glioma (HGG is a rare brain cancer, incurable in spite of modern neurosurgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Novel approaches are in research, and immunotherapy emerges as a promising strategy. Clinical experiences with active specific immunotherapy demonstrate feasibility, safety and most importantly, but incompletely understood, prolonged long-term survival in a fraction of the patients. In relapsed patients, we developed an immunotherapy schedule and we categorized patients into clinically defined risk profiles. We learned how to combine immunotherapy with standard multimodal treatment strategies for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM patients. The developmental program allows further improvements related to newest scientific insights. Finally we developed a mode of care within academic centers to organize cell-based therapies for experimental clinical trials in a large number of patients.

  17. Cellular adoptive immunotherapy after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Dolstra, H.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review presents the role of donor lymphocyte infusion, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells in cellular immunotherapy after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. RECENT FINDINGS: It becomes increasingly possible to infuse more specialized subsets of lymphocyte cells

  18. Hypothesis: stimulation of trained immunity as adjunctive immunotherapy in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2017-12-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has steadily progressed during the past decades, with checkpoint inhibitor therapy becoming the latest and one of the most promising treatments. Despite the progress, most of the patients do not respond or develop resistance, and novel additional approaches are needed to improve the clinical effectiveness of immunotherapy. Trained immunity (TI) has been described recently as a process of epigenetic and metabolic reprogramming that induces a long-term enhanced function of innate immune cells. TI is considered to have beneficial effects in improving host response to infections and vaccination, and increasing evidence suggests that TI-mediated mechanisms also have useful and potent antitumor effects. We hypothesized that novel and more effective approaches for immunotherapy in cancer may involve induction of TI, alone or in combination with current immunotherapies. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  19. Improving cancer immunotherapy by targeting the STATe of MDSCs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, N. de; Koning, C.; Spilgies, L.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Hato, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic avenue; however, in practice its efficacy is hampered by an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment that consists of suppressive cell types like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Eradication or reprogramming of MDSCs could therefore enhance

  20. Analysis of aluminium in rat following administration of allergen immunotherapy using either aluminium or microcrystalline-tyrosine-based adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Stuart A; Heath, Matthew D; Kramer, Matthias F; Skinner, Murray A

    2016-03-01

    Investigation into the absorption, distribution and elimination of aluminium in rat after subcutaneous aluminium adjuvant formulation administration using ICP-MS is described. Assays were verified under the principles of a tiered approach. There was no evidence of systemic exposure of aluminium, in brain or in kidney. Extensive and persistent retention of aluminium at the dose site was observed for at least 180 days after administration. This is the first published work that has quantified aluminium adjuvant retention based on the quantity of aluminium delivered in a typical allergy immunotherapy course. The results indicate that the repeated administration of aluminium-containing adjuvants will likely contribute directly and significantly to an individual's body burden of aluminium.

  1. Adjuvant immunotherapy after surgery and radiotherapy for breast carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavasiliou, C.; Pappas, J.; Pavlatou, M.; Keramopoulos, A.; Giannakoulis, N.; Koumantakis, E.; Nicolaidis, C.

    1982-04-01

    One hundred patients with operable breast cancer received 'prophylactic' postoperative irradiation after mastectomy. In addition, during irradiation and for four months afterwards, part of the patients received immunotherapy (BCG scarification and oral administration of levamisole), while the rest served as controls. Although survival time in the two groups was about the same, disease-free survival time was significantly longer in the immunotherapy group. Tumor reactivation was preceded by deterioration of the Leucocyte Migration Inhibition Index.

  2. EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy: Hymenoptera venom allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Gunter J; Varga, Eva-Maria; Roberts, Graham; Mosbech, Holger; Bilò, M Beatrice; Akdis, Cezmi A; Antolín-Amérigo, Darío; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Gawlik, Radoslaw; Jakob, Thilo; Kosnik, Mitja; Lange, Joanna; Mingomataj, Ervin; Mitsias, Dimitris I; Ollert, Markus; Oude Elberink, Joanna N G; Pfaar, Oliver; Pitsios, Constantinos; Pravettoni, Valerio; Ruëff, Franziska; Sin, Betül Ayşe; Agache, Ioana; Angier, Elizabeth; Arasi, Stefania; Calderón, Moises A; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Halken, Susanne; Jutel, Marek; Lau, Susanne; Pajno, Giovanni B; van Ree, Ronald; Ryan, Dermot; Spranger, Otto; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; Dhami, Sangeeta; Zaman, Hadar; Sheikh, Aziz; Muraro, Antonella

    2017-07-27

    Hymenoptera venom allergy is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction following a honeybee, vespid or ant sting. Systemic allergic sting reactions have been reported in up to 7.5% of adults and up to 3.4% of children. They can be mild and restricted to the skin or moderate-to-severe with a risk of life-threatening anaphylaxis. Patients should carry an emergency kit containing an adrenaline autoinjector, H1 -antihistamines, and corticosteroids depending on the severity of their previous sting reaction(s). The only treatment to prevent further systemic sting reactions is venom immunotherapy. This guideline has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology's (EAACI) Taskforce on Venom Immunotherapy as part of the EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy initiative. The guideline aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of venom immunotherapy, has been informed by a formal systematic review and meta-analysis and produced using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) approach. The process included representation from a range of stakeholders. Venom immunotherapy is indicated in venom allergic children and adults to prevent further moderate to severe systemic sting reactions. Venom immunotherapy is also recommended in adults with only generalized skin reactions as it results in significant improvements in quality of life compared to carrying an adrenaline auto-injector. This guideline aims to give practical advice on performing venom immunotherapy. Key sections cover general considerations before initiating venom immunotherapy, evidence-based clinical recommendations, risk factors for adverse events and for relapse of systemic sting reaction, and a summary of gaps in the evidence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Gum pigmentation: an unusual adverse effect of sublingual immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, Anne; Chiang, Wen Chin; Kang, Liew Woei; Rao, Rajeshwar; Lim, Hwee Hoon; Chng, Chai Kiat

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy has gained acceptance amongst the paediatric community as it is very well tolerated and is safe. The adverse effects of this therapy is minimal consisting mainly of local side effects within the oral cavity such as itching of the mouth, swelling of the lips and less frequently abdominal pain, wheezing and urticaria has been described. This report is to highlight another local side effect of sublingual immunotherapy which has been observed in 3 of our patients. This is...

  4. Fighting liver cancer with combination immunotherapies | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new clinical trial testing the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatment combinations against liver cancer is enrolling patients at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Individually, immunotherapy drugs harness the power of the human immune system to better identify and kill cancer cells. Now, researchers at the NIH’s Center for Cancer Research have begun to find evidence that the drugs may work far more effectively when taken in combination with other therapies and with each other than when taken alone.

  5. Efficacy and safety of D. pteronyssinus immunotherapy in local allergic rhinitis: a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón, C; Campo, P; Salas, M; Aranda, A; Molina, A; González, M; Galindo, L; Mayorga, C; Torres, M J; Blanca, M

    2016-07-01

    The effects of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) on local allergic rhinitis (LAR) are largely unknown. We conducted the first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC), phase II trial of D. pteronyssinus (DP) subcutaneous AIT (DP-AIT) on LAR (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02123316). Thirty-six LAR patients received Pangramin PLUS DP or placebo for 24 months. The primary endpoints were symptoms, medication scores, and medication-free days. The secondary included skin test, serum specific IgE and IgG4, nasal allergen provocation test (NAPT), and adverse events. AIT-DP produced significant improvements in both primary and secondary endpoints vs placebo. After 12 months of AIT-DP, we detected a significant and marked increase in allergen tolerance with negative NAPT in 50% of patients, and significant increases of serum sIgG4. Immunotherapy was well tolerated; no systemic reactions were reported. This study demonstrated that AIT-DP is a safe and clinically effective treatment for LAR, confirming that LAR is a new indication for AIT. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effective melanoma immunotherapy in mice by the skin-depigmenting agent monobenzone and the adjuvants imiquimod and CpG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper G van den Boorn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Presently melanoma still lacks adequate treatment options for metastatic disease. While melanoma is exceptionally challenging to standard regimens, it is suited for treatment with immunotherapy based on its immunogenicity. Since treatment-related skin depigmentation is considered a favourable prognostic sign during melanoma intervention, we here aimed at the reverse approach of directly inducing vitiligo as a shortcut to effective anti-melanoma immunity.We developed an effective and simple to use form of immunotherapy by combining the topical skin-bleaching agent monobenzone with immune-stimulatory imiquimod cream and cytosine-guanine oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG injections (MIC therapy. This powerful new approach promptly induced a melanoma antigen-specific immune response, which abolished subcutaneous B16.F10 melanoma growth in up to 85% of C57BL/6 mice. Importantly, this regimen induced over 100 days of tumor-free survival in up to 60% of the mice, and forcefully suppressed tumor growth upon re-challenge either 65- or 165 days after MIC treatment cessation.MIC therapy is effective in eradicating melanoma, by vigilantly incorporating NK-, B- and T cells in its therapeutic effect. Based on these results, the MIC regimen presents a high-yield, low-cost and simple therapy, readily applicable in the clinic.

  7. Options for investigative postsurgical therapy for gastric cancer, and case report of using the option for combined immunotherapy and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, P

    2001-02-01

    The investigative therapy for a senior patient after radical subtotal gastroesophagectomy for regional lymph node and proximal esophagus metastasized adenocarcinoma (stage IIIA, T3, N 1 M0) of the cardioesophageal junction is reported. The case has several unusual features: (1) the patient is the author and is not a physician; (2) in the absence of codified postsurgical treatment, he used his academic biomedical background, commercial associations, and international contacts to find and prioritize six clinically tested options for investigative postsurgical therapy; (3) after unsuccessful efforts to append ongoing clinical trials of new immunotherapies for breast adenocarcinoma (the first two therapy options), an innovative protocol was designed and gained allowance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for his use of combined nonspecific immunotherapy and chemotherapy based on extensive trials in South Korea that showed the synergistic effect of the two postsurgical therapies used together. A potent, new, nonspecific immunostimulant (DetoxPC) was injected subcutaneously in 10 diminishing doses during 105 weeks. Two standard chemotherapeutic drugs (5-fluorouracil and mitomycin-C) were injected intravenously in six equal doses during three weeks. Five years after the surgery, the patient enjoys good health without signs or symptoms of recurrence or metastasis. He discusses his perspectives on future clinical trials and on a patient actively pursuing investigative postsurgical therapy for a malignancy when otherwise poor survival is indicated.

  8. [ANSYS simulation of subcutaneous pustule electrical characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baohua; Wang, Xuan; Zhu, Honglian; Wang, Guoyong

    2011-12-01

    With the growing number of clinical surgery, post-operative surgical wound infection has become a very difficult clinical problem. In the treatments of it, non-invasive test of wound infection and healing status has a significance in clinical medicine practice. In this paper, beginning with the electrical properties of skin tissue structure and on the basis of the electromagnetism and the human anatomy, using the finite element analysis software, we applied safe voltage on the 3D skin model, performed the subcutaneous pustule simulation study and gained the relational curve between depth and radius of the pustule model. The simulation results suggested that the method we put forward could be feasible, and it could provide basis for non-invasive detection of wound healing and wound infection status.

  9. A review of clinical efficacy, safety, new developments and adherence to allergen-specific immunotherapy in patients with allergic rhinitis caused by allergy to ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkalj, Mirjana; Banic, Ivana; Anzic, Srdjan Ante

    2017-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common health problem in both children and adults. The number of patients allergic to ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is on the rise throughout Europe, having a significant negative impact on the patients' and their family's quality of life. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has disease-modifying effects and can induce immune tolerance to allergens. Both subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy with ragweed extracts/preparations have clear positive clinical efficacy, especially over pharmacological treatment, even years after the treatment has ended. AIT also has very good safety profiles with extremely rare side effects, and the extracts/preparations used in AIT are commonly well tolerated by patients. However, patient adherence to treatment with AIT seems to be quite low, mostly due to the fact that treatment with AIT is relatively time-demanding and, moreover, due to patients not receiving adequate information and education about the treatment before it starts. AIT is undergoing innovations and improvements in clinical efficacy, safety and patient adherence, especially with new approaches using new adjuvants, recombinant or modified allergens, synthetic peptides, novel routes of administration (epidermal or intralymphatic), and new protocols, which might make AIT more acceptable for a wider range of patients and novel indications. Patient education and support (eg, recall systems) is one of the most important goals for AIT in the future, to further enhance treatment success.

  10. A review of clinical efficacy, safety, new developments and adherence to allergen-specific immunotherapy in patients with allergic rhinitis caused by allergy to ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkalj, Mirjana; Banic, Ivana; Anzic, Srdjan Ante

    2017-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common health problem in both children and adults. The number of patients allergic to ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is on the rise throughout Europe, having a significant negative impact on the patients’ and their family’s quality of life. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has disease-modifying effects and can induce immune tolerance to allergens. Both subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy with ragweed extracts/preparations have clear positive clinical efficacy, especially over pharmacological treatment, even years after the treatment has ended. AIT also has very good safety profiles with extremely rare side effects, and the extracts/preparations used in AIT are commonly well tolerated by patients. However, patient adherence to treatment with AIT seems to be quite low, mostly due to the fact that treatment with AIT is relatively time-demanding and, moreover, due to patients not receiving adequate information and education about the treatment before it starts. AIT is undergoing innovations and improvements in clinical efficacy, safety and patient adherence, especially with new approaches using new adjuvants, recombinant or modified allergens, synthetic peptides, novel routes of administration (epidermal or intralymphatic), and new protocols, which might make AIT more acceptable for a wider range of patients and novel indications. Patient education and support (eg, recall systems) is one of the most important goals for AIT in the future, to further enhance treatment success. PMID:28243068

  11. Hyaluronidase facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolles S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Jolles Department of Immunology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK Abstract: Immunoglobulin (Ig-replacement therapy represents the mainstay of treatment for patients with primary antibody deficiency and is administered either intravenously (IVIg or subcutaneously (SCIg. While hyaluronidase has been used in clinical practice for over 50 years, the development of a high-purity recombinant form of this enzyme (recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20 has recently enabled the study of repeated and more prolonged use of hyaluronidase in facilitating the delivery of SC medicines. It has been used in a wide range of clinical settings to give antibiotics, local anesthetics, insulin, morphine, fluid replacement, and larger molecules, such as antibodies. Hyaluronidase has been used to help overcome the limitations on the maximum volume that can be delivered into the SC space by enabling dispersion of SCIg and its absorption into lymphatics. The rate of facilitated SCIg (fSCIg infusion is equivalent to that of IVIg, and the volume administered at a single site can be greater than 700 mL, a huge increase over conventional SCIg, at 20–40 mL. The use of fSCIg avoids the higher incidence of systemic side effects of IVIg, and it has higher bioavailability than SCIg. Data on the long-term safety of this approach are currently lacking, as fSCIg has only recently become available. fSCIg may help several areas of patient management in primary antibody deficiency, and the extent to which it may be used in future will depend on long-term safety data and cost–benefit analysis. Keywords: enzyme facilitated IgG infusion, recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20, subcutaneous immunoglobulin, intravenous immunoglobulin, primary immunodeficiency disease

  12. Impact of immunotherapy among patients with melanoma brain metastases managed with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, William A; Binder, David C; Jones, Bernard L; Oweida, Ayman J; Liu, Arthur K; Rusthoven, Chad G; Karam, Sana D

    2017-12-15

    Patients with melanoma brain metastases (MBM) have been excluded from trials evaluating immunotherapy in melanoma. As such, immunotherapy's role in MBM is poorly understood, particularly in combination with radiotherapy. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with MBM receiving brain radiotherapy. They were classified according to immunotherapy receipt. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to identify factors associated with survival. Among 1287 patients, 185 received immunotherapy. Factors associated with improved survival included younger age, academic facility, lower extracranial disease burden, stereotactic radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. Adding immunotherapy to radiotherapy for MBM is associated with improved survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy in type 1 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-14

    Jan 14, 2013 ... Guidelines: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump therapy in type 1 diabetes. 15. 2013 Volume 18 No 1. JEMDSA. Introduction. The first external insulin pump device to deliver continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII or “insulin pump”) therapy was used more than 30 years ago.

  14. The comparison of the intestinal adaptation effects of subcutaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: Insulin has been reported to have positive effects on intestinal adaptation after short bowel syndrome when applicated oral or subcutaneously. The purpose of this study is to compare the intestinal adaptation effects of subcutaneous and oral routes of insulin in rats with short bowel syndrome. Materials and Methods: ...

  15. Cost-minimization of mabthera intravenous versus subcutaneous administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, P.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To identify and compare all costs related to preparing and administrating MabThera for the intravenous and subcutaneous formulations in Dutch hematological patients. The a priori notion is that the costs of subcutaneous MabThera injections are lower compared to intravenous infusion due

  16. Hypercalcemia in Association With Subcutaneous Fat Necrosis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case of a four weeks-old girl with subcutaneous fat necrosis and associated hypercalcemia is presented. Subcutaneous Fat Necrosis of the New born (SCFN) is an uncommon disorder which is rarely complicated with life threatening hypercalcemia. Though it is reported from many parts of the world this is the first case ...

  17. Guideline on allergen-specific immunotherapy in IgE-mediated allergic diseases: S2k Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the Society for Pediatric Allergy and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the Medical Association of German Allergologists (AeDA), the Austrian Society for Allergy and Immunology (ÖGAI), the Swiss Society for Allergy and Immunology (SGAI), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society of Oto- Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DGHNO-KHC), the German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ), the Society for Pediatric Pneumology (GPP), the German Respiratory Society (DGP), the German Association of ENT Surgeons (BV-HNO), the Professional Federation of Paediatricians and Youth Doctors (BVKJ), the Federal Association of Pulmonologists (BDP) and the German Dermatologists Association (BVDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaar, Oliver; Bachert, Claus; Bufe, Albrecht; Buhl, Roland; Ebner, Christof; Eng, Peter; Friedrichs, Frank; Fuchs, Thomas; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hartwig-Bade, Doris; Hering, Thomas; Huttegger, Isidor; Jung, Kirsten; Klimek, Ludger; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar; Merk, Hans; Rabe, Uta; Saloga, Joachim; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Schuster, Antje; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Sitter, Helmut; Umpfenbach, Ulrich; Wedi, Bettina; Wöhrl, Stefan; Worm, Margitta; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Kaul, Susanne; Schwalfenberg, Anja

    The present guideline (S2k) on allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) was established by the German, Austrian and Swiss professional associations for allergy in consensus with the scientific specialist societies and professional associations in the fields of otolaryngology, dermatology and venereology, pediatric and adolescent medicine, pneumology as well as a German patient organization (German Allergy and Asthma Association; Deutscher Allergie- und Asthmabund, DAAB) according to the criteria of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften, AWMF). AIT is a therapy with disease-modifying effects. By administering allergen extracts, specific blocking antibodies, toler-ance-inducing cells and mediators are activated. These prevent further exacerbation of the allergen-triggered immune response, block the specific immune response and attenuate the inflammatory response in tissue. Products for SCIT or SLIT cannot be compared at present due to their heterogeneous composition, nor can allergen concentrations given by different manufacturers be compared meaningfully due to the varying methods used to measure their active ingredients. Non-modified allergens are used for SCIT in the form of aqueous or physically adsorbed (depot) extracts, as well as chemically modified allergens (allergoids) as depot extracts. Allergen extracts for SLIT are used in the form of aqueous solutions or tablets. The clinical efficacy of AIT is measured using various scores as primary and secondary study endpoints. The EMA stipulates combined symptom and medication scores as primary endpoint. A harmonization of clinical endpoints, e. g., by using the combined symptom and medication scores (CSMS) recommended by the EAACI, is desirable in the future in order to permit the comparison of results from different studies. The current CONSORT recommendations from the ARIA/GA2LEN group specify standards for the

  18. Immunotherapy for non-responders among patients of spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ayush; Gupta, Ajay; Kumar, Awkash; Arora, Sumit

    2016-04-01

    Combined chemo- and immunotherapy are the major advancement in the treatment of tuberculosis. Immunotherapy supposedly increases cure rate while reducing the duration of treatment and tissue damage. Non-responders are those patients of tuberculosis who do not respond to anti-tubercular therapy (ATT) in the desired manner despite the mycobacteria showing sensitivity to the given drugs. The role of immunotherapy in the treatment of this particular subset of patients has been investigated scarcely. The present study included a retrospective review of prospectively collected clinico-radiological data of 14 non-responder patients who were taking ATT for spinal tuberculosis for a mean duration of 10.3 months. An immunotherapeutic regime comprising of single intramuscular injection of vitamin D 600,000IU, 3 days course of oral albendazole 200mg daily, salmonella vaccine 0.5ml intramuscular and influenza vaccine 0.5ml intramuscular were added to ATT. The vaccines and the course of oral albendazole were repeated after a month. Before immunotherapy, seven patients were partially dependent while other seven were completely dependent on others for activities of daily living. All except one patient after treatment became independent till last follow-up (p value <0.01). Post immunotherapy, ATT was continued for mean duration of 4.9 months with mean follow-up of 22.4 months. All patients showed good clinical response within 2-6 weeks after the initiation of immunotherapy. The crux to success of the immunotherapy regime is its potential to restore the existing Th1 Th2 imbalance and to provide substitute to the anergic and dysfunctional immune cells. Copyright © 2015 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared this document, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update”, according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2009”, available at http://www.waojournal.org. Namely, these comprise: “Mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy;” “Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy” – reporting all the data of all controlled trials published after 2009; “Safety of sublingual immunotherapy” – with the recently published Grading System for adverse reactions; “Impact of sublingual immunotherapy on the natural history of respiratory allergy” – with the relevant evidences published since 2009; “Efficacy of SLIT in children” – with detailed analysis of all the studies; “Definition of SLIT patient selection” – reporting the criteria for eligibility to sublingual immunotherapy; “The future of immunotherapy in the community care setting”; “Methodology of clinical trials according to the current scientific and regulatory standards”; and “Guideline development: from evidence-based medicine to patients' views” – including the evolution of the methods to make clinical recommendations. Additionally, we have added new chapters to cover a few emerging crucial topics: “Practical aspects of schedules and dosages and counseling for adherence” – which is crucial in clinical practice for all treatments; “Perspectives and new approaches” – including recombinant allergens, adjuvants, modified allergens, and the concept of validity of the single products. Furthermore, “Raising public awareness about sublingual immunotherapy”, as a need for our patients, and strategies to increase awareness of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) among patients, the medical community, all healthcare stakeholders, and public opinion, are also reported in detail. PMID:24679069

  20. Efficiency of ADOPTIVE immunotherapy for melanoma: a case REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Abakushina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of research is focused on finding better treatment options for cancer. Along with radical treatment, cancer immunotherapy has proved to be useful for a growing number of cancer patients. We report a case of stage IIIB melanoma in a 53-year woman who received adoptive immunotherapy with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells. For activation, mononuclear cells were collected from the patient’s peripheral blood and cultivated in X-vivo20 medium containing IL-2 (250 U/ml and IL-15 (50 ng/ml for 10-14 days. From January 2015 to May 2016, a total of 39 CIK cell infusions were administered intradermally to 2-4 points in the paravertebral area, every 1–2 weeks. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in 3 months after starting CIK cell immunotherapy showed a decrease in the number of NK-cells from 18 % to 12 % and CD314 + NK-cells from 16% to 6%. The levels of CD38+, CD38+Т, HLA-DR+ and HLA-DR+Т lymphocytes increased from 53 %, 24 %, 21 %, 9 % and 19 % to 66 %, 51 %, 28 %, 20 % and 29 %, respectively. There was evidence of reactive changes in lymph nodes and stable disease. Metastases on the left shoulder tended to decrease, and they completely disappeared 9 months after tarting adoptive immunotherapy. Partial regression of metastasis on the right shoulder was observed 11 month after staring adoptive immunotherapy. Adoptive immunotherapy demonstrated the increased disease-free survival for the patient with melanoma. In conclusion, CIK immunotherapy  may be an effective treatment method for metastatic melanoma.

  1. Canine cancer immunotherapy studies: linking mouse and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiwon S; Withers, Sita S; Modiano, Jaime F; Kent, Michael S; Chen, Mingyi; Luna, Jesus I; Culp, William T N; Sparger, Ellen E; Rebhun, Robert B; Monjazeb, Arta M; Murphy, William J; Canter, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent major clinical breakthroughs in human cancer immunotherapy including the use of checkpoint inhibitors and engineered T cells, important challenges remain, including determining the sub-populations of patients who will respond and who will experience at times significant toxicities. Although advances in cancer immunotherapy depend on preclinical testing, the majority of in-vivo testing currently relies on genetically identical inbred mouse models which, while offering critical insights regarding efficacy and mechanism of action, also vastly underrepresent the heterogeneity and complex interplay of human immune cells and cancers. Additionally, laboratory mice uncommonly develop spontaneous tumors, are housed under specific-pathogen free conditions which markedly impacts immune development, and incompletely model key aspects of the tumor/immune microenvironment. The canine model represents a powerful tool in cancer immunotherapy research as an important link between murine models and human clinical studies. Dogs represent an attractive outbred combination of companion animals that experience spontaneous cancer development in the setting of an intact immune system. This allows for study of complex immune interactions during the course of treatment while also directly addressing long-term efficacy and toxicity of cancer immunotherapies. However, immune dissection requires access to robust and validated immune assays and reagents as well as appropriate numbers for statistical evaluation. Canine studies will need further optimization of these important mechanistic tools for this model to fulfill its promise as a model for immunotherapy. This review aims to discuss the canine model in the context of existing preclinical cancer immunotherapy models to evaluate both its advantages and limitations, as well as highlighting its growth as a powerful tool in the burgeoning field of both human and veterinary immunotherapy.

  2. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-finding trial with Lolium perenne peptide immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösges, Ralph; Kasche, Elena M; Raskopf, Esther; Singh, Jaswinder; Sohlich, Lea; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Shah-Hosseini, Kija; Pirotton, Sabine; Haazen, Ludo; Durham, Stephen R; Legon, Thierry; Zadoyan, Gregor; Shamji, Mohamed H

    2017-11-18

    A novel subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy formulation (gpASIT+(™) ) containing Lolium perenne peptides (LPP) and having a short up-dosing phase has been developed to treat grass pollen-induced seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. We investigated peptide immunotherapy containing the hydrolysate from perennial ryegrass allergens for the optimum dose in terms of clinical efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety. This prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase IIb, parallel, four-arm, dose-finding study randomized 198 grass pollen-allergic adults to receive placebo or cumulative doses of 70, 170, or 370 μg LPP. All patients received weekly subcutaneous injections, with the active treatment groups reaching assigned doses within 2, 3, and 4 weeks, respectively. Efficacy was assessed by comparing conjunctival provocation test (CPT) reactions at baseline, after 4 weeks, and after completion. Grass pollen-specific immunoglobulins were analysed before and after treatment. CPT response thresholds improved from baseline to V7 by at least one concentration step in 51.2% (170 μg; P = .023), 46.3% (370 μg), and 38.6% (70 μg) of patients receiving LPP versus 25.6% of patients receiving placebo (modified per protocol set). Also, 39% of patients in the 170 μg-group became non-reactive to CPT versus 18% in the placebo group. Facilitated allergen-binding assays revealed a highly significant (P < .001) dose-dependent reduction in IgE allergen binding across all treatment groups (70 μg: 17.1%; 170 μg: 18.8%; 370 μg: 26.4%). Specific IgG4 levels increased to 1.6-fold (70 μg), 3.1-fold (170 μg), and 3.9-fold (370 μg) (mPP). Three-week immunotherapy with 170 μg LPP reduced CPT reactivity significantly and increased protective specific antibodies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical outcome measures of specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaar, Oliver; Anders, Clemens; Klimek, Ludger

    2009-06-01

    To provide an overview of clinical parameters generally used for monitoring the clinical efficacy of specific immunotherapy (SIT) in clinical trials. In particular, it focuses on primary and secondary outcome measurements and reviews the advantages and disadvantages of each method. In 2007, the World Allergy Organization defined the severity of symptoms and the need for concomitant medication as primary endpoint parameters in clinical outcome measures of SIT. Furthermore, it was stated that the symptom score should always be combined with the rescue medication score. The 'quality of life' is usually used as a secondary outcome measure in clinical trials on SIT. In clinical trials on SIT, several clinical parameters are commonly used to provide evidence of the clinical efficacy of the therapy. These parameters should include a measurement of symptoms and of the use of concomitant medications, which represent the 'primary outcome' parameters. Both physician-rated and patient self-rate scores have been implemented in clinical studies. Furthermore, disease-unspecific (generic) and disease-specific questionnaires for evaluating the quality of life are widely used and partially validated as 'secondary outcome' parameters. This review provides an overview on the different methods to measure the clinical outcome of SIT and points out the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  4. Advancing Immunotherapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mariam; Teo, Zhi Ling; Luen, Stephen J; Loi, Sherene

    2017-06-01

    Despite many advances in the treatment of breast cancer, the development of metastatic disease remains an incurable and frequent cause of cancer death for women worldwide. An improved understanding of the role of host immunosurveillance in modulating breast cancer disease biology, as well as impressive survival benefits seen to checkpoint blockade in other malignancies have provided great hope for an expanding role of immunotherapies in breast cancer management. While these novel therapies are currently being investigated in clinical trials, signals of efficacy, and tolerability in early phase studies suggest these will eventually make their way into standard practice algorithms. Ongoing research has highlighted a high degree of intertumoural heterogeneity in tumour lymphocytic infiltrates, suggesting some tumours or subtypes are more immunogenic than others. Furthermore, tumour intrinsic mechanisms of immune evasion are beginning to be uncovered, potentially representing key therapeutic targets to use in combination with checkpoint blockade, exemplifying the emerging concept of personalised medicine approaches to immune therapies. Subsequently, different immunotherapeutic strategies may be required based on stratification by these factors-for the minority of tumours with a high level of pre-existing immunity, immune checkpoint blockade monotherapy may be sufficient. However, for the majority of tumours with lower levels of pre-existing immunity, combination approaches will likely be required to achieve maximal therapeutic effect. Results of ongoing clinical trials including combinations with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted therapies are eagerly awaited.

  5. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  6. Oncolytic viruses: a step into cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol JG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan G Pol, Julien Rességuier, Brian D LichtyMcMaster Immunology Research Centre, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is currently under investigation in phase I–III clinical trials for approval as a new cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses (OVs selectively infect, replicate in, and kill tumor cells. For a long time, the therapeutic efficacy was thought to depend on the direct viral oncolysis (virocentric view. The host immune system was considered as a brake that impaired virus delivery and spread. Attention was paid primarily to approaches enhancing virus tumor selectivity and cytotoxicity and/or that limited antiviral responses. Thinking has changed over the past few years with the discovery that OV therapy was also inducing indirect oncolysis mechanisms. Among them, induction of an antitumor immunity following OV injection appeared to be a key factor for an efficient therapeutic activity (immunocentric view. Indeed, tumor-specific immune cells persist post-therapy and can search and destroy any tumor cells that escape the OVs, and thus immune memory may prevent relapse of the disease. Various strategies, which are summarized in this manuscript, have been developed to enhance the efficacy of OV therapy with a focus on its immunotherapeutic aspects. These include genetic engineering and combination with existing cancer treatments. Several are currently being evaluated in human patients and already display promising efficacy.Keywords: oncolytic virus, cancer immunotherapy, tumor antigen, cancer vaccine, combination strategies

  7. A review of clinical efficacy, safety, new developments and adherence to allergen-specific immunotherapy in patients with allergic rhinitis caused by allergy to ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkalj M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mirjana Turkalj,1,2 Ivana Banic,1 Srdjan Ante Anzic1 1Children’s Hospital Srebrnjak, Zagreb, 2Faculty of Medicine, JJ Strossmayer University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia Abstract: Allergic rhinitis is a common health problem in both children and adults. The number of patients allergic to ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia is on the rise throughout Europe, having a significant negative impact on the patients’ and their family’s quality of life. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT has disease-modifying effects and can induce immune tolerance to allergens. Both subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy with ragweed extracts/preparations have clear positive clinical efficacy, especially over pharmacological treatment, even years after the treatment has ended. AIT also has very good safety profiles with extremely rare side effects, and the extracts/preparations used in AIT are commonly well tolerated by patients. However, patient adherence to treatment with AIT seems to be quite low, mostly due to the fact that treatment with AIT is relatively time-demanding and, moreover, due to patients not receiving adequate information and education about the treatment before it starts. AIT is undergoing innovations and improvements in clinical efficacy, safety and patient adherence, especially with new approaches using new adjuvants, recombinant or modified allergens, synthetic peptides, novel routes of administration (epidermal or intralymphatic, and new protocols, which might make AIT more acceptable for a wider range of patients and novel indications. Patient education and support (eg, recall systems is one of the most important goals for AIT in the future, to further enhance treatment success. Keywords: allergic rhinitis, allergy, ragweed, allergen-specific immunotherapy, Ambrosia artemisiifolia

  8. Oral immunotherapy for allergic diseases using transgenic rice seeds: current state and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Mayumi; Nishimura, Tomoe; Kaminuma, Osamu; Mori, Akio; Hiroi, Takachika

    2013-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) has been shown to provide clinical benefit for patients with allergic diseases. At present, subcutaneous and sublingual ITs are mainly authorized for clinical treatment. Oral administration of allergens seems to be the easiest way to achieve IT, though it has yet to be translated to the clinical setting, mainly due to the requirement of a large amount of allergens. Plants, especially rice seeds, have recently been recognized as superior allergen carriers for oral administration, because of their high productivity, stability and safety. Therefore, in order to establish clinically applicable oral IT, we have been developing transgenic rice seeds (Tg rice), in which major epitopes of cedar pollen allergens or house-dust mites (HDM) are expressed. The efficacy of this orally administered Tg rice was confirmed in murine models of allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma. In the safety study of the Tg rice, no adverse effects on cynomolgus macaques were observed. In this review, we summarized the current state and future prospects of allergen-specific IT, focusing particularly on oral IT with allergen-expressing Tg rice. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Administration and Handling of Talimogene Laherparepvec: An Intralesional Oncolytic Immunotherapy for Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffner, Brianna; Iodice, Gail M; Gasal, Eduard

    2016-03-01

    To describe the administration and handling requirements of oncolytic viruses in the context of talimogene laherparepvec (Imlygic™), a first-in-class oncolytic immunotherapy.
. Study procedures employed in clinical trials, in particular the OPTiM study.
. Evaluation of nursing considerations for administration of talimogene laherparepvec.
. Talimogene laherparepvec is administered through a series of intralesional injections into cutaneous, subcutaneous, or nodal tumors (with ultrasound guidance as needed) during an outpatient clinic visit. A single insertion point is recommended; however, multiple insertion points are acceptable if the tumor radius exceeds the needle's radial reach. Talimogene laherparepvec must be evenly distributed throughout the tumor through each insertion site. Talimogene laherparepvec requires storage at -90°C to -70°C and, once thawed, should be administered immediately or stored in its original vial and carton and protected from light in a refrigerator (2°C to 8°C). 
. Because talimogene laherparepvec can be administered in the outpatient setting, nurses will be pivotal for appropriate integration and administration of this unique and effective therapy.

  10. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of sublingual immunotherapy in children with house dust mite allergy in primary care: study design and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bot, Cindy M A; Moed, Heleen; Berger, Marjolein Y; Röder, Esther; de Groot, Hans; de Jongste, Johan C; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; van der Wouden, Johannes C

    2008-10-20

    For respiratory allergic disorders in children, sublingual immunotherapy has been developed as an alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Sublingual immunotherapy is more convenient, has a good safety profile and might be an attractive option for use in primary care. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was designed to establish the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy with house dust mite allergen compared to placebo treatment in 6 to 18-year-old children with allergic rhinitis and a proven house dust mite allergy in primary care. Described here are the methodology, recruitment phases, and main characteristics of the recruited children. Recruitment took place in September to December of 2005 and 2006. General practitioners (in south-west Netherlands) selected children who had ever been diagnosed with allergic rhinitis. Children and parents could respond to a postal invitation. Children who responded positively were screened by telephone using a nasal symptom score. After this screening, an inclusion visit took place during which a blood sample was taken for the RAST test. A total of 226 general practitioners invited almost 6000 children: of these, 51% was male and 40% <12 years of age. The target sample size was 256 children; 251 patients were finally included. The most frequent reasons given for not participating were: absence or mildness of symptoms, absence of house dust mite allergy, and being allergic to grass pollen or tree pollen only. Asthma symptoms were reported by 37% of the children. Of the enrolled children, 71% was sensitized to both house dust mite and grass pollen. Roughly similar proportions of children were diagnosed as being sensitized to one, two, three or four common inhalant allergens. Our study was designed in accordance with recent recommendations for research on establishing the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy; 98% of the target sample size was achieved. This study is expected to provide useful information on

  11. Alternative products to treat allergic rhinitis and alternative routes for allergy immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipci, Kagan; Oktemer, Tugba; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Şahin, Ethem; Altıntoprak, Niyazi; Bafaqeeh, Sameer Ali; Kurt, Yasemin; Mladina, Ranko; Šubarić, Marin; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-09-01

    Some alternative products instead of immunotherapy are used in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). In this paper, alternative products to treat allergic rhinitis and alternative routes for allergy immunotherapy are reviewed. Alternative products and methods used instead of immunotherapy are tea therapy, acupuncture, Nigella sativa, cinnamon bark, Spanish needle, acerola, capsaicin (Capsicum annum), allergen-absorbing ointment, and cellulose powder. N. sativa has been used in AR treatment due to its anti-inflammatory effects. N. sativa oil also inhibits the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism. The beneficial effects of N. sativa seed supplementation on the symptoms of AR may be due to its antihistaminic properties. To improve the efficacy of immunotherapy, some measures are taken regarding known immunotherapy applications and alternative routes of intralymphatic immunotherapy and epicutaneous immunotherapy are used. There are alternative routes and products to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy.

  12. Role of Antigen Spread and Distinctive Characteristics of Immunotherapy in Cancer Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulley, J.L.; Madan, R.A.; Pachynski, R.; Mulders, P.; Sheikh, N.A.; Trager, J.; Drake, C.G.

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy is an important breakthrough in cancer. US Food and Drug Administration-approved immunotherapies for cancer treatment (including, but not limited to, sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, and atezolizumab) substantially improve overall survival across multiple

  13. Effect of laser immunotherapy and surgery on the treatment of mouse mammary tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivian A.; Le, Henry; Li, Xiaosong; Wolf, Roman F.; Ferguson, Halie; Sarkar, Akhee; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy using laser photothermal therapy and immunological stimulation could achieve tumor-specific immune responses, as indicated by our previous pre-clinical and preliminary clinical studies. To further study the effect of laser immunotherapy, we conducted an investigation combining laser immunotherapy and surgery. After laser immunotherapy, treated tumors were surgically removed at different time points. The survival rates of treated mice were compared among different groups. Furthermore, the cured mice were rechallenged to test the immunity induced by laser immunotherapy. Our results showed that the mice treated with surgical removal one week after laser immunotherapy had the highest survival rate (77%). When the tumors were removed immediately after laser immunotherapy treatment, the survival rate was 57%. Most cured mice withstood tumor rechallenges, indicating an induction of tumor immunity by laser immunotherapy. The differentiations between different surgery groups indicate that the treated tumors have contributed to the immunological responses of the hosts.

  14. Safety of subcutaneous microinjections (mesotherapy) in musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarte, Danik Arana; Rosset-Llobet, Jaume

    2011-06-01

    Determine the safety and tolerance of mesotherapy as a technique for the treatment of musculoskeletal complaints in musicians. 67 patients (55.2% women) were subjected to a total of 267 mesotherapy sessions. A mesotherapy needle or normal needle was used randomly. The drugs employed were thiocolchicoside and diazepam as muscular relaxants, pentoxifylline or buflomedil as vasodilators, and piroxicam as an anti-inflammatory, as directed. A visual analogue scale was used to quantify the pain produced by the microinjections as well as the degree of immediate and midterm side effects as reported on a standard questionnaire. A mean of 155.5 microinjections were performed per session, of which 45.6% were perceived as painful by the patient with a mean severity of 4.3 out of 10. The pain reduced to 0.5 out of 10 after 24 hours. The most sensitive areas were the levator scapulae and splenius muscles. Systemic symptoms were reported by 5.99% of the musicians after the mesotherapy sessions (muscular weakness 1.5%, rash 1.5%, drowsiness 1.1% and itching 1.1%, being the most frequent). The mean severity of these symptoms was 2.77 out of 10. In all cases the symptoms had completely disappeared after 24 hours. No patient referred to signs of local or systemic infection. The application of drugs by means of subcutaneous injections (mesotherapy) in musicians is a technique that is safe, well tolerated, and without any severe complications.

  15. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: practical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banshi D Saboo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of individuals with diabetes mellitus has prompted new way of treating these patients, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII or insulin pump therapy is an increasingly form of intensive insulin therapy. An increasing number of individuals with diabetes mellitus individuals of all ages have started using insulin pump therapy. Not everyone is a good candidate for insulin pump therapy, and the clinician needs to be able to determine which patients are able to master the techniques required and to watch for the adverse reactions that may develop. Insulin pump increases quality of life of patient with diabetes mellitus with increasing satisfaction with treatment and decrease impact of diabetes mellitus. Manual errors by insulin pump users may lead to hypo or hyperglycemia, resulting into diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA sometimes. Some of practical aspect is associated with insulin pump therapy such as selection of candidates, handling of pump and selection of site, and pump setting, henceforth this review is prepared to explore and solve the practical problems or issues associated with pump therapy.

  16. Does allergen-specific immunotherapy induce contact allergy to aluminium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netterlid, Eva; Hindsén, Monica; Siemund, Ingrid; Björk, Jonas; Werner, Sonja; Jacobsson, Helene; Güner, Nuray; Bruze, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Persistent, itching nodules have been reported to appear at the injection site after allergen-specific immuno-therapy with aluminium-precipitated antigen extract, occasionally in conjunction with contact allergy to aluminium. This study aimed to quantify the development of contact allergy to aluminium during allergen-specific immunotherapy. A randomized, controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children and adults entering allergen-specific immunotherapy was performed using questionnaires and patch-testing. A total of 205 individuals completed the study. In the 3 study groups all subjects tested negative to aluminium before allergen-specific immunotherapy and 4 tested positive after therapy. In the control group 4 participants tested positive to aluminium. Six out of 8 who tested positive also had atopic dermatitis. Positive test results were found in 5/78 children and 3/127 adults. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was not shown to be a risk factor for contact allergy to aluminium. Among those who did develop aluminium allergy, children and those with atopic dermatitis were more highly represented.

  17. Immunotherapy and radiation therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Sharyn I.; Cengel, Keith A.; Simone, Charles B.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a particularly aggressive thoracic malignancy with limited survival following combination chemotherapy. As a result, there has been increased interested in immunotherapy for mesothelioma, both in the first-line and salvage settings. Early investigations of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon alfa-2a/b have been limited by modest response rates and toxicity, whereas cytokine gene therapy is currently being investigated and shows early promise. The most prominent class of immunotherapies to be trialed with mesothelioma in the past half-decade has been immune checkpoint inhibitors (CPI). Early results are encouraging, particularly for agents targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 pathways. With the increasing recognition of the immune potential of mesothelioma, interest in the immunomodulatory properties of radiation therapy has emerged. The combination of immunotherapy and radiation therapy may allow for complimentary immunologic effects that can enhance antitumor response. This article reviews the existing literature on the efficacy of immunotherapy for MPM, describes the rationale for combining immunotherapy with radiation therapy, and discusses early literature on this treatment combination. PMID:28529903

  18. Radiomics to predict immunotherapy-induced pneumonitis: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, Rivka R; Fujii, Takeo; Bilen, Mehmet Asim; Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Abrol, Srishti; Hess, Kenneth R; Hajjar, Joud; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Alshawa, Anas; Hong, David S; Giniebra-Camejo, Dunia; Stephen, Bettzy; Subbiah, Vivek; Sheshadri, Ajay; Mendoza, Tito; Fu, Siqing; Sharma, Padmanee; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Naing, Aung

    2017-10-27

    We present the first reported work that explores the potential of radiomics to predict patients who are at risk for developing immunotherapy-induced pneumonitis. Despite promising results with immunotherapies, immune-related adverse events (irAEs) are challenging. Although less common, pneumonitis is a potentially fatal irAE. Thus, early detection is critical for improving treatment outcomes; an urgent need to identify biomarkers that predict patients at risk for pneumonitis exists. Radiomics, an emerging field, is the automated extraction of high fidelity, high-dimensional imaging features from standard medical images and allows for comprehensive visualization and characterization of the tissue of interest and corresponding microenvironment. In this pilot study, we sought to determine whether radiomics has the potential to predict development of pneumonitis. We performed radiomic analyses using baseline chest computed tomography images of patients who did (N = 2) and did not (N = 30) develop immunotherapy-induced pneumonitis. We extracted 1860 radiomic features in each patient. Maximum relevance and minimum redundancy feature selection method, anomaly detection algorithm, and leave-one-out cross-validation identified radiomic features that were significantly different and predicted subsequent immunotherapy-induced pneumonitis (accuracy, 100% [p = 0.0033]). This study suggests that radiomic features can classify and predict those patients at baseline who will subsequently develop immunotherapy-induced pneumonitis, further enabling risk-stratification that will ultimately lead to better treatment outcomes.

  19. The GILL study: glycerin-induced local reactions in immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabria, Christopher W; Coop, Christopher A; Tankersley, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of local reactions is not well defined. Glycerin, an excellent preservative used commonly in immunotherapy extracts, is a recognized irritant. This study was undertaken to examine whether higher glycerin concentration in immunotherapy extracts is associated with an increase in local reaction rates during immunotherapy. A retrospective analysis of electronic immunotherapy records over a 12-month period was performed from a single site. A small local reaction was defined as induration and/or erythema at the injection site smaller than or equal to the size of the patient's palm. A large local reaction was defined as a reaction larger than the patient's palm. Over the 12-month period, 360 patients received a total of 9678 immunotherapy injections. For all injections, the total local reaction rate was 16.3% (1574/9678), the small local reaction rate was 15.9% (1536/9678), and the large local reaction rate was 0.4% (38/9678). For aeroallergens, small local reaction rates increased significantly with increasing allergen concentrations, from 7.3% (1:1000 vol/vol) to 23.0% (1:1 vol/vol; P glycerin concentration. Large local reactions were infrequent and did not significantly increase with allergen or glycerin concentration. Small local, but not large local, reaction rates increase with higher allergen concentration, number, and volume. Higher glycerin concentrations (even 50%) are not associated with significantly higher small or large local reaction rates.

  20. Specific immunotherapy in hepatocellular cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradaran Noveiry, Behnoud; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Khalili, Nastaran; Hourshad, Niloufar; Greten, Tim F; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Rezaei, Nima

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, several novel immunotherapeutic approaches were developed and investigated in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We designed this systematic review, to evaluate clinical efficacy of specific immunotherapy in patients with HCC, according to the guidelines of Border of Immune Tolerance Education and Research Network (BITERN) and Cochrane collaboration. We searched Medline, Scopus, CENTRAL, TRIP, DART, OpenGrey, and ProQuest through the 9th of December 2015. One author reviewed and retrieved citations from these seven databases for irrelevant and duplicate studies, and two other authors independently extracted data from the studies and rated their quality. We collated study findings and calculated a weighted treatment effect across studies using Review Manager. We found 12144 references in seven databases of which 21 controlled studies with 1885 HCC patients in different stages were included in this systematic review after the primary and secondary screenings. Overall, patients undergoing specific immunotherapy had significantly higher overall survival than those in control group (HR = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.47-0.76, P immunotherapy and patients in control groups and patients in immunotherapy groups overall had less recurrence than control group (HR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.46-0.63, P immunotherapies in the field. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Brian J. [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Pollack, Ian F. [Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Okada, Hideho, E-mail: okadah@upmc.edu [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas.

  2. Renin angiotensin aldosterone system in anaphylactic reactions induced by immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karaayvaz

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Although patients with a history of hymenoptera venom anaphylaxis showed significantly reduced plasma levels of angiotensin-I and angiotensin-II compared to controls, there is no study in the literature to investigate the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS in patients with anaphylactic reaction induced by immunotherapy. The purpose of this study is to determine the role of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system in patients who had an anaphylactic reaction induced by allergen immunotherapy with pollen, house-dust and mold extracts. Plasma levels of angiotensin-I, angiotensin-II, angiotensin converting enzyme and aldosterone were measured in 20 patients who experienced anaphylaxis during allergen immunotherapy. The control group consisted of 15 immunotherapy patients without any history of anaphylaxis. The Mann–Whitney U-test was performed for comparison of the two groups, and a P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Angiotensin-I, angiotensin-II, angiotensin converting enzyme and aldosterone levels were similar in both the study and control groups and no statistical significance was found between the two groups (P > 0.05. The RAAS does not appear to play a role in the pathogenesis of anaphylactic reactions due to allergen immunotherapy with pollen, house-dust and mold extracts.

  3. Specific immunotherapy and biological treatments for occupational allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscato, Gianna; Pala, Gianni; Sastre, Joaquin

    2014-12-01

    Occupational allergy represents a substantial health, social, and financial burden for the society. Its management is a complex task that, in selected cases, may also include allergen-specific immunotherapy. The purpose of this article is to review clinical data on allergen immunotherapy and biological treatments applied to occupational allergy in 2013. Immunotherapy in occupational allergic diseases has been scarcely used, and only for a few sensitizers, such as latex, flour, and Hymenoptera venom, partly due to the lack of standardized extracts. The recent use of the molecular diagnosis can improve the indication and selection of suitable allergens for preparing new standardized and powerful extracts for immunotherapy. Some recent reports suggest a beneficial role of treatment with omalizumab in workers with occupational asthma who continue to be exposed to the causal agent. Although scarce, available data suggest that immunotherapy and biological treatments may allow allergic workers to continue their work activity, but further studies are needed to standardize extracts and to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of these treatments, when exposure at the workplace cannot be avoided.

  4. Advances in Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rodríguez-Cerdeira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanomas are tumors originating from melanocytes and tend to show early metastasis secondary to the loss of cellular adhesion in the primary tumor, resulting in high mortality rates. Cancer-specific active immunotherapy is an experimental form of treatment that stimulates the immune system to recognize antigens on the surface of cancer cells. Current experimental approaches in immunotherapy include vaccines, biochemotherapy, and the transfer of adoptive T cells and dendritic cells. Several types of vaccines, including peptide, viral, and dendritic cell vaccines, are currently under investigation for the treatment of melanoma. These treatments have the same goal as drugs that are already used to stimulate the proliferation of T lymphocytes in order to destroy tumor cells; however, immunotherapies aim to selectively attack the tumor cells of each patient. In this comprehensive review, we describe recent advancements in the development of immunotherapies for melanoma, with a specific focus on the identification of neoantigens for the prediction of their elicited immune responses. This review is expected to provide important insights into the future of immunotherapy for melanoma.

  5. Immunotherapy with rituximab in follicular lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saguna, Carmen; Mut, Ileana Delia; Lupu, Anca Roxana; Tevet, Mihaela; Bumbea, Horia; Dragan, Cornel

    2011-04-01

    Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (NHL) represent a recent and fascinating domain of hemato-oncology, in which remarkable progress has been made. The conventional treatments of indolent lymphomas do not extend the survival rate, nor do they cure. Recent directions are centered on using several new drugs that are capable of overcoming the mechanisms that are resistant to recovery. The initiation of immunotherapy (Rituximab in 1997) seems to have changed the natural evolution of follicular lymphomas (FL). It is possible that resistance to healing in follicular lymphomas may be neutralized with Rituximab by suppressing STAT-1 positive macrophages that are present in the cellular microenvironment.Thereinafter, the re-evaluation of recent models of prognostic and therapeutic paradigmas that were used in FL became compulsory.The purpose of the paper is to compare the evolution of patients with follicular lymphoma and the period of response, according to the treatments. The study group consisted of the 71 patients diagnosed with follicular lymphoma, out of a total of 767 malignant lymphatic proliferations with B cells, for a period of 7 years (2002-2008), at the Hematology Department, Hospital Coltea, Bucharest and Hematology Department, Universitary Hospital, BucharestResults and conclusions: Combining chemotherapy with Rituximab had better results compared to the same chemotherapy, administered alone, both in induction and in case of relapse. The overall response rate in our study group was 74.7%, out of which 42.3% complete remissions. The overall response rate was 84.61% in the Rituximab group, compared to 68.88% in patients without Rituximab.

  6. IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS-RELATED LYMPHOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Kennedy-Nasser

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Latent EBV infection is associated with several malignancies, including EBV post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and Burkitt lymphoma. The range of expression of latent EBV antigens varies in these tumors, which influences how susceptible the tumors are to immunotherapeutic approaches. Tumors expressing type III latency, such as in LPD, express the widest array of EBV antigens making them the most susceptible to immunotherapy. Treatment strategies for EBV-related tumors include restoring normal cellular immunity by adoptive immunotherapy with EBV-specific T cells and targeting the malignant B cells with monoclonal antibodies. We review the current immunotherapies and future studies aimed at targeting EBV antigen expression in these tumors.

  7. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases.

  8. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiji Tsukamoto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules.

  9. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: hkitamu@sapmed.ac.jp; Tsukamoto, Taiji [Department of Urology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South 1 West 16, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8543 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8{sup +} T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules.

  10. Immunotherapy and lung cancer: current developments and novel targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Duarte; Turner, Alice; Silva, Maria Dília; Marques, Dânia Sofia; Mellidez, Juan Carlos; Wannesson, Luciano; Mountzios, Giannis; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a highly prevalent and aggressive disease. In the metastatic setting, major advances include the incorporation of immunotherapy and targeted therapies into the clinician's therapeutic armamentarium. Standard chemotherapeutic regimens have long been reported to interfere with the immune response to the tumor; conversely, antitumor immunity may add to the effects of those therapies. The aim of immunotherapy is to specifically enhance the immune response directed to the tumor. Recently, many trials addressed the role of such therapies for metastatic NSCLC treatment: ipilimumab, tremelimumab, nivolumab and lambrolizumab are immunotherapeutic agents of main interest in this field. In addition, anti-tumor vaccines, such as MAGE-A3, Tecetomide, TG4010, CIMAvax, ganglioside vaccines, tumor cell vaccines and dendritic cell vaccines, emerged as potent inducers of immune response against the tumor. The current work aims to address the most recent developments regarding these innovative immunotherapies and their implementation in the treatment of metastatic NSCLC.

  11. Immunotherapy Approaches for Malignant Glioma From 2007 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a deadly disease for which there have been few therapeutic advances over the past century. Although previous treatments were largely unsuccessful, glioma may be an ideal target for immune-based therapy. Recently, translational research led to several clinical trials based on tumor immunotherapy to treat patients with malignant glioma. Here we review 17 recent glioma immunotherapy clinical trials, published over the past 3 years. Various approaches were used, including passive transfer of naked and radiolabeled antibodies, tumor antigen-specific peptide immunization, and the use of patient tumor cells with or without dendritic cells as vaccines. We compare and discuss the current state of the art of clinical immunotherapy treatment, as well as its limited successes, pitfalls, and future potential. PMID:20424975

  12. Melanoma immunotherapy: historical precedents, recent successes and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Marieke I G; Rozati, Sima; Goldinger, Simone M; Widmer, Daniel S; Dummer, Reinhard; Levesque, Mitchell P

    2013-02-01

    The idea of cancer immunotherapy has been around for more than a century; however, the first immunotherapeutic ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 antibody, has only recently been approved by the US FDA for melanoma. With an increasing understanding of the immune response, it is expected that more therapies will follow. This review aims to provide a general overview of immunotherapy in melanoma. We first explain the development of cancer immunotherapy more than a century ago and the general opinions about it over time. This is followed by a general overview of the immune reaction in order to give insight into the possible targets for therapy. Finally, we will discuss the current therapies for melanoma, their shortcomings and why it is important to develop patient stratification criteria. We conclude with an overview of recent discoveries and possible future therapies.

  13. Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) as cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhapp, F J; Zloza, A; Kaufman, H L

    2015-09-01

    Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) is the first-in-class oncolytic virus immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer and was generated from an attenuated, recombinant herpes simplex virus. T-VEC has demonstrated therapeutic activity in melanoma patients and is being tested in a number of other cancers alone and in combination with standard cancer therapeutics and other immunotherapy agents. This review will discuss the current landscape of melanoma, the construction and application of T-VEC for melanoma along with other indications for T-VEC, as well as highlight some of the novel challenges with oncolytic virus immunotherapy as it enters into clinical practice. Copyright 2015 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent progress in GM-CSF-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wan-Lun; Shen, Kuan-Yin; Tien, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Yu-An; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2017-03-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a growing field. GM-CSF, a potent cytokine promoting the differentiation of myeloid cells, can also be used as an immunostimulatory adjuvant to elicit antitumor immunity. Additionally, GM-CSF is essential for the differentiation of dendritic cells, which are responsible for processing and presenting tumor antigens for the priming of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Some strategies have been developed for GM-CSF-based cancer immunotherapy in clinical practice: GM-CSF monotherapy, GM-CSF-secreting cancer cell vaccines, GM-CSF-fused tumor-associated antigen protein-based vaccines, GM-CSF-based DNA vaccines and GM-CSF combination therapy. GM-CSF also contributes to the regulation of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment. This review provides recommendations regarding GM-CSF-based cancer immunotherapy.

  15. CTLA-4Ig immunotherapy of obesity-induced insulin resistance by manipulation of macrophage polarization in adipose tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Masakazu, E-mail: masakazu731079@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Inoguchi, Toyoshi, E-mail: toyoshi@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Batchuluun, Battsetseg, E-mail: battsetseg.batchuluun@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sugiyama, Naonobu, E-mail: nao1@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kunihisa, E-mail: nihisak@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes Mellitus, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital, 1-1-1 Zokumyoin, Chikushino, Fukuoka 818-8502 (Japan); Sonoda, Noriyuki, E-mail: noriyuki@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Takayanagi, Ryoichi, E-mail: takayana@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •CTLA-4Ig completely alleviates HFD-induced insulin resistance. •CTLA-4Ig reduces epididymal and subcutaneous fat tissue weight and adipocyte size. •CTLA-4Ig alters ATM polarization from inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2. •CTLA-4Ig may lead to a novel anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent. •We identified the mechanism of the novel favorable effects of CTLA-4lg. -- Abstract: It has been established that obesity alters the metabolic and endocrine function of adipose tissue and, together with accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages, contributes to insulin resistance. Although numerous studies have reported that shifting the polarization of macrophages from M1 to M2 can alleviate adipose tissue inflammation, manipulation of macrophage polarization has not been considered as a specific therapy. Here, we determined whether cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4IgG1 (CTLA-4Ig) can ameliorate insulin resistance by induction of macrophages from proinflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 polarization in the adipose tissues of high fat diet-induced insulin-resistant mice. CTLA4-Ig treatment prevented insulin resistance by changing gene expression to M2 polarization, which increased the levels of arginase 1. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis confirmed the alteration of polarization from CD11c (M1)- to CD206 (M2)-positive cells. Concomitantly, CTLA-4Ig treatment resulted in weight reductions of epididymal and subcutaneous adipose tissues, which may be closely related to overexpression of apoptosis inhibitors in macrophages. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels decreased significantly. In contrast, CCAAT enhancer binding protein α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and adiponectin expression increased significantly in subcutaneous adipose tissue. This novel mechanism of CTLA-4lg immunotherapy may lead to an ideal anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent.

  16. A Nodular Type of Subcutaneous Sarcoidosis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyu Ho; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Byoung Suck; Joo, Jong Eun; Jung, Yoon Young; Cho, Young Kwon; An, Jin Kyung; Kim, Hyun Sook; Woo, Jung Joo [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous multisystemic disorder that rarely involves subcutaneous tissue. We describe the MR imaging findings of a subcutaneous sarcoidosis in a patient that presented with a nontender, palpable soft tissue mass on the left buttock, which was confirmed after surgical excision. The MR images showed the presence of a subcutaneous mass that breached the adjacent fascia with an irregular outline and homogeneous, slightly higher signal intensity than the surrounding muscle as seen on a T2-weighted image and with homogeneous enhancement after contrast injection. The lesion could not be differentiated from a sarcoma or a malignancy.

  17. Iatrogenic subcutaneous cervicofacial emphysema with pneumomediastinum after class V restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Woon; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Cha, Min-Sang

    2017-02-01

    Subcutaneous facial emphysema after dental treatment is an uncommon complication caused by the invasion of high-pressure air; in severe cases, it can spread to the neck, mediastinum, and thorax, resulting in cervical emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and pneumothorax. The present case showed subcutaneous cervicofacial emphysema with pneumomediastinum after class V restoration. The patient was fully recovered after eight days of conservative treatment. The cause of this case was the penetration of high-pressure air through the gingival sulcus, which had a weakened gingival attachment. This case indicated that dentists should be careful to prevent subcutaneous emphysema during common dental treatments using a high-speed hand piece and gingival retraction cord.

  18. Metastatic breast cancer 42 years after bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, M B; Roberts, E; Nixon, J; Probert, J C; Braatvedt, G D

    1997-01-01

    Subcutaneous mastectomy has a possible role as prophylaxis in patients at high risk of developing breast cancer. A case history is presented of a woman who developed metastatic breast carcinoma 42 years after bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies for non-malignant disease. This case is presented to draw attention to the persistent risk of developing breast cancer even decades after subcutaneous mastectomy and to point out that the role of such surgery in preventing breast cancer has still not been clarified. The appropriateness of prophylactic mastectomy for an individual is better assessed on the absolute risk of breast cancer developing over a defined period rather than the relative risk.

  19. Tumor microenvironment: hypoxia and buffer capacity for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenghu; Gao, Shangxian; Qu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lining

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in the study of tumor biology and anti-tumor immunotherapy. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumor progression still remain obscure. As we know, tumor microenvironment that can directly influence tumor development and prognosis has attracted much attention of large number of immunologists. Accumulated evidence has suggested that tumor microenvironment is in a hypoxic condition, under which immune cells may exhibit distinct functions compared to those under normal oxygen tension. The article we propose here will offer a novel point of view for understanding tumor microenvironment in order to instruct clinical immunotherapy. Just like the pH buffer system in human body, interactions of immune cells in tumor microenvironment may also constitute a buffer system, the balance of which is of great importance during immunotherapy for tumors. However, many protocols for tumor immunotherapy in clinic at present have not taken it into account, so the therapeutic outcome is often disappointing. In the present study, we have demonstrated the effect of Corynebacterium parvum, a well known immune stimulator, on malignant melanoma. Cell ingredients in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and their anti-tumor effect have been altered when dosage of Corynebacterium parvum is changed. So, to obtain better therapeutic purposes, what we should do first is to detect an index to evaluate immune buffer capacity for the patient during tumor immunotherapy, then to choose appropriate drug doses to augment buffer capacity for their immune buffer system. Taken together, the hypothesis proposed here may help understand the pathogenesis of tumor progression and design more effective strategy for clinical immunotherapy for tumors.

  20. Subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator: Initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Pedro; Cavaco, Diogo; Adragão, Pedro; Costa, Francisco; Carmo, Pedro; Morgado, Francisco; Bernardo, Ricardo; Nunes, Manuela; Abecasis, Miguel; Neves, José; Mendes, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are important tools in the prevention of sudden death, but implantation requires transvenous access, which is associated with complications. Subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (S-ICDs) may prevent some of these complications. To evaluate the therapeutics and complications associated with S-ICD systems. S-ICD implantation was planned in 23 patients, for whom the indications were vascular access problems, increased risk of infection or young patients with long predicted follow-up. The population consisted of four patients with ischemic heart disease, three of them on hemodialysis (two with subclavian vein thrombosis), five with left ventricular noncompaction, four with Brugada syndrome, three with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, one with transposition of the great vessels, two with dilated cardiomyopathy and four with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. S-ICDs were implanted in 21 patients, two having failed to fulfil the initial screening criteria. Mean implantation time was 77 minutes, with no complications. Defibrillation tests were performed, and in one patient the generator had to be repositioned to obtain an acceptable threshold. In a mean follow-up of 14 months, 10 patients had S-ICD shocks, which were appropriate in half of them; one developed infection, one needed early replacement due to loss of telemetry and one patient died of noncardiac cause. S-ICD implantation can be performed by cardiologists with a high success rate. Initial experience appears favorable, but further studies are needed with longer follow-up times to assess the safety and efficacy of this strategy compared to conventional devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunogenic Targets for Specific Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma remains an incurable disease although the prognosis has been improved by novel therapeutics and agents recently. Relapse occurs in the majority of patients and becomes fatal finally. Immunotherapy might be a powerful intervention to maintain a long-lasting control of minimal residual disease or to even eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Several tumor-associated antigens have been identified in patients with multiple myeloma. These antigens are expressed in a tumor-specific or tumor-restricted pattern, are able to elicit immune response, and thus could serve as targets for immunotherapy. This review discusses immunogenic antigens with therapeutic potential for multiple myeloma.

  2. Current Immunotherapies for Sarcoma: Clinical Trials and Rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demytra Mitsis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoma tumors are rare and heterogeneous, yet they possess many characteristics that may facilitate immunotherapeutic responses. Both active strategies including vaccines and passive strategies involving cellular adoptive immunotherapy have been applied clinically. Results of these clinical trials indicate a distinct benefit for select patients. The recent breakthrough of immunologic checkpoint inhibition is being rapidly introduced to a variety of tumor types including sarcoma. It is anticipated that these emerging immunotherapies will exhibit clinical efficacy for a variety of sarcomas. The increasing ability to tailor immunologic therapies to sarcoma patients will undoubtedly generate further enthusiasm and clinical research for this treatment modality.

  3. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic.......After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  4. Laser immunotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifan

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an extremely malignant disease with high mortality rate. Currently there is no effective therapeutic strategy for highly metastatic pancreatic cancers. Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is a combination therapeutic approach of targeted phototherapy and immunotherapy, which could destroy treated primary tumors with elimination of untreated metastases. LIT affords a remarkable efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in pancreatic tumors in mice, and results in complete tumor regression in many cases. LIT could synergize targeted phototherapy and immunological effects of immunoadjuvant, which represent a promising treatment modality to induce systemic antitumor response through a local intervention, paving the way for the treatment of highly metastatic pancreatic cancers.

  5. The Immune Response to Tumors as a Tool toward Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pandolfi

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy of tumors has developed several techniques: immune cell transfer, vaccines, immunobiological molecules such as monoclonal antibodies that improve the immune responses to tumors. This can be achieved by blocking pathways limiting the immune response, such as CTLA-4 or Tregs. Immunotherapy may also use cytokines especially proinflammatory cytokines to enhance the activity of cytotoxic T cells (CTLs derived from tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs. The role of newly discovered cytokines remains to be investigated. Alternatively, an other mechanism consists in enhancing the expression of TAAs on tumor cells. Finally, monoclonal antibodies may be used to target oncogenes.

  6. Development of a sublingual allergy vaccine for grass pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Frati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Franco Frati1,2, Silvia Scurati1, Paola Puccinelli1, Marie David3, Cecile Hilaire4, Maurizio Capecce4, Francesco Marcucci2, Cristoforo Incorvaia51Medical and Scientific Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 2University Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties and Public Health, Perugia, Italy; 3Laboratoire Stallergenes, Antony, France; 4Marketing Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 5Allergy/Pulmonary Rehabilitation Unit, ICP Hospital, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Grass pollen is a very common cause of allergic rhinitis and asthma. The only treatment targeting the underlying causes of allergy is immunotherapy (IT. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT has been introduced to solve the problem of systemic reactions to subcutaneous IT (SCIT. This article evaluates the characteristics of the allergen extract, Staloral, in terms of practical administration, effectiveness, safety, and mechanism of action. Efficacy data were obtained from double-blind, placebo-controlled studies using Staloral in patients sensitized to grass pollen, while practical administration, cost-effectiveness, and mechanism of action data were provided by well designed studies. The efficacy and safety of Staloral, as demonstrated by review of published studies which used doses up to 1125 times those administered with SCIT, shows that this allergen extract has optimal characteristics for treating patients with seasonal allergies due to grass pollens. The main mechanism of action is the interaction between dendritic cells of the oral mucosa and the subsequent tolerance induced in T-cells.Keywords: allergen extracts, high-dose, efficacy, safety, sublingual immunotherapy

  7. Subcutaneous blood flow during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Sestoft, L

    1982-01-01

    Subcutaneous blood flow was measured preceding insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms and 2 h later in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy and in normal males. In all groups subcutaneous blood flow decreased at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms...... compared with pre-hypoglycaemic flow. Two hours after onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms, subcutaneous blood flow was still significantly decreased compared with pre-hypoglycaemic flow. In normal subjects local nerve blockade had no effect on blood flow changes during hypoglycaemia, whereas local alpha......-receptor blockade abolished the vasoconstrictor response. We suggest that circulating catecholamines stimulating vascular alpha-receptors are probably responsible for flow reduction in the subcutaneous tissue during hypoglycaemia....

  8. Severe subcutaneous generalized edema in a patient with dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoshinaga; Kawabata, Daisuke; Yukawa, Naoichiro; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Usui, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Fujii, Takao; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2007-01-01

    Subcutaneous generalized edema associated with dermatomyositis (DM)/polymyositis (PM) is extremely rare. Herein we report a case of severe subcutaneous generalized edema complicating DM. A 78-year-old woman was hospitalized in our department because of massive edema in the four limbs. Elevated muscle enzymes, heliotrope rash, results of electromyography, and muscle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of DM. The absence of other diseases that could cause the symptoms indicated that massive edema was correlated with the pathophysiology of DM. Although myopathy and edema responded well to oral prednisolone, dysphagia persisted. We conclude that subcutaneous generalized edema can occur during the course of DM/PM, and subcutaneous vasculopathy may be involved in the pathogenesis of DM/PM.

  9. Pharmaceutical amyloidosis associated with subcutaneous insulin and enfuvirtide administration

    OpenAIRE

    D’Souza, Anita; Theis, Jason D.; Vrana, Julie A; Dogan, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Protein and peptide drugs administered subcutaneously, such as insulin can be amyloidogenic and result in localized amyloid deposits at the sites of medication injections. These iatrogenic amyloidoses typically present as a localized subcutaneous nodule or skin reaction at the site of administration, and often pose diagnostic challenges. We have analyzed the amyloid proteome in 52 cases of insulin and enfuvirtide associated amyloidosis using laser microdissection/tandem mass spectrometry. We ...

  10. Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin G replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Francisco A

    2016-11-01

    Human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) for therapeutic use has been available for decades. This drug was developed for treatment of antibody deficiency (replacement therapy), although its use has expanded into many anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory applications in recent years. This review focuses on IgG prescribing for replacement therapy. IgG for replacement is most often administered via the intravenous IgG (IVIG) or subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) routes. IVIG is usually administered every 34 weeks, and SCIG is usually administered weekly, although variations may be considered in all cases. Recently, a new product became available that uses hyaluronidase to facilitate absorption of large doses of SCIG less frequently (every 34 weeks, as with IVIG). There are important differences between the pharmacokinetics of these three routes of administration. IVIG therapy leads to high peaks and low troughs between infusions. IgG concentration fluctuates much less over time with SCIG. Hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIG is intermediate. SCIG may have lower bioavailability in comparison with IVIG and may require higher doses over time; this is not true for hyaluronidase SCIG. However, there are large variations in IgG half-life among individuals and with different products. Therefore, individualization of therapy is essential. Mild systemic flu-like adverse effects may affect up to 2025% of patients who receive IVIG, smaller fractions may experience more-severe symptoms, whereas anaphylaxis is exceedingly rare. General flu-like systemic adverse effects are minimal with SCIG (intermediate with hyaluronidase SCIG), but transient (24 hours), mild, local inflammatory symptoms at infusion sites are relatively common with both forms. Additional rare but important complications of IgG therapy include thrombotic events and hemolysis that can be seen at high doses with any route of administration. Renal adverse effects may occur with IVIG as well. The variety of IgG products and routes of

  11. Subcutaneous autologous serum therapy in chronic spontaneous urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Vasant Godse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a felt need for trying newer therapeutic modalities in patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria, especially in the subset of patients classified as non-responders to antihistamines. Autologous serum therapy is an upcoming modality of treatment, and we decided to study its efficacy by subcutaneous route. Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of subcutaneous autologous serum therapy (AST in CSU. Methods: This was a single blind, placebo-controlled parallel group, randomized, controlled study. Twenty-four patients with CSU (11M: 13 F were given subcutaneous AST and seventeen patients (7 M: 10F patients were given subcutaneous injection normal saline (placebo, along with levocetirizine in an on-demand basis in both groups. Results: Urticaria activity score (UAS came down from 35.74 to 7 at the end of 9 weeks and the patients' requirement of antihistamines also reduced remarkably from 5.8 to 1.7 per week in the serum group. Sub-cutaneous saline group did not show statistically significant fall in UAS. Saline group showed UAS 32.8 at zero week to 22.1 at the end of 9 weeks. DLQI showed significant fall in serum group, from 14.26 to 4 at the end of 9 weeks. Conclusion: Subcutaneous autoserum therapy is effective in treatment of CSU.

  12. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis : protocol for a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Roberts, Graham; Pfaar, Oliver; Muraro, Antonella; Ansotegui, Ignacio J.; Calderon, Moises; Cingi, Cemal; Demoly, Pascal; Durham, Stephen; van Wijk, Ronald Gerth; Halken, Susanne; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hellings, Peter; Jacobsen, Lars; Knol, Edward; Larenas Linnemann, Desiree; Lin, Sandra; Maggina, Vivian; Oude-Elberink, Hanneke; Pajno, Giovanni; Panwankar, Ruby; Pastorello, Elideanna; Pitsios, Constantinos; Rotiroti, Giuseppina; Timmermans, Frans; Tsilochristou, Olympia; Varga, Eva-Maria; Wilkinson, Jamie; Williams, Andrew; Worm, Margitta; Zhang, Luo; Sheikh, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Management of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT

  13. Predictors of clinical effectiveness of Hymenoptera venom immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueff, F.; Vos, Byrthe; Oude Elberink, J.; Bender, A.; Chatelain, R.; Dugas-Breit, S.; Horny, H. -P.; Kuechenhoff, H.; Linhardt, A.; Mastnik, S.; Sotlar, K.; Stretz, E.; Vollrath, R.; Przybilla, B.; Flaig, M.

    BackgroundTreatment failure during venom immunotherapy (VIT) may be associated with a variety of risk factors, of which the relative importance is unknown. ObjectiveOur aim was to evaluate the association of baseline serum tryptase concentration (BTC), mastocytosis in the skin (MIS) and of other

  14. Liposome-based synthetic long peptide vaccines for cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varypataki, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic long peptides (SLP) derived from cancer-associated antigens hold great promise as well-defined antigens for cancer immunotherapy. Clinical studies showed that SLP vaccines have functional potency when applied to pre-malignant stage patients, but need to be improved for use as a therapeutic

  15. The evolving role of immunotherapy in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    The prognosis for men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is limited, and patients have very few treatment options, particularly if the treatment failed with docetaxel (Taxotere). As a result, there is a requirement for novel approaches to therapy. Using immunotherapy to

  16. Seasonal versus perennial immunotherapy: evaluation after three years of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Lejarazu, D; Bernaola, G; Fernández, E; Audícana, M; Ventas, P; Martín, S; Fernández de Corres, L

    1993-01-01

    We have performed a comparative study to evaluate seasonal and perennial schedules after 3 years of immunotherapy. Sixty patients suffering from rhinitis and/or asthma due to grass pollen sensitization were randomly allocated to receive a semi-depot extract of Phleum pratense according to a perennial or seasonal schedule. The last year of the study, 14 patients were recruited as a control group without immunotherapy. The cumulative dose was 602 BU in the perennial group and 372 BU in the seasonal group. The frequency and severity of side-effects were similar and very low in both treated groups. The IgE level was significantly lower after perennial immunotherapy at the end of the first 2 years. A seasonal decrease in specific IgG levels was observed in patients who interrupted immunotherapy, while this was not observed in patients under the perennial schedule. Symptoms and medication scores did not show differences between groups. Nevertheless, we found a significant difference between treated patients and the control group.

  17. EAACI guidelines on allergen immunotherapy: Prevention of allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halken, Susanne; Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree; Roberts, Graham; Calderón, Moises A.; Angier, Elisabeth; Pfaar, Oliver; Ryan, Dermot; Agache, Ioana; Ansotegui, Ignacio J.; Arasi, Stefania; Du Toit, George; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Geerth van Wijk, Roy; Jutel, Marek; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Lau, Susanne; Matricardi, Paolo M.; Pajno, Giovanni B.; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Penagos, Martin; Santos, Alexandra F.; Sturm, Gunter J.; Timmermans, Frans; van Ree, R.; Varga, Eva-Maria; Wahn, Ulrich; Kristiansen, Maria; Dhami, Sangeeta; Sheikh, Aziz; Muraro, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Allergic diseases are common and frequently coexist. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is a disease-modifying treatment for IgE-mediated allergic disease with effects beyond cessation of AIT that may include important preventive effects. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) has

  18. Mycobacterium bovis endophthalmitis from BCG immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbrandy, S. J. F.; Schreuders, L. C.; de Smet, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report a patient who developed BCG endophthalmitis after BCG immunotherapy for bladder cancer. Comparison of this case with 2 other reported cases reveals a similar pattern of elderly, debilitated and immunocompromised patients with poor response to systemic antituberculous therapy in

  19. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis : protocol for a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Roberts, Graham; Pfaar, Oliver; Muraro, Antonella; Ansotegui, Ignacio J; Calderon, Moises; Cingi, Cemal; Demoly, Pascal; Durham, Stephen; van Wijk, Ronald Gerth; Halken, Susanne; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hellings, Peter; Jacobsen, Lars; Knol, Edward; Linnemann, Desiree Larenas; Lin, Sandra; Maggina, Vivian; Oude-Elberink, Hanneke; Pajno, Giovanni; Panwankar, Ruby; Pastorello, Elideanna; Pitsios, Constantinos; Rotiroti, Giuseppina; Timmermans, Frans; Tsilochristou, Olympia; Varga, Eva-Maria; Wilkinson, Jamie; Williams, Andrew; Worm, Margitta; Zhang, Luo; Sheikh, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Management of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT

  20. γδ T cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang; Zhao, Pan; Xiao, Zhangang; Han, Xianghua; Fu, Fan; Fu, Li

    2017-01-31

    γδ T cells are one of the three immune cell types that express antigen receptors. They contribute to lymphoid antitumor surveillance and bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immunity. γδ T cells have the capacity of secreting abundant cytokines and exerting potent cytotoxicity against a wide range of cancer cells. γδ T cells exhibit important roles in immune-surveillance and immune defense against tumors and have become attractive effector cells for cancer immunotherapy. γδ T cells mediate anti-tumor therapy mainly by secreting pro-apoptotic molecules and inflammatory cytokines, or through a TCR-dependent pathway. Recently, γδ T cells are making their way into clinical trials. Some clinical trials demonstrated that γδ T cell-based immunotherapy is well tolerated and efficient. Despite the advantages that could be exploited, there are obstacles have to be addressed for the development of γδ T cell immunotherapies. Future direction for immunotherapy using γδ T cells should focus on overcoming the side effects of γδ T cells and exploring better antigens that help stimulating γδ T cell expansion in vitro.

  1. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Swift

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various “omics” technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy—from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse—has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system.

  2. Sublingual immunotherapy for the treatment of allergies | Schellack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment of allergies often involves pharmacological therapy and recommendations by healthcare workers that the allergen should be avoided. Allergen-specific immunotherapy has emerged as an alternative to effectively decrease the immunoglobulin (Ig) E:IgG4 ratio. Two routes of administration are described, ...

  3. Challenges in the implementation of EAACI guidelines on allergen immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonertz, A; Roberts, G C; Hoefnagel, M

    2018-01-01

    Regulatory approaches for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) products and the availability of high-quality AIT products are inherently linked to each other. While allergen products are available in many countries across the globe, their regulation is very heterogeneous. First, we describe the regulatory...

  4. Treatment of advanced melanoma with laser immunotherapy and ipilimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Mark F; Zhou, Feifan; Geister, Brian V; Nordquist, Robert E; Li, Xiaosong; Chen, Wei R

    2017-05-01

    Immunotherapy has become a promising modality for melanoma, especially using checkpoint inhibitors, which revive suppressed T cells against the cancer. Such inhibitors should work better when combined with other treatments which could increase the number and quality of anti-tumor T cells. We treated one patient with advanced (stage IV) melanoma, using the combination of laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel immunological approach for metastatic cancers that has been shown to stimulate adaptive immunity, and ipilimumab. The patient was treated with LIT, followed with one course of ipilimumab 3 months after the beginning of LIT. After LIT treatment, all treated cutaneous melanoma in head and neck cleared completely. After the application of ipilimumab, all the tumor nodules in the lungs decreased. The patient had remained tumor free for one year. While anecdotal, the responses seen in this patient support the hypothesis that laser immunotherapy increases the number and quality of anti-tumor T cells so that ipilimumab and other checkpoint inhibitors are more effective in enhancing the therapeutic effects. Picture: Schematic of treatment using laser immunotherapy and ipilimumab on a stage IV melanoma patient. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Minocycline successfully treats exaggerated granulomatous hypersensitivity reaction to Mw immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, Keshavamurthy; Narang, Tarun; Saikia, Uma N; Kumaran, Muthu Sendhil; Dogra, Sunil

    2017-03-01

    Mycobacterium W (Mw) vaccine has been found to be effective in the treatment of leprosy and warts. Despite increasing use of Mw immunotherapy, data on its safety is limited. We report a series of eight patients who developed persisting injection site granulomatous reaction following Mw immunotherapy and were successfully treated with minocycline. Eight patients with persistent nodular swelling at the site of Mw injections were identified. Seven of them had received Mw immunotherapy for cutaneous warts and one for verrucous epidermal nevus. The lesions were firm, erythematous, succulent, non-tender nodules confined to the sites of Mw vaccine injections. In 6 of these patients nodules also involved the previously injected areas. Skin biopsy from all patients showed eosinophil rich inflammation admixed with histiocytes and lymphocytes. In addition granulomas were seen in all with septal and nodular panniculitis in four patients. Broken and granular acid-fast bacilli were identified in two cases. All patients were treated with oral minocycline 100 mg/day for a mean of 9 weeks and showed good clinical response. Granulomatous reaction is a rare but significant adverse effect of Mw immunotherapy at cosmetically and functionally imperative sites. Oral minocycline appears to be effective therapy in this situation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Minimally invasive diagnostics and immunotherapy of lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talebian-Yazdi, M.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with aspects of diagnostics and immunotherapy of lung cancer. The first aim of this thesis is to investigate how the implementation of minimally invasive endoscopic ultrasound techniques (EUS and EBUS) in the staging algorithm of NSCLC can be optimized. The second aim of this

  7. House dust mite allergy: Its innate immune response and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang-Liang; Liao, En-Chih; Yu, Sheng-Jie

    2017-10-16

    Over the past few decades, allergic diseases have become increasingly prevalent worldwide. House dust mite (HDM) is the most important domestic source for allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) is the major environmental allergen in southeast Asia because of the humid and warm environment is suitable for its growth. In the recent year, role of HDM allergen in allergic inflammation through innate immune system has been well studied. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), protease-activated receptors (PARs) and DC-SIGN could be activated by different HDM major allergens and proinflammatory cytokines also be upregulated. Treatment efficacy for HDM allergy is unsatisfied to the patients and the medication is limited. Immunotherapy provided an alternative option for treating HDM allergy through targeted to the mechanisms of allergic reaction and represented a long-term symptoms relief. Gene specific immunotherapy was currently being developed and it could decrease allergic inflammation and improve the efficacy of treatment. In this report, we reviewed recent studies about the role of HDM allergy in innate immune system and its immunotherapy. Understanding the HDM allergen induced signal transduction pathway and developed allergen specific immunotherapy could help physicians to create precise diagnosis and solve unmet need in HDM allergy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. New modalities of cancer treatment for NSCLC: focus on immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marianne Davies Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Recent advances in the understanding of immunology and antitumor immune responses have led to the development of new immunotherapies, including vaccination approaches and monoclonal antibodies that inhibit immune checkpoint pathways. These strategies have shown activity in melanoma and are now being tested in lung cancer. The antibody drugs targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 and programmed cell death protein-1 immune checkpoint pathways work by restoring immune responses against cancer cells, and are associated with unconventional response patterns and immune-related adverse events as a result of their mechanism of action. As these new agents enter the clinic, nurses and other health care providers will require an understanding of the unique efficacy and safety profiles with immunotherapy to optimize potential patient benefits. This paper provides a review of the new immunotherapeutic agents in development for lung cancer, and strategies for managing patients on immunotherapy. Keywords: immunotherapy, lung cancer, vaccination, nivolumab, ipilimumab, nursing

  9. Tumor immunotherapy : clinics of cytokines and monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieken, Judith

    1999-01-01

    Tumor immunotherapy is defines as treatment that induces anti-tumor responses via the modulation of both cellular and homoral components of the host immune system. Its concept is based on hte assumption that tumor cells express unique protiens, so-calles tumor antigens, that can be identified as

  10. Systemic and local reactions of bee venom immunotherapy in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Farhoudi, Abolhassan; Pourpak, Zahra; Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Movahedi, Masoud; Nabavi, Mohammad; Mozafari, Habibeh; Mohammadzadeh, Iraj; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Shirkhoda, Zahra

    2007-12-01

    Severe allergic reactions during specific immunotherapy may occur in the treatment of hymenoptera sting allergy. The objective of the present study was to examine the characteristics of allergic reactions during specific immunotherapy in patients with allergy towards hymenoptera venom in the Iranian population. A prospective study was performed using the clinical reports of 27 patients with anaphylaxis to bee venom (Apis melifera, Geupes vespula and Geupes Polites). Ten patients treated with Cluster protocol during 2002 and 2006 After diagnosis of hymenoptera sting allergy according to history and intradermal tests, the patient were treated with Cluster protocol immunotherapy. The protocol lasted 6 weeks with an increase in the concentration of venom from 0.01 microg/ml to 100 microg/ml. None of the patient received premedication. All patients with hymenoptera venom allergy received 120 injections. Anaphylactic reactions were classified according to the Mueller-classification. The frequencies of systemic reactions during Cluster protocol were 8.33% and 5% for yellow jacket and honey bee venom respectively. No patient experienced severe systemic reaction. Cluster protocol for hymenoptera immunotherapy is a reliable method for the treatment of anaphylactic reactions to bee venom. It is safe with low cost and do not need hospitalization.

  11. Component-resolved diagnostics to direct in venom immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blank, Simon; Bilò, Maria Beatrice; Ollert, Markus

    2018-01-01

    immunotherapeutic intervention. Moreover, the detailed knowledge about sensitization profiles on a molecular level might open new options to identify patients who are at increased risk for side effects or not to respond to immunotherapy. Therefore, increasing potential of CRD becomes evident, to direct therapeutic...

  12. Specific immunotherapy in renal cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Gordan, Hesam Addin; Zahiri, Zahra; Mirshahvalad, Mohammad; Hosseinverdi, Sima; Rini, Brian I; Rezaei, Nima

    2017-02-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the tenth most common malignancy in adults. In recent years, several approaches of active and passive immunotherapy have been studied extensively in clinical trials of patients with RCC. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the clinical efficacy of various approaches of specific immunotherapy in patients with RCC. We searched Medline, Scopus, CENTRAL, TRIP, DART, OpenGrey and ProQuest without any language filter through to 9 October 2015. One author reviewed search results for irrelevant and duplicate studies and two other authors independently extracted data from the studies. We collated study findings and calculated a weighted treatment effect across studies using Review Manager (version 5.3. Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Centre, the Cochrane Collaboration). We identified 14 controlled studies with 4013 RCC patients after excluding irrelevant and duplicate studies from 11,319 references retrieved from a literature search. Overall, five autologous tumor cell vaccines, one peptide-based vaccine, one virus-based vaccine and one dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine were studied in nine controlled studies of active specific immunotherapies. A total of three passive immunotherapies including autologous cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells, auto lymphocyte therapy (ALT) and autologous lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells were studied in four controlled studies. The clinical efficacy of tumor lysate-pulsed DCs, with CIK cells was studied in one controlled trial concurrently. The overall quality of studies was fair. Meta-analysis of seven studies showed that patients undergoing specific immunotherapy had significantly higher overall survival (OS) than those in the control group [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.72; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.58-0.89, p = 0.003]. In addition, a meta-analysis of four studies showed that there was a significant difference in progression-free survival (PFS) between patients undergoing specific immunotherapy

  13. Systems biology applied to vaccine and immunotherapy development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapies, including vaccines, represent a potent tool to prevent or contain disease with high morbidity or mortality such as infections and cancer. However, despite their widespread use, we still have a limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying the induction of protective immune responses. Immunity is made of a multifaceted set of integrated responses involving a dynamic interaction of thousands of molecules; among those is a growing appreciation for the role the innate immunity (i.e. pathogen recognition receptors - PRRs plays in determining the nature and duration (immune memory of adaptive T and B cell immunity. The complex network of interactions between immune manipulation of the host (immunotherapy on one side and innate and adaptive responses on the other might be fully understood only employing the global level of investigation provided by systems biology. In this framework, the advancement of high-throughput technologies, together with the extensive identification of new genes, proteins and other biomolecules in the "omics" era, facilitate large-scale biological measurements. Moreover, recent development of new computational tools enables the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the interactions between all of the components of immunity over time. Here, we review recent progress in using systems biology to study and evaluate immunotherapy and vaccine strategies for infectious and neoplastic diseases. Multi-parametric data provide novel and often unsuspected mechanistic insights while enabling the identification of common immune signatures relevant to human investigation such as the prediction of immune responsiveness that could lead to the improvement of the design of future immunotherapy trials. Thus, the paradigm switch from "empirical" to "knowledge-based" conduct of medicine and immunotherapy in particular, leading to patient-tailored treatment.

  14. Systemic Immunotherapy for Urothelial Cancer: Current Trends and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial cancer of the bladder, renal pelvis, ureter, and other urinary organs is the fifth most common cancer in the United States, and systemic platinum-based chemotherapy remains the standard of care for first-line treatment of advanced/metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC. Until recently, there were very limited options for patients who are refractory to chemotherapy, or do not tolerate chemotherapy due to toxicities and overall outcomes have remained very poor. While the role of immunotherapy was first established in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in the 1970s, no systemic immunotherapy was approved for advanced disease until the recent approval of a programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 inhibitor, atezolizumab, in patients with advanced/metastatic UC who have progressed on platinum-containing regimens. This represents a significant milestone in this disease after a void of over 30 years. In addition to atezolizumab, a variety of checkpoint inhibitors have shown a significant activity in advanced/metastatic urothelial carcinoma and are expected to gain Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval in the near future. The introduction of novel immunotherapy agents has led to rapid changes in the field of urothelial carcinoma. Numerous checkpoint inhibitors are being tested alone or in combination in the first and subsequent-line therapies of metastatic disease, as well as neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. They are also being studied in combination with radiation therapy and for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer refractory to BCG. Furthermore, immunotherapy is being utilized for those ineligible for firstline platinum-based chemotherapy. This review outlines the novel immunotherapy agents which have either been approved, or are currently being investigated in clinical trials in UC.

  15. Immunotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi infection with DNA vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, Eric; Escobedo-Ortegon, Javier; Reyes-Rodriguez, Norma; Arjona-Torres, Arletty; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathology of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy are still debated, and the controversy has interfered with the development of new treatments and vaccines. Because of the potential of DNA vaccines for immunotherapy of chronic and infectious diseases, we tested if DNA vaccines could control an ongoing Trypanosoma cruzi infection. BALB/c mice were infected with a lethal dose (5 x 10(4) parasites) as a model of acute infection, and then they were treated with two injections of 100 microg of plasmid DNA 1 week apart, beginning on day 5 postinfection. Control mice had high levels of parasitemia and mortality and severe cardiac inflammation, while mice treated with plasmid DNA encoding trypomastigote surface antigen 1 or Tc24 had reduced parasitemia and mild cardiac inflammation and >70% survived the infection. The efficacy of the immunotherapy also was significant when it was delayed until days 10 and 15 after infection. Parasitological analysis of cardiac tissue of surviving mice indicated that most mice still contained detectable parasite kinetoplast DNA but fewer mice contained live parasites, suggesting that there was efficient but not complete parasite elimination. DNA vaccine immunotherapy was also evaluated in CD1 mice infected with a low dose (5 x 10(2) parasites) as a model of chronic infection. Immunotherapy was initiated on day 70 postinfection and resulted in improved survival and reduced cardiac tissue inflammation. These results suggest that DNA vaccines have strong potential for the immunotherapy of T. cruzi infection and may provide new alternatives for the control of Chagas' disease.

  16. Intralesional immunotherapy compared to cryotherapy in the treatment of warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozeimeh, Fahime; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Mahboubi Oskouei, Yaghoub; Jafari, Majid; Tehranian, Shahrzad; Alizadehsani, Roohallah; Layegh, Pouran

    2017-04-01

    Warts are the most common clinical manifestation of the human papilloma-virus infection in the skin and mucous membranes. In spite of the various therapeutic modalities for nongenital skin warts, there is still no single method to be used as an approved treatment. In this study, we compared the efficacy of immunotherapy and cryotherapy on wart lesions. Sixty patients with verruca vulgaris and plantar warts were randomly divided into two groups. One group received intralesional injection of candida antigen repeated every 3 weeks until complete improvement of all warts or for a maximum of three sessions. The second group was treated by cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen for a maximum of ten sessions or until clearance of all lesions. T-test and chi-square test were used for statistical analysis, and P cryotherapy (P = 0.023). Moreover, a significant difference was observed between the time-elapsed before treatment and the therapeutic response between both groups (P = 0.041). 76.7% of patients were completely cured with immunotherapy, while only 56.7% responded to cryotherapy. Complete remission was observed with fewer sessions (20.17 ± 0.65) in immunotherapy compared to cryotherapy (3.82 ± 2.481), but no statistically significant difference was shown between groups. Immunotherapy was well-tolerated except for the pain during injection that was the most common side effect. Intralesional immunotherapy is an effective treatment of warts. This method has a better therapeutic response, needs fewer sessions, and is capable of treating distant warts. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  17. [Preventive vaccines and immunotherapy clinical trials against cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is a public health problem among women worldwide, especially in emerging nations. To improve CC control, new adjuvant therapeutic strategies are required. Advances in immunology, genomics and proteomics have accelerated our understanding of the genetic and cellular basis of many cancer types. CC is a member of virus-related neoplasms and its initiation and promotion is associated with persistent infection of oncogenic human papillomavirus. During viral infection and associated-transforming developing lesions, the HPVs co-express non-structural and structural proteins. These early or late proteins are the antigenic target of the immune response. The intervention to stimulate the humoral or cellular immune anti-HPV response is the objective of the immunoprevention and immunotherapy against CC. Recently in a controlled phase III trial of HPV type 16 vaccine using virus-like particles of L1 capsid of HPV-16, the incidence was reduced of both HPV-16 infection and HPV-16-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Although preliminary results of immunotherapy clinical trials against CC did not modify the clinical status, they occasionally show improvement of lymphocyte response against HPV. A recent immunotherapy trial using dendritic cells pulsed with HPV-18 E7 oncoprotein as adjuvant resulted in temporal remission and improved performance status in a patient with metastatic CC. New and different vaccine preventive trials against HPV are being put into practice and clinically tested. It is hoped that in the future it may be possible to eradicate cervical cancer. The success of immunotherapy anti-HPV clinical trials in CC patients will be determined at a future time. The scientific basis for the development of papillomavirus prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against persistent infection and preinvasive-invasive associated cervical lesions along with the present status of immunopreventive and immunotherapy clinical trials against cervical cancer

  18. Class I histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat suppresses regulatory T cells and enhances immunotherapies in renal and prostate cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shen

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressive factors such as regulatory T cells (Tregs limit the efficacy of immunotherapies. Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors have been reported to have antitumor activity in different malignancies and immunomodulatory effects. Herein, we report the Tregs-targeting and immune-promoting effect of a class I specific HDAC inhibitor, entinostat, in combination with either IL-2 in a murine renal cell carcinoma (RENCA model or a survivin-based vaccine therapy (SurVaxM in a castration resistant prostate cancer (CR Myc-CaP model.RENCA or CR Myc-CaP tumors were implanted orthotopically or subcutaneously, respectively. Inoculated mice were randomized into four treatment groups: vehicle, entinostat, cytokine or vaccine, and combination. Tregs in the blood were assessed by FACS analysis. Real time quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis of isolated T cell subpopulations from spleen were performed to determine Foxp3 gene and protein expression. The suppressive function of Tregs was tested by T cell proliferation assay. Low dose (5 mg/kg entinostat reduced Foxp3 levels in Tregs and this was associated with enhanced tumor growth inhibition in combination with either IL-2 or a SurVaxM vaccine. Entinostat down-regulated Foxp3 expression transcriptionally and blocked Tregs suppressive function without affecting T effector cells (Teffs. In vitro low dose entinostat (0.5 µM induced STAT3 acetylation and a specific inhibitor of STAT3 partially rescued entinostat-induced down-regulation of Foxp3, suggesting that STAT3 signaling is involved in Foxp3 down-regulation by entinostat.These results demonstrate a novel immunomodulatory effect of class I HDAC inhibition and provide a rationale for the clinical testing of entinostat to enhance cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Class I histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat suppresses regulatory T cells and enhances immunotherapies in renal and prostate cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Ciesielski, Michael; Ramakrishnan, Swathi; Miles, Kiersten M; Ellis, Leigh; Sotomayor, Paula; Shrikant, Protul; Fenstermaker, Robert; Pili, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Immunosuppressive factors such as regulatory T cells (Tregs) limit the efficacy of immunotherapies. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been reported to have antitumor activity in different malignancies and immunomodulatory effects. Herein, we report the Tregs-targeting and immune-promoting effect of a class I specific HDAC inhibitor, entinostat, in combination with either IL-2 in a murine renal cell carcinoma (RENCA) model or a survivin-based vaccine therapy (SurVaxM) in a castration resistant prostate cancer (CR Myc-CaP) model. RENCA or CR Myc-CaP tumors were implanted orthotopically or subcutaneously, respectively. Inoculated mice were randomized into four treatment groups: vehicle, entinostat, cytokine or vaccine, and combination. Tregs in the blood were assessed by FACS analysis. Real time quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis of isolated T cell subpopulations from spleen were performed to determine Foxp3 gene and protein expression. The suppressive function of Tregs was tested by T cell proliferation assay. Low dose (5 mg/kg) entinostat reduced Foxp3 levels in Tregs and this was associated with enhanced tumor growth inhibition in combination with either IL-2 or a SurVaxM vaccine. Entinostat down-regulated Foxp3 expression transcriptionally and blocked Tregs suppressive function without affecting T effector cells (Teffs). In vitro low dose entinostat (0.5 µM) induced STAT3 acetylation and a specific inhibitor of STAT3 partially rescued entinostat-induced down-regulation of Foxp3, suggesting that STAT3 signaling is involved in Foxp3 down-regulation by entinostat. These results demonstrate a novel immunomodulatory effect of class I HDAC inhibition and provide a rationale for the clinical testing of entinostat to enhance cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Prostate cancer immunotherapy, particularly in combination with androgen deprivation or radiation treatment. Customized pharmacogenomic approaches to overcome immunotherapy cancer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, C

    2017-01-01

    Conventional therapeutic approaches for advanced prostate cancer - such as androgen deprivation, chemotherapy, radiation - come up often against lack of effectiveness because of possible arising of correlative cancer cell resistance and/or inadequate anti-tumor immune conditions. Whence the timeliness of resorting to immune-based treatment strategies including either therapeutic vaccination-based active immunotherapy or anti-tumor monoclonal antibody-mediated passive immunotherapy. Particularly attractive, as for research studies and clinical applications, results to be the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte check point blockade by the use of anti-CTLA-4 and PD-1 monoclonal antibodies, particularly when combined with androgen deprivation therapy or radiation. Unlike afore said immune check point inhibitors, both cell-based (by the use of prostate specific antigen carriers autologous dendritic cells or even whole cancer cells) and recombinant viral vector vaccines are able to induce immune-mediated focused killing of specific antigen-presenting prostate cancer cells. Such vaccines, either used alone or concurrently/sequentially combined with above-mentioned conventional therapies, led to generally reach, in the field of various clinical trials, reasonable results particularly as regards the patient's overall survival. Adoptive trasferred T-cells, as adoptive T-cell passive immunotherapy, and monoclonal antibodies against specific antigen-endowed prostate cancer cells can improve immune micro-environmental conditions. On the basis of a preliminary survey about various immunotherapy strategies, are here also outlined their effects when combined with androgen deprivation therapy or radiation. What's more, as regard the immune-based treatment effectiveness, it has to be pointed out that suitable personalized epigenetic/gene profile-achieved pharmacogenomic approaches to target identified gene aberrations, may lead to overcome - as well as for conventional therapies - possible

  1. Induction of Immunogenic Cell Death with Non-Thermal Plasma for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Abraham G.

    treatment, ROS immediately increased. When chemical attenuators of ROS were used, intracellular ROS was abrogated and emission of ICD markers were attenuated. This strongly suggests that plasma-induced ICD is associated with increased intracellular ROS. The gold-standard approach to evaluating whether a stimulus can elicit genuine ICD relies on a vaccination assay. CT26 colorectal cancer cells were treated at ICD-inducing regimes of plasma and injected into syngeneic Balb/c mice. One week later, mice were challenged with live CT26 cancer cells. Tumor progression was moderated in animals immunized with plasma-treated CT26 cells. Altogether, these provide strong evidence that plasma regimes can be adapted for a new application: ICD induction. Next, a study was conducted to test the potential of plasma to induce ICD in tumors in animals. Plasma treatment of subcutaneous tumors in mice elicited the emission of ecto-CRT and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), another marker of ICD, in the tumor and also recruited CD11c+ and CD45+ immune cells locally. This was followed by development of cancer-specific splenic T cells, indicating that a systemic anti-tumor response was elicited from localized plasma treatment of the tumor. Overall, this work demonstrates the development of non-thermal plasma as a novel method of inducing immunogenic cell death for cancer immunotherapy. The obtained results further our understanding of plasma-cellular interaction mechanisms and highlight the potential for clinical translation.

  2. Subcutaneous mercury injection by a child: A histopathology case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Sukheeja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intentional subcutaneous injection of mercury by mentally healthy children is rare. Usually, it is seen as a part of suicidal attempt in severely depressed patients or by athletes to enhance their performance. We report a case of a 15-year-old child, inspired by a movie, who deliberately self-injected mercury subcutaneously into his forearm that led to the formation of a non-healing ulcer. Histopathology of the biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. A surgical procedure was thereby performed to treat the ulcer and reduce the blood and urinary levels of mercury. However, the patient did not develop clinical signs of chronic poisoning, proving that subcutaneous mercury injection has a low risk of systemic toxicity, and that histopathology plays an important role in diagnosis.

  3. Subcutaneous steroid injection as treatment for chalazion: prospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, S Y; Lai, J S M

    2002-02-01

    To study the efficacy of subcutaneous steroid injection in the treatment of chalazion. Prospective consecutive case series. University teaching hospital, Hong Kong. Patients with chalazion presenting to the out-patient clinic of the Department of Ophthalmology at the Prince of Wales Hospital from January to June 1998. Size of the chalazion after steroid injection treatment. Forty-eight consecutive patients with chalazion were treated with injection of triamcinolone into the subcutaneous tissue around the lesion. In 43 (89.6%) patients, the lesion subsided completely. Twenty-six (54.2%) patients had lesions that subsided with one injection. The size and duration of the chalazion at presentation did not significantly affect the outcome of the treatment. Two patients developed depigmentation of the skin at the site of injection. No other major complications were encountered. Subcutaneous injection of the steroid triamcinolone acetonide appears to be a simple and effective treatment for chalazion. Further comparative clinical trials are indicated.

  4. Munchausen syndrome revealed by subcutaneous limb emphysema: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufagued, Kaldadak; Chafry, Bouchaib; Benyass, Youssef; Abissegue, Yves; Benchebba, Driss; Bouabid, Salim; Belkacem, Chagar

    2015-08-18

    Limb subcutaneous emphysema secondary to a Munchausen syndrome represents a rare and severe entity because it involves the functional prognosis of the limb and vital prognosis of the patient. We report the case of an 18-year-old Moroccan woman patient who presented to our hospital with a subcutaneous emphysema of the shoulder girdle and the right arm, caused by our patient. Treatment was aggressive, with a wide surgical debridement, parenteral antibiotic therapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The results have been favorable. The correlation of anamnestic data and clinical and para-clinical exams were essential for the diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome in this case. In this regard, we report a rare case of subcutaneous limb emphysema secondary to Munchausen syndrome.

  5. Dermatomyositis associated with generalized subcutaneous edema and Evans syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyu Dong; Kim, Pyoung Su; Park, Hae Young; Kim, Cho Rok; Byun, Ji Yeon; Lee, Dong Youn; Lee, Joo Heung; Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Eil-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Although periorbital edema is a common manifestation of dermatomyositis (DM), generalized subcutaneous edema associated with DM is extremely rare. Evans syndrome is an autoimmune disease in which an individual's antibodies attack one's own red blood cells and platelets. Evans syndrome is rarely a presenting feature of DM. DM has been rarely reported to be associated with either generalized edema or Evans syndrome. We report the case of a 52-year-old Korean woman who presented with generalized subcutaneous edema, an erythematous rash, dysphagia, and proximal muscle weakness, and subsequently developed features of Evans syndrome. Treatment with high-dose glucocorticoids and an immunosuppressive agent controlled the DM, the generalized subcutaneous edema, and the Evans syndrome. Copyright © 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Supramicrosurgical lymphatic-venous anastomosis for postsurgical subcutaneous lymphocele treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentileschi, Stefano; Servillo, Maria; Salgarello, Marzia

    2015-10-01

    Postsurgical subcutaneous lymphocele is caused by accidental lesion of a lymphatic vessel that keeps on flowing lymph under the scar. Traditional treatments include aspiration and compression, with probable recurrence, and sclerotherapy which destroys both lymphatic cyst and vessel, creating risk of lymphedema. We describe the case of a postsurgical subcutaneous lymphocele of the left leg that was treated by supramicrosurgical lympatic-venous anastomosis. A single anastomosis was performed end-to-end, between one lymphatic vessel, individuated through indocyanine green lymphography, and one subcutaneous vein, distally to the lymphocele, under sedation and local anesthesia. Postoperative course was uneventful; the lymphocele completely resolved and never recurred during the nine months followup. This technique may heal the lymphocele with no impairing of lymph drainage function. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Skin temperature and subcutaneous adipose blood flow in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Bülow, J; Madsen, J

    1980-01-01

    The abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) was measured bilaterally by the 133Xe washout method. At one side of the skin (epicutaneous) temperature was varied with a temperature blanket, the other side served as control. There was a significant (P less than 0.001) positive...... correlation between skin temperature and ATBF. In the range from 25 to 37 degrees CATBF increased 9% of the control flow on average per centigrade increase in skin temperature. ATBF at the control side was uninfluenced by the contralateral variations in skin temperature. Although no better correlation could...... be demonstrated between ATBF and subcutaneous temperature than between ATBF and skin temperature, arguments are presented in favour of the hypothesis that ATBF is influenced by the subcutaneous temperature rather than via reflexes from the skin. Infiltration of the 133Xe depots with 20 microgram histamine...

  8. Advances and highlights in allergen immunotherapy: On the way to sustained clinical and immunologic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berings, Margot; Karaaslan, Cagatay; Altunbulakli, Can; Gevaert, Philippe; Akdis, Mübeccel; Bachert, Claus; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2017-11-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is an effective treatment strategy for allergic diseases and has been used for more than 100 years. In recent years, however, the expectations on concepts, conduct, statistical evaluation, and reporting have developed significantly. Products have undergone dose-response and confirmative studies in adults and children to provide evidence for the optimal dosage, safety, and efficacy of AIT vaccines using subcutaneous and sublingual delivery pathways in large patient cohorts, ensuring solid conclusions to be drawn from them for the advantage of patients and societies alike. Those standards should be followed today, and products answering to them should be preferred over others lacking optimization and proof of efficacy and safety. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of AIT include early mast cell and basophil desensitization effects, regulation of T- and B-cell responses, regulation of IgE and IgG4 production, and inhibition of responses from eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils in the affected tissues. There were many developments to improve vaccination strategies, demonstration of new molecules involved in molecular mechanisms, and demonstration of new biomarkers for AIT during the last few years. The combination of probiotics, vitamins, and biological agents with AIT is highlighting current advances. Development of allergoids and recombinant and hypoallergenic vaccines to skew the immune response from IgE to IgG4 and regulation of dendritic cell, mast cell, basophil, innate lymphoid cell, T-cell, and B-cell responses to allergens are also discussed in detail. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface biotinylation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes for in vivo tracking of tumor immunotherapy in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anning; Wu, Yue; Linnoila, Jenny; Pulli, Benjamin; Wang, Cuihua; Zeller, Matthias; Ali, Muhammad; Lewandrowski, Grant K; Li, Jinghui; Tricot, Benoit; Keliher, Edmund; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Fulci, Giulia; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Tannous, Bakhos A; Yao, Zhenwei; Chen, John W

    2016-12-01

    Currently, there is no stable and flexible method to label and track cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in vivo in CTL immunotherapy. We aimed to evaluate whether the sulfo-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-biotin-streptavidin (SA) platform could chemically modify the cell surface of CTLs for in vivo tracking. CD8+ T lymphocytes were labeled with sulfo-NHS-biotin under different conditions and then incubated with SA-Alexa647. Labeling efficiency was proportional to sulfo-NHS-biotin concentration. CD8+ T lymphocytes could be labeled with higher efficiency with sulfo-NHS-biotin in DPBS than in RPMI (P < 0.05). Incubation temperature was not a key factor. CTLs maintained sufficient labeling for at least 72 h (P < 0.05), without altering cell viability. After co-culturing labeled CTLs with mouse glioma stem cells (GSCs) engineered to present biotin on their surface, targeting CTLs could specifically target biotin-presenting GSCs and inhibited cell proliferation (P < 0.01) and tumor spheres formation. In a biotin-presenting GSC brain tumor model, targeting CTLs could be detected in biotin-presenting gliomas in mouse brains but not in the non-tumor-bearing contralateral hemispheres (P < 0.05). In vivo fluorescent molecular tomography imaging in a subcutaneous U87 mouse model confirmed that targeting CTLs homed in on the biotin-presenting U87 tumors but not the control U87 tumors. PET imaging with 89Zr-deferoxamine-biotin and SA showed a rapid clearance of the PET signal over 24 h in the control tumor, while only minimally decreased in the targeted tumor. Thus, sulfo-NHS-biotin-SA labeling is an efficient method to noninvasively track the migration of adoptive transferred CTLs and does not alter CTL viability or interfere with CTL-mediated cytotoxic activity.

  10. Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Metastases From Atypical Laryngeal Carcinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui-Rong; Jia, Yuan-Jing; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Wang, Qin-Ying; Bao, Yang-Yang; Feng, Zhi-Ying; Yao, Hong-Tian; Fan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoids is approximately 20%. However, the pathogenesis and natural history of, and prognostic factors for, the condition remain poorly understood. We reported a 54-year-old female presented with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Laryngoscopy revealed a 0.5 × 1.5-cm reddish mass on the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis. Under general anesthesia, a biopsy sample was obtained via suspension laryngoscopy. Routine pathology revealed atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Immunohistochemical staining of the sections of primary tumor was positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, P53, and CD56. GLUT-1, p-Akt, and PI3K were negative. The Ki-67 index was 15%. Supraglottic laryngectomy and selective right-neck dissection were performed. After 6 months, the patient complained of pain in the right wall of the chest; multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules were evident at that site and in the abdomen. An abdominal nodule was biopsied and pathology revealed that the atypical metastatic carcinoid had metastasized to both cutaneous and subcutaneous areas of the abdomen. Chemotherapy was then prescribed. Currently, the intrathecal drug delivery system remains in place. No local recurrence has been detected. Furthermore, we systematically reviewed clinical manifestations of the disease, pathogenesis, prognostic factors, and treatment. The metastasis rate (cutaneous and subcutaneous) was approximately 12.2%. Thirty patients (62.5%) with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases exhibited contemporaneous lymph node invasion. The 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 44.0%, 22.0%, and 13.0%, respectively. The prognosis of patients with atypical laryngeal carcinoids was poor. Relevant prognostic factors included the level of p53, human papilloma virus status, certain hypoxic markers, and distant metastasis. No

  11. Subcutaneous Implants of Buprenorphine-Cholesterol-Triglyceride Powder in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    L. DeTolla; R. Sanchez; E. Khan; B. Tyler; M. Guarnieri

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous drug implants are convenient systems for the long-term delivery of drugs in animals. Lipid carriers are logical tools because they generally allow for higher doses and low toxicity. The present study used an US Food and Drug Administration Target Animal Safety test system to evaluate the safety of a subcutaneous implant of a cholesterol-triglyceride-buprenorphine powder in 120 BALB/c mice. Mice were evaluated in 4- and 12-day trials with 1- and 5-fold doses of the intended 3 mg/k...

  12. Recombinant hypoallergens for immunotherapy of Parietaria judaica pollen allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asturias, Juan Andres

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant allergens are a promising alternative to crude allergen extracts for diagnosis and therapy of allergic diseases. Genetically modified allergen derivatives with reduced allergenic activity but retaining their immunogenicity have also been produced to increase safety and specificity of allergen-specific immunotherapy. When a limited number of allergens are responsible for most of the allergenic activity, fusion proteins comprising these major allergens can be used to simplify vaccine development. Three different allergen fusions of Par j 1 and Par j 2, the major allergens from Parietaria judaica, were characterized. Two of them (Q1 and Q2) showing reduced allergenicity but conserved immunogenicity represent suitable candidates for allergen-specific immunotherapy against P. judaica pollen allergy.

  13. Overview of Cellular Immunotherapy for Patients with Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Vauleon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High grade gliomas (HGG including glioblastomas (GBM are the most common and devastating primary brain tumours. Despite important progresses in GBM treatment that currently includes surgery combined to radio- and chemotherapy, GBM patients' prognosis remains very poor. Immunotherapy is one of the new promising therapeutic approaches that can specifically target tumour cells. Such an approach could also maintain long term antitumour responses without inducing neurologic defects. Since the past 25 years, adoptive and active immunotherapies using lymphokine-activated killer cells, cytotoxic T cells, tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes, autologous tumour cells, and dendritic cells have been tested in phase I/II clinical trials with HGG patients. This paper inventories these cellular immunotherapeutic strategies and discusses their efficacy, limits, and future perspectives for optimizing the treatment to achieve clinical benefits for GBM patients.

  14. Nanotechnology to augment immunotherapy for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Nolan; Yang, Isaac

    2015-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is characterized as one of the most common and most deadly malignant primary brain tumors. Current treatment modalities include the use of surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy, though survival is still limited. Because of this, new treatment strategies are needed to improve overall survival. Immunotherapy has emerged as a potential treatment, but still possesses certain limitations to have a substantial clinical effect. In addition, nanotechnology has emerged as potent treatment effectors that have been shown to augment the effects of therapies including chemotherapy, gene therapy, and more. Nanoparticles possess a novel approach due to the myriad of functional groups that can create targeted treatments, though further optimization is still required. In this review, the authors will present the current uses and abilities of nanotechnology and its implication for use with immunotherapy in the treatment of GBM.

  15. Cancer immunotherapy: Breakthrough or "deja vu, all over again"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Stewart

    2017-06-01

    From the application of Coley's toxin in the early 1900s to the present clinical trials using immune checkpoint regulatory inhibitors, the history of cancer immunotherapy has consisted of extremely high levels of enthusiasm after anecdotal case reports of enormous success, followed by decreasing levels of enthusiasm as the results of controlled clinical trials are available. In this review, this pattern will be documented for the various immunotherapeutic approaches over the years. The sole exception being vaccination against cancer causing viruses, which have already prevented thousands of cancers. We can only hope that the present high level of enthusiasm for the use of immune stimulation by removal of blocks to cancer immunity will be more productive than the incremental improvements using previous immunotherapies.

  16. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confronts many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistant to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in an acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed to hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to (1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and (2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy.Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit

  17. Research advances in cellular immunotherapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ye

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present therapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC consists of surgery as well as local radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the majority of patients are susceptible to recurrence after comprehensive treatment, and the overall treatment outcome is not ideal due to the lack of effective drugs and strategies. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the immune system is closely related to the development, progression, metastasis, and recurrence of HCC. Thus, immune therapy, especially cellular immunotherapy, could regulate immune function and induce specific antitumor immunity to achieve the goal of controlling HCC and reducing its recurrence and metastasis, which has become an essential part in the comprehensive treatment of HCC. The findings in preclinical and clinical studies on cellular immunotherapy for HCC data are reviewed, and the current problems are discussed.

  18. Novel Anti-Melanoma Immunotherapies: Disarming Tumor Escape Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Sapoznik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system fights cancer and sometimes temporarily eliminates it or reaches an equilibrium stage of tumor growth. However, continuous immunological pressure also selects poorly immunogenic tumor variants that eventually escape the immune control system. Here, we focus on metastatic melanoma, a highly immunogenic tumor, and on anti-melanoma immunotherapies, which recently, especially following the FDA approval of Ipilimumab, gained interest from drug development companies. We describe new immunomodulatory approaches currently in the development pipeline, focus on the novel CEACAM1 immune checkpoint, and compare its potential to the extensively described targets, CTLA4 and PD1. This paper combines multi-disciplinary approaches and describes anti-melanoma immunotherapies from molecular, medical, and business angles.

  19. Targeting CD8+ T-cell tolerance for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stephanie R; Yuan, Jinyun; Teague, Ryan M

    2014-01-01

    In the final issue of Science in 2013, the American Association of Science recognized progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy as the 'Breakthrough of the Year.' The achievements were actually twofold, owing to the early success of genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) and to the mounting clinical triumphs achieved with checkpoint blockade antibodies. While fundamentally very different, the common thread of these independent strategies is the ability to prevent or overcome mechanisms of CD8(+) T-cell tolerance for improved tumor immunity. Here we discuss how circumventing T-cell tolerance has provided experimental insights that have guided the field of clinical cancer immunotherapy to a place where real breakthroughs can finally be claimed.

  20. Recent advances in T-cell immunotherapy for haematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouce, Rayne H; Sharma, Sandhya; Huynh, Mai; Heslop, Helen E

    2017-03-01

    In vitro discoveries have paved the way for bench-to-bedside translation in adoptive T cell immunotherapy, resulting in remarkable clinical responses in a variety of haematological malignancies. Adoptively transferred T cells genetically modified to express CD19 CARs have shown great promise, although many unanswered questions regarding how to optimize T-cell therapies for both safety and efficacy remain. Similarly, T cells that recognize viral or tumour antigens though their native receptors have produced encouraging clinical responses. Honing manufacturing processes will increase the availability of T-cell products, while combining T-cell therapies has the ability to increase complete response rates. Lastly, innovative mechanisms to control these therapies may improve safety profiles while genome editing offers the prospect of modulating T-cell function. This review will focus on recent advances in T-cell immunotherapy, highlighting both clinical and pre-clinical advances, as well as exploring what the future holds. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Current advances in T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjun; Yin, Bingnan; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide; due to the lack of ideal cancer biomarkers for early detection or diagnosis, most patients present with late-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, thus limiting the potential for successful treatment. Traditional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have demonstrated very limited efficacy for patients with late-stage disease. Therefore, innovative and effective cancer treatments are urgently needed for cancer patients with late-stage and refractory disease. Cancer immunotherapy, particularly adoptive cell transfer, has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with late-stage disease, including those who are refractory to standard therapies. In this review, we will highlight recent advances and discuss future directions in adoptive cell transfer based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25524383

  2. Novel targets for natural killer/T-cell lymphoma immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumai, Takumi; Kobayashi, Hiroya; Harabuchi, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (NKTL) is a rare but highly aggressive Epstein-Barr virus-related malignancy, which mainly occurs in nasopharyngeal and nasal/paranasal areas. In addition to its high prevalence in Asian, Central American and South American populations, its incidence rate has been gradually increasing in Western countries. The current mainstay of treatment is a combination of multiple chemotherapies and irradiation. Although chemoradiotherapy can cure NKTL, it often causes severe and fatal adverse events. Because a growing body of evidence suggests that immunotherapy is effective against hematological malignancies, this treatment could provide an alternative to chemoradiotherapy for treatment of NKTL. In this review, we focus on how recent findings could be used to develop efficient immunotherapies against NKTL.

  3. Personalized adoptive immunotherapy for patients with EBVassociated tumors and complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieling, Maren; Tischer, Sabine; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality of immunocompromised patients are increased by primary infection with or reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), possibly triggering EBV+ post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Adoptive transfer of EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells (EBV-CTLs) promises a non......-toxic immunotherapy to effectively prevent or treat these complications. To improve immunotherapy and immunomonitoring this study aimed at identifying and evaluating naturally processed and presented HLA-A*03:01-restricted EBV-CTL epitopes as immunodominant targets. More than 15000 peptides were sequenced from EBV...... by assessing the frequencies and functionality of EBV-CTLs in healthy donors (n > 10) and EBV+ PTLD-patients (n = 5) by multimer staining, Eli- and FluoroSpot assays. All eleven peptides elicited EBV-CTL responses in the donors. Their clinical applicability was determined by small-scale T-cell enrichment using...

  4. MRI in Glioma Immunotherapy: Evidence, Pitfalls, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Aquino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudophenomena, that is, imaging alterations due to therapy rather than tumor evolution, have an important impact on the management of glioma patients and the results of clinical trials. RANO (response assessment in neurooncology criteria, including conventional MRI (cMRI, addressed the issues of pseudoprogression after radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy and pseudoresponse during antiangiogenic therapy of glioblastomas (GBM and other gliomas. The development of cancer immunotherapy forced the identification of further relevant response criteria, summarized by the iRANO working group in 2015. In spite of this, the unequivocal definition of glioma progression by cMRI remains difficult particularly in the setting of immunotherapy approaches provided by checkpoint inhibitors and dendritic cells. Advanced MRI (aMRI may in principle address this unmet clinical need. Here, we discuss the potential contribution of different aMRI techniques and their indications and pitfalls in relation to biological and imaging features of glioma and immune system interactions.

  5. Bacillary Prostatitis after Intravesical Immunotherapy:A Rare Adverse Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Joaquim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the most efficient form of intravesical immunotherapy for superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is the instillation of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG, proceeding from an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis. In up to 40% of cases, its instillation is associated with significantly elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels. In these cases, prostate biopsy should be withheld for 3 months and PSA should be monitored. Bacillary prostatitis is a rare occurrence in patients treated with intravesical BCG immunotherapy. Although symptomatic bacillary prostatitis is even rarer, it is the worst type of this condition. The aims of this study are to report a case of bacillary prostatitis as a rare adverse effect of intravesical BCG immunotherapy and to make a theoretical review about how to manage this complication. A 58-year-old man, former smoker, underwent a transurethral resection of the bladder in February 2004 because of a papillary transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (pT1G2N0M0. After surgery, BCG instillation therapy was given in a total of 15 instillations, the last one in March 2007. In the last 3 months of therapy, until May 2007, a progressive increase in his PSA level was registered, and he underwent a prostate biopsy revealing granulomatous prostatitis of bacillary etiology. The semen culture was positive for M. bovis. After 3 months of a two-drug (isoniazid and rifampin antituberculous regimen, the semen culture became negative and the PSA level decreased. The early identification of intravesical BCG immunotherapy complications allows their effective treatment. However, when a histological diagnosis of asymptomatic granulomatous prostatitis is made, the execution and type of treatment are controversial.

  6. Amyloid-beta-directed immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lannfelt, Lars; Relkin, N. R.; Siemers, E.R.

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment options for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are limited to medications that reduce dementia symptoms. Given the rapidly ageing populations in most areas of the world, new therapeutic interventions for AD are urgently needed. In recent years, a number of drug candidates targeting the amyloid-ss (A ss) peptide have advanced into clinical trials; however, most have failed because of safety issues or lack of efficacy. The A ss peptide is central to the pathogenesis, and immunotherapy a...

  7. Neuroinflammation Screening in Immunotherapy Trials against Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Niels Andreasen; Kaj Blennow; Henrik Zetterberg

    2010-01-01

    Due to side effects in the form of meningoencephalitis in the interrupted phase II AN1792 trial of active antiamyloid ? (A ? ) immunization against Alzheimer's disease (AD), there has been concern that anti-A ? immunization may cause destructive neuroinflammation. Here, we report on two patients fulfilling clinical AD criteria who were diagnosed with Lyme neuroborreliosis during screening before inclusion in anti-A ? immunotherapy trials. The two cases illustrate the necessity of careful bioc...

  8. Immunotherapy in head and neck cancer: aiming at EXTREME precision

    OpenAIRE

    Szturz, Petr; Vermorken, Jan B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Locoregionally advanced, recurrent, and metastatic squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) remain difficult to treat disease entities, in which systemic treatment often forms an integral part of their management. Immunotherapy is based on functional restoration of the host immune system, helping to counteract various tumour evasion strategies. Broadly, immunotherapeutic approaches encompass tumour-specific antibodies, cancer vaccines, cytokines, adoptive T-cell transf...

  9. Treg infiltration in glioma: a hurdle for antiglioma immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberk, Lien; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2012-07-01

    Tregs play a crucial role in glioma-mediated immunosuppression; hence, tackling the Treg population in patients with malignant glioma could improve the clinical success rate of antiglioma immunotherapy. Therefore, it is of high importance to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for Treg recruitment and retention within the glioma microenvironment. The current paper demonstrates that, in addition to preferential chemoattraction, glioma-derived soluble factors can also induce preferential Treg proliferation and survival. These data identify new targets for Treg modulating strategies.

  10. The next generation of immunotherapy: keeping lung cancer in check

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Somasundaram

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung cancer is the deadliest malignancy with more cancer deaths per year than the next three cancers combined. Despite remarkable advances in targeted therapy, advanced lung cancer patients have not experienced a significant improvement in mortality. Lung cancer has been shown to be immunogenic and responsive to checkpoint blockade therapy. Checkpoint signals such as CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 dampen T cell activation and allow tumors to escape the adaptive immune response. Response rates in patients with pretreated, advanced NSCLC were much higher and more durable with PD-1 blockade therapy compared to standard-of-care, cytotoxic chemotherapy. Therefore, PD-1 inhibitors such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab were rapidly approved for both squamous and nonsquamous lung cancer in the pretreated population. The advent of these new therapies have revolutionized the treatment of lung cancer; however, the majority of NSCLC patients still do not respond to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibition leaving an unmet need for a large and growing population. Immunotherapy combinations with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or novel immunomodulatory agents are currently being examined with the hope of achieving higher response rates and improving overall survival rate. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy has been theorized to increase the release of tumor antigen leading to increased responses with immunotherapy. However, cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation therapy may also destroy actively proliferating T cells. The correct combination and order of therapy is under investigation. The majority of patients who do respond to immunotherapy have a durable response attributed to the effect of adaptive immune system’s memory. Unfortunately, some patients’ tumors do progress afterward and investigation of checkpoint blockade resistance is still nascent. This review will summarize the latest efficacy and safety data for early and advanced NSCLC in both the treatment-naïve and

  11. Central Tolerance Blockade to Augment Checkpoint Immunotherapy in Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    antibody) rescues melanoma-fighting T cells from thymus elimination. Anti-RANKL antibody is different from other cancer immunotherapies because of this... cancer . In order to develop anti-RANKL antibody as a combination therapy with checkpoint inhibitors for advanced melanoma patients, several critical...beyond science and technology? Nothing to report. CHANGES/PROBLEMS: Changes in approach and reasons for change Dr. Jennifer Nelson, MD, who was

  12. Adapting cancer immunotherapy models for the real world

    OpenAIRE

    Klevorn, Lauryn E.; Teague, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Early experiments in mice predicted the success of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy in cancer patients. However, these same animal studies failed to accurately predict many of the limitations and toxicities of treatment. One of the likely reasons for this discrepancy is the nearly universal use of young healthy mice, which stand in stark contrast to diverse patient populations varying in age, weight, diet and hygiene. Because these variables impact immunity and metabolism, they also influenc...

  13. Combination Immunotherapy for the Treatment of High-Risk HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0109 TITLE: Combination Immunotherapy for the Treatment of High-Risk HER2-Positive Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL...Report 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Combination Immunotherapy for the Treatment of High-Risk HER2Positive Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...HER2-positive, immunotherapy , vaccines, NeuVax, clinical trial 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a

  14. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target...

  15. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, Genevieve M. [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada); Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Liwski, Robert S. [Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Room 206E, Dr. D. J. Mackenzie Building, Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, 5788 University Avenue, Halifax, NS, B3H 2Y9 (Canada); Mansour, Marc [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada)

    2011-08-05

    Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments.

  16. Cancer immunotherapy in veterinary medicine: Current options and new developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Daniel; Guth, Amanda; Coy, Jonathan; Dow, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Excitement in the field of tumor immunotherapy is being driven by several remarkable breakthroughs in recent years. This review will cover recent advances in cancer immunotherapy, including the use of T cell checkpoint inhibitors, engineered T cells, cancer vaccines, and anti-B cell and T cell antibodies. Inhibition of T cell checkpoint molecules such as PD-1 and CTLA-4 using monoclonal antibodies has achieved notable success against advanced tumors in humans, including melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and non-small cell lung cancer. Therapy with engineered T cells has also demonstrated remarkable tumor control and regression in human trials. Autologous cancer vaccines have recently demonstrated impressive prolongation of disease-free intervals and survival times in dogs with lymphoma. In addition, caninized monoclonal antibodies targeting CD20 and CD52 just recently received either full (CD20) or conditional (CD52) licensing by the United States Department of Agriculture for clinical use in the treatment of canine B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, respectively. Thus, immunotherapy for cancer is rapidly moving to the forefront of cancer treatment options in veterinary medicine as well as human medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Adoptive immunotherapy via CD4+ versus CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Phan-Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of cancer immunotherapy is to induce specific and durable antitumor immunity. Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT has garnered wide interest, particularly in regard to strategies to improve T cell efficacy in trials. There are many types of T cells (and subsets which can be selected for use in ACT. CD4+ T cells are critical for the regulation, activation and aid of host defense mechanisms and, importantly, for enhancing the function of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. To date, much research in cancer immunotherapy has focused on CD8+ T cells, in melanoma and other cancers. Both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells have been evaluated as ACT in mice and humans, and both are effective at eliciting antitumor responses. IL-17 producing CD4+ T cells are a new subset of CD4+ T cells to be evaluated in ACT models. This review discusses the benefits of adoptive immunotherapy mediated by CD8+ and CD4+ cells. It also discusses the various type of T cells, source of T cells, and ex vivo cytokine growth factors for augmenting clinical efficacy of ACT. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(4.000: 588-595

  18. Immunotherapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Raman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC is often curable by surgery alone. However, metastatic RCC is generally incurable. In the 1990s, immunotherapy in the form of cytokines was the mainstay of treatment for metastatic RCC. However, responses were seen in only a minority of highly selected patients with substantial treatment-related toxicities. The advent of targeted agents such as vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitors VEGF-TKIs and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors led to a change in this paradigm due to improved response rates and progression-free survival, a better safety profile, and the convenience of oral administration. However, most patients ultimately progress with about 12% being alive at 5 years. In contrast, durable responses lasting 10 years or more are noted in a minority of those treated with cytokines. More recently, an improved overall survival with newer forms of immunotherapy in other malignancies (such as melanoma and prostate cancer has led to a resurgence of interest in immune therapies in metastatic RCC. In this review we discuss the rationale for immunotherapy and recent developments in immunotherapeutic strategies for treating metastatic RCC.

  19. Targeting O-Acetyl-GD2 Ganglioside for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Fleurence

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Target selection is a key feature in cancer immunotherapy, a promising field in cancer research. In this respect, gangliosides, a broad family of structurally related glycolipids, were suggested as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy based on their higher abundance in tumors when compared with the matched normal tissues. GD2 is the first ganglioside proven to be an effective target antigen for cancer immunotherapy with the regulatory approval of dinutuximab, a chimeric anti-GD2 therapeutic antibody. Although the therapeutic efficacy of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies is well documented, neuropathic pain may limit its application. O-Acetyl-GD2, the O-acetylated-derivative of GD2, has recently received attention as novel antigen to target GD2-positive cancers. The present paper examines the role of O-acetyl-GD2 in tumor biology as well as the available preclinical data of anti-O-acetyl-GD2 monoclonal antibodies. A discussion on the relevance of O-acetyl-GD2 in chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy development is also included.

  20. Immunomodulatory Monoclonal Antibodies in Combined Immunotherapy Trials for Cutaneous Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Aris

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, there has been a twist in cancer treatment toward immunotherapy thanks to the impressive results seen in advanced patients from several tumor pathologies. Cutaneous melanoma is a highly mutated and immunogenic tumor that has been a test field for the development of immunotherapy. However, there is still a way on the road to achieving complete and long-lasting responses in most patients. It is desirable that immunotherapeutic strategies induce diverse immune reactivity specific to tumor antigens, including the so-called neoantigens, as well as the blockade of immunosuppressive mechanisms. In this review, we will go through the role of promising monoclonal antibodies in cancer immunotherapy with immunomodulatory function, especially blocking of the inhibitory immune checkpoints CTLA-4 and PD-1, in combination with different immunotherapeutic strategies such as vaccines. We will discuss the rational basis for these combinatorial approaches as well as different schemes currently under study for cutaneous melanoma in the clinical trials arena. In this way, the combination of “push and release” immunomodulatory therapies can contribute to achieving a more robust and durable antitumor immune response in patients.

  1. Liposome-based immunity-inducing systems for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuba, Eiji

    2017-11-08

    Cancer immunotherapy has gained much attention for next-generation cancer treatment. To conduct cancer immunotherapy, efficient antigen delivery systems must be able to deliver an antigen selectively to antigen-presenting cells, release it at suitable sites for induction of cross-presentation, and simultaneously induce activation of immunocompetent cells. Liposomes are a candidate for use as such multifunctional antigen delivery carriers because of their capability for easy functionalization. This review describes the rational design of liposome-based antigen delivery systems. Surface modification of liposomes by pH-responsive or fusogenic materials can achieve cytoplasmic delivery of antigen, leading to cross-presentation of exogenous antigen via a "cytosolic pathway." In contrast, targeting surface receptors on antigen presenting cells or the selective release of antigen in early endosome induced "vacuolar pathway"-mediated cross-presentation. Introduction of adjuvant molecules such as Toll like receptor agonists, synthetic cationic lipids or bioactive polysaccharides to liposomes improved their immunity-inducing ability. Combination with cancelling systems of immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment enhanced antitumor immunity of antigen delivery systems. Further understanding of immunity-inducing mechanism and molecular basis of tumor immunosuppressive environments and purposeful design of liposome-based antigen delivery systems can provide effective immunity-inducing systems for cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel immunotherapy approaches for metastatic urothelial and renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiying Shao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC and urothelial carcinoma (UC remains a major challenge. Past research has implicated the immune system in tumor surveillance of both malignancies, leading to the application of immunotherapy agents for both cancers. Among them, the most promising agents are the checkpoint blockade drugs, such as antibodies targeting the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4, programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1, and PD-1 ligand (PD-L1. In normal physiology, these immune checkpoints act as inhibitory signals to fine-tune the duration and strength of immune reactions, which is pivotal for maintaining self-tolerance. However, tumor cells also utilize immune checkpoint pathways to evade anti-tumor immune response, leading to disease progression and metastasis. Thus, there has been intense preclinical and clinical effort focused on the application of checkpoint inhibitors in metastatic RCC and UC. To date, nivolumab (anti-PD-1 and atezolizumab (anti-PD-L1 have been approved for the treatment of metastatic RCC and UC, respectively. Despite these successes, challenges remain in how to further improve response rates to immunotherapy and how to select patients that will benefit from this approach. In this report, we review existing data and research on immunotherapy in metastatic RCC and UC.

  3. Single versus combination immunotherapy drug treatment in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Antonio Maria; Marincola, Francesco M; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The advent of new immunotherapies for the treatment of metastatic melanoma has resulted in various novel combination strategies. Because of their distinct modes of action, different immunotherapies have been investigated in combination with one another, as well as combined with targeted therapies and other treatment modalities. Anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 treatments enhance antitumor immunity through complementary and non-redundant mechanisms. The combination of the anti-CTLA-4 agent ipilimumab and the anti-PD-1 agent nivolumab has been shown to improve progression-free survival and objective response rate compared with either agent alone as monotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma. However, the combination was associated with significant toxicity, with around one-third of patients discontinuing treatment as a result. The sequential use of nivolumab and ipilimumab was associated with similar outcomes and comparable toxicity to concurrent therapy. Clinical trials assessing various combinations of immunomodulating antibodies are ongoing or planned. Ipilimumab and pembrolizumab have also been investigated in combination with the oncolytic virus, talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), with promising results. In addition, immunotherapies have also been combined with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and electrochemotherapy. Investigation of combination approaches represents the start of a new story that begins with melanoma treatment and expands to embrace other solid and hematological cancers.

  4. Molecular Pathways: At the Crossroads of Cancer Epigenetics and Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio, Michele; Covre, Alessia; Fratta, Elisabetta; Di Giacomo, Anna Maria; Taverna, Pietro; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Coral, Sandra; Sigalotti, Luca

    2015-09-15

    Epigenetic regulation allows heritably modulating gene expression profiles without modifying the primary sequence of gDNA. Under physiologic conditions, epigenetic patterns determine tissue-specific gene expression landscapes, gene imprinting, inactivation of chromosome X, and preservation of genomic stability. The most characterized mediators of epigenetic inheritance are gDNA methylation and histone posttranslational modifications that cooperate to alter chromatin state and genome transcription. According to these notions, it is not surprising that cancer cells invariantly deploy epigenetic alterations to achieve gene expression patterns required for neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. In this context, the recently uncovered use of epigenetic alterations by cancer cells to become stealth from the host's immune recognition has significant immunobiologic relevance in tumor progression, and it appears to have potential clinical usefulness. Indeed, immune evasion is among the major obstacles to further improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies and to increase long-lasting disease control. Luckily, different "epigenetic drugs" able to revert these "epimutations" are available, some of which have already been approved for clinical use. Here, we summarize the immunomodulatory activities of epigenetic drugs that lead to improved immune recognition of cancer cells and focus on the potential of this class of agents in improving the anticancer activity of novel immunotherapies through combinatorial epigenetic immunotherapy approaches. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy of Breast Cancer: Modulation by CpG

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baar, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    ... in the United States in 2004. Thus, patients with MBC who fail conventional therapies are candidates for clinical trials using novel therapeutic approaches, including immunotherapy. Dendritic cells (DC...

  6. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ick Byun

    Full Text Available To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE and new-onset seizure.Adult (age ≥18 years patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2-4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as "seizure remission", "> 50% seizure reduction", or "no change" based on the degree of its decrease.Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2-4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events.AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE.

  7. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Keun-Hwa; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Doo Young; Shin, Yong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Lee, Han-Sang; Jun, Jinsun; Kim, Dong-Yub; Kim, Man-Young; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Suh, Hong Il; Lee, Yoojin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Jin Ho; Choi, Woo Chan; Bae, Dae Woong; Shin, Jung-Won; Jeon, Daejong; Park, Kyung-Il; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE) and new-onset seizure. Methods Adult (age ≥18 years) patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2–4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as “seizure remission”, “> 50% seizure reduction”, or “no change” based on the degree of its decrease. Results Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2–4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events. Conclusion AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE. PMID:26771547

  8. CANCER IMMUNOLOGY AND IMMUNOTHERAPY – UNDERSTANDING AND ADAPTATION THE CURRENT EVIDENCE TO OPTIMIZE PATIENT THERAPY OUTCOMES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlin Savov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication includes the try to act as intermediary to the readers, which should be able to understand: - The description of the cancer immunotherapy mechanisms in the context of current therapy decisions for the treatment of cancer - The including criteria for those patients with cancer who could be appropriate candidates for immunotherapy - And to optimize patient outcomes by using best practices to manage the adverse events associated with immunotherapy treatment More than 15 promising immunotherapy approaches being tested in clinical trials with appropriate patients and colleagues for enrollment and peer-to-peer education purposes, respectively.

  9. A Reflection of the New Wave of Immunotherapy on the Clinical Study of 
Chinese Lung Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing LIU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the success of anti-CTLA-4 antibody in malignant melanoma, targeted immunotherapy has become one of the effective strategies for anti-tumor therapy, and raised a new wave of research on tumor immunotherapy. In the field of lung cancer, a series of clinical studies on immune-targeted drugs have been carried out aboard, nivolumab, pembrolizumab and atezolizumab have been approved for the treatment of lung cancer, which rewrite the history of lung cancer treatment. In China, clinical studies on immune-targeted drugs for lung cancer have also been developed. The present study mainly analyzed and investigated the current situation, gap and future innovation of the research on anti-tumor immunity of lung cancer in China.

  10. Role of Liposuction Combined with Subcutaneous Mastectomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gynecomastia is one of the common benign male breast diseases, surgical treatment of which remains a controversial issue. Here, we describe successful combined use of liposuction and subcutaneous mastectomy in the treatment of gynecomastia. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of the liposuction ...

  11. combined with either subcutaneous or intravenous administration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    data) found that an ave rage of ,10 mg rcmainccl aftcr the sponge had been insertcd for 15 davs. Thc possibilitv the refore arises of efficicnt synchronization of estrus and reproduction in Karakul ewes using lowcr doscs of pro- gestogen and Pregnant Mare Serum Gonackttrophin. (PMSG). Either intravenous or subcutaneous ...

  12. Fatty acid composition of subcutaneous and kidney fat depots of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fat remains an important quality determinant of meat. Although ... Nutritional influences on the fatty acid composition and the associated effect on flavour have been found in beef (Westerling &. Hedrick, 1979; Brown, Melton, .... Effect of maize meal in diet on fatty acid composition of subcutaneous fat (SCF)and kidney fat (KF).

  13. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Caused by Wallemia sebi in an Immunocompetent Host▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarro, Josep; Gugnani, Harish C.; Sood, Neelam; Batra, Rashmi; Mayayo, Emilio; Gené, Josepa; Kakkar, Shalini

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Wallemia sebi in a 43-year-old-female, the first case reported since 1950. The lesion presented as a nonhealing ulcer on the dorsum of the left foot. Diagnosis was based on histological demonstration of the fungus and its recovery in culture. PMID:18174296

  14. Interleukin-6 production in human subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Dorthe; Simonsen, Lene; Bülow, Jens

    2002-01-01

    The interleukin-6 (IL-6) output from subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue was studied in nine healthy subjects before, during and for 3 h after 1 h two-legged bicycle exercise at 60 % maximal oxygen consumption. Seven subjects were studied in control experiments without exercise. The adipose...

  15. Late hematogenous infection of subcutaneous implants in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottenbos, B; Klatter, F; Van Der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Nieuwenhuis, P

    Late biomaterial-centered infection is a major complication associated with the use of biomaterial implants. In this study biomaterials that had been implanted subcutaneously in rats were hematogenously challenged with bacteria 4 weeks after implantation. Bacteria were spread either by intravenous

  16. Inappropriate shocks in the subcutaneous ICD: Incidence, predictors and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R. A.; Brouwer, Tom F.; Barr, Craig; Theuns, Dominic A. M. J.; Boersma, Lucas V. A.; Johansen, Jens B.; Neuzil, Petr; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Carter, Nathan; Husby, Michael; Lambiase, Pier D.; Knops, Reinoud E.

    2015-01-01

    The entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) eliminates the need for transvenous leads, and therefore has the potential to improve lead-longevity and reduce lead-related complications. The S-ICD has a morphology-based sensing algorithm of which inappropriate shocks have

  17. Spatial distribution of soluble insulin in pig subcutaneous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria; Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Refsgaard, Hanne H F

    2015-01-01

    injections. Increasing the injected volume from 0.1ml to 1ml did not increase the intramuscular volume fraction, but gave a significantly higher volume fraction placed in the fascia separating the deep and superficial subcutaneous fat layers. Varying the injection speed from 25l/s up to 300l/s gave...

  18. Early clinical experience with subcutaneous GR43175 in acute migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P; Brand, J; Dano, P

    1989-01-01

    In six European clinics 111 migraine patients were treated in a series of open dose-ranging studies with subcutaneous injections of 1 to 4 mg GR43175, a novel 5-HT 1-like receptor agonist. Response rates after 20-30 min were dose related and rose from 33% with 1 mg to 96% with 4 mg GR43175. Side ...

  19. Reversible Crystallization of Argatroban after Subcutaneous Application in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Lopez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Argatroban is a thrombin inhibitor used as anticoagulant in patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. It is usually administered as an intravenous bolus followed by infusion. Nevertheless, its pharmacokinetics after subcutaneous administration is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of two different formulations of argatroban in pigs after subcutaneous administration. Antithrombotic activity in plasma was determined by ecarin chromogenic assay. To visualize the formation of crystals, argatroban was administered to rats into the subcutaneous tissue exposed after removing the skin, and the injection site was photographed at different times. After subcutaneous administration of a sorbitol/ethanol formulation of argatroban in pigs was observed a slow absorption phase was followed by long-lasting levels of this inhibitor. Cmax and AUC(0-24 showed dose-dependent increases, while elimination half-life and tmax value did not change significantly with dose. In contrast, saline-dissolved argatroban showed a faster absorption phase followed by a shorter elimination half-life. Argatroban dissolved in sorbitol/ethanol leads to long-lasting plasma levels due to the formation and permanent dissolution of a crystalline depot at the injection place. This represents a simple way to deliver argatroban continuously over an extended period which can be beneficial for prophylaxis or treatment of chronic coagulations disorders.

  20. Subcutaneous Sarcoidosis in a Nigerian female | Yakubu | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has not been any report of isolated cutaneous sarcoidosis from our center. We present a patient who was reviewed with an isolated ganglion-like subcutaneous swelling on the ankle region. Excision biopsy revealed a non caseating granulomatous lesion. Systemic evaluation was not remarkable and the lesion was ...