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Sample records for subcutaneous allergy test

  1. Allergy Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment. These include: allergy screening tests done in supermarkets or drug stores, home testing, applied kinesiology (allergy ... this topic visit the AAAAI Store . Utility navigation Donate Annual meeting Browse your conditions Check pollen counts ...

  2. Allergy testing - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergy skin tests if you have: Hay fever ( allergic rhinitis ) and asthma symptoms that are not well controlled with medicine Hives and angioedema Food allergies Skin rashes ( dermatitis ), in which the skin ...

  3. Testing children for allergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigenmann, P A; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M; O'B Hourihane, J

    2013-01-01

    Allergic diseases are common in childhood and can cause a significant morbidity and impaired quality-of-life of the children and their families. Adequate allergy testing is the prerequisite for optimal care, including allergen avoidance, pharmacotherapy and immunotherapy. Children with persisting...... or recurrent or severe symptoms suggestive for allergy should undergo an appropriate diagnostic work-up, irrespective of their age. Adequate allergy testing may also allow defining allergic trigger in common symptoms. We provide here evidence-based guidance on when and how to test for allergy in children based...... on common presenting symptoms suggestive of allergic diseases....

  4. Allergy Skin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medications: Know your options Allergy skin tests About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  5. FAST: towards safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy of persistent life-threatening food allergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan Laurian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT, using subcutaneous injections with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused by a single major allergen, parvalbumin (Cyp c 1 and lipid transfer protein (Pru p 3, respectively. Two approaches are being evaluated for achieving hypoallergenicity, i.e. site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. The most promising hypoallergens will be produced under GMP conditions. After pre-clinical testing (toxicology testing and efficacy in mouse models, SCIT with alum-absorbed hypoallergens will be evaluated in phase I/IIa and IIb randomized double-blind placebo-controlled (DBPC clinical trials, with the DBPC food challenge as primary read-out. To understand the underlying immune mechanisms in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold for fish or peach intake, thereby decreasing their anxiety and dependence on rescue medication.

  6. Development of a hypoallergenic recombinant parvalbumin for first-in-man subcutaneous immunotherapy of fish allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Huber, Hans; Swoboda, Ines; Rigby, Neil; Versteeg, Serge A.; Jensen, Bettina M.; Quaak, Suzanne; Akkerdaas, Jaap H.; Blom, Lars; Asturias, Juan; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Bernardi, Maria L.; Clausen, Michael; Ferrara, Rosa; Hauer, Martina; Heyse, Jet; Kopp, Stephan; Kowalski, Marek L.; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Maderegger, Bernhard; Maillere, Bernard; Mari, Adriano; Martinez, Alberto; Mills, E. N. Clare; Neubauer, Angela; Nicoletti, Claudio; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Portoles, Antonio; Ranta-Panula, Ville; Santos-Magadan, Sara; Schnoor, Heidi J.; Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig T.; Stahl-Skov, Per; Stavroulakis, George; Stegfellner, Georg; Vázquez-Cortés, Sonia; Witten, Marianne; Stolz, Frank; Poulsen, Lars K.; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Valenta, Rudolf; van Ree, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The FAST (food allergy-specific immunotherapy) project aims at developing safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy for fish allergy, using recombinant hypoallergenic carp parvalbumin, Cyp c 1. Preclinical characterization and good manufacturing practice (GMP) production of mutant Cyp (mCyp) c

  7. In vitro allergy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osguthorpe, John David

    2014-09-01

    History and physical examination are the first, and most important steps, in the evaluation of a patient suspected of having an allergy. The diagnosis can be confirmed with either skin or serum testing for evidence of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated reactivity. The recent literature on serum-based testing for the detection and quantitation of allergen specific IgE (sIgE) was reviewed, identifying where available the "best practices" from high level of evidence studies and/or physician organization guidelines. Current practices for documenting sIgE are detailed, including enzyme-linked immunoassays on conventional extracts (standardized or not), similar on microarrays of highly purified or recombinant allergens, and basophil activation testing. Serum testing is an equal alternative to skin testing for establishing the presence of IgE-mediated sensitivity and for identifying the allergens involved. Like skin testing, limitations include the availability of fully detailed allergenic extracts, particularly for foods, drugs, and occupational agents, and the possibility of non-IgE mediated issues. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  8. Immunological comparison of allergen immunotherapy tablet treatment and subcutaneous immunotherapy against grass allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, K; Backer, V; Lund, G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IgE-mediated allergic rhinitis to grass pollen can successfully be treated with either allergen immunotherapy tablets (SLIT tablet) or SQ-standardized subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). The efficacy of these two treatment modalities for grass allergy is comparable, but the immunological...

  9. [Inappropriate test methods in allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine-Tebbe, J; Herold, D A

    2010-11-01

    Inappropriate test methods are increasingly utilized to diagnose allergy. They fall into two categories: I. Tests with obscure theoretical basis, missing validity and lacking reproducibility, such as bioresonance, electroacupuncture, applied kinesiology and the ALCAT-test. These methods lack both the technical and clinical validation needed to justify their use. II. Tests with real data, but misleading interpretation: Detection of IgG or IgG4-antibodies or lymphocyte proliferation tests to foods do not allow to separate healthy from diseased subjects, neither in case of food intolerance, allergy or other diagnoses. The absence of diagnostic specificity induces many false positive findings in healthy subjects. As a result unjustified diets might limit quality of life and lead to malnutrition. Proliferation of lymphocytes in response to foods can show elevated rates in patients with allergies. These values do not allow individual diagnosis of hypersensitivity due to their broad variation. Successful internet marketing, infiltration of academic programs and superficial reporting by the media promote the popularity of unqualified diagnostic tests; also in allergy. Therefore, critical observation and quick analysis of and clear comments to unqualified methods by the scientific medical societies are more important than ever.

  10. Allergy Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/allergybloodtest.html Allergy Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is an Allergy Blood Test? Allergies are a common and chronic ...

  11. Development of a Hypoallergenic Recombinant Parvalbumin for First-in-Man Subcutaneous Immunotherapy of Fish Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Huber, Hans; Swoboda, Ines

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The FAST (food allergy-specific immunotherapy) project aims at developing safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy for fish allergy, using recombinant hypoallergenic carp parvalbumin, Cyp c 1. OBJECTIVES: Preclinical characterization and good manufacturing practice (GMP) production...... chromatography and mass spectrometry. Allergenicity was assessed by ImmunoCAP inhibition and basophil histamine release assay, immunogenicity by immunization of laboratory animals and stimulation of patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Reference molecules were purified wild-type Cyp c 1 (natural.......e. hypoallergenicity with retained immunogenicity. These results have warranted first-in-man immunotherapy studies to evaluate the safety of this innovative vaccine. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel....

  12. Allergy Skin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Histamine. In most people, this substance causes a skin response. If you don't react to histamine, your ... days or more to produce results. A positive skin test means that you may be allergic to a particular substance. Bigger wheals usually indicate a greater degree of sensitivity. A ...

  13. Rational Approach to Allergy Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Michael P; Wulu, Jacqueline A

    2017-12-01

    Allergy testing is commonly used when symptoms of allergic rhinitis are refractory to symptoms and there is potential for treatment with institution of avoidance measures or immunotherapy. Once the decision for testing has been made, the method of testing by either in vivo skin testing by prick/puncture or intradermal testing or in vitro testing of serum-specific IgE is dictated by factors in the clinical history and an informed decision by the patient. Because there is no perfect testing method, understanding the benefits and limitations of each method is important in selecting the best testing option for each patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Practical aspects of allergy-testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Arne; Halken, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    Allergy-testing is a prerequisite for specific allergy treatment, including specific allergen avoidance measures, relevant pharmacotherapy and specific allergy vaccination. All children with persisting, recurrent or severe possible "allergic symptoms" or those with a need for continuous treatment...... should be tested, irrespective of the child's age. Allergy-testing includes a careful case history and a determination of IgE sensitisation by skin prick test or the measurement of allergen-specific IgE in serum by standardised and validated methods. The diagnosis of food allergy cannot usually be based...... solely on the case history and IgE sensitisation; the diagnosis has to be confirmed by controlled food elimination and food challenge procedures. The diagnosis of inhalant allergic disease requires only confirmatory nasal, conjunctival or bronchial challenges in equivocal cases or before specific allergy...

  15. Immunotherapy in allergy and cellular tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirumbolo, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    The basophil activation test (BAT) is an in vitro assay where the activation of basophils upon exposure to various IgE-challenging molecules is measured by flow cytometry. It is a cellular test able to investigate basophil behavior during allergy and allergy immunotherapy. A panoply of critical issues and suggestive advances have rendered this assay a promising yet puzzling tool to endeavor a full comprehension of innate immunity of allergy desensitization and manage allergen or monoclonal anti-IgE therapy. In this review a brief state of art of BAT in immunotherapy is described focusing onto the analytical issue pertaining BAT performance in allergy specific therapy. PMID:24717453

  16. [Interest of allergy tests in urticaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathelier-Fusade, P

    2014-11-01

    Urticaria is a common skin disease that may affect 20 % of the general population. Most of the time, urticaria is an acute disorder that rarely can be chronic. The difficulty in urticaria is not the clinical diagnosis because the rash is characteristic, but the underlying causes and treatment that result. Urticaria is a benign disease when chronic and potentially dangerous when acute and associated with allergy. This allergy risk, needs an allergy exploration, based on skin tests and / or specific IgE assays. Because allergy is unusual in chronic urticaria, no allergy tests should be performed. By contrast, these tests must be undertaken in case of acute urticaria with a strong suspicion of IgE-mediated reaction because of the risk of severe anaphylaxis in case of allergenic re-exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Personal Plan Hot Topics Flu Facts Arrhythmias Abuse Allergies KidsHealth > For Teens > Allergies Print A A A ... Cold or Allergies? Dealing With Allergies What Are Allergies? Allergies are abnormal immune system reactions to things ...

  18. Basophil-activation tests in hymenoptera allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Anthony E. J.; van der Heide, Sicco

    The measurement of basophil-activation markers may be useful in detecting IgIE-mediated sensitization but the relevance for application of the basophil-activation test in prediction of clinical reactivity in Hymenoptera allergy is very limited. For this reason, this test currently has no established

  19. Sublingual versus subcutaneous immunotherapy: patient adherence at a large German allergy center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemberg M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marie-Luise Lemberg,1 Till Berk,2 Kija Shah-Hosseini,1 Elena-Manja Kasche,1,3 Ralph Mösges1 1Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Center for Dermatology, Specific Allergology and Environmental Medicine, Hamburg, Germany Background: Many placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy (AIT is an effective therapy for treating allergies. Both commonly used routes, subcutaneous (SCIT and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT, require high patient adherence to be successful. In the literature, numbers describing adherence vary widely; this investigation compares these two routes of therapy directly.Methods: All data were retrieved from the patient data management system of a center for dermatology, specific allergology, and environmental medicine in Germany. All 330 patients (aged 13–89 years included in this study had commenced AIT between 2003 and 2011, thus allowing a full 3-year AIT cycle to be considered for each investigated patient.Results: In this specific center, SCIT was prescribed to 62.7% and SLIT to 37.3% of all included patients. The total dropout rate of the whole patient cohort was 34.8%. Overall, SLIT patients showed a higher dropout rate (39.0% than did SCIT patients (32.4%; however, the difference between these groups was not significant. Also, no significant difference between the overall dropout rates for men and for women was observed. A Kaplan–Meier curve of the patient collective showed a remarkably high dropout rate for the first year of therapy.Conclusion: The analysis presented in this single-center study shows that most patients who discontinue AIT do so during the first year of therapy. Patients seem likely to finish the 3-year therapy cycle if they manage to adhere to treatment throughout the first year. Strategies for preventing

  20. Allergy Testing in Children With Low-Risk Penicillin Allergy Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyles, David; Adams, Juan; Chiu, Asriani; Simpson, Pippa; Nimmer, Mark; Brousseau, David C

    2017-08-01

    Penicillin allergy is commonly reported in the pediatric emergency department (ED). True penicillin allergy is rare, yet the diagnosis results from the denial of first-line antibiotics. We hypothesize that all children presenting to the pediatric ED with symptoms deemed to be low-risk for immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity will return negative results for true penicillin allergy. Parents of children aged 4 to 18 years old presenting to the pediatric ED with a history of parent-reported penicillin allergy completed an allergy questionnaire. A prespecified 100 children categorized as low-risk on the basis of reported symptoms completed penicillin allergy testing by using a standard 3-tier testing process. The percent of children with negative allergy testing results was calculated with a 95% confidence interval. Five hundred ninety-seven parents completed the questionnaire describing their child's reported allergy symptoms. Three hundred two (51%) children had low-risk symptoms and were eligible for testing. Of those, 100 children were tested for penicillin allergy. The median (interquartile range) age at testing was 9 years (5-12). The median (interquartile range) age at allergy diagnosis was 1 year (9 months-3 years). Rash (97 [97%]) and itching (63 [63%]) were the most commonly reported allergy symptoms. Overall, 100 children (100%; 95% confidence interval 96.4%-100%) were found to have negative results for penicillin allergy and had their labeled penicillin allergy removed from their medical record. All children categorized as low-risk by our penicillin allergy questionnaire were found to have negative results for true penicillin allergy. The utilization of this questionnaire in the pediatric ED may facilitate increased use of first-line penicillin antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Utility of penicillin allergy testing in patients presenting with a history of penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Priyanka S; Katelaris, Constance H

    2013-04-01

    Current statistics show that approximately 10% of patients claim to be allergic to penicillin yet only 10% of these have demonstrable allergy. The most appropriate and cost-effective antibiotics are sometimes withheld on the basis of patient history of drug allergy. Investigation of IgE hypersensitivity and delayed hypersensitivity in patients with a history of penicillin allergy to a teaching hospital allergy clinic. Patients underwent skin prick and intradermal testing (IDT) with major and minor penicillin determinants. Those with negative skin tests were administered a three-day oral challenge. Demographic and clinical details about the reactions were noted. One hundred twenty eight patients underwent testing, of these, one hundred and ten had self-reported histories of penicillin allergy and eighteen were referred because of other antibiotic allergies. Seventeen patients with self-reported penicillin allergy had either positive skin tests or oral challenge results, corresponding to 15% of patients having proven allergy. None reacted on skin prick testing, four reacted to IDT, thirteen reacted to oral challenge (five immediate and eight delayed). Analysis of clinical histories showed that patients with a well-defined history of allergy and a history of anaphylaxis were more likely to have a positive test compared to patients with vague histories. Skin testing proved to be less sensitive than oral challenge. A minority of patients presenting with a history of penicillin allergy have evidence of immune-mediated hypersensitivity (17/110, 15%) in this study. Of these, eight out of seventeen (47%) had delayed reactions, demonstrating the usefulness and discriminating power of objective testing, which must include three-day oral challenge. Discriminating factors for immune-mediated allergy from patient history were a clear description of the original reaction and a history of anaphylaxis. Negative allergy testing enables the use of penicillin as first-line treatment

  2. Diagnosis of Food Allergy Based on Oral Food Challenge Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komei Ito

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of food allergy should be based on the observation of allergic symptoms after intake of the suspected food. The oral food challenge test (OFC is the most reliable clinical procedure for diagnosing food allergy. The OFC is also applied for the diagnosis of tolerance of food allergy. The Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology issued the 'Japanese Pediatric Guideline for Oral Food Challenge Test in Food Allergy 2009' in April 2009, to provide information on a safe and standardized method for administering the OFC. This review focuses on the clinical applications and procedure for the OFC, based on the Japanese OFC guideline.

  3. Diagnosis of food allergy based on oral food challenge test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Komei; Urisu, Atsuo

    2009-12-01

    Diagnosis of food allergy should be based on the observation of allergic symptoms after intake of the suspected food. The oral food challenge test (OFC) is the most reliable clinical procedure for diagnosing food allergy. The OFC is also applied for the diagnosis of tolerance of food allergy. The Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology issued the 'Japanese Pediatric Guideline for Oral Food Challenge Test in Food Allergy 2009' in April 2009, to provide information on a safe and standardized method for administering the OFC. This review focuses on the clinical applications and procedure for the OFC, based on the Japanese OFC guideline.

  4. Implementation of a penicillin allergy skin test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida Tiemi Nagao-Dias

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The penicillin allergy skin testing is the only accurate and reliable test for penicillin hypersensitivity mediated by IgE. It is useful for identifying patients with doubtful history of allergy. Positive test for major and minor determinants presents a positive predictive value of 50% and negative predictive value of 99%. In Brazil, the Ministry of Health suggests a protocol for in house made reagents, since they are not commercially available. As the referred protocol does not mention some important details about the test procedures, we propose in the present work to implement them, critically evaluating each step in order to allow the protocol establishment at any health service, with quality and safety.O teste cutâneo para alergia imediata a penicilina é o único teste validado internacionalmente, sendo que sua grande utilidade reside na avaliação de pacientes com história positiva de alergia a penicilina. O teste positivo para determinantes principais e secundários da penicilina apresenta um valor preditivo positivo de 50% e valor preditivo negativo de 99%. Em nosso meio, o Ministério de Saúde disponibiliza um protocolo para o preparo dos reagentes, uma vez que os mesmos não estão disponíveis comercialmente. Como o referido protocolo não apresenta maiores detalhes sobre o cuidado relativo às etapas de preparo das soluções, bem como faltam algumas considerações no que tange a realização do teste, propusemo-nos no presente trabalho operacionalizar o teste, avaliando de forma crítica e minuciosa cada etapa, de forma que outros profissionais possam reproduzi-lo de maneira mais segura e eficaz.

  5. Interpreting IgE sensitization tests in food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Niti Y; Sicherer, Scott H

    2016-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence, and with it, IgE testing to foods is becoming more commonplace. Food-specific IgE tests, including serum assays and prick skin tests, are sensitive for detecting the presence of food-specific IgE (sensitization), but specificity for predicting clinical allergy is limited. Therefore, positive tests are generally not, in isolation, diagnostic of clinical disease. However, rationale test selection and interpretation, based on clinical history and understanding of food allergy epidemiology and pathophysiology, makes these tests invaluable. Additionally, there exist highly predictive test cutoff values for common allergens in atopic children. Newer testing methodologies, such as component resolved diagnostics, are promising for increasing the utility of testing. This review highlights the use of IgE serum tests in the diagnosis of food allergy.

  6. Patch testing for food-associated allergies in orofacial granulomatosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Food-associated allergies, especially to benzoates and cinnamon-related compounds, have been associated with orofacial granulomatosis and both standard and urticarial patch testing have been used to detect such allergies. Elimination diets have also been shown to be effective in some patients.

  7. Allergy test outcomes in patients self-reported as having penicillin allergy: Two-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Juan; Thursfield, David; Lukawska, Joanna J

    2016-09-01

    Penicillin allergy is associated with increased antibiotic resistance and health care costs. However, most patients with self-reported penicillin allergy are not truly allergic. To summarize our experience with allergy tests in patients with a history of penicillin allergy and to compare them with the results of other groups. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with a suspected clinical history of penicillin allergy referred to the Drug Allergy Unit at University College London Hospital between March 2013 and June 2015. In total, 84 patients were reviewed. The index drugs included: unidentified penicillin (n = 44), amoxicillin (n = 17), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (n = 13), flucloxacillin (n = 4), and other penicillins (ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam; n = 7). Allergy diagnoses were confirmed in 24 patients (28.6%) (16 to penicillin, 3 to flucloxacillin, 5 to clavulanic acid). Twenty-two patients (91.7%) had allergy diagnosed by positive skin test results. Two patients (8.3%) developed IgE-mediated allergic symptoms during oral challenge (although the skin test results were negative). In vitro specific IgE test results for penicilloyl V, penicilloyl G, and amoxicilloyl were positive in 3 of 16 patients (18.8%). Moreover, reactions to cefuroxime were observed in 3 of 15 patients with penicillin allergy (20%). Selective clavulanic acid and flucloxacillin responders tolerated amoxicillin challenge. The interval between the index reaction and evaluation was shorter (P allergic group. Furthermore, histories of anaphylaxis (33.3%), urticaria, and/or angioedema (58.3%) were more common in the allergic group. Unspecified rashes (35.0%) and nonspecific symptoms (28.3%) predominated in the nonallergic group. Only 28.6% of patients with self-reported penicillin allergy were confirmed to be allergic. Importantly, when the index drug is amoxicillin-clavulanic acid or flucloxacillin, the patients may tolerate amoxicillin. Copyright © 2016

  8. Pattern Of Skin Prick Allergy Test Results In Enugu | Mgbor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The “Allergo Ganzer” Allergy test kit (Germany) was used for skin prick allergy test on each patient. Result The reactivities to test allergens were found to be in 44.4% patients positive to house dust mites I & II, 27.2% to house dust, 22% to grass, 16.6% to cereal and trees respectively and only 8.3% to mould. Conclusion

  9. Getting the Facts on Food Allergy Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... them. Eight kinds of food cause most food allergies: •Cow’s milk •Eggs •Peanuts •Wheat • Soy • Fish • Shellfish • Tree nuts Your source for more information or to find an allergist/immunologist. 02/2011 AAAAI -0111 -532

  10. A Proactive Approach to Penicillin Allergy Testing in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Justin R; Tarver, Scott A; Alvarez, Kristin S; Tran, Trang; Khan, David A

    Penicillin allergy testing is underutilized in inpatients despite its potential to immediately impact antibiotic treatment. Although most tested patients are able to tolerate penicillin, limited availability and awareness of this tool leads to the use of costly and harmful substitutes. We established an inpatient service at a large academic hospital to identify and test patients with a history of penicillin allergy with the goals of removing inaccurate diagnoses, reducing the use of beta-lactam alternatives, and educating patients and clinicians about the procedure. Eligible inpatients were flagged daily through the electronic medical record and prioritized via a specialized algorithm. A trained clinical pharmacist performed penicillin skin tests and challenges preemptively or by provider request. Clinical characteristics and antibiotic use were analyzed in tested patients. A total of 1203 applicable charts were detected by our system leading to 252 direct evaluations over 18 months. Overall, 228 subjects (90.5%) had their penicillin allergy removed. Of these, 223 were cleared via testing and 5 by discovery of prior penicillin tolerance. Among patients testing negative, 85 (38%) subsequently received beta-lactams, preventing 504 inpatient days and 648 outpatient days on alternative agents. Penicillin allergy testing using a physician-pharmacist team model effectively removes reported allergies in hospitalized patients. The electronic medical record is a valuable asset for locating and stratifying individuals who benefit most from intervention. Proactive testing substantially reduces unnecessary inpatient and outpatient use of beta-lactam alternatives that may otherwise go unaddressed. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Cost-Minimisation Analysis Comparing Sublingual Immunotherapy to Subcutaneous Immunotherapy for the Treatment of House Dust Mite Allergy in a Swedish Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björstad, Åse; Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Hahn-Pedersen, Julie; Svärd, Mikael

    2017-06-01

    In Sweden, approximately 6% of children and 10% of adults suffer from house dust mite (HDM) allergy with symptoms of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. Treatment is aimed at reducing HDM exposure and to control the symptoms of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma by symptom-relieving pharmacotherapy. This pharmacotherapy is often effective, but some patients remain inadequately controlled. For these patients, allergy immunotherapy (AIT, subcutaneous or sublingual) with repeated administration of HDM allergen should be considered. The objective of this study was to compare the costs for sublingual AIT (SLIT; SQ® SLIT-tablet) to the costs for subcutaneous AIT (SCIT; SQ® SCIT) for the treatment of HDM allergy in a cost-minimisation analysis (CMA). The CMA included resources (and costs) for treatment, healthcare visits, travelling and lost productivity. Resource use based on Swedish clinical treatment practice and costs were obtained from medical price lists. Analyses were conducted from the societal, as well as healthcare perspective, by use of a time horizon of 3 years. The results show that SQ® SLIT-tablet is a cost-saving treatment as compared to SQ® SCIT for the treatment of HDM allergy (€6800 over 3 years). The results are mainly driven by the cost of healthcare visits and the frequency of SCIT administrations. In conclusion, cost-savings of €6800 over 3 years are expected from treating HDM allergy with SQ® SLIT-tablet as compared to SQ® SCIT, including costs for treatment, healthcare visits, travelling and lost productivity. The reduced number of healthcare visits compensates for higher medication costs.

  12. Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not bother most other people. People who have allergies often are sensitive to more than one thing. Substances that often cause reactions are Pollen Dust mites Mold spores Pet dander Food Insect stings ...

  13. Immunological comparison of allergen immunotherapy tablet treatment and subcutaneous immunotherapy against grass allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, K; Backer, V; Lund, G

    2014-01-01

    with regular serum measurements of specific IgE, IgG4, IgE-blocking factor, facilitated antigen presentation (FAP), and basophil activation test (BAT). Nasal challenges were used to assess changes in nasal sensitivity. RESULTS: After 15 months of treatment IgG4, IgE-blocking factor, FAP, and BAT values...

  14. Development of a Food Allergy Knowledge Test for Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Amy L; Dahlquist, Lynnda M; Hoehn, Jessica L; Elizabeth Bollinger, Mary

    2017-06-01

    To create a measure of food allergy (FA) knowledge for parents of children with FA. The food allergy knowledge test (FAKT) was developed following rigorous test-construction guidelines. The preliminary 110-item pool content was developed in consultation with FA experts. After cognitive interviews and revisions, an 88-item preliminary version was administered to 370 parents of children with FA who were recruited online and from an allergy clinic. After item difficulty, discrimination, item-scale correlations analyses, and assessment of internal consistency, a revised 57-item version was administered to a new clinic-based sample (77 parents). The revised FAKT was highly reliable (α =.86). Validity analyses revealed positive correlations ( r = .23-.57) between FAKT scores and parent age, education, insurance status, access to FA information, and auto-injector use. The FAKT was determined to have strong psychometrics and be appropriately reliable and valid, with clinical and research applications.

  15. The basophil activation test in immediate-type drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Oliver V; Gentinetta, Thomas; Bridts, Chris H; Ebo, Didier G

    2009-08-01

    Diagnosis of drug allergy involves first the recognition of sometimes unusual symptoms as drug allergy and, second, the identification of the eliciting drug. This is an often difficult task, as the clinical picture and underlying pathomechanisms are heterogeneous. In clinical routine, physicians frequently have to rely upon a suggestive history and eventual provocation tests, both having their specific limitations. For this reason both in vivo (skin tests) and in vitro tests are investigated intensively as tools to identify the disease-eliciting drug. One of the tests evaluated in drug allergy is the basophil activation test (BAT). Basophils with their high-affinity IgE receptors are easily accessible and therefore can be used as indicator cells for IgE-mediated reactions. Upon allergen challenge and cross-linking of membrane-bound IgE antibodies (via Fc-epsilon-RI) basophils up-regulate certain activation markers on their surface such as CD63 and CD203c, as well as intracellular markers (eg, phosphorylated p38MAPK). In BAT, these alterations can be detected rapidly on a single-cell basis by multicolor flow cytometry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Combining this technique with in vitro passive sensitization of donor basophils with patients' serum, one can prove the IgE dependence of a drug reaction. This article summarizes the authors' current experience with the BAT in the diagnostic management of immediate-type drug allergy mediated by drug-specific IgE antibodies.

  16. Cytotoxic testing for food allergy: evaluation of reproducibility and correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, T E; Arkins, J A

    1976-10-01

    Cytotoxic food tests still present conflicting opinions concerning their validity. Nine atopic patients with or without a history of food allergy were studied along with 5 nonatopic patients. All tests were conducted in a double-blind fashion with 6 determinations for each of 10 food antigens. Reproducibility of the test (5/6 positive or negative) was demonstrated with wheat, milk, yeast, chocolate, and orange. In the nonatopic group, reproducible results were obtained for wheat, egg, yeast, chocolate, and chicken. Clinical correlation with 11 foods in 7 patients was demonstrated. However, there were 46 positive tests without correlation and 2 negative tests with positive histories. Therefore, there appears to be reproducibility of the tests to only 3 foods but no apparent correlation with clinical symptoms. At the present time, cytotoxic tests offer no reliable help in establishing the diagnosis of food allergy.

  17. Comparison of the Skin Test and ImmunoCAP System in the Evaluation of Mold Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Li Liang

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: The positive rate of the skin test is higher than CAP when evaluating mold allergy. Clinicians should note that a discrepancy may exist between the results of in vitro and in vivo tests when evaluating mold allergy.

  18. Blood histamine release: A new allergy blood test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraj, B.A.; Gottlieb, G.R.; Camp, V.M.; Lollies, P.

    1985-05-01

    Allergen-mediated histamine release from human leukocytes represents an important model for in vitro studies of allergic reactions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the measurement of histamine released in allergic patients (pts) by radioenzymatic assay following mixing of their blood with common allergens represents a reliable index for diagnosis of atopic allergy. Three categories of allergies were used: (1) housedust and mite; (2) cat and dog dander; (3) trees and grasses and ragweed mixture. The presence of allergy was established by intradermal skin testing in the study group of 82 pts. Significant atopy was defined as greater than or equal to 3+ (overall range 0-4 +, negative to maximum) on skin testing. The test was carried out in tubes with 0.5 ml heparinized blood, 0.5 ml tris albumin buffer, and one of the allergens (60-100 PNU/ml). In 20 controls without allergy, there always was less than or equal to 4% histamine release (normal response). A significant allergen-mediated histamine release, ranging from 12 to 30% of the total blood histamine content, was observed in 96% of the pts with skin test sensitivity of greater than or equal to 3+. There was good agreement between skin testing and histamine release in terms of the allergen causing the response. Thus, measurement of histamine release in blood in response to allergen challenge represents a clinically useful in vitro test for the diagnosis of atopic allergy. Because data can be obtained from a single sample and are highly quantitative, this new method should have application to the longitudinal study of allergic pts and to the assessment of interventions.

  19. Beyond skin testing: state of the art and new horizons in food allergy diagnostic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caubet, Jean-Christoph; Sampson, Hugh A

    2012-02-01

    Food allergy affects approximately 1% to 10.8% of the general population, and its prevalence seems to be increasing. An accurate diagnosis is particularly important because a misdiagnosis could lead to life-threatening reactions or to unnecessary restrictive diets. However, allergy tests currently used in clinical practice have limited accuracy, and an oral food challenge, considered as the gold standard, is often required to confirm or exclude a food allergy. This article reviews several promising novel approaches for the diagnosis of food allergy, such as new molecular diagnostic technologies and functional assays, along with their potential clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Retrospective case series analysis of penicillin allergy testing in a UK specialist regional allergy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A G; Wong, G; Goddard, S; Heslegrave, J; Derbridge, C; Srivastava, S; Diwakar, L; Huissoon, A P; Krishna, M T

    2011-11-01

    Penicillin allergy is the most common drug allergy. Skin testing for the major (PPL) and minor determinants (MDMs) of penicillin offers increased sensitivity and specificity over in vitro testing alone. Following a worldwide absence of reagents, a new kit was licensed in the UK in 2008 (Diater, Spain) and this report evaluates its use in a UK specialist allergy clinic. Prospective data on 50 consecutive patients tested with the new reagents were collected. The departmental protocol is adapted from the 2003 EAACI position paper. 14% (7/50) and 12% (6/50) of patients were diagnosed with immediate and non-immediate reactions respectively. The negative predictive value of the PPL and MDM reagents at the neat concentration for an immediate reaction was 93% (true negatives 37, false negatives 3). Two patients experienced systemic reactions to DPT in the absence of demonstrable specific IgE. None of the patients were diagnosed using skin prick testing alone or at lower concentrations of IDT. Five patients were diagnosed at the IDT stage and two at the DPT stage in the absence of demonstrable specific IgE. Six patients were diagnosed with non-immediate reactions, two on IDT alone and four following IDT and DPT. The new PPL and MDM determinants offer enhanced sensitivity when evaluating β-lactam hypersensitivity; however, there are limitations to the current testing regimens. The UK would benefit from local guidelines, which incorporate the new reagents and acknowledge the high amoxicillin prescription rate and the relatively lower specialist-to-patient ratio in this country.

  1. History of penicillin allergy and referral for skin testing: evaluation of a pediatric penicillin allergy testing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Joanne M; Halperin, Scott A; Bortolussi, Robert

    2002-10-01

    Penicillin allergy, commonly reported in children, leads to use of more expensive, broad-spectrum drugs. The results and effectiveness of a skin testing program for immediate hypersensitivity to penicillin in children were studied. Children seen at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax between 1986 and 2000 with a history of suspected penicillin allergy were referred by their family physician or pediatrician. Two-stage skin testing (scratch, intradermal) of benzylpenicilloyl-polylysin and penicillin G sodium, with histamine and saline as positive and negative controls, was carried out. If the test results were negative, an oral challenge was conducted and the child observed for 60 minutes. If no adverse reaction was noted, a letter was sent to the referring physician and to Health Records at the IWK Health Centre, indicating that warning labels should be removed from the chart. Of 72 children tested, 32% described their past cutaneous eruption as hives and 68% had other rashes; 96% of rashes were generalized. The mean age at the time of the suspected penicillin allergy was 4.4 years; it was 7.4 years at the time of testing. There was no positive response to the scratch testing, but 4% of children had a positive response to intradermal testing. No adverse responses to oral challenge were observed. Letters confirming negative status were not received in 4% (3 of 69) cases, resulting in ongoing avoidance of penicillins and falsely labelling of the child as penicillin allergic. In this referral setting, true penicillin allergy was uncommon, suggesting that many children are incorrectly labelled as penicillin-allergic. Communication of test results to family and care providers and health records administration must be effective if testing is to affect prescribing behaviour.

  2. Is a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy a predictive factor for positive allergy tests to anaesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagau, Natalia; Gherman-Ionica, Nadia; Hagau, Denisa; Tranca, Sebastian; Sfichi, Manuela; Longrois, Dan

    2012-03-01

    International recommendations stipulate not performing screening skin tests to a drug in the absence of a clinical history consistent with that specific drug allergy. Nevertheless, two publications showed that a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy was the only predictive factor for a positive skin test when screening for allergy to anaesthetic drugs was done. We selected from a surgical population 40 volunteers with a prior history of allergy to non-anaesthetic drugs in order to analyse the prevalence of positive allergy tests to anaesthetics. The selected adult patients were tested for 11 anaesthetic drugs using in vivo tests: skin prick (SPT) and intradermal (IDT) tests and in vitro tests: the basophil activation test (BAT) and detection of drug-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). The prevalence for the positive SPT and IDT was 1.6% and 5.8% respectively. The result of flow cytometry agreed with the SPT in five out of seven positive SPT (71%). IgEs confirmed two positive SPT with corresponding positive BAT. Ten per cent of the patients had a positive prick test to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). For midazolam none of the SPT was positive, but 11 patients had positive IDT nonconfirmed by BAT. The prevalence of positive in vivo and in vitro allergy tests to NMBAs is higher in our study population. This could be an argument for pre-operative SPT to NMBAs for the surgical population with reported non-anaesthetic drug allergies. A larger prospective study is needed to validate changes in clinical practice. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Debates in allergy medicine: Molecular allergy diagnosis with ISAC will replace screenings by skin prick test in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Jarolim, E; Jensen, A N; Canonica, G W

    2017-01-01

    In today's clinical practice patients' skin is used as screening organ for diagnosing type 1 allergy. According to European guidelines skin prick testing with a panel of 18 allergen extracts is recommended, in the US between 10 to 50 allergens are used. The specificity and sensitivity of skin testing is individually highly variable depending on age, body mass, and skin barrier status. In atopic inflammation skin testing gives more false positive results. Smaller skin area and strain limits prick testing in small children. Although the risk for systemic reactions in skin prick testing is very small, emergency medications must be available. Considering the fact that IgE is the only reliable biomarker for type I allergy, upfront IgE screening with ISAC, followed by fewer skin tests to approve positive sensitizations, is proposed. It is time to arrive in the age of molecular allergy diagnosis in daily patient care.

  4. Kathon CG: cosmetic allergy and patch test sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, A C; Liem, D H; Weyland, J W

    1985-02-01

    Three cases of contact allergy to Kathon CG, a preservative for cosmetics and toiletries containing, as active ingredients, 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one and 2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one are presented. In two patients, Kathon CG was contained in a moisturizing cream, and the third was sensitized by a diagnostic patch test. Although it has been used extensively in cosmetics and toiletries for 9 years in Europe and 4 years in the USA, these appear to be the first case reports of non-occupational sensitization to Kathon CG.

  5. Next step in antibiotic stewardship: Pharmacist-provided penicillin allergy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugkaeva, Z; Crago, J S; Yasnogorodsky, M

    2017-08-01

    Penicillin allergy limits therapeutic options for patients but often disappears over time, leaving patients erroneously labelled allergic and leading to the utilization of broad-spectrum and more expensive antibiotics. Penicillin allergy can be effectively assessed via skin testing. To improve patient access to penicillin allergy testing by implementing a pharmacist-provided service in a hospital setting. Beta-lactams remain a mainstream therapy for many infections due to their effectiveness, low side effects and affordability. Typically, patient access to penicillin allergy testing is limited by the availability of allergy specialists, who traditionally perform such testing. A pharmacist-provided penicillin allergy testing service was implemented at our hospital in 2015 and became a powerful antibiotic stewardship tool. Removing penicillin allergy from patient profiles significantly expanded therapeutic options, expedited discharges and reduced costs of care. Pharmacists can expand patient access to penicillin allergy testing. Pharmacist-provided penicillin allergy testing permitted optimized antibiotic treatment and expedited discharges. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Soy Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Allergy tests Soy allergy Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  7. Insect sting allergy with negative venom skin test responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D B; Kagey-Sobotka, A; Norman, P S; Hamilton, R G; Lichtenstein, L M

    2001-05-01

    In our 1976 controlled venom immuno rapy trial, 33% of 182 patients with a history of systemic reactions to insect stings were excluded because of negative venom skin test responses. There have been reports of patients with negative skin test responses who have had severe reactions to subsequent stings. Our aim is to increase awareness about the patient with a negative skin test response and insect sting allergy and to determine the frequency and significance of negative skin test responses in patients with a history of systemic reactions to insect stings. We prospectively examined the prevalence of negative venom skin test responses in patients with a history of systemic reactions to stings. In patients who gave informed consent, we analyzed the outcome of retesting and sting challenge. Of 307 patients with positive histories screened for our sting challenge study, 208 (68%) had positive venom skin test responses (up to 1 microg/mL concentration), and 99 (32%) had negative venom skin test responses. In 36 (36%) of the 99 patients with negative skin test responses, the venom RAST result was a low positive (1-3 ng/mL), or repeat venom skin test responses were positive; another 7 (7%) patients had high venom-specific IgE antibody levels (4-243 ng/mL). Notably, 56 (57%) of 99 patients with positive histories and negative skin test responses had negative RAST results. In patients with positive skin test responses, sting challenges were performed in 141 of 196 patients, with 30 systemic reactions. Sting challenges were performed on 37 of 43 patients with negative skin test responses and positive venom-specific IgE and in 14 of 56 patients with negative skin test responses and negative RAST results. There were 11 patients with negative skin test responses who had systemic reactions to the challenge sting: 2 had negative RAST results, and 9 had positive RAST results at 1 ng/mL. The frequency of systemic reaction was 21% in patients with positive skin test responses and 22

  8. Risk of redocumenting penicillin allergy in a cohort of patients with negative penicillin skin tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimawi, Ramzy H; Shah, Kaushal B; Cook, Paul P

    2013-11-01

    Even though electronic documentation of allergies is critical to patient safety, inaccuracies in documentation can potentiate serious problems. Prior studies have not evaluated factors associated with redocumenting penicillin allergy in the medical record despite a proven tolerance with a penicillin skin test (PST). Assess the prevalence of reinstating inaccurate allergy information and associated factors thereof. We conducted a retrospective observational study from August 1, 2012 to July 31, 2013 of patients who previously had a negative PST. We reviewed records from the hospital, long-term care facilities (LTCF), and primary doctors' offices. Vidant Health, a system of 10 hospitals in North Carolina. Patients with proven penicillin tolerance rehospitalized within a year period from the PST. We gauged hospital reappearances, penicillin allergy redocumentation, residence, antimicrobial use, and presence of dementia or altered mentation. Of the 150 patients with negative PST, 55 (37%) revisited a Vidant system hospital within a 1-year period, of whom 21 were LTCF residents. Twenty (36%) of the 55 patients had penicillin allergy redocumented without apparent reason. Factors associated with penicillin allergy redocumentation included age >65 years (P = 0.011), LTCF residence (P = 0.0001), acutely altered mentation (P Penicillin allergy was still listed in all 21 (100%) of the LTCF records. At our hospital system, penicillin allergies are often redocumented into the medical record despite proven tolerance. The benefits of PST may be limited by inadequately removing the allergy from different electronic/paper hospital, LTCF, primary physician, and community pharmacy records. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  9. Contact allergy to popular perfumes; assessed by patch test, use test and chemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Menné, T

    1996-01-01

    The frequency of contact allergy to the 10 best-selling women's perfumes was studied in 335 consecutive female eczema patients by patch testing. The diagnostic ability of the fragrance mix, in relation to these products, was evaluated. Of eczema patients, 6.9% had a positive patch test to one...... or more of the perfumes, and 56.5% of these had a concurrent positive reaction to the fragrance mix. Hence, testing with the patients' own cosmetics is a significant part of diagnosing perfume allergy. The clinical relevance of the patch-test reactions to the commercial perfumes was equal...... to that of the fragrance mix, as judged from the patient's history and use testing with one of the perfumes. At least three of the chemically defined sensitizers in the fragrance mix were detected in all the perfumes by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, which indicates that the fragrance mix is a good imitation...

  10. Understanding the experiences of allergy testing: a qualitative study of people with perceived serious allergic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christopher; Irshad, Tasneem; Sheikh, Aziz

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the experience of patients with perceived severe allergic disorders in obtaining allergen testing. In-depth interviews with 20 purposively sampled adults and parents of children with, or at perceived risk of, serious allergic problems. Data were analysed thematically, drawing on Frank's classification of narratives to help interpret patient/career accounts. Accounts fell into four main groups: (i) children with anaphylaxis occurring 'out of the blue' (ii) children in whom the recognition of severe allergy by professionals was perceived as delayed; (iii) adults with anaphylaxis who adapted; and (iv) adults who remained in search of an answer. Whereas children had eventually been assessed and tested in a specialist clinic, adults had difficulty in obtaining testing, and most-including those for whom current guidelines would recommend testing-had not been tested. Participants incorporated their past experience of testing into narrative accounts, which included current ways of dealing with their allergy. They saw testing as only one component of appropriate allergy management which required interpretive expertise in professionals who ordered tests. Despite the limitations in NHS allergy testing provision, there was relatively little interest among patients/carers in using complementary and alternative providers of allergy testing. Patients perceived major shortfalls in relation to NHS allergy testing provision, focusing on both the availability of testing and expertise in interpreting the results. Any increased provision of testing needs to be matched by access to specialist interpretation of these tests.

  11. Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food, most food allergies are caused by tree nuts, peanuts, milk, eggs, soy, wheat, fish, and shellfish. These 8 ... blood tests.Many children usually outgrow allergies to milk, eggs, soybean ... tree nuts, fish, and shellfish. Can food allergies be prevented ...

  12. Clinical outcomes following inpatient penicillin allergy testing: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, K A; Bates, A; Brigham, T J; Imam, J S; Burton, M C

    2017-09-01

    A documented penicillin allergy is associated with increased morbidity including length of hospital stay and an increased incidence of resistant infections attributed to use of broader-spectrum antibiotics. The aim of the systematic review was to identify whether inpatient penicillin allergy testing affected clinical outcomes during hospitalization. We performed an electronic search of Ovid MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library over the past 20 years. Inpatients having a documented penicillin allergy that underwent penicillin allergy testing were included. Twenty-four studies met eligibility criteria. Study sample size was between 24 and 252 patients in exclusively inpatient cohorts. Penicillin skin testing (PST) with or without oral amoxicillin challenge was the main intervention described (18 studies). The population-weighted mean for a negative PST was 95.1% [CI 93.8-96.1]. Inpatient penicillin allergy testing led to a change in antibiotic selection that was greater in the intensive care unit (77.97% [CI 72.0-83.1] vs 54.73% [CI 51.2-58.2], P<.01). An increased prescription of penicillin (range 9.9%-49%) and cephalosporin (range 10.7%-48%) antibiotics was reported. Vancomycin and fluoroquinolone use was decreased. Inpatient penicillin allergy testing was associated with decreased healthcare cost in four studies. Inpatient penicillin allergy testing is safe and effective in ruling out penicillin allergy. The rate of negative tests is comparable to outpatient and perioperative data. Patients with a documented penicillin allergy who require penicillin should be tested during hospitalization given its benefit for individual patient outcomes and antibiotic stewardship. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  13. General anaesthesia-induced anaphylaxis: impact of allergy testing on subsequent anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, A; Seidl, C; Stoevesandt, J; Seitz, C S

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E-mediated allergy to drugs and substances used during general anaesthesia as well as non-allergic drug hypersensitivity reactions may account for anaesthesia-induced anaphylaxis. As IgE-mediated anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening reaction, identification of the culprit allergen is essential to avoid anaphylaxis recurrence during subsequent general anaesthesia. To study whether preventive recommendations derived from allergy testing after intraoperative anaphylaxis were followed in subsequent general anaesthesia. Results of standardized allergy testing after anaesthesia-induced anaphylaxis and outcome of subsequent general anaesthesia were analysed retrospectively. Fifty-three of 107 patients were diagnosed with IgE-mediated allergy to a drug or substance used during general anaesthesia, and 54 patients were test negative. Twenty-eight of 29 allergy patients tolerated subsequent general anaesthesia uneventfully. One patient with cefazolin allergy suffered from anaphylaxis recurrence due to accidental reapplication of cefazolin. Twenty-two of 24 test-negative patients tolerated subsequent general anaesthesia, whereas two patients again developed anaphylaxis despite pre-medication regimens. Our results confirm the practical impact of allergy testing in general anaesthesia-induced anaphylaxis. By identification of the allergen, it is possible to avoid allergic anaphylaxis during subsequent anaesthesia. In most cases, recommended pre-medication seems to prevent the recurrence of non-allergic drug hypersensitivity reactions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Increased adverse drug reactions to cephalosporins in penicillin allergy patients with positive penicillin skin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miguel A; Koch, Cody A; Klemawesch, Patrick; Joshi, Avni; Li, James T

    2010-01-01

    Cephalosporin administration in patients with a history of penicillin allergy is controversial. Studies looking at the safety of cephalosporin in patients with a history of penicillin allergy lacked a control group, had a small number of patients, and/or lacked confirmation of penicillin allergy by penicillin skin testing. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients with penicillin allergy were at increased risk of adverse drug reactions when administered cephalosporin. A cohort study of patients with a history of penicillin allergy and a positive or negative penicillin skin test when administered cephalosporin was conducted. Charts were reviewed for adverse drug reactions to cephalosporin after penicillin skin testing. Eighty-five patients with a history of penicillin allergy and positive penicillin skin test and 726 patients with a history of penicillin allergy and negative penicillin skin test were administered cephalosporin. Five (6%) of 85 cases had an adverse drug reaction to cephalosporin as compared to 5 (0.7%) of 726 of the referent population (p = 0.0019). The rate of presumed IgE-mediated adverse drug reactions to the cephalosporins amongst the cases was 2 (2%) of 85 compared to 1 (0.1%) of 726 amongst the referent population (p = 0.0304). A greater risk of an adverse drug reaction to cephalosporin exists in patients with penicillin allergy. We recommend penicillin skin testing if cephalosporin, especially a first-generation cephalosporin, is to be administered to patients with a history of penicillin allergy. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Chlorhexidine allergy in four specialist allergy centres in the United Kingdom, 2009-13: clinical features and diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, W; Helbert, M; Sargur, R; Swallow, K; Harper, N; Garcez, T; Savic, S; Savic, L; Eren, E

    2017-06-01

    We describe an observational survey of diagnostic pathways in 104 patients attending four specialist allergy clinics in the United Kingdom following perioperative hypersensitivity reactions to chlorhexidine reactions. The majority were life-threatening. Men undergoing urological or cardiothoracic surgery predominated. Skin prick testing and specific immunoglobulin (sIg)E testing were the most common tests used for diagnosis. Fifty-three per cent of diagnoses were made on the basis of a single positive test. Where multiple tests were performed the sensitivity of intradermal, basophil activation and skin prick testing was 68% (50-86%), 50% (10-90%) and 35% (17-55%), respectively. Seven per cent were negative on screening tests initially, and 12 cases were only positive for a single test despite multiple testing. Intradermal tests appeared most sensitive in this context. Additional sensitization to other substances used perioperatively, particularly neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA), was found in 28 patients, emphasizing the need to test for possible allergy to all drugs to which the patient was exposed even where chlorhexidine is positive. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Proactive penicillin allergy testing in primary care patients labeled as allergic: outcomes and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Britta K; Bowen, Brady J; Otabor, Uwa; Celestin, Jocelyn; Sorum, Paul C

    2017-11-01

    To promote penicillin allergy testing in an outpatient setting in patients labeled as penicillin allergic, to determine the number of those who are truly allergic, evaluate patient satisfaction with the testing, and educate both patients and clinicians about testing. Patients with a history of penicillin allergy listed in their EHR were screened and recruited by their primary care office and referred for penicillin allergy testing. The results of allergy testing and patient satisfaction after testing were the main outcomes. We also surveyed the primary care physicians about perceived barriers to recruitment. A total of 82 patients were recruited, although only 37 actually underwent testing. None of these 37 had a positive skin test, and none of 36 had a positive oral challenge (1 refused it). Following testing, 2 patients (5%) had subjective reactions within 24 h. Thirty-one patients (84%) responded to a post-testing follow-up questionnaire; 3 (10%) were subsequently treated with a beta-lactam, and all reported that testing provided important information to their medical history. Providers identified time constraints, either their or their patients lack of time, as the major barrier to recruitment. Penicillin allergy testing safely evaluates patients labeled as penicillin allergic. It is well tolerated, and embraced by the patients who undergo testing. In our study, none of the patients tested had an allergic reaction, but we identified multiple barriers to developing a protocol for testing patients from the primary care setting.

  17. Standardized testing with chlorhexidine in perioperative allergy--a large single-centre evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opstrup, M S; Malling, H-J; Krøigaard, M; Mosbech, H; Skov, P S; Poulsen, L K; Garvey, L H

    2014-10-01

    Perioperative allergic reactions to chlorhexidine are often severe and easily overlooked. Although rare, the prevalence remains unknown. Correct diagnosis is crucial, but no validated provocation model exists, and other diagnostic tests have never been evaluated. The aims were to estimate (i) the prevalence of chlorhexidine allergy in perioperative allergy and (ii) the specificity and sensitivity for diagnostic tests for chlorhexidine allergy. We included all patients investigated for suspected perioperative allergic reactions in the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre during 2004-2012. The following tests were performed: specific IgE (Immunocap® ; Phadia AB, Sweden), histamine release test (HR) (RefLab ApS, Denmark), skin prick test (SPT) and intradermal test (IDT). Positivity criteria were as follows: specific IgE >0.35 kUA/l; HR class 1-12; SPT mean wheal diameter ≥3 mm; IDT mean wheal diameter ≥ twice the diameter of negative control. Chlorhexidine allergy was post hoc defined as a relevant clinical reaction to chlorhexidine combined with two or more positive tests. Based on this definition, sensitivity and specificity were estimated for each test. In total, 22 of 228 patients (9.6%) met the definition of allergy to chlorhexidine. Estimated sensitivity and specificity were as follows: specific IgE (sensitivity 100% and specificity 97%), HR (sensitivity 55% and specificity 99%), SPT (sensitivity 95% and specificity 97%) and IDT (sensitivity 68% and specificity 100%). In patients investigated for suspected perioperative allergic reactions, 9.6% were diagnosed with allergy to chlorhexidine. Using our definition of chlorhexidine allergy, the highest combined estimated sensitivity and specificity was found for specific IgE and SPT. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sensitivity Comparison of the Skin Prick Test and Serum and Fecal Radio Allergosorbent Test (RAST) in Diagnosis of Food Allergy in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Pourreza, Alireza; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Yousefzadeh, Hadis; Masomi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of food allergy is difficult in children. Food allergies are diagnosed using several methods that include medical histories, clinical examinations, skin prick and serum-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) tests, radio-allergosorbent test (RAST), food challenge, and supervised elimination diets. In this study we evaluated allergies to cow's milk, egg, peanut, and fish in children with suspected food allergies with skin prick tests and serum and feces RAST. Methods: Forty-o...

  19. Chapter 31: Common in vitro tests for allergy and immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Melanie; O'Gorman, Maurice R G

    2012-01-01

    Allergen-specific IgE antibody is the most commonly ordered in vitro test in the practice of allergy and is used to diagnose type I hypersensitivity reactions to foods or reactivity to aeroallergens in patients with relative contraindications to skin-prick testing such as dermatographism. The Phadebas radioallergosorbent test (RAST; Pharmacia, Uppsala, Sweden) was the first assay reported for the detection of the allergen-specific IgE antibody. In a RAST, antigen (allergen) is bound to a solid phase, such as a paper disk, and then incubated with human serum. A buffer wash removes unbound serum proteins, and radiolabeled anti-human IgE is added to detect bound IgE, if present. The results are reported in arbitrary units of IgE per milliliter of serum. The term RAST was originally a brand name but it is now often used colloquially (and incorrectly) to describe any in vitro assay for allergen-specific IgE. Total serum IgE can be measured and is helpful in determining atopic presentations such as in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or in patients with persistent asthma who are candidates for monoclonal anti-IgE antibody therapy with, omalizumab. In patients with recurrent bacterial infections of the sinopulmonary tract, the basic humoral immune system testing includes measuring quantitative immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM) and comparing them to age-matched normal ranges. Most clinical laboratories use nephelometry to measure immunoglobulin levels quantitatively. Nephelometry detects either the rate or the end point of soluble immune complex formation (the IgG in sera complexes with an anti-IgG antibody forming a classic immunoprecipitation reaction) by monitoring the scatter of transmitted light. The most common method for the screening of cellular immunodeficiency involved the measurement of the absolute and relative representation of the major lymphocyte subsets, T-cells, T-helper cells, T-cytotoxic cells, B-cells and NK-cells.

  20. Prevalence of skin test reactivity in patients with convincing, vague, and unacceptable histories of penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stember, Rishon H

    2005-01-01

    Penicillin (PCN) allergy has been vastly overdiagnosed, and too many people are incorrectly labeled as allergic to PCN, which affects their health by preventing the use of beta-lactam antibiotics. This investigation explores whether taking a careful history can eliminate the need for some to carry the PCN allergy label. A retrospective study of a focused history and PCN skin testing was done in a consecutive sample of a suburban allergy population of 319 patients who had a positive history of PCN allergy. The patients were divided into three groups based on PCN history: convincing, vague, and unacceptable. The convincing group had patients with impressive histories of PCN allergy likely to be immunoglobulin E-mediated. The vague group had unimpressive but plausible histories of PCN allergy. The unacceptable group were those patients with the PCN-allergic label who were either never exposed to PCN or the PCN reaction was too far-fetched to be believable. Out of 319 patients with a positive PCN allergy history, 135 (42.3%) patients were classified as convincing, 150 (47%) patients were classified as vague, and 34 (10.7%) patients were classified as unacceptable. Positive PCN skin tests were found in 19 of 135 (14.1%) patients in the convincing group, in 10 of 150 (6.7%) patients in the vague group, and 0 of 34 (0%) patients in the unacceptable group. The finding that 6.7% of patients with a vague PCN allergy history had positive skin tests suggests that skin testing is necessary in this group. The PCN-allergic label in the unacceptable group had been unchallenged by 33 primary care physicians and 9 allergists. This study suggests that physician acceptance of unwarranted PCN-allergic labels is not uncommon, and that such labels can be removed without skin testing.

  1. The acceptability of a four-part protocol for penicillin allergy testing by practicing allergists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Alyson B; Murphy, Andrew W; Yousef, Ejaz

    2009-01-01

    Currently, there is no standard protocol to test for penicillin (PCN) allergy since PrePen (manufactured benzylpenicilloyl polylysine; AllerQuest, West Hartford, CT) was discontinued in 2004. Our article reviews allergist's opinions on a protocol to test for PCN allergy in patients without a history of a life-threatening reaction. This study was performed to determine whether fellows of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI) would use a two-challenge PCN allergy protocol to test for PCN allergy while skin testing to the major determinant, benzylpenicilloyl polylysine, is unavailable. A questionnaire regarding PCN allergy and application of a four-step protocol was sent to 1210 allergists and immunologists. Of the 654 respondents, 324 (49.5%) believed that the protocol was practical in a busy, outpatient allergy practice and 64 (9.8%) wanted more information. One hundred ninety-four (29.7%) did not think it was practical. Two hundred ninety-five respondents (45.1%) then went on to respond that they would apply the protocol in an outpatient practice and 117 (17.9%) were undecided and wanted more information. One hundred thirty-five respondents (20.6%) would not apply the protocol in their practice. Of those who were undecided or did not think it was practical, 58 (8.9%) were awaiting PrePen, 33 (5%) wanted to see a larger protocol, 24 (3.7%) wanted more detail on the challenge, and 14 (2.1%) felt more comfortable desensitizing the patient. Forty-five percent of the fellows of the AAAAI would apply the proposed protocol to test for PCN allergy. Sixty-two percent said they may apply the protocol if a larger study was performed.

  2. Practical guide to skin prick tests in allergy to aeroallergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Heinzerling, L; Bachert, C

    2012-01-01

    in the management of allergic diseases. It is not a long or detailed scientific review of the topic. However, the recommendations in this pocket guide were compiled following an in-depth review of existing guidelines and publications, including the 1993 European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology position...

  3. Feasibility, Benefits, and Limitations of a Penicillin Allergy Skin Testing Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Prasanna P; Jeffres, Meghan N

    2017-06-01

    To critically examine the feasibility, benefits, and limitations of an inpatient penicillin skin testing service and how pharmacists can be utilized. A PubMed search was performed from July 2016 through September 2016 using the following search terms: penicillin skin testing, penicillin allergy, β-lactam allergy. Additional references were identified from a review of literature citations. All English-language studies assessing the use of penicillin skin testing as well as management and clinical outcomes of patients with a β-lactam allergy were evaluated. The prevalence of people self-identifying as penicillin allergic ranges from 10% to 20% in the United States. Being improperly labeled as penicillin allergic is associated with higher health care costs, worse clinical outcomes, and an increased prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections. Penicillin skin testing can be a tool used to clarify penicillin allergies and has been demonstrated to be a successful addition to antimicrobial stewardship programs in multiple health care settings. Prior to implementing a penicillin skin testing service, institutions will need to perform a feasibility analysis of who will supply labor and accept the financial burden as well as identify if the positive benefits of a penicillin skin testing service overcome the limitations of this diagnostic test. We conclude that institutions with high percentages of patients receiving non-β-lactams because of penicillin allergy labels would likely benefit the most from a penicillin skin testing service.

  4. Allergy Tests: When You Need Them and When You Don't

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These free tests and home tests for food allergies are not always reliable. Unreliable test results can lead to unnecessary changes in your lifestyle. If the test says you are allergic to some foods, such as wheat, soy, eggs, or milk, you may stop eating those ...

  5. Standardized testing with chlorhexidine in perioperative allergy – a large single-centre evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjørring Opstrup, Morten; Malling, Hans-Jørgen; Krøigaard, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perioperative allergic reactions to chlorhexidine are often severe and easily overlooked. Although rare, the prevalence remains unknown. Correct diagnosis is crucial, but no validated provocation model exists, and other diagnostic tests have never been evaluated. The aims were...... to estimate 1) the prevalence of chlorhexidine allergy and 2) the specificity and sensitivity for diagnostic tests for chlorhexidine allergy. METHODS: We included all patients investigated for suspected perioperative allergic reactions in the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre during 2004-2012. The following...... tests were performed: specific IgE (Immunocap(®) , Phadia AB, Sweden), histamine release test (HR) (RefLab ApS, Denmark), skin prick test (SPT) and intradermal test (IDT). Positivity criteria: specific IgE > 0.35 kUA/l; HR class 1-12; SPT mean wheal diameter ≥ 3 mm; IDT mean wheal diameter ≥ twice...

  6. Amoxicillin allergy in children: five-day drug provocation test in the diagnosis of nonimmediate reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Francesca; Cianferoni, Antonella; Barni, Simona; Pucci, Neri; Rossi, Maria Elisabetta; Novembre, Elio

    2015-01-01

    The drug provocation test (DPT) is the gold standard to rule out drug hypersensitivity. There are standardized DPT protocols to diagnose immediate reactions to drugs, but not for nonimmediate reactions. The aim of this study was to show the sensitivity and specificity of an allergy work-up that included a 5-day DPT in children with histories of nonimmediate reactions to amoxicillin through focusing on a pediatric population with histories of immediate and nonimmediate reactions to amoxicillin. Two hundred consecutive patients with histories of amoxicillin reactions referred to the Allergy Unit of Anna Meyer Children's Hospital for suspected drug allergy from 2008 to 2011 underwent in vivo tests with the culprit drug according to European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology guidelines. Moreover, most of those children, regardless of the skin tests results, were challenged with amoxicillin for a total of 5 days. In 4 years, 200 patients were evaluated for a history of drug hypersensitivity to amoxicillin. The majority of patients (76%) had a history of mild nonimmediate reactions. All 200 patients underwent skin tests, and 9 of 200 tested positive. A total of 177 DPTs were performed with amoxicillin for 5 days in each child. Diagnosis of amoxicillin allergy was confirmed by a DPT in 17 patients (9.6%); 14/17 had history of nonimmediate reactions; 4/14 (26.6%) reacted on day 5. According to our results, a long-term DPT protocol increases the sensitivity of the allergy work-up, and it should be recommended for patients with a history of amoxicillin nonimmediate reaction. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Skin testing only with penicillin G in children with a history of penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Matthieu; Paradis, Louis; Bégin, Philippe; Paradis, Jean; Des Roches, Anne

    2014-07-01

    The absence of commercially available penicilloyl-polylysine (PPL) for most of the last decade severely hampered the practice of penicillin allergy evaluation because skin testing without PPL is reported to have a poor negative predictive value (NPV). To determine the safety and NPV of skin testing without PPL using only penicillin G followed by a 3-dose graded challenge to the incriminated penicillin in children with a history of penicillin allergy. Patients evaluated for a history of penicillin allergy at the CHU Sainte-Justine Allergy Clinic between December 2006 and December 2009 were skin tested only with penicillin G and underwent a 3-dose graded challenge to the culprit penicillin if the skin test result was negative. Among 563 patients skin tested to penicillin G, 185 (33%) had a positive skin test result. These patients had a shorter interval between the initial reaction and skin testing compared with patients with a negative skin test result (P = .03). A total of 375 of 378 patients (99%) with a negative skin test result were challenged and 18 (4.8%) reacted, translating into a NPV of 95.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.5%-97.1%). Three of 17 patients with a history of anaphylaxis and a negative skin test result reacted to challenge (NPV, 82.4%; 95% CI, 59.0-93.8%). All challenge reactions were mild and resolved promptly with treatment. Among children with a history of penicillin allergy, skin testing only with penicillin G followed by a 3-dose graded challenge to the incriminated penicillin is safe and yields a good NPV. This approach could be useful when PPL is unavailable. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnosis and immunotherapy of mould allergy. III. Diagnosis of Cladosporium allergy by means of symptom score, bronchial provocation test, skin prick test, RAST, CRIE and histamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malling, H J; Dreborg, S; Weeke, B

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-three adult asthmatic patients suspected of mould allergy were investigated by in vivo and in vitro tests in order to establish a specific diagnosis of asthma caused by the mould species Cladosporium. The patients were evaluated by daily symptom scores in the peak Cladosporium season, bronchial provocation test (BPT), skin prick test (SPT), RAST, histamine release from basophil granulocytes (HIST), and crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis (CRIE), and the results were scored as negative (score 0), equivocal (score 1) or positive (score 2). Based on daily symptom scores and the result of BPT the patients were classified as being manifest allergic (asthma) to Cladosporium (positive allergy), inconclusive or negative. Positive allergy was defined as asthma symptoms oscillating with the spore concentration and a BPT score 2 (positive at allergen concentration less than 10,000 BU). Negative allergy was defined as no asthma symptoms and a negative BPT (score 0) and inconclusive in the case of symptoms and BPT sum of score 1-3. According to the classification a final diagnosis (positive or negative) could be established in 85% of the patients. "False positive" tests were found: for BPT in 27%, SPT 18%, RAST 0%, HIST 18%, and CRIE 0%. The corresponding figures for "false negative" were: BPT 0%, SPT 0%, RAST 27%, HIST 18%, and CRIE 23%. The relative risk of being allergic in spite of a negative test result was 0% for BPT and SPT, and 25-30% with RAST, HIST, and CRIE. In the case of positive test the risk was 90-100%. Excluding BPT, SPT was found to be the optimal single test to predict/rule out clinical allergy. A stepwise combination of positive SPT and positive RAST was found exclusively in patients clinically evaluated as positive, and does not call for an additional BPT. Using a potent allergenic extract a negative SPT excluded clinically important allergy. The primary conclusion of the study, however, is that the final diagnosis of Cladosporium asthma could not be

  9. Penicillin skin testing in the evaluation and management of penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Stephanie; Park, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    to review the role of penicillin skin testing in the evaluation and management of penicillin allergy mediated by IgE. PubMed and OVID search of English-language articles regarding penicillin allergy, penicillin allergy testing, and management of penicillin allergy. articles pertinent to the subject matter were selected and reviewed. the major determinant (benzylpenicillin polylysine) detects the greatest number of penicillin allergic patients during skin testing, and the minor determinants of penicillin increase the sensitivity of penicillin skin testing. Penicillin skin testing to the major and minor determinants was found to have a negative predictive value of 97% to 99%. The incidence of systemic adverse reaction to penicillin skin testing is less than 1%. a detailed history of the prior reaction to penicillin is an integral part of the evaluation, but it is not accurate in predicting a positive penicillin skin test result. A patient with a negative penicillin skin test result to the major and minor determinants is at a low risk of an immediate-type hypersensitivity reaction to penicillin. Patients with a positive skin test result should undergo desensitization to penicillin or an alternative antibiotic should be considered.

  10. Which test is best for diagnosing peanut allergy in South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (SPTs), immuno solid-phase allergen chip (ISAC) tests, ImmunoCAP component tests to Ara h 1, 2, 3, 8 and 9, and incremental food challenges. Results. One hundred participants (59 Xhosa (black Africans) ..... and laboratory parameters that most accu- rately predict peanut allergy. The study was performed in children with ...

  11. [The examination of SIgE in perennial allergic rhinitis with mast allergy test system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D; Li, L; Hou, X; Zhai, Y

    1999-04-01

    To explore the relation between serum specificity immunoglobulin E (SIgE) and skin test (intracutaneous test) as well as nasal provocation in Perennial allergy rhinitis (PAR) by Mast Allergy Test System. Serum allergen-specific IgE (SIgE) were examined by Mast Allergy Test System in 57 case of PAR patients. The SIgE positive rate of fannae and pteronvssinus are highest (52.6%), the sensitive rate of intracutaneous test is 88.4% and nasal provocation is 88.9%. The SIgE positive rates of cludosporium, penicillum and altemana are 26.3%, 24.6% and 21.0%, respectively. The SIgE positive rates of fannae, cockroach, shrimp, crab, egg and milk is direct proportion with intracutaneous test (P 0.05). In addition, the positive rate of ragweed mix SIgE is 22.8%, but there is non of this plant in South China. It is worthy of paying attention in clinic. It indicate that Mast Allergy Test System is one of the better examination for PAR allergens.

  12. Differential skin test reactivity to pollens in pollen food allergy syndrome versus allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Von; Scott, David R; Chin, William K; Wineinger, Nathan E; Kelso, John M; White, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Pollen food allergy syndrome (PFAS), also called oral allergy syndrome, is a form of food allergy in which uncooked foods cause allergic symptoms generally limited to the oral mucosa. It occurs in a subset of patients with pollen allergy, although not all patients have prominent rhinitis symptoms. PFAS is related to antigenic similarity between the pollen and food allergen. The size of skin test reactions in a group of subjects with pollen sensitivity with PFAS was compared with a group of subjects who were pollen sensitive and without PFAS. Self-reported rhinitis symptoms between the two groups were compared to identify if symptom severity differed. Twenty subjects with PFAS and 20 subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis without PFAS were enrolled in the study. All the subjects underwent standard skin-prick testing to a panel of common allergens, including select fresh fruits and vegetables. The subjects completed a Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire as part of their clinical evaluation. The subjects with PFAS and those without PFAS were compared statistically. The subjects with PFAS had significantly larger-sized skin-prick test results specific to pollens (p allergic rhinitis and PFAS reported milder nasal symptoms in relation to pollen skin test result size when compared with allergic rhinitis controls without PFAS. Our study outlined basic differences between two seemingly similar patient groups with a particularly striking discordance between skin test result sizes and rhinitis symptoms. This discordance should be explored further to increase mechanistic understanding of allergen cross-reactivity in PFAS.

  13. Evaluation of biocompatibility of Targis Dentin and Artglass by using subcutaneous implantation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonmez Nalan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biocompatibility of a crown-bridge material is as important as its physical and mechanical properties. It is also one of the most important factors for the long-lasting clinical success of that restoration. It directly contacts the vital prepared tooth and that is the reason it has to be nontoxic to the local tissues, such as the pulp, gingiva, or the rest of the body. Materials with different physical properties are used in the conventional fixed prosthodontic restorations. Recently, metal-free systems that are reinforced with fibers have been improved for crown and bridge restorations. These new composite systems have the advantages of both ceramic and polymer chemistry. Materials and Methods: In this research, biocompatibility of two ceramic-polymer-based prosthetic materials (Targis Dentin® and Artglass Dentin® was studied using a subcutaneous implantation test on rats. Initially (15 th day mild inflammatory reactions were observed in tissues, which directly contacted the Artglass, Targis, and control tubes. These probably originated from the surgical traumas. After the 90th day of implantation, these reactions resolved and healthy, well-organized fibrous connective capsules were seen around the implants. Results: Initially (15 th day mild inflammatory reactions were observed in tissues, which directly contacted the Artglass, Targis, and control tubes. These probably originated from the surgical traumas. After the 90 th day of implantation, these reactions resolved and healthy, well-organized fibrous connective capsules were seen around the implants. Conclusion: At the end of the study, according to the FDI and ISO-7405 standards, Targis and Artglass indicated biocompatibility with the subcutaneous connective tissue of the rat.

  14. Mold Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Allergist Search Health Professionals Partners Media Donate Allergies Mold Allergy What Is a Mold Allergy? If you have an allergy that occurs ... or basement. What Are the Symptoms of a Mold Allergy? The symptoms of mold allergy are very ...

  15. Can contact allergy to p-phenylenediamine explain the high rates of terpene hydroperoxide allergy? - An epidemiological study based on consecutive patch test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennike, Niels Højsager; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-02-01

    Contact allergy to linalool hydroperoxides (Lin-OOHs) and limonene hydroperoxides (Lim-OOHs) is common. Similarly to what occurs with the terpene hydroperoxides, reactive intermediates formed from p-phenylenediamine (PPD) can cause oxidative modifications of tryptophan residues on proteins in mechanistic studies. To test the hypothesis that patients sensitized to PPD are at increased risk of concomitant reactivity to either of the terpene hydroperoxides, owing to a 'common pathway' of skin protein oxidation. A database study of consecutively patch tested eczema patients (n = 3843) from 2012 to 2015, tested concomitantly with PPD, Lim-OOHs and Lin-OOHs, was performed. Associations were examined by level of concordance and odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for age, sex, and contact allergy to fragrance mix I and fragrance mix II. Concomitant reactions to PPD were seen in 2.2% of Lim-OOH-positive patients and in 4.9% of Lin-OOH-positive patients. Neither proportion was higher than expected by chance. No association existed between PPD and Lim-OOH patch test reactivity. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, PPD allergy was associated with an insignificantly increased risk (OR 2.11, 95%CI:0.92-4.80) of a positive patch test reaction to Lin-OOHs. PPD sensitization cannot explain the high rates of sensitization to Lin-OOHs and/or Lim-OOHs. Contact allergy to oxidized linalool is more strongly associated with fragrance allergy than with PPD allergy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Test-retest reliability of the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaires (FAQLQ) for children, adolescents and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Jantina L.; Flokstra-de Blok, Bertine M. J.; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber J.; Oude Elberink, Joanne N. G.; Schouten, Jan P.; DunnGalvin, Audrey; Hourihane, Jonathan O.'B.; Duiverman, Eric J.; Dubois, Anthony E. J.

    2009-01-01

    The self-administered Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire-Child Form (FAQLQ-CF), -Teenager Form (FAQLQ-TF) and -Adult Form (FAQLQ-AF) were recently developed within EuroPrevall, a multi-centred study of food allergy in Europe. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the test-retest

  17. Hazelnut allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortolani, C; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Hansen, K S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tree nuts are a common cause of food allergy in Europe. However, few studies deal with real food allergy to hazelnuts in subjects believed to be allergic to this food. OBJECTIVE: We sought to select subjects with a history of allergic reactions on ingestion of hazelnut and determine how...... many of these have true allergy by means of the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). METHODS: Eighty-six subjects with a history of symptoms after hazelnut ingestion were recruited from 3 allergy centers (Milan, Zurich, and Copenhagen). All subjects underwent skin prick tests (SPTs......) with aeroallergens and hazelnut, as well as having their specific hazelnut IgE levels determined. Diagnosis of clinical relevant food allergy was made on the basis of the DBPCFC. RESULTS: Sixty-seven (77.9%) of 86 subjects had a positive DBPCFC result; 8 were placebo responders, and 11 were nonresponders. Of the 11...

  18. IgE-mediated allergy to chlorhexidine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, Lene Heise; Krøigaard, Mogens; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2007-01-01

    Investigations at the Danish Anesthesia Allergy Centre have included testing for allergy to chlorhexidine since 1999.......Investigations at the Danish Anesthesia Allergy Centre have included testing for allergy to chlorhexidine since 1999....

  19. Suspicion of macrolide allergy after treatment of infectious diseases including Helicobacter pylori: results of allergological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Cornelia S; Bröcker, Eva-B; Trautmann, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Macrolides are useful in a wide range of bacterial infections including upper and lower respiratory tract, skin, and sexually transmitted diseases and are used in Helicobacter pylori eradication regimen. Skin symptoms occurring during drug therapy are mostly attributed to the antibiotic, causing considerable limitations of future therapeutic options. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to demonstrate results of diagnostic testing in cases of clinically suspected immediate and delayed macrolide hypersensitivity. A total of 125 patients with a history of immediate or delayed hypersensitivity symptoms in temporal relation to treatment with a macrolide antibiotic were studied using standardised skin tests followed by oral challenges. Selected patients with severe symptoms were further evaluated with in vitro tests. Macrolide hypersensitivity was excluded in 109 patients (87.2%) by tolerated oral challenge tests. During 113 challenges in four patients an exanthema was provoked by the suspected macrolide. Only one patient developed a positive late skin test reaction. Out of the 28 Helicobacter pylori-treated patients, one patient with clarithromycin allergy was identified, whereas in eight cases amoxicillin allergy caused the exanthema. Laboratory tests using the suspected macrolides were constantly negative. History alone leads to an over-estimation of macrolide hypersensitivity. Moreover, skin and in vitro tests seem to be not very useful in identifying hypersensitive patients. Challenge tests appear to be necessary for definitely confirming or ruling out macrolide allergy. Copyright © 2010 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Intraoperative Defibrillation Testing of Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Systems-A Simple Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommeyer, Gerrit; Zumhagen, Sven; Dechering, Dirk G; Larbig, Robert; Bettin, Markus; Löher, Andreas; Köbe, Julia; Reinke, Florian; Eckardt, Lars

    2016-03-15

    The results of the recently published randomized SIMPLE trial question the role of routine intraoperative defibrillation testing. However, testing is still recommended during implantation of the entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) system. To address the question of whether defibrillation testing in S-ICD systems is still necessary, we analyzed the data of a large, standard-of-care prospective single-center S-ICD registry. In the present study, 102 consecutive patients received an S-ICD for primary (n=50) or secondary prevention (n=52). Defibrillation testing was performed in all except 4 patients. In 74 (75%; 95% CI 0.66-0.83) of 98 patients, ventricular fibrillation was effectively terminated by the first programmed internal shock. In 24 (25%; 95% CI 0.22-0.44) of 98 patients, the first internal shock was ineffective and further internal or external shock deliveries were required. In these patients, programming to reversed shock polarity (n=14) or repositioning of the sensing lead (n=1) or the pulse generator (n=5) led to successful defibrillation. In 4 patients, a safety margin of defibrillation testing is not necessary in transvenous ICD systems, it seems particular important for S-ICD systems, because in nearly 25% of the cases the primary intraoperative test was not successful. In most cases, a successful defibrillation could be achieved by changing shock polarity or by optimizing the shock vector caused by the pulse generator or lead repositioning. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  1. Role of atopy patch test for diagnosis of food allergy-related gastrointestinal symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyaviwat, Onsuree; Pacharn, Punchama; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Vichyanond, Pakit; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong

    2015-12-01

    Double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge is the gold standard for diagnosing food allergy. However, it is a time-consuming procedure and requires onsite medical supervision and resuscitating medicines and devices on hand. The objective of this study was to compare the atopy patch test (APT) with the oral food challenge test (OFC) in children with suspected food allergy-related gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. A prospective self-controlled study enrolled children with a history of suspected food allergy-related GI symptoms. Skin prick test (SPT) and APT using lyophilized and commercial allergen extracts for cow's milk, egg, wheat, soy, and shrimp were evaluated, and OFC was performed. Thirty-nine patients (25 boys, median age 2.4 yrs) with 76 events of suspected food allergy-related GI symptoms were enrolled. SPT was positive in 11/76 events (14.5%). Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratio were calculated related to the food challenge outcome. Of 41 OFC, 30 (73.2%) were positive. APT using lyophilized allergen extracts yielded high sensitivity (80%) and high positive predictive value (85.7%). APT using commercial allergen extracts yielded low sensitivity (30%) but high specificity (90%). The negative predictive value of APT using lyophilized and commercial allergen extracts was 53.8% and 32.2%, respectively. All cases with positive APT using lyophilized allergen extracts together with positive SPT also had positive OFC. In contrast to commercial extracts, APT with lyophilized allergen extracts is reliable, safe, and maybe useful for the diagnosis of suspected food allergy-related GI symptoms in children. OFC is still needed in most of the cases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The association between allergy skin testing, atopic respiratory conditions, and stroke mortality in middle-aged and elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Eric M; Mainous, Arch G; Carnemolla, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    A history of atopic respiratory conditions has been linked to an increased risk of stroke. What remains unclear is whether positive allergy skin testing is associated with an increased risk of stroke. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether positive allergy skin testing is associated with an increased risk of fatal stroke. A secondary goal is to determine whether having both positive allergy skin testing and an atopic respiratory condition is associated with a particularly high risk of stroke death. An analysis was performed of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey II Mortality Cohort. Controlling for age, gender, race, alcohol use, smoking status, diabetes, hypertension, and body mass index, patients with positive allergy skin testing had a hazard ratio for stroke mortality of 1.56 (95% CI, 1.01-2.40) versus those without positive allergy testing. Patients with both positive allergy testing and an atopic respiratory condition had a hazard ratio for stroke mortality of 2.31 (95% CI, 1.13-4.73). Individuals with both positive allergy skin testing and an atopic respiratory condition have more than a 2-fold increased risk of fatal stroke. This novel risk factor has substantial implications for a large segment of the population not previously considered at risk.

  3. Latex Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... release histamine and other chemicals into your bloodstream, producing a range of allergy signs and symptoms. The ... Make a donation. Patient Care & Health Info Healthy Lifestyle Symptoms A-Z Diseases & Conditions A-Z Tests & ...

  4. Positive Skin Test or Specific IgE to Penicillin Does Not Reliably Predict Penicillin Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannert, Line Kring; Mortz, Charlotte Gotthard; Skov, Per Stahl; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    According to guidelines, patients are diagnosed with penicillin allergy if skin test (ST) result or specific IgE (s-IgE) to penicillin is positive. However, the true sensitivity and specificity of these tests are presently not known. To investigate the clinical relevance of a positive ST result and positive s-IgE and to study the reproducibility of ST and s-IgE. A sample of convenience of 25 patients with positive penicillin ST results, antipenicillin s-IgE results, or both was challenged with their culprit penicillin. Further 19 patients were not challenged, but deemed allergic on the basis of a recent anaphylactic reaction or delayed reactions to skin testing. Another sample of convenience of 18 patients, 17 overlapping with the 25 challenged, with initial skin testing and s-IgE (median, 25; range, 3-121), months earlier (T-1), was repeat skin tested and had s-IgE measured (T0), and then skin tested and had s-IgE measured 4 weeks later (T1). Only 9 (36%) of 25 were challenge positive. There was an increased probability of being penicillin allergic if both ST result and s-IgE were positive at T0. Positive ST result or positive s-IgE alone did not predict penicillin allergy. Among the 18 patients repeatedly tested, 46.2% (12 of 25) of positive ST results at T-1 were reproducibly positive at T0. For s-IgE, 54.2% (14 of 24) positive measurements were still positive at T0 and 7 converted to positive at T1. The best predictor for a clinically significant (IgE-mediated) penicillin allergy is a combination of a positive case history with simultaneous positive ST result and s-IgE or a positive challenge result. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of oral allergy syndrome in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis by food challenge test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahzad Jabbari Azad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral allergy syndrome (OAS characterized by oral IgE-mediated symptoms, which is caused by cross-reactivity between proteins in pollens, fresh fruit and vegetables. OAS is presents in 40% to 80% of Allergic rhinitis patients. Association between oral allergy syndrome and duration of seasonal allergic rhinitis is not well known. Early treatment of Patients with OAS caused improvement in quality of life and relief of their symptoms. Material and methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study between March 2012 to September 2012, 103 consecutive patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis were entered to this study. Their sensitizations to common aeroallergens were confirmed by skin prick test (SPT by three mm more than negative control. According to food allergy history and prick-to-prick test results, we considered 63 of 103 patients for single-blind oral food challenge test. Data analyzed bty SPSS software (ver 11.5, and by Chi squeare test and paired T test. P-value lower than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Among studied cases, 63 patients (61.2% with 28.8±10.6 years old had OAS and 40 (38.8% with 26.8±13.2 years old not OAS. We found that there was significant difference between duration of seasonal allergic rhinitis in OAS group (7±5.9 years and non-OAS group (5±4 years (P=0.03, CI=0.03-0.04. This syndrome was more in women and patients who had concomitant asthma and allergic conjunctivitis but statistical association was not significant. Conclusions: This study showed that all of the patients with hay fever do not develop OAS. Duration of seasonal allergic rhinitis was associated significantly with oral allergy syndrome. However, further studies with more sample size and double-blind placebo controlled methods might be needed.

  6. Testing children for allergies: why, how, who and when: an updated statement of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Section on Pediatrics and the EAACI-Clemens von Pirquet Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenmann, P A; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M; O'B Hourihane, J; Lack, G; Lau, S; Matricardi, P M; Muraro, A; Namazova Baranova, L; Nieto, A; Papadopoulos, N G; Réthy, L A; Roberts, G; Rudzeviciene, O; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Høst, A

    2013-03-01

    Allergic diseases are common in childhood and can cause a significant morbidity and impaired quality-of-life of the children and their families. Adequate allergy testing is the prerequisite for optimal care, including allergen avoidance, pharmacotherapy and immunotherapy. Children with persisting or recurrent or severe symptoms suggestive for allergy should undergo an appropriate diagnostic work-up, irrespective of their age. Adequate allergy testing may also allow defining allergic trigger in common symptoms. We provide here evidence-based guidance on when and how to test for allergy in children based on common presenting symptoms suggestive of allergic diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Comparison of the Performance of Skin Prick, ImmunoCAP, and ISAC Tests in the Diagnosis of Patients with Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Rebecca L M; El-Shanawany, Tariq; Jolles, Stephen R A; Selwood, Clive; Heaps, Adrian G; Carne, Emily M; Williams, Paul E

    2017-01-01

    Allergy is diagnosed from typical symptoms, and tests are performed to incriminate the suspected precipitant. Skin prick tests (SPTs) are commonly performed, inexpensive, and give immediate results. Laboratory tests (ImmunoCAP) for serum allergen-specific IgE antibodies are usually performed more selectively. The immuno-solid phase allergen chip (ISAC) enables testing for specific IgE against multiple allergen components in a multiplex assay. We retrospectively analysed clinic letters, case notes, and laboratory results of 118 patients attending the National Adult Allergy Service at the University Hospital of Wales who presented diagnostic difficulty, to evaluate which testing strategy (SPT, ImmunoCAP, or ISAC) was the most appropriate to use to confirm the diagnosis in these complex patients, evaluated in a "real-life" clinical service setting. In patients with nut allergy, the detection rates of SPTs (56%) and ISAC (65%) were lower than those of ImmunoCAP (71%). ISAC had a higher detection rate (88%) than ImmunoCAP (69%) or SPT (33%) in the diagnosis of oral allergy syndrome. ImmunoCAP test results identified all 9 patients with anaphylaxis due to wheat allergy (100%), whereas ISAC was positive in only 6 of these 9 (67%). In this difficult diagnostic group, the ImmunoCAP test should be the preferred single test for possible allergy to nuts, wheat, other specific foods, and anaphylaxis of any cause. In these conditions, SPT and ISAC tests give comparable results. The most useful single test for oral allergy syndrome is ISAC, and SPT should be the preferred test for latex allergy. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. De-labelling self-reported penicillin allergy within the emergency department through the use of skin tests and oral drug provocation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwood, Joseph; Aguirrebarrena, Gonzalo; Kerr, Stephen; Welch, Susan A; Rimmer, Janet

    2017-10-01

    Self-reported penicillin allergy is common among patients attending the ED, but is a poor predictor of true immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillin. We hypothesise that with a combination of skin testing and drug provocation testing, selected patients can be safely de-labelled of their allergy. This prospective study enrolled a sample of patients presenting to an urban academic ED between 2011 and 2016 with a self-reported allergy to penicillin. Standardised skin prick and intradermal testing with amoxicillin and both major and minor determinants of penicillin was performed in the department. If negative, testing was followed by a graded oral challenge of amoxicillin over 9 days. The primary end point was the allergy status of participants at the end of the study. A total of 100 patients (mean age 42; standard deviation 14 years; 54% women) completed the testing. Of these, 81% (95% confidence interval 71.9-88.2) showed no hypersensitivity to penicillin and were labelled non-allergic. The majority (16/19) of allergies were confirmed by skin testing, with three suspected allergies detected by the oral challenge. Women were more likely than men to have a true penicillin allergy, with odds ratio of 4.0 (95% confidence interval 1.23-13.2). There were no serious adverse events. Selected patients in the ED who self-report an allergy to penicillin can be safely tested there for penicillin allergy, using skin tests and oral drug provocation testing. This testing allows a significant de-labelling of penicillin allergy, with the majority of these patients able to tolerate penicillin without incident. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  9. Penicillin skin testing is a safe and effective tool for evaluating penicillin allergy in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Stephanie J; Park, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Penicillin skin testing has been validated in the evaluation of adult patients with penicillin allergy. However, the commercially available benzylpenicilloyl polylysine (Pre-Pen) is not indicated in the pediatric population. Moreover, the safety and validity of penicillin skin testing in the pediatric population has not been well studied. We describe the safety and validity of penicillin skin testing in the evaluation of children with a history of penicillin allergy. Children (penicillin allergy were evaluated with penicillin skin tests and were reviewed for basic demographics, penicillin skin test results, adverse drug reaction to penicillin after penicillin skin test, and adverse reaction to penicillin skin test. By using the χ(2) test, we compared the differences in the proportion of children and adults with a positive penicillin skin test. P value (penicillin skin testing; 703 of 778 patients had a negative penicillin skin test (90.4%), 66 had a positive test (8.5%), and 9 had an equivocal test (1.1%). Children were more likely to have a positive penicillin skin test (P penicillin skin test (52%) were challenged with penicillin, and 14 of 369 patients (3.8%) had an adverse drug reaction. No adverse reactions to penicillin skin testing were observed. Penicillin skin testing was safe and effective in the evaluation of children with a history of penicillin allergy. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of an Integrated Antibiotic Allergy Testing Program on Antimicrobial Stewardship: A Multicenter Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubiano, Jason A; Thursky, Karin A; Stewardson, Andrew J; Urbancic, Karen; Worth, Leon J; Jackson, Cheryl; Stevenson, Wendy; Sutherland, Michael; Slavin, Monica A; Grayson, M Lindsay; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2017-07-01

    Despite the high prevalence of patient-reported antibiotic allergy (so-called antibiotic allergy labels [AALs]) and their impact on antibiotic prescribing, incorporation of antibiotic allergy testing (AAT) into antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs (AAT-AMS) is not widespread. We aimed to evaluate the impact of an AAT-AMS program on AAL prevalence, antibiotic usage, and appropriateness of prescribing. AAT-AMS was implemented at two large Australian hospitals during a 14-month period beginning May 2015. Baseline demographics, AAL history, age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index, infection history, and antibiotic usage for 12 months prior to testing (pre-AAT-AMS) and 3 months following testing (post-AAT-AMS) were recorded for each participant. Study outcomes included the proportion of patients who were "de-labeled" of their AAL, spectrum of antibiotic courses pre- and post-AAT-AMS, and antibiotic appropriateness (using standard definitions). From the 118 antibiotic allergy-tested patients, 226 AALs were reported (mean, 1.91/patient), with 53.6% involving 1 or more penicillin class drug. AAT-AMS allowed AAL de-labeling in 98 (83%) patients-56% (55/98) with all AALs removed. Post-AAT, prescribing of narrow-spectrum penicillins was more likely (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.81, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-5.42), as was narrow-spectrum β-lactams (aOR, 3.54; 95% CI, 1.98-6.33), and appropriate antibiotics (aOR, 12.27; 95% CI, 5.00-30.09); and less likely for restricted antibiotics (aOR, 0.16; 95% CI, .09-.29), after adjusting for indication, Charlson comorbidity index, and care setting. An integrated AAT-AMS program was effective in both de-labeling of AALs and promotion of improved antibiotic usage and appropriateness, supporting the routine incorporation of AAT into AMS programs.

  11. The evaluation of drug provocation tests in pediatric allergy clinic: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezir, Emine; Erkocoglu, Mustafa; Civelek, Ersoy; Kaya, Aysenur; Azkur, Dilek; Akan, Aysegül; Ozcan, Celal; Toyran, Muge; Ginis, Tayfur; Misirlioglu, Emine Dibek; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2014-01-01

    Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are gold standard to diagnose drug allergy. Our goal was to evaluate the results and safety of diagnostic methods including DPTs during childhood. Between January 2010 and February 2013 DPTs were performed and evaluated, prospectively, in children who attended our pediatric allergy clinic with a suspected drug hypersensitivity reaction. One hundred ninety-eight suspected drug reactions in 175 patients (88 boys and 87 girls) were evaluated. The median age of the subjects at the time of the suspected drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction and at the time of the study was 56 (interquartile range [IQR] = 24-120 months) months and 76 (IQR = 35-149 months) months, respectively. Suspected drugs were beta-lactam antibiotics in 108 cases (54.5%), non-beta-lactam antibiotics in 22 cases (11.1%), and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs in 52 cases (26.3%). The history was compatible with immediate-type reactions in 69 cases (34.8%). Skin-prick tests were not positive in any of the cases. Intradermal tests were positive in three cases (4%). DPTs were positive in 13 (6.8%) of 191 provocation cases, which were performed with culprit drugs. Our results suggest that a positive clinical history is not enough to make a diagnosis of drug allergy, which highlights the significance of undertaking further diagnostic evaluation especially for DPTs.

  12. EMLA cream for pain reduction in diagnostic allergy skin testing: effects on wheal and flare responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicherer, S H; Eggleston, P A

    1997-01-01

    The use of a topical anesthetic cream containing prilocaine and lidocaine (EMLA) has been considered to reduce the pain of diagnostic allergy skin testing, but the effects of the cream on interpretation of skin tests is unclear. To determine the effects of the cream for pain reduction using prick and ID skin tests and for possible alteration of wheal and flare responses to allergen, saline, and histamine. In a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled design, 20 adult volunteers with a history of positive allergen tests had EMLA and placebo cream placed according to the manufacturer's recommendations on the volar aspect of the arms. Paired skin tests were placed and subjects rated the tests on a pain scale from 0 to 5 and average wheal and flare diameters were determined. Mean pain scores (+/-SEM) were significantly reduced from 2.5 +/- 0.7 to 1.1 +/- 0.6 for prick tests (n = 20, P wheal sizes for allergen prick tests, allergen ID tests, and histamine ID tests were identical in comparing placebo to EMLA-treated skin. Flare responses were reduced on the actively treated skin, on average, as follows: allergen skin tests- 52% (P response, all on the EMLA treated skin. EMLA significantly reduced the pain associated with diagnostic allergy skin testing and with no effect on the size of the wheal response. It reduces the flare response, in some cases inhibiting it completely, which must be taken into consideration in interpreting results.

  13. Food allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waserman Susan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Food allergy is defined as an adverse immunologic response to a dietary protein. Food-related reactions are associated with a broad array of signs and symptoms that may involve many bodily systems including the skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, and cardiovascular system. Food allergy is a leading cause of anaphylaxis and, therefore, referral to an allergist for appropriate and timely diagnosis and treatment is imperative. Diagnosis involves a careful history and diagnostic tests, such as skin prick testing, serum-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE testing and, if indicated, oral food challenges. Once the diagnosis of food allergy is confirmed, strict elimination of the offending food allergen from the diet is generally necessary. For patients with significant systemic symptoms, the treatment of choice is epinephrine administered by intramuscular injection into the lateral thigh. Although most children “outgrow” allergies to milk, egg, soy and wheat, allergies to peanut, tree nuts, fish and shellfish are often lifelong. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management and prognosis of patients with food allergy.

  14. Comparison of the skin test and ImmunoCAP system in the evaluation of mold allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kai-Li; Su, Mao-Chang; Jiang, Rong-San

    2006-01-01

    Mold is ubiquitous in our environment and is a common allergen in allergic diseases. The skin test and the Pharmacia ImmunoCAP system (CAP) for assay-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are both widely used. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of the skin test and CAP in the evaluation of mold allergy. Patients with allergic rhinitis were enrolled at our outpatient department. The diagnosis of allergic rhinitis was based on typical symptoms for more than 2 years. All patients were tested by both intradermal skin test and serum assay for specific IgE antibodies. The skin test included house dust, cotton, ragweed, and 5 fungal antigens (Candida, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium). The serum-specific IgE antibodies were quantified using the radioimmunoassay version of CAP. Seventy-five patients (44 males and 31 females) with allergic rhinitis were enrolled in this study. Their ages ranged from 12 to 76 years old, with a mean of 31.9 years. The positive rates of skin test and CAP were 56.0% versus 9.3% for Candida, 22.7% versus 1.3% for Alternaria, 16% versus 9.3% for Aspergillus, 14.7% versus 1.3% for Cladosporium, and 32% versus 8% for Penicillium. There were statistically significant differences between the positive rates for Candida, Alternaria, Cladosporium, and Penicillium when analyzed by the McNemar test. The positive rate of the skin test is higher than CAP when evaluating mold allergy. Clinicians should note that a discrepancy may exist between the results of in vitro and in vivo tests when evaluating mold allergy.

  15. Radioallergosorbent testing for penicillin allergy in family practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Worrall, G J; Hull, C; Briffett, E

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine (a) the prevalence of patients supposedly allergic to penicillin who have a positive radioallergosorbent test (RAST) result for penicillin G or V and (b) the predictive power of family physicians' clinical judgement that a patient who is supposedly allergic to penicillin will have a positive RAST result. DESIGN: Prospective multicentre cross-sectional observational study. SETTING: Eleven primary care practices in Newfoundland; 10 were in a rural setting. PATIENTS: Of ...

  16. Patch test with ether extracts in salicaceae allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawhney M

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 23 cases suggestive of airborne contact dermatitis were patch tested with ether extracts of flowers and leaves of populus sp. and salix sp. in a study conducted in Ladakh at an altitude of 3445 meters above sea level. Overall positivity was found in 12 (52.17%, with populus sp. alone in 7 (30. 43%, salix sp. alone in 4 17.39% and to both in one (8.33%.

  17. Food allergy-related paediatric constipation: the usefulness of atopy patch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrigou, Ekaterini I; Pitsios, Constantinos; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Chouliaras, Georgios; Kitsiou, Sofia; Kanariou, Mary; Roma-Giannikou, Eleftheria

    2011-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the implication of food allergy as a cause of paediatric constipation and to determine the diet period needed to tolerate the constipation-causing foods. Fifty-four children aged 6 months to 14 years (median, 42 months) suffering from chronic constipation (without anatomic abnormalities, cοeliac disease or hypothyroidism), unresponsive to a 3-month laxative therapy, were prospectively evaluated. All participants were evaluated for allergy to cow's milk, egg, wheat, rice, corn, potato, chicken, beef and soy, using skin tests (SPT), serum specific IgE and atopy patch test (APT). A withdrawal of the APT-positive foods was instructed. Thirty-two children had positive APT; 15 were positive to one; six, to two and 11, to three or more food allergens, wheat and egg being the commonest. After withdrawing the APT-positive foods for an 8-week period, constipation had improved in 28/32 children, but a relapse of constipation was noticed after an oral food challenge, so they continued the elimination diet. Tolerance to food allergens was achieved in only 6/28 after 6 months, compared to 25/28 after 12 months and to all after a 2-year-long elimination. Food allergy seems to be a significant etiologic factor for chronic constipation not responding to treatment, in infants and young children. APT was found to be useful in evaluating non-IgE allergy-mediated constipation, and there was no correlation of APT with IgE detection. Tolerance was adequately achieved after 12 months of strict food allergen elimination.

  18. Pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema, and pneumothorax after a pulmonary function testing in a patient with bleomycin-induced interstitial pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Sponholz Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is an uncommon event, the clinical picture of which includes retrosternal chest pain, subcutaneous emphysema, dyspnea, and dysphonia. The pathophysiological mechanism involved is the emergence of a pressure gradient between the alveoli and surrounding structures, causing alveolar rupture with subsequent dissection of the peribronchovascular sheath and infiltration of the mediastinum and subcutaneous tissue with air. Known triggers include acute exacerbations of asthma and situations that require the Valsalva maneuver. We described and documented with HRCT scans the occurrence of pneumomediastinum after a patient with bleomycin-induced interstitial lung disease underwent pulmonary function testing. Although uncommon, the association between pulmonary function testing and air leak syndromes has been increasingly reported in the literature, and lung diseases, such as interstitial lung diseases, include structural changes that facilitate the occurrence of this complication.

  19. Correlation of applied kinesiology muscle testing findings with serum immunoglobulin levels for food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, W H; Leisman, G

    1998-12-01

    The pilot study attempted to determine whether subjective muscle testing employed by Applied Kinesiology practitioners, prospectively determine those individuals with specific hyperallergenic responses. Seventeen subjects were found positive on Applied Kinesiology (A.K.) muscle testing screening procedures indicating food hypersensitivity (allergy) reactions. Each subject showed muscle weakening (inhibition) reactions to oral provocative testing of one or two foods for a total of 21 positive food reactions. Tests for a hypersensitivity reaction of the serum were performed using both a radio-allergosorbent test (RAST) and immune complex test for IgE and IgG against all 21 of the foods that tested positive with A.K. muscle screening procedures. These serum tests confirmed 19 of the 21 food allergies (90.5%) suspected based on the applied kinesiology screening procedures. This pilot study offers a basis to examine further a means by which to predict the clinical utility of a given substance for a given patient, based on the patterns of neuromuscular response elicited from the patient, representing a conceptual expansion of the standard neurological examination process.

  20. Contact allergy to allergens of the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) has decreased modestly in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T; Nielsen, N H; Johansen, J D

    2009-11-01

    The prevalence of contact allergy in the general population is nearly 20%. This study aimed to monitor the development of contact allergy to allergens from the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) between 1990 and 2006. Two random samples of adults from the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark, were invited to participate in a general health examination including patch testing. In 1990 and 2006, we patch tested and questioned 543 and 3460 adult Danes. Patch test readings were performed on day 2 only. The overall prevalence decreased significantly from 15.5% in 1990 to 10.0% in 2006, mainly as a result of a decrease in thimerosal allergy from 3.4% to 0.8%. Furthermore, the prevalence of cobalt allergy and rubber-related allergens decreased from 1.1% to 0.2% and from 1.5% to 0.2%, respectively. Stratification by sex and age group revealed decreasing prevalences of contact allergy in all male age groups and in young and middle-aged female age groups (18-55 years) whereas increasing prevalences were observed among older women (56-69 years). The diverging trend observed in women was probably explained by a cohort effect due to a change in the prevalence of nickel allergy following the Danish regulation on nickel exposure. Although the overall prevalence of contact allergy decreased in the general population, frequent contact allergens such as fragrance mix II and methyldibromo glutaronitrile were not tested. Thus, contact allergy remains prevalent in the general population.

  1. Penicillin allergy: value of including amoxicillin as a determinant in penicillin skin testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Erina; Saxon, Andrew; Riedl, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Allergy to penicillins remains an important issue. Penicillin skin testing (PST) with major and minor determinants has been shown to be a highly valuable tool for identifying IgE-mediated penicillin allergy. The value of additional testing with side-chain-specific moieties from semisynthetic penicillins such as amoxicillin is not well-established in spite of the widespread use of these medications. A retrospective review of all consecutive inpatient PST results from 1995 to 2007 comprising 1,068 patients was performed in our institution on individuals with a self-reported history of beta-lactam allergy to assess the importance of including the amoxicillin determinant in a previously validated PST panel. Descriptive statistics were performed. The PST panel included penicilloyl-polylysine, penicillin G, penicilloate, penilloate and amoxicillin. Of 1,068 patients, 243 (23%) had a positive skin test reaction on the PST panel. Testing with amoxicillin was positive in 30.9% of patients, the majority of whom (81%) were also positive to 1 or more standard penicillin reagents. Fourteen of the 243 positive patients (5.8%) had a positive skin test reaction only to amoxicillin. Additionally, the use of penicilloate and penilloate minor determinants in combination with penicillin G identified a greater percentage of penicillin-allergic individuals compared to using only penicillin G (22.6 vs. 6.6%), demonstrating their importance in the PST panel. These data indicate that the inclusion of the amoxicillin determinant appears to identify a small but important group of allergic individuals who may otherwise test negative on a PST panel. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Patch testing with markers of fragrance contact allergy. Do clinical tests correspond to patients' self-reported problems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, T F; Veien, N

    1997-01-01

    significant association was found between reporting a history of visible skin symptoms from using scented products and a positive patch test to the fragrance mix, whereas no such relationship could be established to the Peru balsam in univariate or multivariate analysis. Our results suggest that the role...... of Peru balsam in detecting relevant fragrance contact allergy is limited, while most fragrance mix-positive patients are aware that the use of scented products may cause skin problems....

  3. Factors associated with negative histamine control for penicillin allergy skin testing in the inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Bob; Thakor, Ami; Clayton, Elisabeth; Finkas, Lindsay; Riedl, Marc A

    2015-07-01

    Identification of factors adversely affecting the utility of allergy skin testing is important in optimizing patient care. Inpatient penicillin skin test data from 1997 through 2007 demonstrate that up to 20% of attempted penicillin skin tests are indeterminate owing to a negative histamine test response, despite exclusion of H1 antagonists. Critical illness, vasopressors, steroid use, and psychotropic medications have been postulated to influence outcomes, but large studies are lacking. To identify factors associated with a negative histamine test response for the inpatient setting. Fifty-two cases were identified with a negative histamine response after penicillin skin testing in the absence of antihistamine therapy for 72 hours before testing. One hundred twenty-five controls with a normal histamine response were randomly selected from same population. Independent variables assessed included stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), skin color, diabetes, age, use of vasopressors, H2 blocker, steroids, other immunosuppressive drugs, thyroid replacement, proton pump inhibitors, diuretics, 5 categories of psychotropic medications, and amiodarone. Mean age was 68 years for cases vs 60 years for controls (P = .002). Bivariate analysis showed ICU stay was more frequent in cases than in controls (73.1% vs 33.6%, P Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of the Skin Test and ImmunoCAP System in the Evaluation of Mold Allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Kai-Li; Su, Mao-Chang; Jiang, Rong-San

    2006-01-01

    Mold is ubiquitous in our environment and is a common allergen in allergic diseases. The skin test and the Pharmacia ImmunoCAP system (CAP) for assay-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are both widely used. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of the skin test and CAP in the evaluation of mold allergy. Methods: Patients with allergic rhinitis were enrolled at our outpatient department. The diagnosis of allergic rhinitis was based on typical symptoms for more than 2...

  5. Nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, L A; Johansen, J D; Menné, T

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency of nickel allergy varies between different population groups. Exposure regulation has proven effective in decreasing the frequency. Experimental studies with other allergens have shown a significant relation between patch test reactivity and repeated open application test...... in a patch test and a dilution series of three concentrations in a ROAT, with duration of up to 21 days. Eighteen persons with no nickel allergy were included as control group for the ROAT. RESULTS: The predicted dose which will elicit a reaction in 10% of allergic individuals was calculated to be 0......-response; indeed, there was no statistically significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: For elicitation of nickel allergy the elicitation threshold for the patch test is higher than the elicitation threshold (per application) for the ROAT, but is approximately the same as the accumulated elicitation threshold...

  6. Sensitivity Comparison of the Skin Prick Test and Serum and Fecal Radio Allergosorbent Test (RAST in Diagnosis of Food Allergy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Kianifar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis of food allergy is difficult in children. Food allergies are diagnosed using several methods that include medical histories, clinical examinations, skin prick and serum-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE tests, radio-allergosorbent test (RAST, food challenge, and supervised elimination diets. In this study we evaluated allergies to cow's milk, egg, peanut, and fish in children with suspected food allergies with skin prick tests and serum and feces RAST. Methods: Forty-one children with clinical symptoms of food allergies were enrolled in the study. Skin prick tests and serum and fecal RAST were performed and compared with challenge tests. Results: The most common sites of food allergy symptoms were gastrointestinal (82.9% and skin (48.8%. 100% of the patients responded to the challenge tests with cow’s milk, egg, peanut, and fish. 65% of the patients tested positive with the skin prick test, 12.1% tested positive with serum RAST, and 29.2% tested positive with fecal RAST. Conclusions: The skin prick test was more sensitive than serum or fecal RAST, and fecal RAST was more than twice as sensitive as serum RAST.

  7. Sensitivity Comparison of the Skin Prick Test and Serum and Fecal Radio Allergosorbent Test (RAST) in Diagnosis of Food Allergy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Pourreza, Alireza; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Yousefzadeh, Hadis; Masomi, Fatemeh

    2016-04-01

    Diagnosis of food allergy is difficult in children. Food allergies are diagnosed using several methods that include medical histories, clinical examinations, skin prick and serum-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) tests, radio-allergosorbent test (RAST), food challenge, and supervised elimination diets. In this study we evaluated allergies to cow's milk, egg, peanut, and fish in children with suspected food allergies with skin prick tests and serum and feces RAST. Forty-one children with clinical symptoms of food allergies were enrolled in the study. Skin prick tests and serum and fecal RAST were performed and compared with challenge tests. The most common sites of food allergy symptoms were gastrointestinal (82.9%) and skin (48.8%). 100% of the patients responded to the challenge tests with cow's milk, egg, peanut, and fish. 65% of the patients tested positive with the skin prick test, 12.1% tested positive with serum RAST, and 29.2% tested positive with fecal RAST. The skin prick test was more sensitive than serum or fecal RAST, and fecal RAST was more than twice as sensitive as serum RAST.

  8. Allergy skin test responses during experimental infection with respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoner, David P; Gentile, Deborah A; Angelini, Betty; Doyle, William J

    2006-06-01

    Allergy skin testing is one of the most frequently performed physician office procedures. Many factors can affect the results of those tests, including the well-defined suppressive effect of systemic antihistamines. False-positive allergen skin test results are known to occur; however, contributing factors are not well understood. To determine whether a viral upper respiratory tract infection affects allergy skin test responsiveness. We performed skin tests with histamine and a panel of geographically relevant inhalant allergens on 16 adults before and 3, 6, and 21 days after experimental exposure to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a virus that causes signs and symptoms of a cold. The RSV exposure, with and without documented infection, caused increased wheal and flare areas to histamine and allergen and de novo positive allergen test responses in individuals with no measurable responses at baseline. These were noted as late as 21 days after RSV exposure and may be consistent with mediation by up-regulated neurogenic inflammation during RSV infection. These results may have implications for explaining the cause of such well-known complications of RSV infection as otitis media, bronchiolitis, and asthmatic exacerbation.

  9. Prediction of new-onset asthma and nasal allergy by skin prick test and RAST in a cohort of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallmeier, Kerstin; Becker, Eva; Kirsten, Anne; Wölke, Gabriele; Manuwald, Olaf; Meyer, Heike; Magnussen, Helgo; Nowak, Dennis; Heinrich, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Limited information exists regarding the incidence and predictors of asthma and nasal allergy in adulthood. We determined the incidence rate of asthma and nasal allergy in adults and assessed the predictive value of skin prick tests (SPTs) and radioallergosorbent tests (RASTs) for these two outcomes. Two German centres involved in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey conducted a follow-up assessment in 2012 of the baseline participants (1185 adults aged 21-47 years assessed in 1990). The predictive value of SPTs and RASTs on new-onset asthma and nasal allergy was assessed by Cox regression and by calculating the positive or negative predictive value. During the 20 years between baseline and follow-up, 3.1 and 4.4 per 1000 person-years of new-onset asthma and nasal allergy cases were recorded, respectively. The hazard ratios for SPTs of any specific and of all aeroallergens combined were slightly higher than those of RASTs for asthma and nasal allergy. The negative predictive values of both the SPT and RAST were very high and similar (0.94-0.96), whereas the postive predictive values were low (0.09-0.20). Positive SPT results showed a better association with new onset asthma and nasal allergy than positive RAST either to any specific aeroallergens or to all combined.

  10. [A clinical case of occupational allergy to piperacilline. A novel diagnostic method: basophil activation test (BAT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, P; Digiesi, G; Pignatti, Patrizia; Bordini, L; Previdi, M

    2013-01-01

    Piperacillin, unlike other antibiotics, rarely causes immediate allergic reactions. Only two cases related to occupational exposure are reported in the literature. Adoption of new methods for diagnosis of occupational allergy to drugs. An atopic nurse, aged 30 years, was referred to our hospital for an allergic work-related reaction to piperacillin. The patient had suffered two successive episodes with immediate cutaneous reaction, angioedema and dyspnoea after preparing piperacillin. Almost four years previously she had suffered from similar symptoms after taking amoxicillin. She was submitted to a clinical examination and a routine allergic test, performing also specific IgE (Phadia Pharmacia ImmunoCap) and BAT (Basophil Activation Test) for Beta-lactam antibiotics. A positive response to piperacillin was observed in our case using BAT a new non-invasive and safe method, that proved useful for diagnosis of allergy. Moreover, we observed a change from an allergic reaction for therapeutic use of amoxicillin to a work-related adverse reaction to another beta-lactam, piperacillin. In previous clinical cases cutaneous and specific challenge tests were performed for diagnosis. At present, availability of an in vitro test, such as BAT may provide new diagnostic opportunities, and a useful tool for studying clinical cases other than, in perspective, monitoring exposed workers. Preventive measures were taken in the workplace to lower the risk of sensitization and allergic response. The nurse was transferred to a well controlled job.

  11. Treatment of delayed food allergy based on specific immunoglobulin G RAST testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, H S

    2000-07-01

    This preliminary, descriptive study after extensive clinical experience demonstrates specific IgG food RASTs done in 114 consecutive patients with strong positive histories for delayed food allergy. Elimination of the positive foods was the sole means of treatment. The symptoms leading to the test are detailed, and the method of workup is reviewed. The overall results demonstrated a 71% success rate for all symptoms achieving at least a 75% improvement level. Of particular interest was the group of patients with chronic, disabling symptoms, unresponsive to other intensive treatments. Whereas 70% obtained 75% or more improvement, 20% of these patients obtained 100% relief.

  12. Laboratory tests for diagnosis of food allergy: advantages, disadvantages and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Kanny, G; Frémont, S

    2003-04-01

    Numerous biological tests point to the diagnosis of food sensitization: detection of specific IgEs by Rast techniques, multi-detection assays, immunoblotting, screening of basophil activation (BAT or FAST), assays for leukotriene LTC4 release (CAST), measurement of plasma histamine, serum tryptase, serum ECP, urinary EDN, completed by mannitol-lactulose test evaluating intestinal permeability, assay of fecal IgEs, Rast for specific IgG4. Primary screening for anti-food IgEs by multi-detection assays seeks justification from insufficient clinical data and false positive tests are common in patients sensitized to pollens or latex, on account of in vitro cross reactivities (CR). Multiple CR explain positive Rast to vegetal food allergens in such patients. Biological tests should not be performed as the first line of diagnosis. In vivo sensitisation is assessed by positive prick-tests, demonstrating the bivalence of allergens, as well as the affinity of specific IgEs, two conditions necessary to bridge membrane bound specific IgEs, leading to the release of mediators. Prick-tests are closer to clinical symptoms than biological tests. However, the diagnosis of food allergy is based on standardised oral challenges. Exceptions are high levels of specific IgEs to egg (> 6 kUl/l), peanut (> 15 kUl/l), fish (> 20 kUl/l) and milk (> 32 kUl/l), reaching a 95% predictive positive value. Rast inhibition tests are useful to identify masked allergens in foods. Research developments will have impact on the development of new diagnostic tools: allergen mixes reinforcing a food extract by associated recombinant major allergens, multiple combination of recombinant allergens (chips) or tests with synthetic epitopes aimed a the prediction of recovery. Laboratory tests take place in the decision free for the diagnosis for the food allergy and the follow-up of the levels specific IgEs is a tool to assess outcome and contributes to predict recovery or persistent allergy. Up to now the

  13. Milk Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan Hot Topics Flu Facts Arrhythmias Abuse Milk Allergy KidsHealth > For Teens > Milk Allergy Print A A ... to find out. What Happens With a Milk Allergy? Food allergies involve the body's immune system, which ...

  14. Fish Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Fish Allergy KidsHealth > For Parents > Fish Allergy Print A A ... Home en español Alergia al pescado About Fish Allergy A fish allergy is not exactly the same ...

  15. Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Food Allergies KidsHealth / For Kids / Food Allergies What's in ... cow's milk eggs soy wheat What Is a Food Allergy? Food allergies happen when the immune system ...

  16. Wheat Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... References Wheat allergy. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. http://www.acaai.org/allergist/allergies/Types/food- ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/wheat-allergy/basics/definition/CON-20031834 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  17. Utility of minor determinants for skin testing in inpatient penicillin allergy evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Bob; Eastman, Jacqueline J; Mori, Karen; Braskett, Melinda; Riedl, Marc A

    2017-09-01

    Most patients with a history of penicillin allergy can tolerate penicillin. Skin testing can identify tolerant patients, but not all known allergenic determinants are commercially available. Protocols exist that use only available reagents, but the sensitivity and safety of these protocols, particularly for hospitalized patients, are controversial. To determine the number of hospitalized patients referred for penicillin skin testing who showed unique positivity to the minor determinants penicilloate and penilloate. A retrospective chart review was conducted of all inpatients who underwent penicillin skin testing at 1 institution. Patients were referred by their treating physician. All patients underwent skin prick testing to benzylpenicilloyl polylysine (major determinant), penicillin G, penicilloate, penilloate (minor determinants), amoxicillin, and positive and negative controls. If the result was negative, then intradermal testing was done with the same penicillin determinants and the negative control. A 4-mm wheal with flare was considered a positive reaction. Inpatient penicillin skin testing was done in 528 subjects. Any positive test reaction was found in 107 subjects (20%). Three subjects (3%) reacted to penilloate only, 25 (23%) reacted to penicilloate only, 2 (2%) reacted to penicillin G only, and 8 (8%) reacted to amoxicillin only. Sixty-eight subjects (64%) reacted to a compound other than the major determinant. This study found a high rate of exclusively positive skin test reactions to the minor determinants penicilloate and penilloate. Because patients with positive test reactions are at increased risk of reaction to drug challenge, these data support the use of these reagents for penicillin skin testing in hospitalized patients. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cow’s milk allergy: Evaluating tolerance through skin-prick test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Valença de Oliveira Neves

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: To evaluate the wheal diameter in allergy skin-prick tests (SPT with cow’s milk extract (CM comparing tolerant and persistent patients. Method: A retrospective cohort study involving database analysis of children with diagnosis of cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA mediated by immunoglobulin E in a specialized outpatient clinic that regularly performed SPT between January 2000 and July 2015. Patients were allocated into two groups: tolerant or persistent. Comparisons were made at diagnosis and over time between tolerant and persistent patients using Fisher’s, Mann-Whitney or Wilcoxon tests and significance level at 5%. Results: After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, the sample includes 44 patients (29 tolerant and 15 who persisted with CMPA. In the tolerant group, the medians of SPT were: 6 mm at diagnosis and 2 mm at the development of tolerance; a significant difference (p<0.0001 was found. In the persistent group, the median SPT at diagnosis was 7 mm, while in the last SPT it was 5 mm, with no statistical difference (p=0.173. The comparison of medians in the last SPT between groups was significant (p=0.001, with a reduction greater than 50% in SPT in the tolerant group. Conclusion: Serial SPTs were useful for diagnosis, and a decrease higher than 50% in diameter can indicate the moment to perform oral food challenge (OFC tests, helping to detect tolerance in CMPA.

  19. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brockow, K.; Garvey, L. H.; Aberer, W.; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M.; Barbaud, A.; Bilo, M. B.; Bircher, A.; Blanca, M.; Bonadonna, B.; Campi, P.; Castro, E.; Cernadas, J. R.; Chiriac, A. M.; Demoly, P.; Grosber, M.; Gooi, J.; Lombardo, C.; Mertes, P. M.; Mosbech, H.; Nasser, S.; Pagani, M.; Ring, J.; Romano, A.; Scherer, K.; Schnyder, B.; Testi, S.; Torres, M.; Trautmann, A.; Terreehorst, I.

    2013-01-01

    Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable

  20. Atopy patch test (APT) in the diagnosis of food allergy in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Soloni Afra Pires; Dortas Junior, Sergio Duarte; Pires, Andrea Huguenim Silva; Abe, Augusto Tiaqui; Valle, Solange Oliveira Rodrigues; Coelho, Vilma Perez; Hahnstadt, Ludwig Ruppert; França, Alfeu Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Food allergens are important in the pathogenesis in 1/3 of the cases. Several mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis. Immediate reactions are identified by both measurement of specific IgE and skin prick test. Atopy Patch Test seems to be relevant in the investigation of patients with suspected delayed-type reactions. To evaluate the standardization of this method concerning allergen concentration, occlusion time and interpretation, and determine the specificity and sensitivity of the Atopy Patch Test according to the skin prick test and specific IgE levels in food allergy diagnosis in children with Atopic Dermatitis. Seventy-two children, aged 2-12 years were selected and followed at the allergy clinic of the Hospital São Zacharias. Skin prick test, specific IgE and food Atopy Patch Test (cow's milk, egg, soy and wheat) were carried out. Three groups were submitted to the Atopy Patch Test: (1) Atopic Dermatitis with or without Rhinitis and Asthma; (2) Rhinitis and or Asthma without AD; (3) Healthy individuals. In group 1, 40% of the patients presented positive reactions. The longer the exposure time (48h and 72h), the higher the sensitivity. In group 2, the test was more specific than sensitive for all the extracts, with increased sensitivity the longer the time of exposure (72h). In group 3, 8.3% presented positive tests. APT evidenced a great diagnostic value in late-phase reactions to food, with high specificity. It showed to be a specific and reliable tool in comparison with the healthy group's results.

  1. Subcutaneous Injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria

    This thesis is about visualization and characterization of the tissue-device interaction during subcutaneous injection. The tissue pressure build-up during subcutaneous injections was measured in humans. The insulin pen FlexTouchr (Novo Nordisk A/S) was used for the measurements and the pressure...... build-up was evaluated indirectly from the changes in the flow rate between subcutaneous injections and air injections. This method enabled the tissue counter pressure to be evaluated without a formal clinical study approval. The measurements were coupled to a model for the pressure evolution...... in subcutaneous tissue, based on mass conservation and flow in a porous medium. From the measurements the flow permeability and bulk modulus of the tissue were determined. In the adipose tissue the drug forms a bolus from where it is absorbed by the blood capillaries. The spatial distribution of the injected...

  2. Eye Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Allergies Sections What Are Eye Allergies? Eye Allergy ... Eye allergy diagnosis Eye allergy treatment What Are Eye Allergies? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Son las Alergias ...

  3. Recombinant Mal d 1 facilitates sublingual challenge tests of birch pollen-allergic patients with apple allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinaciyan, T; Nagl, B; Faustmann, S; Kopp, S; Wolkersdorfer, M; Bohle, B

    2016-02-01

    It is still unclear whether allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) with birch pollen improves birch pollen-related food allergy. One reason for this may be the lack of standardized tests to assess clinical reactions to birch pollen-related foods, for example apple. We tested the applicability of recombinant (r) Mal d 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in apple, for oral challenge tests. Increasing concentrations of rMal d 1 in 0.9% NaCl were sublingually administered to 72 birch pollen-allergic patients with apple allergy. The dose of 1.6 μg induced oral allergy syndromes in 26.4%, 3.2 μg in 15.3%, 6.3 μg in 27.8%, 12.5 μg in 8.3%, 25 μg in 11.1%, and 50 μg in 4.2% of the patients. No severe reactions occurred. None of the patients reacted to 0.9% NaCl alone. Sublingual administration of 50 μg of rMal d 1 induced no reactions in three nonallergic individuals. Our approach allows straight forward, dose-defined sublingual challenge tests in a high number of birch pollen-allergic patients that inter alia can be applied to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of birch pollen AIT on birch pollen-related food allergy. © 2015 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Diagnostic evaluation and risk factors for drug allergies in children: from clinical history to skin and challenge tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikoglu, Tugba; Aslan, Gulen; Batmaz, Sehra Birgul; Eskandari, Gulcin; Helvaci, Ilter; Kuyucu, Semanur

    2015-08-01

    Parent or self-reported drug allergy claims frequently overestimate the real incidence of hypersensitivity reactions. A detailed and algorithmic diagnostic evaluation of drug reactions may allow a proper diagnosis. The aim of this study was to determine the confirmation rates and risk factors for confirmed allergic drug reactions in children. Mersin University Hospital in Turkey. The study consisted of children between ages of 8 months and 18 years with the history of suspected drug allergy as reported by the clinician or the patients. Parents were interviewed by a clinician to complete questionnaires that included questions about demographic data and characteristics of index drug reaction. Immediate reactions (IRs) were assessed with immediate-reading skin prick (SPT) and intradermal tests (IDT). Nonimmediate reactions (NIRs) were assessed with SPT, both early and delayed reading of IDT and patch tests. In case of negative skin tests, drug provocation tests were performed. The possible risk factors for confirmed drug allergy in univariate analysis (p Parent or self-reported drug allergy should be evaluated with a standardized diagnostic work-up before strict prohibitions are made. In addition, family and personal histories of drug allergy were significant risk factors related to allergic drug reactions in children.

  5. Opioid Hypersensitivity: Predictors of Allergy and Role of Drug Provocation Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Philip H; Ue, Kok Loong; Wagner, Annette; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Rutkowski, Krzysztof

    True IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to opioids is rare and many reactions are due to direct mast cell degranulation. Opioid drug provocation testing (DPT) is the gold standard for diagnosis but is underutilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and predictors of opioid hypersensitivity, as well as outcomes of opioid DPT. Patients referred for opioid DPT over the past 9 years were studied. Patient characteristics, indications for opioid use, symptoms of index reaction, and outcomes of DPT were analyzed. Association analysis was performed to study variables associated with a diagnosis of opioid hypersensitivity. Of the total of 98 patients referred with suspected opioid hypersensitivity, 15 (15%) were diagnosed with opioid allergy. Angioedema (odds ratio [OR]: 5.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.49-21.47; P = .011) and hypotension (OR: 5.00; 95% CI: 1.15-21.70; P = .032) were significantly more frequent in opioid allergic patients than those with a negative DPT. Patients who received opioids during anesthesia were significantly more likely to be opioid allergic (OR: 6.74; 95% CI: 2.05-22.13; P = .001). In contrast, a negative association was identified with patients who received opioids for analgesia (OR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.08-0.86; P = .008). Only 15% of our cohort were diagnosed with opioid allergy, emphasizing the importance of DPT in preventing erroneous overdiagnosis. Patients with a history of angioedema or hypotension as their index reaction were significantly more likely to be opioid allergic. DPT are safe when performed by experienced clinicians after risk stratification and using individualized protocols. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. House dust bioactivities predict skin prick test reactivity for children with high risk of allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haejin; Tse, Kevin; Levin, Linda; Bernstein, David; Reponen, Tiina; LeMasters, Grace; Lummus, Zana; Horner, Anthony A

    2012-06-01

    Although evidence suggests that ambient exposures to endotoxin and other immunostimulants during early life influence allergic risk, efforts to understand this host-environment relationship have been hampered by a paucity of relevant assays. These investigations determined whether parameters of house dust extract (HDE) bioactivity were predictive of allergen skin prick test (SPT) reactivity for infants at high risk of allergy participating in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS). We conducted a nested case-control study, selecting 99 CCAAPS children who had positive SPT results to at least 1 aeroallergen at age 3 years and 101 subjects with negative SPT results. HDEs were prepared from dust samples collected from the subjects' homes at age 1 year. Murine splenocytes and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were incubated with HDEs, and supernatant cytokine concentrations were determined by means of ELISA. Alternatively, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were preincubated with HDEs, and then LPS-induced IL-6 responses were assessed. HDE endotoxin levels were determined by using the limulus amebocyte lysate assay. HDEs derived from the homes of children with positive (cases) and negative (control subjects) SPT results had similar bioactivities. However, when cases were considered in isolation, HDEs with higher levels of bioactivity were significantly associated with children who had lower numbers of positive SPT results. Analogous statistical analyses did not identify any association between HDE endotoxin levels and the aeroallergen sensitization profiles of children included in this study. HDE immunostimulatory activities predicted the aeroallergen sensitization status of CCAAPS subjects better than HDE endotoxin levels. These results provide the first published evidence that HDE bioassays have clinical relevance in predicting atopic risk. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  7. Differentiating of cross-reactions in patients with latex allergy with the use of ISAC test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chełmińska, Marta; Specjalski, Krzysztof; Różyło, Anna; Kołakowska, Agata; Jassem, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Differentiating between cross-reactivity and double sensitization is still a challenging issue in allergology. To differentiate cross-reactions accompanying latex allergy with the use of the ISAC test. Thirty-nine patients reporting immediate allergic reactions to latex were enrolled into the study (group A). The control group was comprised of 41 patients with allergic diseases not associated with latex (group B) and 20 healthy individuals (group C). Their history was recorded and skin prick tests were performed with latex, airborne and food allergens. Specific IgE against food allergens, latex (k82) and recombined latex allergens were determined. ImmunoCAP ISAC test was performed with 103 molecules. Sensitization to latex was found by means of skin tests in 16 cases and sIgE against latex was revealed in 12 cases (including 10 positive in both SPT and sIgE). In the ISAC test antibodies against recombined latex allergens were found in 8 patients with rHev b 6 as the most common. All the patients positive for rHev b 1, 5, 6, 8 had allergy or asymptomatic sensitization to food allergens cross-reacting with latex. Some reactions could not have been differentiated due to the lack of allergens in the ISAC test. Others, not related to latex-fruits syndrome were explained by cross-reactivity with other profilins or PR-10 proteins. ImmunoCAP ISAC test could be useful in differentiating between cross-reactions and double sensitizations. However, in the case of latex its advantages are limited due to a small panel of allergens.

  8. Basophil activation test for the diagnosis of hymenoptera venom allergy in childhood: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, H; Tenbrock, K; Baron, J; Merk, H; Lehmann, S

    2011-01-01

    Cellular in vitro tests such as the CD63-based basophil activation test (BAT) have been successfully used to diagnose hymenoptera venom sensitization in adult patients while this has not been investigated in children so far. 15 children (9 male, 6 female; 12.7±3.5 years) with suspected allergy to vespula (VE) or honey bee (HB) venom entered this study. Besides serum tryptase (ST) levels, sensitisation against VE and HB was assessed by titrated skin testing and determination of venom-specific serum IgE (sIgE) in all patients. After stimulation with 50 ng of insect venom, CD63-expression of activated basophils was measured by flow cytometry. Skin testing permitted identification of the culprit insect in 7 patients, 3 cases were diagnosed by additional sIgE measurements. In addition, BAT identified mono-sensitization in 3 further patients with double sensitization upon skin and sIgE testing. Test sensitivity was lower for the BAT (67-75%) than for skin testing (89-100%) and sIgE determination (100%). Neither basophil activation nor sIgE serum levels were identified as reliable predictors of sting reaction severity. In all patients, ST measurements yielded values below the upper reference value. The current pilot study suggests a possible clinical benefit of BAT analysis in the diagnostic workup of pediatric insect venom allergy. However, further large-scale trials are required to investigate whether the BAT reliably contributes to the correct identification of the culprit insect venom. Due to its comparatively low sensitivity, the BAT should currently not be used in isolation from, but only in combination with established diagnostic instruments. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. [Basophil activation test--a practical approach to diagnosis of common respiratory allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniak, Małgorzata; Dyga, Wojciech; Porębski, Grzegorz; Czarnobilska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of immediate allergy is based on clinical data, skin prick tests (SPT), and measurements of allergen-specific IgE (sIgE). Basophil activation test (BAT) can supplement these methods and obviate their disadvantages, and possibly replace allergen challenge tests, such as a nasal provocative test (NPT). In this study, we assessed the influence of different storage times on BAT results. Futhermore, we compared the results of SPT, sIgE and NPT against BAT for common aeroallergens. BAT was performed in twelve patients with allergic rhinitis sensitized to birch pollen or mites 1, 4 and 24 hours after blood sampling. CD63 was used as an activation marker. Three serial 10-fold dilutions (1:1, 1:10, 100) of allergen extract were employed. The further 10 individuals allergic to mites undergone complete diagnostic evaluation including SPT, sIgE measurements, NPT and BAT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the diagnostic techniques and tests conditions. Basophil activation expressed as stimulation index did not decline significantly up to 24h. Exposure to causal allergens resulted in a dose-dependent increase in expression of CD63 on peripheral blood basophils in tested individuals. We did not observed substantial differences in results of the investigated diagnostic methods determined by a ROC analysis. Flow-assisted diagnosis of common respiratory allergy relies upon allergen-induced activation of blood basophils can be a useful approach to determine the clinically relevant allergen in sensitized individuals. BAT with inhaled allergens can be performed within 24 hours after blood collecting into a tube with EDTA. Allergen suitable for NPT in appropriate dilutions is a good reagent for use in BAT.

  10. Keratoconus Progression in Patients With Allergy and Elevated Surface Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Point-of-Care Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Traversi, Claudio; Mellace, Pierfrancesco; Bagaglia, Simone A; Zuccarini, Silvio; Mencucci, Rita; Jacob, Soosan

    2017-10-04

    To assess keratoconus (KC) progression in patients with allergies who also tested positive to surface matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) point-of-care test. Prospective comparative study including 100 stage I-II keratoconic patients, mean age 16.7±4.6 years. All patients underwent an anamnestic questionnaire for concomitant allergic diseases and were screened with the MMP-9 point-of-care test. Patients were divided into two groups: patients KC with allergies (KC AL) and patients KC without allergies (KC NAL). Severity of allergy was established by papillary subtarsal response grade and KC progression assessed by Scheimpflug corneal tomography, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) measurement in a 12-month follow-up. The KC AL group included 52 patients and the KC NAL group 48. In the KC AL group, 42/52 of patients (81%) were positive to MMP-9 point-of-care test versus two positive patients in the KC NAL group (4%). The KC AL group data showed a statistically significant decrease of average CDVA, from 0.155±0.11 to 0.301±0.2 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (Paverage. The KC NAL group revealed a slight KC progression without statistically significant changes. Pearson correlation test showed a high correlation between Kmax worsening and severity of PSR in the KC AL group. The study demonstrated a statistically significant progression of KC in patients with concomitant allergies, positive to MMP-9 point-of-care test versus negative. A high correlation between severity of allergy and KC progression was documented.

  11. Methyldibromoglutaronitrile allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, L A; Johansen, J D; Menné, T

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methyldibromoglutaronitrile (MDBGN) is a preservative, which was approved for use in cosmetics in the mid-1980s. The incidence of allergy to MDBGN rose during the 1990s, but is now decreasing due to regulatory intervention. Experimental studies with other allergens have shown a signif......BACKGROUND: Methyldibromoglutaronitrile (MDBGN) is a preservative, which was approved for use in cosmetics in the mid-1980s. The incidence of allergy to MDBGN rose during the 1990s, but is now decreasing due to regulatory intervention. Experimental studies with other allergens have shown...... to MDBGN were tested with a dilution series of MDBGN in a patch test and a ROAT (duration up to 21 days). Seventeen people with no MDBGN allergy were included as a control group for the ROAT. RESULTS: The response frequency for the ROAT (in microg MDBGN cm(-2) per application) was significantly higher than...... the response frequency for the patch test, while the response frequency for the accumulated ROAT dose, at 1, 2 and 3 weeks was very similar to the patch test response frequency; indeed there was no statistical significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: For elicitation of MDBGN allergy the response frequency...

  12. Nickel allergy in patch-tested female hairdressers and assessment of nickel release from hairdressers' scissors and crochet hooks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Milting, Kristina; Bregnhøj, Anne

    2009-01-01

    the proportion of hairdressers' scissors and crochet hooks that released an excessive amount of nickel and to determine the prevalence of nickel allergy among patch-tested female hairdressers. MATERIALS: Random hairdressers' stores in Copenhagen were visited. The dimethylglyoxime (DMG) test was used to assess...

  13. 20 Years of standard patch testing in an eczema population with focus on patients with multiple contact allergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit Christina; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2007-01-01

    (Me)isothiazolinone, and primin and poor for paraben mix. 5.1% were multiple allergic, primarily women, and 90% got diagnosed by the first test. Frequency of multiple allergies increased with age. More multiple- than mono/double-allergic patients were tested multiple times. Persistency and sensitivity rates in a Danish eczema...

  14. Development and comparative evaluation of a multiple-antigen RAST as a screening test for inhalant allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, D R; Anderson, J A; Jacobs, G L; Homburger, H A

    1984-04-01

    We have developed a modified in vitro test for IgE antibodies, the multi-RAST, to detect antibodies of different allergen specificities simultaneously in a single tube. The multi-RAST is as sensitive for detecting low concentrations of individual IgE antibodies as the discrete RAST. We also evaluated the multi-RAST as a screening test for respiratory allergy to inhalant allergens in children by comparing the results of the multi-RAST performed by use of a mixture of SRP, TGP, and DF allergen-immunosorbents with the results of skin tests, discrete RAST tests for the same allergens, serum total IgE concentrations, and nasal smears for eosinophils in 100 children referred for allergic-disease evaluation. The results of the multi-RAST were more sensitive, specific, and efficient than the results of tests for serum IgE concentration and nasal eosinophils in establishing the diagnosis of inhalant allergy; the multi-RAST was the only diagnostic test that yielded results that were significantly associated with the clinician's impression of allergy. We conclude that the multi-RAST is a useful and cost-effective screening test for inhalant allergy in children.

  15. Latex allergy in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraason, M; Sussman, G; Biagini, R; Meade, J; Beezhold, D; Germolec, D

    2000-11-01

    final allergen preparation most probably could effect diagnostic accuracy. The Hev proteins have been cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins. Sequencing demonstrates both unique epitopes and sequences commonly found in other plant proteins. Sequence homology helps to explain the cross reactivity to a variety of foods experienced by latex allergic individuals. The development of recombinant allergens provides reagents that should improve the diagnostic accuracy of tests for latex allergy. Although clinical and exposure data have been gathered on the factors affecting response in latex-allergic individuals, less is known regarding the development of sensitization. Coupled with in vitro dermal penetration studies, murine models have been established to investigate the route of exposure in the development of latex sensitization. Time-course and dose-response studies have shown subcutaneous, intratracheal, or topical administrations of non-ammoniated latex proteins to induce IgE production. Both in vitro penetration and in vivo studies highlight the importance of skin condition in the development of latex allergy, with enhanced penetration and earlier onset of IgE production seen with experimentally abraded skin. The diagnosis of latex allergy is complicated by these variables, which in turn hinder the development of intervention strategies. Further epidemiological assessment is needed to more explicitly define the scope, trends, and demographics of latex allergy. Diagnostic accuracy can be improved through greater knowledge of proteins involved in the development of latex allergy, and better documentation of the presently available diagnostic tests. In vivo and in vitro models can elucidate mechanisms of sensitization and provide an understanding of the role of the exposure route in latex allergy-associated diseases. Together, these efforts can lead to intervention strategies for reducing latex allergy in the workplace.

  16. [The relationship between the skin allergy test and house dust mites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atambay, Metin; Aycan, Ozlem M; Yoloğlu, Saim; Karaman, Ulkü; Daldal, Nilgün

    2006-01-01

    Since 1960 it has been known that house dust mites are related to allergy and that they cause pulmonary tract diseases. There are various house dust mites and among these Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart, 1897) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Hughes, 1961) are best known with regard to their medical importance and morphological characteristics. Skin tests are used to determine the role of mites in allergic diseases. The tests are performed by using D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae antigens. In order to study, the concordance between the skin test results and the presence of house dust mites, dust samples from the houses of 49 patients diagnosed with allergic diseases who underwent skin tests were taken to investigate the presence of mites in dust. House dust mites were determined in 23 (46.3%) of the houses. Mites were found in the houses of 15 (50.0%) of 30 patients with positive skin test results and 8 (42.0%) of 19 patients with negative skin test results. There was no significant difference between the skin test positivity and negativity in the presence of house dust mites (P>0,005). In conclusion, we thought that it was necessary to evaluate the presence of mites in the houses of people who have allergic symptoms even if they had negative skin test results.

  17. Medical clowns ease anxiety and pain perceived by children undergoing allergy prick skin tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, A; Stauber, T; Peleg, O; Hanuka, P; Eshayek, L; Confino-Cohen, R

    2014-10-01

    Intervention of medical clowns (MC) during various medical procedures performed in children has been used to relieve anxiety and pain. Their role in allergy skin testing has never been evaluated. To evaluate whether MC can diminish pain and anxiety perceived by children undergoing allergy skin prick tests (SPT). In a prospective, randomized, controlled, and blinded study, children undergoing SPT were or were not accompanied by MC. All parents and children ≥8 years completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after SPT. Videotapes recorded during the procedure were scored for anxiety (m-YPAS) for all children and for pain (FLACC) for children 2-7 years old by a psychologist who was unaware of the MC's presence. After SPT, children ≥8 years completed a visual analog score (VAS) for pain. Ninety-one children (mean age 8.2 years, M/F = 54/37) were recruited of whom 45 were accompanied by clowns. A significant reduction in state-STAI was found in the clowns group, in both parents and children, when compared with the regular group (26.9 ± 6.6 and 32.3 ± 10.0; P = 0.004, and 27.1 ± 4.2 and 34.3 ± 7.6; P = 0.002, respectively). Both m-YPAS and FLACC were reduced in the clowns group compared with the regular one. In the clowns group, m-YPAS positively correlated with both VAS and FLACC (P = 0.000 and 0.002, respectively). m-YPAS was positively correlated with FLACC in the regular group (P = 0.000). Medical clowns significantly decrease the level of anxiety perceived by both children undergoing allergy SPT and their parents, as well as the pain perceived by young children. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Does food allergy cause atopic dermatitis? Food challenge testing to dissociate eczematous from immediate reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Debra; Tofte, Susan J; Hanifin, Jon M

    2006-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate and diagnose, in a controlled setting, suspected food allergy causation in patients hospitalized for management of severe, unremitting atopic dermatitis (AD). Nineteen children were hospitalized at Oregon Health and Science University with atopic dermatitis from 1986 to 2003 for food restriction, then challenge, following standard recommendations. Challenges were prioritized by categories of (a) critical foods (e.g., milk, wheat, egg, soy); (b) important foods; and (c) other suspected foods. Patients were closely observed for evidence of pruritus, eczematous responses, or IgE-mediated reactions. If results were inconsistent, double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge was performed. A total of 17 children with atopic dermatitis were assessed. Two could not be fully evaluated, thus were excluded from data tabulations. Only one positive eczematous food response was observed of 58 challenges. Three children had well-documented histories of food-induced IgE-mediated anaphylactoid or urticaria reactions to seafood and/or nuts and were not challenged with those foods. Atopic dermatitis, even in the highest-risk patients, is rarely induced by foods. Undocumented assumptions of food causation detract from proper anti-inflammatory management and should be discouraged. Immediate IgE-mediated food reactions are common in atopic dermatitis patients; such reactions are rapid onset, typically detected outside the clinic, and must be distinguished from eczematous reactions. Diagnosis of food-induced eczema cannot be made without food challenge testing. Such tests can be practical and useful for dispelling unrealistic assumptions about food allergy causation of atopic dermatitis.

  19. Allergy shots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bite sensitivity Eczema , a skin condition that a dust mite allergy can make worse Allergy shots are effective for ... tree pollen Grass Mold or fungus Animal dander Dust mites Insect ... receive allergy shots. Your provider is not likely to recommend ...

  20. Allergy Capitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professionals Partners Media Donate Research 2016 Fall Allergy Capitals If you’re one of the millions ... needs of their residents with allergic diseases. Fall Allergies by the Numbers Nasal allergies affect more than ...

  1. Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss of consciousness Other conditions resulting from drug allergy Less common drug allergy reactions occur days or ... you take the drug. Drugs commonly linked to allergies Although any drug can cause an allergic reaction, ...

  2. Use of a basophil activation test as a complementary diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of severe peanut allergy in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentzos, Georgios; Lundberg, Vanja; Lundqvist, Christina; Rodrigues, Rui; van Odijk, Jenny; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Pullerits, Teet; Telemo, Esbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of severe peanut allergy is difficult and delays in making an accurate diagnosis may place the patient at risk. Adults with a history of anaphylaxis must strictly avoid any contact with peanuts or products that may contain traces of peanuts. For these persons, conventional evaluations with skin prick testing (SPT) and IgE tests may not be sufficient to assess the risk of anaphylaxis. Therefore, we investigated whether the basophil activation test (BAT) could be used for the diagnosis of severe peanut allergy in adults. We compared the non-invasive BAT with conventional laboratory diagnostic tests, including SPT and specific IgE to allergen extracts and components, for the diagnosis of severe peanut allergy. Forty-seven persons with severe allergy to peanuts and a clinical diagnosis of anaphylaxis (PA-group), 22 subjects with peanut sensitization (PS-group) and 22 control (C-group) subjects, all in the age range of 18-60 years, were recruited retrospectively and prospectively into the study. Thirty-four patients with peanut allergy and 11 peanut-sensitized patients were sensitized to soy, while 36 patients in the PA-group and 20 patients in the PS-group were sensitized to birch pollen. All the patients and control subjects were investigated with BAT and SPT for responses to peanut, soy and birch extracts and their serum samples were assayed for the presence of specific IgE to peanut, soy and birch extracts, as well as IgE to allergen components (ISAC). In a multivariate factor analysis, severe peanut allergy (PA) was positively associated with SPT to peanut, IgE to peanut, BAT to peanut and IgE to rAra h 1, 2, 3 and 6 peanut components, as well as to soy components (nGly m 5 and nGly m 6). In contrast, peanut sensitization was positively associated with increased levels of IgE to rAra h 8, birch and birch-related components. BAT-detected reactivity to peanut was significantly higher in patients who had a history of severe allergy to peanuts, as compared

  3. Penicillin skin testing in hospitalized patients with β-lactam allergies: Effect on antibiotic selection and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Esther A; Challa, Sridevi; Curtin, Patrick; Bielory, Leonard

    2016-07-01

    A history of a penicillin allergy generally leads to the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics that may increase complications and cost. To determine the cost-effectiveness of performing penicillin skin testing (PST). A retrospective analysis was conducted on adult inpatients with a β-lactam allergy who underwent PST and oral challenge performed by an allergist. The primary outcome was overall antibiotic cost savings for patients switched to a β-lactam antibiotic (BLA). Secondary outcomes included subsequent admissions that required antibiotics and total number of days a BLA was prescribed. Fifty patients had PST performed (mean age, 62 years). The most common β-lactam allergy reported was penicillin (92%). Cutaneous reactions were reported in 54% of patients, and 56% had a reaction more than 20 years ago. Fifty percent of patients had aztreonam prescribed before PST. The results of PST were negative in all patients, and 1 patient had anaphylactic symptoms during the oral amoxicillin challenge (98% skin test or oral challenge negative). Thirty-seven patients (75.5%) were changed to a BLA. Overall cost savings were $11,005 ($297 per patient switched to a BLA). There were 31 subsequent admissions that required antibiotics for patients who tested negative on skin test and oral challenge. A BLA was prescribed in 22 of 31 readmissions, totaling 147 days of BLA therapy. After the implementation of a PST protocol, we observed a decrease in non-BLA use in patients with previously documented β-lactam allergy. PST is a safe and cost-effective procedure to serve as a negative predictor test for penicillin hypersensitivity mediated by IgE. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. THE FIRST BULGARIAN STANDARDIZED SERIES FOR EPICUTANEOUS PATCH TESTING FOR ALLERGIES TO DENTAL MATERIALS AND ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dencheva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The teeth and teeth rows restoration in the maxillofacial area is the last stage of the ongoing patient treatment and a basic purpose for the dental doctors. For this purpose a different set of modern and classic contemporary dental materials is used. The choice of each material during the treatment of every patient with proven allergy to different kind of allergens is very specific and strictly individual. In the everyday oral diagnostics a standardized set of allergens for diagnostics is used for proving the allergy to dental materials. The set has been developed on the base of all existing and permitted by the Bulgarian authorities dental materials, as well as professional series.The difference between the developed and standardized allergens for diagnostics used in our country and the existing ready-for-use series is that the first are made of the final product (material in the form introduced to the oral cavity and persisting there for a different period of time, sometimes for tenths of years. This enables the possibility for early or late contact allergic reactions with symptoms in the oral cavity and on the skin, maxillofacial area, head and neck, as well as the entire organism.The current article introduces the readers to the results obtained by the realization of the research project №28/2011 “Research on the type of sensibilisation to contemporary dental materials and development of set of allergens for its diagnosing through epicutaneous patch testing” funded by the Committee of Medical science of MU Sofia (CMC. Through the project became possible the creation and the initial research of the first Bulgarian series for epicutaneous testing whose aim is to prove the allergenic potential of the most frequently used by the dental doctors dental materials.

  5. Profile cytological tests, sensibility and specificity of fine needle puncture into skin and subcutaneous samples in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlinda Flores Coleto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Coleto A.F., Moreira T. de A., Gundim L.F., Silva S. de A., de Castro M. de R., Bandarra M. de B. & Medeiros-Ronchi A.A. [Profile cytological tests, sensibility and specificity of fine needle puncture into skin and subcutaneous samples in dogs.] Perfil de exames citológicos, sensibilidade e especificidade da punção por agulha fina para amostras cutâneas e subcutâneas em cães. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(3:311-315, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinárias, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Rua Ceará s/n - Bloco 2D, Sala 3, Campus Umuarama, Uberlândia, MG 38400- 902, Brasil. E-mail: arlindacoleto@hotmail.com The cytology has been routinely used in veterinary clinic and has a good correlation with histological examination. The objective was to conduct a retrospective study of cytological examinations in the period of six years and then calculate accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of cytology examination for neoplasms in cutaneous and subcutaneous samples collected by PAF (fine needle punction in dogs, using histology as golden pattern. The canine species was the most common in 92.2% (736/798. The PAF was the most used technique in 84.0% (814/968. The most frequent samples were from the Cutaneous System in 36.1% (344/951. There was 67.0% (36/53 agreement between the exams. The sensitivity of cytology in the diagnosis of neoplasms was 77% (moderate and specificity of 12.5% (low, and the PPV 83% and NPV 9.0%. Cytology is the most commonly test used in cutaneous and subcutaneous lesions in dogs and the PAF is the most used technique. The examination is recommended as a screening method because of its high sensitivity.

  6. A pilot study of penicillin skin testing in patients with a history of penicillin allergy admitted to a medical ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroliga, M E; Wagner, W; Bobek, M B; Hoffman-Hogg, L; Gordon, S M; Arroliga, A C

    2000-10-01

    Penicillin skin testing is an accurate method to determine whether a person with a history of penicillin allergy is at risk of having an immediate reaction to penicillin. A patient with a negative reaction to a skin test may be able to use a penicillin compound safely, which could reduce the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in this patient population. We prospectively studied all patients with histories of penicillin allergy who were admitted to a medical ICU during a 3-month period and who received antibiotics. Skin testing was performed with benzylpenicilloyl polylysine and penicillin G. We determined the incidence of true allergy, the percentage of patients in whom antibiotic coverage was modified, and the safety of the test. Two hundred fifty-seven patients were admitted to the medical ICU of The Cleveland Clinic Foundation during the study period. Twenty-four patients (9%), labeled as penicillin allergic and receiving antibiotics, were enrolled. Three patients (13%, 3 of 21) gave histories of type I reaction to penicillin and were not skin tested. Twenty patients (95%, 20 of 21) had negative skin test reactions to penicillin and positive skin test reactions to histamine control. One patient (4%, 1 of 21) with negative skin test reactions to both penicillin and histamine control had a test dose challenge with piperacillin that was well tolerated. There were no adverse events. Antibiotic coverage was changed in 10 patients (48%) as a result of skin testing. Most patients with histories of allergy to penicillin have negative reactions to skin tests and may receive penicillin safely. Penicillin skin testing can be utilized as a safe and effective strategy to reduce the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  7. Drug allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrington Richard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drug allergy encompasses a spectrum of immunologically-mediated hypersensitivity reactions with varying mechanisms and clinical presentations. This type of adverse drug reaction (ADR not only affects patient quality of life, but may also lead to delayed treatment, unnecessary investigations, and even mortality. Given the myriad of symptoms associated with the condition, diagnosis is often challenging. Therefore, referral to an allergist experienced in the identification, diagnosis and management of drug allergy is recommended if a drug-induced allergic reaction is suspected. Diagnosis relies on a careful history and physical examination. In some instances, skin testing, graded challenges and induction of drug tolerance procedures may be required. The most effective strategy for the management of drug allergy is avoidance or discontinuation of the offending drug. When available, alternative medications with unrelated chemical structures should be substituted. Cross-reactivity among drugs should be taken into consideration when choosing alternative agents. Additional therapy for drug hypersensitivity reactions is largely supportive and may include topical corticosteroids, oral antihistamines and, in severe cases, systemic corticosteroids. In the event of anaphylaxis, the treatment of choice is injectable epinephrine. If a particular drug to which the patient is allergic is indicated and there is no suitable alternative, induction of drug tolerance procedures may be considered to induce temporary tolerance to the drug. This article provides a backgrounder on drug allergy and strategies for the diagnosis and management of some of the most common drug-induced allergic reactions, such allergies to penicillin, sulfonamides, cephalosporins, radiocontrast media, local anesthetics, general anesthetics, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  8. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockow, K; Garvey, L H; Aberer, W; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M; Barbaud, A; Bilo, M B; Bircher, A; Blanca, M; Bonadonna, B; Campi, P; Castro, E; Cernadas, J R; Chiriac, A M; Demoly, P; Grosber, M; Gooi, J; Lombardo, C; Mertes, P M; Mosbech, H; Nasser, S; Pagani, M; Ring, J; Romano, A; Scherer, K; Schnyder, B; Testi, S; Torres, M; Trautmann, A; Terreehorst, I

    2013-06-01

    Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable indicator of true hypersensitivity.To promote and standardize reproducible skin testing with safe and nonirritant drug concentrations in the clinical practice, the European Network and European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Interest Group on Drug Allergy has performed a literature search on skin test drug concentration in MEDLINE and EMBASE, reviewed and evaluated the literature in five languages using the GRADE system for quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. Where the literature is poor, we have taken into consideration the collective experience of the group.We recommend drug concentration for skin testing aiming to achieve a specificity of at least 95%. It has been possible to recommend specific drug concentration for betalactam antibiotics, perioperative drugs, heparins, platinum salts and radiocontrast media. For many other drugs, there is insufficient evidence to recommend appropriate drug concentration. There is urgent need for multicentre studies designed to establish and validate drug skin test concentration using standard protocols. For most drugs, sensitivity of skin testing is higher in immediate hypersensitivity compared to nonimmediate hypersensitivity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. How accurate and safe is the diagnosis of hazelnut allergy by means of commercial skin prick test reagents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerdaas, J.H.; Wensing, M.; Knulst, A.C.; Krebitz, M.; Breiteneder, H.; Vries, S. de; Penninks, A.H.; Aalberse, R.C.; Hefle, S.L.; Ree, R. van

    2003-01-01

    Background: Allergy to tree nuts, like hazelnuts, ranks among the most frequently observed food allergies. These allergies can start at early childhood and are, in contrast to other food allergies, not always outgrown by the patient. Tree nut allergy is frequently associated with severe reactions.

  10. How accurate and safe is diagnosis of hazelnut allergy by means of commercial skin prick test reagents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerdaas, J.H.; Wensing, M.; Knulst, A.C.; Krebitz, M.; Breiteneder, H.; Vries, de S.C.; Penninks, A.H.; Aalberse, R.C.; Hefle, S.L.; Ree, van R.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Allergy to tree nuts, like hazelnuts, ranks among the most frequently observed food allergies. These allergies can start at early childhood and are, in contrast to other food allergies, not always outgrown by the patient. Tree nut allergy is frequently associated with severe reactions.

  11. Positive Skin Test or Specific IgE to Penicillin Does Not Reliably Predict Penicillin Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tannert, Line Kring; Mørtz, Charlotte G; Skov, Per Stahl

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: According to guidelines, patients are diagnosed with penicillin allergy if skin test (ST) result or specific IgE (s-IgE) to penicillin is positive. However, the true sensitivity and specificity of these tests are presently not known. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical relevance...... of a positive ST result and positive s-IgE and to study the reproducibility of ST and s-IgE. METHODS: A sample of convenience of 25 patients with positive penicillin ST results, antipenicillin s-IgE results, or both was challenged with their culprit penicillin. Further 19 patients were not challenged......-IgE measured (T0), and then skin tested and had s-IgE measured 4 weeks later (T1). RESULTS: Only 9 (36%) of 25 were challenge positive. There was an increased probability of being penicillin allergic if both ST result and s-IgE were positive at T0. Positive ST result or positive s-IgE alone did not predict...

  12. Treatment of respiratory allergy with allergy immunotherapy tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachert, C

    2011-07-01

    Allergy immunotherapy tablets (AIT) have expanded the treatment options for patients suffering from respiratory allergies. Efficacy is established in adults and children for two different commercially available grass AITs. The ALK grass AIT has an efficacy comparable to subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT), with a proven disease-modifying effect after treatment completion. Safety profiles favour AIT over SCIT. Studies suggest that tablets in all aspects are superior to sublingual drops. AITs for other allergies including house dust mite and birch and ragweed pollen are in development. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Reaction of rat subcutaneous tissue to mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement: A secondary level biocompatibility test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Karanth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This secondary-level animal study was conducted to assess and compare the subcutaneous tissue reaction to implantation of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and white Portland cement. Study Design: Polyethylene tubes filled with either freshly mixed white MTA (Group I or white Portland cement (Group II were implanted subcutaneously into 12 Wistar Albino rats. Each animal also received an empty polyethylene tube as the control (Group III. After 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, the implants, together with surrounding tissues were excised. Two pathologists blinded to the experimental procedure, evaluated sections taken from the biopsy specimens for the severity of the inflammatory response, calcification and the presence and thickness of fibrous capsule surrounding the implant. Statistical analysis was performed using the Cross-tabs procedure, Univariate analysis of the variance two-way and the Pearson product moment correlation to assess inter-rater variability between the two evaluators. Results: At 7 days, there was no significant difference in the severity of inflammation between the control group, white MTA, and white Portland cement groups. In the 14 day, 21 day and 30 day test periods, control group had significantly less inflammation than white MTA and white Portland cement. There was no significant difference in the grading of inflammation between white MTA and white Portland cement. All materials exhibited thick capsule at 7 days and thin capsule by 30 days. Conclusion: Both white MTA and white Portland cement were not completely non-irritating at the end of 30 days as evidenced by the presence of mild inflammation. However, the presence of a thin capsule around the materials, similar to the control group, indicates good tissue tolerance. White MTA and white Portland cement seem to be materials of comparable biocompatibility.

  14. Kids with Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living With Food Allergies Allergens Peanut Allergy Tree Nut Allergy Milk Allergy Egg Allergy Soy Allergy Wheat Allergy Sesame ... Lost Nutrients How To Recipe Substitutions Substitutions for ... for Peanuts and Tree Nuts Substitutions for Corn Menu Planning for the Food ...

  15. Drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Evans, R; Mahr, T A

    1990-01-01

    Undesirable or adverse drug effects occur with 1-15% of drug doses. The mechanisms of these reactions are not always known; however, 5-10% are immunologically mediated allergic reactions. Risk factors for allergic drug reactions include age, type of drug, degree of exposure, and route of administration. Penicillin allergy is the most common example of classical drug allergy. Skin test reagents are available which identify the patient at risk of anaphylaxis from penicillin. These patients can be given penicillin in a carefully monitored desensitization protocol. It is essential to establish first the absolute requirement for the drug in the patient sensitive to it. There are also established methods for administration to the sensitive patient: local anesthetics, measles vaccines, and sulfamethoxazole.

  16. Shoulder Joint Dislocation as an Unusual Complication of Defibrillation Threshold Testing Following Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Noheria, MBBS, SM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old man underwent implantation of a totally subcutaneous ICD (S-ICD; Boston Scientific. He was positioned supine, with the left arm abducted, externally rotated (i.e. palm up and strapped to the arm extender. The generator was placed in the left mid-axillary line along the 5th-6th intercostal spaces and the defibrillation coil was tunneled anterior to the sternum. Defibrillation threshold (DFT testing with 65 Jcaused a forceful pectoralis twitch. The patient woke up with a painful anteriorly dislocated left shoulder. Glenohumeral dislocation due to DFT testing has not been previously reported. It is likely that this complication is specific to the S-ICD implantation, and is related to positioning with the arm abducted, externally rotated, and immobilized, and use of greater defibrillation energy with current pathway through the bulk of the pectoralis muscle.Precautions may include extending the arm palm down, strapping the arm loosely, and adduction of the arm for DFT testing.

  17. [SEAFOOD ALLERGY IN ISRAEL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottem, Menachem

    2015-10-01

    Allergy to seafood such as shrimps, crab, lobster and fish eggs is relatively infrequent in Israel compared to fish allergies and allergies to other foods. This is mainly due to the fact that most of the population and restaurants preserve and maintain Kosher food. Changes in the population eating habits, partly due to immigration, were followed by increased frequency of such sensitivities in recent years. We describe three typical cases that illustrate the characteristics of allergy to sea foods. Allergy to seafood can present as a single sensitivity or be part of an allergic tendency, atopy, with other allergic manifestations. Diagnosis by allergy skin test or laboratory evaluation by specific IgE is available for most sea foods but not for fish eggs. The current therapeutic approach is strict avoidance and all patients should be provided with and carry with them an epinephrine auto-injector.

  18. Formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Part 2. Patch test relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy, experimental provocation tests, amount of formaldehyde released, and assessment of risk to consumers allergic to formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Anton; White, Ian R; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann; Lensen, Gerda; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan

    2010-01-01

    This is the second part of an article on formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics. The patch test relationship between the releasers in cosmetics to formaldehyde contact allergy is reviewed and it is assessed whether products preserved with formaldehyde-releasers may contain enough free formaldehyde to pose a threat to individuals with contact allergy to formaldehyde. There is a clear relationship between positive patch test reactions to formaldehyde-releasers and formaldehyde contact allergy: 15% of all reactions to 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol and 40-60% of the reactions to the other releasers are caused by a reaction to the formaldehyde in the test material. There is only fragmented data on the amount of free formaldehyde in cosmetics preserved with formaldehyde donors. However, all releasers (with the exception of 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol, for which adequate data are lacking) can, in the right circumstances of concentration and product composition, release >200 p.p.m. formaldehyde, which may result in allergic contact dermatitis. Whether this is actually the case in any particular product cannot be determined from the ingredient labelling. Therefore, we recommend advising patients allergic to formaldehyde to avoid leave-on cosmetics preserved with quaternium-15, diazolidinyl urea, DMDM hydantoin, or imidazolidinyl urea, acknowledging that many would tolerate some products.

  19. Interpreting skin prick tests in the evaluation of food allergy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenmann, P A; Sampson, H A

    1998-11-01

    Skin prick tests (SPTs) are utilized routinely in the evaluation of food allergy and several authors have discussed their utility. Efforts to standardize SPT reagents and procedures have been made, but the accuracies of different recording techniques have not been clearly defined. The aim of this study was to compare different SPT recording methods with the outcome of oral food challenge and determine whether they offer any advantage over the criteria proposed by Bock and May (1). Children suspected of IgE-mediated symptoms to any of five common food allergens (egg, milk, peanut, soy and wheat) were skin tested by the prick technique utilizing commercial extracts. The wheal reactions were recorded by two different methods: first by measuring the largest diameter of the wheal and the diameter orthogonal to it (mean wheal diameter), and second by recording the surface area of the wheal with a hand-held scanner. Wheal sizes above the 95% confidence interval of tolerant individuals were considered positive. The results of double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges were considered the "gold standard" for diagnosis. Cut-off values were compared for positive responses in our study population (mean diameter/surface area of wheal): 4 mm/16 mm2 for egg, 5 mm/29 mm2 for milk, 6 mm/40 mm2 for peanut, 3 mm/9 mm2 for soy, and 3 mm/7 mm2 for wheat. Significant differences in wheal sizes were seen between individuals who were allergic or tolerant to egg (P Skin prick tests are a useful procedure for evaluating clinical reactivity to egg, milk, peanut and wheat, but not to soy. While the size of the SPT wheals may be interpreted utilizing mean diameter or surface area cut-offs, the predictive values of these measurement methods were no better than the commonly utilized grading method where a positive skin test was recorded as a mean wheal diameter 3 mm greater than the negative control.

  20. Visualization of vasodynamics using THz imaging with applications to allergy testing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shijun; Bajwa, Neha; Grundfest, Warren; Grundfest, Zachary

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores vasodynamics in response to histamine injection using reflective THz imaging. Histamine is a major contributor to allergic disease. Elevations in tissue histamine levels have been observed during anaphylaxis and experimental allergic responses of the skin, nose, and airways. In the skin specifically, vasodilation, vascular permeability, and pruritus is controlled by the release and resorption of histamine. These properties are leveraged in skin prick testing for allergies where histamine dihydrochloride is injected as a positive control to confirm allergen susceptibility prior to the administration of candidate allergens. Subjective parameters such as skin coloration, irritation, and bulging as a consequence of histamine injection and histamine release are well characterized. However limited quantitative metrics on the body's edematous response are available due to the lack of imaging diagnostics that can map surface tissue water content (TWC). THz imaging was used to explore the utility of reflective THz imaging to quantify edematous responses to histamine. Rat models were injected with varying concentrations of histamine dihydrochloride and the resultant edematous response arising from perturbed vasodymanics was mapped. Significant build up and dissipation of surface tissue water content was observed and THz frequency contrast was seen to correlate with visual appearance in some cases and in others reveal tissue water content variations not discernable with the naked eye. The results suggest that THz imaging may be a valuable tool in quantifying the degree of allergic responses and assist in detecting hypersensitivity.

  1. [Allergy diagnosis in patients with bronchial asthma (bronchial provocation test, skin test and RAST) (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, X; Fruhmann, G; von Liebe, V

    1978-12-15

    87 patients with bronchial asthma underwent skin test, RAST and measurment of airway resistance before and after inhalation of control solution as well as at least 10 times after each of one to four bronchial provocations (making up a total of 171 tests) with extracts of house dust, house dust mite, animal dander, mould spores and pollen in increasing concentrations. An actual clinical significance of the skin test reactions was found in 60% of all cases and of the RAST results in 66% of all cases. The overall agreement between skin test results and RAST results was 61%. The correlations between the different tests depended on the degree of hypersensitivity, on the tested allergen and on whether the results of skin test and RAST, respectively, were positive or negative. There existed a good correlation between the results of all three test methods and case history only for pollen allergens and animal dander. Noticeably often negative RAST results with house dust and mould spores, as well as positive skin tests with house dust mite and mould spores could not be confirmed by the provocation test. Important indications for a bronchial provocation test in asthmatics are doubtful case history, doubtful skin test or RAST results with the problem-allergens house dust, house dust mite and mould spores; the bronchial provocation test is especially commendable when drastic or cumbersome therapeutic measures (immunotherapy, change of home, change of job) are to follow or if late asthmatic reactions are expected.

  2. Skin Prick Test Reactivity to Common Aero and Food Allergens among Children with Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoora Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of allergic diseases has risen in the last decades. The objective of this study was to determine the common allergens in children via the skin prick test. Methods: This cross-sectional study recruited 313 allergic children (4 months to 18 years old referred to the Asthma and Allergy Clinic of Children’s Medical Center in Tehran. A questionnaire containing demographic data and patient history was completed. The Skin Prick Test (SPT was selected according to the patients’ history of food and/or aeroallergen sensitivity. Results: Patients (62.4% male, 37.6% female with symptoms of asthma (n=141, 57.1%, allergic rhinitis (n=50, 20.4%, atopic dermatitis (n=29, 11.7%, and urticaria (n=20, 8.1% were studied. Positive skin prick test to at least one allergen was 58.1%. The most prevalent allergens were tree mix (26%, Alternaria alternata (26%, weed mix (23.6%, Dermatophagoides farinae (22.9%, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (22.9%, milk (21.7%, eggs (20%, and wheat flour (18.3%. Also, common allergens in the patients with different symptoms of allergic disorders were as follows: asthma (tree mix, weed mix, and Dermatophagoides farinae; allergic rhinitis (Dermatophagoides farinae, tree mix, and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus; and atopic dermatitis (Alternaria alternata, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and cockroaches. Conclusion: Identifying allergens in each area is necessary and has an important role in the diagnosis and management of allergic disorders and possibility of performing immunotherapy. In this study, the most common aeroallergens were tree mix, Alternaria alternata, and weed mix and also the most common food allergens were milk, eggs, and wheat. Considering these data, appropriate preventive strategies can decrease the cost and morbidity of therapeutic actions.

  3. Comparison of skin prick allergy test in urban and rural children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Widyanto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Children who grow up in rural areas have a lower incidence of atopy and other allergic manifestations than children in urban areas. Several recent studies have suggested that agricultural exposure may protect children from developing asthma and atopy, but these findings are inconsistent. Objective To examine an association between living in rural or urban areas and skin prick allergy test results in children and to detennine associated risk factors for atopy. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in Karo district (rural and Medan (urban in October-December 2009. We enrolled primary school children who had a history of atopy in their families. Skin prick testing was done on the volar side of the forearm and included eight aero-allergens: house dust mites, house dust, cotton, chicken feathers, cat dander, cockroaches, mould, and pollen. We analyzed the folloMng risk factors for association Mth atopy: tobacco smoke, pets, livestock exposure, and having older sibling(s. Results We recruited 49 children from the Karo district and 52 children from the city of Medan. There were significant associations between living in an urban area and positive skin prick test results for house dust mites and house dust compared to living in a rural area (P=0.04, 95% CI: 1.11 to 5.91; P=0.04, 95% CI: 1.13 to 12.45, respectively. The reverse was true for cockroach allergens (P=0.02, 95% CI: 0.16 to 0.81. Tobacco smoke and livestock exposure were associated Mth negative skin prick test results in rural children (P=O.03, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.81 and P=0.002, 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.42, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that lack of livestock exposure was the major risk factor associated Mth any positive skin prick test results in rural children (P=0.004; 95% CI ; 0.02 to 0.49. Conclusion There were differing associations between living in rural and urban areas to various skin prick test results in children. Lack of livestock exposure was the risk

  4. Antibiotic-induced immediate type hypersensitivity is a risk factor for positive allergy skin tests for neuromuscular blocking agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagau, Natalia; Gherman, Nadia; Cocis, Mihaela; Petrisor, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Skin tests for neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are not currently recommended for the general population undergoing general anaesthesia. In a previous study we have reported a high incidence of positive allergy tests for NMBAs in patients with a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy, a larger prospective study being needed to confirm those preliminary results. The objective of this study was to compare the skin tests results for patients with a positive history of antibiotic-induced immediate type hypersensitivity reactions to those of controls without drug allergies. Ninety eight patients with previous antibiotic hypersensitivity and 72 controls were prospectively included. Skin tests were performed for atracurium, pancuronium, rocuronium, and suxamethonium. We found 65 positive skin tests from the 392 tests performed in patients with a positive history of antibiotic hypersensitivity (1 6.58%) and 23 positive skin tests from the 288 performed in controls (7.98%), the two incidences showing significant statistical difference (p = 0.0011). The relative risk for having a positive skin test for NMBAs for patients versus controls was 1.77 (1.15-2.76). For atracurium, skin tests were more often positive in patients with a positive history of antibiotic hypersensitivity versus controls (p = 0.02). For pancuronium, rocuronium and suxamethonium the statistical difference was not attained (p-values 0.08 for pancuronium, 0.23 for rocuronium, and 0.26 for suxamethonium). Patients with a positive history of antibiotic hypersensitivity seem to have a higher incidence of positive skin tests for NMBAs. They might represent a group at higher risk for developing intraoperative anaphylaxis compared to the general population. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Peanut allergy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hourihane, Jonathan O'B

    2011-04-01

    Peanut allergy may affect up to 2% of children in some countries, making it one of the most common conditions of childhood. Peanut allergy is a marker of a broad and possibly severe atopic phenotype. Nearly all children with peanut allergy have other allergic conditions. Peanut accounts for a disproportionate number of fatal and near fatal food-related allergies. Families with a child or children with peanut allergy can struggle to adapt to the stringent avoidance measures required. Although oral induction of tolerance represents the cutting edge of peanut allergy management, it is not yet ready for routine practice.

  6. Diagnosis of penicillin allergy revisited: the value of case history, skin testing, specific IgE and prolonged challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortlund, J; Mortz, C G; Skov, P S; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2013-08-01

    Skin testing in duplicate, correlation between case history of immediate and nonimmediate reactions and challenge outcome and prolonged oral treatment with penicillin in the diagnostic evaluation of allergic reactions to β-lactam antibiotics, mimicking real-life situations, have only been addressed in few studies. A total of 342 patients suspected of having β-lactam allergy were investigated according to the European Network for Drug Allergy (ENDA) guidelines and patients found to be negative in the ENDA program were supplemented with a 7-day oral treatment with penicillin. Skin testing with penicillins was performed in duplicate. Patients with case histories of reactions to other β-lactams were also subsequently challenged with the culprit drug. Nineteen patients were IgE-sensitized to penicillin. Then, intracutaneous tests (ICTs) were performed, in which 35 patients tested positive for allergy, 21 with delayed and 14 with immediate reactions. Only three patients tested positive for the major (PPL) and/or minor (MDM) penicillin determinants, all being positive for penicillin G in ICT. The remaining 291 patients were challenged with penicillin: 10 tested positive in single-dose challenge and 23 tested positive in the 7-day challenge. A total of 17 of 78 patients with a negative penicillin challenge tested positive during challenges with other β-lactams. We found no correlation between case histories of immediate and nonimmediate reactions and reaction time during challenge. The data suggest that case history is often insufficient to discriminate between immediate reactors and nonimmediate reactors. A 7-day challenge with the culprit β-lactam may yield more positive reactions than the accepted one- or 2-day challenge. Interpretation of skin testing should be made with caution. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Relationships between skin test, specific IgE and levels of cytokines in patients with penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, H-L; Liu, J-H; Yang, J; Dong, Z-M

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between skin test, specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E and cytokines in penicillin allergy. We collected the sera of 259 patients with historical positive skin test to penicillins, with immediate positive skin test and with a negative skin test results. The positive rate of specific IgE antibodies in 259 patients was 62.2% (161) by using radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Of the eight kinds of antigenic determinants, the positive rates of specific IgE to major and minor determinants were 43.63% (113) and 52.51% (136), respectively (p test, when the degrees of skin test were +, 2+, 3+ and 4+, the positive rates of specific IgE were 45.7, 57.1, 85.2 and 100%, respectively. The levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13 and interferon (IFN)-gamma in the sera of patients with positive skin test were significantly increased with the degree of positive skin test (p RAST offers the better test for the detection of penicillin-specific IgE antibodies. IL-4, IL-13 and IFN-gamma play important roles in penicillin allergy.

  8. Comparison of the skin-prick test and Phadia ImmunoCAP as tools to diagnose house-dust mite allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Gi; Cho, Hyun-Jin; Park, Ga Young; Min, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyo Yeol; Dhong, Hun-Jong; Chung, Seung Kyu; Kim, Seon Woo

    2010-01-01

    When the skin-prick test (SPT) and in vitro test such as ImmunoCAP assay are performed simultaneously, results do not always coincide in some patients. Our objectives, therefore, were (1) to assess differences in allergic test results according to age group and (2) to establish appropriate guidelines for diagnosing mite allergy according to age. A total of 692 participants complaining of allergic rhinitis symptoms participated. Patients were divided according to age; the mean age was 32 years (range, 8-76 years). The SPT and ImmunoCAP assays were performed to detect allergies to house-dust mites (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae). The association between age and the result of each allergy test were examined, and a cutoff age for proper application of each test was than estimated. Three hundred thirty-six patients (48.6%) were allergic to D. pteronyssinus and 350 patients (50.6%) were allergic to D. farinae. In the case of D. pteronyssinus, SPT was proved to be more useful in detecting allergy for subjects 30 years old (p allergy tests according to age using true allergens. For patients >50 years of age, the ImmunoCAP was found to be the preferred method for detecting allergy to house-dust mites and for patients <30 years old, SPT is the recommended first choice.

  9. The Role of Atopy Patch Test in Diagnosis of Food Allergy in Atopic Eczema/Dermatitis Syndrom in Patients over 14 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Čelakovská

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies concerning the importance of food allergy in adolescents and adult patients with atopic eczema exist. The atopy patch tests with food have mostly been studied in infants and children since food allergy plays a role especially in this age group. Aim: The evaluation of the contribution of atopy patch tests in the diagnostic work-up of food allergy (to wheat, cow milk, peanuts, soya and eggs in the patients with atopic eczema older than 14 years of age. Method: 120 patients were examined in the study in the diagnostic work-up of food allergy – 86 women and 34 men, the mean age 26.5 (s.d. 9.8 and the median SCORAD at the beginning of the study 32.9 (s.d. 14.0. Complete dermatological and allergological examinations in the diagnostic work-up of food allergy were performed (assessment of personal history, assessment of serum specific IgE, skin prick tests, atopy patch tests, diagnostic hypoallergenic diet, food challenge tests with egg, soy, wheat, cow milk and double – blind, placebo – controlled food challenge test with cow milk and wheat. The results of atopy patch tests were compared with the results of other diagnostic methods in the diagnosis of food allergy. Results: The food allergy to cow milk and wheat was confirmed in double – blind, placebo controlled food challenge test in few patients in our study (4 %. The suspicion of food allergy to egg is in 8 %, to peanuts in 13 % and to soya in 4 % of patients in our study. The assessment of atopy patch tests response seems to be of great importance. The reaction in atopy patch tests with more papules has the greatest diagnostic accuracy for predicting the result of challenge tests. At the beginning and at the end of diagnostic hypoallergenic diet the severity of atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome was recorded in all patients enrolled in the study by evaluating SCORAD. The decrease of SCORAD was statistically important. Conclusion: Atopy patch tests alone cannot be used as a

  10. Risk-stratification protocol for carboplatin and oxaliplatin hypersensitivity: repeat skin testing to identify drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alberta L; Patil, Sarita U; Long, Aidan A; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-11-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to platinum-based chemotherapies are increasingly being recognized. The authors developed a novel risk-stratification protocol that was used successfully in a small number of patients with carboplatin-induced HSRs. To describe the utility of this protocol in a large number of patients with carboplatin- or oxaliplatin-induced HSRs. A 5-year retrospective review of patients referred to Massachusetts General Hospital with carboplatin- or oxaliplatin-induced HSR was performed. Patients were managed using a risk-stratification protocol using 3 repeat skin tests (STs) with intervening desensitizations. If the repeat ST result remained negative 3 times, patients received subsequent infusions without desensitization. From 2008 to 2012, 142 patients (92 treated with carboplatin, 50 treated with oxaliplatin) completed 574 desensitizations. Most patients were women (84.5%, mean ± SD 58.1 ± 9.3 years). Patients with carboplatin-induced HSRs were classified as having positive (n = 32, 34.8%), negative (n = 38, 41.3%), or converted (n = 22, 23.9%) ST reactions when the initial negative ST reaction converted to positive at repeat ST. Of those with oxaliplatin-induced HSRs, 22 (44%) had positive, 25 (50%) had negative, and 3 (6%) had converted ST reactions. Of the patients with negative ST reactions, 17 with carboplatin-induced HSRs and 16 with oxaliplatin-induced HSRs safely completed 59 and 95 outpatient infusions, respectively, without desensitizations. For carboplatin and oxaliplatin, ST conversion was associated with an interval of at least 6 months from the HSR to the initial ST (carboplatin, P = .002; oxaliplatin, P = .045). This risk-stratification protocol for presumed carboplatin- and oxaliplatin-induced HSRs safely identifies false-negative ST reactions and nonallergic patients who can receive infusions without desensitizations. This leads to fewer unnecessary desensitizations and improved patient care. Copyright © 2015 American

  11. Formaldehyde in cosmetics in patch tested dermatitis patients with and without contact allergy to formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauksson, Inese; Pontén, Ann; Isaksson, Marléne; Hamada, Haneen; Engfeldt, Malin; Bruze, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Formaldehyde is a well-known contact sensitizer. Formaldehyde releasers are widely used preservatives in cosmetics. To survey the release of formaldehyde in cosmetics brought by patients investigated because of suspected allergic contact dermatitis, to compare it with information given by the manufacturers on the packages, and to investigate whether formaldehyde-allergic patients are potentially exposed to more cosmetics releasing formaldehyde than dermatitis patients without contact allergy to formaldehyde. Cosmetics from 10 formaldehyde-allergic and 30 non-allergic patients (controls) matched for age and sex were investigated with the chromotropic acid spot test, which is a semiquantitative method measuring the release of formaldehyde. Formaldehyde was found in 58 of 245 (23.7%) products. Twenty-six of 126 (20.6%) leave-on products released formaldehyde, and 17 of 26 (65.4%) of these were not declared to contain formaldehyde or formaldehyde releasers. Among the rinse-off products, there were 32 of 119 (26.8%) formaldehyde-releasing products, and nine of 32 (28.0%) of these were not labelled as containing formaldehyde or formaldehyde releasers. Five of 10 formaldehyde-allergic patients brought leave-on products with ≥ 40 ppm formaldehyde, as compared with 4 of 30 in the control group (p = 0.029). Cosmetic products used by formaldehyde-allergic patients that are not declared to contain formaldehyde or formaldehyde-releasing preservatives should be analysed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Penicillin Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seizures Loss of consciousness Other conditions resulting from penicillin allergy Less common penicillin allergy reactions occur days ... immune system to create an antibody to it. Penicillins and related drugs Penicillins belong to a class ...

  13. Food allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sicherer SH, Lack G, Jones SM. Food allergy management. In: Adkinson NF Jr, Bochner BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  14. Food Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food allergy is an abnormal response to a food triggered by your body's immune system. In adults, the foods ... a severe reaction called anaphylaxis. Symptoms of food allergy include Itching or swelling in your mouth Vomiting, ...

  15. Cockroach Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... course of allergic disease by reducing the body’s immune response to allergens. Look for this mark to find products proven more suitable for people with asthma and allergies. Find certified asthma & allergy friendly® products on our ...

  16. Plant Allergies

    OpenAIRE

    Predny, Mary Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    Allergic reactions are caused by an overactive immune system response to a foreign substance such as pollen, dust, or molds. This publication goes over the common plants that cause allergies and ways to prevent allergies while gardening.

  17. A study of skin sensitivity to various allergens by skin prick test in patients of nasobronchial allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study skin sensitivity to various allergens in patients of nasobronchial allergy. Materials and Methods: 2880 skin prick tests with 60 allergens were performed in 48 patients of nasobronchial allergy. Results: Most common offending allergens were insects (21.2%, followed by dusts (12.0%, pollens (7.8%, animal dander (3.1%, and fungi (1.3%. The common insect antigen were locust female (33.3% followed by locust male (25%, grasshopper (20.8%, cricket (16.7%, cockroach female (16.7% and cockroach male (14.6%. Common dust allergens were house dust, wheat dust, cotton mill and paper dust. Among pollens, Amaranthus spinosus, Argemone mexicana, Adhatoda vasica, Ailanthus and Cannabis were found to be common allergens. In animal danders common offending allergens were cow dander and dog dander. Among fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Alternaria teneis and Fusarium sodani were common allergens. Patients of bronchial asthma had associated allergic rhinitis in 80% cases. Conclusion: Common allergens in patients of nasobronchial allergy were identified. The data may prove useful in of allergen avoidance and immunotherapy in these patients.

  18. Functional Testing of Subcutaneous Piezoelectrically Actuated Hearing Aid: Comparison With BAHA and Potential for Treating Single-sided Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotiya, Akhilesh; Bance, Manohar; Leadbetter, Jeff; Brown, Jeremy; Adamson, Rob

    2016-07-01

    To compare the performance of a subcutaneous piezoelectrically actuated hearing aid (SPAHA) with the bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) and assess its effectiveness as a treatment option for conductive loss and single-sided deafness (SSD). To validate the use of the SPAHA as a bone conduction implant, its performance was compared with a widely used bone conduction implant, the BAHA. Maximum dynamic range, power consumed to deliver standard speech signals and total harmonic distortion (THD) was assessed. The transcranial attenuation was also measured to assess the SPAHA's potential to treat SSD. Functional testing of the SPAHA and BAHA was conducted using cadaver heads. Ipsilateral and contralateral promontory velocity and the power consumption by the devices were measured at 111 different frequencies in the range of 200 to 9600 Hz. Performance metrics were derived from these measurements. The maximum dynamic range for SPAHA was within 10 dB of that of BAHA. The THD for the SPAHA was at most 3%, slightly better than the BAHA. The power consumption by the SPAHA, whereas highly variable, was not statistically different than that of the BAHA. Transcranical attenuation in case of SPAHA was 5 to 10 dB across the measured frequency range. From observed dynamic range and THD, the speech quality delivered by the SPAHA should equal or exceed that delivered by the BAHA. To attain equivalent hearing sensation at lower frequencies, the drive voltage for SPAHA would have to be significantly higher than that for BAHA. For typical speech inputs the power consumption requirements of the SPAHA should be roughly equal to those of the BAHA. Given its performance at high frequencies, the SPAHA seems well-suited to treating SSD.

  19. [Allergy in cosmetology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeel, A

    1983-01-01

    The computer analysis of a sample collecting 2,028 patients suffering from an eczematous dermatitis and subordinated to epicutaneous tests allowed us to analyze the rather difficult question of cosmetic allergy. This allergy is observed only in 2 p. 100 of the cases, if one considers the cosmetic allergy isolated; it reaches 5 p. 100 if it is associated with allergens coming from other origins (drugs of professional). However, in a more selected population of 91 patients suffering from a face dermatitis, these levels reach respectively 25 and 43 p. 100. The respective role of topic drugs and cosmetics is studied as well as main allergens associated with cosmetic allergy. The good tolerance of cosmetics encountered in patients allergic to one of their presumed components seems paradoxical. A prevention model of cosmetic allergy is presented, with an hypoallergenic variety of lanolin.

  20. In vitro tests for drug hypersensitivity reactions: an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, C; Celik, G; Rouzaire, P; Whitaker, P; Bonadonna, P; Rodrigues-Cernadas, J; Vultaggio, A; Brockow, K; Caubet, J C; Makowska, J; Nakonechna, A; Romano, A; Montañez, M I; Laguna, J J; Zanoni, G; Gueant, J L; Oude Elberink, H; Fernandez, J; Viel, S; Demoly, P; Torres, M J

    2016-08-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are a matter of great concern, both for outpatient and in hospital care. The evaluation of these patients is complex, because in vivo tests have a suboptimal sensitivity and can be time-consuming, expensive and potentially risky, especially drug provocation tests. There are several currently available in vitro methods that can be classified into two main groups: those that help to characterize the active phase of the reaction and those that help to identify the culprit drug. The utility of these in vitro methods depends on the mechanisms involved, meaning that they cannot be used for the evaluation of all types of DHRs. Moreover, their effectiveness has not been defined by a consensus agreement between experts in the field. Thus, the European Network on Drug Allergy and Drug Allergy Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has organized a task force to provide data and recommendations regarding the available in vitro methods for DHR diagnosis. We have found that although there are many in vitro tests, few of them can be given a recommendation of grade B or above mainly because there is a lack of well-controlled studies, most information comes from small studies with few subjects and results are not always confirmed in later studies. Therefore, it is necessary to validate the currently available in vitro tests in a large series of well-characterized patients with DHR and to develop new tests for diagnosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. End point prick test: could this new test be used to predict the outcome of oral food challenge in children with cow's milk allergy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellini Federica

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cow's milk allergy (CMA is the most frequent food allergy in childhood; the trend of CMA is often characterized by a progressive improvement to achieve tolerance in the first 4 to 5 years of life. It has been observed that specific IgE (sIgE towards cow's milk proteins decrease when the age increases. Although food allergy can be easily diagnosed, it is difficult to predict the outcome of the oral food challenge (OFC, that remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of food allergy, by allergometric tests. Methods We considered 44 children with CMA diagnosed through OFC who returned to our Allergy and Immunology Pediatric Department between January to December 2010 to evaluate the persistence of allergy or the achievement of tolerance. On the basis of the history, we performed both allergometric skin tests and OFC in children that were still following a milk-free diet, whereas only allergometric skin tests those that had already undergone spontaneous introduction of milk protein at home without presenting symptoms. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the persistence of CMA or the acquisition of tolerance and the results of the end point prick test (EPT. Results and Discussion The OFC with cow's milk was performed on 30 children, 4 children were excluded because of a history of severe reactions to cow's milk, and 10 because they had spontaneously already taken milk food derivates at home without problems. 16/30 (53% children showed clinical reactions and the challenge was stopped, 14/30 (47% did not have any reaction. Comparing the mean wheal diameter of every EPT's dilution between the group of allergic children and the tolerant ones, we obtained a significant difference (p We have also calculated sensitivity (SE, specificity (SP, the positive predictive value (PPV and the negative predictive value (NPV for each EPT dilution. Conclusions EPT is a safe and cheap test, easy to be executed

  2. Food allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngshin Han

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy is an important public health problem affecting 5% of infants and children in Korea. Food allergy is defined as an immune response triggered by food proteins. Food allergy is highly associated with atopic dermatitis and is one of the most common triggers of potentially fatal anaphylaxis in the community. Sensitization to food allergens can occur in the gastrointestinal tract (class 1 food allergy or as a consequence of cross reactivity to structurally homologous inhalant allergens (class 2 food allergy. Allergenicity of food is largely determined by structural aspects, including cross-reactivity and reduced or enhanced allergenicity with cooking that convey allergenic characteristics to food. Management of food allergy currently focuses on dietary avoidance of the offending foods, prompt recognition and treatment of allergic reactions, and nutritional support. This review includes definitions and examines the prevalence and management of food allergies and the characteristics of food allergens.

  3. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockow, K; Garvey, L H; Aberer, W

    2013-01-01

    Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable...... search on skin test drug concentration in MEDLINE and EMBASE, reviewed and evaluated the literature in five languages using the GRADE system for quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. Where the literature is poor, we have taken into consideration the collective experience of the group...... to recommend appropriate drug concentration. There is urgent need for multicentre studies designed to establish and validate drug skin test concentration using standard protocols. For most drugs, sensitivity of skin testing is higher in immediate hypersensitivity compared to nonimmediate hypersensitivity....

  4. Allergy-Friendly Gardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gardens of people with outdoor allergies. These include: • Cactus • Cherry tree • Dahlia ... Rye grass • Timothy The best way to determine which plants trigger your allergic reactions is through skin testing ...

  5. Pet Allergy Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of U.S. households include a member of the dog or cat family. Yet, millions of people suffer from pet allergies. Take this quiz to test your knowledge about popular myths as well as coping strategies related to ...

  6. THE FIRST BULGARIAN STANDARDIZED SERIES FOR EPICUTANEOUS PATCH TESTING FOR ALLERGIES TO DENTAL MATERIALS AND ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Dencheva; Iliana Stoeva; Angelina Kisselova; Assya Krasteva; Bogdan Petrunov; George Nikolov; Yordan Galabov

    2012-01-01

    The teeth and teeth rows restoration in the maxillofacial area is the last stage of the ongoing patient treatment and a basic purpose for the dental doctors. For this purpose a different set of modern and classic contemporary dental materials is used. The choice of each material during the treatment of every patient with proven allergy to different kind of allergens is very specific and strictly individual. In the everyday oral diagnostics a standardized set of allergens for diagnostics is us...

  7. A retrospective comparison of false negative skin test rates in penicillin allergy, using pencilloyl-poly-lysine and minor determinants or Penicillin G, followed by open challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Lana; Kalicinsky, Chrystyna; Warrington, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A history of penicillin allergy in patients is common, but only 10-15 % are truly allergic. While the gold standard for diagnosing penicillin allergy is challenge, it is not recommended that this be done without first carrying out diagnostic skin testing. This is carried out with the major determinant benzylpenicilloyl (PPL) and the minor determinant mixture (MDM), consisting of penilloate, penicilloate and Penicillin G. However, since availability of the MDM is limited, Penicillin G alone has been used. A retrospective chart review was carried out on patients tested for penicillin allergy in the Clinical Immunology and Allergy Clinic at the Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Canada between 2005 and 2013. A total of 521 patients charts were reviewed, of whom 240 had skin testing, ImmunoCap(®) for IgE to Penicillin G and V and had oral challenges with penicillin, amoxicillin or cloxacillin. 17/240 (7.5 %) were skin test positive, 8 to PPL, 4 to MDM and 5 to Penicillin G. One was also positive on ImmunoCap(®) testing. Three patients had negative skin tests but weakly positive ImmunoCap(®). 222 patients with negative skin tests and serological tests were challenged. Of these, 12 patients reacted to challenge. Three of the challenges were equivocal. Of the nine patients with definite positive challenges, three were tested with Penicillin G and six with MDM. Therefore the false negative rates for testing were 2.3 % with PPL and Penicillin G and 6.97 % for PPL and MDM. The difference was not significant (p = 0.0856). In this group of patients with a history of penicillin allergy tested with the major determinant of benzyl penicillin and either MDM or Penicillin G, there was no difference in the rate of false negative testing, based on oral penicillin challenges. Therefore, Penicillin G can be safely used as an alternative to MDM in diagnosing penicillin allergy.

  8. Contact allergy to spices

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Akker Th., W.; Roesyanto-Mahadi, I.; Toorenenbergen, Albert van; Joost, Theo

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA group of 103 patients suspected of contact allergy was tested with the European standard series, wood tars and spices; paprika, cinnamon, laurel, celery seed, nutmeg, curry, black pepper, cloves, while pepper, coriander, cacao and garlic. 32 patients (Group I) were selected on the basis of positive tests to one or more of possible indicators for allergy to spices: colophony, balsam of Peru, fragrance‐mix and/or wood tars. 71 patients (Group II) showed no response to these indica...

  9. Trends of contact allergy to fragrance mix I and Myroxylon pereirae among Danish eczema patients tested between 1985 and 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Carlsen, Berit Christina; Menné, Torkil

    2008-01-01

    to test for associations. RESULTS: Of 16,173 patients, 7.2% were sensitized to FM I and 4% to MP. FM I contact allergy was associated with female sex [odds ratio (OR) = 1.52; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.33-1.74] and age between 41 and 60 years (OR = 3.20; 95% CI = 1.98-5.21). Significant declines...... in this analysis. Allergic contact reactions to the ingredients of FM I remain a problem in European consumers....

  10. History of food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Brunello

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we will first consider whether there is real evidence on the basis of literature for early descriptions in antiquity of pathogenic reactions after food intake that could be comparable to allergy, for instance in the scriptures of Hippocrates or Lucretius. On this topic we are skeptical, which is in agreement with the medical historian Hans Schadewaldt. We also assert that it is unlikely that King Richard III was the first food-allergic individual in medical literature. Most probably it was not a well-planned poisoning ('allergy') with strawberries, but rather a birth defect ('… his harm was ever such since his birth') that allowed the Lord Protector to bring Mylord of Ely to the scaffold in the Tower, as we can read in The History of King Richard III by Thomas More (1478-1535; published by his son-in-law, Rastell, in 1557). In 1912, the American pediatrician Oscar Menderson Schloss (1882-1952) was probably the first to describe scratch tests in the diagnosis of food allergy. Milestones in the practical diagnosis of food allergy are further discussed, including scratch tests, intradermal tests, modified prick tests and prick-to-prick tests. False-negative results can be attributed to the phenomenon of a 'catamnestic reaction' according to Max Werner (1911-1987), or to the fermentative degradation of food products. Prior to the discovery of immunoglobulin E, which marked a turning point in allergy diagnosis, and the introduction of the radioallergosorbent test in 1967, several more or less reliable techniques were used in the diagnosis of food allergy, such as pulse rate increase after food intake according to Coca, the leukopenic index, drop in basophils or drastic platelet decrease. The 'leukocytotoxic test' (Bryan's test), today called the 'ALCAT' test, shows no scientific evidence. The double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge test remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of food allergy. For the future, component-resolved diagnostics

  11. Contact allergy to lanolin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransen, Marloes; Overgaard, Line E K; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lanolin has been tested as lanolin alcohols (30% pet.) in baseline patch test series since 1969, and this has shown clinically relevant allergic contact dermatitis cases. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the temporal development of lanolin allergy (i.e. positive reaction to lanolin alcohols...... and/or Amerchol™ L-101), and the association between contact allergy to lanolin and patient characteristics from the MOAHLFA index. METHODS: A retrospective observational study of consecutively patch tested dermatitis patients (n = 9577) between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2015 with lanolin...... alcohols 30% pet. and Amerchol™ L-101 50% pet. was performed. RESULTS: The prevalence of lanolin allergy increased from 0.45% in 2004 to 1.81% in 2015. In age-adjusted and sex-adjusted analyses, weak, significant associations were found between atopic dermatitis and lanolin and lanolin alcohols allergy...

  12. The Spanish standard patch test series: 2016 update by the Spanish Contact Dermatitis and Skin Allergy Research Group (GEIDAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervella-Garcés, M; García-Gavín, J; Silvestre-Salvador, J F

    2016-09-01

    The Spanish standard patch test series, as recommended by the Spanish Contact Dermatitis and Skin Allergy Research Group (GEIDAC), has been updated for 2016. The new series replaces the 2012 version and contains the minimum set of allergens recommended for routine investigation of contact allergy in Spain from 2016 onwards. Four haptens -clioquinol, thimerosal, mercury, and primin- have been eliminated owing to a low frequency of relevant allergic reactions, while 3 new allergens -methylisothiazolinone, diazolidinyl urea, and imidazolidinyl urea- have been added. GEIDAC has also modified the recommended aqueous solution concentrations for the 2 classic, major haptens methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone, which are now to be tested at 200ppm in aqueous solution, and formaldehyde, which is now to be tested in a 2% aqueous solution. Updating the Spanish standard series is one of the functions of GEIDAC, which is responsible for ensuring that the standard series is suited to the country's epidemiological profile and pattern of contact sensitization. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug and vaccine allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, John M

    2015-02-01

    Most children with a history of penicillin allergy are labeled allergic and denied treatment with penicillin and sometimes other beta-lactam antibiotics. Most of these children never were or are no longer allergic to penicillin. Penicillin skin testing and oral challenge can identify patients who are not currently allergic, allowing them to be treated with penicillin. Children with egg allergy are often denied influenza vaccination, because the vaccine contains a small amount of egg protein. However, recent studies have demonstrated that children with even severe egg allergy can safely receive the vaccine, reducing their risk of the morbidity and mortality associated with influenza. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Can contact allergy to p-phenylenediamine explain the high rates of terpene hydroperoxide allergy? - An epidemiological study based on consecutive patch test results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Niels Højsager; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contact allergy to linalool hydroperoxides (Lin-OOHs) and limonene hydroperoxides (Lim-OOHs) is common. Similarly to what occurs with the terpene hydroperoxides, reactive intermediates formed from p-phenylenediamine (PPD) can cause oxidative modifications of tryptophan residues on pro...

  15. Comparison of the sensitivities of the Buehler test and the guinea pig maximization test for predictive testing of contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankild, S; Vølund, A; Wahlberg, J E

    2001-01-01

    International test guidelines, such as the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guideline #406, recommend 2 guinea pig methods for testing of the contact allergenic potential of chemicals: the Guinea Pig Maximization Test (GPMT) and the Buehler test. Previous comparisons...... between the methods suggested that the Buehler test was less sensitive than the GPMT although modified Buehler test protocols were used. Parallel GPMT and Buehler tests were conducted according to OECD guideline #406 using a multiple-dose design and test results were analysed using a standard logistic...... dose-response model. To compare the sensitivity of the 2 test procedures the test conditions were kept identical and the following chemicals with a range of sensitization potentials were tested: chloraniline, chlorhexidine, eugenol, formaldehyde, mercaptobenzothiazole and neomycin sulphate...

  16. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sting Allergy Pet Allergies Eye Allergy Drug Allergies Allergic Rhinitis Latex Allergy Mold Allergy Sinus Infection Cockroach Allergy Seasonal Allergies Type of Allergies Food Allergy Food allergies are estimated to affect 4 ...

  17. Introduction of peanuts in younger siblings of children with peanut allergy: a prospective, double-blinded assessment of risk, of diagnostic tests, and an analysis of patient preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bégin, P; Graham, F; Killer, K; Paradis, J; Paradis, L; Des Roches, A

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of peanut allergy in younger siblings of children with peanut allergy has been reported between 7% and 8.5%, but the anaphylactic risk at the time of introduction is currently unknown, which limits our ability to best counsel parents on this issue. To determine the risk of anaphylaxis and working parameters of allergy testing in this context. One hundred and fifty-four peanut-naïve younger siblings of peanut-allergic children underwent double-blinded skin testing, followed by parent-led peanut introduction. Questionnaires were dispensed to parents to investigate preferences with regard to peanut introduction in this subgroup. Eight participants (5.2%) presented unequivocal IgE-mediated reactions to peanut upon introduction, including five anaphylaxes. These participants were significantly older compared to the rest of the cohort (median 4.0 vs 1.9 years, P = 0.04). The negative predictive value of skin prick test with peanut extract and peanut butter and of specific IgE was 99%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Six peanut-tolerant participants had positive peanut allergy tests. The option of introducing at home without prior skin testing was associated with high levels of anxiety (median 8.4 on 10-point Likert scale) when compared to supervised introduction (median 3.8, P introduction after negative skin test (median 4.3, P introduction in siblings of children with peanut allergy, and parents are reluctant to introduce at home without testing. Allergy testing prior to introduction is negative in over 90% of cases and carries a high negative predictive value. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Allergy Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Managing Allergies Allergy Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Diagnosis Testing for Allergies Knowing exactly what you are allergic to can ...

  19. Food allergy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maleki, Soheila J; Burks, A. Wesley; Helm, Ricki M

    2006-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2. Exploring Current and Novel Methods for the Detection and Diagnosis of Food Allergy: the Clinical Approach * Adriano Mari and Enrico Scala...

  20. Prospective, multicenter clinical trial to validate new products for skin tests in the diagnosis of allergy to penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J; Torres, M J; Campos, J; Arribas-Poves, F; Blanca, M

    2013-01-01

    Allergy to penicillin is the most commonly reported type of drug hypersensitivity. Diagnosis is currently confirmed using skin tests with benzylpenicillin reagents, ie, penicilloyl-polylysine (PPL) as the major determinant of benzylpenicillin and benzylpenicillin, benzylpenicilloate and benzylpenilloate as a minor determinant mixture (MDM). To synthesize and assess the diagnostic capacity of 2 new benzylpenicillin reagents in patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to B-lactams: benzylpenicilloyl octa-L-lysine (BP-OL) as the major determinant and benzylpenilloate (penilloate) as the minor determinant. Prospective multicenter clinical trial performed in 18 Spanish centers. Efficacy was assessed by detection of positive skin test results in an allergic population and negative skin test results in a nonallergic, drug-exposed population. Sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values were determined. The study sample comprised 94 allergic patients: 31 (35.23%) presented anaphylaxis, 4 (4.55%) anaphylactic shock, 51 (58.04%) urticaria, and 2 (2.27%) no specific condition. The culprit 8-lactams were amoxicillin in 63 cases (71.60%), benzypencillin in 14 cases (15.89%), cephalosporins in 2 cases (2.27%), other drugs in 3 cases (3.42%), and unidentified agents in 6 cases (6.82%). The results of testing with BP-OL were positive in 46 cases (52.3%); the results of testing with penilloate were positive in 33 cases (37.5%). When both reagents were taken into consideration, sensitivity reached 61.36% and specificity 100%. Skin testing with penilloate was significantly more often negative when the interval between the reaction and the study was longer. The sensitivity of BP-OL and penilloate was 61%. Considering that amoxicillin was the culprit drug in 71% of reactions, these results indicate that most patients were allergic to the whole group of penicillins. These data support the use of benzylpenicillin determinants in the diagnosis of allergy

  1. A comparative study on basophil activation test, histamine release assay, and passive sensitization histamine release assay in the diagnosis of peanut allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, L. F.; Juel-Berg, N.; Hansen, K. S.; Clare Mills, E. N.; van Ree, R.; Poulsen, L. K.; Jensen, B. M.

    2018-01-01

    BackgroundAllergy can be diagnosed using basophil tests. Several methods measuring basophil activation are available. This study aimed at comparing basophil activation test (BAT), histamine release assay (HR), and passive sensitization histamine release assay (passive HR) in the diagnosis of peanut

  2. Comparison of intradermal dilutional testing with the Multi-Test II applicator in testing for mold allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Jacques; Ryan, Matthew W

    2006-02-01

    To compare and correlate wheal size using the Multi-Test II applicator with the endpoint obtained by intradermal dilutional testing (IDT) for common mold allergens. To validate the safety and efficacy of modified quantitative testing (MQT) for determining immunotherapy starting doses. Prospective study of 86 subjects with Multi-Test II and IDT for 6 common mold antigens. There was 84% concordance between IDT results and the results expected from the MQT method. When IDT and MQT results differed, the MQT algorithm predicted a safer endpoint for starting immunotherapy in all but 2 cases. The correlation between Multi-Test II and IDT is not strong enough to infer IDT endpoint from Multi-Test II results for molds. MQT is nearly as effective as formal IDT in determining endpoint. MQT appears to be a safe method for determining starting doses for immunotherapy with fungal allergens.

  3. Penicillin Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Maxipine) Risk factors While anyone can have an allergic reaction to penicillin, a few factors can increase your risk. These ... allergies, such as food allergy or hay fever Allergic reaction to another ... exposure to penicillin, because of high doses, repetitive use or prolonged ...

  4. Drug allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reaction to a drug (medicine). Causes A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction ... the use of a drug that causes an allergy if you are first treated with ... These include corticosteroids (such as prednisone) and antihistamines. ...

  5. [Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie Ø; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2015-04-27

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site – vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark.

  6. Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie O; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site - vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we...... examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark....

  7. Soy allergy in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmer-Weber, Barbara K; Vieths, Stefan

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss studies on soy allergy. In Central Europe soy is a clinically relevant birch pollen-related allergenic food. Crossreaction is mediated by a Bet v 1 homologous protein, Gly m 4. Additionally, birch pollen allergic patients might acquire through Bet v 1 sensitization allergies to mungbean or peanut, in which Vig r 1 and Ara h 8 are the main cross-reactive allergens. Threshold doses in soy allergic individuals range from 10 mg to 50 g of soy and are more than one order of magnitude higher than in peanut allergy. No evidence was found for increased allergenicity of genetically modified soybeans. In Europe, both primary and pollen-related food allergy exist. The diagnosis of legume allergy in birch pollen-sensitized patients should not be excluded on a negative IgE testing to legume extracts. Bet v 1 related allergens are often underrepresented in extracts. Gly m 4 from soy and Ara h 8 from peanut are nowadays commercially available and are recommended in birch pollen allergic patients with suspicion of soy or peanut allergy, but negative extract-based diagnostic tests to screen for IgE specific to these recombinant allergens.

  8. Diagnostic value of scratch-chamber test, skin prick test, histamine release and specific IgE in birch-allergic patients with oral allergy syndrome to apple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osterballe, M; Scheller, R; Stahl Skov, P

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to examine the diagnostic value of skin prick test (SPT), scratch-chamber test (SCT), histamine release (HR) and specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in birch-allergic patients with oral allergy syndrome to apple. METHODS: Ten birch-allergic patients with oral...... allergy syndrome to apple and 10 control subjects were included. All were tested with SPT, SCT, HR and specific IgE [CAP, Pharmacia, Sweden and Magic Lite (ML), ALK-ABELLO, Denmark]. RESULTS: The SPT with apple, acetone extract of apple (A72) and commercial apple extract showed sensitivities of 0.80, 0.......90 and 0.10, respectively. The SCT with the same extracts showed sensitivities of 0.30, 0.50 and 0.20, respectively. The sensitivity of specific IgE to apple were 0.90 (CAP) and 0.10 (ML). The sensitivity of the HR test was 90% (A72), and 25% using the commercial extract. CONCLUSION: The SPT and HR test...

  9. The association of asthma, nasal allergies, and positive skin prick tests with obesity, leptin, and adiponectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newson, R. B.; Jones, M.; Forsberg, B.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundCross-sectional and longitudinal reports show that obese adults have more asthma than non-obese adults. A proposed mechanism is via effects of adipokines (leptin and adiponectin) on the immune system. ObjectiveWe wished to measure the associations of asthma and other atopic diseases...... with serum adipokine levels and to find whether the associations with asthma were strong enough to rule out the possibility that they are secondary to the association of fatness measures with asthma. MethodsThe Global Asthma and Allergy Network of Excellence (GA(2)LEN) clinical follow-up survey is a clinical...... measures of fatness including body mass index and waist/hip ratio, current asthma, and specific skin prick and IgE sensitisation. We used inverse sampling-probability-weighted rank and regression statistics to measure population associations of disease outcomes with adipokines in males and females...

  10. Going to School with Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reactions (they may say food tastes spicy, their tongue feels hot, their tongue or mouth feels itchy or funny, or their ... to Cope Egg Allergy Allergy Testing Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines Note: ...

  11. Skin prick test responses and allergen-specific IgE levels as predictors of peanut, egg, and sesame allergy in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Rachel L; Allen, Katrina J; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Tang, Mimi L K; Koplin, Jennifer J; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Lowe, Adrian J; Hill, David; Gurrin, Lyle C

    2013-10-01

    Ninety-five percent positive predictive values (PPVs) provide an invaluable tool for clinicians to avoid unnecessary oral food challenges. However, 95% PPVs specific to infants, the age group most likely to present for diagnosis of food allergy, are limited. We sought to develop skin prick test (SPT) and allergen-specific IgE (sIgE) thresholds with 95% PPVs for challenge-confirmed food allergy in a large population-based cohort of 1-year-old infants with challenges undertaken irrespective of SPT wheal size or previous history of ingestion. HealthNuts is a population-based, longitudinal food allergy study with baseline recruitment of 1-year-old infants. Infants were recruited from council-run immunization sessions during which they underwent SPTs to 4 allergens: egg, peanut, sesame, and cow's milk/shrimp. Any infant with a detectable SPT response was invited to undergo oral food challenge and sIgE testing. Five thousand two hundred seventy-six infants participated in the study. Peanut SPT responses of 8 mm or greater (95% CI, 7-9 mm), egg SPT responses of 4 mm or greater (95% CI, 3-5 mm), and sesame SPT responses of 8 mm or greater (95% CI, 5-9 mm) had 95% PPVs for challenge-proved food allergy. Peanut sIgE levels of 34 kUA/L or greater (95% CI, 14-48 kUA/L) and egg sIgE levels of 1.7 kUA/L or greater (95% CI, 1-3 kUA/L) had 95% PPVs for challenge-proved food allergy. Results were robust when stratified on established risk factors for food allergy. Egg SPT responses and sIgE levels were poor predictors of allergy to egg in baked goods. These 95% PPVs, which were generated from a unique dataset, are valuable for the diagnosis of food allergy in young infants and were robust when stratified across a number of different risk factors. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fish and shellfish allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalayasingam, Meera; Lee, Bee-Wah

    2015-01-01

    Fish and shellfish consumption has increased worldwide, and there are increasing reports of adverse reactions to fish and shellfish, with an approximate prevalence of 0.5-5%. Fish allergy often develops early in life, whilst shellfish allergy tends to develop later, from adolescence onwards. Little is known about the natural history of these allergies, but both are thought to be persistent. The clinical manifestations of shellfish allergy, in particular, may vary from local to life-threatening 'anaphylactic' reactions within an individual and between individuals. Parvalbumin and tropomyosin are the two major allergens, but several other allergens have been cloned and described. These allergens are highly heat and biochemically stable, and this may in part explain the persistence of these allergies. Diagnosis requires a thorough history, skin prick and in-vitro-specific IgE tests, and oral challenges may be needed for diagnostic confirmation. Strict avoidance of these allergens is the current standard of clinical care for allergic patients, and when indicated, an anaphylactic plan with an adrenaline auto-injector is prescribed. There are no published clinical trials evaluating specific oral immunotherapy for fish or shellfish allergy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Sesame allergy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adatia A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Adil Adatia,1 Ann Elaine Clarke,2 Yarden Yanishevsky,3 Moshe Ben-Shoshan4 1Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, 2Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, 3Section of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, 4Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children’s Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: Sesame is an important global allergen affecting ~0.1% of the North American population. It is a major cause of anaphylaxis in the Middle East and is the third most common food allergen in Israel. We conducted a systematic review of original articles published in the last 10 years regarding the diagnosis and management of sesame allergy. Skin prick testing appears to be a useful predictor of sesame allergy in infants, although data are less consistent in older children and adults. The diagnostic capacity of serum-specific immunoglobulin E is poor, especially in studies that used oral food challenges to confirm the diagnosis. Double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge thus remains the diagnostic gold standard for sesame allergy. The cornerstone of sesame allergy management is allergen avoidance, though accidental exposures are common and patients must be prepared to treat the consequent reactions with epinephrine. Novel diagnostic and treatment options such as component-resolved diagnostics, basophil activation testing, and oral immunotherapy are under development but are not ready for mainstream clinical application. Keywords: sesame allergy, skin prick testing, specific IgE, component-resolved diagnostics, epinephrine autoinjector

  14. Peanut Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about food allergies. Advocacy Resources Community Resources Teal Pumpkin Project Education Network Food for Thought Video Series ... those advertised as meat substitutes Also, peanut hulls (shells) can sometimes be found in compost, which can ...

  15. Shellfish Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about food allergies. Advocacy Resources Community Resources Teal Pumpkin Project Education Network Food for Thought Video Series ... urchin Scallops Snails (escargot) Squid (calamari) Whelk (Turban shell) *Note: The federal government does not require mollusks ...

  16. Shellfish Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the Food Allergy Research and Education website. Reading Food Labels Makers of foods sold in the ... doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, ...

  17. Wheat Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Watery eyes Wheat allergy Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  18. Allergies - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not cause a problem. In a person with allergies, the immune response is oversensitive. When it recognizes an allergen, the immune system launches a response. Chemicals such as histamines are ... symptoms. Common allergens include: Drugs Dust Food Insect ...

  19. Peanut Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that requires treatment with an epinephrine (adrenaline) injector (EpiPen, Auvi-Q, Twinject) and a trip to the ... and Infectious Diseases. Food Allergy Guidelines Backgrounder. http://epipen.mediaroom.com/press-kit. Accessed March 31, 2015. ...

  20. Food Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Allergy and Related Conditions Early Peanut Introduction: Translation to Clinical Practice (EPI) Content last reviewed on ... Report for International Grants Other Reporting Requirements for International Grants Foreign Organization System ... Cyber Infrastructure Computational Biology Equal Employment Opportunity Ethics ...

  1. [Subcutaneous teicoplanin for children with infectious endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, E; Roméo, B; El Samad, Y; Geslin-Lichtenberger, L; Maingourd, Y; Tourneux, P

    2013-07-01

    Infectious endocarditis in children requires prolonged antibiotic therapy. In adults, antibiotics administrated subcutaneously such as teicoplanin are an alternative to intravenous treatment. We report the use of subcutaneous teicoplanin, after an initial antibiotic treatment administrated intravenously, for 2 children treated for infectious endocarditis following an initial cardiac surgery. Serum concentrations of teicoplanin were within the target range after the adaptation in the teicoplanin subcutaneous dosages. The treatment was effective for both cases. No specific side effects related to the treatment were reported. Subcutaneous administration could be used for prolonged antibiotic therapy for the treatment of infectious endocarditis in children, after an initial intravenous treatment. Variability of the bioavailability of antibiotics administrated subcutaneously requires regular testing. Prospective, randomized trials comparing intravenous and subcutaneous administration of teicoplanin should be conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of this treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Fibrin gels loaded with cisplatin and cisplatin-hyaluronate complexes tested in a subcutaneous human melanoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, Maurizio; Rossi, Marta; Russo, Eleonora; Cilli, Michele; Aprile, Anna; Profumo, Aldo; Santi, Pierluigi; Fenoglio, Carla; Cafaggi, Sergio; Rocco, Mattia

    2015-12-01

    Fibrin gels are attractive biomaterials for local delivery of a variety of agents, from drugs to proteins. Similarly, polymer-anticancer-drug conjugates and nanoparticles are emerging as potential candidates for cancer treatment. Combining these different approaches, we have studied the efficacy of fibrin gels loaded with cisplatin (DDP) and a complex of DDP with hyaluronate (DDP-HA) for tumor growth inhibition in a melanoma model. Loaded gels prepared at relatively high fibrinogen concentration (22 mg/ml) showed good in vitro antiproliferative activities, prolonged release of the anticancer drug, and a long persistence (10-15 days) in vivo when implanted subcutaneously (sc) in immunodeficient mice. Gels loaded with DDP or DDP-HA containing 1/3 or even 1/6 of their systemic dose (6 mg/kg) and positioned under the tumor mass in mice bearing a sc human SK-Mel-28 tumor showed an antitumor activity better than that of the original parent compound given intraperitoneally (ip). Moreover, in an additional experiment in vivo, fibrin gels loaded with N-trimethyl chitosan-based nanoparticles containing a DDP-HA complex were assayed, resulting in a further 8 % improvement of anticancer activity, with lesser adverse systemic toxic effects. Taken together, these results suggest that the combination of fibrin gels and drugs complexed with suitable macromolecules holds great promise for loco-regional anticancer therapy of melanoma and other surgically removable cancer types.

  3. Use of a Penicillin Allergy Screening Algorithm and Penicillin Skin Testing for Transitioning Hospitalized Patients to First-Line Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Allison; Staicu, Mary L

    2017-12-11

    Penicillin allergy is the most commonly reported antibiotic allergy. Avoidance of β-lactam antibiotics in hospitalized patients leads to the use of second-line therapies. The utility of a penicillin allergy history algorithm (PAHA) and subsequent penicillin skin testing (PST) in transitioning hospitalized patients from second- to first-line antibiotic therapy is described. Through an electronic medical record report, pharmacists identified adult inpatients with penicillin allergy receiving moxifloxacin, intravenous vancomycin, aztreonam, daptomycin, or linezolid, in which a β-lactam antibiotic was preferred. The PAHA was administered to identify patients for PST. Skin-test negative patients were transitioned to first-line β-lactam antibiotic therapy. Fifty patients consented to the study. Historical reactions included hives (16 patients, 32%), angioedema (15, 30%), anaphylaxis (6, 12%), unknown (6, 12%), rash (6, 12%), and dyspnea (1, 2%). Pre-PST antibiotic regimens included vancomycin (82%), aztreonam (22%), moxifloxacin (6%), daptomycin (4%), and/or linezolid (2%). Forty-seven patients (94%) were skin-test negative and were subsequently transitioned to a β-lactam antibiotic. Two patients were skin-test positive and one was histamine nonreactive. No patients experienced an immediate adverse reaction when challenged with a penicillin-based antibiotic. A total of 982 days of second-line antibiotic therapy and at least 23 hospital days to administer the antibiotic were avoided. The use of the PAHA and subsequent PST is a safe, effective multidisciplinary intervention that facilitates the transition to β-lactam antibiotics. Our approach is unique in that it prioritizes patients based on the use of second-line antibiotics, and then applies an algorithm to determine eligibility for PST. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Allergy to Parietaria officinalis pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvitanović, S

    1999-03-01

    Parietaria pollen allergens (officinalis, judaica, lusitanica, creatica) are one of the most common causes of pollinosis in the Mediterranean (Spain, France, Italy, and Croatia). Parietaria has very long period of pollination, often reaching peaks of more than 500 grains/m3 of air at the beginning of June, and very strong allergenic properties. There is a significantly positive correlation for the newcomers between the intensity of the skin test reaction and concentration of specific serum IgE with the length of residence in the area, whereas autochthonous patients show a negative correlation between the age and intensity of hypersensitivity. This suggests that the environment encountered at birth may have a decisive role in the development of allergic respiratory diseases. Due to structurally similar pollen antigens in different Parietaria species, they are all equally useful in diagnosis and treatment of allergy, regardless of the pollen species to which the patient is sensitive or the prevalent species in the area. In our hands, specific immunotherapy with subcutaneous injections of partially purified, characterized, and standardized pollen extract of Parietaria allergen proved effective. It was possible to define an optimal maintenance dose of antigen per injection. During (years of) therapy, we observed an initial increase in total serum IgE concentration and increase in allergen-specific serum IgG blocking antibodies, decrease in allergen-specific serum IgE concentration and amount of histamine released from peripheral blood leukocytes challenged in vitro with the allergen, as well as in symptom and additional medication scores.

  5. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Voice in Health Care Decisions Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Parents > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print ... son la causa del asma? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergies don't cause asthma. But kids who ...

  6. Managing Your Seasonal Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Seasonal Allergies Managing Your Seasonal Allergies Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... decongestants, or immunotherapy. Read More "Seasonal Allergies" Articles Managing Your Seasonal Allergies / Diagnosis, Treatment & Research Spring 2015 ...

  7. Allergy Shots (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Allergy Shots KidsHealth > For Parents > Allergy Shots Print A ... to help a child deal with them. Why Allergy Shots Are Used An allergy occurs when the ...

  8. The association of asthma, nasal allergies, and positive skin prick tests with obesity, leptin, and adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newson, R B; Jones, M; Forsberg, B; Janson, C; Bossios, A; Dahlen, S-E; Toskala, E M; Al-Kalemji, A; Kowalski, M L; Rymarczyk, B; Salagean, E M; van Drunen, C M; Bachert, C; Wehrend, T; Krämer, U; Mota-Pinto, A; Burney, P; Leynaert, B; Jarvis, D

    2014-02-01

    Cross-sectional and longitudinal reports show that obese adults have more asthma than non-obese adults. A proposed mechanism is via effects of adipokines (leptin and adiponectin) on the immune system. We wished to measure the associations of asthma and other atopic diseases with serum adipokine levels and to find whether the associations with asthma were strong enough to rule out the possibility that they are secondary to the association of fatness measures with asthma. The Global Asthma and Allergy Network of Excellence (GA(2) LEN) clinical follow-up survey is a clinical survey, embedded in a larger multi-centre cross-sectional postal survey, involving, with a case/control design, enrichment of the sample with subjects with asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). We recorded serum leptin or adiponectin in 845 men and 1110 women in 15 centres and also anthropometric measures of fatness including body mass index and waist/hip ratio, current asthma, and specific skin prick and IgE sensitisation. We used inverse sampling-probability-weighted rank and regression statistics to measure population associations of disease outcomes with adipokines in males and females, adjusting for confounders (area, age, smoking history, and number of elder siblings) and also mutually adjusting associations with adipokines and fatness measures. One thousand nine hundred and fifty-five subjects aged 16-77 years had information on leptin or adiponectin levels. Leptin and leptin/adiponectin ratio were positively associated with the level of asthma, especially in females (Somers' D of leptin by asthma score, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08-0.30; P = 0.00079). These associations were attenuated after adjusting for confounders and became non-significant after additionally adjusting for fatness measures and multiple comparisons. Asthma levels are positively associated with serum leptin. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that this association is secondary to associations of both with fatness

  9. Prevalence of food allergies in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakali, Schweta R; Green, Todd D; Dinakar, Chitra

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the published medical literature on the prevalence and types of food allergies in South Asia. A PubMed search was performed using the keywords India and food allergy, Asia and food allergy, and South Asia and food allergy for any period. Articles cited in selected studies were reviewed for their appropriateness of inclusion into this review. Publications were included that were original research and fit the topic of food allergy and South Asia. South Asia is defined as region inclusive of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. A total of 169 articles were initially identified, and 47 were reviewed in detail for inclusion in this review. The primary focus was placed on 10 studies that consisted of case reports of newly reported or documented food allergy, survey studies that investigated food allergy prevalence in specific demographics, and prospective and cross-sectional studies with case controls, all of which investigated food allergy prevalence by allergy testing in a selected population. The medical literature on the prevalence and types of food allergy in South Asia indicates that there is a variety of unusual and unique allergens and an overall low incidence of food allergy. There is also an association of increased food allergy prevalence in individuals who live in metropolitan regions or who migrate to communities that have adopted westernization. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pollen food allergy syndrome in Turkey: Clinical characteristics and evaluation of its association with skin test reactivity to pollens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Seςil Kepil; Özgüςlü, Selcan

    2017-09-17

    There is limited data regarding pollen food allergy syndrome (PFAS) in Turkey. To investigate the clinical characteristics and possible risk factors of PFAS in Turkey, and to evaluate if there was an association between skin test reactivity to pollens and presence of PFAS. A total of 254 consecutive adult patients with pollen sensitivity were prospectively recruited. Patients were interviewed with a questionnaire including a list of pollen-associated foods. Patients were classified as having PFAS if they reported clear allergic symptoms compatible with PFAS. All participants underwent skin prick tests (SPT) to a panel of common aeroallergens, prick-to-prick tests with culprit fresh foods were performed in patients who gave consent. Self-reported PFAS was observed in 49 patients (19.3%). The most common culprit foods were kiwi, peach, tomato, melon and watermelon. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that potential risk factors for PFAS were having asthma (OR=2.392, P=0.044) and tree pollen sensitization (OR=2.904, P=0.004). There were no significant differences in the SPT wheal sizes to individual pollen extracts between patients with and without PFAS with a positive SPT result for that pollen extract (P> 0.05). PFAS is frequent in pollen sensitized adults in Turkey. The most commonly implicated foods are kiwi, peach,tomato, melon and watermelon, in our geographical region. SPT wheal sizes to pollen extracts seems to be similar in patients with and without PFAS.

  11. Relating microarray component testing and reported food allergy and food-triggered atopic dermatitis: a real-world analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Irene; Kim, Jennifer S; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2013-03-01

    High epitope diversity has been associated with increased IgE-mediated food allergy severity. To characterize associations between results from an automated microarray system and self-reported food allergy and food-triggered atopic dermatitis (AD). Families with food allergic children were identified from a Jewish community in Lakewood, New Jersey, with immediate family members without food allergy or food-triggered AD serving as controls for the identified children. Sets of microarray components analyzed were to milk (Bos d 4, Bos d 5, Bos d 8, Bos d lactoferrin), egg (Gal d 1, Gal d 2, Gal d 3, Gal d 5), and peanut (Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, Ara h 6). Seventy-three patients from 23 families were recruited. Culprit foods included milk (n = 20), egg (n = 10), and peanut (n = 6) for food allergy and milk (n = 10) and egg (n = 7) for food-triggered AD. Odds of having had a self-reported related food allergy or food-triggered AD reaction significantly increased with a higher number of detectable microarray components to that food. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 6 were individually associated with reported peanut allergy, and Bos d 4 was individually associated with reported milk allergy. The number of egg components significantly increased the odds of having related food-triggered AD. High diversity of food allergen components relates well to self-reported history of food allergy and food-associated AD. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-acting insulin allergy in a diabetic child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrorilli, Carla; Rizzuti, Laura; Cangelosi, Antonina Marta; Iovane, Brunella; Chiari, Giovanni; Caffarelli, Carlo

    2017-06-01

    Insulin allergy has been uncommon since the introduction of human recombinant insulin preparations; the prevalence is 2.4%. Insulin injection could elicit immediate reactions, which are usually induced by an IgE-mediated mechanism, within the first hour after drug administration. In the present study, we describe the case of a child who experienced immediate urticaria after long-acting insulin injection. A 9-year-old girl affected by type I diabetes mellitus referred a history of three episodes of urticaria 30 min after insulin subcutaneous injection. During the first week of insulin therapy, she developed generalized immediate urticaria twice after long-acting insulin glargine first and then once after insulin degludec administration. Symptoms resolved within a few hours after treatment with oral antihistamine. She tolerated rapid insulin lispro. Her personal allergological history was negative. Skin prick tests with degludec, glargine and detemir were performed, showing negative results. Intradermal 1:100000-diluted tests were immediately positive for both degludec and glargine but not for detemir. In light of these findings, detemir was administered without any reaction. Our results show that detemir is tolerated by patients with clinical hypersensitivity reactions to degludec and glargine. Although reactions could be attributable to additives allergy, such as zinc or metacresol, this was excluded since all three preparations contain the same components. So, insulin itself acted as offending allergen. Detemir differs from degludec and glargine in a few aminoacids. Therefore, it is possible that the conformational rather than the linear epitope may be responsible for the reaction. This result suggests integrating intradermal tests in the diagnostic flowchart for insulin allergy. Insulin allergy should always be suspected in patients with immediate symptoms after drug injection. As allergologic work-up, prick by prick test and intradermal test to insulin

  13. Allergy, living and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivato, T; Valovirta, E; Dahl, R

    2012-01-01

    Allergy Living and Learning (ALL) is a European initiative designed to increase knowledge and understanding of people living with allergies in order to improve respiratory allergy care.......Allergy Living and Learning (ALL) is a European initiative designed to increase knowledge and understanding of people living with allergies in order to improve respiratory allergy care....

  14. Milk and Soy Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Jacob D.; Cocco, Renata R.; Järvinen, Kirsi M.

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Cow’s milk allergy (CMA) affects 2% to 3% of young children and presents with a wide range of immunoglobulin E (IgE-) and non-IgE-mediated clinical syndromes, which have a significant economic and lifestyle impact. Definitive diagnosis is based on a supervised oral food challenge (OFC), but convincing clinical history, skin prick testing, and measurement of cow’s milk (CM)-specific IgE can aid in the diagnosis of IgE-mediated CMA and occasionally eliminate the need for OFCs. It is logical that a review of CMA would be linked to a review of soy allergy, as soy formula is often an alternative source of nutrition for infants who do not tolerate cow’s milk. The close resemblance between the proteins from soy and other related plants like peanut, and the resulting cross-reactivity and lack of predictive values for clinical reactivity, often make the diagnosis of soy allergy far more challenging. This review examines the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, natural history and diagnosis of cow’s milk and soy allergy. Cross-reactivity and management of milk allergy are also discussed. PMID:21453810

  15. Epidemiology of IgE-mediated food allergy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiology of IgE- mediated food allergy. The prevalence of food allergy varies significantly based on geographical region, allergens tested, diagnostic criteria, population age and concurrent atopic conditions.[5]. Variations in food allergy definitions and inconsistencies in study design make studies on food allergy.

  16. Relationship between formaldehyde and quaternium-15 contact allergy. Influence of strength of patch test reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Anton C.; Blok, Janine; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To test our hypothesis that patients with stronger patch test reactions to formaldehyde are more likely to react to quaternium-15, attesting to the aetiological role for formaldehyde in such co-reactivity. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients patch tested with formaldehyde and

  17. Quantitative aspects of isoeugenol contact allergy assessed by use and patch tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Menné, T

    1996-01-01

    in 4/19 (20%) of the test subjects. The ROAT was performed with a test solution of 0.2% isoeugenol in ethanol, which is the recommended maximum concentration used in perfumes, ethanol being applied as vehicle control. 4 weeks was the maximum exposure period. The upper arm was used as test site the 1st...

  18. Quantitative aspects of isoeugenol contact allergy assessed by use and patch tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, K E; Menné, T

    1996-01-01

    The clinical implications of sensitization to the fragrance material isoeugenol were studied in 19 subjects. Patch testing with serial dilutions of isoeugenol and a repeated open application test (ROAT) were performed. The minimum effect level under patch test conditions was below 0.01% isoeugeno...

  19. Contact allergy to spices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Van den Akker Th. (W.); I.D. Roesyanto-Mahadi (I.); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); Th. van Joost (Theo)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA group of 103 patients suspected of contact allergy was tested with the European standard series, wood tars and spices; paprika, cinnamon, laurel, celery seed, nutmeg, curry, black pepper, cloves, while pepper, coriander, cacao and garlic. 32 patients (Group I) were selected on the

  20. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare are reported. Clinical presentation was in the form of hard subcutaneous nodules, histopathology confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The cases were unique because of onset in adult age, occurrence over unusual sites and absence of classical lesions of granuloma annulare elsewhere.

  1. [Correlation between the magnitude of skin prick test reactivity and pollen-specific serum IgE levels in patients with respiratory allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlachi-Corona, Laura; Caballero-López, Chrystopherson Gengyny; López-García, Aída Inés; Papaqui-Tapia, Sergio; Arana-Muñoz, Oswaldo; Carcaño-Pérez, María Socorro Yolanda; Marín-Marín, Araceli; Garrido-Priego, Fabiola

    2014-01-01

    For the etiological diagnosis of allergic respiratory diseases skin tests or specific serum IgE determination are used. To determine the correlation between the extent of reactivity to cutaneous prick tests and the levels of pollen specific serum IgE in patients with respiratory allergy. A prolective, descriptive and transversal study was done with patients of both genders, aged 2 to 60 years, who attended for the first time at the service of Allergy and Clinical Immunology of University Hospital of Puebla, Mexico, with presumptive diagnosis of respiratory allergy. All patients underwent clinical history, skin prick tests with standardized allergenic extracts and quantification of pollen specific serum IgE by chemiluminescence method. We estimated the correlation index r using the statistical method Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient; a value r equal to or higher than 0.70 was considered a significant relationship or a high correlation. Nine-one patients were included, of whom 58.2% were female. The diagnoses were: allergic rhinitis (79.1%), asthma and allergic rhinitis (16.5%) and only asthma (4.4%). Only significant correlation was found in patients with allergic rhinitis for Rumex crispus (r = 0.702) and in patients with asthma and rhinitis for Ambrosia trifida (r = 1). Only for Rumex crispus and Ambrosia trifida, the skin prick tests or the determination of specific serum IgE levels are comparable diagnostic methods of allergic respiratory diseases.

  2. Allergy Shots: Could They Help Your Allergies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthWhat kind of allergies can be treated with allergy shots? Common allergens include mold and pollen from grasses, ragweed, and trees. You may be allergic to dust mites or an insect that stings, such as bees. Allergy shots also can relieve eye allergies or improve ...

  3. Food Allergies

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-23

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the dangers of food allergies and the need to be aware if any friends or classmates have them.  Created: 4/23/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/23/2013.

  4. Pet Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop bacterial infections of the sinuses, such as sinusitis. Asthma People with asthma and pet allergy often have difficulty managing asthma symptoms. They may be at risk of asthma attacks that require immediate medical treatment or emergency care. Prevention If you don't ...

  5. Cockroach allergy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-11-11

    Nov 11, 2000 ... Objective: To determine the prevalence of cockroach allergy in asthmatics in Lagos. Design: A prospective case-control study. Setting: Medical outpatient department of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos,. Nigeria. Subjects: Two hundred and two patients with confirmed bronchial asthma and ...

  6. Skin testing and oral penicillin challenge in patients with a history of remote penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Arnon; Confino-Cohen, Ronit

    2008-01-01

    Penicillin administration is usually contraindicated in penicillin-allergic patients with positive skin test results. To examine whether penicillin oral challenge for patients with a history of remote non-life-threatening allergic reaction to penicillin can be well tolerated irrespective of skin test results. In a prospective open-label trial, 8,702 individuals were screened between November 1998 and January 2000. Of 687 patients with a non-life-threatening allergic reaction to penicillin, occurring longer than 3 years earlier, 169 were enrolled. Regardless of the response to penicillin skin testing, patients received the usual 1-day dosage of penicillin and amoxicillin, on 2 separate occasions. Two to 6 years later, a follow-up was conducted to assess the outcomes of further penicillin administration. A total of 272 combined skin tests and oral challenges were performed on 169 patients. Among 137 challenges with a positive skin test result and 135 patients with a negative skin test result, 9 (6.6%) and 5 (3.7%) (P = .29), respectively, developed a mild rash to oral challenge. At follow-up, 2 to 6 years afterward, 3 of 55 patients (5.5%) who were given a full treatment course of penicillin developed a mild skin eruption. Positive penicillin skin test results for patients with a remote history of non-life-threatening allergic reaction to penicillin were not associated with a greater prevalence of adverse reactions to oral challenge with penicillin than negative results. Because skin testing is considered the gold standard and the safest method for predicting tolerance to penicillin administration, oral penicillin challenge may be used as a diagnostic method only in these specific patients when skin testing is not feasible.

  7. Application of native prick test in diagnosis of bed bug allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Łukasz; Gawrońska-Ukleja, Ewa; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was case report of the patient with systemic reaction after a bed bug (Cimex lectularius) bite. A 23-year-old female, previously healthy, reports systemic reaction, including rash on her corpus and limbs, itching, nausea, conciseness disorder, forcing her to call the ambulance. The interview revealed that the bed bug occurs in the patient's apartment. A prick-by-prick test with bed bug excretion was made. The skin test with native allergen was strongly positive (histamine 5 mm/5 mm, prick-by-prick 12 mm/8 mm). The prick-by-prick test was useful in objective confirmation of the source of symptoms. PMID:24278049

  8. Two cases of pollen-food allergy syndrome to soy milk diagnosed by skin prick test, specific serum immunoglobulin E and microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Akiko; Inaba, Yasuko; Kuno, Yuki; Suzuki, Kayoko; Tanaka, Akira; Sjolander, Sigrid; Saito, Hirohisa; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2009-01-01

    Oral allergy syndrome to soy milk is classified as a phenotype of pollen-food allergy syndrome (PFAS). As causative antigens, Gly m 4 (Bet v 1 homolog, 17 kD) and oleosin (23 kD), have been reported. In this study, we report two cases of PFAS to soy milk. Both cases showed positive reactions to soy milk in skin prick tests (SPT) and to Gly m 4 in specific serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E antibody. When we measured specific serum IgE antibody of soy-related proteins using a new laboratory testing method, microarray analysis, both cases showed a positive reaction for Bet v 1. One case was weakly positive for a soybean protein, beta-conglycinin. Other results for reactivity to soy, peanut, cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants and profilin were negative. Based on these results, we diagnosed the two cases as PFAS to Gly m 4. We also performed protein microarray analysis and found it useful as a screening test for immediate allergy, such as PFAS.

  9. Challenge Test Results in Patients With Suspected Penicillin Allergy, but No Specific IgE

    OpenAIRE

    Holm, Anne; Mosbech, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Patients with a history of allergic reaction to penicillin, but with no detectable specific IgE, are common and pose a dilemma. Challenge tests are considered to be the diagnostic gold standard. The aim of this study was to identify subgroups of patients with very low risk for reactions who could be safely tested using a more rapid and simple procedure. Methods A total of 580 consecutively referred adult patients with a history of non-serious cutaneous allergic reactions to penicillin...

  10. Cutaneous reactions to heparin therapy: when are they caused by heparin allergy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Zisa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about the incidence and causes of heparin-induced skin lesions. The most commonly reported causes are delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. We describe 3 patients who were referred to our staff between March and October 2009 for suspected heparin allergies. All were scheduled to undergo major surgery (cardiovascular or orthopedic. Materials and methods: All 3 patients reported the development of itchy, erythematous rashes a few days after the subcutaneous administration of heparin (nadroparin calcium in cases 1 and 2, unspecified in case 3. Each of them underwent a diagnostic work-up for heparin allergy, which included prick and intradermal tests with commonly used heparins and patch testing with undiluted heparins and disinfectants. Results: Patch tests with disinfectants were negative in all 3 cases. In case 2, all allergological tests were negative. In cases 1 and 3, delayed positivity emerged for nadroparin calcium and at least one other heparin tested. Intravenous and/or subcutaneous provocation testing was done with an alternative heparin which produced negative results in skin tests (heparin sodium in case 1, pentasaccharide fondaparinux in case 3. In both cases the alternative drug was tolerated. After our evaluation, all 3 patients underwent surgery with no heparin-related complications. Discussion: The presenting clinical features in these 3 cases provided no information on which reactions were likely to be allergic: all 3 patients presented with similar local delayed reaction. The allergic reactions were identified only after cutaneous testing.

  11. [Food allergy. Most often conceals an inhalational allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbling, A

    1998-09-30

    Food allergy (hypersensitivity) is a form of adverse food reaction in which the reaction is caused by an immunological response to a food. Most immediate allergic reactions to food are IgE-mediated. The prevalence of food allergy in the general population without the oral allergy syndrome is about 1-2%. Although many foods have been described to cause an allergic reaction, only a few are responsible for the majority of hypersensitivity symptoms. Based on continuous studies by B. Wüthrich, Allergy Unit of the Dermatology Department, University Hospital, Zurich, celery (42%) followed by dairy products (16%), carrot (13%), hen's egg (12%) and fish (7%) is by far the major source of food allergy in Switzerland. In adults food hypersensitivity is mainly due to cross-reactivity between inhalative and food allergens. Pathophysiologically, IgE antibodies induced by aeroallergens recognize structurally similar components in certain foods even from taxonomically unrelated plants. Following an accurate allergological examination, oral provocation tests are considered the most conclusive procedures to establish diagnosis. The only proven form of management in food allergy is strict elimination of the offending food. Food-allergic patients must be provided with emergency medications. Identification of allergens and their characterization finally will improve our understanding for pathophysiologic mechanisms of food allergy.

  12. Bee-venom allergy in children: long-term predictive value of standardized challenge tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Georg E; Forster, Johannes; Hauk, Pia J; Friedl, Katrin; Kuehr, Joachim

    2002-02-01

    Venom immunotherapy (VIT) is able to protect insect venom-allergic patients against life-threatening sting reactions. Standardized sting challenges can be used as a diagnostic tool to check whether VIT is required. No data are available on the long-term predictive value of sting challenge tests. The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term predictive value of sequential bee-sting challenges with respect to the ability to predict future sting reactions in bee-venom (BV) allergic children. Between 1988 and 1992, 92 BV-allergic children had been challenged with sequential bee stings at intervals of 2-6 weeks to determine the necessity of VIT. In 1996, all 92 families were followed-up using standardized telephone interviews. Until the follow-up, 61 children (66.3%) had experienced at least one natural bee sting. Based on the results of the initial challenge tests, 13 of the 61 patients had been started on VIT. Two of these 13 (15.4%) developed systemic reactions 1 year after VIT of 5 years, of which one was mild and one was severe. Among the 48 re-stung patients who were not treated with VIT, three children (6.3%) experienced mild systemic reactions, whereas 45 children reported no more than a local reaction. The long-term predictive value of sequential bee-sting challenge tests for systemic reactions in children not treated with VIT remained at a level of 93.8% (95% confidence interval: 82.8-98.7%) even over a period of more than 6 years. Based on this data, we conclude that sequential bee-sting challenges are a powerful tool to determine the necessity for VIT in BV-allergic children.

  13. Challenge Test Results in Patients With Suspected Penicillin Allergy, but No Specific IgE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Anne; Mosbech, Holger

    2011-04-01

    Patients with a history of allergic reaction to penicillin, but with no detectable specific IgE, are common and pose a dilemma. Challenge tests are considered to be the diagnostic gold standard. The aim of this study was to identify subgroups of patients with very low risk for reactions who could be safely tested using a more rapid and simple procedure. A total of 580 consecutively referred adult patients with a history of non-serious cutaneous allergic reactions to penicillin, but with no IgE, were challenged with therapeutic doses of penicillin V (phenoxymethylpenicillin), penicillin G (benzylpenicillin), or both. Only 14 of 580 patients had a positive challenge test. In 11 of the 14, a reaction to challenge occurred within 2 hours, and none were anaphylactic. The year of the original reaction was known for 555 patients; a positive challenge was seen in only 0.4% of those with an original reaction >15 years before challenge, but in 4.6% of those with a more recent original reaction (P=0.001). Onset of a reaction within the first day of the original exposure was a predictive factor for a positive challenge (P=0.001) in patients challenged within 15 years of the original reaction. Among suspected penicillin-allergic patients with non-severe skin reactions and no detectable specific IgE, the subgroup of patients who originally reacted more than 15 years previously had very low risk for reacting to a challenge. The risk was higher in patients with a more recent original reaction, especially if the symptoms had occurred within the first day of exposure.

  14. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with negative allergy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Jacob; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe

    2014-02-06

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is a disorder where exercise following allergen ingestion triggers anaphylaxis although exercise and allergen exposure are independently tolerated. The diagnosis of FDEIA is based on a characteristic clinical history. The culprit allergen is usually confirmed through the use of skin prick testing (SPT) serum-specific IgE levels and a food-exercise challenge. We present a case of FDEIA suggested by clinical history and open food-exercise challenge with negative specific IgE levels and SPT that highlights the challenges involved in diagnosing and managing this rare disorder.

  15. The Natural History of Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jessica; Sicherer, Scott; Wood, Robert

    2016-01-01

    On a population level, it is well recognized that some IgE-mediated childhood food allergies, such as milk and egg allergies, are more likely to resolve than others, such as peanut and tree nuts allergies. Unfortunately, some studies suggest that resolution rates may have slowed compared with impressions from past decades. The clinician can apply the knowledge of the epidemiology of these allergies to describe likely patient outcomes, and direct management in a general manner. However, the ability to evaluate and predict the natural course of specific food allergies for individual patients is essential to inform personalized patient care. Data are accumulating to assist in identifying whether a child's allergy has likely resolved, informing the timing of oral food challenges or subsequent testing. Exciting recent studies are increasingly identifying early prognostic markers as well. Emerging food allergy therapies carry risks and costs. Identifying which egg-allergic patient has likely persistent allergy, and which patient with peanut allergy may experience natural resolution, is becoming an important goal to identify the best candidates for these therapies. Although more work needs to be done to identify reliable predictive markers and validate them, there is already much known about the natural course of food allergies that can be applied by the clinician to improve patient care. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding Food Allergies: How to Prevent Peanut Allergy and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe March 2017 Print this issue Understanding Food Allergies How to Prevent Peanut Allergy and More En ... Allergy Therapy Seeking Allergy Relief Wise Choices Food Allergy Symptoms Pay attention to how you feel after ...

  17. Evaluation of the analgesic effect of subcutaneous methadone after cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Jabalameli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inadequate pain control has a significant role in maternal and neonatal health in early post-partum period which interferes with breastfeeding and has a negative influence on child normal growth. The aim of this study is evaluation of subcutaneous methadone effectiveness on post-operative pain control. Materials and Methods: Double blind randomized prospective clinical trial involving 60 term pregnancy patients through 2008 to 2009 Undergo cesarean. Inclusion criteria: Prime gravid candidate of elective cesarean and spinal anesthesia class 1 or 2. Known case of drug allergy and methadone interaction, addiction, uncontrolled medical disease excluded. Case group injected 10 mg of subcutaneous methadone in the site of incision before final suture. Morphine was a pain reliever in follow up examination. Data include mean of pain, nausea and vomiting, MAP, etc., collected and analyzed by independent-T test and Man Whitney test. Results: Although mean usage of morphine between groups was not significant statistically but the mean pain severity (P value < 0.05 and mean satisfactory (P value = 0.02 was statistically significant between groups. Other parameters were not statistically significant. Conclusion: We suggest subcutaneous methadone as a safe pain reliever in post cesarean section patients.

  18. Evaluation of the analgesic effect of subcutaneous methadone after cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabalameli, Mitra; Kalantari, Forough

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate pain control has a significant role in maternal and neonatal health in early post-partum period which interferes with breastfeeding and has a negative influence on child normal growth. The aim of this study is evaluation of subcutaneous methadone effectiveness on post-operative pain control. Double blind randomized prospective clinical trial involving 60 term pregnancy patients through 2008 to 2009 Undergo cesarean. Prime gravid candidate of elective cesarean and spinal anesthesia class 1 or 2. Known case of drug allergy and methadone interaction, addiction, uncontrolled medical disease excluded. Case group injected 10 mg of subcutaneous methadone in the site of incision before final suture. Morphine was a pain reliever in follow up examination. Data include mean of pain, nausea and vomiting, MAP, etc., collected and analyzed by independent-T test and Man Whitney test. Although mean usage of morphine between groups was not significant statistically but the mean pain severity (P value < 0.05) and mean satisfactory (P value = 0.02) was statistically significant between groups. Other parameters were not statistically significant. We suggest subcutaneous methadone as a safe pain reliever in post cesarean section patients.

  19. Meat allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restani, Patrizia; Ballabio, Cinzia; Tripodi, Salvatore; Fiocchi, Alessandro

    2009-06-01

    This review summarizes the scientific evidence on meat allergy, an unusual disorder, whose prevalence in some European countries (such as Italy) may be increasing. Data reported in this review underline some interesting points: in meats rarely consumed, such as kangaroo, whale and seal, the main allergens are only partially correlated to those detected in beef or other usually consumed meats; cross-reactivity and cross-contamination are critical aspects, which should be seriously considered by allergologists. Meat allergy is normally outgrown during the first years of life, so that it is rare in adults. Beef among mammals and chicken among birds are most frequently involved. The major allergens are serum albumins and immunoglobulins, but there are a few reports of allergies to muscle proteins (actin, myosin and tropomyosin). As meat allergenicity can be reduced by various treatments (heat, homogenization and freeze-drying), the consumption of meat derivatives by children allergic to meat proteins is often permitted. Cross-reactivity has been described between different meats, between meat and milk or eggs and between meat and animal dander. There are some reports of cross-contamination associated with the inadequate cleaning of industrial or butchers' equipment. All these aspects may have serious implications for clinical practice.

  20. Vaccine allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Hee

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the increasing numbers of vaccine administrations are associated with increased reports of adverse vaccine reactions. Whilst the general adverse reactions including allergic reactions caused by the vaccine itself or the vaccine components, are rare, they can in some circumstances be serious and even fatal. In accordance with many IgE-mediated reactions and immediate-type allergic reactions, the primary allergens are proteins. The proteins most often implicated in vaccine allergies are egg and gelatin, with perhaps rare reactions to yeast or latex. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the injectable influenza vaccine can be safely administered, although with appropriate precautions, to patients with severe egg allergy, as the current influenza vaccines contain small trace amounts of egg protein. If an allergy is suspected, an accurate examination followed by algorithms is vital for correct diagnosis, treatment and decision regarding re-vaccination in patients with immediate-type reactions to vaccines. Facilities and health care professionals should be available to treat immediate hypersensitivity reactions (anaphylaxis) in all settings where vaccines are administered.

  1. Positive penicillin allergy testing results: a systematic review and meta-analysis of papers published from 2010 through 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harandian, Farnoush; Pham, Donavan; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe

    2016-08-01

    β-lactam antibiotics are the most widely used group of antibiotics, given their effectiveness for the most common bacterial pathogens and their relatively low price. Adverse reactions, mainly cutaneous, are often reported to be associated with their use and hence, less effective and usually more costly alternative antibiotics are prescribed. However, it is not clear what is the risk of immediate immune-mediated (i.e. developing within one hour of administration) and potentially life-threatening reactions among those using β-lactam antibiotic. We conducted a systematic review to assess the prevalence of immediate adverse reactions to β-lactam antibiotics, specifically penicillin derivatives, in patients with a reported adverse reaction to β-lactam antibiotics. In addition, we determined the effect of age on the prevalence of immediate reactions. Assessing the true risk of using β-lactam antibiotics in patients with a reported allergy could prevent physicians from unnecessarily discouraging the use of β-lactam antibiotics. We conducted a systematic review and a meta-analysis using the PubMed, OVID, and Embase databases of work published in English and in French in the last 5 years. Studies were only eligible if they established the prevalence of immediate penicillin reactions with skin testing or challenges in case of negative skin tests. The meta-analysis was conducted using Stata version 12.0. The prevalence of immediate reactions to penicillin derivatives in patients reporting a β-lactam hypersensitivity is 1.98% (95%CI; 1.35%, 2.60%) in the pediatric (under 18 years old) group, 7.78% (95%CI; 6.53%, 9.04%) in the adult group, and 2.84% (95%CI; 1.77%, 3.91%) in the combined group, as tested in various studies, using skin tests and oral challenges. The I(2) value ranged between 87.2% and 97.0%. Our results indicate that the prevalence of immediate reactions is higher in adults than in children. However, wide confidence intervals and a large study

  2. Fire Ant Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Allergy Library ▸ Fire ant allergy Share | Fire Ant Allergy This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Fire ants are a stinging insect typically found in ...

  3. Nut and Peanut Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stepparents Be a Green Kid Nut and Peanut Allergy KidsHealth > For Kids > Nut and Peanut Allergy Print ... previous continue How Is a Nut or Peanut Allergy Diagnosed? If your doctor thinks you might have ...

  4. Skin prick test and basophil reactivity to cetuximab in patients with IgE to alpha-gal and allergy to red meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, S; Scherer, K; Heijnen, I A F M; Bircher, A J

    2014-03-01

    Severe hypersensitivity reactions to red meat with delay of several hours in patients with IgE to alpha-gal (galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose) have been reported. The diagnosis of meat allergy is difficult, because of the limited sensitivity of skin prick tests and specific IgE tests to meat extracts. These circumstances have been explained by the delayed expression of alpha-gal due to digestive processes. Because of the low sensitivity of skin prick tests to meat, we studied the possibility to perform skin prick tests with cetuximab, which carries the alpha-gal epitope. Skin prick and intradermal tests with cetuximab were clearly positive in 2 of 2 patients. As a further diagnostic step, we performed basophil activation tests with cetuximab. Skin prick tests and basophil activation test using cetuximab may be a more sensitive alternative in patients with an assumed allergy to meat. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. International Consensus on drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoly, P; Adkinson, N F; Brockow, K; Castells, M; Chiriac, A M; Greenberger, P A; Khan, D A; Lang, D M; Park, H-S; Pichler, W; Sanchez-Borges, M; Shiohara, T; Thong, B Y- H

    2014-04-01

    When drug reactions resembling allergy occur, they are called drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) before showing the evidence of either drug-specific antibodies or T cells. DHRs may be allergic or nonallergic in nature, with drug allergies being immunologically mediated DHRs. These reactions are typically unpredictable. They can be life-threatening, may require or prolong hospitalization, and may necessitate changes in subsequent therapy. Both underdiagnosis (due to under-reporting) and overdiagnosis (due to an overuse of the term ‘allergy’) are common. A definitive diagnosis of such reactions is required in order to institute adequate treatment options and proper preventive measures. Misclassification based solely on the DHR history without further testing may affect treatment options, result in adverse consequences, and lead to the use of more-expensive or less-effective drugs, in contrast to patients who had undergone a complete drug allergy workup. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents on general or specific drug class-induced DHRs are available to support the medical decision process. The use of standardized systematic approaches for the diagnosis and management of DHRs carries the potential to improve outcomes and should thus be disseminated and implemented. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), and the World Allergy Organization (WAO), has decided to issue an International CONsensus (ICON) on drug allergy. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences and deficiencies of evidence, thus providing a comprehensive reference document for the diagnosis and management of

  6. Overview of penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Christopher; Mahmood, Mubashar M; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2012-08-01

    Allergy to penicillin is the most commonly reported antibiotic allergy. However, most patients who report a positive history of a prior reaction to penicillin are not found to be allergic to penicillin upon skin testing. Often, this history is vague or based on a parent's recollection of an event that occurred in the distant past. Avoidance of penicillin based on self-reported allergic history alone often leads to the use of an alternate antibiotic with greater cost or side effect profile. Patients with a negative skin test to both major and minor determinants may generally be given penicillin, with a statistical risk of developing an allergic reaction similar to that observed in the general population. A more cautious approach in these cases where the degree of suspicion is low, an allergic etiology is unproven, or there is a negative skin test, is to do a graded challenge. If the skin test is positive, an alternate antibiotic should be used. If, however, an alternate antibiotic is not available, then desensitization may be performed, but there are limitations to desensitization as well, and tolerance is not permanent. Avoidance of cephalosporins may be recommended in cases of penicillin allergy, but newer generation cephalosporins have demonstrate less cross-reactivity to penicillin than earlier generation ones. Desensitization protocols for cephalosporins are available but not standardized. The mechanisms of antibiotic sensitization are not clearly understood.

  7. Soy sauce allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, K; Sugiura, M

    2010-07-01

    Soy sauce is well-known as a Japanese traditional seasoning, namely shoyu. Usually, shoyu means sauce made from soy. Shoyu does have not only benefits but also adverse effects. Soy sauce allergy which is not caused by soy or wheat allergy is rare. Our four patients developed cellulites and dermatitis around lips with irritation after a meal with shoyu. The age of the patients was 10, 35, 46 and 51 years; they were all female. These inflammations can be developed by two causes; first it can be caused by allergic reactions to shoyu; the second, it can be caused by histamine poisoning. It is important to determine whether inflammation is caused by allergic reactions or histamine poisoning. We determined the volume of histamine in some sauces and performed prick test and laboratory tests. Four patients had positive reactions by prick test after using some sauces. We suspected that histamine caused their symptoms, but nine normal volunteers had negative reactions. Patient's specific IgE score to soy and wheat was class 0. The results showed that the sauce made from soybean and broad bean contained histamine, but histamine in other sauces was not detected. In this study, we confirmed by prick test, four cases of soy sauce allergy, which was caused by some products during brewing. When patients with inflammations around mouth, after a meal containing or using soy sauce, are examined, it should be considered whether dermatitis or cellulites were developed by allergic reaction or by histamine poisoning.

  8. Hypoallergenic molecules for subcutaneous immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongejan, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-01-01

    Although a large part of the population suffers from allergies, a cure is not yet available. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) offers promise for these patients. AIT has proven successful in insect and venom allergies; however, for food allergy this is still unclear. In this editorial we focus...... on the recent advances in a proof of concept study in food allergy, FAST (Food allergy specific immunotherapy), which may increase interest within the biomolecular and pharmaceutical industry to embark on similar projects of immunology driven precision medicine within the allergy field....

  9. Patch testing with markers of fragrance contact allergy. Do clinical tests correspond to patients' self-reported problems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, T F; Veien, Niels

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between patients' own recognition of skin problems using consumer products and the results of patch testing with markers of fragrance sensitization. Eight hundred and eighty-four consecutive eczema patients, 18-69 years of age, filled...... in a questionnaire prior to patch testing with the European standard series. The questionnaire contained questions about skin symptoms from the use of scented and unscented products as well as skin reactions from contact with spices, flowers and citrus fruits that could indicate fragrance sensitivity. A highly...... significant association was found between reporting a history of visible skin symptoms from using scented products and a positive patch test to the fragrance mix, whereas no such relationship could be established to the Peru balsam in univariate or multivariate analysis. Our results suggest that the role...

  10. Evaluation of a multiple food specific IgE antibody test compared to parental perception, allergy skin tests and RAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, B R; Assadullahi, T; Warner, J A; Warner, J O

    1991-11-01

    This study was set up to evaluate the food panel of a multiple specific IgE antibody assay in 67 atopic asthmatic children by comparing it to the conventional radioallergosorbent test (RAST) and skin-prick tests (SPT) and then comparing the results of these investigations with the parents' perceptions of food related problems. Fifteen food specific IgE antibodies were measured using the multiple chemiluminescence assay (MAST-CLA). IgE antibodies to five of these food allergens were also measured by conventional RAST and SPTs were performed in 43 using 11 standardized food extracts matched to the multiple allergosorbent chemiluminescent assay (MAST-CLA) profile. SPT and MAST-CLA results showed good agreement with one another, range 68.8-96.7% (average 87%), with significant correlation for most allergens tested. MAST-CLA was discrepant with RAST and/or SPTs in 58/210 (27.6%). A questionnaire was sent to the parents to determine their perception of food related symptoms. Sixty-two (92%) questionnaire replies were received, of which 56% reported symptoms with food. The most frequent symptom perceived to be due to food intolerance was behavioural disturbance. The commonest foods implicated were additives (39%), egg (27%), milk (26%), chocolate (23%) and orange (15%). History, SPT, MAST-CLA and RAST were compared for five allergens in 42 patients (210 values). In 14/210 (6.7%), all the tests were negative despite reported symptoms. Conversely in 49/210 (23.3%) at least one test was positive without symptoms. This study did not support a benefit of multipole testing instead of individually selected RASTs or SPTs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Allergy Risk Finder: Hypothesis Generation System for Allergy Risks via Web Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Eiji; Shikata, Shuko; Watabe, Eriko; Miyabe, Mai; Usuda, Yasuyuki; Ayaya, Satsuki; Kumagaya, Shinichiro

    2015-01-01

    This study's aim was to build a web service that automatically collects and tests hypotheses for possible allergy risks. We crowdsourced for unknown allergy risks, and obtained odds ratios. By using the collected hypotheses, we built a web service that estimates allergy risks from a questionnaire (consisting of 10 questions that we gathered from the crowdsourcing task), and at the end, we asked the users their new hypotheses on possible allergy risks. The web service also asked the users to send their original hypotheses to contribute to find the cause of allergy. In the near future, clinical trials to validate the hypotheses found in this study are desired.

  12. Patch testing with markers of fragrance contact allergy. Do clinical tests correspond to patients' self-reported problems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, T F; Veien, Niels

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between patients' own recognition of skin problems using consumer products and the results of patch testing with markers of fragrance sensitization. Eight hundred and eighty-four consecutive eczema patients, 18-69 years of age, filled...... significant association was found between reporting a history of visible skin symptoms from using scented products and a positive patch test to the fragrance mix, whereas no such relationship could be established to the Peru balsam in univariate or multivariate analysis. Our results suggest that the role...

  13. [Determination of specific IgE serum antibodies using the Radio-Allergo-Sorbent-Test (RAST) and its significance for the diagnosis of atopic allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, B; Kopper, E

    1975-10-18

    The Radio Allergo Sorbent Test (Phadebas-RAST) is a recently developed radioimmunological in-vitro test for determining IgE specific serum antibodies in reaginic allergy. The overall correspondence between RAST and skin tests in 1,128 tests with a total of 19 allergens was 70.2%. The agreement between positive RAST and skin tests was 22.1%. In instances of disagreement the combination of a positive skin test and a negative RAST was much more frequent (24.1%) than the reverse (5,7%). The agreement between RAST and skin tests was 94.5% for cat epithelium, 89.3% for egg white, 86.2% for timothy pollen, 84.2% for milk, 80.3% for mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, 78.8% for birch pollen, 71.9% for dog epithelium, 67.7% for horse dandruff, 57.3% for moulds and only 40.3% for house dust. Positive RAST results for atopic patients with respiratory allergy usually indicate a clinically relevant sensitization (positive case history or positive provocation test), while negative results do not rule out the possibility of significant sensitization. Circulating reagins were detected in 9.4% of the mite and 12.7% of the mould RAST, although the skin tests were negative. The greatest discrepancy between RAST and inhalation test results occurred with house dust (47% agreement, only 12% positive correlation). The RAST was negative in 53% of the cases with positive provocation tests. The first step in the diagnosis of allergy is still a thorough case history combined with careful prick and intracutaneous testing. When the case history and skin tests are in disagreement, RAST may be helpful as a supplementary test. In addition, the RAST may be useful in clarifying cases in which the patient is on continuous steroid or antihistamine therapy, as well as for children who are frightened of skin tests. If house dust asthma is suspected, it is advisable in all but a few instances to utilize the bronchial provocation test to confirm the diagnosis and for initiation of specific

  14. Patch testing with markers of fragrance contact allergy. Do clinical tests correspond to patients' self-reported problems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, T F; Veien, Niels

    1997-01-01

    in a questionnaire prior to patch testing with the European standard series. The questionnaire contained questions about skin symptoms from the use of scented and unscented products as well as skin reactions from contact with spices, flowers and citrus fruits that could indicate fragrance sensitivity. A highly...

  15. Patch testing with markers of fragrance contact allergy. Do clinical tests correspond to patients' self-reported problems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, T F; Veien, Niels

    1997-01-01

    significant association was found between reporting a history of visible skin symptoms from using scented products and a positive patch test to the fragrance mix, whereas no such relationship could be established to the Peru balsam in univariate or multivariate analysis. Our results suggest that the role...

  16. Clinical management of food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, J Andrew; Lack, Gideon; Perry, Tamara T

    2015-01-01

    Food allergies are commonly seen by the practitioner, and managing these patients is often challenging. Recent epidemiologic studies report that as many as 1 in 13 children in the United States may have a food allergy, which makes this an important disease process to appropriately diagnose and manage for primary care physicians and specialists alike. Having a understanding of the basic immunologic processes that underlie varying presentations of food-induced allergic diseases will guide the clinician in the initial workup. This review will cover the basic approach to understanding the immune response of an individual with food allergy after ingestion and will guide the clinician in applying appropriate testing modalities when needed by conducting food challenges if indicated and by educating the patient and his or her guardian to minimize the risk of accidental ingestion. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. House-Dust Allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C A

    1982-01-01

    House-dust allergy is a common cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and extrinsic asthma. Symptoms tend to be worse when the patient is in bed. A positive skin test properly performed and interpreted confirms the diagnosis. The house-dust mite is the most important antigenic component of house-dust. Treatment consists of environmental control directed at reducing the mite content of bedroom dust, plus control of symptoms with drugs. Immunotherapy is controversial.

  18. Food allergies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, Paula F G

    2012-02-03

    Adverse reactions to foods are commonly implicated in the causation of ill health. However, foreign antigens, including food proteins and commensal microbes encountered in the gastrointestinal tract, are usually well tolerated. True food allergies, implying immune-mediated adverse responses to food antigens, do exist, however, and are especially common in infants and young children. Allergic reactions to food manifest clinically in a variety of presentations involving the gastrointestinal, cutaneous, and respiratory systems and in generalized reactions such as anaphylaxis. Both IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated immune mechanisms are recognized. Important advances in the clinical features underlying specific food hypersensitivity disorders are reviewed.

  19. Contact allergy to spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker, T W; Roesyanto-Mahadi, I D; van Toorenenbergen, A W; van Joost, T

    1990-05-01

    A group of 103 patients suspected of contact allergy was tested with the European standard series, wood tars and spices: paprika, cinnamon, laurel, celery seed, nutmeg, curry, black pepper, cloves, white pepper, coriander, cacao and garlic. 32 patients (Group I) were selected on the basis of positive tests to one or more of possible indicators for allergy to spices: colophony, balsam of Peru, fragrance-mix and/or wood tars. 71 patients (Group II) showed no response to these indicators. In Group I (n = 32) a statistically significantly higher % of patients (47%) showed positive reactions to 1 or more spices, compared with 15% in Group II (N = 71). Among the spices, the highest numbers of reactions were found to nutmeg (28%), paprika (19%) and cloves (12%) in the indicator-positive Group I. Fragrance-mix turned out to be a particularly important indicator allergen, especially for paprika, nutmeg and cloves. The contact allergy in 11 out of 32 (Group I) and 7 out of 25 patch-tested patients (recruited from Group II) appeared to be directed mainly against the ether-extractable volatile fractions of the spices.

  20. Allergy to penicillin: fable or fact?

    OpenAIRE

    Surtees, S J; Stockton, M G; Gietzen, T W

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess whether, on the basis of one blood test, penicillin allergy might be excluded sufficiently for general practitioners to give oral penicillin to patients claiming a history of penicillin allergy. DESIGN--Prospective study of patients referred by general practitioners. SETTING--Outpatient allergy clinic in a district general hospital. PATIENTS--175 referred patients who gave a history of immediate type reaction to penicillin, of whom 144 attended as requested and 132 comple...

  1. Sensitization according to skin prick testings in atopic patients with asthma or rhinitis at 24 allergy clinics in Northern Europe and Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils E Eriksson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin prick tests (SPT were performed on 2113 atopic patients (407 children and 1 706 adults with asthma and/or rhinitis at 24 allergy clinics in Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Estonia, Lithuania and Russia. Test extracts were Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae [D. farinae, cat, dog, horse, birch, timothy, mugwort, Cladosporium, Alternaria, cockroach, chironomids (red mosquito larvae, RML and shrimp. Among the allergens, timothy followed by cat, birch and dog gave the highest number of positive SPT. Positive SPT with house dust mites (HDM, furred animals, RML and Cladosporium were more common in asthmatics than in patients with rhinitis; birch and timothy more common in patients with rhinitis. Sensitization against D. pteronyssinus, horse, timothy and Cladosporium was more common in men than in women. Although the general sensitization pattern of the atopic patients at the participating centers showed similarities, there were also significant differences between centers. Positive SPT with furred animals were most prevalent in Northern and Central Sweden and St Petersburg, and least common in Siberia and Denmark. Pollen allergy was most common in Novosibirsk and on the west coast of Sweden, and less common in Vladivostok. Sensitization against HDM was most common in Lithuania and least prevalent in Northern Sweden and Finland. Insect allergens gave the most positive reactions in St Petersburg and the least positive reaction in Novosibirsk. Sensitization against multiple allergens was found in 74% of the patients and a mono-allergy in 26%. The degree of atopy was higher in males than in females and higher in asthmatics than in patients with rhinitis. The month of birth of the patients did not influence significantly the test results. It is concluded that although the sensitization pattern shows similarities in different regions, it is also influenced to some extent by residence as well as by diagnosis, sex

  2. Subcutaneous Zygomycosis Basidiobolomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous zygomycosis, also known as basidiobolomycosis, is a rare disease caused by the fungus Basidiobolus ranarum. Since its first description in 1954, may cases have been reported. In India, so far only few cases have been described. We report this entity in a 3 year- old female child who had firm to hard swelling of the right upper extremely and chest. Histopathology showed short aseptate hyphae surrounded by eosinophilic material within the granulomatous tissue response, in the subcutaneous tissue. She responded dramatically to saturated solution of potassium iodide.

  3. Cow's Milk Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Arne; Halken, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    with CMP. Milk from other mammals such as mare and donkey may be tolerated by some children with CMPA. Soy protein is as allergenic as CMP and soy formula is not recommended for young children with CMPA because of a great risk of development of allergy to soy, whereas soymilk is normally tolerated in older......Since the 1930's the scientific literature on cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) has accumulated. Over the last decade new diagnostic tools and treatment approaches have been developed. The diagnosis of reproducible adverse reactions to cow's milk proteins (CMP), i.e. CMPA, still has to be confirmed...... by controlled elimination and challenge procedures. Advanced diagnostic testing using epitope and microarray technology may in the future improve the diagnostic accuracy of CMPA by determination of specific IgE against specific allergen components of cow's milk protein. The incidence of CMPA in early childhood...

  4. Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kirsten Skamstrup; Khinchi, Marianne Søndergaard; Skov, Per Stahl

    2004-01-01

    Conflicting results concerning the effect of specific pollen immunotherapy (SIT) on allergy to plant foods have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SIT using a birch pollen extract on food allergy with focus on allergy to apple. Seventy-four birch pollen......-allergic patients were included in a double-blind, double-dummy, and placebo-controlled comparison of sublingual-swallow (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT) administration of a birch pollen extract. Sixty-nine percent of these patients reported allergy to apple. The clinical reactivity to apple was evaluated by open....... Therefore, oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to apple should not be considered as a main criterion for selecting patients for birch pollen immunotherapy at present....

  5. Soy Allergy in Patients Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Celakovská Jarmila; Ettlerová Kvetuše; Ettler Karel; Vanecková Jaroslava; Bukac Josef

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The evaluation of soy allergy in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis. The evaluation of the correlation to the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy. Materials and Methods: Altogether 175 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: Specific IgE, skin prick tests, atopy patch tests to soy, history and food allergy to peanut and pollen allergy were evaluated. Results : The early allergic reaction to soy was recorded in 2.8% patients. Sen...

  6. EAACI Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, A; Werfel, T; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K

    2014-01-01

    Food allergy can result in considerable morbidity, impact negatively on quality of life, and prove costly in terms of medical care. These guidelines have been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology's (EAACI) Guidelines for Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Group, building...... on previous EAACI position papers on adverse reaction to foods and three recent systematic reviews on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of food allergy, and provide evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of food allergy. While the primary audience is allergists......, this document is relevant for all other healthcare professionals, including primary care physicians, and pediatric and adult specialists, dieticians, pharmacists and paramedics. Our current understanding of the manifestations of food allergy, the role of diagnostic tests, and the effective management...

  7. Subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Berg, Jais O

    2016-01-01

    We have described subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis, which is benign, usually asymptomatic and underreported. Images have only been published on two earlier occasions, in which the necrotic nodules appear "pearly" than the cloudy yellow surface in present case. The presented image may help...

  8. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of subcutaneos granuloma annulare are reported. Clinical presentation was in the form of hard subcutaneous nodules; histopathology confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The cases were unique because of onset in adult hood, occurrence over unusual sites and absence of classical lesions of granuloma annulare elsewhere.

  9. Contact allergy to (meth)acrylates in the dental series in southern Sweden: simultaneous positive patch test reaction patterns and possible screening allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goon, Anthony T J; Isaksson, Marléne; Zimerson, Erik; Goh, Chee Leok; Bruze, Magnus

    2006-10-01

    Contact allergy to dental allergens is a well-studied subject, more so among dental professionals than dental patients. 1632 subjects had been patch tested to either the dental patient series or dental personnel series at the department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Malmö, Sweden. Positive patch tests to (meth)acrylate allergens were seen in 2.3% (30/1322) of the dental patients and 5.8% (18/310) of the dental personnel. The most common allergen for both groups was 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA), followed by ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, and methyl methacrylate. 47 (29 dental patients and 18 dental personnel) out of these 48 had positive patch tests to 2-HEMA. All 30 subjects who had a positive reaction to EGDMA had a simultaneous positive reaction to 2-HEMA. One dental patient reacted only to 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (bis-GMA). From our data, screening for (meth)acrylate contact allergy with 2-HEMA alone would have picked up 96.7% (29/30) of our (meth)acrylate-allergic dental patients and 100% (18/18) of our (meth)acrylate-allergic dental personnel. The addition of bis-GMA in dental patients would increase the pick-up rate to 100%.

  10. In vivo testing of the protection of gloves against acrylates in dentin-bonding systems on patients with known contact allergy to acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, T; Bruze, M; Björkner, B

    1999-11-01

    Occupational contact allergies to dental acrylates are increasing. Commonly used gloves protect poorly against acrylates. The protective efficacy in vivo of other, newer glove materials is not fully known. In this study, an open chamber system was used for testing the protection in vivo of 6 different gloves (1 vinyl glove, 2 latex gloves, 2 nitrile gloves and the 4H glove) against a commonly used dental adhesive, Scotchbond 1, containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TREGDMA). 8 patients with known contact allergy to 2-HEMA participated. Provocation with 50 microl of the adhesive for 7.5, 15 and 30 min was performed for each glove. The test demonstrated clear differences in the protective efficacy between the gloves. The 4H glove gave by far the best protection, followed by one of the nitrile gloves. One of the latex gloves and the vinyl glove gave a very poor protection against the adhesive. A dose-response relationship was observed between different application times of the acrylate product. The test model promises to be a useful clinical complement to in vitro methods in individual preventive measures against contact sensitization to acrylates.

  11. US antibiotic stewardship and penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kara J; Calhoun, Karen H

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to improve otolaryngologists' antibiotic stewardship by detailing current approaches to penicillin allergy. Although up to 15% of hospitalized patients in the United States have a penicillin allergy recorded on their charts, fewer than 10% of these have a true penicillin allergy. Using a combination of a detailed allergy history, skin testing and graded-dose administration, many patients whose charts say 'penicillin-allergic' can safely be treated with penicillin and cross-reacting antibiotics. This permits use of narrower-spectrum antibiotics and saves money.

  12. FOOD ALLERGY IN INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Balabolkin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the etiology, growth mechanisms, clinical implications, diagnostics and treatment of the infant food allergy. The author highlights the status of the allergy to the proteins of cow milk within this age group of children. Alongside the article describes the modern approaches to the diet therapy of the infants with the allergy to the proteins of cow milk.Key words: infant, food allergy, allergy to the proteins of cow milk, diet therapy.

  13. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Metal allergy to everolimus-eluting cobalt chromium stents confirmed by positive skin testing as a cause of recurrent multivessel in-stent restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yoshifumi; Itoh, Tomonori; Morino, Yoshihiro

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old woman treated with cobalt-chromium everolimus eluting stents (CoCr-EES) for her left distal circumflex and diagonal branch lesions suffered from repeated in-stent restenosis in both lesions. Neointimal proliferation occurred rapidly and almost simultaneously in the two lesions. The cause was established to be metal allergy, as determined by patch tests which were strongly positive for bare metal stents and weakly positive for CoCr-EES. Following the third successive angioplasty, we initiated treatment with prednisolone (30 mg daily) and the anti-allergic and anti-proliferative drug tranilast (300 mg daily). An elective angiogram performed 3 months later showed no evidence of in-stent restenosis in any of the stented lesions. Furthermore, the patient has remained angina-free for 15 months. The unique features of this case include: (1) near-simultaneous repeated multivessel in-stent restenosis in a patient with skin test-documented metal allergy to cobalt-chromium stents; (2) adjunctive systemic medical therapy with prednisolone and tranilast appeared to terminate the malignant restenotic cycle. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Palladium allergy in relation to dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, J.

    2015-01-01

    Palladium is a metal that is used as alloying metal for dental crowns and bridges. This thesis focusses on the possible impact of oral exposure to this metal on the immune system, and allergy in particular. An alternative skin test allergen for diagnosing palladium allergy is introduced: (di)sodium

  16. Triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, L; Andersen, K E; Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    A case of triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames is reported. Patch tests with analytical grade triphenyl phosphate, tri-m-cresyl phosphate, and tri-p-cresyl phosphate in the concentrations 5%, 0.5% and 0.05% pet. showed positive reactions to 0.05% triphenyl phosphate and 0.5% tri...... triphenyl phosphate allergy in our patient....

  17. Nasal allergy to avian antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); P.H. Dieges

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThis study describes the case of a patient who developed symptoms of rhinoconjunctivitis on exposure to budgerigars and parrots. An IgE‐mediated allergy to budgerigar, parrot and pigeon antigens was demonstrated using both in‐vivo challenge tests (skin and nasal provocation tests) and

  18. Massive subcutaneous emphysema with pneumoscrotopenis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chest injury commonly leads to subcutaneous emphysema of the chest, neck and face. It is usually non-life threatening. Massive subcutaneous emphysema may occur and very rarely may spread to involve the scrotal sac and subcutaneous tissue planes of the penis to cause pneumoscrotopenis. This case report presents ...

  19. Teicoplanin allergy - an emerging problem in the anaesthetic allergy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, L C; Garcez, T; Hopkins, P M; Harper, N J N; Savic, S

    2015-10-01

    Anaphylaxis to teicoplanin appears to be extremely rare, with only one confirmed case report worldwide. Two anaesthetic allergy clinics in the UK have received a number of suspected cases referred for investigation, and we present here the first case series of teicoplanin allergy. We investigated 20 cases of suspected teicoplanin allergy, identified from the two clinics over a period of two years. We devised a set of five criteria to categorize the certainty of their diagnosis. These included: (1) reaction within 15 min of administration of teicoplanin, (2) ≥2 features of anaphylaxis present, (3) positive skin testing or challenge testing, (4) raised serum mast cell tryptase (MCT), (5) alternative diagnosis excluded. Based on these criteria we defined the likelihood of IgE-mediated allergy to teicoplanin as: definite-met all criteria; probable-met criteria 1.2 and 5, plus 3 or 4; uncertain-met criteria 1.2 and 5; excluded- any others. We identified 7 'definite', 7 'probable' and 2 'uncertain' cases of teicoplanin allergy. Four cases were excluded. IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to teicoplanin appears to be more common than previously thought. This is true even if only definitive cases are considered. Investigation of teicoplanin allergy is hampered by the lack of standardized skin test concentrations. In some cases, there was a severe clinical reaction, but without any skin test evidence of histamine release. The mechanism of reaction in these cases is not known and requires further study. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, L A; Menné, T; Avnstorp, C

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde (HICC) is a synthetic fragrance ingredient. Case reports of allergy to HICC appeared in the 1980s, and HICC has recently been included in the European baseline series. Human elicitation dose-response studies performed with different allergens...... to 21 days). Seventeen persons with no HICC allergy were included as control group for the ROAT. Results The response frequency to the ROAT (in microg HICC cm(-2) per application) was significantly higher than the response frequency to the patch test at one of the tested doses. Furthermore the response...

  1. Subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Manchanda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchogenic cysts occur due to the anomalous development of the primitive tracheobronchial tree early in fetal life. They are usually present in middle mediastinum. Rarely, they have been found in other locations. We describe two patients with subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts located over manubrium sterni with special emphasis on the difficulties in pre-operative diagnosis. The two boys were managed by complete excision of the cysts. The children are well on follow-up.

  2. Mold Allergy: Proper Humidifier Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Training Home Conditions Allergy Allergy: Overview Allergy: Allergens Mold Allergy Proper Humidifier Care Proper Humidifier Care Make ... neglected humidifier can be a major source of mold and mold spores. Learn how to keep a ...

  3. Prevalence of Wheat Allergy in Japanese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eishin Morita

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of wheat allergy in Japanese adults was found to be 0.21% by using a combination of questionnaire-based examination, skin prick test and serum omega-5 gliadin-specific IgE test.

  4. Sweat Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiragun, Takaaki; Hide, Michihiro

    2016-01-01

    For many years, sweat has been recognized as an exacerbation factor in all age groups of atopic dermatitis (AD) and a trigger of cholinergic urticaria (CholU). Recently, we reported the improvement of AD symptoms by spray with tannic acid, which suppresses basophil histamine release by semipurified sweat antigens in vitro, and showering that removes antigens in sweat from the skin surface. We finally identified MGL_1304 secreted by Malassezia globosa as a major histamine-releasing antigen in human sweat. MGL_1304 is detected as a 17-kDa protein in sweat and exhibits almost the highest histamine-release ability from basophils of patients with AD and CholU among antigens derived from Malassezia species. Moreover, serum levels of anti-MGL_1304 IgE of patients with AD and CholU were significantly higher than those of normal controls. Desensitization therapy using autologous sweat or MGL_1304 purified from culture of M. globosa or its cognates might be beneficial for patients with intractable CholU due to sweat allergy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Frequency and Risk Factors of Penicillin and Amoxicillin Allergy in Suspected Patients with Drug Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazlollahi, Mohammad Reza; Bidad, Katayoon; Shokouhi, Raheleh; Dashti, Raheleh; Nabavi, Mohammad; Movahedi, Masoud; Bemanian, Mohammad Hasan; Shafiei, Ali Reza; Kalantari, Najmoddin; Farboud, Effat Sadat; Pourpak, Zahra; Moin, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Unconfirmed beta-lactam allergy is a significant public health problem because of the limitations it imposes in drug selection. In this study, we aimed to evaluate patients referred for beta-lactam allergy to determine the frequency of confirmed beta-lactam allergy and identify some risk factors. In a prospective cohort study, all referred patients to Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute in Tehran University of Medical Sciences (between 2007 - 2009) who suspected to have beta-lactam allergy were entered into this study based on having the inclusion criteria. Follow-up was performed 6 - 8 years after the final diagnosis. Diagnosis of beta-lactam allergy relies on thorough history and specific IgE measurements (ImmunoCAP), skin prick testing (SPT), intradermal testing (IDT), patch testing, and oral drug challenge test. Fifty-one patients with mean age of 24.5 (±18.5) years were enrolled in this study. Based on workups, beta-lactam allergy was confirmed in 16 (31.4%) patients, suspicious in 22 (43.1%) patients and ruled out in 13 (25.5%) patients.  During the follow-up, 3 patients with suspicious drug allergy consumed the culprit drug with no reaction so allergy was finally ruled out in 16 (31.4%) patients. Age, sex, atopy and family history of drug allergies were not significantly different between the patients with confirmed or ruled-out diagnosis of penicillin and amoxicillin allergy. At least up to one-third of patients with a history of beta-lactam allergy are proven to be safe using the drug. Also, a clear protocol consists of serum sIgE assay and SPT can be helpful to the physicians in the health care system.

  6. Milk allergy in adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odedra, Katy Mara

    2015-07-01

    Cow's milk allergy is common in children and rare in adults. The clinical features of cow's milk allergy are varied and they include anaphylaxis, gastrointestinal symptoms and atopic dermatitis. The prevalence of cow's milk allergy is difficult to ascertain, based on self-reported symptoms that are not subsequently confirmed by diagnostic testing. The gold-standard diagnostic test is the double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge. Avoidance of milk and milk products is the main therapy. Nutritional considerations are important in both children and adults, as is recognising the potential for resolution of cow's milk allergy. Providing evidence-based advice and support to individuals and their families and carers is central to managing cow's milk allergy.

  7. Chapter 30: Drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Drug allergy describes clinical adverse reactions that are proved or presumed to be immunologically based. Allergic drug reactions do not resemble pharmacologic actions of the incriminated drug and may occur at fractions of what would be the therapeutic dosage. Allergic drug reactions are unpredictable; nevertheless, there is increased risk of drug hypersensitivity in (1) patients with cystic fibrosis who receive antibiotics; (2) patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) who receive trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole of if HLA-B*5701(+) and receive the antiretroviral agent, abacavir; (3) other genetically susceptible populations such as Han-Chinese who are HLA-B*1502(+) who develop Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis from carbamazepine or if HLA-B*5801(+) are at increased risk for such reactions from allopurinol; and (4) patients with a history of previous compatible allergic reaction to the same medication, similar class, or potentially unrelated medication. Specific patient groups at higher risk for drug allergy include those with Ebstein-Barr virus infection, chronic lymphatic leukemia, HIV/AIDS, cystic fibrosis, patients with seizures being treated with antiepileptic medications, and patients with asthma (especially severe asthma) who are at increased risk of anaphylaxis from any cause including drugs compared with patients without asthma. In patients with a history of penicillin allergy, skin testing helps clarify the current level of risk for anaphylaxis by using the major (penicilloyl-polylysine) and minor penicillin determinants where sensitivity is 99%. If penicilloyl-polylysine and penicillin G are used for skin testing, the sensitivity is ∼85%. When skin tests are negative, graded challenges are performed to administer optimal or truly essential antibiotics.

  8. FOOD ALLERGY AND ORAL ALLERGY SYNDROME. Part I. A review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miglena Balcheva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy and intolerance are wide spread nowadays. However, the problem existed and was registered and described still by the ancients. It was fully understood and scientifically depicted in the 20th century after IgE and anaphylaxis were discovered, new diagnostic tests were initiated and the term “allergy” was introduced. There are some interesting aspects of the problem. Epidemiology is the first one – in the last two decades the number of people suffering from food allergy increased significantly and reached 4% of the population. Food allergy covers all ages, both sexes; atopic people and these with other allergic or digestive diseases are in the risk group also. There is certain influence of the eating habits as well. Etiology is rich and varied. It includes all foodstuffs of plant and animal origin, spices, honey, medicinal products - milk, eggs, meat, fish, nuts, fruits and vegetables, etc. Pathogenesis is complex.

  9. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  10. Tree Nut Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... U.S., you will often find it in Morocco. People with cashew allergy may be at higher risk for allergy to pink peppercorn (known as Brazilian Pepper, Rose Pepper, Christmasberry and others). This dried ...

  11. Asthma and Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content Turn off Animations Turn on Animations Our Sponsors Log in | Register Menu Log in | ... Food Allergies Page Content Article Body A family history of any type of allergy increases the risk ...

  12. Allergy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Allergy URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/allergy.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  13. Skin Allergy Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time. Some common medications that can cause skin allergy include penicillin, sulfa drugs, barbiturates and anticonvulsants just to mention a few. Some of the symptoms from drug allergies might be hives, skin rash, itchy skin or ...

  14. Preventing food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Silva, Debra; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Thusu, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology is developing guidelines about how to prevent and manage food allergy. As part of the guidelines development process, a systematic review is planned to examine published research about the prevention of food allergy. This systematic review...... recommendations. The aim of this systematic review will be to assess the effectiveness of approaches for the primary prevention of food allergy....

  15. Clinical update on contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uter, Wolfgang; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Orton, David I

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of this article is to review recent findings in contact allergy, regarding clinical research. RECENT FINDINGS: The biocide methyldibromo glutaronitrile was identified to be an important sensitizer. Subsequently, it was banned from leave-on cosmetics in the European Union...... a classification of newly introduced chemicals; increasingly, the local lymph node assay is supplementing and potentially replacing the guinea pig maximization test. Recent advances in occupational contact allergy include, for example, some attempts to improve diagnostics for epoxy resin and other plastic, glue...

  16. Diversity of Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is defined as an immune system-mediated adverse reaction to food components. Food allergic reactions are mostly IgE mediated and also known as immediate type hypersensitivity (type I reaction). There are several characteristic clinical types of food allergy, such as Anaphylaxis, Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA), and Oral allergy syndrome (OAS). In addition, food allergy is also classified into two types (class 1 and class 2) based on the pathophysiological mechanism. In the class 2 food allergy, pollen allergy causes plant food allergy; therefore this type of allergy is sometimes called Pollen-food allergy syndrome (PFAS). The risk of food allergy (allergenicity) may vary with the treatment of the food allergens. The formation or status of the causative food affects its allergenicity. Class 1 food allergens are generally heat-, enzyme-, and low pH-resistant glycoproteins ranging in size from 10 to 70 kD. Class 1 food allergens induce allergic sensitization via the gastrointestinal tract and are responsible for systemic reactions. Class 2 food allergens are generally heat-labile, susceptible to digestion, and highly homologous with pollen allergens. Taken together, it may be important to consider the diversity of food allergy in order to fight against food allergy.

  17. Coconut Allergy Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Anagnostou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite concerns voiced often by food-allergic patients, allergy to coconut is rare, not directly associated with nut allergy and few cases are reported so far in the literature. We present an interesting case of coconut allergy in a child that was previously tolerant to coconut and regularly exposed via both the skin and gastrointestinal route.

  18. Learning about Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get Allergies? People may be born with a genetic (say: juh-NET-ik) tendency to have allergies, ... mom or dad or other people in your family have them. People can develop ... soy. But allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, and seafood may last a long time, ...

  19. FOOD ALLERGY IN CHILDHOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Santalha

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In these cases, most children had co-sensitization with other allergens, as well as another manifestation of concomitant allergy, showing the role of food allergy in allergic march. Food allergy diagnosis is extremely important, as it can be potentially serious if not prevented by food avoidance.

  20. Designing Predictive Models for Beta-Lactam Allergy Using the Drug Allergy and Hypersensitivity Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriac, Anca Mirela; Wang, Youna; Schrijvers, Rik; Bousquet, Philippe Jean; Mura, Thibault; Molinari, Nicolas; Demoly, Pascal

    Beta-lactam antibiotics represent the main cause of allergic reactions to drugs, inducing both immediate and nonimmediate allergies. The diagnosis is well established, usually based on skin tests and drug provocation tests, but cumbersome. To design predictive models for the diagnosis of beta-lactam allergy, based on the clinical history of patients with suspicions of allergic reactions to beta-lactams. The study included a retrospective phase, in which records of patients explored for a suspicion of beta-lactam allergy (in the Allergy Unit of the University Hospital of Montpellier between September 1996 and September 2012) were used to construct predictive models based on a logistic regression and decision tree method; a prospective phase, in which we performed an external validation of the chosen models in patients with suspicion of beta-lactam allergy recruited from 3 allergy centers (Montpellier, Nîmes, Narbonne) between March and November 2013. Data related to clinical history and allergy evaluation results were retrieved and analyzed. The retrospective and prospective phases included 1991 and 200 patients, respectively, with a different prevalence of confirmed beta-lactam allergy (23.6% vs 31%, P = .02). For the logistic regression method, performances of the models were similar in both samples: sensitivity was 51% (vs 60%), specificity 75% (vs 80%), positive predictive value 40% (vs 57%), and negative predictive value 83% (vs 82%). The decision tree method reached a sensitivity of 29.5% (vs 43.5%), specificity of 96.4% (vs 94.9%), positive predictive value of 71.6% (vs 79.4%), and negative predictive value of 81.6% (vs 81.3%). Two different independent methods using clinical history predictors were unable to accurately predict beta-lactam allergy and replace a conventional allergy evaluation for suspected beta-lactam allergy. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Latex allergy and filaggrin null mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit C; Meldgaard, Michael; Hamann, Dathan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Natural rubber latex (NRL) contains over 200 proteins of which 13 have been identified as allergens and the cause of type I latex allergy. Health care workers share a high occupational risk for developing latex allergy. Filaggrin null mutations increase the risk of type I sensitizations...... to aeroallergens and it is possible that filaggrin null mutations also increase the risk of latex allergy. The aim of this paper was to examine the association between filaggrin null mutations and type I latex allergy. Methods Twenty latex allergic and 24 non-latex allergic dentists and dental assistants......, occupationally exposed to latex, were genotyped for filaggrin null mutations R501X and 2282del4. Latex allergy was determined by a positive reaction or a historical positive reaction to a skin prick test with NRL. Results 41 individuals were successfully genotyped. Three individuals were filaggrin mutation...

  2. [Ficus benjamina allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehler, R; Theissen, U

    1996-10-01

    We report the case of a 48-year-old patient suffered from asthma and conjunctivitis caused by an immediate type allergy to weeping fig (Ficus benjamina). By RAST inhibition test we could demonstrate that IgE antibodies react with allergens of fig; however our patient tolerated figs in oral provocation test. Sensitization to latex proteins reported to be cross reactive to Ficus species was not found. Ficus benjamina allergens represent relevant indoor allergens. A standardized allergen extract for skin testing is not yet available. Allergen specific IgE is mostly found in patients with strongly positive prick test results using the native sap of the tree. In 12 of 64 latex allergic patients we found simultaneous sensitization to weeping fig, so that cros-sensitization has to been considered in patients with IgE-mediated sensitization to latex.

  3. Contact allergy to cosmetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Held, E; Johansen, J D; Agner, T

    1999-01-01

    In a 2-year period, 1527 patients with contact dermatitis were investigated in the patch-test clinic. In 531 patients, allergy to cosmetics was suspected from the history and they were tested with their own cosmetic products. 40 (7.5%) (of the 531 patients) had 1 or more positive reactions, 82 (15.......4%) had doubtfully positive reaction(s) and 31 (5.8%) had irritant reaction(s). Skin-care products were tested most frequently and were also found to cause most positive, doubtfully positive and irritant reactions, 80% of the patients with positive reactions to their own products had no history of contact...... of common cosmetic ingredients. Fragrance mix and formaldehyde were found to be the ingredients most often responsible and were significantly more frequent in patients with positive reactions to their own products, compared to a control group of eczema patients also seen in the patch-test clinic....

  4. IgE Abs to Der p 1 and Der p 2 as diagnostic markers of house dust mite allergy as defined by a bronchoprovocation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Takafumi; Fukutomi, Yuma; Lidholm, Jonas; Yasueda, Hiroshi; Saito, Akemi; Sekiya, Kiyoshi; Tsuburai, Takahiro; Maeda, Yuji; Mori, Akio; Taniguchi, Masami; Hasegawa, Maki; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the clinical usefulness of measuring the levels of IgE to allergen components from house dust mites (HDMs) in the diagnosis of genuine HDM allergy. To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of measuring levels of serum IgE antibodies (Abs) to allergen components from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) as a predictor of immediate asthmatic response (IAR) to bronchoprovocation, we studied 55 DP-sensitized asthmatic patients who underwent a bronchoprovocation test using crude DP extract. The levels of IgE Abs to crude DP, nDer p 1, rDer p 2, and rDer p 10 in patients who showed IAR (n = 41) were compared with those in patients who showed no IAR (n = 14). While the frequencies of positivity for IgE Abs to nDer p 1 and rDer p 2 among the entire study population were 89 and 86%, respectively, all patients with IAR tested positive for both of them with high IgE concentrations. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for IgE to nDer p 1 and rDer p 2 as predictors of IAR were 0.913 and 0.906, respectively. The specificity of IgE to nDer p 1 and rDer p 2 was higher than IgE to crude DP even at low cut-off points. IgE to nDer p 1 and/or rDer p 2 was highly predictive of allergen-induced IAR. These findings validate the clinical usefulness of measuring the levels of IgE to nDer p 1 and rDer p 2 as a diagnostic tool for genuine HDM allergy. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Association between chronic urticaria and self-reported penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Susanna; Localio, Russell; Apter, Andrea J

    2016-04-01

    Penicillin allergy is the most commonly reported drug allergy and often presents with cutaneous symptoms. Other common diagnoses, such as chronic urticaria, may be falsely attributed to penicillin allergy. Because chronic urticaria is fairly common in the general population, evaluation of its prevalence in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy was of interest. Similarly, the prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria is not well known and also becomes interesting in light of the high prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in the general population. To determine the prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria and the prevalence of chronic urticaria in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy. This was a retrospective medical record review of 11,143 patients completed using the electronic health record of the University of Pennsylvania Allergy and Immunology clinic. The prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria was found to be approximately 3 times greater than in the general population. The prevalence of chronic urticaria in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy was also found to be approximately 3 times greater than in the population. This link between chronic urticaria and self-reported penicillin allergy highlights the need for clinicians to inquire about self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria and to consider penicillin skin testing. Furthermore, patients who report penicillin allergy might actually have chronic urticaria, indicating the importance of inquiring about chronic urticaria symptoms in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Smoking might be a risk factor for contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Nielsen, Niels Henrik; Menné, Torkil

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contact allergy is a major public health problem in industrialized countries. Hitherto, known risk factors for contact allergy have mainly included increased exposure to allergens. There are no published data on the relation between smoking and contact allergy. OBJECTIVE: To investigate...... the association between smoking and contact allergy. METHODS: The study population comprised a cross-sectional, general population-based sample of 15- to 69-year-old persons living in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 1056 persons (73.6% of the invited) were given a patch test (TRUE test). Contact allergy....... A detailed smoking history was obtained in a questionnaire. RESULTS: Contact allergy (adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2 to 2.9), nickel contact allergy (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4 to 5.2), and allergic nickel contact dermatitis (adjusted odds ratio, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.5 to 6.2) were significantly...

  7. Basophil histamine release in the diagnosis of house dust mite and dander allergy of asthmatic children. Comparison between prick test, RAST, basophil histamine release and bronchial provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergaard, P A; Ebbesen, F; Nolte, H; Skov, P S

    1990-04-01

    The aim of the study is to compare the glass fibre-based basophil histamine release test with skin test (Phazet), RAST (Phadebas) and bronchial provocation test in children with allergic asthma. The study comprised 68 selected children with a case history of extrinsic allergic asthma to danders (cat and dog) and house-dust mite. Skin prick test, RAST, and histamine release were performed in all children and the bronchial provocation test was used as a reference of "true allergic asthma". A total of 81 allergen bronchial challenges were performed and 44 children experienced 49 positive provocations. In 2.9% (2/68) of the children histamine release could not be performed due to technical difficulties (low histamine release with anti-IgE). Concordances in the range 76-87% were observed with no significant difference between the tests. The highest concordance (87%) was found between histamine release and bronchial provocation test followed by skin prick test vs bronchial provocation (84%) and RAST vs bronchial provocation (80%). The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each test. All tests showed sensitivities in the range 90-94% and no significant difference between them was observed. The specificity of histamine release, skin prick test, and RAST was 0.78, 0.69, and 0.63, respectively. The specificity of histamine release was better than RAST demonstrated by 95% confidence intervals. In conclusion, it was found that the histamine release test is a convenient diagnostic method and the study indicates a diagnostic value comparable to the common diagnostic methods in clinical allergy.

  8. Subcutaneous Phycomycosis in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjiri R. Naniwadekar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous phycomycosis is a rare entity. We hereby report a case of subcutaneous phycomycosis in 18 months old female child who presented with a painless, non-tender swelling on the thigh. Skin biopsy showed eosinophilic granuloma lying deep in the subcutaneous tissue, with sparse hyphae. Culture on Sabouraud's dextrose agar showed characteristic colonies. Patient was started on oral potassium iodide. The swelling was completely resolved after one month of treatment.

  9. Human seminal plasma allergy: successful pregnancy after prophylactic anti-histamine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Jung; Kim, Deok-In; Kim, Min-Hye; Yang, Min-Suk; Kim, Yoon-Jeong; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2011-10-01

    Human seminal plasma allergy is a rare phenomenon. Its clinical manifestations are diverse, and range from mild local pruritus to fatal anaphylaxis. Treatment varies with severity of the reactions: abstinence, condom usage or immunotherapy (subcutaneous or intravaginal) with seminal fluid. Local allergic reactions can be managed by prophylactic use of antihistamines or local cromolyn cream. A 33-year-old female visited the Asthma and Allergy Clinic in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital for the recurrent generalized urticarial reactions after sexual intercourse. She had been suffering from asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis for 10 years. She gave birth to a baby 6 months ago and no problem before. However, recently she began to recognize unexpected generalized urticaria that occurred after the sexual intercourse with husband. She wanted to have the second baby but hesitated because of the recurrent symptoms after the intercourse. She showed positive response to skin prick test with her husband's seminal fluid. The IgE-binding components were 15, 22, 28, and 35 kDa. Considering her moderate cutaneous reactions, we decided to try prophylactic treatments with oral anti-histamine one hour before sexual intercourse. She did not experience urticarial reactions with intercourse while oral anti-histamine was administered in advance. Finally, treatment outcome was successful, and the couple successfully gave birth to their second baby. We suppose that prophylactic antihistamine may be also applied in seminal plasma allergy patients if systemic reactions are limited to mild to moderate generalized urticaria.

  10. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisawa, Motohiro; Nishima, Sankei; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Kondo, Naomi

    2013-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JSPACI) was started in 1966 and currently has 3613 members as of August 1, 2012. The number of pediatricians specializing in allergies who have been certified by the Japanese Society of Allergology is 817. Among these, there are 125 training directors and training facilities for allergy and clinical immunology. The JSPACI first published an asthma guideline specific for children in 2000, and this has been revised every 3 yrs, contributing to better control of pediatric asthma. Food allergy management guidelines were first developed in 2005, which have helped to improve the care of food allergy patients. Among 514 pediatric training programs by the Japanese Society of Pediatrics, there are 312 facilities routinely performing oral food challenges. Among these, there were already 53 facilities performing oral immunotherapy at the end of 2011, treating 1400 cases of food allergy. The prevalence of pediatric allergic diseases has increased in Japan over the past 50 yrs. A number of International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood surveys have been conducted in the past at specific times. The prevalence of wheezing among children aged 13-14 yrs in 2002 was 13.0%. Multi-year surveys found a 1.5- to 2-fold increase every 10 yrs until 2002. However, according to the latest data in 2012, asthma prevalence seems to have slightly decreased in Japan. Food allergy mainly associated with infantile atopic eczema among infants younger than 1 yr of age is the most common form as with other developed countries. The estimated food allergy prevalence based on data from several surveys is 5-10% among infants (0-6 yrs) and 1-2% among schoolchildren (6-15 yrs). A variety of patients suffering from primary deficiency syndrome have been actively analyzed. Previously, antibody defects and well-defined syndromes with immunodeficiency were analyzed, but recent research is focusing on not only acquired immune

  11. Subcutaneous adipose tissue classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sbarbati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The developments in the technologies based on the use of autologous adipose tissue attracted attention to minor depots as possible sampling areas. Some of those depots have never been studied in detail. The present study was performed on subcutaneous adipose depots sampled in different areas with the aim of explaining their morphology, particularly as far as regards stem niches. The results demonstrated that three different types of white adipose tissue (WAT can be differentiated on the basis of structural and ultrastructural features: deposit WAT (dWAT, structural WAT (sWAT and fibrous WAT (fWAT. dWAT can be found essentially in large fatty depots in the abdominal area (periumbilical. In the dWAT, cells are tightly packed and linked by a weak net of isolated collagen fibers. Collagenic components are very poor, cells are large and few blood vessels are present. The deep portion appears more fibrous then the superficial one. The microcirculation is formed by thin walled capillaries with rare stem niches. Reinforcement pericyte elements are rarely evident. The sWAT is more stromal; it is located in some areas in the limbs and in the hips. The stroma is fairly well represented, with a good vascularity and adequate staminality. Cells are wrapped by a basket of collagen fibers. The fatty depots of the knees and of the trochanteric areas have quite loose meshes. The fWAT has a noteworthy fibrous component and can be found in areas where a severe mechanic stress occurs. Adipocytes have an individual thick fibrous shell. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates evident differences among subcutaneous WAT deposits, thus suggesting that in regenerative procedures based on autologous adipose tissues the sampling area should not be randomly chosen, but it should be oriented by evidence based evaluations. The structural peculiarities of the sWAT, and particularly of its microcirculation, suggest that it could represent a privileged source for

  12. Dilemmas and controversies in penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thethi, Arveen K; Van Dellen, R G

    2004-08-01

    Since the initial reports of penicillin and beta-lactam drugs causing allergic reactions, much has been elucidated regarding their pathophysiology and mechanism of action. Despite advances in testing for penicillin allergy, with IgE antibodies and skin tests available for the major and minor determinants of penicillin, these reactions remain a challenge to all physicians. They have characteristically been classified according to mechanism and time. Herein, the authors propose a classification system of penicillin allergy based on immunologic mechanisms.

  13. Cannabis sativa allergy: looking through the fog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decuyper, I I; Van Gasse, A L; Cop, N; Sabato, V; Faber, M A; Mertens, C; Bridts, C H; Hagendorens, M M; De Clerck, L; Rihs, H P; Ebo, D G

    2017-02-01

    IgE-mediated Cannabis (C. sativa, marihuana) allergy seems to be on the rise. Both active and passive exposure to cannabis allergens may trigger a C. sativa sensitization and/or allergy. The clinical presentation of a C. sativa allergy varies from mild to life-threatening reactions and often seems to depend on the route of exposure. In addition, sensitization to cannabis allergens can result in various cross-allergies, mostly for plant foods. This clinical entity, designated as the 'cannabis-fruit/vegetable syndrome', might also imply cross-reactivity with tobacco, natural latex and plant-food-derived alcoholic beverages. Hitherto, these cross-allergies are predominantly reported in Europe and appear mainly to rely upon cross-reactivity between nonspecific lipid transfer proteins or thaumatin-like proteins present in C. sativa and their homologues, ubiquitously distributed throughout plant kingdom. At present, diagnosis of cannabis-related allergies predominantly rests upon a thorough history completed with skin testing using native extracts from crushed buds and leaves. However, quantification of specific IgE antibodies and basophil activation tests can also be helpful to establish correct diagnosis. In the absence of a cure, treatment comprises absolute avoidance measures. Whether avoidance of further use will halt the extension of related cross-allergies remains uncertain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Cost of Penicillin Allergy Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Li, Yu; Banerji, Aleena; Yun, Brian J; Long, Aidan A; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2017-09-22

    Unverified penicillin allergy leads to adverse downstream clinical and economic sequelae. Penicillin allergy evaluation can be used to identify true, IgE-mediated allergy. To estimate the cost of penicillin allergy evaluation using time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC). We implemented TDABC throughout the care pathway for 30 outpatients presenting for penicillin allergy evaluation. The base-case evaluation included penicillin skin testing and a 1-step amoxicillin drug challenge, performed by an allergist. We varied assumptions about the provider type, clinical setting, procedure type, and personnel timing. The base-case penicillin allergy evaluation costs $220 in 2016 US dollars: $98 for personnel, $119 for consumables, and $3 for space. In sensitivity analyses, lower cost estimates were achieved when only a drug challenge was performed (ie, no skin test, $84) and a nurse practitioner provider was used ($170). Adjusting for the probability of anaphylaxis did not result in a changed estimate ($220); although other analyses led to modest changes in the TDABC estimate ($214-$246), higher estimates were identified with changing to a low-demand practice setting ($268), a 50% increase in personnel times ($269), and including clinician documentation time ($288). In a least/most costly scenario analyses, the lowest TDABC estimate was $40 and the highest was $537. Using TDABC, penicillin allergy evaluation costs $220; even with varied assumptions adjusting for operational challenges, clinical setting, and expanded testing, penicillin allergy evaluation still costs only about $540. This modest investment may be offset for patients treated with costly alternative antibiotics that also may result in adverse consequences. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [House dust mite allergy: myths and realities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Christine; Ducommun, Julien

    2009-04-15

    Since 1967, house dust mites have been shown to be the main allergens to be blamed in household dust allergy. In our countries, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae are predominant. We find them by millions in our bedding. They are responsible of allergic reactions like asthma, rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. Different treatments are available of which some have proved there effectiveness, like subcutaneous immunotherapy and standard symptomatic treatments. On the other hand, the control measures remain controversial and led recently to a lively debate in the medical literature. We felt therefore that it was necessary to set the record straight.

  16. Sunflower seed allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukleja-Sokołowska, Natalia; Gawrońska-Ukleja, Ewa; Żbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Bartuzi, Zbigniew; Sokołowski, Łukasz

    2016-09-01

    Sunflower seeds are a rare source of allergy, but several cases of occupational allergies to sunflowers have been described. Sunflower allergens on the whole, however, still await precise and systematic description. We present an interesting case of a 40-year-old male patient, admitted to hospital due to shortness of breath and urticaria, both of which appeared shortly after the patient ingested sunflower seeds. Our laryngological examination revealed swelling of the pharynx with retention of saliva and swelling of the mouth and tongue. During diagnostics, 2 months later, we found that skin prick tests were positive to mugwort pollen (12/9 mm), oranges (6/6 mm), egg protein (3/3 mm), and hazelnuts (3/3 mm). A native prick by prick test with sunflower seeds was strongly positive (8/5 mm). Elevated concentrations of specific IgE against weed mix (inc. lenscale, mugwort, ragweed) allergens (1.04 IU/mL), Artemisia vulgaris (1.36 IU/mL), and Artemisia absinthium (0.49 IU/mL) were found. An ImmunoCap ISAC test found an average level of specific IgE against mugwort pollen allergen component Art v 1 - 5,7 ISU-E, indicating an allergy to mugwort pollen and low to medium levels of specific IgE against lipid transfer proteins (LTP) found in walnuts, peanuts, mugwort pollen, and hazelnuts. Through the ISAC inhibition test we proved that sunflower seed allergen extracts contain proteins cross-reactive with patients' IgE specific to Art v 1, Art v 3, and Jug r 3. Based on our results and the clinical pattern of the disease we confirmed that the patient is allergic to mugwort pollen and that he had an anaphylactic reaction as a result of ingesting sunflower seeds. We suspected that hypersensitivity to sunflower LTP and defensin-like proteins, both cross-reactive with mugwort pollen allergens, were the main cause of the patient's anaphylactic reaction. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Contact allergy to acrylates/methacrylates in the acrylate and nail acrylics series in southern Sweden: simultaneous positive patch test reaction patterns and possible screening allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teik-Jin Goon, Anthony; Bruze, Magnus; Zimerson, Erik; Goh, Chee-Leok; Isaksson, Marléne

    2007-07-01

    In a recent study we showed that all our dental personnel/patients were detected with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA) and 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (bis-GMA). We studied 90 patients tested to the acrylate and nail acrylics series at our department over a 10 year period to see whether screening allergens could be found. Patch testing with an acrylate and nail acrylics series was performed. Among the 10 acrylate/methacrylate-allergic occupational dermatitis patients tested to the acrylate series, the most common allergens were triethyleneglycol diacrylate (TREGDA, 8), diethyleneglycol diacrylate (5), and 1,4-butanediol diacrylate (BUDA, 5). All 10 of these patients would have been picked up by a short screening series combining TREGDA, 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (2-HPMA), and BUDA or 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate (HDDA). Among the 14 acrylate/methacrylate-allergic nail patients, the most common allergens were ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA, 11), 2-HEMA, (9), and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (9). Screening for 3 allergens i.e. 2-HEMA plus EGDMA plus TREGDA, would have detected all 14 nail patients. A short screening series combining 2-HEMA, EGDMA, TREGDA, 2-HPMA, bis-GMA, and BUDA or HDDA would have picked up all our past study patients (dental, industrial, and nail) with suspected allergy to acrylate/methacrylate allergens.

  18. Cor a 14 is the superior serological marker for hazelnut allergy in children, independent of concomitant peanut allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eller, Esben; Mortz, Charlotte G; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    of concomitant peanut allergy and PR10 sensitization. METHOD: We included 155 children suspected off hazelnut allergy and challenged according to guidelines. Concomitant allergy to peanuts was verified or ruled out by challenge. Skin Prick Test, s-IgE and CRD to hazelnut, peanut, PR10 and LPT protein families...... peanut allergy is common in hazelnut allergic children, but decision points as well as diagnostic values for Cor a 14 are not affected. We found 3 independent and well-characterized serotypes; hazelnut allergic children sensitized to Cor a 14, peanut allergic children sensitized to Ara h 2 and children......BACKGROUND: Hazelnut is the most frequent cause of tree-nut allergy, but up to half of all children with hazelnut allergy additionally suffers from peanut allergy. Our aim was to identify diagnostic values of the most promising serological markers (Cor a 9 and Cor a 14) and to address the influence...

  19. Latex allergy in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Virtič

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of natural rubber latex medical gloves in the last three decades has caused an increase in latex allergy. The majority of risk groups for allergy development include health care workers, workers in the rubber industry, atopic individuals and children with congenital malformations. Three types of pathological reactions can occur in people using latex medical gloves: irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis and immediate hypersensitivity. The latex allergy is caused by constituent components of latex gloves and added powders; there are also numerous latex allergens involved in cross-reactivity between latex and fruits and vegetables, the so-called latex-fruit syndrome. The diagnosis is based on an accurate history of exposure, clinical presentation and confirmatory in vivo and in vitro tests. Prevention is the easiest, most effective and least expensive way to avoid latex allergy. Powder-free latex gloves with reduced levels of proteins and chemicals, and synthetic gloves for allergic workers must be provided in the work environment. There are already many health care institutions around the world where all latex products have been replaced by synthetic material products.

  20. Identification and treatment of patients with suspected penicillin allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Grošelj

    2013-02-01

    Conclusion: We confirmed that many patients report penicillin allergy, however, the allergy is rarely confirmed by tests. Also, after tests that rule out penicillin allergy have been performed, penicillin antibiotics are still prescribed in lesser percent than other antibiotics. We found out that the vast majority of adults who come in the pharmacy with an antibiotic prescription are direct consumers of the prescribed antibiotic. Therefore, there is an opportunity to develop and implement a program of pharmaceutical care also for antibiotic treatment.

  1. Latex Allergy: Tips to Remember

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Allergy Library ▸ Latex allergy TTR Share | Latex Allergy This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Natural rubber latex, a milky fluid found in rubber trees, is ...

  2. Food Allergy: Tips to Remember

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AAAAI Breadcrumb navigation Home ▸ Conditions & Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Allergy Library ▸ Food allergy TTR Share | Food Allergy For most people, celebrations are fun events. But for parents of food allergic children, or ...

  3. [Food allergy in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szépfalusi, Z

    2012-12-01

    Food allergies can result in life-threatening reactions and diminish quality of life. The prevalence of food allergies has increased in several regions throughout the world. A few food allergens cover the majority of food-related reactions (milk, egg, wheat, soy, fish, crustacean, nuts and peanut). Immunological mechanisms range between IgE-mediated (most common) and non-IgE-mediated, the latter of which remaining often a clue in the diagnosis. Treatment of food allergy involves strict avoidance of the trigger food. Medications help to manage symptoms of disease, but currently, there is no cure for food allergy.

  4. Milk and soy allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Jacob D; Cocco, Renata R; Järvinen, Kirsi M

    2011-04-01

    Cow's milk allergy (CMA) affects 2% to 3% of young children and presents with a wide range of IgE and non-IgE-mediated clinical syndromes, which have a significant economic and lifestyle effect. It is logical that a review of CMA would be linked to a review of soy allergy because soy formula is often an alternative source of nutrition for infants who do not tolerate cow's milk. This review examines the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, natural history, and diagnosis of cow's milk and soy allergy. Cross-reactivity and management of milk allergy are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Asthma, Family History of Drug Allergy, and Age Predict Amoxicillin Allergy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faitelson, Yoram; Boaz, Mona; Dalal, Ilan

    2017-12-06

    Suspected adverse reactions to amoxicillin are common, but there are no known factors that can predict amoxicillin allergy in children. In addition, methods used for the diagnosis of amoxicillin allergy are not standardized and their role in diagnosis is not clear. To identify predictive factors and to assess the role of skin test in the diagnosis of amoxicillin allergy in children. Children with a history of immediate (excluding anaphylaxis) or nonimmediate reactions to amoxicillin were tested by skin prick test, followed by oral graded challenge with amoxicillin. Clinical characteristics of the reaction before and after the challenge were recorded, and data of personal and relatives' drug allergies and atopy were collected for statistical analysis. Skin prick tests followed by an oral graded challenge with amoxicillin were performed on 133 children. The skin test result was not of clinical value because it was negative in all children. Three children (2%) had an immediate reaction and 7 children (5%) had a nonimmediate reaction. Asthma (odds ratio [OR], 0.12; 95% CI, 0.017-0.869; P = .03), family history of drug allergy (OR, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.026-0.613; P = .01), older age at reaction (OR, 0.837; 95% CI, 0.699-1; P = .05), and angioedema (OR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.043-1.12; marginally significant at P = .069) were associated with reduced chance to pass the oral challenge. Skin prick test did not contribute to the diagnosis of amoxicillin allergy. The presence of asthma, family history of drug allergy, and older age at reaction can be used as predictive factors for true amoxicillin allergy in children. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical spectrum of food allergies: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Marco H-K; Wong, Wilfred H-S; Chang, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Food allergy is defined as an adverse immune response towards food proteins or as a form of a food intolerance associated with a hypersensitive immune response. It should also be reproducible by a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge. Many reported that food reactions are not allergic but are intolerances. Food allergy often presents to clinicians as a symptom complex. This review focuses on the clinical spectrum and manifestations of various forms of food allergies. According to clinical presentations and allergy testing, there are three types of food allergy: IgE mediated, mixed (IgE/Non-IgE), and non-IgE mediated (cellular, delayed type hypersensitivity). Recent advances in food allergy in early childhood have highlighted increasing recognition of a spectrum of delayed-onset non-IgE-mediated manifestation of food allergy. Common presentations of food allergy in infancy including atopic eczema, infantile colic, and gastroesophageal reflux. These clinical observations are frequently associated with food hypersensitivity and respond to dietary elimination. Non-IgE-mediated food allergy includes a wide range of diseases, from atopic dermatitis to food protein-induced enterocolitis and from eosinophilic esophagitis to celiac disease. The most common food allergies in children include milk, egg, soy, wheat, peanut, treenut, fish, and shellfish. Milk and egg allergies are usually outgrown, but peanut and treenut allergy tends to persist. The prevalence of food allergy in infancy is increasing and may affect up to 15-20 % of infants. The alarming rate of increase calls for a public health approach in the prevention and treatment of food allergy in children.

  7. Contact allergy to allergens of the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) has decreased modestly in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T

    2009-01-01

    in Copenhagen, Denmark, were invited to participate in a general health examination including patch testing. In 1990 and 2006, we patch tested and questioned 543 and 3460 adult Danes. Patch test readings were performed on day 2 only. RESULTS: The overall prevalence decreased significantly from 15.5% in 1990...

  8. Patellofemoral Joint Replacement and Nickel Allergy: An Unusual Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Farhan; Jenner, Edward; Faisal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Metal allergy is an unusual complication of joint replacement that may cause aseptic loosening and necessitate joint revision surgery. We present the case of nickel allergy causing aseptic loosening following patellofemoral joint replacement (PFJR) in a 54-year-old male. Joint revision surgery to a nickel-free total knee replacement was performed with good results. Our literature review shows that there is no evidence to guide the management of metal allergy in PFJR. The evidence from studies of total knee replacement is limited to retrospective case series and case reports and gives contradictory recommendations. The optimal management strategy for metal allergy in PFJR is not clear. We recommend allergy testing in patients with history of metal allergy and use of an allergen-free implant in those with positive tests. As there is no gold standard test to establish metal allergy, the choice of test should be guided by availability and recommendation from the local unit of dermatology and allergy testing. We recommend investigation for metal allergy in patients with implant loosening where other causes have been excluded. PMID:26543657

  9. Patellofemoral Joint Replacement and Nickel Allergy: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Syed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal allergy is an unusual complication of joint replacement that may cause aseptic loosening and necessitate joint revision surgery. We present the case of nickel allergy causing aseptic loosening following patellofemoral joint replacement (PFJR in a 54-year-old male. Joint revision surgery to a nickel-free total knee replacement was performed with good results. Our literature review shows that there is no evidence to guide the management of metal allergy in PFJR. The evidence from studies of total knee replacement is limited to retrospective case series and case reports and gives contradictory recommendations. The optimal management strategy for metal allergy in PFJR is not clear. We recommend allergy testing in patients with history of metal allergy and use of an allergen-free implant in those with positive tests. As there is no gold standard test to establish metal allergy, the choice of test should be guided by availability and recommendation from the local unit of dermatology and allergy testing. We recommend investigation for metal allergy in patients with implant loosening where other causes have been excluded.

  10. Clinical update on contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uter, Wolfgang; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Orton, David I

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of this article is to review recent findings in contact allergy, regarding clinical research. RECENT FINDINGS: The biocide methyldibromo glutaronitrile was identified to be an important sensitizer. Subsequently, it was banned from leave-on cosmetics in the European Union....... Another group of important allergens that have been studied extensively included the fragrances oak moss absolute, isoeugenol, hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde and farnesol. A new fragrance mix II has been developed for standard testing, which includes the two latter compounds. Dose response...... a classification of newly introduced chemicals; increasingly, the local lymph node assay is supplementing and potentially replacing the guinea pig maximization test. Recent advances in occupational contact allergy include, for example, some attempts to improve diagnostics for epoxy resin and other plastic, glue...

  11. Patterns of suspected wheat-related allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker Christensen, Morten; Eller, Esben; Mortz, Charlotte G

    2014-01-01

    ). All children had atopic dermatitis, and most (13/15) outgrew their wheat allergy. Most children (13/15) had other food allergies. Challenge positive patients showed significantly higher levels of sIgE to wheat and significantly more were SPT positive than challenge negative. Group 2: Eleven out of 13...... of sIgE to ω-5-gliadin. The natural course is presently unknown. CONCLUSION: Wheat allergy can manifest in different disease entities, rendering a detailed case history and challenge mandatory. Patient age, occupation, concomitant allergies (food or inhalant) and atopic dermatitis are important factors...... were examined with detailed case history, specific IgE (sIgE), Skin Prick Test (SPT) and wheat challenge (nasal or oral ± exercise). Details of the case history were extracted from the patients´ case records. RESULTS: Group 1: Twenty one of 95 patients were challenge positive (15 children, 6 adults...

  12. IgE - the main player of food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broekman, Henrike C H; Eiwegger, Thomas; Upton, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Food allergy is a growing problem worldwide, presently affecting 2-4% of adults and 5-8% of young children. IgE is a key player in food allergy. Consequently huge efforts have been made to develop tests to detect either the presence of IgE molecules, their allergen binding sites or their function......Food allergy is a growing problem worldwide, presently affecting 2-4% of adults and 5-8% of young children. IgE is a key player in food allergy. Consequently huge efforts have been made to develop tests to detect either the presence of IgE molecules, their allergen binding sites...... or their functionality, in order to provide information regarding the patient's food allergy. The ultimate goal is to develop tools that are capable of discriminating between asymptomatic sensitization and a clinically relevant food allergy, and between different allergic phenotypes in an accurate and trustworthy manner...

  13. Antihistamines for allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antihistamines are drugs that treat allergy symptoms . When taken by mouth, they come as ... your child feel better in the morning during allergy season. What ... are combined with a decongestant, a drug that dries up your nasal passages. Ask your ...

  14. Drug allergy REVIEW ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    true incidence of allergy in children is far lower than that in adults.15 Children are also less likely to show ... type switching and activation of IgE memory cells is enhanced by TH2 produced IL-4 and suppressed by ..... The prospective assessment of individual risk of drug allergy is difficult. History-taking is a nonspecific cost-.

  15. Lettuce contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus E

    2016-01-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and its varieties are important vegetable crops worldwide. They are also well-known, rarely reported, causes of contact allergy. As lettuce allergens and extracts are not commercially available, the allergy may be underdiagnosed. The aims of this article are to present...

  16. Itching for Allergy Relief?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... function, you don't find relief from OTC drugs, or you experience allergy symptoms over a long period. You may need ... available OTC and in generic form. The prescription drugs Astelin ... sprays approved to treat allergy symptoms. They can be used several times a ...

  17. Occupational allergy caused by Peruvian lily (Alstroemeria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Robin Y C; Oppenheimer, John J

    2002-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria has been well documented; however, occupational allergy to this decorative flower has never been reported in the literature. We describe a florist with complaints of a sense of throat tightness, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, urticaria, and facial angioedema attributable to the handling of this popular flower. An allergy skin testing by the puncture technique and a challenge test are performed in a private office. A staff member is used as a control for the skin testing. Main outcome measures are the subject's clinical symptoms. The allergy skin testing reveals positive response to Alstroemeria (Peruvian lily), but negative to Stargazer lily, solidago, and few other flower extracts. In the challenge test, the subject develops conjunctival injection, postnasal drip with nasal congestion, and cough. This is the first report of a type I allergic reaction to Alstroemeria and illustrate the ease of in-office performance of skin testing and challenge to flowering plants.

  18. Immunology of Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordesillas, Leticia; Berin, M Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A

    2017-07-18

    Many consider food allergy as the "second wave" of the allergy epidemic following the "first wave" of respiratory allergy, i.e., asthma and allergic rhinitis, plaguing westernized countries, with up to 8% of young children and 2%-3% of adults in the United States now affected by hypersensitivity reactions to various foods. In the past decade, there have been great strides in our understanding of the underlying immunopathogenesis of these disorders, which have led to improved diagnostic techniques, management strategies, and therapeutic approaches. Here we will review the most recent understanding of basic mechanisms underlying IgE-mediated food allergies and novel therapeutic approaches under investigation for both the prevention and treatment of IgE-mediated food allergies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Allergy and the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, A; Motterle, L; Bortolotti, M

    2008-01-01

    The eye represents an ideal and frequent site for the allergic reactions. The term ‘allergic conjunctivitis’ refers to a collection of disorders that affect the lid, conjunctiva and/or cornea. Even though the diagnosis is essentially clinical, local tests such as cytology, conjunctival provocation and tear mediator analysis can be performed. The immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated mechanism does not explain completely the severity and the clinical course of chronic allergic ocular diseases such as vernal (VKC) and atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC), which are probably also related to T cell-mediated responses, massive eosinophil attraction and activation and non-specific hypersensitivity. An altered balance between T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cells and between Th1- and Th2-types of cytokines is thought to be responsible of the development of ocular allergic disorders. New findings suggest that a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, proteases and growth factors are involved by complex interwoven interactions rather than distinct and parallel pathways. In addition, several non-specific enzymatic systems may be activated during acute and chronic allergic inflammation, thus contributing to the complex pathogenesis of the disease. Current drug treatment for ocular allergy targets the key mechanisms involved in the development of clinical disease: mast cells with mast cell stabilizers, histamine with histamine receptor antagonists and inflammation with corticosteroids, severe inflammation with immunomodulators. None of these agents lacks side effects and none abolishes signs and symptoms completely. New therapeutic strategies are still needed to respond to the complex pathogenesis of severe forms of ocular allergy such as VKC and AKC. PMID:18721324

  20. Penicillin and beta-lactam allergy: epidemiology and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Penicillin is the most common beta-lactam antibiotic allergy and the most common drug class allergy, reported in about 8% of individuals using health care in the USA. Only about 1% of individuals using health care in the USA have a cephalosporin allergy noted in their medical record, and other specific non-penicillin, non-cephalosporin beta-lactam allergies are even rarer. Most reported penicillin allergy is not associated with clinically significant IgE-mediated reactions after penicillin rechallenge. Un-verified penicillin allergy is a significant and growing public health problem. Clinically significant IgE-mediated penicillin allergy can be safely confirmed or refuted using skin testing with penicilloyl-poly-lysine and native penicillin G and, if skin test is negative, an oral amoxicillin challenge. Acute tolerance of an oral therapeutic dose of a penicillin class antibiotic is the current gold standard test for a lack of clinically significant IgE-mediated penicillin allergy. Cephalosporins and other non-penicillin beta-lactams are widely, safely, and appropriately used in individuals, even with confirmed penicillin allergy. There is little, if any, clinically significant immunologic cross-reactivity between penicillins and other beta-lactams. Routine cephalosporin skin testing should be restricted to research settings. It is rarely needed clinically to safely manage patients and has unclear predictive value at this time. The use of alternative cephalosporins, with different side chains, is acceptable in the setting of a specific cephalosporin allergy. Carbapenems and monobactams are also safely used in individuals with confirmed penicillin allergy. A certain predictable, but low, rate of adverse reactions will occur with all beta-lactam antibiotic use both pre- and post-beta-lactam allergy evaluations.

  1. Characteristics of patients patch tested in the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA) network, 2009-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uter, Wolfgang; Gefeller, Olaf; Giménez-Arnau, Ana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patch test results often vary between departments, and also between countries. Such variation may be partly attributable to systematic effects introduced by patient characteristics, differing exposures, patient selection, or methodological differences. OBJECTIVE: To examine the amount...

  2. Contact allergy to common ingredients in hair dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søsted, Heidi; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Gonçalo, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is the primary patch test screening agent for hair dye contact allergy, and approximately 100 different hair dye chemicals are allowed.......p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is the primary patch test screening agent for hair dye contact allergy, and approximately 100 different hair dye chemicals are allowed....

  3. Diagnostic evaluation of a large group of patients with immediate allergy to penicillins: the role of skin testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M J; Romano, A; Mayorga, C; Moya, M C; Guzman, A E; Reche, M; Juarez, C; Blanca, M

    2001-09-01

    Penicillin is no longer the most commonly prescribed beta-lactam, and the pattern of reactions has changed. We studied the diagnostic value of skin testing in penicillin-allergic subjects from a population where benzylpenicillin is not now the most frequently used beta-lactam. Patients with a history of immediate allergic reactions to penicillins were studied with: skin tests with major and minor determinants of benzylpenicillin (BPO/MDM), amoxicillin, and ampicillin; in vitro determination of specific IgE; and controlled administration for those with a positive history but negative skin and in vitro tests. A reaction was considered immediate when symptoms appeared within a maximum of 1 h after drug intake. After testing, 290 patients (71% having anaphylaxis and 29% having urticaria) proved to be allergic. Amoxicillin was involved in 64.8% and benzylpenicillin in 2.8% of the patients. Skin test positivity to at least one determinant appeared in 70% of cases, amoxicillin being the most frequent. The overall sensitivity decreased markedly when only BPO and MDM were considered. In 13.1% of patients, the diagnosis was established by in vitro test and in 16.9% by controlled administration. Of the 290 patients, 42.1% were positive to determinants generated from benzylpenicillin and 57.9% were selective responders. Sensitivity of skin tests to BPO was lower than reported, being partly replaced by minor determinants, mostly amoxicillin. The incorporation of additional reagents and the development of new tests are required, and these will probably change as the patterns of consumption vary.

  4. Prevalence of beta-lactam allergy: a retrospective chart review of drug allergy assessment in a predominantly pediatric population

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Elissa M.; Wakeman, Andrew; Gerstner, Tom V.; Warrington, Richard J.; Singer, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Research suggests that 90% of patients labeled beta-lactam allergic are able to tolerate penicillins following further assessment. This study aims to define and describe the frequency of true beta-lactam allergy following allergy patient evaluation in a predominantly pediatric population. Methods 306 primary care patients referred between January 2010 and June 2015 were assessed for a suspected beta-lactam allergy. Patient demographics, history and test results were extracted from ...

  5. Cow's milk allergy in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    His academic work focuses principally on allergy diagnosis, food allergy, skin allergy, drug allergy and asthma. Correspondence to: Cassim Motala ... related to lower levels of CMP in breast milk compared with cow's milk, immunomodulators in .... following organ systems: gastrointestinal. (50 - 60%), skin (50 - 50%) and ...

  6. Tolerability of intracameral cefuroxime during cataract surgery in case of penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promelle, V; Jany, B; Drimbea, A; Jezraoui, P; Milazzo, S

    2015-04-01

    Since the results of the ESCRS study in 2007 and then the AFSSAPS recommendations of 2011, postoperative endophthalmitis prophylaxis in cataract surgery has evolved toward intracameral cefuroxime. Penicillin allergy is frequent and is not considered as a contra-indication to cefuroxime injection, but cross-reactions do exist. The goal of this study was to assess the tolerability of intracameral cefuroxime in patients with a penicillin allergy. In this monocentric open prospective study, adult patients undergoing cataract surgery and declaring themselves penicillin-allergic were included. A subcutaneous test of cefuroxime was performed preoperatively. If negative, patients received the intracameral injection of cefuroxime at the conclusion of the surgical procedure. The primary assessment criteria, evaluated on the day after the surgery, was the occurrence of allergic reactions. Forty-eight eyes of 40 patients, 72 ± 8 years old, were included. Forty-three skin tests were performed: 1 was positive and one was unreliable. Thirty-six patients were examined in our center the day after the surgery: 2 presented a conjunctival allergic reaction. No severe anaphylactic reaction was reported. Of our patients, 95.3% declaring a penicillin allergy had a negative pre-operative cefuroxime test. According to literature, 80 to 90% of presumed penicillin allergic patients would not actually be allergic to cefuroxime. In our population, we reported 2 benign conjunctival cross-reactions. Intracameral cefuroxime injection during cataract surgery seems well-tolerated in penicillin-allergic patients with a negative preoperative skin test. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Allergy to illicit drugs and narcotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerts, S; Van Gasse, A; Leysen, J; Faber, M; Sabato, V; Bridts, C H; Jorens, P G; De Clerck, L S; Ebo, D G

    2014-03-01

    Despite their frequent use, allergy to illicit drugs and narcotics is rarely reported in literature. We present a review of the different classes of drugs of abuse that might be involved in allergies: central nervous system (CNS) depressants (such as cannabis, opioids and kava), CNS stimulants (cocaine, amphetamines, khat and ephedra) and hallucinogens such as ketamine and nutmeg. Diagnosis of drug and narcotic allergy generally relies upon careful history taking, complemented with skin testing eventually along with quantification of sIgE. However, for various reasons, correct diagnosis of most of these drug allergies is not straightforward. For example, the native plant material applied for skin testing and sIgE antibody tests might harbour irrelevant IgE-binding structures that hamper correct diagnosis. Diagnosis might also be hampered due to uncertainties associated with the non-specific histamine releasing characteristics of some compounds and absence of validated sIgE tests. Whether the introduction of standardized allergen components and more functional tests, that is, basophil activation and degranulation assays, might be helpful to an improved diagnosis needs to be established. It is anticipated that due to the rare character of these allergies further validation is although necessary. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Allergy patch test reading from photographic images: disagreement on ICDRG grading but agreement on simplified tripartite reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivens, U; Serup, J; O'goshi, K

    2007-02-01

    The International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG) system for clinical scoring of allergic patch test reactions is well established in clinical dermatology for detailed scoring of allergic reactions. The degree of redness and the presence of swelling, papules, vesicles and bullae are assessed based on visual examination and palpation of reactions. In photographic assessment used in research and tele-dermatology, the scoring is solely based on visual examination of photos. The aim of the study was to evaluate inter-expert variation in patch test reading using photographic images, with ICDRG reading as a reference. Five experienced senior dermatologists each scored 55 positive patch test reactions from 16 slides in an office environment. The slides showed pictures of patch tests with different allergens. The scoring system by ICDRG with six categories for scoring was used. The five dermatologists performed the scoring very differently. When the scoring system was simplified to a tripartite scoring system, the scoring was performed almost similarly by the five clinicians. Based on the present results, it is proposed that the number of scoring categories should be minimized and simplified into negative (including doubtful) reactions, positive reactions and irritant reactions. Such simplified tripartite reading is proposed for research purposes and for tele-dermatology, when scoring is based on photographic images.

  9. Self-testing for contact allergy to hair dyes - a 5-year follow-up multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulrik F; Goosens, An; Giménez-Arnau, Ana Maria

    2017-01-01

    March 2016, a total of 40 oxidative hair dye products from 21 different manufacturers were bought in retail stores in 8 European countries. RESULTS: The consumers were instructed to perform a self-test prior to hair dyeing for 39 of the products; however, the procedures varied greatly regarding...

  10. In vitro tests for drug hypersensitivity reactions : an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayorga, C.; Celik, G.; Rouzaire, P.; Whitaker, P.; Bonadonna, P.; Rodrigues-Cernadas, J.; Vultaggio, A.; Brockow, K.; Caubet, J. C.; Makowska, J.; Nakonechna, A.; Romano, A.; Montanez, M. I.; Laguna, J. J.; Zanoni, G.; Gueant, J. L.; Oude Elberink, H.; Fernandez, J.; Viel, S.; Demoly, P.; Torres, M. J.

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are a matter of great concern, both for outpatient and in hospital care. The evaluation of these patients is complex, because invivo tests have a suboptimal sensitivity and can be time-consuming, expensive and potentially risky, especially drug provocation

  11. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare: radiologic appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kransdorf, M.J. [Saint Mary`s Hospital, Richmond, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiol.]|[Department of Radiologic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); Murphey, M.D. [Department of Radiologic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States)]|[Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)]|[Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Temple, H.T. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)]|[Department of Orthopedic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Objective. Granuloma annulare is an uncommon benign inflammatory dermatosis characterized by the formation of dermal papules with a tendency to form rings. There are several clinically distinct forms. The subcutaneous form is the most frequently encountered by radiologists, with the lesion presenting as a superficial mass. There are only a few scattered reports of the imaging appearance of this entity in the literature. We report the radiologic appearance of five cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. Design and patients. The radiologic images of five patients (three male, two female) with subcutaneous granuloma annulare were retrospectively studied. Mean patient age was 6.4 years (range, 2-13 years). The lesions occurred in the lower leg (two), foot, forearm, and hand. MR images were available for all lesions, gadolinium-enhanced imaging in three cases, radiographs in four, and bone scintigraphy in one. Results. Radiographs showed unmineralized nodular masses localized to the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The size range, in greatest dimension on imaging studies, was 1-4 cm. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with variable but generally relatively well defined margins. There was extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Conclusion. The radiologic appearance of subcutaneous granuloma annulare is characteristic, typically demonstrating a nodular soft-tissue mass involving the subcutaneous adipose tissue. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences and variable but generally well defined margins. There is extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Radiographs show a soft-tissue mass or soft-tissue swelling without evidence of bone involvement or mineralization. This radiologic appearance in a young individual is highly suggestive of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. (orig.) With 3 figs., 17 refs.

  12. Management of Food Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Maleknejad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although food allergy is a major public health problem, currently there is no effective and safe treatment except to avoid the foods .But the need for new options is critical now as the number of children diagnosed with food allergies rises. Avoiding the offending allergen in the diet is the primary treatment of food allergy. Once a food to which the patient is sensitive has been identified, the food must be removed from the diet. People with severe food allergies must be prepared to treat an anaphylactic reaction. These individuals also always should carry a syringe of adrenaline (epinephrine [EpiPen], and be prepared to self-administer it if they think they are developing an allergic reaction. Several medications are available for treating the other symptoms of food allergy. For example, antihistamines can relieve gastrointestinal symptoms, hives, sneezing, and a runny nose. Bronchodilators can relieve the symptoms of asthma. They are not effective, however, in preventing an allergic reaction when taken prior to eating the food. In fact, no medication in any form is available to reliably prevent an allergic reaction to a certain food before eating that food.Novel therapeutic approaches to food allergy can be classified as food allergen-specific therapy(immunotherapy with native or modified recombinant allergens, or oral desensitization or food allergen-nonspecifictherapy (anti-IgE, traditional Chinese medicine.   Key Words: Children, Food Allergy, Management.  

  13. Managing a child with possible allergy to vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caubet, Jean-Christoph; Rudzeviciene, Odilija; Gomes, Eva; Terreehorst, Ingrid; Brockow, Knut; Eigenmann, Philippe A

    2014-06-01

    Similarly to other medications, vaccines may be responsible for allergic reactions. Although IgE-mediated allergies to vaccine are extremely rare, they are clearly overdiagnosed. Indeed, accurate diagnosis of vaccine allergy is important not only to prevent serious or even life-threatening reactions, but also to avoid unnecessary vaccine restriction. Systematic approaches have been proposed and, if implemented, will likely reduce the number of children being inappropriately labeled as allergic to vaccine. In diagnosis of vaccine allergy, the patient's history is central although not sufficient. In case of suspicion of an allergy, the child should be referred to an allergist in order to perform a complete allergy workup, based primarily on skin tests and/or specific IgE. Highlighting the most recent literature, this article will address the management of children with a possible allergy to vaccine. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Association between cancer and contact allergy: a linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engkilde, Kaare; Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil

    2011-01-01

    and cancer, few have looked into the association between cancer and contact allergy, a type IV allergy. By linking two clinical databases, the authors investigate the possible association between contact allergy and cancer. Methods Record linkage of two different registers was performed: (1) a tertiary...... hospital register of dermatitis patients patch tested for contact allergy and (2) a nationwide cancer register (the Danish Cancer Register). After linking the two registers, only cancer subtypes with 40 or more patients registered were included in the analysis. The final associations were evaluated...... by logistic regression analysis. Results An inverse association between contact allergy and non-melanoma skin- and breast cancer, respectively, was identified in both sexes, and an inverse trend for brain cancer was found in women with contact allergy. Additionally, a positive association between contact...

  15. Contact allergy to propolis in beekeepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münstedt, K; Kalder, M

    2009-01-01

    Allergy to propolis seems to be rare and little is known about it. The aim of the study was to survey a subset of affected beekeepers to determine aspects such as time of onset of disease, comorbidity, and possible methods of prevention. With the help of two German journals for beekeepers we contacted 41 beekeepers with propolis allergy. They were sent a questionnaire which assessed several aspects of the disease and was based on the current literature. 70.7% returned our questionnaire and had clear signs of propolis allergy with positive testing by their local allergologists. They reported that allergy had developed after an average of 9.5 years beekeeping. We also found a high prevalence of other allergies (72.4%). Interestingly, there were also systemic reactions to propolis in some beekeepers but not necessarily when using propolis as a medication against other diseases. Beekeepers believed that solvents used to clean the hands could play a role in the development of the disease. This study provides new insights into allergy to propolis. The hypothesis that solvents used to clean the hands could play a role in the development of the disease should be addressed in future studies.

  16. Update on Quinolone Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doña, Inmaculada; Moreno, Esther; Pérez-Sánchez, Natalia; Andreu, Inmaculada; Hernández Fernandez de Rojas, Dolores; Torres, María José

    2017-08-01

    Quinolones are a group of synthetic antibiotics widely use as first-line treatment for many infections. There has been an increase in the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions to quinolones in recent years, likely due to increased prescription. The purpose of this review is to summarize the clinical pictures, the methods used for diagnosing and the management of allergic reactions to quinolones. Allergic reactions to quinolones can be immediate or delayed, being anaphylaxis and maculopapular exanthema respectively the most frequent clinical entities. A precise diagnosis is particularly difficult since clinical history is often unreliable, skin tests can induce false-positive results, and commercial in vitro test are not well validated. Therefore, drug provocation testing is considered the gold standard to establish diagnosis, which is not a risk-free procedure. Cross-reactivity between quinolones is difficult to predict due to the small number of patients included in the few published studies. Moreover, hypersensitivity to quinolones has also been associated with beta-lactam and neuromuscular blocking agent allergies, although further studies are needed to understand the underlying mechanisms. Avoidance of the culprit quinolone is indicated in patients with a diagnosis of hypersensitivity to these drugs. When quinolone treatment is the only therapeutic option available, desensitization is necessary. This review summarizes the complex diagnostic approach and management of allergic reactions to quinolones.

  17. Determinants of food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilamani, Madhan; Commins, Scott; Shreffler, Wayne

    2012-02-01

    Food allergy is an emerging epidemic in the United States and the Western world. The determination of factors that make certain foods allergenic is still not clearly understood. Only a tiny fraction of thousands of proteins and other molecules is responsible for inducing food allergy. In this review, the authors present 3 examples of food allergies with disparate clinical presentations: peanut, soy, and mammalian meat. The potential relationships between allergen structure and function, emphasizing the importance of cross-reactive determinants, immunoglobulin E antibodies to the oligosaccharides, and the immune responses induced in humans are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Food allergy in South African children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Claudia L; Levin, Michael E; Zar, Heather J; Potter, Paul C; Khumalo, Nonhlanhla P; Volkwyn, Lucia; Fenemore, Bartha; du Toit, George

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of food allergy in South Africa is unknown, but previously thought to be rare in black South Africans. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of, and risk factors for, IgE-mediated food allergy in South African children with atopic dermatitis (AD). This was a prospective, observational study in a paediatric university hospital in Cape Town. Children with AD, aged 6 months to 10 yrs, were randomly recruited from the dermatology clinic. They were assessed for sensitization and allergy by questionnaire, skin prick tests, Immuno Solid Phase Allergen Chip (ISAC) test and incremental food challenges. 100 participants (59 black Africans and 41 of mixed race) were enrolled, median age 42 months. There were high overall rates of food sensitization (66%) and food allergy (40%). Egg (25%) and peanut (24%) were the most common allergies. Black participants had comparable sensitization (69% vs. 61%) but lower allergy rates (34% vs. 46%) than mixed race participants. This was especially evident for peanut allergy (15% Blacks vs. 37% mixed race allergic to peanut, p = 0.01). Early-onset AD (children with AD, and comparable with food allergy rates in patients with AD in developed countries. There are ethnic differences, with significantly lower peanut allergy rates in Blacks compared to mixed race patients. These results are not generalizable to an unselected South African population, which requires further study. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Pollinex Quattro Ragweed: safety evaluation of a new allergy vaccine adjuvanted with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) for the treatment of ragweed pollen allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrick, Paul; Richardson, Derek; Woroniecki, Stefan R; Lees, Beverley

    2007-01-01

    A novel allergy vaccine (Pollinex Quattro Ragweed) has been developed for the prevention or relief of allergic symptoms caused by pollen from Ambrosia spp. (ragweed). An extract from the pollen (chemically modified by glutaraldehyde) is adsorbed onto l-tyrosine with addition of the immunostimulatory adjuvant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). A specific preclinical safety testing strategy was developed to support clinical use and comprised reference to preclinical data available for the marketed non-MPL adjuvanted form of the ragweed vaccine (Pollinex R) and a new repeat dose toxicity study in the rat. Studies with Pollinex R comprised single dose subcutaneous toxicity studies in mice and rats, repeat dose (10 injections over 20 days) parenteral toxicity studies in rats and dogs, an in vitro gene mutation assay along with single and multiple injection local tolerance studies in rats and dogs. The repeat dose subcutaneous toxicity study with Pollinex Quattro Ragweed involved seven injections over 3 weeks (which was more aggressive than the four weekly doses used in the clinic) with dose levels of up to 0.5 ml per animal used. Overall, the product showed no toxicological findings of significance at levels greatly in excess of those proposed for clinical use. As is a feature with vaccination, some dose site irritation was seen. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Factors associated with different results of allergy tests in children with dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuiano, N; Delvecchio, M; Incorvaia, C

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a public health problem, with an increasing prevalence worldwide. AD is a chronic inflammatory disease characterised by skin lesions and severe itching. Immunologically, AD has two forms, IgE-mediated and cell-mediated, but it may also be idiopathic. In the pathogenesis of AD, the gene mutations for filaggrin, a filament-aggregating protein present in the epidermis, are of pivotal importance, but other genetic factors are also operating, including those linked to family atopy. We evaluated the role of family atopy, and of the results of the atopy patch test (APT) in parents, in children with mite-induced AD. 64 children, 38 males and 26 females, mean age 4.97 years, were included for the diagnosis of AD and underwent APT and skin prick test (SPT) with dust mite extracts, with evaluation of atopy and result of APT also in parents. A positive family history of atopy was shown for children with positivity to both APT and SPT compared to those with negative or only one positive result to APT or SPT (p=0.08). Significant associations were found concerning APT results in children and parents. In particular, children of a positive-APT parent had an 18-fold higher risk of APT-positivity in comparison with children of negative-APT parents, while the risk was 6.6-fold higher if APT was positive in father. Family atopy and a positive APT in fathers are risk factors to develop cell-mediated AD, as assessed by the APT, in children. Copyright © 2014 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. [Allergy to latex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxenaire, M C; Moneret-Vautrin, D A

    In France 18% of all preoperative allergic shock syndromes result from allergic reactions to latex. IgE antibodies mediate the immediate hypersensitivity reaction to natural latex proteins extracted for the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). Sensibilization occurs after repeated direct contact of the skin or mucosa with latex products including gloves, urinary catheters or after chronic inhalation of airborne particles of latex in the operating theatre. Clinical expressions include skin rash, asthma or anaphylactic shock. During the preoperative period, the shock may occur late after induction of anaesthesia and after the operative procedure has begun or after the arm cuff has been released. In obstetrics oxytocin injection can precipitate the phenomenon. Subjects at risk have been clearly identified: subjects who wear gloves regularly, those working in an environment contaminated with airborne latex, children who have undergone multiple operations on malformations of the urinary tract or who have had repeated catheterisms (40% of the spina bifida patients are sensitized), atopic subjects, those allergic to exotic fruits (banana, avocado, kiwi). These patients should be identified during the preoperative work-up in order to perform allergy tests. The diagnosis of over-sensitivity should be confirmed by prick-tests and perhaps complete antilatex antibody assay and challenge. All material composed of natural latex should be avoided for these patients. Proposed alternatives include synthetic rubber. Hypoallergenic gloves add no further safety. The operative procedure should be conducted using standard techniques.

  2. Secondary soy allergy in children with birch pollen allergy may cause both chronic and acute symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Swert, Liliane F A; Gadisseur, Romy; Sjölander, Sigrid; Raes, Marc; Leus, Jasmine; Van Hoeyveld, Erna

    2012-03-01

    Secondary soy allergy occurring in tree pollen allergic patients may cause acute symptoms. We selected children with birch pollen allergy suspected of also being soy allergic (SA). Soy allergy was proven based on one of the following: (i) a clear-cut clinical history; (ii) a positive provocation test; and (iii) elimination and reintroduction of soy. Skin prick tests (SPT) were performed with a commercial soy extract and with soy flour. Specific IgE to Gly m 4, Gly m 5, and Gly m 6 was determined by means of ImmunoCAP and ISAC. Eight soy-tolerant atopic children being CAP rGly m 4-negative served as a control group for skin testing. Of 15 subjects with birch pollen allergy and being suspected of soy allergy, eight of them proved to be SA; 7/15 subjects proved to be soy tolerant (ST). Besides acute symptoms in 8/8 SA subjects, 3/8 subjects also had been suffering from severe chronic complaints because of soy allergy. SPT with commercial soy extract was negative in all SA and ST subjects tested. SPT with soy flour was positive in 8/8 SA and in 5/6 ST subjects, but negative in all 8 controls (p soy allergy may cause severe chronic besides acute symptoms. SPT with soy flour is a sensitive and specific tool in detecting soy sensitization. SPT with soy flour, CAP rGly m 4, and ISAC rGLY m 4 are valuable tools in the diagnosis of birch-pollen-associated secondary soy allergy. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Ocular allergy and keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is the most common corneal ectatic disorder, the cause of which is largely unknown. Many factors have been implicated, and the ocular allergy is being one of them. The commonly proposed pathogenesis includes the release of inflammatory mediators due to eye rubbing which may alter the corneal collagen and lead to corneal ectasias. The onset of keratoconus is often early in cases associated with allergy and routine corneal topography may detect subtle forms of keratoconus. These cases may require early keratoplasty and are at an increased risk of having acute corneal hydrops. Surgical outcomes are similar to primary keratoconus cases. However, post-operative epithelial breakdown may be a problem in these cases. Control of allergy and eye rubbing is the best measure to prevent corneal ectasias in cases of ocular allergy.

  4. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - pollen; Bronchial asthma - pollen; Triggers - pollen; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. It is important to know your triggers because avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. ...

  5. Milk Allergy in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... commercial baby formulas). Every time the child has milk, the body thinks these proteins are harmful invaders and works ... thing as lactose intolerance , which is when the body has trouble digesting milk. Some babies with a milk allergy have an ...

  6. Prevention of food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S

    1997-01-01

    Development of a food allergy appears to depend on both genetic factors and exposure-especially in early infancy-to food proteins. In prospective studies, the effect of dietary allergy prevention programmes has only been demonstrated in high-risk infants, i.e. infants with at least one first degree...... relative with documented atopic disease. High-risk infants feeding exclusively on breast milk and/or extensively hydrolysed formula (eHF) combined with avoidance of cow's milk proteins and solid foods during at least the first 4 months of life are found to have a significant reduction in the cumulative...... incidence of food allergy, especially cow's milk protein allergy/intolerance (CMPA/CMPI), in the first 4 years of life. As no studies have been conducted pertaining to the preventive effect of avoidance of milk and other foods after the age of 4-6 months, recommendation of preventive elimination diets...

  7. Allergy and allergic diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kay, A. B

    2008-01-01

    ... and Other Tolerogenic Mechanisms in Allergy and Asthma, 83 Catherine Hawrylowicz and Cezmi A. Akdis 5 IgE and IgE Receptors, 103 Brian J. Sutton, Andrew J. Beavil, Rebecca L. Beavil and James Hunt...

  8. Medication/Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... creates IgE and other antibodies and/or cytotoxic immune cells in response to an otherwise harmless substance in the medication. One characteristic of all drug allergies is that similar symptoms will occur every time ...

  9. Contact allergy to rubber accelerators remains prevalent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, J F; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2016-01-01

    several clinical cases with allergic facial dermatitis to rubber. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate temporal trends of contact allergy to rubber accelerators from the European baseline series in a tertiary patch test clinic in Denmark, and examine associations with anatomical locations of dermatitis. METHODS: Patch...... test and clinical data collected in a Danish tertiary dermatology clinic in Gentofte, Herlev, Copenhagen between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2014 were analysed. The following rubber accelerators or mixtures in petrolatum from the European baseline patch test series were included: thiuram mix 1.......0%, mercaptobenzothiazole 2.0% and mercapto mix 1.0%. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of contact allergy to rubber accelerators was 3.1% with no significant change during the study period (Ptrend = 0.667). Contact allergy to thiuram mix was the most prevalent and was significantly associated with occupational contact...

  10. Patch test results with fragrance markers of the baseline series - analysis of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA) network 2009-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frosch, Peter J; Duus Johansen, Jeanne; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contact allergy to fragrances is common, and impairs quality of life, particularly in young women. OBJECTIVE: To provide current results on the prevalences of sensitization to fragrance allergens used as markers in the baseline series of most European countries. METHODS: Data of patie...

  11. Course of contact allergy in consecutive eczema patients patch tested with TRUE Test panels 1 and 2 at least twice over a 12-year period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte D; Andersen, Klaus E

    2005-01-01

    -year period using the TRUE Test standardized patch test system. Out of 297 positive reactions, 66% remained positive in a 2nd test, 10% were scored as doubtful and 24% as negative. Among the previously recorded doubtful reactions, 13% were positive in the 2nd test, 13% were again doubtful and 74......% negative. In relation to the degree of patch test reactivity, 48% of the + reactions were reproducible, compared to 87% of ++ and +++ reactions. No difference in reproducibility was observed between patients tested with a short or a long-time interval between tests. With the use of the TRUE Test panels 1...... and 2, methodological factors are minimized. The variation in patch test positivity may then be attributed to biological variation, which depends on several individual factors such as patch test reading, patient-related factors such as changed immunological sensitivity, regional variation of the skin...

  12. [Allergy to radiographic contrast media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, Julien; Petitpierre, Stéphanie; Fumeaux, Alexandre; Meuli, Reto; Spertini, Francois; Comte, Denis

    2013-04-17

    Allergy to radiographic contrast media Hypersensitivity reactions to radio-contrast media are common in the daily practice. These products are responsible for immediate ( 1 hour after administration) hypersensitivity reactions. A diagnostic work-up by an allergologist with skin tests and in some cases provocation tests is of value in reducing the risk of recurrent hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media. A careful selection of the patients is required because the incidence of breakthrough reactions is still concerning, even with proper premedication. Practical recommendations are presented in this article. For gadolinium-based contrast agents, data in the literature is not sufficient for suggesting guidelines.

  13. Allergy in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, S R; Bakirtas, A; Bel, E; Custovic, A; Diamant, Z; Hamelmann, E; Heffler, E; Kalayci, Ö; Saglani, S; Sergejeva, S; Seys, S; Simpson, A; Bjermer, L

    2017-02-01

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps 4-5 of GINA guidelines to prevent their asthma from becoming 'uncontrolled', or whose disease remains 'uncontrolled' despite this therapy. Epidemiological studies on emergency room visits and hospital admissions for asthma suggest the important role of allergy in asthma exacerbations. In addition, allergic asthma in childhood is often associated with severe asthma in adulthood. A strong association exists between asthma exacerbations and respiratory viral infections, and interaction between viruses and allergy further increases the risk of asthma exacerbations. Furthermore, fungal allergy has been shown to play an important role in severe asthma. Other contributing factors include smoking, pollution and work-related exposures. The 'Allergy and Asthma Severity' EAACI Task Force examined the current evidence and produced this position document on the role of allergy in severe asthma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Diurnal variations in subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavishi, Aakash A; Grammer, Leslie C; Pongracic, Jacqueline; Rychlik, Karen; Kumar, Rajesh; Zee, Phyllis; Greenberger, Paul A; Fishbein, Anna B

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms underlie many immune responses and allergic diseases. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) can result in adverse reactions; however, it is unclear whether such reactions have a diurnal pattern. To assess whether the timing of SCIT affects the rate of adverse reactions. This study was a retrospective medical record review of adult patients (n = 289) who received SCIT at the Northwestern Medical Faculty Foundation, Chicago, Illinois, during a 10-year period (2004-2014). Injections were given in the outpatient setting. There were a total of 17,457 injections with 574 reactions. Covariates included age, sex, median income, asthma status, vial contents, number of injections, and previous immunotherapy reactions. Logistical regression was used to calculate the odds of having a reaction with time of SCIT administration as the primary determinate. Immunotherapy reactions occurred more frequently after afternoon or evening (pm) injections (328/8721 = 3.8%) vs morning (am) injections (246/8736 = 2.8%), (χ2 = 12.26, P < .01). Systemic reactions, defined as World Allergy Organization grade 1 or higher, did not have diurnal variation (59/8721 = 0.67% for pm vs am 56/8736 = 0.64% for morning; χ2 = 0.08; P = .77). pm injections resulted in higher odds of reaction compared with am injection in a fully adjusted logistic regression model (odds ratio = 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-1.70; P < .01). When considering time as 4 categories, the highest odds of reaction were noted for the period from 15:01 to 17:30 (odds ratio, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-2.00; P < .01). pm injections of SCIT are associated with increased cutaneous reaction rates when compared with am injections. In patients experiencing bothersome local reactions, it may be beneficial to administer SCIT in the morning. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Alberto E; Armenio, Lucio; Bernardini, Roberto; Boner, Attilio; Calvani, Mauro; Cardinale, Fabio; Cavagni, Giovanni; Dondi, Arianna; Duse, Marzia; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Marseglia, Gian L; del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Muraro, Antonella; Pajno, Giovanni B; Paravati, Francesco; Peroni, Diego; Tripodi, Salvatore; Ugazio, Alberto G; Indinnimeo, Luciana

    2011-05-01

    In Italy, according to the International Study on Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study, the prevalence of current asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema in 2006 was 7.9%, 6.5%, and 10.1% among children aged 6-7 and 8.4%, 15.5%, and 7.75% among children aged 13-14 yr. University education in this field is provided by the Postgraduate Schools of Pediatrics and those of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, as well as several annual Master courses. The Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) was founded in 1996 and counts about 1000 members. SIAIP promotes evidence-based management of allergic children and disseminates information to patients and their families through a quite innovative website and the National Journal 'Rivista Italiana di Allergologia Pediatrica'. In the last decade, four major regional, inter-regional, and national web-based networks have been created to link pediatric allergy centers and to share their clinical protocols and epidemiologic data. In addition, National Registers of Primary Immune-deficiencies and on Pediatric HIV link all clinical excellence centers. Research projects in the field of pediatric allergy and immunology are founded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by the National Research Council (CNR), but the overall investments in this research area are quite low. Only a handful Italian excellence centers participate in European Projects on Pediatric Allergy and Immunology within the 7th Framework Program. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology currently hosts two Italians in its Executive Committee (EC) and one in the EC of the Pediatric Section; moreover, major European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology meetings and courses in the area of pediatrics (e.g., PAAM, Venice, 2009) have been held in Italy in the last 3 yr. Italian hallmarks in the management of allergic diseases in childhood are a quite alive and spread interest in

  16. Prevalence of celiac disease in patients with severe food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, R; Ziberna, F; Badina, L; Ventura, A; Longo, G; Quaglia, S; De Leo, L; Vatta, S; Martelossi, S; Patano, G; Not, T; Berti, I

    2015-10-01

    The association between food allergy and celiac disease (CD) is still to be clarified. We screened for CD 319 patients with severe food allergy (IgE > 85 kU/l against food proteins and a history of severe allergic reactions) who underwent specific food oral immunotherapy (OIT), together with 128 children with mild allergy who recovered without OIT, and compared the prevalence data with our historical data regarding healthy schoolchildren. Sixteen patients (5%) with severe allergy and one (0.8%) with mild allergy tested positive for both genetic and serological CD markers, while the prevalence among the schoolchildren was 1%. Intestinal biopsies were obtained in 13/16 patients with severe allergy and in the one with mild allergy, confirming the diagnosis of CD. Sufferers from severe food allergy seem to be at a fivefold increased risk of CD. Our findings suggest that routine screening for CD should be recommended in patients with severe food allergy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Nasal allergies hayfever among young adults in Melbourne, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Abramson

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is wide variation in the prevalence of nasal allergies internationally, the extent to which this is due to variation in etiological factors is not known. The purpose of the present study was to define the relative importance of atopy and other risk factors for nasal allergies, including hayfever, among young adults in Melbourne. The subjects were participants in the second phase of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey; 876 adults between 20 and 45 years of age completed a detailed respiratory questionnaire, 745 had skin prick testing with common aeroallergens and 675 underwent methacholine challenge. Total and allergen-specific IgE levels were measured in 701 and 693 subjects by radioimmunoassay and RAST, respectively. Nasal allergies, including hayfever, were reported by 47.5% of randomly selected participants. Females, non- smokers, subjects with a family history of allergies, those with current asthma, a history of eczema and nasal symptoms induced by dust, pollen or food were significantly more likely to have nasal allergies. Oral antihistamines had been used by 45.7% of those reporting nasal allergies and 12.4% had received allergen immunotherapy. The risk of nasal allergies, including hayfever, was increased 6.1-fold by atopy, particularly by positive skin tests to outdoor allergens such as Birch, Timothy grass, plantain, olive, Cladosporium and Rye grass pollen. Total serum IgE was significantly higher in subjects reporting nasal allergies than in those who did not report such allergies. There were significant trends in the prevalence of nasal allergies with increasing titers of specific IgE directed against all allergens tested. In conclusion, the significant independent risk factors for nasal allergies, including hayfever, in young adults were atopy, particularly sensitization to Timothy grass, house dust mites and plantain, current asthma, not smoking, a history of eczema and female gender. Future research

  18. Food allergy due to olive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsel, M; Ardeniz, O; Mete, N; Ersoy, R; Sin, A Z; Gulbahar, O; Kokuludag, A

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old man who presented palatal itching and genaralized urticaria following ingestion of olive 3 years after being diagnosed with olive pollinosis. The patient did not have a history of food allergy or urticaria. The results of skin prick tests with aeroallergens including latex were positive for house dust mite and olive pollen. The results of prick tests and prick-to-prick tests for olive fruit were positive, as were those of specific immunoglobulin E tests to olive pollen and fruit. The results of prick tests to peach, pear, kiwi, melon, and nut were negative. Nasal provocation with olive pollen gave positive results. An open oral provocation test with olive oil did not cause symptoms. This case is unique in that the patient developed olive fruit allergy in the presence of olive pollinosis, and he did not experience allergic symptoms to fruits other than olive, thus enabling us to define a new pollen-food (olive-olive) syndrome.

  19. Fragrance allergy and hand eczema - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2003-01-01

    Because hand eczema and fragrance allergy are common both among patients and in the general population, simultaneous occurrence by chance must be expected. Fragrances are ubiquitous and a part of many domestic and occupational products intended for hand exposure. The present review is based...... fragrance allergy and hand eczema. In future studies, a more detailed exposure assessment is needed, combined with patch test studies among patients with hand eczema tested with relevant fragrance allergens, as well as experimental control exposure studies to specific fragrance allergens on the hands....... As exposures to fragrances on the hands are often simultaneous exposures to irritants, this combined exposure approach needs to be considered....

  20. Fragrance allergy and hand eczema - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2003-01-01

    Because hand eczema and fragrance allergy are common both among patients and in the general population, simultaneous occurrence by chance must be expected. Fragrances are ubiquitous and a part of many domestic and occupational products intended for hand exposure. The present review is based...... fragrance allergy and hand eczema. In future studies, a more detailed exposure assessment is needed, combined with patch test studies among patients with hand eczema tested with relevant fragrance allergens, as well as experimental control exposure studies to specific fragrance allergens on the hands...

  1. Penicillin allergy: A practical guide for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Estrada, Alexei; Radojicic, Cristine

    2015-05-01

    Penicillin allergy is the most commonly reported drug allergy in the United States. However, after undergoing a complete evaluation by a board-certified allergist, including skin testing, 90% of patients labeled as 'penicillin-allergic' are able to tolerate penicillin. Clinical presentation is key in classifying reactions as either mediated by or not mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE), and in determining which patients may benefit from penicillin skin testing, graded-dose challenge, or desensitization. Cross-reactivity between penicillin and other beta-lactams is less common than previously thought. Copyright © 2015 Cleveland Clinic.

  2. Sulfa Allergy: Which Medications Should I Avoid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a statement of the WAO special committee on drug allergy. World Allergy Organization Journal. 2013;6:18. Li ... Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/drug-allergy/expert-answers/sulfa-allergy/FAQ-20057970 . Mayo Clinic ...

  3. Eosinophilic Drug Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Merin; Khan, David A

    2016-04-01

    While peripheral or tissue eosinophilia may certainly characterize drug eruptions, this feature is hardly pathognomonic for a medication-induced etiology. While delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions with prominent eosinophilic recruitment have been typically classified as type IVb reactions, their pathophysiology is now known to be more complex. Eosinophilic drug reactions have a diversity of presentations and may be benign and self-limited to severe and life-threatening. The extent of clinical involvement is also heterogeneous, ranging from isolated peripheral eosinophilia or single organ involvement (most often the skin and lung) to systemic disease affecting multiple organs, classically exemplified by drug-reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). The spectrum of implicated medications in the causation of DRESS is ever expanding, and multiple factors including drug metabolites, specific HLA alleles, herpes viruses, and immune system activation have been implicated in pathogenesis. Due to this complex interplay of various factors, diagnostic workup in terms of skin and laboratory testing has not been validated. Similarly, the lack of controlled trials limits treatment options. This review also describes other localized as well as systemic manifestations of eosinophilic disease induced by various medication classes, including their individual pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management. Given the multitude of clinical patterns associated with eosinophilic drug allergy, the diagnosis can be challenging. Considerable deficits in our knowledge of these presentations remain, but the potential for severe reactions should be borne in mind in order to facilitate diagnosis and institute appropriate management.

  4. Food Allergy: Common Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavisha Y; Volcheck, Gerald W

    2015-10-01

    Food allergy is a growing concern, and recognition of symptoms, knowledge of common food allergens, and management of reactions are important for patients and practitioners. Symptoms of a classic IgE-mediated food allergy vary in severity and can include any combination of laryngeal edema, wheezing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, urticaria, angioedema, and hypotension. Many foods can induce an allergic reaction, but the most commonly implicated foods include cow's milk, egg, peanut, tree nut, soy, wheat, fish, and shellfish. Milk and egg allergy generally develop and are outgrown in childhood. Peanut and tree nut allergy can occur during childhood or adulthood, are less likely to be outgrown, and tend to cause more fatal reactions. Given the possibility of life-threatening reactions, it is important to recognize the potential for cross-reactivity among food groups. Diagnosis of food allergy includes skin prick testing, specific serum IgE testing, and oral food challenges. Management is centered on avoidance of allergenic and cross-reacting foods and early recognition and immediate treatment of reactions. Treatment protocols to desensitize patients to food are currently under investigation. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SUBCUTANEOUS BASIDIOBOLOMYCOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-09

    Jul 9, 2013 ... E-mail: sackey@sky.com. Conflict of interest: None declared. SUMMARY. Basidiobolomycosis is an uncommon chronic deep fungal infection in which gradually enlarging granulomas form, usually in the subcutaneous fat tissues of the limbs, chest or trunk of immunocompetent hosts, primarily children.

  6. Pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous cervical emphysema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2012-09-08

    Sep 8, 2012 ... department with a history of increasing difficulty with breathing and ... ward and commenced on intravenous antibiotics and high flow oxygen. He made remarkable improvement with complete resolution of subcutaneous emphysema on the 4th day ... the left lateral decubitus position.18 Our patient met most.

  7. Pyrexial therapy in subcutaneous phycomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy BSN

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of subcutaneous phycomycosis occurring in a 2 ½ year old child is reported for its rarity, clinical interest and paucity of literature. The condition failed to resolve with conventional antimycotics but improved with the administration of concomitant pyrexial therapy.

  8. Pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous cervical emphysema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2012-09-08

    Sep 8, 2012 ... to trauma or pathological disease state3, with gastroin- testinal and respiratory diseases most commonly impli- cated.4,5. The respiratory disease commonly associated with pneu- momediastinum and subcutaneous cervical emphysema is bronchial asthma.6 Pneumonia, though a very com- mon childhood ...

  9. Oral allergy syndrome to fig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antico, A; Zoccatelli, G; Marcotulli, C; Curioni, A

    2003-06-01

    The few cases of food allergy to fig reported to date, whose main manifestations were anaphylactic reactions, have been related to a cross-sensitisation to weeping fig (Ficus benjamina) or to the 'latex-fruit syndrome'. Here we report on two cases of the oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to fig in patients whose main allergic manifestations were related to sensitisation to grass and birch pollens. The patients were characterised by clinical history, skin prick tests (SPT) with commercial and in-house extracts, prick-by-prick test, specific IgE measurements and challenge tests. PBS-soluble and insoluble extracts of both fig skin and pulp were examined for the presence of potential allergens by IgE immunoblotting. Both patients showed OAS followed by respiratory symptoms when challenged with fig. They were negative in both specific IgE detection and SPT with commercial extracts of fig and many other plant materials, including F. benjamina and Hevea Brasiliensis, while grass and birch pollens gave positive results. Prick-by-prick tests and SPT with in-house extracts indicated that the fig skin had a much higher allergenicity than the pulp. Despite negative IgE detection by the CAP assay, immunoblotting experiments showed that potential fig allergens were PBS-soluble and present only in the skin of the fruit. OAS to fig followed by respiratory symptoms can be present in patients not sensitised to weeping fig or having the latex-fruit syndrome. Different parts of the fig can have different allergenicities, the most important allergens being proteins related to the skin of the fruit. Improved commercial fig extracts to be used for the diagnosis of this type of allergy have to be developed. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Occupational contact allergy to formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Kuuliala, O; Suuronen, K; Alanko, K

    2008-11-01

    Formaldehyde allergy is common and usually derives from formaldehyde-releasing biocides in cosmetic and other products. To analyse patterns of patch test reactions to formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasing compounds and the sources of sensitization. At the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, we screened the patch test files for allergic reactions to formaldehyde and 12 formaldehyde-releasing compounds. All patients with contact allergy to any of the substances were included, and their records were reviewed. Between January 2001 and May 2007, we had patch tested 81 patients with formaldehyde allergy and 18 with independent allergy to some formaldehyde releaser. Of the formaldehyde allergies, 60 were new sensitizations, 25 of which were considered to be occupational. The most common source of occupational sensitization was metalworking fluids followed by creams and related products. Exposure to formaldehyde-releasing preservatives in liquid soaps and other rinse-off products was common in both occupational and non-occupational cases. Reactions to formaldehyde-releasing compounds were seen in 79% of the formaldehyde-allergic patients. Occupational formaldehyde allergy was common and occurred in metalworkers, hairdressers, masseurs, and workers using protective creams, detergents, and liquid soaps. When compared with studies on general dermatological patients, contact allergy to formaldehyde releasers without formaldehyde allergy was rare.

  11. Contact allergy to epoxy hardeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Suuronen, Katri; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Jolanki, Riitta

    2014-09-01

    Diglycidylether of bisphenol A resin is the most important sensitizer in epoxy systems, but a minority of patients develop concomitant or solitary contact allergy to epoxy hardeners. At the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, several in-house test substances of epoxy hardeners have been tested in a special epoxy compound patch test series. To analyse the frequency and clinical relevance of allergic reactions to different epoxy hardeners. Test files (January 1991 to March 2013) were screened for contact allergy to different epoxy hardeners, and the clinical records of patients with allergic reactions were analysed for occupation, concomitant allergic reactions, and exposure. The most commonly positive epoxy hardeners were m-xylylenediamine (n = 24), 2,4,6-tris-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol (tris-DMP; n = 14), isophorone-diamine (n = 12), and diethylenetriamine (n = 9). Trimethylhexamethylenediamine (n = 7), tetraethylenepentamine (n = 4), and triethylenetetramine (n = 2) elicited some reactions, although most patients were found to have no specific exposure. Allergic reactions to hexamethylenetetramine, dimethylaminopropylamine and ethylenediamine dihydrochloride were not related to epoxy products. Tris-DMP is an important sensitizer in epoxy hardeners, and should be included in the patch test series of epoxy chemicals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Food allergy in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy represents a highly up-to-date and continually increasing problem of modern man. Although being present in all ages, it most often occures in children aged up to three years. Sensitization most often occurs by a direct way, but it is also possible to be caused by mother’s milk, and even transplacentally. Predisposition of inadequate immune response to antigen stimulation, reaginic or nonreaginic, is of nonselective character so that food allergy is often multiple and to a high rate associated with inhalation and/ or contact hypersensitivity. Also, due to antigen closeness of some kinds of food, cross-reactive allergic reaction is also frequent, as is the case with peanuts, legumes and tree nuts or cow’s, sheep’s and goat’s milk. Most frequent nutritive allergens responsible for over 90% of adverse reactions of this type are proteins of cow’s milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish, crustaceans, and cephalopods. Allergy intolerance of food antigens is characterized by a very wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Highly severe systemic reactions, sometimes fatal, are also possible. The diagnosis of food allergy is based on a detailed personal and family medical history, complete clinical examination, and corresponding laboratory and other examinations adapted to the type of hypersensitivity and the character of patient’s complaints, and therapy on the elimination diet. A positive effect of elimination diet also significantly contributes to the diagnosis. Although most children “outgrow” their allergies, allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, crustaceans, and cephalopods are generally life-long allergies.

  13. Safety and effectiveness of a preoperative allergy clinic in decreasing vancomycin use in patients with a history of penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miguel; Markus, Patricia; Matesic, Damir; Li, James T C

    2006-11-01

    We developed a clinical pathway to optimize the use of antimicrobials by decreasing vancomycin use in preoperative patients with a history of penicillin allergy. To decrease the use of vancomycin in surgical patients with a self-reported penicillin allergy. In June 2002, same-day allergy consultation and penicillin skin testing were made available for preoperative patients with self-reported penicillin allergy at the preoperative evaluation (POE) clinic. We reviewed the penicillin allergy skin test results, recommendations, and beta-lactam antibiotic administration outcomes from July 1, 2002, to September 16, 2003. A total of 1,204 of 11,819 patients were evaluated for beta-lactam allergy at the POE clinic. Of these, 1,120 were approved by the institutional review board for inclusion in the study and 9 were excluded from the study. Of the remaining 1,111 patients, 1,030 (93%) underwent skin testing for penicillin allergy. Forty-three (4%) had a positive skin test result to penicillin. A total of 947 (85%) of the 1,111 patients with a history of beta-lactam allergy were advised to use a beta-lactam antibiotic, and 164 (15%) were advised to avoid beta-lactams. A total of 955 patients (86%) actually received preoperative antibiotics. Of these 955 patients, 716 (75%) received cefazolin, and only 149 (16%) received vancomycin compared with 30% historical controls (P penicillin skin test result who received a cephalosporin, 5 (0.7%) of 675 experienced an adverse drug reaction to a cephalosporin. Establishment of a clinical pathway in a preoperative clinic that includes allergy consultation and penicillin skin testing reduced vancomycin use to only 16% in surgical patients with a history of beta-lactam allergy.

  14. Association between obesity and asthma in the elderly population: potential roles of abdominal subcutaneous adiposity and sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Jung; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Lim, Soo; Park, Young-Joo; Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, Seok-Bum; Kim, Ki-Woong; Jang, Hak-Chul; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2012-10-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for asthma; however, the association of asthma with obesity has rarely been studied in the elderly population. The role of central obesity has been suggested as a link between the 2 entities but has not been comprehensively studied in elderly populations. To investigate the mechanisms of association between obesity and asthma in the elderly population. This cross-sectional analysis included 994 participants (aged ≥65 years) in the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging. Asthma was defined by using questionnaires. Spirometry and chest radiography were performed to exclude asthma-mimicking conditions. Measurements of abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat were calculated by computed tomography of the abdomen, and regional body compositions were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Biochemical parameters were also measured. The prevalence of asthma was 5.4%. The study population had a mean body mass index (BMI) of 24.0. Multivariate logistic regression tests revealed that the risk of asthma increased in proportion to an increase in BMI or abdominal subcutaneous adiposity. However, no association was found with visceral adiposity, serum adiponectin levels, or serum vitamin D levels. The dual energy X-ray absorptiometry-measured appendicular fat-free mass index was inversely related to asthma among patients with a BMI of 25.0 or greater. Our findings suggest that the relationships between obesity and asthma in the elderly population may be mediated by factors such as abdominal subcutaneous adiposity and sarcopenia. These associations warrant further investigations to identify their potential roles. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ingestive and inhalative allergy to the mushroom Boletus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, R; Johansson, S G; Wüthrich, B

    1997-07-01

    This is the first report on inhalative and ingestive allergy to the common edible mushroom Boletus edulis (Be) (English, edible boletus; German, Steinpilz; French, bolet; Italian, porcino or boleto) belonging to the class Basidiomycetes. Four cases observed in our allergy unit are presented, showing different clinical manifestations of this rare allergy: as an occupational problem or life-threatening anaphylactic reactions after eating Be. In all cases, skin prick-to-prick tests with raw Be were strongly positive: in three cases, specific IgE against Be could be found. The symptoms were reproducible after an inhalation challenge test. It is noteworthy that not only can Basidiomycetes cause airborne allergy but also that edible mushrooms from this class can cause inhalative and intestinal allergy. The two patients with strong anaphylactic reactions demonstrate that Be may have great allergenic potential.

  16. Soy allergy in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmila, Celakovská; Květuše, Ettlerová; Karel, Ettler; Jaroslava, Vaněčková; Josef, Bukač

    2013-07-01

    The evaluation of soy allergy in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis. The evaluation of the correlation to the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy. Altogether 175 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: Specific IgE, skin prick tests, atopy patch tests to soy, history and food allergy to peanut and pollen allergy were evaluated. The early allergic reaction to soy was recorded in 2.8% patients. Sensitization to soy was found in another 27.2% patients with no clinical manifestation after soy ingestion. The correlation between the positive results of examinations to soy and between the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy was confirmed in statistics. Almost one third of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis are sensitized to soy without clinical symptoms. The early allergic reaction to soy occur in minority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

  17. Soy Allergy in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celakovská Jarmila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The evaluation of soy allergy in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis. The evaluation of the correlation to the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy. Materials and Methods: Altogether 175 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: Specific IgE, skin prick tests, atopy patch tests to soy, history and food allergy to peanut and pollen allergy were evaluated. Results : The early allergic reaction to soy was recorded in 2.8% patients. Sensitization to soy was found in another 27.2% patients with no clinical manifestation after soy ingestion. The correlation between the positive results of examinations to soy and between the occurence of peanut and pollen allergy was confirmed in statistics. Conclusion: Almost one third of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis are sensitized to soy without clinical symptoms. The early allergic reaction to soy occur in minority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

  18. Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 attenuates allergy development in a pig model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra J Thomas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probiotics have been studied as immunomodulatory agents of allergy. Several human probiotic trials tracking the development of eczema and other forms of allergy have yielded inconsistent results. A recent infant study demonstrated that pre and postnatal Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (HN001 supplementation decreased the prevalence of eczema and IgE associated eczema. However, the influence of HN001 on the incidence of wheeze, asthma, and/or other allergic manifestations has yet to be reported. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to determine the effects of the probiotic HN001 on the development of allergic lung disease in a pig model. METHODS: Allergy was induced by a series of subcutaneous and intratracheal sensitizations with Ascaris suum allergen (ASA during a six week time frame in post-weanling pigs supplemented daily with HN001, or without supplementation. One week following final sensitization intradermal skin tests and respiratory challenges were conducted. RESULTS: In response to intradermal and respiratory challenges, ASA-sensitized pigs fed HN001 had less severe skin flare reactions, smaller increases in pleural pressure, and trends towards lower changes in arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressure levels compared to control pigs. The frequency of ASA-specific IFN-γ-secreting peripheral blood mononuclear cells, as well as the amount of IL-10 produced by ASA-specific cells, was of greater magnitude in probiotic-fed pigs compared to control animals. These observations suggest that differences in clinical responses to the allergen challenges may be related to probiotic-induced modulation of Th1 (IFN-γ and regulatory (IL-10 cytokine expression. CONCLUSIONS: Probiotic supplementation decreased the severity of allergic skin and lung responses in allergen-sensitized pigs with a corresponding increase in IFN-γ expression. A similar correlation between certain allergic responses and increased IFN-γ expression has been

  19. Oral allergy syndrome to chicory associated with birch pollen allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadot, P.; Kochuyt, A.-M.; van Ree, R.; Ceuppens, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A few cases of IgE-mediated chicory allergy with oral, cutaneous, and/or respiratory symptoms are reported. We present 4 patients with inhalant birch pollen allergy and oral allergy syndrome to chicory. IgE-binding proteins in chicory and cross-reactivity with birch pollen were studied.

  20. Multiple food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, F

    1975-02-01

    This paper is devoted to a study of multiple food allergy, here defined as sensitivity to three or more foods. The purpose of the study is to report findings obtained from a study of 250 private patients and to show what type of persons develop this condition, how it affects them, and what their common allergens are. It was found that multiple food allergy occurs in both sexes and at all ages but is more common in boys than in girls and more common in women then in men. The clinical manifestations were much like those caused by the more familiar inhalant allergy but with a much more widespread constitutional disturbance. The great majority of patients (86%) also reacted to such air-borne allergens as molds, pollens, house dust, and animal epithelials. This indicates that food allergy and inhalant allergy are fundamentally the same phenomenon. The common food allergens were such everyday foods as milk, chocolate, corn, egg, tomato, peanut, and citrus fruits.

  1. Allergy and orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Sunitha; Padmanabhan, Sridevi; Chitharanjan, Arun B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the current literature on allergy in orthodontics and to identify the predisposing factors and the implications of the allergic reaction in the management of patients during orthodontic treatment. A computerized literature search was conducted in PubMed for articles published on allergy in relation to orthodontics. The MeSH term used was allergy and orthodontics. Allergic response to alloys in orthodontics, particularly nickel, has been extensively studied and several case reports of nickel-induced contact dermatitis have been documented. Current evidence suggests that the most common allergic reaction reported in orthodontics is related to nickel in orthodontic appliances and allergic response is more common in women due to a previous sensitizing exposure from nickel in jewellery. Studies have implicated allergy in the etiology of hypo-dontia. It has also been considered as a high-risk factor for development of extensive root resorption during the course of orthodontic treatment. This review discusses the relationship and implications of allergy in orthodontics. PMID:24987632

  2. Fish allergy: in review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Michael F; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-06-01

    Globally, the rising consumption of fish and its derivatives, due to its nutritional value and divergence of international cuisines, has led to an increase in reports of adverse reactions to fish. Reactions to fish are not only mediated by the immune system causing allergies, but are often caused by various toxins and parasites including ciguatera and Anisakis. Allergic reactions to fish can be serious and life threatening and children usually do not outgrow this type of food allergy. The route of exposure is not only restricted to ingestion but include manual handling and inhalation of cooking vapors in the domestic and occupational environment. Prevalence rates of self-reported fish allergy range from 0.2 to 2.29 % in the general population, but can reach up to 8 % among fish processing workers. Fish allergy seems to vary with geographical eating habits, type of fish processing, and fish species exposure. The major fish allergen characterized is parvalbumin in addition to several less well-known allergens. This contemporary review discusses interesting and new findings in the area of fish allergy including demographics, novel allergens identified, immunological mechanisms of sensitization, and innovative approaches in diagnosing and managing this life-long disease.

  3. Managing latex allergies at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latex products; Latex allergy; Latex sensitivity; Contact dermatitis - latex allergy ... Items that may contain latex include: Balloons Condoms and diaphragms Rubber bands Shoe soles Bandages Latex gloves Toys Paint Carpet backing Baby-bottle nipples and ...

  4. Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Of Age Older Adults Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine Women Infant, Children and Teenagers Living With Lung ... written by Respiratory Experts Like no other health magazine, Allergy & Asthma Health Magazine is published by people ...

  5. Allergy Relief for Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Up to 40 percent of children suffer from allergic rhinitis. And children are more likely to develop allergies if one or both parents have allergies. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates over-the-counter ( ...

  6. Study on Patients Who Underwent Suspected Diagnosis of Allergy to Amide-Type Local Anesthetic Agents by the Leukocyte Migration Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikio Saito

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions:: There is a high possibility that these adverse reactions were caused by pseudoallergy to drug. Even by allergic reactions, it was assumed that 80% of them might be caused by antiseptic agents such as paraben. In addition, it was suggested that ALAs, especially lidocaine hydrochloride preparations have high antigenicity (sensitizing property. Furthermore, it was considered that patients with past history of drug or food allergies have a high potential for manifestation of the reactions.

  7. Food allergy: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Hugh A

    2016-10-01

    Hippocrates is often credited with first recognizing that food could be responsible for adverse symptoms and even death in some individuals, but it was not until the seminal observations by Prausnitz that the investigation of food allergy was viewed on a more scientific basis. In the first half of the 20th century, there were periodic reports in the medical literature describing various food allergic reactions. In the mid- to late- 1970's, the studies of Charles May and colleagues began to penetrate the medical world's skepticism about the relevance of food allergy and how to diagnose it, since standard skin testing was known to correlate poorly with clinical symptoms. With May's introduction of the double-blind placebo-controlled oral food challenge, the study of food allergy became evidence-based and exponential strides have been made over the past four decades in the study of basic immunopathogenic mechanisms and natural history, and the diagnosis and management of food allergies. Today IgE- and non-IgE-mediated food allergic disorders are well characterized and efforts to treat these allergies by various immunotherapeutic strategies are well under way. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dipropylene glycol allergy: A hidden cause of perfume contact dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Ernst Jemec, Gregor Borut

    1994-01-01

    A case of allergic contact dermatitis caused by a hand lotion is presented. A positive patch test reaction to the perfume formulation from the lotion was found, establishing a case of perfume allergy. However, when all 16 ingredients of the perfume were tested, the patient reacted not only...... to a fragrance material but also to the solvent used in the perfume, dipropylene glycol. The diagnosis of perfume allergy is common. However, the substances in the responsible perfume are rarely obtained for testing, and significant allergies to the solvent of the perfume may be overlooked....

  9. Japanese Guideline for Food Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Urisu

    2011-01-01

    Therapy for food allergy includes treatments of and prophylactic measures against hypersensitivity like anaphylaxis. A fundamental prophylactic measure is the elimination diet. However, elimination diets should be conducted only if they are inevitable because they places a burden on patients. For this purpose, it is highly important that causative foods are accurately identified. Many means to determine the causative foods are available, including history taking, skin prick test, antigen specific IgE antibodies in blood, basophil histamine release test, elimination diet test, oral food challenge test, etc. Of these, the oral food challenge test is the most reliable. However, it should be conducted under the supervision of experienced physicians because it may cause adverse reactions such as anaphylaxis.

  10. Determinants of Food Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilamani, Madhan; Commins, Scott; Shreffler, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Much has been learned by identifying the molecules that can be recognized by IgE from patients with allergies. Increasingly, by correlating patterns of sensitization with clinical features, it has become possible to distinguish molecules responsible for primary sensitization (complete allergens) from those that are more likely cross-reactive targets. In the case of animal allergens, evolutionary distance seems to be an important factor in determining allergenicity. However, until more is understood regarding the mechanistic details of primary sensitization, including the participation of molecules that stimulate innate immune responses and the repertoire of T-cell antigens, molecules that may or may not themselves be important B-cell antigens, we will not be able to explain fundamental questions, such as why peanut allergy is more severe than soy allergy or why tick exposure is associated with clinically relevant sensitization to a carbohydrate epitope. PMID:22244230

  11. Contact Allergy in Danish Healthcare Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, Jakob F; Menné, Torkil; Sommerlund, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Contact dermatitis in healthcare workers is a pan-European problem. We conducted a retrospective observational study of the patch-test results of 1402 healthcare workers and 1402 matched controls with contact dermatitis who were treated at 3 hospitals departments in Denmark between 2007 and 2014....... The primary objective was to determine whether healthcare work was associated with contact allergy to thiuram mix. Unadjusted univariate analyses revealed that healthcare work was significantly associated with occupational contact dermatitis and hand dermatitis. Contact allergy to thiuram mix was more common...... in healthcare workers was significantly associated with having occupational contact dermatitis, hand dermatitis and older age. In conclusion, we report here a potential problem of contact allergy to thiurams in healthcare workers with contact dermatitis. Legislative authorities may in the future focus...

  12. Clinical update on contact allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uter, Wolfgang; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Orton, David I; Frosch, Peter J; Schnuch, Axel

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this article is to review recent findings in contact allergy, regarding clinical research. The biocide methyldibromo glutaronitrile was identified to be an important sensitizer. Subsequently, it was banned from leave-on cosmetics in the European Union. Another group of important allergens that have been studied extensively included the fragrances oak moss absolute, isoeugenol, hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde and farnesol. A new fragrance mix II has been developed for standard testing, which includes the two latter compounds. Dose response studies have demonstrated broad individual variation of elicitation thresholds, dependent on the allergen concentration during induction, and other factors. Some unsuspected routes of exposure to allergens include oral, inhalational, connubial or airborne contact. Experimental studies provide a classification of newly introduced chemicals; increasingly, the local lymph node assay is supplementing and potentially replacing the guinea pig maximization test. Recent advances in occupational contact allergy include, for example, some attempts to improve diagnostics for epoxy resin and other plastic, glue, and cutting fluid components. Constant awareness for new allergens, confirmed by critical evaluation, standardization of patch test materials, and the identification of temporal patterns and subgroups at risk will improve both the diagnosis and prevention of allergic contact dermatitis.

  13. Injectable agents affecting subcutaneous fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Lk; Cohen, Joel L; Green, Jeremy B

    2015-09-01

    Mesotherapy is an intradermal or subcutaneous injection of therapeutic agents to induce local effects, and was pioneered in Europe during the 1950s. For the past 2 decades, there has been significant interest in the use of mesotherapy for minimally invasive local fat contouring. Based on the theorized lipolytic effects of the agent phosphatidylcholine, initial attempts involved its injection into subcutaneous tissue. With further studies, however, it became apparent that the activity attributed to phosphatidylcholine mesotherapy was due to the adipolytic effects of deoxycholate, a detergent used to solubilize phosphatidylcholine. Since then, clinical trials have surfaced that demonstrate the efficacy of a proprietary formulation of deoxycholate for local fat contouring. Current trials on mesotherapy with salmeterol, a b-adrenergic agonist and lipolysis stimulator, are underway-with promising preliminary results as well. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  14. Principles of subcutaneous port placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Shaun J; Li, Ruizong

    2011-12-01

    The introduction of totally implantable subcutaneous devices in the early 1980s provided patients with secure, reliable venous access and also gave them the ability to move more freely and have a more normal lifestyle with these devices in place. The most common totally implantable device used today is the subcutaneous port. These ports consist of an injection port connected to a catheter. Ports provide a number of advantages compared with other venous catheters; the most important is the reduced risk of infection. These devices have significantly lower rates of infection than nontunneled and tunneled catheters. Additional advantages include less frequent irrigation and minimal home care, and they are less prone to environmental or cutaneous contamination when not being accessed. This article will focus on the placement of these ports. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Subcutaneous emphysema during status astmaticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, E.

    1985-09-01

    Spontaneous subcutaneous accumulations of air in the soft parts of the thorax during an asthmatic crisis (status asthmaticus) are rarely seen. The pathomechanism of the phenomenon, which may lead to the formation of an emphysema of the soft parts via the pneumomediastinum, is discussed, and the possible complications which must be taken into account are pointed out. The value of radiological examination of the thorax in children suffering from asthma bronchiale, is explained briefly. (orig.).

  16. Epidural, paraspinal, and subcutaneous lipomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R. Nuri [Department of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2003-09-01

    A unique case of idiopathic diffuse lipomatosis is reported. The patient was an 11-year-old boy with diffuse lipomatosis in the epidural space, paraspinal muscles, and thoracolumbar subcutaneous regions. Epidural lipomatosis involved the entire thoracolumbar spine and was associated with filar thickening and lipoma. In addition, paraspinal muscles, especially the erector spinae group, had diffuse fatty infiltration. The ultimate clinical effect of this fatty tissue was urinary dysfunction, radicular pain and hypoesthesia in both legs and difficulty walking. (orig.)

  17. Food Allergy in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Claudia L

    2017-06-01

    Whilst food allergy seems to have increased significantly in many developed countries in the past few decades, quality data on the burden of food allergy in many developing countries is scanty. Until recently, South Africa had a dearth of robustly designed food allergy studies. This article summarizes some of the recent research and observations regarding food allergy from the South African setting. South Africa has recently seen two important food allergy prevalence studies in selected and unselected populations. Both show allergy rates in keeping with those in several westernized countries. The major difference between sensitization and allergy rates in these studies emphasizes the vital role of the food challenge in differentiating true food allergy from asymptomatic sensitisation in equivocal cases. Eczema, young age and living in an urban population are important risk factors for food allergy in South Africa. Egg and peanut allergy are the most common food allergies in both selected and unselected populations in South Africa. In peanut allergy, Ara h 2 is the most useful component in differentiating true allergy from tolerance in peanut-sensitized patients. Use of internationally derived 95% positive predictive values for peanut and egg allergy produced many false positives in South African studies. Studies in South Africa show a trend towards more conservative introduction of peanut in eczema patients, which needs to be addressed in the light of recent studies showing a protective effect of earlier introduction of peanut. "Novel" allergies such as galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose allergy, food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and eosinophilic oesophagitis are being described with increasing frequency in South Africa. The surprisingly high prevalence of food allergy in South Africa points towards possible involvement of South Africa in the so-called "food allergy epidemic". This has major implications on the planning of health services in the allergy sector

  18. Breast feeding and allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. O. Kulia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Prevalence of allergy in children is increasing. Influence of feeding on the risk of development of allergy in infants was studied in 140 infants. Methods and results. Along with general clinical evaluation methods immunological parameters assessment was used. It was showed that great care must be given to the pregnant woman treatment, especially with antibiotics, vitamins. Conclusion. As secondary preventive measures suggest: early (in the first 30 minutes application of the newborn babies on the breast, exclusively breastfeeding, careful and minimal medicines prescription, rational feeding.

  19. Indoor and Outdoor Allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhavi; Hays, Amy

    2016-09-01

    In last 30 to 40 years there has been a significant increase in the incidence of allergy. This increase cannot be explained by genetic factors alone. Increasing air pollution and its interaction with biological allergens along with changing lifestyles are contributing factors. Dust mites, molds, and animal allergens contribute to most of the sensitization in the indoor setting. Tree and grass pollens are the leading allergens in the outdoor setting. Worsening air pollution and increasing particulate matter worsen allergy symptoms and associated morbidity. Cross-sensitization of allergens is common. Treatment involves avoidance of allergens, modifying lifestyle, medical treatment, and immunotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. South African food allergy consensus document 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, M E; Gray, C L; Goddard, E; Karabus, S; Kriel, M; Lang, A C; Manjra, A I; Risenga, S M; Terblanche, A J; van der Spuy, D A

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of food allergy is increasing worldwide and is an important cause of anaphylaxis. There are no local South African food allergy guidelines. This document was devised by the Allergy Society of South Africa (ALLSA), the South African Gastroenterology Society (SAGES) and the Association for Dietetics in South Africa (ADSA). Subjects may have reactions to more than one food, and different types and severity of reactions to different foods may coexist in one individual. A detailed history directed at identifying the type and severity of possible reactions is essential for every food allergen under consideration. Skin-prick tests and specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) (ImmunoCAP) tests prove IgE sensitisation rather than clinical reactivity. The magnitude of sensitisation combined with the history may be sufficient to ascribe causality, but where this is not possible an incremental oral food challenge may be required to assess tolerance or clinical allergy. For milder non-IgE-mediated conditions a diagnostic elimination diet may be followed with food re-introduction at home to assess causality. The primary therapy for food allergy is strict avoidance of the offending food/s, taking into account nutritional status and provision of alternative sources of nutrients. Acute management of severe reactions requires prompt intramuscular administration of adrenaline 0.01 mg/kg and basic resuscitation. Adjunctive therapy includes antihistamines, bronchodilators and corticosteroids. Subjects with food allergy require risk assessment and those at increased risk for future severe reactions require the implementation of risk-reduction strategies, including education of the patient, families and all caregivers (including teachers), the provision of a written emergency action plan, a MedicAlert necklace or bracelet and injectable adrenaline (preferably via auto-injector) where necessary.

  1. Utility of Component-Resolved Diagnostics in Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuano, Karen S; Davis, Carla M

    2015-06-01

    Allergen component-resolved diagnostic testing (CRD) is a new methodology in clinical food allergy diagnosis, improving the ability to identify specific clinical phenotypes. Instead of relying on the crude allergen extracts used in standard allergy diagnostics, CRD utilizes purified or recombinant allergens for identification of specific molecules causing sensitization or allergy. This method is able to determine risk of the severity of allergic reactions in specific cases, like soy, peanut, and hazelnut allergy. The severity of allergic reaction can be predicted in peanut allergy with Ara h 2, and clinically relevant disease in pollen-allergic patients can be identified. However, age and geographic differences affect CRD results and it should always be utilized in the context of a clinical history. In the future, clinical phenotypes may be differentiated with larger prospective studies utilizing food challenges.

  2. Drug allergy | Zent | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The majority of reactions are non-anaphylactic and involve the skin, with a lesser incidence of haematological, renal, :musculoskeletal, cardiorespiratory and other systemic manifestations. The only definitive test for allergy in a patient with a history of previous allergic reaction is rechallenge, a dangerous and seldom ...

  3. Corticosteroid contact allergy: an EECDRG multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dooms-Goossens, A; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Brandäo, F M

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the results of an EECDRG multicentre study on contact allergy to corticosteroids. A total of 7238 patients were investigated: 6238 in 13 centres in the course of 1993, and 1000 patients in 1 centre in 1993 and 1994. The 5 corticosteroids tested were budesonide 0.1% pet., be...

  4. The clinical differences of asthma in patients with molds allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziejczyk, Krzysztof; Bożek, Andrzej; Jarząb, Jerzy; Gawlik, Radosław

    2016-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is an increasing problem worldwide. The course of bronchial asthma is dependent on the type of inducing allergens. The differences between the clinical features of asthma in patients with monovalent allergies to molds and with other allergies were explored. Randomly selected 1910 patients (924 women and 986 men) between 18-86 years in age were analyzed according to type of allergy and asthma. The diagnosis of asthma was confirmed on the basis of GINA criteria, physical examination and spirometry. Allergy diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of medical history, a positive skin prick test and the measurement of serum-specific IgE to inhalant allergens, using an extended profile of mold allergens. Patients with monovalent allergies to molds (4% of analyzed group) had significantly more frequent diagnoses of asthma than patients in the other group (53% vs. 27.1-32.4%, p mold had significantly more frequent exacerbation of asthma requiring systemic corticosteroids and/or hospitalization. They used a significantly greater mean daily dose of inhaled steroids compared to other patients. Patients with monovalent IgE allergies to molds are at a higher risk for asthma than patients with other allergies. Their asthma is often more intense and less controlled compared to that of patients with other types of allergies.

  5. Natural history of food allergy in infants and children in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronov, Darit; Tasher, Diana; Levine, Arie; Somekh, Eli; Serour, Francis; Dalal, Ilan

    2008-12-01

    Knowledge about the natural history of food allergy, especially sesame, is scarce. To follow the natural history of food allergies in Israel, particularly of sesame allergy. The survey was conducted based on clinical records and a detailed questionnaire of children diagnosed as having food allergy. We found 234 children with suspected food allergy. Testing detected 283 allergies in 180 patients (77%) with confirmed diagnosis. The most common allergies were to cow's milk (n = 125), eggs (n = 71), sesame (n = 30), and soy (n = 23). Of those with milk allergy, 69% were IgE mediated (group 1) and 31% were non-IgE mediated (group 2). Group 1 was more likely to have an atopic background than was group 2 (P = .003), whereas group 2 was more likely to have resolution of the allergy (35 of 39 [90%] in group 2 compared with only 32 of 86 [37%] in group 1, P Allergy to soy was found in 23 children, of whom 87% manifested with gastrointestinal symptoms and 21 (91%) were also allergic to cow's milk. In 19 children (83%), the allergy resolved. Thirty children had allergy to sesame, and 73% of them had an atopic background. The allergy resolved in only 9 of these patients (30%) at a mean age of 2.8 years. The distribution of food allergens in Israel differs from that in other countries. Non-IgE-mediated food allergy and particularly milk and soy allergy were likely to resolve completely with time. Sesame allergy was 1 of the most frequent in this cohort, was usually IgE mediated, and tended to resolve in only a few patients.

  6. House dust mite-related allergic diseases: role of skin prick test, atopy patch test, and RAST in the diagnosis of different manifestations of allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuiano, Nicola; Fusilli, Saverio; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2010-07-01

    The atopy patch test (APT) was recently defined as an important tool in diagnosis of atopic dermatitis (AD) and also of rhinitis and asthma caused by hypersensitivity to the house dust mites. We evaluated 465 children (279 males and 186 females) aged 0.4-17.6 years (mean 6.6 +/- 3.8 years), by dividing them into four groups: group A, current AD (40 patients); group B, current AD with respiratory symptoms (156 patients); group C, past AD with respiratory symptoms (203 patients); and the control group, respiratory symptoms with no history of AD (66 patients). The APT was significantly more frequently positive in groups with current AD (groups A and B) or past AD (group C) than in the control group, while skin prick test (SPT) and radioallergosorbent test (RAST) were significantly more frequently positive in the control group. With multivariate analysis, for APT, significant differences were found in the comparison between group A vs group B (odds ratio (OR) 1.55) and between group A vs group C (OR 1.81). The mean age was significantly lower in group A than in groups B, C, and the control group and with less significance in groups C vs D. Children sensitized to mites with current or past AD, with or without respiratory symptoms, have a different response to diagnostic tests, which is characterized by a highly significantly more frequent positive APT in comparison with subjects who have respiratory symptoms but a negative history for AD, who show the common response to SPT and RAST.

  7. [House dust mite allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, A; Pichler, C

    2012-04-01

    House dust mites can be found all over the world where human beings live independent from the climate. Proteins from the gastrointestinal tract- almost all known as enzymes - are the allergens which induce chronic allergic diseases. The inhalation of small amounts of allergens on a regular base all night leads to a slow beginning of the disease with chronically stuffed nose and an exercise induced asthma which later on persists. House dust mites grow well in a humid climate - this can be in well isolated dwellings or in the tropical climate - and nourish from human skin dander. Scales are found in mattresses, upholstered furniture and carpets. The clinical picture with slowly aggravating complaints leads quite often to a delayed diagnosis, which is accidently done on the occasion of a wider spectrum of allergy skin testing. The beginning of a medical therapy with topical steroids as nasal spray or inhalation leads to a fast relief of the complaints. Although discussed in extensive controversies in the literature - at least in Switzerland with the cold winter and dry climate - the recommendation of house dust mite avoidance measures is given to patients with good clinical results. The frequent ventilation of the dwelling with cold air in winter time cause a lower indoor humidity. Covering encasings on mattresses, pillow, and duvets reduces the possibility of chronic contact with mite allergens as well as the weekly changing the bed linen. Another option of therapy is the specific immunotherapy with extracts of house dust mites showing good results in children and adults. Using recombinant allergens will show a better quality in diagnostic as well as in therapeutic specific immunotherapy.

  8. Anaphylaxis in the allergy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherman, Bryan D

    2014-09-01

    Otolaryngologists managing patients with allergic rhinitis are faced with the possibility of anaphylactic reactions in the office, especially when providing allergen immunotherapy. Literature review was performed and recent published articles on anaphylaxis were examined. Details on pathophysiology, incidence, signs/symptoms, and treatment of anaphylaxis are included in this review article. Although anaphylaxis is a rare event with allergy testing and immunotherapy, it can result in fatal consequences. Clinical manifestations of anaphylaxis are rapid, and the upper and lower airways, skin, conjunctiva, and gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems are often affected, individually or in combination. Treatment of anaphylaxis in the office begins with proper preparation in advance. The most important drug in the treatment of anaphylaxis is epinephrine, which should be administered early during an anaphylactic reaction. Recognition of the risks factors for anaphylaxis, such as uncontrolled asthma, may be helpful in order to prevent anaphylaxis. Fortunately, Anaphylaxis is a rare occurrence in the allergy office if strict attention is paid to proper testing and treatment principles. Maintaining a high level of vigilance and preparedness is important to increase the chances of a favorable outcome should an anaphylactic episode occur. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  9. Comprehensive allergy work-up is mandatory in cystic fibrosis patients who report a history suggestive of drug allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi Silvia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the general population, reports on suspected ß-lactam hypersensitivity are common. After a drug allergy work-up at best 20% of the selected patients are positive. However, these considerations have not been explored in cystic fibrosis patients for whom antibiotics are even more crucial. Methods The study, part of the Drug Allergy and Hypersensitivity (DAHD cohort, was performed in the regional cystic fibrosis center of Montpellier, France. After identifying patients with a clinical history suggestive of drug allergy to ß-lactams, a complete drug allergy work-up, was carried out according to the EAACI recommendations. Results Among the 171 patients involved, 23 reported clinical manifestations potentially compatible with a drug allergy to ß-lactams. After performing the complete drug-allergy work-up, 7 were considered as drug hypersensitive (3 had positive skin tests, 1 a positive provocation test, 3 declined the tests. Excluding the latter 3 patients with incomplete drug allergy work-up, the rate of proven drug allergy was 2.3%. Conclusions Drug allergy to ß-lactams in cystic fibrosis patients is of importance. A full drug allergy work-up is mandatory in case of suspicion, because ß-lactam responsibility is often ruled out.

  10. Traveling with Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In the Know FARE on Facebook FARE on Twitter FARE on Youtube FARE on Instagram A Great Place to Start Get the free Food Allergy Field Guide, full of our best resources to help you stay safe, avoid reactions, shop smartly and live well. Dine Out Safely ...

  11. Kiwifruit allergy across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, T. M.; Knulst, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Kiwifruit has a high nutritive and health value. Commercial plantings of kiwifruit started a few decades ago and in the last 30 years, it has become a widely consumed fruit. Nowadays, it is one of the most common causes of food allergy. Symptoms vary between mild symptoms in the oral cavity to

  12. Seasonal Allergies in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as blankets, every 2 to 3 weeks in hot water to kill the dust mite. Pillows should be replaced every 2 to 3 years. Working With Your Child’s Pediatrician Your child’s allergy and/or asthma treatment should start with your pediatrician. If needed, your ...

  13. Sorting Out Seasonal Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... physician if your allergy symptoms persist, affecting your quality of life. Share This Category AOA Headquarters 142 E. Ontario St.Chicago, IL 60611-2864 Phone: (888) 62-MYAOA (888-626-9262) The DO Difference FAQs Becoming a DO Careers at the AOA Terms of Use Privacy Policy ...

  14. Dust Mite Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more likely to develop infections of the sinuses (sinusitis). Asthma. People with asthma and dust mite allergy often have difficulty managing asthma symptoms. They may be at risk of asthma attacks that require immediate medical treatment or emergency care. By Mayo Clinic Staff . Mayo ...

  15. Kiwifruit allergy across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, T. M.; Knulst, A. C.

    Kiwifruit has a high nutritive and health value. Commercial plantings of kiwifruit started a few decades ago and in the last 30 years, it has become a widely consumed fruit. Nowadays, it is one of the most common causes of food allergy. Symptoms vary between mild symptoms in the oral cavity to

  16. Allergy in severe asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Giacco, Stefano R.; Bakirtas, A.; Bel, E.; Custovic, A.; Diamant, Z.; Hamelmann, E.; Heffler, E.; Kalayci, O.; Saglani, S.; Sergejeva, S.; Seys, S.; Simpson, A.; Bjermer, Leif

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps

  17. Food allergy in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi; Lee, Bee Wah

    2006-06-01

    Food allergy is increasing in prevalence in Western populations, but little is known about it in Asia. The perception is that the prevalence in this region is low, but is likely to increase with the global increase in allergy. Asia is unique because of the many different cultures and eating habits, with the resulting occurrence of unique food allergens. This review describes the epidemiology and clinical features of food allergy, and introduces some of the unusual food allergens in Asia. Recent studies describing the pattern of anaphylaxis and the role of food triggers show that food is an important cause of severe allergic reactions in Asia. Progress has been made on the characterization of unique food allergens from the region. Peanut and tree nuts are rarely the cause of allergic reactions in Asia. The lack of availability of epinephrine auto-injectors in many countries is an important issue that needs to be addressed. The pattern of food allergy in Asia is unique. Unfortunately, data from many parts of Asia are still lacking. Large, well-designed epidemiological studies are needed so that the scale of the problem can be understood, public awareness can be increased and important food allergens in the region can be identified.

  18. RN AND ALLERGY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The HIV-l Tat protein is a promiscuous transactivator of viral and cellular genes. This transactivation leads to three important events involved in the interaction between HIV and cellular determinants of allergy: (I) Tat induces secretion of IL-4 and IL-13 from maSl cells and basophils;. (il) Tat protein causes chemotaxis of mast ...

  19. Chapter 23: Food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Rachel G; Pongracic, Jacqueline A

    2012-01-01

    The onset of IgE-mediated food allergy is usually within minutes to 2 hours of food ingestion. Risk factors for fatal food-induced anaphylaxis include presence of asthma (which is a risk factor for anaphylaxis in general), failure to use epinephrine autoinjectors promptly, history of prior severe reactions, known food allergy, denial of symptoms, and adolescent/young adult age. The most commonly implicated foods are cow's milk, eggs, peanuts, soy, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, and wheat. Allergies to peanut, tree nuts, and seafood are the most common food allergens in adults. The major food allergens are glycoproteins that are generally water soluble and stable to the effects of heat, proteases, and acids. Food proteins that escape proteolysis are taken up by intestinal epithelial cells and presented to primed T cells. This process leads to the generation of T-helper type 2 (Th2) cells that produce IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13. Recent studies have found that tolerance can be acquired with >70% of children becoming tolerant to cow's milk and eggs by age 16 years. Allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, and seafood are frequently lifelong. Food-allergic patients or their care givers should be taught when and how to administer injectable epinephrine. In terms of prevention, the American Academy of Pediatrics concluded that there is no convincing evidence that delaying the introduction of solid foods, including common allergens, beyond 4-6 months of age has a protective effect on the development of atopic disease.

  20. Oral Allergy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuto Kondo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as the symptoms of IgE-mediated immediate allergy localized in the oral mucosa, and the characteristics depend on the lability of the antigen. Another term used for this syndrome is pollen-food allergy (PFS; the patient is sensitized with pollen via the airways and exhibits an allergic reaction to food antigen with a structural similarity to the pollen (class 2 food allergy. In addition to PFS, latex-fruit syndrome is also well-known as the disease exhibiting OAS. In treating the condition, it must be noted that most but not all symptoms of PFS are those of OAS. In many cases, antigens become edible by heating, but some are resistant to heating. Also, since the exacerbation of atopic dermatitis is occasionally observed after the intake of cooked antigens in asymptomatic individuals, careful inquiry of the history is important in designing the treatment. Immunotherapy against the cross-reacting pollen has also been attempted in PFS.

  1. The efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergy is not affected by different dosage regimens in the induction phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambugaro, R; Puccinelli, P; Burastero, S E; Di Rienzo, V

    2003-01-01

    Sublingual administration of allergens is a safe and effective alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy in patients with respiratory allergies. A drawback to this therapeutic approach is the relatively long and complex management of the induction phase. To determine whether different induction regimens affect the outcome of sublingual immunotherapy. Adult and pediatric patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and/or asthma were included in the study. Ten subjects served as controls and received symptomatic treatments. Forty-three subjects were allocated to sublingual immunotherapy, with three different induction protocols (8-, 15- and 20-day, respectively). Symptom and medication scores, skin test results and (in asthmatic patients) FEV1 values were monitored for two years. Adverse effects were recorded. All induction regimens produced a significant improvement in symptom and medication usage (p protocol is safe and effective. Our results encourage the usage of shorter induction regimens, which produce better compliance with this therapy.

  2. Allergy in Total Knee Replacement. Does It Exist?: Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faschingbauer, Martin; Renner, Lisa; Boettner, Friedrich

    2017-02-01

    There is little data on whether preexisting allergies to implant materials and bone cement have an impact on the outcome of TKA. This review article analyzes the current literature to evaluate the prevalence and importance of metal and cement allergies for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. A review of the literature was performed using the following search criteria: "knee," "arthroplasty," and "allergy" as well as "knee," "arthroplasty," and "hypersensitivity." One hundred sixteen articles were identified on PubMed, Seventy articles could be excluded by reviewing the title and abstract leaving 46 articles to be included for this review. The majority of the studies cited patch testing as the gold standard for screening and diagnosis of hypersensitivity following TKA. There is consensus that patients with self-reported allergies against metals or bone cement and positive patch test should be treated with hypoallergenic materials or cementless TKA. Treatment options include the following: coated titanium or cobalt-chromium implants, ceramic, or zirconium oxide implants. Allergies against implant materials and bone cement are rare. Patch testing is recommended for patients with self-reported allergies. The use of special implants is recommended for patients with a confirmed allergy.

  3. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    Background. Epoxy resin monomers are strong skin sensitizers that are widely used in industrial sectors. In Denmark, the law stipulates that workers must undergo a course on safe handling of epoxy resins prior to occupational exposure, but the effectiveness of this initiative is largely unknown....... Objectives. To evaluate the prevalence of contact allergy to epoxy resin monomer (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A; MW 340) among patients with suspected contact dermatitis and relate this to occupation and work-related consequences. Patients/methods. The dataset comprised 20 808 consecutive dermatitis...... patients patch tested during 2005-2009. All patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test were sent a questionnaire. Results. A positive patch test reaction to epoxy resin was found in 275 patients (1.3%), with a higher proportion in men (1.9%) than in women (1.0%). The prevalence of sensitization...

  4. Patch testing with methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone 200 ppm aq. detects significantly more contact allergy than 100 ppm. A multicentre study within the European Environmental and Contact Dermatitis Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruze, Magnus; Isaksson, Marléne; Gruvberger, Birgitta; Andersen, Klaus E; Gonçalo, Margarida; Goossens, An; Johansen, Jeanne D; Maibach, Howard I; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Le Coz, Christophe-J; White, Ian R

    2014-07-01

    Methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI) and methylisothiazolinone (MI) are the active ingredients in commonly used preservative systems (e.g. Kathon CG(®)). MCI/MI is present in the European baseline patch test series at 100 ppm aq. Since 1986, 200 ppm (dose 0.006 mg/cm(2)) has been used in Sweden without causing skin irritation. Centres in Spain, the United Kingdom and Ireland have also used 200 ppm in their baseline series. To find the optimal patch test concentration for MCI/MI. MCI/MI 100 ppm aq. and MCI/MI 200 ppm aq. were simultaneously patch tested in 3300 consecutively tested dermatitis patients at eight European patch test clinics and one US patch test clinic. With the Finn Chambers(®) technique (diameter 8 mm), 15 µl was micropipetted on to the filter paper in the chamber. The corresponding volume for Van der Bend(®) chambers was 20 µl, and that for IQ Chambers(®) was 25 µl. Contact allergy to MCI/MI at 100 and 200 ppm was found in 1.2% and 2.1% of patients, respectively (p < 0.001). MCI/MI 200 ppm aq. (dose 0.006 mg/cm(2) ) diagnoses significantly more contact allergy than the presently used concentration of 100 ppm (dose 0.003 mg/cm(2)), without resulting in more adverse reactions. MCI/MI at 200 ppm should therefore be considered for inclusion in the European baseline test series. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Persistence of contact allergy among Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N H; Linneberg, A; Menné, T

    2001-01-01

    , the persistence of allergic contact sensitivity, defined as 1 or more positive patch tests in both surveys, was 71% (37 out of 52 subjects). Nickel allergy persisted in 79% (19 out of 24 subjects), while 60% (21 out of 35 subjects) had a positive patch test reaction to 1 or more allergens, other than nickel......, in both surveys. The lowest persistence was 50% (5 out of 10 subjects) and this was found for patch test reactivity to 1 or more of the cosmetic ingredients included in the patch test series. 8 years after the baseline study had demonstrated allergic contact sensitivity, 71% of the subjects still had...... at least 1 positive patch test. Nickel allergy persisted in 79%. Allergen avoidance should probably be lifelong to prevent elicitation of contact dermatitis....

  6. Prevalence of beta-lactam allergy: a retrospective chart review of drug allergy assessment in a predominantly pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Elissa M; Wakeman, Andrew; Gerstner, Tom V; Warrington, Richard J; Singer, Alexander G

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that 90% of patients labeled beta-lactam allergic are able to tolerate penicillins following further assessment. This study aims to define and describe the frequency of true beta-lactam allergy following allergy patient evaluation in a predominantly pediatric population. 306 primary care patients referred between January 2010 and June 2015 were assessed for a suspected beta-lactam allergy. Patient demographics, history and test results were extracted from electronic medical records. Testing performed was based on specialist recommendation following review of patient history. 34% of the study participants had intradermal testing. Oral challenge was given to 96.7% of the sample. 96% of patients with a prior history of beta-lactam allergy were advised that they could re-introduce beta-lactam antibiotics following evaluation. Among patients with a documented beta-lactam allergy or a recent history of a reaction there is a low rate of 'true' beta-lactam allergy. Consistent evaluation of beta-lactam antibiotic allergies can reduce rates of broad spectrum antibiotic prescribing, among other harmful consequences.

  7. Early-life gut microbiome and egg allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazlollahi, Mina; Chun, Yoojin; Grishin, Alexander; Wood, Robert A; Burks, A Wesley; Dawson, Peter; Jones, Stacie M; Leung, Donald Y M; Sampson, Hugh A; Sicherer, Scott H; Bunyavanich, Supinda

    2018-01-10

    Gut microbiota may play a role in egg allergy. We sought to examine the association between early-life gut microbiota and egg allergy. We studied 141 children with egg allergy and controls from the multi-center Consortium of Food Allergy Research study. At enrollment (age 3 to 16 months), fecal samples were collected and clinical evaluation, egg specific IgE measurement, and egg skin prick test were performed. Gut microbiome was profiled by 16S rRNA sequencing. Analyses for the primary outcome of egg allergy at enrollment, and the secondary outcomes of egg sensitization at enrollment and resolution of egg allergy by age 8 years, were performed using Quantitative Insights into Microbial Ecology (QIIME), Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States (PICRUSt), and Statistical Analysis of Metagenomic Profiles (STAMP). Compared to controls, increased alpha diversity and distinct taxa (PERMANOVA P=5.0x10 -4 ) characterized the early-life gut microbiome of children with egg allergy. Genera from the Lachnospiraceae, Streptococcaceae, and Leuconostocaceae families were differentially abundant in children with egg allergy. Predicted metagenome functional analyses showed differential purine metabolism by the gut microbiota of egg allergic subjects (Kruskal Wallis P adj =0.021). Greater gut microbiome diversity and genera from Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae were associated with egg sensitization (PERMANOVA P = 5.0x10 -4 ). Among those with egg allergy, there was no association between early-life gut microbiota and egg allergy resolution by age 8 years. The distinct early-life gut microbiota in egg allergic and egg-sensitized children identified by our study may point to targets for preventive or therapeutic intervention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Subcutaneous Leiomyosarcoma of the Frenulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mendis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyosarcomas of the penis are rare, with only 29 reported cases to date. We record the case of a patient who presented with a 2-year history of a seemingly indolent penile skin lesion. On histopathology of the local resection, a diagnosis of subcutaneous leiomyosarcoma was made. Specifically, leiomyosarcoma of the penile frenulum has not been clearly reported previously. The patient underwent a further excision to ensure an adequate resection margin and has had no disease recurrence at subsequent follow-up. Our case was of a lesion that, although clinically benign, was malignant and this possibility should be borne in mind when assessing patients.

  9. A world allergy organization international survey on diagnostic procedures and therapies in drug allergy/hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, Bernard Yu-Hor; Mirakian, Rita; Castells, Mariana; Pichler, Werner; Romano, Antonino; Bonadonna, Patrizia; Diana, Deleanu; Kowalski, Marek; Yanez, Anahi; Lleonart, Ramon; Sanchez-Borges, Mario; Demoly, Pascal

    2011-12-01

    To study the diagnostic and treatment modalities used in drug allergy/hypersensitivity among members of the World Allergy Organization (WAO). A questionnaire comprising 39 questions was circulated electronically to member societies, associate member societies, and regional and affiliate organizations of WAO between June 29, 2009, and August 9, 2009. Eighty-two responses were received. Skin testing was used by 74.7%, with only 71.4% having access to penicillin skin test reagents. In vitro-specific IgE tests were used by 67.4%, and basophil activation test was used by 54.4%. Lymphocyte transformation tests were used by 36.8% and patch tests by 54.7%. Drug provocation tests were used by 68.4%, the most common indication being to exclude hypersensitivity where history/symptoms were not suggestive of drug hypersensitivity/allergy (76.9%). Rapid desensitization for chemotherapy, antibiotics, or biologic agents was used by 69.6%. Systemic corticosteroid was used in the treatment of Stevens-Johnson syndrome by 72.3%, and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins in toxic epidermal necrolysis by 50.8%. Human leukocyte antigen screening before prescription of abacavir was used by 92.9% and before prescription of carbamazepine by 21.4%. Results of this survey form a useful framework for developing educational and training needs and for improving access to drug allergy diagnostic and treatment modalities across WAO member societies.

  10. Developments in the field of allergy in 2013 through the eyes of Clinical and Experimental Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankestijn, M A; Boyle, R J; Gore, R; Hawrylowicz, C; Jarvis, D; Knulst, A C; Wardlaw, A J

    2014-12-01

    2013 was another exciting year for allergy in general and Clinical and Experimental Allergy in particular. In the field of asthma and rhinitis, there continued to be a focus on heterogeneity and phenotypes with increasing use of biostatistical techniques to determine clusters of similar populations. Obesity- and aspirin-associated disease are intriguing associations with asthma which were explored in a number of papers. We published a number of excellent papers on mechanisms of airway inflammation and how this relates to physiology, pathology, genetics and biomarkers in both human and experimental model systems. In terms of mechanisms, there is less on individual cell types in allergic disease at the moment, but the immunology of allergic disease continued to fascinate our authors. Another area that was popular both in the mechanisms and in the epidemiology sections was early life events and how these lead to allergic disease, with an increasing focus on the role of the microbiome and how this influences immune tolerance. In the clinical allergy section, oral immunotherapy for food allergy is clearly a major topic of interest at the moment as was in vitro testing to distinguish between sensitization and allergic disease. There was less on inhalant allergy this year, but a good representation from the drug allergy community including some interesting work on non-IgE-mediated mechanisms. In the allergen section, important new allergens continue to be discovered, but the major focus as in the last couple of years was on working out how component-resolved approaches can improve diagnosis and management of food and venom allergy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Allergy to antibiotics in children: an overestimated problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Castellazzi, Luca; Tagliabue, Claudia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are the most prescribed drugs for children, and a relevant number of prescriptions are associated with the emergence of adverse events. Allergic reactions are the most frequently reported adverse events, with an incidence of up to 10% of all prescriptions. However, literature analysis has shown that allergy to antibiotics is generally overdiagnosed in children because in most cases the diagnosis is based only on the clinical history without a full allergy work-up. Consequently, children are often improperly deprived of narrow-spectrum antibiotics because of a suspected allergy to these drugs. β-Lactams, mainly penicillins, are more frequently involved as a cause of allergy to antibiotics, although allergic problems are reported for most of the antibiotic classes. Accurate diagnosis is essential for a precise definition of determination of allergy to a given drug. Diagnosis has to be based on history, laboratory tests and, when possible, on in vitro and drug provocation tests. Unfortunately, the allergological work-up is well structured only for β-lactam antibiotics, whereas for non-β-lactams few studies are available, with very limited experience in children. The main aim of this paper is to discuss the real relevance of allergy to antibiotics in children in order to provide physicians with the knowledge needed to establish an appropriate diagnostic allergy work-up and to make better use of antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Nickel allergy and relationship with Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdali, Anna M; Anna, Bogdali M; Grazyna, Antoszczyk; Wojciech, Dyga; Aleksander, Obtulowicz; Anna, Bialecka; Andrzej, Kasprowicz; Zofia, Magnowska; Krystyna, Obtulowicz

    2016-01-01

    The increase of nickel air pollution is supposed to frequent side effects of nickel action related to virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with nickel allergy in atopic dermatitis. The goal was to investigate the relationship between nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus in atopic dermatitis. Nickel allergy was confirmed in atopic patients and excluded in healthy volunteers using patch testing. Infection by S. aureus was tested in atopic patients and healthy volunteers by use of API Staph system. The specific IgE for staphylococcal enterotoxin A and B were measured. Secretion of IFN-g, IL-2, IL-13 by PBMC under nickel sulfate and the enterotoxins A and B stimulations were studied with ELISpot. We found the increased number of infections by S. aureus in atopic patients with nickel allergy in comparison to atopic patients and healthy volunteers without nickel allergy. The elevated secretion of IL-2 under nickel sulfate stimulation in vitro was exclusively found in atopic patients with nickel allergy infected by S. aureus. Our data suggest that nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus are linked in atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst in adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung Mo; Lee, Sang Min; Kang, Haeyoun; Choi, Hye Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts have been described rarely, particularly among adolescents. Only a few reports have described the ultrasonographic features of bronchogenic cysts, characterizing them as nonspecific cystic masses with or without internal echogenic foci or debris. Therefore, it is hard to differentiate subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts from other subcutaneous cystic tumors ultrasonographically. We report a case of presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst in an 18-year-old man with unusual ultrasonographic findings. Ultrasonography revealed a small, oval, cystic mass containing a well-circumscribed, heterogeneously hypoechoic, egg-shaped lesion in the dependent portion of the mass within the subcutaneous fat layer overlying the sternum. Surgical excision was performed, and the cystic mass was diagnosed as a bronchogenic cyst. On pathological examination, the internal, heterogeneously hypoechoic, ball-like lesion was found to be mucous material within the cyst. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst presenting with a ball-like lesion inside of the cyst. This unusual ultrasonographic feature can be a clue to the diagnosis of subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst. In conclusion, if an anechoic cyst containing an internal, well-circumscribed, hypoechoic ball-like lesion is seen in the presternal subcutaneous fat layer, subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous cystic masses. PMID:28151916

  14. Public perception of food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, D R; Chiaramonte, L T

    1997-11-01

    Although studies that use the double-blind placebo-controled food challenge (DBPCFC) suggest that the prevalence of food allergy is about 2%, public belief in food allergy appears to be considerably higher. The study was undertaken to determine the magnitude and features of the American public's belief in food allergy by surveying a large, demographically balanced population. A simple question about food allergy was incorporated into a broad, self-reported, mailed consumer questionnaire. Demographically representative American households (5000) were surveyed by means of quota sample in 1989, 1992, and 1993. The response rate was 79, 75, and 74%, respectively. Of responding households, 16.2, 16.6, and 13.9%, respectively, of responding households reported an average of 1.17 household members with food allergy. Individuals reported to be allergic to foods were more likely to be female, particularly adult women. Male individuals with reported food allergy tended to be young, whereas no such skew was noted among female subjects. Geographic differences were observed in reported food allergy, with the highest rate in the Pacific region. Milk and chocolate were the individual foods most frequently implicated in food allergy. Trends were consistent over the time period studied. Perceived food allergy is widespread and persistent. The characteristics and demographic patterns of this belief are not reflective of known food allergy epidemiology derived from studies in which the DBPCFC is used.

  15. The association between metal allergy, total knee arthroplasty, and revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münch, Henrik J; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Olesen, Jens T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: It is unclear whether delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions against implanted metals play a role in the etiopathogenesis of malfunctioning total knee arthroplasties. We therefore evaluated the association between metal allergy, defined as a positive patch test reaction...... to common metal allergens, and revision surgery in patients who underwent knee arthroplasty. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The nationwide Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register, including all knee-implanted patients and revisions in Denmark after 1997 (n = 46,407), was crosslinked with a contact allergy patch test......, the prevalence of cobalt and chromium allergy was markedly higher. Metal allergy that was diagnosed before implant surgery appeared not to increase the risk of implant failure and revision surgery. INTERPRETATION: While we could not confirm that a positive patch test reaction to common metals is associated...

  16. Patch test results of the European baseline series among patients with occupational contact dermatitis across Europe - analyses of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergy network, 2002-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, Maria; Jolanki, Riitta; Larese Filon, Francesca; Wilkinson, Mark; Kręcisz, Beata; Kieć-Świerczyńska, Marta; Bauer, Andrea; Mahler, Vera; John, Swen M; Schnuch, Axel; Uter, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is one of the most common occupational diseases in Europe. In order to develop effective preventive measures, detailed and up-to-date data on the incidence, main causes and professions at risk of occupational contact dermatitis are needed. To describe the pattern of patch test reactivity to allergens in the European baseline series of patients with occupational contact dermatitis in different occupations. We analysed data collected by the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergy (ESSCA) network from 2002 to 2010, from 11 European countries. Allergens in the European baseline series associated with an at least doubled risk of occupational contact dermatitis include: thiuram rubber chemical accelerators, epoxy resin, and the antimicrobials methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone, methyldibromo glutaronitrile, and formaldehyde. The highest risk of occupational contact dermatitis was found in occupations classified as 'other personal services workers', which includes hairdressers, nursing and other healthcare professionals, precision workers in metal and related materials, and blacksmiths, tool-makers and related trades workers. In the planning and implementation of measures aimed at preventing occupational contact dermatitis, the focus should be on the identified high-risk occupational groups and the most common occupational allergies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Latex Allergy In Health Care Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayriye Sarıcaoğlu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: We aimed to determine the frequency of latex allergy in our hospital and to to evaluate the clinical and demographical features of the cases.Materials and Methods: A detailed questionnaire was administered to healthcare workers by a physician. Skin prick test with latex and patch test with rubber chemicals and a piece of latex glove were performed for all healthcare workers. Latex-specific IgE was measured in serum.Results: The study sample consisted of 36 nurses, 14 doctors, and 50 healthcare workers. While 46 subjects had symptoms, 54 subjects had no symptoms. The relationship of clinical disease with working duration, exposure duration (hour/day, history of atopy, and drug/food allergies was statistically significant. Five nurses and 1 healthcare worker had positive skin prick test. Two of them had positive latex-specific IgE. Positive skin prick test statistically significantly correlated with occupation, working duration, exposure duration (hour/day and positive latex-specific IgE. Two nurses and 2 healthcare workers had positive latex-specific IgE. Two of them had positive skin prick test. Positive latexspecific IgE statistically significantly correlated with working duration, exposure duration, and positive skin prick test. Patch test with a piece of latex glove was negative in all subjects. Three healthcare workers had positive patch test with thiuram-mix, one of them had also positive patch test with mercaptobenzothiazole.Discussion: One of the risk factors for latex allergy is occupations involving frequent exposure to latex products. Latex allergy should be taken into consideration if type I hypersensitivity reactions occur in occupational groups at risk for anaphylactic reaction.

  18. Subcutaneous Implants of Buprenorphine-Cholesterol-Triglyceride Powder in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    L. DeTolla; R. Sanchez; E. Khan; B. Tyler; M. Guarnieri

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous drug implants are convenient systems for the long-term delivery of drugs in animals. Lipid carriers are logical tools because they generally allow for higher doses and low toxicity. The present study used an US Food and Drug Administration Target Animal Safety test system to evaluate the safety of a subcutaneous implant of a cholesterol-triglyceride-buprenorphine powder in 120 BALB/c mice. Mice were evaluated in 4- and 12-day trials with 1- and 5-fold doses of the intended 3 mg/k...

  19. Fragrance allergy and hand eczema - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2003-01-01

    Because hand eczema and fragrance allergy are common both among patients and in the general population, simultaneous occurrence by chance must be expected. Fragrances are ubiquitous and a part of many domestic and occupational products intended for hand exposure. The present review is based...... on a systematic literature research using both a manual and a Medline based search. The search identified 39 studies, including epidemiological patch test studies, general population patch test studies, case studies, and studies of occupational groups. The published data indicate a possible association between...... fragrance allergy and hand eczema. In future studies, a more detailed exposure assessment is needed, combined with patch test studies among patients with hand eczema tested with relevant fragrance allergens, as well as experimental control exposure studies to specific fragrance allergens on the hands...

  20. [Allergy caused by sodium fluoride glycerin: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jihong

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, though more and more ulcerations of oral mucosa caused by allergy to drug occurred clinically, allergy to sodium fluoride glycerin is extremely rare. A case of allergy to sodium fluoride glycerin occurred in Qianfoshan Campus Hospital of Shandong University. After treatment by sodium fluoride glycerin, there was mucosal edema, a large number of red miliary granules in buccal and palatal mucosa. After 3 hours, there were swallowing difficulties, but no breathing difficulties. Next day large ulcers of oral mucosa developed. The patient was cured 7 days after treatment. Fluoride-sensitive test result was positive.

  1. Decreasing trends in methyldibromo glutaronitrile contact allergy - following regulatory intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J.D.; Veien, N.; Laurberg, G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The preservative methyldibromo glutaronitrile (MDBGN) has been banned, first from stay-on, and later from rinse-off cosmetics, in the EU countries because of increasing rates of contact allergy. Objectives: To evaluate the frequency of contact allergy to MDBGN among patients patch....... Results: A significantly decreasing trend in the frequency of positive patch tests to MDBGN was found from 4.6% in 2003 to 2.6% in 2007 (P women. A significantly decreasing proportion of cases with a current relevance of contact allergy to MDBGN...

  2. Historic overview of allergy research in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalberse, Rob C; Knol, Edward F

    2014-12-01

    Research in allergy has a long history in the Netherlands, although the relation with immunology has not always been appreciated. In many aspects Dutch researchers have made major contribution in allergy research. This ranges from the first characterization of house dust mite as an important allergen, the first characterization of human Th2 and Th1 T cell clones, to the development of diagnostic test systems. In this overview Aalberse and Knol have made an overview of the major contributions of Dutch immunologists in allergy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral allergy syndrome induced by chestnut (Castanea sativa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antico, A

    1996-01-01

    Oral allergy syndrome is a distinctive type of allergy to food resulting from direct contact between food and the oral mucosa. Normally, it affects patients who are allergic to pollens. It can be challenged by testing for hypersensitivity to fresh fruit or vegetables in well-known associations. Oral allergy syndrome rarely occurs in patients with other types of allergies, or to food not associated with pollens. Only occasionally does chestnut cause hypersensitivity. There are only a few reported cases, depending on cross-reactivity in previously latex-hypersensitive patients. Oral allergy syndrome to chestnut in a patient with respiratory allergy to Dermatophagoides is therefore unusual and worth reporting. To describe the clinical features and their differences from previously reported cases and to analyze the techniques and methodologic problems related to in vivo and in vitro diagnosis. Case report. Skin tests with commercial and freshly made extracts and by the prick-by-prick method. Challenge test. Specific IgE antibody assay. Prausnitz-Küstner reaction. The challenge with fresh food confirmed an oral allergy syndrome to chestnut. Clear symptoms of rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma set in as well. Skin tests with several commercial extracts and the prick-by-prick test were negative and so was specific IgE assay in serum by RAST and other immunoenzymatic methods. Skin prick test with a freshly prepared extract of fresh chestnut and the passive transfer reaction were positive. The case of oral allergy syndrome to chestnut reported here appears to be a manifestation of immediate IgE-dependent hypersensitivity.

  4. Evaluation of Penicillin Allergy in the Hospitalized Patient: Opportunities for Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Justin R; Khan, David A

    2017-06-01

    Penicillin allergy is often misdiagnosed and is associated with adverse consequences, but testing is infrequently done in the hospital setting. This article reviews historical and contemporary innovations in inpatient penicillin allergy testing and its impact on antimicrobial stewardship. Adoption of the electronic medical record allows rapid identification of admitted patients carrying a penicillin allergy diagnosis. Collaboration with clinical pharmacists and the development of computerized clinical guidelines facilitates increased testing and appropriate use of penicillin and related β-lactams. Education of patients and their outpatient providers is the key to retaining the benefits of penicillin allergy de-labeling. Penicillin allergy testing is feasible in the hospital and offers tangible benefits towards antimicrobial stewardship. Allergists should take the lead in this endeavor and work towards overcoming personnel limitations by partnering with other health care providers and incorporating technology that improves the efficiency of allergy evaluation.

  5. Penicillin allergy: a practical approach to management.

    OpenAIRE

    Sussman, G L; Davis, K; Kohler, P F

    1986-01-01

    Although penicillin is nontoxic, it is highly immunogenic and is the most common drug that causes allergic reactions. A previous reaction to penicillin has been shown to be unreliable in predicting sensitivity in 75% to 90% of patients. To more accurately test for penicillin allergy, diagnostic skin test reagents have been developed; these include the major determinant (benzylpenicilloyl-polylysine) and the minor determinant mixture (penicillin G potassium, benzylpenicilloate sodium and benzy...

  6. Allergy to Ficus benjamina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian-Teherani, Daniela; Hentges, François

    2002-01-01

    The clinical history of 16 patients found to have specific IgE antibodies against Ficus benjamina was analyzed in terms of allergic symptoms, clinical and biological cross-sensitisation to other allergens and compared to the data found in the literature. Two different groups of patients were studied. Group A consisted of 13 patients who became sensitised through contact with ficus plants and experienced symptoms upon exposure. Their main symptoms where conjunctivitis, rhinitis, asthma, eyelid oedema or urticaria. Of these patients 11 had other atopic manifestations. Two persons had no other allergy. 10 patients experienced symptoms at home, 2 at the working place and 1 while being in a restaurant. One patient had a crossreactive food allergy to figs. Group B consisted of 3 highly atopic patients who had also a sensitization both to latex (Hevea brasiliensis) and to Ficus benjamina. They had no clinical history of allergic reactions provoked by ficus plants.

  7. Food Allergy Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Developed the content of this website in collaboration with a group of leading allergy experts from the food industry, patient organisations, clinical centres, and research institutions in Europe. This has been undertaken as part of the EuroPrevall project coordinated by Clare Mills at the Instit......Developed the content of this website in collaboration with a group of leading allergy experts from the food industry, patient organisations, clinical centres, and research institutions in Europe. This has been undertaken as part of the EuroPrevall project coordinated by Clare Mills...... at the Institute of Food Research. The InformAll database is curated by the Institute of Food Research which also maintains the website....

  8. Immunotherapy in food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Toral; Bryce, Paul J

    2010-05-01

    Food allergies are caused by immune responses to food proteins and represent a breakdown of oral tolerance. They can range from mild pruritus to life-threatening anaphylaxis. The only current consensus for treatment is food avoidance, which is fraught with compliance issues. For this reason, there has been recent interest in immunotherapy, which may induce desensitization and possibly even tolerance. Through these effects, immunotherapy may decrease the potential for adverse serious reactions with accidental ingestions while potentially leading to an overall health benefit. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of food allergy and give an overview of the various immunotherapeutic options and current supporting evidence, as well as look towards the future of potential novel therapeutic modalities.

  9. Patients with multiple contact allergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit Christina; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Menné, Torkil

    2008-01-01

    Patients with multiple contact allergies, also referred to as polysensitized, are more frequent than predicted from prevalence of single sensitivities. The understanding of why some people develop multiple contact allergies, and characterization of patients with multiple contact allergies...... is limited. This review presents the current knowledge on the topic and discusses the evidence and characteristics of an increased susceptibility factor, possible causes to and genetic markers for the increased susceptibility, composition of the patient group and identification of patients at risk...... of developing multiple contact allergies. Evidence of allergen clusters among polysensitized individuals is also reviewed. The literature supports the idea that patients with multiple contact allergies constitute a special entity within the field of contact allergy. There is no generally accepted definition...

  10. Determinants of Food Allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Masilamani, Madhan; Commins, Scott; Shreffler, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Much has been learned by identifying the molecules that can be recognized by IgE from patients with allergies. Increasingly, by correlating patterns of sensitization with clinical features, it has become possible to distinguish molecules responsible for primary sensitization (complete allergens) from those that are more likely cross-reactive targets. In the case of animal allergens, evolutionary distance seems to be an important factor in determining allergenicity. However, until more is unde...

  11. Can We Make Cosmetic Contact Allergy History?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Basketter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical allergy is of considerable importance to the toxicologist, who, amongst other things, has the responsibility of identifying and characterizing the skin (and respiratory sensitizing potential of chemicals, and estimating the risk they pose to human health. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD is to a large extent a preventable disease. Although quantitative risk assessment (QRA for contact allergy can be performed, it is reasonable to ask why the burden of the skin disease ACD appears to remain stubbornly high, and in particular, that the general level of ACD to sensitizing ingredients found in cosmetics has not fallen noticeably over recent decades; some could argue that it has increased. In this review, this conundrum is addressed, considering whether and to what extent the prevalence of cosmetic allergy is truly unchanged, whether the predicted test methods and potency estimations are sufficiently precise and how proposed changes to the QRA process (i.e., cumulative exposure may ameliorate the situation. Improved and more widespread use of risk assessment, better education of risk assessors, better post-marketing surveillance and monitoring of dermatology clinic feedback to improve QRA, all together could help to “make contact allergy history”.

  12. Subcutaneous Emphysema—Beyond the Pneumoperitoneum

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Subcutaneous emphysema and gas extravasation outside of the peritoneal cavity during laparoscopy has consequences. Knowledge of the circumstances that increase the potential for subcutaneous emphysema is necessary for safe laparoscopy. Methods: A literature review and a PubMed search are the basis for this review. Conclusions: The known risk factors leading to subcutaneous emphysema during laparoscopy are multiple attempts at abdominal entry, improper cannula placement, loose fitt...

  13. Immunologic features of infants with milk or egg allergy enrolled in an observational study (Consortium of Food Allergy Research) of food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicherer, Scott H; Wood, Robert A; Stablein, Donald; Burks, A Wesley; Liu, Andrew H; Jones, Stacie M; Fleischer, David M; Leung, Donald Y M; Grishin, Alexander; Mayer, Lloyd; Shreffler, Wayne; Lindblad, Robert; Sampson, Hugh A

    2010-05-01

    Immune features of infants with food allergy have not been delineated. We sought to explore the basic mechanisms responsible for food allergy and identify biomarkers, such as skin prick test (SPT) responses, food-specific IgE levels, and mononuclear cell responses, in a cohort of infants with likely milk/egg allergy at increased risk of peanut allergy. Infants aged 3 to 15 months were enrolled with a positive SPT response to milk or egg and either a corresponding convincing clinical history of allergy to milk or egg or moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis. Infants with known peanut allergy were excluded. Overall, 512 infants (67% male) were studied, with 308 (60%) having a history of a clinical reaction. Skin test responses, detectable food-specific IgE, or both revealed sensitization as follows: milk, 78%; egg, 89%; and peanut, 69%. SPT responses and food-specific IgE levels were discrepant for peanut (15% for IgE > or = 0.35 kU(A)/L and negative SPT response vs 8% for positive SPT response and IgE Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Laboratory animal; allergy; asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, M; Romano, C; Mutti, A

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory animal allergy (LAA) may develop when susceptible persons are exposed to allergens produced by laboratory animals. LAA is associated with exposure to urine, fur, and salivae of rats, guinea pigs, dogs and rabbits. Approximately 30% of persons who are exposed to laboratory animals may develop LAA and some will also develop asthma. LAA is most likely to occur in persons with previously known allergies, especially to domestic pets. The majority of LAA sufferers experience symptoms within six months their first exposure to laboratory animals; almost all develop symptoms within three years. The most common symptoms are watery eyes and an itchy, runny nose, although skin symptoms and lower respiratory tract symptoms may also occur. Feeding and handling laboratory animals or cleaning their cages generates ten times the amount of allergens compared with undisturbed conditions. Prevention of animal allergy depends on control of allergenic material in the work environment and on organizational and individual protection measures. Pre-placement evaluation and periodic medical surveillance of workers are important pieces of the overall occupational health programme. The emphasis of these medical evaluations should be on counselling and early disease detection.

  15. Globalisation and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelain, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Globalisation brings patients more and more into contact with products or food from other cultures or countries. Europeans may be confronted with allergens not yet known in Europe - such as dimethylfumarate - responsible for contact allergy epidemics. Moreover, "low cost" goods, not always legally imported into Europe, sometimes may lead to European legislation being circumvented and thus bring our patients into contact with components that have been banned from manufacturing processes or strongly regulated, such as nickel in jewelry or telephones, some colouring agents in clothes or preservatives in cosmetics. Disinfection measures for freight containers arriving from other continents into our harbours lead to fumigants and other toxic products contaminating the air and the transported products or goods. Globalisation can not only elicit contact allergy but also airborne contact dermatitis or food allergy. The aim of this paper is not to make an exhaustive review of cutaneous allergic problems elicited by globalisation, but to illustrate this new worldwide problem with a few meaningful examples.

  16. Immunotherapy for mold allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding mold immunotherapy. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to mold immunotherapy using the following keywords: mold, allergy, asthma, and immunotherapy. In addition, references cited within these articles were also reviewed. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic. Allergic responses to inhaled mold antigens are a recognized factor in allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are significant problems with respect to the production of relevant allergen material for the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergy with immunotherapy. Mold allergens contain proteases and should not be mixed with other allergens for immunotherapy. Most of the immunotherapy studies focus on two molds, Alternaria and Cladosporium. There is a lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials when evaluating the efficacy of mold immunotherapy with trials only focusing on immunotherapy to Alternaria and Cladosporium. Additional studies are needed regarding mold allergy and immunotherapy focusing on which molds are important for causing allergic disease.

  17. Allergy to beta-lactams in pediatrics: a practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, Nelson A; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic

    2006-11-01

    To present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics. Allergy journals indexed in MEDLINE and LILACS, as well as seminal studies and texts. Allergy to penicillin is commonly reported. In many cases, this results in the decision not to use this drug. About 10% of drug allergy reports are confirmed. The clinical manifestations due to allergic reaction to penicillin vary widely, with emphasis on skin disorders. Gell & Coombs' four hypersensitivity mechanisms are involved in allergic reactions. Penicillin is degraded to a major (95%) and minor determinants (5%). Immediate IgE-mediated reactions causing anaphylaxis are associated with minor determinants in 95% of the cases. Hypersensitivity to these products can be assessed using cutaneous tests performed with major and minor determinants, thus avoiding anaphylactic shock in allergic individuals. The present article underscores the basic body of knowledge on allergy to penicillin, providing support for a more accurate diagnosis of this event and for the choice of management in cases of suspected beta-lactam allergy. The incorrect diagnosis of penicillin allergy frequently leads to the exclusion of this drug as a therapeutic option. A better recognition of these situations will enable the use of penicillin and reduce the risks associated with hypersensitivity.

  18. [ANSYS simulation of subcutaneous pustule electrical characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baohua; Wang, Xuan; Zhu, Honglian; Wang, Guoyong

    2011-12-01

    With the growing number of clinical surgery, post-operative surgical wound infection has become a very difficult clinical problem. In the treatments of it, non-invasive test of wound infection and healing status has a significance in clinical medicine practice. In this paper, beginning with the electrical properties of skin tissue structure and on the basis of the electromagnetism and the human anatomy, using the finite element analysis software, we applied safe voltage on the 3D skin model, performed the subcutaneous pustule simulation study and gained the relational curve between depth and radius of the pustule model. The simulation results suggested that the method we put forward could be feasible, and it could provide basis for non-invasive detection of wound healing and wound infection status.

  19. Penicillin allergy: a practical approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, G L; Davis, K; Kohler, P F

    1986-01-01

    Although penicillin is nontoxic, it is highly immunogenic and is the most common drug that causes allergic reactions. A previous reaction to penicillin has been shown to be unreliable in predicting sensitivity in 75% to 90% of patients. To more accurately test for penicillin allergy, diagnostic skin test reagents have been developed; these include the major determinant (benzylpenicilloyl-polylysine) and the minor determinant mixture (penicillin G potassium, benzylpenicilloate sodium and benzylpenicilloyl-N-propylamine). Penicillin skin testing has been shown to be safe and useful in predicting immediate IgE-mediated reactions (overall predictive value 99%). Reactions that occur when patients are challenged with penicillin are mild or accelerated urticarial reactions. We outline a practical and rational therapeutic approach based on the current understanding of penicillin allergy. PMID:3518897

  20. Propofol Use in Pediatric Patients With Food Allergy and Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pooja; Sundaram, Shikha S; Furuta, Glenn T; Pan, Zhaoxing; Atkins, Dan; Markowitz, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Propofol is a safe, well-tolerated anesthetic that is labeled as contraindicated in patients with egg or soy allergy. This contraindication has become increasingly problematic given the rising incidence of food allergy and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). To address this issue, we studied practice patterns of propofol use for esophagogastroduodenoscopies in children with EoE and food allergies at our institution. A retrospective observational study of 1365 esophagogastroduodenoscopies from January 2013 to June 2014 was performed. Data were analyzed using Student t tests, chi square tests, Fisher exact tests, and multivariable logistic regression. We found that propofol was used significantly less in patients with egg or soy allergy, and in patients with EoE, even after adjusting for the presence of food allergy. There was no difference in complication rates relative to propofol use. Propofol was used safely in pediatric patients with EoE and food allergy in this limited single-center review.