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Sample records for subclinical renal disease

  1. Subclinical renal abnormalities in young thalassemia major and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Limited data are available about renal involvement in thalassemia patients. Renal dysfunction in these patients seems to be multifactorial attributed mainly to long standing anemia, chronic hypoxia, iron overload and toxicity of iron chelators. Objective: To assess the frequency of subclinical glomerular and ...

  2. Association between syndecan-1 and renal function in adolescents with excess weight: evidence of subclinical kidney disease and endothelial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.M.R.M. Saboia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Excess weight (overweight and obesity is associated with kidney and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between syndecan-1 and renal function among adolescents with excess weight. A total of 56 students from a public school at Fortaleza, CE, Brazil, were investigated. The adolescents were submitted to anthropometric evaluation, including weight, height, blood pressure and body mass index. Blood and urine samples were collected for the determination of serum lipids (total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and the endothelial injury biomarker syndecan-1. Participants' mean age was 16±1 years (range 14-19 years, and 68% were females. Overweight was observed in 4 cases (7.1% and obesity in 7 (12.5%. Changes in serum lipid levels were more frequent in the overweight group. A positive correlation between syndecan-1 and serum creatinine (r=0.5, P=0.001 and triglycerides (r=0.37, P=0.004, and a negative correlation with glomerular filtration rate (r=-0.33, P=0.02 were found. These findings suggest that adolescents with excess weight present incipient changes at the cellular level that make them more vulnerable to the development of kidney and cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Unresolved Subclinical Hypothyroidism is Independently Associated with Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Oh; Lee, Ihn Suk; Choi, Yoo A; Lee, Sang Ju; Chang, Yoon Kyung; Yoon, Hye Eun; Jang, Yi Sun; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Hye Soo; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Suk Young; Hwang, Hyeon Seok

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often have subclinical hypothyroidism. However, few reports have investigated changes in the status of subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients and its clinical significance in CKD progression. Methods: We included 168 patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD stages 2-4. The normalization of subclinical hypothyroidism during follow-up was assessed, and the association between transitions in subclinical hypothyroid status and the rate of decline of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was investigated. Results: At baseline, 127 patients were euthyroid and 41 (24.4%) patients were diagnosed with subclinical hypothyroidism. Of these 41 patients, 21 (51.2%) spontaneously resolved to euthyroid during follow-up. The rate of eGFR decline of patients with resolved subclinical hypothyroidism was similar to that of euthyroid patients. The patients with unresolved subclinical hypothyroidism showed a steeper renal function decline than patients with euthyroidism or resolved subclinical hypothyroidism (all p hypothyroidism than in those who were euthyroid (p = 0.006). In multivariate linear regression for rate of eGFR decrease, unresolved subclinical hypothyroidism (β = -5.77, p = 0.001), baseline renal function (β = -0.12, p hypothyroidism did not resolve to euthyroidism, and this lack of resolution was independently associated with rapid renal function decline. PMID:24396286

  4. Renal disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys...

  5. Sub-clinical Addison′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manash P Baruah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As autoimmune adrenalitis is fast replacing tuberculosis as the most common etiology cause of adrenal insufficiency, subtler forms of the same are being recognised as subclinical addison′s disease. In this article, we review what is known about this entity till date.

  6. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Kronbichler, Andreas; Mayer, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sj?gren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome n...

  7. [Hypertension and renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...

  8. Atheroembolic renal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk factors for atherosclerosis, including age, male gender, cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. Alternative Names Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - ...

  9. Thrombospondin in Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo, Christian; Daniel, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are multifunctional matricellular glycoproteins which are involved in the regulation of angiogenesis, proliferation, apoptosis, the NO-cGMP-dependent protein kinase pathway and transforming growth factor (TGF) _ activation. The TSP family consists of 5 members, but currently only data on effects of TSP-1 and TSP-2 in renal disease are available. Both TSPs are hardly expressed within the healthy renal cortex and can be upregulated during renal disease. Using different an...

  10. S-adenosylhomocysteine is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis and renal function in a cardiovascular low-risk population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawada, Adam M; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Hummel, Björn; Berg, Judith T; Friedrich, Annika; Roth, Heinz J; Obeid, Rima; Geisel, Jürgen; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H

    2014-05-01

    Although homocysteine has been proposed as a cardiovascular risk factor, interventional trials lowering homocysteine have not consistently demonstrated clinical benefit. Recent evidence proposed the homocysteine metabolite S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) rather than homocysteine itself as the real culprit in cardiovascular disease. Of note, SAH is predominantly excreted by the kidneys, and cannot be lowered by vitamin supplementation. Due to its cumbersome measurement, data from large studies on the association between SAH, kidney function and cardiovascular disease are not available. We recruited 420 apparently healthy subjects into our I Like HOMe FU study. Among all study participants, we assessed parameters of C1 metabolism (homocysteine, SAH and S-adenosylmethionine), renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR]) and subclinical atherosclerosis (common carotid intima-media-thickness [IMT]). eGFR was estimated by the CKD-EPIcreat-cys equation. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis were associated with SAH, but not with homocysteine (IMT vs SAH: r = 0.129; p = 0.010; IMT vs homocysteine: r = 0.009; p = 0.853). Moreover, renal function was more closely correlated with SAH than with homocysteine (eGFR vs SAH: r = -0.335; p subclinical atherosclerosis and eGFR are more strongly associated with SAH than with homocysteine in apparently healthy subjects. Thus, SAH might represent a more promising target to prevent cardiovascular disease than homocysteine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hereditary Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Lakshmi; Jim, Belinda

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary kidney disease comprises approximately 10% of adults and nearly all children who require renal replacement therapy. Technologic advances have improved our ability to perform genetic diagnosis and enhanced our understanding of renal and syndromic diseases. In this article, we review the genetics of renal diseases, including common monogenic diseases such as polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Fabry disease, as well as complex disorders such as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. We provide the nephrologist with a general strategy to approach hereditary disorders, which includes a discussion of commonly used genetic tests, a guide to genetic counseling, and reproductive options such as prenatal diagnosis or pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for at-risk couples. Finally, we review pregnancy outcomes in certain renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neonatal renal cystic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Anshika; Krishnappa, Vinod; Kumar, Deepak; Raina, Rupesh

    2017-08-02

    Neonatal renal cystic diseases have a great impact on the morbidity and mortality of the affected neonates and infants. A good insight into the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options of various neonatal renal cystic diseases aid in early diagnosis and intervention, thereby preventing complications. PubMed search was done for articles on "neonatal renal cystic diseases" and relevant publications including reviews were considered for our article. Both hereditary and nonhereditary causes of cystic kidney diseases can result in severe morbidity and mortality. The main diagnostic modality is ultrasound imaging and most of the neonatal renal cystic diseases are detected during prenatal ultrasound screening. Commonly encountered neonatal renal cystic diseases are autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and multicystic dysplastic kidney. A thorough knowledge of various renal cystic diseases can be of extreme prognostic value. Physicians should be aware of the impact of early diagnosis and intervention on the lives of those affected. Further research about treatment of these diseases is ongoing and can result in breakthrough therapies for these patients.

  13. Subclinical renal abnormalities in young thalassemia major and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amira A.M. Adly

    2014-08-11

    Aug 11, 2014 ... Abstract Background: Limited data are available about renal involvement in thalassemia patients. Renal dysfunction in these patients seems to be multifactorial attributed mainly to long standing anemia, chronic hypoxia, iron overload and toxicity of iron chelators. Objective: To assess the frequency of ...

  14. Chemokines in Renal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Segerer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemokines, members of a large family of chemotactic cytokines, act as directional cues for sorting inflammatory cell subsets to sites of inflammation or lymphoid microenvironments. In addition to their effects on migration, chemokines can also activate effector function in leukocytes and are involved in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Therefore, it is not surprising that chemokines play important roles in a wide range of human diseases, including genetic immunodeficiencies, infections, autoimmune diseases, and malignant tumors. In this report, we have reviewed recent developments (since mid 2003 in chemokines in renal diseases. In animal models, chemokines are produced at the site of injury, leading to inflammatory cell recruitment. The therapeutic impact of the blockade of CCR1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, or the corresponding ligands has been further studied in various renal disease models. Recent studies on the role of the chemokine receptors in human diseases have demonstrated the expression of CXCR1, CXCR3, CCR2, and CCR5 on different subsets of inflammatory cells. The number of CCR5- and CXCR3-positive interstitial infiltrating cells (mainly T cells correlates with renal function and proteinuria in glomerular diseases. Polymorphisms of chemokines and chemokine receptors are of impact on renal disease courses and allograft survival. Chemokine receptor blockade has approached clinical applications in nonrenal diseases and awaits the application in patients with kidney diseases.

  15. Prevalence of subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in healthy HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases are among the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The association between HIV and CVD has been established in many studies. However, information is still lacking on subclinical disease as well as its associated risk factors in this population. This study aimed at ...

  16. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronbichler, Andreas; Mayer, Gert

    2013-04-04

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that.In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA.In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions.

  17. Association between microalbuminuria and subclinical atherosclerosis evaluated by carotid artery intima-media in elderly patients with normal renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong XiangLei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Moderate to severe renal insufficiency and albuminuria have been shown to be independent risk factors for atherosclerosis. However, little is known about the direct association between subclinical atherosclerosis evaluated by carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT and microalbuminuria in elderly patients with normal renal function. Methods Subjects were 272 elderly patients (age  ≥ 60 years with normoalbuminuria (n = 238 and microalbuminuria (n = 34. Carotid IMT was measured by means of high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 was defined as normal renal function. Those who had macroalbuminuria and atherosclerotic vascular disease were not included. Results Compared to subjects with normoalbuminuria, subjects with microalbuminuria had higher mean carotid IMT (1.02 ± 0.38 vs. 0.85 ± 0.28 mm; P  Conclusions A slight elevation of albuminuria is a significant determinant of carotid IMT independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in our patients. Our study further confirms the importance of intensive examinations for the early detection of atherosclerosis when microalbuminuria is found in elderly patients, although with normal renal function.

  18. Subclinical Kidney Damage in Hypertensive Patients: A Renal Window Opened on the Cardiovascular System. Focus on Microalbuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulè, Giuseppe; Castiglia, Antonella; Cusumano, Claudia; Scaduto, Emilia; Geraci, Giulio; Altieri, Dario; Di Natale, Epifanio; Cacciatore, Onofrio; Cerasola, Giovanni; Cottone, Santina

    2017-01-01

    The kidney is one of the major target organs of hypertension.Kidney damage represents a frequent event in the course of hypertension and arterial hypertension is one of the leading causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD).ESRD has long been recognized as a strong predictor of cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. However, over the past 20 years a large and consistent body of evidence has been produced suggesting that CV risk progressively increases as the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) declines and is already significantly elevated even in the earliest stages of renal damage. Data was supported by the very large collaborative meta-analysis of the Chronic Kidney Disease Prognosis Consortium, which provided undisputable evidence that there is an inverse association between eGFR and CV risk. It is important to remember that in evaluating CV disease using renal parameters, GFR should be assessed simultaneously with albuminuria.Indeed, data from the same meta-analysis indicate that also increased urinary albumin levels or proteinuria carry an increased risk of all-cause and CV mortality. Thus, lower eGFR and higher urinary albumin values are not only predictors of progressive kidney failure, but also of all-cause and CV mortality, independent of each other and of traditional CV risk factors.Although subjects with ESRD are at the highest risk of CV diseases, there will likely be more events in subjects with mil-to-moderate renal dysfunction, because of its much higher prevalence.These findings are even more noteworthy when one considers that a mild reduction in renal function is very common in hypertensive patients.The current European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension recommend to sought in every patient signs of subclinical (or asymptomatic) renal damage. This was defined by the detection of eGFR between 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or the

  19. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease.

  20. Anesthetic Management of a Surgical Patient with Chronic Renal Tubular Acidosis Complicated by Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroe Yoshioka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old man with chronic renal tubular acidosis and subclinical hypothyroidism underwent lower leg amputation surgery under general anesthesia. Perioperative acid-base management in such patients poses many difficulties because both pathophysiologies have the potential to complicate the interpretation of capnometry and arterial blood gas analysis data; inappropriate correction of chronic metabolic acidosis may lead to postoperative respiratory deterioration. We discuss the management of perioperative acidosis in order to achieve successful weaning from mechanical ventilation and promise a complete recovery from anesthesia.

  1. Is diabetic retinopathy related to subclinical cardiovascular disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, R; Cheung, N; Islam, FMA; Klein, R; Klein, BEK; Cotch, MF; Sharrett, AR; O'leary, D; Wong, TY

    2011-01-01

    Objective Persons with diabetic retinopathy (DR) have an increased risk of clinical cardiovascular events. This study aimed to determine whether DR is associated with a range of measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in persons without clinical CVD. Design Population-based, cross-sectional epidemiologic study. Participants Nine hundred twenty-seven persons with diabetes without clinical CVD in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Methods Diabetic retinopathy was ascertaine...

  2. Is Diabetic Retinopathy Related to Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Ryo; Cheung, Ning; Islam, FM Amirul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara EK; Cotch, Mary Frances; Sharrett, A Richey; O’Leary, Daniel; Wong, Tien Y.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Persons with diabetic retinopathy (DR) have an increased risk of clinical cardiovascular events. Our study aimed to determine whether DR is associated with a range of measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in persons without clinical CVD. DESIGN Population-based, cross-sectional epidemiologic study PARTICIPANTS Nine hundred and twenty seven persons with diabetes without clinical CVD in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. METHODS DR was ascertained from retinal photographs according to modification of the Airlie House Classification system. Vision threatening DR (VTDR) was defined as severe non-proliferative DR, proliferative DR or clinically significant macular edema. Subclinical CVD measures were assessed and defined as follows: high coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, defined as CAC score≥400; low ankle-brachial index (ABI), defined as ABI25% stenosis or presence of carotid plaque. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Associations between DR and subclinical CVD measures. RESULTS The prevalence of DR and VTDR in this sample was 30.0% and 7.2%, respectively. VTDR was associated with a high CAC score (odds ratio [OR] 2.33, 95% condifence interval [CI] 1.15–4.73), low ABI (OR 2.54; 95%CI, 1.08–5.99) and high ABI (OR 12.6, 95% CI, 1.14, 140.6), after adjusting for risk factors including hemoglobin A1c level and duration of diabetes. The association between VTDR and high CAC score remained significant after further adjustment for hypoglycemic, anti-hypertensive and cholesterol-lowering medications. DR was not significantly associated with measures of carotid artery disease. CONCLUSIONS In persons with diabetes without a history of clinical CVD, the presence of advanced stage of DR is associated with subclinical coronary artery disease. These findings emphasize the need to be careful about the use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor for the treatment of DR. PMID:21168222

  3. Renal vascular changes in renal disease independent of hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W. J.; Demircan, M. M.; Weening, J. J.; Krediet, R. T.; van der Wal, A. C.

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular disease is common in patients with renal disease, but little is known about the effect of renal disease and loss of renal function on vascular morphology. Intima proliferation of small renal arteries, which correlates with atherosclerosis in the aorta, is sometimes

  4. Comparing Survival between peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis patients with subclinical peripheral artery disease: a 6-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Chen, Jan-Yow; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Ting, I-Wen; Liang, Chih-Chia; Wang, I-Kuan; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is known to be an increased mortality risk in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of this study was to compare patient survival between patients with subclinical PAD undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD). Subclinical peripheral artery was defined as an ankle-brachial index of less than 0.9. This study was conducted from April 2005, and the observation period ended on 30 June 2011. At the end of the follow-up, the status of all patients was assessed and data on mortality were obtained for the entire cohort. A total of 91 patients (61 HD and 30 PD) were included for analyses in this study. Mortality rate was 60.0% (18/30) for PD and 52.5% (32/61) for HD. Kaplan-Meier estimate demonstrate that PD patients had a higher mortality rate than those underwent HD (log-rank p = 0.0039). Cox regression model demonstrated that PD was an independent predictor for further mortality in ESRD patients with subclinical peripheral artery disease.(p = 0.012, HR: 1.776, 95% CI: 1.136-2.775). In multivariate analysis, the HD group still had a greater survival than PD group (p = 0.005, HR:1.916, 95% CI: 1.218-3.015). In patients with subclinical peripheral artery disease, the patient survival is better in HD patients as compared with PD patients.

  5. Increased H-FABP concentrations in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Possible marker for subclinical myocardial damage and subclinical atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başar, O; Akbal, E; Köklü, S; Tuna, Y; Koçak, E; Başar, N; Tok, D; Erbiş, H; Senes, M

    2013-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disorder which is reported as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with NAFLD are also at risk of future cardiac events independently of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to examine serum concentrations of heart type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in NAFLD and to investigate its correlations with metabolic parameters and subclinical atherosclerosis. A total of 34 patients with NAFLD and 35 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. NAFLD patients had elevated liver enzymes and steatosis graded on ultrasonography. Healthy subjects had normal liver enzymes and no steatosis on ultrasonography. H-FABP levels were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and correlations with metabolic parameters and subclinical atherosclerosis were examined. Subclinical atherosclerosis was determined with carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) which was measured by high resolution B mode ultrasonography. H-FABP levels were elevated in patients with NAFLD (16.3 ± 4.0 ng/ml) when compared with healthy controls (13.8 ± 2.1 ng/ml; p  subclinical myocardial damage in patients with NAFLD but also of subclinical atherosclerosis, independent of metabolic syndrome and cardiac risk factors.

  6. Cardiovascular risk and subclinical cardiovascular disease in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajuk Studen, Katica; Jensterle Sever, Mojca; Pfeifer, Marija

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its effects on reproductive health, it is now well recognized that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a metabolic disorder, characterized by decreased insulin sensitivity which leads to an excess lifetime risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PCOS patients are often obese, hypertensive, dyslipidemic and insulin resistant; they have obstructive sleep apnea and have been reported to have higher aldosterone levels in comparison to normal healthy controls. These are all components of an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. Many studies exploring subclinical atherosclerosis using different methods (flow-mediated dilatation, intima media thickness, arterial stiffness, coronary artery calcification) as well as assessing circulating cardiovascular risk markers, point toward an increased cardiovascular risk and early atherogenesis in PCOS. The risk and early features of subclinical atherosclerosis can be reversed by non-medical (normalization of weight, healthy lifestyle) and medical (metformin, thiazolidinediones, spironolactone, and statins) interventions. However, the long-term risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as well as the clinical significance of different interventions still need to be properly addressed in a large prospective study. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Subclinical carotid atherosclerosis and hyperuricemia in relation to renal impairment in a rural Japanese population: the Nagasaki Islands study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yuji; Sato, Shimpei; Koyamatsu, Jun; Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Tamai, Mami; Kadota, Koichiro; Arima, Kazuhiko; Yamasaki, Hironori; Takamura, Noboru; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Takahiro

    2014-04-01

    The influence of hyperuricemia on atherosclerosis is controversial. Subclinical carotid atherosclerosis can be defined in two ways in terms of mean and maximum carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT): one with mean CIMT≥1.1 mm and the other with maximum CIMT≥1.1 mm. However, no studies have been reported of the association between hyperuricemia and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis while taking the two different ways of classification into account. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 4133 subjects (1492 men and 2641 women) aged 30-89 years undergoing general health check-ups. For analysis of various associations, we calculated the multivariable odds ratios (ORs) for the two ways classifications of subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in relation to hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related renal impairment constitutes a significant marker for subclinical carotid atherosclerosis with mean CIMT≥1.1 mm for both men and women, while hyperuricemia per se was found to be beneficially associated with risk of subclinical carotid atherosclerosis with maximum CIMT≥1.1 mm for men. The classical cardiovascular risk factors without adjustment for glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of ORs for subclinical carotid atherosclerosis (mean CIMT≥1.1 mm) and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis (maximum CIMT≥1.1 mm) were 2.20(1.10-4.22) and 0.84(0.63-1.13) for men and 2.12(1.02-4.38) and 0.92(0.66-1.27) for women. After further adjustment for GFR, the corresponding values were 1.54(0.74-3.20) and 0.67(0.49-0.92) for men and 1.32(0.61-2.88) and 0.80(0.57-1.12) for women. Hyperuricemia-related renal impairment is a significant marker for subclinical carotid atherosclerosis for both men and women, while hyperuricemia per se may be inversely associated with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis for men as seen in a rural community-dwelling Japanese population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Predictive Value of Cystatin C in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: A Marker of Disease Severity and Subclinical Cardiovascular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawy, Azza Abdel Gawad; Adly, Amira Abdel Moneam; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Abdelazeem, Mai

    2017-11-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at high risk of renal dysfunction and cardiovascular morbidity. The association between cystatin C and renal function is well known, however, cystatin C has recently emerged as a strong predictor of cardiovascular events and adverse outcomes in patients with and without kidney disease, mostly related to both inflammation and atherosclerosis. To determine cystatin C levels in 53 children and adolescents with SCD compared to 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls and assess its relation to markers of hemolysis, iron overload, sickle vasculopathy, and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Patients with SCD in steady state were studied, focusing on hydroxyurea therapy, hematological profile, serum ferritin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR), and serum cystatin C. Echocardiography and CIMT were assessed using high-resolution ultrasound. Heart disease was defined by systolic left ventricle dysfunction (shortening fraction C levels than those without ( P C levels than untreated patients ( P = .039). High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, UACR, ejection fraction, and CIMT were independently related to cystatin C in multiple regression analysis. The cutoff values of cystatin C for detection of renal or cardiovascular complications were determined. Cystatin C may be considered a biological marker for vascular dysfunction and subclinical atherosclerosis in SCD.

  9. Management of renal disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podymow, Tiina; August, Phyllis; Akbari, Ayub

    2010-06-01

    Although renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, it poses considerable risk to maternal and fetal health. This article discusses renal physiology and assessment of renal function in pregnancy and the effect of pregnancy on renal disease in patients with diabetes, lupus, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and chronic pyelonephritis. Renal diseases occasionally present for the first time in pregnancy, and diagnoses of glomerulonephritis, acute tubular necrosis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are described. Finally, therapy of end-stage renal disease in pregnancy, dialysis, and renal transplantation are reviewed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevention Of Chronic Renal Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Fejzi Alushi; Nestor Thereska

    2011-01-01

    It is easier to prevent a disease than to cure it. This postulate is a foundation stone of the contemporary medicine, furthermore its mission. The Chronic Kidney Diseases (CKD), amongst them the Chronic Pyelonephrites (CP) and the mass kidney reduction  take an important  place in human pathologies in general, and in particular in renal ones. The Chronic Pyelonephrites  are chronic renal pathologies, which on one side are of various causes and on the other side are multi systemic. At the same...

  11. Extracellular vesicles in renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpman, Diana; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Arvidsson, Ida

    2017-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes and microvesicles, are host cell-derived packages of information that allow cell-cell communication and enable cells to rid themselves of unwanted substances. The release and uptake of extracellular vesicles has important physiological functions and may also contribute to the development and propagation of inflammatory, vascular, malignant, infectious and neurodegenerative diseases. This Review describes the different types of extracellular vesicles, how they are detected and the mechanisms by which they communicate with cells and transfer information. We also describe their physiological functions in cellular interactions, such as in thrombosis, immune modulation, cell proliferation, tissue regeneration and matrix modulation, with an emphasis on renal processes. We discuss how the detection of extracellular vesicles could be utilized as biomarkers of renal disease and how they might contribute to disease processes in the kidney, such as in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal transplantation, thrombotic microangiopathies, vasculitides, IgA nephropathy, nephrotic syndrome, urinary tract infection, cystic kidney disease and tubulopathies. Finally, we consider how the release or uptake of extracellular vesicles can be blocked, as well as the associated benefits and risks, and how extracellular vesicles might be used to treat renal diseases by delivering therapeutics to specific cells.

  12. Lactation and maternal subclinical cardiovascular disease among premenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    MCCLURE, Candace K.; CATOV, Janet M.; NESS, Roberta B.; SCHWARZ, Eleanor Bimla

    2012-01-01

    Objective Examine the association between lactation and maternal subclinical cardiovascular disease (sCVD). Study Design The Women and Infants Study of Healthy Hearts enrolled 607 mothers who delivered a singleton between 1997 and 2002. In 2007, participating mothers underwent measurements of carotid intima-media thickness, lumen diameter (LD), adventitial diameter (AD), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Multivariable linear and logistic regression were used to estimate the associations between lactation and sCVD. Results Compared with mothers who breastfed for ≥3 months after every birth, mothers who never breastfed exhibited a 0.13mm larger LD (95%CI 0.04,0.22) and a 0.12mm larger AD (95%CI 0.02,0.22) in models adjusting for age, parity, birth outcome, sociodemographic variables, health-related behaviors, family history, gestational weight gain, early adult BMI, current BMI, CRP, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, glucose and insulin levels. Conclusions Mothers who do not breastfeed have vascular characteristics associated with a greater risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22727348

  13. Associations between life stress and subclinical cardiovascular disease are partly mediated by depressive and anxiety symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bomhof-Roordink, Hanna; Seldenrijk, Adrie; van Hout, Hein P. J.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Diamant, Michaela; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Background: Stress experienced during childhood or adulthood has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but it is not clear whether associations are already prevalent on a subclinical cardiovascular level. This study investigates associations between indicators of life stress and

  14. Betel Nut Chewing and Subclinical Ischemic Heart Disease in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Hsiao Tseng

    2011-01-01

    Background. This study investigated the association between betel nut chewing and subclinical ischemic heart disease (IHD) in Taiwanese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods. A total of 394 male patients aging ≥45 years and without previous heart disease were studied. Among them 349 had no habit of chewing betel nut and 45 possessed the habit for ≥5 years. Subclinical IHD was diagnosed by a Minnesota-coded resting electrocardiogram and was present in 71 cases. Statistical analyses were perform...

  15. Frequency of subclinical thyroid dysfunction and risk factors for cardiovascular disease among women at a workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Diaz-Olmos

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is very common in clinical practice and there is some evidence that it may be associated with cardiovascular disease. The aim here was to evaluate the frequencies of subclinical thyroid disease and risk factors for cardiovascular disease among women at a workplace, and to evaluate the association between subclinical thyroid disease and cardiovascular risk factors among them. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study on 314 women aged 40 years or over who were working at Universidade de São Paulo (USP. METHODS: All the women answered a questionnaire on sociodemographic characteristics and risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the Rose angina questionnaire. Anthropometric variables were measured and blood samples were analyzed for blood glucose, total cholesterol and fractions, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, free thyroxine (free-T4 and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO. RESULTS: The frequencies of subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were, respectively, 7.3% and 5.1%. Women with subclinical thyroid disease presented higher levels of anti-TPO than did women with normal thyroid function (P = 0.01. There were no differences in sociodemographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors according to thyroid function status, except for greater sedentarism among the women with subclinical hypothyroidism. Restricting the comparison to women with subclinical hypothyroidism (TSH > 10 mIU/l did not change the results. CONCLUSION: In this sample of women, there was no association between poor profile of cardiovascular risk factors and presence of subclinical thyroid disease that would justify screening at the workplace.

  16. Long-Term Outcome in Levothyroxine Treated Patients With Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Concomitant Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mette Nygaard; Olsen, Anne-Marie Schjerning; Madsen, Jesper Clausager

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Subclinical hypothyroidism is a common condition that may lead to impaired cardiac function. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to examine the effects of levothyroxine treatment in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism and heart disease. DESIGN: This was a register-based historical cohort...... study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The study was composed of Danish primary care patients and hospital outpatients age 18 years and older with established heart disease who were diagnosed with subclinical hypothyroidism in 1997-2011. Patients were stratified according to whether they claimed a subsequent...... myocardial infaction and stroke, and all-cause hospital admissions. RESULTS: Of 61 611 patients with a diagnosis of cardiac disease having their first time thyroid function testing, 1192 patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (mean age 73.6 [SD ± 13.3] y, 63.8% female) were included, of whom 136 (11...

  17. Renal cystic diseases and renal neoplasms: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsib, Stephen M

    2009-12-01

    The past two decades have witnessed recognition of several new types of renal cell carcinoma, each with distinct cytogenetic abnormalities. Included are several genetic and acquired cystic kidney diseases associated with development of renal cell carcinoma, the topic of this review. The risk in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is not accurately known but may be slightly increased. The risk for patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease is substantial, and death from renal cancer is common. For patients with tuberous sclerosis complex, the challenge is recognition of the occasional malignancy arising in a field of many benign tumors. Patients with end-stage kidney disease and acquired cystic kidney disease may develop a variety of renal cell carcinoma types. Progress in understanding the molecular basis of renal cyst formation and neoplastic disease has fostered development of targeted therapies that now hold promise for a group of neoplasms whose cure was traditionally dependent on surgical approaches.

  18. Family history of coronary heart disease and markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease: where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Arvind K; Pandey, Shivda; Blaha, Michael J; Agatston, Arthur; Feldman, Theodore; Ozner, Michael; Santos, Raul D; Budoff, Matthew J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram

    2013-06-01

    The goals of this systematic analysis are to determine the association between family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) and markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease as well as to discuss the inclusion of CHD family history in the frequently used coronary risk prediction algorithms. Individuals with a family history of CHD are at high risk for developing atherosclerosis and events related to CHD, regardless of the presence of other coronary risk factors. They form a target population that might benefit from primary prevention strategies; however, family history data is not a part of the frequently used risk prediction algorithms. Medline and PubMed databases were searched for all studies evaluating the relationship between measures of subclinical atherosclerosis and family history of CHD, published till June 2010. Thirty-two studies met the above criteria and were included in this review. Coronary artery calcium, carotid intima thickness, vascular function, and inflammatory markers including C reactive protein, fibrinogen, and D-dimer were used as measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. Studies differed in design, demographic data of the population, techniques and validation of family history information. Most studies established a statistically significant relationship between the above markers and family history of CAD; further, the association was noted to be independent of traditional risk factors. Family history of CAD is associated with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, and this relationship remains statistically significant after adjusting for traditional risk factors. The above data suggest these individuals should be considered strongly as candidates for assessment of subclinical CVD to further refine risk and treatment goals. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Subclinical zinc deficiency in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, George J; Kanzer, Steve H; Zimmerman, Earl A; Molho, Eric S; Celmins, Dzintra F; Heckman, Susan M; Dick, Robert

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate zinc status in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, 29 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 30 patients with Parkinson's disease, and 29 age- and sex-matched controls were studied. All patients and controls were older than age 50, and all zinc and copper supplements were prohibited beginning 30 days prior to study. Patients were diagnosed by standard criteria. Blood zinc and urine zinc were measured. Urine zinc was measured in a casual specimen, standardized for dilution by reference to creatinine content. Results showed a significantly lower blood zinc in patients with Alzheimer's and patients with Parkinson's than in controls. Urine zinc excretion, normalized to urine creatinine excretion, was not significantly different in either patient group compared to controls. These patients are probably zinc deficient because of nutritional inadequacy.

  20. Microvascular Disease After Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Lun Ooi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Individuals who reach end-stage kidney disease (CKD5 have a high risk of vascular events that persists even after renal transplantation. This study compared the prevalence and severity of microvascular disease in transplant recipients and patients with CKD5. Methods: Individuals with a renal transplant or CKD5 were recruited consecutively from renal clinics, and underwent bilateral retinal photography (Canon CR5-45, Canon. Their retinal images were deidentified and reviewed for hypertensive/microvascular signs by an ophthalmologist and a trained grader (Wong and Mitchell classification, and for vessel caliber at a grading centre using a computer-assisted method and Knudtson's modification of the Parr-Hubbard formula. Results: Ninety-two transplant recipients (median duration 6.4 years, range 0.8 to 28.8 and 70 subjects with CKD5 were studied. Transplant recipients were younger (pConclusions: Hypertensive/microvascular disease occurred just as often and was generally as severe in transplant recipients and subjects with CKD5. Microvascular disease potentially contributes to increased cardiac events post- transplantation.

  1. Association of NAFLD with subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary-artery disease: meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuero, Javier; Gallego-Durán, Rocío; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, using tests of subclinical atherosclerosis. To evaluate the influence of NAFLD on subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD). We reviewed Pubmed and EMBASE. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, we selected 14 studies and were classified in two groups. Ten studies aimed the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis and four studies the presence of coronary artery disease. To assess subclinical atherosclerosis, we selected studies with pathological carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and with presence of carotid plaques. We considered coronary artery disease when patients showed at least 50% stenosis at one or more major coronary arteries. NAFLD was assessed by ultrasound (US) and liver biopsy. NAFLD showed a higher prevalence of pathological CIMT [35.1% (351/999) vs. 21.8% (207/948); p subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The right management of these patients could modify the natural history both liver and cardiovascular disease.

  2. Subclinical cardiovascular disease and its association with risk factors in children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candan, Cengiz; Canpolat, Nur; Gökalp, Selman; Yıldız, Nurdan; Turhan, Pınar; Taşdemir, Mehmet; Sever, Lale; Çalışkan, Salim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its relation to risk factors in pediatric patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (NS). Thirty-seven patients with normal renal function were compared with 22 healthy controls regarding the presence of subclinical CVD. Measurements included aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), carotid intima media thickness (IMT), and left ventricular mass (LVM). Patients were additionally assessed for blood pressure (BP) pattern and the presence of hypertension by 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Compared with the controls, patients had significantly higher mean aortic PWV-standard deviation scores (SDS), mean carotid IMT-SDS, and LVM index (p < 0.001 for all). Increased aortic PWV was noted in 5 % of patients, increased carotid IMT in 22 %, and increased LVM index in 19 %. Five patients (14 %) were hypertensive, and mean BP indexes, SDS, and BP loads during nighttime were significantly higher than those during daytime (p < 0.001 for all). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant relationship between PWV-SDS and ferritin (R(2) = 0.269, p = 0.006) and between carotid IMT-SDS and proteinuria (R(2) = 0.141, p = 0.022). The LVM index was independently associated only with higher body mass index SDS (R(2) = 0.317, p < 0.001). In addition, six patients (16 %) had multiple abnormal subclinical CVD markers, and increased subclinical CVD risk was independently associated only with higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (R(2) = 0.292, p = 0.044). Based on these results, steroid-resistant NS children generally are at high risk of cardiovascular complications, but the increased risk is likely to be multifactorial.

  3. Functional Abnormalities and Thyroid Nodules in Patients with End-stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuna, Vania; Menghi, Viola; Comai, Giorgia; Cappuccilli, Maria; Cianciolo, Giuseppe; Raimondi, Concettina; Grammatico, Francesco; Donati, Gabriele; Baraldi, Olga; Capelli, Irene; LA Manna, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism is more common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) than in the general population. Patients with ESRD with hypothyroidism are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease, with an increased risk of mortality than those with normal thyroid function. Moreover, these patients have higher incidence of benign and malignant nodules. This was a retrospective study on 2,147 patients with ESRD on the renal transplant waiting list between 2000 and 2015 aimed at identifying the presence of hypothyroidism and associated variables. Hypothyroidism was detected in 437/2,147 (20.3%) patients, 289 of them having the subclinical form. Cardiovascular disease and older age were significantly associated with hypothyroidism, and autosomal polycystic kidney disease was correlated to goiter (prenal transplant to control cardiovascular complications and cancer risk. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  4. Betel nut chewing and subclinical ischemic heart disease in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2010-11-04

    Background. This study investigated the association between betel nut chewing and subclinical ischemic heart disease (IHD) in Taiwanese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods. A total of 394 male patients aging ≥45 years and without previous heart disease were studied. Among them 349 had no habit of chewing betel nut and 45 possessed the habit for ≥5 years. Subclinical IHD was diagnosed by a Minnesota-coded resting electrocardiogram and was present in 71 cases. Statistical analyses were performed considering confounding effects of age, diabetic duration, smoking, body mass index, blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and metabolic control status. Results. Betel nut chewers were younger and had higher prevalence of smoking (86.7% versus 60.5%), higher body mass index, poorer glycemic control, and higher prevalence of subclinical IHD (28.9% versus 16.6%). Patients with subclinical IHD were older and had higher prevalence of betel nut chewing (18.0% versus 9.9%). The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio for subclinical IHD for chewers versus nonchewers was 4.640 (1.958-10.999). The adjusted odds ratios in younger or older patients divided by the median age of 63 years were similar: 4.724 (1.346-16.581) and 4.666 (1.278-17.028), respectively. Conclusions. Betel nut chewing is significantly associated with increased risk of subclinical IHD.

  5. Fast renal decline to end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Skupien, Jan; Rossing, Peter

    2017-01-01

    A new model of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes emerged from our studies of Joslin Clinic patients. The dominant feature is progressive renal decline, not albuminuria. This decline is a unidirectional process commencing while patients have normal renal function and, in the majority......, progressing steadily (linearly) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While an individual's rate of renal decline is constant, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope varies widely among individuals from –72 to –3.0 ml/min/year. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines define rapid......, that very fast and fast decline from normal eGFR to ESRD within 2 to 10 years constitutes 50% of the Joslin cohort. In this review we present data about frequency of fast decliners in both diabetes types, survey some mechanisms underlying fast renal decline, discuss methods of identifying patients at risk...

  6. Subclinical ketosis: prevalence and associations with production and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohoo, I R; Martin, S W

    1984-01-01

    Cows in 32 southern Ontario Holstein herds were monitored for subclinical ketosis for a period of two and one half years. Milk samples were routinely collected and the level of milk ketone bodies determined by the use of a commercial nitroprusside based test powder (reactions scored as negative, +1 or +2). Approximately 92% of positive reactions were observed in the first 65 days of lactation and for that time period the prevalence of ketosis was 12.1%. Based on this prevalence, the minimum possible duration of subclinical ketosis would be 7.9 days and the minimum possible lactational incidence rate would be 12.1%. The prevalence during the first 65 days of lactation in individual herds ranged from 0 to 33.9%. Subclinical ketosis was more likely to be found in cows experiencing metritis than in unaffected cows. Detection of elevated levels of milk ketones also indicated that the cow had a significantly higher risk of having clinical ketosis, metritis or cystic ovaries diagnosed within the following four days. Milk ketone scores of +1 and +2 were found to be associated with a reduction in daily milk production of 1.0 and 1.4 kg of milk respectively. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6713247

  7. Renal manifestations of rheumatic diseases. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Pavel; Smrzova, Andrea; Krejci, Karel; Tichy, Tomas; Zadrazil, Josef; Skacelova, Martina

    2013-06-01

    Renal manifestations of rheumatic diaseases are sometimes very discrete and mild. At others, they can present the leading symptomatology of a given disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic scleroderma, renal vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis, mixed connective tissue disease, Sjögren's syndrome and gout can all manifest in or be accompanied by renal impairment. The authors reviewed the literature on renal manifestation of rheumatic diseases using the key words, lupus erythematosus, systemic autoimmune diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis and gout. The review below is accompanied by their own histological findings. Diagnosis requires proper interpretation of the clinical situation, laboratory results and image analysis methods plus close interdisciplinary collaboration between nephrologist and clinical pathologist/nephropathologist.

  8. Immune and Inflammatory Role in Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic and acute renal diseases, irrespective of the initiating cause, have inflammation and immune system activation as a common underlying mechanism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad overview of immune cells and inflammatory proteins that contribute to the pathogenesis of renal disease, and to discuss some of the physiological changes that occur in the kidney as a result of immune system activation. An overview of common forms of acute and chronic renal disease is provided, followed by a discussion of common therapies that have antiinflammatory or immunosuppressive effects in the treatment of renal disease. PMID:23720336

  9. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and subclinical cardiovascular disease in normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Ulrik Madvig; Jensen, Tonny; Køber, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is associated with increased mortality in diabetes. Since CAN often develops in parallel with diabetic nephropathy as a confounder, we aimed to investigate the isolated impact of CAN on cardiovascular disease in normoalbuminuric patients. Fifty......-six normoalbuminuric, type 1 diabetic patients were divided into 26 with (+) and 30 without (-) CAN according to tests of their autonomic nerve function. Coronary artery plaque burden and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) were evaluated using computed tomography. Left ventricular function was evaluated using...... with increased CACS, subclinical left ventricular dysfunction, and increased pulse pressure. In conclusion, CAN in normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients is associated with distinct signs of subclinical cardiovascular disease....

  10. Subclinical atherosclerotic vascular disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prospective hospital-based case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chindhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is an important non-communicable disease worldwide with a rising global incidence. COPD is associated with multiple co-morbidities. Patients with COPD are at increased risk of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in COPD. The present case-control study was designed to assess the relationship between sub-clinical atherosclerotic vascular diseases with COPD. Methods: It was a prospective case-control blinded observational study. There were 142 COPD patients and 124 age-and sex-matched controls without COPD and cardiovascular diseases. Frequency of sub-clinical atherosclerosis was assessed by the carotid B-mode duplex ultrasonography assessment of carotid wall intima medial thickness (IMT. Plaque was defined as IMT of more than 1.2 mm. Results: Prevalence of carotid plaqing was significantly higher amongst patients of COPD (38.7% compared to controls (13.7% , odds ratio 3.9, P < 0.0001. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed COPD as an independent predictor of carotid plaqing (r = 0.85, P < 0.023. Conclusion: The frequency of carotid plaqing is high in COPD patients. Carotid plaqing may be due to shared risk factors or the presence of low-grade systemic inflammation. Presence of increased CIMT and carotid plaqing in COPD patients identifies early atherosclerotic changes and future cardiovascular risk. Hence screening of CIMT should be a part of cardiovascular assessment in patients with COPD.

  11. [Selected markers of subclinical renal damage in men occupationally exposed to mercury vapours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutowski, Jan; Moszczyński, Paulin

    2006-01-01

    concentrations was highest in the group of exposed workers with mean urine mercury concentration > 150 microg/dm3, 2-times higher (purine mercury concentrations 51 to 150 microg/dm3 (purine mercury concentrations urine concentrations were higher [IgG 2.6-times higher (purine mercury concentrations > 150 microg/dm3. Mean alpha-1-m and beta-2-m urine concentrations were highest in group of workers with urine mercury concentration > 150 microg/dm3 [alpha-1-m by 82% (purine concentration and alpha-1-m (r=0,33), as well as between mercury urine concentration and albumin (r=0,31) and IgG (r=0.30) also were observed. Values of "r" between mercury urine concentration and albumine (r=0.46), IgG (r=0.46) and transferrin (r=0.42) were highest in group of workers exposed to mercury vapours from 10 to 20 years. Albumin, transferrin and IgG urine concentrations, as well as alpha-1-m and beta-2-m urine concentrations were statistically significantly higher in the group of workers with > 150 microg Hg/dM3 urine concentration. In conclusion, determination of urine proteins, as a markers of early subclinical renal damage may be useful in monitoring occupational exposure to mercury vapours, especially in the group of workers with higher values of urine mercury concentrations.

  12. Divergent cellular responses during asymptomatic subclinical and clinical states of disease in cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection of the host with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) results in a chronic and progressive enteritis that traverses both subclinical and clinical stages. The mechanism(s) for the shift from asymptomatic subclinical disease state to advanced clinical disease are not fully under...

  13. Factors Associated With Low Levels of Subclinical Vascular Disease in Older Adults: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Michos, Erin D.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Szklo, Moyses; Burke, Gregory L.; Siscovick, David S; Tracy, Russell P.; Barr, R. Graham; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Greenland, Philip; David R Jacobs; Post, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC), carotid intimal medial thickness (cIMT), and reduced ankle brachial indices (ABI) are markers of subclinical vascular disease strongly associated with aging. We identified factors associated with low levels of subclinical vascular disease in 1824 participants ≥70 years in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. 452 had low CAC (

  14. Emerging roles for eicosanoids in renal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmara, Niels O S; Martins, Joilson O; Landgraf, Richardt G; Jancar, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Eicosanoids are products of arachidonic acid metabolism which have important roles in renal homeostasis and disease. In recent years the development of genetically modified animals and new drugs targeting eicosanoids producing enzymes and receptors has unveiled new roles for eicosanoids in kidney function. This review provides an overview of eicosanoid biosynthesis and receptors and discusses recent findings on their role in acute and chronic renal diseases and in renal transplantation. Products of the cyclooxygenases, 5-lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism act through distinct receptors presented at different segment of the nephron. Apart from its role in renal physiology and hemodynamic, eicosanoids actively participate in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic renal diseases and have immunoregulatory role in kidney transplantation. The new discoveries on the role of eicosanoids in kidney functions and the development of drugs targeting eicosanoids synthesis or action should help to envisage novel therapeutic approaches for patients suffering from renal diseases.

  15. Betel Nut Chewing and Subclinical Ischemic Heart Disease in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Hsiao Tseng

    2011-01-01

    Methods. A total of 394 male patients aging ≥45 years and without previous heart disease were studied. Among them 349 had no habit of chewing betel nut and 45 possessed the habit for ≥5 years. Subclinical IHD was diagnosed by a Minnesota-coded resting electrocardiogram and was present in 71 cases. Statistical analyses were performed considering confounding effects of age, diabetic duration, smoking, body mass index, blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and metabolic control status. Results. Betel nut chewers were younger and had higher prevalence of smoking (86.7% versus 60.5%, higher body mass index, poorer glycemic control, and higher prevalence of subclinical IHD (28.9% versus 16.6%. Patients with subclinical IHD were older and had higher prevalence of betel nut chewing (18.0% versus 9.9%. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio for subclinical IHD for chewers versus nonchewers was 4.640 (1.958–10.999. The adjusted odds ratios in younger or older patients divided by the median age of 63 years were similar: 4.724 (1.346–16.581 and 4.666 (1.278–17.028, respectively. Conclusions. Betel nut chewing is significantly associated with increased risk of subclinical IHD.

  16. Paediatric cancer survivors demonstrate a high rate of subclinical renal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudi, Abdullahi; Levy, Cecil Steven; Geel, Jennifer Ann; Poole, Janet Elizabeth

    2016-11-01

    Clinical manifestations of renal dysfunction in childhood cancer survivors include hypertension, proteinuria, tubulopathy (and its biochemical consequences) and renal insufficiency. This study aimed to determine the factors associated with renal dysfunction in paediatric cancer survivors at a single centre in Johannesburg. A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 130 cancer survivors between 2 and 18 years of age. Physical examination and screening urine dipstick were performed on all patients. Blood results of samples routinely drawn were analysed. After a median follow-up period of 2 years, the various manifestations of renal dysfunction included decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), hypomagnesaemia, hypophosphataemia, proteinuria, haematuria and hypertension. In total, 34 survivors (26.15%) had at least one manifestation of renal dysfunction after completing treatment. The most prevalent manifestation of renal dysfunction was decreased eGFR (17.7%) followed by hypomagnesaemia (6.2%) and hypophosphataemia (4.6%). Patients with pre-existing renal dysfunction were three times more likely to have renal dysfunction post-treatment (P = 0.020). Ifosfamide (P = 0.010) and nephrectomy (P = 0.003) had independent significant impact on reduction in eGFR. High cumulative ifosfamide doses were identified as a possible cause for hypophosphataemia (P = 0.021). While not clinically evident in the early follow-up period, the high rate of renal dysfunction is concerning. We suggest that patients with pre-existing renal dysfunction should be assessed by a nephrologist prior to initiation of cancer therapy, and nephro-protective measures should be employed stringently in all children with cancer. Patients with decreased eGFR should be followed up closely in a multidisciplinary late effects clinic. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Living with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Karen; Landeweer, Elleke; Abma, Tineke A

    2017-01-01

    Living with a renal disease often reduces quality of life because of the stress it entails. No attention has been paid to the moral challenges of living with renal disease. To explore the moral challenges of living with a renal disease. A case study based on qualitative research. We used Walker's ethical framework combined with narrative ethics to analyse how negotiating care responsibilities lead to a new perspective on moral issues. Participants and research context: One case was chosen from 20 qualitative interviews with renal patients in the Netherlands. Ethical considerations: Several actions have been taken to ensure the informed consent, privacy, anonymity and confidentiality of the patient in this article. More details are offered in this article. The study has been conducted in line with the recommendations of the Medical Ethical Committee of the VU Medical Center. A renal disease can force people to change their identity, relationships, values and responsibilities. The case study illustrates the moral challenges confronting renal patients. Moral issues can be raised by the changes to identities, relationships, values and responsibilities caused by renal disease. Support services for renal patients and their relatives should pay more attention to these issues in order to promote self-management.

  18. Prenatal ultrasonographic findings of renal cystic diseases of the fetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jeong Yeon; Song, Mi Jin; Lee, Young Ho; Cho, Byung Jae; Hong, Sung Ran [Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    The renal cystic diseases of the fetus consist of variable types of multicystic dysplastic kidney, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney, obstructive cystic renal dysplasia, simple renal cyst, medullary cystic disease, and various syndromes with associated cystic renal diseases. Prenatal US findings of renal cystic diseases were compared and analyzed with the pathologic and postnatal US findings to establish the differential points of renal cystic diseases.

  19. Renal cystic diseases in children: new concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avni, Fred E. [University Clinics of Brussels - Erasme Hospital, Departments of Medical Imaging and Pediatric Nephrology, Brussels (Belgium); Hall, Michelle [Pediatric Nephrology Erasme Hospital, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    This review highlights the changes that have occurred in the general approach to cystic renal diseases in children. For instance, genetic mutations at the level of the primary cilia are considered as the origin of many renal cystic diseases. Furthermore, these diseases are now included in the spectrum of the hepato-renal fibrocystic diseases. Imaging plays an important role as it helps to detect and characterize many of the cystic diseases based on a detailed sonographic analysis. The diagnosis can be achieved during fetal life or after birth. Hyperechoic kidneys and/or renal cysts are the main sonographic signs leading to such diagnosis. US is able to differentiate between recessive and dominant polycystic kidney diseases, hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 Beta mutation, glomerulocystic kidneys and nephronophtisis. MR imaging can, in selected cases, provide additional information including the progressive associated hepatic changes. (orig.)

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kousios

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains a significant problem in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD. Subclinical atherosclerosis identified by noninvasive methods could improve CVD risk prediction in CKD but these methods are often unavailable. We therefore systematically reviewed whether circulating levels of Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs and tissue inhibitors (TIMPs are associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in CKD, as this would support their use as biomarkers or pharmacologic targets. Methods. All major electronic databases were systematically searched from inception until May 2015 using appropriate terms. Studies involving CKD patients with data on circulating MMPs levels and atherosclerosis were considered and subjected to quality assessment. Results. Overall, 16 studies were identified for qualitative synthesis and 9 studies were included in quantitative synthesis. MMP-2 and TIMP-1 were most frequently studied while most studies assessed carotid Intima-Media Thickness (cIMT as a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. Only MMP-2 demonstrated a consistent positive association with cIMT. Considerable variability in cIMT measurement methodology and poor plaque assessment was found. Conclusions. Although MMPs demonstrate great potential as biomarkers of subclinical atherosclerosis, they are understudied in CKD and not enough data existed for meta-analysis. Larger studies involving several MMPs, with more homogenized approaches in determining the atherosclerotic burden in CKD, are needed.

  1. Non-invasive imaging for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in patients with peripheral artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjaer, Andreas; Hesse, Birger

    2014-01-01

    of subclinical coronary artery disease varies widely in patients with peripheral artery disease, it could include more than half of patients. No consensus exists to date on either the rationale for screening patients with peripheral artery disease for coronary atherosclerosis or the optimal algorithm and method......Patients with peripheral artery disease are at high risk of coronary artery disease. An increasing number of studies show that a large proportion of patients with peripheral artery disease have significant coronary atherosclerosis, even in the absence of symptoms. Although the reported prevalence...

  2. Subclinical Hyperthyroidism and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Tinh-Hai; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Bauer, Douglas C.; den Elzen, Wendy P. J.; Cappola, Anne R.; Balmer, Philippe; Iervasi, Giorgio; Åsvold, Bjørn O.; Sgarbi, José A.; Völzke, Henry; Gencer, Bariş; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Molinaro, Sabrina; Bremner, Alexandra; Luben, Robert N.; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Cornuz, Jacques; Newman, Anne B.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Walsh, John P.; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Background Data from prospective cohort studies regarding the association between subclinical hyperthyroidism and cardiovascular outcomes are conflicting. We aimed to assess the risks of total and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality, CHD events, and atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism among all available large prospective cohorts. Methods Individual data on 52 674 participants were pooled from 10 cohorts. Coronary heart disease events were analyzed in 22 437 participants from 6 cohorts with available data, and incident AF was analyzed in 8711 participants from 5 cohorts. Euthyroidism was defined as thyrotropin level between 0.45 and 4.49 mIU/L and endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism as thyrotropin level lower than 0.45 mIU/L with normal free thyroxine levels, after excluding those receiving thyroid-altering medications. Results Of 52 674 participants, 2188 (4.2%) had subclinical hyperthyroidism. During follow-up, 8527 participants died (including 1896 from CHD), 3653 of 22 437 had CHD events, and 785 of 8711 developed AF. In age-and sex-adjusted analyses, subclinical hyperthyroidism was associated with increased total mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.24, 95% CI, 1.06–1.46), CHD mortality (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.02–1.62), CHD events (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.99–1.46), and AF (HR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.16–2.43). Risks did not differ significantly by age, sex, or preexisting cardiovascular disease and were similar after further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, with attributable risk of 14.5% for total mortality to 41.5% for AF in those with subclinical hyperthyroidism. Risks for CHD mortality and AF (but not other outcomes) were higher for thyrotropin level lower than 0.10 mIU/L compared with thyrotropin level between 0.10 and 0.44 mIU/L (for both, P value for trend, ≤.03). Conclusion Endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased risks of total, CHD mortality, and incident AF, with highest

  3. Relations between subclinical disease markers and type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and incident cardiovascular disease: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthakis, Vanessa; Sung, Jung Hye; Samdarshi, Tandaw E; Hill, Alethea N; Musani, Solomon K; Sims, Mario; Ghraibeh, Kamel A; Liebson, Philip R; Taylor, Herman A; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Fox, Ervin R

    2015-06-01

    The presence of subclinical disease measures has been directly associated with the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in whites. African Americans (AAs) in the U.S. are at higher risk of CVD compared with non-Hispanic whites; however, data on the prevalence of subclinical disease measures in AAs and their association to CVD remain unclear and may explain the higher CVD risk in this group. We evaluated 4,416 participants attending the first examination of the Jackson Heart Study (mean age 54 years; 64% women) with available subclinical disease measures. There were 1,155 participants (26%) with subclinical disease, defined as the presence of one or more of the following: peripheral arterial disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, microalbuminuria, high coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, and low left ventricular ejection fraction. In cross-sectional analyses using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression, participants with metabolic syndrome (MetS) or diabetes (DM) had higher odds of subclinical disease compared with those without MetS and DM (odds ratios 1.55 [95% CI 1.30-1.85] and 2.86 [95% CI 2.32-3.53], respectively). Furthermore, the presence of a high CAC score and left ventricular hypertrophy were directly associated with the incidence of CVD (265 events) in multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models (P disease (P disease, which in turn translated into a greater risk of CVD, especially in people with MetS and DM. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Plasmapheresis for Children with Renal Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    服部, 元史; Motoshi, Hattori; 東京女子医科大学腎臓小児科; Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Tokyo Women's Medical University

    2011-01-01

    Plasmapheresis has been used extensively to treat a variety of renal diseases. In this article, the efficacy of plasmapheresis and possible mechanisms of action of plasmapheresis in renal diseases, especially focusing on 1) a rapidly progressive type of Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (HSPN), 2) steroid-resistant primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and 3) post-transplant recurrence of FSGS are reviewed. Although further studies should be carried out to validate the therapeuti...

  5. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical...

  6. Renal cystic disease and associated ciliopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Karl O; Dufke, Andreas; Gembruch, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    To review disorders that are associated with renal cystic disease during prenatal life and to highlight the strong association between renal cystic disease and ciliopathies. There are numerous causative genes for ciliopathies that can present with cystic kidney disease. In the group of single gene ciliopathies, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is by far the most prevalent one. Other examples are autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, nephronophthisis, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Joubert syndrome and related disorders as well as X-linked orofaciodigital syndrome type 1, respectively. The prevalence of these inherited disorders sums up to about in 1 : 2000 people. These disorders with their hepatorenal fibrocystic character should be classified as multisystem diseases. Understanding of the origin of renal cystic disease and associated disorders is important to make the appropriate prenatal diagnosis and for counseling affected parents. In the future, understanding of the pathophysiology may help to develop new treatment strategies.

  7. Sleeping and resting respiratory rates in dogs with subclinical heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohad, Dan G; Rishniw, Mark; Ljungvall, Ingrid; Porciello, Francesco; Häggström, Jens

    2013-09-15

    To characterize sleeping respiratory rates (SRRs) and resting respiratory rates (RRRs), collected in the home environment, of dogs with subclinical heart disease that could result in left-sided congestive heart failure. Prospective cross-sectional study. 190 adult dogs with subclinical left-sided heart disease. Most dogs had mitral valve disease or dilated cardiomyopathy of various severities. Clients collected ten 1-minute SRRs or RRRs during a period ranging from 1 week to 6 months. Clinicians provided echocardiographic and medical data on each patient. The within-dog mean SRR (SRRmean; 16 breaths/min) was significantly lower than the within-dog mean RRR (RRRmean; 21 breaths/min). Seven dogs had SRRmean and 33 dogs had RRRmean > 25 breaths/min; 1 dog had SRRmean and 12 dogs had RRRmean > 30 breaths/min; these dogs mostly had a left atrial (LA)-to-aortic ratio > 1.8. Dogs with moderate LA enlargement had a significantly higher SRRmean than did other dogs. However, median SRRmean for each of 4 levels of LA enlargement was dog SRR and RRR remained stable for 10 consecutive measurements. Treatment with cardiac medications or presence of pulmonary hypertension was not associated with SRRmean or RRRmean. Results suggested that dogs with confirmed subclinical left-sided heart disease of various severities generally had SRRmean dog SRRmean or RRRmean.

  8. Association of exhaled carbon monoxide with subclinical cardiovascular disease and their conjoint impact on the incidence of cardiovascular outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Susan; Enserro, Danielle; Xanthakis, Vanessa; Sullivan, Lisa M.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Polak, Joseph F.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Wolf, Philip A.; O'Connor, George T.; Keaney, John F.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Whereas endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) is cytoprotective at physiologic levels, excess CO concentrations are associated with cardiometabolic risk and may represent an important marker of progression from subclinical to clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods and results In 1926 participants of the Framingham Offspring Study (aged 57 ± 10 years, 46% women), we investigated the relationship of exhaled CO, a surrogate of blood CO concentration, with both prevalent subclinical CVD and incident clinical CVD events. Presence of subclinical CVD was determined using a comprehensive panel of diagnostic tests used to assess cardiac and vascular structure and function. Individuals with the highest (>5 p.p.m.) compared with lowest (≤4 p.p.m.) CO exposure were more likely to have subclinical CVD [odds ratios (OR): 1.67, 95% CI: 1.32–2.12; P < 0.001]. During the follow-up period (mean 5 ± 3 years), 193 individuals developed overt CVD. Individuals with both high CO levels and any baseline subclinical CVD developed overt CVD at an almost four-fold higher rate compared with those with low CO levels and no subclinical disease (22.1 vs. 6.3%). Notably, elevated CO was associated with incident CVD in the presence [hazards ration (HR): 1.83, 95% CI: 1.08–3.11; P = 0.026] but not in the absence (HR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.42–1.53; P = 0.51) of subclinical CVD (Pinteraction = 0.019). Similarly, subclinical CVD was associated with incident CVD in the presence of high but not low CO exposure. Conclusion Our findings in a community-based sample suggest that elevated CO is a marker of greater subclinical CVD burden and, furthermore, a potential key component in the progression from subclinical to clinical CVD. PMID:24574370

  9. Frequency of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Subclinical Atherosclerosis Among Young Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Clarence; Vatcheva, Kristina P; Pan, Jen-Jung; Smulevitz, Beverly; McPherson, David D; Fallon, Michael; McCormick, Joseph B; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; Laing, Susan T

    2017-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, whose criteria are risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of NAFLD, its association with subclinical atherosclerosis, and factors that may account for this association in Mexican Americans. In a population-based cross-sectional sample drawn from the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort in Texas, carotid intima media thickness (cIMT), an indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis, was measured. Abnormal carotid ultrasound study was defined as mean cIMT >75th percentile for age and gender and/or plaque presence. NAFLD was defined as steatosis by ultrasound in the absence of other causes of liver disease. Multivariable weighted regression analyses were performed to evaluate associations between NAFLD and cIMT. Mean age was 50.4 ± 1.2 years with 58.3% women. Mean body mass index was 31.0 ± 0.4 kg/m(2), and 54.0% had the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD was highly prevalent (48.80%); subjects with NAFLD had greater body mass index, central obesity, fasting glucose levels, and dyslipidemia and were more likely to have the metabolic syndrome. Nearly 1/3 of subjects with NAFLD also had evidence of subclinical atherosclerosis (31.2%). After adjusting for covariates, there was an independent association between NAFLD and increased cIMT only in younger subjects subclinical atherosclerosis among younger subjects; clustering of diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome in this health disparity cohort increases the risk of both liver disease and early atherosclerosis in young adults. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Rheumatic Heart Disease Associated with Secondary Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of systemic amyloidosis worldwide, AA amyloidosis occurs in the course of chronic inflammatory diseases, hereditary periodic fevers, and with certain neoplasms such as Hodgkin disease and renal cell carcinoma. Amyloidosis due to rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is not common but can be seen. We report here a patient ...

  11. Association of NAFLD with subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary-artery disease: meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ampuero

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies have associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, using tests of subclinical atherosclerosis. Aim: To evaluate the influence of NAFLD on subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD. Methods: We reviewed Pubmed and EMBASE. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, we selected 14 studies and were classified in two groups. Ten studies aimed the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis and four studies the presence of coronary artery disease. To assess subclinical atherosclerosis, we selected studies with pathological carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT and with presence of carotid plaques. We considered coronary artery disease when patients showed at least 50 % stenosis at one or more major coronary arteries. NAFLD was assessed by ultrasound (US and liver biopsy. Results: NAFLD showed a higher prevalence of pathological CIMT [35.1 % (351/999 vs. 21.8 % (207/948; p < 0.0001], with OR 2.04 (95 % CI: 1.65-2.51. Similarly, the presence of carotid plaques was higher in NAFLD diagnosed by US [34.2 % (101/295 vs. 12.9 % (51/394; p < 0.0001] [OR 2.82 (95 % CI: 1.87-4.27] and diagnosed by liver biopsy [64.8 % (70/108 vs. 31.3 % (59/188; p < 0.0001] [OR 4.41 (95 % CI: 2.63-7.40]. On the other hand, four studies assessed CAD in patients underwent coronary angiogram. Subjects with NAFLD showed 80.4 % (492/612 of CAD, while it was detected in 60.7 % (356/586 (p < 0.0001 in patients without NAFLD. Therefore, NAFLD was associated with a remarkably higher likelihood of CAD, using random effects model [OR 3.31 (95 % CI: 2.21-4.95] or fixed effects model [OR 3.13 (95 % CI: 2.36-4.16]. Conclusions: NAFLD increases the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The right management of these patients could modify the natural history both liver and cardiovascular disease.

  12. Renal function recovery in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichette, V; Quérin, S; Desmeules, M; Ethier, J; Copleston, P

    1993-09-01

    Renal function recovery (RFR) is a rare event in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Although some predictive factors have been described, there are still unresolved questions. We have analyzed the Canadian Organ Replacement Register data for the 1981 to 1989 period to assess the incidence and factors predictive of RFR in a large ESRD population as well as the outcome after recovery. Renal function recovery was defined as the interruption of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for more than 3 months. Patients on RRT for < or = 45 days were excluded. Of 14,318 registered ESRD patients, 342 (2.4%) experienced RFR after 8.9 +/- 0.5 months of RRT (mean +/- SEM); 52.3% of the recoveries occurred within 6 months of initiating RRT, while 23.7% were only observed after 12 months or more. By Cox regression, patients within the following diagnostic groups had a significantly higher rate of RFR than those with primary glomerulonephritis, who are considered to comprise the reference group: myeloma (relative rate [RR] = 6.00; P < 0.001), drug-induced disease (RR = 4.21; P < 0.001), vascular/hypertensive disease (RR = 2.60; P < 0.001), and systemic disease (RR = 2.58; P < 0.001). Inversely, patients with polycystic kidneys (RR = 0.06; P = 0.004) and diabetic patients (RR = 0.56; P = 0.024) had a lower rate of RFR than those with glomerulonephritis. Men younger than 45 years had a lower rate of RFR than older men and women of all ages (P < or = 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Distribution of glucose transporters in renal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2017-08-31

    Kidneys play an important role in glucose homeostasis. Renal gluconeogenesis prevents hypoglycemia by releasing glucose into the blood stream. Glucose homeostasis is also due, in part, to reabsorption and excretion of hexose in the kidney.Lipid bilayer of plasma membrane is impermeable for glucose, which is hydrophilic and soluble in water. Therefore, transport of glucose across the plasma membrane depends on carrier proteins expressed in the plasma membrane. In humans, there are three families of glucose transporters: GLUT proteins, sodium-dependent glucose transporters (SGLTs) and SWEET. In kidney, only GLUTs and SGLTs protein are expressed. Mutations within genes that code these proteins lead to different renal disorders and diseases. However, diseases, not only renal, such as diabetes, may damage expression and function of renal glucose transporters.

  14. Renal amyloidosis in cattle with inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elitok, O M; Elitok, B; Unver, O

    2008-01-01

    The association of inflammatory diseases such as traumatic reticuloperitonitis (TRP), mastitis, metritis, and pododermatitis with renal amyloidosis in cattle is poorly described. Serum amyloid A (SAA) levels are elevated during inflammatory diseases, and renal amyloidosis is formed as a complication. This study was conducted with 82 crossbred cattle with mastitis (n = 18 cows), metritis (n = 11 cows), TRP (n = 30 cows), and pododermatitis (n = 23 : 15 cows and 8 beef cattle). Ten clinically healthy cows served as controls. Hematological, urinary, and blood parameters, including SAA, were measured by an automated procedure provided with trade kits. Determination of amyloidal structures was made by histopathological examination of renal biopsy specimens. At the end of this trial, amyloidosis was detected in 5 cows displaying typical nephrotic syndrome, with hypoproteinemia and proteinuria in combination with polyuria and weight loss. Furthermore, it was observed that cows with renal amyloidosis had significantly higher (P pododermatitis have a high prevalence of systemic amyloidosis in response to inflammation.

  15. The renal arterial resistive index and stage of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal allograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine O; Thiesson, Helle C; Poulsen, Lene N

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft.......The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft....

  16. ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE AND RENAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. I. Belyalov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ischemic heart disease (IHD with comorbid kidney dysfunction has more severe course and worse prognosis, regardless of the chosen therapeutic strategy for the treatment of coronary disease. Traits of diagnosis and treatment of IHD in patients with renal dysfunction, including end-stage kidney disease, are discussed. The analysis of the studies showed increasing difficulties in the diagnosis of IHD, and decrease in the effectiveness of drug and invasive treatment.Results of large randomized and observational studies can help to treat patients with IHD and comorbid renal dysfunction more effectively and safe. 

  17. Subclinical hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Peter; Hjortshøj, Cristel S; Gaede, Peter

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cyanotic congenital heart disease is a systemic disease, with effects on multiple organ systems. A high prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) has been reported in a small cohort of cyanotic congenital heart disease patients. Subclinical hypothyroidism has been associated...... with various adverse cardiovascular effects, as well as an increased risk of progression to overt hypothyroidism. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of SCH in cyanotic congenital heart disease patients, consider possible etiologies, and evaluate thyroid function over time. METHODS: First, 90...... follow-up (6.5 ± 1.0 years), SCH (defined as ≥2 consecutive elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone values) was present in 26%. Three patients progressed to overt hypothyroidism. Patients with SCH were younger (34 ± 12 vs 42 ± 16 years; P = .01) and had a lower oxygen saturation (80 ± 5 vs 84 ± 6%; P = .03...

  18. Randomised intervention study to assess the prevalence of subclinical vascular disease and hidden kidney disease and its impact on morbidity and mortality: The ILERVAS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Àngels Betriu

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The ILERVAS project will reveal the prevalence of subclinical vascular disease and hidden kidney disease, determine whether or not their early diagnosis brings health benefits and will also allow investigation of new risk factors.

  19. Prevalence of subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in healthy HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESEM

    among acutely ill hospitalised patients, in DRC the. 9 prevalence was ... clinic visits. All the participants were over 18 years of age and had signed informed consent. We excluded those with documented cardiac disease, woody edema of the limbs, or ... Valvular abnormalities in terms of structure and function were defined ...

  20. Disease conditions and subclinical infections of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    OpenAIRE

    Munday, B L; Whittington, R. J.; Stewart, N J

    1998-01-01

    Before the arrival of European settlers in Australia, the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, probably suffered from little disease. Among other things, European settlement has involved substantial environmental perturbation, introduction of large predators, introduction of motor vehicles and translocation of potential pathogens. As a result, platypuses are now killed by motor vehicles, dogs, foxes and discarded plastic litter. Information programmes targeting appropriate segments of the publ...

  1. Child Abuse and Neglect and Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease Among Midlife Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Rebecca C; Chang, Yuefang; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; von Känel, Roland; Jennings, J Richard; Santoro, Nanette; Landsittel, Doug P; Matthews, Karen A

    2017-05-01

    A childhood history of abuse or neglect may be associated with elevated adult cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. No studies have examined associations between child abuse/neglect and subclinical CVD using a validated measure of abuse and neglect. We hypothesized that midlife women with a history of childhood abuse or neglect would have increased subclinical CVD beyond standard CVD risk factors. We tested moderation of associations by sleep, hot flashes, and race/ethnicity. Two hundred ninety-five midlife women completed the Child Trauma Questionnaire, physiologic hot flash and actigraphic sleep monitoring, blood draw, and carotid ultrasound (intima media thickness [IMT]; plaque). Relations between abuse/neglect and outcomes were tested in linear regression models adjusting for demographic, psychosocial, and CVD risk factors. Interactions with sleep, hot flashes, and race/ethnicity were tested. Forty-five percent of women reported a history of child abuse or neglect. Women with any child abuse or neglect had higher IMT [b(SE) = .039 (.011), p = .001] and carotid plaque [odds ratio (95% [CI] = 1.95 [1.15-3.33]); p = .014] than nonabused/neglected women. Furthermore, physical abuse, emotional abuse, and emotional neglect were associated with higher subclinical CVD. Sexual abuse was associated with higher IMT among nonwhite women. Interactions with sleep time and sleep hot flashes (p values abuse/neglect history was observed primarily among women sleeping less than 6 hours/night or with sleep hot flashes. A history of child abuse or neglect is associated with higher subclinical CVD in women, particularly when paired with short sleep or hot flashes. Findings underscore the importance of childhood adversity in midlife women's CVD risk.

  2. HIV related renal disease in Africans | Elangovan | IMTU Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal disease is becoming an increasingly prevalent entity in human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV)–infected patients, first diagnosed in AIDS patients in 1984. The HIV-related renal disease represents a spectrum of clinical and histological conditions presenting as acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, glomerulopathies, ...

  3. Defining Kidney Biology to Understand Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Melissa H.; Brown, Dennis; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Sands, Jeff M.; Weisz, Ora A.; Mullins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Kidney Research National Dialogue represents a novel effort by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to solicit and prioritize research objectives from the renal research and clinical communities. The present commentary highlights selected scientific opportunities specific to the study of renal development, physiology, and cell biology. Describing such fundamental kidney biology serves as a necessary foundation for translational and clinical studies that will advance disease care and prevention. It is intended that these objectives foster and focus scientific efforts in these areas in the coming decade and beyond. PMID:24370769

  4. Subclinical heart failure in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a consequence of chronic inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada S Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Our findings indicate the presence of subclinical heart failure in these patients. JIA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis, with systemic disease, and with active disease are at greatest risk of developing subclinical heart failure.

  5. [Subclinical and manifested hypothyroidism as a consequence of thyroid autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Dragoslav P; Djurica, Snezana; Davidović, Mladen; Stević, Radmila; Rajić, Miodrag; Marković, Natasa

    2005-10-01

    Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) is a slowly developing persistent inflamation of the thyroid gland, which frequently leads to hypothyroidism. Some of the up-to-date knowledge about hypothyroidism, both subclinical and manifested, caused by autoimmune disease, was presented. Autoimmune thyroid gland disease can occur at any age, but predominantly affects women after periods of high emotional and physical stress or accidents, as well as during periods of hormonal changes. It can also develop in families, and having an autoimmune disease slightly increases the risk of developing another. This paper showed an increasing incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism (4.17%) in elderly, and, at the same time, the incidence of primary hypothyroidism accounting for 1%. It is very usefull to estimate the stimulated thyrotropin (TSH) response, as well as the value of fast, short time thyroid gland reserves, analyzed by T3 and T4 serum level at 60th minute after TRH stimulation. Treatment of choice for HT (hypothyroidism of any cause) is thyroid hormone replacement. Drug of choice is orally administered levothyroxine sodium, usually for life-time. The standard dose is 1.6-1.8 mcg/kg body weight per day, but is in most cases patient dependent. Elderly patients usually require smaller replacement dose of levothyroxine, sometimes less than 1 mcg/kg body weight per day with coronary dilatator at the same time.

  6. Dental considerations for the patient with renal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Martí Álamo, Silvia; Gavaldá Esteve, Carmen; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia

    2011-01-01

    Chronic renal disease (CRD) is the renal disease that manifests oral consequences most frequently, and it is defined as a progressive and irreversible decline in renal function associated with a reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The most frequent causes of CRD are diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and glomerulonephritis. CRD is classified in 5 stages – from kidney damage with normal or increased GFR to renal failure. In order to quantify the CRD, renal function is m...

  7. Kidney injury molecule-1 in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, Femke; van Timmeren, Mirjan M.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van Goor, Harry

    Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) is a marker for renal proximal tubular damage, the hallmark of virtually all proteinuric, toxic and ischaemic kidney diseases. KIM-1 has gained increasing interest because of its possible pathophysiological role in modulating tubular damage and repair. In this

  8. Unilateral renal cell carcinoma with coexistent renal disease: a rare cause of end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Alvarez-Navascués, R

    2001-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a disorder encompassing a wide spectrum of pathological renal lesions. Coexistence of unilateral RCC and associated pathology in the contralateral kidney is an unusual and challenging therapeutic dilemma that can result in renal failure. So far, data on unilateral RCC with chronic renal failure necessitating renal replacement therapy have not been published. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from unilateral RCC, and to assess the associated pathology and possible pathogenic factors. In 1999, a survey of the 350 patients treated by chronic dialysis in Asturias, Spain, was carried out to identify and collect clinical information on patients with primary unilateral RCC whilst on their renal replacement programme. Seven patients were identified as having ESRD and unilateral RCC, giving an incidence of 2% of patients treated by dialysis. There was a wide spectrum of associated disease and clinical presentation. All patients underwent radical or partial nephrectomy and were free of recurrence 6--64 months after surgery. Six patients were alive and free of malignancy recurrence for 6--30 months after the onset of haemodialysis. ESRD is rare in association with unilateral RCC, but does contribute to significant morbidity. However, the data presented here are encouraging and suggest that cancer-free survival with renal replacement therapy can be achieved in such patients.

  9. Subclinical hypothyroidism as a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease in obese adolescents with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Ahmet; Pirgon, Ozgur; Aypar, Ebru; Yilmaz, Hakan; Odabas, Dursun

    2013-06-01

    No data are available on the relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease in obese adolescents with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study aimed to determine whether an association exists between subclinical hypothyroidism and risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease in obese adolescents with NAFLD. The study enrolled 111 obese adolescents and 42 lean subjects. The obese subjects were divided into two subgroups based on the presence or absence of fatty liver with high transaminases: a NAFLD group and a non-NAFLD group. Subclinical hypothyroidism was defined as a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level higher than 4 mIU/l and a normal free-thyroxine level (0.6-1.8 ng/dl). Insulin resistance was calculated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Left ventricular mass (LVM), LVM index measurements, carotid intima media thickness (IMT), and HOMA-IR values were higher in the NAFLD obese group with TSH levels higher than 4 mIU/l than in the NAFLD obese group with TSH levels lower than 4 mIU/l. Elevated TSH values in the NAFLD obese group were positively correlated with most of the metabolic and cardiovascular risk parameters such as total cholesterol (r = 0.606, p = 0.001), triglycerides (r = 0.476, p = 0.016), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.461, p = 0.004), insulin (r = 0.607, p = 0.001), HOMA-IR (r = 0.596, p = 0.002), carotid IMT (r = 0.894, p obese adolescents with NAFLD and subclinical hypothyroidism had a more adverse cardiovascular risk profile and a higher carotid IMT and LVM.

  10. Metabolic Syndrome As an Underlying Disease Entity and Its Relationship to Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Andean Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Arguelles, William; Goldberg, Ronald; Schneiderman, Neil; Khan, Zubair; Morey, Oscar O.; Raja, Muhammad Waheed; Paz, Roberto; Chirinos, Julio A.; Llabre, Maria M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The question of whether the metabolic syndrome truly reflects a single disease entity with a common underlying pathology remains unclear. In this study, we assess whether metabolic syndrome represents an underlying disease construct in a large population-based sample of Andean Hispanic adults and examine its relationship to subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods: The study sample was comprised of 2513 participants. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to identify a metabolic syndrome latent factor using waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TGs), and glucose levels as indicators. The relationship with subclinical atherosclerosis, measured by carotid intima media thickness (cIMT), was assessed using structural equation modeling. Results: Results supported the proposed structure of the metabolic syndrome latent factor evidenced by adequate fit indexes. HDL-C did not significantly load on the metabolic syndrome latent factor (standardized factor loading=0.01, P=0.88). The metabolic syndrome latent factor was significantly associated with cIMT in women (B=0.007, P<0.001) and men (B=0.008, P<0.001) after controlling for age, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and smoking. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that metabolic syndrome components, such as waist circumference, blood pressure, TGs, and glucose levels, but not HDL-C, share a common underlying pathophysiology that may contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis in Andean Hispanics. Its longitudinal association with cardiovascular disease should be the focus of future research. PMID:24206171

  11. Follow-up of congenital heart disease patients with subclinical hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-08-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism or mild thyroid failure is a common problem in patients without known thyroid disease. Demographic and analytical data were collected in 309, of which 181 were male and 128 were female, congenital heart disease (CHD) patients. CHD patients with thyroid-stimulating hormone above 5.5 mIU/L were also followed up from an analytical point of view to determine changes in serum glucose, cholesterol, N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide, and C-reactive protein concentrations. Of the CHD patients, 35 (11.3%) showed thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration above 5.5 mIU/L. Of them, 27 were followed up during 2.4±1.2 years - 10 were under thyroid hormone replacement treatment, and 17 were not. Of the 27 patients (25.9%), 7 with subclinical hypothyroidism had positive anti-thyroid peroxidase, and 3 of them (42.8%) with positive anti-thyroid peroxidase had Down syndrome. Down syndrome and hypoxaemic CHD patients showed higher thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations than the rest of the congenital patients (puric acid, lipids, C-reactive protein, or N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide concentrations before and after the follow-up in those CHD patients with thyroid-stimulating hormone above 5.5 mIU/L whether or not they received levothyroxine therapy. CHD patients with subclinical hypothyroidism showed no significant changes in serum thyroxine, cholesterol, C-reactive protein, or N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide concentrations whether or not they were treated with thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

  12. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the facility...

  13. Subclinical atherosclerosis in young patients with rheumatoid arthritis and low disease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ragni Alunni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (RA are characterized by acceleration of atherosclerotic process of arterial wall. However, all investigations performed so far to evaluate subclinical atherosclerosis in RA included subjects without selection for age and degree of disease activity that may represent confounding factors in such an evaluation. Objectives: To verify signs of accelerated subclinical atherosclerosis in young subject suffering from RA but with low disease activity. Methods: Thirty-two patients with RA and 28 age- and sex-matched control subjects with non-inflammatory rheumatic diseases were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were age less than 60 and low disease activity with score £3.2 according to DAS28, while subjects with traditional risk factors for and/or overt cardiovascular disease were ruled out from the study. Both patients and controls underwent evaluation of carotid and femoral artery intima-media thickness by ultrasounds. Results: Patients had higher intima-media thickness than controls of all the sites evaluated at carodit artery level, whereas there were no differences at the comparison of the superficial and common femoral artery wall. At the univariate analysis, a positive correlation between LDL cholesterol levels and intima-media thickness at the carotid bifurcation was found. Conclusions: Young patients with RA and low disease activity have acceleration of atherosclerosis development as shown by increased intima-media thickness of carotid artery with respect to subjects without inflammatory rheumatic disease. It is conceivable that the organic damage of arterial wall could be the result of persistent endothelial dysfunction induced by chronic inflammation and immune dysregulation which characterize RA.

  14. Subclinical hypothyroidism: A common finding in adult patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Peter; Hjortshøj, Cristel S; Gaede, Peter; Idorn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars; Jensen, Annette S

    2017-12-27

    Cyanotic congenital heart disease is a systemic disease, with effects on multiple organ systems. A high prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) has been reported in a small cohort of cyanotic congenital heart disease patients. Subclinical hypothyroidism has been associated with various adverse cardiovascular effects, as well as an increased risk of progression to overt hypothyroidism. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of SCH in cyanotic congenital heart disease patients, consider possible etiologies, and evaluate thyroid function over time. First, 90 clinically stable cyanotic congenital heart disease patients were examined with blood samples (thyroid-stimulating hormone, C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and N-terminal pro-brain-natriuretic peptide) in a cross-sectional descriptive study. Second, a longitudinal follow-up study of 43 patients originating from the first study part, was carried out. These patients had thyroid function parameters (thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroid hormones, and thyroid peroxidase antibodies) evaluated biannually. Elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone was present in 24% of the 90 screened patients. During follow-up (6.5 ± 1.0 years), SCH (defined as ≥2 consecutive elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone values) was present in 26%. Three patients progressed to overt hypothyroidism. Patients with SCH were younger (34 ± 12 vs 42 ± 16 years; P = .01) and had a lower oxygen saturation (80 ± 5 vs 84 ± 6%; P = .03). Subclinical hypothyroidism is a very common finding in cyanotic congenital heart disease. This is not associated with increased levels of C-reactive protein, heart failure, or autoimmunity but appears to be associated with cyanosis and age. Since the clinical impact of SCH is uncertain, further studies are needed to determine this. Regular thyroid evaluation is recommended in cyanotic congenital heart disease patients since SCH can develop to overt hypothyroidism. © 2017

  15. Associations between life stress and subclinical cardiovascular disease are partly mediated by depressive and anxiety symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomhof-Roordink, Hanna; Seldenrijk, Adrie; van Hout, Hein P J; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Diamant, Michaela; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2015-04-01

    Stress experienced during childhood or adulthood has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but it is not clear whether associations are already prevalent on a subclinical cardiovascular level. This study investigates associations between indicators of life stress and subclinical CVD, and whether these are mediated by depression and anxiety. Subjects were 650 participants of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, aged 20-66 years, with or without (27.5%) depressive and anxiety disorders. Life stress included childhood trauma, negative life events and recently experienced daily hassles or job strain. Subclinical CVD was measured as 1) carotid atherosclerosis (intima-media thickness and the presence of plaques) using B-mode ultrasonography, and 2) central arterial stiffness (heart rate normalized augmentation index) using calibrated radial applanation tonometry. Increased central arterial stiffness was shown in subjects who had experienced childhood trauma (per SD increase: β=.07; p=.01), or reported recently experienced daily hassles (per SD increase: β=.06; p=.02), negative life events (per SD increase: β=.05; p=.03), or job strain (high versus low: β=.09; p=.01). Associations between life stress and arterial stiffness appeared to be partly mediated by severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms. No significant associations were found for childhood life events, nor between indicators of life stress and carotid atherosclerosis. Childhood trauma and recent life stress were associated with increased central arterial stiffness. This suggests that life stress - partly via depression and anxiety - might enhance the development and progression of CVD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fibrogenesis in progressive renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baelde, H.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular biology offers new opportunities for experimental and clinical medicine. Promising clinical applications for patient care include identification of mRNA expression patterns (gene profiling) in diseased organs in correlation with diagnosis, prognosis, and responsiveness to different

  17. Assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis in ankylosing spondylitis: correlations with disease activity indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M. Perrotta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate atherosclerosis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS through the assessment of morphological and functional measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. Twenty patients [M/F=12/8, age (median/range 43.5/28-69 years; disease duration (median/range 9.7/1-36 years] with AS classified according to modified New York criteria and twenty age and sex related healthy controls with negative past medical history for cardiovascular events were enrolled in the study. In all patients and controls, the intima-media thickness (IMT of common carotid artery, carotid bulb and internal carotid artery, and the flow-mediated dilatation (FMD of non-dominant arm brachial artery were determined, using a sonographic probe Esaote GPX (Genoa, Italy. Furthermore, we assess the main disease activity and disability indices [bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index, ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score-eritrosedimentation rate (ASDAS-ESR, ASDAS-C-reactive protein (CRP, bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index, bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index and acute phase reactants. Plasmatic values of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride and homocysteine were carried out in all twenty patients. IMT at carotid bulb was significant higher in patients than in controls (0.67 mm vs 0.54 mm; P=0.03. FMD did not statistically differ between patients and controls (12.5% vs 15%; P>0.05. We found a correlation between IMT at carotid bulb and ESR (rho 0.43; P=0.04. No correlation was found between FMD and disease activity and disability indices. This study showed that in AS patients, without risk factors for cardiovascular disease, carotid bulb IMT, morphological index of subclinical atherosclerosis, is higher than in controls.

  18. Silicosis and chronic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millerick-May, Melissa L; Schrauben, Sarah; Reilly, Mary Jo; Rosenman, Kenneth D

    2015-07-01

    Silica has been associated with end stage kidney disease and kidney dysfunction. Calculated glomerular filtration rate, history of kidney disease or chronic dialysis, elevated serum creatinine, and stages of chronic kidney disease among silicotics identified in Michigan's Silicosis Surveillance System from 1987 to 2009 were reviewed to determine the prevalence of kidney disease in confirmed cases of silicosis. Twenty-four percent of 1,072 silicotics had a measure of kidney dysfunction (32.3% if diabetes or hypertension present vs. 20.2% if not). Sixty-nine percent of silicotics had Stage I or greater chronic kidney dysfunction versus 38.8% of the U.S. general population ≥60 years. No association was found between kidney function and measures of silica exposure. Individuals with silicosis have an increased prevalence of kidney disease. More work to define the pathological changes associated with silica exposure is needed to understand the cause of silica's adverse effect on the kidney. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Computed tomographic features of clinical and subclinical middle ear disease in domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus): 88 cases (2007-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Ricardo; Ruby, Jennifer; Van Hatten, Ruth A; Thompson, Margret

    2015-02-01

    To describe and compare CT abnormalities of the middle ear in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) that had clinical or subclinical middle ear disease and to determine the prevalence of otitis media and evaluate the role of predisposing factors for otitis media in that species. Retrospective case series. 88 domestic rabbits. Medical records for rabbits that underwent CT of the head in June 2007 through February 2014 were searched and classified on the basis of reason for head CT (i.e., ear-related disease vs non-ear-related disease). The ears, upper respiratory tract, teeth, and other important structures of each rabbit's head were evaluated. Follow-up information was obtained for rabbits with CT abnormalities of the middle ear without clinical signs (i.e., subclinical disease). 12 of 21 (57%) rabbits with clinical signs of ear disease and 18 of 67 (27%) rabbits without clinical signs of ear disease had CT abnormalities of the middle ear. In CT images, all affected ears had soft tissue-attenuating material within the tympanic bulla. Tympanic bulla lysis was associated with clinical middle ear disease. Most (12/18) rabbits with subclinical middle ear disease remained subclinical after CT examination. Middle ear CT-detected changes and lop-ear conformation or otitis externa were strongly correlated; middle ear disease and upper respiratory tract disease were not correlated. Data suggested that subclinical otitis media frequently affects rabbits, and those with bulla lysis should be closely monitored. Lop-eared rabbits and rabbits with otitis externa had a higher risk of developing otitis media.

  20. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  1. Quantitative MRI of kidneys in renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Timothy L; Edwards, Marie E; Garg, Ishan; Irazabal, Maria V; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Harris, Peter C; King, Bernard F; Torres, Vicente E; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Erickson, Bradley J

    2017-06-28

    To evaluate the reproducibility and utility of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the assessment of kidneys in young adults with normal renal function (eGFR ranged from 90 to 130 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) and patients with early renal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). This prospective case-control study was performed on ten normal young adults (18-30 years old) and ten age- and sex-matched patients with early renal parenchymal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). All subjects underwent a comprehensive kidney MRI protocol, including qualitative imaging: T1w, T2w, FIESTA, and quantitative imaging: 2D cine phase contrast of the renal arteries, and parenchymal diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). The normal controls were imaged on two separate occasions ≥24 h apart (range 24-210 h) to assess reproducibility of the measurements. Quantitative MR imaging sequences were found to be reproducible. The mean ± SD absolute percent difference between quantitative parameters measured ≥24 h apart were: MTI-derived ratio = 4.5 ± 3.6%, DWI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) = 6.5 ± 3.4%, BOLD-derived R2* = 7.4 ± 5.9%, and MRE-derived tissue stiffness = 7.6 ± 3.3%. Compared with controls, the ADPKD patient's non-cystic renal parenchyma (NCRP) had statistically significant differences with regard to quantitative parenchymal measures: lower MTI percent ratios (16.3 ± 4.4 vs. 23.8 ± 1.2, p quantitative measurements was obtained in all cases. Significantly different quantitative MR parenchymal measurement parameters between ADPKD patients and normal controls were obtained by MT, DWI, BOLD, and MRE indicating the potential for detecting and following renal disease at an earlier stage than the conventional qualitative imaging techniques.

  2. Renal disease in HIV infected patients at University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV related renal disease is a common occurrence in patients with HIV infection. It is the third leading cause of end stage renal disease among African-American males between the ages of 20 and 64 years in USA. Renal function impairment has been reported at all stages of HIV infection. The aim of this study ...

  3. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounissi, M; Gargueh, T; Mahfoudhi, M; Boubaker, K; Hedri, H; Goucha, R; Abderrahim, E; Ben Hamida, F; Ben Abdallah, T; El Younsi, F; Ben Maiz, H; Kheder, A

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men) had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied. Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite) accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%), primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI), medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate. Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of ESRD. These findings highlight the crucial importance of accurate stone analysis and metabolic evaluation to provide early diagnosis and efficient treatment for conditions leading to ESRD. PMID:21694924

  4. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    . Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide are modulators of myogenic and MD-TGF mechanisms. Attenuated renal autoregulation contributes to renal damage in many, but not all, models of renal, diabetic, and hypertensive diseases. This review provides a summary of our current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms enabling renal autoregulation in health and disease and methods used for its study. PMID:25834230

  5. HIV-associated renal disease - an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearne, Nicola; Okpechi, Ikechi G

    The cause of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in South Africa (SA) was worsened by the denial by key political players that HIV causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). South Africa continues to have the highest rate of HIV world-wide, which has had a huge impact on the development of both chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury. Fortunately, there is now an effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) roll-out program. SA is also dealing with a collision of epidemics of HIV, tuberculosis, and non-communicable disease, particularly hypertension and diabetes. This has been evidenced by recent data seen in the reinstated SA renal registry. There is also an unacceptably high rate of tuberculosis in regions of SA, this has led to high rates of granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) and case reports of TB-GIN immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) remains common in SA and responds well to ART. The definitive diagnosis requires a renal biopsy, which is often not possible in many regions of sub-Saharan Africa. Unfortunately, there is still a high rate of HIVAN in SA due to late presentation and lack of effective screening for renal disease in HIV-positive patients. Transplantation for HIV-positive donors to positive recipients offers a unique and encouraging way forward for these patients.

  6. Renal disease and accidental falls: a review of published evidence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    López-Soto, Pablo Jesús; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Senno, Elisa; Tiseo, Ruana; Ferraresi, Annamaria; Canella, Cinzia; Rodríguez-Borrego, María Aurora; Manfredini, Roberto; Fabbian, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    .... The relationship between renal disease and falls is unclear, and the goal of this study was to collect the available evidence and investigate the relationship between accidental falls and renal dysfunction...

  7. Association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis: An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Bum; Park, Gyung-Min; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Byung Uk; Park, Jae Ho; Kim, Byung Gyu; Jung, Seok Won; Jeong, In Du; Bang, Sung-Jo; Shin, Jung Woo; Park, Neung Hwa; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Choe, Jaewon; Lee, Han Chu

    2017-12-20

    There are limited data on the association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. This study investigated the influence of NAFLD on subclinical coronary atherosclerosis as detected by coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in an asymptomatic population. A total of 5,121 consecutive asymptomatic individuals with no prior history of coronary artery disease or significant alcohol intake voluntarily underwent abdominal ultrasonography and CCTA as part of a general health examination. Fatty liver was assessed by ultrasonography examination. The fatty liver index and NAFLD fibrosis score were also calculated. Coronary atherosclerotic plaques on CCTA were evaluated. The association between NAFLD and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis was determined by logistic regression analysis. Of the study participants, 1,979 (38.6%) had ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, there were no statistically significant differences in the adjusted odds ratios of NAFLD for calcified plaque (1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89-1.20, P=0.673) and mixed plaque (1.15, 95% CI 0.93-1.42, P=0.214). However, adjusted odds ratios for any atherosclerotic plaque (1.18, 95% CI 1.03-1.35, P=0.016) and non-calcified plaque (1.27, 95% CI 1.08-1.48, P=0.003) were significantly higher in NAFLD. In addition, there was a significant association of fatty liver index ≥30 with non-calcified plaque (1.37, 95% CI 1.14-1.65, P=0.001) and NAFLD fibrosis score ≥-1.455 with non-calcified plaque (1.20, 95% CI 1.08-1.42, P=0.030). In this large cross-sectional study of asymptomatic individuals undergoing CCTA, NAFLD was consistently associated with non-calcified plaque, suggesting an increased cardiovascular risk. In asymptomatic individuals, the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was an independent risk factor for non-calcified plaque, which has been known as a vulnerable plaque associated with

  8. [Acute renal failure in paediatric oncological disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanowicz, Joanna; Maciejka-Kapuścińska, Lucyna; Rückemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna; Drozyńska-Duklas, Magdalena; Zurowska, Aleksandra; Balcerska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in children with malignancies is a rare clinical situation, but nonetheless it is a serious life threatening condition. It may arise from different clinical situations and may be caused by various factors. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency, aetiology and the course of ARF in children treated for malignancies in the Department of Pediatrics, Hematology, Oncology and Endocrinology, Medical University of Gdansk. A group of 586 pediatric oncology patients treated between 1992 and 2004 were enrolled in a retrospective study. ARF was diagnosed in 29 cases including: 12 patients with prerenal course of ARF (11 due to septic shock and 1 due to dehydration), 16 patients with intrinsic renal aetiology of ARF (as a complication after cisplatinum and carboplatinum therapy in 2 children, in 2 cases after methotrexate, as a consequence of bilateral nephrectomy due to nephroblastoma in 1 patient and in 11 children with tumour lysis syndrome, including 5 patients with neoplasmatic infiltration of kidneys) and postrenal ARF in 1 patient as a first symptom of a tumour located in the small pelvis (Rhabdomyosarcoma). Renal replacement therapy (dialysis) was necessary in 11 children. Among 29 analysed children, in 20 cases renal failure was reversible. Due to appropriate treatment, ARF in course of tumour lysis syndrome is nowadays reversible. ARF due to septic shock or cytostatics nephrotoxicity is a significant therapeutic problem. In most of the cases it is irreversible. 1. ARF in these studies occurred in 29 out of 586 children with malignancies (4.9%). 2. Prerenal and renal ARF were the most frequent forms. 3. Implementation of tumour lysis prophylaxis in the treatment of children with blood system proliferative diseases reduces the incidence of ARF. 4. In cases of ARF in children's malignancies close cooperation between paediatric oncologist and nephrologist is necessary.

  9. Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Subclinical Cerebrovascular Disease in NOMAS (the Northern Manhattan Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulick, Erin R; Wellenius, Gregory A; Kaufman, Joel D; DeRosa, Janet T; Kinney, Patrick L; Cheung, Ying Kuen; Wright, Clinton B; Sacco, Ralph L; Elkind, Mitchell S

    2017-07-01

    Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution is associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. We hypothesized that long-term exposure to air pollution would be associated with magnetic resonance imaging markers of subclinical cerebrovascular disease. Participants were 1075 stroke-free individuals aged ≥50 years drawn from the magnetic resonance imaging subcohort of the Northern Manhattan Study who had lived at the same residence for at least 2 years before magnetic resonance imaging. Cross-sectional associations between ambient air pollution and subclinical cerebrovascular disease were analyzed. We found an association between distance to roadway, a proxy for residential exposure to traffic pollution, and white matter hyperintensity volume; however, after adjusting for risk factors, this relationship was no longer present. All other associations between pollutant measures and white matter hyperintensity volume were null. There was no clear association between exposure to air pollutants and subclinical brain infarcts or total cerebral brain volume. We found no evidence that long-term exposure to ambient air pollution is independently associated with subclinical cerebrovascular disease in an urban population-based cohort. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Angiogenic Factors and Renal Disease in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie S. Rhee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in patients with underlying renal disease and proteinuria. Prior studies show that there is an angiogenic factor imbalance with elevated levels of antiangiogenic proteins soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1 and soluble endoglin (sEng and reduced levels of the proangiogenic protein, placental growth factor (PlGF in women with preeclampsia. These angiogenic biomarkers may be useful in distinguishing preeclampsia from other conditions of pregnancy, which may present with overlapping clinical characteristics. Cases. Case 1: A multiparous woman at 18 weeks gestation with nephrotic syndrome presented with hypertensive emergency and worsening renal insufficiency. She underwent induction of labor for severe preeclampsia. Her sFlt1 and sEng levels were at the 97 percentile while her PlGF level was undetectable (less than the 1st percentile. Case 2: A nulliparous woman with lupus nephritis at 22 weeks gestation presented with fetal demise and heart failure. Three weeks previously, the patient had developed thrombocytopenia and hypertensive urgency. She underwent dilation and evacuation. Her angiogenic profile was consistent with severe preeclampsia. Conclusion. Angiogenic factors may provide evidence to support a diagnosis of preeclampsia in patients with preexisting renal disease and proteinuria, conditions in which the classical definition of hypertension and proteinuria cannot be used.

  11. Subclinical Coronary Plaque Burden in Asymptomatic Relatives of Patients With Documented Premature Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Jensen, Jesper Møller; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    Introduction: A family history of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) is a well-known risk factor for adverse coronary events with age of onset being inversely related to the degree of heritability. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that asymptomatic first degree relatives, of patients with premature...... CAD, suffer a high burden of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Methods: First degree relatives, aged 30-65 years, of patients with a documented coronary revascularization procedure before the age of 40 years, were invited to participate in the study. Participants were matched by age, sex...... and absence of a family history, with patients referred for coronary CT angiography (CTA) because of atypical angina or non-anginal chest pain. A pooled blinded analysis was performed. The main outcome measure was the number of plaque-affected coronary segments. Results: 88 relatives and 88 symptomatic...

  12. Reduced subclinical carotid vascular disease and arterial stiffness in vegetarian men: The CARVOS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Navarro, Julio; Antoniazzi, Luiza; Oki, Adriana Midori; Bonfim, Maria Carlos; Hong, Valeria; Acosta-Cardenas, Pedro; Strunz, Celia; Brunoro, Eleonora; Miname, Marcio Hiroshi; Filho, Wilson Salgado; Bortolotto, Luiz Aparecido; Santos, Raul D

    2017-03-01

    Dietary habits play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. The objective of this study was to verify if vegetarian (VEG) diet could be related a better profile of subclinical vascular disease evaluated by arterial stiffness and functional and structural properties of carotid arteries, compared to omnivorous (OMN) diet. In this cross-sectional study, 44 VEG and 44 OMN apparently healthy men ≥35years of age, in order to not have confounding risk factors of subclinical atherosclerosis, were assessed for anthropometric data, blood pressure, blood lipids, glucose, C reactive protein (CRP), and arterial stiffness determined by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Also, carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT) and distensibility were evaluated. VEG men had lower body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, fasting serum total cholesterol, LDL and non-HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, glucose and glycated hemoglobin values in comparison with OMN individuals (all p values <0.05). Markers of vascular structure and function were different between VEG and OMN: PWV 7.1±0.8m/s vs. 7.7±0.9m/s (p<0.001); c-IMT 593±94 vs. 661±128μm (p=0.003); and relative carotid distensibility 6.39±1.7 vs. 5.72±1.8% (p=0.042), respectively. After a multivariate linear regression analysis, a VEG diet was independently and negatively associated with PWV (p value 0.005). A VEG diet is associated with a more favorable cardiovascular diseases biomarker profile and better vascular structural and functional parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ounissi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available M Ounissi¹, T Gargueh², M Mahfoudhi¹, K Boubaker¹, H Hedri¹, R Goucha¹, E Abderrahim¹, F Ben Hamida¹, T Ben Abdallah¹, F El Younsi¹, H Ben Maiz³, A Kheder¹1Internal Medicine Department, 2Pediatric Department, 3Laboratory of Kidney Diseases, Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis, TunisiaIntroduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD.Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied.Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI, medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate.Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of

  14. Subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a meta-analysis of literature studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosino, Pasquale; Lupoli, Roberta; Cafaro, Giovanni; Iervolino, Salvatore; Carone, Mauro; Pappone, Nicola; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients have an increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Common carotid intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) and carotid plaques are surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis and predictors of CV events. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between COPD and subclinical atherosclerosis. Studies evaluating the impact of COPD on CCA-IMT and on the prevalence of carotid plaques were systematically searched. Twenty studies (2082 COPD patients and 4844 controls) were included, 12 studies with data on CCA-IMT (13 data-sets on 1180 COPD patients and 2312 controls) and 12 studies reporting on the prevalence of carotid plaques (1231 COPD patients and 4222 controls). Compared to controls, COPD patients showed a significantly higher CCA-IMT (mean difference [MD]: 0.201 mm; 95%CI: 0.142, 0.260; p prevalence of carotid plaques (Odds Ratio [OR]: 2.503; 95%CI: 1.333, 2.175; p COPD patients and controls. COPD is significantly associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. These findings may be useful to plan adequate CV prevention strategies. Key messages COPD patients show a higher CCA-IMT and an increased prevalence of carotid plaques compared with controls. A more severe pulmonary disease is associated with a higher prevalence of carotid plaques in COPD patients. Screening for subclinical atherosclerosis may be worthy in COPD patients to plan specific prevention strategies.

  15. Nanomedicines for renal disease: current status and future applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamaly, Nazila; He, John C.; Ausiello, Dennis A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment and management of kidney disease currently presents an enormous global burden, and the application of nanotechnology principles to renal disease therapy, although still at an early stage, has profound transformative potential. The increasing translation of nanomedicines to the clinic...... outlines nanomedicine characteristics central to improved targeting of renal cells and highlights the prospects, challenges, and opportunities of nanotechnology-mediated therapies for renal diseases....

  16. Advanced chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and renal death among HIV-positive individuals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryom, L; Kirk, O; Lundgren, Jd

    2013-01-01

    (two consecutive measurements ≥ 3 months apart) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≤ 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) using Cockcroft-Gault, and ESRD as haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis for ≥ 1 month or renal transplant. Renal death was death with renal disease as the underlying cause, using Coding....../ESRD/renal death was low and predictors included traditional renal risk factors, HIV-related factors and pre-existing renal impairment. The prognosis following advanced CKD/ESRD was poor. Larger studies should address possible contributions of specific antiretrovirals....

  17. Protein losing enteropathy: comprehensive review of the mechanistic association with clinical and subclinical disease states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) has been associated with more than 60 different conditions, including nearly all gastrointestinal diseases (Crohn's disease, celiac, Whipple's, intestinal infections, and so on) and a large number of non-gut conditions (cardiac and liver disease, lupus, sarcoidosis, and so on). This review presents the first attempt to quantitatively understand the magnitude of the PLE in relation to the associated pathology for three different disease categories: 1) increased lymphatic pressure (e.g., lymphangiectasis); 2) diseases with mucosal erosions (e.g., Crohn's disease); and 3) diseases without mucosal erosions (e.g., celiac disease). The PLE with lymphangiectasis results from rupture of the mucosal lymphatics, with retrograde drainage of systemic lymph into the intestinal lumen with the resultant loss of CD4 T cells, which is diagnostic. Mucosal erosion PLE results from macroscopic breakdown of the mucosal barrier, with the epithelial capillaries becoming the rate-limiting factor in albumin loss. The equation derived to describe the relationship between the reduction in serum albumin (CP) and PLE indicates that gastrointestinal albumin clearance must increase by at least 17 times normal to reduce the CP by half. The strengths and limitations of the two quantitative measures of PLE ((51)Cr-albumin or α1-antitrypsin [αAT] clearance) are reviewed. αAT provides a simple quantitative diagnostic test that is probably underused clinically. The strong, unexplained correlation between minor decreases in CP and subsequent mortality in seemingly healthy individuals raises the question of whether subclinical PLE could account for the decreased CP and, if so, could the mechanism responsible for PLE play a role in the increased mortality? A large-scale study correlating αAT clearance with serum albumin concentrations will be required in order to determine the role of PLE in the regulation of the serum albumin concentration of seemingly healthy

  18. Recurrence of light-chain deposition disease after renal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas; Hammer, Anne; Jørgensen, Kaj Anker

    2008-01-01

    A 51-year-old male with a history of chronic renal disease received a renal allograft, in which disease recurred. Light-chain deposition disease was confirmed through biopsies of the native kidney and graft, and detection of free kappa light chains in serum. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep-6...

  19. Nanomedicines for renal disease: current status and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaly, Nazila; He, John C.; Ausiello, Dennis A.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment and management of kidney disease currently presents an enormous global burden, and the application of nanotechnology principles to renal disease therapy, although still at an early stage, has profound transformative potential. The increasing translation of nanomedicines to the clinic, alongside research efforts in tissue regeneration and organ-on-a-chip investigations, are likely to provide novel solutions to treat kidney diseases. Our understanding of renal anatomy and of how the biological and physicochemical properties of nanomedicines (the combination of a nanocarrier and a drug) influence their interactions with renal tissues has improved dramatically. Tailoring of nanomedicines in terms of kidney retention and binding to key membranes and cell populations associated with renal diseases is now possible and greatly enhances their localization, tolerability, and efficacy. This Review outlines nanomedicine characteristics central to improved targeting of renal cells and highlights the prospects, challenges, and opportunities of nanotechnology-mediated therapies for renal diseases. PMID:27795549

  20. Dyslipidemia in pediatric renal disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saland, Jeffrey M; Ginsberg, Henry; Fisher, Edward A

    2002-04-01

    Dyslipidemia increases the risk of cardiovascular events among individuals with renal disease, and there is a growing body of evidence that it hastens the progression of renal disease itself. Children with nephrotic syndrome or renal transplants have easily recognized hyperlipidemia. Among those with chronic renal insufficiency or end-stage renal disease, detection of dyslipidemia requires more careful analysis and knowledge of normal pediatric ranges. Disordered lipoprotein metabolism results from complex interactions among many factors, including the primary disease process, use of medications such as corticosteroids, the presence of malnutrition or obesity, and diet. The systematic treatment of dyslipidemia in children with chronic renal disease is controversial because conclusive data regarding the risks and benefits are lacking. Hepatic 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins), fibrates, plant stanols, bile acid-binding resins, and dietary manipulation are options for individualized treatment. Prospective investigations are required to guide clinical management.

  1. Nanomedicines for renal disease: current status and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaly, Nazila; He, John C; Ausiello, Dennis A; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2016-12-01

    Treatment and management of kidney disease currently presents an enormous global burden, and the application of nanotechnology principles to renal disease therapy, although still at an early stage, has profound transformative potential. The increasing translation of nanomedicines to the clinic, alongside research efforts in tissue regeneration and organ-on-a-chip investigations, are likely to provide novel solutions to treat kidney diseases. Our understanding of renal anatomy and of how the biological and physico-chemical properties of nanomedicines (the combination of a nanocarrier and a drug) influence their interactions with renal tissues has improved dramatically. Tailoring of nanomedicines in terms of kidney retention and binding to key membranes and cell populations associated with renal diseases is now possible and greatly enhances their localization, tolerability, and efficacy. This Review outlines nanomedicine characteristics central to improved targeting of renal cells and highlights the prospects, challenges, and opportunities of nanotechnology-mediated therapies for renal diseases.

  2. Renal cell carcinoma in end-stage renal disease: Multi-institutional comparative analysis of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cheryn; Hong, Sung Hoo; Chung, Jin Soo; Byun, Seok Soo; Kwak, Cheol; Jeong, Chang Wook; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Seo, Ill Young

    2016-06-01

    To describe the clinical features of renal cell carcinoma arising in end-stage renal disease and to compare survival outcomes after definitive treatment with non-end-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma. Data of 181 consecutive patients with end-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma who had received surgical treatment between 1995 and 2011 at seven institutions were reviewed. Data of 362 non-end-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma patients matched for clinicopathological parameters who received surgery at Asan Medical Center during the same study period were also reviewed. The two study groups were compared with respect to recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards method. Mean follow up was 40 ± 34.2 months after surgery. Median tumor size was 2.5 cm (interquartile range 1.5-4.5), and pathological tumor stage was T1 in 78%, T2 in 7.1% and T3 and higher in 14.9%. Tumor histological type was clear cell in 63%, papillary in 17%, chromophobe in 5%, clear cell papillary in 2.8% and acquired cystic disease-related in 6.1%. Compared with the controls, the stage-specific 5-year recurrence-free survival was similar (87.6 vs 88.5%), but cancer-specific and overall survival was significantly lower. On multivariate analysis, end-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma was not a predictor for recurrence-free survival, but a significant predictor for cancer-specific (hazard ratio 4.07, 95% confidence interval 2.08-7.94) and overall survival (hazard ratio 3.13, 95% confidence interval 1.66-5.96). End-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma seems to have comparable stage-specific recurrence-free, but poorer cancer-specific and overall survival compared with non-end-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma. As patients with end-stage renal disease are a high-risk population for renal cell carcinoma, routine radiographic screening to improve survival outcomes should be further investigated. © 2016

  3. Chemerin in renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-02-01

    The potential involvement of chemerin in cardiovascular and renal dysfunction has recently been acknowledged. There are indeed many links between this protein and inflammation, atherosclerosis, and multiple obesity- and diabetes-related parameters such as body mass index, insulin resistance, and blood levels of insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose. In addition, in the last few years, several reports have investigated the circulating chemerin levels and their pathophysiologic significance in chronic kidney disease populations. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of this matter, in particular as to whether elevated chemerin might be the cause behind, or simply mirror, a reduced renal function. The limitations of the present knowledge on chemerin may partly relate to the lack of specific antibodies for assessing the different active isoforms of the protein. Measuring its bioactive serum concentration, and achieving a precise overall pattern of the tissue-specific formation of different isoforms, with the use of suitable technology, will ultimately help define the role of chemerin in disease pathophysiology, or as a diagnostic or therapeutic marker. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Associations between objectively measured physical activity intensity in childhood and measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease in adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Grøntved, Anders; Møller, Niels Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: No prospective studies have investigated the association between physical activity (PA) and carotid subclinical cardiovascular disease across childhood. Therefore, the primary aim was to investigate the association between PA intensity across childhood and carotid intima media......-and-vigorous and vigorous PA intensity were measured using the Actigraph activity monitor. Subclinical cardiovascular disease was expressed as cIMT, carotid arterial stiffness and secondarily as a metabolic risk z-score including the homoeostasis model assessment score of insulin resistance, triglycerides, total...... thickness (cIMT) and stiffness in adolescence. Second, we included a clustered cardiovascular disease risk score as outcome. METHODS: This was a prospective study of a sample of 254 children (baseline age 8-10 years) with a 6-year follow-up. The mean exposure and the change in minutes of moderate...

  5. Subclinical Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUÍS M.T.R. LIMA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is increasing in prevalence worldwide, and those non-diagnosed or misdiagnosed comprise a significant group compared to those diagnosed. Accumulated scientific evidence indicate that the current diagnostic markers (fasting glycemia, 2h glycemia after an oral glucose load and HbA1c are indeed late diagnostic criteria when considering the incidence of diabetes-related complications and comorbidities, which are also at high risk in some groups among normoglycemic individuals. Additionally, the earlier identification of future risk of diabetes is desirable since it would allow better adherence to preventive actions such as lifestyle intervention, ultimately avoiding complications and minimizing the economic impact/burden on health care expenses. Insulin resistance and hyperhormonemia (insulin, amylin, glucagon are non-disputable hallmarks of T2DM, which already takes place among these normoglycemic, otherwise health subjects, characterizing a state of subclinical diabetes. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia can be computed from fasting plasma insulin as an independent variable in normoglycemia. An overview of the current diagnostic criteria, disease onset, complications, comorbidities and perspectives on lifestyle interventions are presented. A proposal for early detection of subclinical diabetes from routine evaluation of fasting plasma insulin, which is affordable and robust and thus applicable for the general population, is further suggested.

  6. Relationships between serum MCP-1 and subclinical kidney disease: African American-Diabetes Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murea Mariana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 plays important roles in kidney disease susceptibility and atherogenesis in experimental models. Relationships between serum MCP-1 concentration and early nephropathy and subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD were assessed in African Americans (AAs with type 2 diabetes (T2D. Methods Serum MCP-1 concentration, urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, and atherosclerotic calcified plaque (CP in the coronary and carotid arteries and infrarenal aorta were measured in 479 unrelated AAs with T2D. Generalized linear models were fitted to test for associations between MCP-1 and urine ACR, eGFR, and CP. Results Participants were 57% female, with mean ± SD (median age 55.6±9.5 (55.0 years, diabetes duration 10.3±8.2 (8.0 years, urine ACR 149.7±566.7 (14.0 mg/g, CKD-EPI eGFR 92.4±23.3 (92.0 ml/min/1.73m2, MCP-1 262.9±239.1 (224.4 pg/ml, coronary artery CP 280.1±633.8 (13.5, carotid artery CP 47.1±132.9 (0, and aorta CP 1616.0±2864.0 (319.0. Adjusting for age, sex, smoking, HbA1c, BMI, and LDL, serum MCP-1 was positively associated with albuminuria (parameter estimate 0.0021, P=0.04 and negatively associated with eGFR (parameter estimate −0.0003, P=0.001. MCP-1 remained associated with eGFR after adjustment for urine ACR. MCP-1 levels did not correlate with the extent of CP in any vascular bed, HbA1c or diabetes duration, but were positively associated with BMI. No interaction between BMI and MCP-1 was detected on nephropathy outcomes. Conclusions Serum MCP-1 levels are associated with eGFR and albuminuria in AAs with T2D. MCP-1 was not associated with subclinical CVD in this population. Inflammation appears to play important roles in development and/or progression of kidney disease in AAs.

  7. Subclinical Hypothyroidism after 131I-Treatment of Graves' Disease: A Risk Factor for Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Tian, Ai-Juan; Yuan, Xin; Cheng, Xiao-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well accepted that there is a close relationship between hypothyroidism and depression, previous studies provided inconsistent or even opposite results in whether subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) increased the risk of depression. One possible reason is that the etiology of SCH in these studies was not clearly distinguished. We therefore investigated the relationship between SCH resulting from 131I treatment of Graves' disease and depression. The incidence of depression among 95 patients with SCH and 121 euthyroid patients following 131I treatment of Graves' disease was studied. The risk factors of depression were determined with multivariate logistic regression analysis. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy was performed in patients with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels exceeding 10 mIU/L. Patients with SCH had significantly higher Hamilton Depression Scale scores, serum TSH and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) levels compared with euthyroid patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed SCH, Graves' eye syndrome and high serum TPO antibody level as risk factors for depression. L-thyroxine treatment is beneficial for SCH patients with serum TSH levels exceeding 10 mIU/L. The results of the present study demonstrated that SCH is prevalent among 131I treated Graves' patients. SCH might increase the risk of developing depression. L-thyroxine replacement therapy helps to resolve depressive disorders in SCH patients with TSH > 10mIU/L. These data provide insight into the relationship between SCH and depression.

  8. Concurrent Diseases and Conditions in Cats with Renal Infarcts

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey, M. C.; Jandrey, K.; Farrell, K.S.; Carlson?Bremer, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal infarcts identified without definitive association with any specific disease process. Objective Determine diseases associated with diagnosis of renal infarcts in cats diagnosed by sonography or necropsy. Animals 600 cats underwent abdominal ultrasonography, necropsy, or both at a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Methods Information obtained from electronic medical records. Cats classified as having renal infarct present based on results of sonographic evaluation or necro...

  9. Endothelin-A Receptor Antagonism after Renal Angioplasty Enhances Renal Recovery in Renovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullos, Nathan; Stewart, Nicholas J.; Surles, Bret

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty/stenting (PTRAS) is frequently used to treat renal artery stenosis and renovascular disease (RVD); however, renal function is restored in less than one half of the cases. This study was designed to test a novel intervention that could refine PTRAS and enhance renal recovery in RVD. Renal function was quantified in pigs after 6 weeks of chronic RVD (induced by unilateral renal artery stenosis), established renal damage, and hypertension. Pigs with RVD then underwent PTRAS and were randomized into three groups: placebo (RVD+PTRAS), chronic endothelin-A receptor (ET-A) blockade (RVD+PTRAS+ET-A), and chronic dual ET-A/B blockade (RVD+PTRAS+ET-A/B) for 4 weeks. Renal function was again evaluated after treatments, and then, ex vivo studies were performed on the stented kidney. PTRAS resolved renal stenosis, attenuated hypertension, and improved renal function but did not resolve renal microvascular rarefaction, remodeling, or renal fibrosis. ET-A blocker therapy after PTRAS significantly improved hypertension, microvascular rarefaction, and renal injury and led to greater recovery of renal function. Conversely, combined ET-A/B blockade therapy blunted the therapeutic effects of PTRAS alone or PTRAS followed by ET-A blockade. These data suggest that ET-A receptor blockade therapy could serve as a coadjuvant intervention to enhance the outcomes of PTRAS in RVD. These results also suggest that ET-B receptors are important for renal function in RVD and may contribute to recovery after PTRAS. Using clinically available compounds and techniques, our results could contribute to both refinement and design of new therapeutic strategies in chronic RVD. PMID:25377076

  10. Subclinical cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women with low/medium cardiovascular risk by the Framingham risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Maria Augusta; Franz, Roberta Fernandez; Metzdorf, Marcela; da Silva, Thais Rasia; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its association with clinical and hormone variables in postmenopausal women from Southern Brazil. Cross-sectional study. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) assessed by electron-beam computed tomography. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and atheromatous plaques assessed using B-mode ultrasound. IMT was measured at three segments. Subclinical CVD was defined as the presence of plaque and/or IMT >0.9 mm. Ninety-seven postmenopausal women (mean age 55 ± 5 years, median duration of menopause 5.8 [3-10] years) were studied. A low/medium Framingham risk score (FRS) was present in 97.9% of participants; 35.1% had subclinical CVD on carotid ultrasound, and 24.7% had the presence of plaque. Seven women had a CAC score ≥ 100, and two had a score ≥ 200. CAC score (p<0.001) and FRS (p=0.013) were higher in patients with subclinical atherosclerosis. Positive correlations were found between IMT and age (rs=0.293 p=0.004), duration of menopause (rs=0.237, p=0.020), and CAC score (rs=0.468, p<0.001). Common carotid IMT (IMT-CC) was negatively associated with estradiol levels (β=-0.237, p=0.018) and positively with age (β=0.210, p=0.033), and BMI (β=0.260, p=0.010). However, correlations with estradiol and age did not remain significant when adjusted for systolic blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol levels. A high prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis was detected in this sample of postmenopausal women with low/medium CV risk by the FRS. The association between IMT-CC and age or endogenous estrogen levels was dependent of blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol in these postmenopausal women from Southern Brazil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Thyroid Antibody Status, Subclinical Hypothyroidism, and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: An Individual Participant Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Tinh-Hai; Bauer, Douglas C.; Cappola, Anne R.; Åsvold, Bjørn O.; Weiler, Stefan; Vittinghoff, Eric; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Bremner, Alexandra; den Elzen, Wendy P. J.; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Vanderpump, Mark P. J.; Cornuz, Jacques; Dörr, Marcus; Wallaschofski, Henri; Newman, Anne B.; Sgarbi, José A.; Razvi, Salman; Völzke, Henry; Walsh, John P.; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2014-01-01

    Context: Subclinical hypothyroidism has been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), particularly with thyrotropin levels of 10.0 mIU/L or greater. The measurement of thyroid antibodies helps predict the progression to overt hypothyroidism, but it is unclear whether thyroid autoimmunity independently affects CHD risk. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the CHD risk of subclinical hypothyroidism with and without thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs). Data Sources and Study Selection: A MEDLINE and EMBASE search from 1950 to 2011 was conducted for prospective cohorts, reporting baseline thyroid function, antibodies, and CHD outcomes. Data Extraction: Individual data of 38 274 participants from six cohorts for CHD mortality followed up for 460 333 person-years and 33 394 participants from four cohorts for CHD events. Data Synthesis: Among 38 274 adults (median age 55 y, 63% women), 1691 (4.4%) had subclinical hypothyroidism, of whom 775 (45.8%) had positive TPOAbs. During follow-up, 1436 participants died of CHD and 3285 had CHD events. Compared with euthyroid individuals, age- and gender-adjusted risks of CHD mortality in subclinical hypothyroidism were similar among individuals with and without TPOAbs [hazard ratio (HR) 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87–1.53 vs HR 1.26, CI 1.01–1.58, P for interaction = .62], as were risks of CHD events (HR 1.16, CI 0.87–1.56 vs HR 1.26, CI 1.02–1.56, P for interaction = .65). Risks of CHD mortality and events increased with higher thyrotropin, but within each stratum, risks did not differ by TPOAb status. Conclusions: CHD risk associated with subclinical hypothyroidism did not differ by TPOAb status, suggesting that biomarkers of thyroid autoimmunity do not add independent prognostic information for CHD outcomes. PMID:24915118

  12. Trace elements in renal disease and hemodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Yoshinori E-mail: yomiura@iwate-med.ac.jp; Nakai, Keiko; Suwabe, Akira; Sera, Koichiro

    2002-04-01

    A number of considerations suggest that trace element disturbances might occur in patients with renal disease and in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Using particle induced X-ray emission, we demonstrated the relations between serum concentration, urinary excretion of the trace elements and creatinine clearance (Ccr) in randomized 50 patients. To estimate the effects of HD, we also observed the changes of these elements in serum and dialysis fluids during HD. Urinary silicon excretion decreased, and serum silicon concentration increased as Ccr decreased, with significant correlation (r=0.702, p<0.001 and r=0.676, p<0.0001, respectively). We also observed the increase of serum silicon, and the decrease of silicon in dialysis fluids during HD. These results suggested that reduced renal function and also dialysis contributed to silicon accumulation. Although serum selenium decreased significantly according to Ccr decrease (r=0.452, p<0.01), we could detect no change in urinary selenium excretion and no transfer during HD. Serum bromine and urinary excretion of bromine did not correlate to Ccr. However we observed a bromine transfer from the serum to the dialysis fluid that contributed to the serum bromine decrease in HD patients.

  13. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Renal Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Funda SAĞLAM

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc dependent proteinases and the main promoters of extracellular matrix degradation. Their role in renal diseases is now being understood better. Several progressive renal diseases are characterized with persistent cell proliferation and abnormal production of extracellular matrix by mesengial cells. Understanding mesengial cell proliferation and the factors regulating extracellular matrix metabolism is therefore becoming more important. MMPs...

  14. Assessment of dyslipidemia in renal disease patients | Digban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dyslipidemia is elevation of plasma cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), or both, or a low high density lipoprotein level that contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Lipid pattern of renal disease patients were determined. One hundred volunteers were recruited for this study which comprised of sixty renal disease ...

  15. Causes and consequences of increased sympathetic activity in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joles, JA; Koomans, HA

    Much evidence indicates increased sympathetic nervous activity (SNA) in renal disease. Renal ischemia is probably a primary event leading to increased SNA. Increased SNA often occurs in association with hypertension. However, the deleterious effect of increased SNA on the diseased kidney is not only

  16. Socioeconomic status and subclinical coronary disease in the Whitehall II epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, Andrew; Hamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Katie; Venuraju, Shreenidhi; Marmot, Michael G; Lahiri, Avijit

    2010-01-25

    There are pronounced socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease, but the extent to which these primarily reflect gradients in underlying coronary artery disease severity or in the clinical manifestation of advanced disease is uncertain. We measured the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) as indexed by grade of employment and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in the Whitehall II epidemiological cohort, and tested the contribution of lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors in accounting for this association. CAC was assessed in 528 asymptomatic men and women aged 53-76 years, stratified into higher, intermediate and lower by grade of employment groups. Lifestyle (smoking, body mass index, alcohol consumption, physical activity), biological (blood pressure, lipids, fasting glucose, inflammatory markers) and psychosocial factors (work stress, financial strain, social support, depression, hostility, optimism) were also measured. Detectable CAC was present in 293 participants (55.5%). The presence of calcification was related to lifestyle and biological risk factors, but not to grade of employment. But among individuals with detectable calcification, the severity of CAC was inversely associated with grade of employment (p = 0.010), and this relationship remained after controlling for demographic, lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors. Compared with the higher grade group, there was a mean increase in log Agatston scores of 0.783 (95% C.I. 0.265-1.302, p = 0.003) in the intermediate and 0.941 (C.I. 0.226-1.657, p = 0.010) in the lower grade of employment groups, after adjustment for demographic, lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors. Low grade of employment did not predict the presence of calcification in this cohort, but was related to the severity of CAC. These findings suggest that lower SES may be particularly relevant at advanced stages of subclinical coronary artery disease, when calcification has developed.

  17. Socioeconomic status and subclinical coronary disease in the Whitehall II epidemiological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Steptoe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are pronounced socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease, but the extent to which these primarily reflect gradients in underlying coronary artery disease severity or in the clinical manifestation of advanced disease is uncertain. We measured the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES as indexed by grade of employment and coronary artery calcification (CAC in the Whitehall II epidemiological cohort, and tested the contribution of lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors in accounting for this association.CAC was assessed in 528 asymptomatic men and women aged 53-76 years, stratified into higher, intermediate and lower by grade of employment groups. Lifestyle (smoking, body mass index, alcohol consumption, physical activity, biological (blood pressure, lipids, fasting glucose, inflammatory markers and psychosocial factors (work stress, financial strain, social support, depression, hostility, optimism were also measured. Detectable CAC was present in 293 participants (55.5%. The presence of calcification was related to lifestyle and biological risk factors, but not to grade of employment. But among individuals with detectable calcification, the severity of CAC was inversely associated with grade of employment (p = 0.010, and this relationship remained after controlling for demographic, lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors. Compared with the higher grade group, there was a mean increase in log Agatston scores of 0.783 (95% C.I. 0.265-1.302, p = 0.003 in the intermediate and 0.941 (C.I. 0.226-1.657, p = 0.010 in the lower grade of employment groups, after adjustment for demographic, lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors.Low grade of employment did not predict the presence of calcification in this cohort, but was related to the severity of CAC. These findings suggest that lower SES may be particularly relevant at advanced stages of subclinical coronary artery disease, when calcification has developed.

  18. Growth hormone in chronic renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe growth retardation (below the third percentile for height is seen in up to one-third children with chronic kidney disease. It is thought to be multifactorial and despite optimal medical therapy most children are unable to reach their normal height. Under-nutrition, anemia, vitamin D deficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy; abnormalities in the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor system and sex steroids, all have been implicated in the pathogenesis of growth failure. Therapy includes optimization of nutritional and metabolic abnormalities. Failure to achieve adequate height despite 3-6 months of optimal medical measures mandates the use of recombinant GH (rGH therapy, which has shown to result in catch-up growth, anywhere from 2 cm to 10 cm with satisfactory liner, somatic and psychological development.

  19. The impact of obesity on subclinical coronary atherosclerosis according to the risk of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Yul; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Sung, Jimin; Kim, Kwang Joon; Shin, Sanghoon; Cho, In-Jeong; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Chung, Namsik

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate whether the association of obesity with coronary atherosclerosis depends on the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A total of 1,406 asymptomatic Korean adults underwent both cardiac and abdominal multislice computed tomography (MSCT) as part of a routine health check-up. Obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and MSCT-derived area/ratio of visceral and subcutaneous fat. The burden of CVD risk was assessed by the Framingham risk equation. In the low-risk group for CVD, obesity measurements (standardized odds ratio, 95% confidence interval) of BMI (1.406, 1.197-1.652), WC (1.707, 1.434-2.032), visceral fat area (1.700, 1.438-2.009), and visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio (1.620, 1.379-1.903) were associated with the presence of coronary calcification after adjusting for traditional CVD risks. But in the moderate-to-high risk group, the associations were attenuated. For additional adjustments of obesity measurements, in the low-risk group, WC (1.717, 1.172-2.514) and visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio (1.400, 1.029-1.904) were independent determinants of coronary calcification. Obesity is differentially associated with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis, according to the burden of CVD risk. In low-risk adults, the relative distribution of abdominal fat, as well as whole body fat, is important to coronary atherosclerosis. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  20. Blood pressure control and perceived health status in African Americans with subclinical hypertensive heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Michael J; Brody, Aaron M; Ference, Brian A; Flack, John M; Mahn, James J; Marinica, Alexander L; Carroll, Justin A; Nasser, Samar A; Zhang, Shiling; Levy, Phillip D

    2014-05-01

    The role of antihypertensive therapy in reducing the risk of cardiovascular complications such as heart failure is well established, but the effects of different blood pressure goals on patient-perceived health status has not been well defined. We sought to determine if adverse effects on perceived health status will occur with lower blood pressure goals or more intensive antihypertensive therapy. Data were prospectively collected as a part of a single center, randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate standard (Seventh Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure-compliant) versus intense (<120/80 mm Hg) blood pressure goals for patients with uncontrolled hypertension and subclinical hypertensive heart disease. Blood pressure management was open label, and health status was measured at 3-month intervals over 1 year of follow-up using the short-form (SF)-36. Mixed linear models were constructed for each of the SF-36 summary scores. One hundred twenty-three (mean age 49.4 ± 8.2; 65% female; 95.1% African American) patients were randomized, 88 of whom completed the protocol. With the exception of a decrease in perceived health transition, health status did not change significantly on repeat measurement. Lower blood pressure goals and more intensive antihypertensive therapy appear to be well tolerated with limited effects on patients' perception of health status. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protein losing enteropathy: comprehensive review of the mechanistic association with clinical and subclinical disease states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitt DG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available David G Levitt,1,* Michael D Levitt,2,* 1Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of Minnesota, 2Research Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Protein losing enteropathy (PLE has been associated with more than 60 different conditions, including nearly all gastrointestinal diseases (Crohn’s disease, celiac, Whipple’s, intestinal infections, and so on and a large number of non-gut conditions (cardiac and liver disease, lupus, sarcoidosis, and so on. This review presents the first attempt to quantitatively understand the magnitude of the PLE in relation to the associated pathology for three different disease categories: 1 increased lymphatic pressure (e.g., lymphangiectasis; 2 diseases with mucosal erosions (e.g., Crohn’s disease; and 3 diseases without mucosal erosions (e.g., celiac disease. The PLE with lymphangiectasis results from rupture of the mucosal lymphatics, with retrograde drainage of systemic lymph into the intestinal lumen with the resultant loss of CD4 T cells, which is diagnostic. Mucosal erosion PLE results from macroscopic breakdown of the mucosal barrier, with the epithelial capillaries becoming the rate-limiting factor in albumin loss. The equation derived to describe the relationship between the reduction in serum albumin (CP and PLE indicates that gastrointestinal albumin clearance must increase by at least 17 times normal to reduce the CP by half. The strengths and limitations of the two quantitative measures of PLE (51Cr-albumin or α1-antitrypsin [αAT] clearance are reviewed. αAT provides a simple quantitative diagnostic test that is probably underused clinically. The strong, unexplained correlation between minor decreases in CP and subsequent mortality in seemingly healthy individuals raises the question of whether subclinical PLE could account for the decreased CP and, if so, could the mechanism responsible for

  2. Periodontitis is associated with the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis and peripheral arterial disease in Korean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yoo-Been; Shin, Myung-Seop; Han, Dong-Hun; Sukhbaatar, Munkhzaya; Kim, Mi-Sun; Shin, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyun-Duck

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association of periodontitis with the development of early atherosclerotic vascular disease in Korean adults. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1343 adults aged over 40 years were recruited from a community-based cohort of Yangpyeong county, Korea, during the period 2010-2014. Only dentate individuals were included in the study. Subclinical atherosclerosis (SA) was defined as carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT)≥0.754 mm, as assessed bilaterally by B-mode ultrasound. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) was defined as ankle-brachial index (ABI)≤1.0, as measured by Doppler. History of periodontitis was assessed by measuring the radiographic alveolar bone loss (RABL) on a digital dental panorama and was classified into three groups: normal, moderate and severe periodontitis (≥2 non-adjacent interproximal sites with RABL≥4 mm and 6 mm, respectively). The associations of periodontitis with SA and PAD were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression analysis and analysis of covariance, adjusted for age, sex, education level, tooth loss, smoking, drinking, exercise, obesity, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, hs-CRP, diabetes and hypertension. Stratified analyses were performed to identify specific risk groups. After controlling for confounders, severe periodontitis was associated with SA [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.55; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-2.24] and PAD (aOR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.05-3.93). These associations were highlighted in never-smokers. For increasing severity of periodontitis, the adjusted mean cIMT increased (p = 0.011) while that of ABI decreased (p = 0.033). Our data showed that periodontitis is a substantially important risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease among Korean adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Advanced chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and renal death among HIV-positive individuals in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryom, L.; Kirk, O.; Lundgren, J. D.; Reiss, P.; Pedersen, C.; de Wit, S.; Buzunova, S.; Gasiorowski, J.; Gatell, J. M.; Mocroft, A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in HIV-positive persons is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate incidence, predictors and outcomes for advanced CKD/ESRD and renal death. Advanced CKD was defined as confirmed (two consecutive

  4. Association Between Coronary Artery Disease Genetic Variants and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: An Association Study and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabalza, Michel; Subirana, Isaac; Lluis-Ganella, Carla; Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi; de Groot, Eric; Arnold, Roman; Cenarro, Ana; Ramos, Rafel; Marrugat, Jaume; Elosua, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have identified several genetic variants associated with coronary artery disease. Some of these genetic variants are not associated with classical cardiovascular risk factors and the mechanism of such associations is unclear. The aim of the study was to determine whether these genetic variants are related to subclinical atherosclerosis measured by carotid intima media thickness, carotid stiffness, and ankle brachial index. A cross-sectional study nested in the follow-up of the REGICOR cohort was undertaken. The study included 2667 individuals. Subclinical atherosclerosis measurements were performed with standardized methods. Nine genetic variants were genotyped to assess associations with subclinical atherosclerosis, individually and in a weighted genetic risk score. A systematic review and meta-analysis of previous studies that analyzed these associations was undertaken. Neither the selected genetic variants nor the genetic risk score were significantly associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. In the meta-analysis, the rs1746048 (CXCL12; n = 10581) risk allele was directly associated with carotid intima-media thickness (β = 0.008; 95% confidence interval, 0.001-0.015), whereas the rs6725887 (WDR12; n = 7801) risk allele was inversely associated with this thickness (β = -0.013; 95% confidence interval, -0.024 to -0.003). The analyzed genetic variants seem to mediate their association with coronary artery disease through different mechanisms. Our results generate the hypothesis that the CXCL12 variant appears to influence coronary artery disease risk through arterial remodeling and thickening, whereas the WDR12 risk variant could be related to higher plaque vulnerability. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Several issues regarding evaluation of renal injury and renal insufficiency in patients with liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Kunyan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In patients with liver disease such as viral hepatitis and liver cirrhosis, renal injury and renal insufficiency can be generally classified as acute kidney injury (AKI, chronic kidney disease, and acute-on-chronic nephropathy. AKI can be classified as stage 1 (risk stage, stage 2 (injury stage, and stage 3 (failure stage. Traditionally hepatorenal syndrome is classified as types Ⅰ and Ⅱ, and in recent years, type Ⅲ hepatorenal syndrome with organic renal injury has been proposed. Hepatorenal disorder(HRD is used to describe any renal disease which occurs in patients with liver cirrhosis. At present, sensitive and accurate biochemical parameters used to evaluate renal function in patients with liver disease in clinical practice include estimated glomerular filtration rate, increase in serum creatinine within unit time, and serum cystatin C level, and urinary microalbumin level also plays an important role in the early diagnosis of nephropathy. Causes of liver disease, severity, complications including infection, nutritional status, therapeutic drugs, and underlying nephropathy may be associated with renal injury and renal insufficiency in patients with liver disease and should be differentiated.

  6. Concurrent diseases and conditions in cats with renal infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, M C; Jandrey, K; Farrell, K S; Carlson-Bremer, D

    2014-01-01

    Renal infarcts identified without definitive association with any specific disease process. Determine diseases associated with diagnosis of renal infarcts in cats diagnosed by sonography or necropsy. 600 cats underwent abdominal ultrasonography, necropsy, or both at a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Information obtained from electronic medical records. Cats classified as having renal infarct present based on results of sonographic evaluation or necropsy. Time-matched case-controls selected from cats that underwent the next scheduled diagnostic procedure. 309 of 600 cats having diagnosis of renal infarct and 291 time-matched controls. Cats 7-14 years old were 1.6 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 1.03-2.05, P = .03) more likely to have renal infarct than younger cats but no more likely to have renal infarct than older cats (1.4, 0.89-2.25, P = .14). All P = .14 are statistically significant. Cats with renal infarcts were 4.5 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 2.63-7.68, P cats without renal infarcts. Cats with renal infarcts were 0.7 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 0.51-0.99, P = .046) less likely to have diagnosis of neoplasia compared to cats without renal infarcts. Cats with diagnosis of hyperthyroidism did not have significant association with having renal infarct. Cats with renal infarcts were 8 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 2.55-25.40, P ≤ .001) more likely to have diagnosis of distal aortic thromboembolism than cats without renal infarcts. Cats with renal infarcts identified on antemortem examination should be screened for occult cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. Common polymorphisms in CYP2C9, subclinical atherosclerosis and risk of ischemic vascular disease in 52 000 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, D.; Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, Børge

    2009-01-01

    -reactive protein), ischemic vascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, ischemic cerebrovascular disease and ischemic stroke) and death after an ischemic heart disease diagnosis. We genotyped the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a prospective study including 10 398 participants with 30-32 years....... Furthermore, the odds/hazard ratios for ischemic vascular disease did not differ from 1.0 for CYP2C9 carriers versus noncarriers. Finally, we found no altered risk of early death after a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. For all end points, we could exclude even minor changes in risk of disease with 90......% power. In conclusion, in three independent studies totaling more than 52 000 individuals, we found no association between CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 polymorphisms and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis, ischemic vascular disease or death after ischemic heart disease. The Pharmacogenomics Journal (2009) 9...

  8. Influence of coronary artery disease and subclinical atherosclerosis related polymorphisms on the risk of atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Mejías, Raquel; Corrales, Alfonso; Vicente, Esther; Robustillo-Villarino, Montserrat; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; Genre, Fernanda; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Huaranga, Marco A. Ramírez; Pina, Trinitario; Blanco, Ricardo; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Raya, Enrique; Mijares, Verónica; Ubilla, Begoña; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Balsa, Alejandro; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Carreira, Patricia; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Ocejo-Vinyals, J. Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Castañeda, Santos; Martín, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    A genetic component influences the development of atherosclerosis in the general population and also in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, genetic polymorphisms associated with atherosclerosis in the general population are not always involved in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in RA. Accordingly, a study in North-American RA patients did not show the association reported in the general population of coronary artery disease with a series of relevant polymorphisms (TCF21, LPA, HHIPL1, RASD1-PEMT, MRPS6, CYP17A1-CNNM2-NT5C2, SMG6-SRR, PHACTR1, WDR12 and COL4A1-COL4A2). In the present study, we assessed the potential association of these polymorphisms with CVD in Southern European RA patients. We also assessed if polymorphisms implicated in the increased risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in non-rheumatic Caucasians (ZHX2, PINX1, SLC17A4, LRIG1 and LDLR) may influence the risk for CVD in RA. 2,609 Spanish patients were genotyped by TaqMan assays. Subclinical atherosclerosis was determined in 1,258 of them by carotid ultrasonography (assessment of carotid intima media thickness and presence/absence of carotid plaques). No statistically significant differences were found when each polymorphism was assessed according to the presence/absence of cardiovascular events and subclinical atherosclerosis, after adjustment for potential confounder factors. Our results do not show an association between these 15 polymorphisms and atherosclerosis in RA. PMID:28059143

  9. Factors associated with low levels of subclinical vascular disease in older adults: multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michos, Erin D; Rice, Kenneth M; Szklo, Moyses; Burke, Gregory L; Siscovick, David S; Tracy, Russell P; Barr, R Graham; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Greenland, Philip; Jacobs, David R; Post, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and reduced ankle brachial indices (ABI) are markers of subclinical vascular disease strongly associated with aging. The authors identified factors associated with low levels of subclinical vascular disease in 1824 participants 70 years and older in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. A total of 452 had low CAC (0.9), and 165 had a combination index indicating favorable values for all 3 parameters. This combination index was independently associated with younger age (odds ratio [OR] 2.5 per 1 SD [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.8-3.6]), female sex (OR 3.0 [95% CI, 1.9-4.8]), lower body mass index (OR 1.6 per 1 SD [95% CI, 1.2-2.0]), absence of hypertension (OR 1.8 [95% CI, 1.2-2.6]), absence of dyslipidemia (OR 1.6 [95% CI, 1.04-2.4]), and never-smoking (OR 1.7 [95% CI, 1.1-2.6]). No significant associations were observed for C-reactive protein, education, diet, or physical activity. Favorable levels of multiple traditional risk factors, but not several novel risk factors, were associated with subclinical markers of successful cardiovascular aging. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Case definition for clinical and subclinical bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) in New Brunswick, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerlage, A S; Stryhn, H; Sanchez, J; Hammell, K L

    2017-03-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) is considered an important cause of loss in salmon aquaculture in Atlantic Canada. Causative agent of BKD is the Gram-positive bacteria Renibacterium salmoninarum. Infected salmon are often asymptomatic (subclinical infection), and the disease is considered chronic. One of the challenges in quantifying information from farm production and health records is the application of a standardized case definition. Case definitions for farm-level and cage-level clinical and subclinical BKD were developed using retrospective longitudinal data from aquaculture practices in New Brunswick, Canada, combining (i) industry records of weekly production data including mortalities, (ii) field observations for BKD using reports of veterinarians and/or fish health technicians, (iii) diagnostic submissions and test results and (iv) treatments used to control BKD. Case definitions were evaluated using veterinarians' expert judgements as reference standard. Eighty-nine and 66% of sites and fish groups, respectively, were associated with BKD at least once. For BKD present (subclinical or clinical), sensitivity and specificity of the case definition were 75-100% varying between event, fish group, site cycle and level (site pen). For clinical BKD, sensitivities were 29-64% and specificities 91-100%. Industry data can be used to develop sensitive case definitions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Income Gradient in Renal Disease Mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Lankarani, Maryam Moghani

    2017-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases and associated mortality follow a social gradient and chronic kidney disease is not an exception to this rule. Intermediate behavioral and medical factors that may explain such social gradients are, however, still unknown. Using nationally representative data in the United States, this study was conducted to investigate the mediating effect of medical and behavioral risk factors on the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and renal disease mortality. Americans' Changing Lives Study (ACL), 1986-2011, is a 25-year nationally representative prospective cohort study. ACL followed 3,361 adults for up to 25 years. Income, education, and unemployment were the main predictors of interest. Death due to renal disease was the main outcome. Health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) and medical risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, and obesity) were the mediators. Cox proportional hazards models were used for data analysis. Higher income (HR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.62-0.89) was associated with lower risk of death due to renal disease over the 25-year follow-up period. Although health behaviors and medical risk factors at baseline were also predictors of the outcome, they failed to explain the effect of income on death due to renal disease. That is, income was associated with death due to renal disease above and beyond all potential mediators including behavioral and medical risk factors. Socioeconomic inequalities in the United States cause disparities in renal disease mortality; however, such differences are not due to health behaviors (smoking and drinking) and medical risk factors (hypertension and diabetes). To reduce disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States, policies should go beyond health behaviors and medical risk factors. While programs should help low-income individuals maintain exercise and avoid smoking, reduction of income disparities should be regarded as a strategy for reduction of disparities

  12. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and subclinical cerebrovascular disease: the WHIMS-MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, L H; Hogan, P E; Bryan, N R; Kuller, L H; Margolis, K L; Bettermann, K; Wallace, R B; Lao, Z; Freeman, R; Stefanick, M L; Shumaker, S A

    2009-01-13

    The Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS) hormone therapy (HT) trials reported that conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) with or without medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) increases risk for all-cause dementia and global cognitive decline. WHIMS MRI measured subclinical cerebrovascular disease as a possible mechanism to explain cognitive decline reported in WHIMS. We contacted 2,345 women at 14 WHIMS sites; scans were completed on 1,424 (61%) and 1,403 were accepted for analysis. The primary outcome measure was total ischemic lesion volume on brain MRI. Mean duration of on-trial HT or placebo was 4 (CEE+MPA) or 5.6 years (CEE-Alone) and scans were conducted an average of 3 (CEE+MPA) or 1.4 years (CEE-Alone) post-trial termination. Cross-sectional analysis of MRI lesions was conducted; general linear models were fitted to assess treatment group differences using analysis of covariance. A (two-tailed) critical value of alpha = 0.05 was used. In women evenly matched within trials at baseline, increased lesion volumes were significantly related to age, smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, lower post-trial global cognition scores, and increased incident cases of on- or post-trial mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia. Mean ischemic lesion volumes were slightly larger for the CEE+MPA group vs placebo, except for the basal ganglia, but the differences were not significant. Women assigned to CEE-Alone had similar mean ischemic lesion volumes compared to placebo. Conjugated equine estrogen-based hormone therapy was not associated with a significant increase in ischemic brain lesion volume relative to placebo. This finding was consistent within each trial and in pooled analyses across trials.

  13. Factors predicting cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease patients. Role of subclinical atheromatosis extent assessed by vascular ultrasound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Valdivielso

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD have an increased incidence of cardiovascular events (CVE. The contribution of subclinical atheromatosis extent, including femoral arteries, to CVE in CKD patients has not been investigated. In this paper, we examine the prognostic value of subclinical atheromatosis extent, assessed as the number of arterial territories with plaque, in predicting the incidence of major and minor CVE. The NEFRONA is a multicenter, prospective cohorts study that recruited 2445 CKD subjects and 559 controls, free from previous cardiovascular disease, in 81 medical centers across Spain. The presence of atheroma plaque was assessed by arterial ultrasound in ten arterial territories (carotid and femoral. The predictive power of the presence or absence of atheroma plaque in any territory was compared with the quantification of atheroma extent as the number of territories with plaque. During the median follow up of 48 months, 216 CVE were reported. Factors predicting the incidence of CVE in the whole cohort were being male, CKD patient, lower levels of 25(OH vitamin D, higher levels of cholesterol and the extent of subclinical atheromatosis, yielding a higher concordance (C index than the presence or absence of plaque. In stratified analysis including specific factors of CKD patients not on dialysis, the variables predicting CVE were the same as in the whole cohort, plus higher levels of potassium. Again, the inclusion of the information about atheromatosis as number of territories with plaque, presented a higher C index than the presence or absence of plaque. In the dialysis population, significant variables were older age, diabetes, dialysis vintage and higher levels of cholesterol and phosphate. In this case the higher C index was obtained with the information about plaque presence. Subclinical atheromatosis extent, including femoral arteries, influences CVE in CKD and its detection could improve the prediction of

  14. Factors predicting cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease patients. Role of subclinical atheromatosis extent assessed by vascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivielso, José M; Betriu, Angels; Martinez-Alonso, Montserrat; Arroyo, David; Bermudez-Lopez, Marcelino; Fernandez, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased incidence of cardiovascular events (CVE). The contribution of subclinical atheromatosis extent, including femoral arteries, to CVE in CKD patients has not been investigated. In this paper, we examine the prognostic value of subclinical atheromatosis extent, assessed as the number of arterial territories with plaque, in predicting the incidence of major and minor CVE. The NEFRONA is a multicenter, prospective cohorts study that recruited 2445 CKD subjects and 559 controls, free from previous cardiovascular disease, in 81 medical centers across Spain. The presence of atheroma plaque was assessed by arterial ultrasound in ten arterial territories (carotid and femoral). The predictive power of the presence or absence of atheroma plaque in any territory was compared with the quantification of atheroma extent as the number of territories with plaque. During the median follow up of 48 months, 216 CVE were reported. Factors predicting the incidence of CVE in the whole cohort were being male, CKD patient, lower levels of 25(OH) vitamin D, higher levels of cholesterol and the extent of subclinical atheromatosis, yielding a higher concordance (C) index than the presence or absence of plaque. In stratified analysis including specific factors of CKD patients not on dialysis, the variables predicting CVE were the same as in the whole cohort, plus higher levels of potassium. Again, the inclusion of the information about atheromatosis as number of territories with plaque, presented a higher C index than the presence or absence of plaque. In the dialysis population, significant variables were older age, diabetes, dialysis vintage and higher levels of cholesterol and phosphate. In this case the higher C index was obtained with the information about plaque presence. Subclinical atheromatosis extent, including femoral arteries, influences CVE in CKD and its detection could improve the prediction of cardiovascular events.

  15. Current MRI techniques for the assessment of renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takamune; Wang, Feng; Quarles, Christopher C

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decade, a variety of MRI methods have been developed and applied to many kidney diseases. These MRI techniques show great promise, enabling the noninvasive assessment of renal structure, function and injury in individuals. This review will highlight the current applications of functional MRI techniques for the assessment of renal disease and discuss future directions. Many pathological (functional and structural) changes or factors in renal disease can be assessed by advanced MRI techniques. These include renal vascular structure and function (contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial spin labelling), tissue oxygenation (blood oxygen level dependent MRI), renal tissue injury and fibrosis (diffusion or magnetization transfer imaging, magnetic resonance elastography), renal metabolism (chemical exchange saturation transfer, spectroscopic imaging), nephron endowment (cationic-contrast imaging), sodium concentration (23Na-MRI) and molecular events (targeted-contrast imaging). Current advances in MRI techniques have enabled the noninvasive investigation of renal disease. Further development, evaluation and application of the MRI techniques should facilitate better understanding and assessment of renal disease, and the development of new imaging biomarkers, enabling the intensified treatment of high-risk populations and a more rapid interrogation of novel therapeutic agents and protocols.

  16. Polycystic kidney disease and chronic renal failure in tuberous sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Mona; Dhakal, O P; Bhandari, Dhurba

    2013-10-02

    Tuberous sclerosis is a rare genetic disease which leads to formation of benign tumours in the brain and other organs of the body. It is a multisystem disease with various clinical manifestations. Renal angiomyolipomas are the most common renal manifestations whereas renal cell carcinoma is the least. Renal cysts are found in around 20% of the patients but polycystic kidney disease is present in less than 2% cases and is relatively rare manifestation of the disease. We present a case of tuberous sclerosis in a 60-year-old man who presented to the medicine outpatient department for routine evaluation of his hypertension. He was diagnosed as tuberous sclerosis. His ultrasound and CT scan of abdomen revealed polycystic kidney disease. His kidney function test and urine analysis were suggestive of chronic kidney disease.

  17. Imaging Manifestations of Hematologic Diseases with Renal and Perinephric Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purysko, Andrei S; Westphalen, Antonio C; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Leão Filho, Hilton M; Herts, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys and perinephric tissues can be affected by a variety of hematologic disorders, which usually occur in the setting of multisystem involvement. In many of these disorders, imaging is used to evaluate the extent of disease, guide biopsy, and/or monitor disease activity and patient response to therapy. Lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma commonly manifest as multiple parenchymal or perinephric lesions. Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease, rare forms of multisystemic histiocytosis, are often identified as perinephric and periureteral masses. Renal abnormalities depicted at imaging in patients with sickle cell disease include renal enlargement, papillary necrosis, and renal medullary carcinoma. Sickle cell disease, along with other causes of intravascular hemolysis, can also lead to hemosiderosis of the renal cortex. Thrombosis of renal veins is sometimes seen in patients with coagulation disorders but more often occurs in association with certain malignancies and nephrotic syndrome. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease is another multisystem process that often produces focal renal lesions, seen along with involvement of more characteristic organs such as the pancreas. Perinephric lesions with calcifications should raise the possibility of secondary amyloidosis, especially in patients with a history of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the imaging patterns of renal and perinephric involvement are usually not specific for a single entity, and the same entity can manifest with different or overlapping patterns, familiarity with these patterns and key clinical and histopathologic features may help to narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the next step of care. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  18. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sunil K; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  19. Childhood renal diseases in Benin-City: assessment of knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Childhood renal diseases (CRD) are commonly associated with few no specific symptoms and for the small fraction of such patients seen in orthodox health facilities, representing point of initial contact, it is expedient that they are adequately managed. The study therefore evaluates the management of childhood renal ...

  20. Pattern of Childhood Renal Diseases in Jos, Nigeria: A Preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Childhood kidney diseases remain important causes of significant morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. This is characterized by late presentation, missed diagnosis in certain cases and failure to offer renal replacement therapy to many renal failure patients who required it. Methodology: This was a retrospective ...

  1. Proteinuria and progression of renal disease : Therapeutic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gansevoort, RT; Navis, GJ; Wapstra, JH; de Jong, PE; de Zeeuw, D

    The relationship between proteinuria and progression of renal disease has long been an issue of debate. The present review deals with some of the recent publications on this topic. New concepts are emphasized: the possible causal role of proteinuria in the pathophysiology of progressive renal

  2. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical ...

  3. The role of complement in autoimmune renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seelen, M. A.; Daha, M. R.

    The predominance of renal involvement in autoimmune diseases can most likely be assigned to the specialised function of the kidneys filtrating over 120 ml plasma per minute. Complement activation by autoantibodies directed against planted antigens or antigens already present in renal tissue in the

  4. Common polymorphisms in CYP2C9, subclinical atherosclerosis and risk of ischemic vascular disease in 52,000 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, D; Bojesen, S E; Nordestgaard, B G

    2009-01-01

    -reactive protein), ischemic vascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, ischemic cerebrovascular disease and ischemic stroke) and death after an ischemic heart disease diagnosis. We genotyped the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a prospective study including 10 398 participants with 30-32 years....... Furthermore, the odds/hazard ratios for ischemic vascular disease did not differ from 1.0 for CYP2C9 carriers versus noncarriers. Finally, we found no altered risk of early death after a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. For all end points, we could exclude even minor changes in risk of disease with 90......Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) enzymes metabolize warfarin and arachidonic acid. We hypothesized that the CYP2C9(*)2 (rs.1799853) and CYP2C9(*)3 (rs.1057910) polymorphisms with decreased enzyme activity affect risk of subclinical atherosclerosis (reduced ankle brachial index and increased C...

  5. End stage renal disease in children: diagnosis, management, and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J H

    1996-01-01

    Chronic irreversible renal failure affects not only the child but the entire family. Physical, psychosocial, and financial challenges must be met and overcome. The primary goal is for the child to grow and develop as normally as possible, receiving the modality of treatment to best achieve this goal, with the fewest complications. Renal assessment includes a thorough history and physical exam, laboratory and radiological testing, and possibly a kidney biopsy. Causes of renal disease in children include congenital or genetic anomalies or conditions acquired after birth. When normal renal functions are impaired, clinical manifestations develop. Progression of chronic renal failure relates to the amount of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) remaining, and follows four stages, from early failure without symptoms, to end stage renal disease (ESRD) with many clinical symptoms of varying severity. In the final stage, renal replacement therapy by peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or renal transplantation is necessary to sustain life. Nursing goals and interventive measures include maintaining fluid, electrolyte, and acidbase balance, and blood pressure control; promoting adequate nutrition, growth, and development; preventing complications related to progressive renal failure or treatment modality; and providing educational and psychosocial support to the child and family.

  6. Subclinical Atherosclerosis is Weakly Associated with Lower Cognitive Function in Healthy Hyperhomocysteinemic Adults without Clinical Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Nicole M.; Henderson, Victor W.; St. John, Jan A.; McCleary, Carol; Detrano, Robert; Hodis, Howard N.; Mack, Wendy J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Atherosclerosis is the most common pathologic process underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is not well known whether subclinical atherosclerosis is an independent risk factor for lower cognitive function among individuals without clinically evident CVD. METHODS We examined cross-sectional associations between subclinical atherosclerosis and cognitive function in a community-based sample of otherwise healthy adults with plasma homocysteine ≥8.5 µmol/L enrolled in the BVAIT study (n=504, mean age 61 years). Carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), coronary (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcium (AAC) were used to measure subclinical atherosclerosis. Cognitive function was assessed with a battery of neuropsychological tests. A principal components analysis was used to extract five uncorrelated cognitive factors from scores on individual tests, and a measure of global cognition was derived. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the association between subclinical atherosclerosis and cognitive function, adjusting for other correlates of cognition. RESULTS Increasing thickness of CIMT was associated with significantly lower scores on the verbal learning factor (β = −0.07 per 0.1 mm increase CIMT [SE(β)=0.03], p=0.01). CAC and AAC were not individually associated with any of the cognitive factors. CONCLUSIONS This study provides evidence that increasing CIMT is weakly associated with lower verbal learning abilities but not global cognition in a population of otherwise healthy middle-to-older aged adults with elevated plasma homocysteine but without clinically evident CVD. The association between CIMT and poor verbal learning may pertain particularly to men. PMID:18836986

  7. Hypertension and renal disease : Role of microalbuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, WMT; deJong, PE; deZeeuw, D

    1996-01-01

    Risks associated with hypertension Hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular and possibly renal organ damage. Microalbuminuria is a newly recognized cardiovascular and renal risk factor in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. The prevalence of microalbuminuria is enhanced in hypertensive

  8. [Spectrum of renal manifestations in sickle cell disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazenave, Maud; Koehl, Bérengère; Nochy, Dominique; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Audard, Vincent

    2014-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common hemoglobinopathy, is an increasing cause of chronic kidney disease. In the last decade, we have witnessed a better understanding in the characterization of clinical manifestations and pathogenesis of sickle cell nephropathy. The spectrum of renal diseases during SCD includes various renal manifestations such as impairment of urinary concentrating ability, defect in urine acidification, renal papillary necrosis and proteinuria related to glomerular injury leading to progressive end-stage renal disease. Endothelial dysfunction related to chronic hemolysis and the relative renal hypoxia caused by vaso-occlusive sickle red blood cells are probably two key factors for SCN development. Optimal therapeutic management (including the use of blockers of the renin-angiotensin system) of patients with proteinuria remains to be determined. Renal replacement therapy with dialysis is required in SCD patients with end-stage renal disease but these patients should probably undergo kidney transplantation that requires careful management. Copyright © 2013 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Subclinical markers of cardiovascular disease predict adverse outcomes in chronic kidney disease patients with normal left ventricular ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulemane, Samir; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Bratsas, Athanasios; Grapsa, Julia; Brown, Edwina A; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2017-05-01

    Emerging cardiovascular biomarkers, such as speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) and aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), have recently demonstrated the presence of subclinical left ventricular dysfunction and arterial stiffening in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and no previous cardiovascular history. However, limited information exists on the prognostic impact of these biomarkers. We aimed to investigate whether STE and aPWV predict major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in this patient population. In this cohort study we prospectively analysed 106 CKD patients with no overt cardiovascular disease (CVD) and normal left ventricular ejection fraction. Cardiac deformation was measured using STE while aPWV was measured using arterial tonometry. The primary end-point was the composite of all-cause mortality, acute coronary syndrome, stable angina requiring revascularization (either using percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass surgery), hospitalization for heart failure and stroke. Over a median follow up period of 49 months (interquartile range 11-63 months), 26 patients (24.5%) reached the primary endpoint. In a multivariable Cox hazards model, global longitudinal strain (GLS) (HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.02-1.29, p = 0.041) and aPWV (HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.05-1.41, p = 0.021) were significant, independent predictors of MACE. GLS and aPWV independently predict MACE in CKD patients with normal EF and no clinically overt CVD.

  10. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 in patients with chronic schistosomiasis mansoni: evidences of subclinical renal inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia P Hanemann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate renal markers and the biomarker MCP-1 in patients with schistosomiasis mansoni. This is a cross-sectional study with 85 patients aged 5 to 48 years, with a confirmed diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni through the Kato-Katz method. The patients were divided in three groups: control (G-I; infected by S. mansoni before treatment (G-II and infected by S. mansoni after treatment (G-III. Renal function was evaluated by tubular and glomerular biomarkers and through urinary MCP-1. Patients' mean age was 23.2 ± 13 years. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding tubular and glomerular function evaluated through the traditional biomarkers. MCP-1 was higher in G-II and G-III, when compared to G-I; p=0.009 and p=0.007, respectively. There was no difference when comparing groups G-II and G-III (p=0.892. Although it was not different among the groups, there was a significant correlation between albuminuria and MCP-1. There was a significant increase in urinary MCP-1 levels in patients with schistosomiasis mansoni, which was associated with albuminuria. This protein has a role in the recruitment of monocytes to injury and inflammation sites . The increase of MCP-1 in the urine evidences that there is silent renal inflammation in these patients and the inflammatory status is not interrupted by specific treatment of the offending agent. Our findings suggest that urinary MCP-1 can be a sensitive marker of renal injury in patients with schistosomiasis mansoni.

  11. End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This final rule implements a case-mix adjusted bundled prospective payment system (PPS) for Medicare outpatient end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis facilities...

  12. End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Initiative promotes ongoing CMS strategies to improve the quality of care provided to ESRD patients. This initiative...

  13. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Radiographic evidence of chronic renal disease; (3) Autopsy report; (4) Physician summary report; (5) Hospital discharge summary report; (6) Hospital admitting report; or (7) Death certificate, provided that it is signed by a physician at the time of death. ...

  14. Transvascular lipoprotein transport in patients with chronic renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Krogsgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While increased plasma cholesterol is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor in the general population, this is not so among patients with chronic renal disease. We hypothesized that the transvascular lipoprotein transport, in addition to the lipoprotein concentration in plasma......, determines the degree of atherosclerosis among patients with chronic renal disease. METHODS: We used an in vivo method for measurement of transvascular transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in 21 patients with chronic renal disease and in 42 healthy control patients. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL...... was reinjected intravenously, and the 1-hour fractional escape rate was taken as index of transvascular transport. RESULTS: Transvascular LDL transport tended to be lower in patients with chronic renal disease than in healthy control patients [3.3 (95% CI 2.4-4.2) vs. 4.2 (3.7-4.2)%/hour; NS]. However...

  15. Hyperexpression of the granzyme B inhibitor PI-9 in human renal allografts: A potential mechanism for stable renal function in patients with subclinical rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowshani, Ajda T.; Florquin, Sandrine; Bemelman, Frederike; Kummer, J. Alain; Hack, C. Erik; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Granzyme B-positive T lymphocytes infiltrate renal allografts during acute cellular rejection and cause graft injury by inducing apoptosis of tubular cells. Protease inhibitor 9 (PI-9), an intracellular serpin that inhibits granzyme B, is known to protect cells from the action of

  16. Frequency and clinical predictors of coronary artery disease in chronic renal failure renal transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque Seixas, Emerson; Carmello, Beatriz Leone; Kojima, Christiane Akemi; Contti, Mariana Moraes; Modeli de Andrade, Luiz Gustavo; Maiello, José Roberto; Almeida, Fernando Antonio; Martin, Luis Cuadrado

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality in chronic renal failure patients before and after renal transplantation. Among them, coronary disease presents a particular risk; however, risk predictors have been used to diagnose coronary heart disease. This study evaluated the frequency and importance of clinical predictors of coronary artery disease in chronic renal failure patients undergoing dialysis who were renal transplant candidates, and assessed a previously developed scoring system. Coronary angiographies conducted between March 2008 and April 2013 from 99 candidates for renal transplantation from two transplant centers in São Paulo state were analyzed for associations between significant coronary artery diseases (≥70% stenosis in one or more epicardial coronary arteries or ≥50% in the left main coronary artery) and clinical parameters. Univariate logistic regression analysis identified diabetes, angina, and/or previous infarction, clinical peripheral arterial disease and dyslipidemia as predictors of coronary artery disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified only diabetes and angina and/or previous infarction as independent predictors. The results corroborate previous studies demonstrating the importance of these factors when selecting patients for coronary angiography in clinical pretransplant evaluation.

  17. Relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and subclinical coronary artery disease in long-term smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas; Køber, Lars; Pedersen, Jesper Holst

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular conditions are reported to be the most frequent cause of death in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unsettled whether severity of COPD per se is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) independent of traditional cardiovascular risk...

  18. Prevalence of subclinical ketosis and relationships with postpartum diseases in European dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, V S; Canelas-Raposo, J; Deniz, A; Heuwieser, W

    2013-05-01

    Subclinical ketosis (SCK) is defined as concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) ≥ 1.2 to 1.4 mmol/L and it is considered a gateway condition for other metabolic and infectious disorders such as metritis, mastitis, clinical ketosis, and displaced abomasum. Reported prevalence rates range from 6.9 to 43% in the first 2 mo of lactation. However, there is a dearth of information on prevalence rates considering the diversity of European dairy farms. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine prevalence of SCK, (2) identify thresholds of BHBA, and (3) study their relationships with postpartum metritis, clinical ketosis, displaced abomasum, lameness, and mastitis in European dairy farms. From May to October 2011, a convenience sample of 528 dairy herds from Croatia, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, and Turkey was studied. β-Hydroxybutyrate levels were measured in 5,884 cows with a handheld meter within 2 to 15 d in milk (DIM). On average, 11 cows were enrolled per farm and relevant information (e.g., DIM, postpartum diseases, herd size) was recorded. Using receiver operator characteristic curve analyses, blood BHBA thresholds were determined for the occurrence of metritis, mastitis, clinical ketosis, displaced abomasum, and lameness. Multivariate binary logistic regression models were built for each disease, considering cow as the experimental unit and herd as a random effect. Overall prevalence of SCK (i.e., blood BHBA ≥ 1.2 mmol/L) within 10 countries was 21.8%, ranging from 11.2 to 36.6%. Cows with SCK had 1.5, 9.5, and 5.0 times greater odds of developing metritis, clinical ketosis, and displaced abomasum, respectively. Multivariate binary logistic regression models demonstrated that cows with blood BHBA levels of ≥ 1.4, ≥ 1.1 and ≥ 1.7 mmol/L during 2 to 15 DIM had 1.7, 10.5, and 6.9 times greater odds of developing metritis, clinical ketosis, and displaced abomasum, respectively, compared with cows with lower

  19. Target organ damage assessment in French hypertensive patients without established cardiovascular or renal disease: results of the PREVENT-A study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Patrick; Hosseini, Kossar; Tropeano, Anne-Isabelle; Fay, Renaud; Tsatsaris, Anne; Guillemin, Francis; Mounier-Vehier, Claire

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the modalities of subclinical target organ damage (TOD) assessment in France, 2-3 years after publication of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2007 guidelines. Two parallel, large, cross-sectional surveys were performed in representative samples of 516 private practice cardiologists, and 943 general practitioners (GPs), in hypertensive patients (952 and 1778, respectively) without established cardiovascular or renal disease. At least one TOD search was performed in 97.6% of cardiologists' patients, performed or ongoing in 96.1% of GPs' patients, with a median number of three TOD searches in both surveys. Only 8.6% of cardiologists' patients and 6.3% of GPs' patients had a full set of TOD analyses [i.e. the five categories investigated: left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), vascular, renal, retinopathy and cerebrovascular]. When considering the three priority categories of subclinical TOD search recommended by the ESH/ESC guidelines (i.e. LVH, vascular and renal), 63.2% of cardiologists' patients and 49.5% of GPs' patients had this triple assessment completed. The new TOD assessment modalities, namely pulse wave velocity, ankle brachial index and microalbuminuria, were rarely used. Only 3.3% of GPs' patients and 15.4% of cardiologists' patients were reclassified with an upgraded cardiovascular risk. Subclinical TOD modalities are commonly assessed in French hypertensive patients without established cardiovascular or renal diseases, although 55% still do not benefit from combined triple LVH, macrovascular and renal assessment. The new modalities of TOD assessment are rarely implemented. Moreover, TOD assessment displayed poor effectiveness in upgrading cardiovascular risk classification.

  20. Amygdalin inhibits renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junqi; Wu, Weizheng; Sheng, Mingxiong; Yang, Shunliang; Tan, Jianming

    2013-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic renal diseases. Amygdalin is one of a number of nitrilosides, the natural cyanide‑containing substances abundant in the seeds of plants of the prunasin family that are used to treat cancer and relieve pain. However, whether amygdalin inhibits the progression of renal fibrosis or not remains unknown. The present study aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of amygdalin by investigating its effect and potential mechanism on the activation of renal interstitial fibroblast cells and renal fibrosis in rat unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Treatment of the cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts with amygdalin inhibited their proliferation and the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1. In the rat model of obstructive nephropathy, following ureteral obstruction, the administration of amygdalin immediately eliminated the extracellular matrix accumulation and alleviated the renal injury on the 21st day. Collectively, amygdalin attenuated kidney fibroblast (KFB) activation and rat renal interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that amygdalin is a potent antifibrotic agent that may have therapeutic potential for patients with fibrotic kidney diseases.

  1. Isolated sarcoid renal granulomatous tubulointerstitial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Abdel Ghani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old lady presented with hypercalcemia and acute renal impairment. She had no previous medical problems apart from the use of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for nonspecific body pains. Her abdominal ultrasound scan as well as urine studies were nonspecific. Further workup for hypercalcemia (skeletal survey, high resolution computed tomography (CT of the chest and abdomen, purified protein derivative (PPD test, serum protein electrophoresis, tumor markers, immunology screening, and Bence Jones proteinuria was negative. Serum angiotensin converting enzyme was high. Renal biopsy showed extensive lymphocytes and multinucleated giant cells infiltration forming interstitial non necrotizing granulomata. Immune staining as well as staining for acid fast bacilli was negative. The possibility of sarcoid renal granulomata was raised and the patient was started on oral prednisolone with subsequent normalization of renal functions and serum calcium after one month of treatment.

  2. Pregnancy outcomes among renal transplant recipients and patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliem, Sara; Patenaude, Valerie; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of our study is to compare pregnancy outcomes between women with a functioning renal transplant and women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We carried out a population-based retrospective cohort study using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2006 to 2011. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the age-adjusted effect of functioning renal transplant vs. ESRD requiring dialysis on pregnancy outcomes. We identified 264 birth records to women with a functional renal transplant and 267 birth records to women with ESRD on dialysis among 5,245,452 births. As compared to women with ESRD on dialysis, renal transplant recipients were less likely to have placental abruption [odds ratio, OR 0.23 (95% confidence interval, CI 0.08-0.70)], to receive blood transfusions [OR 0.17 (95% CI 0.09-0.30)], and to have growth-restricted and small-for-gestational-age babies [OR 0.45 (95% CI 0.23-0.85)]. Renal transplant recipients were more likely to have an instrumental delivery [OR 15.38 (95% CI 1.92-123.3)]. Among renal transplant women, there was a trend towards delivery by cesarean section as compared to patients with ESRD [OR 1.31 (95% CI 0.93-1.85)]. However, these results were not statistically significant. Fetal deaths were less likely to occur in women with a renal transplant [OR 0.41 (95% CI 0.17-0.96)]. There were four maternal deaths among patients with ESRD on dialysis and no maternal deaths among renal transplant patients. Patients with a functional renal graft had an overall lower rate of morbidity and adverse pregnancy complications when compared to patients with ESRD on dialysis.

  3. Renal Tubular Dysfunction in Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo B. Silva Junior

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Kidney abnormalities are one of the main chronic complications of sickle cell disease (SCD. The aim of this study is to investigate the occurrence of renal tubular abnormalities among patients with SCD. Methods: This is a prospective study with 26 SCD adult patients in Brazil. Urinary acidification and concentration tests were performed using calcium chloride (CaCl2, after a 12h period of water and food deprivation. Fractional excretion of sodium (FENa, transtubular potassium gradient (TTKG and solute free water reabsorption (TcH2O were calculated. The SCD group was compared to a group of 15 healthy volunteers (control group. Results: Patient`s average age and gender were similar to controls. Urinary acidification deficit was found in 10 SCD patients (38.4%, who presented urinary pH >5.3 after CaCl2 test. Urinary osmolality was significantly lower in SCD patients (355±60 vs. 818±202mOsm/kg, p=0.0001, after 12h period water deprivation. Urinary concentration deficit was found in all SCD patients (100%. FENa was higher among SCD patients (0.75±0.3 vs. 0.55±0.2%, p=0.02. The TTKG was higher in SCD patients (5.5±2.5 vs. 3.0±1.5, p=0.001, and TcH2O was lower (0.22±0.3 vs. 1.1±0.3L/day, p=0.0001. Conclusions: SCD is associated with important kidney dysfunction. The main abnormalities found were urinary concentrating and incomplete distal acidification defect. There was also an increase in the potassium transport and decrease in water reabsorption, evidencing the occurrence of distal tubular dysfunction.

  4. The glycocalyx-linking albuminuria with renal and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabelink, Ton J.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Albuminuria is commonly used as a marker of kidney disease progression, but some evidence suggests that albuminuria also contributes to disease progression by inducing renal injury in specific disease conditions. Studies have confirmed that in patients with cardiovascular risk factors, such as

  5. Microalbuminuria Represents a Feature of Advanced Renal Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opsig

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... complications related to the disease and current treatment were collected. Microalbuminuria was ... ently (e.g. hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiac diseases, primary renal diseases, malaria, HIV in- .... hypertrophy, glomerulosclerosis and then to pro- teinuria. Theoretically, increase in the glomerular fil-.

  6. Prospective study on late consequences of subclinical non-compliance with immunosuppressive therapy in renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaminck, Hans; Maes, Bart; Evers, Georges; Verbeke, Geert; Lerut, Evelyne; Van Damme, Boudewijn; Vanrenterghem, Yves

    2004-09-01

    In this prospective study we compared the incidence of late acute rejections (LAR) and changes in serum-creatinine over time between compliers and noncompliers with immunosuppressive therapy more than 1 year post transplantation and explored the relative contribution of non-compliance and other risk factors in the occurrence of LAR. One hundred and forty-six adult renal transplant recipients were followed during a 5-year period. Patients were interviewed at the beginning of the study and categorized as non-compliers if they admitted to have skipped immunosuppressive medication on a regular basis during the previous 12 months. The occurrence of LAR during the follow-up period was recorded. We identified 22.6% non-compliers of which 21.2% experienced a late acute rejection compared with 8% in the group of compliers at 5 years postinclusion (p risk of LAR (Cox regression analysis, p = 0.005). Non-compliers experienced a higher increase in serum-creatinine over time (Linear Mixed Models, p Non-compliance in renal transplant patients more than 1-year post transplantation is associated with an increased risk for LAR and a higher increase in serum-creatinine during the following 5 years. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Munksgaard

  7. Epidemic renal disease of unknown etiology in the Zuni Indians

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    Hoy, W.E.; Megill, D.M.; Hughson, M.D.

    1987-06-01

    An epidemic of renal disease is occurring among the Zuni Indians in western New Mexico. In 1985, 1.6% of Zunis had clinically recognized renal disease and 1% had renal insufficiency. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 1984 and 1985 was 14 times the rate for US whites, and three times the rates of other Indians in ESRD network 6. One third of the cases of renal disease and ESRD is due to type 2 diabetes, but the etiology of disease in most of the remainder is unknown. Affected subjects range from early childhood to old age. Early signs are hematuria, mild to moderate proteinuria, normal BP, and low total hemolytic complement, normal or low C3 and C4 levels, in about 40% of the cases. The clinical course varies from benign to rapidly progressive renal failure. Biopsies usually reflect an immune-complex mediated mesangiopathic glomerulonephritis, with IgA, IgG, IgM, and C3 variably present in the mesangium. In some cases, there is a very strong familial pattern suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance or a marked communal exposure effect. This may be a genetic disease educed by the consanguinity in the ethnically homogeneous Zuni population. Mesangiopathic renal disease is common in some Oriental populations, and this phenomenon may reflect the American Indians' Oriental ancestry. This disease may also be due to toxic exposures related to jewelry-making, potting, Zuni water, Zuni salt, or herbal or other products used for medicinal or religious purposes. This epidemic is causing much morbidity and generating huge costs for ESRD treatment. Further study is needed to better understand its etiology.

  8. Circulating neuregulin 4 levels are inversely associated with subclinical cardiovascular disease in obese adults

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Jiang; Mingzhu Lin; Yanfang Xu; Jin Shao; Xuejun Li; Huijie Zhang; Shuyu Yang

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (Nrg4) has been identified as a new secreted adipokine that may protect against development of obesity and metabolic disorders. However, information is not available regarding the association between circulating Nrg4 and subclinical atherosclerosis in humans. We measured serum Nrg4 in 485 obese adult subjects (aged 40 years or older) who had the measurement of carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) recruited from the community. Individuals with increased CIMT and carotid plaque ha...

  9. Lipid and other management to improve arterial disease and survival in end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmitt, Simon B; Martin, Jennifer H

    2017-03-01

    Arterial disease is common in advancing renal failure, culminating in myocardial infarction with cardiac failure, strokes and peripheral and renal artery disease. Attention to cardiac and arterial disease may slow deterioration of renal function. Management of risk factors can reduce these sequelae. Areas covered: Modifiable risk factors for arterial disease and relevant pharmacotherapies. Expert opinion: Cardiovascular disease is the biggest killer in renal failure. Statins are viewed as essential in symptomatic coronary disease and have been shown in non-renal patients to improve survival after myocardial infarction. Cochrane recommends statins in renal failure but not in end stage renal disease or transplant patients. Large well powered clinical trials focussed specifically on renal patients failed to demonstrate cardiovascular outcome or mortality benefits of statins when compared to placebo. Other lipid lowering pharmacotherapies are weaker and adverse effects may account for the absence of net clinical benefit in non-renal patients in published clinical trials. Patients should be started on a statin after myocardial infarction, regardless of lipid levels, but the risk of adverse effects in advanced renal failure with its comorbidities predicates employing only essential doses. Optimal antihypertensive and antithrombotic pharmacotherapy are also priorities.

  10. Wnt and planar cell polarity signaling in cystic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggolidou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    Cystic kidney diseases can cause end stage renal disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. They may arise early or later in life, are characterized by a spectrum of symptoms and can be caused by diverse genetic defects. The primary cilium, a microtubule-based organelle that can serve as a signaling antenna, has been demonstrated to have a significant role in ensuring correct kidney development and function. In the kidney, one of the signaling pathways that requires the cilium for normal development is Wnt signaling. In this review, the roles of primary cilia in relation to canonical and non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling in cystic renal disease are described. The evidence of the associations between cilia, Wnt signaling and cystic renal disease is discussed and the significance of planar cell polarity-related mechanisms in cystic kidney disease is presented. Although defective Wnt signaling is not the only cause of renal disease, research is increasingly highlighting its importance, encouraging the development of Wnt-associated diagnostic and prognostic tools for cystic renal disease.

  11. Serum lipoprotein changes in dogs with renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling-Kelly, E

    2014-01-01

    People with renal disease develop a dyslipidemia that contributes to progression of renal injury and development of cardiovascular disease. Lipoproteins in dogs with renal disease have not been investigated. Dogs with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have dyslipidemia characterized by increased lower density lipoproteins and decreased high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). The degree of dyslipidemia is positively correlated with severity of disease, as reflected by serum creatinine concentration. Prospective study of client-owned dogs presented to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals: 29 dogs with confirmed CKD, 5 dogs with nephrotic syndrome (NS), and 12 healthy control dogs presented for routine vaccinations, dental cleaning, or owned by students. Lipoprotein electrophoresis was used to quantify relative proportions of the 3 main classes of lipoproteins in canine serum: low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and HDL. Serum cholesterol and creatinine concentrations; urinalysis and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured by standard methods. Dyslipidemia was consistently found in dogs with CKD and NS and was characterized by a decrease in HDL and variable increases in LDL and VLDL. Dogs with NS had a proportionately greater increase in the VLDL fraction, as compared with dogs with CKD. Dyslipidemia similar to that documented in people with renal disease occurs in dogs with CKD, despite serum cholesterol concentrations often being within the reference interval. The contribution of altered lipoproteins to the pathogenesis of renal disease in dogs warrants additional study. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. [Major complications of acquired renal cystic disease: Wünderlich syndrome and papilar carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Zarco, Enrique; Vallejo-Benítez, Ana; Delgado Cotán, Antonio; Pereira-Gallardo, Sofía

    2017-07-01

    We report a case of acquired renal cystic disease associated with renal dialysis and endstage renal disease. The patient suffered the two major complications related with acquired renal cystic disease; hemorrhage and renal carcinoma. Our case is a patient with acquired renal cystic disease, single kidney after surgery for renal clear cell carcinoma four years earlier, who developed a Wünderlich syndrome (WS). The histological study of the nephrectomy specimen showed a renal papillary carcinoma in the context of acquired renal cystic disease after surgery for a WS. Renal hemorrhage is a serious complication that can lead to a fatal outcome. Patients undergoing dialysis should be monitored actively due to the risk of developing acquired renal cystic disease and associated complications.

  13. Renal involvement of mantle cell lymphona leading to end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Seo, Jong Woo; Cho, Hyun Seop; Kang, Yeojin; Bae, Eun Jin; Lee, Dong Won; Jeon, Dae-Hong; Lee, Jong Sil; Chang, Se-Ho; Park, Dong Jun

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), owing to its insensitivity to chemotherapy, has a poor prognosis, with a median survival of 3 years to 4 years. MCL frequently infiltrates other organs. However, reports involving kidney in living patients are rare. Here, we report a case of MCL with renal involvement leading to end stage renal disease that required renal replacement therapy. A 69-year-old man diagnosed with MCL 3 years earlier was admitted to our emergency room due to uremic symptoms. After eight cycles of chemotherapy, he had displayed complete remission, but experienced a recurrence 1.5 years later; after refusing chemotherapy, the patient was lost on follow-up in the final 10 months. On presentation at the emergency room, the patient's serum blood urea nitrogen was 109.5 mg/dL, and creatinine was 11.1 mg/dL. All serological markers for secondary glomerulonephritis were negative. Renal biopsy revealed 50% sclerosis of the glomerulus and small dense lymphocyte infiltration of the tubulo-interstitium. Similar cells were found on the gastric mucosa. Despite our recommendation for chemotherapy, he refused all treatments except for hemodialysis, which was maintained for 12 months until his death. This patient represents the first case report of the renal involvement of MCL leading to end stage renal disease.

  14. Renal tissue oxygenation in essential hypertension and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruijm, Menno; Hofmann, Lucie; Vogt, Bruno; Muller, Marie-Eve; Piskunowicz, Maciej; Stuber, Matthias; Burnier, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that renal tissue hypoxia plays an important role in the development of renal damage in hypertension and renal diseases, yet human data were scarce due to the lack of noninvasive methods. Over the last decade, blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI), detecting deoxyhemoglobin in hypoxic renal tissue, has become a powerful tool to assess kidney oxygenation noninvasively in humans. This paper provides an overview of BOLD-MRI studies performed in patients suffering from essential hypertension or chronic kidney disease (CKD). In line with animal studies, acute changes in cortical and medullary oxygenation have been observed after the administration of medication (furosemide, blockers of the renin-angiotensin system) or alterations in sodium intake in these patient groups, underlining the important role of renal sodium handling in kidney oxygenation. In contrast, no BOLD-MRI studies have convincingly demonstrated that renal oxygenation is chronically reduced in essential hypertension or in CKD or chronically altered after long-term medication intake. More studies are required to clarify this discrepancy and to further unravel the role of renal oxygenation in the development and progression of essential hypertension and CKD in humans.

  15. Renal Tissue Oxygenation in Essential Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menno Pruijm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal studies suggest that renal tissue hypoxia plays an important role in the development of renal damage in hypertension and renal diseases, yet human data were scarce due to the lack of noninvasive methods. Over the last decade, blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI, detecting deoxyhemoglobin in hypoxic renal tissue, has become a powerful tool to assess kidney oxygenation noninvasively in humans. This paper provides an overview of BOLD-MRI studies performed in patients suffering from essential hypertension or chronic kidney disease (CKD. In line with animal studies, acute changes in cortical and medullary oxygenation have been observed after the administration of medication (furosemide, blockers of the renin-angiotensin system or alterations in sodium intake in these patient groups, underlining the important role of renal sodium handling in kidney oxygenation. In contrast, no BOLD-MRI studies have convincingly demonstrated that renal oxygenation is chronically reduced in essential hypertension or in CKD or chronically altered after long-term medication intake. More studies are required to clarify this discrepancy and to further unravel the role of renal oxygenation in the development and progression of essential hypertension and CKD in humans.

  16. Does subclinical atherosclerosis burden identify the increased risk of cardiovascular disease mortality among United Kingdom Indian Asians? A population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Navtej S; Lim, Tiong K; Jain, Piyush; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Senior, Roxy

    2011-09-01

    Indian Asians living in the United Kingdom have a >50% higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death compared with native European whites. The mechanisms underlying their excess mortality are not clear, and there are no validated tools capable of identifying this increased risk. The burden of subclinical atherosclerosis detected in the carotid arteries is an established prognosticator for major CVD events. We hypothesized that the increased prevalence of CVD among Indian Asians would be reflected by their having a greater burden of subclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis compared with European whites. We studied 2,288 healthy subjects and 148 patients with known CVD from the London Life Sciences Prospective Population study who underwent carotid ultrasonography for assessment of intima-media thickness (IMT), plaque prevalence, and plaque echogenicity. The prevalence of CVD was significantly higher among Indian Asians compared with European whites (odds ratio 1.72, 95% CI 1.2-2.3). Intima-media thickness was slightly higher in European whites compared with that of Indian Asians (0.66 vs 0.65 mm, P = .06), reflecting their higher Framingham Risk Score. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, there were no significant differences in IMT, plaque prevalence, or plaque echogenicity between the 2 ethnic groups regardless of CVD status. The burden of carotid atherosclerosis does not identify the markedly increased risk of CVD among United Kingdom Indian Asians. Other markers and mechanisms of disease require investigation in this high-risk group. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Estatinas na doença renal crônica Statins in chronic renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia R. C. Ferreira

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Hipertrigliceridemia e o HDL baixo são aspectos comuns em pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica. A mortalidade cardiovascular está substancialmente aumentada na presença de doença renal crônica (10-20 vezes maior. Existem evidências de estudos clínicos com estatinas sugerindo uma ação protetora dessas drogas na progressão da doença renal. Além disso, pacientes pós-transplante renal recebendo fluvastatina, experimentaram redução na incidência de infartos não fatais e de mortalidade cardíaca. Entretanto, um estudo recente com atorvastatina não demonstrou reduções na morbi-mortalidade cardiovascular entre pacientes diabéticos em hemodiálise. Estudos em andamento definirão o preciso papel das estatinas neste grupo especial de pacientes.Hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-c are common features in patients with chronic renal failure. Cardiovascular mortality is substantially increased in the presence of chronic renal disease (10-20 times higher. There is evidence from clinical trials with statins suggesting their protective role in the progression of renal disease. In addition, reduced rates of non-fatal myocardial infarction and cardiac mortality were seen after renal transplant in patients receiving fluvastatin. However, a recent study with atorvastatin failed to demonstrate reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients on hemodyalisis therapy. Ongoing trials will define the precise role of statins in this subset of patients.

  18. Fast renal decline to end-stage renal disease: an unrecognized feature of nephropathy in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolewski, Andrzej S; Skupien, Jan; Rossing, Peter; Warram, James H

    2017-06-01

    A new model of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes emerged from our studies of Joslin Clinic patients. The dominant feature is progressive renal decline, not albuminuria. This decline is a unidirectional process commencing while patients have normal renal function and, in the majority, progressing steadily (linearly) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While an individual's rate of renal decline is constant, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope varies widely among individuals from -72 to -3.0 ml/min/year. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines define rapid progression as rate of eGFR declines > 5 ml/min/year, a value exceeded by 80% of patients in Joslin's type 1 diabetes ESRD cohort. The extraordinary range of slopes within the rapid progression category prompted us to partition it into "very fast," "fast" and "moderate" decline. We showed, for the first time, that very fast and fast decline from normal eGFR to ESRD within 2 to 10 years constitutes 50% of the Joslin cohort. In this review we present data about frequency of fast decliners in both diabetes types, survey some mechanisms underlying fast renal decline, discuss methods of identifying patients at risk and comment on the need for effective therapeutic interventions. Whether the initiating mechanism of fast renal decline affects glomerulus, tubule, interstitium or vasculature is unknown. Since no animal model mimics progressive renal decline, studies in humans are needed. Prospective studies searching for markers predictive of the rate of renal decline yield findings that may make detection of fast decliners feasible. Identifying such patients will be the foundation for developing effective individualized methods to prevent or delay onset of ESRD in diabetes. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. NT-proBNP, echocardiographic abnormalities and subclinical coronary artery disease in high risk type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Henrik; Hansen, Peter R; Wiinberg, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Intensive multifactorial treatment aimed at prevention of cardiovascular (CV) disease may reduce left ventricular (LV) echocardiographic abnormalities in diabetic subjects. Plasma N-terminal (NT)-proBNP predicts CV mortality in diabetic patients but the association between P-NT-proBNP and the put......Intensive multifactorial treatment aimed at prevention of cardiovascular (CV) disease may reduce left ventricular (LV) echocardiographic abnormalities in diabetic subjects. Plasma N-terminal (NT)-proBNP predicts CV mortality in diabetic patients but the association between P......-NT-proBNP and the putative residual abnormalities in such patients are not well described. This study examined echocardiographic measurements of LV hypertrophy, atrial dilatation and LV dysfunction and their relation to P-NT-proBNP levels or subclinical coronary artery disease (CAD) in type 2 diabetic patients...

  20. Renal Impairment and Cardiovascular Disease in HIV-Positive Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Lundgren, Jens D; Ross, Mike

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While the association between renal impairment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established in the general population, the association remains poorly understood in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. METHODS: Individuals with ≥2 estimated glomerular...... relation between confirmed impaired eGFR and CVD was observed. This finding highlights the need for renal preventive measures and intensified monitoring for emerging CVD, particularly in older individuals with continuously low eGFRs....

  1. Characteristics and survival of patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida in the United States renal data system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Lijing; Bolen, Julie; Valdez, Rodolfo; Joseph, David; Baum, Michelle A; Thibadeau, Judy

    2015-02-01

    We describe the characteristics, treatments and survival of patients with spina bifida in whom end stage renal disease developed from 2004 through 2008 in the United States Renal Data System. We used ICD-9-CM code 741.* to identify individuals with spina bifida using hospital inpatient data from 1977 to 2010, and physician and facility claims from 2004 to 2008. We constructed a 5:1 comparison group of patients with end stage renal disease without spina bifida matched by age at first end stage renal disease service, gender and race/ethnicity. We assessed the risk of mortality and of renal transplantation while on dialysis using multivariate cause specific proportional hazards survival analysis. We also compared survival after the first renal transplant from the first end stage renal disease service to August 2011. We identified 439 patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida in whom end stage renal disease developed at an average younger age than in patients without spina bifida (41 vs 62 years, p spina bifida those who had spina bifida showed a similar mortality hazard on dialysis and after transplantation. However, patients with end stage renal disease without spina bifida were more likely to undergo renal transplantation than patients with spina bifida (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.13-2.03). Hospitalizations related to urinary tract infections were positively associated with the risk of death on dialysis in patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida (HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.33-1.53). Spina bifida was not associated with increased mortality in patients with end stage renal disease on dialysis or after renal transplantation. Proper urological and bladder management is imperative in patients with spina bifida, particularly in adults. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Urinary protein excretion profile: A contribution for subclinical renal damage identification among environmental heavy metals exposure in Southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlipp, C. R.; Bottini, P. V.; de Capitan, E. M.; Pinho, M. C.; Panzan, A. D. N.; Sakuma, A. M. A.; Paoliello, M. B.

    2003-05-01

    In Southeast Brazil. Ribeira Valley region has been a major public health concern due to he environmental heavy metals contamination indexes of vegetation, rocks and aquifers, caused by locai mining in the past. Human contamination low levels of heavy rnetals doesn't cause acute intoxication but ni chronic exposure, renal damage may occur with progressive tubuJointerstitial changes evolvil1g to glomemlar 1esiol1, ln this stndy we invesligated the relationship between thc profile of utillan, excreted proteins (glomerular or lubular origin) of arsenic and mercury and blood lead concentration in chiJdren and adults from highly e) qJosed regions of the Ribeira Valley. The subjects were classieed as GROUP 1 (GI; higher environmental risk n=333) and GROUP 2 (G2; lower risk of contamination. n=104). In order to determine the urinary excretion of total protein, albumin (MA, glomerular marker) and alpha i microglobulin (AIM, tubular marker) and the blood lead concentrations. random wine and blood samples were obtaiiied. Plasmatic lead levels were assessed by atomic absorption spectrometty with graphite fumace. Totai protein concentration (PROT) was assessed on a biochemical analyzer ,progallol red method). MA and AIM were determined by nephelometric method. Croup 1 showcd a higher frequency of altered urinary excretion of PROT (GI=3.4%; G2=1.0%), MA (Gl=9.0%; G2=5.1%) and AIM (Gt=7.5%, G2=3.8%), without significant differences between both groups. Elevated arscnic levels were more prevaient among subjects from Group 1 (2.8.8%) and demonstrated a significant corrolation with abiiormal iirinarv excretion of ilbumin and alpha-l-micrglobulin (p=0.019).Leadaand mercury levels showed no difference among the groups and no correlation will MAa and/or M. Oti-c dala suggests that abnormal itrinary protein excretion is relatively frequent in this population independently of the plasmatic or urinaryl heavy metal levels. The early detection of possible renal damage become necessary for

  3. End-stage renal disease secondary to renal malignancy: Epidemiologic trends and survival outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kevin A; Vourganti, Srinivas; Syed, Jamil S; Luciano, Randy; Campbell, Steven C; Shuch, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Loss of renal parenchyma after surgery may contribute to chronic kidney disease; however, the long-term consequences of chronic kidney disease may differ by cause. We analyzed the outcomes of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) based on various medical and surgical causes. In the United States Renal Data System from the period 1983 to 2007, patients with renal tumors, traumatic surgical loss, diabetes, or other known causes were identified. The annual incidence, prevalence, and influence of age, race, sex, and primary cause on survival were evaluated. Of 1.3 million patients, 6,812 (0.49%) had renal malignancy-related ESRD (RM-ESRD). An increased over time was noted in the standardized incidence rates of patients with RM-ESRD (R2 = 0.973, Prenal cell carcinoma treatment. Although overall survival for RM-ESRD was worse than either that of nonmalignant surgical loss or other known causes, non-cancer-specific mortality was decreased compared to diabetic causes, likely due to systemic effects by cause of ESRD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Renal disease pathophysiology and treatment: contributions from the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J. Mullins

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rat has classically been the species of choice for pharmacological studies and disease modeling, providing a source of high-quality physiological data on cardiovascular and renal pathophysiology over many decades. Recent developments in genome engineering now allow us to capitalize on the wealth of knowledge acquired over the last century. Here, we review rat models of hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and acute and chronic kidney disease. These models have made important contributions to our understanding of renal diseases and have revealed key genes, such as Ace and P2rx7, involved in renal pathogenic processes. By targeting these genes of interest, researchers are gaining a better understanding of the etiology of renal pathologies, with the promised potential of slowing disease progression or even reversing the damage caused. Some, but not all, of these target genes have proved to be of clinical relevance. However, it is now possible to generate more sophisticated and appropriate disease models in the rat, which can recapitulate key aspects of human renal pathology. These advances will ultimately be used to identify new treatments and therapeutic targets of much greater clinical relevance.

  5. Renal disease pathophysiology and treatment: contributions from the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Linda J; Conway, Bryan R; Menzies, Robert I; Denby, Laura; Mullins, John J

    2016-12-01

    The rat has classically been the species of choice for pharmacological studies and disease modeling, providing a source of high-quality physiological data on cardiovascular and renal pathophysiology over many decades. Recent developments in genome engineering now allow us to capitalize on the wealth of knowledge acquired over the last century. Here, we review rat models of hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and acute and chronic kidney disease. These models have made important contributions to our understanding of renal diseases and have revealed key genes, such as Ace and P2rx7, involved in renal pathogenic processes. By targeting these genes of interest, researchers are gaining a better understanding of the etiology of renal pathologies, with the promised potential of slowing disease progression or even reversing the damage caused. Some, but not all, of these target genes have proved to be of clinical relevance. However, it is now possible to generate more sophisticated and appropriate disease models in the rat, which can recapitulate key aspects of human renal pathology. These advances will ultimately be used to identify new treatments and therapeutic targets of much greater clinical relevance. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Developing a provisional and national renal disease registry for Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ajami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease registry is a database that includes information about people suffering a special kind of disease. The aim of this study was to first identify and compare the National Renal Disease Registry (NRDR characteristics in some countries with Iran; and second, develop a provisional and NRDR for Iran. Materials and Methods: Retrieval of data of the NRDR was performed by scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Renal Disease charity, and data registries in the United States, United Kingdom, Malaysia, and Iran. This research was applied, and the study was descriptive-comparative. The study population consisted of the NRDR in selected countries in which data were collected by forms that were designed according to the study objectives. Sources of data were researchers, articles, books, journals, databases, websites, related documents, and people who are active in this regard, and related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and patient support charity. The researchers collected data for each country based on the study objectives and then put them in comparative tables. Data were analyzed by descriptive, comparative, and theoretical methods. Results: Most of the renal transplant teams report their own results as a single center experiences. America and Britain have a preeminent national registry of renal disease compared to other countries. Conclusion: Given that control, prevention, and treatment of chronic renal diseases incur high expenses and the disease is one of leading mortality factors in Iran and across the world and since national registry system for chronic renal diseases can provide better tools and strategies to manage and evaluate patients′ characteristics as well as risk factors which eventually leads to making better decisions.

  7. Diet-sensitive prognostic markers for cardiovascular and renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riphagen, Ineke Jowanna

    2016-01-01

    Diet plays a relevant role in the development and progression of lifestyle-related diseases like hypertension and type 2 diabetes and the subsequent risk of cardiovascular and renal disease. Riphagen used several diet-sensitive biomarkers to further explore the effects of diet on cardiovascular and

  8. Nanomedicines for renal disease: current status and future applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamaly, Nazila; He, John C.; Ausiello, Dennis A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment and management of kidney disease currently presents an enormous global burden, and the application of nanotechnology principles to renal disease therapy, although still at an early stage, has profound transformative potential. The increasing translation of nanomedicines to the clinic, a...

  9. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Imberti

    Full Text Available New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration.

  10. Growth retardation in children with chronic renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the management of children with chronic renal disease (CRD, growth retardation remains its most visible comorbid condition. Growth retardation has adverse impact on morbidity and mortality rates, quality of life and education, and in adult patients on job family life, and independent leaving accomodation. Pathophysiology of impaired growth in CRD is complex and still not fully understood. The following complications are: anorexia, malnutrition, inflammation, decreased residual renal function, dialysis frequency and adequacy, renal anemia, metabolic acidosis, fluid/electrolyte imbalance, renal osteodistrophy, growth hormone (GH and insulin-like growth factor -1 (IGF-1 resistance. Malnutrition is most frequent and most important factor contributing to the degree of growth retardation in infancy. The degree of renal dysfunction is the major determinant of variability in growth from third year of age until puberty onset, while in puberty hypergonadotropic hypogonadism has negative effect. The main factors that influence growth after renal transplantation are the age of the recipient and glucocorticoid drugs dosage with negative effect and allograft function with positive effect. In order to improve growth in children with CRD it is necessary to include: diet with optimal caloric intake, correction of fluid/ electrolyte imbalance, correction of acidosis, renal osteodistrophy and anemia. If growth velocity is insufficient to normalize growth, it is necessary to start recombinant human GH (rhGH therapy at 0.05 mg/kg per day (0.35 mg/kg per week or 28 IU/m2 per week administered by subcutaneous injection.

  11. Value of renal cortical thickness as a predictor of renal function impairment in chronic renal disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Rafael Yamashita

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the presence of linear relationship between renal cortical thickness, bipolar length, and parenchymal thickness in chronic kidney disease patients presenting with different estimated glomerular filtration rates (GFRs and to assess the reproducibility of these measurements using ultrasonography. Materials and Methods: Ultrasonography was performed in 54 chronic renal failure patients. The scans were performed by two independent and blinded radiologists. The estimated GFR was calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault equation. Interobserver agreement was calculated and a linear correlation coefficient (r was determined in order to establish the relationship between the different renal measurements and estimated GFR. Results: The correlation between GFR and measurements of renal cortical thickness, bipolar length, and parenchymal thickness was, respectively, moderate (r = 0.478; p < 0.001, poor (r = 0.380; p = 0.004, and poor (r = 0.277; p = 0.116. The interobserver agreement was considered excellent (0.754 for measurements of cortical thickness and bipolar length (0.833, and satisfactory for parenchymal thickness (0.523. Conclusion: The interobserver reproducibility for renal measurements obtained was good. A moderate correlation was observed between estimated GFR and cortical thickness, but bipolar length and parenchymal thickness were poorly correlated.

  12. Pattern of renal diseases in children: A developing country experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Prasad Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectrum of renal disease varies in different ethnic population, geographical location, and by environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinical spectrum and occurrence of different pediatric renal diseases at a teaching hospital in the Eastern part of Nepal. All cases of renal diseases from one month to 15 years of age, attending the pediatric renal outpatient department and/or were admitted to the wards during the period of February 2012 to January 2013, were included in the study. Detailed clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed on all patients. Diseases were categorized as per standard definitions and managed with hospital protocols. Renal diseases accounted to be 206 cases (6.9% of total annual pediatric admissions, of which (58% were male and (42% female. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN was the most common disorder (37.7% followed by nephrotic syndrome (26.1%, urinary tract infection (21.3%, acute kidney injury (AKI (17.9%, obstructive uropathy (1.9%, chronic kidney disease (CKD (1.2%, and others. In AGN group, the most common cause was post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN (32.9% followed by lupus nephritis (4% and Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (0.8%. Urine culture was positive in (9.22% and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (57.9%. The causes of AKI were urosepsis, septicemia, and AGN (18.9% each, followed by dehydration (13.5%. Mortality was found in 5% of cases and the etiologies were AKI in (72.7%, PIGN (18.1%, and CKD (9%. Renal diseases are a significant problem among children and are one of the common causes of hospital admission. These patients need comprehensive services for early identification and management.

  13. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis independent of obesity and metabolic syndrome in Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Manik Lal; Sharma, Sanjay; Kumar, Atin; Bhatt, Surya Prakash; Luthra, Kalpana; Guleria, Randeep; Pandey, Ravindra M; Vikram, Naval K

    2012-08-01

    We examined the association of subclinical atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in Asian Indians. This study included 40 non-diabetic subjects with NAFLD and 40 apparently healthy controls without NAFLD with similar age, gender and body mass index. Measurements included anthropometric parameters, oral glucose tolerance test, fasting and 2 h insulin, lipid profile, C-reactive protein, sICAM-1, VCAM-1, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD). Subjects with NAFLD had higher average and maximum CIMT (0.6 ± 0.12 and 0.684 ± 0.16 mm, respectively, vs 0.489 ± 0.1 and 0.523 ± 0.1 mm, respectively; p subclinical atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction independent of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Elevated levels of hs-CRP and sICAM-1 may be useful as indicators of liver injury in NAFLD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Subclinical cardiovascular disease assessment and its relationship with cardiovascular risk SCORE in a healthy adult population: A cross-sectional community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitu, Ovidiu; Roca, Mihai; Floria, Mariana; Petris, Antoniu Octavian; Graur, Mariana; Mitu, Florin

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship and the accuracy of SCORE (Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation Project) risk correlated to multiple methods for determining subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a healthy population. This cross-sectional study included 120 completely asymptomatic subjects, with an age range 35-75 years, and randomly selected from the general population. The individuals were evaluated clinically and biochemical, and the SCORE risk was computed. Subclinical atherosclerosis was assessed by various methods: carotid ultrasound for intima-media thickness (cIMT) and plaque detection; aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV); echocardiography - left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and aortic atheromatosis (AA); ankle-brachial index (ABI). SCORE mean value was 2.95±2.71, with 76% of subjects having SCORE <5. Sixty-four percent of all subjects have had increased subclinical CVD changes, and SCORE risk score was correlated positively with all markers, except for ABI. In the multivariate analysis, increased cIMT and aPWV were significantly associated with high value of SCORE risk (OR 4.14, 95% CI: 1.42-12.15, p=0.009; respectively OR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.01-1.96, p=0.039). A positive linear relationship was observed between 3 territories of subclinical CVD (cIMT, LVMI, aPWV) and SCORE risk (p<0.0001). There was evidence of subclinical CVD in 60% of subjects with a SCORE value <5. As most subjects with a SCORE value <5 have subclinical CVD abnormalities, a more tailored subclinical CVD primary prevention program should be encouraged. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Distribution of glucose transporters in renal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Kidneys play an important role in glucose homeostasis. Renal gluconeogenesis prevents hypoglycemia by releasing glucose into the blood stream. Glucose homeostasis is also due, in part, to reabsorption and excretion of hexose in the kidney. Lipid bilayer of plasma membrane is impermeable for glucose, which is hydrophilic and soluble in water. Therefore, transport of glucose across the plasma membrane depends on carrier proteins expressed in the plasma membrane. In humans, there are three famil...

  16. The Renal Histopathology Spectrum of Elderly Patients with Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Zhou, Fu-de; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The elderly population has significantly increased in China. However, data regarding renal histopathology in this population is lacking. The present study retrospectively analyzed renal disease spectrum of 430 elderly patients who had received renal biopsy at Peking University First Hospital between January 2003 and December 2012. Among 6049 patients receiving renal biopsies during the same period, 430 (7.10%) were elderly (≥65 years). The ratio of male (263 patients) to female (167 patients) was 1.57:1, with an age of 70.29 ± 3.99 (range 65–82) years at the time of biopsy. The most common indication for renal biopsy was nephrotic syndrome (59.53%), followed by acute kidney injury (AKI, 19.53%) and chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN, 16.05%). The most common renal histopathology in primary glomerular disease was idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN, 61.02%), followed by IgA nephropathy (18.22%), minimal change disease (MCD, 9.32%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (6.78%). ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV, 43.95%) was the leading secondary glomerular disease, followed by HBV-related glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN, 24.2%), and amyloidosis (14.01%). In patients with nephrotic syndrome, iMN (50%) was the leading cause, followed by HBV-GN (16.02%), MCD (7.81%), and amyloidosis (7.81%). In patients with iMN, 89.5% presented as nephrotic syndrome, 8.39% as CGN. In patients with AKI, the leading cause was AAV (48.12%), followed by acute interstitial nephritis (20.48%) and acute tubular necrosis (8.43%). In conclusion, in elderly Chinese patients, the most common renal histopathology pattern was iMN in patients with nephrotic syndrome, and AAV in patients with AKI. PMID:25526441

  17. Prognostic clinical and molecular biomarkers of renal disease in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena, Michelle J; de Zeeuw, Dick; Mischak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease occurs in ∼ 25-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes. Given the high risk of progressive renal function loss and end-stage renal disease, early identification of patients with a renal risk is important. Novel biomarkers may aid in improving renal risk stratification. In thi...

  18. Prognostic clinical and molecular biomarkers of renal disease in type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena, Michelle J.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Mischak, Harald; Jankowski, Joachim; Oberbauer, Rainer; Woloszczuk, Wolfgang; Benner, Jacqueline; Dallmann, Guido; Mayer, Bernd; Mayer, Gert; Rossing, Peter; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.

    Diabetic kidney disease occurs in similar to 25-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes. Given the high risk of progressive renal function loss and end-stage renal disease, early identification of patients with a renal risk is important. Novel biomarkers may aid in improving renal risk stratification.

  19. Advanced renal disease, end-stage renal disease and renal death among HIV-positive individuals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryom, L; Kirk, O; Lundgren, Jens

    2012-01-01

    in EuroSIDA. ARD was defined as confirmed eGFR 3 months apart) using Cockcroft-Gault. ESRD was defined as hemo- or peritoneal dialysis>1 month/renal transplant. Renal deaths were defined as renal failure as the underlying cause of death, using CoDe methodology. Patients were...... followed from baseline (first eGFR after 1/1/2004) until last eGFR, ARD/ESRD/renal death; whichever occurred first. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors. 8817 persons were included, the majority were white (87.3%), males (73.9%) infected though homosexual contact (41.5%) and with a median age...

  20. Is subclinical gambling really subclinical?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Jeremiah; April, Laura M; Kallmi, Selmi

    2017-10-01

    Gambling disorder and substance use disorders (SUD) overlap in terms of etiology and diagnostic constructs (e.g., preoccupation, loss of control), yet diagnostic thresholds for the disorders are different. Currently, endorsing 2-3 gambling disorder criteria does not warrant a diagnosis while endorsing 2-3 SUD criteria does. The aim of this study was to examine whether subclinical gamblers (i.e., endorsing 2-3 gambling disorder criteria) experience psychosocial dysfunction equivalent to individuals who are diagnosed with mild severity SUD (i.e., 2-3 SUD criteria) and whether this level of dysfunction is significantly different from individuals with no psychopathology. Data are from the first wave of Quinte Longitudinal Study, a large epidemiological sample (N=4121). Psychometrically supported measures assessed for psychosocial functioning and the presence of Axis-I psychiatric disorders. Cross-sectional analysis examined 7 domains of psychosocial functioning using ANCOVA, which allowed for the inclusion of covariates, to test for difference between subclinical gamblers and individuals with no psychopathology and individuals with mild severity SUD. Equivalency testing compared subclinical gamblers in relation to mild severity SUD. Subclinical gamblers reported significantly poorer psychosocial functioning in relation to individuals endorsing no current psychopathology. Subclinical gamblers were also equivalent to and not significantly different from individuals with mild severity SUD. Subclinical gamblers experience similar psychosocial impairment to those individuals who endorse mild severity SUD, and this significantly differed from healthy individuals. The threshold for diagnosis of gambling disorder therefore warrants re-examination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tumour Calcification and Calciphylaxis in End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Di

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although soft tissue and vascular calcifications are common in CKD and progress as an independent risk factor of all-cause mortality, tumour calcification and calciphylaxis are uncommon in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Here, we discuss a rare case of a patient with tumour calcification complicated with calciphylaxis developed septic shock from infection. Our patient is a 57-year-old man in his late stage of renal disease who presented with a huge mass at the right hip and necrotic cutaneous ulcers on the lower legs followed by local and systemic infection and death due to septic shock.

  2. Advanced chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and renal death among HIV-positive individuals in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryom, L; Kirk, O; Lundgren, J D; Reiss, P; Pedersen, C; De Wit, S; Buzunova, S; Gasiorowski, J; Gatell, J M; Mocroft, A

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge about advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in HIV-positive persons is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate incidence, predictors and outcomes for advanced CKD/ESRD and renal death. Advanced CKD was defined as confirmed (two consecutive measurements ≥ 3 months apart) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≤ 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) using Cockcroft-Gault, and ESRD as haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis for ≥ 1 month or renal transplant. Renal death was death with renal disease as the underlying cause, using Coding Causes of Death in HIV (CoDe) methodology. Follow-up was from 1 January 2004 until last eGFR measurement, advanced CKD, ESRD or renal death, whichever occurred first. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors. Of 9044 individuals included in the study, 58 (0.64%) experienced advanced CKD/ESRD/renal death [incidence rate 1.32/1000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU); 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.66]; 52% of those who experienced the endpoint had a baseline eGFR ≤ 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) compared with 3% of those who did not. Using Kaplan-Meier methods, at 6 years from baseline, 0.83% (95% CI 0.59-1.07%) were estimated to have experienced the endpoint overall and 11.26% (95% CI 6.75-15.78%) among those with baseline eGFR ≤ 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) . Independent predictors of the endpoint included any cardiovascular event [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2.16; 95% CI 1.24-3.77], lower eGFR (IRR 0.64 per 5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ; 95% CI 0.59-0.70) and lower CD4 count (IRR 0.77 per doubling; 95% CI 0.62-0.95). One year after experiencing advanced CKD or ESRD, an estimated 19.21% (95% CI 7.84-30.58%) of patients had died, mostly from extra-renal causes. The incidence of advanced CKD/ESRD/renal death was low and predictors included traditional renal risk factors, HIV-related factors and pre-existing renal impairment. The prognosis following advanced CKD/ESRD was poor

  3. The pattern of renal disease in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, L M

    1994-06-01

    An analysis of 1000 consecutive, adequate renal biopsies from patients of the University Hospital Kuala Lumpur between 1982 and 1991 revealed: minimal change nephritis (20.7%), focal glomerulosclerosis (2.9%), proliferative glomerulonephritides (16.0%), membranous glomerulonephritis (5.5%), IgA nephropathy (18.5%), lupus nephritis (24.9%), end stage nephropathy (3.1%) and others (8.4%). Compared with the previous decade, IgA nephropathy has emerged as a common entity. Lupus nephritis forms the largest diagnostic entity and is probably related to the selected referral of SLE patients to this hospital.

  4. The Role of Radioisotope Renal Scanning in the Assessment of Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthall, Leonard

    1964-01-01

    Experience with 500 radio-chlormerodrin renal scans has shown that the technique can detect (1) altered renal function, both focal and generalized, (2) space-occupying kidney lesions, and (3) renal size and disease in some cases in which the blood urea nitrogen is elevated and the excretory urogram inconclusive. The technique is valuable as an adjunct to the intravenous pyelogram since it may discriminate more disease than was thought to be present or may distinguish between anomalous variations in renal outline and calyceal displacement from parenchymal disease. The technique is completely harmless and there are no known contraindications to the test agent, radio-chlormerodrin. ImagesFig. 1aFig. 1bFig. 2aFig. 2bFig. 3aFig. 3bFig. 3cFig. 4aFig. 4bFig. 5aFig. 5bFig. 5cFig. 6aFig. 6bFig. 7aFig. 7bFig. 7c PMID:14166466

  5. Chronic renal disease in renal transplant patients: management of cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fresnedo, G; Gómez-Alamillo, C; Ruiz, J C; de Francisco, A L M; Arias, M

    2009-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. Despite improvements in short-term patient and graft outcomes, there has been no major improvement in long-term outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and obesity, and the impact of their control among 526 stable renal transplant recipients according to the guidelines in the general population. Mean blood pressure was 133 +/- 16/81 +/- 9 mm Hg. The proportion of patients on antihypertensive therapy was 75%, and on ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers, 26%. The mean cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides were 195 +/- 41, 115 +/- 32, 51 +/- 17, and 137 +/- 75 mg/dL, respectively. The proportion of patients on statin treatment was 49.7%, and those with body mass indices between 25 and 30, 30 and 35, and >35 kg/m(2) were 35%, 15%, and 4%. We observed a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity among renal transplant patients. Suboptimal control was frequent and control of some of these complications was far below targets established for nontransplant patients despite progressive intensification of therapy with functional graft decline. The findings of this study may have an impact on the management of renal transplant recipients.

  6. Preliminary report on digitalization of renal microangiograms used in analysing renal parenchymal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M; Kaneko, M

    1983-01-01

    Glomerulography is a useful method for the angiographic diagnosis of various renal parenchymal diseases. A new system for digitalization of the glomerulogram has been developed using a high resolution television camera and a CT computer. We describe the fundamental procedures involved in the clinical application of digital glomerulography by applying this method to a renal microangiogram of a cow. This new method aids a clearer understanding of the detailed microvasculatures by providing better magnification and storage and allowing for further processing of the original analogue images. With a computer printout of any part of the glomerulogram also possible, an estimation of the glomerular counts and their distribution can now be given for any unit of cross-sectional area of the renal cortex.

  7. Regulatory T cells in immune-mediated renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Joanna R; Wang, Yuan Min; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are CD4+ T cells that can suppress immune responses by effector T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. This review discusses the role that Tregs play in murine models of immune-mediated renal diseases and acute kidney injury and in human autoimmune kidney disease (such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis). Current research suggests that Tregs may be reduced in number and/or have impaired regulatory function in these diseases. Tregs possess several mechanisms by which they can limit renal and systemic inflammatory immune responses. Potential therapeutic applications involving Tregs include in vivo induction of Tregs or inducing Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells or expanding natural Tregs ex vivo, to use as a cellular therapy. At present, the optimal method of generating a phenotypically stable pool of Tregs with long-lasting suppressive effects is not established, but human studies in renal transplantation are underway exploring the therapeutic potential of Tregs as a cellular therapy, and if successful may have a role as a novel therapy in immune-mediated renal diseases. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  8. Sirtuins and renal diseases: relationship with aging and diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kume, Shinji; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuins are members of the Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) family, a group of class III deacetylases. Mammals have seven different sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT7. Among them, SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are induced by calorie restriction conditions and are considered anti-aging molecules. SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied. SIRT1 deacetylates target proteins using the coenzyme NAD+ and is therefore linked to cellular energy metabolism and the redox state through multiple signalling and survival pathways. SIRT1 deficiency under various stress conditions, such as metabolic or oxidative stress or hypoxia, is implicated in the pathophysiologies of age-related diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and renal diseases. In the kidneys, SIRT1 may inhibit renal cell apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and may regulate lipid metabolism, autophagy, blood pressure and sodium balance. Therefore the activation of SIRT1 in the kidney may be a new therapeutic target to increase resistance to many causal factors in the development of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In addition, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are implicated in age-related disorders or longevity. In the present review, we discuss the protective functions of sirtuins and the association of sirtuins with the pathophysiology of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  9. Renal Oxygenation in the Pathophysiology of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhao Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a significant health problem associated with high morbidity and mortality. Despite significant research into various pathways involved in the pathophysiology of CKD, the therapeutic options are limited in diabetes and hypertension induced CKD to blood pressure control, hyperglycemia management (in diabetic nephropathy and reduction of proteinuria, mainly with renin-angiotensin blockade therapy. Recently, renal oxygenation in pathophysiology of CKD progression has received a lot of interest. Several advances have been made in our understanding of the determinants and regulators of renal oxygenation in normal and diseased kidneys. The goal of this review is to discuss the alterations in renal oxygenation (delivery, consumption and tissue oxygen tension in pre-clinical and clinical studies in diabetic and hypertensive CKD along with the underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic options.

  10. Relationship of cigarette smoking with inflammation and subclinical vascular disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, John W; Nasir, Khurram; DeFilippis, Andrew P; Lima, Joao A C; Bluemke, David A; Hundley, W Gregory; Barr, R Graham; Budoff, Matthew J; Szklo, Moyses; Navas-Acien, Ana; Polak, Joseph F; Blumenthal, Roger S; Post, Wendy S; Blaha, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    We sought to assess the impact of smoking status, cumulative pack-years, and time since cessation (the latter in former smokers only) on 3 important domains of cardiovascular disease: inflammation, vascular dynamics and function, and subclinical atherosclerosis. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort enrolled 6814 adults without prior cardiovascular disease. Smoking variables were determined by self-report and confirmed with urinary cotinine. We examined cross-sectional associations between smoking parameters and (1) inflammatory biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP], interleukin-6, and fibrinogen); (2) vascular dynamics and function (brachial flow-mediated dilation and carotid distensibility by ultrasound, as well as aortic distensibility by MRI); and (3) subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcification, carotid intima-media thickness, and ankle-brachial index). We identified 3218 never smokers, 2607 former smokers, and 971 current smokers. Mean age was 62 years and 47% were male. There was no consistent association between smoking and vascular distensibility or flow-mediated dilation outcomes. However, compared with never smokers, the adjusted association between current smoking and measures of either inflammation or subclinical atherosclerosis was consistently stronger than for former smoking (eg, odds ratio for hsCRP>2 mg/L of 1.7 [95% confidence interval, 1.5-2.1] versus 1.2 [1.1-1.4], odds ratio for coronary artery calcification>0 of 1.8 [1.5-2.1] versus 1.4 [1.2-1.6], respectively). Similar associations were seen for interleukin-6, fibrinogen, carotid intima-media thickness, and ankle-brachial index. A monotonic association was also found between higher pack-year quartiles and increasing inflammatory markers. Furthermore, current smokers with hsCRP>2 mg/L were more likely to have increased carotid intima-media thickness, abnormal ankle-brachial index, and coronary artery calcification>75th percentile for age, sex

  11. [Renal involvement in glycogen storage disease type 1: Practical issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Chehida, Amel; Bensmaïl, Takoua; Ben Rehouma, Faten; Ben Abdelaziz, Rim; Azzouz, Hatem; Boudabbous, Hela; Slim Abdelmoula, Mohamed; Abdelhak, Sonia; Kaabachi, Naziha; Ben Turkia, Hadhami; Tebib, Néji

    2015-07-01

    To investigate risk factors of renal complications in glycogen storage disease type I, in order to identify practical implications for renal preservation. A retrospective study of 38 patients with glycogen storage disease type I. The patients studied were 8.6 years old in average (1.5 to 22 years) and were followed during 7.4 ± 4.5 years. Hypercalciuria was detected in 23 patients and was related to acidosis (P=0.028), higher lactate levels (5.9 ± 3.5 versus 3.7 ± 1.7 mmol/L; P=0.013) and smaller height (-2.1 ± 1.5 SD versus -0.8 ± 1.5 SD; P=0.026). Urolithiasis was diagnosed in 7 cases. Glomerular disease (19/38) was more frequent in cases with severe hypertriglyceridemia (P=0.042) and occurred at an older age (P=0.007). Microalbuminuria occurred in 15/31 cases; ACE inhibitors were prescribed in only 8 cases. The frequency of renal complications did not differ according to the diet group (continuous enteral feeding or uncooked starch). Logistic regression concluded as risk factors: lactic acidosis for tubular disease and age>10 years for glomerular disease. Renal involvement is common in glycogen storage disease type I patients. Tubular abnormalities are precocious, related to lactic acidosis and may be detected by monitoring of urinary calcium. Glomerular hyperfiltration is the first stage of a progressive glomerular disease and is related to age. Practical implications for renal preservation are discussed based on our results and literature. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Genetic Polymorphisms, HDL Cholesterol, and Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Michael Y.; Johnson, Craig; Kao, W.H. Linda; Sharrett, A. Richey; Arends, Valerie L.; Kronmal, Richard; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Jacobs, David R.; Arnett, Donna; O’Leary, Daniel; Post, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The cholesteryl ester transport protein (CETP) plays a key role in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Genetic variants that alter CETP activity and concentration may cause significant alterations in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration; however, controversies remain about whether these genetic variants are associated with atherosclerosis. We genotyped the CETP R451Q, A373P, -629C/A, Taq1B, and -2505C/A polymorphisms in a cohort of Caucasian, Chinese, African-American, and Hispanic individuals within the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Genotypes were examined in relationship to HDL-C, CETP activity, CETP concentration, and three measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD): coronary artery calcium (CAC) measured by fast CT scanning, and carotid intimal-medial thickness (IMT) and carotid artery plaque, measured by ultrasonography. Carriers of the 451Q and 373P alleles have significantly higher CETP concentration (22.4% and 19.5%, respectively; psubclinical CVD. PMID:18243217

  13. Immunological traits have the potential to improve selection of pigs for resistance to clinical and subclinical disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henryon, M.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Nielsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    , potentially useful as criteria to improve selection of pigs for resistance to clinical and subclinical disease. We tested this premise by assessing 4204 male pigs from the Duroc, Landrace, and Yorkshire breeds for total and differential numbers of leukocytes and serum concentrations of IgG and haptoglobin...... models to the expression levels of SLA I and II. We detected additive genetic variation for each group of traits. Total and differential numbers of leukocytes were moderately heritable (h(2) = 0.22 to 0.30), expression levels of SLA I and II were moderate-to-highly heritable (h(2) = 0.46 to 1.23), while...... serum concentrations of IgG and haptoglobin were lowly heritable (h(2) = 0.14 to 0.16). The additive genetic variation shown for the immunological traits is encouraging for pig breeders. It indicates that these traits are potentially useful as criteria to improve selection of pigs for resistance...

  14. Nulliparity is associated with less healthy markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease in young women with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczyk, Nancy Anderson; Catov, Janet M; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; McClure, Candace K; Roberts, James M; Tepper, Ping G; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2015-05-01

    Higher parity is associated with increased subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in mid-life and older women and with increased CVD risk overall. The relationship between parity, subclinical CVD, and infertility in young women with overweight and obesity has been infrequently evaluated. Reproductive histories were obtained in 191 (66%) young women with overweight and obesity (BMI 25-39.9 kg/m(2) ) participating in a weight loss trial. Baseline carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and inter-adventitial diameter (IAD) were assessed via B-mode ultrasound. Linear regression was used to estimate the relationship between parity and carotid measures, adjusted for demographic, cardiovascular, and reproductive risk factors. Nulliparous women (n = 70, age 34.9 ± 7.1) had increased common carotid IAD (0.230 mm, SE 0.08, P = 0.003) and mean common carotid artery (CCA) IMT (0.031 mm, SE 0.01, P = 0.007) compared with parous women (n = 102, age 39.5 ± 4.9), persisting after adjustment for age, race, and CVD risk factors. No other reproductive factors were statistically significantly associated. Nulliparity is associated with markers of less healthy carotid arteries in a sample of disease-free 25- to 45-year-old women with overweight or obesity. This may represent a beneficial effect of pregnancy or indicate overall better health in women with overweight/obesity who are capable of childbearing. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  15. [Anderson-Fabry disease and renal transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basić-Jukić, Nikolina; Kes, Petar; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Mesar, Ines; Corić, Marijana; Kastelan, Zeljko

    2011-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare disease associated with progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in visceral organs and vascular endothelium. The disease primarily affects male patients. It has long been considered that females are asymptomatic carriers of Anderson-Fabry disease. However, recent results demonstrated a significant proportion of symptomatic affected females. We present our experience in the treatment of patients with Anderson-Fabry disease having received allograft from deceased donor, as well as follow-up of patients having received allograft from donor with unrecognized Anderson-Fabry disease.

  16. MicroRNA biomarkers in clinical renal disease: from diabetic nephropathy renal transplantation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassirpour, Rounak; Raj, Dominic; Townsend, Raymond; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2016-12-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a common health problem affecting 1 in 12 Americans. It is associated with elevated risks of mortality, cardiovascular disease, and high costs for the treatment of renal failure with dialysis or transplantation. Advances in CKD care are impeded by the lack of biomarkers for early diagnosis, assessment of the extent of tissue injury, estimation of disease progression, and evaluation of response to therapy. Such biomarkers should improve the performance of existing measures of renal functional impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) or kidney damage (proteinuria). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) a class of small, non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional repressors are gaining momentum as biomarkers in a number of disease areas. In this review, we examine the potential utility of miRNAs as promising biomarkers for renal disease. We explore the performance of miRNAs as biomarkers in two clinically important forms of CKD, diabetes and the nephropathy developing in kidney transplant recipients. Finally, we highlight the pitfalls and opportunities of miRNAs and provide a broad perspective for the future clinical development of miRNAs as biomarkers in CKD beyond the current gold standards of eGFR and albuminuria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; Pchronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Targeting Nrf2 in Protection Against Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Hue, Melania; Farre-Alins, Victor; Palomino-Antolin, Alejandra; Parada, Esther; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Egido, Jesus; Egea, Javier; Moreno, Juan A

    2017-01-01

    Renal disease is a serious health problem, with increasing incidence and prevalence. Oxidative stress and inflammation play a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of renal disease. Therefore, therapeutic approaches to decrease oxidative stress should be of interest. This review aims to provide a comprehensive and updated overview of the protective mechanisms mediated by Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2), a description of novel compounds that target Nrf2, its effectiveness to prevent renal disease and the on-going clinical trials for this pathological condition. We undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research in literature about Nrf2 activators and renal disease. The transcription factor Nrf2 is an emerging regulator of cellular resistance to oxidants and inflammation. Nrf2 controls the basal and induced expression of a couple of cytoprotective and antiinflammatory genes that regulate the physiological and pathophysiological outcomes of oxidant exposure. We have analyzed numerous findings showing that Nrf2 induction protects against oxidative stress and modulates inflammation in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease progression. However, few clinical trials have been performed in humans. Recent studies suggested that renoprotective effects of Nrf2 activation are observed at low doses, whereas harmful effects appear at higher concentrations. The findings of this review confirm that novel studies are necessary to address whether Nrf2-targeting may be a safe therapeutic approach to decrease renal disease progression in humans. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Cystic Fibrosis: A Risk Condition for Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Domenico; Postorino, Adele; Lucanto, Cristina; Costa, Stefano; Cristadoro, Simona; Pellegrino, Salvatore; Conti, Giovanni; Buemi, Michele; Magazzù, Giuseppe; Bellinghieri, Guido

    2017-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive disease affecting the Caucasian population, with a birth incidence ranging between 1:2,500 and 1:1,800. It is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator gene which is localized on 7 chromosomes. Renal disease is reported as a relatively rare complication in adult patient with CF. We evaluated proteinuria and chronic renal failure (CRF) in a population of patients with CF. A retrospective study was carried out in a referral center for CF at University of Messina in Italy. We identified all patients with renal disease, characterized by proteinuria and/or CRF, during the period 2007 to 2012 and reviewed their medical records to assess influence on renal disease of genotype, number of pulmonary exacerbation, pancreatic insufficiency, pulmonary function, CF-related diabetes, and antibiotics courses. From a population of 77 adult patients with CF, we identified 9 patients with proteinuria (11.7%), and 11 patients (14.28%) with CRF. Mean age was 35.6 (+5.1 standard deviation) years, 55% were female and 33% had diabetes mellitus. Renal biopsy was performed in 3 patients because of nephrotic syndrome in 1 patient and proteinuria with renal failure in the other 2 patients. Renal amyloidosis was disclosed in 2, whereas IgA nephropathy in 1 patient. The ΔF508 mutation in homozygosis was present in 44% of patients with proteinuria (vs. 27% of our CF population, relative risk 2.07), whereas genotype ΔF508/N1303K in 22%. ΔF508 allele mutation was present in 77.7% of proteinuric patients. Our study shows a higher prevalence of renal disease in patients with CF, than was previously described. The main reason may be related to increased life expectancy because of better management. Moreover, patients with ΔF508 homozygosis had higher risk of proteinuria. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sodium intake, RAAS-blockade and progressive renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Borst, Martin H; Navis, Gerjan

    Pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers is the current standard treatment to prevent progressive renal function loss in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet in many patients the

  1. Developmental disorder of podocytes and the related renal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ya-Nan; Ao, Ying; Li, Bin; Wan, Yang; Wang, Hui

    2018-02-20

    Podocyte is one of the main components of glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney; the loss or dysfunction of podocyte could impair the functions of glomerular filtration barrier, leading to development of various renal diseases. Podocyte is a terminally differentiated cell, and thus does not possess any proliferative properties. Accordingly, its number and contribution to renal function are initially determined by its normal development. Information from the literature and results of our research indicate that genetic factors or prenatal adverse environment could cause developmental retardation of podocytes, thereby suggesting the potential fetal developmental origin(s) of kidney diseases, and involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of key genes in podocyte development. In this review, we provide a brief overview on the podocyte normal development; discussion on the potential pathogenic mechanisms for developmental disorders of podocytes; as well as renal diseases associated with podocyte developmental retardation. We aim to provide some insights in articulating the strategies for diagnosis and treatments of renal diseases associated with podocyte developmental abnormalities.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and dietary factors in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Cunha Baia, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids and mineral metabolism: novel therapy for cardiovascular disease in renal patients? Deregulations in mineral metabolism, particularly related to phosphate and its regulating hormone fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), are common in patients with chronic kidney

  3. The dyslipidemia of chronic renal disease: effects of statin therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozsoy, Riza C.; van Leuven, Sander I.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Arisz, Lambertus; Koopman, Marion G.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Dyslipidemia is a prevalent condition in patients with chronic renal disease, but is often left untreated. Statin treatment constitutes an effective way to improve lipid abnormalities. This review summarizes present studies on dyslipidemia and its treatment in patients with

  4. High prevalence of frailty in end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Diederik; Kalf, Annette; Vogtlander, Nils; van Munster, Barbara C.

    Purpose Prognosis of the increasing number of elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is poor with high risk of functional decline and mortality. Frailty seems to be a good predictor for those patients that will not benefit from dialysis. Varying prevalences between populations are

  5. End Stage Renal Disease: Racial Differences | Chijioke | Orient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The prevalence and aetiological of end stage renal disease (ESRD) differ from race to race and from location to location even among people of the same race. There is paucity of data on the comparison of ESDR in whites and blacks living in their native environment. The study was undertaken to retrospectively ...

  6. End State Renal Disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Jeffrey M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Determines the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States from 1983-86. Findings indicate 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of White cases were attributed to diabetes. (JS)

  7. Vascular progenitor cells in renal and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerweel, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    Maintenance of endothelial integrity plays a central role in the protection against the development and progression of renal and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Damaged or lost endothelial cells may be replaced through proliferation of local endothelium and by circulating bone marrow

  8. Biochemical values stability in serum and plasma of renal diseased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stability of five parameters in serum and plasma after prolonged storage was studied by determining the effects of storage temperature and time on the laboratory results of samples obtained from renal diseased patients. Serum and plasma were separated from clot and red cells and analysed in duplicates immediately ...

  9. Estimating glomerular filtration rate: Cockcroft-Gault and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formulas compared to renal inulin clearance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botev, R.; Mallie, J.P.; Couchoud, C.; Schuck, O.; Fauvel, J.P.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Lee, N.; Santo, N.G. De; Cirillo, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of renal function by estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is very important for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The Cockcroft-Gault (CG) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formulas are the

  10. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome with End Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendrakumar Parakh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS is one of the rare autosomal recessive disorders that affect multiple organs of the body. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary among affected individuals, even among members of the same family. We present a case of BBS with features of hypogonadism and features such as marked central obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, polydactyly, renal abnormalities and mental retardation, along with a brief review of the literature. The patient had end stage renal disease and managed with dialysis. This case also exemplifies the need for multidisciplinary approach in the management of such cases.

  11. 42 CFR 406.13 - Individual who has end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual who has end-stage renal disease. 406.13... Premiums § 406.13 Individual who has end-stage renal disease. (a) Statutory basis and applicability. This... renal disease, and specifies the beginning and end of the period of entitlement. It implements section...

  12. Subclinical Synovitis Measured by Ultrasound in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients With Clinical Remission Induced by Synthetic and Biological Modifying Disease Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, Marcos; Al Snih, Soham; Serra-Bonett, Natalí; Rivas, Juan C

    2017-10-09

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with disease in clinical remission might show subclinical synovitis, which can be related to the progress of structural joint damage. To determine and compare the degree of synovial inflammation by ultrasound (US) in patients with RA in clinical remission, treated with DMARD or combination therapy with DMARD and anti-TNF. Hospital-based cross-sectional study of 58 patients with RA in sustained remission for at least 6 months by DAS28 <2.6, who attended the Rheumatology Service at the Hospital Universitario de Caracas. Patients underwent clinical, functional, and laboratory assessments. Ultrasound was performed in hands measuring synovial effusion, synovial hypertrophy and power Doppler signal; using a semiquantitative 4-point scale of 0=none to 3=severe. Chi-square and t-test were used to compare the clinical, functional, laboratory and US assessments between the DMARD (N=37) and combination therapy with DMARD and anti-TNF (N=21) groups. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Out of 58 patients, 25.9% had remission by US and 74.1% had synovial effusion or hypertrophy or positive power Doppler signal. Non-significant differences in US synovitis between the two groups were found. Persistent US activity was evident in a high percentage of rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical remission by DAS28. No differences in subclinical synovitis measured by US were found between patients with DMARD and anti-TNF-induced clinical remission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  13. Air pollution and subclinical interstitial lung disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) air-lung study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Coralynn; Vedal, Sverre; Sheppard, Lianne; Raghu, Ganesh; Barr, R Graham; Podolanczuk, Anna; Doney, Brent; Hoffman, Eric A; Gassett, Amanda; Hinckley-Stukovsky, Karen; Williams, Kayleen; Kawut, Steve; Lederer, David J; Kaufman, Joel D

    2017-12-01

    We studied whether ambient air pollution is associated with interstitial lung abnormalities (ILAs) and high attenuation areas (HAAs), which are qualitative and quantitative measurements of subclinical interstitial lung disease (ILD) on computed tomography (CT).We performed analyses of community-based dwellers enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) study. We used cohort-specific spatio-temporal models to estimate ambient pollution (fine particulate matter (PM2.5), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3)) at each home. A total of 5495 participants underwent serial assessment of HAAs by cardiac CT; 2671 participants were assessed for ILAs using full lung CT at the 10-year follow-up. We used multivariable logistic regression and linear mixed models adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, education, tobacco use, scanner technology and study site.The odds of ILAs increased 1.77-fold per 40 ppb increment in NOx (95% CI 1.06 to 2.95, p = 0.03). There was an overall trend towards an association between higher exposure to NOx and greater progression of HAAs (0.45% annual increase in HAAs per 40 ppb increment in NOx; 95% CI -0.02 to 0.92, p = 0.06). Associations of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5), NOx and NO2 concentrations with progression of HAAs varied by race/ethnicity (p = 0.002, 0.007, 0.04, respectively, for interaction) and were strongest among non-Hispanic white people.We conclude that ambient air pollution exposures were associated with subclinical ILD. The content of this work is not subject to copyright. Design and branding are copyright ©ERS 2017.

  14. Obesity and renal disease: a possible role of leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papafragkaki, Dafni-Kalliopi; Tolis, George

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is one of the most frequently encountered medical problems of our time. Among the complications of this pathologic entity, renal disease is an important issue and its pathophysiologic mechanisms are a challenge for the physician, since a variety of etiologic factors are implicated in its genesis. For example, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance affect renal function, each one in a different way. Obesity seems to be a state in which kidneys demonstrate morphological and functional alterations, while hormonal and growth factors play a significant role. Among them, leptin, a recently discovered cytokine, has undergone extended investigation and has proven to be a factor that contributes to renal disease, mainly through mechanisms that involve activation of the TGF-beta system resulting in glomerulopathy and related clinical symptoms. Experiments in animals have revealed interesting aspects as far as the role of leptin in kidney function. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of obesity-related glomerulopathy may become a valuable aid in handling an obese patient with renal disease and associated problems.

  15. Calciphylaxis in chronic, non-dialysis-dependent renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschke Ralf

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calciphylaxis cutis is characterized by media calcification of arteries and, most prominently, of cutaneous and subcutaneous arterioles occurring in renal insufficiency patients. Case Report A 53-year-old woman with chronic cardiac and renal failure complained of painful crural, non-varicosis ulcers. She was hospitalized in an immobilized condition due to both the crural ulcerations and the existing heart-failure state (NYHA III-IV having pleural and pericardial effusions, atrial fibrillation and weight loss of 30 kg over the past year. Despite normalization of calcium-phosphorus balance and improvement of renal function, the clinical course of crural ulcerations deteriorated during the following 3 months. After failure of surgical debridements, multiple courses of sterile-maggot therapy were introduced at a late stage to stabilize the wounds. The patient died of recurrent wound infections and sepsis paralleled by exacerbations of renal malfunction. Conclusions The role of renal disease in vascular complications is discussed. Sterile-maggot debridement may constitute a therapy for the ulcerated calciphylaxis at an earlier stage, i.e. when first ulcerations appear.

  16. Levels of Vitamin D, Disease Activity and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Post-menopausal Women with Sjögren's Syndrome: Does a Link Exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardi, Enrico Maria; Basta, Fabio; Afeltra, Antonella

    Low levels of vitamin D play a role progression of cardiovascular diseases. Knowledge lacks whether a relationship exists between vitamin D levels and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). We evaluated vitamin D levels and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in 25 patients with pSS compared to 22 mild ostheoarthritic control patients (OCp). Intima-media thickness (IMT) and levels of vitamin D were significantly increased and decreased in pSS, respectively. No correlation was observed between low levels of vitamin D and IMT in pSS. Significant positive correlation between disease duration and IMT and negative between vitamin D levels and increased Sjögren syndrome disease activity index (SSDAI) and syndrome disease damage index (SSDDI) were also found in pSS. IMT of pSS with long disease duration is significantly increased with respect to that of OCp. Vitamin D deficiency does not play a role on IMT of pSS, whereas it plays a role in disease damage and activity. A long disease duration is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in pSS. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. [The peritoneal ultrafiltration in patients with cardio-renal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corciulo, Roberto; Corciulo, Simone

    2017-03-01

    In Italy, the congestive heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization and despite advances in therapy, the long-term prognosis is poor. Congestive heart failure is associated with advanced varying degrees of chronic renal disease that identify the cardio-renal syndrome type 2. High-dose diuretic therapy often fail to solve the water overload that is frequently the cause of death. The resistance to diuretics aggravates the state of the patient's edema and consequently morbidity and mortality. In the acute stage, the extracorporeal ultrafiltration unable to repair over hydration but needs frequent access weekly or midweek at the dialysis center. In addition, the significant changes of the fluid overload induce the risk of intradialytic hypotension and consequent renal hypoperfusion can cause a gradual loss of kidney function. The ultrafiltration can also be obtained using a method similar to the peritoneal dialysis (peritoneal ultrafiltration -PUF) but with a limited daily commitment both manual and automated modalities because the indication is not the correction of end stage renal disease. PUF is a home treatment and is indicated for chronic congestive heart failure with refractory hypervolemia despite optimal sequential diuretic therapy. PUF clinical results for the treatment of chronic congestive heart failure have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the clinical condition with reduction of NYHA class and improvement of FE%, the reduction of days of hospitalization, in reducing mortality, improving quality patient's life. In addition, PUF ensures a constant and continuous ultrafiltration, similar to renal function and thus allows a constant hemodynamic stability and ensures the maintenance of diuresis and the residual renal function. Therefore PUF in patients with refractory heart failure seems to be a viable integration of cardiological therapy and the encouraging results lead to the search of a multidisciplinary collaboration between cardiologist

  18. Nondiabetic renal disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikram Mami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the major complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The diagnosis of DN is mostly clinical. Kidney biopsy is indicated only if nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD is suspected. This study is aimed to assess the prevalence of NDRD and to determine predictor and prognostic factors of DN, NDRD. It was a retrospective analytic study including T2DM patients in whom renal biopsies were performed at our department from 1988 to 2014. Seventy-five patients were included. Mean age was 52.7 years with sex ratio at 1.56. Renal biopsy findings were isolated NDRD in 33 cases, NDRD superimposed on DN in 24 cases, and isolated DN in 18 cases. Most common NDRD found were focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (21% and membranous nephropathy (19%. Multivariate analysis showed that the absence of ischemic heart disease [odds ratio (OR = 0.178, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.041–0.762], absence of peripheral vascular disease (OR = 0.173, 95% CI = 0.045–0.669, and presence of hematuria (OR = 7.200, 95%CI = 0.886–58.531 were independent predictors of NDRD. 24 patients reached end-stage renal disease 55% in DN group, 16% in DN associated to NDRD group, and 30% in NDRD group. The prevalence of NDRD found in our study confirmed usefulness of renal biopsy in patients with T2DM, especially in those without degenerative complications, hypertension, and insulin therapy.

  19. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis.

  20. Diabetes mellitus and renal involvement in chronic viral liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovanescu, V F; Streba, C T; Ionescu, M; Constantinescu, A F; Vere, C C; Rogoveanu, I; Moța, E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral liver disease is often associated with other conditions. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently reported in this context and may play a role in the progression of the liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Renal disease is also an important extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis viral infection and its presence is associated with poor prognosis and management issues. Our study had multiple purposes: to determine the frequency of the association between chronic viral liver disease and diabetes mellitus, evaluate the potential of diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for HCC and assess an eventual renal involvement. We included in our study a number of 246 patients with chronic liver disease, from whom 136 were diagnosed with chronic viral hepatitis and 110 with viral liver cirrhosis. These patients were assessed by using a clinical examination and a series of tests, including serum transaminase levels, serum bilirubin, serum albumin, markers of cholestasis, fasting plasma glucose levels, serum creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Addis-Hamburger test, electrophoresis of urinary proteins, abdominal ultrasound and, in some cases, CT examination. We obtained the following results: diabetes mellitus is often associated with chronic liver disease of viral etiology, having been identified in 18.29% of the patients in our study. Age above 60 in patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.013diabetes mellitus. Renal disease was present in 13.4% of the patients with chronic liver disease and it was especially associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus. The most common form of renal injury was glomerulonephritis. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed only in cirrhotic patients as hepatorenal syndrome, occurring in 7.27% of the subjects, while chronic kidney disease was identified only in two cases of chronic viral hepatitis. Four patients in our study were diagnosed with HCC and none of them presented diabetes mellitus. Our study revealed that there is a

  1. Randomised intervention study to assess the prevalence of subclinical vascular disease and hidden kidney disease and its impact on morbidity and mortality: The ILERVAS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betriu, Àngels; Farràs, Cristina; Abajo, María; Martinez-Alonso, Montserrat; Arroyo, David; Barbé, Ferran; Buti, Miquel; Lecube, Albert; Portero, Manuel; Purroy, Francisco; Torres, Gerard; Valdivielso, José Manuel; Fernández, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and atherosclerosis are 2 interrelated diseases that increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The objectives of the ILERVAS project are: 1) to determine the prevalence of subclinical arterial disease and hidden kidney disease; 2) to assess the impact of early diagnosis of both diseases on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and also on the progression of CKD; 3) to have a platform of data and biological samples. Randomized intervention study. From 2015 to 2017, 19,800 people (9,900 in the intervention group and 9,900 in the control group) aged between 45 and 70 years without previous history of cardiovascular disease and with at least one cardiovascular risk factor will be randomly selected from the primary health care centres across the province of Lérida. A team of experts will travel around in a mobile unit to carry out the following baseline tests on the intervention group: Artery ultrasound; (carotid, femoral, transcranial and abdominal aorta); ankle-brachial index; spirometry; determination of advanced glycation end products; dried blood spot and urine spot tests. Additionally, blood and urine samples will be collected and stored in the biobank to identify new biomarkers using omics studies. Participants will be followed up until 2025 for identification of cardiovascular events, treatment changes and changes in lifestyle. The ILERVAS project will reveal the prevalence of subclinical vascular disease and hidden kidney disease, determine whether or not their early diagnosis brings health benefits and will also allow investigation of new risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. FUROSEMIDE TEST: ITS PATTERN IN NOT SEVERE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos G. Musso

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Furosemide test is a simple and useful test of renal physiology used to evaluate the capability of the collecting tubules to secrete potassium under the effect of serum aldosterone. Its behaviour pattern has already been established in children and young adults but not described in chronic renal disease patients yet, which we explored in this study.Material & Method: Twenty-six young volunteers (between 20 and 40 years old, chronically on a low potassium diet (40 mmol of K day were studied: twenty of them were healthy young ( they were neither suffering form diseases nor on any medication, and the rest were young patients suffering from stage II / III chronic renal disease (damaged kidney with GFR between 83.1 ml-min to 39.2 ml-min secondary to glomerular diseases documented by kidney biopsy. None of the studied chronic renal disease patients were suffering from diabetes mellitus, urinary obstruction, nor treated with dyskalemia generating drugs, such as: diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists, etc. Before, while the test was being carried out and after 180 minutes of a single dose of intravenous furosemide (1 mg/kg, urine and blood samples were obtained, for creatinine and potassium levels. From these data we calculated fractional excretion (FE of potassium. Statistical analysis was performed applying Student´s t-test.Results: There was no significant difference neither in pre-furosemide (basal and post-furosemide average FE of potassium between the healthy and chronic renal disease (CRD group: 16.4 ± 8.6% (CRD vs 11.5 ± 4.6% (healthy (p = NS ; 40.8 ± 3.2 % (CRD vs 35.4 ± 8.9% (healthy (p = NS respectively. Conversely, there was a significant difference in post-furosemide peak FE of potassium value, which was higher and delayed in the CRD group compared to the healthy one: 49.5 ± 8.2 % at 118 mins (CRD vs 31.6 ± 11% at 30 mins (healthy (p = 0.001.Conclusion: Furosemide test showed a

  3. Resolution of Graves' disease after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yvonne; Butani, Lavjay; Glaser, Nicole; Nguyen, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of an adolescent boy with Down's syndrome and ESRD on hemodialysis who developed mild Graves' disease that was not amenable to radioablation, surgery, or ATDs. After 14 months of observation without resolution of Graves' disease, he successfully received a DDRT with a steroid minimization protocol. Thymoglobulin and a three-day course of steroids were used for induction and he was started on tacrolimus, MMF, and pravastatin for maintenance transplant immunosuppression. One month after transplantation, all biochemical markers and antibody profiling for Graves' disease had resolved and remain normal one yr later. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Anderson-Fabry disease and renal transplantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Basić-Jukić, Nikolina; Kes, Petar; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Mesar, Ines; Corić, Marijana; Kastelan, Zeljko

    2011-01-01

    .... We present our experience in the treatment of patients with Anderson-Fabry disease having received allograft from deceased donor, as well as follow-up of patients having received allograft from donor...

  5. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Ossoli

    Full Text Available Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT deficiency (FLD is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis.

  6. Left Renal Cortical Thickness Measured by Ultrasound Can Predict Early Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Tomoaki; Koda, Masahiko; Sugihara, Takaaki; Sugihara, Shinobu; Okamoto, Toshiaki; Miyoshi, Kenichi; Hodotsuka, Masanori; Fujise, Yuki; Matono, Tomomitsu; Okano, Junichi; Hosho, Keiko; Iyama, Takuji; Fukui, Takeaki; Fukuda, Satoko; Munemura, Chishio; Isomoto, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    The kidney becomes atrophic in advanced chronic kidney disease, and renal size and parenchymal volume correlate with renal function. However, alterations in renal parenchymal volume have not been adequately studied in terms of the renal cortex and medulla. We investigated the relationship between the changes in the renal cortex and medulla and renal function. Renal ultrasound (US) parameters including renal length, parenchymal thickness, cortical thickness and medullary thickness were assessed in 176 subjects, who were categorized into 4 groups based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (ml/min/1.73 m2): group 1, ≥ 90; group 2, ≥ 60 but < 90; group 3, ≥ 30 but < 60; and group 4, < 30. Renal US parameters in both kidneys were compared among the 4 groups. We found stepwise associations in renal length, cortical thickness and parenchymal thickness with decreased renal function. Medullary thickness showed no changes among groups 1-3. Multiple linear regression analysis including sex, age and renal US parameters showed that only renal length was an independent predictor of renal function. When analyzed in groups 1-3, cortical thickness was the strongest associated parameter. Lower cortical left/right ratio (left cortical thickness/right cortical thickness) showed a stepwise association with a decrease in renal function. Renal length and cortical thickness measured by US were correlated with renal function. In particular, left cortical thickness could help to detect early changes in renal function. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Inflammatory Cutaneous Diseases in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Savoia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory skin diseases in this type of patient. In this study, we analyze the incidence of a number of inflammatory cutaneous diseases in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation. Although our study shows a relatively low incidence of these pathologies in transplanted patients—in agreement with the general action of immunosuppressant therapies in reducing inflammation—we scored a different efficacy of the various immunosuppressive regimens on inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. This information can be key for designing immunosuppressive regimens and devising accurate follow-up protocols.

  8. A case of renal oncocytoma associated with acquired cystic disease of the kidney

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 威文; 永田, 幹男; 貫井, 文彦; 黒川, 純; 岡本, 重禮; 福井, 準之助; 大岩, 孝誌

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of renal oncocytoma associated with acquired cystic disease of kidney (ACDK). A right renal mass was incidentally found on an annual ultrasonography of the kidneys in a 56-year-old female patient who had been on maintenance hemodialysis for 6 years. Computerized tomography (CT) showed a right hypervascular renal mass, suggesting a renal cell carcinoma associated with ACDK. Right radical nephrectomy was performed. The post-operative pathological diagnosis was renal oncocytoma....

  9. Renal replacement therapy for rare diseases affecting the kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wühl, Elke; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Wanner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    -stage renal disease (ESRD) population is limited. The aims of this study were (i) to identify those rare diseases within the ERA-EDTA Registry for which renal replacement therapy (RRT) is being provided and (ii) to determine the prevalence and incidence of RRT for ESRD due to rare diseases, both overall....... RESULTS: From 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2011, 7194 patients started RRT for a rare disease (10.6% children). While some diseases were exclusively found in adults (e.g. Fabry disease), primary oxalosis, cystinosis, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and medullary cystic kidney...... disease affected young patients in up to 46%. On 31 December 2011, 20 595 patients (12.4% of the total RRT population) were on RRT for ESRD caused by a rare disease. The point prevalence was 32.5 per million age-related population in children and 152.0 in adults. Only 5.8% of these patients were younger...

  10. 2,8-Dihydroxyadenine Nephropathy Identified as Cause of End-Stage Renal Disease After Renal Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Smiley Annie; Al-Rushaidan, Sulaiman; Francis, Issam; Soonowala, Darius; Nampoory, M R Narayanan

    2017-10-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of uric acid metabolism that leads to formation and excretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine into urine. The low solubility of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine results in precipitation and formation of urinary crystals and renal stones. Patients with this disorder usually have recurrent nephrolithiasis and can develop nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation in the renal parenchyma. The disease is most often underdiagnosed and can recur in renal transplant, causing graft failure. Lack of specific clinical manifestations, chemical and radiologic features identical to those shown with uric acid stones, and lack of awareness among clinicians are among the causes for the underdiagnoses of this treatable disease. Allopurinol, a xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor, is the mainstay of treatment, supported by high fluid intake and dietary modifications. The possibility of adenine phosphoribosyl transferase deficiency should be considered in all cases of urolithiasis in children, patients with recurrent urolithiasis, and patients with urolithiasis associated with renal failure of unknown cause, including patients with end-stage renal disease and renal transplant recipients. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old female patient who had a late diagnosis of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine nephropathy-induced end-stage renal disease, made on the native nephrectomy that accompanied the renal transplant, and who had a timely intervention that prevented recurrence in the graft.

  11. Accuracy of the screening physical examination to identify subclinical atherosclerosis and peripheral arterial disease in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournot, Maxime; Boccalon, Henri; Cambou, Jean-Pierre; Guilloux, Jérôme; Taraszkiewicz, Dorota; Hanaire-Broutin, Hélène; Chamontin, Bernard; Galinier, Michel; Ferrières, Jean

    2007-12-01

    This study assessed the accuracy of the screening vascular physical examination for predicting asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic and apparently healthy subjects. A standardized physical examination and a carotid and femoral ultrasonography were administered to 2736 men and women aged 20 to 90 years old, with no personal history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and no complaint of neurologic, coronary, or lower limb symptom. We assessed the accuracy of auscultation for bruits and pulse palpation for identifying the presence of significant carotid stenosis, carotid plaque, femoral plaque, and ankle-brachial index (ABI) factors. The absence of both pedal pulses also provided additional information, beyond risk factors, on the presence of an ABI <0.9 (+LR, 3.57; 95% CI, 1.93 to 6.60). The presence of a carotid bruit did not affect the likelihood of carotid stenosis, plaque, or intima-media thickness above the median. Unlike carotid auscultation, pulse palpation and auscultation for femoral bruits provided valuable information on the presence of asymptomatic PAD and underlying atherosclerosis in apparently healthy subjects.

  12. IgG4 related renal disease: A wolf in sheep′s clothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rohan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IgG4 related disease is a fibro-inflammatory condition with involvement of renal and extra renal organs, characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with organ dysfunction. We describe three cases of IgG4 related renal disease from a tertiary care hospital in south India.

  13. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    extract DNA for genotype and for total RNA for specific mRNA determinations. 7b. probe tissue to measure cyst formation and size , fibrosis...transplantation, including reduction in cyst volume and renal scar formation. The results may also positively affect other forms of chronic kidney disease...but maldifferentiate into glomerular adipocytes . J Am Soc Nephrol. 2007; 18(6):1754-1764. 19. Kelly KJ, Williams WW, Colvin RB, Bonventre JV. Antibody

  14. Graves′ disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C G Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves′ disease (GD are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis.

  15. Role of Micronutrients on Subclinical Atherosclerosis Micronutrients in Subclinical Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocyigit, Duygu; Gurses, Kadri Murat; Yalcin, Muhammed Ulvi; Tokgozoglu, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) leading to coronary heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. Nutrition is one of the key factors in the etiology of atherosclerosis. Micronutrient supplements are widely used to prevent many chronic diseases including atherosclerosis. However, scientific evidence regarding this issue is still insufficient and current data on the association of dietary micronutrients and CVD risk is contradictory. Most of the randomized studies have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of micronutrient supplementation on markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. In this review, role of each micronutrient on subclinical atherosclerosis will be evaluated thoroughly.

  16. Multiethnic Exome-Wide Association Study of Subclinical Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Bis, Joshua C; Bielak, Lawrence F; Cox, Amanda J; Dörr, Marcus; Feitosa, Mary F; Franceschini, Nora; Guo, Xiuqing; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Isaacs, Aaron; Jhun, Min A; Kavousi, Maryam; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Marioni, Riccardo E; Schminke, Ulf; Stitziel, Nathan O; Tada, Hayato; van Setten, Jessica|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/345493990; Smith, Albert V; Vojinovic, Dina; Yanek, Lisa R; Yao, Jie; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Amin, Najaf; Baber, Usman; Borecki, Ingrid B; Carr, J Jeffrey; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Cupples, L Adrienne; de Jong, Pim A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/287955672; de Koning, Harry; de Vos, Bob D|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413986004; Demirkan, Ayse; Fuster, Valentin; Franco, Oscar H; Goodarzi, Mark O; Harris, Tamara B; Heckbert, Susan R; Heiss, Gerardo; Hoffmann, Udo; Hofman, Albert; Išgum, Ivana|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31484984X; Jukema, J Wouter; Kähönen, Mika; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kral, Brian G; Launer, Lenore J; Massaro, Joseph; Mehran, Roxana; Mitchell, Braxton D; Mosley, Thomas H; de Mutsert, Renée; Newman, Anne B; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung; North, Kari E; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Pankow, James S; Peloso, Gina M; Post, Wendy; Province, Michael A; Raffield, Laura M; Raitakari, Olli T; Reilly, Dermot F; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rosendaal, Frits; Sartori, Samantha; Taylor, Kent D; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; Turner, Stephen T; Uitterlinden, André G; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van der Lugt, Aad; Völker, Uwe; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassel, Christina L; Weiss, Stefan; Wojczynski, Mary K; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bowden, Donald W; Deary, Ian J; Dehghan, Abbas; Felix, Stephan B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mathias, Rasika; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Psaty, Bruce M; Rader, Daniel J; Rotter, Jerome I; Wilson, James G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Völzke, Henry; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peyser, Patricia A; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -The burden of subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic individuals is heritable and associated with elevated risk of developing clinical coronary heart disease (CHD). We sought to identify genetic variants in protein-coding regions associated with subclinical atherosclerosis and the

  17. Drosophila provides rapid modeling of renal development, function, and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of specialized excretory cells is a cornerstone of the metazoan radiation, and the basic tasks performed by Drosophila and human renal systems are similar. The development of the Drosophila renal (Malpighian) tubule is a classic example of branched tubular morphogenesis, allowing study of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transitions, stem cell-mediated regeneration, and the evolution of a glomerular kidney. Tubule function employs conserved transport proteins, such as the Na+, K+-ATPase and V-ATPase, aquaporins, inward rectifier K+ channels, and organic solute transporters, regulated by cAMP, cGMP, nitric oxide, and calcium. In addition to generation and selective reabsorption of primary urine, the tubule plays roles in metabolism and excretion of xenobiotics, and in innate immunity. The gene expression resource FlyAtlas.org shows that the tubule is an ideal tissue for the modeling of renal diseases, such as nephrolithiasis and Bartter syndrome, or for inborn errors of metabolism. Studies are assisted by uniquely powerful genetic and transgenic resources, the widespread availability of mutant stocks, and low-cost, rapid deployment of new transgenics to allow manipulation of renal function in an organotypic context. PMID:20926630

  18. Lipotoxicity as a trigger factor of renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Lahuerta, Adriana; Martínez-García, Cristina; Medina-Gómez, Gema

    2016-10-01

    In the last few decades, rapid changes in lifestyle have led to an alarming increase in the prevalence of obesity and obesity-associated complications. Obese patients are at increased risk of developing hypertension, heart disease, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes and kidney disease. The surplus of calories is normally stored as triglycerides in adipose tissue. However, excess lipids can also accumulate ectopically in other organs, including the kidney, contributing to their damage through toxic processes named lipotoxicity. The kidney is negatively affected by dyslipidemia, lipid accumulation and changes in circulating adipokines that bring about alterations in renal lipid metabolism and promote insulin resistance, generation of reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress, ultimately leading to alterations in the glomerular filtration barrier and renal failure. This review focuses on the pathogenic molecular mechanisms associated with renal lipotoxicity, and presents new insights about potential new therapeutic targets and biomarkers such as microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, of relevance for the early detection of lipid-associated kidney disease.

  19. Intradialytic Muscle Cramp and its Association with Peripheral Arterial Disease in End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Ghimire

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease were common occurrence in end stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis patients, however there was no association between the presence of intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease. Keywords: end stage renal disease; intradialytic muscle cramps; peripheral arterial disease.

  20. Management of subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Palacios, Silvia; Pascual-Corrales, Eider; Galofre, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The ideal approach for adequate management of subclinical hyperthyroidism (low levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH] and normal thyroid hormone level) is a matter of intense debate among endocrinologists. The prevalence of low serum TSH levels ranges between 0.5% in children and 15% in the elderly population. Mild subclinical hyperthyroidism is more common than severe subclinical hyperthyroidism. Transient suppression of TSH secretion may occur because of several reasons; thus, corroboration of results from different assessments is essential in such cases. During differential diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, pituitary or hypothalamic disease, euthyroid sick syndrome, and drug-mediated suppression of TSH must be ruled out. A low plasma TSH value is also typically seen in the first trimester of gestation. Factitial or iatrogenic TSH inhibition caused by excessive intake of levothyroxine should be excluded by checking the patient's medication history. If these nonthyroidal causes are ruled out during differential diagnosis, either transient or long-term endogenous thyroid hormone excess, usually caused by Graves' disease or nodular goiter, should be considered as the cause of low circulating TSH levels. We recommend the following 6-step process for the assessment and treatment of this common hormonal disorder: 1) confirmation, 2) evaluation of severity, 3) investigation of the cause, 4) assessment of potential complications, 5) evaluation of the necessity of treatment, and 6) if necessary, selection of the most appropriate treatment. In conclusion, management of subclinical hyperthyroidism merits careful monitoring through regular assessment of thyroid function. Treatment is mandatory in older patients (> 65 years) or in presence of comorbidities (such as osteoporosis and atrial fibrillation).

  1. Management of Subclinical Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Palacios, Silvia; Pascual-Corrales, Eider; Galofre, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The ideal approach for adequate management of subclinical hyperthyroidism (low levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH] and normal thyroid hormone level) is a matter of intense debate among endocrinologists. The prevalence of low serum TSH levels ranges between 0.5% in children and 15% in the elderly population. Mild subclinical hyperthyroidism is more common than severe subclinical hyperthyroidism. Transient suppression of TSH secretion may occur because of several reasons; thus, corroboration of results from different assessments is essential in such cases. During differential diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, pituitary or hypothalamic disease, euthyroid sick syndrome, and drug-mediated suppression of TSH must be ruled out. A low plasma TSH value is also typically seen in the first trimester of gestation. Factitial or iatrogenic TSH inhibition caused by excessive intake of levothyroxine should be excluded by checking the patient’s medication history. If these nonthyroidal causes are ruled out during differential diagnosis, either transient or long-term endogenous thyroid hormone excess, usually caused by Graves’ disease or nodular goiter, should be considered as the cause of low circulating TSH levels. We recommend the following 6-step process for the assessment and treatment of this common hormonal disorder: 1) confirmation, 2) evaluation of severity, 3) investigation of the cause, 4) assessment of potential complications, 5) evaluation of the necessity of treatment, and 6) if necessary, selection of the most appropriate treatment. In conclusion, management of subclinical hyperthyroidism merits careful monitoring through regular assessment of thyroid function. Treatment is mandatory in older patients (> 65 years) or in presence of comorbidities (such as osteoporosis and atrial fibrillation). PMID:23843809

  2. Dietary choline and betaine; associations with subclinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk and incidence of CVD, coronary heart disease and stroke: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Heather R; Musani, Solomon K; Dibaba, Daniel T; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Taylor, Herman A; Tucker, Katherine L; Bidulescu, Aurelian

    2018-02-01

    Several mechanisms have been described through which dietary intake of choline and its derivative betaine may be associated in both directions with subclinical atherosclerosis. We assessed the association of dietary intake of choline and betaine with cardiovascular risk and markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease. Data from 3924 Jackson Heart Study (JHS) African-American participants with complete food frequency questionnaire at baseline and follow-up measurements of heart disease measures were used. Multivariable linear regression models were employed to assess associations between choline and betaine intake with carotid intima-media thickness, coronary artery calcium, abdominal aortic calcium and left ventricular mass. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate associations with time to incident coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD). During an average nine years of follow-up, 124 incident CHD events, 75 incident stroke events and 153 incident CVD events were documented. In women, greater choline intake was associated with lower left ventricular mass (p = 0.0006 for trend across choline quartiles) and with abdominal aortic calcium score. Among all JHS participants, there was a statistically significant inverse association between dietary choline intake and incident stroke, β = -0.33 (p = 0.04). Betaine intake was associated with greater risk of incident CHD when comparing the third quartile of intake with the lowest quartile of intake (HR 1.89, 95 % CI 1.14, 3.15). Among our African-American participants, higher dietary choline intake was associated with a lower risk of incident ischemic stroke, and thus putative dietary benefits. Higher dietary betaine intake was associated with a nonlinear higher risk of incident CHD.

  3. Effect of Urate Lowering Therapy on Renal Disease Progression in Hyperuricemic Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonjin; Shin, Sungjoon; Kim, Kyungsoo; Choi, Sangtae; Lee, Kwanghoon

    2015-11-01

    To determine whether urate lowering therapy (ULT) could delay renal disease progression in hyperuricemic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We performed a retrospective review of hyperuricemic patients with stage 3 CKD followed from September 2005 to July 2014 in Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea. A total of 158 eligible patients were identified and 65 of them were treated with ULT in addition to the usual CKD management. We divided the patients according to the use of ULT and compared the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) change from baseline value and the proportion of renal disease progression (decline of eGFR > 30% of the baseline value, initiation of dialysis or eGFR renal disease progression were identified by logistic regression analysis. After a median followup of 118.5 weeks (minimum 25, maximum 465), the ULT group showed better outcomes compared to the non-ULT group in terms of eGFR change from baseline (-1.19 ± 12.07 vs -7.37 ± 11.17 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.001) and the proportion of renal disease progression (12.3% vs 27.9%, p = 0.01). Goal-directed ULT showed better clinical outcomes compared to maintaining the initial ULT dose. Actual (area under the SUA-time curve adjusted by total observation time period) serum uric acid was significantly associated with the risk of renal disease progression (p for trend = 0.04) and actual serum uric acid level renal disease progression by 69.4%. ULT significantly delayed renal disease progression in hyperuricemic patients with CKD. Goal-directed ULT seems to be better than continuing the initial ULT prescription.

  4. Arterial spin labelling in imaging of renal diseases and renal allograft pathology; MRT-Perfusionsmessung mit Arterial Spin Labelling. Anwendung fuer die Niere und Transplantatniere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueper, Katja; Gutberlet, Marcel [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Kuehn, Bernd [Siemens AG/Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Arterial Spin Labelling (ASL) is a technique for non-invasive and contrast-free assessment of perfusion with MRI. Renal ASL allows examination of renal pathophysiology, evaluation of the course of renal disease and therapy effects by longitudinal measurements as well as characterization of renal tumors. In this article, techniques of ASL will be explained and challenges of renal ASL will be emphasized. In addition, examples for clinical application of ASL for diagnosis of renal disease and renal allograft pathology will be given.

  5. Mid-term Risk for Subclinical Atherosclerosis and Chronic Myocarditis in Children with Kawasaki Disease and Transient Coronary Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Mansingh; Singh, Surjit; Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Gupta, Anju; Rohit, Manojkumar

    2017-08-01

    There is evidence for premature atherosclerosis and systemic arterial stiffening during follow-up of children with Kawasaki disease (KD) and coronary artery abnormalities (CAA). Moreover, patients with KD may also have subclinical myocardial involvement and inhomogeneous ventricular repolarization. The inhomogeneous ventricular repolarization manifests as increased QT dispersion on electrocardiography. There is a paucity of studies in endothelial dysfunction and QT dispersion in children with KD and transient CAA. Twenty children with KD and transient CAA were studied at least 1 year after resolution of CAA. Mean follow-up period between KD onset and enrolment in the study was 53.7 months. Twenty age and sex-matched controls were enrolled. High-resolution B-mode ultrasonography was used to analyze brachial artery dilatation in response to reactive hyperemia (cases and controls) and sublingual nitroglycerine (cases only). Carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT) and stiffness index were calculated. The difference between maximum and minimum QTc intervals on 12 lead electrocardiogram was calculated as QTc dispersion (QTcd). No statistically significant difference was noted in percent flow-mediated dilatation of brachial arteries in response to reactive hyperemia between cases (13.31 ± 10.41%) and controls (12.86 ± 7.09%). Sublingual nitroglycerine-mediated dilatation in children with KD was 14.88 ± 12.03%. Mean cIMT was similar in cases (0.036 ± 0.015 cm) and controls (0.035 ± 0.076 cm; p = 0.791). No statistically significant difference between groups was observed in mean QTcd values (0.057 ± 0.018 s vs. 0.059 ± 0.015 s in controls, p = 0.785). No evidence of significant endothelial dysfunction or increased QT dispersion in patients with KD and transient coronary artery abnormalities was found in our cohort when studied at a mean follow-up of 53.7 months. This is reassuring, and indicates that risk of subclinical atherosclerosis

  6. Mechanisms of renal NaCl retention in proteinuric disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Friis, Ulla G; Versland, Jostein B

    2013-01-01

    In diseases with proteinuria, for example nephrotic syndrome and pre-eclampsia, there often are suppression of plasma renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system components, expansion of extracellular volume and avid renal sodium retention. Mechanisms of sodium retention in proteinuria are reviewed...... pressure. Aberrant filtration of plasminogen and conversion within the urinary space to plasmin may activate gamma ENaC proteolytically and contribute to inappropriate NaCl retention and oedema in acute proteinuric conditions and to hypertension in diseases with chronic microalbuminuria/proteinuria....

  7. Tobacco Exposure as Determined by Serum Cotinine and Subclinical Myocardial Injury in Individuals Free from Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad; Li, Yabing; O'Neal, Wesley T; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2017-10-01

    Tobacco exposure including second-hand smoke is the leading preventable cause of premature death in the United States. Serum cotinine, a highly sensitive and specific biomarker for tobacco exposure, is a more accurate measure of tobacco exposure than self-reported smoking status. Although the harmful effect of tobacco exposure on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (e.g., atherosclerosis) or hard CVD outcomes (e.g., myocardial infarction) is well established, its effect on intermediate outcomes such as subclinical myocardial injury (SMI), especially in nonsmokers, is not clear. Therefore, we examined the risk of SMI, defined as a Cardiac Infarction/Injury Score of ≥10 points on the 12-lead electrocardiogram with abnormal serum cotinine levels (>15 ng/ml) in 6,264 smokers and nonsmokers who were free from CVD enrolled in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. SMI was more common in those with abnormal compared with normal serum cotinine levels (25.9% vs 19.6%, respectively; p tobacco exposures on the cardiovascular system, and highlight the need for a personalized risk assessment that takes into account groups at high risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of subclinical bacteriuria in cats with dermatological disease receiving long-term glucocorticoids and/or ciclosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Samantha L; Schick, Anthea E; Lewis, Thomas P; Newton, Heide

    2017-08-18

    Dogs receiving long-term glucocorticoids or ciclosporin have an increased frequency of bacteriuria. No studies have investigated the frequency of bacteriuria in cats receiving long-term glucocorticoids and/or ciclosporin. To document whether subclinical bacteriuria occurs in cats receiving long-term glucocorticoid and/or ciclosporin for management of chronic disease. Thirty two cats treated with parenteral glucocorticoids and/or oral glucocorticoids and/or ciclosporin were included. Thirty two cats receiving oral glucocorticoids and/or ciclosporin for at least three months or at least two injections of long-acting glucocorticoids within the preceding six months were evaluated. Thirty four healthy cats were used as a control group. Urinalysis and urine culture was performed on urine samples collected by cystocentesis from each cat. In the glucocorticoid/ciclosporin group, none of 32 cats had a positive urine culture. In the control group, one of 34 cats had a positive urine culture. There were no statistically significant differences between the urinalyses from either group. There was no evidence to suggest that administration of long-term glucocorticoids and/or ciclosporin is associated with bacteriuria in cats. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  9. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  10. End-stage renal disease: endocrine aspects of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsson, Gudmundur; Ahlmén, Jarl

    2003-08-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a deadly disease unless supportive treatment is administered in the form of haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis or kidney transplantation. Although marked improvements have occurred in the efficiency of dialysis and in overall care, patients with ESRD still have poor long-term survival. The outcome is largely dependent on age, nutritional status, efficiency of dialysis and underlying reason for renal failure. As a consequence of renal failure, these patients experience a number of endocrine and metabolic disorders that may affect their well being and overall outcome. Disturbances in the somatotropic axis have been documented at several different levels, including an end-organ resistance to both growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). A consequence seen in childhood is reduced growth velocity and short final height that may be overcome by long-term GH treatment, and it is possible that metabolism and nutritional status in adults with ESRD may be influenced by these abnormalities. Although a few small trials of GH treatment in adults with ESRD suggest that nutritional status may improve, long-term trials are needed to demonstrate other benefit of such treatment. This review will give a brief description of endocrine problems in adult patients with ESRD with a focus on the somatotropic axis, and it will review the experience reported in published trials of GH treatment in this patient group.

  11. Periodontal disease characterization in dogs with normal renal function or chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbudo-Selmi Glenda Ramalho

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate periodontal disease (PD in dogs with chronic renal failure (CRF and to compare it to PD in dogs with normal renal function (NRF. Twelve dogs with CRF and 24 dogs with NRF, all presenting dental pocket formation, were compared. In all dogs, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, urine specific gravity and total red and white blood cells were determined. A complete oral examination was also performed including evaluation of bacterial plaque, gingivitis, gingival recession, pocket, calculus, dental mobility, dental loss, and ulcers. These data were used to calculate plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI and periodontal destruction index (PDI. PD was graded as mild, moderate or severe based on the results. Mild, moderate or severe PD was observed in dogs with NRF, whereas dogs with CRF presented either mild or severe PD. Dogs with NRF showed higher involvement of the maxillary teeth, whereas dogs with CRF showed a higher involvement of the mandibular teeth. Plaque index was significantly higher in dogs with NRF. It was concluded that lesion distribution and periodontal disease progression may be altered in dogs with CRF, and gingival inflammatory response differs in dogs with NRF and CRF regarding to the stage of periodontal disease.

  12. Dietary inflammatory index in relation to sub-clinical atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Nicola P; Lewis, Joshua R; Blekkenhorst, Lauren C; Shivappa, Nitin; Woodman, Richard J; Bondonno, Catherine P; Ward, Natalie C; Hébert, James R; Thompson, Peter L; Prince, Richard L; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2017-06-01

    Arterial wall thickening, stimulated by low-grade systemic inflammation, underlies many cardiovascular events. As diet is a significant moderator of systemic inflammation, the dietary inflammatory index (DIITM) has recently been devised to assess the overall inflammatory potential of an individual's diet. The primary objective of this study was to assess the association of the DII with common carotid artery-intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) and carotid plaques. To substantiate the clinical importance of these findings we assessed the relationship of DII score with atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD)-related mortality, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVA)-related mortality and ischaemic heart disease (IHD)-related mortality more. The study was conducted in Western Australian women aged over 70 years (n 1304). Dietary data derived from a validated FFQ (completed at baseline) were used to calculate a DII score for each individual. In multivariable-adjusted models, DII scores were associated with sub-clinical atherosclerosis: a 1 sd (2·13 units) higher DII score was associated with a 0·013-mm higher mean CCA-IMT (P=0·016) and a 0·016-mm higher maximum CCA-IMT (P=0·008), measured at 36 months. No relationship was seen between DII score and carotid plaque severity. There were 269 deaths during follow-up. High DII scores were positively associated with ASVD-related death (per sd, hazard ratio (HR): 1·36; 95 % CI 1·15, 1·60), CVA-related death (per sd, HR: 1·30; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·69) and IHD-related death (per sd, HR: 1·40; 95 % CI 1·13, 1·75). These results support the hypothesis that a pro-inflammatory diet increases systemic inflammation leading to development and progression of atherosclerosis and eventual ASVD-related death.

  13. The relationship between serum thyroid hormone levels, subclinical hypothyroidism, and coronary collateral circulation in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballı, Mehmet; Çetin, Mustafa; Taşolar, Hakan; Uysal, Onur Kadir; Yılmaz, Mahmut; Durukan, Mine; Elbasan, Zafer; Çaylı, Murat

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid disease is a common endocrine disease with important effects on the cardiovascular system. As an adaptive response to myocardial ischemia, coronary collateral circulation (CCC) plays an important role in obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). The association between serum thyroid hormone levels and development of CCC was investigated in the present study. In total, 430 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography procedure and had documented total occlusion in at least 1 major coronary artery were investigated retrospectively. Degree of CCC was classified according to Cohen-Rentrop method. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were assessed by the chemiluminescence immunoassay technique. In spite of diabetes mellitus (p=0.019), smoking (p<0.001), and TSH (p<0.001), FT3 (p<0.001), FT4 (p=0.015), and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) (p<0.001) ratios were significantly different between groups. In regression analysis, SCH (p=0.024), DM (p=0.021), smoking (p<0.001), and heart failure (p=0.029) were independent predictors of poor CCC development in multivariate model 1. When regression analyses were performed based on multivariate model 2, TSH (p<0.001), FT3 (p<0.001), heart failure (p=0.022), smoking (p<0.001), and hyperlipidemia (HPL) (p=0.046) were independent predictors of poor CCC development. In addition to traditional risk factors, SCH, higher serum TSH, and lower FT3 levels were associated with development of poor CCC in patients with obstructive CA.

  14. Homocysteine as a predictive biomarker in early diagnosis of renal failure susceptibility and prognostic diagnosis for end stages renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Hatem K; El-Sayed, Mohamed-I Kotb; Leheta, Ola F

    2016-09-01

    Glomerular filtration rate and/or creatinine are not accurate methods for renal failure prediction. This study tested homocysteine (Hcy) as a predictive and prognostic marker for end stage renal disease (ESRD). In total, 176 subjects were recruited and divided into: healthy normal group (108 subjects); mild-to-moderate impaired renal function group (21 patients); severe impaired renal function group (7 patients); and chronic renal failure group (40 patients) who were on regular hemodialysis. Blood samples were collected, and serum was separated for analysis of total Hcy, creatinine, high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), serum albumin, and calcium. Data showed that Hcy level was significantly increased from normal-to-mild impairment then significantly decreases from mild impairment until the patient reaches severe impairment while showing significant elevation in the last stage of chronic renal disease. Creatinine level was increased in all stages of kidney impairment in comparison with control. CRP level was showing significant elevation in the last stage. A significant decrease in both albumin and calcium was occurred in all stages of renal impairment. We conclude Hcy in combination with CRP, creatinine, albumin, and calcium can be used as a prognostic marker for ESRD and an early diagnostic marker for the risk of renal failure.

  15. Effect of Underlying Renal Disease on Nutritional and Metabolic Profile of Older Adults with Reduced Renal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Silvia; Amabile, Maria Ida; Altieri, Silvia; Mastroluca, Daniela; Lai, Carlo; Aceto, Paola; Crudo, Massimiliano; D'Angelo, Anna Rita; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Molfino, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a common condition in the general population, particularly among older adults. Renal impairment is in turn associated with metabolic and nutritional derangements and with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To compare the metabolic, nutritional, and cardiovascular impact of reduced kidney function between patients with and without known renal disease. We enrolled consecutive outpatients (age ≥65 years) with reduced renal function who were divided into two groups: Group A with history of renal disease and Group B with unknown renal disease. Metabolic and nutritional parameters, including involuntary body weight loss (BWL) in the previous 6 months, mineral metabolism, inflammatory indices, and left ventricular mass index (LVMI), were evaluated. A total of 76 patients were enrolled. Group A (n = 39, M: 24, F: 15) showed greater BWL with a significant reduction of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, transferrin, cholinesterase, albumin, and LVMI with respect to Group B (p renal disease may negatively impact on several metabolic and nutritional parameters related to increased cardiovascular risk among older adults.

  16. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in hispanic youth with dysglycemia: Risk for subclinical atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obese Hispanic adolescents (OHAs) with dysglycemia have increased cardiovascular disease risk burden. To investigate if nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) confers added risk for endothelial dysfunction in these youth. Cross-sectional study. Academic institution. Thirty-six OHAs (15.360.4 years...

  17. Predictors of advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown.......Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown....

  18. Renal cell carcinoma co-existent with other renal disease: clinico-pathological features in pre-dialysis patients and those receiving dialysis or renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Martínez-Ara, Jorge; Miguel, José Luis; Arrieta, Javier; Costero, Olga; Górriz, José Luis; Picazo, Mari-Luz; Fresno, Manuel

    2004-11-01

    Patients on chronic dialysis are prone to developing acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may lead to the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The risk factors for the development of RCC so far have not been determined in pre-dialysis patients with co-existent renal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinico-pathological features of RCC in pre-dialysis patients with associated renal diseases or in those undergoing chronic dialysis and renal transplantation. We studied 32 kidneys from 31 patients with RCC and associated renal diseases. Of those, 18 kidneys were from 17 patients not on renal replacement therapy (RRT) when diagnosed with RCC; 14 patients received dialysis or dialysis followed by renal transplantation. Several clinico-pathological features were analysed and compared between the two groups. Overall, there was a preponderance of males (75%); nephrosclerosis was the predominant co-existent disease (31%). The median intervals from renal disease to RCC in the dialysis and transplanted groups were significantly longer than in the pre-dialysis group (15.8+/-1.1 vs 2.4+/-0.7 years, P<0.0001). In contrast to pre-dialysis RCC, the dialysis and transplant RCC groups had greater frequency of ACKD (100 vs 28%, P<0.0001), papillary type RCC (43 vs 11%, P<0.05) and multifocal tumours (43 vs 5%, P<0.05). At the end of the study, 71% of dialysis and transplanted patients and 72% of pre-dialysis patients were alive. ACKD develops in dialysis patients, as it does in those with renal disease prior to RRT. The duration of renal disease, rather than the dialysis procedure itself, appears to be the main determinant of ACKD and RCC. The RCC occurring in patients with ACKD and prolonged RRT is more frequently of the papillary type and multifocal than the RCC occurring in patients with no or few acquired cysts and a short history of renal disease. Long-term outcomes did not differ between the two groups.

  19. ABSOLUTE AND RELATIVE RENAL LENGTH IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASES

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    Jovana Čukuranović Kokoris

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to evaluate the significance of absolute and relative renal length in the diagnoses of several chronic kidney diseases (CKDs in which kidney size changes in different manners during the disease course. The study included 181 patients: 35 with Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN, 31 with diabetic nephropathy (DN, 30 with primary glomerular diseases (GN, 30 with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, and 58 healthy controls (C. Absolute renal length was the distance between two most distant points on their poles and it was measured ultrasonographically, and relative length was obtained as the ratio of renal length and body height (kidney/body ratio, KBR. In the statistical analysis, One Way ANOVA test was used to establish the differences in absolute lengths and KBR between the studied groups; 2 test was used to establish the differences in the number of examinees of male and female gender; correlation and linear regression analysis were used to assess the association between age of the examinees and absolute and relative parameters of kidney size. The obtained results demonstrated that the average lengths of the right and left kidney were highest in ADPKD and lowest in BEN group. The average values of KBR of the right and left kidney showed a trend similar to that of average absolute lengths in all groups, except in GN and DN groups, in which absolute parameters of kidney size differed significantly from relative parameters. The correlation analysis showed that a significant negative correlation between age and absolute i.e. relative parameters of kidney size existed only in BEN group, but even in this case the differences between correlation coefficients of absolute and relative length of both kidneys were not statistically significant. Based on the obtained results, we could not establish the advantage of absolute over relative kidney length and vice versa in the studied CKDs. Further studies of larger

  20. Patterns of renal disease in South Korea: a 20-year review of a single-center renal biopsy database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ho Sik; Cho, Dae Hyeon; Kang, Soo Kyoung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Soo Young; Yang, Joung Wook; Kang, Gyong Hoon; Kim, Ye Na; Jung, Yeonsoon; Cheon, Bong-Kwon; Rim, Hark

    2017-11-01

    Several registries and centers have reported the results of renal biopsies from different parts of the world. As there are few data regarding the epidemiology of glomerulonephritis (GN) in South Korea, we conducted this study on renal biopsy findings during the last 20 years from a single center. Data for 818 patients who underwent renal biopsy at our center between 1992 and 2011 were collected retrospectively. All kidney specimens were examined with light microscopy (LM) and immunofluorescent microscopy (IF). There were 818 cases of native kidney biopsies. In cases of primary GN, the most frequent type of renal pathology in adults (18-59 years) was mesangial proliferative GN (MsPGN, 34.5%) followed by IgA nephropathy (IgAN, 33.3%) and membranous GN (MGN, 8.8%). Indications in adults (18-59 years) were asymptomatic urinary abnormalities (75.3%) followed by nephrotic syndrome (19.8%) and acute kidney injury (AKI, 3.4%). Among 818 renal biopsy specimens, MsPGN and IgAN were the most frequent biopsy-proven renal diseases. MGN was the third most common cause of primary GN and lupus nephritis (LN) was the most common secondary glomerular disease. Our data contribute to the epidemiology of renal disease in South Korea.

  1. The effects of multiple coronary artery disease risk factors on subclinical atherosclerosis in a rural population in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamudu, Hadii M; Paul, Timir K; Wang, Liang; Veeranki, Sreenivas P; Panchal, Hemang B; Alamian, Arsham; Sarnosky, Kamrie; Budoff, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    The risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are associated with coronary atherosclerosis and having multiple risk factors potentiates atherosclerosis. This study examined the prevalence of multiple biological and lifestyle/behavioral risk factors and their association with coronary artery calcium (CAC), a marker for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. This is a cross-sectional study of 1607 community-dwelling asymptomatic individuals from central Appalachia who participated in CAC screening between January 2011 and December 2012. Data on demographics (sex and age) and 7 traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) were collected and categorized into 5 groups (0-1, 2, 3, 4, and ≥5). Prevalence of these risk factors and CAC scores (0, 1-99, 100-399, ≥400) were assessed, and the impact of the number of risk factors on CAC scores were delineated using multiple logistic regression. Over 98% of participants had ≥1 risk factor. While obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and family history of CAD significantly increased the odds of having CAC, CAC scores significantly increased with number of risk factors. After adjusting for demographic factors, having 3, 4, and ≥5 risk factors was significantly associated with increased odds of having higher CAC scores when compared to zero CAC score by more than one and half times [OR=1.65, CI (1.20-2.25)], two times [OR=2.32, CI (1.67-3.23)] and three times [OR=3.45, CI (2.42-4.92)], respectively. The high prevalence of multiple risk factors in the study population suggests the need for aggressive multiple risk factors interventions for primary prevention of CAD, which could address CVD health disparities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Wilson′s disease - A rare cause of renal tubular acidosis with metabolic bone disease

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    D. K. S. Subrahmanyam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 16-year-old boy who presented with weakness of lower limbs. He was diagnosed to have Wilson′s disease, renal tubular acidosis and osteoporosis. Screening of siblings showed that his younger sister was also affected by the disease.

  3. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  4. Markers of kidney disease and risk of subclinical and clinical heart failure in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Nisha; Katz, Ronit; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Afkarian, Maryam; Kestenbaum, Bryan; de Boer, Ian H; Young, Bessie

    2016-12-01

    African Americans and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for clinical heart failure (HF). In this study, we aimed to determine the association of markers of kidney disease with subclinical HF (by echocardiogram) and risk of clinical HF among a large, well-characterized community-based cohort of African American patients. We also examined whether the association of markers of kidney disease with HF was attenuated with adjustment for echocardiographic measures. We studied participants in the Jackson Heart Study, a large community-based cohort of African Americans. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) were measured at baseline. We tested the association of eGFR and urine ACR with left ventricular mass (LVM), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and physician-adjudicated incident HF. Among the 3332 participants in the study, 166 (5%) had eGFR disease, lower eGFR and higher urine ACR were associated with higher LVM {β-coefficient 1.54 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-2.31] per 10 mL/min/1.73 m 2 decrease in eGFR and 2.87 (95% CI 1.85-3.88) per doubling of urine ACR}. There was no association of eGFR and urine ACR with LVEF [β-coefficient -0.12 (95% CI -0.28-0.04) and -0.11 (95% CI -0.35-0.12), respectively]. There was no association of eGFR with the risk of incident HF [HR 1.02 (95% CI 0.91-1.14) per 10 mL/min/1.73 m 2 decrease], while there was a significant association of urine ACR [HR 2.22 (95% CI 1.29-3.84) per doubling of urine ACR]. This association was only modestly attenuated with adjustment for LVM [HR 1.95 (95% CI 1.09-3.49)]. Among a community-based cohort of African Americans, lower eGFR and higher ACR were associated with higher LVM. Furthermore, higher urine ACR was associated with incident HF, which was not entirely explained by the presence of left ventricular disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  5. Outcomes of renal transplant from donors with polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamali, Awad; Milsom-Mcquillan, Sarah; Gibbs, Paul

    2018-02-06

    Kidneys from donors affected by autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are, in general, considered unsuitable for transplantation. However, some authors report cases of patients who received kidneys from a deceased ADPKD donor showing encouraging outcomes. Our aim is to provide our experience of a patient with end stage renal failure who received a deceased donor kidney from a 29-year-old who themselves had been diagnosed with ADPKD but well maintained renal function, and to provide a comprehensive review of all the published literature. In addition to our case, a literature search (PubMed database, Embase, Cochrane Library) of articles published between 1980 and 2017 was performed. Sixteen cases were identified. Median donor age was 24 (range12-55) years old. Median recipient age was 46 (range 19-72) years old. Fifteen cases had a single kidney transplant and one case had a dual kidney transplant. 13/16 (81%) had immediate function, 2 patients (12.5%) had delayed graft function and one patient (6.25%) had primary non-function. Median graft follow up was 36 months (range 6-180). Median serum creatinine at last follow up was 124 μmol/L (range75-442). Thirteen patients (81%) were still alive with a working renal transplant at last follow up. The published literature is encouraging and supports the use of polycystic kidneys from younger deceased donors. Therefore, we believe that if kidneys from ADPKD donors are offered, they should have a full assessment and be considered acceptable for renal donation to recipients who may have a life expectancy of 10 years or less and who are fully informed and have the capacity to consent to receiving a polycystic kidney. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Renal and extrarenal manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Romão

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of the most common clinical features in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in a sample of the Brazilian population. The medical records of 92 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease attended during the period from 1985 to 2003 were reviewed. The following data were recorded: age at diagnosis, gender, associated clinical manifestations, occurrence of stroke, age at loss of renal function (beginning of dialysis, and presence of a family history. The involvement of abdominal viscera was investigated by ultrasonography. Intracranial alterations were prospectively investigated by magnetic resonance angiography in 42 asymptomatic patients, and complemented with digital subtraction arteriography when indicated. Mean age at diagnosis was 35.1 ± 14.9 years, and mean serum creatinine at referral was 2.4 ± 2.8 mg/dL. The most frequent clinical manifestations during the disease were arterial hypertension (63.3%, lumbar pain (55.4%, an abdominal mass (47.8%, and urinary infection (35.8%. Loss of renal function occurred in 27 patients (mean age: 45.4 ± 9.5 years. The liver was the second organ most frequently affected (39.1%. Stroke occurred in 7.6% of the patients. Asymptomatic intracranial aneurysm was detected in 3 patients and arachnoid cysts in 3 other patients. In conclusion, the most common clinical features were lumbar pain, arterial hypertension, abdominal mass, and urinary infection, and the most serious complications were chronic renal failure and stroke. Both intracranial aneurysms and arachnoid cysts occurred in asymptomatic patients at a frequency of 7.14%.

  7. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population

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    J.S. Lasa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. Aim: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Materials and methods: Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. Results: A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55, P=.001. Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Conclusions: Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Resumen: Introducción: Existe una extensa heterogeneidad en los reportes de la prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca en el contexto de la anemia ferropénica. Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca en pacientes con anemia ferropénica. Materiales y métodos: Pacientes adultos con anemia ferropénica fueron reclutados para realizarse una endoscopia digestiva alta con biopsia duodenal. Se reclutaron asimismo voluntarios de la comunidad como controles. Resultados: Se reclutó a 135 pacientes con anemia y 133 controles. La prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca fue mayor en el grupo de anemia (11.11% vs. 1.51%, OR 8.18 [1.83-36.55], p = 0.001; el 73.3% de los celíacos en el grupo de anémicos presentaron algún signo endoscópico de atrofia vellositaria, mientras que el 100% de los celíacos en el grupo control presentaron por lo menos un signo endoscópico. Conclusión: Los pacientes

  8. Low Serum Levels of Vitamin D are Associated with Progression of Subclinical Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Prospective, Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Fontán, Miguel; Borràs Sans, Mercè; Bajo Rubio, Maria Auxiliadora; Rodriguez-Carmona, Ana; Betriu, Angels; Valdivielso, José Maria; Fernández, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis and the main predictors of progression of this condition in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) have been insufficiently investigated. Following a prospective, multicenter, observational design, we studied 237 patients who were treated with PD for ≥3 months, without any clinical background of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Our objectives were the following: (1) to investigate the prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis, as compared to a control group of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals, and (2) to disclose PD technique-related predictors of progression of disease during a 24-month follow-up period. We used vascular ultrasound for characterization of subclinical atherosclerotic disease. A total of 123 patients (51.9%) vs. 79 controls (33.5%) presented ≥1 carotid plaque, and 114 patients (48.3%) vs. 72 controls (30.5%) ≥1 femoral plaque, at baseline evaluation (p identified age, carotid intima-media thickness, presence of ≥1 carotid plaque, and serum levels of 25OH vitamin D and C-reactive protein (CRP) at baseline as independent correlates of progression of atherosclerotic disease. On the contrary, PD technique-related variables did not show any association with this outcome. Atherosclerotic vascular disease is frequent among asymptomatic patients undergoing PD. Older age, pre-existent disease (assessed by vascular ultrasound), and serum levels of 25OH vitamin D and CRP are independent markers of the progression of this condition. These findings may contribute to improve identification of subpopulations with a high risk of CV events, deserving intensified measures of prevention. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Senescence rates in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, J J E; Rozing, M P; Kramer, Ada

    2011-01-01

    The most frequently used model to describe the exponential increase in mortality rate over age is the Gompertz equation. Logarithmically transformed, the equation conforms to a straight line, of which the slope has been interpreted as the rate of senescence. Earlier, we proposed the derivative...... function of the Gompertz equation as a superior descriptor of senescence rate. Here, we tested both measures of the rate of senescence in a population of patients with end-stage renal disease. It is clinical dogma that patients on dialysis experience accelerated senescence, whereas those with a functional...

  10. Early Renal Involvement in a Girl with Classic Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antongiovanni, Norberto; Jaurretche, Sebastián

    2017-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from the deficiency or absence of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A; this defect leads to the systemic accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and its metabolites. Organic involvement in men is well known, but in women it is controversial, mainly due to the random X-chromosome inactivation in each of their cells (Lyon hypothesis). This would explain why women (heterozygotes) present a wide variability in the severity of their phenotype. The manifestations are multisystemic and begin in early childhood, reaching a severe compromise in adulthood. Typical acroparesthesia in hands and feet, gastrointestinal symptoms, angiokeratomas, dyshidrosis, hearing loss, arrhythmias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular accidents, and renal failure can be observed. Nephropathy is one of the major complications of Fabry disease. Glomerular and vascular changes are present before progression to overt proteinuria and decreased glomerular filtration rate, even in pediatric patients. A case of incipient renal involvement in a girl with classic Fabry disease is reported. PMID:29098097

  11. Edema in renal diseases – current view on pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Bobkova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Edema is a common complication of numerous renal disease. In the recent past several aspects of the pathophysiology of this condition have been elucidated. We herein present a case of nephrotic syndrome in a 30 year-old men. The discussion revolves around the following key questions on fluid accumulation in renal disease: 1. What is edema? What diseases can cause edema? 2. What are the mechanisms of edema in nephrotic syndrome?   2a. The “underfill” theory   2b. The “overfill” theory   2c. Tubulointerstitial inflammation   2d. Vascular permeability 3. What are the mechanisms of edema in nephritic syndrome? 4. How can the volume status be assessed in patients with nephrotic syndrome? 5. What are therapeutic strategies for edema management? 6. What are the factors affecting response to diuretics? 7. How can we overcome the diuretics resistance?   7a. Effective doses of loop diuretics   7b. Combined diuretic therapy   7c. Intravenous administration of diuretics   7d. Albumin infusions   7e. Alternative methods of edema management 8. Conclusion.

  12. Early Renal Involvement in a Girl with Classic Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Perretta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from the deficiency or absence of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A; this defect leads to the systemic accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and its metabolites. Organic involvement in men is well known, but in women it is controversial, mainly due to the random X-chromosome inactivation in each of their cells (Lyon hypothesis. This would explain why women (heterozygotes present a wide variability in the severity of their phenotype. The manifestations are multisystemic and begin in early childhood, reaching a severe compromise in adulthood. Typical acroparesthesia in hands and feet, gastrointestinal symptoms, angiokeratomas, dyshidrosis, hearing loss, arrhythmias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular accidents, and renal failure can be observed. Nephropathy is one of the major complications of Fabry disease. Glomerular and vascular changes are present before progression to overt proteinuria and decreased glomerular filtration rate, even in pediatric patients. A case of incipient renal involvement in a girl with classic Fabry disease is reported.

  13. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  14. Bariatric Surgery as a Bridge to Renal Transplantation in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahri, Shadi; Fakhry, Tannous K; Gonzalvo, John Paul; Murr, Michel M

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is a relative contraindication to organ transplantation. Preliminary reports suggest that bariatric surgery may be used as a bridge to transplantation in patients who are not eligible for transplantation because of morbid obesity. The Bariatric Center at Tampa General Hospital, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. We reviewed the outcomes of 16 consecutive patients on hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who underwent bariatric surgery from 1998 to 2016. Demographics, comorbidities, weight loss, as well as transplant status were reported. Data is mean ± SD. Six men and ten women aged 43-66 years (median = 54 years) underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB, n = 12), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB, n = 3), or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG, n = 1). Preoperative BMI was 48 ± 8 kg/m 2 . Follow-up to date was 1-10 years (median = 2.8 years); postoperative BMI was 31 ± 7 kg/m 2 ; %EBWL was 62 ± 24. Four patients underwent renal transplantation (25%) between 2.5-5 years after bariatric surgery. Five patients are currently listed for transplantation. Five patients were not listed for transplantation due to persistent comorbidities; two of these patients died as a consequence of their comorbidities (12.5%) more than 1 year after bariatric surgery. Two patients were lost to follow-up (12.5%). Bariatric surgery is effective in patients with ESRD and improves access to renal transplantation. Bariatric surgery offers a safe approach to weight loss and improvement in comorbidities in the majority of patients. Referrals of transplant candidates with obesity for bariatric surgery should be considered early in the course of ESRD.

  15. Beware erysipelas: renal disease is just around the corner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Lagi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of erysipelas caused by Streptococcus Group G to draw attention to organ and systemic complications that may be associated with this disease. Group G streptococcal infection affected a 70-year old woman following a small skin wound at the base of her second left toe. On admittance to the emergency department, the patient’s urine was dark from macrohematuria. She later developed septic shock. Cutaneous and renal symptoms were kept in check with antibiotic therapy, and she fully recovered from the septic shock after receiving specific therapies. This case shows that erysipelas is not just a disease of the skin and soft tissues, but one that may be associated with organ diseases and systemic complications. The patient completely recovered from both the cutaneous and kidney pathologies after antibiotic therapy.

  16. Mild systemic oxidative stress in the subclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavarotti, Leandro; Simon, Karin A; Azzalis, Ligia A; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Lima, Alessandra F; Freitas, Maria C V; Brunialti, Milena K C; Salomão, Reinaldo; Moscardi, Alcione A V S; Montaño, Maria B M M; Ramos, Luiz R; Junqueira, Virgínia B C

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a late-onset, progressive degenerative disorder that affects mainly the judgment, emotional stability, and memory domains. AD is the outcome of a complex interaction among several factors which are not fully understood yet; nevertheless, it is clear that oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways are among these factors. 65 elderly subjects (42 cognitively intact and 23 with probable Alzheimer's disease) were selected for this study. We evaluated erythrocyte activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase as well as plasma levels of total glutathione, α-tocopherol, β-carotene, lycopene, and coenzyme Q10. These antioxidant parameters were confronted with plasmatic levels of protein and lipid oxidation products. Additionally, we measured basal expression of monocyte HLA-DR and CD-11b, as well as monocyte production of cytokines IL1-α, IL-6, and TNF-α. AD patients presented lower plasmatic levels of α-tocopherol when compared to control ones and also higher basal monocyte HLA-DR expression associated with higher IL-1α production when stimulated by LPS. These findings support the inflammatory theory of AD and point out that this disease is associated with a higher basal activation of circulating monocytes that may be a result of α-tocopherol stock depletion.

  17. Predictors of Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Interrelationship of Dyslipidemia and Arterial Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuro Macut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS could develop subclinical atherosclerosis during life. Purpose. To analyze cardiovascular risk (CVR factors and their relation to clinical markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD in respect to their age. Material and Methods. One hundred women with PCOS (26.32±5.26 years, BMI: 24.98±6.38 kg/m2 were compared to 50 respective controls. In all subjects, total cholesterol (TC, HDL-C, LDL-C, triglycerides, TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C ratios, glucose, insulin and HOMA index, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, resp., and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT were analyzed in respect to their age and level of androgens. Results. PCOS over 30 years had higher WHR (P=0.008, SBP (P<0.001, DBP (P<0.001, TC (P=0.028, HDL-C (P=0.028, LDL-C (P=0.045, triglycerides (P<0.001, TC/HDL-C (P<0.001, and triglycerides/HDL-C (P<0.001 and had more prevalent hypertension and pronounced CIMT on common carotid arteries even after adjustment for BMI (P=0.005 and 0.036, resp.. TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C were higher in PCOS with the highest quintile of FAI in comparison to those with lower FAI (P=0.045 and 0.034, resp.. Conclusions. PCOS women older than 30 years irrespective of BMI have the potential for early atherosclerosis mirrored through the elevated lipids/lipid ratios and through changes in blood pressure.

  18. UAB HRFD Core Center: Core A: The Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Diseases Translational Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Disease; Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Bardet Biedl Syndrome; Meckel-Gruber Syndrome; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli Syndrome; Oro-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type I; Nephronophthisis; Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

  19. Association between previously unknown connective tissue disease and subclinical hypothyroidism diagnosed during first trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneventi, Fausta; Locatelli, Elena; Alpini, Claudia; Lovati, Elisabetta; Ramoni, Véronique; Simonetta, Margherita; Cavagnoli, Chiara; Spinillo, Arsenio

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the presence of autoimmune rheumatic disorders among women with autoimmune thyroid disorders diagnosed during the first trimester of pregnancy and subsequent pregnancy outcomes. Case-control study. Tertiary obstetric and gynecologic center. Pregnant women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Clinical, laboratory, ultrasonographic evaluations. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level; antibodies against thyroperoxidase, thyroid globulin and TSH receptor detection; screening for rheumatic symptoms and antinuclear antibodies (ANA); uterine artery pulsatility index evaluation; pregnancy complication onset. Out of 3,450 women enrolled, 106 (3%) were diagnosed with autoimmune thyroid disorders. ANA were present in 18 (16.9%) of 106 cases and 26 (12.6%) of 206 controls. Of the cases, 28 (26.4%) of 106 reported rheumatic symptoms, 5 of these were diagnosed with Sjögren syndrome or with undefined connective tissue disease. Autoimmune thyroid diseases are statistically significantly associated with a higher risk of preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and overall pregnancy complications compared with controls, with a higher uterine artery pulsatility index, suggesting a defective placentation in thyroid disorders. The effect of ANA-positivity on moderate/severe adverse pregnancy outcomes was statistically significant among the patients with thyroid disorders (9 of 18 as compared to 8 of 88, odds ratio 9.65; 95% confidence interval, 2.613-7.81). Connective tissue diseases are frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders diagnosed during the first trimester of pregnancy. Thyroid autoimmunity and ANA positivity independently increased the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Subclinical anaemia of chronic disease in adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'connor, T M

    2012-02-03

    Patients with chronic hypoxaemia develop secondary polycythaemia that improves oxygen-carrying capacity. Therefore, normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values in the presence of chronic arterial hypoxaemia in cystic fibrosis constitute \\'relative anaemia\\'. We sought to determine the cause of this relative anaemia in patients with cystic fibrosis. We studied haematological indices and oxygen saturation in healthy volunteers (n=17) and in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (n=15). Patients with cystic fibrosis had lower resting arterial oxygen saturation when compared with normal volunteers (P<0.0001), and exercise led to a greater reduction in arterial oxygen saturation (P<0.0001). However, haemoglobin and haematocrit values in patients with cystic fibrosis did not significantly differ from normal volunteers. Serum iron (P=0.002), transferrin (P=0.02), and total iron-binding capacity (P=0.01) were lower in patients with cystic fibrosis. There were no significant differences in serum ferritin, percentage iron saturation, serum erythropoietin or red cell volume between the groups. The data presented demonstrate a characteristic picture of anaemia of chronic disease in adult patients with cystic fibrosis, except for normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values. Normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values in patients with cystic fibrosis appear to represent a combination of the effects of arterial hypoxaemia promoting polycythaemia, counterbalanced by chronic inflammation promoting anaemia of chronic disease.

  1. Renal diseases in adults with cystic fibrosis: a 40 year single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, M J; Ruddick, A; Gyi, K M; Hodson, M E

    2015-10-01

    There is a sizable literature describing renal disease in patients with cystic fibrosis. Previous studies have focused on single disease processes alone, most commonly renal stone disease or acute kidney injury. In this study we report for the first time on the prevalence of all forms of renal disease in a cystic fibrosis population. A retrospective review of adult patients with cystic fibrosis attending the Adult Cystic Fibrosis Department at the Royal Brompton Hospital was carried out by searching the department's database to identify patients with renal problems and subsequently retrieving clinical information from medical notes. The prevalence of all renal diseases in our population was 5.1 %. The most commonly identified problem was renal stones. At 2.0 % the prevalence of renal stones in adult patients with cystic fibrosis was comparable to the general population. A range of other renal diseases were identified, the next most common being drug-induced acute kidney injury. A range of cystic fibrosis independent and attributable diseases has been identified but no cystic fibrosis specific disease. In contrast to other cystic fibrosis centres no increased prevalence of renal stones was found.

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Subclinical Interstitial Lung Disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, John S; Podolanczuk, Anna J; Borker, Priya; Kawut, Steven M; Raghu, Ganesh; Kaufman, Joel D; Stukovsky, Karen D Hinckley; Hoffman, Eric A; Barr, R Graham; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Redline, Susan S; Lederer, David J

    2017-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been postulated to contribute to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis by promoting alveolar epithelial injury via tractional forces and intermittent hypoxia. To determine whether OSA is associated with subclinical interstitial lung disease (ILD) and with biomarkers of alveolar epithelial injury and remodeling. We performed cross-sectional analyses of 1,690 community-dwelling adults who underwent 15-channel in-home polysomnography and thoracic computed tomographic imaging in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. We measured the obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (oAHI) by polysomnography and high-attenuation areas (HAAs) and interstitial lung abnormalities (ILAs) by computed tomography. Serum matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) and surfactant protein-A (SP-A) were measured by ELISA in 99 participants. We used generalized linear models to adjust for potential confounders. The mean age was 68 years, and the mean forced vital capacity was 97% predicted. The median oAHI was 8.4 events/h, and 32% had an oAHI greater than 15. After adjusting for demographics, smoking, and center, an oAHI greater than 15 was associated with a 4.0% HAA increment (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-6.8%; P = 0.003) and 35% increased odds of ILA (95% CI, 13-61%; P = 0.001). However, there was evidence that these associations varied by body mass index (BMI) (P for interaction = 0.08 and 0.04, respectively). Among those with a BMI less than 25 kg/m2, an oAHI greater than 15 was associated with a 6.1% HAA increment (95% CI, 0.5-12%; P = 0.03) and 2.3-fold increased odds of ILA (95% CI, 1.3-4.1; P = 0.005). Among those with a BMI greater than 30 kg/m2, an oAHI greater than 15 was associated with 1.8-fold greater odds of ILA (95% CI, 1.1-2.9; P = 0.01) but was not associated with HAA. There were no meaningful associations detected among those with a BMI of 25-30 kg/m2. Greater oAHI was associated higher serum SP-A and MMP-7 levels, particularly

  3. Prevalence of Subclinical Coronary Artery Disease in Masters Endurance Athletes With a Low Atherosclerotic Risk Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghani, Ahmed; Maestrini, Viviana; Rosmini, Stefania; Cox, Andrew T; Dhutia, Harshil; Bastiaenan, Rachel; David, Sarojini; Yeo, Tee Joo; Narain, Rajay; Malhotra, Aneil; Papadakis, Michael; Wilson, Mathew G; Tome, Maite; AlFakih, Khaled; Moon, James C; Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-07-11

    Studies in middle-age and older (masters) athletes with atherosclerotic risk factors for coronary artery disease report higher coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores compared with sedentary individuals. Few studies have assessed the prevalence of coronary artery disease in masters athletes with a low atherosclerotic risk profile. We assessed 152 masters athletes 54.4±8.5 years of age (70% male) and 92 controls of similar age, sex, and low Framingham 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores with an echocardiogram, exercise stress test, computerized tomographic coronary angiogram, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and a 24-hour Holter. Athletes had participated in endurance exercise for an average of 31±12.6 years. The majority (77%) were runners, with a median of 13 marathon runs per athlete. Most athletes (60%) and controls (63%) had a normal CAC score. Male athletes had a higher prevalence of atherosclerotic plaques of any luminal irregularity (44.3% versus 22.2%; P=0.009) compared with sedentary males, and only male athletes showed a CAC ≥300 Agatston units (11.3%) and a luminal stenosis ≥50% (7.5%). Male athletes demonstrated predominantly calcific plaques (72.7%), whereas sedentary males showed predominantly mixed morphology plaques (61.5%). The number of years of training was the only independent variable associated with increased risk of CAC >70th percentile for age or luminal stenosis ≥50% in male athletes (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.15; P=0.016); 15 (14%) male athletes but none of the controls revealed late gadolinium enhancement on cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Of these athletes, 7 had a pattern consistent with previous myocardial infarction, including 3(42%) with a luminal stenosis ≥50% in the corresponding artery. Most lifelong masters endurance athletes with a low atherosclerotic risk profile have normal CAC scores. Male athletes are more likely to have a CAC

  4. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  5. Biomarkers of Renal Disease and Progression in Patients with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Hojs

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes prevalence is increasing worldwide, mainly due to the increase in type 2 diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy occurs in up to 40% of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It is important to identify patients at risk of diabetic nephropathy and those who will progress to end stage renal disease. In clinical practice, most commonly used markers of renal disease and progression are serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria or albuminuria. Unfortunately, they are all insensitive. This review summarizes the evidence regarding the prognostic value and benefits of targeting some novel risk markers for development of diabetic nephropathy and its progression. It is focused mainly on tubular biomarkers (neutrophil-gelatinase associated lipocalin, kidney injury molecule 1, liver-fatty acid-binding protein, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, markers of inflammation (pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-α and tumour necrosis factor-α receptors, adhesion molecules, chemokines and markers of oxidative stress. Despite the promise of some of these new biomarkers, further large, multicenter prospective studies are still needed before they can be used in everyday clinical practice.

  6. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Diseases: More than Novel Biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdbrügger, Uta; Le, Thu H

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles from the urine and circulation have gained significant interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers in renal diseases. Urinary extracellular vesicles contain proteins from all sections of the nephron, whereas most studied circulating extracellular vesicles are derived from platelets, immune cells, and the endothelium. In addition to their diagnostic role as markers of kidney and vascular damage, extracellular vesicles may have functional significance in renal health and disease by facilitating communication between cells and protecting against kidney injury and bacterial infection in the urinary tract. However, the current understanding of extracellular vesicles has derived mostly from studies with very small numbers of patients or in vitro data. Moreover, accurate assessment of these vesicles remains a challenge, in part because of a lack of consensus in the methodologies to measure extracellular vesicles and the inability of most techniques to capture the entire size range of these vesicles. However, newer techniques and standardized protocols to improve the detection of extracellular vesicles are in development. A clearer understanding of the composition and biology of extracellular vesicles will provide insights into their pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic roles. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-08-01

    The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR) was founded in 1991; it collects data from 20 countries which are members of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nefrología e Hipertension. This paper presents the results corresponding to the year 2010. This study is an annual survey requesting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities: hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and living with a functioning graft (LFG), etc. Prevalence and incidence were compared with previous years. The type of renal replacement therapy was analyzed, with special emphasis on PD and transplant (Tx). These variables were correlated with the gross national income (GNI) and the life expectancy at birth. Twenty countries participed in the surveys, covering 99% of the Latin American. The prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) under RRT in Latin America (LA) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 660 pmp in 2010 (HD 413 pmp, PD 135 pmp and LFG 111 pmp). HD proportionally increased more than PD, and Tx HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (75%). The kidney Tx rate increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 6.9 pmp in 1991 and to 19.1 in 2010. The total number of Tx's in 2010 was 10 397, with 58% deceased donors. The total RRT prevalence correlated positively with GNI (r2 0.86; P < 0.05) and life expectancy at birth (r2 0.58; P < 0.05). The HD prevalence and the kidney Tx rate correlated significantly with the same indexes, whereas the PD rate showed no correlation with these variables. A tendency to rate stabilization/little growth was reported in the most regional countries. As in previous reports, the global incidence rate correlated significantly only with GNI (r2 0.63; P < 0.05). Diabetes remained the leading cause of ESRD. The most frequent causes of death were cardiovascular (45%) and infections (22%). Neoplasms accounted for 10% of the causes of death. The

  8. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-01-01

    The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR) was founded in 1991; it collects data from 20 countries which are members of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nefrología e Hipertension. This paper presents the results corresponding to the year 2010. This study is an annual survey requesting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities: hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and living with a functioning graft (LFG), etc. Prevalence and incidence were compared with previous years. The type of renal replacement therapy was analyzed, with special emphasis on PD and transplant (Tx). These variables were correlated with the gross national income (GNI) and the life expectancy at birth. Twenty countries participed in the surveys, covering 99% of the Latin American. The prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) under RRT in Latin America (LA) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 660 pmp in 2010 (HD 413 pmp, PD 135 pmp and LFG 111 pmp). HD proportionally increased more than PD, and Tx HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (75%). The kidney Tx rate increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 6.9 pmp in 1991 and to 19.1 in 2010. The total number of Tx's in 2010 was 10 397, with 58% deceased donors. The total RRT prevalence correlated positively with GNI (r2 0.86; P < 0.05) and life expectancy at birth (r2 0.58; P < 0.05). The HD prevalence and the kidney Tx rate correlated significantly with the same indexes, whereas the PD rate showed no correlation with these variables. A tendency to rate stabilization/little growth was reported in the most regional countries. As in previous reports, the global incidence rate correlated significantly only with GNI (r2 0.63; P < 0.05). Diabetes remained the leading cause of ESRD. The most frequent causes of death were cardiovascular (45%) and infections (22%). Neoplasms accounted for 10% of the causes of death. The

  9. [Management of patients with end-stage renal disease prior to initiation of renal replacement therapy in 2013 in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppin, Philippe; Cuerq, Anne; Torre, Sylvie; Couchoud, Cécile; Fagot-Campagna, Anne

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the management of patients with end-stage renal disease prior to initiation of renal replacement therapy. Among the 51 million national health insurance general scheme beneficiaries (77% of the population), persons 18 years and older, starting dialysis or undergoing preemptive renal transplantation in 2013, were included in this study. Data were derived from the French national health insurance system (SNIIRAM). In this population of 6674 patients (median age: 68 years), 88% initiated renal replacement therapy by haemodialysis, 8% by peritoneal dialysis, and 4% by renal transplantation. During the year preceding initiation of dialysis, 76% of patients had been hospitalised with at least one diagnostic code for renal disease in 83% of cases, 16% had not received any reimbursements for serum creatinine assay and 32% had not seen a nephrologist; 87% were taking at least one antihypertensive drug (60% were taking at least a renin-angiotensin system inhibitor) and 30% were taking a combination of 4 or more classes of antihypertensive drugs. For patients initiating haemodialysis in a haemodialysis centre, 39% had undergone a procedure related to arteriovenous fistula and 10% had been admitted to an intensive care unit. This study, based on the available reimbursement data, shows that, despite frequent use of the health care system by this population, there is still room for improvement of screening and management of patients with end-stage renal disease and preparation for renal replacement therapy. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Pregnancy in advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhunaizi, Ahd; Melamed, Nir; Hladunewich, Michelle A

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the available literature about the incidence, outcomes, and the management of pregnancy in women with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who require renal replacement therapy. Pregnancy in women with advanced CKD and ESRD can result in serious adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, but improved outcomes have been noted in recent years, likely secondary to intensified dialysis regimens. More intensive dialysis allows for the gentle removal of water, solutes, and uremic toxins, which theoretically results in near-normal maternal renal physiology, an improvement in placental blood flow, and therefore a better environment for fetal growth and development. As management remains complex, a close joint collaboration between the high-risk obstetrical team and nephrology is essential. Pregnancy on dialysis is becoming a viable option for women with advanced CKD and ESRD who do not have immediate access to transplantation.

  11. Subclinical visuospatial impairment in Parkinson's disease: the role of basal ganglia and limbic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eCaproni

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception deficits are a recurrent manifestation in Parkinson's disease (PD. Recently, structural abnormalities of fronto-parietal areas and subcortical regions, implicated in visual stimuli analysis, have been observed in PD patients with cognitive decline and visual hallucinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the salient aspects of visual perception in cognitively unimpaired PD patients. METHODS: Eleven right-handed non-demented right-sided onset PD patients without visuospatial impairment or hallucinations and eleven healthy controls were studied with fMRI while performing a specific visuoperceptual/visuospatial paradigm that allowed to highlight the specific process underlying visuospatial judgment. RESULTS: Significant changes in both cortical areas and subcortical regions involved in visual stimuli processing were observed. In particular, PD patients showed a reduced activation for the right insula, left putamen, bilateral caudate and right hippocampus, as well as an over-activation of the right dorso-lateral prefrontal and of the posterior parietal cortices, particularly in the right hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: We found that both loss of efficiency and compensatory mechanisms occur in PD patients, providing further insight into the pathophysiological role of the functional alterations of basal ganglia and limbic structures in the impairment of visuoperceptual and visuospatial functions observed in PD.

  12. Standard echocardiography versus handheld echocardiography for the detection of subclinical rheumatic heart disease: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, Lisa H; Abdullahi, Leila H; Ochodo, Eleanor A; Zühlke, Liesl J; Engel, Mark E

    2018-02-10

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a preventable and treatable chronic condition which persists in many developing countries largely affecting impoverished populations. Handheld echocardiography presents an opportunity to address the need for more cost-effective methods of diagnosing RHD in developing countries, where the disease continues to carry high rates of morbidity and mortality. Preliminary studies have demonstrated moderate sensitivity as well as high specificity and diagnostic odds for detecting RHD in asymptomatic patients. We describe a protocol for a systematic review on the diagnostic performance of handheld echocardiography compared to standard echocardiography using the 2012 World Heart Federation criteria for diagnosing subclinical RHD. Electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and EBSCOhost as well as reference lists and citations of relevant articles will be searched from 2012 to date using a predefined strategy incorporating a combination of Medical Subject Heading terms and keywords. The methodological validity and quality of studies deemed eligible for inclusion will be assessed against review specific Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 criteria and information on metrics of diagnostic accuracy and demographics extracted. Forest plots of sensitivity and specificity as well as scatter plots in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) space will be used to investigate heterogeneity. If possible, a meta-analysis will be conducted to produce summary results of sensitivity and specificity using the Hierarchical Summary ROC method. In addition, a sensitivity analysis will be conducted to investigate the effect of studies with a high risk of bias. Ethics approval is not required for this systematic review of previously published literature. The planned review will provide a summary of the diagnostic accuracy of handheld echocardiography. Results may feed into evidence-based guidelines and should the findings of this

  13. A CASE OF RENAL DISEASE IN HIV INFECTED PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Vina Septiani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Kidney diseases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients has been been fourth leading cause of death after sepsis, pneumonia, and liver disease. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN is the most common. We report a case, a male patient, 48 years, who experienced shortness of breath, cough and intermittent fever and has been reported as HIV positive, without previous antiretroviral treatment and last CD4+ count is 89 cells/mm3. There are elevated BUN and SC from day to day during treatment and proteinuria +2 as a sign of kidney disease with normal blood pressure and there was no edema. Patients given an antibiotic and ACE inhibitors as antiproteinuria. Patients with suspicion of HIVAN in this case can progress very rapidly and causes progressive decline in renal function. Prognosis of patients with HIVAN if not handled properly will develop end stage renal disease (ESRD in 1-4 months and had a mortality rate 4.7 times higher than HIV patients without renal impairment. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  14. Association of Subjective and Objective Sleep Duration as well as Sleep Quality with Non-Invasive Markers of Sub-Clinical Cardiovascular Disease (CVD): A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Muhammad; Ali, Shozab S.; Das, Sankalp; Younus, Adnan; Malik, Rehan; Latif, Muhammad A.; Humayun, Choudhry; Anugula, Dixitha; Abbas, Ghulam; Salami, Joseph; Elizondo, Javier Valero; Veledar, Emir

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Abnormal daily sleep duration and quality have been linked to hypertension, diabetes, stroke, and overall cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity & mortality. However, the relationship between daily sleep duration and quality with subclinical measures of CVD remain less well studied. This systematic review evaluated how daily sleep duration and quality affect burden of subclinical CVD in subjects free of symptomatic CVD. Methods: Literature search was done via MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science until June 2016 and 32 studies met the inclusion criteria. Sleep duration and quality were measured either via subjective methods, as self-reported questionnaires or Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) or via objective methods, as actigraphy or polysomnography or by both. Among subclinical CVD measures, coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by electron beam computed tomography, Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) measured by high-resolution B-mode ultrasound on carotid arteries, endothelial/microvascular function measured by flow mediated dilation (FMD) or peripheral arterial tone (PAT) or iontophoresis or nailfold capillaroscopy, and arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) or ankle brachial index (ABI). Results: Subjective short sleep duration was associated with CAC and CIMT, but variably associated with endothelial dysfunction (ED) and arterial stiffness; however, subjective long sleep duration was associated with CAC, CIMT and arterial stiffness, but variably associated with ED. Objective short sleep duration was positively associated with CIMT and variably with CAC but not associated with ED. Objective long sleep duration was variably associated with CAC and CIMT but not associated with ED. Poor subjective sleep quality was significantly associated with ED and arterial stiffness but variably associated with CAC and CIMT. Poor objective sleep quality was significantly associated with CIMT, and ED but variably associated with CAC. Conclusions

  15. Association of Subjective and Objective Sleep Duration as well as Sleep Quality with Non-Invasive Markers of Sub-Clinical Cardiovascular Disease (CVD): A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Muhammad; Ali, Shozab S; Das, Sankalp; Younus, Adnan; Malik, Rehan; Latif, Muhammad A; Humayun, Choudhry; Anugula, Dixitha; Abbas, Ghulam; Salami, Joseph; Elizondo, Javier Valero; Veledar, Emir; Nasir, Khurram

    2017-03-01

    Abnormal daily sleep duration and quality have been linked to hypertension, diabetes, stroke, and overall cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity& mortality. However, the relationship between daily sleep duration and quality with subclinical measures of CVD remains less well studied. This systematic review evaluated how daily sleep duration and quality affect burden of subclinical CVD in subjects free of symptomatic CVD. Literature search was done via MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science until June 2016 and 32 studies met the inclusion criteria. Sleep duration and quality were measured either via subjective methods, as self-reported questionnaires or Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) or via objective methods, as actigraphy or polysomnography or by both. Among subclinical CVD measures, coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by electron beam computed tomography, Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) measured by high-resolution B-mode ultrasound on carotid arteries, endothelial/microvascular function measured by flow mediated dilation (FMD) or peripheral arterial tone (PAT) or iontophoresis or nailfold capillaroscopy, and arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) or ankle brachial index (ABI). Subjective short sleep duration was associated with CAC and CIMT, but variably associated with endothelial dysfunction (ED) and arterial stiffness; however, subjective long sleep duration was associated with CAC, CIMT and arterial stiffness, but variably associated with ED. Objective short sleep duration was positively associated with CIMT and variably with CAC but not associated with ED. Objective long sleep duration was variably associated with CAC and CIMT but not associated with ED. Poor subjective sleep quality was significantly associated with ED and arterial stiffness but variably associated with CAC and CIMT. Poor objective sleep quality was significantly associated with CIMT, and ED but variably associated with CAC. Overall, our review provided mixed

  16. The oral health status of patients with renal disease in central India: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vidhatri; Saxena, Vrinda; Bhambhal, Ajay; Tiwari, Utkarsh; Singh, Aishwarya; Goud, Siddana

    2013-12-01

    To compare prevalence of caries and periodontal disease amongst patients on renal dialysis with healthy individuals. A case-control study was conducted amongst 30 cases and 30 controls. Patients who were diagnosed with renal disease were included as cases and systemically healthy individuals as controls. Patients' perceptions of oral health were recorded using structured questionnaires. The WHO proforma (1997) was used to record the periodontal condition, caries status and the treatment need of each group. The number of people affected by periodontal disease (bleeding and calculus) was significantly higher amongst people with renal disease compared with controls (p periodontal disease amongst patients with renal disease as compared with healthy individuals. © 2013 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  17. PPARγ as a therapeutic target in diabetic nephropathy and other renal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jichun; Zhou, Yunfeng; Guan, Youfei

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated nuclear transcription factor that regulates many important physiological processes including glucose and lipid metabolism, energy homeostasis, cell proliferation, inflammation, immunity and reproduction. The current review aims to summarize and discuss recent findings evaluating the protective effects of PPARγ against kidney diseases with a focus on diabetic nephropathy. We will also delineate the potential underlying mechanisms. PPARγ plays important roles in renal physiology and pathophysiology. Agonists of PPARγ exert protective effects against various kidney diseases including diabetic nephropathy, ischemic renal injury, IgA nephropathy, chemotherapy-associated kidney damage, polycystic kidney diseases and age-related kidney diseases via both systemic and renal actions. PPARγ agonists are effective in delaying and even preventing the progression of many renal diseases, especially diabetic nephropathy. PPARγ may represent a promising target for the treatment of renal diseases.

  18. Obesity end stage renal disease and survival in an elderly cohort with cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is highly prevalent in African-Americans and is associated with increased risk of end stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. It is not known if the effect of obesity is similar among Blacks and whites. The aim of this study is to examine racial differences in the association of obesity with E...

  19. Role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system in the progression of renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushihara, Maki; Kagami, Shoji

    2016-07-05

    The intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has many well-documented pathophysiologic functions in both blood pressure regulation and renal disease development. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the major bioactive product of the RAS. It induces inflammation, renal cell growth, mitogenesis, apoptosis, migration, and differentiation. In addition, Ang II regulates the gene expression of bioactive substances and activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways that are involved in renal damage. Activation of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor pathway results in the production of proinflammatory mediators, intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species, cell proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis, which in turn facilities renal injury. Involvement of angiotensinogen (AGT) in intrarenal RAS activation and development of renal disease has previously been reported. Moreover, studies have demonstrated that the urinary excretion rates of AGT provide a specific index of the intrarenal RAS status. Enhanced intrarenal AGT levels have been observed in experimental models of renal disease, supporting the concept that AGT plays an important role in the development and progression of renal disease. In this review, we focus on the role of intrarenal RAS activation in the pathophysiology of renal disease. Additionally, we explored the potential of urinary AGT as a novel biomarker of intrarenal RAS status in renal disease.

  20. The impact of daily temperature on renal disease incidence: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Matthew; Bi, Peng; Nitschke, Monika; Williams, Susan; McDonald, Stephen

    2017-10-27

    Extremely high temperatures over many consecutive days have been linked to an increase in renal disease in several cities. This is becoming increasingly relevant with heatwaves becoming longer, more intense, and more frequent with climate change. This study aimed to extend the known relationship between daily temperature and kidney disease to include the incidence of eight temperature-prone specific renal disease categories - total renal disease, urolithiasis, renal failure, acute kidney injury (AKI), chronic kidney disease (CKD), urinary tract infections (UTIs), lower urinary tract infections (LUTIs) and pyelonephritis. Daily data was acquired for maximum, minimum and average temperature over the period of 1 July 2003 to 31 March 2014 during the warm season (October to March) in Adelaide, South Australia. Data for daily admissions to all metropolitan hospitals for renal disease, including 83,519 emergency department admissions and 42,957 inpatient admissions, was also obtained. Renal outcomes were analyzed using time-stratified negative binomial regression models, with the results aggregated by day. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated for associations between the number of admissions and daily temperature. Increases in daily temperature per 1 °C were associated with an increased incidence for all renal disease categories except for pyelonephritis. Minimum temperature was associated with the greatest increase in renal disease followed by average temperature and then maximum temperature. A 1°C increase in daily minimum temperature was associated with an increase in daily emergency department admissions for AKI (IRR 1.037, 95% CI: 1.026-1.048), renal failure (IRR 1.030, 95% CI: 1.022-1.039), CKD (IRR 1.017, 95% CI: 1.001-1.033) urolithiasis (IRR 1.015, 95% CI: 1.010-1.020), total renal disease (IRR 1.009, 95% CI: 1.006-1.011), UTIs (IRR 1.004, 95% CI: 1.000-1.007) and LUTIs (IRR 1.003, 95% CI: 1.000-1.006). An increased

  1. Lack of association of MRI determined subclinical cardiovascular disease with dizziness and vertigo in a cross-sectional population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Lorbeer

    Full Text Available We investigated the association between subclinical cardiovascular diseases assessed by MRI examination and symptoms of dizziness and vertigo in participants of a population-based sample.Data from 400 participants (169 women aged from 39 to 73 of a cross-sectional MRI sub-study of the "Kooperative Gesundheitsforschung in der Region Augsburg" (KORA FF4 study from the south of Germany was used. MRI determined subclinical cardiovascular diseases include left and right ventricular structure and function as well as the presence of carotid plaque and carotid wall thickness. Cerebrum diseases include white matter lesions (WML and cerebral microbleeds (CMB. The main outcomes of dizziness and vertigo were assessed by standardized interview. Logistic regression models were applied and adjusted odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were provided.Lifetime and 12-month prevalence of dizziness and vertigo were 30% (95%CI 26% to 35% and 21% (95%CI 17% to 26% respectively in this sample. On multivariable analysis, cardiac and carotid measurements were not associated with dizziness and vertigo excluding orthostatic vertigo (20%, 95CI 16% to 24%. Only in male participants, there was a significant association between WML and the presence of dizziness and vertigo (OR = 2.95, 95%CI 1.08 to 8.07. There was no significant association of CMB with dizziness and vertigo. However, CMB and WML were tending to associate with a higher risk of dizziness and vertigo in the whole sample (CMB: OR = 1.48, 95%CI 0.70; 3.15; WML: OR = 1.71, 95%CI 0.80 to 3.67;, in persons with prediabetes and diabetes (WML: OR = 2.71, 95%CI 0.89 to 8.23 and in men with normal glucose metabolism (CMB: OR = 2.60, 95%CI 0.56 to 12.0; WML: OR = 3.08, 95%CI 0.58 to 16.5.In this sample of participants without manifest cardiovascular diseases, subclinical left and right ventricular function and carotid structure were consistently not associated with dizziness and vertigo. Subclinical cerebrum

  2. Subclinical hypothyroidism after vascular complicated pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zanden, Moniek; Hop-de Groot, Rianne J; Sweep, Fred C G J; Ross, H Alec; den Heijer, Martin; Spaanderman, Marc E A

    2013-01-01

    Women with a history of vascular complicated pregnancy are at risk for developing remote cardiovascular disease. It is associated with underlying cardiovascular risk factors both jeopardizing trophoblast and vascular function. Subclinical hypothyroidism may relate to both conditions. In 372 women with a history of vascular complicated pregnancy, we assessed thyroid function. Subclinical hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 73/372 women (19.6%). It occurred more often when pregnancy ended before 32 weeks of gestation (p = 0.008). In this cohort, subclinical hypothyroidism is more common after very preterm delivery. It may contribute to the elevated risk of remote cardiovascular disease.

  3. Mizoribine: A New Approach in the Treatment of Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiko Kawasaki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mizoribine (MZB is an imidazole nucleoside and an immunosuppressive agent. The immunosuppressive effect of MZB has been reported to be due to the inhibition of DNA synthesis in the S phase of the cell cycle. Because of its relative lack of toxicity, during the past decade MZB has been frequently used instead of azathioprine as a component of immunosuppressive drug regimens. MZB is being used to treat renal transplantation patients, IgA nephropathy, lupus erythematosus, and childhood nephrotic syndrome (NS, and some recent studies have assessed the efficacy of oral MZB pulse therapy for severe lupus nephritis, steroid-resistant NS, and frequently relapsing-steroid-dependent NS. This review summarizes the published findings on the efficacy of MZB for renal disease including IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and NS, as well as of oral MZB pulse therapy for severe lupus nephritis and NS, and also the mechanism of the effect of oral MZB pulse therapy on the lymphocyte cell cycle.

  4. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  5. Heart disease risk factors in midlife predict subclinical coronary atherosclerosis more than 25 years later in survivors without clinical heart disease: the Rancho Bernardo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Bergstrom, Jacqueline; Wright, Michael; Kramer, Caroline K

    2009-06-01

    To determine which of the classic modifiable coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, measured in midlife, are associated with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in older age. Prospective study. Community based. Participants were 400 community-dwelling middle-aged adults who had no history of CHD at baseline (1972-1974), when CHD risk factors were measured, and who were still free of known CHD in 2000 to 2002. Coronary artery plaque burden was assessed according to coronary artery calcium (CAC) score using computed tomography in 2000 to 2002. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to compare baseline risk factors with severity of CAC. Mean age was 42 at baseline and 69 at the time of CAC assessment; 46.5% were male. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, and all other risk factors, one standard deviation increase in body mass index (odds ratio (OR)=1.24, 95%confidence interval (CI)=1.02-1.51; P=.03), cholesterol (OR=1.28, 95% CI=1.03-1.58; P=.020, pulse pressure (OR=1.24, 95% CI=1.03-1.50; P=.03), and log triglycerides (OR=1.22, 95% CI=0.99-1.50; P=.06) each independently predicted the presence and severity of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Modifiable risk factors measured more than 25 years earlier influence plaque burden in elderly survivors without clinical heart disease.

  6. Renal status of children with sickle cell disease in Accra, Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: In West Africa, the prevalence of sickle cell disease (SCD) is 2%. The disease adversely affects growth, development and organ function including the kidneys. There is however a dearth of information about the renal status of SCD children in Ghana. Objectives: To assess the renal status of children with SCD in ...

  7. Challenges in the management of a child with end stage renal disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) is on the rise among children in Nigeria. The cost of its management with renal replacement therapy is quite enormous for the average Nigerian family. There is no support yet from the Nigerian government or the National Health Insurance Scheme to cushion the burden of this disease.

  8. Care of the Patient with Renal Disease: Peritoneal Dialysis and Transplants, Nursing 321A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulburd, Kimberly

    A description is provided of a course, "Care of the Patient with Renal Disease," offered at the community college level to prepare licensed registered nurses to care for patients with renal disease, including instruction in performing the treatments of peritoneal dialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The first…

  9. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene I/D polymorphism and renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navis, G; van der Kleij, FGH; de Zeeuw, D; de Jong, PE

    1999-01-01

    In recent years a vast amount of data has been published on the association between the insertion/deletion (VD) polymorphism of the gene coding for angiotensin-converting enzyme and renal disease. It has be come clear that the polymorphism does not affect the prevalence of renal disease. However,

  10. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...

  11. Subclinical hypothyroidism after vascular complicated pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, M. van der; Hop-de Groot, R.J.; Sweep, F.C.; Ross, H.A.; Heijer, M. den; Spaanderman, M.E.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Women with a history of vascular complicated pregnancy are at risk for developing remote cardiovascular disease. It is associated with underlying cardiovascular risk factors both jeopardizing trophoblast and vascular function. Subclinical hypothyroidism may relate to both conditions.

  12. Diabetes Mellitus, Microalbuminuria, and Subclinical Cardiac Disease: Identification and Monitoring of Individuals at Risk of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Peter P; McDiarmid, Adam K; Erhayiem, Bara; Ripley, David P; Dobson, Laura E; Garg, Pankaj; Musa, Tarique A; Witte, Klaus K; Kearney, Mark T; Barth, Julian H; Ajjan, Ramzi; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2017-07-17

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and elevated urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) have increased risk of heart failure. We hypothesized this was because of cardiac tissue changes rather than silent coronary artery disease. In a case-controlled observational study 130 subjects including 50 ACR+ve diabetes mellitus patients with persistent microalbuminuria (ACR >2.5 mg/mol in males and >3.5 mg/mol in females, ≥2 measurements, no previous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone therapy, 50 ACR-ve diabetes mellitus patients and 30 controls underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance for investigation of myocardial fibrosis, ischemia and infarction, and echocardiography. Thirty ACR+ve patients underwent further testing after 1-year treatment with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade. Cardiac extracellular volume fraction, a measure of diffuse fibrosis, was higher in diabetes mellitus patients than controls (26.1±3.4% and 23.3±3.0% P=0.0002) and in ACR+ve than ACR-ve diabetes mellitus patients (27.2±4.1% versus 25.1±2.9%, P=0.004). ACR+ve patients also had lower E' measured by echocardiography (8.2±1.9 cm/s versus 8.9±1.9 cm/s, P=0.04) and elevated high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T 18% versus 4% ≥14 ng/L (P=0.05). Rate of silent myocardial ischemia or infarction were not influenced by ACR status. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade was associated with increased left ventricular ejection fraction (59.3±7.8 to 61.5±8.7%, P=0.03) and decreased extracellular volume fraction (26.5±3.6 to 25.2±3.1, P=0.01) but no changes in diastolic function or high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels. Asymptomatic diabetes mellitus patients with persistent microalbuminuria have markers of diffuse cardiac fibrosis including elevated extracellular volume fraction, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T, and diastolic dysfunction, which may in part be reversible by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade. Increased risk in these patients may be mediated by subclinical

  13. Renal parenchymal histopathology predicts life-threatening chronic kidney disease as a result of radical nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejima, Takehiro; Honda, Masashi; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The preoperative prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency plays an important role in the decision-making process regarding renal surgery options. Furthermore, the prediction of both postoperative renal insufficiency and postoperative cardiovascular disease occurrence, which is suggested to be an adverse consequence caused by renal insufficiency, contributes to the preoperative policy decision as well as the precise informed consent for a renal cell carcinoma patient. Preoperative nomograms for the prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, calculated using patient backgrounds, are advocated. The use of these nomograms together with other types of nomograms predicting oncological outcome is beneficial. Post-radical nephrectomy attending physicians can predict renal insufficiency based on the normal renal parenchymal pathology in addition to preoperative patient characteristics. It is suggested that a high level of global glomerulosclerosis in nephrectomized normal renal parenchyma is closely associated with severe renal insufficiency. Some studies showed that post-radical nephrectomy severe renal insufficiency might have an association with increased mortality as a result of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, such pathophysiology should be recognized as life-threatening, surgically-related chronic kidney disease. On the contrary, the investigation of the prediction of mild post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, which is not related to adverse consequences in the postoperative long-term period, is also promising because the prediction of mild renal insufficiency might be the basis for the substitution of radical nephrectomy for nephron-sparing surgery in technically difficult or compromised cases. The deterioration of quality of life caused by post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency should be investigated in conjunction with life-threatening matters. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  14. Childhood Albuminuria and Chronic Kidney Disease is Associated with Mortality and End-Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ching-Yuang Lin; Shiuh-Ming Huang

    2016-01-01

    We do not yet fully grasp the significance of childhood albuminuria. Based on mass urinary screening (MUS) using albumin-specific dipsticks in school children, we studied the independent association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: A prospective cohort of 5351 children with albuminuria detected by school MSU during the period 1992–1996, followed up to 2009...

  15. Lymphocyte subpopulations during cytomegalovirus disease in renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Castro

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the number of circulating T, B and natural killer cells in renal transplant recipients in order to detect changes during cytomegalovirus (CMV infections. Serial blood samples were taken from 61 patients on standard triple immunosuppression therapy (cyclosporin A, azathioprine and prednisone. Using two-color flow cytometry analysis, the absolute number of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+, CD3+HLA-DR+ and CD16+56+ cells was determined. Forty-eight patients (78.7% developed active CMV infection, and all of them subsequently recovered. Twenty of the infected patients (32.8% presented symptoms compatible with CMV disease during the infectious process. The number of lymphocytes and their main subpopulations were normal before the onset of CMV disease. During the disease there was a decrease followed by a significant increase (P<0.005 in the number of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD3+HLA-DR+ cells. No significant changes were observed in natural killer cells or B lymphocytes during the disease. We conclude, as observed in all viremic patients recovering from infection, that recovery is associated with an increase in the number of T cell subsets. The monitoring of different lymphocyte subsets along with antigenemia can be extremely useful in the detection of patients at high risk of developing CMV symptoms, allowing the early introduction of antiviral therapy or the reduction of immunosuppression therapy.

  16. Lack of association between anemia and renal disease progression in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liubao; Lou, Qinglin; Wu, Haidi; Ouyang, Xiaojun; Bian, Rongwen

    2016-01-01

    Anemia has a close interaction with renal dysfunction in diabetes patients. More proof is still awaited on the relationship between anemia and the progression of renal disease in this population. In the present longitudinal study, 1,645 Chinese type 2 diabetes patients without end-stage renal disease were included in the analysis in Nanjing, China, during January 2006 and December 2012. All patients were managed by staged diabetes management protocol, and clinical parameters were collected at each visit. The end-point of progression of renal disease was evaluated during the follow up. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the risk of anemia on renal disease progression. On recruitment, 350 (21.3%) patients had anemia, which was more common among those with older ages, longer diabetes duration, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate or more albuminura. On median follow up of 49 months (range 28-62 months), 37 patients (2.2%) developed the defined renal end-point. Compared with those without anemia, patients with anemia had a higher risk of renal disease progression. However, multivariate analysis showed that anemia lost its statistical significance once estimated glomerular filtration rate was added into the model. Although the incidence of renal disease progression markedly increased by anemia status in patients of estimated glomerular filtration rate renal disease progression in this subgroup. Anemia was a common finding in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients. Anemia was a risk factor for renal disease progression, but lost its significance once baseline renal function was adjusted.

  17. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.P. (New York Medical Coll., Valhalla); McClennan, B.L.; Rottenberg, R.R.

    1983-08-01

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious.

  18. Renal disease masquerading as pyrexia of unknown origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Korivi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrexia of unknown origin is a challenging clinical problem. Infections, malignancies, and connective tissue diseases form the major etiologies for this condition. We report a case of a 57-year-old diabetic male who presented with fever of unknown origin for several months. The course of investigations led to a kidney biopsy which clinched the cause of his fever as well as the underlying diagnosis. The light microscopy findings of expansile storiform fibrosis with a dense inflammatory infiltrate suggested the diagnosis which was confirmed by positive staining of Immunoglobulin G4, the dense lympho-plasmacytic infiltrate and elevated serum IgG4 concentrations. A course of steroids followed by mycophenolate mofetil as maintenance immunosuppression rendered the patient afebrile with improvement of renal function.

  19. Association of Mild-to-Moderate Reduction in Glomerular Filtration Rate with Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parv, Florina; Beceanu, Andrei; Avram, Rodica; Timar, Romulus Zorin; Timar, Bogdan; Gadalean, Florica

    2017-05-24

    Due to loss of hormonal protective effects, postmenopausal women have an increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a well-established risk factor for CV disease, but little is known whether mild-to-moderate kidney dysfunction is associated with atherosclerosis burden in the postmenopausal asymptomatic women. Subclinical atherosclerosis was evaluated in 125 postmenopausal women with no clinical form of atherosclerosis, by carotid and femoral ultrasonography, ankle-brachial index (ABI), and flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Carotid and femoral atherosclerosis were defined as increased intima-media thickness (IMT) and/or the presence of plaques. Endothelial function was assessed by endothelial dependent (flow-mediated dilation at 1 minute [FMD1]) and independent (flow-mediated dilation after nitroglycerin [FMDNTG]) vasodilation. Classical CV risk factors (age, smoking, obesity, diabetes, blood pressure, and lipids) were evaluated. Kidney function was evaluated in terms of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated by the CKD-EPI formula. Univariate linear regression and multivariate logistic regressions were used to evaluate the independent associations between kidney function and markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. In the unadjusted linear analysis, eGFR showed a significant negative association with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis: carotid IMT (R(2) = 0.305; p subclinical atherosclerosis, independent of traditional CV risk factors. It is important to detect renal function decline, even if it is mild, to improve risk stratification of subclinical atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women.

  20. Polycystic kidney disease and cancer after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, James B; Calvet, James P; Yu, Alan S L; Lynch, Charles F; Wang, Connie J; Kasiske, Bertram L; Engels, Eric A

    2014-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most common form of polycystic kidney disease (PKD), is a disorder with characteristics of neoplasia. However, it is not known whether renal transplant recipients with PKD have an increased risk of cancer. Data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, which contains information on all solid organ transplant recipients in the United States, were linked to 15 population-based cancer registries in the United States. For PKD recipients, we compared overall cancer risk with that in the general population. We also compared cancer incidence in PKD versus non-PKD renal transplant recipients using Poisson regression, and we determined incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, dialysis duration, and time since transplantation. The study included 10,166 kidney recipients with PKD and 107,339 without PKD. Cancer incidence in PKD recipients was 1233.6 per 100,000 person-years, 48% higher than expected in the general population (standardized incidence ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 1.60), whereas cancer incidence in non-PKD recipients was 1119.1 per 100,000 person-years. The unadjusted incidence was higher in PKD than in non-PKD recipients (IRR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20). However, PKD recipients were older (median age at transplantation, 51 years versus 45 years for non-PKD recipients), and after multivariable adjustment, cancer incidence was lower in PKD recipients than in others (IRR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.91). The reason for the lower cancer risk in PKD recipients is not known but may relate to biologic characteristics of ADPKD or to cancer risk behaviors associated with ADPKD. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. Features of Mineral Metabolism and Parathyroid Glands Functioning in Chronic Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Martynyuk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The calcium phosphoric metabolism was analyzed depending on the severity of renal functioning disorders. Chronic renal disease is known to be associated with impaired mineral metabolism in terms of hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphatemia and enhanced level of Ca × P product that aggravates in chronic renal failure progression. The majority of patients with nephropathy have parathyroid hormone concentration to be different from target one recommended by NKF-K/DOQI (2003, at that secondary hyperparathyroidism prevails on pre-dialysis stage of chronic renal disease, the relative hypoparathyroidism is common among the patients received dialysis.

  2. Renal infarct: a rare disease due to a rare etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akshintala, Divya; Bansal, Saurabh K.; Emani, Vamsi Krishna; Yadav, Manajyoti

    2015-01-01

    Renal infarction is caused by profound hypoperfusion secondary to embolic/thrombotic occlusion of the renal artery or vasospasm of the renal artery. We present a case of a 54-year-old patient who presented with nausea, vomiting, and vague abdominal pain. He had frequent episodes of migraine headaches and he treated himself with as needed rizatriptan. CT scan of the abdomen showed renal cortical infarction. After extensive investigations, etiology of his renal infarct was deemed to be due to rizatriptan. PMID:26091657

  3. Isoniazid Induced Metabolic Acidosis and Renal Dysfunction in an Elderly Patient with Chronic Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Upinder; Chakrabarti, Sankha S; Gambhir, Indrajeet S

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is one of the common manifestations of Isoniazid toxicity but rare with normally used doses of the drug. Among anti tubercular drugs, rifampicin, streptomycin and capreomycin are commonly implicated in renal injury. Here we report the first case of metabolic acidosis and renal injury caused by isoniazid at normal prescribed dose.

  4. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  5. Sustained complete renal remission is a predictor of reduced mortality, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakchotanon, R; Gladman, D D; Su, J; Urowitz, M B

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this paper is to identify the relationship between patients with lupus nephritis (LN) who achieve sustained complete renal remission (CR) and renal outcome and survival. Methods From a longitudinal cohort study we identified patients with LN with CR. We compared the outcomes of patients who achieved sustained CR for at least five years (Group A) with those less than five years (Group B). The outcomes were death, SLICC/ACR damage index (SDI), renal flare, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) renal SDI, renal flare, renal transplantation, ESRD or eGFR renal SDI (HR = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.21-0.76; p = 0.01), developing ESRD or eGFR < 50 ml/min (HR = 0.27; 95% CI, 0.12-0.61; p = 0.001), and doubling of serum creatinine (HR = 0.29; 95% CI, 0.14-0.61; p = 0.001) compared with Group B. Conclusion Sustained CR for at least five years is a predictor of better prognosis in patients with LN.

  6. Differential patterns of planning impairments in Parkinson's disease and sub-clinical signs of dementia? A latent-class model-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köstering, Lena; McKinlay, Audrey; Stahl, Christoph; Kaller, Christoph P

    2012-01-01

    Planning impairments mark a well-documented consequence of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, using the Tower of London task we demonstrated that, rather than being generally impaired, PD patients selectively fail when planning requires flexible in-breadth search strategies. For a better understanding of the interindividual patterns underlying specific planning impairments, here we performed an explorative re-analysis of the original data using a latent-class model-based approach. Data-driven classification according to subjects' performance was based on a multinomial processing tree (MPT) model accommodating the impact of increased breadth versus depth of looking ahead during planning. In order to assess interindividual variability in coping with these different task demands, an extension of MPT models was used in which sample-immanent heterogeneity is accounted for by identifying different latent classes of individuals. Two latent classes were identified that differed considerably in performance for problems placing high demands on the depth of anticipatory search processes. In addition, these impairments were independent of PD diagnosis. However, latent-class mediated search depth-related deficits in planning performance were associated with poorer outcomes in dementia screenings, albeit sub-clinical. PD patients exhibited additional deficits related to the breadth of searching ahead. Taken together, results revealed dissociable impairments in specific planning processes within a single task of visuospatial problem solving. Present analyses put forward the hypothesis that cognitive sequelae of PD and sub-clinical signs of dementia may be related to differential patterns of planning impairments.

  7. Associations between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and subclinical atherosclerosis in middle-aged adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWagner, Lisa B; Ning, Hongyan; Lewis, Cora E; Shay, Christina M; Wilkins, John; Carr, J Jeffrey; Terry, James G; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Jacobs, David R; Carnethon, Mercedes R

    2014-08-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an obesity-related condition associated with cardiovascular mortality. Yet, whether or not NAFLD is independently related to atherosclerosis is unclear. In a population-based cross-sectional sample of middle-aged adults free from liver or heart disease, we tested the hypothesis that NAFLD is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC)) independent of obesity. Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study with CT quantification of liver fat, CAC and AAC were included (n = 2424). NAFLD was defined as liver attenuation ≤40 Hounsfield Units after exclusion of other causes of liver fat. CAC and AAC presence was defined as Agatston score >0. Mean participant age was 50.1 ± 3.6 years, (42.7% men, 50.0% black) and BMI was 30.6 ± 7.2 kg/m(2). The prevalence of NAFLD, CAC, and AAC was 9.6%, 27.1%, and 51.4%. NAFLD participants had increased prevalence of CAC (37.9% vs. 26.0%, p subclinical atherosclerosis. Further studies evaluating the role of NAFLD duration on atherosclerotic progression and cardiovascular events are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Leptospirosis Renal Disease: Emerging Culprit of Chronic Kidney Disease Unknown Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Wei

    2017-09-20

    Leptospirosis is the most prevalent zoonosis affecting more than 1 million populations worldwide. Interestingly, leptospirosis endemic regions coincide with chronic kidney disease (CKD) hotspots largely due to flooding and agricultural overlaps. Acute leptospirosis induces multiple organ dysfunction including acute kidney injury and may predispose to CKD and end-stage renal disease, if not treated timely. Asymptomatic infection may carry the bacteria in the kidney and CKD progresses insidiously. Histologic finding of leptospirosis renal disease includes tubulointerstitial nephritis, interstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy. Proximal tubule dysfunction and hypokalemia are observed in adult male workers with leptospirosis, a characteristic similarity to CKD unknown etiology (CKDu). CKDu is a form of CKD that is not attributable to traditional risk factors clustering in agricultural communities affecting young male farmers. Kidney pathology shows a chronic tubulointerstitial disease. CKDu is being reported as an endemic nephropathy across the globe. Recent surveys suggest that asymptomatic leptospira renal colonization is an overlooked risk for renal fibrosis and CKDu. Population with anti-leptospira seropositivity is associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate in endemic regions and carrier may progress to CKD. Leptospirosis has been considered as a risk factor for CKDu in Sri Lanka and in Mesoamerican area. Sugarcane workers in Nicaragua showed increased anti-leptospira seropositivity and higher urinary biomarkers for kidney injury. Emerging evidence with signs of infection were reported in these endemic population, indicating that leptospira exposure could play a role in CKDu as a cause of primary kidney disease or a susceptible factor when secondary injury such as heat stress or dehydration aggravates kidney disease. Therefore, leptospirosis as an emerging culprit of CKDu deserves further in-depth investigation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The validity of the modification of diet in renal disease formula in HIV-infected patients: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppenga, W.L.; Luin, M. van; Richter, C.; Derijks, H.J.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Wensing, M.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Renal dysfunction is highly prevalent in HIV-infected patients and may require dose adjustment of renally excreted antiretroviral drugs. The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD)-4 formula is frequently used in daily practice to estimate patients' renal

  10. Influence of elevated-CRP level-related polymorphisms in non-rheumatic Caucasians on the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Mejías, Raquel; Genre, Fernanda; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Robustillo-Villarino, Montserrat; Llorca, Javier; Corrales, Alfonso; Vicente, Esther; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Magro, César; Tejera-Segura, Beatriz; Ramírez Huaranga, Marco A.; Pina, Trinitario; Blanco, Ricardo; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Raya, Enrique; Mijares, Verónica; Ubilla, Begoña; Mínguez Sánchez, María D.; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Balsa, Alejandro; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Carreira, Patricia; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Castañeda, Santos; Martín, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Association between elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels and subclinical atherosclerosis and cardiovascular (CV) events was described in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CRP, HNF1A, LEPR, GCKR, NLRP3, IL1F10, PPP1R3B, ASCL1, HNF4A and SALL1 exert an influence on elevated CRP serum levels in non-rheumatic Caucasians. Consequently, we evaluated the potential role of these genes in the development of CV events and subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients. Three tag CRP polymorphisms and HNF1A, LEPR, GCKR, NLRP3, IL1F10, PPP1R3B, ASCL1, HNF4A and SALL1 were genotyped in 2,313 Spanish patients by TaqMan. Subclinical atherosclerosis was determined in 1,298 of them by carotid ultrasonography (by assessment of carotid intima-media thickness-cIMT-and presence/absence of carotid plaques). CRP serum levels at diagnosis and at the time of carotid ultrasonography were measured in 1,662 and 1,193 patients, respectively, by immunoturbidimetry. Interestingly, a relationship between CRP and CRP serum levels at diagnosis and at the time of the carotid ultrasonography was disclosed. However, no statistically significant differences were found when CRP, HNF1A, LEPR, GCKR, NLRP3, IL1F10, PPP1R3B, ASCL1, HNF4A and SALL1 were evaluated according to the presence/absence of CV events, carotid plaques and cIMT after adjustment. Our results do not confirm an association between these genes and CV disease in RA. PMID:27534721

  11. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.210 Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system...

  12. Effect of end-stage renal disease on oral health in patients undergoing renal dialysis: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Nalam Radhika; Gautam, Nalam Sai; Rao, Thota Hanumantha; Koganti, Ravichandra; Agarwal, Rohit; Alamanda, Madhavi

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of chronic renal failure on oral health in renal dialysis patients. To assess and improvise awareness of staff regarding oral health care of the patients in hemodialysis unit. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey and oral health examination study were conducted on 206 end-stage chronic renal failure patients (stage V) who were undergoing renal dialysis in Guntur city. The study included the questionnaire form and modified WHO proforma to record their oral health status. Oral examination was done in American Dental Association (ADA) type III method by using mouth mirror and community periodontal index (CPI) probe. Questionnaire survey was conducted among the nursing staff in the hemodialysis unit. Mean age of the study subjects was 46.79 ± 12.78 years; 81.1% were males and 18.9% were females. Candidiasis (8.3%) was the most frequently seen oral mucosal condition in these subjects. Majority of the subjects (44.2%) showed periodontal diseases (CPI score 3: Pocket depth of 4-5 mm). Caries prevalence of 56.3% was seen in this study group. Higher incidence of hepatitis C was significantly associated with higher duration of dialysis. There was very little awareness among the nursing staff regarding dental care. There is greater deterioration of periodontal health among dialysis patients with chronic renal disease. Awareness regarding dental care is very less among patients undergoing renal dialysis. These patients should be monitored carefully to maintain their oral health. Awareness must be increased among dialysis patients and nursing staff about the need for primary prevention of dental diseases.

  13. Relationship between epicardial adipose tissue and subclinical coronary artery disease in patients with extra-cardiac arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Dekker, M A M; Takashima, R; van den Heuvel, E R; van den Dungen, J J A M; Tio, R A; Oudkerk, M; Vliegenthart, R

    2014-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) and mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT) are linked to coronary artery disease (CAD). The association between EAT, MAT, and severity of CAD in known extra-cardiac arterial disease was investigated. Sixty-five cardiac asymptomatic patients (mean age 65 ± 8 years, 69% male) with peripheral arterial disease, carotid stenosis, or aortic aneurysm underwent coronary computed tomography angiography. Patients were divided into non-significant (cardiovascular risk factors. Median EAT was 99.5, 98.0, and 112.0 cm(3) (P = 0.38) and median MAT was 66.0, 90.0, and 81.0 cm(3) (P = 0.53) for non-significant, single vessel, and multi-vessel CAD, respectively. In age- and gender-adjusted analysis, only EAT was significantly associated with CAD (odds ratio [OR] 1.12 [95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.25] per 10 cm(3) increase in EAT; P = 0.04). This remained in multivariate-adjusted analysis (OR 1.21 [1.04-1.39]; P = 0.01). In patients with known extra-cardiac arterial disease, CAD is correlated with EAT, but not with MAT. These results suggest that EAT has a local effect on coronary atherosclerosis, apart from the endocrine effect of visceral fat. © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  14. Chronic kidney disease: role of sympathetic nervous system activation and potential benefits of renal denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Dagmara; Esler, Murray D; Schlaich, Markus P

    2013-05-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease continues to increase worldwide. Hypertension and diabetes are recognised as two major factors contributing to further progression of CKD. Importantly, progressive renal impairment increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in pharmacological antihypertensive and anti-diabetic approaches, the alarming number of patients developing nephropathy indicates the failure of the available treatment strategies. The relevance of sympathetic activation for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease is well established. Likewise, progressive renal failure results in exaggerated sympathetic activation leading to a vicious cycle, providing the rationale for the use of renal denervation to modulate directly the mechanisms underlying disease progression. While initial data on the safety and effectiveness of the procedure to lower BP were obtained in patients with resistant hypertension and preserved renal function, there are now preliminary data to suggest that this approach can also be applied safely in patients with stage 3-4 CKD. Similarly, first reports applying renal denervation in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis demonstrate favourable effects. If appropriately designed clinical trials can confirm these initial observations, renal denervation may become a valuable new treatment option for the large cohort of patients with CKD.

  15. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation. PMID:24379850

  16. Renal Failure in Sickle Cell Disease: Prevalence, Predictors of Disease, Mortality and Effect on Length of Hospital Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeruva, Sri L H; Paul, Yonette; Oneal, Patricia; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease is not only a chronic comorbidity but also a mortality risk factor. Though renal dysfunction starts early in life in sickle cell patients, the predictors that can identify sickle cell disease patients at risk of developing renal dysfunction is not known. We used the Truven Health MarketScan® Medicaid Databases from 2007 to 2012. Incidence of new acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was calculated in this cohort. There were 9481 patients with a diagnosis of sickle cell disease accounting for 64,201 hospital admissions, during the study period. Both ARF and CKD were associated with higher risk of inpatient mortality, longer duration of the hospital stay and expensive hospitalizations. The yearly incidence of new ARF in sickle cell disease patients was 1.4% and annual CKD incidence was 1.3%. The annual rate of new ARF and CKD in the control group was 0.4 and 0.6%, respectively. The most important predictors of new CKD were proteinuria, ARF and hypertension. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension and sickle cell crisis were the most important predictors of new ARF. The annual rate of incidences of ARF and CKD were 2- to 3-fold higher in sickle cell disease compared to the non sickle cell disease group. Besides the common risk factors for renal disease in the general population, it is imperative to monitor the sickle cell disease patients with more severe disease to prevent them from developing renal dysfunction.

  17. Renal involvement in Chinese patients with Behcet's disease: a report of 16 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjie; Li, Guohua; Zhou, Mengyu; Chen, Limeng; Tian, Xinping; Zhang, Fengchun

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the clinical and pathological characteristics of renal involvement in Behcet's disease (BD). A retrospective analysis was carried out in BD patients complicated with renal damage who were hospitalized in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from June 1998 to July 2012. There were 16 BD patients with renal involvement, accounted for 2.6% of all the 618 hospitalized BD patients. The presentation of renal disease was chronic glomerulonephritis in six patients (including one with nephritic syndrome), renal tubular acidosis in one patient, renal artery stenosis in eight patients and renal vein thrombosis in one patient. Renal biopsy was performed in five patients, three of whom revealed to have minor glomerular lesions, mild mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis and chronic tubular-interstitial nephropathy, respectively. The other two patients underwent a second biopsy, the one with minor glomerular lesion in the first biopsy was transformed into grade III immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy on Lee's glomerular grading system 6 years later, and the other one who had IgA nephropathy of grade II in the first biopsy was progressed to grade IV 2 years later. Among the nine patients with renal vascular involvement, two underwent surgery, and several received anticoagulant therapy. During the follow-up of 13 patients, the urine protein quantifications were reduced, and renal function remained relatively stable. Renal damage is relatively uncommon in BD patients. There are various clinical presentations of renal involvement in BD. Routine screening with urinalysis, serum creatinine and imaging studies should be carried out for the early diagnosis of renal involvement in BD. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. History of Childhood Kidney Disease and Risk of Adult End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Margalit, Ronit; Golan, Eliezer; Twig, Gilad; Leiba, Adi; Tzur, Dorit; Afek, Arnon; Skorecki, Karl; Vivante, Asaf

    2018-02-01

    The long-term risk associated with childhood kidney disease that had not progressed to chronic kidney disease in childhood is unclear. We aimed to estimate the risk of future end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among adolescents who had normal renal function and a history of childhood kidney disease. We conducted a nationwide, population-based, historical cohort study of 1,521,501 Israeli adolescents who were examined before compulsory military service in 1967 through 1997; data were linked to the Israeli ESRD registry. Kidney diseases in childhood included congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, pyelonephritis, and glomerular disease; all participants included in the primary analysis had normal renal function and no hypertension in adolescence. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio for ESRD associated with a history of childhood kidney disease. During 30 years of follow-up, ESRD developed in 2490 persons. A history of any childhood kidney disease was associated with a hazard ratio for ESRD of 4.19 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.52 to 4.99). The associations between each diagnosis of kidney disease in childhood (congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, pyelonephritis, and glomerular disease) and the risk of ESRD in adulthood were similar in magnitude (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of 5.19 [95% CI, 3.41 to 7.90], 4.03 [95% CI, 3.16 to 5.14], and 3.85 [95% CI, 2.77 to 5.36], respectively). A history of kidney disease in childhood was associated with younger age at the onset of ESRD (hazard ratio for ESRD among adults <40 years of age, 10.40 [95% CI, 7.96 to 13.59]). A history of clinically evident kidney disease in childhood, even if renal function was apparently normal in adolescence, was associated with a significantly increased risk of ESRD, which suggests that kidney injury or structural abnormality in childhood has long-term consequences.

  19. Celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies in patients undergoing renal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Rakel; Metso, Martti; Pörsti, Ilkka; Niemelä, Onni; Huhtala, Heini; Mustonen, Jukka; Kaukinen, Katri; Mäkelä, Satu

    2018-01-01

    An association between celiac disease and renal diseases has been suggested, but the results are controversial. To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity among individuals undergoing renal biopsies and to evaluate whether co-existent celiac autoimmunity influences the clinical outcome of the renal disease. The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity (previous diagnosis of celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies) was determined in 827 consecutive patients undergoing kidney biopsies due to clinical indications. Up to 15 years' follow-up data on kidney function and co-morbidities were obtained. Celiac autoimmunity was found in 45 (5.4%) patients. Among the IgA nephropathy patients, 8.2% of had celiac autoimmunity. At the time of kidney biopsy and after a median follow-up of 5 to 6 years, renal function measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was inferior in IgA nephropathy patients with celiac autoimmunity compared to those without it (P=0.048 and P=0.022, respectively). The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity seems to be high in patients undergoing renal biopsies, especially in patients with IgA nephropathy. Such autoimmunity may be associated with worse renal function in IgA nephropathy. Hence the co-existence of celiac disease should be taken into consideration when treating patients with renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. C-reactive protein and end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacson, Eduardo; Levin, Nathan W

    2004-01-01

    The significance of CRP and inflammation has increased over time, especially in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population. From a simple marker it now appears that CRP is an active participant in pro-atherosclerotic phenomenon including local pro-inflammatory and thrombotic events. Studies in the general population indicate the usefulness of CRP in prognostication and in monitoring response to therapy. The clinical usefulness of CRP monitoring in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and especially in ESRD deserves closer study. In the meantime, the utility of CRP measurements for monitoring and treatment is on a case-by-case basis. Management of traditional cardiovascular risk factors should be considered. In the interest of optimizing therapy it is prudent to use biocompatible membranes and ultrapure water. A careful search for infectious processes in dialysis patients is recommended, with special attention to vascular access sites, periodontitis, gastritis, and other potentially chronic or covert infections. ACE-inhibitor use should be maximized in all eligible CKD patients. The data on the use of statins in ESRD have been generally positive but await further validation. Individualized use for selected patients is probably beneficial.

  1. Hospital admissions for neurological and renal diseases among dentists and dental assistants occupationally exposed to mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Hanehøj, Kirsten; Kjuus, Helge; Juel, Knud

    2011-12-01

    For many years an amalgam containing metallic mercury, which has been associated with neurological and renal diseases, has been used in dentistry. In this nationwide study we compared hospital admissions due to neurological and renal diseases among dentists and dental assistants to admissions in controls. This register-based cohort study included all Danish workers employed in dental clinics, general practitioners' clinics or lawyers' offices between 1964 and 2006. We compared dentists with general practitioners and lawyers, and dental assistants with medical secretaries, nurses and legal secretaries. We also compared dentists and dental assistants employed during periods with high occupational mercury exposure with dentists and dental assistants employed during periods with less mercury exposure. We followed all subjects in a nationwide register of hospital admissions. We analysed risk of neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease and renal diseases using a Cox regression model. The cohort consisted of 122,481 workers including 5371 dentists and 33,858 dental assistants. For neurological diseases, no association was observed for dental assistants, while for dentists an increasing risk for periods with less mercury exposure was observed. Among dental assistants, a negative association between employment length and risk of neurological disease was observed. Admissions for renal disease among dental assistants were increased during periods with less mercury exposure compared with controls. For dentists a non-significant increased risk was observed between employment length and renal disease risk. Our nationwide study does not indicate that occupational exposure to mercury increases the risk of hospital admissions for neurological, Parkinson's or renal diseases.

  2. ' RENAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    METASTASE OSSEUSE: SOLITAIRE D'UN ADENOCARCINOME RENAL. Fig. 2: TDM ... du gène de résistance aux médicaments. NIDR1. ... vie. La néphrectomie trouve sa place dans quatre situations: En cas de métastase unique, dans un but de réduction tumorale avant immunothérapie, elle peut être adjuvante après.

  3. Pregnancy in End Stage Renal Disease Patients, Treatment with Hemodialysis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Savaş SİPAHİ; YAYLACI, Selçuk; Genç, Ahmet Bilal; Mehmet GÜNDÜZ; Mine GÜNAYDIN; CEVRİOĞLU, Arif Serhan; Tamer, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Occasionally, pregnancy can occur in patients receiving hemodialysis due to chronic kidney disease. Despite successful pregnancies reported in the literature, high complication rates and progression of renal disease can be observed. Major risk factors are maternal age, type of renal disease, dialysis prior to pregnancy, age at the time of dialysis, dialysis modality, hemoglobin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine levels during pregnancy and dialysis dose. Improvements in dialysis technology and ...

  4. Immunoglobulin G4-related Kidney Disease as a Cause of Acute Renal Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai; Du, Xiao-Gang

    2015-09-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related kidney disease is a systemic autoimmune disease which characterized by elevated serum IgG4 and dense infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells into tubular interstitium. It can be a mimicker of acute renal insufficiency. We herein report a rare case of IgG4-related kidney disease as a cause of acute renal insufficiency.

  5. Corynebacterium renale as a cause of reactions to the complement fixation test for Johne's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilmour, N.J.L.; Goudswaard, J.

    Complement fixation (C.F.) tests and fluorescent antibody (F.A.) tests were carried out on sera from rabbits inoculated with Corynebacterium renale and Mycobacterium johnei, and on sera from cattle with C. renale pyelonephritis and with Johne's disease. Cross-reactions were a feature of the C.F.

  6. Nutrition and growth in European children with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonthuis, M.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focused on nutrition and growth in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Europe. ESRD in childhood is a rare condition, with a total number of children of 4.4 per million age related population who started renal replacement therapy in 2011. Therefore, in order to conduct

  7. RENAL-DISEASE IN POEMS SYNDROME - REPORT ON A CASE AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navis, Ger Jan; Dullaart, R.P.F.; Vellenga, Edo; ELEMA, J.D.; DEJONG, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a multisystem disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasias. This report describes a patient with POEMS-associated renal disease and reviews the literature on biopsy-proven renal involvement in POEMS syndrome. Our patient had glomerulonephritis with membranoproliferative features

  8. Periodic Peritoneal Dialysis in End Stage Renal Disease: Is it Still ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: High cost of maintenance hemodialysis (HD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (PD) in India has made renal replacement therapy out of reach of many patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Repeated puncture PD although inferior to HD biochemically, is easily and freely available across ...

  9. Indices of Paraoxonase and Oxidative Status Do Not Enhance the Prediction of Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in Mixed-Ancestry South Africans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Macharia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the association of indices of paraoxonase (PON1 and oxidative status with subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD in mixed-ancestry South Africans. Participants were 491 adults (126 men who were stratified by diabetes status and body mass index (BMI. Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT was used as a measure of subclinical CVD. Indices of PON1 and oxidative status were determined by measuring levels and activities (paraoxonase and arylesterase of PON1, antioxidant activity (ferric reducing antioxidant power and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation markers (malondialdehyde and oxidized LDL. Diabetic subjects (28.9% displayed a significant decrease in PON1 status and antioxidant activity as well as increase in oxidized LDL and malondialdehyde. A similar profile was apparent across increasing BMI categories. CIMT was higher in diabetic than nondiabetic subjects (P<0.0001  but showed no variation across BMI categories. Overall, CIMT correlated negatively with indices of antioxidant activity and positively with measures of lipid oxidation. Sex, age, BMI, and diabetes altogether explained 29.2% of CIMT, with no further improvement from adding PON1 and/or antioxidant status indices. Though indices of PON1 and oxidative status correlate with CIMT, their measurements may not be useful for identifying subjects at high CVD risk in this population.

  10. Cytomegalovirus infection inducing flare of Behcet's disease with possible recurrence of glomerulonephritis after renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R A Annigeri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of young male with end-stage renal disease due to type III membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (GN and clinical features consistent with Behcet's disease (BD. He developed flare of BD 3 months after deceased donor renal transplantation following cytomegalovirus infection, in the form of oral and genital ulcers. He also had GN characterized by mild mesangial proliferation, neutrophilic infiltration and subepithelial, mesangial and intramembranous electron dense deposits, which could possibly be attributed to recurrence of renal disease due to BD. The clinical flare of BD was treated with colchicine with good response.

  11. Adult Henoch–Schönlein purpura: Clinical and histopathological predictors of systemic disease and profound renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxi Cao

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Adult Henoch–Schönlein purpura patients older than 30 years have a threefold increased risk of renal involvement. The risk of profound renal disease necessitating nephrology referral rose significantly with age and the presence of cutaneous bullae and/or necrosis.

  12. Increased risk of emergency hospital admissions for children with renal diseases during heatwaves in Brisbane, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yu; Barnett, Adrian; Guo, Yu-Ming; Yu, Wei-Wei; Shen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Shi-Lu

    2014-11-01

    Heatwaves have a significant impact on population health including both morbidity and mortality. In this study we examined the association between heatwaves and emergency hospital admissions (EHAs) for renal diseases in children (aged 0-14 years) in Brisbane, Australia. Daily data on EHAs for renal diseases in children and exposure to temperature and air pollution were obtained for Brisbane city from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2005. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to compare the risks for renal diseases between heatwave and non-heatwave periods. There were 1565 EHAs for renal diseases in children during the study period. Heatwaves exhibited a significant impact on EHAs for renal diseases in children after adjusting for confounding factors (odds ratio: 3.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.4-9.5). The risk estimates differed with lags and the use of different heatwave definitions. There was a significant increase in EHAs for renal diseases in children during heatwaves in Brisbane, a subtropical city where people are well accustomed to warm weather. This finding may have significant implications for pediatric renal care, particularly in subtropical and tropical regions.

  13. The antiproteinuric effect of ace inhibition in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeg, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    In 1985 some studies were published showing that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition not only reduced the elevated blood pressure in animals with chronic renal failure (experimentally induced by renal ablation or by induced diabetic nephropathy), but also prevented the development of

  14. Antioxidative vitamines for prevention of cardiovascular disease for patients after renal transplantation and patients with chronic renal failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Kossmann, Beate; Fischereder, Michael; Klauss, Volker; Wasem, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The mortality from cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic renal failure is much higher than in the general population. In particular, patients with chronic renal failure with replacement therapies (dialysis patients and patients with renal transplantation) show both increased traditional risk factors and risk factors due to the dysfunction of the renal system. In combination with necessary medication for renal insufficiency oxidative stress is elevated. Progression of atherosclerosis is promoted due to increased oxidation of lipids and endothelium damage. This link between lipid oxidation and artherogenesis provides the rationale for the supposed beneficial effect of supplementation with antioxidative vitamins (vitamin A, C and E). Such an effect could not be demonstrated for patients with a history of cardiovascular disease and without kidney diseases. However, in high risk patients with chronic renal failure and renal replacement therapies this could be different. Objectives The objective of this systematic literature review was to assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of supplementation with antioxidative vitamins A, C or E to reduce cardiovascular events in patients with chronic kidney diseases, dialysis-requiring patients and patients after a renal transplantation with or without cardiovascular diseases. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted with documented search and selection of the literature, using a priori defined inclusion and exclusion criteria as well as a documented extraction and assessment of the literature according to the methods of evidence-based medicine. Results 21 publications met the inclusion criteria for the evaluation of clinical effectiveness. No study could be identified for the economic evaluation. Two studies (four publications) analysed the effect of oral supplementation on the secondary prevention of clinical cardiovascular endpoints. Studies analysing the effect on patients

  15. Antioxidative vitamines for prevention of cardiovascular disease for patients after renal transplantation and patients with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The mortality from cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic renal failure is much higher than in the general population. In particular, patients with chronic renal failure with replacement therapies (dialysis patients and patients with renal transplantation show both increased traditional risk factors and risk factors due to the dysfunction of the renal system. In combination with necessary medication for renal insufficiency oxidative stress is elevated. Progression of atherosclerosis is promoted due to increased oxidation of lipids and endothelium damage. This link between lipid oxidation and artherogenesis provides the rationale for the supposed beneficial effect of supplementation with antioxidative vitamins (vitamin A, C and E. Such an effect could not be demonstrated for patients with a history of cardiovascular disease and without kidney diseases. However, in high risk patients with chronic renal failure and renal replacement therapies this could be different. Objectives: The objective of this systematic literature review was to assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of supplementation with antioxidative vitamins A, C or E to reduce cardiovascular events in patients with chronic kidney diseases, dialysis-requiring patients and patients after a renal transplantation with or without cardiovascular diseases. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted with documented search and selection of the literature, using a priori defined inclusion and exclusion criteria as well as a documented extraction and assessment of the literature according to the methods of evidence-based medicine. Results: 21 publications met the inclusion criteria for the evaluation of clinical effectiveness. No study could be identified for the economic evaluation. Two studies (four publications analysed the effect of oral supplementation on the secondary prevention of clinical cardiovascular endpoints. Studies analysing the

  16. Profile of renal diseases in Iraqi children: A single-center report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatha Hussain Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal disease in hospitalized children can be difficult to diagnose early as it may exhibit few symptoms, unlike in adults. This study reports the epidemiological data, percentages and types of renal disorders in children seen at the pediatric nephrology center of the AlKadhymia Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq. A retrospective review of the charts of all patients, aged between one month and 14 years, who were admitted and followed-up for a period of three years from January 2009 till January 2012 were studied. The presence of renal disease based on their clinical records, laboratory tests and final diagnosis were noted. A total of 4785 children were admitted during the study period, of whom 326 renal disorders were observed in 281 children (5.8%. The affected children included 158 males (56.2% and 123 females (43.7%. Majority of the cases were above two years of age (n = 181; 64.4%. Among them, urinary tract infection, seen in 60 patients (18.4%, was the most common renal disease, followed by nephrotic syndrome (n = 52; 15.9%, renal stone disease (n = 49; 15%, congenital malformations (n = 46; 14.1%, acute renal failure (n = 37; 11.3%, chronic renal failure (n = 22; 6.7%, glomerulonephritis (n = 16; 4.9%, isolated hematuria (n = 14; 4.2%, hypertension (n = 8; 2.4%, tubular disorders [renal tubular acidosis (n = 8; 2.4%, isolated hypercalciuria (n = 7; 2.1%, Bartter syndrome (n = 1; 0.3%] and Wilm′s tumor in six (1.8% patients. The spectrum of renal disorders in Iraq is wide, and is similar to those reported from other developing countries with a predominance of infectious diseases.

  17. Renal glucosuria is not associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease outcome in a general Japanese community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Hayato; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Sakata, Kenji; Yoneda, Takashi; Yasuda, Kenji; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2017-06-01

    Renal glucosuria is defined as the excretion of detectable amounts of glucose in the urine without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Few data exist regarding the prevalence of renal glucosuria and its clinical impact on atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. This study included 47,842 subjects (16,913 men, 35.4%) aged ≥40 years who underwent the Japanese specific health checkup in Kanazawa City during 2014. We defined renal glucosuria as fulfillment of all of the following three criteria: 1) detectable glucosuria; 2) the absence of diabetes; 3) normal blood glucose (renal glucosuria and of factors associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, including coronary artery disease and stroke, was assessed. The criteria for renal glucosuria were met by 665 (1.4%) subjects. Significantly higher proportions of subjects with renal glucosuria exhibited coronary artery disease, stroke, or either outcome than those without (14.9% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.0305; 9.9% vs. 6.9%, p = 0.00255; 22.3% vs. 17.0%, p = 4.0 × 10-4, respectively), but multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that renal glucosuria was not associated with coronary artery disease (odds ratio [OR] = 0.940, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.748-1.171, not significant), stroke (OR = 1.122, 95% CI = 0.853-1.453, not significant), or atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (OR = 1.122, 95% CI = 0.853-1.453, not significant). These results indicate that the prevalence of renal glucosuria in the Japanese general population was 1.4%, and that renal glucosuria was not associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases per se. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Renovascular disease, microcirculation, and the progression of renal injury: role of angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports the pivotal role of renal microvascular disease as a determinant of tubulo-interstitial and glomerular fibrosis in chronic kidney disease. An intact microcirculation is vital to restore blood flow to the injured tissues, which is a crucial step to achieve a successful repair response. The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact and mechanisms of the functional and structural changes of the renal microvascular network, as well as the role of these changes in the progression and irreversibility of renal injury. Damage of the renal microcirculation and deterioration of the angiogenic response may constitute early steps in the complex pathways involved in progressive renal injury. There is limited but provocative evidence that stimulation of vascular proliferation and repair may stabilize renal function and slow the progression of renal disease. The feasibility of novel potential therapeutic interventions for stabilizing the renal microvasculature is also discussed. Targeted interventions to enhance endogenous renoprotective mechanisms focused on the microcirculation, such as cell-based therapy or the use of angiogenic cytokines have shown promising results in some experimental and clinical settings. PMID:21307362

  19. Periostin and Discoidin Domain Receptor 1: New Biomarkers or Targets for Therapy of Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Prakoura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD can be a life-threatening condition, which eventually requires renal replacement therapy through dialysis or transplantation. A lot of effort and resources have been invested the last years in the identification of novel markers of progression and targets for therapy, in order to achieve a more efficient prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of renal diseases. Using experimental models of renal disease, we identified and studied two promising candidates: periostin, a matricellular protein with high expression in bone and dental tissues, and discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1, a transmembrane collagen receptor of the tyrosine kinase family. Both proteins are inactive in physiological conditions, while they are highly upregulated during development of renal disease and are primarily expressed at the sites of injury. Further studies demonstrated that both periostin and DDR1 are involved in the regulation of inflammation and fibrosis, two major processes implicated in the development of renal disease. Targeting of either protein by genetic deletion or pharmacogenetic inhibition via antisense oligonucleotides highly attenuates renal damage and preserves renal structure and function in several animal models. The scope of this review is to summarize the existing evidence supporting the role of periostin and DDR1 as novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets in CKD.

  20. Hepatic and renal manifestations in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a dichotomy of two ends of a spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulick, J.J. van; Gevers, T.J.G.; Keimpema, L. van; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a multisystem disorder. It is the most common genetic cause of end-stage renal disease. One frequent extra-renal manifestation is hepatic cyst formation. The majority of ADPKD patients develop complications as a result of renal cyst

  1. Renal fibrosis: insight from proteomics in animal models and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julie; Kavvadas, Panagiotis; Prakoura, Niki; Karagianni, Fani; Schanstra, Joost P; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Charonis, Aristidis

    2011-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the end-point of a number of renal and systemic diseases. The high incidence and financial burden of CKD makes it imperative to diagnose CKD at early stages when therapeutic interventions are far more effective. A key component of CKD is the development of renal fibrosis. Renal fibrosis is a complex process, associated with many cell types and pathways, resulting in structural and functional alterations. Identification of specific biomarkers of renal fibrosis may thus not only help us to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in this process, but also improve diagnosis in the clinic. In this review, the existing literature on proteomic approaches to study renal fibrosis is presented and evaluated. The importance of using animal models along with patient material is discussed and future directions, considered key to this field, are proposed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Endocan, TGF-beta, and ADMA as Risk Factors for Endothelial Dysfunction and Possible Vascular Disease in Patients with Subclinical Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaci, Dilek; Karakece, Engin; Tocoglu, Aysel Gurkan; Ergenc, Hasan; Gurol, Gonul; Ciftci, Ihsan Hakki; Tamer, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Although the relationship between atherosclerosis and overt hypothyroidism has been confirmed, it remains controversial in cases of subclinical hypothyroidism. Higher TSH and similar T4 suggest differences in set-points or differences due to diagnostic limitations regarding subclinical hypothyroidism. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is a marker rather than a precursor of cardiovascular disease. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and endocan are known as novel markers of ED in various diseases. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) has a protective role against autoimmune diseases such as thyroiditis. This study aimed to determine the relationships between serum ADMA, endocan, TGF-β, and the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels, a proven indicator of ED, in patients with SH. Thirty-five patients with SH and 21 age- and sex-matched euthyroid subjects were included in the study. The levels of TSH, FT4, lipid parameters, endocan, ADMA, TGF-β, and hs-CRP were measured. No significant differences in age or sex were found between the patient and control groups (p=0.294 and 0.881, respectively). Mean TSH level was higher in the patient group (p=0.005), whereas mean fT4 level was similar in two groups (p=0.455). The average hs-CRP, endocan, TGF-β l level in the patient group was higher than control group (p=0.001; P=0.012; P=0.025; Phypothyroidism is associated with increased levels of serum endocan, ADMA, and TGF-β, which are new markers for ED. In particular, ADMA was correlated with both endocan and hs-CRP levels. These findings are suggestive for increased risk of ED and subsequent development of atherosclerosis in patients with SH. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  3. Reduced end-systolic pressure-volume ratio response to exercise: a marker of subclinical myocardial disease in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellis, Christine L; Jenkins, Carly; Leano, Rodel; Martin, Jennifer H; Marwick, Thomas H

    2010-07-01

    Limitations in the predictive value of negative exercise echocardiography in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to a reduced end-systolic pressure-volume response (ESPVR). We sought whether abnormal ESPVR reflected subclinical diabetic heart disease by examining the association between the ESPVR and markers of myocardial dysfunction and to establish if the change (Delta) or peak systolic blood pressure/end-systolic left ventricular volume ratio (SP/ESV) is a better marker of contractile reserve in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Resting and exercise echocardiography was performed in 167 apparently healthy patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (97 men; age, 55+/-10 years) without ischemia, other cardiac disease, or noncardiac complications of diabetes. Standard echocardiographic and color tissue Doppler measures (early diastolic tissue velocity, strain, and strain rate) were acquired at baseline and peak stress in apical long-axis views. Calibrated integrated backscatter was calculated from a resting parasternal long-axis view. DeltaSP/ESV was calculated as [(peak stress SP/ESV)-(rest SP/ESV)]. The 83 subjects who demonstrated a DeltaSP/ESV exercise were older and had lower peak heart rate, resting diastolic and stress systolic tissue velocity, stress ejection fraction, and exercise capacity than the remainder. There was no significant association between DeltaSP/ESV and metabolic derangement or echocardiographic measures of deformation or backscatter. Change in Sm and stress ejection fraction were independent correlates of DeltaSP/ESV. DeltaSP/ESV ratio is associated with established features of subclinical diabetic heart disease as well as determinants of contractile reserve (peak hemodynamic response and stress systolic function). Peak ESPVR is poorly associated with markers of myocardial dysfunction.

  4. Diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and long-term risk of renal disease mortality: Racial and socioeconomic differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghani Lankarani, Maryam; Assari, Shervin

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes, hypertension, and obesity increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and associated mortality. Race and socioeconomic status (SES) differences in the effects of these risk factors are, however, still unknown. The current study aimed to investigate whether or not race and SES alter the effects of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity on mortality due to renal disease. Data came from the Americans' Changing Lives Study, 1986-2011, a nationally representative prospective cohort of adults with 25 years of follow up. The study included 3,361 adults aged 25 years and older who were followed for up to 25 years. The outcome was death from renal disease. Diabetes, hypertension, and obesity were the main predictors. Race and SES (education, income, and employment) were moderators. Health behaviors and health status at baseline were covariates. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. In separate models, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity at baseline were associated with a higher risk of death from renal disease. From our SES indicators, education and income interacted with diabetes, hypertension, and obesity on death from renal disease. In a consistent pattern, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity showed stronger effects on the risk of death from renal disease among high-SES groups compared with low-SES individuals. Race and employment did not alter the effects of diabetes, hypertension and obesity on the risk of death from renal disease. Social groups differ in how diabetes, hypertension, and obesity influence health outcomes over long-term periods. Elimination of disparities in renal disease mortality in the USA requires understanding of the complex and non-linear effects of socioeconomic and medical risk factors on health outcomes. Multidisciplinary programs and policies are required to reduce social inequality in renal disease burden caused by diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published

  5. Factors associated with diffusely increased renal uptake of Tc-99m diphosphono-propanedicarboxylic acid on bone scintigraphy in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keunyoung; Kim, Seong-Jang; Song, Sang H; Kim, In-Joo; Pak, Kyoungjune; Kim, So J; Shin, Senghyeon; Kim, Bum S

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to determine the factors contributing toward diffusely increased renal uptake on bone scintigraphy using technetium-99m (Tc-99m) diphosphono-propanedicarboxylic acid (DPD) in patients with end-stage renal disease. One-hundred and forty-three bone scintigraphies, performed between June 2007 and July 2013, in 135 patients with chronic kidney disease were analyzed retrospectively, including 22 bone scintigraphies (15 patients; eight women; seven men) with glomerular filtration rates less than 15 ml/min/1.73 m. Patients with nephrocalcinosis were excluded. The clinical records of medication and underlying disease were reviewed retrospectively. The presence of renal artery calcification was visually estimated and the Hounsfield unit (HU) of renal parenchyma was measured by abdominal and pelvic nonenhanced computed tomography. Two patients underwent peritoneal dialysis and 13 underwent hemodynamic dialysis. Diffusely increased renal Tc-99m DPD uptake was observed on 15 of 22 (68%) bone scintigraphy images. Laboratory test results were not significantly different between the patients with or without increased renal uptake. A history of inflammatory conditions or antibiotic administration did not correlate with kidney visualization. The significant factor for diffuse renal tracer uptake on multivariate analysis was renal artery calcification (odds ratio: 18.42; 95% confidence interval: 2.01-79.43; Prenal tracer uptake (P=0.04) and renal artery calcification (P=0.02). Small renal arteriolar calcification and a higher HU value of renal parenchyma could be associated with diffusely increased renal Tc-99m DPD uptake in patients with end-stage renal disease.

  6. Milk fever and subclinical hypocalcaemia--an evaluation of parameters on incidence risk, diagnosis, risk factors and biological effects as input for a decision support system for disease control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houe, H; Østergaard, S; Thilsing-Hansen, T

    2001-01-01

    of risk factors is outlined. The clinical symptoms of milk fever are highly specific and the disease level may thus be determined from recording of treatments. Diagnosis of subclinical hypocalcaemia needs to include laboratory examinations or it may be determined by multiplying the incidence of milk fever......The present review analyses the documentation on incidence, diagnosis, risk factors and effects of milk fever and subclinical hypocalcaemia. It is hereby evaluated whether the existing documentation seems sufficient for further modelling in a decision support system for selection of a control...... strategy. Several studies have been carried out revealing an incidence of milk fever most often in the level of 5-10%. Few studies indicate that the incidence of subclinical hypocalcaemia is several times higher than milk fever. The diagnosis based on clinical or laboratory methods or based on presence...

  7. Cardiovascular disease in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila S. V. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on hemodialysis (HD in Brazil. Their mean age was 47 ± 39 years. The main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases were arterial hypertension (89.4%, dyslipidemia (78.3%, low high-density lipoprotein levels (84.2% and low physical activity (64.1%. Family history of coronary insufficiency and high low-density lipoprotein levels were significantly associated with coronary artery disease (P = 0.005 and P = 0.029, respectively. Sedentary life style, diabetes mellitus, secondary hyperparathyroidism and hyperglycemia also showed a significant association with the underlying vascular disease (P = 0.017, P = 0.039, P = 0.037 and P = 0.030, respectively. Hypercalcemia, hypertension and black race were factors significantly associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (P = 0.01, P = 0.0013 and P = 0.024, respectively. Our study shows that the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases in patients with ESRD were left ventricular hypertrophy, atherosclerotic disease, valvular disease and coronary artery disease. Hypertension and dyslipidemia were the common risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on HD in a single center in Brazil.

  8. LIFE EXPERIENCES OF PATIENTS SUFFERING END STAGE RENAL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulis Setiya Dewi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Haemodialysis (HD is one of therapies to sustain life for people with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD. HD and ESRD are the source of the stressor for the patients. The purpose of this study was to gain insight about the life experiences of patients suffering from ESRD and coping that they used in dealing with stressors. Method: This study employed hermeneutic phenomenological study as methodology. Samples were taken at RSU Dr. Soedono Madiun in December 2010–May 2011 using purposive sampling. Participants in this study amounted to 9 people who all male and had suffered kidney failure and undergoing HD for more than 2 years. Data were processed and analysed through the nine stages data interpretation according collaizi. Result: Client's life experiences with HD and coping strategies they used to cope with critical situations have been identified and grouped into several themes. The first theme was the reaction of participants when receiving the diagnosis should undergo HD including: sad, rejection, fear, shock and feelings of resignation and hope. The second theme was perceived to critical situations by clients include shortness of breath, weakness, body swelling, itching, diarrhea and could not urinate. Last theme was the meaning of life in hemodialysis derived from attitudinal values (the values to be and experiential values (the values of appreciation. Discussion: Ways in which clients address critical situations were quite diverse. Emotional informational, instrumental supports from spouse or significant other were needed by participants to overcome the critical situation. This study suggests that nurse should perform therapeutic communication to HD patients so that patients may cope with the disease more positively.

  9. End-stage renal disease in Nigeria: An overview of the epidemiology and the pathogenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M O Odubanjo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is paucity of information on the magnitude of the burden of renal disease in our environment. Obtaining accurate data is hampered by the poor socioeconomic status of most patients with lack of access to specialized care in tertiary institutions, where most of the data is generated. The incidence of chronic renal failure (CRF and end-stage renal disease (ESRD in any specified area is known to be influenced by the prevalence of specific disease entities resulting in CRF. Hypertension, glomerulonephritis (GN, sickle cell disease, quartan malaria nephropathy, urinary tract schistosomiasis and other parasite-related forms of chronic GN are known to contribute significantly to the incidence of CRF in Nigeria. As is the situation in other parts of the world, diabetic nephropathy appears to be of increasing importance in the causation of ESRD in Nigeria. Even though the underlying cause of renal disease can often not be treated, extensive studies in experimental animals and preliminary studies in humans suggest that progression in chronic renal disease may largely be due to secondary factors, attention to which may be important in the prevention and/or control of renal disease.

  10. Computerized tomography of Castleman's disease simulating a false renal artery aneurysm: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, L; Dubowitz, B; Papert, B; Porteous, P

    1987-07-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal Castleman's disease of the hyaline vascular type simulating a false renal artery aneurysm. Excretory urography with computerized tomography and angiographic findings are presented. All 3 investigations demonstrated a homogeneously enhancing hypervascular retroperitoneal mass.

  11. Hypokalemic Rhabdomyolysis Induced Acute Renal Failure As a Presentation of Coeliac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Sarı

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Adult coeliac disease commonly presents without classical symptoms as chronic diarrhea and weight loss. We describe the case of a 31-year-old woman with persistent life-threatening hypokalemia, acute renal failure, and acute quadriplegia due to diarrhea that had continued for one month. Although there are cases of coeliac disease diagnosed with hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis in the literature, none of the cases developed acute renal failure. This is the first case in the literature diagnosed with acute renal failure due to hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis as a presentation of coeliac disease. In acute renal failure cases that present with hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis due to severe diarrhea, coeliac disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis despite the negative antigliadin IgA antibody.

  12. Improving Outcomes in Patients with Lupus and End Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Inda-Filho, Antonio; Neugarten, Joel; Putterman, Chaim; Broder, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The development of lupus-related end stage renal disease (ESRD) confers the highest mortality rates among individuals with lupus. Lupus-related ESRD is also associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates compared with non-lupus ESRD.

  13. Subclinical elevation of plasma C-reactive protein and illusions/hallucinations in subjects with Parkinson's disease: case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Sawada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Though infections are associated with psychotic symptoms, whether or not subclinical inflammation is associated with hallucinations is not known in Parkinson's disease (PD. PURPOSE: To investigate the association of illusions/hallucinations and plasma CRP levels in PD patients without symptomatic infections. METHODS: PD patients not diagnosed as having infections were assessed for illusions and hallucinations using the Parkinson Psychosis Questionnaire (PPQ. It comprises four-domain questions: PPQ-A for sleep problems, PPQ-B for hallucinations/illusions, PPQ-C for delusions, and PPQ-D for disorientation. Assigning patients with ≥1 points in the PPQ-B score to be cases and others as controls, the association of hallucinations/illusions and clinical features (age, sex, duration of PD, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part 3 (UPDRS-3, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE score, sleep disturbance (PPQ-A score as well as daily doses of L-Dopa, dopamine agonists, amantadine, and selegiline were analyzed using a case-control design. RESULTS: A total of 111 patients were examined and plasma CRP levels were <0.1-6.0 mg/L. Hallucinations or illusions were detected in 28 (25.2%. There were significant differences in age, UPDRS-3 score, MMSE score, PPQ-A, daily doses of L-Dopa and dopamine agonists and plasma CRP levels between cases and controls. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that UPDRS-3 scores and plasma CRP levels were significantly associated with hallucinations/illusions with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.96 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.20-3.20 per 10 points and 1.57 (95% confidence interval 1.13-2.16 per two-fold, respectively. Dividing patients into thirds by CRP levels (≤0.2, 0.3-0.6, ≥0.7 mg/L, the prevalence of hallucinations/illusions was 13.2%, 21.6%, and 41.7%, in the bottom-, middle-, and top-thirds, respectively (for trend p = 0.012. CONCLUSIONS: Subclinical elevation of plasma CRP levels was

  14. Childhood Albuminuria and Chronic Kidney Disease is Associated with Mortality and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Yuang; Huang, Shiuh-Ming

    2016-08-01

    We do not yet fully grasp the significance of childhood albuminuria. Based on mass urinary screening (MUS) using albumin-specific dipsticks in school children, we studied the independent association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A prospective cohort of 5351 children with albuminuria detected by school MSU during the period 1992-1996, followed up to 2009. Cumulative mortality rate, prevalence of CKD, and ESRD were higher in children with albuminuria than those without. Albuminuria category was associated with the risk of mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 3.4] and ESRD (HR 3.24). Lower eGFR and albuminuria predicted mortality and ESRD among children with albuminuria and CKD. We found that being below a threshold of 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was significantly associated with ESRD. The highest renal function decline, along with the steepest slope of cumulative ESRD number, occurred in Stage 3, the critical point in renal progression. Risk factors for renal progression among different age groups with albuminuria were hypercholesterolemia and low serum albumin at 7-17 years of age. Beyond 18 years of age, besides the risk factor, a higher fasting blood sugar (BS) was also noted. Childhood albuminuria is a risk factor for CKD in later life, albuminuria provides additional prognostic information, and complications of CKD should be defined in each case. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Risk of end-stage renal disease associated with gout: a nationwide population study

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Kuang-Hui; Kuo, Chang-Fu; Luo, Shue-Fen; See, Lai-Chu; Chou, I-Jun; Chang, Hsiao-Chun; Chiou, Meng-Jiun

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We explored the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among gout patients in a representative cohort in Taiwan. Methods The primary database used was the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Subjects older than 20 years without ESRD, coronary heart disease, or stroke were included in the study. The case definition of gout in the present study was gout diagnosis and medical treatment for gout. An ESRD case was defined by the presence of chronic renal failure necess...

  16. Effect of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium management in polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, V E; Wilson, D M; Burnett, J C; Johnson, C M; Offord, K P

    1991-10-01

    We compared the tubular transport of sodium and the erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity in hypertensive patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and in normotensive control subjects. In addition, we assessed the effects of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion in hypertensive patients with ADPKD to provide information on mechanisms responsible for the increased renal vascular resistance and filtration fraction and the adjustment of the pressure-natriuresis relationship during saline expansion, observed in patients with ADPKD, hypertension, and preserved renal function. In comparison with normotensive control subjects, the hypertensive patients with ADPKD had lower renal plasma flows, higher renal vascular resistances and filtration fractions, and similar proximal and distal fractional reabsorptions of sodium. The administration of enalapril resulted in significant increases in the renal plasma flow and significant reductions in mean arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance, and filtration fraction, but the glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged. Despite the significant reduction in mean arterial pressure during inhibition of converting enzyme, the distal fractional reabsorption of sodium decreased while the total fractional excretion of sodium remained unchanged or increased slightly. No significant differences were detected between the normotensive control subjects and the hypertensive patients with ADPKD in erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone concentration, or atrial natriuretic factor. These results suggest that the renal renin-angiotensin system plays a central role in the alterations in renal hemodynamics and sodium management associated with the development of hypertension in ADPKD.

  17. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì’, Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well. PMID:26034591

  18. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì', Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-06-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well.

  19. Octreotide reduces hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Selgas, Rafael

    2011-06-01

    A 43-year-old woman with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) received octreotide for 12 months, and this was associated with a 6.3% reduction in liver volume, an 8% reduction in total kidney volume and stabilization of renal function. There was also a reduction of cyst size in fibrocystic disease of breast. These data suggest that the cyst fluid accumulation in different organs from patients with ADPKD is a dynamic process which can be reversed by octreotide. This is the first report of a case of simultaneous reduction in hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume with preservation of renal function in a patient with ADPKD receiving octreotide.

  20. Interankle systolic blood pressure difference and renal outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Lee, Su-Chu; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Interankle blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with peripheral artery disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the relationship between interankle BP difference and renal outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has never been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine whether interankle BP difference is associated with the rate of renal function decline and progression to renal end points in patients with stage 3-5 CKD. We enrolled 144 patients with CKD from one regional hospital. The BP in four limbs was simultaneously measured using an ABI-form device. The decline in renal function was evaluated using an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. Rapid renal progression was defined as an eGFR slope < -3 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) per year. The renal end points were defined as ≥ 25% decline in eGFR or commencement of dialysis during the follow-up period. During a mean follow-up period of 3.1 years, 90 patients (62.5%) reached renal end points. Multivariate analysis showed that an increased interankle systolic BP difference (per 5 mmHg) was associated with a worse eGFR slope (regression β, -0.292; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.482 to -0.102; P = 0.003), rapid renal progression (odds ratio, 1.189; 95% CI, 1.015-1.394; P = 0.032), and an increased risk of progression to renal end points (hazard ratio, 1.126; 95% CI, 1.052-1.204, P = 0.001). Interankle systolic BP difference was associated with rapid renal progression and progression to renal end points in patients with stage 3-5 CKD in our study. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  1. Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease. Diagnosis and prevalence in an hypertensive and/or uremic elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Michele

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure leading to dialysis among the elderly; Its prevalence is inferred from autopsy or retrospective arteriographic studies. This study has been conducted on 269 subjects over 50 with hypertension and/or CRF, unrelated to other known causes of renal disease. Methods All 269 patients were studied either by color-flow duplex sonography (n = 238 or by renal scintigraphy (n = 224, and 199 of the 269 patients were evaluated using both of these techniques. 40 patients, found to have renal artery stenosis (RAS, were subjected to 3D-contrast enhancement Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA and/or Selective Angiography (SA. An additional 23 cases, negative both to scintigraphy and to ultrasound study, underwent renal angiography (MRA and/or SA. Results Color-duplex sonography, carried out in 238 patients, revealed 49 cases of RAS. MR or SA was carried out in 35 of these 49 patients, and confirmed the diagnosis in 33. Color-duplex sonography showed a PPV value of 94.3% and NPV of 87.0% while renal scintigraphy, carried out in 224 patients, had a PPV of 72.2% and a NPV of 29.4%. Patients with RAS showed a higher degree of renal insufficiency compared to non stenotic patients while there were no differences in proteinuria. RAS, based on color-duplex sonography studies, was present in 11% of patients in the age group 50–59, 18% in the 60–69 and 23% at age 70 and above. Conclusions A relatively large percentage of the elderly population with renal insufficiency and/or hypertension is affected by RAS and is at risk of developing end-stage renal failure. Color-duplex ultrasonography is a valid routine method of investigation of population at risk for renal artery stenosis.

  2. Endothelin-A receptor blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental renovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Silvia; Hall, John E; Chade, Alejandro R

    2011-07-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1, a potent renal vasoconstrictor with mitogenic properties, is upregulated by ischemia and has been shown to induce renal injury via the ET-A receptor. The potential role of ET-A blockade in chronic renovascular disease (RVD) has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported. We hypothesized that chronic ET-A receptor blockade would preserve renal hemodynamics and slow the progression of injury of the stenotic kidney in experimental RVD. Renal artery stenosis, a major cause of chronic RVD, was induced in 14 pigs and observed for 6 wk. In half of the pigs, chronic ET-A blockade was initiated (RVD+ET-A, 0.75 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) at the onset of RVD. Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and perfusion were quantified in vivo after 6 wk using multidetector computer tomography. Renal microvascular density was quantified ex vivo using three-dimensional microcomputer tomography, and growth factors, inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis were determined in renal tissue. The degree of stenosis and increase in blood pressure were similar in RVD and RVD+ET-A pigs. Renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density were decreased in the stenotic kidney but preserved by ET-A blockade, accompanied by increased renal expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and downstream mediators such as phosphorilated-Akt, angiopoietins, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. ET-A blockade also reduced renal apoptosis, inflammation, and glomerulosclerosis. This study shows that ET-A blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental RVD and preserves renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density in the stenotic kidney. These results support a role for ET-1/ET-A as a potential therapeutic target in chronic RVD.

  3. Recipient Outcomes Following Transplantation of Allografts From Live Kidney Donors Who Subsequently Developed End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaale, A D; Massie, A B; Anjum, S; Liao, C; Garg, A X; Lentine, K L; Segev, D L

    2016-12-01

    Live kidney donors have an increased risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) compared with nondonors; however, it is unknown whether undetected, subclinical kidney disease exists at donation that subsequently contributes to this risk. To indirectly test this hypothesis, the authors followed the donated kidneys, by comparing the outcomes of 257 recipients whose donors subsequently developed ESRD with a matched cohort whose donors remained ESRD free. The compared recipients were matched on donor (age, sex, race/ethnicity, donor-recipient relationship), transplant (HLA mismatch, peak panel-reactive antibody, previous transplantation, year of transplantation), and recipient (age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, cause of ESRD, and time on dialysis) risk factors. Median recipient follow-up was 12.5 years (interquartile range 7.4-17.9, maximum 20 years). Recipients of allografts from donors who developed ESRD had increased death-censored graft loss (74% versus 56% at 20 years; adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-2.0; p < 0.001) and mortality (61% versus 46% at 20 years; aHR 1.5; 95% CI 1.2-1.8; p < 0.001) compared with matched recipients of allografts from donors who did not develop ESRD. This association was similar among related, spousal, and unrelated nonspousal donors. These findings support a novel view of the mechanisms underlying donor ESRD: that of pre-donation kidney disease. However, biopsy data may be required to confirm this hypothesis. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  4. Acceptance and effects of a therapeutic renal food in pet cats with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Dale A; Jewell, Dennis E; Leventhal, P S; Brejda, J; Ahle, N W; Schiefelbein, H M; Forrester, S D

    2015-01-01

    Renal foods are used to manage chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats, but their effectiveness may be limited by the ability to transition animals to them. In a prospective study, pet cats with previously undiagnosed kidney disease (20 International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) 1, 61 IRIS 2, 14 IRIS 3/4, 33 at risk for CKD) were transitioned to a renal food. Markers of renal function were measured and owners answered questionnaires about their pet over one year. All but eight cats (120/128; 94 per cent) successfully transitioned to the renal food. Most of the time, cats moderately or extremely liked the food (89 per cent), ate at least half (73 per cent) and were moderately or extremely enthusiastic while eating (68 per cent). Cats rarely disliked the food (2 per cent) or refused to eat it (1 per cent). Markers of renal function were unchanged in IRIS 1 and 2 cats and changed little in IRIS 3/4 cats. In all groups, owner-assessed quality of life improved initially and then remained stable. Mean bodyweight did not change in cats with CKD. Most cats with CKD successfully transitioned to the renal food. The results also support previous studies that the renal food can help stabilise cats with CKD.

  5. Ultrastructural deposits appearing as "zebra bodies" in renal biopsy: Fabry disease?- comparative case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes Neves, Precil Diego Miranda; Machado, Juliana Reis; Custódio, Fabiano Bichuette; Dos Reis Monteiro, Maria Luíza Gonçalves; Iwamoto, Shigueo; Freire, Marlene; Ferreira, Marisa França; Dos Reis, Marlene Antônia

    2017-05-12

    Fabry Disease (FD) is a genetic disorder caused by alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. Certain drugs, such as hydroxychloroquine, can produce renal deposits that mimic morphological findings seen in FD, characterizing a type of drug-induced renal phospholipidosis. Case 1: A 28-year-old female patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who had been using hydroxychloroquine for 14 months presented subnephrotic proteinuria. Renal biopsy showed deposits compatible with FD. Neither activity analysis of alpha-galactosidase A nor genetic analysis were available and were not performed. These deposits were not detected in a subsequent renal biopsy three years after withdrawal of the medication, characterizing a possible hydroxychloroquine-induced renal phospholipidosis. Case 2: A 29-year-old male patient presented with acroparesthesia, angiokeratomas, cornea verticillata and subnephrotic proteinuria. Deposits compatible with FD were detected upon renal biopsy. The evaluation of alpha-galactosidase A showed no activity in both blood and leukocytes. Genetic analysis identified an M284 T mutation in exon 6, and such mutation was also found in other family members. Clinical investigation is necessary in suspected cases of Fabry Disease upon renal biopsy in order to confirm diagnosis. Drug-induced renal phospholipidosis should be considered in differential diagnosis in cases with intracellular osmiophilic, lamellar inclusions in electron microscopy.

  6. Chronic kidney disease and risk of renal cell carcinoma: differences by race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Jonathan N; Corley, Douglas A; Zhao, Wei K; Colt, Joanne S; Shuch, Brian; Chow, Wong-Ho; Purdue, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma in the United States differs by race/ethnicity. To better understand these disparities, we conducted a nested case-control study investigating renal cell carcinoma risk factors across racial/ethnic groups within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California health care network. Our study included 3136 renal cell carcinoma cases (2152 whites, 293 blacks, 425 Hispanics, and 255 Asians) diagnosed between 1998 and 2008 and 31031 individually matched controls (21478 whites, 2836 blacks, 4147 Hispanics, and 2484 Asians). Risk of renal cell carcinoma was assessed in relation to smoking status, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using conditional logistic regression, and population attributable risk (PAR) to estimate by race the proportion of cases attributable to hypertension and chronic kidney disease. The association between chronic kidney disease and renal cell carcinoma differed markedly by race (Pinteraction chronic kidney disease (combined, PAR = 37%; hypertension only, PAR = 27%; chronic kidney disease, PAR = 10%). Our findings suggest that hypertension and chronic kidney disease likely have contributed to the observed excess in renal cell carcinoma incidence among blacks compared with whites.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue are not affected by renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemeling-van Rhijn, Marieke; Reinders, Marlies E J; de Klein, Annelies; Douben, Hannie; Korevaar, Sander S; Mensah, Fane K F; Dor, Frank J M F; IJzermans, Jan N M; Betjes, Michiel G H; Baan, Carla C; Weimar, Willem; Hoogduijn, Martin J

    2012-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are a potential therapeutic agent in renal disease and kidney transplantation. Autologous cell use in kidney transplantation is preferred to avoid anti-HLA reactivity; however, the influence of renal disease on mesenchymal stem cells is unknown. To investigate the feasibility of autologous cell therapy in patients with renal disease, we isolated these cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy controls and patients with renal disease and compared them phenotypically and functionally. The mesenchymal stem cells from both groups showed similar morphology and differentiation capacity, and were both over 90% positive for CD73, CD105, and CD166, and negative for CD31 and CD45. They demonstrated comparable population doubling times, rates of apoptosis, and were both capable of inhibiting allo-antigen- and anti-CD3/CD28-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation. In response to immune activation they both increased the expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors. These mesenchymal stem cells were genetically stable after extensive expansion and, importantly, were not affected by uremic serum. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells of patients with renal disease have similar characteristics and functionality as those from healthy controls. Hence, our results indicate the feasibility of their use in autologous cell therapy in patients with renal disease.

  8. Applications of urinary proteomics in renal disease research using animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yang; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of renal disease are essential tools in research on kidney disease and have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis. Use of animal models minimises inter-individual differences, allows specific pathological changes to be examined, and facilitates collection of tissue samples. Thus, mechanistic research and identification of biomarkers are possible. Various animal models manifesting specific pathological lesions can be used to investigate acute or chronic kidney disease (CKD). Urine, a terminal metabolic product, is produced via glomerular filtration, reabsorption, and excretion in the tubular and collecting ducts, reflecting the functions of glomeruli or tubular tissue stimulated in various ways or subject to disease. Almost 70 % of urinary proteins originate from the kidney (the other 30 % come from plasma), and urinary sampling is important to noninvasively detect renal disease. Proteomics is powerful when used to screen urine components. Increasingly, urine proteomics is used to explore the pathogenesis of kidney disease in animals and to identify novel biomarkers of renal disease. In this section, we will introduce the field of urinary proteomics as applied in different models of animal renal disease and the valuable role played by proteomics in noninvasive diagnosis and rational treatment of human renal disease.

  9. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Availability and implementation: Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. Database URL: http://rged.wall-eva.net PMID:25252782

  10. Intensified Multifactorial Intervention in Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria Reduces End Stage Renal Disease and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oellgaard, Jens; Gæde, Peter; Rossing, Peter

    2016-01-01

    -label trial. Duration of the intervention was 8 years, where after all patients were recommended intensified treatment. Total follow-up of up to 21 years of 24 hour urinary albumin excretion rate and GFR (51Cr-EDTA-clearance) assessed at 6 study visits. Information on end stage renal disease (ESRD......) and mortality was obtained from national registries. Outcome measures were progression to macroalbuminuria (>300 mg/24h), decline-rates of GFR and progression to end stage renal disease (ESRD) or death. Results: Progression to macroalbuminuria was reduced in the original intensive-therapy group with a hazard...... treatment for 8 years in type 2 diabetes patients with microalbuminuria slows long-term progression in nephropathy and loss of renal function and reduces the risk of end stage renal disease and the mortality rate....

  11. Sono-Guided Percutaneous Automated Gun Biopsy in Pediatric Renal Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Chul [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    To evaluate whether sono-guided percutaneous automated gun biopsy is also useful in pediatricpatients with renal diseases. In the prone position of twenty pediatric patients with renal parenchymal diseases, percutaneous biopsy was done through lateral aspect of the lower pole of left kidney with automated biopsy gun under the guidance of ultrasonography. The biopsy needle was either of 18 or 20 gauge. The obtained core of renal tissue was examined with light, immunofluorescent or electron microscope by the renal pathologist. In 18 among 20 patients, adequate renal tissue core sufficient to be pathologically diagnosed was obtained. The histologic findings were as follows : IG A nephropathy (n = 2), lupus nephritis (n =2), minimal change glomerulonephritis (n = 5), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (n = 3), mesangialproliferative glomeru-lonephritis (n = 1), diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (n = 3), focalglomerulo-sclerosis (n = 1), membranous glomerulopathy (n = 1). No significant complications occurred during or after the biopsy. Sono-guided percutaneous renal biopsy using automated biopsy gun is also useful todiagnose renal parenchymal diseases without significant complications in pediatric patients

  12. Presentation, pathology and prognosis of renal disease in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jasmine; Zwi, L Jonathan; Collins, John F; Marshall, Mark R; Cundy, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD) is common in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the relationship between its presentation and prognosis is unknown. In a retrospective cohort study, we compared renal and patient survival among 263 patients with T2D who had native renal biopsies between 2002 and 2008 from three Auckland hospitals in New Zealand. The presence of diabetic nephropathy (DN), NDRD or mixed (DN and NDRD) was determined from biopsy. We examined clinical associations according to NDRD etiologies and mode of presentation-acute (defined by acute kidney injury (AKI)) or non-acute. Patients were followed until end-stage renal disease, death or December 2015. Survival was compared using Log-rank test. 94 (36%) patients had DN, 72 (27%) had NDRD, and 97 (37%) had mixed pathologies. Obesity-related focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was the most common NDRD (46%) in patients with non-acute presentations, whereas interstitial nephritis or immune-complex glomerulonephritides were the most prevalent in those with acute presentations (60%). DN was commonly associated with AKI (pRenal survival was best in the NDRD group (prenal prognosis was worse in those with more advanced DN lesions and those with an acute presentation (pRenal disease in patients with T2D is heterogeneous. The renal prognosis differs markedly according to histopathological diagnosis and mode of presentation.

  13. Are Octogenarians With End-Stage Renal Disease Candidates for Renal Transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lønning, Kjersti; Midtvedt, Karsten; Leivestad, Torbjørn; Reisæter, Anna V; Line, Pål-Dag; Hartmann, Anders; Heldal, Kristian

    2016-12-01

    Elderly patients are the fastest-growing group in need of renal transplantation. This study puts focus on renal transplant recipients in their 80th year or longer at time of engraftment. Is there evidence to support an absolute upper age limit for renal transplantation? Recipients in their 80th year or longer, transplanted between 1983 and 2015, were included. Data were retrieved from the Norwegian Renal Registry in the end of October 2015. Graft and patient survivals were compared with recipients aged 70 to 79 years at transplantation. Forty-seven patients older than 79 years were transplanted in the defined period. Median age 80.1 years, 81% were men. Median time on dialysis before transplantation was 18.5 months. All patients received an allograft from a deceased donor (median donor age, 61.8 years). In the death-censored graft survival model, there was no statistical difference between the groups. We found improved patient and graft survivals after introduction of mycophenolate mofetil and induction with basiliximab. Patients transplanted before 2000 had increased risk of death compared with those transplanted after 2000 (hazard ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-8.7). Median uncensored graft survival for patients transplanted after the year 2000 was 5.0 year (95% confidence interval, 2.4-7.6). Median patient survival was 5.0 years (3.1-6.9) and 5-year patient survival was 55%. Age by itself should not be an absolute contraindication against renal transplantation. An estimated 5-year survival rate of 55% post-engraftment for an 80-year-old patient is in our opinion more than acceptable.

  14. Serum tryptase concentration and progression to end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesky, Mark D; Stringer, Stephanie J; Fenton, Anthony; Ng, Khai Ping; Yadav, Punit; Ndumbo, Miguel; McCann, Katerina; Plant, Tim; Dasgupta, Indranil; Harding, Stephen J; Drayson, Mark T; Redegeld, Frank; Ferro, Charles J; Cockwell, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Mast cell activation can lead to nonclassical activation of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System. However, the relevance of this to human chronic kidney disease is unknown. We assessed the association between serum tryptase, a product of mast cell activation, and progression to end-stage renal disease or mortality in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. We stratified patients by use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor II blockers (ACEi/ARB). This was a prospective cohort study of 446 participants recruited into the Renal Impairment in Secondary Care study. Serum tryptase was measured at recruitment by sandwich immunoassay. Cox regression analysis was undertaken to determine variables associated with progression to end-stage renal disease or death. Serum tryptase concentration was independently associated with progression to end-stage renal disease but not with death. In patients treated with ACEi or ARB, there was a strong independent association between higher tryptase concentrations and progression to end-stage renal disease; when compared to the lowest tertile, tryptase concentrations in the middle and highest tertiles had hazard ratios [HR] of 5·78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1·19-28·03, P = 0·029) and 6·19 (95% CI 1·49-25·69, P = 0·012), respectively. The other independent risk factors for progression to end-stage renal disease were lower age, male gender, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher urinary albumin creatinine ratio. Elevated serum tryptase concentration is an independent prognostic factor for progression to end-stage renal disease in patients with chronic kidney disease who are receiving treatment with an ACEi or ARB. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  15. Castleman Disease in the Kidney and Retroperitoneum Mimicking Renal Cell Carcinoma with Retroperitoneal Lymphadenopathy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Hee Sun; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Jung, Ah Young; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Castleman disease, or angiofollicular lymph node hyperplasia, is a fairly rare benign tumor of lymphoid origin with unknown etiology. Castleman disease arises mostly in the mediastinum, and some cases of renal and retroperitoneal involvement have been reported. However, Castleman disease that simultaneously involves the kidney and regional lymph nodes has not been reported in radiologic literature. We report a case of renal and pararenal Castleman disease, mimicking renal cell carcinoma with retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy.

  16. Chronic renal ischemia in humans: can cell therapy repair the kidney in occlusive renovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Ahmed; Herrmann, Sandra M; Textor, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Occlusive renovascular disease caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) elicits complex biological responses that eventually lead to loss of kidney function. Recent studies indicate a complex interplay of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and activation of fibrogenic and inflammatory cytokines as a result of atherosclerosis, hypoxia, and renal hypoperfusion in this disorder. Human studies emphasize the limits of the kidney adaptation to reduced blood flow, eventually leading to renal hypoxia with activation of inflammatory and fibrogenic pathways. Several randomized prospective clinical trials show that stent revascularization alone in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis provides little additional benefit to medical therapy once these processes have developed and solidified. Experimental data now support developing adjunctive cell-based measures to support angiogenesis and anti-inflammatory renal repair mechanisms. These data encourage the study of endothelial progenitor cells and/or mesenchymal stem/stromal cells for the repair of damaged kidney tissue. ©2015 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  17. Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Payment for Renal Dialysis Services Furnished to Individuals With Acute Kidney Injury, and End-Stage Renal Disease Quality Incentive Program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    This rule updates and makes revisions to the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2018. It also updates the payment rate for renal dialysis services furnished by an ESRD facility to individuals with acute kidney injury (AKI). This rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD Quality Incentive Program (QIP), including for payment years (PYs) 2019 through 2021.

  18. Regadenoson use in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease: A focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Aviral; Golzar, Yasmeen; Doukky, Rami

    2018-02-01

    Regadenoson is a selective A 2A adenosine receptor agonist that has been approved as a vasodilator stress agent with single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Since its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2008, it has become the most commonly used pharmacologic stress agent with SPECT-MPI. Given that it is predominantly renally excreted, its use in patients with chronic kidney disease has been the subject of active post-marketing clinical research. Until recently, prescribing information regarding the use of regadenoson in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was not defined in the package insert. Based on accumulating data since its initial approval, the FDA has recently outlined the use of regadenoson in patients with ESRD in a label update on January 17, 2017. In this review, we discuss the evidence leading to the recent label update, focusing on the pharmacokinetics of regadenoson in patients with impaired kidney function, the safety and tolerability of regadenoson in patients with chronic kidney disease and ESRD, and the prognostic value of regadenoson stress MPI in this patient population.

  19. Complications and Mortality After Lumbar Spinal Fusion in Elderly Patients With Late Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvanesarajah, Varun; Jain, Amit; Hess, Daniel E; Shimer, Adam L; Shen, Francis H; Hassanzadeh, Hamid

    2016-11-01

    Retrospective database review. To assess complication and mortality rates after lumbar spinal fusion surgery in patients with late stage renal disease. Lumbar spinal fusion surgeries are common in elderly patients who are well-known to have increased comorbidity burden. Elderly patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a population with poorly understood mortality and complication rates after spine surgery. Medicare data from the PearlDiver Database (2005-2012) was queried for patients who underwent primary 1-2 level posterolateral lumbar spine fusion surgeries. This cohort was divided into two study groups: a cohort with a preexisting diagnosis of late stage renal disease (N = 1654) and a control cohort of all other patients (N = 242,085). The control group was matched to the renal disease cohort by age, sex, and comorbidities. Moreover, 90-day complication rates and 90-day and 1-year mortality were assessed. The renal disease cohort had increased rates of all medical complications (21.3 vs. 14.2%; odds ratio, OR, 1.64; 95% confidence intervals, CI, 1.44 -1.85; P renal disease cohort. Both 90-day (1.1 vs. 0.2%; OR 5.05; 95% CI 2.90-8.77; P renal disease group compared with the control group. Elderly patients with late-stage renal disease treated with 1-2 level posterolateral lumbar fusion have 1.6 times increased odds of experiencing a major medical complication within 3 months of surgery and 2.8 times increased odds of 1-year mortality when compared with matched controls. 3.

  20. Cross-Reactive Myelin Antibody Induces Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lisa K.; Masaki, Takahisa; Wheelwright, Steven R.; Tsunoda, Ikuo; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Previously, we reported renal immunoglobulin (Ig) deposition in mice with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG92-106) induced progressive-EAE and naïve mice injected with MOG92-106 hybridoma cells producing antibody that cross-reacts with various autoantigens including double-stranded DNA. To assess whether MOG92-106 antibodies actually induce kidney changes, the extent of renal Ig deposition and changes in glomerular histology and filtration were investigated. Mice with progressive-EAE exhibited Ig deposition, glomerular hypercellularity and proteinuria indicating kidney dysfunction. MOG92-106 hybridoma cell injected mice also had Ig in the kidneys and proteinuria. Therefore, sensitization with MOG92-106 and transfer of MOG92-106 antibodies can induce both central nervous system and renal pathology. The renal involvement reported in MS is believed to occur as a side effect of nephrotoxic drugs or neurogenic bladder. Our results demonstrate that an autoimmune response against myelin could induce pathologic changes in the kidney and may help explain renal changes reported in patients with progressive MS. PMID:18608179

  1. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Left Ventricular Structure and Function in Chronic Kidney Disease: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faraz S; Cai, Xuan; Kunkel, Katherine; Ricardo, Ana C; Lash, James P; Raj, Dominic S; He, Jiang; Anderson, Amanda H; Budoff, Matthew J; Wright Nunes, Julie A; Roy, Jason; Wright, Jackson T; Go, Alan S; St John Sutton, Martin G; Kusek, John W; Isakova, Tamara; Wolf, Myles; Keane, Martin G

    2017-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and it is especially common among Blacks. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an important subclinical marker of CVD, but there are limited data on racial variation in left ventricular structure and function among persons with CKD. In a cross-sectional analysis of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study, we compared the prevalence of different types of left ventricular remodeling (concentric hypertrophy, eccentric hypertrophy, and concentric remodeling) by race/ethnicity. We used multinomial logistic regression to test whether race/ethnicity associated with different types of left ventricular remodeling independently of potential confounding factors. We identified 1,164 non-Hispanic Black and 1,155 non-Hispanic White participants who completed Year 1 visits with echocardiograms that had sufficient data to categorize left ventricular geometry type. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks had higher mean left ventricular mass index (54.7 ± 14.6 vs. 47.4 ± 12.2 g/m2.7; P 3 antihypertensive medications, Black race/ethnicity was independently associated with higher odds of concentric LVH compared to White race/ethnicity (odds ratio: 2.73; 95% confidence interval: 2.02, 3.69). In a large, diverse cohort with CKD, we found significant differences in left ventricular mass and hypertrophic morphology between non-Hispanic Blacks and Whites. Future studies will evaluate whether higher prevalence of LVH contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in cardiovascular outcomes among CKD patients.

  2. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and subclinical atherosclerosis: A comparison of metabolically- versus genetically-driven excess fat hepatic storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Costanzo, Alessia; D'Erasmo, Laura; Polimeni, Licia; Baratta, Francesco; Coletta, Paola; Di Martino, Michele; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Perri, Ludovica; Ceci, Fabrizio; Montali, Anna; Girelli, Gabriella; De Masi, Bruna; Angeloni, Antonio; Catalano, Carlo; Maranghi, Marianna; Del Ben, Maria; Angelico, Francesco; Arca, Marcello

    2017-02-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is frequently associated with atherosclerosis. However, it is unclear whether this association is related to excess fat liver storage per se or to metabolic abnormalities that typically accompany NAFLD. To investigate this, we compared individuals with hepatic steatosis driven by metabolic disturbances to those with hepatic steatosis associated with the rs738409 GG genotype in the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 gene (PNPLA3). Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), as a surrogate marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, was measured in 83 blood donors with the mutant GG genotype (group G), 100 patients with features of metabolic syndrome (MetS) but the wildtype CC genotype (group M), and 74 blood donors with the wildtype CC genotype (controls). Fatty liver was evaluated by ultrasonography and hepatic fat fraction (HFF) was measured using magnetic resonance (MRS/MRI) in 157 subjects. Compared with group G and controls, group M subjects were older and had increased adiposity indices, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and elevated transaminase levels (all p fatty liver on both ultrasonography and MRS/MRI. After adjustment for confounders (including severity of hepatic steatosis), the median CIMT in group M (0.84 [0.70-0.95] mm) was significantly greater than that in group G (0.66 [0.55-0.74] mm; p liver fat accumulation appeared to increase the burden of subclinical atherosclerosis only when it is associated with metabolic abnormalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, obesity, and metabolic syndrome, with systemic inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rifai, Mahmoud; Silverman, Michael G; Nasir, Khurram; Budoff, Matthew J; Blankstein, Ron; Szklo, Moyses; Katz, Ronit; Blumenthal, Roger S; Blaha, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    We characterized the association of 3 metabolic conditions - obesity, metabolic syndrome, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) - with increased inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of 3976 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) with adequate CT imaging to diagnose NAFLD. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2), metabolic syndrome by AHA/NHLBI criteria, and NAFLD using non-contrast cardiac CT and a liver/spleen attenuation ratio (L/S) inflammation was defined as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) ≥2 mg/L and subclinical atherosclerosis as coronary artery calcium (CAC) > 0. We studied the association of a stepwise increase in number of these metabolic conditions (0-3) with increased inflammation and CAC, stratifying results by gender and ethnicity. Mean age of participants was 63 (±10) years, 45% were male, 37% white, 10% Chinese, 30% African American, and 23% were Hispanic. Adjusting for obesity, metabolic syndrome and traditional risk factors, NAFLD was associated with a prevalence odds ratio for hsCRP ≥2 mg/L and CAC >0 of 1.47 (1.20-1.79) and 1.37 (1.11-1.68) respectively. There was a positive interaction between female gender and NAFLD in the association with hsCRP ≥2 mg/L (p = 0.006), with no interaction by race. With increasing number of metabolic conditions, there was a graded increase in prevalence odds ratios of hsCRP ≥2 mg/L and CAC >0. NAFLD is associated with increased inflammation and CAC independent of traditional risk factors, obesity and metabolic syndrome. There is a graded association between obesity, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD with inflammation and CAC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Comparative Study of Sonographic Grading of Renal Parenchymal Changes and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) using Modified Diet in Renal Disease Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankara, Vinayaka Undemane; Shivalli, Siddharudha; Pai, B H Santhosh; Acharya, Koteshwara Devadasa; Gopalakrishnan, Ravichandra; Srikanth, Vivek; Reddy, Vishwanath; Haris, Arafat

    2016-02-01

    The sonographic findings are of help in evaluating the nephrological diseases. Glomerular filtration rate is another parameter for assessing the reserved renal function and an indicator of prognosis. In clinical practice GFR estimation (eGFR) is done by using a mathematical formula. In our study, we compared the sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes with eGFR calculated using Modified Diet in Renal Diseases formula based on serum creatinine, age, gender and ethnicity. To evaluate the relevance of sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes in assessing the severity of the renal disease and comparing it to the eGFR calculated using MDRD formula based on the age, gender and serum creatinine value of the patient. The adult patients with suspected kidney disease referred for sonography of abdomen were our study participants. As per our study design following strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, patients were selected as study participants and for each of the patient's renal parenchymal status, serum creatinine, age, gender and ethnicity were documented. A total of 70 patients were our study participants, out of which 67.1% were males and 32.9% were females. Our study showed a linear correlation between sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes with eGFR. We conclude that by evaluating the kidneys with sonography and calculating eGFR using MDRD formula the renal status will be more accurately interpreted.

  5. Long-Term Health and Work Outcomes of Renal Transplantation and Patterns of Work Status During the End-Stage Renal Disease Trajectory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, Sijrike F.; Kuiper, Daphne; Groothoff, Johan W.; van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; van Son, Willem J.; Brouwer, Sandra

    Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the health-and work outcomes of renal transplant recipients long-term after transplantation as well as the pattern of work status, work ability and disability benefits during the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) trajectory that precedes

  6. Reducing VEGF-B Signaling Ameliorates Renal Lipotoxicity and Protects against Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkevall, Annelie; Mehlem, Annika; Palombo, Isolde; Heller Sahlgren, Benjamin; Ebarasi, Lwaki; He, Liqun; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Olauson, Hannes; Axelsson, Jonas; Sundelin, Birgitta; Patrakka, Jaakko; Scotney, Pierre; Nash, Andrew; Eriksson, Ulf

    2017-03-07

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common cause of severe renal disease, and few treatment options are available today that prevent the progressive loss of renal function. DKD is characterized by altered glomerular filtration and proteinuria. A common observation in DKD is the presence of renal steatosis, but the mechanism(s) underlying this observation and to what extent they contribute to disease progression are unknown. Vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B) controls muscle lipid accumulation through regulation of endothelial fatty acid transport. Here, we demonstrate in experimental mouse models of DKD that renal VEGF-B expression correlates with the severity of disease. Inhibiting VEGF-B signaling in DKD mouse models reduces renal lipotoxicity, re-sensitizes podocytes to insulin signaling, inhibits the development of DKD-associated pathologies, and prevents renal dysfunction. Further, we show that elevated VEGF-B levels are found in patients with DKD, suggesting that VEGF-B antagonism represents a novel approach to treat DKD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Baclofen Toxicity in a Patient with Hemodialysis-Dependent End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Lauren M; Merrick, Stephanie S; Katz, Kenneth D

    2017-04-01

    Oral baclofen toxicity is extremely rare, but can affect patients with renal disease due to the drug's predominant renal clearance of approximately 69-85%. Patients with severely impaired renal function typically develop symptoms soon after initiating baclofen therapy, even at relatively low doses. A 69-year-old woman with a history of hemodialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease presented to the Emergency Department with encephalopathy, ataxia, and dystonia after the addition of a recent baclofen prescription for back pain (10 mg twice daily). She had been taking baclofen as prescribed for approximately 1 week when, the day prior to admission, she had increased her dose to a total of 40 mg. Diagnostic studies demonstrated the patient had chronic, end-stage renal disease and a supratherapeutic concentration of baclofen. Signs and symptoms resolved with hemodialysis. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: It is of critical importance for emergency physicians to appreciate impaired baclofen clearance in those with underlying renal disease to obviate the potential for significant drug toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Treatment of end-stage renal disease in Iceland 1968-1997 heart disease in Iceland?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmundsson, P; Palsson, R

    1999-01-01

    Renal replacement therapy for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) jas been provided in Iceland since 1968 when hemodialysis was begun. Kidney transplantation in Iceland patients has benn performed abroad since 1970 mainly in Copenhagen, Gothenburg and Boston. The purpose of theis retrospective study was to determine the changes in incidencs, prevalence, and outcome of ESRD treatment during the period 1968-1997 and compare the results with other ESRD programs, mainly in the Nordic countries. Included in this study were all patients who began renal replacement therapy for ESRD during the study period and remained on therapy for at least six weeks. Data were obtained from the registry of ESRD, compiled by the Dialysis Service of the National University Hospital. The data were used to determine the annual incidence and prevalence of treated ESRD. Changes in parameters, such as age at the beginning of renal replacement therapy, gender distribution, causes of ESRD, treatment modalities, and survival were evaluated. Annual mortality rate was calculated as deaths per 100 life-years. Comparison of means was done by the twö sample t-test, survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and survival differences weere determined with the Mantel-Cox test. A total of 201 patients began therapy for ESRD during this 30 year period. The number of patients beginning renal replacement therapy in each of the three consecutive decades was 27, 59 and 115, respectively, which corresponds to 12.8, 25.1 and 44 per million population per year. The mean age rose throughout hte study period nad was 54.8 in the final decade. The prevalence per million population was 72 in 1977, 182 in 1987 nad 356 in 1997. Diabetic nephropathy was not observed as a cause of ESRD until the last decade when it accounted for 12% of new patiens. Hemodialysis was the sole dialysis modality undtil 1985. Peritoneal dialysis has since provided approximately one third of the dialysis treatment. The number of renal

  9. Interaction of renal failure and dyslipidaemia in the development of calcific aortic valve disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Kris; Roosens, Bram; Bala, Gezim; Remory, Isabel; Hernot, Sophie; Delvenne, Philippe; Mestrez, Fabienne; Droogmans, Steven; Cosyns, Bernard

    2017-10-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is currently the most common heart valve disease worldwide and is known to be an active process. Both renal failure and dyslipidaemia are considered to be promoting factors for the development of valvular calcifications. The aim of this study is to prospectively evaluate the respective contribution and interaction of renal failure and dyslipidaemia on CAVD in a rat model, using echocardiography and compared with histology. Sixty-eight male Wistar rats were prospectively divided in eight groups, each fed a different diet to induce renal failure alone and combined with hyperlipidaemia or hypercholesterolemia. CAVD was detected and quantified by calibrated integrated backscatter of ultrasound (cIB) and compared with the histological calcium score. The study follow-up was 20 weeks. At the end of the study, the cIB value and the calcium score of the aortic valve were significantly increased in the group with isolated renal failure but not with dyslipidaemia. The combination of renal failure with high cholesterol or high-fat diet did not significantly increase calcifications further. Renal failure alone does induce aortic valve calcifications in a rat model of CAVD, whereas dyslipidaemia alone does not. The combination of renal failure with dyslipidaemia does not increase calcification further. These findings suggest that a combination of atherosclerotic and calcifying factors is not required to induce aortic valve calcifications in this model.

  10. Urine Bikunin as a Marker of Renal Impairment in Fabry's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Junior Lepedda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry’s disease is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of α-galactosidase A that leads to the accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids in many organs including kidney, heart, and brain. Since end-stage renal disease represents a major complication of this pathology, the aim of the present work was to evaluate if urinary proteoglycan/glycosaminoglycan excretion could represent a useful marker for monitoring kidney function in these patients at high risk. Quali-quantitative and structural analyses were conducted on plasma and urine from 24 Fabry’s patients and 43 control subjects. Patients were sorted for presence and degree of renal impairment (proteinuria/renal damage. Results showed that levels of urine bikunin, also known as urinary trypsin inhibitor (UTI, are significantly higher in patients with renal impairment than in controls. In this respect, no differences were evidenced in plasma chondroitin sulfate isomers level/structure indicating a likely direct kidney involvement. Noteworthy, urine bikunin levels are higher in patients since early symptoms of renal impairment occur (proteinuria. Overall, our findings suggest that urine bikunin level, as well as proteinuria, could represent a useful parameter for monitoring renal function in those patients that do not present any symptoms of renal insufficiency.

  11. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease:Associations with Renal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eRusso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephro pathological changes are commonly observed in the non tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy. In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with radical nephrectomy. Despite emerging evidence that partial nephrectomy provides equivalent local tumor control to radical nephrectomy while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  12. The application of knemometry in renal disease: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, C; Schaefer, F; Walther, U; Schärer, K

    1991-07-01

    Short-term lower leg length was measured longitudinally using a high-precision device called a knemometer in 11 children with chronic renal failure and 12 normal children. The method has a high accuracy (mean standard error 0.13 mm) and may prove useful for prediction of long-term total body growth. Its application in renal patients undergoing corticosteroid, growth hormone (GH) and erythropoietin (EPO) therapy is documented. GH was shown to improve lower leg growth in an adolescent who already had passed the maximum of his pubertal spurt. EPO treatment produced no consistent increase of short-term growth.

  13. End-Stage Renal Disease From Cast Nephropathy in a Teenager With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butani, Lavjay; Ducore, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Cast nephropathy is the most common manifestation of renal injury in patients with multiple myeloma but is rarely reported in other conditions. We are reporting our experience in caring for a teenager with a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma who developed rapidly progressive kidney injury that advanced to end-stage renal disease. On renal biopsy extensive tubular necrosis and intratubular eosinophilic casts were noted. This previously unreported finding should prompt oncologists to closely monitor for such a complication in patients with secretory tumors. Whether early plasmapheresis could be of benefit, as has been tried in multiple myeloma, remains to be determined.

  14. Network analysis of genes regulated in renal diseases: implications for a molecular-based classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish HV

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic renal diseases are currently classified based on morphological similarities such as whether they produce predominantly inflammatory or non-inflammatory responses. However, such classifications do not reliably predict the course of the disease and its response to therapy. In contrast, recent studies in diseases such as breast cancer suggest that a classification which includes molecular information could lead to more accurate diagnoses and prediction of treatment response. This article describes how we extracted gene expression profiles from biopsies of patients with chronic renal diseases, and used network visualizations and associated quantitative measures to rapidly analyze similarities and differences between the diseases. Results The analysis revealed three main regularities: (1 Many genes associated with a single disease, and fewer genes associated with many diseases. (2 Unexpected combinations of renal diseases that share relatively large numbers of genes. (3 Uniform concordance in the regulation of all genes in the network. Conclusion The overall results suggest the need to define a molecular-based classification of renal diseases, in addition to hypotheses for the unexpected patterns of shared genes and the uniformity in gene concordance. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the utility of network analyses to rapidly understand complex relationships between diseases and regulated genes.

  15. Screening and differential diagnosis of renal light chain-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, Jens; Sachse, Anja; Busch, Martin; Illner, Nico; Muegge, Lars-Olof; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Wolf, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    Renal involvement in the light chain-associated diseases multiple myeloma (MM), amyloidosis (AL) and monoclonal immune position disease (MIDD) is common and differential diagnosis usually requires renal biopsy. The aim of this study was to investigate if noninvasive methods are viable to identify and differentiate between the various types of kidney diseases. All patients with a light chain-associated disease admitted to our center from 1996 to 2008 were retrospectively evaluated. Renal biopsy data were correlated with proteinuria findings. Only the ratio of free κ/λ light chains showed a good sensitivity for myeloma cast nephropathy (MCN), AL and MIDD. The λ light chain was characteristic for AL, the κ light chain dominated in MIDD. Renal function at the time of diagnosis was worst in MIDD. MCN presented with a proteinuria of > 3.5 g/g creatinine. In contrast, a higher proteinuria was found in AL or MIDD. Whereas the κ/λ ratio in the urine was pathological for all three diseases, extremely high or low ratios indicated the presence of MCN. However, in AL or MIDD, the ratio was only moderately elevated. A noninvasive differentiation between MCN and other forms of renal light chain disease is possible. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Dosing of radioactive iodine in end-stage renal disease patient with thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika Bhat

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe detailed administration of thyroidal and extrathyroidal doses of radioiodine to a patient with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. A thorough description of area under curve measurements in a patient with compromised renal function has rarely been described in the literature. Few publications have described thyroid cancer management of patients on hemodialysis, and we believe our management will aid in patient treatment in the future.

  17. Incidence and Predictors of End-Stage Renal Disease in Outpatients With Systolic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosselmann, Helle Skovmand; Gislason, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Background- Renal dysfunction is an important prognostic factor in heart failure (HF), but whether this dysfunction progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unknown. Therefore, we examined incidence and predictors of ESRD in outpatients with HF. Methods and Results- Patients with systolic HF......(2), group II: 30 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), group III: 15 to 29 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), group IV:...

  18. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Pot??, Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pre...

  19. Prostate specific antigen levels and prostate cancer detection rates in patients with end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Catherine J; Heldt, Jonathan P; Anderson, Kirk M; Ruckle, Herbert C; Agarwal, Gautum; Smith, Damien L; Schlaifer, Amy E; Richards, Gideon D; Arnold, Don C; Baldwin, D Duane

    2012-06-01

    Patients with end stage renal disease plus prostate cancer are ineligible to receive a renal transplant at most centers until an acceptable cancer-free period is demonstrated. To our knowledge previously established prostate specific antigen reference ranges have not been validated in patients with end stage renal disease. We determined age stratified 95th percentile prostate specific antigen reference ranges and the prostate cancer detection rate at specific prostate specific antigen intervals for patients with end stage renal disease. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 775 male patients with end stage renal disease on the waiting list for a renal transplant who had undergone a serum prostate specific antigen test. Prostate specific antigen was stratified by age at the time of the blood test and 95th percentile reference ranges were calculated for each decade. A total of 80 patients underwent prostate biopsy for increased prostate specific antigen and/or abnormal digital rectal examination. The cancer detection rate was calculated for specific prostate specific antigen reference ranges. The age specific 95th percentile prostate specific antigen references ranges were 0 to 4.0 ng/ml for ages 40 to 49 in 137 patients, 0 to 5.3 ng/ml for ages 50 to 59 in 257, 0 to 10.5 ng/ml for ages 60 to 69 in 265 and 0 to 16.6 ng/ml for ages 70 to 79 years in 69. The cancer detection rate was 44%, 38% and 67% for prostate specific antigen 2.5 to 4.0, 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml, respectively. In our study population of patients with end stage renal disease age stratified prostate specific antigen was higher than in the general population. The cancer detection rate was increased in our patients with end stage renal disease compared to that in patients with normal renal function at specific prostate specific antigen intervals. Lower prostate specific antigen cutoffs may be appropriate to recommend prostate biopsy in patients with end stage renal disease. Copyright

  20. Acute renal failure in patients with chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-16

    Aug 16, 2007 ... of GFR prediction equations that require the age, sex and ethnicity of the individual, as well as the serum ... synergistic effects from concurrent use of different diuretic classes.8. Osmotic diuresis from concurrent poorly ..... of obstruction leads to reversal of renal function deterioration and recovery back to.

  1. Clinical symptoms predict poor overall survival in chronic-dialysis patients with renal cell carcinoma associated with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezawa, Eri; Kondo, Tsunenori; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Iizuka, Junpei; Takagi, Toshio; Omae, Kenji; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate which clinical symptoms predict the survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma associated with end-stage renal disease under chronic dialysis. We retrospectively evaluated 401 patients with renal cell carcinoma associated with end-stage renal disease who underwent radical nephrectomy at our institute up through December 2012. Patients were divided into two groups: the symptomatic group and the incidental group, by diagnosis. We compared the clinicopathologic features and patient survival of the two groups and investigated prognostic factors using Cox multivariate analysis. Of the 401 patients, 124 (30.9%) were in the symptomatic group and 277 (69.0%) in the incidental group. The symptomatic group included more advanced tumors in terms of larger tumor size, higher stage and higher grade compared with the incidental group. The 5-year cancer-specific survival and overall survival of the symptomatic and incidental groups were 76.9 vs. 95.3% (P renal cell carcinoma associated with end-stage renal disease as well as sporadic renal cell carcinoma. The high incidence of renal cell carcinoma as well as the poor oncologic outcome in patients with longer dialysis therapy may suggest an important role for routine screening in these patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Renal volume and cardiovascular risk assessment in normotensive autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans, Laia; Pascual, Julio; Radosevic, Aleksandar; Quintian, Claudia; Ble, Mireia; Molina, Lluís; Mojal, Sergi; Ballarin, José A.; Torra, Roser; Fernández-Llama, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease, closely related to an early appearance of hypertension, is the most common mortality cause among autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients (ADPKD). The development of hypertension is related to an increase in renal volume. Whether the increasing in the renal volume before the onset of hypertension leads to a major cardiovascular risk in ADPKD patients remains unknown. Observational and cross-sectional study of 62 normotensive ADPKD patients with normal renal function and a group of 28 healthy controls. Renal volume, blood pressure, and renal (urinary albumin excretion), blood vessels (carotid intima media thickness and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), and cardiac (left ventricular mass index and diastolic dysfunction parameters) asymptomatic organ damage were determined and were considered as continuous variables. Correlations between renal volume and the other parameters were studied in the ADPKD population, and results were compared with the control group. Blood pressure values and asymptomatic organ damage were used to assess the cardiovascular risk according to renal volume tertiles. Even though in the normotensive range, ADPKD patients show higher blood pressure and major asymptomatic organ damage than healthy controls. Asymptomatic organ damage is not only related to blood pressure level but also to renal volume. Multivariate regression analysis shows that microalbuminuria is only associated with height adjusted renal volume (htTKV). An htTKV above 480 mL/m represents a 10 times higher prevalence of microalbuminuria (4.8% vs 50%, P renal volume group (htTKV > 336 mL/m) show higher urinary albumin excretion, but the 3rd tertile htTKV (htTKV > 469 mL/m) group shows the worst cardiovascular risk profile. Normotensive ADPKD patients show in the early stages of the disease with slight increase in renal volume, higher cardiovascular risk than healthy controls. An htTKV above 468 mL/m is associated

  3. Determinants and prevalence of depression in patients with chronic renal disease, and their caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawamdeh S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sana Hawamdeh, Aljawharah Mohammed Almari, Asrar Salem Almutairi, Wireen Leila T Dator College of Nursing, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: This study explored the prevalence of depression among the patients with chronic kidney disease and their caregivers and its association to their demographic profile.Methods: A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study that used the Hamilton rating scale tool to assess the prevalence of depression among 226 patients undergoing hemodialysis and 105 of their caregivers in a hospital in Saudi Arabia.Results: Patients with chronic renal disease and their caregivers experience depression at varying levels. Depression was positively associated with the socioeconomic and marital status of the patients. Socioeconomic status of the caregivers was seen to be associated with their depression.Conclusion: Depression is highly prevalent among patients with chronic renal disease and their caregivers. Keywords: caregivers, chronic renal disease, depression

  4. Multiethnic Exome-Wide Association Study of Subclinical Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Bis, Joshua C.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Cox, Amanda J.; Dorr, Marcus; Feitosa, Mary F.; Franceschini, Nora; Guo, Xiuqing; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Isaacs, Aaron; Jhun, Min A.; Kavousi, Maryam; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Schminke, Ulf; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Tada, Hayato; van Setten, Jessica; Smith, Albert V.; Vojinovic, Dina; Yanek, Lisa R.; Yao, Jie; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Amin, Najaf; Baber, Usman; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Cupples, L. Adrienne; de Jong, Pim A.; de Koning, Harry; de Vos, Bob D.; Demirkan, Ayse; Fuster, Valentin; Franco, Oscar H.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Heiss, Gerardo; Hoffmann, Udo; Hofman, Albert; Isgum, Ivana; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahonen, Mika; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kral, Brian G.; Launer, Lenore J.; Massaro, Joe; Mehran, Roxana; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Jr, Thomas H. Mosley; de Mutsert, Renee; Newman, Anne B.; Nguyen, Khanh-dung; North, Kari E.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Pankow, James S.; Peloso, Gina M.; Post, Wendy; Province, Michael A.; Raffield, Laura M.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Reilly, Dermot F.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rosendaal, Frits; Sartori, Samantha; Taylor, Kent D.; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; Turner, Stephen T.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van der Lugt, Aad; Volker, Uwe; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wassel, Christina L.; Weiss, Stefan; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bowden, Donald W.; Deary, Ian J.; Dehghan, Abbas; Felix, Stephan B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Lehtimaki, Terho; Mathias, Rasika; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rader, Daniel J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Wilson, James G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Volzke, Henry; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peyser, Patricia A.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Background-The burden of subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic individuals is heritable and associated with elevated risk of developing clinical coronary heart disease. We sought to identify genetic variants in protein-coding regions associated with subclinical atherosclerosis and the risk of

  5. End-stage renal disease due to delayed diagnosis of renal tuberculosis: a fatal case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth De Francesco Daher

    Full Text Available Renal TB is difficult to diagnose, because many patients present themselves with lower urinary symptoms which are typical of bacterial cystitis. We report a case of a young woman with renal TB and ESRD. She was admitted with complaints of adynamia, anorexia, fever, weight loss, dysuria and generalized edema for 10 months. At physical examination she was febrile (39ºC, and her abdomen had increased volume and was painful at palpation. Laboratorial tests showed serum urea=220mg/dL, creatinine=6.6mg/dL, hemoglobin=7.9g/dL, hematocrit=24.3%, leukocytes=33,600/mm³ and platelets=664,000/mm³. Urinalysis showed an acid urine (pH=5.0, leukocyturia (2+/4+ and mild proteinuria (1+/4+. She was also oliguric (urinary volume <400mL/day. Abdominal echography showed thick and contracted bladder walls and heterogeneous liquid collection in the left pelvic region. Two laparotomies were performed, in which abscess in pelvic region was found. Anti-peritoneal tuberculosis treatment with rifampin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide was started. During the follow-up, the urine culture was found to be positive for M. tuberculosis. Six months later the patient had complaints of abdominal pain and dysuria. New laboratorial tests showed serum urea=187mg/dL, creatinine=8.0mg/dL, potassium=6.5mEq/L. Hemodialysis was then started. The CT scan showed signs of chronic nephropathy, dilated calyces and thinning of renal cortex in both kidneys and severe dilation of ureter. The patient developed neurologic symptoms, suggesting tuberculous meningoencephalitis, and died despite of support measures adopted. The patient had ESRD due to secondary uropathy to prolonged tuberculosis of urinary tract that was caused by delayed clinical and laboratorial diagnosis, and probably also due to inadequate antituberculous drugs administration.

  6. The Putative Role of the Antiageing Protein Klotho in Cardiovascular and Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maltese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a multifactorial process often characterized by a progressive decline in physiological function(s. Ageing can and is often associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular and renal disease. Klotho is a novel antiageing gene that encodes a protein with multiple pleiotropic functions including an emerging role in cardiorenal disease. Mice deficient for this gene display a phenotype of premature human ageing characterized by diffuse vascular calcification, altered calcium/phosphate metabolism, and shortened lifespan. Klotho is mainly expressed in the renal tubules but it also exists as circulating soluble form detectable in the blood, with systemic effects. Reduction in soluble Klotho has been associated with renal disease, hyperphosphataemia, increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and diffuse vascular calcification. Conversely, overexpression of Klotho promotes cardiovascular-renal protection. The majority of the research on Klotho has been conducted in vitro and in animal studies but there is emerging data from human studies which suggest that Klotho may be a modifiable factor involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and renal disease in at-risk populations. Further data is required to confirm if this novel protein can emerge as therapeutic tool that may be used to prevent or slow progression of cardiorenal disease.

  7. Barriers to exercise for patients with renal disease: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Mary; Bronas, Ulf G

    2017-12-01

    Renal disease is a common health condition that leads to loss of physical function, frailty, and premature loss of independence in addition to other severe comorbidities and increased mortality. Increased levels of physical activity and initiation of exercise training is recommended in the current guidelines for all patients with renal disease, but participation and adherence rates are low. The barriers to exercise and physical activity in patients with renal disease are not well defined and currently based on patient provider perception and opinion. There have been no published reviews that have synthesized published findings on patient reported barriers to exercise. This integrative literature review therefore aimed to identify the current understanding of patient reported barriers to regular exercise. This integrative review found that patient perceived barriers to exercise are not consistent with the barriers that have been identified by renal disease specialists and healthcare providers, which were disinterest, lack of motivation, and being incapable of exercise. The patient reported barriers identified through this review were complex and diverse, and the most frequently reported patient perceived barrier to exercise was low energy levels and fatigue. It is clear that additional research to identify patient perceived barriers to exercise is needed and that patient directed interventions to address these barriers should be developed. This integrative review provides information to the interdisciplinary nephrology team that can be used to tailor their assessment of barriers to exercise and provide exercise education for patients with renal disease.

  8. Natural progression of renal function in the elderly: analysis of poor prognosis factors associated with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras, Manuel; García-Cosmes, Pedro; Fernández-Reyes, María J; Sánchez, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years a debate has emerged on the range of normal renal function and the rate at which renal disease progresses in the elderly. In this review we analysed, on the basis of the results of the study Ancianos con enfermedad renal crónica del Hospital General de Segovia (Elderly people with chronic kidney disease of the Hospital General de Segovia), the poor prognosis factors associated with this disease: proteinuria, episodes of acute renal failure and heart failure, and the role of uric acid. Elderly people with chronic kidney disease who present these poor prognosis factors may benefit from follow-up by Nephrology.

  9. Cell therapy in renal and cardiovascular disease Terapia celular en enfermedades renales y cardiovasculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Senior Sánchez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been important advances in the field of molecular biology, the mechanisms responsible for nephrogenesis and the factors that modulate the process of development, proliferation, growth, and maturation during fetal and adult life have not been thoroughly explained. Animals, including mammals, share the intrinsic ability to regenerate tissues and organs as an important biological defense mechanism. In the case of the kidney, after tissue damage secondary to injury, anatomical and functional recovery of integrity is achieved, accompanied by the activation of a complex, poorly understood process, leading to the replacement of damaged tubular cells by functional ones that reorganize tubular architecture. This regeneration and repair process is produced by somatic, exogenous, adult stem cells, and probably by intrinsic renal stem cells, that are responsible for maintaining renal homeostasis Aunque se han logrado grandes avances en el campo de la biología molecular, todavía no se han esclarecido completamente los mecanismos responsables de la organogénesis y los factores que modulan el proceso de desarrollo, proliferación, crecimiento y maduración celulares durante la vida fetal y adulta. Los animales comparten la capacidad de regenerar tejidos y órganos, como un mecanismo biológico importante de defensa. En el caso del riñón, luego del daño tisular secundario a una noxa, se produce recuperación anatómica y funcional de la integridad, acompañada por la activación de un proceso sofisticado, mal comprendido, que lleva al reemplazo de las células tubulares dañadas por otras funcionalmente normales que reorganizan la arquitectura tubular. Este fenómeno de recambio se produce gracias a la presencia de células madre adultas somáticas exógenas, responsables del proceso de mantenimiento de la homeostasis renal, y posiblemente por células renales intrínsecas.

  10. TREATMENT OF RENAL STONES WITH PERCUTANEOUS NEPHROLITHOTOMY IMPROVES RENAL FUNCTIONS IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem Akdeniz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of percutaneous nephrolitotomy on kidney functions in stage III or higher chronic renal failure patients using glomerular filtration rate and serum creatinine level. Material and Method:Between 2010 and 2014, percutaneous nephrolithotomy was applied to patients who had glomerular filtration rate below 60 mL/min/1.73m2. Pre-operative demographic features, stone burden and localization, urine analysis and microbial test, serum creatinine level, direct urinary system graphy, and spiral non-enhanced computerized tomography were obtained. Intraoperative renal unit counts, anesthesia and surgery time, and X-ray exposure time were calculated. Early and late post-operative complications, hospitalization time, stone-free rate, and glomerular function rate were evaluated, retrospectively. Findings:Pre-operatively, mean creatinine value was 2,42±0.76 mg/dL, mean glomerular filtration rate was 45.3±13mL/min/1.73m2, mean stone burden was 393±40 mm², mean intervention time was 79±34 min and 12 patients were stone free (70.5%. Decrease of hemoglobin 1,6 g/dL and transfusion was done only two patients (11.8% due to excessive bleeding. In early and long term follow-up, mean creatinine values and glomerular filtration rate were 1.98±0.72mg/dL, 2.16±0.78mL/dL and 54.1±14 mL/min/1.73m2and 51.8±15 mL/min/1.73m2, respectively. Comparison of pre-operative and post-operative creatinine and glomerular filtration rates revealed significant decrease in creatinine level and increase in glomerular filtration rate. Results:Percutaneous nephrolithotomy which eliminates urinary obstruction is safely used in the treatment of kidney stones with minimal damage on kidney functions. Stage III or higher renal failure patients who have obstructive kidney stones or recurrent urinary tract infections can effectively be treated and this may help patients to prevent progression to end-stage renal failure.

  11. Disease progression in pre-dialysis patients : renal function, symptoms, and health-related quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeij, Moniek Cornelia Maria de

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigated the effect of several risk factors on objectively assessed disease progression (renal function decline and time until the start of renal replacement therapy) and subjectively assessed disease progression (disease-related symptoms and health-related quality of life) in

  12. Cytomegalovirus Disease Amongst Renal Transplant Recipients in Australia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Seale

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is a significant pathogen causing disease in renal transplant patients. The highest incidence of CMV disease occurs during the first 3 months post-transplant and is most problematic in CMV-naïve transplant recipients. In this study, we conducted a retrospective review of two databases, the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry (ANZDATA and the National Hospital Morbidity Database, from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW, to examine CMV in renal transplant recipients. The first source looked at CMV serostatus at the time of transplantation and the second recorded hospital admissions for recipients with invasive CMV disease. From the ANZDATA registry, we obtained information from 13,530 renal transplants recipients from 1980 to 2004. Of these recipients, 7808 had a known CMV serostatus, of which 65.7% (5134/7808 had a positive sero antibody status and 34.2% (2674/7808 had a negative sero antibody status. In univariate analysis, factors significantly associated with renal rejection were being male, recipient age <50 years, being diabetic, being diagnosed with cancer at some point and having a positive EBV status. Positive CMV serostatus was not a contributing factor. Between 1993 and 2001 there were 1445 renal transplant recipients hospitalized in Australia with a diagnosis of CMV disease, of which 38% (554/1445 had CMV disease as a principal diagnoses. The average annual rate of admissions with any diagnosis was 3871 episodes per 100,000 people living with a functioning graft. Preventative strategies for CMV in renal transplant recipients should be a priority. New vaccines for CMV may soon be available and renal transplant recipients would be a suitable target group for vaccination.

  13. Cytomegalovirus Disease Amongst Renal Transplant Recipients in Australia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Chapman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is a significant pathogen causing disease in renal transplant patients. The highest incidence of CMV disease occurs during the first 3 months post-transplant and is most problematic in CMV-naïve transplant recipients. In this study, we conducted a retrospective review of two databases, the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry (ANZDATA and the National Hospital Morbidity Database, from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW, to examine CMV in renal transplant recipients. The first source looked at CMV serostatus at the time of transplantation and the second recorded hospital admissions for recipients with invasive CMV disease.From the ANZDATA registry, we obtained information from 13,530 renal transplants recipients from 1980 to 2004. Of these recipients, 7808 had a known CMV serostatus, of which 65.7% (5134/7808 had a positive sero antibody status and 34.2% (2674/7808 had a negative sero antibody status. In univariate analysis, factors significantly associated with renal rejection were being male, recipient age 50 years, being diabetic, being diagnosed with cancer at some point and having a positive EBV status. Positive CMV serostatus was not a contributing factor. Between 1993 and 2001 there were 1445 renal transplant recipients hospitalized in Australia with a diagnosis of CMV disease, of which 38% (554/1445 had CMV disease as a principal diagnoses. The average annual rate of admissions with any diagnosis was 3871 episodes per 100,000 people living with a functioning graft.Preventative strategies for CMV in renal transplant recipients should be a priority. New vaccines for CMV may soon be available and renal transplant recipients would be a suitable target group for vaccination.

  14. Circadian sleep-wake rhythm disturbances in end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, B.C.P.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Kerkhof, G.A.; ter Wee, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is an increasing health problem worldwide. Given the increasing prevalence of this disease, the high cost of hemodialysis treatment and the burden of hemodialysis on a patient's life, more research on improving the clinical outcomes and the quality of life of

  15. Marriage and End-Stage Renal Disease: Implications for African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortridge, Emily F.; James, Cara V.

    2010-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately represented among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD is managed with a strict routine that might include regular dialysis as well as dietary, fluid intake, and other lifestyle changes. In a disease such as this, with such disruptive treatment modalities, marriage, specifically, and its ties…

  16. Care of patients with end-stage renal disease in Nigeria: a call for a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing in most developing countries such as Nigeria. There are over a million persons with end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) around the world. The cost of providing care for patients with ESRD is colossal; and data from most ...

  17. Chronic kidney disease and small renal tumors: What urologists should know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandham, K.; Mandhani, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To review the evidence in literature regarding the occurrence of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) after the treatment of small renal tumors with either radical nephrectomy (RN) or partial nephrectomy (PN). Materials and Methods: Current literature reviewed using Mediline search regarding renal functional outcomes following surgical treatment of small renal tumours. Results: Studies have clearly shown that RN leads to CKD more often than PN and RN remains an independent risk factor for patients developing new onset renal insufficiency. There is independent, graded association between a reduced estimated GFR and the risk of death, cardiovascular events, and hospitalization. PN achieves a better Health Related Quality Of Life due to better preservation of renal function. Radical nephrectomy is significantly associated with death from any cause compared with partial nephrectomy. Conclusion: Removal of entire kidney is definitely an over-treatment for small renal tumors and PN should be the standard of care for these small renal tumors even in the setting of a normal contralateral kidney. PMID:19955687

  18. Non-diabetic renal diseases in patients with type 2 diabetes: A single center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jian-Zhen; Wang, Rong

    2017-12-05

    To analyse the pathological characteristics and distribution of renal injury in selected type 2 diabetic patients. Comparison between diabetic nephropathy (DN) and non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD) in clinical characteristics, to find important predictors for NDRD. To conduct retrospective analysis of clinical, laboratory and pathohistological data of type 2 diabetic patients in whom renal biopsies were performed from March 2010 to September 2014 in Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University (n = 88). According to the findings of renal biopsy, the incidences of DN, NDRD and DN complicated with NDRD were 20.46%, 72.73%, and 6.82 %, respectively. The most common NDRD found were: membranous nephropathy, followed by IgA nephropathy and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In multivariate logistic-analysis, fasting blood glucose (OR 0.714; 95%CI = 0.543-0.939; p = 0.016) and absence of diabetic retinopathy (OR 18.602; 95%CI =2.176-159.018; p = 0.003) were independent predictors of NDRD. This study confirmed a considerably high prevalence of NDRD in type 2 diabetic patients with renal injury. Since some cases of NDRD are readily treatable or remittable, we should consider renal biopsy in selected diabetic patients with renal involvement, especially in those with effective blood glucose control and absence of diabetic retinopathy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence and clinical implications of renal artery stenosis in pediatric moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin Wook; Jo, Kyung-Il; Park, Jeong Jin; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keon Ha

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, extracranial involvement of moyamoya disease (MMD) had not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical implications of renal artery stenosis in pediatric MMD patients. This retrospective study included 101 pediatric (renal angiography. Baseline characteristics, including hypertension (HT) and angiographic findings, were retrospectively evaluated. The median age was 8 (range 2-16) years. Six patients (5.9%) had HT. Renal artery stenosis was identified in 8 patients (7.9%). Five of 8 renal artery stenosis patients had HT. Statistical analysis showed that advanced stages of MMD and HT were associated with renal artery stenosis (p Renal artery stenosis was not uncommon in pediatric MMD. Renal artery evaluation could help determine the cause of HT in advanced pediatric MMD cases. Further prospective and large-scale studies may be helpful in elucidating the extracranial manifestation of MMD. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biopsy-diagnosed renal disease in patients after transplantation of other organs and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, A; Haller, H; Schmitt, R; Schiffer, M; Koenecke, C; Strassburg, C; Lehner, F; Gottlieb, J; Bara, C; Becker, J U; Broecker, V

    2010-09-01

    Renal function deteriorates in about half of patients undergoing other transplants. We report the results of 105 renal biopsies from 101 nonrenal transplant recipients (bone marrow 14, liver 41, lung 30, heart 20). Biopsy indications were protracted acute renal failure (9%), creatinine increases (83%), heavy proteinuria (22%), or renal insufficiency before re-transplantation (9%). Histological findings other than nonspecific chronic changes, hypertension-related damage, and signs of chronic CNI toxicity included primary glomerular disease (17%), mostly after liver transplantation (21%) or after bone marrow transplantation (29%), and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) namely (10%). TMA had the most serious impact on the clinical course. Besides severe hypertension, one TMA patient died of cerebral hemorrhage, 5 had hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and 6 rapidly developed end-stage renal failure. TMA patients had the shortest kidney survival post-biopsy and, together with patients with acute tubular injury, the shortest kidney and patient survival since transplantation. Nine TMA patients had received CNI, 3 of them concomitantly received an mTOR-inhibitor. CNI toxicity is implicated in most patients with renal failure after transplant of other organs and may play a role in the development of TMA, the most serious complication. However, decreased renal function should not be routinely ascribed to CNI. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  1. Renal Osteodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Metin Terzibaşoğlu

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic renal insufficiency is a functional definition which is characterized by irreversible and progressive decreasing in renal functions. This impairment is in collaboration with glomeruler filtration rate and serum creatinine levels. Besides this, different grades of bone metabolism disorders develop in chronic renal insufficiency. Pathologic changes in bone tissue due to loss of renal paranchyme is interrelated with calcium, phosphorus vitamine-D and parathyroid hormone. Clinically we can see high turnover bone disease, low turnover bone disease, osteomalacia, osteosclerosis and osteoporosis in renal osteodystropy. In this article we aimed to review pathology of bone metabolism disorders due to chronic renal insufficiency, clinic aspects and treatment approaches briefly.

  2. The evolution of renal function and the incidence of end-stage renal disease in patients aged ≥ 50 years.