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Sample records for subclass deficiency response

  1. Retinal vasculitis revealing immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency.

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    Hassani, Rachid Tahiri Joutei; Rousseau, Antoine; de Monchy, Ivan; el Sanharawi, Mohamed; Gendron, Gael; Barreau, Emmanuel; Goujard, Cécile; Labetoulle, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by recurrent infections and autoimmune disorders. However, there have been no reports of ocular involvement, either inflammatory or infectious, in association with IgG subclass deficiency. The authors report the first case of retinal vasculitis that led to the diagnosis of IgG subclass deficiency, in a patient with a history of inflammatory bowel disease and recurrent infections of previously unknown origin.

  2. Chronic glomerulonephritis associated with IgG subclass deficiency.

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    Kamei, Koichi; Nakagawa, Atsuko; Otsuka, Yasufumi; Nakayama, Makiko; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2007-08-01

    We experienced two patients with IgG subclass deficiency who suffered from chronic glomerulonephritis (GN). Patient 1 was a 17-year-old girl with IgG subclass deficiency (combined deficiency of IgG2 and IgG4). Renal biopsy was performed when she was aged 16 years, and she was diagnosed with membranoproliferative GN. Patient 2 was a 16-year-old girl with IgG subclass deficiency (combined deficiency of IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4). Renal biopsy was performed when she was aged 15 years, and she was diagnosed with membranous nephropathy. We examined the glomerular deposition patterns of their IgG subclasses. Furthermore, we compared their clinical and laboratory findings with those of three patients with IgG subclass deficiency without GN. Patients with GN suffered infections more frequently than those without GN. The serum levels of IgG (especially IgG1) and IgM were higher in patients with GN than in those without GN. In patient 1 IgG1 and IgG3 were deposited in a mesangiocapillary pattern, but, in patient 2, only IgG1 was deposited in a capillary pattern. Thus, the different patterns of IgG subclass deficiency between the two patients may be responsible for their different glomerular pathologies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of chronic GN in patients with IgG subclass deficiency.

  3. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass deficiency in Thai children.

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    Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Hengcrawit, Wiriya; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Luangwedchakam, Voravich

    2011-12-01

    Patients with Immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass deficiency may suffer from recurrent infections, mainly sino-pulmonary infection. To determine the epidemiology of IgG subclass deficiency in Thai children at a tertiary care hospital and to compare the differences between children who were diagnosed with IgG subclass deficiency by using low level criteria [less than 2 standard deviation (SD) of normal levels for age] and by using low percentage criteria (proportion of each IgG subclasses/total IgG). The study was a descriptive study of 55 children up to 15 years old with recurrent infections diagnosed as having IgG subclass deficiency but no acquired or other primary immune deficiencies except for IgA and/or IgM deficiency. Isolated IgG3 subclass deficiency was the most common IgG subclass deficiency (56.4%). IgG3 subclass deficiency, either isolated or combined with other IgG subclass deficiency, was found in 85.5% of the cases. The common age of onset was between birth and five years of age. The most common presenting symptom was recurrent sinusitis (83.6%). Majority of the cases (89.3%) were diagnosed by low percentage criteria while 12.7% were diagnosed by low level criteria. All cases with low levels of IgG subclass antibodies also had low percentages. There were no statistically significant differences in the clinical manifestations and management methods between the children who were diagnosed by low level and low percentage. IgG3 subclass deficiency was the most common IgG subclass deficiency in Thai children. The most common presenting symptom was recurrent sinusitis. Although the diagnosis could be made in the patients with recurrent upper respiratory infection by using low level criteria, but the diagnosis should be considered when the low percentage criteria are met.

  4. IgG subclass deficiencies in children: Facts and fiction.

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    Wahn, Volker; von Bernuth, Horst

    2017-09-01

    The chance to analyse the four IgG subclasses arose with the publication of Terry and Fahey(1) . Since then, a lot of new information on the role of subclasses and their deficiency states in humans has been obtained. This review tries to analyse critically our current knowledge of subclass deficiencies in children. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  5. Antibody response to the Haemophilus influenzae type b-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine in healthy and infection-prone individuals with IgG3 subclass deficiency.

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    Hahn-Zoric, M; Ulanova, M; Friman, V; Björkander, J; Oxelius, V A; Lucas, A; Hanson, L A

    2004-09-01

    Searching for a possible explanation for the phenotypic heterogeneity in IgG3 deficiency, we studied the antibody response to a polysaccharide and a protein antigen in IgG3-deficient (IgG3d) adults after vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (Hib CP) conjugated to tetanus toxoid. Distribution of isotypes, idiotypes, clonotypes, and Gm allotypes were compared. All the vaccinated individuals, irrespective of the level of IgG3 and proneness to infections, developed protective levels of anti-Hib CP. Significantly lower prevaccination levels of IgG2 (p infection-prone compared to the healthy IgG3d individuals and/or controls. Seventy percent of the IgG3d patients and none of the controls had the low responding Gm(ga-n/ga-n) genotype, while the majority of the controls had the alternative Gm(bfn/bfn) genotype. The conjugate ACT-HIB vaccine efficiently overcomes the IgG3 subclass deficiency state and the genetic predisposition for lower responsiveness, providing protection against Hib and tetanus infections. The proneness to infection in some IgG3d individuals may relate to their low prevaccination antibody levels.

  6. Nasal polyposis and immunoglobulin-G subclass deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Khai Hoan, N; Karmochkine, M; Laccourreye, O; Bonfils, P

    2014-06-01

    Study of the association between immunoglobulin-G (IgG) subclass deficiency and nasal polyposis. Longitudinal study (5 years) in a prospective cohort of 161 nasal polyposis patients. Analysis of the association between humoral immunodeficiency, rhinologic symptoms, endoscopy score and prescribed doses of local and systemic corticosteroids. The prevalence of IgG subclass deficiency was 13.7% (22/161). One patient was diagnosed with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). No significant differences were observed between the groups with and without pre-treatment deficiency for symptom severity, endoscopic score or local or systemic corticosteroid regimens at baseline or during the 5 years, following initiation of medical and surgical treatment. Only the Lund-Mackay CT score was significantly higher in the pre-treatment deficiency group. There was no correlation between the presence of humoral deficiency and either symptom evolution after medical and surgical treatment or the dose of corticosteroids needed to control disease. Thus, a link between IgG subclass deficiency and nasal polyposis seems unlikely. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency and infection risk in 150 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jane A; Crassini, Kyle R; Best, O Giles; Forsyth, Cecily J; Mackinlay, Naomi J; Han, Ping; Stevenson, William; Mulligan, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    Hypogammaglobulinemia is a common complication of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but the significance of immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass deficiency is unknown. We analyzed the prevalence of immunoglobulins G, A and M, IgG subclass deficiency and infection in 150 patients with CLL. Low IgG, IgA and IgM levels were observed in 27.3%, 30.7% and 56.7% of patients, respectively. IgG subclass deficiency was frequent, with reduced IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 in 28%, 19.3%, 52% and 22.7% of patients, respectively. IgG subclass deficiency (total 64.6%) and hypogammaglobulinemia (27.3%) were more prevalent than clinically significant infection (16%). Recurrent or significant infections were seen in 24 patients (16%), of whom 50% had hypogammaglobulinemia but 100% had at least one IgG subclass deficiency, indicating that half the patients with infection had IgG subclass deficiency but normal total IgG level. Deficiencies of IgG3 and IgG4 were statistically associated with infection risk. Normal immunoglobulin and IgG subclass levels were seen in 26 patients (17%) and none had infections. IgG subclass deficiency is commonly observed in patients with CLL with both normal and reduced total IgG levels, and is associated with infection. Screening patients with CLL for IgG subclass deficiency may be a useful adjunct in stratifying their infection risk.

  8. IgA deficiency: clinical correlates with IgG subclass and mannan-binding lectin deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaella, María L; Peredo, Rubén; Disdier, Orville M

    2005-06-01

    To characterize an IgA deficient population in terms of the incidence of IgG subclass and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) deficiencies and the type and severity of infections and other associated disorders. Selective IgA deficiency is probably the commonest of the primary immunodeficiency disorders and although it may lead to an increased risk for respiratory and gastrointestinal infections and associated to various autoimmune diseases, it may also be asymptomatic. Several studies have suggested the need of a concomitant defect in order for manifestation of its symptoms. A total of 27 patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of selective IgA deficiency were evaluated for IgG subclass and MBL deficiencies after a thorough medical history, physical examination and pertinent evaluation for concomitant medical conditions. The overall incidence of IgG subclass deficiency found in the IgA deficient group was 18.5%. MBL deficiency was found to be 3.7%. These frequencies may have been influenced by the age group evaluated and the size of the population studied. Severe infections were more common in patients with combined deficiencies, either IgA and any of the IgG subclasses or IgA and MBL deficiency. Atopy was widely represented in the patients studied. The observed relationship between combined deficiencies Ig A, IgG subclasses and MBL and the increased representation of severe infections needs to be corroborated in a larger sample of patients with an inclusion of pediatric patients.

  9. Clinical and laboratory evaluation of periodically monitored Turkish children with IgG subclass deficiencies.

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    Karaca, Neslihan Edeer; Karadeniz, Cem; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil

    2009-03-01

    IgG subclass deficiencies are common immune system disorders during childhood. The aim of this retrospective study was to review clinical findings and laboratory results of patients with IgG subclass deficiencies in order to determine the changes in serum IgG subclass levels during follow-up, the percentage and time span until normalization of the IgG subclass levels to age-corresponding normal levels, the type of infections incurred and the benefits of prophylaxis. Among the 59 pediatric patients reviewed, the most frequent defect was an IgG3 subclass deficiency (77%). Nine percent of the patients had an isolated IgG2 deficiency and 14% had an IgG2+G3 deficiency. The most common clinical presentations were recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, followed by pneumonia, acute gastroenteritis and urinary tract infections. Atopy was present in 15% of the patients. Ninety percent of the patients were given a prophylactic treatment (benzathine penicillin, oral antibiotics, oral bacterial lysate or intravenous immunoglobulin). The frequency of recurrent infections decreased from 13.4 +/- 7.4 per year to 5.7 +/- 3.9 in patients receiving a prophylactic regimen. Serum IgG subclass levels reached normal ranges in 30% of the patients in the IgG3 deficiency group and in 35.7% of the patients in the IgG2+G3 deficiency group. Patients with an isolated IgG2 deficiency did not reach age-related normal levels during the study period. Our study shows that IgG subclass levels may normalize in 30 to 40% of patients at about 6 years of age. We emphasize the need of monitoring IgG levels together with the clinical symptomatology in affected individuals and initiate preventive measures when appropriate.

  10. Recurrent meningitis in a child with IgG3 subclass deficiency.

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    Vehapoglu, Aysel; Ozgurhan, Gamze; Demir, Aysegul Dogan; Uzuner, Selcuk; Nursoy, Mustafa Atilla; Turkmen, Serdar

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent meningitis is an uncommon life-threatening condition. Here, the case of a 6-year-old boy is reported who had two episodes of meningitis with an IgG3 subclass deficiency. The boy had aseptic meningitis at the age of 3 years, followed by bacterial meningitis at the age of 4 years. Primary immunoglobulin deficiencies are a group of disorders associated with an increased incidence and/or severity of infection. Recurrent infections, sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia are the most frequently observed illnesses in patients with IgG subclass deficiencies, of which an IgG3 subclass deficiency is the most common, especially in adults. Although cases of recurrent viral or bacterial meningitis have been reported, herein a patient is presented with recurrence of aseptic and bacterial meningitis 1 year after the initial episode. Some researchers recommend that all children with episodes of recurrent meningitis should be screened for primary immunoglobulin or complement deficiencies.

  11. Clinical significance of serum immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

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    Svensson, Tobias; Höglund, Martin; Cherif, Honar

    2013-07-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and hypogammaglobulinemia who suffer from recurrent infections can be offered prophylactic intravenous immunoglobulin (Ig) substitution. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of pure IgG subclass deficiency (with normal Ig levels), its correlation to risk of infection, and the clinical value of routine measurement of serum IgG subclass levels in patients with CLL. Serum levels of Ig and IgG subclasses were determined in patients with CLL at Uppsala University Hospital. Clinical data were collected through patient records and questionnaires. Hypogammaglobulinemia occurred in 52.3% out of 111 patients. These patients did not have a higher annual risk of infection than patients without hypogammaglobulinemia (79.5% vs 79.1%, p = 0.706 for all infections; 13.4% vs 11.2%, p = 0.394 for severe infection; and 1.7% vs 3.4%, p = 0.083 for sepsis). Pure subclass deficiency was uncommon and occurred in 6 patients (5.4%). The annual overall risk of infection, of severe infection, and of sepsis for these patients did not differ as compared to patients with no hypogammaglobulinemia and no subclass deficiency (70.8% vs 80.7%, p = 0.334; 11.8% vs 11.1%, p = 0.497; and 8.9% vs 2.3%, p = 0.067, respectively). Pure IgG subclass deficiency is rare in patients with CLL. In this heterogeneous cohort of patients, neither hypogammaglobulinemia nor pure IgG subclass deficiency were significant risk factors for infectious complications. Measurement of serum levels of Ig may be justified in patients with recurrent severe infections, but routine analysis of IgG subclass levels in patients with CLL is probably not warranted.

  12. A case of IgG subclass deficiency with the initial presentation of transient hypogammaimmuno-globulinemia of infancy and a review of IgG subclass deficiencies.

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    Nettagul, R; Visitsunthorn, N; Vichyanond, P

    2003-07-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases are not common in children. The possibility of an immunological defect should be considered in any individual with repeated infections. A definite diagnosis for immodeficiency is sometimes difficult to achieve because of overlapping clinical manifestations. Immunoglobulin subclass deficiency is an immunological deficiency disease with which, one or more IgG subclasses are deficient. T cell immunity is normal. Patients may develop recurrent bacterial and respiratory infections or could remain asymptomatic. The authors report a case of immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency presenting initially as transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy. A 2 month-old boy presented to Siriraj Hospital with a history of chronic protracted diarrhea, disseminated scabies and sepsis. On presentation, he had generalized scaly and maculopapular rash with no palpable lymph nodes. CBC revealed WBC 22,100 cells/cm3 with PMN 42 per cent, lymphocytes 38 per cent, Eosinophils 4 per cent, Basophil 2 per cent and platelets 254,000/cm3. The immunoglobulin levels were as follows: IgG 181 mg/dl, IgA IgG became normal at 2 years of age (after 12 months of IVIG). IVIG was stopped and the diagnosis was changed to transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy (THI). Nevertheless, during his 4 month follow-up he developed recurrent sinopulmonary infections (i.e, otitis media and pneumonia). Repeated immunoglobulin profile showed IgG 1,200 mg/dl, IgA 135 mg/dl, IgM 26 mg/dl, IgG subclass were IgG, 1,030 mg/dl (N 280-830), IgG2 30 mg/dl (N 40-2,400), IgG3 22 mg/dl (N 6-130), IgG4 3 mg/dl (N 3-120). A diagnosis of IgG2 subclass deficiency presenting early as transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy was then made. Treatment with monthly IVIG was reinitiated and the patient is currently doing well. The authors present a case of IgG subclass deficiency presenting as transient hypogammaglbulinemia of infancy. Follow-up of the immune profile and clinical manifestation is

  13. [Sinonasal polyposis associated with a deficiency subclass immunoglobulin G: Place of substitution immunoglobulins].

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    Hoan, Nhung Tran Khai; Karmochkine, M; Laccourreye, O; Bonfils, P

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of the introduction of a substitution by intravenous Immunoglobulins (Ig IV) at patients with immunoglobulins G (IgG) subclasses deficiency and nasal polyposis. Prospective study concerning five patients with IgG subclasses deficiency and nasal polyposis treated by Ig IV. Rhinologic, otologic and pulmonary symptoms, exacerbations of nasal polyposis, chronic otitis and asthma as well as the number of antibiotics and corticoids treatments were counted during the Ig IV substitution. To study the association between IgIV substitution and the number of exacerbations of nasal polyposis, chronic otitis, asthma and the number of antibiotics and corticoids treatments in patients with IgG subclasses deficiency and nasal polyposis. Five patients with a IgG subclass deficiency and nasal polyposis were substituted. The number of antibiotics and corticoids cures increased at one patient and remained stable at four others. The number of sinus, ear and lung infections as well as the global rhinologic score of symptoms and the endoscopic stage of the nasal polyposis remained stable. In the absence of efficiency of the treatment, this one was interrupted at the end of 6 months for patients n° 1 and n° 3, 24 months for patient n° 4 and 42 months for patient n° 5. The current study failed to highlight clinical improvement in patients wih IgG subclasses deficiency and nasal polyposis treated by Ig IV. A previous study had not allowed to find a link between IgG subclasses deficiency and severity of nasal polyposis, what seems to be confirmed by the absence of improvement brought during the substitution of this deficit in the current study.

  14. The Challenge of Immunoglobulin-G Subclass Deficiency and Specific Polysaccharide Antibody Deficiency--a Dutch Pediatric Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schatorjé, Ellen J H; de Jong, Everieke; van Hout, Roeland W N M; García Vivas, Yumely; de Vries, Esther

    PURPOSE: Immunoglobulin(Ig)G-subclass deficiency and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD) are among the most frequent causes of recurrent respiratory infections in children. Little is known about their prevalence, clinical presentation and prognosis. No study has been published in a

  15. The challenge of Immunoglobulin-G Subclass Deficiency and Specific Polysaccharide Antibody Deficiency : A Dutch pediatric cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schatorjé, E.J.H.; de Jong, E.; van Hout, R.; García Vivas, Y.; de Vries, E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Immunoglobulin(Ig)G-subclass deficiency and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD) are among the most frequent causes of recurrent respiratory infections in children. Little is known about their prevalence, clinical presentation and prognosis. No study has been published in a

  16. The Challenge of Immunoglobulin-G Subclass Deficiency and Specific Polysaccharide Antibody Deficiency--a Dutch Pediatric Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatorjé, Ellen J H; de Jong, Everieke; van Hout, Roeland W N M; García Vivas, Yumely; de Vries, Esther

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin(Ig)G-subclass deficiency and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD) are among the most frequent causes of recurrent respiratory infections in children. Little is known about their prevalence, clinical presentation and prognosis. No study has been published in a Western-European nor in a mainly non-tertiary cohort until now. Therefore, we performed this observational cohort study in children recruited from secondary and tertiary pediatric practices all over The Netherlands. Dutch pediatricians were monthly asked to report patients with IgG-subclass deficiency and/or SPAD. Demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics were collected. Separate informed consent was asked from parents and children (≥ 12 years of age) for annual update of the medical status. 49 children with confirmed IgG-subclass deficiency and/or SPAD were included. The majority of children (69%) was reported by four (out of 12) secondary hospitals with a pediatric immunologist in the staff. 45 children had ≥ 1 low IgG-subclass level and 11 had SPAD. IgG2 deficiency was the most prevalent IgG-subclass deficiency (37/49;76%). 10% of these children already showed bronchiectasis. Two-thirds were male (33/49;67%, p = 0.015). From 10 years of age, only boys were left and only boys showed progressive immunodeficiency during follow-up (11/24; 46%). This is the first Western-European mainly non-tertiary cohort of children with IgG-subclass deficiency and/or SPAD. The disease course is not always benign, especially in boys. Most children were reported and managed in secondary hospitals with a pediatric immunologist in the staff. To identify more patients, the awareness of these diseases among general pediatricians should increase.

  17. Frequent IgG subclass and mannose binding lectin deficiency in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Sabrina; Loebel, Madlen; Mooslechner, Agnes A; Knops, Michael; Hanitsch, Leif G; Grabowski, Patricia; Wittke, Kirsten; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a severe disease characterized by various symptoms of immune dysfunction. CFS onset is typically with an infection and many patients suffer from frequently recurrent viral or bacterial infections. Immunoglobulin and mannose binding lectin (MBL) deficiency are frequent causes for increased susceptibility to infections. In this study we retrospectively analysed 300 patients with CFS for immunoglobulin and MBL levels, and B-cell subset frequencies. 25% of the CFS patients had decreased serum levels of at least one antibody class or subclass with IgG3 and IgG4 subclass deficiencies as most common phenotypes. However, we found elevated immunoglobulin levels with an excess of IgM and IgG2 in particular in another 25% of patients. No major alteration in numbers of B cells and B-cell subsets was seen. Deficiency of MBL was found in 15% of the CFS patients in contrast to 6% in a historical control group. In a 2nd cohort of 168 patients similar frequencies of IgG subclass and MBL deficiency were found. Thus, humoral immune defects are frequent in CFS patients and are associated with infections of the respiratory tract. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency is the major phenotype of primary immunodeficiency in a Korean adult cohort.

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    Kim, Joo-Hee; Park, Han-Jung; Choi, Gil-Soon; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Ye, Young-Min; Nahm, Dong-Ho; Park, Hae-Sim

    2010-06-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disease (PID) is a rare disorder in adults. Most often, serious forms are detected during infancy or childhood. However, mild forms of PID may not be diagnosed until later in life, and some types of humoral immunodeficiency may occur in adulthood. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical features of PID in Korean adults. A retrospective study was performed on 55 adult patients who were diagnosed as PID between January 1998 and January 2009 at a single tertiary medical center in Korea. IgG subclass deficiency was the most common phenotype (67%, 37/55), followed by total IgG deficiency (20%, 11/55), IgM deficiency (7%, 4/55), common variable immunodeficiency (2%, 1/55), and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (2%, 1/55). IgG3 and IgG4 were the most affected subclasses. Upper and lower respiratory tract infections (76%) were the most frequently observed symptoms, followed by multiple site infection (11%), urinary tract infection, and colitis. Bronchial asthma, rhinitis, and several autoimmune diseases were common associated diseases. IgG and IgG subclass deficiency should be considered in adult patients presenting with recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections, particularly in those with respiratory allergies or autoimmune diseases.

  19. The Clinical Utility of Measuring IgG Subclass Immunoglobulins During Immunological Investigation for Suspected Primary Antibody Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Antony R; Skold, Markus; Ramsden, David B; Ocejo-Vinyals, J Gonzalo; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Harding, Stephen

    2017-11-08

    Measurement of IgG subclass concentrations is a standard laboratory test run as part of a panel to investigate the suspicion of antibody deficiency. The assessment is clinically important when total IgG is within the normal age-specific reference range. The measurement is useful for diagnosis of IgG subclass deficiency, to aid the diagnosis of specific antibody deficiency, as a supporting test for the diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency, as well as for risk stratification of patients with low IgA. The measurement of IgG subclasses may also help determine a revaccination strategy for patients and support patient management. In certain circumstances, the measurement of IgG subclasses may be used to monitor a patient's humoral immune system. In this review, we discuss the utility of measuring IgG subclass concentrations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  20. Post-prandial alterations in LDL size and subclasses in patients with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Trepp, Roman; Berneis, Kaspar; Christ, Emanuel R

    2008-06-01

    Several studies have suggested that lipoproteins generated during the post-prandial phase are highly atherogenic, with modifications in low-density lipoproteins (LDL) size and density. In the present study we assessed post-prandial variations in LDL size and subclasses in patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). We studied in 12 hypopituitary patients with GHD and 10 healthy control subjects matched for gender, age and body mass index (BMI) post-prandial variations after a standardized meal consisting of 35% fat, 45% carbohydrate and 20% of protein (Clinutren Mix, Nestlé) and containing calories corresponding to 1/3 of estimated basal metabolic rate. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 2 and 4h to measure plasma lipids and LDL size and subclasses by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. At baseline patients had similar plasma lipids than controls, with the exception of higher triglycerides (1.2+/-0.8 vs. 0.7+/-0.4mmol/L, p=.0024). Baseline LDL size was similar between the two groups and LDL subclass analysis revealed a small increase in LDL-IIIA (p=.0046). During post-prandial phase no significant differences were found in LDL size and subclasses in patients vs. controls with the sole exception of increased levels of LDL-IVB after 2h (p=.0295) and LDL-IIIB after 4h (p=.0478). It is, therefore, unlikely that a post-prandial variation in levels of small, dense LDL may significantly contribute to the atherogenic potential in hypopituitary patients with GHD.

  1. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode...... revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis...... and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine....

  2. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode re...... and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine....... revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis...

  3. Chronic rhinosinusitis and recurrent nasal polyps in two children with IgG subclass deficiency and review of the literature.

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    Chinratanapisit, Sasawan; Tunsuriyawong, Prayuth; Vichyanond, Pakit; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Luangwedchakarn, Voravich; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai

    2005-11-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of mucosa of the nose and the paranasal sinuses. Two major forms of CRS can be differentiated; CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). The pathophysiology and etiology of nasal polyps (NPs) are partly understood. IgG subclass deficiency was shown to be associated with an increased susceptibility to infections. However the association between NPs and IgG subclass deficiency has never been reported. To report two cases of recalcitrant CRS and recurrent NPs with IgG subclass deficiency. Two children (6 and 8 year-old boys) were referred to the Pediatric Allergy/Immunology Clinic, Siriraj Hospital due to a prolonged history of CRS and recurrent NPs. Both of them were treated with aggressive medical (topical and systemic corticosteroids, antibiotics, leukotriene antagonist, nasal irrigation) as well as surgical therapy, without significant improvement. Immunologic investigation in both patients showed that IgG, IgA, and IgM level were normal. IgG subclasses level in patient No. 1 were IgG1 1,235 (280-1120) mg/dl (79%), IgG2 235 (30-630) mg/dl (23.5%), IgG3 27.3 (40-250) mg/dl (1.74%), and IgG4 92.4 (11-620) mg/dl (5.9%). IgG subclasses level in patient No. 2 were IgG1 1,139 (280-1120) mg/dl (82.5%), IgG2 170 (30-630) mg/dl (12.3%), IgG3 5.6 (40-250) mg/dl (0.4%), IgG4 65.7 (11-620) mg/dl (4.8%). The diagnosis of CRS and recurrent NPs with IgG3 subclass deficiency in the first patient and IgG2/IgG3 subclass deficiency in the second patient were made. Patient No. 1 was given monthly IVIG therapy for the total of 7 courses and medications were gradually tapered. Currently, the patient is doing well after the cessation of IVIG therapy for 3 months. Patient No. 2 denied the IVIG treatment and was lost to follow up. We reported two cases of recalcitrant CRS and recurrent NPs in children. Immunologic work up revealed IgG subclass deficiency. The treatment with monthly IVIG improved

  4. Increases in serum immunoglobulins to age-related normal levels in children with IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency.

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    Kutukculer, Necil; Karaca, Neslihan Edeer; Demircioglu, Ozlem; Aksu, Guzide

    2007-03-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) A and G subclass deficiencies are common immune system disorders which cause morbidity especially between 2 and 6 yr of age. Prognosis of these defects and therapeutic approach is unclear. The aim of the present retrospective study was to review the clinical and laboratory records of 87 children with IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency to determine whether these patients experience changes in serum Ig concentrations during follow-up and to give more clinic and laboratory information to the families about the course of these diseases. Among 87 patients studied, the most frequent defect was partial IgA deficiency combined with IgG3 subclass deficiency (41%). The other groups were as follows; partial IgA deficiency (32%), selective IgA deficiency (8%), partial IgA combined with IgG2-G4 subclass deficiency (6%), and IgG subclass deficiency (13%). The commonest clinical presentations were recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (76%), pneumonia (14%), acute gastroenteritis (3%), urinary tractus infection (3%), sinusitis (2%), and acute otitis media (2%). Atopy was widely represented in the patients studied (24%). The number of patients who were given prophylactic treatment with benzathine penicilline, prophylactic oral antibiotic, or oral bacterial extract to prevent infections was 68 (78%). Frequency of recurrent infections decreased from 7.9 +/- 4.9 per year to 2.5 +/- 2.3 in 68 patients receiving any prophylactic regimen; however, decrease in frequency of infections did not show any significant difference between different prophylactic groups. None of the patients in the selective IgA deficiency group had reached normal serum levels of IgA. At the age of 58.3 +/- 21.4 months, 52% of patients in partial IgA deficiency group and 51% of patients in partial IgA + IgG subclass deficiency group, serum IgA increased to normal ranges. Serum IgG subclass levels increased to normal range for age in 67% of patients in partial IgA + IgG subclass

  5. Effects of Immunoglobulin Replacement on Asthma Exacerbation in Adult Asthmatics with IgG Subclass Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Hee; Ye, Young Min; Ban, Ga Young; Shin, Yoo Seob; Lee, Hyun Young; Nam, Young Hee; Lee, Soo Keol; Cho, You Sook; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki Suck; Park, Hae Sim

    2017-11-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infection is a common manifestation of primary immunodeficiency disease, and respiratory viruses or bacteria are important triggers of asthma exacerbations. Asthma often coexists with humoral immunodeficiency in adults, and some asthmatics with immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSCD) suffer from recurrent exacerbations. Although some studies suggest a benefit from Ig replacement, others have failed to support its use. This study aimed to assess the effect of Ig replacement on asthma exacerbation caused by respiratory infection as well as the asthma control status of adult asthmatics with IgGSCD. This is a multi-center, open-label study of adult asthmatics with IgGSCD. All patients received monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for 6 months and were evaluated regarding asthma exacerbation related to infection, asthma control status, quality of life, and lung function before and after IVIG infusion. A total of 30 patients were enrolled, and 24 completed the study. Most of the patients had a moderate degree of asthma severity with partly (52%) or uncontrolled (41%) status at baseline. IVIG significantly reduced the proportion of patients with asthma exacerbations, lowered the number of respiratory infections, and improved asthma control status, compared to the baseline values (P<0.001). The mean asthma-specific quality of life and asthma control test scores were improved significantly (P=0.009 and P=0.053, respectively); however, there were no significant changes in lung function. IVIG reduced the frequency of asthma exacerbations and improved asthma control status in adult asthmatics with IgGSCD, suggesting that IVIG could be an effective treatment option in this population.

  6. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Gaini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine.

  7. Overcoming recurrent spontaneous abortions in women suffering from IgG subclass deficiency: high efficiency of low dose intravenous immunoglobulins treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, G; Dell'Aera, L; Liguori, R

    2015-05-01

    It's well known that iv. immunoglobulins may be useful to overcome habitual abortions, but the mechanisms at the base of a successful outcome and the likelihoods are still unknown. In one hundred and sixty women with habitual abortions and one hundred and sixty healthy mothers, we evaluated blood IgG subclasses; among the patients, sixteen merely showed IgG subclass deficiency, after leaving out any autoimmunity and/or coagulation disorders. All the patients (100%) showed IgG3, twelve (75%) IgG1, eight (50%) IgG4 and six (37,5%) IgG2 deficiency; healthy control people's IgG subclasses fell in normal range in 156 women, but just four women showed IgG2 and IgG4 deficiency with neither immune deficiency's clinical marks nor increased vulnerability to infections. All the patients were treated with whole immunoglobulins iv. infusion (200 mg/kg/monthly) all over the pregnancy. The successful pregnancy rate is very high (>90%): 100% out of women showing IgG1 (12/12), 87,5% of IgG3 (14/16), 75% of IgG4 (6/8) and 66% of IgG2 deficiency (4/6) had successful pregnancies. The Odd's Ratio between IgG subclass deficiency and recurrent abortions is 4,33 with confidence interval of 95%; chi square value is 7.68 (pIgG subclass deficiency without autoimmunity and/or coagulation disorders, likely restoring idiotype-antiidiotype network; showing evidence of IgG subclasses deficiency (mostly IgG1 and IgG3) may help identify patients who can benefit from iv. immunoglobulin treatment.

  8. IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency in children with recurrent respiratory infections and its relationship with chronic pulmonary damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, H; Atlihan, F; Genel, F; Targan, S; Gunvar, T

    2005-01-01

    Most patients with IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency are asymptomatic but some may suffer from frequent mainly respiratory infections. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiencies and the rate of chronic pulmonary damage secondary to recurrent pulmonary infections in these children. Serum IgA and IgG subclass levels were measured in 225 children aged 6 months to 6 years with recurrent sinopulmonary infections (44 with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, 100 with recurrent pulmonary infections and 81 with recurrent bronchiolitis). In order to determine chronic pulmonary damage due to recurrent infections in patients with recurrent pulmonary infections CT scans of thorax were also obtained. The overall frequency of antibody defects was found to be 19.1%. IgA deficiency was observed in 9.3%, IgG subclass deficiency in 8.4% and IgA + IgG subclass deficiency in 1.4%. The prevalance of IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency was 25% in patients with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, 22% in patients with recurrent pulmonary infections and 12.3% in patients with recurrent bronchiolitis (p>0.05). Chronic pulmonary damage in lungs was determined radiologically in 17 of 100 cases with recurrent pulmonary infection. In IgG subclass deficiencies sequel changes, although not statistically significant, were observed five times more frequently than that of IgA deficiencies. CT scans revealed pulmonary sequels in 5 of the 22 (22.7%) patients with recurrent pulmonary infections and immunodeficiency (bronchiectasis in 2 patients with IgG3 deficiency, fibrotic changes in one with IgA deficiency and in one with IgG3 deficiency, bronchiolitis obliterans in one with IgG2 + IgG3 deficiency). On the other hand, pulmonary sequels were observed in 12 patients (15.4%) with normal immunoglobulin levels. Eight of them were bronchiolitis obliterans, 2 of them were atelectasia and 1 of them was bronchiectasia. We therefore suggest

  9. Common variable immunodeficiency and IgG subclass deficiency in central Alabama hemochromatosis probands homozygous for HFE C282Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, James C; Bertoli, Luigi F; Acton, Ronald T

    2003-01-01

    Eight hemochromatosis probands with HFE C282Y homozygosity had frequent, severe, or unusual infections and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) or immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSD). Thus, we performed serum Ig isotyping and other characterization of 43 additional unselected probands, 5 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical siblings, and 240 consecutive CVID or IgGSD index patients. C282Y allele frequencies were estimated in 58 CVID or IgGSD index patients without hemochromatosis phenotypes and in 341 controls. HLA-A and -B haplotypes and frequencies were determined in all 51 probands, 186 CVID or IgGSD index patients without hemochromatosis phenotypes, and 751 controls. Thirteen unselected probands (30%) had CVID or IgGSD. Among all 21 hemochromatosis probands with CVID (n = 4) or IgGSD (n = 17), Ig subclass deficiency patterns were IgG(1) (n = 5), IgG(1) and IgG(3) (n = 6), IgG(3) (n = 9), and IgG(1), IgG(3), and IgG(4) (n = 1). IgG(2) or IgA deficiency was not detected; one proband had IgM deficiency. Mean values of total IgG, IgG(1), and IgG(3) were significantly lower in probands with CVID or IgGSD. Mean values of age, transferrin saturation, and ferritin at diagnosis and phlebotomy units required to induce iron depletion were similar in probands with or without CVID or IgGSD; phlebotomy had no apparent effect on IgG levels. C282Y frequencies were similar in CVID or IgGSD index cases without hemochromatosis phenotypes and in controls. There was concordance of Ig and hemochromatosis phenotypes in probands and respective HLA-identical siblings. Eight of 240 CVID or IgGSD index patients had hemochromatosis phenotypes and C282Y homozygosity (3 vs 0.7% and 0.2% controls; P IgG abnormalities characteristic of CVID or IgGSD are common in hemochromatosis probands, and that the prevalence of hemochromatosis is increased in CVID and IgGSD index cases. These observations could be explained by the increased frequencies of HLA-A*03-B*07 in C282Y

  10. Predictors of shingles reports at diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency and selective immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency in 212 Alabama adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Barton

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We sought to determine predictors of shingles reports in adults with common variable immunodeficiency or immunoglobulin (Ig G subclass deficiency (CVID/IgGSD. We tabulated observations at diagnosis of CVID/IgGSD in 212 white adult index patients (165 women, 47 men who responded to a question about having had shingles. None had been vaccinated for herpes zoster. We analyzed age, sex, and shingles reports; blood levels of CD19+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD56+ mononuclear cells; serum levels of IgG subclasses, IgA, and IgM; and positivity for human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A and -B haplotypes. Cell counts and immunoglobulin levels were normalized with loge (ln transformation for analyses. Thirty-one patients (14.6% reported shingles; 11 reported recurrent or disseminated shingles. Patients with shingles reports had greater mean age at diagnosis of CVID/IgGSD [54±13 (standard deviation years vs. 47±12 years; P=0.0130] and a greater prevalence of HLA-A*01, B*08 positivity (35.5% vs. 17.7%; P=0.0227. In a 13-factor logistic regression model, there was a positive association of age with shingles reports [P=0.0151; odds ratio (1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.01, 1.08]. HLA-A*01, B*08 positivity was also positively associated with shingles reports [P=0.0480; odds ratio 2.61 (1.00, 6.81]. During a mean followup interval of 7.5 years after CVID/IgGSD diagnosis, the prevalence of recurrent shingles was almost five-fold greater in patients with previous shingles reports. In conclusion, in white adults at CVID/IgGSD diagnosis, age at diagnosis and positivity for HLA-A*01, B*08 have significant positive associations with reports of previous shingles.

  11. Immunoglobulin prophylaxis in 350 adults with IgG subclass deficiency and recurrent respiratory tract infections: a long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinder-Nielsen, Ann-Margreth; Granert, Carl; Forsberg, Pia; Friman, Vanda; Vietorisz, Auli; Björkander, Janne

    2007-01-01

    350 adult patients in Sweden were included in a retrospective study covering more than 2000 patient-y, to evaluate the efficacy of immunoglobulin (Ig) prophylaxis. All patients had selective or combined IgG subclass deficiency, without IgA deficiency, and suffered from recurrent respiratory tract infections (RTIs). The patients had been given Ig prophylaxis for 0.5-21 y (mean 5.5 y). In total, 164/350 of the patients had a concomitant lung disease. Because of the heterogeneity of this retrospective material we evaluated only those patients with 4 or more antibiotic-demanding (i.e. presumably bacterial) episodes of RTI per y treated with an Ig dose of about 100 mg/kg/week (132/350). The frequency of antibiotic treated RTIs prior to and during latest y/s of Ig prophylaxis was compared. No difference in response could be found between patients with and without chronic lung diseases. In 92/132 a > or = 50% reduction of the rate of episodes of antibiotic-demanding RTIs was recorded (p IgG1 57%, IgG2 59%, IgG3 63% and for the combinations 61% (all p<0.001).

  12. Low density lipoprotein subclasses and response to a low-fat diet in healthy men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.M.; Dreon, D.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    1994-11-01

    Lipid and lipoprotein response to reduced dietary fat intake was investigated in relation to differences in distribution of LDL subclasses among 105 healthy men consuming high-fat (46%) and low-fat (24%) diets in random order for six weeks each. On high-fat, 87 subjects had predominantly large, buoyant LDL as measured by gradient gel electrophoresis and confirmed by analytic ultracentrifugation (pattern A), while the remainder had primarily smaller, denser LDL (pattern B). On low-fat, 36 men changed from pattern A to B. Compared with the 51 men in the stable A group, men in the stable B group (n = 18) had a three-fold greater reduction in LDL cholesterol and significantly greater reductions in plasma apoB and mass of intermediate (LDL II) and small (LDL III) LDL subtractions measured by analytic ultracentrifugation. In both stable A and change groups, reductions in LDL-cholesterol were not accompanied by reduced plasma apoB, consistent with the observation of a shift in LDL particle mass from larger, lipid-enriched (LDL I and II) to smaller, lipid-depleted (LDL III and IV) subfractions, without significant change in particle number. Genetic and environmental factors influencing LDL subclass distributions thus may also contribute substantially to interindividual variation in response to a low-fat diet.

  13. Rituximab impairs immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG (subclass) responses after influenza vaccination in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, J.; van Assen, S.; Wilting, K. R.; Land, J.; Horst, G.; de Haan, A.; Bijl, M.

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX) treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients severely hampers humoral response after influenza vaccination as determined by haemagglutination inhibition assay (HI). It is not known whether HI reflects both immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG (subclass) influenza response, and whether IgM

  14. Immunoglobulin G1 Allotype Influences Antibody Subclass Distribution in Response to HIV gp140 Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kratochvil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibody subclasses exhibit extensive polymorphisms (allotypes that could potentially impact the quality of HIV-vaccine induced B cell responses. Allotypes of immunoglobulin (Ig G1, the most abundant serum antibody, have been shown to display altered functional properties in regard to serum half-life, Fc-receptor binding and FcRn-mediated mucosal transcytosis. To investigate the potential link between allotypic IgG1-variants and vaccine-generated humoral responses in a cohort of 14 HIV vaccine recipients, we developed a novel protocol for rapid IgG1-allotyping. We combined PCR and ELISA assays in a dual approach to determine the IgG1 allotype identity (G1m3 and/or G1m1 of trial participants, using human plasma and RNA isolated from PBMC. The IgG1-allotype distribution of our participants mirrored previously reported results for caucasoid populations. We observed elevated levels of HIV gp140-specific IgG1 and decreased IgG2 levels associated with the G1m1-allele, in contrast to G1m3 carriers. These data suggest that vaccinees homozygous for G1m1 are predisposed to develop elevated Ag-specific IgG1:IgG2 ratios compared to G1m3-carriers. This elevated IgG1:IgG2 ratio was further associated with higher FcγR-dimer engagement, a surrogate for potential antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP function. Although preliminary, these results suggest that IgG1 allotype may have a significant impact on IgG subclass distribution in response to vaccination and associated Fc-mediated effector functions. These results have important implications for ongoing HIV vaccine efficacy studies predicated on engagement of FcγR-mediated cellular functions including ADCC and ADCP, and warrant further investigation. Our novel allotyping protocol provides new tools to determine the potential impact of IgG1 allotypes on vaccine efficacy.

  15. Rotavirus-specific subclass antibody and cytokine responses in Bangladeshi children with rotavirus diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Tasnim; Zaki, M Hasan; Podder, Goutam; Sultana, Novera; Salam, M Abdus; Rahman, S Moshfiqur; Sefat-e-Khuda; Sack, David A

    2003-02-01

    Rotavirus-specific subclass antibody responses and cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and IL-10, were measured in children 7-24 months of age with rotavirus diarrhoea (n = 29); the responses were compared with children with watery diarrhoea from whom no enteric pathogens were isolated (controls; n = 11). All children had diarrhoea for or = 4-fold rise in antibody titre between the acute and convalescent stages were considered to have a response. The numbers of children with rotavirus-specific IgA and IgA1 responses in stool were similar in the two groups of children. In the plasma, more children with rotavirus diarrhoea had rotavirus-specific IgA, IgA1, IgG, IgG1, and IgG3 responses than did control children (P = 0.049, 0.007, 0.001, 0.002, and 0.012, respectively). IgA2 was not detectable. Among cytokines measured in supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured for 6 and 24 hr, IFN-gamma was the only cytokine that was higher in children with rotavirus diarrhoea compared with controls (P = 0.013). Severity of illness did not correlate with nutritional status or antibody titres, but severity did correlate with TNF-alpha during the acute stage of illness. IFN-gamma correlated positively with IgG1 titres. These findings suggest a role for IFN-gamma in the pathogenesis of rotavirus infection, but this needs confirmation by other studies. The immune responses described are relevant to future vaccine trials, as immune responses in vaccinees should mimic those in natural infection.

  16. Effects of pregnancy and intensity of Plasmodium falciparum transmission on immunoglobulin G subclass responses to variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Megnekou, Rosette; Staalsoe, Trine; Taylor, Diane W

    2005-01-01

    , the levels of VSA(PAM)-specific antibodies either were very low or negative or were very high, whereas the levels of the antibodies specific for non-PAM type VSA were uniformly high. Interestingly, the levels of VSA(PAM)-specific IgG1 increased with increasing gestational age, while the levels...... status, parity, gestational age, and parasite transmission intensity, whereas only the parasite transmission intensity influenced the levels of IgG specific for non-PAM type VSA. For both types of VSA, the responses were dominated by the cytophilic subclass IgG1, followed by IgG3. In pregnant women...

  17. Immunization of humans with polysaccharide vaccines induces systemic, predominantly polymeric IgA2-subclass antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, A; Lue, C; Moldoveanu, Z; Kiyono, H; McGhee, J R; Mestecky, J

    1990-05-15

    Ig class- and IgA subclass-specific immune responses to protein and polysaccharide Ag were studied in serum, external secretions, and at the single cell level in peripheral blood of systemically immunized adults. Immunization with tetanus toxoid induced predominantly IgG antibody responses in serum and in the PBMC. The IgA antibody response was low, and was mostly of the IgA1 subclass. In contrast, immunization with polysaccharide Ag (Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A, C, Y, W-135, and Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides) elicited a major IgA response predominantly of the IgA2 isotype. Analysis of the molecular forms of secreted IgA antibodies indicated that polymers were produced early after immunization, irrespective of the nature of the Ag. When compared with serum antibody and to PBMC cell responses, systemic immunization with polysaccharides induced a minor salivary response dominated by IgG and IgM antibodies. In contrast, the presence of antipolysaccharide antibodies in bile, irrespective of their isotype, paralleled the serum response 14 days after the immunization with polysaccharide Ag. These results suggest that biliary Ig were mostly derived from serum. Different patterns of the expression of MHC class II Ag on T cells, B cells, and monocytes during the course of immunization with protein or polysaccharide Ag were observed: whereas protein Ag induced a high frequency of HLA-DP- and HLA-DR-expressing cells early in the course of immunization, polysaccharide vaccines elicited low and protracted increases of HLA-DP+ T cells. Polysaccharide vaccine covalently coupled to a protein carrier induced a higher frequency of antipolysaccharide antibody-secreting cells in peripheral blood and increased the IgG to IgA ratio among polysaccharide-specific antibody-secreting cells.

  18. HLA-A and -B alleles and haplotypes in 240 index patients with common variable immunodeficiency and selective IgG subclass deficiency in central Alabama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barton James C

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We wanted to quantify HLA-A and -B phenotype and haplotype frequencies in Alabama index patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID and selective IgG subclass deficiency (IgGSD, and in control subjects. Methods Phenotypes were detected using DNA-based typing (index cases and microlymphocytotoxicity typing (controls. Results A and B phenotypes were determined in 240 index cases (114 CVID, 126 IgGSD and 1,321 controls and haplotypes in 195 index cases and 751 controls. Phenotyping revealed that the "uncorrected" frequencies of A*24, B*14, B*15, B*35, B*40, B*49, and B*50 were significantly greater in index cases, and frequencies of B*35, B*58, B*62 were significantly lower in index cases. After Bonferroni corrections, the frequencies of phenotypes A*24, B*14, and B*40 were significantly greater in index cases, and the frequency of B*62 was significantly lower in index cases. The most common haplotypes in index cases were A*02-B*44 (frequency 0.1385, A*01-B*08 (frequency 0.1308, and A*03-B*07 (frequency 0.1000, and the frequency of each was significantly greater in index cases than in control subjects ("uncorrected" values of p p p = 0.0166. Most phenotype and haplotype frequencies in CVID and IgGSD were similar. 26.7% of index patients were HLA-haploidentical with one or more other index patients. We diagnosed CVID or IgGSD in first-degree or other relatives of 26 of 195 index patients for whom HLA-A and -B haplotypes had been ascertained; A*01-B*08, A*02-B*44, and A*29-B*44 were most frequently associated with CVID or IgGSD in these families. We conservatively estimated the combined population frequency of CVID and IgGSD to be 0.0092 in adults, based on the occurrence of CVID and IgGSD in spouses of the index cases. Conclusions CVID and IgGSD in adults are significantly associated with several HLA haplotypes, many of which are also common in the Alabama Caucasian population. Immunoglobulin phenotype variability

  19. Pattern of pre-existing IgG subclass responses to a panel of asexual stage malaria antigens reported during the lengthy dry season in Daraweesh, Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasr, A; Iriemenam, N C; Troye-Blomberg, M

    2011-01-01

    The anti-malarial IgG immune response during the lengthy and dry season in areas of low malaria transmission as in Eastern Sudan is largely unknown. In this study, ELISA was used for the measurement of pre-existing total IgG and IgG subclasses to a panel of malaria antigens, MSP2-3D7, MSP2-FC27...

  20. A computational approach to the description of individual immune responses. IgE and IgG-subclass allergen-specific antibodies formed during immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, I; Poulsen, L K; Osterballe, O

    1991-01-01

    Detailed evaluation of the IgE and IgG-subclass immune response during immunotherapy can now be performed by crossed radio immunoelectrophoresis (CRIE). Some new concepts are introduced facilitating the handling of the vast amount of data obtained by quantitating the immune response. These concepts...... are "distance" between antibody responses and "immune response width". The 20 patients included in this study were pollen-allergic patients who underwent specific immunotherapy in a 3-year prospective study. It was found that the immune response during immunotherapy was restricted to IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies...... and decreased towards six. For the IgG4 antibodies the number of reactions increased towards 15 antigens and decreased towards four. The increase is generally paralleled by an increase in quantitative immune response as well. For some of the antigens a rise in the IgE antibodies is contrasted by a fall...

  1. Can non-cholesterol sterols and lipoprotein subclasses distribution predict different patterns of cholesterol metabolism and statin therapy response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojkovic, Tamara; Vladimirov, Sandra; Spasojevic-Kalimanovska, Vesna; Zeljkovic, Aleksandra; Vekic, Jelena; Kalimanovska-Ostric, Dimitra; Djuricic, Ivana; Sobajic, Sladjana; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana

    2017-03-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis disorders may cause dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis progression and coronary artery disease (CAD) development. Evaluation of non-cholesterol sterols (NCSs) as synthesis and absorption markers, and lipoprotein particles quality may indicate the dyslipidemia early development. This study investigates associations of different cholesterol homeostasis patterns with low-density (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) subclasses distribution in statin-treated and statin-untreated CAD patients, and potential use of aforementioned markers for CAD treatment optimization. The study included 78 CAD patients (47 statin-untreated and 31 statin-treated) and 31 controls (CG). NCSs concentrations were quantified using gas chromatography- flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Lipoprotein subclasses were separated by gradient gel electrophoresis. In patients, cholesterol-synthesis markers were significantly higher comparing to CG. Cholesterol-synthesis markers were inversely associated with LDL size in all groups. For cholesterol homeostasis estimation, each group was divided to good and/or poor synthetizers and/or absorbers according to desmosterol and β-sitosterol median values. In CG, participants with reduced cholesterol absorption, the relative proportion of small, dense LDL was higher in those with increased cholesterol synthesis compared to those with reduced synthesis (pcholesterol absorption had increased proportion of LDL IVB (pcholesterol homeostasis. Desmosterol/β-sitosterol ratio could be used for estimating individual propensity toward dyslipidemia development and direct the future treatment.

  2. Diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of intestine in selective IgG 2 subclass deficiency, autoimmune thyroiditis, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vikas; Lipka, Seth; Rizvon, Kaleem; Singh, Jaspreet; Rashid, Sadat; Mustacchia, Paul

    2012-12-01

    Diffuse Nodular Lymphoid Hyperplasia (DNLH) of the intestine is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of uncertain etiology, which is characterized by the presence of multiple nodular lesions. It can present as an asymptomatic disease or manifest with gastrointestinal symptoms like abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, occult bleeding or rarely intestinal obstruction. DNLH has been seen in association with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) where it poses a risk of malignant transformation. We present a case of diffuse lymphoid nodular lymphoid hyperplasia in a patient who was presented with abdominal pain and diarrhea, and was later found to have IgG2 subclass immunodeficieny, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and Hashimoto's (autoimmune) thyroiditis. Through this report, we wish to review current literature as well as share our clinical experience in managing this rare entity.

  3. The Essence of Subclassing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    The essence of subclassing is the ability to represent classification hierarchies reflecting domain concepts. With the right class mechanism there is no need for a separate type/subtype mechanism, and general classes may have behavior specifications so that subclassing also implies code reuse....... Sometimes the application is so well defined (known) that developers may readily start out with classes that represent domain concepts. Singular objects have been around for some time, so a new kind of language with equal support for both objects and classes would simply ask for tool support for objects...

  4. The influence of allotypes on the IgG subclass response to chromosomal beta-lactamase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Pressler, T; Pandey, J P

    1997-01-01

    Sera from 70 adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa were typed for seven GM and two KM allotype determinants. IgG class and all four IgG subclasses of antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase of Ps. aeruginosa (a beta ab) were measured...... in all 70 CF patients in a cross-sectional study. The a beta ab IgG subclass response in sera collected during the first 11 years of chronic infection from 20 CF patients (10 patients with G3M*5 G1M*3/G3M*5 G1M*3 genotype and 10 patients with G3M*21 G1M*1/G3M*21 G1M*1 genotype) was analysed...... in a longitudinal study. Increased levels of IgG2 were associated with the presence of GM 23 allotype. IgG3 a beta ab levels were the lowest for subjects with the GM 1,2,3,17 23 5,21 and GM 1,3,17 21 phenotypes and the highest in subjects with GM 3,23,5 and GM 3,5. No significant differences in IgG1 and IgG4 a beta...

  5. Characteristics of HPV-specific antibody responses induced by infection and vaccination: cross-reactivity, neutralizing activity, avidity and IgG subclasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirte Scherpenisse

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In order to assess HPV-specific IgG characteristics, we evaluated multiple aspects of the humoral antibody response that will provide insight in the HPV humoral immune response induced by HPV infection and vaccination. METHODS: Cross-reactivity of HPV-specific antibodies induced by infection or vaccination was assessed with VLP16 or 18 inhibition using a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay (MIA for HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58. HPV16/18 specific IgG1-4 subclasses and avidity were determined with the VLP-MIA in sera after HPV infection and after vaccination. Neutralizing antibodies were determined in a small subset of single-seropositive and multi-seropositive naturally derived antibodies. RESULTS: Naturally derived antibodies from single-positive sera were highly genotype-specific as homologue VLP-inhibition percentages varied between 78-94%. In multi-positive sera, cross-reactive antibodies were observed both within and between α7 and α9 species. After vaccination, cross-reactive antibodies were mainly species-specific. Avidity of vaccine-derived HPV-specific antibodies was 3 times higher than that of antibodies induced by HPV infection (p<0.0001. IgG1 and IgG3 were found to be the predominant subclasses observed after HPV infection and vaccination. In the small subset tested, the number of single-positive sera with neutralizing capacity was higher than of multi-positive sera. CONCLUSION: Naturally derived HPV-specific antibodies from single-positive samples showed different characteristics in terms of cross-reactivity and neutralizing capacity compared with antibodies from multi-positive sera. Post-vaccination, HPV antibody avidity was approximately 3 times higher than antibody avidity induced by HPV infection. Therefore, antibody avidity might be a potential surrogate of protection.

  6. Nutritional status predicts primary subclasses of T cells and the lymphocyte proliferation response in healthy older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molls, Roshni R; Ahluwalia, Namanjeet; Mastro, Andrea M; Smiciklas-Wright, Helen; Handte, Gordon C

    2005-11-01

    Aging is often associated with a dysregulation in immune function, particularly in T-cell responses, even in the healthy elderly. Adequate nutrition is important for optimal immune function. The literature on the relation of nutritional status with immune function in the elderly offers mixed findings. Because several nutrients can influence immune response, and there are interactions among nutrients, examining the association of various nutrients measured simultaneously with tests of immune function is important. We examined the association of protein, iron, zinc, vitamin B-12, and folic acid with tests of acquired immunity in healthy older women (76.7 +/- 7.0 y; n = 130). Discriminant analysis was used to identify the predictive subset of nutrients that could correctly classify subjects into the lowest or highest quartiles (75th percentile) on various immune function tests (T cells and subsets and lymphocyte proliferation in response to culture with mitogens). Protein and iron status variables were identified in the predictive subset for all immune tests; in addition, zinc emerged in the predictive model for T cells and their subsets as well as for the proliferation response to concanavalin A. The probability of correctly classifying women into the lowest or highest quartiles of immune tests by the predictive subset of nutrition variables was high, i.e., 62.8-83.5% for T cells and their subsets, and 79.3-89.7% for the proliferation response to mitogens. In conclusion, protein, iron, and zinc were significant predictors of immune function in older women. Adequate status of these nutrients may help maintain immunity in older adults.

  7. Nonencapsulated Trichinella pseudospiralis Infection Impairs Follicular Helper T Cell Differentiation with Subclass-Selective Decreases in Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kazunobu; Wu, Zhiliang; Srinontong, Piyarat; Ikeda, Takahide; Nagano, Isao; Morita, Hirokuyi; Maekawa, Yoichi

    2016-12-01

    Infectious microorganisms often modify host immunity to escape from immune elimination. Trichinella is a unique nematode of the helminth family, whose members parasitize the muscle cells inside the host without robust eliminative reactions. There are several species of Trichinella; some develop in muscle cells that become encapsulated (e.g., Trichinella spiralis) and others in cells that do not encapsulate (e.g., Trichinella pseudospiralis). It has already been established that Trichinella infection affects host immune responses in several experimental immune diseases in animal models; however, most of those studies were done using T. spiralis infection. As host immune responses to T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis infections have been reported to be different, it is necessary to clarify how T. pseudospiralis infection influences the host immune responses. In this study, we investigated the influence on host humoral immunity in T. pseudospiralis-infected mice. We demonstrated that T. pseudospiralis infection decreased antigen-specific IgG2a and IgG2b antibody (Ab) production in mice immunized with a model antigen. This selective decrease in gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-dependent Ab production was not due to a decrease in IFN-γ production, and we instead found impaired follicular helper T (Tfh) cell differentiation. The affinity maturation of antigen-specific Ab tended to be delayed but was not significant in T. pseudospiralis-infected mice. We also observed that CD11b(+) spleen cells in T. pseudospiralis-infected mice expressed CD206 and PD-L2, the phenotype of which was M2 macrophages with weak production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), possibly resulting in impaired Tfh differentiation. Taken together, our results indicate that nonencapsulated Trichinella infection induces selective dampening in humoral immunity with the suppression of Tfh differentiation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Characteristics of HPV-specific antibody responses induced by infection and vaccination: cross-reactivity, neutralizing activity, avidity and IgG subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Schepp, Rutger M; Mollers, Madelief; Meijer, Chris J L M; Berbers, Guy A M; van der Klis, Fiona R M

    2013-01-01

    In order to assess HPV-specific IgG characteristics, we evaluated multiple aspects of the humoral antibody response that will provide insight in the HPV humoral immune response induced by HPV infection and vaccination. Cross-reactivity of HPV-specific antibodies induced by infection or vaccination was assessed with VLP16 or 18 inhibition using a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay (MIA) for HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58. HPV16/18 specific IgG1-4 subclasses and avidity were determined with the VLP-MIA in sera after HPV infection and after vaccination. Neutralizing antibodies were determined in a small subset of single-seropositive and multi-seropositive naturally derived antibodies. Naturally derived antibodies from single-positive sera were highly genotype-specific as homologue VLP-inhibition percentages varied between 78-94%. In multi-positive sera, cross-reactive antibodies were observed both within and between α7 and α9 species. After vaccination, cross-reactive antibodies were mainly species-specific. Avidity of vaccine-derived HPV-specific antibodies was 3 times higher than that of antibodies induced by HPV infection (pHPV infection and vaccination. In the small subset tested, the number of single-positive sera with neutralizing capacity was higher than of multi-positive sera. Naturally derived HPV-specific antibodies from single-positive samples showed different characteristics in terms of cross-reactivity and neutralizing capacity compared with antibodies from multi-positive sera. Post-vaccination, HPV antibody avidity was approximately 3 times higher than antibody avidity induced by HPV infection. Therefore, antibody avidity might be a potential surrogate of protection.

  9. Equine insect bite hypersensitivity: immunoblot analysis of IgE and IgG subclass responses to Culicoides nubeculosus salivary gland extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellberg, W; Wilson, A D; Mellor, P; Doherr, M G; Torsteinsdottir, S; Zurbriggen, A; Jungi, T; Marti, E

    2006-09-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis of horses caused by IgE-mediated reactions to bites of Culicoides and sometimes Simulium spp. The allergens causing IBH are probably salivary gland proteins from these insects, but they have not yet been identified. The aim of our study was to identify the number and molecular weight of salivary gland extract (SGE) proteins derived from Culicoides nubeculosus which are able to bind IgE antibodies (ab) from the sera of IBH-affected horses. Additionally, we sought to investigate the IgG subclass (IgGa, IgGb and IgGT) reactivity to these proteins. Individual IgE and IgG subclass responses to proteins of C. nubeculosus SGE were evaluated by immunoblot in 42 IBH-affected and 26 healthy horses belonging to different groups (Icelandic horses born in Iceland, Icelandic horses and horses from different breeds born in mainland Europe). Additionally, the specific antibody response was studied before exposure to bites of Culicoides spp. and over a period of 3 years in a cohort of 10 Icelandic horses born in Iceland and imported to Switzerland. Ten IgE-binding protein bands with approximate molecular weights of 75, 66, 52, 48, 47, 32, 22/21, 19, 15, 13/12 kDa were found in the SGE. Five of these bands bound IgE from 50% or more of the horse sera. Thirty-nine of the 42 IBH-affected horses but only 2 of the 26 healthy horses showed IgE-binding to the SGE (p<0.000001). Similarly, more IBH-affected than healthy horses had IgGa ab binding to the Culicoides SGE (19/22 and 9/22, respectively, p<0.01). Sera of IBH-affected horses contained IgE, IgGa and IgGT but not IgGb ab against significantly more protein bands than the sera of the healthy horses. The cohort of 10 Icelandic horses confirmed these results and showed that Culicoides SGE specific IgE correlates with onset of IBH. IBH-affected horses that were born in Iceland had IgGa and IgGT ab (p< or =0.01) as well as IgE ab (p=0.06) against a significantly higher number of

  10. Development of a fluorescent-bead-based multiplex immunoassay to determine immunoglobulin G subclass responses to Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A and C polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voer, Richarda M.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; Engels, Carla W. A. M.; Rijkers, Ger T.; Sanders, Elisabeth A.; Berbers, Guy A. M.

    A fluorescent-particle-based multiplex flow cytometric immunoassay (MIA) for the detection of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and two IgG subclasses, IgG1 and IgG2, specific for Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A ( MenA) and C (MenC) polysaccharides ( PS) was developed. The assay comprised three

  11. IgG subclasses in previously healthy adult patients with acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    has been known for more than 20 years that certain patients with IgG subclass deficiencies may develop recurrent respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia.I...; However, there are few studies of IgG subclass levels in previously healthy adult patients with acute community-acquired pneumonia,~ particularly of patients ...

  12. Measurement of the IgG2 response to Pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides may identify an antibody deficiency in individuals referred for immunological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Antony; Irure Ventura, Juan; Sims, Dawn; Echeverría de Carlos, Ainara; Gómez de la Torre, Ricardo; Tricas Aizpún, Lourdes; Ocejo-Vinyals, J Gonzalo; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Wallis, Gregg; Harding, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    IgG2 is the most efficient subclass for providing protection against pneumococcal pathogens. We hypothesised that some individuals may be unable to mount an effective pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PCP) IgG2 response despite having a normal PCP IgG concentration (PCP IgG2 deficient). The median pre-vaccination PCP IgG2 concentration was significantly lower in individuals referred for immunological investigation compared to healthy controls (2.8 mg/L range, 95% CI 1.1-88 vs. 29.5mg/L, 95% CI 13.5-90, p = 0.0002). PCP IgG:IgG2 ratios were significantly higher for the referral population than for healthy controls suggesting the increased production of PCP specific subclasses other than IgG2. The percentage of individuals with PCP IgG2 deficiency was significantly higher in referral groups compared to controls (31% vs. 5%; p = 0.0009) and in an individual with PCP IgG2 deficiency, the balance of PCP specific IgG subclass antibodies post vaccination changed from IgG2>IgG1>IgG3>IgG4 to IgG1>IgG3>IgG2>IgG4. The median PCP IgG2 concentration in those with PCP IgG2 deficiency was significantly lower in the referral groups compared to controls (7.8 mg/L, 95% CI 1.1-12 vs. 12.7 mg/L, 95% CI 11.8-13.1; p = 0.006). The data suggests a defect in the production PCP IgG2 may be present in individuals with normal PCP IgG referred for immunological investigation.

  13. IgG subclasses determine pathways of anaphylaxis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutier, Héloïse; Gillis, Caitlin M; Iannascoli, Bruno; Godon, Ophélie; England, Patrick; Sibilano, Riccardo; Reber, Laurent L; Galli, Stephen J; Cragg, Mark S; Van Rooijen, Nico; Mancardi, David A; Bruhns, Pierre; Jönsson, Friederike

    2017-01-01

    Animal models have demonstrated that allergen-specific IgG confers sensitivity to systemic anaphylaxis that relies on IgG Fc receptors (FcγRs). Mouse IgG2a and IgG2b bind activating FcγRI, FcγRIII, and FcγRIV and inhibitory FcγRIIB; mouse IgG1 binds only FcγRIII and FcγRIIB. Although these interactions are of strikingly different affinities, these 3 IgG subclasses have been shown to enable induction of systemic anaphylaxis. We sought to determine which pathways control the induction of IgG1-, IgG2a-, and IgG2b-dependent passive systemic anaphylaxis. Mice were sensitized with IgG1, IgG2a, or IgG2b anti-trinitrophenyl mAbs and challenged with trinitrophenyl-BSA intravenously to induce systemic anaphylaxis that was monitored by using rectal temperature. Anaphylaxis was evaluated in mice deficient for FcγRs injected with mediator antagonists or in which basophils, monocytes/macrophages, or neutrophils had been depleted. FcγR expression was evaluated on these cells before and after anaphylaxis. Activating FcγRIII is the receptor primarily responsible for all 3 models of anaphylaxis, and subsequent downregulation of this receptor was observed. These models differentially relied on histamine release and the contribution of mast cells, basophils, macrophages, and neutrophils. Strikingly, basophil contribution and histamine predominance in mice with IgG1- and IgG2b-induced anaphylaxis correlated with the ability of inhibitory FcγRIIB to negatively regulate these models of anaphylaxis. We propose that the differential expression of inhibitory FcγRIIB on myeloid cells and its differential binding of IgG subclasses controls the contributions of mast cells, basophils, neutrophils, and macrophages to IgG subclass-dependent anaphylaxis. Collectively, our results unravel novel complexities in the involvement and regulation of cell populations in IgG-dependent reactions in vivo. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier

  14. Ethylene response factor AtERF72 negatively regulates Arabidopsis thaliana response to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Qiwei; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ting; Yang, Yafei; Zhang, Xinzhong; Han, Zhenhai; Xu, Xuefeng

    2017-09-23

    Ethylene regulates the plant's response to stress caused by iron (Fe) deficiency. However, specific roles of ERF proteins in response to Fe deficiency remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of ERF72 in response to iron deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the levels of the ethylene response factor AtERF72 increased in leaves and roots induced under the iron deficient conditions. erf72 mutant plants showed increased growth compared to wild type (WT) when grown in iron deficient medium for 5 d. erf72 mutants had increased root H(+) velocity and the ferric reductase activity, and increase in the expression of the iron deficiency response genes iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) and H(+)-ATPase (HA2) levels in iron deficient conditions. Compared to WT plants, erf72 mutants retained healthy chloroplast structure with significantly higher Fe and Mg content, and decreased chlorophyll degradation gene pheophorbide a oxygenase (PAO) and chlorophyllase (CLH1) expression when grown in iron deficient media. Yeast one-hybrid analysis showed that ERF72 could directly bind to the promoter regions of iron deficiency responses genes IRT1, HA2 and CLH1. Based on our results, we suggest that ethylene released from plants under iron deficiency stress can activate the expression of ERF72, which responds to iron deficiency in the negative regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Boron deficiency in woody plants: various responses and tolerance mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan eWang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Boron (B is an essential microelement for higher plants, and its deficiency is widespread around the world and constrains the productivity of both agriculture and forestry. In the last decades, accumulating studies on model or herbaceous plants have contributed greatly to our understanding of the complex network of B-deficiency responses and mechanisms for tolerance. In woody plants, however, only a few studies have been conducted and they are not well synthesised. Trees have a larger body size, longer lifespan and more B reserves than do herbaceous plants, indicating that woody species might undergo long-term or mild B deficiency more commonly and that a more complicated B reserves must accordingly be developed to cope with B deficiency. In addition, the highly heterozygous genetic background of tree species suggests that they may have a more complicated mechanism of response and tolerance to B deficiency than do model plants.B-deficient trees usually exhibit two key visible symptoms: depression of growing points (root tip, bud, flower, and young leaf and deformity of organs (root, shoot, leaf, and fruit. These symptoms may be ascribed to B functioning in the cell wall and membrane, and B deficiency results in damage to vascular tissues and the suppression of both B and water transport. B deficiency also affects metabolic processes, such as increased lignin and phenol, and decreased leaf photosynthesis. These negative effects will influence the quality and quantity of wood, fruit and other agricultural products.B efficiency probably originates from a combined effect of three processes: B uptake, B translocation and retranslocation, and B utilization. Root morphology and mycorrhiza can affect the B uptake efficiency of trees. During B translocation from the root to shoot, differences in B concentration between root cell saps and xylem exudates, as well as water use efficiency, may play key roles in tolerance to B deficiency. In addition, B

  16. Mismatch Repair Deficiency and Response to Immune Checkpoint Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Valerie; Murphy, Adrian; Le, Dung T.

    2016-01-01

    More than 1.6 million new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2016, resulting in more than 500,000 deaths. Although chemotherapy has been the mainstay of treatment in advanced cancers, immunotherapy development, particularly with PD-1 inhibitors, has changed the face of treatment for a number of tumor types. One example is the subset of tumors characterized by mismatch repair deficiency and microsatellite instability that are highly sensitive to PD-1 blockade. Hereditary forms of cancer have been noted for more than a century, but the molecular changes underlying mismatch repair-deficient tumors and subsequent microsatellite unstable tumors was not known until the early 1990s. In this review article, we discuss the history and pathophysiology of mismatch repair, the process of testing for mismatch repair deficiency and microsatellite instability, and the role of immunotherapy in this subset of cancers. Implications for Practice: Mismatch repair deficiency has contributed to our understanding of carcinogenesis for the past 2 decades and now identifies a subgroup of traditionally chemotherapy-insensitive solid tumors as sensitive to PD-1 blockade. This article seeks to educate oncologists regarding the nature of mismatch repair deficiency, its impact in multiple tumor types, and its implications for predicting the responsiveness of solid tumors to immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:27412392

  17. Transcriptome analysis of rice root responses to potassium deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Tian-Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Potassium (K+ is an important nutrient ion in plant cells and plays crucial roles in many plant physiological and developmental processes. In the natural environment, K+ deficiency is a common abiotic stress that inhibits plant growth and reduces crop productivity. Several microarray studies have been conducted on genome-wide gene expression profiles of rice during its responses to various stresses. However, little is known about the transcriptional changes in rice genes under low-K+ conditions. Results We analyzed the transcriptomic profiles of rice roots in response to low-K+ stress. The roots of rice seedlings with or without low-K+ treatment were harvested after 6 h, and 3 and 5 d, and used for microarray analysis. The microarray data showed that many genes (2,896 were up-regulated or down-regulated more than 1.2-fold during low-K+ treatment. GO analysis indicated that the genes showing transcriptional changes were mainly in the following categories: metabolic process, membrane, cation binding, kinase activity, transport, and so on. We conducted a comparative analysis of transcriptomic changes between Arabidopsis and rice under low-K+ stress. Generally, the genes showing changes in transcription in rice and Arabidopsis in response to low-K+ stress displayed similar GO distribution patterns. However, there were more genes related to stress responses and development in Arabidopsis than in rice. Many auxin-related genes responded to K+ deficiency in rice, whereas jasmonic acid-related enzymes may play more important roles in K+ nutrient signaling in Arabidopsis. Conclusions According to the microarray data, fewer rice genes showed transcriptional changes in response to K+ deficiency than to phosphorus (P or nitrogen (N deficiency. Thus, transcriptional regulation is probably more important in responses to low-P and -N stress than to low-K+ stress. However, many genes in some categories (protein kinase and ion transporter

  18. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency.

  19. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  20. Separability-Oriented Subclass Discriminant Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Huan; Wang, Hui; Guo, Gongde; Wei, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is a classical method for discriminative dimensionality reduction. The original LDA may degrade in its performance for non-Gaussian data, and may be unable to extract sufficient features to satisfactorily explain the data when the number of classes is small. Two prominent extensions to address these problems are subclass discriminant analysis (SDA) and mixture subclass discriminant analysis (MSDA). They divide every class into subclasses and re-define the within-class and between-class scatter matrices on the basis of subclass. In this paper we study the issue of how to obtain subclasses more effectively in order to achieve higher class separation. We observe that there is significant overlap between models of the subclasses, which we hypothesise is undesirable. In order to reduce their overlap we propose an extension of LDA, separability oriented subclass discriminant analysis (SSDA), which employs hierarchical clustering to divide a class into subclasses using a separability oriented criterion, before applying LDA optimisation using re-defined scatter matrices. Extensive experiments have shown that SSDA has better performance than LDA, SDA and MSDA in most cases. Additional experiments have further shown that SSDA can project data into LDA space that has higher class separation than LDA, SDA and MSDA in most cases.

  1. Gene regulation in response to protein disulphide isomerase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Per; Tachibana, Christine; Bruun, Anette W

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the activities of promoters of a number of yeast genes encoding resident endoplasmic reticulum proteins, and found increased expression in a strain with severe protein disulphide isomerase deficiency. Serial deletion in the promoter of the MPD1 gene, which encodes a PDI1-homologue...... element. The sequence (GACACG) does not resemble the unfolded protein response element. It is present in the upstream regions of the MPD1, MPD2, KAR2, PDI1 and ERO1 genes....

  2. Boron deficiency in woody plants: various responses and tolerance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nannan; Yang, Chengquan; Pan, Zhiyong; Liu, Yongzhong; Peng, Shu'ang

    2015-01-01

    Boron (B) is an essential microelement for higher plants, and its deficiency is widespread around the world and constrains the productivity of both agriculture and forestry. In the last two decades, numerous studies on model or herbaceous plants have contributed greatly to our understanding of the complex network of B-deficiency responses and mechanisms for tolerance. In woody plants, however, fewer studies have been conducted and they have not well been recently synthesized or related to the findings on model species on B transporters. Trees have a larger body size, longer lifespan and more B reserves than do herbaceous plants, indicating that woody species might undergo long-term or mild B deficiency more commonly and that regulation of B reserves helps trees cope with B deficiency. In addition, the highly heterozygous genetic background of tree species suggests that they may have more complex mechanisms of response and tolerance to B deficiency than do model plants. Boron-deficient trees usually exhibit two key visible symptoms: depression of growing points (root tip, bud, flower, and young leaf) and deformity of organs (root, shoot, leaf, and fruit). These symptoms may be ascribed to B functioning in the cell wall and membrane, and particularly to damage to vascular tissues and the suppression of both B and water transport. Boron deficiency also affects metabolic processes such as decreased leaf photosynthesis, and increased lignin and phenol content in trees. These negative effects will influence the quality and quantity of wood, fruit and other agricultural products. Boron efficiency probably originates from a combined effect of three processes: B uptake, B translocation and retranslocation, and B utilization. Root morphology and mycorrhiza can affect the B uptake efficiency of trees. During B translocation from the root to shoot, differences in B concentration between root cell sap and xylem exudate, as well as water use efficiency, may play key roles in

  3. Deficiency in Th2 cytokine responses exacerbate orthopoxvirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakala, Isaac G; Chaudhri, Geeta; Eldi, Preethi; Buller, R Mark; Karupiah, Gunasegaran

    2015-01-01

    Ectromelia virus (ECTV) causes mousepox in mice, a disease very similar to smallpox in humans. ECTV and variola virus (VARV), the agent of smallpox, are closely related orthopoxviruses. Mousepox is an excellent small animal model to study the genetic and immunologic basis for resistance and susceptibility of humans to smallpox. Resistance to mousepox is dependent on a strong polarized type 1 immune response, associated with robust natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses. In contrast, ECTV-susceptible mice generate a type 2 response, associated with weak NK cell, CTL and IFN-γ responses but robust IL-4 responses. Nonetheless, susceptible strains infected with mutant ECTV lacking virus-encoded IFN-γ binding protein (vIFN-γbp) (ECTV-IFN-γbpΔ) control virus replication through generation of type 1 response. Since the IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways polarize type 2/T helper 2 (Th2) responses with a corresponding suppression of IFN-γ production, we investigated whether the combined absence of vIFN-γbp, and one or more host genes involved in Th2 response development, influence generation of protective immunity. Most mutant mouse strains infected with wild-type (WT) virus succumbed to disease more rapidly than WT animals. Conversely, the disease outcome was significantly improved in WT mice infected with ECTV-IFN-γbpΔ but absence of IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways did not provide any added advantage. Deficiency in IL-13 or STAT-6 resulted in defective CTL responses, higher mortality rates and accelerated deaths. Deficiencies in IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways significantly reduced the numbers of IFN-γ producing CD4 and CD8 T cells, indicating an absence of a switch to a Th1-like response. Factors contributing to susceptibility or resistance to mousepox are far more complex than a balance between Th1 and Th2 responses.

  4. Deficiency in Th2 cytokine responses exacerbate orthopoxvirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac G Sakala

    Full Text Available Ectromelia virus (ECTV causes mousepox in mice, a disease very similar to smallpox in humans. ECTV and variola virus (VARV, the agent of smallpox, are closely related orthopoxviruses. Mousepox is an excellent small animal model to study the genetic and immunologic basis for resistance and susceptibility of humans to smallpox. Resistance to mousepox is dependent on a strong polarized type 1 immune response, associated with robust natural killer (NK cell, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL and gamma interferon (IFN-γ responses. In contrast, ECTV-susceptible mice generate a type 2 response, associated with weak NK cell, CTL and IFN-γ responses but robust IL-4 responses. Nonetheless, susceptible strains infected with mutant ECTV lacking virus-encoded IFN-γ binding protein (vIFN-γbp (ECTV-IFN-γbpΔ control virus replication through generation of type 1 response. Since the IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways polarize type 2/T helper 2 (Th2 responses with a corresponding suppression of IFN-γ production, we investigated whether the combined absence of vIFN-γbp, and one or more host genes involved in Th2 response development, influence generation of protective immunity. Most mutant mouse strains infected with wild-type (WT virus succumbed to disease more rapidly than WT animals. Conversely, the disease outcome was significantly improved in WT mice infected with ECTV-IFN-γbpΔ but absence of IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways did not provide any added advantage. Deficiency in IL-13 or STAT-6 resulted in defective CTL responses, higher mortality rates and accelerated deaths. Deficiencies in IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways significantly reduced the numbers of IFN-γ producing CD4 and CD8 T cells, indicating an absence of a switch to a Th1-like response. Factors contributing to susceptibility or resistance to mousepox are far more complex than a balance between Th1 and Th2 responses.

  5. Characterization of two neuronal subclasses through constellation pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Russell W; Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Memon, Tosifa; Cox, Jeffrey L; Foulkes, Tucker; Rivier, Jean E; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2012-07-31

    Different types of neurons diverge in function because they express their own unique set or constellation of signaling molecules, including receptors and ion channels that work in concert. We describe an approach to identify functionally divergent neurons within a large, heterogeneous neuronal population while simultaneously investigating specific isoforms of signaling molecules expressed in each. In this study we characterized two subclasses of menthol-sensitive neurons from cultures of dissociated mouse dorsal-root ganglia. Although these neurons represent a small fraction of the dorsal-root ganglia neuronal population, we were able to identify them and investigate the cell-specific constellations of ion channels and receptors functionally expressed in each subclass, using a panel of selective pharmacological tools. Differences were found in the functional expression of ATP receptors, TRPA1 channels, voltage-gated calcium-, potassium-, and sodium channels, and responses to physiologically relevant cold temperatures. Furthermore, the cell-specific responses to various stimuli could be altered through pharmacological interventions targeted to the cell-specific constellation of ion channels expressed in each menthol-sensitive subclass. In fact, the normal responses to cold temperature could be reversed in the two neuronal subclasses by the coapplication of the appropriate combination of pharmacological agents. This result suggests that the functionally integrated constellation of signaling molecules in a particular type of cell is a more appropriate target for effective pharmacological intervention than a single signaling molecule. This shift from molecular to cellular targets has important implications for basic research and drug discovery. We refer to this paradigm as "constellation pharmacology."

  6. Quantitative analysis of the IgG and IgG subclass immune responses to chromosomal Pseudomonas aeruginosa beta-lactamase in serum from patients with cystic fibrosis by western blotting and laser scanning densitometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T D; Ciofu, O; Pressler, T

    1996-01-01

    lung infection with P aeruginosa was further investigated by correlating the a beta ab IgG subclasses with pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis. METHODS: Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG subclass a beta ab were investigated by western blotting and quantified by laser scanning densitometry......BACKGROUND: Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a beta ab) are markers of the development of resistance of P aeruginosa to beta-lactam antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection. The role of these antibodies in patients with chronic....... A longitudinal study on 43 consecutive patients with cystic fibrosis who developed chronic lung infection with P aeruginosa was performed. RESULTS: IgG subclass a beta ab appeared in all patients with chronic infection with P aeruginosa. Eleven years after the onset of infection all the patients had IgG1, 79...

  7. Quantification of serum IgG subclasses by use of subclass-specific tryptic peptides and liquid chromatography--tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladwig, Paula M; Barnidge, David R; Snyder, Melissa R; Katzmann, Jerry A; Murray, David L

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of IgG subclasses is a useful tool for investigation of humoral immune deficiency in the presence of total IgG within reference intervals and IgG4-related disease. Nephelometry has been the method of choice for quantification. We describe an LC-MS/MS method that can multiplex all 4 subclasses along with total IgG by use of either IgG subclass-specific peptide stable isotope-labeled internal standards or a surrogate digest standard for quantification and does not rely on antigen/antibody reactions. We combined serum with labeled internal peptide standards and intact purified horse IgG. Samples were denatured, reduced, alkylated, and digested. We analyzed the digested serum by LC-MS/MS for IgG subclasses 1-4 and total IgG. We assayed 112 patient sera by LC-MS/MS and immunonephelometry. The mean of the slopes and R(2) values for IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, and IgG were 1.18 and 0.93, respectively. Interassay imprecision for the LC-MS/MS method was IgG and subclasses and was slightly improved by use of a calibrator peptide from an exogenous horse IgG. Summed total IgG correlated with the measured total IgG within 10%. Reference intervals and analytical measuring range were all similar to our previous validation data for the immunonephelometry assays. Total IgG and IgG subclasses 1, 2, 3, and 4 can be quantified by LC-MS/MS with performance comparable to nephelometry. © 2014 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  8. CCK Response Deficiency in Synphilin-1 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wanli W; Smith, Megan; Yang, Dejun; Choi, Pique P; Moghadam, Alexander; Li, Tianxia; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have identified a novel role for the cytoplasmic protein, synphilin-1(SP1), in the controls of food intake and body weight in both mice and Drosophila. Ubiquitous overexpression of human SP1 in brain neurons in transgenic mice results in hyperphagia expressed as an increase in meal size. However, the mechanisms underlying this action of SP1 remain to be determined. Here we investigate a potential role for altered gut feedback signaling in the effects of SP1 on food intake. We examined responses to peripheral administration of cholecytokinin (CCK), amylin, and the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, exendin-4. Intraperitoneal administration of CCK at doses ranging from 1-10 nmol/kg significantly reduced glucose intake in wild type (WT) mice, but failed to affect intake in SP1 transgenic mice. Moreover, there was a significant attenuation of CCK-induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal vagal complex in SP1 transgenic mice. In contrast, WT and SP1 transgenic mice were similarly responsive to both amylin and exendin-4 treatment. These studies demonstrate that SP1 results in a CCK response deficiency that may contribute to the increased meal size and overall hyperphagia in synphillin-1 transgenic mice.

  9. Gastrin-deficient mice have disturbed hematopoiesis in response to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Suzana; Anderson, Gregory J; Alexander, Warren S; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2011-08-01

    Gastrins are peptide hormones important for gastric acid secretion and growth of the gastrointestinal mucosa. We have previously demonstrated that ferric ions bind to gastrins, that the gastrin-ferric ion complex interacts with the iron transport protein transferrin in vitro, and that circulating gastrin concentrations positively correlate with transferrin saturation in vivo. Here we report the effect of long-term dietary iron modification on gastrin-deficient (Gas(-/-)) and hypergastrinemic cholecystokinin receptor 2-deficient (Cck2r(-/-)) mice, both of which have reduced basal gastric acid secretion. Iron homeostasis in both strains appeared normal unless the animals were challenged by iron deficiency. When fed an iron-deficient diet, Gas(-/-) mice, but not Cck2r(-/-) mice, developed severe anemia. In iron-deficient Gas(-/-) mice, massive splenomegaly was also apparent with an increased number of splenic megakaryocytes accompanied by thrombocytosis. The expression of the mRNA encoding the iron-regulatory peptide hepcidin, Hamp, was down-regulated in both Cck2r(-/-) and Gas(-/-) mice on a low-iron diet, but, interestingly, the reduction was greater in Cck2r(-/-) mice and smaller in Gas(-/-) mice than in the corresponding wild-type strains. These data suggest that gastrins play an important direct role, unrelated to their ability to stimulate acid secretion, in hematopoiesis under conditions of iron deficiency.

  10. Gastrin-Deficient Mice Have Disturbed Hematopoiesis in Response to Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory J.; Alexander, Warren S.; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrins are peptide hormones important for gastric acid secretion and growth of the gastrointestinal mucosa. We have previously demonstrated that ferric ions bind to gastrins, that the gastrin-ferric ion complex interacts with the iron transport protein transferrin in vitro, and that circulating gastrin concentrations positively correlate with transferrin saturation in vivo. Here we report the effect of long-term dietary iron modification on gastrin-deficient (Gas−/−) and hypergastrinemic cholecystokinin receptor 2-deficient (Cck2r−/−) mice, both of which have reduced basal gastric acid secretion. Iron homeostasis in both strains appeared normal unless the animals were challenged by iron deficiency. When fed an iron-deficient diet, Gas−/− mice, but not Cck2r−/−mice, developed severe anemia. In iron-deficient Gas−/−mice, massive splenomegaly was also apparent with an increased number of splenic megakaryocytes accompanied by thrombocytosis. The expression of the mRNA encoding the iron-regulatory peptide hepcidin, Hamp, was down-regulated in both Cck2r−/− and Gas−/−mice on a low-iron diet, but, interestingly, the reduction was greater in Cck2r−/− mice and smaller in Gas−/− mice than in the corresponding wild-type strains. These data suggest that gastrins play an important direct role, unrelated to their ability to stimulate acid secretion, in hematopoiesis under conditions of iron deficiency. PMID:21652729

  11. On Certain Subclasses of Analytic Functions Defined by Differential Subordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Mahzoon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and study certain subclasses of analytic functions which are defined by differential subordination. Coefficient inequalities, some properties of neighborhoods, distortion and covering theorems, radius of starlikeness, and convexity for these subclasses are given.

  12. Ethylene and the Regulation of Physiological and Morphological Responses to Nutrient Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María José; Romera, Francisco Javier; Lucena, Carlos; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    To cope with nutrient deficiencies, plants develop both morphological and physiological responses. The regulation of these responses is not totally understood, but some hormones and signaling substances have been implicated. It was suggested several years ago that ethylene participates in the regulation of responses to iron and phosphorous deficiency. More recently, its role has been extended to other deficiencies, such as potassium, sulfur, and others. The role of ethylene in so many deficiencies suggests that, to confer specificity to the different responses, it should act through different transduction pathways and/or in conjunction with other signals. In this update, the data supporting a role for ethylene in the regulation of responses to different nutrient deficiencies will be reviewed. In addition, the results suggesting the action of ethylene through different transduction pathways and its interaction with other hormones and signaling substances will be discussed. PMID:26175512

  13. Induction of Nickel Accumulation in Response to Zinc Deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Sho Nishida

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Excessive accumulation of nickel (Ni can be toxic to plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Fe2+ transporter, iron (Fe-regulated transporter1 (IRT1, mediates Fe uptake and also implicates in Ni2+ uptake at roots; however, the underlying mechanism of Ni2+ uptake and accumulation remains unelucidated. In the present study, we found that zinc (Zn deficient conditions resulted in increased accumulation of Ni in plants, particularly in roots, in A. thaliana. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of Ni uptake correlating zinc condition, we traced 63Ni isotope in response to Zn and found that (i Zn deficiency induces short-term Ni2+ absorption and (ii Zn2+ inhibits Ni2+ uptake, suggesting competitive uptake between Ni and Zn. Furthermore, the Zrt/Irt-like protein 3 (ZIP3-defective mutant with an elevated Zn-deficient response exhibited higher Ni accumulation than the wild type, further supporting that the response to Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation. Previously, expression profile study demonstrated that IRT1 expression is not inducible by Zn deficiency. In the present study, we found increased Ni accumulation in IRT1-null mutant under Zn deficiency in agar culture. These suggest that Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation in an IRT1-independen manner. The present study revealed that Ni accumulation is inducible in response to Zn deficiency, which may be attributable to a Zn uptake transporter induced by Zn deficiency.

  14. Induction of Nickel Accumulation in Response to Zinc Deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Sho; Kato, Aki; Tsuzuki, Chisato; Yoshida, Junko; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of nickel (Ni) can be toxic to plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Fe2+ transporter, iron (Fe)-regulated transporter1 (IRT1), mediates Fe uptake and also implicates in Ni2+ uptake at roots; however, the underlying mechanism of Ni2+ uptake and accumulation remains unelucidated. In the present study, we found that zinc (Zn) deficient conditions resulted in increased accumulation of Ni in plants, particularly in roots, in A. thaliana. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of Ni uptake correlating zinc condition, we traced 63Ni isotope in response to Zn and found that (i) Zn deficiency induces short-term Ni2+ absorption and (ii) Zn2+ inhibits Ni2+ uptake, suggesting competitive uptake between Ni and Zn. Furthermore, the Zrt/Irt-like protein 3 (ZIP3)-defective mutant with an elevated Zn-deficient response exhibited higher Ni accumulation than the wild type, further supporting that the response to Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation. Previously, expression profile study demonstrated that IRT1 expression is not inducible by Zn deficiency. In the present study, we found increased Ni accumulation in IRT1-null mutant under Zn deficiency in agar culture. These suggest that Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation in an IRT1-independen manner. The present study revealed that Ni accumulation is inducible in response to Zn deficiency, which may be attributable to a Zn uptake transporter induced by Zn deficiency. PMID:25923075

  15. Heavy Metals Induce Iron Deficiency Responses at Different Hierarchic and Regulatory Levels1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In plants, the excess of several heavy metals mimics iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis, indicating a disturbance in Fe homeostasis. To examine the level at which heavy metals interfere with Fe deficiency responses, we carried out an in-depth characterization of Fe-related physiological, regulatory, and morphological responses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to heavy metals. Enhanced zinc (Zn) uptake closely mimicked Fe deficiency by leading to low chlorophyll but high ferric-chelate reductase activity and coumarin release. These responses were not caused by Zn-inhibited Fe uptake via IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER (IRT1). Instead, Zn simulated the transcriptional response of typical Fe-regulated genes, indicating that Zn affects Fe homeostasis at the level of Fe sensing. Excess supplies of cobalt and nickel altered root traits in a different way from Fe deficiency, inducing only transient Fe deficiency responses, which were characterized by a lack of induction of the ethylene pathway. Cadmium showed a rather inconsistent influence on Fe deficiency responses at multiple levels. By contrast, manganese evoked weak Fe deficiency responses in wild-type plants but strongly exacerbated chlorosis in irt1 plants, indicating that manganese antagonized Fe mainly at the level of transport. These results show that the investigated heavy metals modulate Fe deficiency responses at different hierarchic and regulatory levels and that the interaction of metals with physiological and morphological Fe deficiency responses is uncoupled. Thus, this study not only emphasizes the importance of assessing heavy metal toxicities at multiple levels but also provides a new perspective on how Fe deficiency contributes to the toxic action of individual heavy metals. PMID:28500270

  16. Response to parenteral iron therapy distinguish unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia from iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, M; Sarbay, H; Guler, S; Balci, Y I; Polat, A

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated that response to parenteral iron therapy could be helpful in distinguishing the types of iron deficiency anemia. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy of 15 children with unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia (URIDA). We compared the results at diagnosis, 6 weeks and 6 months after the therapy. Results were compared with responses of 11 patients' results with iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) from our previous study. Six weeks after the start of treatment, ferritin, MCV, MCH and Hb values were in normal range in 10 patients. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 2.6-3.5 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. In five patients, Hb, MCH, and MCV mean (range) values [11.2 g/dL (11-12.2), 24.5 pg (24-25.6), and 67 fL (65-70)] were nearly normal but ferritin mean (range) values [9.8 ng/mL (8-11)] were below normal. Six weeks after the start of treatment, Hb, MCH, MCV and ferritin values of patients with IRIDA were increased. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 0.8-2.7 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. IRIDA is only partially responsive to parenteral iron supplementation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the response to intravenous iron therapy for the URIDA cases improved blood parameters more effectively than hereditary IRIDA. Response to parenteral iron therapy would be helpful to distinguish unexplained refractory IDA from hereditary IRIDA for clinicians who do not have access to hepcidin or TMPRS6 mutation analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Responses to Deficiencies and Suggestions, AIHA Site Assessment July 12-14, 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Jack T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Harding, Ruth N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-11

    These are the responses to the deficiencies and suggestions found during the American Industrial Hygiene Association external site assessment carried out July 12-14, 2016 in the Analytical Services and Instrumentation Division Analytical Laboratory.

  18. DEFICIENCY OF INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST RESPONSIVE TO ANAKINRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHNELLBACHER, CHARLOTTE; CIOCCA, GIOVANNA; MENENDEZ, ROXANNA; AKSENTIJEVICH, IVONA; GOLDBACH-MANSKY, RAPHAELA; DUARTE, ANAM.; RIVAS-CHACON, RAFAEL

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 3-month-old infant who presented to our institution with interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist deficiency (DIRA), which consists of neutrophilic pustular dermatosis, periostitis, aseptic multifocal osteomyelitis, and persistently high acutephase reactants. Skin findings promptly improved upon initiation of treatment with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), and the bony lesions and systemic inflammation resolved with continued therapy. PMID:22471702

  19. IgG subclass distribution of autoantibodies differs between renal and extra-renal relapses in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, M.; Dijstelbloem, H. M.; Oost, W. W.; Bootsma, H.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Aten, J.; Limburg, P. C.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Background. IgG subclasses of autoantibodies differ in their potential to induce an inflammatory response as they interact differentially with complement and Fcgamma receptors. Methods. The IgG subclass distribution of anti-nucleohistone and anti-dsDNA antibodies was analysed longitudinally in

  20. Evaluation of cysticercus-specific IgG (total and subclasses and IgE antibody responses in cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with neurocysticercosis showing intrathecal production of specific IgG antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisandra Akemi Suzuki

    Full Text Available In the present study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA standardized with vesicular fluid of Taenia solium cysticerci was used to screen for IgG (total and subclasses and IgE antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from patients with neurocysticercosis showing intrathecal production of specific IgG antibodies and patients with other neurological disorders. The following results were obtained: IgG-ELISA: 100% sensitivity (median of the ELISA absorbances (MEA=1.17 and 100% specificity; IgG1-ELISA: 72.7% sensitivity (MEA=0.49 and 100% specificity; IgG2-ELISA: 81.8% sensitivity (MEA=0.46 and 100% specificity; IgG3-ELISA: 63.6% sensitivity (MEA=0.12 and 100% specificity; IgG4-ELISA: 90.9% sensitivity (MEA=0.85 and 100% specificity; IgE-ELISA 93.8% sensitivity (MEA=0.60 and 100% specificity. There were no significant differences between the sensitivities and specificities in the detection of IgG-ELISA and IgE-ELISA, although in CSF samples from patients with neurocysticercosis the MEA of the IgG-ELISA was significantly higher than that of the IgE-ELISA. The sensitivity and MEA values of the IgG4-ELISA were higher than the corresponding values for the other IgG subclasses. Future studies should address the contribution of IgG4 and IgE antibodies to the physiopathology of neurocysticercosis.

  1. JAZ repressors: Possible Involvement in Nutrients Deficiency Response in Rice and Chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit P. Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Jasmonates (JA are well-known phytohormones which play important roles in plant development and defence against pathogens. Jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ proteins are plant-specific proteins and act as transcriptional repressors of JA-responsive genes. JA regulates both biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants; however, its role in nutrient deficiency responses is very elusive. Although, JA is well-known for root growth inhibition, little is known about behaviour of JAZ genes in response to nutrient deficiencies, under which root architectural alteration is an important adaptation. Using protein sequence homology and a conserved-domains approach, here we identify ten novel JAZ genes from the recently sequenced Chickpea genome, which is one of the most nutrient efficient crops. Both rice and chickpea JAZ genes express in tissue- and stimuli-specific manners. Many of which are preferentially expressed in root. Our analysis further showed differential expression of JAZ genes under macro (NPK and micronutrients (Zn, Fe deficiency in rice and chickpea roots. While both rice and chickpea JAZ genes showed a certain level of specificity towards type of nutrient deficiency, generally majority of them showed induction under K deficiency. Generally, JAZ genes showed an induction at early stages of stress and expression declined at later stages of macro-nutrient deficiency. Our results suggest that JAZ genes might play a role in early nutrient deficiency response both in monocot and dicot roots, and information generated here can be further used for understanding the possible roles of JA in root architectural alterations for nutrient deficiency adaptations

  2. Infectious diseases and immunological responses in adult subjects with lifetime untreated, congenital GH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Viviane C; Barrios, Mônica R; Salvatori, Roberto; de Almeida, Roque Pacheco; de Melo, Enaldo V; Nascimento, Ana C S; de Jesus, Amélia Ribeiro; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H

    2016-10-01

    Growth hormone is important for the development and function of the immune system, but there is controversy on whether growth hormone deficiency is associated to immune disorders. A model of isolated growth hormone deficiency may clarify if the lack of growth hormone is associated with increased susceptibility to infections, or with an altered responsiveness of the immune system. We have studied the frequency of infectious diseases and the immune function in adults with congenital, untreated isolated growth hormone deficiency. In a cross-sectional study, 35 adults with isolated growth hormone deficiency due to a homozygous mutation in the growth hormone releasing hormone receptor gene and 31 controls were submitted to a clinical questionnaire, physical examination serology for tripanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, HIV, tetanus, hepatitis B and C, and serum total immunoglobulin G, M, E and A measurement. The immune response was evaluated in a subset of these subjects by skin tests and response to vaccination for hepatitis B, tetanus, and bacillus Calmette-Guérin. There was no difference between the groups in history of infectious diseases and baseline serology. Isolated growth hormone deficiency subjects had lower total IgG, but within normal range. There was no difference in the response to any of the vaccinations or in the positivity to protein Purified Derived, streptokinase or candidin. Adult untreated isolated growth hormone deficiency does not cause an increased frequency of infectious diseases, and does not alter serologic tests, but is associated with lower total IgG levels, without detectable clinical impact.

  3. Medicago truncatula ecotypes A17 and R108 differed in their response to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gen; Wang, Baolan; Tian, Qiuying; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2014-05-01

    Medicago truncatula Gaertn is a model legume species with a wide genetic diversity. To evaluate the responses of the two M. truncatula ecotypes, the effect of Fe deficiency on ecotype A17 and ecotype R108, which have been widely used in physiological and molecular studies, was investigated. A greater reduction in shoot Fe concentration of R108 plants than that of A17 plants was observed under Fe-deficient conditions. Exposure to Fe-deficient medium led to a greater increase in ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity in roots of A17 than those of R108 plants, while expression of genes encoding FCR in roots of A17 and R108 plants was similarly up-regulated by Fe deficiency. Exposure of A17 plants to Fe-deficient medium evoked an ethylene evolution from roots, while the same treatment had no effect on ethylene evolution from R108 roots. There was a significant increase in expression of MtIRT encoding a Fe transporter in A17, but not in R108 plants, upon exposure to Fe-deficient medium. Transcripts of MtFRD3 that is responsible for loading of iron chelator citrate into xylem were up-regulated by Fe deficiency in A17, but not in R108 plants. These results suggest that M. truncatula ecotypes A17 and R108 differed in their response and adaptation to Fe deficiency, and that ethylene may play an important role in regulation of greater tolerance of A17 plant to Fe deficiency. These findings provide important clues for further elucidation of molecular mechanism by which legume plants respond and adapt to low soil Fe availability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Iron-responsive olfactory uptake of manganese improves motor function deficits associated with iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghan Kim

    Full Text Available Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl(2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl(2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT and dopamine receptor D(1 (D1R levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D(2 (D2R levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed "rescue response" with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status.

  5. Using constellation pharmacology to define comprehensively a somatosensory neuronal subclass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Russell W; Memon, Tosifa; Aman, Joseph W; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2014-02-11

    Change is intrinsic to nervous systems; change is required for learning and conditioning and occurs with disease progression, normal development, and aging. To better understand mammalian nervous systems and effectively treat nervous-system disorders, it is essential to track changes in relevant individual neurons. A critical challenge is to identify and characterize the specific cell types involved and the molecular-level changes that occur in each. Using an experimental strategy called constellation pharmacology, we demonstrate that we can define a specific somatosensory neuronal subclass, cold thermosensors, across different species and track changes in these neurons as a function of development. Cold thermosensors are uniformly responsive to menthol and innocuous cool temperature (17 °C), indicating that they express TRPM8 channels. A subset of cold thermosensors expressed α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) but not other nAChR subtypes. Differences in temperature threshold of cold thermosensors correlated with functional expression of voltage-gated K channels Kv1.1/1.2: Relatively higher expression of KV1.1/1.2 channels resulted in a higher threshold response to cold temperature. Other signaling components varied during development and between species. In cold thermosensors of neonatal mice and rats, ATP receptors were functionally expressed, but the expression disappeared with development. This developmental change occurred earlier in low-threshold than high-threshold cold thermosensors. Most rat cold thermosensors expressed TRPA1 channels, whereas mouse cold thermosensors did not. The broad implications of this study are that it is now feasible to track changes in receptor and ion-channel expression in individual neuronal subclasses as a function of development, learning, disease, or aging.

  6. Coefficient estimates for certain subclass of bi-univalent functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Rashidah; Halim, Suzeini Abdul; Janteng, Aini

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a subclass of bi-univalent functions is introduced using subordination. Estimates on the initial coefficients and the Fekete-Szegö inequality are determined for functions in this subclass. The results would generalize the previous related works of several earlier authors.

  7. Iron-Responsive Olfactory Uptake of Manganese Improves Motor Function Deficits Associated with Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonghan; Li, Yuan; Buckett, Peter D.; Böhlke, Mark; Thompson, Khristy J.; Takahashi, Masaya; Maher, Timothy J.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D2 (D2R) levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed “rescue response” with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status. PMID:22479410

  8. Deficient IgA and IgG2 anti-pneumococcal antibody levels and response to vaccination in otitis prone children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhooge, IJ; van Kempen, MJP; Sanders, LAM; Rijkers, GT

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the isotype and IgG subclass distribution of anti-pneumococcal antibodies and response to polysaccharide vaccination in otitis prone children. Methods: IgG1, IgG2 and IgA antibodies to pneumococcal serotypes 3, 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 19F and 23F were determined in otitis prone

  9. Behavioral responses and fluid regulation in male rats after combined dietary sodium deficiency and water deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Kimberly J; Curtis, Kathleen S

    2018-02-01

    Most investigators use a single treatment such as water deprivation or dietary sodium deficiency to evaluate thirst or sodium appetite, which underlie behavioral responses to body fluid challenges. The goal of the present experiments was to assess the effects of combined treatments in driving behaviors. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of combined overnight water deprivation and dietary sodium deficiency on water intake and salt intake by adult male rats in 2-bottle (0.5M NaCl and water) tests. Overnight water deprivation alone increased water intake, and 10days of dietary sodium deficiency increased 0.5M NaCl intake, with a secondary increase in water intake. During combined water deprivation and dietary sodium deficiency, water intake was enhanced and 0.5M NaCl was reduced, but not eliminated, suggesting that physiologically relevant behavioral responses persist. Nonetheless, the pattern of fluid intake was altered by the combined treatments. We also assessed the effect of these behaviors on induced deficits in body sodium and fluid volume during combined treatments and found that, regardless of treatment, fluid ingestion partially repleted the induced deficits. Finally, we examined urine volume and sodium excretion during dietary sodium deficiency with or without overnight water deprivation and found that, whether or not rats were water deprived, and regardless of water consumption, sodium excretion was minimal. Thus, the combination of water deprivation and dietary sodium deficiency appears to arouse drives that stimulate compensatory behavioral responses. These behaviors, in conjunction with physiological adaptations to the treatments, underlie body sodium and volume repletion in the face of combined water deprivation and dietary sodium deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 5-Lipoxygenase deficiency impairs innate and adaptive immune responses during fungal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Secatto

    Full Text Available 5-Lipoxygenase-derived products have been implicated in both the inhibition and promotion of chronic infection. Here, we sought to investigate the roles of endogenous 5-lipoxygenase products and exogenous leukotrienes during Histoplasma capsulatum infection in vivo and in vitro. 5-LO deficiency led to increased lung CFU, decreased nitric oxide production and a deficient primary immune response during active fungal infection. Moreover, H. capsulatum-infected 5-LO(-/- mice showed an intense influx of neutrophils and an impaired ability to generate and recruit effector T cells to the lung. The fungal susceptibility of 5-LO(-/- mice correlated with a lower rate of macrophage ingestion of IgG-H. capsulatum relative to WT macrophages. Conversely, exogenous LTB4 and LTC4 restored macrophage phagocytosis in 5-LO deficient mice. Our results demonstrate that leukotrienes are required to control chronic fungal infection by amplifying both the innate and adaptive immune response during histoplasmosis.

  11. Transient impairment of the adaptive response to fasting in FXR-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cariou, B; van Harmelen, K; Duran-Sandoval, D; van Dijk, T; Grefhorst, A; Bouchaert, E; Fruchart, JC; Gonzalez, FJ; Kuipers, F; Staels, B

    2005-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) has been suggested to play a role in gluconeogenesis. To determine whether FXR modulates the response to fasting in vivo, FXR-deficient (FXR-/-) and wild-type mice were submitted to fasting for 48 h. Our results demonstrate that FXR modulates the kinetics of

  12. Epithelial CaSR Deficiency Alters Intestinal Integrity and Promotes Proinflammatory Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Sam X.; Lightfoot, Yaíma L.; Yang, Tao; Zadeh, Mojgan; Tang, Lieqi; Sahay, Bikash; Wang, Gary P.; Owen, Jennifer L.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is equipped with sensing receptor mechanisms that interact with luminal microorganisms and nutrients to regulate barrier function and gut immune responses, thereby maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Herein, we clarify the role of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) using intestinal epithelium-specific Casr−/− mice. Epithelial CaSR deficiency diminished intestinal barrier function, altered microbiota composition, and skewed immune responses towards proi...

  13. Deficient induction response in a Xenopus nucleocytoplasmic hybrid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Narbonne

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Incompatibilities between the nucleus and the cytoplasm of sufficiently distant species result in developmental arrest of hybrid and nucleocytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid embryos. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain their lethality, including problems in embryonic genome activation (EGA and/or nucleo-mitochondrial interactions. However, conclusive identification of the causes underlying developmental defects of cybrid embryos is still lacking. We show here that while over 80% of both Xenopus laevis and Xenopus (Silurana tropicalis same-species androgenetic haploids develop to the swimming tadpole stage, the androgenetic cybrids formed by the combination of X. laevis egg cytoplasm and X. tropicalis sperm nucleus invariably fail to gastrulate properly and never reach the swimming tadpole stage. In spite of this arrest, these cybrids show quantitatively normal EGA and energy levels at the stage where their initial gastrulation defects are manifested. The nucleocytoplasmic incompatibility between these two species instead results from a combination of factors, including a reduced emission of induction signal from the vegetal half, a decreased sensitivity of animal cells to induction signals, and differences in a key embryonic protein (Xbra concentration between the two species, together leading to inefficient induction and defective convergence-extension during gastrulation. Indeed, increased exposure to induction signals and/or Xbra signalling partially rescues the induction response in animal explants and whole cybrid embryos. Altogether, our study demonstrates that the egg cytoplasm of one species may not support the development promoted by the nucleus of another species, even if this nucleus does not interfere with the cytoplasmic/maternal functions of the egg, while the egg cytoplasm is also capable of activating the genome of that nucleus. Instead, our results provide evidence that inefficient signalling and differences in the

  14. Transcriptional responses of Medicago truncatula upon sulfur deficiency stress and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eWipf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur plays an essential role in plants’ growth and development and in their response to various abiotic and biotic stresses despite its leachability and its very low abundance in the only form that plant roots can uptake (sulfate. It is part of amino acids, glutathione (GSH, thiols of proteins and peptides, membrane sulfolipids, cell walls and secondary products, so reduced availability can drastically alter plant growth and development. The nutritional benefits of symbiotic interactions can help the plant in case of S deficiency. In particular the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM interaction improves N, P and S plant nutrition, but the mechanisms behind these exchanges are not fully known yet. Although the transcriptional changes in the leguminous model plant Medicago truncatula have been already assessed in several biotic and/or abiotic conditions, S deficiency has not been considered so far. The aim of this work is to get a first overview on S-deficiency responses in the leaf and root tissues of plants interacting with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis.Several hundred genes displayed significantly different transcript accumulation levels. Annotation and GO ID association were used to identify biological processes and molecular functions affected by sulfur starvation. Beside the beneficial effects of AM interaction, plants were greatly affected by the nutritional status, showing various differences in their transcriptomic footprints. Several pathways in which S plays an important role appeared to be differentially affected according to mycorrhizal status, with a generally reduced responsiveness to S deficiency in mycorrhized plants.

  15. Emerging Trends in Epigenetic Regulation of Nutrient Deficiency Response in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Gunjan; Pandey, Bipin K; Deveshwar, Priyanka; Giri, Jitender

    2016-03-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli largely affect the ionic balance of soil, which have a direct effect on growth and crop yield. Details are fast emerging on the genetic/molecular regulators, at whole-genome levels, of plant responses to mineral deficiencies in model and crop plants. These genetic regulators determine the root architecture and physiological adaptations for better uptake and utilization of minerals from soil. Recent evidence also shows the potential roles of epigenetic mechanisms in gene regulation, driven by minerals imbalance. Mineral deficiency or sufficiency leads to developmental plasticity in plants for adaptation, which is preceded by a change in the pattern of gene expression. Notably, such changes at molecular levels are also influenced by altered chromatin structure and methylation patterns, or involvement of other epigenetic components. Interestingly, many of the changes induced by mineral deficiency are also inheritable in the form of epigenetic memory. Unravelling these mechanisms in response to mineral deficiency would further advance our understanding of this complex plant response. Further studies on such approaches may serve as an exciting interaction model of epigenetic and genetic regulations of mineral homeostasis in plants and designing strategies for crop improvement.

  16. Response of Indian growth hormone deficient children to growth hormone therapy: association with pituitary size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadilkar, Vaman V; Prasad, Hemchand Krishna; Ekbote, Veena H; Rustagi, Vaishakhi T; Singh, Joshita; Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Khadilkar, Anuradha V

    2015-05-01

    To ascertain the impact of pituitary size as judged by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), on response to Growth Hormone (GH) therapy in GH deficient children. Thirty nine children (9.1 ± 2.7 y, 22 boys) with non-acquired GH deficiency (21 Isolated GH deficiency and 18 Combined pituitary hormone deficiency) were consecutively recruited and followed up for one year. Clinical, radiological (bone age and MRI) and biochemical parameters were studied. Children with hypoplastic pituitary (pituitary height children with normal pituitary heights (p children with hypoplastic pituitaries (13.8 ± 3.6 and 28.7 % vs. 11.2 ± 4.1 and 21.4 %). Significant co-relation was observed between pituitary height and height for age Z-scores at baseline (r = 0.39, p children with hypoplastic pituitary when compared to an increase from 145.8 to 153.5 cm observed in children with normal pituitary height (p growth hormone deficient children with hypoplastic pituitary respond better to therapy with GH in short term.

  17. Perinatal thiamine deficiency-induced spontaneous abortion and pup-killing responses in rat dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bâ, Abdoulaye

    2013-03-01

    The current study attempts to determine whether thiamine (B1 vitamin) deficiency and chronic alcohol-related thiamine-deficient (TD) status, disturb maternal behavior towards pups. During gestation and lactation, Wistar rat dams were exposed to the following treatments: (i) prenatal TD dams; (ii) perinatal TD dams; (iii) postnatal TD dams; (iv) 12% alcohol/water drinking mothers; (v) ad libitum control dams. Pair-feeding treatments controlled malnutrition related to thiamine deficiency; (vi) prenatal pair-fed (PF) dams; (vii) perinatal PF dams; (viii) postnatal PF dams and included also the control of alcohol consummation: (ix) PF saccharose dams. Dams were observed for gestation outcome and for apparent disorders of the maternal behavior related to the pups at parturition. From the nine experimental groups studied, only pre- and perinatal TD dams exhibited spontaneous abortion (33.36 and 41.66%, respectively) followed by pups-killing responses where, respectively, 4 dams/7 (57.14%) and 5 dams/7 (71.43%) showed disruption of maternal behavior and appearance of cannibalism towards pups which all were killed within 48 hours after parturition. Spontaneous abortion and pup-killing responses were not observed in the dams of any other experimental group, suggesting that perinatal disturbances of hormonal factors underlay these maternal disorders. Previous studies reported that thiamine deficiency-induced degeneration of dopamine neurons may be related to mouse-killing aggression in rats. The present study suggests that perinatal thiamine deficiency-induced alteration of dopaminergic neurons in maternal brain could be a trigger factor of pup-killing responses. Central dopamine and oxytocin have been strongly associated with both the onset and maintenance of maternal behavior and the regulation of maternal aggressiveness as well. Our studies suggest that estrogen control oxytocin levels in brain structures of pregnancy-terminated rats via dopamine transmission. Thiamine

  18. Genome-wide microarray analysis of tomato roots showed defined responses to iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamboni Anita

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants react to iron deficiency stress adopting different kind of adaptive responses. Tomato, a Strategy I plant, improves iron uptake through acidification of rhizosphere, reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ and transport of Fe2+ into the cells. Large-scale transcriptional analyses of roots under iron deficiency are only available for a very limited number of plant species with particular emphasis for Arabidopsis thaliana. Regarding tomato, an interesting model species for Strategy I plants and an economically important crop, physiological responses to Fe-deficiency have been thoroughly described and molecular analyses have provided evidence for genes involved in iron uptake mechanisms and their regulation. However, no detailed transcriptome analysis has been described so far. Results A genome-wide transcriptional analysis, performed with a chip that allows to monitor the expression of more than 25,000 tomato transcripts, identified 97 differentially expressed transcripts by comparing roots of Fe-deficient and Fe-sufficient tomato plants. These transcripts are related to the physiological responses of tomato roots to the nutrient stress resulting in an improved iron uptake, including regulatory aspects, translocation, root morphological modification and adaptation in primary metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis and TCA cycle. Other genes play a role in flavonoid biosynthesis and hormonal metabolism. Conclusions The transcriptional characterization confirmed the presence of the previously described mechanisms to adapt to iron starvation in tomato, but also allowed to identify other genes potentially playing a role in this process, thus opening new research perspectives to improve the knowledge on the tomato root response to the nutrient deficiency.

  19. Role of hormones in the induction of iron deficiency responses in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, W; Tittel, J; Schikora, A

    2000-04-01

    In "strategy I" plants, several alterations in root physiology and morphology are induced by Fe deficiency, although the mechanisms by which low Fe levels are translated into reactions aimed at alleviating Fe shortage are largely unknown. To prove whether changes in hormone concentration or sensitivity are involved in the adaptation to suboptimal Fe availability, we tested 45 mutants of Arabidopsis defective in hormone metabolism and/or root hair formation for their ability to increase Fe(III) chelate reductase activity and to initiate the formation and enlargement of root hairs. Activity staining for ferric chelate reductase revealed that all mutants were responsive to Fe deficiency, suggesting that hormones are not necessary for the induction. Treatment of wild-type plants with the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid caused the development of root hairs in locations normally occupied by non-hair cells, but did not stimulate ferric reductase activity. Ectopic root hairs were also formed in -Fe roots, suggesting a role for ethylene in the morphological responses to Fe deficiency. Ultrastructural analysis of rhizodermal cells indicated that neither Fe deficiency nor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid treatment caused transfer-cell-like alterations in Arabidopsis roots. Our data indicate that the morphological and physiological components of the Fe stress syndrome are regulated separately.

  20. Proteomic analyses provide new insights into the responses of Pinus massoniana seedlings to phosphorus deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fuhua; Ding, Guijie; Wen, Xiaopeng

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Plants can respond defensively to phosphorus deficiency by modifying their morphology and metabolic pathways via the differential expression of low phosphate responsive genes. To better understand the mechanisms by which the Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) adapts to phosphorus deficiency, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis using an elite line exhibiting high tolerance to phosphorus deficiency. The selected seedlings were treated with 0.5 mM KH2PO4 (control), 0.01 mM KH2PO4 (P1), or 0.06 mM KH2PO4 (P2) for 48 days. Total protein samples were separated via 2DE. A total of 98 differentially expressed proteins, which displayed at least 1.7-fold change expression compared to the control levels (p ≤ 0.05), were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. These phosphate starvation responsive proteins were implicated in photosynthesis, defense, cellular organization, biosynthesis, energy metabolism, secondary metabolism, signal transduction etc. Therefore, these proteins might play important roles in facilitating internal phosphorus homeostasis. Additionally, the obtained data may be useful for the further characterization of gene function and may provide a foundation for a more comprehensive understanding of the adaptations of the Masson pine to phosphorus-deficient conditions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Regulatory roles of cytokinins and cytokinin signaling in response to potassium deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Jeong Nam

    Full Text Available Potassium (K is an important plant macronutrient that has various functions throughout the whole plant over its entire life span. Cytokinins (CKs are known to regulate macronutrient homeostasis by controlling the expression of nitrate, phosphate and sulfate transporters. Although several studies have described how CKs signal deficiencies for some macronutrients, the roles of CKs in K signaling are poorly understood. CK content has been shown to decrease under K-starved conditions. Specifically, a CK-deficient mutant was more tolerant to low K than wild-type; however, a plant with an overaccumulation of CKs was more sensitive to low K. These results suggest that K deprivation alters CK metabolism, leading to a decrease in CK content. To investigate this phenomenon further, several Arabidopsis lines, including a CK-deficient mutant and CK receptor mutants, were analyzed in low K conditions using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches. ROS accumulation and root hair growth in low K were also influenced by CKs. CK receptor mutants lost the responsiveness to K-deficient signaling, including ROS accumulation and root hair growth, but the CK-deficient mutant accumulated more ROS and exhibited up-regulated expression of HAK5, which is a high-affinity K uptake transporter gene that is rapidly induced by low K stress in ROS- and ethylene-dependent manner in response to low K. From these results, we conclude that a reduction in CK levels subsequently allows fast and effective stimulation of low K-induced ROS accumulation, root hair growth and HAK5 expression, leading to plant adaptation to low K conditions.

  2. Regulatory roles of cytokinins and cytokinin signaling in response to potassium deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Youn-Jeong; Tran, Lam-Son Phan; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Rie; Shin, Ryoung

    2012-01-01

    Potassium (K) is an important plant macronutrient that has various functions throughout the whole plant over its entire life span. Cytokinins (CKs) are known to regulate macronutrient homeostasis by controlling the expression of nitrate, phosphate and sulfate transporters. Although several studies have described how CKs signal deficiencies for some macronutrients, the roles of CKs in K signaling are poorly understood. CK content has been shown to decrease under K-starved conditions. Specifically, a CK-deficient mutant was more tolerant to low K than wild-type; however, a plant with an overaccumulation of CKs was more sensitive to low K. These results suggest that K deprivation alters CK metabolism, leading to a decrease in CK content. To investigate this phenomenon further, several Arabidopsis lines, including a CK-deficient mutant and CK receptor mutants, were analyzed in low K conditions using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches. ROS accumulation and root hair growth in low K were also influenced by CKs. CK receptor mutants lost the responsiveness to K-deficient signaling, including ROS accumulation and root hair growth, but the CK-deficient mutant accumulated more ROS and exhibited up-regulated expression of HAK5, which is a high-affinity K uptake transporter gene that is rapidly induced by low K stress in ROS- and ethylene-dependent manner in response to low K. From these results, we conclude that a reduction in CK levels subsequently allows fast and effective stimulation of low K-induced ROS accumulation, root hair growth and HAK5 expression, leading to plant adaptation to low K conditions.

  3. Differential Transcriptional Response in Macrophages Infected with Cell Wall Deficient versus Normal Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yu-Rong; Gao, Kun-Shan; Ji, Rui; Yi, Zheng-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions determine the outcome following infection by mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Under adverse circumstances, normal Mtb can form cell-wall deficient (CWD) variants within macrophages, which have been considered an adaptive strategy for facilitating bacterial survival inside macrophages. However, the molecular mechanism by which infection of macrophages with different phenotypic Mtb elicits distinct responses of macrophages is not fully understood. To explore the mole...

  4. Vitamin D Deficiency Reduces the Immune Response, Phagocytosis Rate, and Intracellular Killing Rate of Microglial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Marie Luise; Schütze, Sandra; Redlich, Sandra; Götz, Alexander; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Bertsch, Thomas; Ribes, Sandra; Hanenberg, Andrea; Schneider, Simon; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Sieber, Cornel; Nau, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Meningitis and meningoencephalitis caused by Escherichia coli are associated with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. A high prevalence of neurological disorders has been observed in geriatric populations at risk of hypovitaminosis D. Vitamin D has potent effects on human immunity, including induction of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and suppression of T-cell proliferation, but its influence on microglial cells is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of vitamin D deficiency on the phagocytosis rate, intracellular killing, and immune response of murine microglial cultures after stimulation with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl-cysteine (TLR1/2), poly(I·C) (TLR3), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4), and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (TLR9). Upon stimulation with high concentrations of TLR agonists, the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was decreased in vitamin D-deficient compared to that in vitamin D-sufficient microglial cultures. Phagocytosis of E. coli K1 after stimulation of microglial cells with high concentrations of TLR3, -4, and -9 agonists and intracellular killing of E. coli K1 after stimulation with high concentrations of all TLR agonists were lower in vitamin D-deficient microglial cells than in the respective control cells. Our observations suggest that vitamin D deficiency may impair the resistance of the brain against bacterial infections. PMID:24686054

  5. Zinc or copper deficiency-induced impaired inflammatory response to brain trauma may be caused by the concomitant metallothionein changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Giralt, M.; Thomsen, Pernille Sjølin

    2001-01-01

    The role of zinc- and copper-deficient diets on the inflammatory response to traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been evaluated in adult rats. As expected, zinc deficiency decreased food intake and body weight gain, and the latter effect was higher than that observed in pair-fed rats. In noninjured ...

  6. Objective Evaluation of Subclass Characteristics on Breech Face Marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Fabiano; Hermsen, Rob; Mattijssen, Erwin; Pieper, Pascal; Champod, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    Subclass characteristics can be found on the breech face marks left on spent cartridge cases. Even if they are assumed to be rare and their reported number is small, they can potentially lead to false associations. Subclass characteristics have been studied empirically allowing examiners to recognize them and to understand in which conditions they are produced. Until now, however, their influence on the identification process has not been studied from a probabilistic point of view. In this study, we aim at measuring the effect of these features on the strength of association derived from examinations involving subclass characteristics. The study takes advantage of a 3D automatic comparison system allowing the calculation of likelihood ratios (LRs). The similarities between cartridge case specimens fired by thirteen S&W .40S&W Sigma pistols are quantified, and their respective LRs are computed. The results show that the influence of subclass characteristics on the LRs is limited, even when these features are prevalent among the potential sources considered in a case. We show that the proportion of firearms sharing subclass characteristics should be larger than 40% of the pool of potential firearms for the effect to be significant. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Comparative transcript profiling of maize inbreds in response to long-term phosphorus deficiency stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanling; Mu, Chunhua; Chen, Yu; Kong, Xiangpei; Xu, Yuanchao; Zheng, Hongxia; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Qingcheng; Xue, Yanfang; Li, Zongxin; Ding, Zhaojun; Liu, Xia

    2016-12-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is an important food and energy crop, and low phosphate (Pi) availability is one of the major constraints in maize production worldwide. Plants adapt suitably to acclimate to low Pi stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of Pi deficiency response is still unclear. In this study, comparative transcriptomic analyses were conducted to investigate the differences of transcriptional responses in two maize genotypes with different tolerances to low phosphorus (LP) stress. LP-tolerant genotype QXN233 maintained higher P and Pi levels in shoots than LP-sensitive genotype QXH0121 suffering from Pi deficiency at seedling stage. Moreover, the transcriptomic analysis identified a total of 1391 Pi-responsive genes differentially expressed between QXN233 and QXH0121 under LP stress. Among these genes, 468 (321 up- and 147 down-regulated) were identified in leaves, and 923 (626 up- and 297 down-regulated) were identified in roots. These Pi-responsive genes were involved in various metabolic pathways, the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, ion transport, phytohormone regulation, and other adverse stress responses. Consistent with the differential tolerance to LP stress, five maize inorganic Pi transporter genes were more highly up-regulated in QXN233 than in QXH0121. Results provide important information to further study the changes in global gene expression between LP-tolerant and LP-sensitive maize genotypes and to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying maize's long-term response to Pi deficiency. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  8. Strongly compromised inflammatory response to brain injury in interleukin-6-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Moos, T; Carrasco, J

    1999-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) elicits an inflammatory response involving activation of microglia, brain macrophages, and astrocytes, processes likely mediated by the release of proinflammatory cytokines. In order to determine the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) during the inflammatory...... response in the brain following disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we examined the effects of a focal cryo injury to the fronto-parietal cortex in interleukin-6-deficient (IL-6-/-) and normal (IL-6+/+) mice. In IL-6+/+ mice, brain injury resulted in the appearance of brain macrophages...

  9. Epithelial CaSR Deficiency Alters Intestinal Integrity and Promotes Proinflammatory Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sam X.; Lightfoot, Yaíma L.; Yang, Tao; Zadeh, Mojgan; Tang, Lieqi; Sahay, Bikash; Wang, Gary P.; Owen, Jennifer L.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is equipped with sensing receptor mechanisms that interact with luminal microorganisms and nutrients to regulate barrier function and gut immune responses, thereby maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Herein, we clarify the role of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) using intestinal epithelium-specific Casr−/− mice. Epithelial CaSR deficiency diminished intestinal barrier function, altered microbiota composition, and skewed immune responses towards proinflammatory. Consequently, Casr−/− mice were significantly more prone to chemically induced intestinal inflammation resulting in colitis. Accordingly, CaSR represents a potential therapeutic target for autoinflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:24842610

  10. Wfs1-deficient mice display altered function of serotonergic system and increased behavioural response to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanel eVisnapuu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene make humans more susceptible to mood disorders. Besides that, mood disorders are associated with alterations in the activity of serotonergic and noradrenergic systems. Therefore, in this study, the effects of imipramine, an inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT and noradrenaline (NA reuptake, and paroxetine, a selective inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, were studied in tests of behavioural despair. The tail suspension test (TST and forced swimming test (FST were performed in Wfs1-deficient mice. Simultaneously, gene expression and monoamine metabolism studies were conducted to evaluate changes in 5-HT- and NA-ergic systems of Wfs1-deficient mice. The basal immobility time of Wfs1-deficient mice in TST and FST did not differ from that of their wild-type littermates. However, a significant reduction of immobility time in response to lower doses of imipramine and paroxetine was observed in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice, but not in their wild-type littermates. In gene expression studies, the levels of 5-HT transporter (SERT were significantly reduced in the pons of homozygous animals. Monoamine metabolism was assayed separately in the dorsal and ventral striatum of naive mice and mice exposed for 30 minutes tobrightly lit motility boxes. We found that this aversive challenge caused a significant increase in the levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, a metabolite of 5-HT, in the ventral and dorsal striatum of wild-type mice, but not in their homozygous littermates. Taken together, the blunted 5-HT metabolism and reduced levels of SERT are a likely reason for the elevated sensitivity of these mice to the action of imipramine and paroxetine. These changes in the pharmacological and neurochemical phenotype of Wfs1-deficient mice may help to explain the increased susceptibility of Wolfram syndrome patients to depressive states.

  11. Reinforcement and Stimulant Medication Ameliorate Deficient Response Inhibition in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, Keri S; Fosco, Whitney D; Pelham, William E; Waxmonsky, James G; Bubnik, Michelle G; Hawk, Larry W

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the degree to which reinforcement, stimulant medication, and their combination impact response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Across three studies, participants with ADHD (n = 111, 25 girls) and typically-developing (TD) controls (n = 33, 6 girls) completed a standard version of the stop signal task (SST) and/or a reinforcement-manipulation SST with performance-contingent points. In two of these studies, these tasks were performed under placebo or 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg methylphenidate (MPH) conditions. Cross-study comparisons were conducted to test hypotheses regarding the separate and combined effects of reinforcement and methylphenidate on response inhibition among children with ADHD relative to TD controls. Baseline response inhibition was worse among children with ADHD compared to controls. MPH produced dose-related improvements in response inhibition in children with ADHD; compared to non-medicated TD controls, 0.3 mg/kg MPH normalized deficient response inhibition, and 0.6 mg/kg MPH resulted in better inhibition in children with ADHD. Reinforcement improved response inhibition to a greater extent for children with ADHD than for TD children, normalizing response inhibition. The combination of MPH and reinforcement improved response inhibition among children with ADHD compared to reinforcement alone and MPH alone, also resulting in normalization of response inhibition despite repeated task exposure. Deficient response inhibition commonly observed in children with ADHD is significantly improved with MPH and/or reinforcement, normalizing inhibition relative to TD children tested under standard conditions.

  12. Reinforcement and stimulant medication ameliorate deficient response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, Keri S.; Fosco, Whitney D.; Pelham, William E.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Bubnik, Michelle G.; Hawk, Larry W.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which reinforcement, stimulant medication, and their combination impact response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Across three studies, participants with ADHD (n=111, 25 girls) and typically-developing (TD) controls (n=33, 6 girls) completed a standard version of the stop signal task (SST) and/or a reinforcement-manipulation SST with performance-contingent points. In two of these studies, these tasks were performed under placebo or 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg methylphenidate (MPH) conditions. Cross-study comparisons were conducted to test hypotheses regarding the separate and combined effects of reinforcement and methylphenidate on response inhibition among children with ADHD relative to TD controls. Baseline response inhibition was worse among children with ADHD compared to controls. MPH produced dose-related improvements in response inhibition in children with ADHD; compared to non-medicated TD controls, 0.3 mg/kg MPH normalized deficient response inhibition, and 0.6 mg/kg MPH resulted in better inhibition in children with ADHD. Reinforcement improved response inhibition to a greater extent for children with ADHD than for TD children, normalizing response inhibition. The combination of MPH and reinforcement improved response inhibition among children with ADHD compared to reinforcement alone and MPH alone, also resulting in normalization of response inhibition despite repeated task exposure. Deficient response inhibition commonly observed in children with ADHD is significantly improved with MPH and/or reinforcement, normalizing inhibition relative to TD children tested under standard conditions. PMID:25985978

  13. Evidence for unfolded protein response activation in monocytes from individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2010-04-15

    The hereditary disorder alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and presents with emphysema in young adults and liver disease in childhood. The most common form of AAT deficiency occurs because of the Z mutation, causing the protein to fold aberrantly and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This leads to ER stress and contributes significantly to the liver disease associated with the condition. In addition to hepatocytes, AAT is also synthesized by monocytes, neutrophils, and epithelial cells. In this study we show for the first time that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in quiescent monocytes from ZZ individuals. Activating transcription factor 4, X-box binding protein 1, and a subset of genes involved in the UPR are increased in monocytes from ZZ compared with MM individuals. This contributes to an inflammatory phenotype with ZZ monocytes exhibiting enhanced cytokine production and activation of the NF-kappaB pathway when compared with MM monocytes. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular accumulation of AAT within the ER of ZZ monocytes. These are the first data showing that Z AAT protein accumulation induces UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. These findings change the current paradigm regarding lung inflammation in AAT deficiency, which up until now was derived from the protease-anti-protease hypothesis, but which now must include the exaggerated inflammatory response generated by accumulated aberrantly folded AAT in circulating blood cells.

  14. The adaptive intestinal response to massive enterectomy is preserved in c-SRC-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, R A; Shin, C E; Erwin, C R; Warner, B W

    1999-05-01

    The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases has been implicated in the downstream mitogenic signaling of several ligands including epidermal growth factor (EGF). Because EGF likely plays a role in adaptation after massive small bowel resection (SBR), we tested the hypothesis that c-src is required for this important response. A 50% proximal SBR or sham operation (bowel transection or reanastomosis alone) was performed on c-src-deficient (n = 14) or wild-type (C57bl/6) mice (n = 20). The ileum was harvested on postoperative day 3 and adaptive parameters determined as changes in ileal wet weight, protein and DNA content, proliferation index, villus height, and crypt depth. Comparisons were done using analysis of variance (ANOVA), and a Pvalue less than .05 was considered significant. Values are presented as mean +/- SEM. The activity of c-src was increased in the ileum of wild-type mice after SBR but remained unchanged in c-src-deficient mice. Despite this lack of increase, adaptation occurred after SBR in the c-src-deficient mice as demonstrated by increased ileal wet weight, protein and DNA content, proliferation index, villus height, and crypt depth similar to wild-type mice. The adaptive response of the intestine to massive SBR is preserved despite reduced activity of the c-src protein. The mitogenic signaling that characterizes intestinal adaptation and is associated with receptor activation by EGF or other growth factors probably occurs by mechanisms independent of c-src protein tyrosine kinase.

  15. The effects of exercise on the lipoprotein subclass profile: A meta-analysis of 10 interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzynski, Mark A; Burton, Jeffrey; Rankinen, Tuomo; Blair, Steven N; Church, Timothy S; Després, Jean-Pierre; Hagberg, James M; Landers-Ramos, Rian; Leon, Arthur S; Mikus, Catherine R; Rao, D C; Seip, Richard L; Skinner, James S; Slentz, Cris A; Thompson, Paul D; Wilund, Kenneth R; Kraus, William E; Bouchard, Claude

    2015-12-01

    The goal was to examine lipoprotein subclass responses to regular exercise as measured in 10 exercise interventions derived from six cohorts. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to quantify average particle size, total and subclass concentrations of very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein particles (VLDL-P, LDL-P, and HDL-P, respectively) before and after an exercise intervention in 1555 adults from six studies, encompassing 10 distinct exercise programs: APOE (N = 106), DREW (N = 385), GERS (N = 79), HERITAGE (N = 715), STRRIDE I (N = 168) and II (N = 102). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed to evaluate the overall estimate of mean change across the unadjusted and adjusted mean change values from each exercise group. Meta-analysis of unadjusted data showed that regular exercise induced significant decreases in the concentration of large VLDL-P, small LDL-P, and medium HDL-P and mean VLDL-P size, with significant increases in the concentration of large LDL-P and large HDL-P and mean LDL-P size. These changes remained significant in meta-analysis with adjustment for age, sex, race, baseline body mass index, and baseline trait value. Despite differences in exercise programs and study populations, regular exercise produced putatively beneficial changes in the lipoprotein subclass profile across 10 exercise interventions. Further research is needed to examine how exercise-induced changes in lipoprotein subclasses may be associated with (concomitant changes in) cardiovascular disease risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of exercise on the lipoprotein subclass profile: a meta-analysis of 10 interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzynski, Mark A.; Burton, Jeffrey; Rankinen, Tuomo; Blair, Steven N.; Church, Timothy S.; Després, Jean-Pierre; Hagberg, James M.; Landers-Ramos, Rian; Leon, Arthur S.; Mikus, Catherine R.; Rao, D.C.; Seip, Richard L.; Skinner, James S.; Slentz, Cris A.; Thompson, Paul D.; Wilund, Kenneth R.; Kraus, William E.; Bouchard, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal was to examine lipoprotein subclass responses to regular exercise as measured in 10 exercise interventions derived from six cohorts. Methods Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to quantify average particle size, total and subclass concentrations of very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein particles (VLDL-P, LDL-P, and HDL-P, respectively) before and after an exercise intervention in 1,555 adults from six studies, encompassing 10 distinct exercise programs: APOE (N=106), DREW (N=385), GERS (N=79), HERITAGE (N=715), STRRIDE I (N=168) and II (N=102). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed to evaluate the overall estimate of mean change across the unadjusted and adjusted mean change values from each exercise group. Results Meta-analysis of unadjusted data showed that regular exercise induced significant decreases in the concentration of large VLDL-P, small LDL-P, and medium HDL-P and mean VLDL-P size, with significant increases in the concentration of large LDL-P and large HDL-P and mean LDL-P size. These changes remained significant in meta-analysis with adjustment for age, sex, race, baseline body mass index, and baseline trait value. Conclusions Despite differences in exercise programs and study populations, regular exercise produced putatively beneficial changes in the lipoprotein subclass profile across 10 exercise interventions. Further research is needed to examine how exercise-induced changes in lipoprotein subclasses may be associated with (concomitant changes in) cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26520888

  17. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Deficiency Leads to Hypersensitivity of the Pressor Response Against Angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Norikazu; Kanasaki, Keizo; Kanasaki, Megumi; Takeda, Satoru; Koya, Daisuke

    2017-06-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes 2-hydroxyestradiol into 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME); COMT deficiency has shown to be associated with hypertension in men and preeclampsia, the disease associated with hypersensitivity of pressor response against angiotensin II (Ang II). Here, we found that COMT deficiency could explain the hypersensitivity of pressor response against Ang II in mice because of the lack of 2-ME-dependent suppression of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R). Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to COMT inhibitor (COMTi: 25 mg/kg per day) or oil (control) for 4 weeks, with or without low-dose Ang II infusion (ANGII: 70 ng/kg per minute) for the last 3 weeks. The Ang II-infused mice were treated with 2-ME (10 ng/d) or vehicle for the last 1 week. We obtained the following experimental groups: control, ANGII, COMTi, COMTi+ANGII, and COMTi+ANGII+2-ME. We performed similar experiments using the in vivo administration of small interfering RNA of COMT instead of COMTi. Neither ANGII nor COMTi exhibited significant alterations in systolic blood pressure. Compared with ANGII or COMTi, COMTi+ANGII displayed significantly higher systolic blood pressure, albuminuria, and glomerular endotheliosis; 2-ME normalized such alterations. Similar phenotypes were observed in COMT small interfering RNA-treated mice. In the aorta of COMT-deficient mice, AT1R expression was increased; 2-ME suppressed AT1R expression. The 2-ME exhibited peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonistic activity in vitro and ex vivo plasma from pregnant female mice as well. In vitro, 2-ME suppressed both basal and Ang II-induced AT1R levels in a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-dependent manner. The 2-ME is relevant to combat COMT deficiency-associated hypertensive disorders via suppression of AT1R by its peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Comparison and Characterization of Immunoglobulin G Subclasses among Primate Species

    OpenAIRE

    Shearer, Michael H.; Dark, Robyn D.; Chodosh, James; Kennedy, Ronald C.

    1999-01-01

    Little information is available on the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses expressed in the sera of nonhuman primate species. To address this issue, we compared the IgG subclasses found in humans (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) to those of nonhuman primates, such as baboons and macaques. Cross-reactive antihuman IgG subtype-specific reagents were identified and used to analyze purified IgG from sera by solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Protein A-purified human ...

  19. Lipoprotein subclasses in genetic studies: The Berkeley Data Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.M.; Williams, P.T.; Blanche, P.J.; Cavanaugh, A.; Holl, L.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Austin, M.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Epidemiology

    1992-10-01

    Data from the Berkeley Data Set was used to investigate familial correlations of HDL-subclasses. Analysis of the sibling intraclass correlation coefficient by HDL particle diameter showed that sibling HDL levels were significantly correlated for HDL{sub 2b}, HDL{sub 3a} and HDL{sub 3b} subclasses. The percentage of the offsprings` variance explained by their two parents. Our finding that parents and offspring-have the highest correlation for HDL{sub 2b} is consistent with published reports that show higher heritability estimates for HDL{sub 2} compared with HDL{sub 3}{minus} cholesterol.

  20. Defective anti-polysaccharide IgG vaccine responses in IgA deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yoichi; Kirimanjeswara, Girish S; Roberts, Sean; Racine, Rachael; Wilson-Welder, Jennifer; Sanfilippo, Alan M; Salmon, Sharon L; Metzger, Dennis W

    2017-09-05

    We report that IgA(-/-) mice exhibit specific defects in IgG antibody responses to various polysaccharide vaccines (Francisella tularensis LPS and Pneumovax), but not protein vaccines such as Fluzone. This defect further included responses to polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (Prevnar and Haemophilus influenzae type b-tetanus toxoid vaccine). In agreement with these findings, IgA(-/-) mice were protected from pathogen challenge with protein- but not polysaccharide-based vaccines. Interestingly, after immunization with live bacteria, IgA(+/+) and IgA(-/-) mice were both resistant to lethal challenge and their IgG anti-polysaccharide antibody responses were comparable. Immunization with live bacteria, but not purified polysaccharide, induced production of serum B cell-activating factor (BAFF), a cytokine important for IgG class switching; supplementing IgA(-/-) cell cultures with BAFF enhanced in vitro polyclonal IgG production. Taken together, these findings show that IgA deficiency impairs IgG class switching following vaccination with polysaccharide antigens and that live bacterial immunization can overcome this defect. Since IgA deficient patients also often show defects in antibody responses following immunization with polysaccharide vaccines, our findings could have relevance to the clinical management of this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Iodine deficiency induces a VEGF-dependent microvascular response in salivary glands and in the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstraeten, Jessica; Derradji, Hanane; Craps, Julie; Sonveaux, Pierre; Colin, Ides M; Many, Marie-Christine; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Despite efforts to optimize iodine supply in iodine deficient countries, iodine deficiency (ID) remains a global problem worldwide. Activation of the local microvasculature by ID in the thyroid gland aims at improving the local supply of iodide. For this purpose, the thyrocytes secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that acts on adjacent capillaries, via a reactive oxygen species (ROS)/Hypoxia Inducible factor (HIF)-dependent pathway. Beside the thyroid, other organs including salivary glands and the stomach do express the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and are able to take iodide up, potentially rendering them sensitive to ID. To verify this hypothesis, ID-induced effects on the local microvasculature were studied in salivary glands and in the stomach. ID was induced by feeding young mice with an iodide-deficient diet and NIS inhibitor perchlorate in the drinking water. In salivary glands, ID induced a transient increase in HIF-1α protein expression accompanied by a transient, VEGF-dependent increase in blood flow. In the gastric mucosa, ID transiently increased VEGF expression in the mucin-secreting epithelium and in ghrelin-secreting endocrine cells. These observations suggest that microvascular changes in response to ID occur in NIS-expressing tissues other than the thyroid. NIS expressing cells could be viewed as iodide sensors that respond to ID by inducing vascular changes, probably to optimize iodide bioavailability at regional or systemic levels.

  2. Root antioxidant responses of two Pisum sativum cultivars to direct and induced Fe deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelali, N; Donnini, S; Dell'Orto, M; Abdelly, C; Gharsalli, M; Zocchi, G

    2014-05-01

    The contribution of antioxidant defence systems in different tolerance to direct and bicarbonate-induced Fe deficiency was evaluated in two pea cultivars (Kelvedon, tolerant and Lincoln, susceptible). Fe deficiency enhanced lipid peroxidation and H2 O2 concentration in roots of both cultivars, particularly in the sensitive one grown under bicarbonate supply. The results obtained on antioxidant activities (SOD, CAT, POD) suggest that H2 O2 accumulation could be due to an overproduction of this ROS and, at the same time, to a poor capacity to detoxify it. Moreover, under bicarbonate supply the activity of POD isoforms was reduced only in the sensitive cultivar, while in the tolerant one a new isoform was detected, suggesting that POD activity might be an important contributor to pea tolerance to Fe deficiency. The presence of bicarbonate also resulted in stimulation of GR, MDHAR and DHAR activities, part of the ASC-GSH pathway, which was higher in the tolerant cultivar than in the sensitive one. Overall, while in the absence of Fe only slight differences were reported between the two cultivars, the adaptation of Kelvedon to the presence of bicarbonate seems to be related to its greater ability to enhance the antioxidant response at the root level. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Neuroinflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide is exacerbated in mice genetically deficient in cyclooxygenase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosetti Francesca

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclooxygenases (COX -1 and -2 are key mediators of the inflammatory response in the central nervous system. Since COX-2 is inducible by inflammatory stimuli, it has been traditionally considered as the most appropriate target for anti-inflammatory drugs. However, the specific roles of COX-1 and COX-2 in modulating a neuroinflammatory response are unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that COX-1 deficient mice show decreased neuroinflammatory response and neuronal damage in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Methods In this study, we investigated the role of COX-2 in the neuroinflammatory response to intracerebroventricular-injected LPS (5 μg, a model of direct activation of innate immunity, using COX-2 deficient (COX-2-/- and wild type (COX-2+/+ mice, as well as COX-2+/+ mice pretreated for 6 weeks with celecoxib, a COX-2 selective inhibitor. Results Twenty-four hours after LPS injection, COX-2-/- mice showed increased neuronal damage, glial cell activation, mRNA and protein expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, such as cytokines, chemokines, iNOS and NADPH oxidase. Brain protein levels of IL-1β, NADPH oxidase subunit p67phox, and phosphorylated-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 were higher in COX-2-/- and in celecoxib-treated mice, compared to COX-2+/+ mice. The increased neuroinflammatory response in COX-2-/- mice was likely mediated by the upregulation of STAT3 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3. Conclusion These results show that inhibiting COX-2 activity can exacerbate the inflammatory response to LPS, possibly by increasing glial cells activation and upregulating the STAT3 and SOCS3 pathways in the brain.

  4. CD69 Deficiency Enhances the Host Response to Vaccinia Virus Infection through Altered NK Cell Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notario, Laura; Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; de Molina, Antonio; Lauzurica, Pilar

    2016-07-15

    During the host response to viral infection, the transmembrane CD69 protein is highly upregulated in all immune cells. We have studied the role of CD69 in the murine immune response to vaccinia virus (VACV) infection, and we report that the absence of CD69 enhances protection against VACV at both short and long times postinfection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. Natural killer (NK) cells were implicated in the increased infection control, since the differences were greatly diminished when NK cells were depleted. This role of NK cells was not based on an altered NK cell reactivity, since CD69 did not affect the NK cell activation threshold in response to major histocompatibility complex class I NK cell targets or protein kinase C activation. Instead, NK cell numbers were increased in the spleen and peritoneum of CD69-deficient infected mice. That was not just secondary to better infection control in CD69-deficient mice, since NK cell numbers in the spleens and the blood of uninfected CD69(-/-) mice were already augmented. CD69-deficient NK cells from infected mice did not have an altered proliferation capacity. However, a lower spontaneous cell death rate was observed for CD69(-/-) lymphocytes. Thus, our results suggest that CD69 limits the innate immune response to VACV infection at least in part through cell homeostatic survival. We show that increased natural killer (NK) cell numbers augment the host response and survival after infection with vaccinia virus. This phenotype is found in the absence of CD69 in immunocompetent and immunodeficient hosts. As part of the innate immune system, NK lymphocytes are activated and participate in the defense against infection. Several studies have focused on the contribution of NK cells to protection against infection with vaccinia virus. In this study, it was demonstrated that the augmented early NK cell response in the absence of CD69 is responsible for the increased protection seen during infection with

  5. CrMAPK3 regulates the expression of iron-deficiency-responsive genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xiaowen; Yu, Junmei; Li, Yajun; Deng, Xiaodong

    2017-05-16

    Under iron-deficient conditions, Chlamydomonas exhibits high affinity for iron absorption. Nevertheless, the response, transmission, and regulation of downstream gene expression in algae cells have not to be investigated. Considering that the MAPK pathway is essential for abiotic stress responses, we determined whether this pathway is involved in iron deficiency signal transduction in Chlamydomonas. Arabidopsis MAPK gene sequences were used as entry data to search for homologous genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genome database to investigate the functions of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) gene family in C. reinhardtii under iron-free conditions. Results revealed 16 C. reinhardtii MAPK genes labeled CrMAPK2-CrMAPK17 with TXY conserved domains and low homology to MAPK in yeast, Arabidopsis, and humans. The expression levels of these genes were then analyzed through qRT-PCR and exposure to high salt (150 mM NaCl), low nitrogen, or iron-free conditions. The expression levels of these genes were also subjected to adverse stress conditions. The mRNA levels of CrMAPK2, CrMAPK3, CrMAPK4, CrMAPK5, CrMAPK6, CrMAPK8, CrMAPK9, and CrMAPK11 were remarkably upregulated under iron-deficient stress. The increase in CrMAPK3 expression was 43-fold greater than that in the control. An RNA interference vector was constructed and transformed into C. reinhardtii 2A38, an algal strain with an exogenous FOX1:ARS chimeric gene, to silence CrMAPK3. After this gene was silenced, the mRNA levels and ARS activities of FOX1:ARS chimeric gene and endogenous CrFOX1 were decreased. The mRNA levels of iron-responsive genes, such as CrNRAMP2, CrATX1, CrFTR1, and CrFEA1, were also remarkably reduced. CrMAPK3 regulates the expression of iron-deficiency-responsive genes in C. reinhardtii.

  6. On a Subclass of Harmonic Convex Functions of Complex Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Magesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and study a subclass of harmonic convex functions of complex order. Coefficient bounds, extreme points, distortion bounds, convolution conditions, and convex combination are determined for functions in this class. Further, we obtain the closure property of this class under integral operator.

  7. Vitamin d deficiency in a multiethnic healthy control cohort and altered immune response in vitamin D deficient European-American healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L Ritterhouse

    Full Text Available In recent years, vitamin D has been shown to possess a wide range of immunomodulatory effects. Although there is extensive amount of research on vitamin D, we lack a comprehensive understanding of the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or the mechanism by which vitamin D regulates the human immune system. This study examined the prevalence and correlates of vitamin D deficiency and the relationship between vitamin D and the immune system in healthy individuals.Healthy individuals (n = 774 comprised of European-Americans (EA, n = 470, African-Americans (AA, n = 125, and Native Americans (NA, n = 179 were screened for 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] levels by ELISA. To identify the most noticeable effects of vitamin D on the immune system, 20 EA individuals with severely deficient (24.8 ng/mL vitamin D levels were matched and selected for further analysis. Serum cytokine level measurement, immune cell phenotyping, and phosphoflow cytometry were performed.Vitamin D sufficiency was observed in 37.5% of the study cohort. By multivariate analysis, AA, NA, and females with a high body mass index (BMI, >30 demonstrate higher rates of vitamin D deficiency (p<0.05. Individuals with vitamin D deficiency had significantly higher levels of serum GM-CSF (p = 0.04, decreased circulating activated CD4+ (p = 0.04 and CD8+ T (p = 0.04 cell frequencies than individuals with sufficient vitamin D levels.A large portion of healthy individuals have vitamin D deficiency. These individuals have altered T and B cell responses, indicating that the absence of sufficient vitamin D levels could result in undesirable cellular and molecular alterations ultimately contributing to immune dysregulation.

  8. Anti-food and anti-microbial IgG subclass antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Anke; Mandić, Ana D; Bennek, Eveline; Frehn, Lisa; Verdier, Julien; Tebrügge, Irene; Lutz, Holger; Streetz, Konrad; Trautwein, Christian; Sellge, Gernot

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly Crohn's disease (CD), is associated with increased microbial-specific IgG and IgA antibodies, whereas alterations of anti-food antibodies are still disputed. The knowledge about IgG subclass antibodies in IBD is limited. In this study we analysed IgG subclass antibodies specific for nutritional and commensal antigens in IBD patients and controls. Serum IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 specific for wheat and milk extracts, purified ovalbumin, Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis lysates and mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analysed by ELISA in patients with CD (n = 56), ulcerative colitis (UC; n = 29), acute gastroenteritis/colitis (n = 12) as well as non-inflammatory controls (n = 62). Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) of all IgG subclasses and anti-B. fragilis IgG1 levels were increased in CD patients compared to UC patients and controls. The discriminant validity of ASCA IgG2 and IgG4 was comparable with that of ASCA pan-IgG and IgA, whereas it was inferior for ASCA IgG1/IgG3 and anti-B. fragilis IgG1. Complicated CD defined by the presence of perianal, stricturing or penetrating disease phenotypes was associated with increased ASCA IgG1/IgG3/IgG4, anti-B. fragilis IgG1 and anti-E. coli IgG1 levels. Anti-food IgG subclass levels were not different between IBD patients and controls and did not correlate with food intolerance. In contrast to anti-microbial Abs, food-specific IgG responses were predominately of the IgG4 isotype and all food-specific IgG subclass levels correlated negatively with age. Our study supports the notion that the adaptive immune recognition of food and commensal antigens are differentially regulated.

  9. Different IgG-subclass distributions after whole-cell and acellular pertussis infant primary vaccinations in healthy and pertussis infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, Lotte H; Schure, Rose-Minke; Oztürk, Kemal; de Rond, Lia G H; de Greeff, S C; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2011-09-16

    The distribution of IgG-subclasses provides insight in the immunological mechanisms of protection against whooping cough. We investigated the effect of Dutch whole-cell pertussis and acellular pertussis vaccines administered in infancy on the IgG-subclass distributions in healthy children aged 12 months, 4 years and 9 years as well as in children who have been infected with Bordetella pertussis. A fluorescent bead-based multiplex immunoassay was used for the measurement of IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 responses against pertussis toxin, filamentous heamagglutinin and pertactin. Although IgG1 was the predominant subclass for all pertussis antigens in both healthy and infected children, elevated IgG4 levels were only present in children who had received repeated number of acellular pertussis vaccinations. IgG2 and IgG3 antibodies did not contribute to the IgG response. No differences in IgG-subclasses between healthy vaccinated or infected children were found. The pertussis vaccine used for priming seems to determine the IgG-subclass composition elicited after a secondary antibody response either induced by pertussis vaccination or infection. The pronounced anti-pertussis IgG4 response might reflect the Th2-skewing of the immune response after aP vaccination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced periosteal and endocortical responses to axial tibial compression loading in conditional connexin43 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K Grimston

    Full Text Available The gap junction protein, connexin43 (Cx43 is involved in mechanotransduction in bone. Recent studies using in vivo models of conditional Cx43 gene (Gja1 deletion in the osteogenic linage have generated inconsistent results, with Gja1 ablation resulting in either attenuated or enhanced response to mechanical load, depending upon the skeletal site examined or the type of load applied. To gain further insights on Cx43 and mechanotransduction, we examined bone formation response at both endocortical and periosteal surfaces in 2-month-old mice with conditional Gja1 ablation driven by the Dermo1 promoter (cKO. Relative to wild type (WT littermates, it requires a larger amount of compressive force to generate the same periosteal strain in cKO mice. Importantly, cKO mice activate periosteal bone formation at a lower strain level than do WT mice, suggesting an increased sensitivity to mechanical load in Cx43 deficiency. Consistently, trabecular bone mass also increases in mutant mice upon load, while it decreases in WT. On the other hand, bone formation actually decreases on the endocortical surface in WT mice upon application of axial mechanical load, and this response is also accentuated in cKO mice. These changes are associated with increase of Cox-2 in both genotypes and further decrease of Sost mRNA in cKO relative to WT bones. Thus, the response of bone forming cells to mechanical load differs between trabecular and cortical components, and remarkably between endocortical and periosteal envelopes. Cx43 deficiency enhances both the periosteal and endocortical response to mechanical load applied as axial compression in growing mice.

  11. Identification of pediatric septic shock subclasses based on genome-wide expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Marie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Septic shock is a heterogeneous syndrome within which probably exist several biological subclasses. Discovery and identification of septic shock subclasses could provide the foundation for the design of more specifically targeted therapies. Herein we tested the hypothesis that pediatric septic shock subclasses can be discovered through genome-wide expression profiling. Methods Genome-wide expression profiling was conducted using whole blood-derived RNA from 98 children with septic shock, followed by a series of bioinformatic approaches targeted at subclass discovery and characterization. Results Three putative subclasses (subclasses A, B, and C were initially identified based on an empiric, discovery-oriented expression filter and unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Statistical comparison of the three putative subclasses (analysis of variance, Bonferonni correction, P Conclusion Genome-wide expression profiling can identify pediatric septic shock subclasses having clinically relevant phenotypes.

  12. Compensatory T cell responses in IRG-deficient mice prevent sustained Chlamydia trachomatis infections.

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    Jörn Coers

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. In women C. trachomatis can establish persistent genital infections that lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and sterility. In contrast to natural infections in humans, experimentally induced infections with C. trachomatis in mice are rapidly cleared. The cytokine interferon-γ (IFNγ plays a critical role in the clearance of C. trachomatis infections in mice. Because IFNγ induces an antimicrobial defense system in mice but not in humans that is composed of a large family of Immunity Related GTPases (IRGs, we questioned whether mice deficient in IRG immunity would develop persistent infections with C. trachomatis as observed in human patients. We found that IRG-deficient Irgm1/m3((-/- mice transiently develop high bacterial burden post intrauterine infection, but subsequently clear the infection more efficiently than wildtype mice. We show that the delayed but highly effective clearance of intrauterine C. trachomatis infections in Irgm1/m3((-/- mice is dependent on an exacerbated CD4(+ T cell response. These findings indicate that the absence of the predominant murine innate effector mechanism restricting C. trachomatis growth inside epithelial cells results in a compensatory adaptive immune response, which is at least in part driven by CD4(+ T cells and prevents the establishment of a persistent infection in mice.

  13. Z α-1 antitrypsin deficiency and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2010-10-06

    The serine proteinase inhibitor α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is produced principally by the liver at the rate of 2 g\\/d. It is secreted into the circulation and provides an antiprotease protective screen throughout the body but most importantly in the lung, where it can neutralise the activity of the serine protease neutrophil elastase. Mutations leading to deficiency in AAT are associated with liver and lung disease. The most notable is the Z AAT mutation, which encodes a misfolded variant of the AAT protein in which the glutamic acid at position 342 is replaced by a lysine. More than 95% of all individuals with AAT deficiency carry at least one Z allele. ZAAT protein is not secreted effectively and accumulates intracellularly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes and other AAT-producing cells. This results in a loss of function associated with decreased circulating and intrapulmonary levels of AAT. However, the misfolded protein acquires a toxic gain of function that impacts on the ER. A major function of the ER is to ensure correct protein folding. ZAAT interferes with this function and promotes ER stress responses and inflammation. Here the signalling pathways activated during ER stress in response to accumulation of ZAAT are described and therapeutic strategies that can potentially relieve ER stress are discussed.

  14. Gibberellin deficiency is responsible for shy-flowering nature of Epipremnum aureum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Qiu, Jie; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Chen, Jianjun; Kittur, Farooqahmed S; Henny, Richard J; Jin, Gulei; Fan, Longjiang; Xie, Jiahua

    2016-06-27

    Epipremnum aureum is an extremely popular houseplant belonging to the Araceae family of angiosperms, but it does not flower either in the wild or under cultivation. We uncovered the potential causes of its shy-flowering nature by building the transcriptome using next-generation sequencing and identifying floral-related genes that are differentially expressed between vertical growth (VG, adult) and horizontal growth (HG, juvenile) plants. Transcripts of the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic gene EaGA3ox1 and GA-responsive floral meristem identity gene EaLFY were absent in both VG and HG plants, suggesting that a deficiency of bioactive GAs may be responsible for its shy-flowering nature. This hypothesis is supported by undetectable or low levels of three bioactive GAs, and exogenous GA3 triggered flowering in both plants. Our study resolves the mystery why E. aureum fails to flower, and reveals the positive role of GAs in floral transition in perennials.

  15. Coefficient Estimates for Certain Subclasses of Biunivalent Functions Defined by Convolution

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    R. Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce two new subclasses of the function class Σ of biunivalent functions in the open disc defined by convolution. Estimates on the coefficients a2 and a3 for the two subclasses are obtained. Moreover, we verify Brannan and Clunie’s conjecture a2≤2 for our subclasses.

  16. Intrapartum colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae, early-onset sepsis and deficient specific neonatal immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Kirstin; Demmert, Martin; Bendiks, Meike; Göpel, Wolfgang; Herting, Egbert; Härtel, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    Intrapartum colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) is a rare but important risk factor for severe courses of early-onset sepsis (EOS) in the newborn, as underlined in the case of a preterm infant born after 32 weeks of gestation described here. One potential explanation could be an immature immune response of the neonate to S. pneumoniae, however, immunological data in term and preterm infants are scarce. To determine the neonatal immune responses to S. pneumoniae, flow-cytometry analysis of the cytokine production by CD14+ cells was performed after full pathogen stimulation with S. pneumoniae (serotype 18C, derived from an EOS case described here) of cord blood of 10 term (37-41 gestational weeks) and 6 preterm (31-32 gestational weeks) neonates, compared to peripheral venous blood samples of 10 healthy adults in vitro. Neonatal cytokine responses of term and preterm infants to S. pneumoniae are diminished compared to adults. The quantities of cytokine expression were comparable to immune responses induced by other important gram-positive pathogens of EOS such as Streptococcus agalacticae. Severe courses of EOS with S. pneumoniae may be attributed to remarkable deficiencies of the specific neonatal immune response. To protect the neonate from invasive pneumococcal disease, maternal immunization may be an important prevention strategy, as protective antibodies can be transferred through the placenta and vaccination of pregnant women may reduce colonization.

  17. Response of copper deficient rats to inhibitors of renal sodium reabsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordewier, B.; Saari, J.T. (Northwestern College, Orange City, IA (United States) USDA/ARS, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

    1991-03-11

    This study examined the effects of furosemide (Furo), a Loop diuretic, and amiloride (Am), a potassium (K)-sparing diuretic, on the excretion of sodium (Na) and K in copper-adequate (CuAdeq) and copper-deficient (CuDef) rats. Weanling male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a CuDef or CuAdeq diet ad libitum and given deionized water to drink. After 5 weeks on the diets, rats were assigned to one of four treatment regimens: Furo, Am or Furo + Am. Rats were anesthetized and electrolyte excretion was measured in 2 {times} 15 min control periods followed by 3 {times} 15 min treatment periods. Furo increased Na excretion in a dose dependent manner in both the CuAdeq and the CuDef rats. The response of the CuAdeq rats was slightly greater than that of the CuDef rats in each of the 3 treatment groups in which Furo was given. K excretion following Furo increased to the same extent in the CuAdeq and CuDef rats. The natriuretic response to Am alone was slightly greater in the CuDef than the CuAdeq rats. The antikaliuretic response of the CuDef rats was similar to that of the CuAdeq rats whether Am was given alone or in combination with Furo. These data show that CuDef rats respond to Furo and Am in a manner which is similar to that of CuAdeq rats, this indicates that the sensitivity of the Na reabsorption mechanisms to inhibition by diuretics is not markedly affected by copper deficiency.

  18. Physiological responses of Tunisian grapevine varieties to bicarbonate-induced iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksouri, Riadh; Gharsalli, Mohamed; Lachaal, Mokhtar

    2005-03-01

    Plants are frequently submitted to iron deficiency when growing on calcareous soils, which contain high concentrations of bicarbonate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the variability of physiological responses of Tunisian grapevine varieties to bicarbonate-induced iron chlorosis. Vine woodcuttings of seven autochthonous Tunisian varieties (Khamri, Mahdaoui, Blan3, Saouadi, Arich Dressé, Beldi and Balta4), two rootstocks (140Ru and S.O.4), and an introduced table variety (Cardinal) were cultivated on inert sand for 2 months using a complete nutrient solution (20 microM Fe) that was either well supplied or not supplied with 10 mM HCO3-. Young leaves of plants cultivated on bicarbonate-enriched medium showed characteristic symptoms of iron chlorosis, although the intensity of the symptoms depended on the variety and the rootstock. Chlorosis score confirmed these observations since the most sensitive varieties showed the highest values. This variability in tolerance to iron deficiency was also displayed when analysing the physiological parameters (shoot length, plant dry weight, and chlorophyll concentration) and the iron contents in the 4th leaf. Analysis of morphological and physiological parameters showed three behaviour groups. The first one corresponded to tolerant varieties (Khamri, Mahdaoui, and the root-stock: 140Ru), the second included moderately tolerant vines (Saouadi, Arich Dressé, Blanc3, and the rootstock: S.O.4) and the third represented the sensitive ones (Balta4, Beldi, and Cardinal).

  19. Neonatal liver failure and Leigh syndrome possibly due to CoQ-responsive OXPHOS deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshinsky-Silver, E; Levine, A; Nissenkorn, A; Barash, V; Perach, M; Buzhaker, E; Shahmurov, M; Polak-Charcon, S; Lev, D; Lerman-Sagie, T

    2003-08-01

    CoQ transfers electrons from complexes I and II of the mitochondrial respiratory chain to complex III. There are very few reports on human CoQ deficiency. The clinical presentation is usually characterized by: epilepsy, muscle weakness, ataxia, cerebellar atrophy, migraine, myogloblinuria and developmental delay. We describe a patient who presented with neonatal liver and pancreatic insufficiency, tyrosinemia and hyperammonemia and later developed sensorineural hearing loss and Leigh syndrome. Liver biopsy revealed markedly reduced complex I+III and II+III. Addition of CoQ to the liver homogenate restored the activities, suggesting CoQ depletion. Histological staining showed prominent bridging; septal fibrosis and widening of portal spaces with prominent mixed inflammatory infiltrate, associated with interface hepatitis, bile duct proliferation with numerous bile plugs. Electron microscopy revealed a large number of mitochondria, which were altered in shape and size, widened and disordered intercristal spaces. This may be the first case of Leigh syndrome with liver and pancreas insufficiency, possibly caused by CoQ responsive oxphos deficiency.

  20. Increased GLP-1 response after gavage-administration of glucose in UCP2-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Li, J; Li, Z; Luo, Y

    2012-02-01

    Although it has been widely reported that endogenous level of GLP-1 can be enhanced by various secretagogues, the mechanism of GLP-1 secretion in vivo is still not fully understood. In the present study, we assessed the possible effect of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) on GLP-1 secretion in gut. The levels of plasma GLP-1(7-36) amide/(7-37) in UCP2-deficient mice and wild-type mice were measured by applying ELISA technique. UCP2 mRNA and protein levels were detected in the gastrointestinal tract by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis, respectively. The plasma GLP-1 levels in C57BL/6J mice had significantly increased to 6.9 pM (n=8, p<0.001) at 15 min after gavage-administration of glucose (2 g glucose/kg body weight), approximately 2-fold, compared with control group. Plasma GLP-1 levels were also significantly elevated at 30 min (p<0.001), but nearly returned to baseline levels at 60 min. UCP2-deficient mice had higher level of GLP-1 at various time points after administration of glucose (UCP2-deficient mice vs. wild type littermates, 15 min, 9.3±0.9 vs. 6.9±0.3, p<0.001; 30 min, 7.9±0.3 vs. 5.6±0.4, p<0.001; 60 min, 4.9±0.1 vs. 3.3±0.1, p<0.01). UCP2-deficient mice increased GLP-1 response to gavage-administration of glucose. Plasma GLP-1 level was not significantly altered after gavage-administration of saline. This study showed that plasma GLP-1 level increased after gastric glucose challenge, and UCP2 maybe serve as a negative regulator in glucose-induced GLP-1 secretion in mouse gut tract. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Temporal variation in HIV-specific IgG subclass Abs during acute infection differentiates spontaneous controllers from chronic progressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanand, Saheli; Das, Jishnu; Chung, Amy W; Schoen, Matthew K; Lane, Sophie; Suscovich, Todd J; Streeck, Hendrik; Smith, Davey; Little, Susan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Richman, Douglas; Alter, Galit

    2017-12-12

    Given the emerging appreciation for the role of antibody-dependent effector functions and IgG subclass distribution among spontaneous controllers of HIV, we sought to determine whether antibody-associated features diverged in early HIV infection between subjects who ultimately became controllers versus those who became progressors. IgG was purified from plasma from nine acutely infected subjects who subsequently controlled HIV spontaneously (controllers) and ten acutely infected individuals who did not control viremia (progressors). Antibody profiles were compared at weeks 4, 12, 24 and 48 post-infection. Levels of clade B gp120-, gp140-and gp41-specific IgG antibody subclasses were measured. Additionally, gp120-specific antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), rapid fluorescent antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (RFADCC), and antibody-dependent cellular viral inhibition (ADCVI) were all assessed. While no single Ab-related measurement was significantly associated with long-term HIV control, combinations of Ab-associated variables were able to accurately differentiate controllers and progressors. In contrast to controllers, progressors showed greater dynamic changes in gp120-specific subclass selection profiles, with increasing levels of Env-specific IgG2 Abs and losses in Env-specific IgG3 Abs. Moreover, progressors, but not controllers, lost ADCVI function over time. Together, these results highlight changes in IgG subclass selection profiles in progressive, but not controlled, HIV infection. This study suggests that the temporal variation and maintenance of Env-specific IgG subclasses during acute HIV infection are predictive of eventual disease control. The maintenance of gp120-specific and gp140-specific IgG3 may contribute to control of disease in spontaneous controllers. Thus, strategies to induce stable IgG3 responses may preserve control of the viral reservoir.

  2. Combining Unsupervised and Supervised Learning for Discovering Disease Subclasses

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, A; Bosoni, P; Bellazzi, R; Nihtyanova, S; Denton, C

    2016-01-01

    Diseases are often umbrella terms for many subcategories of disease. The identification of these subcategories is vital if we are to develop personalised treatments that are better focussed on individual patients. In this short paper, we explore the use of a combination of unsupervised learning to identify potential subclasses, and supervised learning to build models for better predicting a number of different health outcomes for patients that suffer from systemic sclerosis, a rare chronic co...

  3. Tailoring gut immune responses with lipoteichoic acid-deficient Lactobacillus acidophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Yaíma L.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    As highlighted by the development of intestinal autoinflammatory disorders when tolerance is lost, homeostatic interactions between gut microbiota, resident immune cells, and the gut epithelium are key in the maintenance of gastrointestinal health. Gut immune responses, whether stimulatory or regulatory, are dictated by the activated dendritic cells (DCs) that first interact with microorganisms and their gene products to then elicit T and B cell responses. Previously, we have demonstrated that treatment with genetically modified Lactobacillus acidophilus is sufficient to tilt the immune balance from proinflammatory to regulatory in experimental models of colitis and colon cancer. Given the significant role of DCs in efficiently orchestrating intestinal immune responses, characterization of the signals induced within these cells by the surface layer molecules, such as lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and proteins of L. acidophilus is critical for future treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we discuss the potential regulatory pathways involved in the downregulation of pathogenic inflammation in the gut, and explore questions regarding the immune responses to LTA-deficient L. acidophilus that require future studies. PMID:23390423

  4. Subclasses of Normal Helly Circular-Arc Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Min Chih; Szwarcfiter, Jayme L

    2011-01-01

    A Helly circular-arc model M = (C,A) is a circle C together with a Helly family \\A of arcs of C. If no arc is contained in any other, then M is a proper Helly circular-arc model, if every arc has the same length, then M is a unit Helly circular-arc model, and if there are no two arcs covering the circle, then M is a normal Helly circular-arc model. A Helly (resp. proper Helly, unit Helly, normal Helly) circular-arc graph is the intersection graph of the arcs of a Helly (resp. proper Helly, unit Helly, normal Helly) circular-arc model. In this article we study these subclasses of Helly circular-arc graphs. We show natural generalizations of several properties of (proper) interval graphs that hold for some of these Helly circular-arc subclasses. Next, we describe characterizations for the subclasses of Helly circular-arc graphs, including forbidden induced subgraphs characterizations. These characterizations lead to efficient algorithms for recognizing graphs within these classes. Finally, we show how do these ...

  5. Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase Deficiency Not Responding to Pyridoxine and Bromocriptine Therapy: Case Report and Review of Response to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Alfadhel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC deficiency (MIM #608643 is an autosomal recessive inborn error of monoamines. It is caused by a mutation in the DDC gene that leads to a deficiency in the AADC enzyme. The clinical features of this condition include a combination of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin deficiencies, and a patient may present with hypotonia, oculogyric crises, sweating, hypersalivation, autonomic dysfunction, and progressive encephalopathy with severe developmental delay. We report the case of an 8-month-old boy who presented with the abovementioned symptoms and who was diagnosed with AADC deficiency based on clinical, biochemical, and molecular investigations. Treatment with bromocriptine and pyridoxine showed no improvement. These data support the findings observed among previously reported cohorts that showed poor response of this disease to current regimens. Alternative therapies are needed to ameliorate the clinical complications associated with this disorder.

  6. Integrating microarray analysis and the soybean genome to understand the soybeans iron deficiency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Soybeans grown in the upper Midwestern United States often suffer from iron deficiency chlorosis, which results in yield loss at the end of the season. To better understand the effect of iron availability on soybean yield, we identified genes in two near isogenic lines with changes in expression patterns when plants were grown in iron sufficient and iron deficient conditions. Results Transcriptional profiles of soybean (Glycine max, L. Merr) near isogenic lines Clark (PI548553, iron efficient) and IsoClark (PI547430, iron inefficient) grown under Fe-sufficient and Fe-limited conditions were analyzed and compared using the Affymetrix® GeneChip® Soybean Genome Array. There were 835 candidate genes in the Clark (PI548553) genotype and 200 candidate genes in the IsoClark (PI547430) genotype putatively involved in soybean's iron stress response. Of these candidate genes, fifty-eight genes in the Clark genotype were identified with a genetic location within known iron efficiency QTL and 21 in the IsoClark genotype. The arrays also identified 170 single feature polymorphisms (SFPs) specific to either Clark or IsoClark. A sliding window analysis of the microarray data and the 7X genome assembly coupled with an iterative model of the data showed the candidate genes are clustered in the genome. An analysis of 5' untranslated regions in the promoter of candidate genes identified 11 conserved motifs in 248 differentially expressed genes, all from the Clark genotype, representing 129 clusters identified earlier, confirming the cluster analysis results. Conclusion These analyses have identified the first genes with expression patterns that are affected by iron stress and are located within QTL specific to iron deficiency stress. The genetic location and promoter motif analysis results support the hypothesis that the differentially expressed genes are co-regulated. The combined results of all analyses lead us to postulate iron inefficiency in soybean is a result of a

  7. Serum cholesterol and triglyceride reference ranges of twenty lipoprotein subclasses for healthy Japanese men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusyo, Norihiro; Ai, Masumi; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Ikezaki, Hiroaki; Ihara, Takeshi; Hayashi, Takeo; Hiramine, Satoshi; Ura, Kazuya; Kohzuma, Takuji; Schaefer, Ernst J; Hayashi, Jun

    2013-12-01

    This epidemiological study was done to generate normal ranges for the cholesterol and triglyceride levels in serum lipoprotein subclasses isolated from healthy adults based on gender and menopausal status. Cholesterol and triglyceride levels in 20 lipoprotein subclasses as separated by high performance liquid chromatography were measured in serum obtained from 825 fasting healthy subjects (267 men, 558 women). For serum cholesterol, 13.7% was found in very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) subclasses, 55.6% in low density lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses, and 30.4% in high density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses. For serum triglycerides, these values were 52.1%, 27.9%, and 17.4%, respectively. Levels of cholesterol in some VLDL subclasses were inversely correlated with the levels of some HDL subclasses, while for triglycerides, elevated levels in any one subclass were generally strongly associated with elevated levels in all other subclasses. Men had significantly higher large VLDL-cholesterol levels than women (P cholesterol levels than men (P cholesterol levels than men (P cholesterol levels, and significantly higher all VLDL, LDL, and HDL-triglyceride levels than premenopausal women (P cholesterol and triglyceride subclass levels, as well as significant correlations between values in the various serum lipoprotein subclasses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor 8 deficiency compromises the functional response of the serotonergic system to stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah R Brooks

    Full Text Available Functionally heterogeneous populations of serotonergic neurons, located within the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR, play a role in stress-related behaviors and neuropsychiatric illnesses such as anxiety and depression. Abnormal development of these neurons may permanently alter their structure and connections, making the organism more susceptible to anxiety-related disorders. A factor that critically regulates the development of serotonergic neurons is fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8. In this study, we used acute restraint stress followed by behavioral testing to examine whether Fgf8 signaling during development is important for establishing functional stress- and anxiety-related DR neurocircuits in adulthood. Wild-type and heterozygous male mice globally hypomorphic for Fgf8 were exposed to acute restraint stress and then tested for anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus-maze. Further, we measured c-Fos immunostaining as a marker of serotonergic neuronal activation and tissue 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentrations as a marker of serotonin functional output. Results showed that Fgf8 hypomorphs exhibited 1 an exaggerated response of DR anxiety-promoting circuits and 2 a blunted response of a DR panic-inhibiting circuit to stress, effects that together were associated with increased baseline anxiety-like behavior. Overall, our results provide a neural substrate upon which Fgf8 deficiency could affect stress response and support the hypothesis that developmental disruptions of serotonergic neurons affect their postnatal functional integrity.

  9. Deficient antiviral immune responses in childhood: distinct roles of atopy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldo, Simonetta; Contoli, Marco; Bazzan, Erica; Turato, Graziella; Padovani, Anna; Marku, Brunilda; Calabrese, Fiorella; Caramori, Gaetano; Ballarin, Andrea; Snijders, Deborah; Barbato, Angelo; Saetta, Marina; Papi, Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Impaired immune response to viral infections in atopic asthmatic patients has been recently reported and debated. Whether this condition is present in childhood and whether it is affected by atopy per se deserves further investigation. We sought to investigate airway interferon production in response to rhinovirus infection in children who are asthmatic, atopic, or both and its correlation with the airway inflammatory profile. Bronchial biopsy specimens and epithelial cells were obtained from 47 children (mean age, 5 ± 0.5 years) undergoing bronchoscopy. The study population included asthmatic children who were either atopic or nonatopic, atopic children without asthma, and children without atopy or asthma. Rhinovirus type 16 induction of IFN-λ and IFN-β mRNA and protein levels was assessed in bronchial epithelial cell cultures. The immunoinflammatory profile was evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry in bronchial biopsy specimens. Rhinovirus type 16-induced interferon production was significantly reduced in atopic asthmatic, nonatopic asthmatic, and atopic nonasthmatic children compared with that seen in nonatopic nonasthmatic children (all P asthma. These findings suggest that deficient immune responses to viral infections are not limited to patients with atopic asthma but are present in those with other T(H)2-oriented conditions. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Emotional response in dopamine D2L receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hranilovic, Dubravka; Bucan, Maja; Wang, Yanyan

    2008-12-22

    The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) system has been implicated in emotional processing which is often impaired in neuropsychiatric disorders. The long (D2L) and the short (D2S) isoforms of D2R are generated by alternative splicing of the same gene. To study differential roles of the two D2R isoforms, D2L-deficient mice (D2L-/-) expressing functional D2S were previously generated. In this study the contribution of D2L isoform to emotional response was investigated by examining behaviors that reflect emotionality (exploratory behavior, anxiety-like behavior and learned helplessness) in D2L-/- and (wild-type) WT mice. While the thigmotactic, locomotor and general components of anxiety in zero maze did not differ among the genotypes, D2L-/- mice displayed significantly lower level of exploration in a hole board and zero maze, and significantly higher increase in latency to escape from a foot-shock after the learned helplessness training, compared with WT mice. These results suggest that D2L may play a more prominent role than D2S in mediating emotional response, such as behavioral reactions to novelty and inescapable stress. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying emotional responses.

  11. Identification of genes differentially expressed in the roots of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) in response to phosphorus deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Peng; Qin, Huaide; Wu, Min; Wu, Bingsun; Wei, Jiashao; Wang, Dapeng

    2013-02-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. P deficiency could affect rubber tree productivity seriously, and understanding the mechanism responses of the rubber tree under the P deficiency will be helpful to improving rubber tree productivity. The molecular mechanism by which the rubber trees respond to a P-deficiency is a complex network involving many processes. To identify the genes differentially expressed in that response, we constructed subtractive suppression hybridization libraries for roots of plants growing under deficient or sufficient conditions. We identified 94 up-regulated genes from the forward library and 45 down-regulated from the reverse library. These differentially expressed genes were categorized into eight groups representing functions in metabolism, transcription, signal transduction, protein synthesis, transport, stress responses, photosynthesis, and development. We also performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the expression profiles of eight randomly selected clones. Our results provide useful information for further study of the molecular mechanism for adaptations to a P-deficiency in this species. Further characterization and functional analysis of these differentially expressed genes will help us improve its phosphorus utilization and overall productivity.

  12. Tbet Deficiency Causes T Helper Cell Dependent Airways Eosinophilia and Mucus Hypersecretion in Response to Rhinovirus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Glanville

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Current understanding of adaptive immune, particularly T cell, responses to human rhinoviruses (RV is limited. Memory T cells are thought to be of a primarily T helper 1 type, but both T helper 1 and T helper 2 memory cells have been described, and heightened T helper 2/ lessened T helper 1 responses have been associated with increased RV-induced asthma exacerbation severity. We examined the contribution of T helper 1 cells to RV-induced airways inflammation using mice deficient in the transcription factor T-Box Expressed In T Cells (Tbet, a critical controller of T helper 1 cell differentiation. Using flow cytometry we showed that Tbet deficient mice lacked the T helper 1 response of wild type mice and instead developed mixed T helper 2/T helper 17 responses to RV infection, evidenced by increased numbers of GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3 and RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt, and interleukin-13 and interleukin-17A expressing CD4+ T cells in the lung. Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3 and interleukin-10 expressing T cell numbers were unaffected. Tbet deficient mice also displayed deficiencies in lung Natural Killer, Natural Killer T cell and γδT cell responses, and serum neutralising antibody responses. Tbet deficient mice exhibited pronounced airways eosinophilia and mucus production in response to RV infection that, by utilising a CD4+ cell depleting antibody, were found to be T helper cell dependent. RV induction of T helper 2 and T helper 17 responses may therefore have an important role in directly driving features of allergic airways disease such as eosinophilia and mucus hypersecretion during asthma exacerbations.

  13. Effects of adjuvants on IgG subclasses elicited by virus-like Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visciano Maria Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus-Like Particles (VLPs represent an efficient strategy to present and deliver conformational antigens to the immune system, inducing both arms of the adaptive immune response. Moreover, their particulate structure surrounded by cell membrane provides an adjuvanted effect to VLP-based immunizations. In the present study, the elicitation of different patterns of IgG subclasses by VLPs, administered in CpG ODN1826 or poly(I:C adjuvants, has been evaluated in an animal model. Results Adjuvanted VLPs elicited a higher titer of total specific IgG compared to VLPs alone. Furthermore, while VLPs alone induced a balanced TH2 pattern, VLPs formulated with either adjuvant elicited a TH1-biased IgG subclasses (IgG2a and IgG3, with poly(I:C more potent than CpG ODN1826. Conclusions The results confirmed that adjuvants efficiently improve antigen immunogenicity and represent a suitable strategy to skew the adaptive immune response toward the differentiation of the desired T helper subset, also using VLPs as antigen.

  14. SPECIFIC ANTIBODY DEFICIENCY IN CHILDREN SUFFERING RECURRENT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Naseri. G.P. Spickett

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Specific antibody deficiency lias been recognized as an immunodeficiency. In order to investigate an antipolysaccliaride antibody defect as a cause of rcccttrent infections, 30 children were studied. Patients who had been identified to have a major immunodeficiency or structural abnormality or a disease known to cause infection were excluded."nTliirty patints, aged I to 13.8 years (mean age, 5.8; male; female, 13:17 were chosen; all liad normal IgG and IgGl. Tiic level of IgA, IgG2 and lgG3 were of lower than normal in some cases. All were immunized with Hih conjugate (PRI'-T vaccine, and 26 with pneumococcal vaccine. Antibody responses were measured 4-6 weeks later. Twelve showed a poor response to immunization: 8 to pneumovax 3 to Hib and 1 to both. No correlation was observed between IgG 2 level anil specific antibody responses to polysacciiaridc antigens. Tlie infections were more severe and more frequent in children who responded poorly to polysacciiaridc antigens. Chikircn who had infections in more than one site were most likely to have deficient antibody responses."nThese results show that assessment of specific antibody responses to challenge immunization is an essential part of the investigation of children suffering from recurrent pyogenic infections. The study confirms that measurement of immunoglobulin isotypes and IgG subclasses atone docs not exclude significant hormonal immune deficiency.

  15. Co-expression analysis reveals a group of genes potentially involved in regulation of plant response to iron-deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Wang, Lei; Yang, Zhi Min

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant growth and development. Iron deficiency results in abnormal metabolisms from respiration to photosynthesis. Exploration of Fe-deficient responsive genes and their networks is critically important to understand molecular mechanisms leading to the plant adaptation to soil Fe-limitation. Co-expression genes are a cluster of genes that have a similar expression pattern to execute relatively biological functions at a stage of development or under a certain environmental condition. They may share a common regulatory mechanism. In this study, we investigated Fe-starved-related co-expression genes from Arabidopsis. From the biological process GO annotation of TAIR (The Arabidopsis Information Resource), 180 iron-deficient responsive genes were detected. Using ATTED-II database, we generated six gene co-expression networks. Among these, two modules of PYE and IRT1 were successfully constructed. There are 30 co-expression genes that are incorporated in the two modules (12 in PYE-module and 18 in IRT1-module). Sixteen of the co-expression genes were well characterized. The remaining genes (14) are poorly or not functionally identified with iron stress. Validation of the 14 genes using real-time PCR showed differential expression under iron-deficiency. Most of the co-expression genes (23/30) could be validated in pye and fit mutant plants with iron-deficiency. We further identified iron-responsive cis-elements upstream of the co-expression genes and found that 22 out of 30 genes contain the iron-responsive motif IDE1. Furthermore, some auxin and ethylene-responsive elements were detected in the promoters of the co-expression genes. These results suggest that some of the genes can be also involved in iron stress response through the phytohormone-responsive pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lower Selenoprotein T Expression and Immune Response in the Immune Organs of Broilers with Exudative Diathesis Due to Selenium Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tingru; Liu, Tianqi; Tan, Siran; Wan, Na; Zhang, Yiming; Li, Shu

    2017-08-05

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether dietary selenium (Se) deficiency would affect the expression of selenoprotein T (SelT) and immune response in the immune organs of broilers. Changes in expression of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress response caused by Se deficiency can lead to organism damage, which in turn leads to immune response. Sixty (1-day-old) broilers were divided into the control group and Se-deficiency group. Animal models with exudative diathesis were duplicated in the broilers by feeding them Se-deficient diet for 20 days. After the Se-deficient group exhibited symptoms of exudative diathesis, all the broilers were euthanized, and their immune organs were taken for analysis. The tissues including spleen, bursa of Fabricius, and thymus were treated to determine the pathological changes (including microscopic and ultramicroscopic), the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of SelT and its synthetase (SecS and SPS1), cytokine mRNA expression levels, and antioxidant status. The microscopic and ultramicroscopic analyses showed that immune tissues were obviously injured in the Se-deficient group. The mRNA expression of SelT was decreased compared with that in the control group. Meanwhile, the mRNA expression levels of SecS and SPS1 were downregulated. In the Se-deficient group, the mRNA expression levels of IL-1R and IL-1β were higher than those of three control organs. Additionally, the IL-2 and INF-γ mRNA expression levels were lower than those of the control group. The activity of CAT was decreased, and the contents of H2O2 and •OH were increased due to Se deficiency. Pearson method analysis showed that the expression of SelT had a positive correlation with IL-2, INF-γ, SecS, and SPS1 and a negative correlation with IL-1R and IL-1β. In summary, these data indicated that Se-deficient diet decreased the SelT expression and its regulation of oxidative stress, and it inhibited a pleiotropic mechanism of the immune

  17. Gene regulation of iron-deficiency responses is associated with carbon monoxide and heme oxydase 1 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Liping

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO as an endogenous gaseous molecule regulates a variety of biological processes in animals. However, CO regulating nutrient stress responses in green alga is largely unknown. On the other hand, heme oxydase (HO1 as a rate-limiting enzyme of the first step for heme degration and to catalyze heme into biliverdin (BV, which is concomitant with releasing of CO and ferrous ions, probably participates in the process of CO-regulating response to nutrient stress in green alga. In this paper, we described an observation that CO could regulate iron-homeostasis in iron-starving Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Exogenous CO at 8 µM was able to prevent the iron deficient-inducing chlorosis and improve chlorophyll accumulation. Expression pattern of FOX1, FTR1 and ferredoxin was up-regulated by CO exposure in iron-deficient mediam. treatment with external CO increasing iron accumulation in iron-deficient C. reinhardtii. Moreover, to get insights into the regulatory role of HO1, we constructed a transgenic alga overexpressing HO1 and HO1 knock-out mutants. The results show that there was no significant influence on chlorosis with HO1 overexpression of C. reinhardtii under iron-deficiency and the chlorophyll accumulation, and gene expression associated with iron deficiency of mutant were greatly improved. Otherwise, those results from HO1 knock-out mutants were opposite to HO1 overexpression mutants. Finally, CO exposure induced NO accumulation in cells. However, such an action could be blocked by NO scavenger cPTIO. These results indicate that CO/HO1 may play an important role in improving green algae adaptation to iron deficiency or cross-talking with NO under the iron deficiency.

  18. Dendritic cells derived from TBP-2-deficient mice are defective in inducing T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Aoi; Nakamura, Hajime; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Oka, Shin-ichi; Yoshihara, Eiji; Liu, Wenrui; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Norihiko; Masutani, Hiroshi; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Iyoda, Tomonori; Inaba, Kayo; Yodoi, Junji

    2008-05-01

    Thioredoxin-binding protein-2 (TBP-2), also known as vitamin D3-up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1), was identified as an endogenous molecule interacting with thioredoxin (TRX). Here, we show that dendritic cells (DC) derived from TBP-2-deficient mice are defective in the function of T cell activation. To compare TBP-2(-/-) DC function with wild-type (WT) DC, we stimulated DC with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Although TBP-2(-/-) DC and WT DC expressed comparable levels of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80 and CD86, the IL-12p40, IL-12p70 and IL-6 productions of TBP-2(-/-) DC were attenuated. In a mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR), the concentrations of IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-10 in the culture supernatant of MLR with TBP-2(-/-) DC were significantly lower than those in the cultures with WT DC. In MLR also, as with LPS stimulation, IL-12p40 and IL-12p70 production from TBP-2(-/-) DC was less than that from WT DC. Proliferation of T cells cultured with TBP-2(-/-) DC was poorer than that with WT DC. In vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in TBP-2(-/-) mice immunized with ovalbumin were significantly reduced compared to WT mice. These results indicate that TBP-2 plays a crucial role in DC to induce T cell responses.

  19. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata eToth

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as C. parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response towards this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi’s virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses.In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host pathogen interactions.

  20. Adult height in children with growth hormone deficiency: a randomized, controlled, growth hormone dose-response trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, T.C.J.; Ridder, M.A. de; Wit, J.M.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Oostdijk, W.; Reeser, H.M.; Otten, B.J.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of 2 growth hormone (GH) doses on adult height (AH) in GH deficiency (GHD). METHODS: A multicenter, randomized, controlled dose-response trial compared attained AH minus target height (TH) between children receiving 0.7 mg/m(2)/day biosynthetic GH (approx. 0.025

  1. Adult Height in Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency: A Randomized, Controlled, Growth Hormone Dose-Response Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, T.C.J.; de Ridder, M.A.J.; Wit, J.M.; Rotteveel, J.; Oostdijk, W.; Reeser, H.M.; Otten, B.J.; Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of 2 growth hormone (GH) doses on adult height (AH) in GH deficiency (GHD). Methods: A multicenter, randomized, controlled dose-response trial compared attained AH minus target height (TH) between children receiving 0.7 mg/m

  2. Evaluation of iodide deficiency in the lactating rat and pup using a biologically based dose response (BBDR) Model***

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biologically-based dose response (BBDR) model for the hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis in the lactating rat and nursing pup was developed to describe the perturbations caused by iodide deficiency on the 1-IPT axis. Model calibrations, carried out by adjusting key model...

  3. Evaluation of iodide deficiency in the lactating rat and pup using a biologically based dose-response model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biologically-based dose response (BBDR) model for the hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (BPT) axis in the lactating rat and nursing pup was developed to describe the perturbations caused by iodide deficiency on the HPT axis. Model calibrations, carried out by adjusting key model p...

  4. IgG Subclasses and Allotypes: From Structure to Effector Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidarsson, Gestur; Dekkers, Gillian; Rispens, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Of the five immunoglobulin isotypes, immunoglobulin G (IgG) is most abundant in human serum. The four subclasses, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4, which are highly conserved, differ in their constant region, particularly in their hinges and upper CH2 domains. These regions are involved in binding to both IgG-Fc receptors (FcγR) and C1q. As a result, the different subclasses have different effector functions, both in terms of triggering FcγR-expressing cells, resulting in phagocytosis or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and activating complement. The Fc-regions also contain a binding epitope for the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), responsible for the extended half-life, placental transport, and bidirectional transport of IgG to mucosal surfaces. However, FcRn is also expressed in myeloid cells, where it participates in both phagocytosis and antigen presentation together with classical FcγR and complement. How these properties, IgG-polymorphisms and post-translational modification of the antibodies in the form of glycosylation, affect IgG-function will be the focus of the current review. PMID:25368619

  5. Gibberellins regulate iron deficiency-response by influencing iron transport and translocation in rice seedlings (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baolan; Wei, Haifang; Xue, Zhen; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2017-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of plant hormones with diverse functions. However, there has been little information on the role of GAs in response to plant nutrient deficiency. To evaluate the roles of GAs in regulation of Fe homeostasis, the effects of GA on Fe accumulation and Fe translocation in rice seedlings were investigated using wild-type, a rice mutant ( eui1 ) displaying enhnaced endogenous GA concentrations due to a defect in GA deactivation, and transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsEUI . Exposure to Fe-deficient medium significantly reduced biomass of rice plants. Both exogenous application of GA and an endogenous increase of bioactive GA enhanced Fe-deficiency response by exaggerating foliar chlorosis and reducing growth. Iron deficiency significantly suppressed production of GA 1 and GA 4 , the biologically active GAs in rice. Exogenous application of GA significantly decreased leaf Fe concentration regardless of Fe supply. Iron concentration in shoot of eui1 mutants was lower than that of WT plants under both Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient conditions. Paclobutrazol, an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis, alleviated Fe-deficiency responses, and overexpression of EUI significantly increased Fe concentration in shoots and roots. Furthermore, both exogenous application of GA and endogenous increase in GA resulting from EUI mutation inhibited Fe translocation within shoots by suppressing OsYSL2 expression, which is involved in Fe transport and translocation. The novel findings provide compelling evidence to support the involvement of GA in mediation of Fe homeostasis in strategy II rice plants by negatively regulating Fe transport and translocation.

  6. Five-year response to growth hormone in children with Noonan syndrome and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavras, Niki; Meazza, Cristina; Pilotta, Alba; Gertosio, Chiara; Pagani, Sara; Tinelli, Carmine; Bozzola, Mauro

    2015-10-06

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by specific features including short stature, distinctive facial dysmorphic features, congenital heart defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, skeletal anomalies and webbing of the neck. Molecular screening has shown that the majority of individuals with NS have a mutation in the PTPN11 gene. Noonan syndrome children may show an impaired growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis. Moreover, recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been shown to improve growth rate in patients with NS, although data are still limited. In the present study, we assessed growth response following GH therapy (0.25 mg/Kg/week) in 5 (2 M and 3 F) GH-deficient NS patients (NSGHD, mean age 8.5 years) and in 5 (2 M and 3 F) idiopathic GH deficient (IGHD, mean age 8.6 years) patients. We also evaluated the safety of rhGH therapy in NS patients with GHD. At the beginning of GH treatment, height and growth rate were statistically lower in NSGHD children than in IGHD ones. During the first three years of rhGH therapy, NSGHD patients showed a slight improvement in height (from -2.71 SDS to -2.44 SDS) and growth rate (from -2.42 SDS to -0.23 SDS), although the values were always significantly lower than in IGHD children. After five years of rhGH treatment, height gain was higher in IGHD children (mean 28.3 cm) than in NSGHD patients (mean 23.6 cm). During the first five years of rhGH therapy, regular cardiological and haematological check-ups were performed, leading to the conclusion that rhGH therapy was safe. In conclusion, pre-pubertal NS children with GHD slightly increased their height and growth rate during the first years of GH therapy, although the response to rhGH treatment was significantly lower than IGHD children. Furthermore, the therapy appeared to be safe since no severe adverse effects were reported, at least during the first five years. However, a close follow-up of these patients is mandatory, especially to

  7. Transcriptome analyses of a salt-tolerant cytokinin-deficient mutant reveal differential regulation of salt stress response by cytokinin deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Nishiyama

    Full Text Available Soil destruction by abiotic environmental conditions, such as high salinity, has resulted in dramatic losses of arable land, giving rise to the need of studying mechanisms of plant adaptation to salt stress aimed at creating salt-tolerant plants. Recently, it has been reported that cytokinins (CKs regulate plant environmental stress responses through two-component systems. A decrease in endogenous CK levels could enhance salt and drought stress tolerance. Here, we have investigated the global transcriptional change caused by a reduction in endogenous CK content under both normal and salt stress conditions. Ten-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type (WT and CK-deficient ipt1,3,5,7 plants were transferred to agar plates containing either 0 mM (control or 200 mM NaCl and maintained at normal growth conditions for 24 h. Our experimental design allowed us to compare transcriptome changes under four conditions: WT-200 mM vs. WT-0 mM, ipt1,3,5,7-0 mM vs. WT-0 mM, ipt1,3,5,7-200 mM vs. ipt1,3,5,7-0 mM and ipt1,3,5,7-200 mM vs. WT-200 mM NaCl. Our results indicated that the expression of more than 10% of all of the annotated Arabidopsis genes was altered by CK deficiency under either normal or salt stress conditions when compared to WT. We found that upregulated expression of many genes encoding either regulatory proteins, such as NAC, DREB and ZFHD transcription factors and the calcium sensor SOS3, or functional proteins, such as late embryogenesis-abundant proteins, xyloglucan endo-transglycosylases, glycosyltransferases, glycoside hydrolases, defensins and glyoxalase I family proteins, may contribute to improved salt tolerance of CK-deficient plants. We also demonstrated that the downregulation of photosynthesis-related genes and the upregulation of several NAC genes may cause the altered morphological phenotype of CK-deficient plants. This study highlights the impact of CK regulation on the well-known stress-responsive signaling pathways, which

  8. Refractory iron-deficiency anemia and gluten intolerance - Response to gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Luis Rodrigo; Álvarez, Dolores Fuentes; Martínez, Isabel Pérez; Mieres, Noemí Alvarez; García, Pilar Niño; García, Ruth de Francisco; Menéndez, Sabino Riestra; Alegre, Santiago Vivas; Goñi, José Luis Olcoz

    2011-07-01

    refractory iron-deficiency anemia has a multifactorial origin related to various gastrointestinal conditions, with celiac disease plus malabsorption and IBD together with isolated gluten intolerance being most common. to determine the prevalence of serum, genetic, and histological markers for gluten intolerance, and to analyze the response to gluten withdrawal from the diet in these patients. a number of patients with refractory anemia were prospectively and consecutively enrolled. A protocol to measure serum (TGt-2), genetic (HLA-DQ2/DQ8), and histological markers for celiac disease was applied. All followed a gluten-free diet for a median 3.6 years. Sustained remission of anemia during follow-up was interpreted as positive response. ninety-eight patients (84% females) with a mean age of 54 years were studied. Anti-TGt2 antibodies were positive in 5% of cases. A total of 67 cases (68%) were haplotype HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 (+). We found villous atrophy (Marsh III) in 13% of patients, and an inflammatory pattern (Marsh I or II) in 13%. All remaining 72 patients (74%) had no histological duodenal changes.Age, anemia duration, number of transfusions, number of parenteral iron doses, and time on a gluten-free diet were all compared according to the presence or absence of villous atrophy and HLA-DQ2/8 positivity, and no significant differences were found for any of the analyzed variables. Response was positive in 92% of subjects. celiac disease with villous atrophy is rarely a cause of refractory anemia. Gluten intolerance with no histological lesions is seen in almost 75% of patients, and therefore plays a relevant role in its development.

  9. Effect of oxygen deficiency on response of CR-39 on board scientific balloons

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, M; Osawa, A; Saitô, T; Yamamoto, K; Hasebe, T; Nakamura, T; Sasaki, H; Yanagita, T; Aglietta, M; Vernetto, S; Castellina, A; Fulgione, W; Saavedra, O; Trinchero, G C

    1999-01-01

    We should be careful about the effect of oxygen deficiency on polymeric track detectors even at balloon altitude. Results of balloon experiments and calibration experiments in a vacuum chamber at different pressures show that the effect of oxygen deficiency becomes serious at a pressure below 10 hPa.

  10. Changes in the proteomic and metabolic profiles of Beta vulgaris root tips in response to iron deficiency and resupply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez-Fernández Ana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants grown under iron deficiency show different morphological, biochemical and physiological changes. These changes include, among others, the elicitation of different strategies to improve the acquisition of Fe from the rhizosphere, the adjustment of Fe homeostasis processes and a reorganization of carbohydrate metabolism. The application of modern techniques that allow the simultaneous and untargeted analysis of multiple proteins and metabolites can provide insight into multiple processes taking place in plants under Fe deficiency. The objective of this study was to characterize the changes induced in the root tip proteome and metabolome of sugar beet plants in response to Fe deficiency and resupply. Results Root tip extract proteome maps were obtained by 2-D isoelectric focusing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and approximately 140 spots were detected. Iron deficiency resulted in changes in the relative amounts of 61 polypeptides, and 22 of them were identified by mass spectrometry (MS. Metabolites in root tip extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-MS, and more than 300 metabolites were resolved. Out of 77 identified metabolites, 26 changed significantly with Fe deficiency. Iron deficiency induced increases in the relative amounts of proteins and metabolites associated to glycolysis, tri-carboxylic acid cycle and anaerobic respiration, confirming previous studies. Furthermore, a protein not present in Fe-sufficient roots, dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine (DMRL synthase, was present in high amounts in root tips from Fe-deficient sugar beet plants and gene transcript levels were higher in Fe-deficient root tips. Also, a marked increase in the relative amounts of the raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs was observed in Fe-deficient plants, and a further increase in these compounds occurred upon short term Fe resupply. Conclusions The increases in DMRL synthase and in RFO sugars were the major changes induced by Fe

  11. Growth hormone deficiency in a dopa-responsive dystonia patient with a novel mutation of guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu; Wang, Dan-Ni; Chen, Wan-Jin; Lin, Xiang; Lin, Min-Ting; Wang, Ning

    2015-05-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia is a rare hereditary movement disorder caused by mutations in the guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) gene. This disease typically manifests in dystonia, with marked diurnal fluctuation and a dramatic response to levodopa. However, growth retardation in dopa-responsive dystonia has rarely been reported, and the etiology of short stature is not clarified. Here, we report a 14-year-old patient with extremities dystonia and short stature. Treatment with levodopa relieved his symptoms and resulted in a height increase. We also investigated the mutation in GCH1 and the etiology of short stature in this case. Sequence analysis of GCH1 revealed a novel mutation (c.695G>T). Laboratory examinations and imaging confirmed the diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency. We conclude that our case reveals a rare feature for dopa-responsive dystonia and suggests a possible pathogenic link between growth hormone deficiency and dopa-responsive dystonia. We recommend levodopa as the first choice for treating dopa-responsive dystonia in children with growth hormone deficiency. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Kernel Subclass Support Vector Description for Face and Human Action Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Mygdalis, Vasileios; Iosifidis, Alexandros; Tefas, Anastasios; Pitas, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Kernel Subclass Support Vector Data Description classifier. We focus on face recognition and human action recognition applications, where we argue that sub-classes are formed within the training class. We modify the standard SVDD optimization problem, so that it exploits subclass information in its optimization process. We extend the proposed method to work in feature spaces of arbitrary dimensionality. We evaluate the proposed method in publicly available face r...

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of F-bZIP transcription factors indicates conservation of the zinc deficiency response across land plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro, Pedro Humberto Araújo R F; Lilay, Grmay Hailu; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors control important developmental and physiological processes in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the three gene F-bZIP subfamily has been associated with zinc deficiency and salt stress response. Benefiting from the present abundance of plant genomic...... data, we performed an evolutionary and structural characterization of plant F-bZIPs. We observed divergence during seed plant evolution, into two groups and inferred different selective pressures for each. Group 1 contains AtbZIP19 and AtbZIP23 and appears more conserved, whereas Group 2, containing...... of AtZIP4. A survey of AtZIP4 orthologs promoters across different plant taxa revealed an enrichment of the Zinc Deficiency Response Element (ZDRE) to which both AtbZIP19/23 bind. Overall, our results indicate that while the AtbZIP24 function in the regulation of the salt stress response may...

  14. Factor XI Deficiency Alters the Cytokine Response and Activation of Contact Proteases during Polymicrobial Sepsis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles E Bane

    Full Text Available Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is often accompanied by abnormalities of blood coagulation. Prior work with a mouse model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP suggested that the protease factor XIa contributed to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC and to the cytokine response during sepsis. We investigated the importance of factor XI to cytokine and coagulation responses during the first 24 hours after CLP. Compared to wild type littermates, factor XI-deficient (FXI-/- mice had a survival advantage after CLP, with smaller increases in plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-10 and delayed IL-1β and IL-6 responses. Plasma levels of serum amyloid P, an acute phase protein, were increased in wild type mice 24 hours post-CLP, but not in FXI-/- mice, supporting the impression of a reduced inflammatory response in the absence of factor XI. Surprisingly, there was little evidence of DIC in mice of either genotype. Plasma levels of the contact factors factor XII and prekallikrein were reduced in WT mice after CLP, consistent with induction of contact activation. However, factor XII and PK levels were not reduced in FXI-/- animals, indicating factor XI deficiency blunted contact activation. Intravenous infusion of polyphosphate into WT mice also induced changes in factor XII, but had much less effect in FXI deficient mice. In vitro analysis revealed that factor XIa activates factor XII, and that this reaction is enhanced by polyanions such polyphosphate and nucleic acids. These data suggest that factor XI deficiency confers a survival advantage in the CLP sepsis model by altering the cytokine response to infection and blunting activation of the contact (kallikrein-kinin system. The findings support the hypothesis that factor XI functions as a bidirectional interface between contact activation and thrombin generation, allowing the two processes to influence each other.

  15. Delayed auditory conduction in diabetes: is metformin-induced vitamin B12 deficiency responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattar, D; Khaliq, F; Vaney, N; Madhu, S V

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the functional integrity of the auditory pathway in patients with diabetes taking metformin. A further aim is to assess its association with vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Thirty diabetics taking metformin and 30 age-matched non-diabetic controls were enrolled. Stimulus-related potentials and vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in all the subjects. The diabetics showed deficient vitamin B12 levels and delayed wave III latency and III-V interpeak latency in the right ear and delayed Na and Pa wave latencies in the left ear compared with the controls. The dose and duration of metformin showed no association with the stimulusrelated potentials. Therefore, although vitamin B12 levels were deficient and auditory conduction impairment was present in the diabetics on metformin, this impairment cannot be attributed to the vitamin B12 deficiency.

  16. Delayed auditory conduction in diabetes: is metformin-induced vitamin B12 deficiency responsible?

    OpenAIRE

    Khattar, Deepti; Khaliq, Farah; Vaney, Neelam; Madhu, Sri Venkata

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the functional integrity of the auditory pathway in patients with diabetes taking metformin. A further aim is to assess its association with vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Thirty diabetics taking metformin and 30 age-matched non-diabetic controls were enrolled. Stimulus-related potentials and vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in all the subjects. The diabetics showed deficient vitamin B12 levels and delayed wave III latency and III–V interpeak ...

  17. Acclimative changes in root epidermal cell fate in response to Fe and P deficiency: a specific role for auxin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, A; Schmidt, W

    2001-01-01

    Root hair formation and the development of transfer cells in the rhizodermis was investigated in various existing auxin-related mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana and in the tomato mutant diageotropica. Wild-type Arabidopsis plants showed increased formation of root hairs when the seedlings were cultivated in Fe- or P-free medium. These extranumerary hairs were located in normal positions and in positions normally occupied by nonhair cells, e.g., over periclinal walls of underlying cortical cells. Defects in auxin transport or reduced auxin sensitivity inhibited the formation of root hairs in response to Fe deficiency completely but did only partly affect initiation and elongation of hairs in P-deficient roots. Application of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid or the auxin analog 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid did not rescue the phenotype of the auxin-resistant axr2 mutant under control and Fe-deficient conditions, indicating that functional AXR2 product is required for translating the Fe deficiency signal into the formation of extra hairs. The development of extra hairs in axr2 roots under P-replete conditions was not affected by auxin antagonists, suggesting that this process is independent of auxin signaling. In roots of tomato, growth under Fe-deficient conditions induced the formation of transfer cells in the root epidermis. Transfer cell frequency was enhanced by application of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid but was not inhibited by the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid. In the diageotropica mutant, which displays reduced sensitivity to auxin, transfer cells appeared to develop in both Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient roots. Similar to the wild type, no reduction in transfer cell frequency was observed after application of the above auxin transport inhibitor. These data suggest that auxin has no primary function in inducing transfer cell development; the formation of transfer cells, however, appears to be affected by

  18. Investigating B Cell Development, Natural and Primary Antibody Responses in Ly-6A/Sca-1 Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan A Jones

    Full Text Available Ly-6A/Stem cell antigen-1 (Ly-6A/Sca-1 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expressed on many cell types including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and early lymphoid-specific progenitors. Ly-6A/Sca-1 is expressed on CD4+ T cells and plays a role in regulating cellular responses to foreign antigens. The role of Ly-6A/Sca-1 in primary antibody responses has not been defined. To investigate whether Ly-6A/Sca-1 functions in humoral immunity, we first injected Ly-6A/Sca-1-deficient and wild-type control mice with chicken ovalbumin (c-Ova protein mixed with an adjuvant. We then assessed the ability of the mice to generate a primary antibody response against cOva. We further examined the development of B cells and circulating antibody isotypes in non-immunized Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient mice to determine if Ly6A/Sca-1 functions in development irrespective of antigen-specific immune activation. Ly-6A/Sca-1/Sca-1-deficient mice did not show any significant changes in the number of B lymphocytes in the bone marrow and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Interestingly, Ly-6A/Sca-1/Sca-1-/- mice have significantly elevated serum levels of IgA with λ light chains compared to wild type controls. B cell clusters with high reactivity to anti-IgA λ monoclonal antibody were detected in the lamina propria of the gut, though this was not observed in the bone marrow and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Despite these differences, the Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient mice generated a similar primary antibody response when compared to the wild-type mice. In summary, we conclude that the primary antibody response to cOva antigen is similar in Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient and sufficient mice. In addition, we report significantly higher expression of the immunoglobulin λ light chain by B cells in lamina propria of Ly-6A/Sca-1deficient mice when compared to the wild-type control.

  19. [Severe vitamin D deficiency in children from Punta Arenas, Chile: Influence of nutritional status on the response to supplementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Karin; Le Roy, Catalina; Iñiguez, Germán; Borzutzky, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    There is a high risk of vitamin D (VD) deficiency in the population of southern Chile that can be treated with VD supplements. Weight excess (WE) can influence the response to supplements. To study the prevalence of VD deficiency and the effect of cholecalciferol (VD3) supplements in healthy children from Punta Arenas, Chile, and evaluate a possible association with nutritional status. Demographic and anthropometric data, as well as laboratory assessment of serum 25-hidroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and other bone metabolism parameters were evaluated. After baseline evaluation, children were supplemented with VD3 1600 IU/day for one month, after which 25OHD was retested. Of the 108 children studied, 50% were boys, and had a mean age of 9.6±0.5 years. Nutritional assessment showed that 39% had normal weight, 46% were overweight, and 15% were obese. Median 25OHD was 10.9ng/ml: 96.3% had deficiency (30ng/ml). Children with WE had a significantly lower increase in 25OHD than children with normal weight (5±5.5 vs. 7.7±4.9, p=03). Children with WE may require 32% higher VD dose than normal weight children to attain the same 25OHD concentration. Chilean schoolchildren from Punta Arenas have high prevalence of WE and VD deficiency, with a majority in the range of severe VD deficiency. WE interferes in the response to VD supplementation, leading to a lower increase in 25OHD. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Methyl donor deficiency in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts induces ER stress as an important part of the proteome response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emilie; Deval, Christiane; Jousse, Céline; Mazur, Andrzej; Brachet, Patrick; Comte, Blandine

    2015-02-01

    Deficiency of methyl donors (MDs, folate, vitamin B12, and choline) causes increased plasma level of Hcy, a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Previously, we showed that maternal MD deprivation altered the cardiac proteome of rat pups. To better understand its impact on cardiac cells, we exposed rat H9c2 cardiomyoblasts to selectively a synthetic folate- or MD-deficient (FD or MDD) medium. We found that a 4-day exposure to the FD medium, unlike the MDD one, did not cause an abnormal extracellular release of Hcy relatively to similar exposure to the control complete (C) medium. Comparative analyses of the proteomes of FD, MDD, and C cells identified 7 and 6 proteins up- or downregulated by either deficiency, respectively. Most proteins were found interrelated in a single network dealing with "post-translational modification, protein folding and cell death/survival" (FD cells) or "DNA replication/recombination/repair and cell morphology/compromise" (MDD cells). Both deficiencies altered the protein and mRNA levels of the chaperones α-crystallin B, protein disulfide-isomerase A4, and prohibitin. This was concurrent with rapid induction of several key genes of the ER stress response, notably gadd153/chop, and increased expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, Hrd1, and MAFbx. In conclusion, the effects of folate and MD deficiencies on the cardiomyoblast proteome display some dissimilarities possibly related to different cellular production of Hcy. In both cases activation of the ER stress could occur in response to accumulation of ubiquitinated misfolded proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Apical versus Basal Neurogenesis Directs Cortical Interneuron Subclass Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Petros

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fate determination in the mammalian telencephalon, with its diversity of neuronal subtypes and relevance to neuropsychiatric disease, remains a critical area of study in neuroscience. Most studies investigating this topic focus on the diversity of neural progenitors within spatial and temporal domains along the lateral ventricles. Often overlooked is whether the location of neurogenesis within a fate-restricted domain is associated with, or instructive for, distinct neuronal fates. Here, we use in vivo fate mapping and the manipulation of neurogenic location to demonstrate that apical versus basal neurogenesis influences the fate determination of major subgroups of cortical interneurons derived from the subcortical telencephalon. Somatostatin-expressing interneurons arise mainly from apical divisions along the ventricular surface, whereas parvalbumin-expressing interneurons originate predominantly from basal divisions in the subventricular zone. As manipulations that shift neurogenic location alter interneuron subclass fate, these results add an additional dimension to the spatial-temporal determinants of neuronal fate determination.

  2. Changes in spectral reflectance of wheat leaves in response to specific macronutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Beyl, Caula A.

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants, deficiency of an essential element may drastically affect growth, appearance, and most importantly yield. Wheat, the focus of this study, is one of the crops studied in the CELSS program. Information about nutrient deficiencies in crops grown in controlled environment is essential to optimize food productivity. The main objective of this study was to determine whether deficiency of Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K), Calcium (Ca) and Magnesium (M) alters spectral reflectance properties of wheat leaves. Plants were grown in the greenhouse and growth chamber, in a modified Hoagland’s nutrient solution. Spectral reflectance of fully expanded wheat leaves from 280 to 1100 nm, nutrient concentrations (N, P, K, and Ca) and chlorophyll (Chl) were determined when deficiency symptoms were first evident (≈6 7 weeks). Chlorophyll content and fresh and dry weight, were used to assess the severity of the nutrient stress. All nutrient deficiencies affected chlorophyll content and generally increased reflectance in the visible (VIS) 400 700 nm and infrared (IR) 700 1100 nm ranges. Magnesium and nitrogen deficiencies had the most pronounced effect on chlorophyll concentration height, and reflectance. All macronutrient deficiencies tested reduced chlorophyll concentration, increase reflectance in the visible range and caused a shift in the position of the red edge (the point of maximum slope on the reflectance spectrum of vegetation between red and near-infrared wavelengths) toward shorter or longer wavelengths; depending upon the element. In the greenhouse, N and Mg induced the greatest increase in reflectance of 33% and 25% in the VI range and 86% and 53% in the IR range, respectively. However, in the growth chamber, an increase of 97% and 25% occurred in the VI range, and 20% and 33% in the IR range, respectively. In the IR range in the growth chamber, P, K, and Ca deficiency caused a reduction in reflectance (412 770 nm

  3. Is Metformin-Induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency Responsible for Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattar, Deepti; Khaliq, Farah; Vaney, Neelam; Madhu, S V

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has its deleterious effects on various aspects of cognition such as memory function, executive function, and information-processing speed. The present study aims to assess cognition in diabetes patients and also tries to find its association with Vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Thirty diabetics taking metformin and thirty nondiabetic controls were enrolled. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and serum Vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in them. Vitamin B12 levels were found to be deficient, and latencies of waves P200 and P300 were prolonged in the diabetics as compared to the controls. The dose and duration of metformin had no association with the ERPs. Although the Vitamin B12 levels were deficient in diabetics on metformin, this is not the reason behind the cognitive impairment found in them.

  4. Calcium-deficient diet attenuates carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice through suppression of lipid peroxidation and inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Yoshioka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate whether a Ca-deficient diet has an attenuating effect on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. Four-week-old male ddY mice were fed a Ca-deficient diet for 4 weeks as a part of the experimental protocol. While hypocalcemia was observed, there was no significant change in body weight. The CCl4-exposed hypocalcemic mice exhibited a significant decrease in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities at both 6 h and 24 h even though markers of renal function remained unchanged. Moreover, lipid peroxidation was impaired and total antioxidant power was partially recovered in the liver. Studies conducted in parallel with the biochemical analysis revealed that hepatic histopathological damage was attenuated 24 h post CCl4 injection in hypocalcemic mice fed the Ca-deficient diet. Finally, this diet impaired CCl4-induced inflammatory responses. Although upregulation of Ca concentration is a known indicator of terminal progression to cell death in the liver, these results suggest that Ca is also involved in other phases of CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity, via regulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  5. Parathyroid hormone response to severe vitamin D deficiency is sex associated: an observational study of 571 hip fracture inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Monaco, M; Castiglioni, C; Vallero, F; Di Monaco, R; Tappero, R

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the association between sex and parathyroid hormone response to severe vitamin D deficiency after hip fracture. Cross-sectional study. Rehabilitation hospital in Italy. 571 consecutive inpatients with hip fracture and severe vitamin D deficiency (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D secondary hyperparathyroidism (serum PTH >75pg/ml) or functional hypoparathyroidism, i.e., inappropriate normal levels of PTH (≤75pg/ml). Among the 571 patients, 336 (59%) had functional hypoparathyroidism, whereas 235 (41%) had secondary hyperparathyroidism. PTH status was significantly different between sexes (p=0.003): we found functional hypoparathyroidism in 61% of women and 43% of men (secondary hyperparathyroidism in 39% of women and 57% of men). The significance of the between-sex difference was maintained after adjustment for age, estimated GFR, phosphate, albumin-adjusted total calcium, albumin, Barthel index scores, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and hip fracture type (either cervical or trochanteric). The adjusted odds ratio was 1.85 (95%CI from 1.09 to 3.13; p=0.023). Data shows that PTH response to vitamin D deficiency was sex-associated following a fracture of the hip. The higher prevalence of secondary hyperparathyroidism may play a role in the known prognostic disadvantage found in hip-fracture men.

  6. Deficiency of PdxR in Streptococcus mutans affects vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S; Bitoun, J P; Nguyen, A H; Bozner, D; Yao, X; Wen, Z T

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of the human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in tenacious biofilms. The SMU864 locus, designated pdxR, is predicted to encode a member of the novel MocR/GabR family proteins, which are featured with a winged helix DNA-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain highly homologous to the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aspartate aminotransferases. A pdxR-deficient mutant, TW296, was constructed using allelic exchange. PdxR deficiency in S. mutans had little effect on cell morphology and growth when grown in brain heart infusion. However, when compared with its parent strain, UA159, the PdxR-deficient mutant displayed major defects in acid tolerance response and formed significantly fewer biofilms (P mutans is known to require vitamin B6 to grow in defined medium, B6 vitamers, especially pyridoxal, were strongly inhibitory at millimolar concentrations, against S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. Our results suggest that PdxR in S. mutans plays an important role in regulation of vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Attenuated Heart Rate Response is Associated with Hypocretin Deficiency in Patients with Narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Knudsen, Stine; Petersen, Eva Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Our results show that autonomic dysfunction is part of the narcoleptic phenotype, and that hypocretin-1 deficiency is the primary predictor of this dysfunction. This finding suggests that the hypocretin system participates in the modulation of cardiovascular function at rest. CITATION: Sorensen G...

  8. Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome with Carbohydrate-Responsive Symptoms but without Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, Anne; Assmann, Birgit; Klepper, Joerg; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. The main symptoms are epilepsy, developmental delay, movement disorders, and deceleration of head circumference. A ketogenic diet has been shown to be effective in controlling epilepsy in GLUT1-DS. We report a female…

  9. Effect of threonine deficiency on intestinal integrity and immune response to coccidiosis in broiler chicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    For this study, threonine (Thr) deficiency was hypothesized to exacerbate the intestinal damage induced by feed withdrawal and coccidiosis infection because of its high obligatory requirement of the gut. Two dietary Thr treatments (0.49 and 0.90%) were fed to chicks from 1-21 d of age. At 13 d of a...

  10. The Inflammatory Response in Acyl-CoA Oxidase 1 Deficiency (Pseudoneonatal Adrenoleukodystrophy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Hajj, H. I.; Vluggens, A.; Andreoletti, P.; Ragot, K.; Mandard, S.; Kersten, S.; Waterham, H. R.; Lizard, G.; Wanders, R. J. A.; Reddy, J. K.; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    Among several peroxisomal neurodegenerative disorders, the pseudoneonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (P-NALD) is characterized by the acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1) deficiency, which leads to the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids ( VLCFA) and inflammatory demyelination. However, the

  11. Responses of spinach to salinity and nutrient deficiency in growth, physiology and nutritional value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinity and nutrient depleted soil are major constraints to crop production, especially for vegetable crops. The effects of salinity and nutrient deficiency on spinach were evaluated in sand cultures under greenhouse conditions. Plants were watered every day with Hoagland nutrition solution, depriv...

  12. Mechanisms involved in calcium deficiency development in tomato fruit in response to gibberellins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although gibberellins (GAs) have been shown to induce the calcium deficiency disorder, blossom-end rot (BER), development in tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum), the mechanisms involved remain largely unexplored. Our objectives were to better understand how GAs and a GA biosynthesis inhibitor affect...

  13. Antigen-specific immune responsiveness and lymphocyte recruitment in leukocyte adhesion deficiency type II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, T. W.; Etzioni, A.; Pollack, S.; Pals, S. T.

    1997-01-01

    The leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome type II (LAD-II) is caused by a general defect in fucose metabolism, which leads to the absence of fucosylated sugar determinants such as the selectin ligand SLe(x). In view of the important role of selectins in lymphocyte migration and homing, we have

  14. An ABC transporter complex encoded by Aluminum Sensitive 3 and NAP3 is required for phosphate deficiency responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belal, Rania; Tang, Renjie; Li, Yangping; Mabrouk, Yasser; Badr, Effat; Luan, Sheng

    Phosphate is essential for cell metabolism in all organisms. As it is often limiting in the soil, plants have evolved various mechanisms to cope with low-phosphate conditions. Here, we report that Aluminum Sensitive 3 and NAP3, two genes previously identified to function in aluminum tolerance, play a critical role in plant response to phosphate deficiency. Two T-DNA insertional alleles of ALS3 gene in Arabidopsis showed hypersensitive responses to phosphate limiting conditions. Compared to the wild type, als3 mutant plants exhibited more severe root growth inhibition and developed more root hairs under phosphate starvation. Interestingly, these phenotypic changes occurred only when the low-phosphate medium is supplemented with sucrose, suggesting that ALS3 regulates low-phosphate response in a sugar-dependent manner. Furthermore, NAP3, a gene encoding the nucleotide binding domain protein that physically interacts with ALS3, was implicated in the same pathway in response to low-P. The nap3 mutant showed the same phenotype as the als3 mutant when grown on phosphate depletion medium. We conclude that ALS3 and NAP3 protein form an ABC transporter complex that is required for sugar-dependent response to phosphate deficiency. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. A modified choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet reduces morbidity and retains a liver progenitor cell response in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Passman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE dietary model induces chronic liver damage, and stimulates liver progenitor cell (LPC-mediated repair. Long-term CDE administration leads to hepatocellular carcinoma in rodents and lineage-tracing studies show that LPCs differentiate into functional hepatocytes in this model. The CDE diet was first modified for mice by our laboratory by separately administering choline-deficient chow and ethionine in the drinking water (CD+E diet. Although this CD+E diet is widely used, concerns with variability in weight loss, morbidity, mortality and LPC response have been raised by researchers who have adopted this model. We propose that these inconsistencies are due to differential consumption of chow and ethionine in the drinking water, and that incorporating ethionine in the choline-deficient chow, and altering the strength, will achieve better outcomes. Therefore, C57Bl/6 mice, 5 and 6 weeks of age, were fed an all-inclusive CDE diet of various strengths (67% to 100% for 3 weeks. The LPC response was quantitated and cell lines were derived. We found that animal survival, LPC response and liver damage are correlated with CDE diet strength. The 67% and 75% CDE diet administered to mice older than 5 weeks and greater than 18 g provides a consistent and acceptable level of animal welfare and induces a substantial LPC response, permitting their isolation and establishment of cell lines. This study shows that an all-inclusive CDE diet for mice reproducibly induces an LPC response conducive to in vivo studies and isolation, whilst minimizing morbidity and mortality.

  16. The isotype and IgG subclass distribution of anti-carbamylated protein antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Delft, Myrthe A M; Verheul, Marije K; Burgers, Leonie E; Derksen, Veerle F A M; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; van der Woude, Diane; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Trouw, Leendert A

    2017-08-15

    Anti-carbamylated protein (anti-CarP) antibodies have recently been reported to occur in around 45% of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to have prognostic and diagnostic properties. At present, the breadth and molecular make-up of the anti-CarP antibody response is ill defined. To understand the anti-CarP antibody immune response and potential immune effector mechanisms it can recruit, we determined the anti-CarP antibody isotype and IgG-subclass usage in RA patients. Anti-CarP antibody IgM, IgA, and IgG or IgG subclasses were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in sera from 373 unselected RA patients and 196 healthy controls. An additional 114 anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) and anti-CarP IgG double-positive patients were selected to study the concomitant presence of both antibody systems. Anti-CarP IgG was present in around 45% of the patients and comprised all anti-CarP IgG subclasses. The presence of anti-CarP IgG1 particularly associates with radiological damage. Anti-CarP IgM was detected in 16% of RA patients, even in anti-CarP IgG-positive individuals, and is indicative of an actively ongoing immune response. Around 45% of the patients were positive for IgA which included ACPA-positive cases but also 24% of the ACPA-negative cases. In ACPA and anti-CarP double-positive patients, the distribution and number of isotypes and IgG subclasses was similar for both autoantibodies at the group level, but substantial variation was observed within individual patient samples. In RA, the anti-CarP antibody response uses a broad spectrum of isotypes and seems to be an actively ongoing immune reaction. Furthermore, the anti-CarP and ACPA autoantibody responses seems to be differentially regulated.

  17. Evaluation of cysticercus-specific IgG (total and subclasses and IgE antibody responses in cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with neurocysticercosis showing intrathecal production of specific IgG antibodies Avaliação das respostas de anticorpos anti-cisticercos IgG (total e subclasses e IgE em amostras de líquido cefalorraquidiano de pacientes com neurocisticercose apresentando produção intratecal de anticorpos específicos IgG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisandra Akemi Suzuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA standardized with vesicular fluid of Taenia solium cysticerci was used to screen for IgG (total and subclasses and IgE antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from patients with neurocysticercosis showing intrathecal production of specific IgG antibodies and patients with other neurological disorders. The following results were obtained: IgG-ELISA: 100% sensitivity (median of the ELISA absorbances (MEA=1.17 and 100% specificity; IgG1-ELISA: 72.7% sensitivity (MEA=0.49 and 100% specificity; IgG2-ELISA: 81.8% sensitivity (MEA=0.46 and 100% specificity; IgG3-ELISA: 63.6% sensitivity (MEA=0.12 and 100% specificity; IgG4-ELISA: 90.9% sensitivity (MEA=0.85 and 100% specificity; IgE-ELISA 93.8% sensitivity (MEA=0.60 and 100% specificity. There were no significant differences between the sensitivities and specificities in the detection of IgG-ELISA and IgE-ELISA, although in CSF samples from patients with neurocysticercosis the MEA of the IgG-ELISA was significantly higher than that of the IgE-ELISA. The sensitivity and MEA values of the IgG4-ELISA were higher than the corresponding values for the other IgG subclasses. Future studies should address the contribution of IgG4 and IgE antibodies to the physiopathology of neurocysticercosis.No presente estudo, uma reação imunoenzimática (ELISA padronizada com o fluido vesicular de cisticercos de Taenia solium foi utilizada para avaliar as respostas de anticorpos anti-cisticercos IgG (total e subclasses e IgE em amostras de líquido cefalorraquidiano (LCR de pacientes com neurocisticercose apresentando produção intratecal de anticorpos específicos IgG e pacientes com outras desordens neurológicas. Os seguintes resultados foram obtidos: ELISA-IgG: 100% de sensibilidade (mediana das absorbâncias das reações ELISA (MAE=1,17 e especificidade 100%; ELISA-IgG1: sensibilidade 72,7% (MAE=0,49 e especificidade 100%; ELISA-IgG2

  18. Foreign body response to subcutaneous biomaterial implants in a mast cell-deficient Kit(w-Sh) murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avula, M N; Rao, A N; McGill, L D; Grainger, D W; Solzbacher, F

    2014-05-01

    Mast cells (MCs)_are recognized for their functional role in wound-healing and allergic and inflammatory responses - host responses that are frequently detrimental to implanted biomaterials if extended beyond acute reactivity. These tissue reactions impact especially on the performance of sensing implants such as continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices. Our hypothesis that effective blockade of MC activity around implants could alter the host foreign body response (FBR) and enhance the in vivo lifetime of these implantable devices motivated this study. Stem cell factor and its ligand c-KIT receptor are critically important for MC survival, differentiation and degranulation. Therefore, an MC-deficient sash mouse model was used to assess MC relationships to the in vivo performance of CGM implants. Additionally, local delivery of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that inhibits c-KIT activity was also used to evaluate the role of MCs in modulating the FBR. Model sensor implants comprising polyester fibers coated with a rapidly dissolving polymer coating containing drug-releasing degradable microspheres were implanted subcutaneously in sash mice for various time points, and the FBR was evaluated for chronic inflammation and fibrous capsule formation around the implants. No significant differences were observed in the foreign body capsule formation between control and drug-releasing implant groups in MC-deficient mice. However, fibrous encapsulation was significantly greater around the drug-releasing implants in sash mice compared to drug-releasing implants in wild-type (e.g. MC-competent) mice. These results provide insights into the role of MCs in the FBR, suggesting that MC deficiency provides alternative pathways for host inflammatory responses to implanted biomaterials. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Asma y deficiencia de subclases de IgG Asthma and IgG subclases deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Santamaría Ortiz

    1995-04-01

    G deficiency was found in four steroid. dependent patients. Serum levels of IgG subclasses 1 to 4 were measured by means of a sandwich-like ELISA with specific monoclonal antibodies. One or more subclass deficiencies were present In 55.6% of the patients. Significant differences were not found between the following groups: steroid and nonsteroid dependent patients; allergic or intrinsic, asthma; and individuals with or without history of infection. IgG 1 deficiency was the most commonly found: It was present in 46.7% of the patients, either as an isolated disorder or combined with alteration of other subclasses. Deficiency of other subclasses was present in the following proportions: 31.1% for IgG2; 24.4% for IgG3 and 17.8 for IgG4. The high incidence of subclass deficiency may be due to steroid action or to primary Immune defects leading to disorders of IgG synthesis. Such situation might be responsible for the aggressive behavior of the disease.

  20. Interaction between ATM and PARP-1 in response to DNA damage and sensitization of ATM deficient cells through PARP inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Quesada, Rocío; Muñoz-Gámez, José Antonio; Martín-Oliva, David; Peralta, Andreína; Valenzuela, Ma Teresa; Matínez-Romero, Rubén; Quiles-Pérez, Rosa; Murcia, Josiane Menissier-de; de Murcia, Gilbert; de Almodóvar, Mariano Ruiz; Oliver, F Javier

    2007-01-01

    ATM and PARP-1 are two of the most important players in the cell's response to DNA damage. PARP-1 and ATM recognize and bound to both single and double strand DNA breaks in response to different triggers. Here we report that ATM and PARP-1 form a molecular complex in vivo in undamaged cells and this association increases after γ-irradiation. ATM is also modified by PARP-1 during DNA damage. We have also evaluated the impact of PARP-1 absence or inhibition on ATM-kinase activity and have found that while PARP-1 deficient cells display a defective ATM-kinase activity and reduced γ-H2AX foci formation in response to γ-irradiation, PARP inhibition on itself is able to activate ATM-kinase. PARP inhibition induced γ H2AX foci accumulation, in an ATM-dependent manner. Inhibition of PARP also induces DNA double strand breaks which were dependent on the presence of ATM. As consequence ATM deficient cells display an increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In summary our results show that while PARP-1 is needed in the response of ATM to gamma irradiation, the inhibition of PARP induces DNA double strand breaks (which are resolved in and ATM-dependent pathway) and activates ATM kinase. PMID:17459151

  1. Interaction between ATM and PARP-1 in response to DNA damage and sensitization of ATM deficient cells through PARP inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Murcia Gilbert

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ATM and PARP-1 are two of the most important players in the cell's response to DNA damage. PARP-1 and ATM recognize and bound to both single and double strand DNA breaks in response to different triggers. Here we report that ATM and PARP-1 form a molecular complex in vivo in undamaged cells and this association increases after γ-irradiation. ATM is also modified by PARP-1 during DNA damage. We have also evaluated the impact of PARP-1 absence or inhibition on ATM-kinase activity and have found that while PARP-1 deficient cells display a defective ATM-kinase activity and reduced γ-H2AX foci formation in response to γ-irradiation, PARP inhibition on itself is able to activate ATM-kinase. PARP inhibition induced γ H2AX foci accumulation, in an ATM-dependent manner. Inhibition of PARP also induces DNA double strand breaks which were dependent on the presence of ATM. As consequence ATM deficient cells display an increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In summary our results show that while PARP-1 is needed in the response of ATM to gamma irradiation, the inhibition of PARP induces DNA double strand breaks (which are resolved in and ATM-dependent pathway and activates ATM kinase.

  2. Comparison of response to 2-years' growth hormone treatment in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency, born small for gestational age, idiopathic short stature, or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Peter A; Sävendahl, Lars; Oliver, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have compared the response to growth hormone (GH) treatment between indications such as isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD), born small for gestational age (SGA), idiopathic short stature (ISS), and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD). The aim of this analysis of data......, collected from two large ongoing observational outcome studies, was to evaluate growth and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) response data for children of short stature with IGHD, MPHD, SGA, or ISS following two years of treatment with the recombinant GH product Norditropin® (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd...

  3. Is Metformin-Induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency Responsible for Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes?

    OpenAIRE

    Deepti Khattar; Farah Khaliq; Neelam Vaney; S V Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has its deleterious effects on various aspects of cognition such as memory function, executive function, and information-processing speed. The present study aims to assess cognition in diabetes patients and also tries to find its association with Vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Materials and Methods: Thirty diabetics taking metformin and thirty nondiabetic controls were enrolled. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and serum Vitamin B12 levels were eva...

  4. A Founder Mutation in the GK1 Gene Is Responsible for Galactokinase Deficiency in Roma (Gypsies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaydjieva, Luba; Perez-Lezaun, Anna; Angelicheva, Dora; Onengut, Suna; Dye, Danielle; Bosshard, Nils U.; Jordanova, Albena; Savov, Alexei; Yanakiev, Peter; Kremensky, Ivo; Radeva, Brigitta; Hallmayer, Joachim; Markov, Arseni; Nedkova, Vanya; Tournev, Ivailo; Aneva, Lidia; Gitzelmann, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Summary Galactokinase deficiency is an inborn error in the first step of galactose metabolism. Its major clinical manifestation is the development of cataracts in the first weeks of life. It has also been suggested that carriers of the deficiency are predisposed to presenile cataracts developing at age 20–50 years. Newborn screening data suggest that the gene frequency is very low worldwide but is higher among the Roma in Europe. Since the cloning of the galactokinase gene (GK1) in 1995, only two disease-causing mutations, both confined to single families, have been identified. Here we present the results of a study of six affected Romani families from Bulgaria, where index patients with galactokinase deficiency have been detected by the mass screening. Genetic linkage mapping placed the disease locus on 17q, and haplotype analysis revealed a small conserved region of homozygosity. Using radiation hybrid mapping, we have shown that GK1 is located in this region. The founder Romani mutation identified in this study is a single nucleotide substitution in GK1 resulting in the replacement of the conserved proline residue at amino acid position 28 with threonine (P28T). The P28T carrier rate in this endogamous population is ∼5%, suggesting that the mutation may be an important cause of early childhood blindness in countries with a sizeable Roma minority. PMID:10521295

  5. Subclass mapping: identifying common subtypes in independent disease data sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujin Hoshida

    Full Text Available Whole genome expression profiles are widely used to discover molecular subtypes of diseases. A remaining challenge is to identify the correspondence or commonality of subtypes found in multiple, independent data sets generated on various platforms. While model-based supervised learning is often used to make these connections, the models can be biased to the training data set and thus miss inherent, relevant substructure in the test data. Here we describe an unsupervised subclass mapping method (SubMap, which reveals common subtypes between independent data sets. The subtypes within a data set can be determined by unsupervised clustering or given by predetermined phenotypes before applying SubMap. We define a measure of correspondence for subtypes and evaluate its significance building on our previous work on gene set enrichment analysis. The strength of the SubMap method is that it does not impose the structure of one data set upon another, but rather uses a bi-directional approach to highlight the common substructures in both. We show how this method can reveal the correspondence between several cancer-related data sets. Notably, it identifies common subtypes of breast cancer associated with estrogen receptor status, and a subgroup of lymphoma patients who share similar survival patterns, thus improving the accuracy of a clinical outcome predictor.

  6. Truly selective primary IgM deficiency is probably very rare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, L M A; Macken, T; Creemers, M C W; Pruijt, J F M; Eijk, J J J; de Vries, E

    2017-10-06

    Isolated decreased serum-immunoglobulin (Ig)M has been associated with severe and/or recurrent infections, atopy and autoimmunity. However, the reported high prevalence of clinical problems in IgM-deficient patients may reflect the skewed tertiary centre population studied so far. Also, many papers on IgM deficiency have included patients with more abnormalities than simply IgM-deficiency. We studied truly selective primary IgM deficiency according to the diagnostic criteria of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID) (true sIgMdef) by reviewing the literature (261 patients with primary decreased serum-IgM in 46 papers) and analysing retrospectively all patients with decreased serum-IgM in a large teaching hospital in 's-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands [1 July 2005-23 March 2016; n = 8049 IgM IgG+IgA normal/IgM deficiencies (unPAD) instead. The diagnosis was often uncertain (possible sIgMdef): data on IgG subclasses and/or vaccination responses were lacking in 192 of 261 (74%) literature cases and 42 of 45 (93%) cases from our cohort. Our results also illustrate the clinical challenge of determining the relevance of a serum sample with decreased IgM; a larger cohort of true sIgMdef patients is needed to explore fully its clinical consequences. The ESID online Registry would be a useful tool for this. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  7. Epidermal filaggrin deficiency mediates increased systemic T-helper 17 immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, C. M.; Petersen, T. H.; Bandier, J.

    2016-01-01

    cells. We evaluated ft/ft mice and wild-type (WT) control mice for interleukin (IL)-17-producing CD4+ T cells in naive mice and following 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) challenge. In addition, the T-cell receptor (TCR) Vβ-chain repertoire was analysed by flow cytometry. Results: Human studies showed...... with WT mice. An increased frequency of CD4+ Vβ10+ T cells producing IL-17 was found in the spleen of adult ft/ft mice when compared with WT mice. Finally, DNFB challenge induced an increased number of Th17 cells in ft/ft mice compared with WT mice. Conclusions: Deficiency of filaggrin appeared...

  8. Different metabolite profile and metabolic pathway with leaves and roots in response to boron deficiency at the initial stage of citrus rootstock growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaochang; Liu, Guidong; Wu, Xiuwen; Lu, Xiaopei; Yan, Lei; Muhammad, Riaz; Shah, Asad; Wu, Lishu; Jiang, Cuncang

    2016-11-01

    Boron (B) is a microelement required for higher plants, and B deficiency has serious negative effect on metabolic processes. We concentrated on the changes in metabolite profiles of trifoliate orange leaves and roots as a consequence of B deficiency at the initial stage of growth by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics. Enlargement and browning of root tips were observed in B-deficient plants, while any obvious symptom was not recorded in the leaves after 30 days of B deprivation. The distinct patterns of alterations in metabolites observed in leaves and roots due to B deficiency suggest the presence of specific organ responses to B starvation. The accumulation of soluble sugars was occurred in leaves, which may be attributed to down-regulated pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and amino acid biosynthesis under B deficiency, while the amount of most amino acids in roots was increased, indicating that the effects of B deficiency on amino acids metabolism in trifoliate orange may be a consequence of disruptions in root tissues and decreased protein biosynthesis. Several important products of shikimate pathway were also significantly affected by B deficiency, which may be related to abnormal growth of roots induced by B deficiency. Conclusively, our results revealed a global perspective of the discriminative metabolism responses appearing between B-deprived leaves and roots and provided new insight into the relationship between B deficiency symptom in roots and the altered amino acids profiling and shikimate pathway induced by B deficiency during seedling establishment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased susceptibility to fundus camera-delivered light-induced retinal degeneration in mice deficient in oxidative stress response proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Aredo, Bogale; Zhong, Xin; Zhao, Cynthia X; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L

    2017-06-01

    Oxidative stress is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of many retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration and retinal dystrophies. Light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) can serve as a model in which to study the response of the retina to stress. Of note, many genetic mutant mice are in a C57BL/6 J background and are thus resistant to the usual LIRD models. We recently developed a new model of fundus camera-delivered light-induced retinal degeneration (FCD-LIRD) which is effective in strains of mice expressing the light-resistant variant of RPE65 (450Met), including C57BL/6 J. In this work we investigated whether FCD-LIRD would be useful as a model in which to test the effect of genetic mutations on the response of the retina to stress. Furthermore, we tested whether oxidative stress plays an important role in the setting of this new FCD-LIRD model. FCD-LIRD was applied to C57BL/6 J mice and to mice simultaneously deficient in three proteins that are important in the response of the retina to oxidative stress (SOD1, DJ-1 and Parkin). Using fundus photography, we found that retinal damage was dramatically increased in the SOD1/DJ-1/Parkin deficient mice compared to C57BL/6 J. Outer retinal OCT volume and RPE cell morphology analysis in ZO-1-stained flat mounts added support to these findings. Gene expression analysis confirmed a strong oxidative stress response after FCD-LIRD, which was differentially altered in the SOD1/DJ1/Parkin deficient mice. We conclude that FCD-LIRD is useful to study the effect of genetic mutations on the response of the retina to light stress in light-resistant strains of mice. Furthermore, oxidative stress seems to be an important component of FCD-LIRD. Finally, we have established protocols to quantify the effect of FCD-LIRD on the retina and RPE which will be useful for future studies. Further dissection of the mechanisms by which the retina responds to light-induced oxidative stress may result in new

  10. Living Without Creatine: Unchanged Exercise Capacity and Response to Chronic Myocardial Infarction in Creatine-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygate, Craig A.; Aksentijevic, Dunja; Dawson, Dana; Hove, Michiel ten; Phillips, Darci; de Bono, Joseph P.; Medway, Debra J.; Sebag-Montefiore, Liam; Hunyor, Imre; Channon, Keith M.; Clarke, Kieran; Zervou, Sevasti; Watkins, Hugh; Balaban, Robert S.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Creatine is thought to be involved in the spatial and temporal buffering of ATP in energetic organs such as heart and skeletal muscle. Creatine depletion affects force generation during maximal stimulation, while reduced levels of myocardial creatine are a hallmark of the failing heart, leading to the widely held view that creatine is important at high workloads and under conditions of pathological stress. Objective We therefore hypothesised that the consequences of creatine-deficiency in mice would be impaired running capacity, and exacerbation of heart failure following myocardial infarction. Methods and Results Surprisingly, mice with whole-body creatine deficiency due to knockout of the biosynthetic enzyme (guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase – GAMT) voluntarily ran just as fast and as far as controls (>10km/night) and performed the same level of work when tested to exhaustion on a treadmill. Furthermore, survival following myocardial infarction was not altered, nor was subsequent LV remodelling and development of chronic heart failure exacerbated, as measured by 3D-echocardiography and invasive hemodynamics. These findings could not be accounted for by compensatory adaptations, with no differences detected between WT and GAMT−/− proteomes. Alternative phosphotransfer mechanisms were explored; adenylate kinase activity was unaltered, and although GAMT−/− hearts accumulated the creatine pre-cursor guanidinoacetate, this had negligible energy-transfer activity, while mitochondria retained near normal function. Conclusions Creatine-deficient mice show unaltered maximal exercise capacity and response to chronic myocardial infarction, and no obvious metabolic adaptations. Our results question the paradigm that creatine is essential for high workload and chronic stress responses in heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:23325497

  11. Both AtrbohD and AtrbohF are essential for mediating responses to oxygen deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Sun, Lirong; Ma, Liya; Hao, Fu-Shun

    2017-06-01

    Both AtrbohD and AtrbohF promote the increases in activities of ADH, PDC, LDH, and Ca2+ levels, and induce the expression of multiple hypoxia response genes, thus improving Arabidopsis adaptation to oxygen deficiency. NADPH oxidase AtrbohD and AtrbohF cooperatively play key roles in regulation of growth and stress signaling in Arabidopsis. However, reports on AtrbohD and AtrbohF functioning together in hypoxia signaling are scarce, and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that the double null mutant atrbohD/F is more sensitive to oxygen deprivation compared with wild type (WT) and the single mutant atrbohD and atrbohF. Under oxygen deficiency, enhancements of the transcripts of alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (ADH1) and pyruvate decarboxylase 1 (PDC1) and the activities of ADH, PDC and lactate dehydrogenase in WT are clearly reduced in the single mutants, and more strongly reduced in the double mutant. Moreover, increases in the production of ATP, H2O2 and Ca2+ in WT are significantly arrested in atrbohD, atrbohF, and especially in atrbohD/F. Hypoxia-promoted rise in the expression of some hypoxic responsive genes is also inhibited in atrbohD/F relative to WT, atrbohD and atrbohF. These genes include ethylene response factor 73, lactate dehydrogenase, MYB transcription factor 2, sucrose synthase 1 (SUS1), SUS4, heat stress transcription factor A2 and heat-shock protein 18.2. These results suggest that both AtrbohD and AtrbohF are essential for mediating hypoxia signaling. H2O2 derived from AtrbohD and AtrbohF triggers the Ca2+ increase and induces the expression of multiple hypoxia response genes, thus improving Arabidopsis tolerance to low-oxygen stress. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of AtrbohF in regulating the responses to oxygen deprivation in Arabidopsis.

  12. Human IgG subclass antibodies to the 19 kilodalton carboxy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human IgG subclass antibodies to the 19 kilodalton carboxy terminal fragment of Plasmodium Falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 19 ) and predominance of the MAD20 allelic type of MSP1 in Uganda.

  13. Discovery of a new subclass of alpha-conotoxins in the venom of Conus australis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Lebbe, E.K.M.; Peigneur, S.; Maiti, M.; Mille, B.G.; Prabhadevi; Ravichandran, S.; Lescrinier, E.; Waelkens, E.; DeSouza, L.; Herdewijn, P.; Tytgat, J.

    -conotoxins, acts on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) which dysfunctions play important roles in pathologies such as epilepsy, myasthenic syndromes, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Here we define a new subclass of the alpha...

  14. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of three subclasses of IgT in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nu; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Chen, Dan-Dan; Oriol Sunyer, J; Zhang, Yong-An

    2017-05-01

    As the teleost specific immunoglobulin, IgT plays important roles in systemic and mucosal immunity. In the current study, in rainbow trout, we have cloned the heavy chain (Igτ) genes of a secretory form of IgT2 as well as the membrane and secretory forms of a third IgT subclass, termed IgT3. Conserved cysteine and tryptophan residues that are crucial for the folding of the immunoglobulin domain as well as hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues within CART motif were identified in all IgT subclasses. Through analysis of the rainbow trout genome assembly, Igτ3 gene was found localized upstream of Igτ1 gene, while Igτ2 gene situated on another scaffold. At the transcriptional level, Igτ1 was mainly expressed in both systemic and mucosal lymphoid tissues, while Igτ2 was largely expressed in systemic lymphoid organs. After LPS and poly (I:C) treatment, Igτ1 and Igτ2 genes exhibited different expression profiles. Interestingly the transcriptional level of Igτ3 was negligible, although its protein product could be identified in trout serum. Importantly, a previously reported monoclonal antibody directed against trout IgT1 was able to recognize IgT2 and IgT3. These data demonstrate that there exist three subclasses of IgT in rainbow trout, and that their heavy chain genes display different expression patterns during stimulation. Overall, our data reflect the diversity and complexity of immunoglobulin in trout, thus provide a better understanding of the IgT system in the immune response of teleost fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of three safeners on sulfur assimilation and iron deficiency response in barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartucca, Maria Luce; Celletti, Silvia; Astolfi, Stefania; Mimmo, Tanja; Cesco, Stefano; Panfili, Ivan; Del Buono, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Safeners are agrochemicals used in agriculture to protect crops from herbicide injuries. They act by stimulating herbicide metabolism. As graminaceous plants, to cope with iron (Fe) deficiency, activate sulfur (S) metabolism and release huge amounts of Fe-chelating compounds, or phytosiderophores (PSs), we investigated, in barley plants (Hordeum vulgare, L.) grown in Fe deficiency, the effects of three safeners on two enzymes of S assimilation, cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH), and PS release. Finally, we monitored the root Fe content in plants treated with the most effective safener. Generally, all the safeners activated S metabolism and increased Cys and GSH contents. In addition, the safened plants excreted higher levels of PSs. Given that mefenpyr-diethyl (Mef) was the most effective in causing these effects, we assessed the Fe concentration in Mef-treated barley and found higher Fe levels than those in untreated plants. The three safeners, in different ways but specifically, activated S reductive metabolism and regulated Cys and GSH contents, PS release rate and Fe content (Mef-treated barley). The results of this research provide new indications of the biochemical and physiological mechanisms involved in the safening action. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Alterations in early cytokine-mediated immune responses to Plasmodium falciparum infection in Tanzanian children with mineral element deficiencies: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeurink Prescilla V

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deficiencies in vitamins and mineral elements are important causes of morbidity in developing countries, possibly because they lead to defective immune responses to infection. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of mineral element deficiencies on early innate cytokine responses to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 304 Tanzanian children aged 6-72 months were stimulated with P. falciparum-parasitized erythrocytes obtained from in vitro cultures. Results The results showed a significant increase by 74% in geometric mean of TNF production in malaria-infected individuals with zinc deficiency (11% to 240%; 95% CI. Iron deficiency anaemia was associated with increased TNF production in infected individuals and overall with increased IL-10 production, while magnesium deficiency induced increased production of IL-10 by 46% (13% to 144% in uninfected donors. All donors showed a response towards IL-1β production, drawing special attention for its possible protective role in early innate immune responses to malaria. Conclusions In view of these results, the findings show plasticity in cytokine profiles of mononuclear cells reacting to malaria infection under conditions of different micronutrient deficiencies. These findings lay the foundations for future inclusion of a combination of precisely selected set of micronutrients rather than single nutrients as part of malaria vaccine intervention programmes in endemic countries.

  17. Impact of liver fat on the differential partitioning of hepatic triacylglycerol into VLDL subclasses on high and low sugar diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umpleby, A Margot; Shojaee-Moradie, Fariba; Fielding, Barbara; Li, Xuefei; Marino, Andrea; Alsini, Najlaa; Isherwood, Cheryl; Jackson, Nicola; Ahmad, Aryati; Stolinski, Michael; Lovegrove, Julie A; Johnsen, Sigurd; Jeewaka R Mendis, A S; Wright, John; Wilinska, Malgorzata E; Hovorka, Roman; Bell, Jimmy D; Thomas, E Louise; Frost, Gary S; Griffin, Bruce A

    2017-11-01

    Dietary sugars are linked to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and dyslipidaemia, but it is unknown if NAFLD itself influences the effects of sugars on plasma lipoproteins. To study this further, men with NAFLD ( n = 11) and low liver fat 'controls' ( n = 14) were fed two iso-energetic diets, high or low in sugars (26% or 6% total energy) for 12 weeks, in a randomised, cross-over design. Fasting plasma lipid and lipoprotein kinetics were measured after each diet by stable isotope trace-labelling.There were significant differences in the production and catabolic rates of VLDL subclasses between men with NAFLD and controls, in response to the high and low sugar diets. Men with NAFLD had higher plasma concentrations of VLDL 1 -triacylglycerol (TAG) after the high ( P liver fat accumulation leads to a differential partitioning of hepatic TAG into large and small VLDL subclasses, in response to high and low intakes of sugars. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Transcriptomic analysis of hepatic responses to testosterone deficiency in miniature pigs fed a high-cholesterol diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhaowei; Jiang, Xiaoling; Pan, Yongming; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Lifan; Zhu, Keyan; Cai, Yueqin; Ling, Yun; Chen, Fangming; Xu, Xiaoping; Chen, Minli

    2015-02-06

    Recent studies have indicated that low serum testosterone levels are associated with increased risk of developing hepatic steatosis; however, the mechanisms mediating this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. To gain insight into the role of testosterone in modulating hepatic steatosis, we investigated the effects of testosterone on the development of hepatic steatosis in pigs fed a high-fat and high-cholesterol (HFC) diet and profiled hepatic gene expression by RNA-Seq in HFC-fed intact male pigs (IM), castrated male pigs (CM), and castrated male pigs with testosterone replacement (CMT). Serum testosterone levels were significantly decreased in CM pigs, and testosterone replacement attenuated castration-induced testosterone deficiency. CM pigs showed increased liver injury accompanied by increased hepatocellular steatosis, inflammation, and elevated serum alanine aminotransferase levels compared with IM pigs. Moreover, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were markedly increased in CM pigs. Testosterone replacement decreased serum and hepatic lipid levels and improved liver injury in CM pigs. Compared to IM and CMT pigs, CM pigs had lower serum levels of superoxide dismutase but higher levels of malondialdehyde. Gene expression analysis revealed that upregulated genes in the livers of CM pigs were mainly enriched for genes mediating immune and inflammatory responses, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes mainly included those that regulate metabolism-related processes, including fatty acid oxidation, steroid biosynthesis, cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, and glucose metabolism. KEGG analysis showed that metabolic pathways, fatty acid degradation, pyruvate metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the nuclear factor-kappaB signaling pathway were the major pathways altered in CM pigs. This study demonstrated that testosterone deficiency aggravated

  19. Genomic scars as biomarkers of homologous recombination deficiency and drug response in breast and ovarian cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Johnathan A; Irshad, Sheeba; Grigoriadis, Anita; Tutt, Andrew N J

    2014-06-03

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and platinum-based chemotherapies have been found to be particularly effective in tumors that harbor deleterious germline or somatic mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, the products of which contribute to the conservative homologous recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Nonetheless, several setbacks in clinical trial settings have highlighted some of the issues surrounding the investigation of PARP inhibitors, especially the identification of patients who stand to benefit from such drugs. One potential approach to finding this patient subpopulation is to examine the tumor DNA for evidence of a homologous recombination defect. However, although the genomes of many breast and ovarian cancers are replete with aberrations, the presence of numerous factors able to shape the genomic landscape means that only some of the observed DNA abnormalities are the outcome of a cancer cell's inability to faithfully repair DNA double-strand breaks. Consequently, recently developed methods for comprehensively capturing the diverse ways in which homologous recombination deficiencies may arise beyond BRCA1/2 mutation have used DNA microarray and sequencing data to account for potentially confounding features in the genome. Scores capturing telomeric allelic imbalance, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and large scale transition score, as well as the total number of coding mutations are measures that summarize the total burden of certain forms of genomic abnormality. By contrast, other studies have comprehensively catalogued different types of mutational pattern and their relative contributions to a given tumor sample. Although at least one study to explore the use of the LOH scar in a prospective clinical trial of a PARP inhibitor in ovarian cancer is under way, limitations that result in a relatively low positive predictive value for these biomarkers remain. Tumors whose genome has undergone one or more events that restore high

  20. CX₃CR1 deficiency exacerbates neuronal loss and impairs early regenerative responses in the target-ablated olfactory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomster, Linda V; Vukovic, Jana; Hendrickx, Debbie A E; Jung, Steffen; Harvey, Alan R; Filgueira, Luis; Ruitenberg, Marc J

    2011-11-01

    The olfactory epithelium is a site of sustained adult neurogenesis where olfactory sensory neurons are continuously replaced from endogenous stem/progenitor cells. Epithelial macrophages have been implicated in the phagocytosis of degenerating cells but the molecular mechanisms allowing for their recruitment and activation while maintaining a neurogenic microenvironment are poorly understood. We have previously shown that the chemokine fractalkine (CX₃CL1) is expressed by olfactory sensory neurons and ensheathing cells in the olfactory epithelium. In turn, the fractalkine receptor, CX₃CR1, is expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells within the olfactory epithelium. We report that a selective cell death of olfactory sensory neurons in the epithelium of CX₃CR1-deficient mice via target ablation (i.e. olfactory bulbectomy) results in an exacerbated loss of olfactory sensory neurons compared to wild-type mice. In addition, reduced proliferation of intraepithelial stem/progenitor cells was observed in lesioned CX₃CR1-deficient mice, suggesting an impaired regenerative response. Importantly, a lack of CX₃CL1-signaling caused increased recruitment of macrophages into the olfactory epithelium, which in turn contained higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α and IL-6) as determined by qPCR. We also present novel data showing that, relative to wild-type, CX₃CR1-deficient macrophages have diminished phagocytic activity following stimulation with CX₃CL1. Collectively, our data indicate that signaling through the CX₃CR1 receptor modulates macrophage activity, resulting in an environment conducive to olfactory sensory neuron clearance and targeted replacement from endogenous stem/progenitor cells. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Subclass restriction pattern of antigen-specific antibodies in donors with defective expression of IgG or IgA subclass heavy chain constant region genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammerström, L.; Carbonara, A.O.; DeMarchi, M.; LeFranc, G.; Möller, G.; Smith, C.I.E.; Zegers, B.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have developed a method for the measurement of the IgG and IgA subclass distribution of antigen-specific human antibodies. The controls for the specificity of the assay include the use of a number of monoclonal human antibodies and sera from individuals with deletions of particular immunoglobulin

  2. The role of microRNA399 and sucrose in physiological responses to phosphate deficiency in Arabidopsis thalina plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Mohammadsaleh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are noncoding small RNAs that generally function as posttranscriptional negative regulators. The miRNAs play a direct role in plant responses to many types of environmental stresses. For example miR399 had a role in response to Pi deficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR399 and sucrose in some physiological responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to phosphate deficiency. Therefore, miR399-overexpressing transgenic and wild type Arabidopsis plants were used. The plant seeds were cultured on the Suc+Pi+ (S+P+, Suc-Pi+ (S-P+, Suc+Pi- (S+P- and Suc-Pi- (S-P- media. Pi+ and Pi- refer to 1.2 mM and 10 µM Pi, respectively and Suc+ or Suc- are media culture with 1% sucrose or without. The results showed that sucrose and miR399 had a dramatic effect on root architecture so that primary root length and its branches on S-P+ medium were significantly reduced in over expressed as compared with wild type plants. The highest anthocyanin and starch accumulation was achieved in S+P- media in both plant types. However, miR399 over expression was resulted in significant rise in anthocyanin accumulation on S-P- medium in transgenic relative to wild type plants. In addition, miR399 was resulted in significant rise in free phosphorous level in all types' media. compared to wild type. These results were probably due to the role of sucrose and miR399 in signalling pathway during phosphate starvation in Arabidopsis plant.

  3. The Interaction between Auxin and Nitric Oxide Regulates Root Growth in Response to Iron Deficiency in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huwei Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fe deficiency (-Fe is a common abiotic stress that affects the root development of plants. Auxin and nitric oxide (NO are key regulator of root growth under -Fe. However, the interactions between auxin and NO regulate root growth in response to Fe deficiency are complex and unclear. In this study, the indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and NO levels in roots, and the responses of root growth in rice to different levels of Fe supply were investigated using wild type (WT, ospin1b and osnia2 mutants. -Fe promoted LR formation but inhibited seminal root elongation. IAA levels, [3H] IAA transport, and expression levels of PIN1a-c genes in roots were reduced under -Fe, suggesting that polar auxin transport from shoots to roots was decreased. Application of IAA to -Fe seedlings restored seminal root length, but not LR density, to levels similar to those under normal Fe (+Fe, and the seminal root length was shorter in two ospin1b mutants relative to WT under +Fe, but not under -Fe, confirming that auxin transport participates in -Fe-inhibited seminal root elongation. Moreover, -Fe-induced LR density and -Fe-inhibited seminal root elongation paralleled NO production in roots. Interestingly, similar NO accumulation and responses of LR density and root elongation were observed in osnia2 mutants compared to WT, and the higher expression of NOA gene under -Fe, suggesting that -Fe-induced NO was generated via the NO synthase-like pathway rather than the nitrate reductase pathway. However, IAA could restore the functions of NO in inhibiting seminal root elongation, but did not replace the role of NO-induced LR formation under -Fe. Overall, our findings suggested that NO functions downstream of auxin in regulating LR formation; NO-inhibited seminal root elongation by decreasing meristem activity in root tips under -Fe, with the involvement of auxin.

  4. Deficiency of Serotonin in Raphe Neurons and Altered Behavioral Responses in Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2-Knockout Medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Satoshi; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Shingo; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Washio, Youhei; Sato, Kenji; Kinoshita, Masato

    2017-12-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) is a bioactive monoamine that acts as a neurotransmitter in the central and peripheral nervous system of animals. Teleost fish species have serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei of the brainstem; however, the role of 5-HT in the raphe neurons in teleost fish remains largely unknown. Here, we established a medaka (Oryzias latipes) strain with targeted disruption of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (tph2) gene that is involved in the 5-HT synthesis in the raphe nuclei. Immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the homozygous mutants (tph2Δ13/Δ13) lacked the ability to synthesize 5-HT in the raphe neurons. To investigate the effects of 5-HT deficiency in adult behaviors, the mutant fish were subjected to five behavioral paradigms (diving, open-field, light-dark transition, mirror-biting, and two-fish social interaction). The homozygous mutation caused a longer duration of freezing response in all examined paradigms and reduced the number of entries to the top area in the diving test. In addition, the mutants exhibited a decreased number of mirror-biting in the males and an increased contact time in direct social interaction between the females. These results indicate that this tph2-knockout medaka serves as a good model to analyze the effects of 5-HT deficiency in the raphe neurons.

  5. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Fukao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex, respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  6. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Supersonic Turbine Bladed Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2012-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. Assessing the blade structural integrity is a complex task requiring an initial characterization of whether resonance is possible and then performing a forced response analysis if that condition is met. The standard technique for forced response analysis in rocket engine turbines is to decompose a computational fluid dynamics (CFD).generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies using cyclically symmetric structural dynamic models. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non ]harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. This complex content can only be captured by a CFD flow field encompassing at least an entire revolution. A substantial development effort to create a series of software programs to enable application of the 360 degree forcing function in a frequency response analysis on cyclic symmetric models has been completed (to be described in a future paper), but the question still remains whether the frequency response analysis itself is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, of bladed-disks undergoing this complex flow environment have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements and the disk modeled with plates (using the finite element code MSC/NASTRAN). The focus of this model is to be representative of response of realistic bladed disks, and so the dimensions are roughly equivalent to the new J2X rocket engine 1st stage fuel pump turbine. The simplicity of the model allows

  7. Responses of barley root and shoot proteomes to long‐term nitrogen deficiency, short‐term nitrogen starvation and ammonium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell Blom Møller, Anders; Pedas, Pai; Andersen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Cereals are major crops worldwide, and improvement of their nitrogen use efficiency is a crucial challenge. In this study proteins responding to N supply in barley roots and shoots were analysed using a proteomics approach, to provide insight into mechanisms of N uptake and assimilation. Control...... in shoots and roots. N starvation altered proteins of amino acid metabolism in roots. Both treatments caused proteome changes in roots that could affect growth. Shoots of plants grown with ammonium as N source (28 d with 5 mm nitrate followed by 5 d with 5 mm ammonium) showed responses similar to N...... deficient shoots, characterized by turnover of ribulose 1·5‐bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and increases in proteins of the chloroplastic transcription and translation machinery. Identified proteins in 67 and 49 varying spots in roots and shoots respectively, corresponded to 62 functions...

  8. Cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus: innervation, light responsiveness and entrainment in CCK-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hundahl, Christian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the principal pacemaker driving circadian rhythms of physiology and behaviour. Neurons within the SCN express both classical and neuropeptide transmitters which regulate clock functions. Cholecyctokinin (CCK) is a potent neurotransmitter expressed in neurons......, CCK-containing processes make synaptic contacts with both groups of neurons and some CCK cell bodies were innervated by VIPergic neurons. The CCK neurons received no direct input from the three major pathways to the SCN, and the CCK neurons were not light-responsive as evaluated by induction of c......FOS, and did not express the core clock protein PER1. Accordingly, CCK-deficient mice showed normal entrainment and had similar τ, light-induced phase shift and negative masking behaviour as wild-type animals. In conclusion, CCK signalling seems not to be involved directly in light-induced resetting...

  9. Cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus: innervation, light responsiveness and entrainment in CCK-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hundahl, Christian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the principal pacemaker driving circadian rhythms of physiology and behaviour. Neurons within the SCN express both classical and neuropeptide transmitters which regulate clock functions. Cholecyctokinin (CCK) is a potent neurotransmitter expressed in neurons......, CCK-containing processes make synaptic contacts with both groups of neurons and some CCK cell bodies were innervated by VIPergic neurons. The CCK neurons received no direct input from the three major pathways to the SCN, and the CCK neurons were not light-responsive as evaluated by induction of c......FOS, and did not express the core clock protein PER1. Accordingly, CCK-deficient mice showed normal entrainment and had similar t, light-induced phase shift and negative masking behaviour as wild-type animals. In conclusion, CCK signalling seems not to be involved directly in light-induced resetting...

  10. Tailoring gut immune responses with lipoteichoic acid-deficient Lactobacillus acidophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Yaíma Luzardo Lightfoot; Mansour eMohamadzadeh

    2013-01-01

    As highlighted by the development of intestinal autoinflammatory disorders when tolerance is lost, homeostatic interactions between gut microbiota, resident immune cells, and the gut epithelium are key in the maintenance of gastrointestinal health. Gut immune responses, whether stimulatory or regulatory, are dictated by the activated dendritic cells (DCs) that first interact with microorganisms and their gene products to then elicit T and B cell responses. Previously, we have demonstrated t...

  11. Clustering and Differential Alignment Algorithm: Identification of Early Stage Regulators in the Arabidopsis thaliana Iron Deficiency Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koryachko, Alexandr; Matthiadis, Anna; Muhammad, Durreshahwar; Foret, Jessica; Brady, Siobhan M; Ducoste, Joel J; Tuck, James; Long, Terri A; Williams, Cranos

    2015-01-01

    Time course transcriptome datasets are commonly used to predict key gene regulators associated with stress responses and to explore gene functionality. Techniques developed to extract causal relationships between genes from high throughput time course expression data are limited by low signal levels coupled with noise and sparseness in time points. We deal with these limitations by proposing the Cluster and Differential Alignment Algorithm (CDAA). This algorithm was designed to process transcriptome data by first grouping genes based on stages of activity and then using similarities in gene expression to predict influential connections between individual genes. Regulatory relationships are assigned based on pairwise alignment scores generated using the expression patterns of two genes and some inferred delay between the regulator and the observed activity of the target. We applied the CDAA to an iron deficiency time course microarray dataset to identify regulators that influence 7 target transcription factors known to participate in the Arabidopsis thaliana iron deficiency response. The algorithm predicted that 7 regulators previously unlinked to iron homeostasis influence the expression of these known transcription factors. We validated over half of predicted influential relationships using qRT-PCR expression analysis in mutant backgrounds. One predicted regulator-target relationship was shown to be a direct binding interaction according to yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) analysis. These results serve as a proof of concept emphasizing the utility of the CDAA for identifying unknown or missing nodes in regulatory cascades, providing the fundamental knowledge needed for constructing predictive gene regulatory networks. We propose that this tool can be used successfully for similar time course datasets to extract additional information and infer reliable regulatory connections for individual genes.

  12. Response to dietary phosphorus deficiency is affected by genetic background in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, L S; Qu, A; Cutler, S A; Mahajan, A; Lonergan, S M; Rothschild, M F; Weber, T E; Kerr, B J; Stahl, C H

    2008-10-01

    Concern over the environmental effect of P excretion from pig production has led to reduced dietary P supplementation. To examine how genetics influence P utilization, 94 gilts sired by 2 genetic lines (PIC337 and PIC280) were housed individually and fed either a P-adequate diet (PA) or a 20% P-deficient diet (PD) for 14 wk. Initially and monthly, blood samples were collected and BW recorded after an overnight fast. Growth performance and plasma indicators of P status were determined monthly. At the end of the trial, carcass traits, meat quality, bone strength, and ash percentage were determined. Pigs fed the PD diet had decreased (P < 0.05) plasma P concentrations and poorer G:F (P < 0.05) over the length of the trial. After 4 wk on trial, pigs fed the PD diet had increased (P < 0.05) plasma 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and decreased (P < 0.05) plasma parathyroid hormone compared with those fed the PA diet. At the end of the trial, pigs fed the PD diet had decreased (P < 0.05) BW, HCW, and percentage fat-free lean and tended to have decreased LM area (P = 0.06) and marbling (P = 0.09) and greater (P = 0.12) 10th-rib backfat than pigs fed the PA diet. Additionally, animals fed the PD diet had weaker bones and also decreased (P < 0.05) ash percentage and increased (P < 0.05) concentrations of 1alpha-hydroxylase and parathyroid hormone receptor mRNA in kidney tissue. Regardless of dietary treatment, PIC337-sired pigs consumed more feed and gained more BW than their PIC280-sired counterparts (P < 0.05) during the study. The PIC337-sired pigs also had greater (P < 0.05) HCW, larger (P < 0.01) LM area, and tended to have (P = 0.07) greater dressing percentage. Meat from the PIC337-sired pigs also tended to have greater (P = 0.12) concentrations of lactate but decreased (P = 0.07) concentrations of total glucose units 24 h postslaughter. Although plasma 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) concentrations were elevated (P < 0.05) in all the animals fed the PD diet, this elevation due to P deficiency

  13. Effect of adiponectin deficiency on intestinal damage and hematopoietic responses of mice exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponemone, Venkatesh; Fayad, Raja; Gove, Melissa E.; Pini, Maria [Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Fantuzzi, Giamila, E-mail: giamila@uic.edu [Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-08-07

    Adiponectin (APN) is an adipose tissue-derived cytokine that regulates insulin sensitivity and inflammation. It is also involved in modulation of cell proliferation by binding to various growth factors. Based on its known effects in modulating cell proliferation and oxidative stress, APN may potentially be involved in regulating tissue damage and repair following irradiation. Adiponectin KO mice and their WT littermates were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 3 or 6 Gy gamma radiation. Radiation-induced alterations were studied in jejunum, blood, bone marrow and thymus at days 1 and 5 post-irradiation and compared with sham-irradiated groups. In WT mice, irradiation did not significantly alter serum APN levels while inducing a significant decrease in serum leptin. Irradiation caused a significant reduction in thymocyte cellularity, with concomitant decrease in CD4{sup +}, CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cell populations, with no significant differences between WT and APN KO mice. Irradiation resulted in a significantly higher increase in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes in the blood of APN KO compared with WT mice, whereas frequency of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow at day 5 was significantly higher in WT compared with APN KO mice. Finally, irradiation induced similar alterations in villus height and crypt cell proliferation in the jejunum of WT and APN KO mice. Jejunum explants from sham-irradiated APN KO mice produced higher levels of IL-6 compared with tissue from WT animals, but the difference was no longer apparent following irradiation. Our data indicate that APN deficiency does not play a significant role in modulating radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury in mice, while it may participate in regulation of damage to the hematopoietic system.

  14. Cerebrovascular responses in mice deficient in the potassium channel, TREK-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiranian, Khodadad; Lloyd, Eric E; Crossland, Randy F; Marrelli, Sean P; Taffet, George E; Reddy, Anilkumar K; Hartley, Craig J; Bryan, Robert M

    2010-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that TREK-1, a two-pore domain K channel, is involved with dilations in arteries. Because there are no selective activators or inhibitors of TREK-1, we generated a mouse line deficient in TREK-1. Endothelium-mediated dilations were not different in arteries from wild-type (WT) and TREK-1 knockout (KO) mice. This includes dilations of the middle cerebral artery to ATP, dilations of the basilar artery to ACh, and relaxations of the aorta to carbachol, a cholinergic agonist. The nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor components of ATP dilations were identical in the middle cerebral arteries of WT and TREK-1 KO mice. Furthermore, the NO and cyclooxygenase-dependent components were identical in the basilar arteries of the different genotypes. Dilations of the basilar artery to alpha-linolenic acid, an activator of TREK-1, were not affected by the absence of TREK-1. Whole cell currents recorded using patch-clamp techniques were similar in cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (CVSMCs) from WT and TREK-1 KO mice. alpha-linolenic acid or arachidonic acid increased whole cell currents in CVSMCs from both WT and TREK-1 KO mice. The selective blockers of large-conductance Ca-activated K channels, penitrem A and iberiotoxin, blocked the increased currents elicited by either alpha-linolenic or arachidonic acid. In summary, dilations were similar in arteries from WT and TREK-1 KO mice. There was no sign of TREK-1-like currents in CVSMCs from WT mice, and there were no major differences in currents between the genotypes. We conclude that regulation of arterial diameter is not altered in mice lacking TREK-1.

  15. TLR7 deficiency contributes to attenuated diabetic retinopathy via inhibition of inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yun-Ru; Li, Zi-Jing; Zeng, Peng; Lan, Yu-Qing

    2017-11-18

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major microvascular complication of diabetes, resulting in neuronal dysfunction, retinal vascular leakage, and apoptosis within the retina. Innate immunity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and related complications. The toll-like receptors (TLRs), central to innate immunity, are essential participants in the progression and pathogenesis of the disease and its complications. In the study, streptozotocin (STZ) was combined with whole-body hypoxia for quicker induction of early-stage diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the wild type (WT) and TLR7-knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice. The effects of TLR7 were also investigated in fructose-treated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In the retinas of WT/DR mice, abnormal a-wave and b-wave activity, hyperfluorescence, and reduced retinal thickness were observed. DR development was associated with enhanced TLR7 expression, whose deletion dramatically reduced VEGF expression levels. And the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and IL-12, was highly reduced by TLR7-deficiency in DR mice. Consistently, WT/DR mice exhibited higher phosphorylation of IκB kinase α (IKKα), inhibitor of NF-κB α (IκBα) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which were found to be down-regulated in KO/DR mice. Similarly, DR-induced mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation was blocked by TLR7-knockout. In vitro, fructose incubation-triggered inflammation was reversed by TLR7 knockdown, accompanied with inactivated NF-κB and MAPKs pathways. And reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was observed in TLR7-knockdown cells with fructose treatment. Together, inhibiting TLR7 suppressed diabetic retinopathy by reducing inflammation and suggested a potential application in clinics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The association between growth response to growth hormone and baseline body composition of children with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Ihsan; Demirel, Fatma; Tepe, Derya; Kara, Ozlem; Koc, Nevra

    2013-10-01

    We wanted to examine the relationship between initial growth response to recombinant human Growth Hormone (rhGH) treatment and body composition in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Forty-two patients (21 boys and 21 girls) aged between 5.7-15.5 years (mean age: 10.8 ± 2.6 years) with isolated GHD. The auxological and laboratory data (GH and IGF-I levels) and results of bioelectrical impedance analyses were evaluated. Children with GHD were followed up for 12 months and categorized according to growth response to rhGH into good and poor responders (change in height of > 0.7 SDS or growth response to rhGH therapy. At study entry, mean age, height SDS, weight SDS, serum IGF-1 SDS, IGFBP-3 SDS, growth velocity prior to rhGH therapy, GH after clonidine and l-dopa were similar in the two groups. At baseline, BMI SDS and waist-hip ratio were significantly higher in good responders (p = 0.02 and p = 0.006, respectively). Good responders had lower percentages of FFM (73.4 ± 8.9 vs. 83.1 ± 5.9) and total body water (TBW) (56.5 ± 5.3 vs. 63.1 ± 4.4), compared to poor responders (p children with GHD on rhGH treatment (r = -0.617 for percentage of FFM, r = -0.629 for percentage of TBW, p growth response was observed only in prepubertal subjects. Baseline body composition data in children with GHD can be used to predict the growth response to rhGH treatment. A management strategy that involves titrating rhGH dose according to FFM as a means of optimizing the growth response to intervention requires further study. Crown Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.

  17. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1)-deficient mice demonstrate abnormal antibody responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Helen E; Willimott, Shaun; Beswick, Richard W; Dantzer, Françoise; de Murcia, Josiane Ménissier; Yelamos, José; Wagner, Simon D

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosylation) of acceptor proteins is an epigenetic modification involved in DNA strand break repair, recombination and transcription. Here we provide evidence for the involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1) in antibody responses. Parp-1−/− mice had increased numbers of T cells and normal numbers of total B cells. Marginal zone B cells were mildly reduced in number, and numbers of follicular B cells were preserved. There were abnormal levels of basal immunoglobulins, with reduced levels of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) and increased levels of IgA and IgG2b. Analysis of specific antibody responses showed that T cell-independent responses were normal but T cell-dependent responses were markedly reduced. Germinal centres were normal in size and number. In vitro purified B cells from Parp-1−/− mice proliferated normally and showed normal IgM secretion, decreased switching to IgG2a but increased IgA secretion. Collectively our results demonstrate that Parp-1 has essential roles in normal T cell-dependent antibody responses and the regulation of isotype expression. We speculate that Parp-1 forms a component of the protein complex involved in resolving the DNA double-strand breaks that occur during class switch recombination. PMID:18778284

  18. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Turbine Bladed Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2012-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. The standard technique for forced response analysis to assess structural integrity is to decompose a CFD generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non-harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. These complications suggest the question of whether frequency domain analysis is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements. It was hypothesized that the randomness and other variation from the standard harmonic excitation would reduce the blade structural response, but the results showed little reduction. The second study was of a realistic model of a bladed-disk excited by the same CFD used in the J2X engine program. The results showed that the transient analysis results were up to 10% higher for "clean" nodal diameter excitations and six times larger for "messy" excitations, where substantial Fourier content around the main harmonic exists.

  19. IgG subclass and vaccination stimulus determine changes in antigen specific antibody glycosylation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Daniela; Lux, Anja; Schaffert, Anja; Lang, Roland; Altmann, Friedrich; Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2017-08-02

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) glycosylation can modulate antibody effector functions. Depending on the precise composition of the sugar moiety attached to individual IgG glycovariants either pro- or anti-inflammatory effector pathways can be initiated via differential binding to type I or type II Fc-receptors. However, an in depth understanding of how individual IgG subclasses are glycosylated during the steady state and how their glycosylation pattern changes during vaccination is missing. To monitor IgG subclass glycosylation during the steady state and upon vaccination of mice with different T-cell dependent and independent antigens, tryptic digests of serum, and antigen-specific IgG preparations were analyzed by reversed phase-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We show that there is a remarkable difference with respect to how individual IgG subclasses are glycosylated during the steady state. More importantly, upon T-cell dependent and independent vaccinations, individual antigen-specific IgG subclasses reacted differently with respect to changes in individual glycoforms, suggesting that the IgG subclass itself is a major determinant of restricting or allowing alterations in specific IgG glycovariants. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Enhanced spinal neuronal responses as a mechanism for the increased nociceptive sensitivity of interleukin-4 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmer, Sören; Schießer, Peter; Geis, Christian; Sommer, Claudia; Vanegas, Horacio; Üçeyler, Nurcan

    2015-09-01

    Lack of the anti-inflammatory and analgesic cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4) is associated with mechanical hypersensitivity in mice, and low systemic levels of IL-4 are associated with pain in humans. We investigated whether the firing properties of murine nociceptive neurons in the spinal dorsal horn are affected by IL-4 deficiency. Single unit recordings from lumbar dorsal horn wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neurons were performed in IL-4 knock out (ko) mice and wild type (WT) littermates (3, 9, and 22 months old). We measured neuronal responses to innocuous (1g) and noxious (26 g) von Frey mechanical stimulation at the plantar hind paw. Additionally, we induced secondary hyperalgesia by intraplantar injection of capsaicin and recorded discharges before and 5 and 10 min after injection. Baseline activity, activity upon innocuous stimulation, and postdischarges after noxious stimulation were not different between genotypes and ages. Responses to the noxious von Frey filament in 3 (34.5, 26.6-41.1 Hz) and 9 month old (49.7, 21.7-108.2 Hz) IL-4 ko mice were greater than in WT littermates (3 months, 18.1, 16.3-27.2 Hz, n.s.; 9 months, 33.6, 10.4-69.7 Hz; pnociceptive pathway may contribute to the increased behavioral responsiveness to painful stimuli of young IL-4 ko mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CSN6, a subunit of the COP9 signalosome, is involved in early response to iron deficiency in Oryza sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Song; Liu, Fang; Pan, Xiao-Xi; Zang, Yue-Peng; Jin, Fei; Zu, Wei-Xi; Qi, Xiao-Ting; Xiao, Wei; Yin, Li-Ping

    2016-05-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) plays an important role in proteasome-mediated degradation by regulating CUL1 rubylation of the SCF ligase and is involved in many crucial biological processes. Here, we demonstrate a link between IDEF1 accumulation and the decline in COP9 derubylation activity in response to iron deficiency (-Fe) in rice (Oryza sativa). CSN6 expression is rapidly down-regulated during Fe depletion, contributing to reduced CSN activity, as judged by CSN5 and CUL1 expression, indicating CSN6 is involved in the early stage response of -Fe. In contrast to CSN6, the IDEF1 protein and expression of several iron uptake/utilisation-related genes are increased in response to -Fe. Thus, we constructed CSN6 transgenic sense and antisense lines and found that experimental depletion of CSN6 results in accumulation of the IDEF1 protein and up-regulation of several iron uptake/utilisation-related genes. Furthermore, IDEF1 can be decorated with K48-linked polyubiquitin and degraded via the 26S proteasome. Accumulated IDEF1 in antisense lines led to increased chlorophyll and Fe content in seedlings during -Fe. Collectively, the cellular CSN6 level is decreased during early stages of -Fe to ensure the rapid accumulation of IDEF1, which in turn up-regulates several iron uptake/utilisation-related genes to help overcome -Fe stress in rice.

  2. Chitin synthase-deficient mutant of Fusarium oxysporum elicits tomato plant defence response and protects against wild-type infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; Martín-Urdíroz, Magdalena; Roncero, María Isabel González; González-Reyes, José Antonio; Roldán, María Del Carmen Ruiz

    2010-07-01

    A mutant of the root pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, deficient in class V chitin synthase, has been shown previously to be nonvirulent. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the cause of its avirulence could be the elicitation of the induced plant defence response, leading to the restriction of fungal infection. Co-inoculation of tomato plants with the wild-type strain and the DeltachsV mutant resulted in a significant reduction in symptom development, supporting a protective mechanism exerted by the mutant. The ability of the mutant to penetrate and colonize plant tissues was determined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, as well as fluorescence microscopy using green fluorescent protein- or cherry fluorescent protein-labelled fungal strains. The extent of wild-type strain colonization in co-inoculated plants decreased steadily throughout the infection process, as shown by the quantification of fungal biomass using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The hypothesis that defence responses are activated by the DeltachsV mutant was confirmed by the analysis of plant pathogenesis-related genes using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Tomato plants inoculated with the DeltachsV mutant showed a three fold increase in endochitinase activity in comparison with wild-type inoculated plants. Taken together, these results suggest that the perturbation of fungal cell wall biosynthesis results in elicitation of the plant defence response during the infection process.

  3. Periostin deficiency increases bone damage and impairs injury response to fatigue loading in adult mice.

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    Nicolas Bonnet

    Full Text Available Bone damage removal and callus formation in response to fatigue loading are essential to prevent fractures. Periostin (Postn is a matricellular protein that mediates adaptive response of cortical bone to loading. Whether and how periostin influences damage and the injury response to fatigue remains unknown. We investigated the skeletal response of Postn(-/- and Postn(+/+ mice after fatigue stimulus by axial compression of their tibia. In Postn(+/+ mice, cracks number and surface (CsNb, CsS increased 1h after fatigue, with a decrease in strength compared to non-fatigued tibia. At 15 days, CsNb had started to decline, while CtTV and CtBV increased in fatigued vs non-fatigued tibia, reflecting a woven bone response that was present in 75% of the fatigued bones. Cortical porosity and remodelling also prominently increased in the fatigued tibia of Postn(+/+ mice. At 30 days, paralleling a continuous removal of cortical damage, strength of the fatigued tibia was similar to the non-fatigue tibia. In Postn(-/- mice, cracks were detectable even in the absence of fatigue, while the amount of collagen crosslinks and tissue hardness was decreased compared to Postn(+/+. Fatigue significantly increased CsNb and CsS in Postn(-/-, but was not associated with changes in CtTV and CtBV, as only 16% of the fatigued bones formed some woven bone. Cortical porosity and remodelling did not increase either after fatigue in Postn(-/-, and the level of damage remained high even after 30 days. As a result, strength remained compromised in Postn(-/- mice. Contrary to Postn(+/+, which osteocytic lacunae showed a change in the degree of anisotropy (DA after fatigue, Postn(-/- showed no DA change. Hence periostin appears to influence bone materials properties, damage accumulation and repair, including local modeling/remodeling processes in response to fatigue. These observations suggest that the level of periostin expression could influence the propensity to fatigue fractures.

  4. Marrow Adipose Tissue: Skeletal Location, Sexual Dimorphism, and Response to Sex Steroid Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Stechschulte, Lance A; Czernik, Piotr J; Sherman, Shermel B; Huang, Shilong; Krings, Amrei

    2017-01-01

    profile of beige adipocyte gene markers correlates with skeletal location of active bone remodeling and higher BV/TV, however bone loss resulted from sex steroid deficiency is not proportional to MAT expansion at the same skeletal location.

  5. Marrow Adipose Tissue: Skeletal Location, Sexual Dimorphism, and Response to Sex Steroid Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Lecka-Czernik

    2017-08-01

    , expression profile of beige adipocyte gene markers correlates with skeletal location of active bone remodeling and higher BV/TV, however bone loss resulted from sex steroid deficiency is not proportional to MAT expansion at the same skeletal location.

  6. Efficacy of intravenous iron in treating iron deficiency anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: Are there predictors of response?

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    Rocío Ferreiro Iglesias

    Full Text Available Introduction: in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD iron deficiency anaemia (IDA is a very common disorder. Until recently, oral iron has been the mainstay therapy, nevertheless it has been associated with intolerance and noncompliance. Therefore, the goal of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous iron in IDA in IBD patients and the secondary aim was to investigate whether other potential factors could influence in the response to the treatment. Design: an open-label, prospective, consecutive, single centre study. Material and methods: we performed our study in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC or Crohn's disease (CD with severe anaemia or intolerance with oral iron. All of them received intravenous sacarose iron and did biochemistry profile with haemoglobin (Hb. Moreover, the correlation with other variables was studied: age, sex, smoking habit, IBD type, previous surgery and type of surgery and other treatments. Response was defined as Hb increase of ≥ 2 g/dL or normalization of the levels. Results: fifty-four patients were included into the study, 34 (63% with UC y 20 (37% with CD, 18 (33.3% men and 36 women (66.6% and the average was 48 ± 14 years. The total proportion of responders was 52% (SD ± 05; 43% of the patients reached Hb ≥ 2 g/dl and y 9% of them normalized Hb. Only the utilization of 5-ASA was associated with low response to iron treatment (p < 0.05. Conclusions: our study suggests that response to intravenous iron is achievable in the majority of patients with IBD and severe IDA or intolerance treatment with oral iron. Moreover, the patients with consumption of 5-ASA could had less response to the treatment.

  7. Impaired cardiac contractility response to hemodynamic stress in S100A1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao-Jun; Cole, Timothy J; Tenis, Nora; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Köntgen, Frank; Kemp, Bruce E; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2002-04-01

    Ca(2+) signaling plays a central role in cardiac contractility and adaptation to increased hemodynamic demand. We have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the S100A1 gene coding for the major cardiac isoform of the large multigenic S100 family of EF hand Ca(2+)-binding proteins. S100A1(-/-) mice have normal cardiac function under baseline conditions but have significantly reduced contraction rate and relaxation rate responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation that are associated with a reduced Ca(2+) sensitivity. In S100A1(-/-) mice, basal left-ventricular contractility deteriorated following 3-week pressure overload by thoracic aorta constriction despite a normal adaptive hypertrophy. Surprisingly, heterozygotes also had an impaired response to acute beta-adrenergic stimulation but maintained normal contractility in response to chronic pressure overload that coincided with S100A1 upregulation to wild-type levels. In contrast to other genetic models with impaired cardiac contractility, loss of S100A1 did not lead to cardiac hypertrophy or dilation in aged mice. The data demonstrate that high S100A1 protein levels are essential for the cardiac reserve and adaptation to acute and chronic hemodynamic stress in vivo.

  8. Renal functional and structural integrity in infants with iron deficiency anemia: relation to oxidative stress and response to iron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shimi, Mohamed S; El-Farrash, Rania A; Ismail, Eman A; El-Safty, Ibrahim A; El-Safty, A; Nada, Ahmed S; El-Gamel, Omayma A; Salem, Yomna M; Shoukry, Sara M

    2015-10-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare renal functional and structural integrity in 50 infants with IDA and 50 healthy controls and to assess the relation between IDA and oxidative stress and response to iron therapy. This was a prospective study in which peripheral blood samples were collected from all study subjects and the following laboratory investigations performed: serum iron profile, urinary microalbumin, urinary leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), fractional excretion of sodium (FeNa), serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC), serum malondialdehyde (MDA), serum and urinary trace elements (iron, copper, zinc, calcium and magnesium). All patients received oral iron therapy and were followed-up for 3 months. The levels of baseline urinary markers were higher among the patients with IDA than among the controls (p < 0.05). Patients had a lower pre-therapy TAC and lower serum zinc and magnesium levels than controls as well as higher MDA and serum copper levels (p < 0.05). MDA level was positively correlated to microalbumin and LAP level (p < 0.05). Urinary LAP concentration was positively correlated to urinary trace element concentrations (p < 0.05). A significant decrease in microalbumin, LAP, FeNa, and urinary trace elements was observed post-iron therapy while hemoglobin and ferritin levels were increased (p < 0.05). Among the study subjects, IDA had an adverse influence on renal functional and structural integrity which could be reversed with iron therapy. Oxidative stress played an important role in the pathogenesis of renal injury in IDA.

  9. Thiamine deficiency activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α to facilitate pro-apoptotic responses in mouse primary astrocytes.

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    Kristy Zera

    Full Text Available Thiamine is an essential enzyme cofactor required for proper metabolic function and maintenance of metabolism and energy production in the brain. In developed countries, thiamine deficiency (TD is most often manifested following chronic alcohol consumption leading to impaired mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, inflammation and excitotoxicity. These biochemical lesions result in apoptotic cell death in both neurons and astrocytes. Comparable histological injuries in patients with hypoxia/ischemia and TD have been described in the thalamus and mammillary bodies, suggesting a congruency between the cellular responses to these stresses. Consistent with hypoxia/ischemia, TD stabilizes and activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α under physiological oxygen levels. However, the role of TD-induced HIF-1α in neurological injury is currently unknown. Using Western blot analysis and RT-PCR, we have demonstrated that TD induces HIF-1α expression and activity in primary mouse astrocytes. We observed a time-dependent increase in mRNA and protein expression of the pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory HIF-1α target genes MCP1, BNIP3, Nix and Noxa during TD. We also observed apoptotic cell death in TD as demonstrated by PI/Annexin V staining, TUNEL assay, and Cell Death ELISA. Pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α activity using YC1 and thiamine repletion both reduced expression of pro-apoptotic HIF-1α target genes and apoptotic cell death in TD. These results demonstrate that induction of HIF-1α mediated transcriptional up-regulation of pro-apoptotic/inflammatory signaling contributes to astrocyte cell death during thiamine deficiency.

  10. Thiamine deficiency activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α to facilitate pro-apoptotic responses in mouse primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zera, Kristy; Zastre, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Thiamine is an essential enzyme cofactor required for proper metabolic function and maintenance of metabolism and energy production in the brain. In developed countries, thiamine deficiency (TD) is most often manifested following chronic alcohol consumption leading to impaired mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, inflammation and excitotoxicity. These biochemical lesions result in apoptotic cell death in both neurons and astrocytes. Comparable histological injuries in patients with hypoxia/ischemia and TD have been described in the thalamus and mammillary bodies, suggesting a congruency between the cellular responses to these stresses. Consistent with hypoxia/ischemia, TD stabilizes and activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α) under physiological oxygen levels. However, the role of TD-induced HIF-1α in neurological injury is currently unknown. Using Western blot analysis and RT-PCR, we have demonstrated that TD induces HIF-1α expression and activity in primary mouse astrocytes. We observed a time-dependent increase in mRNA and protein expression of the pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory HIF-1α target genes MCP1, BNIP3, Nix and Noxa during TD. We also observed apoptotic cell death in TD as demonstrated by PI/Annexin V staining, TUNEL assay, and Cell Death ELISA. Pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α activity using YC1 and thiamine repletion both reduced expression of pro-apoptotic HIF-1α target genes and apoptotic cell death in TD. These results demonstrate that induction of HIF-1α mediated transcriptional up-regulation of pro-apoptotic/inflammatory signaling contributes to astrocyte cell death during thiamine deficiency.

  11. Induction of premalignant host responses by cathepsin x/z-deficiency in Helicobacter pylori-infected mice.

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    Sabine Krueger

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori are responsible for the induction of chronic gastric inflammation progressing to atrophy, metaplasia, and gastric cancer. The overexpression of Cathepsin X/Z (Ctsz in H. pylori-infected mucosa and gastric cancer is mediated predominantly by an augmented migration of ctsz(-/-positive macrophages and the up-regulation of Ctsz in tumor epithelium. To explore the Ctsz-function in the context of chronic inflammation and the development of preneoplastic lesions, we used Ctsz-deficient mice in a H. pylori gastritis model. Ctsz (-/- and wild-type (wt mice were infected with H. pylori strain SS1. The mice were sacrificed at 24, 36, and 50 weeks post infection (wpi. The stomach was removed, and gastric strips were snap-frozen or embedded and stained with H&E. Tissue sections were scored for epithelial lesions and inflammation. Ki-67 and F4/80 immunostaining were used to measure epithelial cell proliferation and macrophage infiltration, respectively. The upregulation of compensating cathepsins and cytokines were confirmed by Western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR. SS1-infected wt and ctsz (-/- mice showed strong inflammation, foveolar hyperplasia, atrophy, and cystically-dilated glands. However, at 50 wpi, ctsz (-/- mice developed significantly more severe spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM, showed enhanced epithelial proliferation, and higher levels of infiltrating macrophages. Induction of cytokines was higher and significantly prolonged in ctsz (-/- mice compared to wt. Ctsz deficiency supports H. pylori-dependent development of chronic gastritis up to metaplasia, indicating a protective, but not proteolytic, function of Ctsz in inflammatory gastric disease.

  12. The relationship between high density lipoprotein subclass profile and plasma lipids concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Li

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HDL particles posses multiple antiatherogenic activities and the identification and differentiation of individual HDL subclasses may be useful in documentation and understanding of metabolic changes of different HDL subclasses. The major plasma lipids exist and are transported in the form of lipoprotein complexes. Hence, alterations in plasma lipids levels can interfere with the composition, content, and distribution of plasma lipoprotein subclasses that affect atherosclerosis risk. The research review major discussed the relationship between plasma lipids levels and HDL subclasses distribution. The general shift toward smaller size of HDL particle size in HTG, HCL and MHL subjects, and the changes were more prominent with the elevation of TG and TC levels which imply that HDL maturation might be abnormal and RCT pathway might be weaken, and these changes were more seriously in MHL subjects. Plasma contents of small sized HDL particles significantly higher, whereas those of large sized HDL particles were significantly lower with elevation of TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios. Increased in the TC/HDL-C ratio alone did not influence the distributions of HDL subclasses significantly when the TG/HDL-C ratio was low (TG/HDL-C ≤ 2.5. Hence, the TG/HDL-C ratio might be more sensitive to reflect the alteration of HDL subclass distribution than the TC/HDL-C ratio. In LDL-C/HDL-C ≤ 2.3 group, the pattern of distribution in HDL subclass was in agreement with the normolipidemic subjects. Moreover, considering the relative ease of measuring TC/HDL-C, TG/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios, as opposed to measuring HDL subclasses, these 3 ratios together may be a good indicator of HDL subclass distribution. The protective effect of increased apoA-I levels against the reduction of HDL2b caused by elevated TG concentration. On one hand, plasma HDL-C and apoA-I appear to play a coordinated role in the assembly of HDL particles and the determination of their

  13. The catabolism of human γG immunoglobulins of different heavy chain subclasses. III. The catabolism of heavy chain disease proteins and of Fc fragments of myeloma proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, H. L.; Fishkin, B. G.

    1972-01-01

    The catabolism of 131I and 125I paired labelled Fc fragments of myeloma proteins and of H chain disease proteins of different heavy chain subclasses was studied in men and monkeys. In contrast to the previously demonstrated catabolic heterogeneity of intact γG immunoglobulins, the Fc fragments and H chain disease proteins of all subclasses tested were catabolized at a similar rate. These data suggest that structures not present on the Fc fragments are responsible for the faster turnover rate of γG3 immunoglobulins and for the differences in half-lives of myeloma proteins within a given subclass. The catabolic features of the H chain disease proteins differed from those of intact γG. Although the whole body half-lives of the two proteins were similar, the fractional turnover rate of the H chain disease proteins was higher than that of γG, on the average 8% of the intravascular pool/day as compared to 4% for γG. One-half to 1% of the intravascular pool of the H chain disease protein and less than 0·1% of the γG was excreted into the urine. An average of 24% of the H chain disease proteins and 44% of the γG equilibrated into the intravascular compartment. PMID:4624553

  14. Sudan ebolavirus long recovered survivors produce GP-specific Abs that are of the IgG1 subclass and preferentially bind FcγRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radinsky, Olga; Edri, Avishay; Brusilovsky, Michael; Fedida-Metula, Shlomit; Sobarzo, Ariel; Gershoni-Yahalom, Orly; Lutwama, Julius; Dye, John; Lobel, Leslie; Porgador, Angel

    2017-07-20

    Ebolavirus is a highly lethal pathogen, causing a severe hemorrhagic disease with a high fatality rate. To better understand immune correlates of protection by virus specific IgG, we investigated the evolution of the Fcγ receptors (FcγRs)-activating capabilities of antiviral IgG in serum samples of long recovered survivors. To this end, longitudinal serum samples from survivors of Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV) infection, studied over years, were examined for the presence of Ebola-GP specific IgG subclasses, and for their binding to FcγRs. We developed a cell-based reporter system to quantitate pathogen-specific antibody binding to FcγRIIIA, FcγRIIA, FcγRIIB and FcγRI. With this system, we demonstrate that anti-GP-specific stimulation of the FcγRI reporter by survivors' sera was substantially high one year after acute infection, with a slight reduction in activity over a decade post infection. We further demonstrate that GP-specific IgG1 is by far the seroprevalent subclass that retained and even enhanced its presence in the sera, over ten years post infection; the prevalence of other GP-specific IgG subclasses was considerably reduced over time. In accordance, GP-specific FcγRI reporter response and GP-specific total IgG1 subclass correlated in the studied group of Ebola survivors. These observations are important for further informing Ebola vaccine and therapeutic development.

  15. Rac2-deficiency leads to exacerbated and protracted colitis in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection.

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    Ramzi Fattouh

    Full Text Available Recent genetic-based studies have implicated a number of immune-related genes in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Our recent genetic studies showed that RAC2 is associated with human IBD; however, its role in disease pathogenesis is unclear. Given Rac2's importance in various fundamental immune cell processes, we investigated whether a defect in Rac2 may impair host immune responses in the intestine and promote disease in the context of an infection-based (Citrobacter rodentium model of colitis. In response to infection, Rac2(-/- mice showed i worsened clinical symptoms (days 13-18, ii increased crypt hyperplasia at days 11 and 22 (a time when crypt hyperplasia was largely resolved in wild-type mice; WT, and iii marked mononuclear cell infiltration characterized by higher numbers of T (CD3(+ cells (day 22, compared to WT-infected mice. Moreover, splenocytes harvested from infected Rac2(-/- mice and stimulated in vitro with C. rodentium lysate produced considerably higher levels of interferon-γ and interleukin-17A. The augmented responses observed in Rac2(-/- mice did not appear to stem from Rac2's role in NADPH oxidase-driven reactive oxygen species production as no differences in crypt hyperplasia, nor inflammation, were observed in infected NOX2(-/- mice compared to WT. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that Rac2(-/- mice develop more severe disease when subjected to a C. rodentium-induced model of infectious colitis, and suggest that impaired Rac2 function may promote the development of IBD in humans.

  16. Female mice deficient in alpha-fetoprotein show female-typical neural responses to conspecific-derived pheromones.

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    Olivier Brock

    Full Text Available The neural mechanisms controlling sexual behavior are sexually differentiated by the perinatal actions of sex steroid hormones. We recently observed using female mice deficient in alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-KO and which lack the protective actions of AFP against maternal estradiol, that exposure to prenatal estradiol completely defeminized the potential to show lordosis behavior in adulthood. Furthermore, AFP-KO females failed to show any male-directed mate preferences following treatment with estradiol and progesterone, indicating a reduced sexual motivation to seek out the male. In the present study, we asked whether neural responses to male- and female-derived odors are also affected in AFP-KO female mice. Therefore, we compared patterns of Fos, the protein product of the immediate early gene, c-fos, commonly used as a marker of neuronal activation, between wild-type (WT and AFP-KO female mice following exposure to male or estrous female urine. We also tested WT males to confirm the previously observed sex differences in neural responses to male urinary odors. Interestingly, AFP-KO females showed normal, female-like Fos responses, i.e. exposure to urinary odors from male but not estrous female mice induced equivalent levels of Fos protein in the accessory olfactory pathways (e.g. the medial part of the preoptic nucleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the amygdala, and the lateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus as well as in the main olfactory pathways (e.g. the piriform cortex and the anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus, as WT females. By contrast, WT males did not show any significant induction of Fos protein in these brain areas upon exposure to either male or estrous female urinary odors. These results thus suggest that prenatal estradiol is not involved in the sexual differentiation of neural Fos responses to male-derived odors.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of riboflavin responsiveness in patients with ETF-QO variations and multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Nanna; Frerman, Frank E; Corydon, Thomas J; Palmfeldt, Johan; Bross, Peter; Gregersen, Niels; Olsen, Rikke K J

    2012-08-01

    Riboflavin-responsive forms of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (RR-MADD) have been known for years, but with presumed defects in the formation of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) co-factor rather than genetic defects of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO). It was only recently established that a number of RR-MADD patients carry genetic defects in ETF-QO and that the well-documented clinical efficacy of riboflavin treatment may be based on a chaperone effect that can compensate for inherited folding defects of ETF-QO. In the present study, we investigate the molecular mechanisms and the genotype-phenotype relationships for the riboflavin responsiveness in MADD, using a human HEK-293 cell expression system. We studied the influence of riboflavin and temperature on the steady-state level and the activity of variant ETF-QO proteins identified in patients with RR-MADD, or non- and partially responsive MADD. Our results showed that variant ETF-QO proteins associated with non- and partially responsive MADD caused severe misfolding of ETF-QO variant proteins when cultured in media with supplemented concentrations of riboflavin. In contrast, variant ETF-QO proteins associated with RR-MADD caused milder folding defects when cultured at the same conditions. Decreased thermal stability of the variants showed that FAD does not completely correct the structural defects induced by the variation. This may cause leakage of electrons and increased reactive oxygen species, as reflected by increased amounts of cellular peroxide production in HEK-293 cells expressing the variant ETF-QO proteins. Finally, we found indications of prolonged association of variant ETF-QO protein with the Hsp60 chaperonin in the mitochondrial matrix, supporting indications of folding defects in the variant ETF-QO proteins.

  18. Deficient recovery response and adaptive feedback potential in dynamic gait stability in unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrum, Christopher; Eysel-Gosepath, Katrin; Epro, Gaspar; Meijer, Kenneth; Savelberg, Hans H C M; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2014-12-01

    Unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder (UPVD) causes deficient locomotor responses to novel environments due to a lack of accurate vestibular sensory information, increasing fall risk. This study aimed to examine recovery response (stability recovery actions) and adaptive feedback potential in dynamic stability of UPVD-patients and healthy control subjects during perturbed walking. 17 UPVD-patients (>6 months since onset) and 17 matched healthy control participants walked on a treadmill and were subjected to eight unexpected perturbations during the swing phase of the right leg. For each perturbation, the margin of stability (MS; state of body's centre of mass in relation to the base of support), was determined at touchdown of the perturbed leg and during the following six recovery steps. The first perturbation caused a reduced MS at touchdown for the perturbed leg compared to baseline, indicating an unstable position, with controls requiring five recovery steps to return to MS baseline and UPVD-patients not returning to baseline level within the analyzed six recovery steps. By the eighth perturbation, control subjects needed two steps, and UPVD-patients required three recovery steps, both thereby improving their recovery response with practice. However, MS at touchdown of the perturbed leg increased only for the controls after repeated perturbations, indicating adaptive feedback-driven locomotor improvements for the controls, but not for the UPVD-patients. We concluded that UPVD-patients have a diminished ability to control dynamic gait stability during unexpected perturbations, increasing their fall risk, and that vestibular dysfunction may inhibit the neuromotor system adapting the reactive motor response to perturbations. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  19. High beta-palmitate fat controls the intestinal inflammatory response and limits intestinal damage in mucin Muc2 deficient mice.

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    Peng Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Palmitic-acid esterified to the sn-1,3 positions of the glycerol backbone (alpha, alpha'-palmitate, the predominant palmitate conformation in regular infant formula fat, is poorly absorbed and might cause abdominal discomfort. In contrast, palmitic-acid esterified to the sn-2 position (beta-palmitate, the main palmitate conformation in human milk fat, is well absorbed. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of high alpha, alpha'-palmitate fat (HAPF diet and high beta-palmitate fat (HBPF diet on colitis development in Muc2 deficient (Muc2(-/- mice, a well-described animal model for spontaneous enterocolitis due to the lack of a protective mucus layer. METHODS: Muc2(-/- mice received AIN-93G reference diet, HAPF diet or HBPF diet for 5 weeks after weaning. Clinical symptoms, intestinal morphology and inflammation in the distal colon were analyzed. RESULTS: Both HBPF diet and AIN-93G diet limited the extent of intestinal erosions and morphological damage in Muc2(-/- mice compared with HAPF diet. In addition, the immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg cell response as demonstrated by the up-regulation of Foxp3, Tgfb1 and Ebi3 gene expression levels was enhanced by HBPF diet compared with AIN-93G and HAPF diets. HBPF diet also increased the gene expression of Pparg and enzymatic antioxidants (Sod1, Sod3 and Gpx1, genes all reported to be involved in promoting an immunosuppressive Treg cell response and to protect against colitis. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows for the first time that HBPF diet limits the intestinal mucosal damage and controls the inflammatory response in Muc2(-/- mice by inducing an immunosuppressive Treg cell response.

  20. On some subclasses of the family of Darboux Baire 1 functions

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    Gertruda Ivanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a subclass of the family of Darboux Baire 1 functions \\(f:\\mathbb{R}\\rightarrow\\mathbb{R}\\ modifying the Darboux property analogously as it was done by Z. Grande in [On a subclass of the family of Darboux functions, Colloq. Math. 17 (2009, 95-104], and replacing approximate continuity with \\(\\mathcal{I}\\-approximate continuity, i.e. continuity with respect to the \\(\\mathcal{I}\\-density topology. We prove that the family of all Darboux quasi-continuous functions from the first Baire class is a strongly porous set in the space \\(\\mathcal{DB}_1\\ of Darboux Baire 1 functions, equipped with the supremum metric.

  1. Bleomycin-Treated Chimeric Thy1-Deficient Mice with Thy1-Deficient Myofibroblasts and Thy-Positive Lymphocytes Resolve Inflammation without Affecting the Fibrotic Response

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    Pazit Y. Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung fibrosis is characterized by abnormal accumulation of fibroblasts in the interstitium of the alveolar space. Two populations of myofibroblasts, distinguished by Thy1 expression, are detected in human and murine lungs. Accumulation of Thy1-negative (Thy1− myofibroblasts was shown in the lungs of humans with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and of bleomycin-treated mice. We aimed to identify genetic changes in lung myofibroblasts following Thy1 crosslinking and assess the impact of specific lung myofibroblast Thy1-deficiency, in vivo, in bleomycin-injured mouse lungs. Thy1 increased in mouse lung lymphocytes following bleomycin injury but decreased in myofibroblasts when fibrosis was at the highest point (14 days, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Using gene chip analysis, we detected that myofibroblast Thy1 crosslinking mediates downregulation of genes promoting cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation, and reduces production of extracellular matrix (ECM components, while concurrently mediating the upregulation of genes known to foster inflammation and immunological functions. Chimeric Thy1-deficient mice with Thy1+ lymphocytes and Thy1− myofibroblasts showed fibrosis similar to wild-type mice and an increased number of CD4/CD25 regulatory T cells, with a concomitant decrease in inflammation. Lung myofibroblasts downregulate Thy1 expression to increase their proliferation but to diminish the in vivo inflammatory milieu. Inflammation is not essential for evolution of fibrosis as was previously stated.

  2. [FREQUENCY OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN E DEFICIENCY AMONG PATIENTS WITH IMMUNODEPENDENT DISORDERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmirchuk, V Ie; Tsaryk, V V; Sydorenko, O I; Solon'ko, I I; Diuseieva, V V; Voĭtiuk, T V

    2014-01-01

    Isolated IgE deficiency is one of the most common primary immunodeficiency, which is still underestimated cause of health disorders of modern man. Recent genetic studies report that the cause of the IgE deficiency is immune dysregulation caused by polymorphisms of the gene, which is responsible for the synthesis of activation-induced cytidinedeaminase (AICDA). The Institute of Immunology and Allergology at Bogomolets NMU during the years 2012-2014 were examined 5298 patients with a range of different diseases, which could be suspected violations of immunity. All patients were conducted comprehensive immunological study, and 4476 of them were examined for content of total serum IgE. The criterion for the selection of patients for follow-up began serum IgE deficiency (5-10 kIU/l) was detected in 212 patients (4%), while the total--130 (3%). For follow-up, we are clinically selected group of patients with deficiency of IgE (n = 60) and control group (n = 30). All patients were distributed as per clinical syndromes, and the frequency of their manifestations: sinopulmonary syndrome (63%), gastrointestinal syndrome (13%), autoimmune manifestations (10%), allergic reactions (7%) and chronic fatigue syndrome (7%). The levels of serum IgG, IgA, IgM in the study group were within the age norm (IgG = 1160.00 mg/dl ± 2.88 mg/dl, IgA = 138 g/l ± 37 mg/dl, IgM = 114 mg/dl ± 30 mg/dl). However, only a small proportion of patients was observed decrease in other classes of immunoglobulins in 8 patients with IgG IgG subclasses and sIgA levels in saliva. Significant violations by cellular immunity in determining lymphocyte subpopulations by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies also were found. Phagocytic indices were also no significant abnormalities. An important aspect of clinical deficiency of immunoglobulin E is its association with diseases of bacterial origin (H. influenza, M. catarrhalis, Str. pneumoniae), indicating a protective role of these antibodies in the mucosa

  3. Fibrotic Transformation of the Rat Pancreas as Response to the Nitric Oxide Deficiency

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    B.F. Shevchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide NG-nitro-L-arginine was administrated for the duration of the experiment, and the most significant changes (discirculation and dissecretion were observed on the 12th day, whereupon the reaction slows due to a compensatory response. On the 30th day of experiment tiny bands of fibrous tissue were formed, which also evidenced by the increase of collagen synthesis markers in blood — protein-bound hydroxyproline (p < 0.05. Incompetence of pancreatic cells was manifested by the reduced activity of pancreatic enzymes (p < 0.05, and the visible hyposecretion of acinar cells on the morphological study. The maximum decrease of nitrite/nitrate concentration was observed after the first day (p < 0.05, with a gradual increase to a maximum on 12th day (p < 0.05.

  4. Increased sensitivity of DNA damage response-deficient cells to stimulated microgravity-induced DNA lesions.

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    Nan Li

    Full Text Available Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG. In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR defects.

  5. HMBPP-deficient Listeria mutant immunization alters pulmonary/systemic responses, effector functions, and memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencher, James T.; Shen, Hongbo; Yan, Lin; Wilson, Jessica O.; Freitag, Nancy E.; Rizzo, Alicia N.; Chen, Crystal Y.; Chen, Zheng W.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas infection or immunization of humans/primates with microbes coproducing HMBPP/IPP can remarkably activate Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, in vivo studies have not been done to dissect HMBPP- and IPP-driven expansion, pulmonary trafficking, effector functions, and memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. We define these phosphoantigen-host interplays by comparative immunizations of macaques with the HMBPP/IPP-coproducing Listeria ΔactA prfA* and HMBPP-deficient Listeria ΔactAΔgcpE prfA* mutant. The HMBPP-deficient ΔgcpE mutant shows lower ability to expand Vγ2Vδ2 T cells in vitro than the parental HMBPP-producing strain but displays comparably attenuated infectivity or immunogenicity. Respiratory immunization of macaques with the HMBPP-deficient mutant elicits lower pulmonary and systemic responses of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells compared with the HMBPP-producing vaccine strain. Interestingly, HMBPP-deficient mutant reimmunization or boosting elicits enhanced responses of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, but the magnitude is lower than that by HMBPP-producing listeria. HMBPP-deficient listeria differentiated fewer Vγ2Vδ2 T effector cells capable of coproducing IFN-γ and TNF-α and inhibiting intracellular listeria than HMBPP-producing listeria. Furthermore, HMBPP deficiency in listerial immunization influences memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. Thus, both HMBPP and IPP production in listerial immunization or infection elicit systemic/pulmonary responses and differentiation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, but a role for HMBPP is more dominant. Findings may help devise immune intervention. PMID:25114162

  6. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  7. Radiation response of chemically derived mitochondrial DNA-deficient AG01522 human primary fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieri, D; Fioramonti, M; Berardinelli, F; Leone, S; Cherubini, R; De Nadal, V; Gerardi, S; Moreno, S; Nardacci, R; Tanzarella, C; Antoccia, A

    2013-08-30

    Mitochondria are the main cellular source of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Alterations of mitochondrial metabolism and consequent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential may lead to redox imbalance and in turn to DNA damage, chromosomal instability and apoptosis. On the other hand, impaired mitochondrial functions may either exacerbate the detrimental effects of geno- and cytotoxic agents or may bring beneficial cellular responses. To study the role of mitochondria within this framework, AG01522 human primary fibroblasts were incubated with the mitochondrial polymerase γ inhibitor 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC), leading to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and to mitochondrial dysfunctions. The successful treatment toward mtDNA depletion was confirmed by Complex-IV subunit I (COX-I) immunofluorescence and western blot assays. mtDNA-depleted cells and their counterparts were ultrastructurally characterized by transmission electron microscopy. mtDNA-depleted cells showed dramatic mitochondrial alterations such as fragmentation and cristae disruption along with a reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevated levels of ROS. Despite increased ROS levels, we did not find any difference in telomere length between ddC-treated and untreated cells. The spontaneous rate of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations was significantly enhanced in mtDNA-depleted cells whereas the induction of DSBs by low-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) (X-rays; 7.7keV/μm protons) and high-LET radiations (28.5keV/μm protons) did not differ when compared with normal cells. However, in irradiated cells impaired mitochondrial functions seemed to bring beneficial cellular responses to the detrimental effect of radiations. In fact, after X-irradiation mtDNA-depleted cells show less remaining unrejoined DSBs than normal cells and furthermore a lower induction of cytogenetic damage. Overall, these data show that active mitochondrial functions are required for the proper

  8. Differential Impact of LPG-and PG-Deficient Leishmania major Mutants on the Immune Response of Human Dendritic Cells.

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    Michelle A Favila

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania major infection induces robust interleukin-12 (IL12 production in human dendritic cells (hDC, ultimately resulting in Th1-mediated immunity and clinical resolution. The surface of Leishmania parasites is covered in a dense glycocalyx consisting of primarily lipophosphoglycan (LPG and other phosphoglycan-containing molecules (PGs, making these glycoconjugates the likely pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS responsible for IL12 induction.Here we explored the role of parasite glycoconjugates on the hDC IL12 response by generating L. major Friedlin V1 mutants defective in LPG alone, (FV1 lpg1-, or generally deficient for all PGs, (FV1 lpg2-. Infection with metacyclic, infective stage, L. major or purified LPG induced high levels of IL12B subunit gene transcripts in hDCs, which was abrogated with FV1 lpg1- infections. In contrast, hDC infections with FV1 lpg2- displayed increased IL12B expression, suggesting other PG-related/LPG2 dependent molecules may act to dampen the immune response. Global transcriptional profiling comparing WT, FV1 lpg1-, FV1 lpg2- infections revealed that FV1 lpg1- mutants entered hDCs in a silent fashion as indicated by repression of gene expression. Transcription factor binding site analysis suggests that LPG recognition by hDCs induces IL-12 in a signaling cascade resulting in Nuclear Factor κ B (NFκB and Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF mediated transcription.These data suggest that L. major LPG is a major PAMP recognized by hDC to induce IL12-mediated protective immunity and that there is a complex interplay between PG-baring Leishmania surface glycoconjugates that result in modulation of host cellular IL12.

  9. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) PvTIFY orchestrates global changes in transcript profile response to jasmonate and phosphorus deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background TIFY is a large plant-specific transcription factor gene family. A subgroup of TIFY genes named JAZ (Jasmonate-ZIM domain) has been identified as repressors of jasmonate (JA)-regulated transcription in Arabidopsis and other plants. JA signaling is involved in many aspects of plant growth/development and in defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we identified the TIFY genes (designated PvTIFY) from the legume common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and functionally characterized PvTIFY10C as a transcriptional regulator. Results Nineteen genes from the PvTIFY gene family were identified through whole-genome sequence analysis. Most of these were induced upon methyl-JA elicitation. We selected PvTIFY10C as a representative JA-responsive PvTIFY gene for further functional analysis. Transcriptome analysis via microarray hybridization using the newly designed Bean Custom Array 90 K was performed on transgenic roots of composite plants with modulated (RNAi-silencing or over-expression) PvTIFY10C gene expression. Data were interpreted using Gene Ontology and MapMan adapted to common bean. Microarray differential gene expression data were validated by real-time qRT-PCR expression analysis. Comparative global gene expression analysis revealed opposite regulatory changes in processes such as RNA and protein regulation, stress responses and metabolism in PvTIFY10C silenced vs. over-expressing roots. These data point to transcript reprogramming (mainly repression) orchestrated by PvTIFY10C. In addition, we found that several PvTIFY genes, as well as genes from the JA biosynthetic pathway, responded to P-deficiency. Relevant P-responsive genes that participate in carbon metabolic pathways, cell wall synthesis, lipid metabolism, transport, DNA, RNA and protein regulation, and signaling were oppositely-regulated in control vs. PvTIFY10C-silenced roots of composite plants under P-stress. These data indicate that PvTIFY10C regulates, directly or indirectly, the

  10. TREM2 deficiency impairs chemotaxis and microglial responses to neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Fargol; Snaidero, Nicolas; Kleinberger, Gernot; Madore, Charlotte; Daria, Anna; Werner, Georg; Krasemann, Susanne; Capell, Anja; Trümbach, Dietrich; Wurst, Wolfgang; Brunner, Bettina; Bultmann, Sebastian; Tahirovic, Sabina; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Misgeld, Thomas; Butovsky, Oleg; Haass, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Sequence variations in the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) have been linked to an increased risk for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. In the brain, TREM2 is predominantly expressed in microglia. Several disease-associated TREM2 variants result in a loss of function by reducing microglial phagocytosis, impairing lipid sensing, preventing binding of lipoproteins and affecting shielding of amyloid plaques. We here investigate the consequences of TREM2 loss of function on the microglia transcriptome. Among the differentially expressed messenger RNAs in wild-type and Trem2(-/-) microglia, gene clusters are identified which represent gene functions in chemotaxis, migration and mobility. Functional analyses confirm that loss of TREM2 impairs appropriate microglial responses to injury and signals that normally evoke chemotaxis on multiple levels. In an ex vivo organotypic brain slice assay, absence of TREM2 reduces the distance migrated by microglia. Moreover, migration towards defined chemo-attractants is reduced upon ablation of TREM2 and can be rescued by TREM2 re-expression. In vivo, microglia lacking TREM2 migrate less towards injected apoptotic neurons, and outgrowth of microglial processes towards sites of laser-induced focal CNS damage in the somatosensory cortex is slowed. The apparent lack of chemotactic stimulation upon depletion of TREM2 is consistent with a stable expression profile of genes characterizing the homoeostatic signature of microglia. © 2017 The Authors.

  11. Sensitivity of some Immunoglobulin G class and subclass antibodies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indirect sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure serum antibody responses in onchocerciasis patients. Apparently, IgG antibody class was more sensitive than IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 responses to Onchocerca volvulus adult worms sodium duodecyl sulphate (SDS) extracted crude ...

  12. Deficient beta-mannosylation of Candida albicans phospholipomannan affects the proinflammatory response in macrophages.

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    Audrey Devillers

    Full Text Available Candida albicans produces a complex glycosphingolipid called phospholipomannan (PLM, which is present on the cell-wall surface of yeast and shed upon contact with host cells. The glycan moiety of PLM is composed of β-mannosides with degrees of polymerization up to 19 in C. albicans serotype A. PLM from serotype B strains displays a twofold decrease in the length of the glycan chains. In this study we compared the proinflammatory activities of PLMs purified from C. albicans serotype A and serotype B strains and from a bmt6Δ mutant of C. albicans, whose PLM is composed of short truncated oligomannosidic chain. We found that PLMs activate caspase-1 in murine macrophage cell line J774 independent of the glycan chain length although IL-1β secretion is more intense with long glycan chain. None of the tested PLMs stimulate ROS production, indicating that caspase-1 activation may occur through a ROS-independent pathway. On the other hand, only long-chain oligomannosides present on PLM from serotype A strain (PLM-A are able to induce TNF-α production in macrophages, a property that is not affect by blocking endocytosis through latrunculin A treatment. Finally, we demonstrate that soluble and not cell surface-bound galectin-3, is able to potentiate PLM-A-induced TNF-α production in macrophages. PLMs from C. albicans serotype B and from bmt6∆ mutant are not able to induce TNF-α production and galectin-3 pretreatment does not interfere with this result. In conclusion, we show here that PLMs are able to evoke a proinflammatory state in macrophage, which is in part dependent on their glycosylation status. Long-glycan chains favor interaction with soluble galectin-3 and help amplify inflammatory response.

  13. Sleep-wake behavior and responses of interleukin-6-deficient mice to sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Jonathan D; Opp, Mark R

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) are involved in the regulation of non-rapid eye movements sleep (NREMS). Accumulating evidence suggests IL-6 modulates sleep under some pathophysiologic conditions. We used mice lacking a functional IL-6 gene to investigate further a potential role for IL-6 in the regulation of sleep. IL-6 knockout mice (B6.129S6-Il6tm1Kopf; n=10) and C57BL/6J mice (n=10) were purchased from the Jackson Laboratory (Bar Harbor, ME). Twenty-four-hour baseline recordings were obtained from mice in the absence of any experimental manipulation. Mice were then subjected to 6-h sleep deprivation beginning at light onset. Recordings were obtained during the deprivation period and for 18 h thereafter. During baseline conditions there were no differences between mouse strains with respect to the duration, timing or intensity of NREMS. However, across the 24-h recording period IL-6 knockout mice spent approximately 30% more time in rapid eye movements sleep (REMS) than did C57BL/6J mice. Relative to C57BL/6J mice, core body temperatures of IL-6 knockout mice were higher during the light period of the light:dark cycle. Both strains responded to sleep deprivation by spending more time in NREMS and REMS. Although the total increase in the amount of NREMS after sleep deprivation was the same in both strains, IL-6 knockout mice took 6h longer to accumulate this additional sleep. Under the conditions of this study, IL-6 does not appear necessary for the full manifestation of NREMS, although this cytokine may influence the dynamics of responses to sleep deprivation. That mice lacking IL-6 spend more time in REMS suggests that interactions between IL-6 and REMS regulatory mechanisms may differ from those of IL-1 and/or TNF.

  14. Association of human TLR1 and TLR6 deficiency with altered immune responses to BCG vaccination in South African infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Kaur Randhawa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of effective immunoprophylaxis against tuberculosis (TB remains a global priority, but is hampered by a partially protective Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine and an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although host genetic factors may be a primary reason for BCG's variable and inadequate efficacy, this possibility has not been intensively examined. We hypothesized that Toll-like receptor (TLR variation is associated with altered in vivo immune responses to BCG. We examined whether functionally defined TLR pathway polymorphisms were associated with T cell cytokine responses in whole blood stimulated ex vivo with BCG 10 weeks after newborn BCG vaccination of South African infants. In the primary analysis, polymorphism TLR6_C745T (P249S was associated with increased BCG-induced IFN-γ in both discovery (n = 240 and validation (n = 240 cohorts. In secondary analyses of the combined cohort, TLR1_T1805G (I602S and TLR6_G1083C (synonymous were associated with increased IFN-γ, TLR6_G1083C and TLR6_C745T were associated with increased IL-2, and TLR1_A1188T was associated with increased IFN-γ and IL-2. For each of these polymorphisms, the hypo-responsive allele, as defined by innate immunity signaling assays, was associated with increased production of TH1-type T cell cytokines (IFN-γ or IL-2. After stimulation with TLR1/6 lipopeptide ligands, PBMCs from TLR1/6-deficient individuals (stratified by TLR1_T1805G and TLR6_C745T hyporesponsive genotypes secreted lower amounts of IL-6 and IL-10 compared to those with responsive TLR1/6 genotypes. In contrast, no IL-12p70 was secreted by PBMCs or monocytes. These data support a mechanism where TLR1/6 polymorphisms modulate TH1 T-cell polarization through genetic regulation of monocyte IL-10 secretion in the absence of IL-12. These studies provide evidence that functionally defined innate immune gene variants are associated with the

  15. Role of stress system disturbance and enhanced novelty response in spatial learning of NCAM-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandewiede, Joerg; Jakovcevski, Mira; Stork, Oliver; Schachner, Melitta

    2013-11-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a crucial role in stress-related brain function, emotional behavior and memory formation. In this study, we investigated the functions of the glucocorticoid and serotonergic systems in mice constitutively deficient for NCAM (NCAM-/- mice). Our data provide evidence for a hyperfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, with enlarged adrenal glands and increased stress-induced corticosterone release, but reduced hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression in NCAM-/- mice when compared to NCAM+/+ mice. We also obtained evidence for a hypofunction of 5-HT1A autoreceptors as indicated by increased 8-0H-DPAT-induced hypothermia. These findings suggest a disturbance of both humoral and neural stress systems in NCAM-/- mice. Accordingly, we not only confirmed previously observed hyperarousal of NCAM-/- mice in various anxiety tests, but also observed an increased response to novelty exposure in these animals. Spatial learning deficits of the NCAM-/- mice in a Morris Water maze persisted, even when mice were pretrained to prevent effects of novelty or stress. We suggest that NCAM-mediated processes are involved in both novelty/stress-related emotional behavior and in cognitive function during spatial learning.

  16. Responses of transpiration and hydraulic conductance to root temperature in nitrogen- and phosphorus-deficient cotton seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, J W

    1990-03-01

    Suboptimal N or P availability and cool temperatures all decrease apparent hydraulic conductance (L) of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) roots. The interaction between nutrient status and root temperature was tested in seedlings grown in nutrient solutions. The depression of L (calculated as the ratio of transpiration rate to absolute value of leaf water potential [Psi(w)]) by nutrient stress depended strongly on root temperature, and was minimized at high temperatures. In fully nourished plants, L was high at all temperatures >/=20 degrees C, but it decreased greatly as root temperature approached the chilling threshold of 15 degrees C. Decreasing temperature lowered Psi(w) first, followed by transpiration rate. In N- or P-deficient plants, L approached the value for fully nourished plants at root temperatures >/=30 degrees C, but it decreased almost linearly with temperature as roots were cooled. Nutrient effects on L were mediated only by differences in transpiration, and Psi(w) was unaffected. The responses of Psi(w) and transpiration to root cooling and nutrient stress imply that if a messenger is transmitted from cooled roots to stomata, the messenger is effective only in nutrient-stressed plants.

  17. Complications of vitamin D deficiency from the foetus to the infant: One cause, one prevention, but who's responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högler, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Calcium and phosphorus represent building material for bones. The supplier of these bone minerals is the hormone calcitriol, which originates from vitamin D, itself made by sunshine in human skin. Requirement for bone minerals is highest during phases of rapid growth, and no one grows faster than the foetus and the infant, making them particularly vulnerable. Deprivation of calcium, whether through low calcium intake or low vitamin D, leads to serious health consequences throughout life, such as hypocalcaemic seizures, dilated cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, congenital and infantile rickets, and osteomalacia. These 5 conditions are often summarised as 'symptomatic vitamin D deficiency', are fully reversible but also fully preventable. However, the increasing prevalence of rickets and osteomalacia, and the deaths from hypocalcaemic cardiomyopathy, demand action from global health care providers. Clarification of medical and parental responsibilities is a prerequisite to deliver successful prevention programmes. The foetus and infant have the human right to be protected against harm, and vitamin D supplementation has the same public health priority as vaccinations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2012-01-01

    directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated...... that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD......8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity....

  19. Root responses of Medicago truncatula plants grown in two different iron deficiency conditions: changes in root protein profile and riboflavin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Celma, Jorge; Lattanzio, Giuseppe; Grusak, Michael A; Abadía, Anunciación; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor

    2011-05-06

    Iron deficiency is a yield-limiting factor with major implications for field crop production in one-third of the world's agricultural areas, especially those with high soil CaCO(3). In the present work, a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis proteomic approach was combined with a study on the riboflavin synthesis pathway, including qPCR and riboflavin determination, to investigate Fe-deficiency responses in Medicago truncatula plants grown with and without CaCO(3). Iron deficiency caused a de novo accumulation of DMRLs and GTPcII, proteins involved in riboflavin biosynthesis, as well as marked increases in root riboflavin concentrations and in the expression of four genes from the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway. Two novel changes found were the increased accumulation of proteins related to N recycling and protein catabolism. Other identified changes were consistent with previously found increases in glycolysis, TCA cycle, and stress-related processes. All effects were more marked in the presence of CaCO(3). Our results show that the riboflavin biosynthesis pathway was up-regulated at the genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic levels under both Fe-deficiency treatments, especially in the presence of CaCO(3). Results also indicate that N recycling occurs in M. truncatula upon Fe deficiency, possibly constituting an additional anaplerotic N and C source for the synthesis of secondary metabolites, carboxylates, and others.

  20. Biophysical and Functional Characterization of Rhesus Macaque IgG Subclasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Austin W.; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Crowley, Andrew R.; Chu, Thach H.; Chan, Ying N.; Weiner, Joshua A.; Bharadwaj, Pranay; Hards, Rufus; Adamo, Mark E.; Gerber, Scott A.; Cocklin, Sarah L.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Miles, Adam R.; Eckman, Joshua W.; Belli, Aaron J.; Reimann, Keith A.; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies raised in Indian rhesus macaques [Macaca mulatta (MM)] in many preclinical vaccine studies are often evaluated in vitro for titer, antigen-recognition breadth, neutralization potency, and/or effector function, and in vivo for potential associations with protection. However, despite reliance on this key animal model in translation of promising candidate vaccines for evaluation in first in man studies, little is known about the properties of MM immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses and how they may compare to human IgG subclasses. Here, we evaluate the binding of MM IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4 to human Fc gamma receptors (FcγR) and their ability to elicit the effector functions of human FcγR-bearing cells, and unlike in humans, find a notable absence of subclasses with dramatically silent Fc regions. Biophysical, in vitro, and in vivo characterization revealed MM IgG1 exhibited the greatest effector function activity followed by IgG2 and then IgG3/4. These findings in rhesus are in contrast with the canonical understanding that IgG1 and IgG3 dominate effector function in humans, indicating that subclass-switching profiles observed in rhesus studies may not strictly recapitulate those observed in human vaccine studies. PMID:28018355

  1. Antibody isotypes, including IgG subclasses, in Ecuadorian patients with pulmonary Paragonimiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Guevara E.

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available An ELISA test was developed to detect Paragonimus-specific antibodies, including IgG subclasses, using P. mexicanus crude water-soluble antigens. The test was standardized to detect antibodies in sera of Ecuadorian patients with pulmonary paragonimiasis and negative controls from the endemic area. The detected mean levels of IgG (0.753, SEM: 0.074 and IgM (0.303, SEM: 0.033 were significantly elevated (P<0.05. Within the IgG subclasses, IgG4 showed the highest detected mean level (0.365, SEM: 0.116 and the other three subclasses showed considerably lower mean levels (IgG1, 0.186 SEM: 0.06; IgG2, 0.046 SEM: 0.01; IgG3, 0.123 SEM: 0.047. The number of P. mexicanus eggs found in sputum of infected individuals showed a positive correlation with the level of antibodies detected for IgM, IgG and its subclasses (P<0.001. The relevance of these findings in Ecuadorian patients suffering from pulmonary paragonimiasis is discussed.

  2. Influence of immunoglobulin G-glycan and subclass variation on antibody effector functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, G.

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies signal to other parts of the immune system by binding of their constant domain (Fc) to receptors, such as Fc gamma receptors (FcγR) or C1q of the complement system in the case of immunoglobulin G (IgG). For these interactions the Fc-structure, influenced by subclasses or

  3. Associations between intensive diabetes therapy and NMR-determined lipoprotein subclass profiles in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Jenkins, Alicia J; Basu, Arpita; Stoner, Julie A; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Klein, Richard L; Lyons, Timothy J

    2016-02-01

    Our objective is to define differences in circulating lipoprotein subclasses between intensive versus conventional management of type 1 diabetes during the randomization phase of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). NMR-determined lipoprotein subclass profiles (NMR-LSPs), which estimate molar subclass concentrations and mean particle diameters, were determined in 1,294 DCCT subjects after a median of 5 years (interquartile range: 4-6 years) of randomization to intensive or conventional diabetes management. In cross-sectional analyses, we compared standard lipids and NMR-LSPs between treatment groups. Standard total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol levels were similar between randomization groups, while triglyceride levels were lower in the intensively treated group. NMR-LSPs showed that intensive therapy was associated with larger LDL diameter (20.7 vs. 20.6 nm, P = 0.01) and lower levels of small LDL (median: 465 vs. 552 nmol/l, P = 0.007), total IDL/LDL (mean: 1,000 vs. 1,053 nmol/l, P = 0.01), and small HDL (mean: 17.3 vs. 18.6 μmol/l, P intensive diabetes therapy was associated with potentially favorable changes in LDL and HDL subclasses in sera. Further research will determine whether these changes contribute to the beneficial effects of intensive diabetes management on vascular complications.

  4. Fekete-Szegö Inequalities of a Subclass of Multivalent Analytic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj C.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The main object of this paper is to study Fekete-Szegö problem for a certain subclass of p - valent analytic functions. Fekete-Szegö inequality of several classes are obtained as special cases from our results. Applications of the result are also obtained on the class defined by convolution.

  5. Separation of human immunoglobulin G subclasses on a protein A monolith column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblebici, Pelin; Leblebici, M Enis; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Rodrigues, Alírio E; Pais, Luís S

    2014-07-01

    Monolithic columns have attracted significant attention for the purification of large biomolecules. In the present study, a step gradient elution method was evaluated for the separation of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) into its subclasses on CIM (convective interaction media) r-protein A (recombinant protein A) monolithic column. hIgG was loaded onto the column and bound protein was eluted with a pH gradient. The subclass content of the eluted fractions was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results showed that separation of IgG3 from the other three subclasses can be successfully achieved with high selectivity (100%) and throughput on monolithic media. It was also revealed that enriched fractions of IgG1 and IgG2 could be obtained from purified hIgG in a 28min long chromatographic run. Three fractions with high IgG1 content (89.1%, 94.3% and 88.8%) were recovered. Furthermore, IgG2 was enriched to 64% successfully. A rapid step gradient elution scheme without any additives in buffers was proven to obtain enriched preparations of the two important subclasses with high throughput. The separation time can be reduced even more by increasing the flow rate without any loss in selectivity, which will be beneficial in industrial scale applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Response to intravenous iron in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and restless leg syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Tahir; Auerbach, Michael; Earley, Christopher J; Allen, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) engenders restless legs syndrome (RLS, aka Willis-Ekbom disease). Intravenous (IV) iron can rapidly reverse IDA and would be expected to similarly reverse RLS caused by IDA. This is the first consecutive case series evaluating the effects of IV iron therapy on RLS occurring with IDA (RLS-IDA). RLS-IDA patients were evaluated before and 7-12 months after a 1000-mg IV infusion of low-molecular-weight iron dextran (INFeD(@)) using validated questionnaires and standardized telephone interview. Patients were classified as respondent versus nonrespondent for RLS improvement. Follow-up data were obtained on 42 (70%) of 60 consecutive RLS-IDA patients. The symptoms of RLS were reduced in 76% (32/42) with 47% (20/42) showing an extended response lasting >6 months. The response did not relate to age or gender, but tended to be less among African-Americans than Whites (40% (2/5) vs. 81% (30/37), p = 0.078). White respondents versus nonrespondents had higher hemoglobin levels after treatment (12.1 vs. 11.3 g/dl, p = 0.03). RLS-IDA is reduced after administration of IV iron in most cases, but the 24% failing to respond was higher than expected. The nonrespondents all showed below-normal hemoglobin levels (IDA likely requires ensuring more than minimally adequate body iron stores to support iron delivery to the brain. For some, this may require a dose higher than the customary 1000-mg IV iron used for the treatment of either IDA or RLS alone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Habitual intake of flavonoid subclasses and risk of colorectal cancer in 2 large prospective cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Zhang, Xuehong; Cassidy, Aedín; Song, Mingyang; O'Reilly, Éilis J; Lin, Jennifer H; Pischon, Tobias; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter C; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T; Giovannucci, Edward L; Wu, Kana

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids inhibit the growth of colon cancer cells in vitro. In a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial, the Polyp Prevention Trial, a higher intake of one subclass, flavonols, was statistically significantly associated with a reduced risk of recurrent advanced adenoma. Most previous prospective studies on colorectal cancer evaluated only a limited number of flavonoid subclasses and intake ranges, yielding inconsistent results. In this study, we examined whether higher habitual dietary intakes of flavonoid subclasses (flavonols, flavones, flavanones, flavan-3-ols, and anthocyanins) were associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer. Using data from validated food-frequency questionnaires administered every 4 y and an updated flavonoid food composition database, we calculated flavonoid intakes for 42,478 male participants from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and for 76,364 female participants from the Nurses' Health Study. During up to 26 y of follow-up, 2519 colorectal cancer cases (1061 in men, 1458 in women) were documented. Intakes of flavonoid subclasses were not associated with risk of colorectal cancer in either cohort. Pooled multivariable adjusted RRs (95% CIs) comparing the highest with the lowest quintiles were 1.04 (0.91, 1.18) for flavonols, 1.01 (0.89, 1.15) for flavones, 0.96 (0.84, 1.10) for flavanones, 1.07 (0.95, 1.21) for flavan-3-ols, and 0.98 (0.81, 1.19) for anthocyanins (all P values for heterogeneity by sex >0.19). In subsite analyses, flavonoid intake was also not associated with colon or rectal cancer risk. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that a higher habitual intake of any flavonoid subclass decreases the risk of colorectal cancer.

  8. IDH mutation and neuroglial developmental features define clinically distinct subclasses of lower grade diffuse astrocytic glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorovets, Daniel; Kannan, Kasthuri; Shen, Ronglai; Kastenhuber, Edward R; Islamdoust, Nasrin; Campos, Carl; Pentsova, Elena; Heguy, Adriana; Jhanwar, Suresh C; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Chan, Timothy A; Huse, Jason T

    2012-05-01

    Diffuse gliomas represent the most prevalent class of primary brain tumor. Despite significant recent advances in the understanding of glioblastoma [World Health Organization (WHO) IV], its most malignant subtype, lower grade (WHO II and III) glioma variants remain comparatively understudied, especially in light of their notable clinical heterogeneity. Accordingly, we sought to identify and characterize clinically relevant molecular subclasses of lower grade diffuse astrocytic gliomas. We conducted multidimensional molecular profiling, including global transcriptional analysis, on 101 lower grade diffuse astrocytic gliomas collected at our own institution and validated our findings using publically available gene expression and copy number data from large independent patient cohorts. We found that IDH mutational status delineated molecularly and clinically distinct glioma subsets, with IDH mutant (IDH mt) tumors exhibiting TP53 mutations, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)A overexpression, and prolonged survival, and IDH wild-type (IDH wt) tumors exhibiting EGFR amplification, PTEN loss, and unfavorable disease outcome. Furthermore, global expression profiling revealed three robust molecular subclasses within lower grade diffuse astrocytic gliomas, two of which were predominantly IDH mt and one almost entirely IDH wt. IDH mt subclasses were distinguished from each other on the basis of TP53 mutations, DNA copy number abnormalities, and links to distinct stages of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone. This latter finding implicates discrete pools of neuroglial progenitors as cells of origin for the different subclasses of IDH mt tumors. We have elucidated molecularly distinct subclasses of lower grade diffuse astrocytic glioma that dictate clinical behavior and show fundamental associations with both IDH mutational status and neuroglial developmental stage. ©2012 AACR.

  9. The subclass distribution of IgG autoantibodies in cicatricial pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, P; Prost, C; Aucouturier, P; Durepaire, N; Denis, F; Bonnetblanc, J M

    1991-08-01

    To study the subclass distribution of autoantibodies and their complement-fixing capacity in cicatricial pemphigoid (CP) and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) we studied the sera from 23 patients by both indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on 4-microns cryostat sections of normal human skin and immunoblotting of epidermal or dermal extracts. Monoclonal antibodies of strict specificity for human IgG subclasses were used. Sera from 20 patients with BP served as controls. In addition, total IgG subclass levels were determined by indirect competitive ELISA in all sera. Complement binding capacity was studied by IIF using antibodies to C3 after incubation of skin section with autoantibodies and source of fresh complement. CP autoantibodies reacting with the 230-240 kD and/or the 180-kD epidermal bands showed an IgG4/IgG1 subclass restriction, with a predominance of IgG4 in 10 cases, of IgG1 in four. In BP sera, IgG4 and IgG1 autoantibodies were detected with a similar frequency (100% and 83%, respectively). In EBA sera, autoantibodies reacting with the 290 kD and 145 kD dermal bands also showed an IgG1/IgG4 restriction. Concordant results were obtained by IIF. However, the IIF method had a lower sensitivity for the detection of IgG4 CP antibodies and IgG1 EBA antibodies than immunoblotting. Finally, when CP antibodies were analyzed for their complement-binding activity, it was found that sera containing IgG4 autoantibodies alone never fixed complement whereas all complement-fixing CP sera had IgG1 autoantibodies, suggesting that only this subclass of antibodies is capable of fixing complement.

  10. Association between habitual dietary intake and lipoprotein subclass profile in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogl, L H; Pietiläinen, K H; Rissanen, A; Kangas, A J; Soininen, P; Rose, R J; Ala-Korpela, M; Kaprio, J

    2013-11-01

    Nutritional epidemiology is increasingly shifting its focus from studying single nutrients to the exploration of the whole diet utilizing dietary pattern analysis. We analyzed associations between habitual diet (including macronutrients, dietary patterns, biomarker of fish intake) and lipoprotein particle subclass profile in young adults. Complete dietary data (food-frequency questionnaire) and lipoprotein subclass profile (via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) were available for 663 subjects from the population-based FinnTwin12 study (57% women, age: 21-25 y). The serum docosahexaenoic to total fatty acid ratio was used as a biomarker of habitual fish consumption. Factor analysis identified 5 dietary patterns: "Fruit and vegetables", "Meat", "Sweets and desserts", "Junk food" and "Fish". After adjustment for sex, age, body mass index, waist circumference, physical activity, smoking status and alcohol intake, the "Junk food" pattern was positively related to serum triglycerides (r = 0.12, P = 0.002), a shift in the subclass distribution of VLDL toward larger particles (r = 0.12 for VLDL size, P < 0.001) and LDL toward smaller particles (r = -0.15 for LDL size, P < 0.001). In addition, higher scores on this pattern were positively correlated with concentrations of small, dense HDL (r = 0.16, P < 0.001). Habitual fish intake associated negatively with VLDL particle diameter ("Fish" pattern and biomarker) and positively with HDL particle diameter (biomarker). Our results suggest that in young adults, higher habitual fish consumption is related to favorable subclass distributions of VLDL and HDL, while junk food intake is associated with unfavorable alterations in the distribution of all lipoprotein subclasses independent of adiposity and other lifestyle factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of Soil Grown T. aestivum cv. Root to Reveal the Changes in Expression of Genes in Response to Multiple Nutrients Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gupta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of necessary macronutrients, i.e., Potassium (K, Magnesium (Mg, Nitrogen (N, Phosphorus (P, and Sulfate (S in the soil leads to a reduction in plant growth and yield, which is a result of changes in expression level of various genes. This study was performed to identify the differentially expressed genes and its associated metabolic pathways occurred in soil grown wheat root samples excavated from the control and treated fields. To identify the difference in gene expression levels due to deficiency of the said nutrients, a transcriptomic, meta-analysis was performed on array expression profile data. A set of 435 statistically significant probes encoding 398 Nutrient Deficiency Response Genes (NRGs responding at-least one nutrients deficiency (ND were identified. Out of them 55 NRGs were found to response to minimum two ND. Singular Enrichment Analysis (SEA predicts ontological based classifications and functional analysis of NRGs in different cellular/molecular pathways involved in root development and growth. Functional annotation and reaction mechanism of differentially expressed genes, proteins/enzymes in the different metabolic pathway through MapMan analysis were explored. Further the meta-analysis was performed to revels the active involvement each NRGs in distinct tissues and their comparative potential expression analysis in different stress conditions. The study results in exploring the role of major acting candidate genes such as Non-specific serine/threonine protein kinase, Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase, Peroxides, Glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase proenzyme, Dehydrin family proteins, Transcription factors, Membrane Proteins, Metal binding proteins, Photosystem proteins, Transporter and Transferase associated in different metabolic pathways. Finally, the differences of transcriptional responses in the soil-grown root of T. aestivum cv. and in-vitro grown model plants

  12. Levels of H-ras codon 61 CAA to AAA mutation: response to 4-ABP-treatment and Pms2-deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Barbara L; Delongchamp, Robert R; Beland, Frederick A; Heflich, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiencies result in increased frequencies of spontaneous mutation and tumor formation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that a chemically-induced mutational response would be greater in a mouse with an MMR-deficiency than in the MMR-proficient mouse models commonly used to assay for chemical carcinogenicity. To accomplish this, the induction of H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutation was examined in Pms2 knockout mice (Pms2-/-, C57BL/6 background) and sibling wild-type mice (Pms2+/+). Groups of five or six neonatal male mice were treated with 0.3 micromol 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) or the vehicle control, dimethylsulfoxide. Eight months after treatment, liver DNAs were isolated and analysed for levels of H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutation using allele-specific competitive blocker-PCR. In Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice, 4-ABP treatment caused an increase in mutant fraction (MF) from 1.65x10(-5) to 2.91x10(-5) and from 3.40x10(-5) to 4.70x10(-5), respectively. Pooling data from 4-ABP-treated and control mice, the approximately 2-fold increase in MF observed in Pms2-deficient as compared with Pms2-proficient mice was statistically significant (P=0.0207) and consistent with what has been reported previously in terms of induction of G:C-->T:A mutation in a Pms2-deficient background. Pooling data from both genotypes, the increase in H-ras MF in 4-ABP-treated mice, as compared with control mice, did not reach the 95% confidence level of statistical significance (P=0.0606). The 4-ABP treatment caused a 1.76-fold and 1.38-fold increase in average H-ras MF in Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice, respectively. Furthermore, the levels of induced mutation in Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice were nearly identical (1.26x10(-5) and 1.30x10(-5), respectively). We conclude that Pms2-deficiency does not result in an amplification of the H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutational response induced by 4-ABP.

  13. Co-ordinated expression of amino acid metabolism in response to N and S deficiency during wheat grain filling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jonathan R. Howarth; Saroj Parmar; Janina Jones; Caroline E. Shepherd; Delia-Irina Corol; Aimee M. Galster; Nathan D. Hawkins; Sonia J. Miller; John M. Baker; Paul J. Verrier; Jane L. Ward; Michael H. Beale; Peter B. Barraclough; Malcolm J. Hawkesford

    2008-01-01

    .... Transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches were used to study the impact of nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S) deficiency on N and S remobilization from senescing canopy tissues during grain filling in winter wheat...

  14. Metabolic responses to iron deficiency in roots of Carrizo citrange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck. x Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Iglesias, Domingo J; Talón, Manuel; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Legaz, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    ... (CC) [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osb. × Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.] roots. Major LMWOAs found in roots, xylem sap and root exudates were citrate and malate and their concentrations increased with Fe deficiency...

  15. Proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves in response to acute boron deficiency and toxicity reveals effects on photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, and protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Mishra, Sasmita; Heckathorn, Scott A; Frantz, Jonathan M; Krause, Charles

    2014-02-15

    Boron (B) stress (deficiency and toxicity) is common in plants, but as the functions of this essential micronutrient are incompletely understood, so too are the effects of B stress. To investigate mechanisms underlying B stress, we examined protein profiles in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under normal B (30 μM), compared to plants transferred for 60 and 84 h (i.e., before and after initial visible symptoms) in deficient (0 μM) or toxic (3 mM) levels of B. B-responsive polypeptides were sequenced by mass spectrometry, following 2D gel electrophoresis, and 1D gels and immunoblotting were used to confirm the B-responsiveness of some of these proteins. Fourteen B-responsive proteins were identified, including: 9 chloroplast proteins, 6 proteins of photosynthetic/carbohydrate metabolism (rubisco activase, OEC23, photosystem I reaction center subunit II-1, ATPase δ-subunit, glycolate oxidase, fructose bisphosphate aldolase), 6 stress proteins, and 3 proteins involved in protein synthesis (note that the 14 proteins may fall into multiple categories). Most (8) of the B-responsive proteins decreased under both B deficiency and toxicity; only 3 increased with B stress. Boron stress decreased, or had no effect on, 3 of 4 oxidative stress proteins examined, and did not affect total protein. Hence, our results indicate relatively early specific effects of B stress on chloroplasts and protein synthesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Malaria resistance genes are associated with the levels of IgG subclasses directed against Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage antigens in Burkina Faso

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    Afridi Sarwat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HBB, IL4, IL12, TNF, LTA, NCR3 and FCGR2A polymorphisms have been associated with malaria resistance in humans, whereas cytophilic immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies are thought to play a critical role in immune protection against asexual blood stages of the parasite. Furthermore, HBB, IL4, TNF, and FCGR2A have been associated with both malaria resistance and IgG levels. This suggests that some malaria resistance genes influence the levels of IgG subclass antibodies. Methods In this study, the effect of HBB, IL4, IL12, TNF, LTA, NCR3 and FCGR2A polymorphisms on the levels of IgG responses against Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage extract was investigated in 220 individuals living in Burkina Faso. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient among IgG subclasses was determined. A family-based approach was used to assess the association of polymorphisms with anti-P. falciparum IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 levels. Results After applying a multiple test correction, several polymorphisms were associated with IgG subclass or IgG levels. There was an association of i haemoglobin C with IgG levels; ii the FcγRIIa H/R131 with IgG2 and IgG3 levels; iii TNF-863 with IgG3 levels; iv TNF-857 with IgG levels; and, v TNF1304 with IgG3, IgG4, and IgG levels. Conclusion Taken together, the results support the hypothesis that some polymorphisms affect malaria resistance through their effect on the acquired immune response, and pave the way towards further comprehension of genetic control of an individual’s humoral response against malaria.

  17. Proteomic analysis of chromium stress and sulfur deficiency responses in leaves of two canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars differing in Cr(VI) tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Mustafa; Terzi, Hakan

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur (S) is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development, and it plays an essential role in response to environmental stresses. Plants suffer with combined stress of S deficiency and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in the rhizosphere. Little is known about the impact of S deficiency on leaf metabolism of canola (Brassica napus L.) under Cr(VI) stress. Therefore, this study is the first to examine the effects of Cr(VI) stress and S deficiency in canola at a molecular level. A comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the differences in protein abundance between Cr-tolerant NK Petrol and Cr-sensitive Sary cultivars. The germinated seeds were grown hydroponically in S-sufficient (+S) nutrient solution for 7 days and then subjected to S-deficiency (-S) for 7 days. S-deficient and +S seedlings were then exposed to 100μM Cr(VI) for 3 days. Protein patterns analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed that 58 protein spots were differentially regulated by Cr(VI) stress (+S/+Cr), S-deficiency (-S/-Cr) and combined stress (-S/+Cr). Of these, 39 protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Differentially regulated proteins predominantly had functions not only in photosynthesis, but also in energy metabolism, stress defense, protein folding and stabilization, signal transduction, redox regulation and sulfur metabolism. Six stress defense related proteins including 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1, glutathione S-transferase, ferritin-1, l-ascorbate peroxidase, thiazole biosynthetic enzyme and myrosinase-binding protein-like At3g16470 exhibited a greater increase in NK Petrol. The stress-related proteins play an important role in the detoxification of Cr(VI) and maintaining cellular homeostasis under variable S nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vitamin A supplementation in early life enhances the intestinal immune response of rats with gestational vitamin A deficiency by increasing the number of immune cells.

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    Xia Liu

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is a critical micronutrient for regulating immunity in many organisms. Our previous study demonstrated that gestational or early-life vitamin A deficiency decreases the number of immune cells in offspring. The present study aims to test whether vitamin A supplementation can restore lymphocyte pools in vitamin A-deficient rats and thereby improve the function of their intestinal mucosa; furthermore, the study aimed to identify the best time frame for vitamin A supplementation. Vitamin A-deficient pregnant rats or their offspring were administered a low-dose of vitamin A daily for 7 days starting on gestational day 14 or postnatal day 1, day 14 or day 28. Serum retinol concentrations increased significantly in all four groups that received vitamin A supplementation, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The intestinal levels of secretory immunoglobulin A and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor increased significantly with lipopolysaccharide challenge in the rats that received vitamin A supplementation starting on postnatal day 1. The rats in this group had higher numbers of CD8+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, CD11C+ dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches and CD4+CD25+ T cells in the spleen compared with the vitamin A-deficient rats; flow cytometric analysis also demonstrated that vitamin A supplementation decreased the number of B cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Additionally, vitamin A supplementation during late gestation increased the numbers of CD8+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and decreased the numbers of B lymphocytes in the mesenteric lymph nodes. However, no significant differences in lymphocyte levels were found between the rats in the other two vitamin A supplement groups and the vitamin A-deficient group. In conclusion, the best recovery of a subset of lymphocytes in the offspring of gestational vitamin A-deficient rats and the greatest improvement in the intestinal mucosal immune

  19. Analyses of Selenotranscriptomes and Selenium Concentrations in Response to Dietary Selenium Deficiency and Age Reveal Common and Distinct Patterns by Tissue and Sex in Telomere-Dysfunctional Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Zhang, Li; Zeng, Huawei; Wu, Ryan Ty; Wu, Tung-Lung; Cheng, Wen-Hsing

    2017-10-01

    Background: The hierarchies of tissue selenium distribution and selenotranscriptomes are thought to critically affect healthspan and longevity.Objective: We determined selenium status and selenotranscriptomes in response to long-term dietary selenium deficiency and age in tissues of male and female mice.Methods: Weanling telomerase RNA component knockout C57BL/6 mice were fed a selenium-deficient (0.03 mg Se/kg) Torula yeast-based AIN-93G diet or a diet supplemented with sodium selenate (0.15 mg Se/kg) until age 18 or 24 mo. Plasma, hearts, kidneys, livers, and testes were collected to assay for selenotranscriptomes, selected selenoproteins, and tissue selenium concentrations. Data were analyzed with the use of 2-factor ANOVA (diet × age) in both sexes.Results: Dietary selenium deficiency decreased (P ≤ 0.05) selenium concentrations (65-72%) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) 3 (82-94%) and selenoprotein P (SELENOP) (17-41%) levels in the plasma of both sexes of mice and mRNA levels (9-68%) of 4, 4, and 12 selenoproteins in the heart, kidney, and liver of males, respectively, and 5, 16, and 14 selenoproteins, respectively, in females. Age increased selenium concentrations and SELENOP levels (27% and 30%, respectively; P ≤ 0.05) in the plasma of males only but decreased (12-46%; P selenium deficiency and age in ≥1 tissue or sex, or both. Dietary selenium deficiency upregulated (40-160%; P ≤ 0.05) iodothyronine deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and selenoprotein N (Selenon) in the kidneys of males. Age upregulated (11-44%; P selenium status and selenotranscriptomes because of dietary selenium deficiency and age. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 in growth hormone-deficient Little mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroni, Cibele N.; Hayashida, Cesar Y.; Nascimento, Nancy; Longuini, Viviane C.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Bartolini, Paolo; Bowers, Cyril Y.; Toledo, Sergio P.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate a possible direct, growth hormone-releasing, hormone-independent action of a growth hormone secretagogue, GHRP-2, in pituitary somatotroph cells in the presence of inactive growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The responses of serum growth hormone to acutely injected growth hormone-releasing P-2 in lit/lit mice, which represent a model of GH deficiency arising from mutated growth hormone-releasing hormone-receptors, were compared to those observed in the heterozygous (lit/+) littermates and wild-type (+/+) C57BL/6J mice. RESULTS: After the administration of 10 mcg of growth hormone-releasing P-2 to lit/lit mice, a growth hormone release of 9.3±1.5 ng/ml was observed compared with 1.04±1.15 ng/ml in controls (pgrowth hormone release of 34.5±9.7 ng/ml and a higher growth hormone release of 163±46 ng/ml were induced in the lit/+ mice and wild-type mice, respectively. Thus, GHRP-2 stimulated growth hormone in the lit/lit mice, and the release of growth hormone in vivo may be only partially dependent on growth hormone-releasing hormone. Additionally, the plasma leptin and ghrelin levels were evaluated in the lit/lit mice under basal and stimulated conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we have demonstrated that lit/lit mice, which harbor a germline mutation in the Growth hormone-releasing hormone gene, maintain a limited but statistically significant growth hormone elevation after exogenous stimulation with GHRP-2. The present data probably reflect a direct, growth hormone-independent effect on Growth hormone S (ghrelin) stimulation in the remaining pituitary somatotrophs of little mice that is mediated by growth hormone S-R 1a. PMID:22473409

  1. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive beige- like anchor (LRBA Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency.

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    Shahrzad Bakhtiar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency and vitiligo. LPS-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1 presented at six months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2 presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency.Using whole-exome sequencing (WES we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29 in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge our patient (patient 2 is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype-phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are necessary to

  2. Effects of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on the metabolic and cardiac responses to obesogenic or high-fructose diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Peter A.; Mapanga, Rudo F.; Kimar, Charlene P.; Ribeiro, Rogerio F.; Brown, Bethany H.; O'Connell, Kelly A.; Cox, James W.; Shekar, Kadambari C.; Asemu, Girma; Essop, M. Faadiel

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzymopathy that affects cellular redox status and may lower flux into nonoxidative pathways of glucose metabolism. Oxidative stress may worsen systemic glucose tolerance and cardiometabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that G6PD deficiency exacerbates diet-induced systemic metabolic dysfunction by increasing oxidative stress but in myocardium prevents diet-induced oxidative stress and pathology. WT and G6PD-deficient (G6PDX) mice received a standard high-starch diet, a high-fat/high-sucrose diet to induce obesity (DIO), or a high-fructose diet. After 31 wk, DIO increased adipose and body mass compared with the high-starch diet but to a greater extent in G6PDX than WT mice (24 and 20% lower, respectively). Serum free fatty acids were increased by 77% and triglycerides by 90% in G6PDX mice, but not in WT mice, by DIO and high-fructose intake. G6PD deficiency did not affect glucose tolerance or the increased insulin levels seen in WT mice. There was no diet-induced hypertension or cardiac dysfunction in either mouse strain. However, G6PD deficiency increased aconitase activity by 42% and blunted markers of nonoxidative glucose pathway activation in myocardium, including the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway activation and advanced glycation end product formation. These results reveal a complex interplay between diet-induced metabolic effects and G6PD deficiency, where G6PD deficiency decreases weight gain and hyperinsulinemia with DIO, but elevates serum free fatty acids, without affecting glucose tolerance. On the other hand, it modestly suppressed indexes of glucose flux into nonoxidative pathways in myocardium, suggesting potential protective effects. PMID:22829586

  3. Intranasal administration of retinyl palmitate with a respiratory virus vaccine corrects impaired mucosal IgA response in the vitamin A-deficient host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surman, Sherri L; Jones, Bart G; Rudraraju, Rajeev; Sealy, Robert E; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2014-04-01

    Our previous studies showed that intranasal vaccination of vitamin A-deficient (VAD) mice failed to induce normal levels of upper respiratory tract IgA, a first line of defense against respiratory virus infection. Here we demonstrate that the impaired responses in VAD animals are corrected by a single intranasal application of retinyl palmitate with the vaccine. Results encourage the clinical testing of intranasal vitamin A supplements to improve protection against respiratory viral disease in VAD populations.

  4. Evaluation of in vivo responses of sorafenib therapy in a preclinical mouse model of PTEN-deficient of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yutaka; De Velasco, Marco A; Kura, Yurie; Nozawa, Masahiro; Hatanaka, Yuji; Oki, Takashi; Ozeki, Takayuki; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Minami, Takafumi; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-08

    Despite recent advances in the treatment for advanced prostate cancer, outcomes remain poor. This lack of efficacy has prompted the development of alternative treatment strategies. In the present study we investigate the effects of the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib in a genetically engineered mouse model of prostate cancer and explore the rational combination with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. Conditional prostate specific PTEN-deficient knockout mice were utilized to determine the pharmacodynamic and chemopreventive effects of sorafenib. This mouse model was also used to examine the therapeutic efficacy of sorafenib alone or in combination with everolimus. Preclinical efficacy was assessed by comparing the reduction of tumor burden, proliferation, angiogenesis and the induction of apoptosis. Molecular responses were assessed by immunohistochemical, TUNEL and western blot assays. Pharmacodynamic analysis revealed that a single dose of sorafenib decreased activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling axis at doses of 30-60 mg/kg, but activated JAK/STAT3 signaling. Levels of cleaved casapase-3 increased in a dose dependent manner. Chemoprevention studies showed that chronic sorafenib administration was capable of inhibiting tumor progression through the reduction of cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis and the induction of apoptosis. In intervention models of established castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer, treatment with sorafenib provided modest but statistically insignificant reduction in tumor burden. However, sorafenib significantly inhibited cancer cell proliferation and MVD but had minimal effects on the induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, the administration of sorafenib increased the expression levels of the androgen receptor, p-GSK3β and p-ERK1/2 in castration-resistant prostate cancers. In both intervention models, combination therapy demonstrated a clear tendency of enhanced antitumor effects over monotherapy. Notably, the

  5. Uncoupled responses of Smad4-deficient cancer cells to TNFα result in secretion of monomeric laminin-γ2

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    Schmiegel Wolff

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional loss of the tumor suppressor Smad4 is involved in pancreatic and colorectal carcinogenesis and has been associated with the acquisition of invasiveness. We have previously demonstrated that the heterotrimeric basement membrane protein laminin-332 is a Smad4 target. Namely, Smad4 functions as a positive transcriptional regulator of all three genes encoding laminin-332; its loss is thus implicated in the reduced or discontinuous deposition of the heterotrimeric basement membrane molecule as evident in carcinomas. Uncoupled expression of laminin genes, on the other hand, namely overexpression of the laminin-γ2 chain is an impressive marker at invasive edges of carcinomas where tumor cells are maximally exposed to signals from stromal cell types like macrophages. As Smad4 is characterized as an integrator of multiple extracellular stimuli in a strongly contextual manner, we asked if loss of Smad4 may also be involved in uncoupled expression of laminin genes in response to altered environmental stimuli. Here, we address Smad4 dependent effects of the prominent inflammatory cytokine TNFα on tumor cells. Results Smad4-reconstituted colon carcinoma cells like adenoma cells respond to TNFα with an increased expression of all three chains encoding laminin-332; coincubation with TGFβ and TNFα leads to synergistic induction and to the secretion of large amounts of the heterotrimer. In contrast, in Smad4-deficient cells TNFα can induce expression of the γ2 and β3 but not the α3 chain. Surprisingly, this uncoupled induction of laminin-332 chains in Smad4-negative cells rather than causing intracellular accumulation is followed by the release of γ2 into the medium, either in a monomeric form or in complexes with as yet unknown proteins. Soluble γ2 is associated with increased cell migration. Conclusions Loss of Smad4 may lead to uncoupled induction of laminin-γ2 in response to TNFα and may therefore represent one of

  6. Transcriptional and physiological analyses of Fe deficiency response in maize reveal the presence of Strategy I components and Fe/P interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Laura; Venuti, Silvia; Zamboni, Anita; Varanini, Zeno; Tomasi, Nicola; Pinton, Roberto

    2017-02-13

    Under limited iron (Fe) availability maize, a Strategy II plant, improves Fe acquisition through the release of phytosiderophores (PS) into the rhizosphere and the subsequent uptake of Fe-PS complexes into root cells. Occurrence of Strategy-I-like components and interactions with phosphorous (P) nutrition has been hypothesized based on molecular and physiological studies in grasses. In this report transcriptomic analysis (NimbleGen microarray) of Fe deficiency response revealed that maize roots modulated the expression levels of 724 genes (508 up- and 216 down-regulated, respectively). As expected, roots of Fe-deficient maize plants overexpressed genes involved in the synthesis and release of 2'-deoxymugineic acid (the main PS released by maize roots). A strong modulation of genes involved in regulatory aspects, Fe translocation, root morphological modification, primary metabolic pathways and hormonal metabolism was induced by the nutritional stress. Genes encoding transporters for Fe(2+) (ZmNRAMP1) and P (ZmPHT1;7 and ZmPHO1) were also up-regulated under Fe deficiency. Fe-deficient maize plants accumulated higher amounts of P than the Fe-sufficient ones, both in roots and shoots. The supply of 1 μM (59)Fe, as soluble (Fe-Citrate and Fe-PS) or sparingly soluble (Ferrihydrite) sources to deficient plants, caused a rapid down-regulation of genes coding for PS and Fe(III)-PS transport, as well as of ZmNRAMP1 and ZmPHT1;7. Levels of (32)P absorption essentially followed the rates of (59)Fe uptake in Fe-deficient plants during Fe resupply, suggesting that P accumulation might be regulated by Fe uptake in maize plants. The transcriptional response to Fe-deficiency in maize roots confirmed the modulation of known genes involved in the Strategy II and revealed the presence of Strategy I components usually described in dicots. Moreover, data here presented provide evidence of a close relationship between two essential nutrients for plants, Fe and P, and highlight a key

  7. Microarray analysis of rat pancreas reveals altered expression of Alox15 and regenerating islet-derived genes in response to iron deficiency and overload.

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    Richard Coffey

    Full Text Available It is well known that iron overload can result in pancreatic iron deposition, beta-cell destruction, and diabetes in humans. Recent studies in animals have extended the link between iron status and pancreatic function by showing that iron depletion confers protection against beta-cell dysfunction and diabetes. The aim of the present study was to identify genes in the pancreas that are differentially expressed in response to iron deficiency or overload. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6/group were fed iron-deficient, iron-adequate, or iron-overloaded diets for 3 weeks to alter their iron status. Total RNA was isolated from the pancreases and pooled within each group for microarray analyses in which gene expression levels were compared to those in iron-adequate controls. In iron-deficient pancreas, a total of 66 genes were found to be differentially regulated (10 up, 56 down, whereas in iron-overloaded pancreas, 164 genes were affected (82 up, 82 down. The most up-regulated transcript in iron-deficient pancreas was arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (Alox15, which has been implicated in the development of diabetes. In iron-overloaded pancreas, the most upregulated transcripts were Reg1a, Reg3a, and Reg3b belonging to the regenerating islet-derived gene (Reg family. Reg expression has been observed in response to pancreatic stress and is thought to facilitate pancreatic regeneration. Subsequent qRT-PCR validation indicated that Alox15 mRNA levels were 4 times higher in iron-deficient than in iron-adequate pancreas and that Reg1a, Reg3a, and Reg3b mRNA levels were 17-36 times higher in iron-overloaded pancreas. The elevated Alox15 mRNA levels in iron-deficient pancreas were associated with 8-fold higher levels of Alox15 protein as indicated by Western blotting. Overall, these data raise the possibility that Reg expression may serve as a biomarker for iron-related pancreatic stress, and that iron deficiency may adversely affect the risk of

  8. A Novel Negative Fe-Deficiency-Responsive Element and a TGGCA-Type-Like FeRE Control the Expression of FTR1 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

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    Xiaowen Fei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have reported three Fe-deficiency-responsive elements (FEREs, FOX1, ATX1, and FEA1, all of which are positive regulatory elements in response to iron deficiency in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here we describe FTR1, another iron regulated gene and mutational analysis of its promoter. Our results reveal that the FeREs of FTR1 distinguish itself from other iron response elements by containing both negative and positive regulatory regions. In FTR1, the −291/−236 region from the transcriptional start site is necessary and sufficient for Fe-deficiency-inducible expression. This region contains two positive FeREs with a TGGCA-like core sequence: the FtrFeRE1 (ATGCAGGCT at −287/−279 and the FtrFeRE2 (AAGCGATTGCCAGAGCGC at −253/−236. Furthermore, we identified a novel FERE, FtrFeRE3 (AGTAACTGTTAAGCC localized at −319/−292, which negatively influences the expression of FTR1.

  9. Dose response of gamma rays and iron nuclei for induction of chromosomal aberrations in normal and repair-deficient cell lines.

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    George, Kerry A; Hada, Megumi; Jackson, Lori J; Elliott, Todd; Kawata, Tetsuya; Pluth, Janice M; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2009-06-01

    We studied the effects of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies on chromosomal aberration frequency using low doses (gamma rays and high-energy iron ions (LET = 151 keV/microm). Chromosomal aberrations were measured using the fluorescence whole-chromosome painting technique. The cell lines included fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome) and gliomablastoma cells proficient in or lacking DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. The yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were increased in DSB repair-defective cells compared to normal cells; the increase was more than twofold higher for gamma rays compared to iron nuclei. For gamma-ray-induced aberrations, the ATM- and NBS-defective lines were found to have significantly larger quadratic components compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for the NBS cells. For simple and complex aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses, respectively, for each cell line studied. RBEs were reduced relative to normal cells for all of the DSB repair-defective lines, with the DNA-PK-deficient cells found to have RBEs near unity. The large increase in the quadratic dose-response terms in the DSB repair-deficient cell lines points to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and to minimize aberration formation. The differences found between AT and NBS cells at lower doses suggest important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high doses to low-dose exposures.

  10. Sex bias occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in Poly7 molecular subclass is associated with EGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keng, Vincent W; Sia, Daniela; Sarver, Aaron L; Tschida, Barbara R; Fan, Danhua; Alsinet, Clara; Solé, Manel; Lee, Wai L; Kuka, Timothy P; Moriarity, Branden S; Villanueva, Augusto; Dupuy, Adam J; Riordan, Jesse D; Bell, Jason B; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Llovet, Josep M; Largaespada, David A

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest solid cancers and is the third leading cause of cancer-related death. There is a universal estimated male/female ratio of 2.5, but the reason for this is not well understood. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system was used to elucidate candidate oncogenic drivers of HCC in a forward genetics screening approach. Sex bias occurrence was conserved in our model, with male experimental mice developing liver tumors at reduced latency and higher tumor penetrance. In parallel, we explored sex differences regarding genomic aberrations in 235 HCC patients. Liver cancer candidate genes were identified from both sexes and genotypes. Interestingly, transposon insertions in the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) gene were common in SB-induced liver tumors from male mice (10/10, 100%) but infrequent in female mice (2/9, 22%). Human single-nucleotide polymorphism data confirmed that polysomy of chromosome 7, locus of EGFR, was more frequent in males (26/62, 41%) than females (2/27, 7%) (P = 0.001). Gene expression-based Poly7 subclass patients were predominantly male (9/9) compared with 67% males (55/82) in other HCC subclasses (P = 0.02), and this subclass was accompanied by EGFR overexpression (P < 0.001). Sex bias occurrence of HCC associated with EGFR was confirmed in experimental animals using the SB transposon system in a reverse genetic approach. This study provides evidence for the role of EGFR in sex bias occurrences of liver cancer and as the driver mutational gene in the Poly7 molecular subclass of human HCC. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  11. Associations of Apgar score and size at birth with lipoprotein subclasses in juvenile obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhet, Osama H.; Vekic, Jelena; Zeljkovic, Aleksandra; Parıpovıc, Dusan; Gojkovıc, Tamara; Janac, Jelena; Spasojevıc-Kalımanovska, Vesna; Peco-Antıc, Amira; Mılosevskı-Lomıc, Gordana; Jelıc-Ivanovıc, Zorana; Stefanovıc, Aleksandra

    2017-12-19

    Background/aim: Juvenile obesity is associated with several metabolic abnormalities, one of them being atherogenic dyslipidemia. Suboptimal fetal growth is associated with obesity risk in childhood, but also with increased rate of metabolic diseases in later life. This study investigated associations of neonatal data (Apgar score, birth weight and birth length) with low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein (LDL and HDL) subclasses in a group of obese children, as well as a possible impact of breastfeeding duration on obesity-associated lipoprotein subclasses distributions.Materials and methods: We included 42 obese children, aged 14.2 ± 2.1 years. LDL and HDL subfractions were separated by gradient gel electrophoresis and biochemical parameters were assessed by routine methods.Results: Compared with obese children with Apgar ≥ 9, the group with Apgar < 9 had significantly higher percentages of small, dense LDL particles (P < 0.05), due to reduced LDL I (P < 0.01) and increased LDL III subclasses (P < 0.05). Birth weight was positively associated with the proportions of LDL I particles (P < 0.001), whereas birth height positively correlated with the amount of HDL 2b subclasses (P < 0.05). The group of never or less than 3 months breastfed children had significantly smaller LDL size (P < 0.01) and lower proportion of HDL 2a particles (P < 0.05) than their ≥3 months breastfed peers.Conclusion: The results showed significant associations of neonatal characteristics with LDL and HDL particle distributions in obese children. In addition, our results point toward positive aspects of longer breastfeeding duration on lipoprotein particle distributions in obese children.

  12. Phrase Structure Patterning and Licensing for English and Serbian Speaker-Oriented Adverb Subclasses

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    Dimković-Telebaković Gordana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to set phrase structure rules for English and Serbian speaker-oriented adverb subclasses. Adverbs are looked at here as specifiers licensed by the semantic feature [ILLOCUTIONARY FORCE]. The results suggest that illocutionary, evaluative and evidential adverbs normally merge within the complementizer layer and the inflectional layer, and that English epistemic adverbs are in most cases preferably integrated into the inflectional layer, whereas Serbian epistemic adverbs tend to occur in the sentence-initial position.

  13. In-depth analysis of subclass-specific conformational preferences of IgG antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Xinsheng; Vestergaard, Bente; Thorolfsson, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    with identical variable regions, were thoroughly analysed by the ensemble optimization method. The extended analysis of the optimized ensembles through shape clustering reveals distinct subclass-specific conformational preferences, which provide new insights for understanding the variations in physical....../chemical stability and biological function of therapeutic antibodies. Importantly, the way that specific differences in the linker region correlate with the solution structure of intact antibodies is revealed, thereby visualizing future potential for the rational design of antibodies with designated physicochemical...

  14. Association between ethnicity and obesity with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function and subclass distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woudberg, Nicholas J; Goedecke, Julia H; Blackhurst, Dee; Frias, Miguel; James, Richard; Opie, Lionel H; Lecour, Sandrine

    2016-05-11

    Obesity and low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are associated with cardiovascular risk. Surprisingly, despite a greater prevalence of obesity and lower HDL concentrations than white women, black South African women are relatively protected against ischaemic heart disease. We investigated whether this apparent discrepancy may be related to different HDL function and subclass distribution in black and white, normal-weight and obese South African women (n = 40). HDL functionality was assessed by measuring paraoxonase (PON) activity, platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity, Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) and quantification of the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule in endothelial cells. PON-1 and PAF-AH expression was determined in isolated HDL and serum using Western blotting. Levels of large, intermediate and small HDL subclasses were measured using the Lipoprint® system. PON activity was lower in white compared to black women (0.49 ± 0.09 U/L vs 0.78 ± 0.10 U/L, p Obese black women had lower PAF-AH activity (9.34 ± 1.15 U/L vs 13.89 ± 1.21 U/L, p obese white women. Compared to normal-weight women, obese women had lower large HDL, greater intermediate and small HDL; an effect that was more pronounced in white women than black women. There were no differences in antioxidant capacity or anti-inflammatory function across groups. Our data show that both obesity and ethnicity are associated with differences in HDL functionality, while obesity was associated with decreases in large HDL subclass distribution. Measuring HDL functionality and subclass may, therefore, be important factors to consider when assessing cardiovascular risk.

  15. A subclass of harmonic univalent functions with positive coefficients associated with fractional calculus operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Agarwal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we are defining a subclass of harmonic univalent functions with positive coefficients in unit disc $U$ by using fractional calculus operator. Further we obtain distortion bounds, extreme points and radii of convexity for functions belonging to this class and discuss a class preserving integral operator. Here we also determine that the class studied in this paper is closed under convolution and convex combinations.

  16. Subclasses of Starlike Functions Associated with Fractional q-Calculus Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Murugusundaramoorthy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Making use of fractional q-calculus operators, we introduce a new subclass ℳq(λ,γ,k of starlike functions and determine the coefficient estimate, extreme points, closure theorem, and distortion bounds for functions in ℳq(λ,γ,k. Furthermore we discuss neighborhood results, subordination theorem, partial sums, and integral means inequalities for functions in ℳq(λ,γ,k.

  17. Detection of herbicide subclasses by an optical multibiosensor based on an array of photosystem II mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Guzzella, Licia; Euzet, Pierre; Rouillon, Regis; Esposito, Dania

    2005-07-15

    Massive use of herbicides in agriculture over the last few decades has become a serious environmental problem. The residual concentration of these compounds frequently exceeds the maximum admissible concentration in drinking water for human consumption and is a real environmental risk for the aquatic ecosystem. Herbicides inhibiting photosynthesis via targeting photosystem II function still represent the basic means of weed control. A multibiosensor was constructed for detecting herbicides using as biosensing elements photosynthetic preparations coupled to an optical fluorescence transduction system (Giardi et al. EU patent EP1134585, 01830148.1-2204); this paper is about its application in the detection of herbicide subclasses in river water. Photosynthetic material was immobilized on a silicio septum inside a series of flow cells, close to diodes so as to activate photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence. The principle of the detection was based on the factthat herbicides selectively modify PSII fluorescence activity. The multibiosensor has the original feature of being able to distinguish the subclasses of the photosynthetic herbicides by using specific immobilized biomediators isolated from mutated organisms. This setup resulted in a reusable, portable multibiosensor for the detection of herbicide subclasses with a half-life of 54 h for spinach thylakoids and limit of detection of 3 x 10(-9) M for herbicides present in river water.

  18. Effects of cardiovascular lifestyle change on lipoprotein subclass profiles defined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decewicz, David J; Neatrour, David M; Burke, Amy; Haberkorn, Mary Jane; Patney, Heather L; Vernalis, Marina N; Ellsworth, Darrell L

    2009-06-29

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering is a primary goal in clinical management of patients with cardiovascular disease, but traditional cholesterol levels may not accurately reflect the true atherogenicity of plasma lipid profiles. The size and concentration of lipoprotein particles, which transport cholesterol and triglycerides, may provide additional information for accurately assessing cardiovascular risk. This study evaluated changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients participating in a prospective, nonrandomized lifestyle modification program designed to reverse or stabilize progression of coronary artery disease (CAD) to improve our understanding of lipoprotein management in cardiac patients. The lifestyle intervention was effective in producing significant changes in lipoprotein subclasses that contribute to CAD risk. There was a clear beneficial effect on the total number of LDL particles (-8.3%, p lifestyle change program were not confounded by lipid-lowering medications. In at risk patients motivated to participate, an intensive lifestyle change program can effectively alter traditional CAD risk factors and plasma lipoprotein subclasses and may reduce risk for cardiovascular events. Improvements in lipoprotein subclasses are more evident in men compared to women.

  19. Effects of cardiovascular lifestyle change on lipoprotein subclass profiles defined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patney Heather L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol lowering is a primary goal in clinical management of patients with cardiovascular disease, but traditional cholesterol levels may not accurately reflect the true atherogenicity of plasma lipid profiles. The size and concentration of lipoprotein particles, which transport cholesterol and triglycerides, may provide additional information for accurately assessing cardiovascular risk. This study evaluated changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy in patients participating in a prospective, nonrandomized lifestyle modification program designed to reverse or stabilize progression of coronary artery disease (CAD to improve our understanding of lipoprotein management in cardiac patients. Results The lifestyle intervention was effective in producing significant changes in lipoprotein subclasses that contribute to CAD risk. There was a clear beneficial effect on the total number of LDL particles (-8.3%, p Conclusion In at risk patients motivated to participate, an intensive lifestyle change program can effectively alter traditional CAD risk factors and plasma lipoprotein subclasses and may reduce risk for cardiovascular events. Improvements in lipoprotein subclasses are more evident in men compared to women.

  20. Circulating Blood Monocyte Subclasses and Lipid-Laden Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Human Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecht, Tal; Haim, Yulia; Bashan, Nava; Shapiro, Hagit; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Kirshtein, Boris; Clément, Karine; Shai, Iris; Rudich, Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Visceral adipose tissue foam cells are increased in human obesity, and were implicated in adipose dysfunction and increased cardio-metabolic risk. In the circulation, non-classical monocytes (NCM) are elevated in obesity and associate with atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that circulating NCM correlate and/or are functionally linked to visceral adipose tissue foam cells in obesity, potentially providing an approach to estimate visceral adipose tissue status in the non-surgical obese patient. We preformed ex-vivo functional studies utilizing sorted monocyte subclasses from healthy donors. Moreover, we assessed circulating blood monocyte subclasses and visceral fat adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) lipid content by flow-cytometry in paired blood and omental-fat samples collected from patients (n = 65) undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Ex-vivo, NCM and NCM-derived macrophages exhibited lower lipid accumulation capacity compared to classical or intermediate monocytes/-derived macrophages. Moreover, of the three subclasses, NCM exhibited the lowest migration towards adipose tissue conditioned-media. In a cohort of n = 65, increased %NCM associated with higher BMI (r = 0.250,plipid content (r = 0.303,plipid content, particularly in men. Collectively, although circulating blood NCM are unlikely direct functional precursor cells for adipose tissue foam cells, their increased percentage in the circulation may clinically reflect higher lipid content in visceral ATMs.

  1. Specific Antibody Deficiency: Controversies in Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Elena; Bonilla, Francisco A.; Orange, Jordan S.; Ballow, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Specific antibody deficiency (SAD) is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by normal immunoglobulins (Igs), IgA, IgM, total IgG, and IgG subclass levels, but with recurrent infection and diminished antibody responses to polysaccharide antigens following vaccination. There is a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of SAD, and its clinical significance is not well understood. Here, we discuss current evidence and challenges regarding the diagnosis and treatment of SAD. SAD is normally diagnosed by determining protective titers in response to the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. However, the definition of an adequate response to immunization remains controversial, including the magnitude of response and number of pneumococcal serotypes needed to determine a normal response. Confounding these issues, anti-polysaccharide antibody responses are age- and probably serotype dependent. Therapeutic strategies and options for patients with SAD are often based on clinical experience due to the lack of focused studies and absence of a robust case definition. The mainstay of therapy for patients with SAD is antibiotic prophylaxis. However, there is no consensus regarding the frequency and severity of infections warranting antibiotic prophylaxis and no standardized regimens and no studies of efficacy. Published expert guidelines and opinions have recommended IgG therapy, which are supported by observations from retrospective studies, although definitive data are lacking. In summary, there is currently a lack of evidence regarding the efficacy of therapeutic strategies for patients with SAD. We believe that it is best to approach each patient as an individual and progress through diagnostic and therapeutic interventions together with existing practice guidelines. PMID:28588580

  2. Specific Antibody Deficiency: Controversies in Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Perez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Specific antibody deficiency (SAD is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by normal immunoglobulins (Igs, IgA, IgM, total IgG, and IgG subclass levels, but with recurrent infection and diminished antibody responses to polysaccharide antigens following vaccination. There is a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of SAD, and its clinical significance is not well understood. Here, we discuss current evidence and challenges regarding the diagnosis and treatment of SAD. SAD is normally diagnosed by determining protective titers in response to the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. However, the definition of an adequate response to immunization remains controversial, including the magnitude of response and number of pneumococcal serotypes needed to determine a normal response. Confounding these issues, anti-polysaccharide antibody responses are age- and probably serotype dependent. Therapeutic strategies and options for patients with SAD are often based on clinical experience due to the lack of focused studies and absence of a robust case definition. The mainstay of therapy for patients with SAD is antibiotic prophylaxis. However, there is no consensus regarding the frequency and severity of infections warranting antibiotic prophylaxis and no standardized regimens and no studies of efficacy. Published expert guidelines and opinions have recommended IgG therapy, which are supported by observations from retrospective studies, although definitive data are lacking. In summary, there is currently a lack of evidence regarding the efficacy of therapeutic strategies for patients with SAD. We believe that it is best to approach each patient as an individual and progress through diagnostic and therapeutic interventions together with existing practice guidelines.

  3. Comparison of response to 2-years’ growth hormone treatment in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency, born small for gestational age, idiopathic short stature, or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency: combined results from two large observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peter A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have compared the response to growth hormone (GH treatment between indications such as isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD, born small for gestational age (SGA, idiopathic short stature (ISS, and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD. The aim of this analysis of data, collected from two large ongoing observational outcome studies, was to evaluate growth and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I response data for children of short stature with IGHD, MPHD, SGA, or ISS following two years of treatment with the recombinant GH product Norditropin® (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark. Methods Analysis of auxologic data from two ongoing prospective observational studies, NordiNet® International Outcomes Study (NordiNet® IOS and NovoNet®/American Norditropin® Studies: Web-enabled Research (ANSWER Program®. Results 4,582 children aged p = 0.047; p  0.001 vs. IGHD, respectively. Height gain was comparable between IGHD and MPHD. In pre-pubertal children vs. total population, height SDS change after two years was: IGHD, +1.24 vs. +0.97; SGA, +1.17 vs. +1.03; ISS, +1.04 vs. +0.84; and MPHD, +1.16 vs. +0.99 (all p  Conclusions After two years’ GH treatment, change in height SDS was greater in SGA and less in ISS, compared with IGHD; the discrepancy in responses may be due to the disease nature or confounders (i.e. age. Height SDS increase was greatest in pre-pubertal children, supporting early treatment initiation to optimize growth outcomes.

  4. Impaired inflammatory response to glial cell death in genetically metallothionein-I- and -II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Giralt, M; Moos, T

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein I+II (MT-I+II) are acute-phase proteins which are upregulated during pathological conditions in the brain. To elucidate the neuropathological importance of MT-I+II, we have examined MT-I+II-deficient mice following ip injection with 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN). 6-AN is antimetaboli...

  5. RNA-Seq atlas of white lupin: a guide to the phosphorus deficiency response pathway in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the most limiting macronutrients in soils for plant growth and development. White lupin (Lupinus albus) has evolved unique adaptation systems for growth in P-deficient conditions (-P) in soils including: 1) development of densely clustered determinant lateral roots called pr...

  6. ETFDH mutations as a major cause of riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Olpin, Simon E; Andresen, Brage S

    2007-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) is a disorder of fatty acid, amino acid and choline metabolism that can result from defects in two flavoproteins, electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or ETF: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO). Some patients respond to pharmacological doses of ...

  7. Functional and electrophysiological characterization of four non-truncating mutations responsible for creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficiency syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valayannopoulos, V.; Bakouh, N.; Mazzuca, M.; Nonnenmacher, L.; Hubert, L.; Makaci, F.L.; Chabli, A.; Salomons, G.S.; Mellot-Draznieks, C.; Brule, E.; de Lonlay, P.; Toulhoat, H.; Munnich, A.; Planelles, G.; de Keyzer, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability coupled with epilepsy are clinical hallmarks of the creatine (Cr) transporter deficiency syndrome resulting from mutations in the SLC6A8 gene. So far characterization of pathogenic mutations of SLC6A8 has been limited to Cr uptake. The aim of our study was to characterize the

  8. Impaired inflammatory response and increased oxidative stress and neurodegeneration after brain injury in interleukin-6-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Giralt, M; Carrasco, J

    2000-01-01

    of the antioxidants Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), Mn-SOD, and catalase remained unaffected by the IL-6 deficiency. The lesioned mice showed increased oxidative stress, as judged by malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrotyrosine (NITT) levels and by formation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). IL-6KO mice...

  9. Female Mice Deficient in Alpha-Fetoprotein Show Female-Typical Neural Responses to Conspecific-Derived Pheromones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brock, O.; Keller, M.; Douhard, Q.; Bakker, J.

    2012-01-01

    The neural mechanisms controlling sexual behavior are sexually differentiated by the perinatal actions of sex steroid hormones. We recently observed using female mice deficient in alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-KO) and which lack the protective actions of AFP against maternal estradiol, that exposure to

  10. Iron partitioning at an early growth stage impacts iron deficiency responses in soybean plants (Glycine max L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Carla S.; Roriz, Mariana; Pinto de Carvalho, S.M.P.; Vasconcelos, Marta W.

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency chlorosis (IDC) leads to leaf yellowing, stunted growth and drastic yield losses. Plants have been differentiated into ‘Fe-efficient’ (EF) if they resist to IDC and ‘Fe-inefficient’ (IN) if they do not, but the reasons for this contrasting efficiency remain elusive. We grew

  11. Adaptive Immune Response to Model Antigens Is Impaired in Murine Leukocyte-Adhesion Deficiency-1 Revealing Elevated Activation Thresholds In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Peters

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Absence of β2 integrins (CD11/CD18 leads to leukocyte-adhesion deficiency-1 (LAD1, a rare primary immunodeficiency syndrome. Although extensive in vitro work has established an essential function of β2 integrins in adhesive and signaling properties for cells of the innate and adaptive immune system, their respective participation in an altered adaptive immunity in LAD1 patients are complex and only partly understood in vivo. Therefore, we investigated adaptive immune responses towards different T-dependent antigens in a murine LAD1 model of β2 integrin-deficiency (CD18−/−. CD18−/− mice generated only weak IgG responses after immunization with tetanus toxoid (TT. In contrast, robust hapten- and protein-specific immune responses were observed after immunization with highly haptenated antigens such as (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl21 acetyl chicken γ globulin (NP21-CG, even though regularly structured germinal centers with specificity for the defined antigens/haptens in CD18−/− mice remained absent. However, a decrease in the hapten/protein ratio lowered the efficacy of immune responses in CD18−/− mice, whereas a mere reduction of the antigen dose was less crucial. Importantly, haptenation of TT with NP (NP-TT efficiently restored a robust IgG response also to TT. Our findings may stimulate further studies on a modification of vaccination strategies using highly haptenated antigens in individuals suffering from LAD1.

  12. Novel missense variants in LCAT and APOB genes in an Italian kindred with familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency and hypobetalipoproteinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conca, Paola; Pileggi, Silvana; Simonelli, Sara; Boer, Emanuela; Boscutti, Giuliano; Magnolo, Lucia; Tarugi, Patrizia; Penco, Silvana; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Gomaraschi, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Background Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is responsible for cholesterol esterification in plasma. Mutations of LCAT gene cause familial LCAT deficiency, a metabolic disorder characterized by hypoalphalipoproteinemia. Apolipoprotein B (apoB) is the main protein component of very-low-density lipoproteins and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Mutations of APOB gene cause familial hypobetalipoproteinemia, a codominant disorder characterized by low plasma levels of LDL cholesterol and apoB. Objective This was a genetic and biochemical analysis of an Italian kindred with hypobetalipoproteinemia whose proband presented with hypoalphalipoproteinemia and severe chronic kidney disease. Methods Plasma lipids and apolipoproteins, cholesterol esterification, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclass distribution were analyzed. LCAT and APOB genes were sequenced. Results The proband had severe impairment of plasma cholesterol esterification and high preβ-HDL content. He was heterozygote for the novel LCAT P406L variant, as were two other family members. The proband’s wife and children presented with familial hypobetalipoproteinemia and were heterozygotes for the novel apoB H1401R variant. Cholesterol esterification rate of apoB H1401R carriers was reduced, likely attributable to the low amount of circulating LDL. After renal transplantation, proband’s lipid profile, HDL subclass distribution, and plasma cholesterol esterification were almost at normal levels, suggesting a mild contribution of the LCAT P406L variant to his pretransplantation severe hypoalphalipoproteinemia and impairment of plasma cholesterol esterification. Conclusion LCAT P406L variant had a mild effect on lipid profile, HDL subclass distribution, and plasma cholesterol esterification. ApoB H1401R variant was identified as possible cause of familial hypobetalipoproteinemia and resulted in a reduction of cholesterol esterification rate. PMID:22658148

  13. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  14. Vitamin A deficiency impairs adaptive B and T cell responses to a prototype monovalent attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and virulent human rotavirus challenge in a gnotobiotic piglet model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep S Chattha

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses (RV are a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Widespread vitamin A deficiency is associated with reduced efficacy of vaccines and higher incidence of diarrheal infections in children in developing countries. We established a vitamin A deficient (VAD gnotobiotic piglet model that mimics subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children to study its effects on an oral human rotavirus (HRV vaccine and virulent HRV challenge. Piglets derived from VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS sows were orally vaccinated with attenuated HRV or mock, with/without supplemental vitamin A and challenged with virulent HRV. Unvaccinated VAD control piglets had significantly lower hepatic vitamin A, higher severity and duration of diarrhea and HRV fecal shedding post-challenge as compared to VAS control pigs. Reduced protection coincided with significantly higher innate (IFNα cytokine and CD8 T cell frequencies in the blood and intestinal tissues, higher pro-inflammatory (IL12 and 2-3 fold lower anti-inflammatory (IL10 cytokines, in VAD compared to VAS control pigs. Vaccinated VAD pigs had higher diarrhea severity scores compared to vaccinated VAS pigs, which coincided with lower serum IgA HRV antibody titers and significantly lower intestinal IgA antibody secreting cells post-challenge in the former groups suggesting lower anamnestic responses. A trend for higher serum HRV IgG antibodies was observed in VAD vs VAS vaccinated groups post-challenge. The vaccinated VAD (non-vitamin A supplemented pigs had significantly higher serum IL12 (PID2 and IFNγ (PID6 compared to vaccinated VAS groups suggesting higher Th1 responses in VAD conditions. Furthermore, regulatory T-cell responses were compromised in VAD pigs. Supplemental vitamin A in VAD pigs did not fully restore the dysregulated immune responses to AttHRV vaccine or moderate virulent HRV diarrhea. Our findings suggest that that VAD in children in developing countries may partially contribute to more

  15. A PHD in histone language: on the role of histone methylation in plant responses to phosphate deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Sundaravelpandian, Kalaipandian; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    Post-translational modifications of core histones are important for various DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. We recently reported that the ALFIN LIKE 6 (AL6) gene, identified in a forward genetic screen, is critical for phosphate deficiency-induced root hair formation and several other processes associated with the regulation of cellular phosphate homeostasis. AL6 contains a Plant Homeo Domain (PHD) finger that can bind to trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3). Homozygous mutants defective in AL6 expression form very short root hairs under phosphate-deficient conditions, presumably caused by altered expression of putative primary and secondary down-stream targets of AL6. In this Addendum, we speculate about possible roles of AL6, H3K4 trimethylation and other chromatin modifications in the adaptation of plants to low phosphate availability.

  16. Sulla carnosa modulates root invertase activity in response to the inhibition of long-distance sucrose transport under magnesium deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, N; Smaoui, A; Maurousset, L; Porcheron, B; Lemoine, R; Abdelly, C; Rabhi, M

    2016-11-01

    Being the principal product of photosynthesis, sucrose is involved in many metabolic processes in plants. As magnesium (Mg) is phloem mobile, an inverse relationship between Mg shortage and sugar accumulation in leaves is often observed. Mg deficiency effects on carbohydrate contents and invertase activities were determined in Sulla carnosa Desf. Plants were grown hydroponically at different Mg concentrations (0.00, 0.01, 0.05 and 1.50 mM Mg) for one month. Mineral analysis showed that Mg contents were drastically diminished in shoots and roots mainly at 0.01 and 0.00 mM Mg. This decline was adversely associated with a significant increase of sucrose, fructose and mainly glucose in shoots of plants exposed to severe deficiency. By contrast, sugar contents were severely reduced in roots of these plants indicating an alteration of carbohydrate partitioning between shoots and roots of Mg-deficient plants. Cell wall invertase activity was highly enhanced in roots of Mg-deficient plants, while the vacuolar invertase activity was reduced at 0.00 mM Mg. This decrease of vacuolar invertase activity may indicate the sensibility of roots to Mg starvation resulting from sucrose transport inhibition. (14) CO2 labeling experiments were in accordance with these findings showing an inhibition of sucrose transport from source leaves to sink tissues (roots) under Mg depletion. The obtained results confirm previous findings about Mg involvement in photosynthate loading into phloem and add new insights into mechanisms evolved by S. carnosa to cope with Mg shortage in particular the increase of the activity of cell wall invertase. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  17. Inflammatory cytokine response to exercise in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficient COPD patients 'on' or 'off' augmentation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Olfert, IM; Malek, MH; Eagan, TML; Wagner, H; Wagner, PD

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is still limited information on systemic inflammation in alpha-1-antitrypsin-deficient (AATD) COPD patients and what effect alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy and/or exercise might have on circulating inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that AATD COPD patients on augmentation therapy (AATD + AUG) would have lower circulating and skeletal muscle inflammatory cytokines compared to AATD COPD patients not receiving augmentation therapy (AATD-AUG) and/or the typical non...

  18. Metabolism and regulation of tetrahydrobiopterin and its implications for BH4-responsive hyperphenylalaninemia and BH4-deficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Zurflüh, M R

    2008-01-01

    The autosomal recessive inherited, metabolic disorder phenylketonuria (PKU) is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) – a key enzyme in the catabolism of phenylalanine. PKU patients present with noxiously increased concentrations of the amino acid phenylalanine in the plasma, leading to a so-called hyperphenylalaninemia. This disorder is treatable by avoiding uptake of phenylalanine. As this amino acid is naturally ubiquitously present in normal nutrition, patien...

  19. [Construction of root library by SSH and preliminary analysis of genes responsible for phosphorus deficiency in maize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Q; Gao, S B; Zhang, Z M; Lin, H J; Pan, G T; Yang, K C; Rong, T Z

    2010-12-01

    An elite maize inbred line with high tolerance to low phosphorus, 178, was studied for constructing root library and analyzing some genes closely related to phosphorus (P) deficiency using SSH and Semi-quantitative RT-PCR. As a result, 3648 preliminary clones were obtained for root library under stress of P deficiency. By DNA sequencing of 34 random clones, we obtained 23 unique EST sequences which are involved in functions of root cell structure, tolerance and defense, protein modification and composition, transcription regulation, metabolism, and other unknown aspects. Five representative genes were further analyzed for their expression models. The results suggested that the molecular mechanism to adapt P deficiency in maize, performed by multi-genes with different contributions, is similar to rice, Arabidopsis and soybean. The expression order of 5 low P tolerant genes in maize root was PAP, GCS, TOM, PDI and AIP. And it was considered preliminarily that physiological and biochemical changes were prior to morphologic changes in maize root and the essential tolerance to low P may be determined by extending absorption of P to wide soil range through adaption of root architecture and root secretions, which is the greatest difference between tolerant and sensitive maize varieties under low P stress.

  20. IL-10 deficiency exacerbates the brain inflammatory response to permanent ischemia without preventing resolution of the lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de Puig, Isabel; Miró, Francesc; Salas-Perdomo, Angélica; Bonfill-Teixidor, Ester; Ferrer-Ferrer, Maura; Márquez-Kisinousky, Leonardo; Planas, Anna M

    2013-01-01

    Stroke induces inflammation that can aggravate brain damage. This work examines whether interleukin-10 (IL-10) deficiency exacerbates inflammation and worsens the outcome of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). Expression of IL-10 and IL-10 receptor (IL-10R) increased after ischemia. From day 4, reactive astrocytes showed strong IL-10R immunoreactivity. Interleukin-10 knockout (IL-10 KO) mice kept in conventional housing showed more mortality after pMCAO than the wild type (WT). This effect was associated with the presence of signs of colitis in the IL-10 KO mice, suggesting that ongoing systemic inflammation was a confounding factor. In a pathogen-free environment, IL-10 deficiency slightly increased infarct volume and neurologic deficits. Induction of proinflammatory molecules in the IL-10 KO brain was similar to that in the WT 6 hours after ischemia, but was higher at day 4, while differences decreased at day 7. Deficiency of IL-10 promoted the presence of more mature phagocytic cells in the ischemic tissue, and enhanced the expression of M2 markers and the T-cell inhibitory molecule CTLA-4. These findings agree with a role of IL-10 in attenuating local inflammatory reactions, but do not support an essential function of IL-10 in lesion resolution. Upregulation of alternative immunosuppressive molecules after brain ischemia can compensate, at least in part, the absence of IL-10. PMID:24022622

  1. Vitamin deficiencies in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, T M; Williams, S N; Graham, T W

    1991-03-01

    Deficiencies of vitamins A, D, K, E and thiamin can cause severe limitations in beef production. In particular, vitamin A and E can be common causes of lost profit, secondary to limitations of reproductive and growth potential. Prolonged dry periods will reduce available A and E in pasture forage, as can ensiling and prolonged storage of harvested feedstuffs. Polioencephalomalacia is a thiamin responsive disorder, associated with high concentrate feeding and lush pastures. Antimetabolites, such as amprolium, will cause thiamine deficiency when fed in excess. Recent information has shown improved performance with supplemental beta carotene and niacin. The positive responses in reproductive performance, noted with cattle fed supplemental beta carotene, was independent of vitamin A. Supplementation of vitamins above National Research Council recommendations can be justified. However, proper evaluation of feed and animal status, and documentation of a response to supplementation is necessary before diagnosing deficiencies of specific nutrients.

  2. MyD88-, but not Nod1- and/or Nod2-deficient mice, show increased susceptibility to polymicrobial sepsis due to impaired local inflammatory response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Sônego

    Full Text Available Pathogen recognition and triggering of the inflammatory response following infection in mammals depend mainly on Toll-like and Nod-like receptors. Here, we evaluated the role of Nod1, Nod2 and MyD88-dependent signaling in the chemokine production and neutrophil recruitment to the infectious site during sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in C57Bl/6 mice. We demonstrate that Nod1 and Nod2 are not involved in the release of chemokines and recruitment of neutrophils to the infectious site during CLP-induced septic peritonitis because these events were similar in wild-type, Nod1-, Nod2-, Nod1/Nod2- and Rip2-deficient mice. Consequently, the local and systemic bacterial loads were not altered. Accordingly, neither Nod1 nor Nod2 was involved in the production of the circulating cytokines and in the accumulation of leukocytes in the lungs. By contrast, we showed that MyD88-dependent signaling is crucial for the establishment of the local inflammatory response during CLP-induced sepsis. MyD88-deficient mice were susceptible to sepsis because of an impaired local production of chemokines and defective neutrophil recruitment to the infection site. Altogether, these data show that Nod1, Nod2 and Rip2 are not required for local chemokine production and neutrophil recruitment during CLP-induced sepsis, and they reinforce the importance of MyD88-dependent signaling for initiation of a protective host response.

  3. Response to GH treatment in adult GH deficiency is predicted by gender, age, and IGF1 SDS but not by stimulated GH-peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Brabant, Georg; Maiter, Dominique; Jonsson, Björn; Toogood, Andy; Koltowska-Haggstrom, Maria; Rasmussen, Aase Krogh; Buchfelder, Michael; Saller, Bernhard; Biller, Beverly M K

    2013-05-01

    We studied whether the severity of GH deficiency (GHD) defined as i) GH-peak on stimulation tests (insulin tolerance test (ITT), arginine, and glucagon), ii) number of additional pituitary deficits, or iii) baseline IGF1 SDS could impact the response to GH treatment. We further explored whether iv) IGF1 SDS after 24 months of GH replacement or v) ΔIGF1 SDS from baseline to 24 months was related to the phenotypic response to GH treatment. DESIGN, PATIENTS, AND MEASUREMENTS: The patient cohort (n=1752; 50% women) was obtained from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database). The patients were divided into three groups of approximately equal size (tertiles) according to the stimulated GH-peak values and baseline IGF1 SDS and were studied at baseline, 12, and 24 months of GH therapy. Lower baseline IGF1 SDS predicted better response in weight, BMI, total cholesterol, and triglycerides, while IGF1 SDS after 24 months was associated with reduction in waist/hip ratio, total cholesterol, and improved quality of life (QoL). Age-correlated negatively with the response in body weight, BMI, waist, IGF1 SDS, and total and LDL-cholesterol. Response in weight and BMI was greater in men than in women, whereas women showed greater improvement in QoL than men. Patients with more severe GHD as assessed by lower GH-peaks and more pituitary hormone deficiencies had a greater increase in IGF1 SDS. The increase in IGF1 SDS was associated with a reduction in waist/hip ratio and an increase in weight, BMI, and triglycerides. There was no correlation with other lipids, blood pressure, or glucose. Our findings indicate that baseline and 24 months, IGF1 and its degree of increase during GH replacement were more important than stimulated peak GH to predict the phenotypic response.

  4. Association among Dietary Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses and Ovarian Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ruxu; Yang, Yu; Liao, Jing; Chen, Dongsheng; Yu, Lixiu

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have indicated that intake of dietary flavonoids or flavonoid subclasses is associated with the ovarian cancer risk, but presented controversial results. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of these associations. Methods We performed a search in PubMed, Google Scholar and ISI Web of Science from their inception to April 25, 2015 to select studies on the association among dietary flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses and ovarian cancer risk. The information was extracted by two independent authors. We assessed the heterogeneity, sensitivity, publication bias and quality of the articles. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates. Results Five cohort studies and seven case-control studies were included in the final meta-analysis. We observed that intake of dietary flavonoids can decrease ovarian cancer risk, which was demonstrated by pooled RR (RR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68–0.98). In a subgroup analysis by flavonoid subtypes, the ovarian cancer risk was also decreased for isoflavones (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.50–0.92) and flavonols (RR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.58–0.80). While there was no compelling evidence that consumption of flavones (RR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.71–1.03) could decrease ovarian cancer risk, which revealed part sources of heterogeneity. The sensitivity analysis indicated stable results, and no publication bias was observed based on the results of Funnel plot analysis and Egger’s test (p = 0.26). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggested that consumption of dietary flavonoids and subtypes (isoflavones, flavonols) has a protective effect against ovarian cancer with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer except for flavones consumption. Nevertheless, further investigations on a larger population covering more flavonoid subclasses are warranted. PMID:26960146

  5. Family analysis of immunoglobulin classes and subclasses in children with autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiroski, Mirko; Trajkovski, Vladimir; Trajkov, Dejan; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Hristomanova, Slavica; Djulejic, Eli; Paneva, Meri; Bozhikov, Jadranka

    2009-11-01

    Autistic disorder is a severe neurodevelopment disorder characterized by a triad of impairments in reciprocal social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and a pattern of repetitive stereotyped activities, behaviours and interests. There are strong lines of evidence to suggest that the immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of autistic disorder. The aim of this study was to analyze quantitative plasma concentration of immunoglobulin classes, and subclasses in autistic patients and their families. The investigation was performed retrospectively in 50 persons with autistic disorder in the Republic of Macedonia. Infantile autistic disorder was diagnosed by DSM-IV and ICD-10 criteria. Plasma immunoglobulin classes (IgM, IgA, and IgG) and subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) were determined using Nephelometer Analyzer BN-100. Multiple comparisons for the IgA variable have shown statistically significant differences between three pairs: male autistic from the fathers (p = 0,001), female autistic from the mothers (p = 0,008), as well as healthy sisters from the fathers (p = 0,011). Statistically significant differences found between three groups regarding autistic disorder (person with autistic disorder, father/mother of a person with autistic disorder, and brother/sister) independent of sex belongs to IgA, IgG2, and IgG3 variables. Multiple comparisons for the IgA variable have shown statistically significant differences between children with autistic disorder from the fathers and mothers (p autistic disorder from the same family should be tested for immunoglobulin classes and subclasses in order to avoid differences between generations.

  6. Catabolism of human γG-immunoglobulins of different heavy chain subclasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, Hans L.; Fishkin, Ben G.; Grey, Howard M.

    1968-01-01

    The rates of catabolism of human γG-immunoglobulins of subclasses γG1, γG2, γG3, and γG4 were studied by determining the rates of elimination from the circulation of pairs of 131I-and 125I-labeled γG-myeloma proteins in 57 patients suffering from cancer other than multiple myeloma. On the average, γG1-, γG2-, and γG4-myeloma proteins were catabolized at a rate similar to that of normal γG-immunoglobulin, whereas γG3-myeloma proteins were catabolized more rapidly than normal γG-immunoglobulin. The average half-lives for the myeloma proteins were 12.3 days for normal γG, 11.6 days for γG1, 12.4 days for γG2, 8.2 days for γG3, and 11.3 days for γG4. However, significant differences in catabolic rates were observed when individual myeloma proteins of a single subclass were compared. These individual variations were present within all four heavy chain subclasses. The extent of differences ranged from 10 to 47%. The catabolic rate of normal γG was in an intermediate range when compared with myeloma proteins of relatively long and short half-lives. The rate of catabolism of an individual myeloma protein did not correlate with its light chain type, Gm factor, carbohydrate content, or electrophoretic mobility. These findings indicate that the structure(s) related to the catabolism of γG-immunoglobulins are complex and differ from one immunoglobulin molecule to another. Images PMID:4175542

  7. Lipid subclasses profiles and oxidative stress in aggressive periodontitis before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibali, L; Rizzo, M; Li Volti, G; D'Aiuto, F; Giglio, R V; Barbagallo, I; Pelekos, G; Donos, N

    2015-12-01

    Associations between dyslipidaemia, oxidative stress and periodontitis have emerged in recent years. However, there is a lack of studies investigating these associations in aggressive periodontitis (AgP) cases. The aim of this study was to investigate the lipid and oxidative stress profiles in patients with AgP, and to relate them to clinical variables and interleukin (IL)-6 genetic variants. Twelve non-smoking Caucasian patients with AgP selected based on their IL6 haplotypes underwent periodontal non-surgical and surgical treatment. Peripheral blood samples taken at baseline and at six different time-points after treatment were processed to determine IL-6 circulating levels, lipid profiles (cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein [HDL] and low-density lipoprotein [LDL] subclasses) and oxidative stress markers (glutathione and total lipid hydroperoxide levels). HDLs were the most prevalent lipoproteins, followed by intermediate-density lipoprotein, very-low-density lipoprotein and LDL. The LDL subclasses consisted mainly of the less atherogenic large LDL. The lipid profile did not consistently change after treatment up to 3 mo after surgery. Periodontal disease severity was associated with LDL levels and size. The IL6 haplotypes were associated with total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL subclasses after adjusting for confounders. IL-6 circulating levels were associated with both very-low-density lipoprotein and lipid hydroperoxide levels. Based on these data, we conclude that both periodontal disease severity and IL6 haplotypes may influence lipid profiles in AgP. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Association among Dietary Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses and Ovarian Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiaoli; Yu, Lili; You, Ruxu; Yang, Yu; Liao, Jing; Chen, Dongsheng; Yu, Lixiu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that intake of dietary flavonoids or flavonoid subclasses is associated with the ovarian cancer risk, but presented controversial results. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of these associations. We performed a search in PubMed, Google Scholar and ISI Web of Science from their inception to April 25, 2015 to select studies on the association among dietary flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses and ovarian cancer risk. The information was extracted by two independent authors. We assessed the heterogeneity, sensitivity, publication bias and quality of the articles. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates. Five cohort studies and seven case-control studies were included in the final meta-analysis. We observed that intake of dietary flavonoids can decrease ovarian cancer risk, which was demonstrated by pooled RR (RR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68-0.98). In a subgroup analysis by flavonoid subtypes, the ovarian cancer risk was also decreased for isoflavones (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.50-0.92) and flavonols (RR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.58-0.80). While there was no compelling evidence that consumption of flavones (RR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.71-1.03) could decrease ovarian cancer risk, which revealed part sources of heterogeneity. The sensitivity analysis indicated stable results, and no publication bias was observed based on the results of Funnel plot analysis and Egger's test (p = 0.26). This meta-analysis suggested that consumption of dietary flavonoids and subtypes (isoflavones, flavonols) has a protective effect against ovarian cancer with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer except for flavones consumption. Nevertheless, further investigations on a larger population covering more flavonoid subclasses are warranted.

  9. Manganese spread in Ursa Minor as a proof of sub-classes of type Ia supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescutti, G.; Kobayashi, C.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Recently, new sub-classes of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) were discovered, including SNe Iax. The suggested progenitors of SNe Iax are relatively massive, possibly hybrid C+O+Ne white dwarfs, which can cause white dwarf winds at low metallicities. There is another class that can potentially occur at low or zero metallicities; sub-Chandrasekhar mass explosions in single and/or double degenerate systems of standard C+O white dwarfs. These explosions have different nucleosynthesis yields compared to the normal, Chandrasekhar mass explosions. Aims: We test these SN Ia channels using their characteristic chemical signatures. Methods: The two sub-classes of SNe Ia are expected to be rarer than normal SNe Ia and do not affect the chemical evolution in the solar neighbourhood; however, because of the shorter delay time and/or weaker metallicity dependence, they could influence the evolution of metal-poor systems. Therefore, we have included both in our stochastic chemical evolution model for the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Ursa Minor. Results: The model predicts a butterfly-shape spread in [Mn/Fe] in the interstellar medium at low metallicity and - at the same time - a decrease of [α/Fe] ratios at lower [Fe/H] than in the solar neighbourhood, both of which are consistent with the observed abundances in stars of Ursa Minor. Conclusions: The surprising agreement between our models and available observations provides a strong indication of the origins of these new sub-classes of SNe Ia. This outcome requires confirmation by future abundance measurements of manganese in stars of other satellite galaxies of our Milky Way. It will be vital for this project to measure not the most extreme metal-poor tail, as more commonly happens, but the opposite; the metal-rich end of dwarf spheroidals.

  10. Gender bias occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in Poly7 molecular subclass is associated with EGFR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keng, Vincent W.; Sia, Daniela; Sarver, Aaron L.; Tschida, Barbara R.; Fan, Danhua; Alsinet, Clara; Solé, Manel; Lee, Wai L.; Kuka, Timothy P.; Moriarity, Branden S.; Villanueva, Augusto; Dupuy, Adam J.; Riordan, Jesse D.; Bell, Jason B.; Silverstein, Kevin A.T.; Llovet, Josep M.; Largaespada, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest solid cancers and represents the third leading cause of cancer-related death. There is a universal HCC male to female estimated ratio of 2.5, but the reason for this is not well understood. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system was used to elucidate candidate oncogenic drivers of HCC in a forward genetics screening approach. Gender bias occurrence was conserved in our model, with male experimental mice developing liver tumors at reduced latency and higher tumor penetrance. In parallel, we explored gender differences regarding genomic aberrations in 235 HCC patients. Liver cancer candidate genes were identified from both genders and genotypes. Interestingly, transposon insertions in the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) gene were common in SB-induced liver tumors from male mice (10/10, 100%) but infrequent in female animals (2/9, 22%). Human SNP data confirmed that polysomy of chromosome 7, locus of EGFR, was more frequent in males (26/62, 41%) than females (2/27, 7%) (P = 0.001). Gene expression based Poly7 subclass patients were predominantly males (9/9) compared with 67% males (55/82) in other HCC subclasses (P = 0.02) and was accompanied by EGFR overexpression (P < 0.001). Gender bias occurrence of HCC associated with EGFR was confirmed in experimental animals using the SB transposon system in a reverse genetic approach. This study provides evidence for the role of EGFR in gender bias occurrences of liver cancer and as the driver mutational gene in the Poly7 molecular subclass of human HCC. PMID:22899566

  11. Flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Chang; Qi, Xie; Qianyong, Zhang; Xiaoli, Peng; Jundong, Zhu; Mantian, Mi

    2013-01-01

    Studies have suggested the chemopreventive effects of flavonoids on carcinogenesis. Yet numbers of epidemiologic studies assessing dietary flavonoids and breast cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. The association between flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses (flavonols, flavan-3-ols, etc.) and the risk of breast cancer lacks systematic analysis. We aimed to examine the association between flavonoids, each flavonoid subclass (except isoflavones) and the risk of breast cancer by conducting a meta-analysis. We searched for all relevant studies with a prospective cohort or case-control study design published before July 1(st), 2012, using Cochrane library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PUBMED. Summary relative risks (RR) were calculated using fixed- or random-effects models. All analyses were performed using STATA version 10.0. Twelve studies were included, involving 9 513 cases and 181 906 controls, six of which were prospective cohort studies, and six were case-control studies. We calculated the summary RRs of breast cancer risk for the highest vs lowest categories of each flavonoid subclass respectively. The risk of breast cancer significantly decreased in women with high intake of flavonols (RR=0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98) and flavones (RR=0.83, 95% CI: 0.76-0.91) compared with that in those with low intake of flavonols and flavones. However, no significant association of flavan-3-ols (RR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.84-1.02), flavanones (summary RR=0.95, 95% CI: 0.88-1.03), anthocyanins (summary RR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.87-1.08) or total flavonoids (summary RR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.86-1.12) intake with breast cancer risk was observed. Furthermore, summary RRs of 3 case-control studies stratified by menopausal status suggested flavonols, flavones or flavan-3-ols intake is associated with a significant reduced risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal while not in pre-menopausal women. The present study suggests the intake of flavonols and flavones, but not other flavonoid subclasses or total

  12. Flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have suggested the chemopreventive effects of flavonoids on carcinogenesis. Yet numbers of epidemiologic studies assessing dietary flavonoids and breast cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. The association between flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses (flavonols, flavan-3-ols, etc. and the risk of breast cancer lacks systematic analysis. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the association between flavonoids, each flavonoid subclass (except isoflavones and the risk of breast cancer by conducting a meta-analysis. DESIGN: We searched for all relevant studies with a prospective cohort or case-control study design published before July 1(st, 2012, using Cochrane library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PUBMED. Summary relative risks (RR were calculated using fixed- or random-effects models. All analyses were performed using STATA version 10.0. RESULTS: Twelve studies were included, involving 9 513 cases and 181 906 controls, six of which were prospective cohort studies, and six were case-control studies. We calculated the summary RRs of breast cancer risk for the highest vs lowest categories of each flavonoid subclass respectively. The risk of breast cancer significantly decreased in women with high intake of flavonols (RR=0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98 and flavones (RR=0.83, 95% CI: 0.76-0.91 compared with that in those with low intake of flavonols and flavones. However, no significant association of flavan-3-ols (RR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.84-1.02, flavanones (summary RR=0.95, 95% CI: 0.88-1.03, anthocyanins (summary RR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.87-1.08 or total flavonoids (summary RR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.86-1.12 intake with breast cancer risk was observed. Furthermore, summary RRs of 3 case-control studies stratified by menopausal status suggested flavonols, flavones or flavan-3-ols intake is associated with a significant reduced risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal while not in pre-menopausal women. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests the intake of flavonols

  13. Acute effects of interleukin-6 infusion on apo-B-containing lipoprotein subclasses in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagdade, John; Pedersen, Bente K; Schwenke, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    IL-6 is believed to mediate the elevation in plasma TG and VLDL lipids in patients with sepsis. Previous studies of lipoprotein density fractions do not reveal the extent to which cytokines change the immunochemically distinct TG-rich (LpB:C, LpB:C:E, LpAII:B:C:D:E) and cholesterol-rich (LpB, Lp...... unchanged by IL-6, the distribution of TG-rich subclasses was significantly altered. Compared to baseline values, LpB:E + LpB:C:E increased significantly at 0.5 h (p

  14. Subclass-based Multi-task Learning for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung-Il eSuk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose a novel subclass-based multi-task learning method for feature selection in computer-aided Alzheimer's Disease (AD or Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI diagnosis. Unlike the previous methods that often assumed a unimodal data distribution, we take into account the underlying multipeak distribution of classes. The rationale for our approach is that it is highly likely for neuroimaging data to have multiple peaks or modes in distribution, e.g., mixture of Gaussians, due to the inter-subject variability. In this regard, we use a clustering method to discover the multipeak distributional characteristics and define subclasses based on the clustering results, in which each cluster covers a peak in the underlying multipeak distribution. Specifically, after performing clustering for each class, we encode the respective subclasses, i.e., clusters, with their unique codes. In encoding, we impose the subclasses of the same original class close to each other and those of different original classes distinct from each other. By setting the codes as new label vectors of our training samples, we formulate a multi-task learning problem in a l21-penalized regression framework, through which we finally select features for classification. In our experimental results on the ADNI dataset, we validated the effectiveness of the proposed method by improving the classification accuracies by 1% (AD/Normal Control: NC, 3.25% (MCI/NC, 5.34% (AD/MCI, and 7.4% (MCI Converter: MCI-C/MCI Non-Converter: MCI-NC compared to the competing single-task learning method. It is remarkable for the performance improvement in MCI-C/MCI-NC classification, which is the most important for early diagnosis and treatment. It is also noteworthy that with the strategy of modality-adaptive weights by means of a multi-kernel support vector machine, we maximally achieved the classification accuracies of 96.18% (AD/NC, 81.45% (MCI/NC, 73.21% (AD/MCI, and 74.04% (MCI

  15. Meningococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Failure in a Patient with C7 Deficiency and a Decreased Anticapsular Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    dl); C8: 19.8 mgldL (reference range 10.7 24.9); C9: 31 mgldL (reference range 6 29). 582 Human Vaccines & lmmunotherapeutics Volume 8 Issue 5 An...disclosed. 584 Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics Volume 8 Issue 5 D ow nl oa de d by [ N H R C ] at 0 9: 17 1 2 A ug us t 2 01 5 © 2012 Landes...Sprong T, Roos D, Weemaes C, Neeleman C, Geesing CL, Mollnes TE, et al. Deficient alternative comple- ment pathway activation due to factor D

  16. Heat shock transcriptional responses in an MC-Producing Cyanobacterium (Planktothrix agardhii) and its MC-deficient mutant under high light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Du Chi; Bernard, Cecile; Ammar, Myriam; Chaouch, Soraya; Comte, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are the most commonly-reported hepatotoxins produced by various cyanobacterial taxa in fresh waters to constitute a potential threat to human and animal health. The biological role of MCs in the producer organisms is not known, and it would be very useful to understand the driving force behind the toxin production. Recent studies have suggested that MCs may have a protective function in cells facing environmental stress. Following this starting premise, we speculate that under adverse conditions the expression of stress-related genes coding for Heat Shock Proteins (Hsp) might be different in an MC-producing strain and its MC-deficient mutant. We therefore used RT-qPCR to compare the expression of 13 hsp genes of an MC-producing strain of Planktothrix agardhii (CYA126/8) and its MC-deficient ΔmcyD mutant over different periods of exposure to high light stress (HL). Three reference genes (RGs) were selected from six candidates to normalize the RT-qPCR data. Of these three RGs (rsh, rpoD, and gltA), gltA is used here for the first time as an RG in prokaryotes. Under HL stress, five genes were found to be strongly up-regulated in both strains (htpG, dnaK, hspA, groES, and groEL). Unexpectedly, we found that the MC-producing wild type strain accumulated higher levels of htpG and dnaK transcripts in response to HL stress than the MC-deficient mutant. In addition, a significant increase in the mcyE transcript was detected in the mutant, suggesting that MCs are required under HL conditions. We discuss several possible roles of MCs in the response to HL stress through their possible involvement in the protective mechanisms of the cells.

  17. Growth of chitinolytic dune soil ß-subclass Proteobacteria in response to invading fungal hyphae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    It has frequently been reported that chitinolytic soil bacteria, in particular biocontrol strains, can lyse living fungal hyphae, thereby releasing potential growth substrate. However, the conditions used in such assays (high bacterial density, rich media, fragmented hyphae) make it difficult to

  18. Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses, and Esophageal Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lingling; Liu, Xinxin; Tian, Yalan; Xie, Chen; Li, Qianwen; Cui, Han; Sun, Changqing

    2016-06-08

    Flavonoids have been suggested to play a chemopreventive role in carcinogenesis. However, the epidemiologic studies assessing dietary intake of flavonoids and esophageal cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. This study was designed to examine the association between flavonoids, each flavonoid subclass, and the risk of esophageal cancer with a meta-analysis approach. We searched for all relevant studies with a prospective cohort or case-control study design published from January 1990 to April 2016, using PUBMED, EMBASE, and Web of Science. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using fixed or random-effect models. In total, seven articles including 2629 cases and 481,193 non-cases were selected for the meta-analysis. Comparing the highest-intake patients with the lowest-intake patients for total flavonoids and for each flavonoid subclass, we found that anthocyanidins (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.49-0.74), flavanones (OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.49-0.86), and flavones (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.64-0.95) were inversely associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, total flavonoids showed marginal association with esophageal cancer risk (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.59-1.04). In conclusion, our study suggested that dietary intake of total flavonoids, anthocyanidins, flavanones, and flavones might reduce the risk of esophageal cancer.

  19. Physical activity versus sedentary behavior: associations with lipoprotein particle subclass concentrations in healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eivind Aadland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA and sedentary behavior (SED may have independent effects on health and disease. This might be due to PA and SED having distinct effects on lipoprotein metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine associations between lipoprotein subclass particle concentrations (-P and accelerometer-measured SED and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA in a sample of healthy adult subjects. METHODS: Lipoprotein subclass particle concentrations were determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, whereas SED and MVPA were measured using Agtigraph GT1M and GT3X+ accelerometers. We obtained valid data in 73 subjects (30 men and 43 women, age 40.5 ± 10.6 years; body mass index 24.0 ± 2.8. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine associations (partial correlations with lipoproteins. RESULTS: Positive associations were detected between SED and small VLDL-P, large LDL-P and TG (partial r = 0.24 to 0.25, p .355. On the contrary, MVPA was positively associated with large HDL-P, average HDL size, Apo A1 and HDL-cholesterol (partial r = 0.28 to 0.50, p .607. CONCLUSION: There might be a specific effect of SED versus MVPA on lipoprotein metabolism. However, our results must be interpreted carefully due to possible effect-modification by gender and a low sample size. Thus, our findings should be viewed as preliminary.

  20. The reduction in visceral fat mass in response to growth hormone is more marked in men than in oestrogen-deficient women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Celina; Koranyi, Josef; Brandberg, John

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Women with severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency have a less marked response to GH replacement than men. This has mostly been attributed to the attenuating effects of oestrogen replacement therapy. OBJECTIVE: To study gender related differences in the response to GH treatment in men...... and postmenopausal women. METHODS: Fifteen men and 15 age- and BMI-matched women with abdominal obesity (mean age: 58; range 51-64 years) were treated for one year with similar doses (0.47 vs. 0.51 mg/day) of GH. All women were postmenopausal not receiving oestrogen treatment. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using...... a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and body composition by computed tomography (CT) scans and from total body potassium, K(40). RESULTS: Men and women were comparable at baseline in terms of waist circumference, IGF-1 and lipid levels. After one year of GH treatment, there was a 18% reduction in visceral adipose...

  1. Response to GH treatment in adult GH deficiency is predicted by gender, age, and IGF1 SDS but not by stimulated GH-peak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Brabant, Georg; Maiter, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    We studied whether the severity of GH deficiency (GHD) defined as i) GH-peak on stimulation tests (insulin tolerance test (ITT), arginine, and glucagon), ii) number of additional pituitary deficits, or iii) baseline IGF1 SDS could impact the response to GH treatment. We further explored whether iv......) IGF1 SDS after 24 months of GH replacement or v) ΔIGF1 SDS from baseline to 24 months was related to the phenotypic response to GH treatment. DESIGN, PATIENTS, AND MEASUREMENTS: The patient cohort (n=1752; 50% women) was obtained from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database). The patients were...... divided into three groups of approximately equal size (tertiles) according to the stimulated GH-peak values and baseline IGF1 SDS and were studied at baseline, 12, and 24 months of GH therapy....

  2. Cytokines, IgG subclasses and costimulation in a mouse model of thyroid autoimmunity induced by injection of fibroblasts co-expressing MHC class II and thyroid autoantigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X-M; Guo, J; Pichurin, P; Tanaka, K; Jaume, J C; Rapoport, B; Mclachlan, S M

    2000-01-01

    AKR/N mice injected with fibroblasts expressing MHC class II (RT4.15HP cells) and the TSH receptor (TSHR) develop antibodies similar to those in Graves' disease. We were unable to analyse the subclass of these antibodies because of unexpectedly high non-specific binding by ELISA or flow cytometry. The non-specific binding reflected generalized immune activation which occurred even when the fibroblasts did not express the TSHR. However, the IgG subclasses were determined for thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies induced using TPO-expressing RT4.14HP cells and found to be IgG2a > IgG1. This Th1 pattern is consistent with spontaneous secretion of interferon-gamma (but not IL-4 or IL-10) by splenocytes from injected mice. The Th1 bias was related to fibroblast injection because conventional immunization of the same mouse strain with purified TPO and adjuvant induced a Th2 response (IgG1 >> IgG2a). Further, untransfected fibroblasts themselves induced powerful, non-specific proliferative responses when used as antigen-presenting cells (APC) in vitro. Flow cytometry revealed that the RT4.15HP fibroblasts (and TSHR- and TPO-transfected derivatives) expressed B7-1. Unexpected constitutive expression of this key molecule may bypass the requirement for up-regulation of other costimulatory molecules involved in T cell stimulation. Our data support the concept that RT4.15HP fibroblasts present the TSHR (or TPO), at least for initiating the immune response. However, the accompanying generalized immune stimulation creates difficulties for analysis of TSHR-specific T and B lymphocytes. On the other hand, extension of the model to TPO, an easier antigen to study, will facilitate analysis of murine T cell responses likely to resemble those in human thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:11091271

  3. A calcitonin receptor (CALCR) single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with growth performance and bone integrity in response to dietary phosphorus deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, L S; Qu, A; Cutler, S A; Mahajan, A; Rothschild, M F; Cai, W; Dekkers, J C; Stahl, C H

    2010-03-01

    Although concerns over the environmental impact of excess P in the excreta from pig production and governmental regulations have driven research toward reducing dietary supplementation of P to swine diets for over a decade, recent dramatic increases in feed costs have further motivated researchers to identify means to further reduce dietary P supplementation. We have demonstrated that genetic background impacts P utilization in young pigs and have identified genetic polymorphisms in several target genes related to mineral utilization. In this study, we examined the impact of a SNP in the calcitonin receptor gene (CALCR) on P utilization in growing pigs. In Exp. 1, 36 gilts representing the 3 genotypes identified by this CALCR SNP (11, 12, and 22) were fed a P-adequate (PA) or a marginally P-deficient (approximately 20% less available P; PD) diet for 14 wk. As expected, P deficiency reduced plasma P concentration, bone strength, and mineral content (P < 0.05). However, the dietary P deficiency was mild enough to not affect the growth performance of these pigs. A genotype x dietary P interaction (P < 0.05) was observed in measures of bone integrity and mineral content, with the greatest reduction in bone strength and mineral content due to dietary P deficiency being associated with the allele 1. In Exp. 2, 168 pigs from a control line and low residual feed intake (RFI) line were genotyped for the CALCR SNP and fed a PA diet. As expected, pigs from the low RFI line consumed less feed but also gained less BW when compared with the control line (P < 0.05). Although ADFI did not differ between genotypes, pigs having the 11 genotype gained less BW (P < 0.05) than pigs having the 12 or 22 genotypes. Pigs of the 11 and 12 genotypes had bones that tolerated greater load when compared with animals having the 22 genotype (P < 0.05). A similar trend was observed in bone modulus and ash % (P < 0.10). These data are supportive of the association of this CALCR SNP with bone

  4. Leptin deficiency down-regulates IL-23 production in glomerular podocytes resulting in an attenuated immune response in nephrotoxic serum nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kei; Kaneko, Yoshikatsu; Sato, Yuya; Otsuka, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Suguru; Goto, Shin; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Madaio, Michael P; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-04-01

    Leptin, one of the typical adipokines, is reported to promote Th17 cell responses and to enhance production of proinflammatory cytokines. To clarify the role of leptin in the regulation of the IL-23/IL-17 axis and the development of kidney disease, we used a murine model of nephrotoxic serum (NTS) nephritis (NTN). Sheep NTS was administered in wild-type C57BL/6J mice and food-restricted, leptin-deficient C57BL/6J-ob/ob(FR-ob/ob) mice after preimmunization with sheep IgG. The profile of mRNA expression relevant to T helper lymphocytes in the kidneys was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Cultured murine glomerular podocytes and peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs) were used to investigate the direct effect of leptin on IL-23 or MCP-1 production by qRT-PCR. Kidney injury and macrophage infiltration were significantly attenuated in FR-ob/obmice 7 days after NTS injection. The Th17-dependent secondary immune response against deposited NTS in the glomeruli was totally impaired in FR-ob/obmice because of deteriorated IL-17 and proinflammatory cytokine production including IL-23 and MCP-1 in the kidney. IL-23 was produced in glomerular podocytes in NTN mice and cultured murine glomerular podocytes produced IL-23 under leptin stimulation. MCP-1 production in PEMs was also promoted by leptin. Induction of MCP-1 expression was observed in PEMs regardless of Ob-Rb, and the leptin signal was transduced without STAT3 phosphorylation in PEMs. Leptin deficiency impairs the secondary immune response against NTS and down-regulates IL-23 production and Th17 responses in the NTN kidney, which is accompanied by decreased MCP-1 production and macrophage infiltration in the NTN kidney. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Leptin deficiency down-regulates IL-23 production in glomerular podocytes resulting in an attenuated immune response in nephrotoxic serum nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kei; Sato, Yuya; Otsuka, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Suguru; Goto, Shin; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Madaio, Michael P.; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Leptin, one of the typical adipokines, is reported to promote Th17 cell responses and to enhance production of proinflammatory cytokines. To clarify the role of leptin in the regulation of the IL-23/IL-17 axis and the development of kidney disease, we used a murine model of nephrotoxic serum (NTS) nephritis (NTN). Sheep NTS was administered in wild-type C57BL/6J mice and food-restricted, leptin-deficient C57BL/6J-ob/ob (FR-ob/ob) mice after preimmunization with sheep IgG. The profile of mRNA expression relevant to T helper lymphocytes in the kidneys was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT–PCR). Cultured murine glomerular podocytes and peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs) were used to investigate the direct effect of leptin on IL-23 or MCP-1 production by qRT–PCR. Kidney injury and macrophage infiltration were significantly attenuated in FR-ob/ob mice 7 days after NTS injection. The Th17-dependent secondary immune response against deposited NTS in the glomeruli was totally impaired in FR-ob/ob mice because of deteriorated IL-17 and proinflammatory cytokine production including IL-23 and MCP-1 in the kidney. IL-23 was produced in glomerular podocytes in NTN mice and cultured murine glomerular podocytes produced IL-23 under leptin stimulation. MCP-1 production in PEMs was also promoted by leptin. Induction of MCP-1 expression was observed in PEMs regardless of Ob-Rb, and the leptin signal was transduced without STAT3 phosphorylation in PEMs. Leptin deficiency impairs the secondary immune response against NTS and down-regulates IL-23 production and Th17 responses in the NTN kidney, which is accompanied by decreased MCP-1 production and macrophage infiltration in the NTN kidney. PMID:26567290

  6. Data for iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis of Brassica napus leaves in response to chlorophyll deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Chu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential pigment chlorophyll (Chl plays important roles in light harvesting and energy transfer during photosynthesis. Here we present the data from a comparative proteomic analysis of chlorophyll-deficient Brassica napus mutant cde1 and its corresponding wild-type using the iTRAQ approach (Pu Chu et al., 2014 [1]. The distribution of length and number of peptides, mass and sequence coverage of proteins identified was calculated, and the repeatability of the replicates was analyzed. A total of 443 differentially expressed proteins were identified in B. napus leaves, including 228 down-accumulated proteins mainly involved in photosynthesis, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, carbon fixation and 215 up-accumulated proteins that enriched in the spliceosome, mRNA surveillance and RNA degradation.

  7. Interleukin 27 (IL-27) Alleviates Bone Loss in Estrogen-deficient Conditions by Induction of Early Growth Response-2 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Priyanka; Mansoori, Mohd Nizam; Kakaji, Manisha; Shukla, Manoj; Gupta, Sushil Kumar; Singh, Divya

    2017-03-17

    A growing understanding of the bone remodeling process suggests that inflammation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. T cells and various cytokines contribute majorly to the estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss. Recent studies have identified the IL-12 cytokine family as consisting of pro-inflammatory IL-12 and IL-23 and the anti-inflammatory IL-27 and IL-35 cytokines. IL-27 exerts protective effects in autoimmune diseases like experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; however, its role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis remains to be determined. In this report, we study the effect of IL-27 supplementation on ovariectomized estrogen-deficient mice on various immune and skeletal parameters. IL-27 treatment in ovariectomized mice suppressed Th17 cell differentiation by inhibiting transcription factor RORγt. Supplementation of IL-27 activates Egr-2 to induce IL-10 producing Tr1 cells. IL-27 treatment prevented the loss of trabecular micro-architecture and preserved cortical bone parameters. IL-27 also inhibited osteoblast apoptosis through increased Egr-2 expression, which induces anti-apoptotic factors like MCL-1. IL-27 suppressed osteoclastogenesis in an Egr-2-dependent manner that up-regulates Id2, the repressor of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-mediated osteoclastogenesis. Additionally, these results were corroborated in female osteoporotic subjects where we found decreased serum IL-27 levels along with reduced Egr-2 expression. Our study forms a strong basis for using humanized IL-27 toward the treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Alterations of platelet functions in children and adolescents with iron-deficiency anemia and response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Galila M; Ibrahim, Wafaa E; Kassim, Nevine A; Ragab, Iman A; Saad, Abeer A; Abdel Raheem, Heba G

    2015-01-01

    Several changes in platelets have been reported in patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), so a relationship between iron metabolism and thrombopoiesis should be considered. We aimed to study the alterations of platelet functions in patients with IDA by assessment of platelet aggregation with epinephrine, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and ristocetin and by measuring platelet function analyzer-100 (PFA-100) closure time together with the effect of iron therapy on the same tests. A follow-up study was conducted in Ain Shams University Children's hospital in the period from June 2011 to June 2012 including 20 patients with confirmed IDA and 20 healthy age- and sex-matched control. Bleeding manifestations were reported. Laboratory analysis included complete blood count, assessment of iron status by measuring serum iron, TIBC and ferritin, assessment of platelet functions by PFA-100 closure time and platelet aggregation with collagen, ADP and ristocetin. Patients with IDA were treated by oral iron therapy 6 mg/kg/day of ferrous sulfate and post-therapeutic re-assessment was done. Mean age of IDA patients was 5.7 ± 4.2 years. Bleeding manifestations were more common in patients group. Mean PFA-100 closure times (with epinephrine) were significantly longer in patients (179.1 ± 86.4 seconds) compared to control group (115 ± 28.5 seconds) (p iron deficiency and platelet functions. Subtle bleeding manifestations can occur in patients with IDA with delay in platelet aggregation and prolongation in PFA-100 closure times which can be reversed by iron therapy.

  9. CD70-deficiency impairs effector CD8 T cell generation and viral clearance but is dispensable for the recall response to LCMV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munitic, Ivana; Kuka, Mirela; Allam, Atef; Scoville, Jonathan P.; Ashwell, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    CD27 interactions with its ligand, CD70, are thought to be necessary for optimal primary and memory adaptive immune responses to a variety of pathogens. Thus far all studies addressing the function of the CD27-CD70 axis have been performed either in mice lacking CD27, overexpressing CD70, or in which these receptors were blocked or mimicked by antibodies or recombinant soluble CD70. Because these methods have in some cases led to divergent results, we generated CD70-deficient mice to directly assess its role in vivo. We find that lack of CD70-mediated stimulation during primary responses to LCMV lowered the magnitude of CD8 antigen-specific T cell response, resulting in impaired viral clearance, without affecting CD4 T cell responses. Unexpectedly, CD70-CD27 costimulation was not needed for memory CD8 T cell generation or the ability to mount a recall response to LCMV. Adoptive transfers of wild type (WT) memory T cells into CD70−/− or WT hosts also showed no need for CD70-mediated stimulation during the course of the recall response. Moreover, CD70-expression by CD8 T cells could not rescue endogenous CD70−/− cells from defective expansion, arguing against a role for CD70-mediated T:T help in this model. Therefore, CD70 appears to be an important factor in the initiation of a robust and effective primary response but dispensable for CD8 T cell memory responses. PMID:23269247

  10. CD70 deficiency impairs effector CD8 T cell generation and viral clearance but is dispensable for the recall response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munitic, Ivana; Kuka, Mirela; Allam, Atef; Scoville, Jonathan P; Ashwell, Jonathan D

    2013-02-01

    CD27 interactions with its ligand, CD70, are thought to be necessary for optimal primary and memory adaptive immune responses to a variety of pathogens. Thus far, all studies addressing the function of the CD27-CD70 axis have been performed in mice lacking CD27, in those overexpressing CD70, or in those in which these molecules were blocked or mimicked by Abs or recombinant soluble CD70. Because these methods have in some cases led to divergent results, we generated CD70-deficient mice to directly assess its role in vivo. We find that lack of CD70-mediated stimulation during primary responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus lowered the magnitude of CD8 Ag-specific T cell response, resulting in impaired viral clearance, without affecting CD4 T cell responses. Unexpectedly, CD70-CD27 costimulation was not needed for memory CD8 T cell generation or the ability to mount a recall response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Adoptive transfers of wild-type memory T cells into CD70(-/-) or wild-type hosts also showed no need for CD70-mediated stimulation during the course of the recall response. Moreover, CD70 expression by CD8 T cells could not rescue endogenous CD70(-/-) cells from defective expansion, arguing against a role for CD70-mediated T:T help in this model. Therefore, CD70 appears to be an important factor in the initiation of a robust and effective primary response but dispensable for CD8 T cell memory responses.

  11. Dissecting the relationships of IgG subclasses and complements in membranous lupus nephritis and idiopathic membranous nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Woong; Yi, Kijong; Song, Young Soo; Park, Moon Hyang

    2017-01-01

    Membranous lupus nephritis (MLN) and idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN) are kidney diseases with similar morphology, but distinct etiologies, both producing glomeruli with immune deposits. Immunoglobulins and complements, the main components of the deposits, can be detected by immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy. Previous researches characterized the immune deposits only individually, but not the interactions between them. To study these relationships we analyzed an IF profile of IgG subclasses and complements (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, C3, C1q, and C4) in 53 and 95 cases of biopsy-confirmed MLNs and IMNs, respectively, mainly using information theory and Bayesian networks. We identified significant entropy differences between MLN and IMN for all markers except C3 and IgG1, but mutual information (a measure of mutual dependence) were not significantly different for all the pairs of markers. The entropy differences between MLN and IMN, therefore, were not attributable to the mutual information. These findings suggest that disease type directly and/or indirectly influences the glomerular deposits of most of IgG subclasses and complements, and that the interactions between any pair of the markers were similar between the two diseases. A Markov chain of IgG subclasses was derived from the mutual information about each pair of IgG subclass. Finally we developed an integrated disease model, consistent with the previous findings, describing the glomerular immune deposits of the IgG subclasses and complements based on a Bayesian network using the Markov chain of IgG subclasses as seed. The relationships between the markers were effectively explored by information theory and Bayesian network. Although deposits of IgG subclasses and complements depended on both disease type and the other markers, the interaction between the markers appears conserved, independent from the disease type. The disease model provided an integrated and intuitive representation of the

  12. A pilot study evaluating therapeutic response of different dosage of oral glucocorticoid in two children with familial glucocorticoid deficiency presenting with diffuse mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Kumar Sarkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD is a rare autosomal recessive potentially life-threatening condition, characterized by glucocorticoid deficiency, preserved aldosterone/renin secretion, and secondary rise in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone level. This occurs due to either mutation in adrenocorticotropic receptor (25%, FGD Type-1 or in the MC2 receptor accessory protein (15%–20%. However, in about 50% patients, no identifiable mutations have been identified. Clinically, it manifests with weakness, fatigue, weight loss, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypoglycemia, and hypothermia. Progressive mucocutaneous pigmentation is a conspicuous presentation. Repeated hypoglycemia may result in seizure, persistent neurological, severe mental disability, and even sudden death. Standard therapy is oral glucocorticoids (10–15 mg/m2. Patients and Results: Two familial cases of FGD were put on progressively increasing doses of oral glucocorticoids (10 mg, 15 mg, and 20 mg/m2/day, each for 6 weeks to achieve the best response without any adverse effects. One patient had excellent improvement with 15 mg/m2/day, and another required 20 mg/m2/day. The latter patient had excellent overall improvement with only moderate improvement in pigmentation. Conclusion: Glucocorticoids replacement with optimum dose is necessary in FGD to promote physical and neurological growth and to prevent adrenal crises, hypotension, hypoglycemia, and sudden death. Higher dose than mentioned in literature (15 mg/m2/day may be required in selected cases. Mucocutaneous pigmentation may require even higher dose than we used. More studies are required.

  13. Definition of the locus responsible for systemic carnitine deficiency within a 1.6-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 by detailed linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, Kohei; Tokino, Takashi; Nishimori, Hiroyuki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency results in failure of energy production by mitochondria and leads to metabolic encephalopathy, lipid-storage myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. The juvenile visceral steatosis (JVS) mouse, an animal model of systemic carnitine deficiency, inherits the JVS phenotype in autosomal recessive fashion, through a mutant allele mapped to mouse chromosome 11. As a step toward identifying the gene responsible for JVS by positional cloning, we attempted to refine the jvs locus in the mouse by detailed linkage analysis with 13 microsatellite markers, using 190 backcross progeny. Among the 13 loci tested, 5 (defined by markers D11Mit24, D11Mit111,D11Nds9, D11Mit86, and D11Mit23) showed no recombination, with a maximum lod score of 52.38. Our results implied that the jvs gene can be sought on mouse chromosome 11 within a genetic distance no greater than about 1.6 cM. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Deletion of Galgt2 (B4Galnt2) Reduces Muscle Growth in Response to Acute Injury and Increases Muscle Inflammation and Pathology in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Singhal, Neha; Serinagaoglu, Yelda; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Joshi, Mandar; Bauer, John A.; Janssen, Paulus M.L.; Martin, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic overexpression of Galgt2 (official name B4Galnt2) in skeletal muscle stimulates the glycosylation of α dystroglycan (αDG) and the up-regulation of laminin α2 and dystrophin surrogates known to inhibit muscle pathology in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophy 1A and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Skeletal muscle Galgt2 gene expression is also normally increased in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy compared with the wild-type mice. To assess whether this increased endogenous Galgt2 expression could affect disease, we quantified muscular dystrophy measures in mdx mice deleted for Galgt2 (Galgt2−/−mdx). Galgt2−/− mdx mice had increased heart and skeletal muscle pathology and inflammation, and also worsened cardiac function, relative to age-matched mdx mice. Deletion of Galgt2 in wild-type mice also slowed skeletal muscle growth in response to acute muscle injury. In each instance where Galgt2 expression was elevated (developing muscle, regenerating muscle, and dystrophic muscle), Galgt2-dependent glycosylation of αDG was also increased. Overexpression of Galgt2 failed to inhibit skeletal muscle pathology in dystroglycan-deficient muscles, in contrast to previous studies in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles. This study demonstrates that Galgt2 gene expression and glycosylation of αDG are dynamically regulated in muscle and that endogenous Galgt2 gene expression can ameliorate the extent of muscle pathology, inflammation, and dysfunction in mdx mice. PMID:26435413

  15. Accumulation and Secretion of Coumarinolignans and other Coumarins in Arabidopsis thaliana Roots in Response to Iron Deficiency at High pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Sisó-Terraza

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Root secretion of coumarin-phenolic type compounds has been recently shown to be related to Arabidopsis thaliana tolerance to Fe deficiency at high pH. These studies revealed the identity of a few simple coumarins occurring in roots and exudates of Fe-deficient A. thaliana plants, and left open the possible existence of other unknown phenolics. We used HPLC-UV-VIS-ESI-MS(TOF, HPLC/ESI-MSn(ion trap and HPLC-ESI-MS-MS(Q-TOF to characterize (identify and quantify phenolic-type compounds accumulated in roots or secreted into the nutrient solution of A. thaliana plants in response to Fe deficiency. Plants grown with or without Fe and using nutrient solutions buffered at pH 5.5 or 7.5 enabled to identify an array of phenolics. These include several coumarinolignans not previously reported in A. thaliana (cleomiscosins A, B, C and D and the 5’-hydroxycleomiscosins A and/or B, as well as some coumarin precursors (ferulic acid and coniferyl and sinapyl aldehydes, and previously reported cathecol (fraxetin and non-cathecol coumarins (scopoletin, isofraxidin and fraxinol, some of them in hexoside forms not previously characterized. The production and secretion of phenolics were more intense when the plant accessibility to Fe was diminished and the plant Fe status deteriorated, as it occurs when plants are grown in the absence of Fe at pH 7.5. Aglycones and hexosides of the four coumarins were abundant in roots, whereas only the aglycone forms could be quantified in the nutrient solution. A comprehensive quantification of coumarins, first carried out in this study, revealed that the catechol coumarin fraxetin was predominant in exudates (but not in roots of Fe-deficient A. thaliana plants grown at pH 7.5. Also, fraxetin was able to mobilize efficiently Fe from a Fe(III-oxide at pH 5.5 and pH 7.5. On the other hand, non-catechol coumarins were much less efficient in mobilizing Fe and were present in much lower concentrations, making unlikely that they

  16. Core Gene Set As the Basis of Multilocus Sequence Analysis of the Subclass Actinobacteridae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Butler, Ray W.; Hanrahan, Finnian; Delcher, Arthur L.; Drancourt, Michel; Shinnick, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomic sequencing is shedding new light on bacterial identification, taxonomy and phylogeny. An in silico assessment of a core gene set necessary for cellular functioning was made to determine a consensus set of genes that would be useful for the identification, taxonomy and phylogeny of the species belonging to the subclass Actinobacteridae which contained two orders Actinomycetales and Bifidobacteriales. The subclass Actinobacteridae comprised about 85% of the actinobacteria families. The following recommended criteria were used to establish a comprehensive gene set; the gene should (i) be long enough to contain phylogenetically useful information, (ii) not be subject to horizontal gene transfer, (iii) be a single copy (iv) have at least two regions sufficiently conserved that allow the design of amplification and sequencing primers and (v) predict whole-genome relationships. We applied these constraints to 50 different Actinobacteridae genomes and made 1,224 pairwise comparisons of the genome conserved regions and gene fragments obtained by using Sequence VARiability Analysis Program (SVARAP), which allow designing the primers. Following a comparative statistical modeling phase, 3 gene fragments were selected, ychF, rpoB, and secY with R2>0.85. Selected sets of broad range primers were tested from the 3 gene fragments and were demonstrated to be useful for amplification and sequencing of 25 species belonging to 9 genera of Actinobacteridae. The intraspecies similarities were 96.3–100% for ychF, 97.8–100% for rpoB and 96.9–100% for secY among 73 strains belonging to 15 species of the subclass Actinobacteridae compare to 99.4–100% for 16S rRNA. The phylogenetic topology obtained from the combined datasets ychF+rpoB+secY was globally similar to that inferred from the 16S rRNA but with higher confidence. It was concluded that multi-locus sequence analysis using core gene set might represent the first consensus and valid approach for

  17. Adiposity in women and children from transition countries predicts decreased iron absorption, iron deficiency and a reduced response to iron fortification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Zeder, C.; Muthayya, S.; Winichagoon, P.; Chaouki, N.; Aeberli, I.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Overweight is increasing in transition countries, while iron deficiency remains common. In industrialized countries, greater adiposity increases risk of iron deficiency. Higher hepcidin levels in obesity may reduce dietary iron absorption. Therefore, we investigated the association

  18. Capitalizing on the autophagic response for treatment of liver disease caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and other genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Andrew S; Perlmutter, David H; Wang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD) is one of the most common genetic causes of liver disease and is a prototype of liver diseases caused by the pathologic accumulation of aggregated mutant alpha-1-antitrypsin Z (ATZ) within liver cells. In the case of ATD-associated liver disease, the resulting "gain-of-function" toxicity can lead to serious clinical manifestations, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, the only definitive therapy for ATD-associated liver disease is liver transplantation, but recent efforts have demonstrated the exciting potential for novel therapies that target disposal of the mutant protein aggregates by harnessing a cellular homeostasis mechanism called autophagy. In this review, we will summarize research advances on autophagy and genetic liver diseases. We will discuss autophagy enhancer strategies for liver disease due to ATD and another genetic liver disease, inherited hypofibrinogenemia, caused by the proteotoxic effects of a misfolded protein. On the basis of recent evidence that autophagy plays a role in cellular lipid degradation, we also speculate about autophagy enhancer strategies for treatment of hepatic lipid storage diseases such as cholesterol ester storage disease.

  19. Functional and electrophysiological characterization of four non-truncating mutations responsible for creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Bakouh, Naziha; Mazzuca, Michel; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Hubert, Laurence; Makaci, Fatna-Léa; Chabli, Allel; Salomons, Gajja S; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline; Brulé, Emilie; de Lonlay, Pascale; Toulhoat, Hervé; Munnich, Arnold; Planelles, Gabrielle; de Keyzer, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability coupled with epilepsy are clinical hallmarks of the creatine (Cr) transporter deficiency syndrome resulting from mutations in the SLC6A8 gene. So far characterization of pathogenic mutations of SLC6A8 has been limited to Cr uptake. The aim of our study was to characterize the electrogenic and pharmacological properties of non truncating SLC6A8 mutations identified in patients presenting variable clinical severity. Electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of four mutants (including two novel ones) were studied in X. laevis oocyte expression system. Creatine uptake was assessed with [(14)C]-Cr in X. laevis and patients' fibroblasts. Subcellular localization was determined by immunofluorescence and western blot. All mutants were properly targeted to the plasma membrane in both systems. Mutations led to the complete loss of both electrogenic and transport activities in X. laevis and Cr uptake in patients' fibroblasts. Among the Cr analogs tested, guanidinopropionate induced an electrogenic activity with the normal SLC6A8 transporter similar to creatine whereas a phosphocreatine derivative, PCr-Mg-CPLX, resulted in partial activity. SLC6A8 mutants displayed no electrogenic activity with all Cr analogs tested in X. laevis oocytes. Although the mutations altered various domains of SLC6A8 Cr uptake and electrogenic properties were completely inhibited and could not be dissociated. Besides the metabolic functions of Cr, the loss of SLC6A8 electrogenic activity, demonstrated here for the first time, may also play a role in the altered brain functions of the patients.

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  1. Immune responses to intramuscular administration of alipogene tiparvovec (AAV1-LPL(S447X)) in a phase II clinical trial of lipoprotein lipase deficiency gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Valerie; Twisk, Jaap; Kwikkers, Karin; Aronica, Eleonora; Brisson, Diane; Methot, Julie; Petry, Harald; Gaudet, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Cellular immune responses to adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors used for gene therapy have been linked to attenuated transgene expression and loss of efficacy. The impact of such cellular immune responses on the clinical efficacy of alipogene tiparvovec (Glybera; AAV1-LPL(S447X); uniQure), a gene therapy consisting of intramuscular administration of a recombinant AAV1 mediating muscle-directed expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), was investigated. Five subjects with LPL deficiency (LPLD) were administered intramuscularly with a dose of 1 × 10(12) gc/kg alipogene tiparvovec. All subjects were treated with immune suppression starting shortly before administration of alipogene tiparvovec and maintained until 12 weeks after administration. Systemic antibody and T cell responses against AAV1 and LPL(S447X), as well as local cellular immune responses in the injected muscle, were investigated in five LPLD subjects. Long-term transgene expression was demonstrated despite a transient systemic cellular response and a stable humoral immune response against the AAV1 capsid protein. Cellular infiltrates were found in four of the five subjects but were not associated with adverse clinical events or elevation of inflammation markers. Consistent herewith, CD8+ T cells in the infiltrates lacked cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, FoxP3+/CD4+ T cells were found in the infiltrates, suggesting that multiple mechanisms contribute to local tolerance. Systemic and local immune responses induced by intramuscular injection of alipogene tiparvovec did not appear to have an impact on safety and did not prevent LPL transgene expression. These findings support the use of alipogene tiparvovec in individuals with LPLD and indicate that muscle-directed AAV-based gene therapy remains a promising approach for the treatment of human diseases.

  2. Immune Responses to Intramuscular Administration of Alipogene Tiparvovec (AAV1-LPLS447X) in a Phase II Clinical Trial of Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twisk, Jaap; Kwikkers, Karin; Aronica, Eleonora; Brisson, Diane; Methot, Julie; Petry, Harald; Gaudet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cellular immune responses to adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors used for gene therapy have been linked to attenuated transgene expression and loss of efficacy. The impact of such cellular immune responses on the clinical efficacy of alipogene tiparvovec (Glybera; AAV1-LPLS447X; uniQure), a gene therapy consisting of intramuscular administration of a recombinant AAV1 mediating muscle-directed expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), was investigated. Five subjects with LPL deficiency (LPLD) were administered intramuscularly with a dose of 1×1012 gc/kg alipogene tiparvovec. All subjects were treated with immune suppression starting shortly before administration of alipogene tiparvovec and maintained until 12 weeks after administration. Systemic antibody and T cell responses against AAV1 and LPLS447X, as well as local cellular immune responses in the injected muscle, were investigated in five LPLD subjects. Long-term transgene expression was demonstrated despite a transient systemic cellular response and a stable humoral immune response against the AAV1 capsid protein. Cellular infiltrates were found in four of the five subjects but were not associated with adverse clinical events or elevation of inflammation markers. Consistent herewith, CD8+ T cells in the infiltrates lacked cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, FoxP3+/CD4+ T cells were found in the infiltrates, suggesting that multiple mechanisms contribute to local tolerance. Systemic and local immune responses induced by intramuscular injection of alipogene tiparvovec did not appear to have an impact on safety and did not prevent LPL transgene expression. These findings support the use of alipogene tiparvovec in individuals with LPLD and indicate that muscle-directed AAV-based gene therapy remains a promising approach for the treatment of human diseases. PMID:24299335

  3. Latest findings about the interplay of auxin, ethylene and nitric oxide in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses by strategy I plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera, Francisco J; García, María J; Alcántara, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Under Fe deficiency, strategy I (non-graminaceous) plants upregulate the expression of many Fe acquisition genes and develop morphological changes in their roots. The regulation of these responses is not completely known, but since the 1980s different results suggest a role for auxin, ethylene and, more recently, nitric oxide. The upregulation of the Fe acquisition genes does not depend solely on these hormones that would act as activators, but also on some other signals, probably phloem Fe, that would act as inhibitors. It is not known which of the hormones considered is the last activator of the Fe acquisition genes, but some results suggest that auxin acts upstream of ethylene and NO and that, perhaps, ethylene is the last activator. PMID:21248474

  4. Biological Responsiveness and Metabolic Performance of Liposome-Encapsulated Hemoglobin (Hemoglobin-Vesicles) in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice after Massive Intravenous Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Nagao, Saori; Yamasaki, Keishi; Sakai, Hiromi; Seo, Hakaru; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    The hemoglobin-vesicle (HbV), a vesicle in which a concentrated human hemoglobin solution is encapsulated, was developed as an artificial oxygen carrier. Although HbV has a favorable safety, metabolic, and excretion performance in healthy animals, the effect of a massive amount of HbV, which also contains a large amount of a lipid component including cholesterol, on physiological response and metabolic performance under hyperlipidemic conditions is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether administration of HbV causes toxicity in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (hyperlipidemic model mice). Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were given a single injection of HbV (2000 mg hemoglobin/kg), and physiological responses and metabolic profiles were monitored for 14 d thereafter. All the mice tolerated the massive amount of HbV and survived, and adequate biocompatibility was observed. Serum biochemical parameters indicate that liver and kidney function were not remarkably affected, and morphological changes in the liver and spleen were negligible. Lipid parameters in serum were significantly increased until 3 d after HbV administration, but recovered within 7 d after the administration. In a pharmacokinetic study, HbV was mainly found distributed in the liver and spleen, and disappeared from the body within 14 d. In conclusion, even under conditions of hyperlipidemia, a massive dose of HbV and its components resulted in favorable biological compatibility, metabolic, and excretion profiles. These findings provide further support for the safety of HbV for clinical use.

  5. Osteoarthitis of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice in response to biomechanical loading in micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heep, Hansjoerg; Hilken, Gero; Hofmeister, Sebastian; Wedemeyer, Christian

    2009-01-01

    these data as body weight increases in OP mices. The correlation of the hip-joint between micro-CT data and osteoarthritis shows a decrease in these data as osteoarthritis increases in OP mices. The correlation of the knee-joint between micro-CT data and body weight shows differencies between ON and OP mices. The correlation of the knee-joint between micro-CT data and osteoarthritis shows an increase in these data as osteoarthritis increases in OP mices. biomechanical loading led to decreased bone mineral density by a decrease in the number of trabeculae. Trabecular thickness was not increased by biomechanical loading in growing mice. Decreased body weight in leptin-deficient mice protects against bone loss. This finding is consistent with the principle of light-weight construction of bone. Differences in osteoarthritis-positive and osteoarthritis-negative mices show the eventual importance of diet in leptin-deficience. It is not possible to conclude that these results also apply to human beings.

  6. Immunoglobulin deficiency in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis: Systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitzguébel, Adrien J-P; Jandus, Peter; Lacroix, Jean-Silvain; Seebach, Jörg D; Harr, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have shown a high prevalence of immunoglobulin deficiencies in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). We sought to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate this prevalence more precisely and to identify patients who need substitution treatment. All case series published after 1990 describing patients with CRS, which was defined as symptomatic rhinosinusitis for more than 12 weeks and documented immunoglobulin deficiencies (including deficiencies of IgG with subclasses, IgA, and IgM; specific antibody deficiencies; and potential common variable immunodeficiency), were retrieved. A meta-analysis of the proportion of any combination of common variable immunodeficiency, IgG deficiency, IgA deficiency, and IgM deficiency in patients with CRS was performed by using logit transformation of the prevalence. Recurrent CRS was defined as rhinosinusitis not controlled by appropriate conservative management for 4 months, and difficult-to-treat CRS was defined as noncontrollable rhinosinusitis despite successful sinus surgery and appropriate conservative management for at least 1 year. The meta-analysis revealed a prevalence of pooled IgG, IgA, and IgM deficiencies in 13% of patients with recurrent CRS and 23% of patients with difficult-to-treat CRS. The prevalence of IgG subclass deficiency (5% to 50%) and specific antibody deficiency (8% to 34%) was increased in patients with CRS, as was the prevalence of respiratory allergies in patients with recurrent CRS (31% to 72%). Immunoglobulin deficiency is a frequent condition in patients with CRS. An even higher prevalence of atopy was observed in patients with recurrent CRS. Therefore immunoglobulin titers and accurate allergy diagnostic workups are strongly recommended in these patients to provide specific treatments for symptom alleviation. However, there is a need for larger prospective studies addressing the effect of specific therapeutic interventions for CRS. Copyright © 2015 American

  7. Kinetics of dengue virus-specific serum immunoglobulin classes and subclasses correlate with clinical outcome of infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Koraka (Penelope); C. Suharti (Catarina); T.E. Setiati (Tatty); A.T.A. Mairuhu; E.C.M. van Gorp (Eric); C.E. Hack (Erik); M. Juffrie; J. Sutaryo; G.M. van der Meer; J. Groen (Jan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe kinetics of dengue virus (DEN)-specific serum immunoglobulin classes (immunoglobulin M [IgM] and IgA) and subclasses (IgG1 to IgG4) were studied in patients suffering from dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Serum samples from non-DEN

  8. Isolation and characterization of a monoclonal anti CK-2 alpha subunit antibody of the IgG1 subclass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Spaniol, I; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1992-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody was produced against the recombinant human alpha subunit of CK-2. The antibody was of the IgG1 subclass and it was isolated from serum-free cell culture media and purified by affinity chromatography on Protein G Sepharose. The antibody can be used to detect specifically the ...

  9. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant functions of high-density lipoprotein subclasses in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying TAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To assess the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant functions of high-density lipoprotein (HDL subclasses (HDL2 and HDL3 in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, and to elucidate whether incapacitation of HDL subclasses occurred in ACS patients. Methods  Forty ACS patients hospitalized in Nanfang Hospital from Jan. 2011 to Jan. 2012 (ACS group, and 40 subjects simultaneously receiving health examination (control group were enrolled in present study. Plasma lipid and hypersensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP levels, HDL subclasses inflammatory index (HII, paraoxonase-1 (PON1 activity and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH levels in both groups were measured. Results  The low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and hs-CRP levels were higher in ACS group than in control group (P0.05. Conclusions  The incapacitation of HDL subclasses may occur in ACS patients, with an attenuated antioxidant ability and accentuated proinflammatory function. Mature HDL2 possesses better anti-inflammatory and antioxidant function than HDL3, thus playing a better cardioprotective effect.

  10. Antimitochondrial antibodies of immunoglobulin G3 subclass are associated with a more severe disease course in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Davies, Edward T; Bogdanos, Dimitrios-Petrou; Liaskos, Christos; Mytilinaiou, Maria; Koukoulis, George K; Dalekos, George N; Vergani, Diego

    2007-11-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is characterised by the presence of immunoglobulin (Ig) G antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA), which are routinely detected by indirect immunofluorescence (IFL) using composite rodent tissue substrate. The IgG subclass distribution and clinical significance of IFL-detected AMA in patients with PBC have not been previously studied in detail. We have examined IgG subclass-specific AMA detected by IFL on rodent liver, kidney and stomach tissue substrate using affinity-purified IgG subclass monospecific antisera as revealing reagents in 95 AMA-positive PBC patients from Greece. AMA of any of the IgG1, IgG2 or IgG3 subclasses were present in 89/95 (93.7%) patients. Among those 89, 55 (61.8%) had IgG1, 2, 3 AMA positivity; eight (9%) had IgG1, 2; seven (7.9%) had IgG2, 3; eight (9%) had IgG1, 3; nine (10.1%) had IgG1 subclass and two (2.2%) single IgG3 AMA reactivity. IgG4 AMA was absent. IgG3 titres were higher than IgG2 and IgG1 (P<0.001) and IgG1 higher than IgG2 (P<0.001). IgG3 AMA-positive patients had a histologically more advanced disease (P<0.01) and were more frequently cirrhotic compared with those who were negative (P<0.01). There was a positive correlation between AMA IgG3 titre and Mayo risk score (r=0.55, P=0.009, Spearman's correlation). Our findings suggest that AMA are not restricted to a specific IgG subclass. AMA of the IgG3 subclass are associated with a more severe disease course, possibly reflecting the peculiar ability of this isotype to engage mediators of damage.

  11. Sex differences in the associations of visceral adiposity, HOMA-IR, and BMI with lipoprotein subclass analysis in obese adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch-Stein, Jacquelyn A; Kelly, Andrea; Gidding, Samuel S; Zemel, Babette S; Magge, Sheela N

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship of lipoprotein particle subclasses to visceral adipose tissue area (VAT-area) in obese children has not been examined previously. Objectives The study aims were to compare the relationships of VAT-area, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and body mass index (BMI) with lipids and lipoprotein subclasses in obese adolescents, and to determine if these relationships vary by sex. Methods This cross-sectional study of obese adolescents (BMI≥95th percentile), ages 12-18y, measured VAT-area by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), BMI, fasting lipids, lipoprotein subclasses, and HOMA-IR. Linear regression models evaluated the associations of VAT-area, HOMA-IR, and BMI with lipid cardiometabolic risk factors. Sex-stratified analyses further explored these associations. Results Included were 127 adolescents (age=14.4±1.5 years; 53.5% female; 88.2% African-American), mean BMI=34.0±5.1 kg/m2. VAT-area was negatively associated with LDL particle (−P) size (β=−0.28, p=0.0001), HDL-P size (β=−0.33, p<0.0001) and large HDL-P concentration (β=−0.29, p<0.0001), and positively associated with small LDL-P concentration (β=0.23, p=0.0005) and small HDL-P concentration (β=0.25, p=0.05). When VAT-area, HOMA-IR, and BMI associations were compared, VAT-area had the strongest associations with most of the lipoprotein subclasses. After sex-stratification, the associations of VAT-area with HDL cholesterol, LDL-P size, and large LDL-P concentration were significant only for females (all p<0.05). Conclusions In a cohort of largely African-American obese adolescents, VAT-area was associated with a more atherogenic lipoprotein subclass profile. When compared to HOMA-IR and BMI, VAT-area had the strongest associations with most lipoprotein subclasses. The relationships between VAT-area and certain lipoprotein subclasses are significantly different in males versus females. PMID:27578105

  12. Effects of lipid-lowering drugs on high-density lipoprotein subclasses in healthy men-a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiner K Berthold

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Investigating the effects of lipid-lowering drugs on HDL subclasses has shown ambiguous results. This study assessed the effects of ezetimibe, simvastatin, and their combination on HDL subclass distribution. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A single-center randomized parallel 3-group open-label study was performed in 72 healthy men free of cardiovascular disease with a baseline LDL-cholesterol of 111±30 mg/dl (2.9±0.8 mmol/l and a baseline HDL-cholesterol of 64±15 mg/dl (1.7±0.4 mmol/l. They were treated with ezetimibe (10 mg/day, n = 24, simvastatin (40 mg/day, n = 24 or their combination (n = 24 for 14 days. Blood was drawn before and after the treatment period. HDL subclasses were determined using polyacrylamide gel-tube electrophoresis. Multivariate regression models were used to determine the influence of treatment and covariates on changes in HDL subclass composition. RESULTS: Baseline HDL subclasses consisted of 33±10% large, 48±6% intermediate and 19±8% small HDL. After adjusting for baseline HDL subclass distribution, body mass index, LDL-C and the ratio triglycerides/HDL-C, there was a significant increase in large HDL by about 3.9 percentage points (P<0.05 and a decrease in intermediate HDL by about 3.5 percentage points (P<0.01 in both simvastatin-containing treatment arms in comparison to ezetimibe. The parameters obtained after additional adjustment for the decrease in LDL-C indicated that about one third to one half of these effects could be explained by the extent of LDL-C-lowering. CONCLUSIONS: In healthy men, treatment with simvastatin leads to favorable effects on HDL subclass composition, which was not be observed with ezetimibe. Part of these differential effects may be due to the stronger LDL-C-lowering effects of simvastatin. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00317993.

  13. Differences in trabecular bone of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice in response to biomechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heep, Hansjoerg; Wedemeyer, Christian; Wegner, Alexander; Hofmeister, Sebastian; von Knoch, Marius

    2008-06-15

    It is known that bone mineral density (BMD) and the strength of bone is predicted by body mass. Fat mass is a significant predictor of bone mineral density which correlates with body weight. This suggests that body fat regulates bone metabolism first by means of hormonal factors and second that the effects of muscle and loading are signaling factors in mechanotransduction. Leptin, a peptide hormone produced predominantly by white fat cells, is one of these hormonal factors. The aim of this study was to investigate and measure by micro-CT the different effects of weight-bearing on trabecular bone formation in mice without the stimulation of leptin. Animals with an ad-libitum-diet (Group A) were found to increase body weight significantly at the age of six weeks in comparison with lean mice (Group B). From this point on, the difference increased constantly. At the age of twenty weeks the obese mice were almost twice as heavy as the lean mice. Significant statistical differences are shown between the two groups for body weight and bone mineral density. Examination of trabecular bone (BV/TV, trabecular number (Tb.N.), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.)) revealed that the only statistically significant difference between the two groups was the Tb.N. for the proximal femur. High weight-bearing insignificantly improved all trabecular bone parameters in the obese mice. Compared with the control-diet Group B, the BV/TV and Tb.N. were slightly higher in the controlled-diet Group A, but not the Tb.Th.. However, correlation was found between Tb.N. and BMD on the one hand and body weight on the other hand. biomechanical loading led to decreased bone mineral density by a decrease in the number of trabeculae. Trabecular thickness was not increased by biomechanical loading in growing mice. Decreased body weight in leptin-deficient mice protects against bone loss. This finding is consistent with the principle of light-weight construction of bone. Differences in cortical and trabecular

  14. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abildgaard Steffensen

    Full Text Available Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii. To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  15. Molecular epidemiology and BH4-responsiveness in patients with phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency from Galicia region of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couce, M L; Bóveda, M D; Fernández-Marmiesse, A; Mirás, A; Pérez, B; Desviat, L R; Fraga, J M

    2013-05-25

    Knowledge of hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) mutational spectrum in a population allows in many cases an accurate prediction of the phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) responsiveness, thus selecting an adequate treatment. In this work, we have performed the molecular characterization of 105 HPA patients from Galicia, in the northwest region of Spain, evaluating their phenotype and BH4 response. The mutational spectrum analysis showed 47 distinct mutations in 89 families, 37 of them (78.7%) corresponding to missense mutations. Six mutations account for 47.2% of all the investigated alleles, each one with a frequency ≥ 5% (IVS10-11G>A, p.R261Q, p.V388M, p.R176L, p.E280K, p.A300S). The most prevalent HPA mutations in Galicia are the common Mediterranean mutation IVS10-11G>A and p.R261Q, with frequencies of 13.8% and 10.5%, respectively. One novel mutation (p.K361Q; c.1081A>C) was also reported. Although a good genotype-phenotype correlation is observed, there is no exact correlation for some genotypes involving mutations p.R261Q, p.I65T or IVS10-11G>A. Forty seven patients were monitored for post-challenge BH4, establishing genotype-based predictions of BH4-responsiveness in all of them. All phenylketonuric patients with 2 nonresponsive mutations were unresponsive to BH4 and patients with mutations previously associated with BH4 responsiveness in the two alleles had a clear positive response to the test, with the exception of 5 patients with mutations p.R261Q, p.I65T and p.R68S. Our study supports a similar degree of heterogeneity of the HPA mutation spectrum in Galicia compared to reported data from Southern Europe. Patients carrying null mutations in both alleles showed the highest degree of concordance with the most severe phenotypes. Genotype is a good predictor of BH4 response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Impaired behavioural pain responses in hph-1 mice with inherited deficiency in GTP cyclohydrolase 1 in models of inflammatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasser, Arafat; Bjerrum, Ole J; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    1 gene results in decreased basal GCH1 expression, and is associated with DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD). So far it is unknown if such mutations affect acute and inflammatory pain.Results: In the current study, we examined the involvement of the GCH1 gene in pain models using...... the hyperphenylalaninemia 1 (hph-1) mouse, a genetic model for DRD, with only 10% basal GTP-CH1 activity compared to wild type mice. The study included assays for determination of acute nociception as well as models for pain after sensitisation. Pain behavioural analysis of the hph-1 mice showed reduced pain-like responses......Background: GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), encoded by the GCH1 gene, has been implicated in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain in rats. In humans, homozygous carriers of a " pain-protective" (PP) haplotype...

  17. Deficiency of carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) reduces lipogenesis as well as glycolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Iizuka, Katsumi; Bruick, Richard K.; Liang, Guosheng; Horton, Jay D.; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2004-01-01

    The liver provides for long-term energy needs of the body by converting excess carbohydrate into fat for storage. Insulin is one factor that promotes hepatic lipogenesis, but there is increasing evidence that glucose also contributes to the coordinated regulation of carbohydrate and fat metabolism in liver by mechanisms that are independent of insulin. In this study, we show that the transcription factor, carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), is required both for basal and c...

  18. Agonistic anti-TIGIT treatment inhibits T cell responses in LDLr deficient mice without affecting atherosclerotic lesion development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda C Foks

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules are mainly expressed on T cells and antigen presenting cells and strongly orchestrate adaptive immune responses. Whereas co-stimulatory molecules enhance immune responses, signaling via co-inhibitory molecules dampens the immune system, thereby showing great therapeutic potential to prevent cardiovascular diseases. Signaling via co-inhibitory T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT directly inhibits T cell activation and proliferation, and therefore represents a novel therapeutic candidate to specifically dampen pro-atherogenic T cell reactivity. In the present study, we used an agonistic anti-TIGIT antibody to determine the effect of excessive TIGIT-signaling on atherosclerosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: TIGIT was upregulated on CD4(+ T cells isolated from mice fed a Western-type diet in comparison with mice fed a chow diet. Agonistic anti-TIGIT suppressed T cell activation and proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. However, agonistic anti-TIGIT treatment of LDLr(-/- mice fed a Western-type diet for 4 or 8 weeks did not affect atherosclerotic lesion development in comparison with PBS and Armenian Hamster IgG treatment. Furthermore, elevated percentages of dendritic cells were observed in the blood and spleen of agonistic anti-TIGIT-treated mice. Additionally, these cells showed an increased activation status but decreased IL-10 production. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the inhibition of splenic T cell responses, agonistic anti-TIGIT treatment does not affect initial atherosclerosis development, possibly due to increased activity of dendritic cells.

  19. Different long-term response to growth hormone therapy in small- versus appropriate-for-gestational-age children with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meazza, Cristina; Pagani, Sara; Pietra, Benedetta; Tinelli, Carmine; Calcaterra, Valeria; Bozzola, Elena; Bozzola, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    The role of birth weight on growth hormone (GH) therapy response in GH-deficient (GHD) children has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we examined the growth of 23 small-for-gestational-age GHD children (SGA-GHD, 11 females and 12 males), 26 appropriate-for-gestational-age GHD children (AGA-GHD, 11 females and 15 males) during the first 5 years of GH therapy and that of 22 non-GH-treated SGA children (12 females and 10 males). We collected height and height velocity measurements yearly. In AGA-GHD children, height was always greater than in the SGA groups and significantly increased from the fourth year of treatment. Height velocity was higher (SGA-GHD: 1.72 ± 0.30 standard deviation score, SDS, AGA-GHD: 2.67 ± 0.21 SDS; p = 0.039) in AGA-GHD children during the first year of treatment. The AGA-GHD group showed the highest percentage (52.4%) of subjects surpassing mid-parental height and the greatest height gain after 5 years of follow-up. Our results show that birth size is an important factor affecting the response to GH therapy in GHD children during the first 5 years of treatment. The paediatric endocrinologist should be aware of this factor when planning the management of GHD children born SGA. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Absolute Reticulocyte Count and Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content as Predictors of Early Response to Exclusive Oral Iron in Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Parodi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report data regarding kinetic of response to oral iron in 34 iron deficiency anemia children. Twenty-four/34 patients (70.5% reached reference value of hemoglobin (Hb concentration for age and sex at day + 30 from the beginning of treatment (complete early responders (CERs, and 4/34 (12% reached an Hb concentration at least 50% higher than the original (partial early responders (PERs. CHr at T1 (within 7 days from the beginning of treatment was significantly different in the different groups (22.95 in CERs versus 18.41 in other patients; p=0.001; 22.42 in early responders versus 18.07 in NERs; p=0.001. Relative increase of CHr from T0 to T1 resulted significantly higher in CERs than in other patients (0.21 versus 0.11, p=0.042 and in early responders than in NERs (0.22 versus 0.004, p=0.006. Multivariate logistic models revealed a higher probability of being a complete early responder due to relative increase of ARC from T0 to T1 [OR (95% CI = 44.95 (1.54–1311.98] and to CHr at T1 [OR (95% CI =3.18 (1.24–8.17]. Our preliminary data confirm CHr as early and accurate predictor of hematological response to oral iron.

  1. Lst1 deficiency has a minor impact on course and outcome of the host response to influenza A H1N1 infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leist, Sarah R; Kollmus, Heike; Hatesuer, Bastian; Lambertz, Ruth L O; Schughart, Klaus

    2016-01-27

    Previously, we performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study in BXD recombinant inbred mice to identify host genetic factors that confer resistance to influenza A virus infection. We found Lst1 (leukocyte specific transcript 1) as one of the most promising candidate genes in the Qivr17-2 locus because it is non-functional in DBA/2 J mice. Several studies have proposed that LST1 plays a role in the immune response to inflammatory diseases in humans and has additional immune-regulatory functions. Here, we evaluated the relevance of LST1 for the host response to influenza A infection in B6-Lst1 (-/-) mutant mice. To investigate the role of LST1, we infected B6-Lst1 (-/-) mutant and C57BL/6 N wild-type mice with a low-virulent influenza A virus (PR8M; H1N1). Lst1 deficient mice exhibited significantly increased body weight loss at days 5 and 6 after infection and slightly increased lethality compared to infected wild-type mice. Determination of viral loads, histopathological examination and analysis of immune cell composition in bronchoalveolar lavage of infected lungs did not reveal any obvious differences between KO and wild-type mice. The absence of Lst1 leads to a slightly more susceptible phenotype. However, deletion of Lst1 in DBA/2 J mice alone does not explain the high susceptibility of this strain to PR8M influenza infections.

  2. Understanding plant responses to phosphorus starvation for improvement of plant tolerance to phosphorus deficiency by biotechnological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sukbong; Tran, Lam-Son

    2014-03-01

    In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, including plants, phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient that is involved in various biochemical processes, such as lipid metabolism and the biosynthesis of nucleic acids and cell membranes. P also contributes to cellular signaling cascades by function as mediators of signal transduction and it also serves as a vital energy source for a wide range of biological functions. Due to its intensive use in agriculture, P resources have become limited. Therefore, it is critically important in the future to develop scientific strategies that aim to increase P use efficiency and P recycling. In addition, the biologically available soluble form of P for uptake (phosphate; Pi) is readily washed out of topsoil layers, resulting in serious environmental pollution. In addition to this environmental concern, the wash out of Pi from topsoil necessitates a continuous Pi supply to maintain adequate levels of fertilization, making the situation worse. As a coping mechanism to P stress, plants are known to undergo drastic cellular changes in metabolism, physiology, hormonal balance and gene expression. Understanding these molecular, physiological and biochemical responses developed by plants will play a vital role in improving agronomic practices, resource conservation and environmental protection as well as serving as a foundation for the development of biotechnological strategies, which aim to improve P use efficiency in crops. In this review, we will discuss a variety of plant responses to low P conditions and various molecular mechanisms that regulate these responses. In addition, we also discuss the implication of this knowledge for the development of plant biotechnological applications.

  3. Repeatability of metabolic responses to a nutrient deficiency in early and mid lactation and implications for robustness of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, J J; Bruckmaier, R M

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient partitioning toward the mammary gland during insufficient energy and nutrient supply is a strategy to ensure survival of the offspring in mammalian species. This homeorhetic priority of the mammary gland is also present in the modern dairy cow, in particular in early lactation. However, despite similar metabolic loads, the adaptive response to a given metabolic load varies considerably among animals. The aim of this study was to investigate if individual cows respond in a consistent manner to a negative energy balance (NEB) in early and mid lactation. Twenty-five dairy cows experienced the usual NEB after parturition and were subjected to a second 3-wk NEB induced by feed restriction in mid lactation. Animals were retrospectively ranked according to their highest plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration in wk 1 to 4 postpartum. The animals with the 33% highest and 33% lowest values were selected and classified either as the high response (HR) or low response (LR) group. Before parturition, no differences in the studied parameters, dry matter intake, energy balance, concentrations of glucose, NEFA, β-hydroxybutyrate, cholesterol, triglycerides, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor-1, were detected between LR and HR. After parturition, milk yield and energy-corrected milk yield was higher for HR compared with LR in wk 2 to 14 and wk 1 to 6, respectively. During feed restriction in wk 15 to 17 postpartum, no differences in energy-corrected milk between LR and HR were found. Energy balance was more negative in HR during the NEB in early lactation, but not different from LR during feed restriction in mid lactation. Although plasma concentrations of glucose, growth hormone, triglycerides, and cholesterol showed group differences in early lactation, but not during feed restriction, the plasma concentrations of NEFA, β-hydroxybutyrate, and insulin-like growth factor-1 in HR changed repeatedly to a greater extent during the NEB at the 2

  4. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I.; Wijeratne, Subhashinee SK

    2008-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role...

  5. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  6. Abnormal response of melanin-concentrating hormone deficient mice to fasting: hyperactivity and rapid eye movement sleep suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willie, J T; Sinton, C M; Maratos-Flier, E; Yanagisawa, M

    2008-10-28

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that has been implicated in energy homeostasis. Pharmacological studies with MCH and its receptor antagonists have suggested additional behavioral roles for the neuropeptide in the control of mood and vigilance states. These suggestions have been supported by a report of modified sleep in the MCH-1 receptor knockout mouse. Here we found that MCH knockout (MCH(-)(/)(-)) mice slept less during both the light and dark phases under baseline conditions. In response to fasting, MCH(-)(/)(-) mice exhibited marked hyperactivity, accelerated weight loss and an exaggerated decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Following a 6-h period of sleep deprivation, however, the sleep rebound in MCH(-)(/)(-) mice was normal. Thus MCH(-)(/)(-) mice adapt poorly to fasting, and their loss of bodyweight under this condition is associated with behavioral hyperactivity and abnormal expression of REM sleep. These results support a role for MCH in vigilance state regulation in response to changes in energy homeostasis and may relate to a recent report of initial clinical trials with a novel MCH-1 receptor antagonist. When combined with caloric restriction, the treatment of healthy, obese subjects with this compound resulted in some subjects experiencing vivid dreams and sleep disturbances.

  7. Dectin-2 deficiency promotes Th2 response and mucin production in the lungs after pulmonary infection with Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuri; Sato, Ko; Yamamoto, Hideki; Matsumura, Kana; Matsumoto, Ikumi; Nomura, Toshiki; Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Ishii, Keiko; Kanno, Emi; Tachi, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Sho; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    Dectin-2 is a C-type lectin receptor that recognizes high mannose polysaccharides. Cryptococcus neoformans, a yeast-form fungal pathogen, is rich in polysaccharides in its cell wall and capsule. In the present study, we analyzed the role of Dectin-2 in the host defense against C. neoformans infection. In Dectin-2 gene-disrupted (knockout) (Dectin-2KO) mice, the clearance of this fungus and the inflammatory response, as shown by histological analysis and accumulation of leukocytes in infected lungs, were comparable to those in wild-type (WT) mice. The production of type 2 helper T (Th2) cytokines in lungs was higher in Dectin-2KO mice than in WT mice after infection, whereas there was no difference in the levels of production of Th1, Th17, and proinflammatory cytokines between these mice. Mucin production was significantly increased in Dectin-2KO mice, and this increase was reversed by administration of anti-interleukin 4 (IL-4) monoclonal antibody (MAb). The levels of expression of β1-defensin, cathelicidin, surfactant protein A (Sp-A), and Sp-D in infected lungs were comparable between these mice. In in vitro experiments, IL-12p40 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production and expression of CD86 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages were completely abrogated in Dectin-2KO mice. Finally, the disrupted lysates of C. neoformans, but not of whole yeast cells, activated Dectin-2-triggered signaling in an assay with nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter cells expressing this receptor. These results suggest that Dectin-2 may oppose the Th2 response and IL-4-dependent mucin production in the lungs after infection with C. neoformans, and it may not be required for the production of Th1, Th17, and proinflammatory cytokines or for clearance of this fungal pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Antigen-Experienced CD4lo T Cells Are Linked to Deficient Contraction of the Immune Response in Autoimmune Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Linkes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following proper activation, naïve “CD4lo” T cells differentiate into effector T cells with enhanced expression of CD4 -“CD4hi” effectors. Autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice display a unique set of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells that persist after primary stimulation. Here, we report that a population of such cells remained after secondary and tertiary TCR stimulation and produced cytokines upon antigenic challenge. However, when NOD blasts were induced in the presence of rIL-15, the number of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells was significantly reduced. Clonal contraction, mediated in part by CD95-dependent activation-induced cell death (AICD, normally regulates the accumulation of “CD4hi” effectors. Interestingly, CD95 expression was dramatically reduced on the AICD-resistant NOD “CD4lo” T cells. Thus, while autoimmune disease has often been attributed to the engagement of robust autoimmunity, we suggest that the inability to effectively contract the immune response distinguishes benign autoimmunity from progressive autoimmune diseases that are characterized by chronic T cell-mediated inflammation.

  9. Classification of a Subclass of Two-Dimensional Lattices via Characteristic Lie Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibullin, Ismagil; Poptsova, Mariya

    2017-09-01

    The main goal of the article is testing a new classification algorithm. To this end we apply it to a relevant problem of describing the integrable cases of a subclass of two-dimensional lattices. By imposing the cut-off conditions u_{-1}=c_0 and u_{N+1}=c_1 we reduce the lattice u_{n,xy}=α(u_{n+1},u_n,u_{n-1})u_{n,x}u_{n,y} to a finite system of hyperbolic type PDE. Assuming that for each natural N the obtained system is integrable in the sense of Darboux we look for α. To detect the Darboux integrability of the hyperbolic type system we use an algebraic criterion of Darboux integrability which claims that the characteristic Lie rings of such a system must be of finite dimension. We prove that up to the point transformations only one lattice in the studied class passes the test. The lattice coincides with the earlier found Ferapontov-Shabat-Yamilov equation. The one-dimensional reduction x=y of this lattice passes also the symmetry integrability test.

  10. Synthesis of some members of the hydroxylated phenanthridone subclass of the Amaryllidaceae alkaloid family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padwa, Albert; Zhang, Hongjun

    2007-03-30

    The total synthesis of several members of the hydroxylated phenanthridone subclass of the Amaryllidaceae alkaloid family has been carried out. (+/-)-Lycoricidine and (+/-)-7-deoxypancratistatin were assembled through a one-pot Stille/intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloaddition cascade to construct the core skeleton. The initially formed [4+2]-cycloadduct undergoes nitrogen-assisted ring opening followed by a deprotonation/reprotonation of the resulting zwitterion to give a rearranged hexahydroindolinone on further heating at 160 degrees C. The stereochemical outcome of the IMDAF cycloaddition has the side arm of the tethered vinyl group oriented exo with respect to the oxygen bridge. The resulting cycloadduct was used for the stereocontrolled installation of the remaining functionality present in the C-ring of the target molecules. Key features of the synthetic strategy include (1) a lithium hydroxide induced tandem hydrolysis/decarboxylation/elimination sequence to introduce the required pi-bond in the C-ring of (+/-)-lycoricidine, and (2) conversion of the initially formed Diels-Alder adduct into an aldehyde intermediate which then undergoes a stereospecific decarbonylation reaction mediated by Wilkinson's catalyst to set the trans-B-C ring junction of (+/-)-7-deoxypancratistatin.

  11. Area-specific development of distinct projection neuron subclasses is regulated by postnatal epigenetic modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Kawssar; Magrinelli, Elia; Nicolas, Céline S; Lukianets, Nikita; Frangeul, Laura; Pietri, Mariel; Sun, Tao; Sandoz, Guillaume; Grammont, Franck; Jabaudon, Denis; Studer, Michele; Alfano, Christian

    2016-01-27

    During cortical development, the identity of major classes of long-distance projection neurons is established by the expression of molecular determinants, which become gradually restricted and mutually exclusive. However, the mechanisms by which projection neurons acquire their final properties during postnatal stages are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the number of neurons co-expressing Ctip2 and Satb2, respectively involved in the early specification of subcerebral and callosal projection neurons, progressively increases after birth in the somatosensory cortex. Ctip2/Satb2 postnatal co-localization defines two distinct neuronal subclasses projecting either to the contralateral cortex or to the brainstem suggesting that Ctip2/Satb2 co-expression may refine their properties rather than determine their identity. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that the transcriptional adaptor Lmo4 drives this maturation program through modulation of epigenetic mechanisms in a time- and area-specific manner, thereby indicating that a previously unknown genetic program postnatally promotes the acquisition of final subtype-specific features.

  12. Fractal analysis reveals subclasses of neurons and suggests an explanation of their spontaneous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favela, Luis H; Coey, Charles A; Griff, Edwin R; Richardson, Michael J

    2016-07-28

    The present work used fractal time series analysis (detrended fluctuation analysis; DFA) to examine the spontaneous activity of single neurons in an anesthetized animal model, specifically, the mitral cells in the rat main olfactory bulb. DFA bolstered previous research in suggesting two subclasses of mitral cells. Although there was no difference in the fractal scaling of the interspike interval series at the shorter timescales, there was a significant difference at longer timescales. Neurons in Group B exhibited fractal, power-law scaled interspike intervals, whereas neurons in Group A exhibited random variation. These results raise questions about the role of these different cells within the olfactory bulb and potential explanations of their dynamics. Specifically, self-organized criticality has been proposed as an explanation of fractal scaling in many natural systems, including neural systems. However, this theory is based on certain assumptions that do not clearly hold in the case of spontaneous neural activity, which likely reflects intrinsic cell dynamics rather than activity driven by external stimulation. Moreover, it is unclear how self-organized criticality might account for the random dynamics observed in Group A, and how these random dynamics might serve some functional role when embedded in the typical activity of the olfactory bulb. These theoretical considerations provide direction for additional experimental work. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Structural response of photosystem 2 to iron deficiency : Characterization of a new photosystem 2-IdiA complex from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lax, Julia E. -M.; Arteni, Ana A.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Pistorius, Elfriede K.; Michel, Klaus-Peter; Roegner, Matthias

    Iron deficiency triggers various processes in cyanobacterial cells of which the synthesis of an additional antenna system (IsiA) around photosystem (PS) 1 is well documented [T.S. Bibby, J. Nield, J. Barber, Iron deficiency induces the formation of an antenna ring around trimeric photosystem I in

  14. Responses to Iron-Deficiency in Arabidopsis-Thaliana - The Turbo Iron Reductase does not depend on the Formation of Root Hairs and Transfer Cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moog, P.R.; Van der Kooij, T.A.W.; Bruggemann, W.; Schiefelbein, J.W.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Columbia wild type and a root hair-less mutant RM57 were grown on iron-containing and iron-deficient nutrient solutions. In both genotypes, ferric chelate reductase (FCR) of intact roots was induced upon iron deficiency and followed a Michaelis-Menten kinetic with a

  15. Water conditions and geochemistry in northern Adriatic anoxia-prone areas and response of benthic faunas to oxygen deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuschin, Martin; Riedel, Bettina; Stachowitsch, Michael; Cermelj, Branko

    2010-05-01

    One predicted effect of global climate change, specifically global warming, is the increase in the temperatures and stratification of shallow coastal and estuarine systems. This, coupled with ongoing anthropogenic eutrophication, will exacerbate hypoxia and benthic mortalities, significantly damaging these critical marine ecosystems. These phenomena are particularly severe on sublitoral soft-bottoms such as the poorly sorted silty sands at the study site in the northern Adriatic Sea. We deployed a specially developed underwater chamber to artificially induce anoxia in situ. Our Experimental Anoxia Generating Unit (EAGU) is a large plexiglass chamber that combines a digital camera with oxygen/hydrogen sulphide/pH sensors along with flashes and battery packs. The unit can be deployed for up to five days to autonomously generate oxygen crises and quantify both physico-chemical parameters and benthic responses. The system is initially positioned in an "open" configuration (open-sided aluminium frame) over the benthic fauna ("control" experiment). After 24 h the EAGU is switched to its "closed" configuration (plexiglass enclosure) and repositioned over the same assemblage. In this contribution, we focus on the natural oxygen content, temperature and pH of bottom waters during summer, the course of oxygen decrease during our experiments and the onset of H2S development. Oxygen content of the bottom water, a few centimetres above the sediment-water interface, ranges from ~3.5-8 but is mostly between 4-6 ml l-1 during July to September of the study periods (2005 and 2006) and decreases to zero within ~1-3 days after initiation of our experiments. In parallel, H2S starts to develop at the onset of anoxia. Water temperatures at the bottom were stable during experiments and ranged from 18.5°C to 21.4°C, but pH decreased from 8.3 to 8.1 at the beginning to 7.9 to 7.7 at the end of the experiments. Sediment profiling indicates that the diffusive benthic boundary layer is

  16. Deficiency of FK506-binding protein (FKBP) 51 alters sleep architecture and recovery sleep responses to stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albu, Stefana; Romanowski, Christoph P N; Letizia Curzi, M; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Gassen, Nils C; Hartmann, Jakob; Schmidt, Mathias V; Schmidt, Ulrike; Rein, Theo; Holsboer, Florian; Hausch, Felix; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Kimura, Mayumi

    2014-04-01

    FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is a co-chaperone of the glucocorticoid receptor, functionally linked to its activity via an ultra-short negative feedback loop. Thus, FKBP51 plays an important regulatory role in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis necessary for stress adaptation and recovery. Previous investigations illustrated that HPA functionality is influenced by polymorphisms in the gene encoding FKBP51, which are associated with both increased protein levels and depressive episodes. Because FKBP51 is a key molecule in stress responses, we hypothesized that its deletion impacts sleep. To study FKBP51-involved changes in sleep, polysomnograms of FKBP51 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were compared at baseline and in the recovery phase after 6-h sleep deprivation (SD) and 1-h restraint stress (RS). Using another set of animals, the 24-h profiles of hippocampal free corticosterone levels were also determined. The most dominant effect of FKBP51 deletion appeared as increased nocturnal wake, where the bout length was significantly extended while non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) and rapid eye movement sleep were rather suppressed. After both SD and RS, FKBP51KO mice exhibited less recovery or rebound sleep than WTs, although slow-wave activity during NREMS was higher in KOs, particularly after SD. Sleep compositions of KOs were nearly opposite to sleep profiles observed in human depression. This might result from lower levels of free corticosterone in FKBP51KO mice, confirming reduced HPA reactivity. The results indicate that an FKBP51 deletion yields a pro-resilience sleep phenotype. FKBP51 could therefore be a therapeutic target for stress-induced mood and sleep disorders. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  17. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood...... samples taken at age 48-72 h were diagnostic whereas repeat samples at an older age were normal in 4/6 babies. Urine analysis was normal in 5/5. We conclude that the timing of blood sampling for newborn screening is important and that it is important to perform mutation analysis to avoid false......-negative diagnoses of VLCADD in asymptomatic newborn babies. In view of the emerging genotype-phenotype correlation in this disorder, the information derived from mutational analysis can be helpful in designing the appropriate follow-up and therapeutic regime for these patients....

  18. Carnitine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Răşanu, T; Mehedinţi-Hâncu, Mihaela; Alexianu, Marilena; Mehedinţi, T; Gheorghe, Emma; Damian, Irene

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a female patient, aged 12 years, with fatigability and exertional myalgias, progressively developed within the last two years. Negative family history, as well as negative personal medical history, were found. At physical examination, short stature, proximal muscle weakness and mild hepatomegaly were noted. Urine ketones level was slightly decreased, serum transaminases, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels were increased. Electromyographical examination showed a myopathic non-specific pattern. Deltoid muscle biopsy revealed: small, clear vesicles are present on Hematoxylin-Eosin and modified Gömöri trichrome stains; modified Gömöri trichrome stain also revealed muscle fibers (especially type I of muscle fibers) having mild to moderate mitochondrial proliferation (red rim and speckled sarcoplasm). The lipid storage has been well demonstrated by Sudan Black stain, which revealed small lipid droplets in type I muscle fibers. Abnormal internal architecture with a punctate pattern was showed by adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase and succinate dehydrogenase stains. Electron microscopy showed small inter-myofibrillar accumulations of round, amorphous, homogeneous acellular substances that are not membrane bounded. These features indicate that these are neutral fat (lipid) droplets. Subsarcolemmal accumulations of mitochondria were also revealed. The differential diagnosis of this case is discussed, and the up to date general data concerning carnitine deficiency are presented. The aim of our case-report is to emphasize the role of muscle biopsy in carnitine deficiency, as well as to remind the necessity of keeping in mind such metabolic disorders when doing the differential diagnostic of a muscular weakness.

  19. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVexTM-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Chang Albershardt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8 T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1.

  20. Protein O-mannosylation deficiency increases LprG-associated lipoarabinomannan release by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and enhances the TLR2-associated inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Henar; Parra, Julien; Malaga, Wladimir; Payros, Delphine; Liu, Chia-Fang; Berrone, Céline; Robert, Camille; Meunier, Etienne; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Rivière, Michel; Guilhot, Christophe

    2017-08-11

    Protein O-mannosylation is crucial for the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis but the key mannosylated protein(s) involved and its(their) underlying function(s) remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that the M. tuberculosis mutant (Δpmt) deficient for protein O-mannosylation exhibits enhanced release of lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in a complex with LprG, a lipoprotein required for LAM translocation to the cell surface. We determined that LprG is O-mannosylated at a unique threonine position by mass spectrometry analyses of the purified protein. However, although replacement of this amino acid by an alanine residue completely abolished LprG O-mannosylation, the increased release of the LAM/LprG complex was preserved. We found that the increased secretion of this complex is due to enhanced LAM production in the Δpmt M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis mutants relative to their wild-type counterparts. This abnormal release of LAM/LprG has functional consequences on the induction of inflammatory responses and provides a possible explanation for the reduced virulence of the M. tuberculosis Δpmt mutant.

  1. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVex(TM)-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; Ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1.

  2. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVexTM-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. PMID:27626061

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  4. A new subclass of intrinsic aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, ANT(3")-II, is horizontally transferred among Acinetobacter spp. by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Chao; Ai, Guomin; Liu, Shuangjiang

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. have been investigated extensively. Most studies focused on the multiple antibiotic resistance genes located on plasmids or genomic resistance islands. On the other hand, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are still not well understood. In this study, we identified the novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(3")-II in Acinetobacter spp., which comprised numerous variants distributed among three main clades. All members of this subclass can inactivate streptomycin and spectinomycin. The three ant(3")-II genes, encoding for the three ANT(3")-II clades, are widely distributed in the genus Acinetobacter and always located in the same conserved genomic region. According to their prevalence, these genes are intrinsic in Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii, and Acinetobacter gyllenbergii. We also demonstrated that the ant(3")-II genes are located in a homologous recombination hotspot and were recurrently transferred among Acinetobacter species. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated a novel mechanism of natural resistance in Acinetobacter spp., identified a novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase and provided new insight into the evolutionary history of intrinsic resistance genes. PMID:28152054

  5. A new subclass of intrinsic aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, ANT(3")-II, is horizontally transferred among Acinetobacter spp. by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Chao; Yahara, Koji; Ai, Guomin; Liu, Shuangjiang; Feng, Jie

    2017-02-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. have been investigated extensively. Most studies focused on the multiple antibiotic resistance genes located on plasmids or genomic resistance islands. On the other hand, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are still not well understood. In this study, we identified the novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(3")-II in Acinetobacter spp., which comprised numerous variants distributed among three main clades. All members of this subclass can inactivate streptomycin and spectinomycin. The three ant(3")-II genes, encoding for the three ANT(3")-II clades, are widely distributed in the genus Acinetobacter and always located in the same conserved genomic region. According to their prevalence, these genes are intrinsic in Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii, and Acinetobacter gyllenbergii. We also demonstrated that the ant(3")-II genes are located in a homologous recombination hotspot and were recurrently transferred among Acinetobacter species. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated a novel mechanism of natural resistance in Acinetobacter spp., identified a novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase and provided new insight into the evolutionary history of intrinsic resistance genes.

  6. [Multicenter study of commercial kits for the determination of human IgG subclasses, using the ELISA technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontet, F; Pressac, M; Musset, L; Tapon-Bretaudière, J; Jehl, C; Cailliez, M; Bienvenu, F

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated two commercially available sandwich type Elisa procedures for the measurement of IgG subclasses in human serum. Assay kits from The Binding Site and the Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service were tested in six laboratories. The performance of spectrophotometers, pipettes and dilutors were assessed at each center. Within-run precision was estimated according to the Valtec method (Société Française de Biologie Clinique). The overall coefficient of variation ranged from 4 to 50% depending on subclass and kit. We also evaluated the IgG2 and IgG4 specificity using four sera containing a monoclonal IgG2 or IgG4 (kappa or lambda type). Using total IgG and immunoelectrophoresis as a comparative technique, IgG2 kappa and IgG4 kappa were both underestimated, IgG2 lambda was overestimated while IgG4 lambda compared favorably. Polyclonal IgG subclasses were frequently overestimated in these sera suggesting cross-reactions with either monoclonal IgG or other polyclonal IgG. Antigen excess was investigated and not encountered with either kit. Our results demonstrate that these procedures are insufficiently accurate or precise for routine clinical use.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  8. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack ... vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia called pernicious anemia. Vitamin C deficiency anemia risk factors include: Smoking. Smoking ...

  9. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ...

  11. Monocyte Recruitment by HLA IgG‐Activated Endothelium: The Relationship Between IgG Subclass and FcγRIIa Polymorphisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valenzuela, N. M; Trinh, K. R; Mulder, A; Morrison, S. L; Reed, E. F

    2015-01-01

    ...RIIa polymorphisms, the authors show the ability of different human IgG subclasses to cause endothelial activation and recruitment of monocytes, and evaluate therapeutic potential of IgG with two...

  12. Affinity separation of immunoglobulin G subclasses on dye attached poly(hydroxypropyl methacrylate) beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Handan; Akgöl, Sinan; Say, Ridvan; Denizli, Adil

    2006-11-15

    Poly(hydroxypropyl methacrylate) [poly(HPMA)] gel beads with an average size of 150-200 micro m were prepared by suspension polymerization of hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA). The poly(HPMA) gel beads were characterized by swelling studies, surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental analysis. Poly(HPMA) gel beads had a specific surface area of 88.6 m(2)/g. The dye Reactive Green HE 4BD was chemically attached to yield dye-poly(HPMA) gel beads at an average concentration of 44.3 micro mol dye/g bead with a swelling ratio of 75%. These dye attached gel beads were used in the separation of immunoglobulin-G (IgG) through adsorption-elution studies. The non-specific adsorption of IgG on the poly(HPMA) gel beads was 0.5 mg/g. The attachment of Reactive Green HE 4BD significantly increased the adsorption of IgG up to 71 mg/g. The Langmuir adsorption model was found to be applicable in interpretation of data pertaining to the adsorption studies of IgG with Reactive Green HE 4BD attached to the poly(HPMA) gel beads. The adsorption of IgG was found to be optimal at pH 7.0. The adsorption of IgG was observed to decrease by about 76% as the NaCl concentration was increased from 0.001 to 0.1 M. The IgG adsorption capacity of the dye attached poly(HPMA) gel beads was determined for a commercially available IgG solution to be 4.2 mg/g for IgG(1), 64.5 mg/g for IgG(2), 7.1 mg/g for IgG(3) and 10.8 mg/g for IgG(4). The Reactive Green HE 4BD attached poly(HPMA) gel beads have a significant adsorption capacity for IgG(2). The quantity of adsorbed IgG(2) is three times higher than the quantity of the other subclasses, IgG(1), IgG(3) and IgG(4). A similar adsorption behaviour was observed when the albumin free human plasma was used. The quantity of adsorbed IgG(2) is higher than the quantity of the other subclasses, IgG(1), IgG(3) and IgG(4). Adsorption capacities for albumin free human plasma were obtained as 6.4 mg/g for IgG(1), 67.8 mg/g for IgG(2

  13. Taxonomic resolutions based on 18S rRNA genes: a case study of subclass copepoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Wu

    Full Text Available Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1-9 within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%; and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2 nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9 of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%; 3 compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%; and 4 V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy.

  14. Differential effects of calcium antagonist subclasses on markers of nephropathy progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakris, George L; Weir, Matthew R; Secic, Michelle; Campbell, Brett; Weis-McNulty, Annette

    2004-06-01

    Numerous studies suggest that the dihydropyridine calcium antagonists (DCAs) and nondihydropyridine calcium antagonists (NDCAs) have differential antiproteinuric effects. Proteinuria reduction is a correlate of the progression of renal disease. In an earlier systematic review, calcium antagonists were shown as effective antihypertensive drugs, but there was uncertainty about their renal benefits in patients with proteinuria and renal insufficiency. A systematic review was conducted to assess the differential effects of DCAs and NDCAs on proteinuria in hypertensive adults with proteinuria, with or without diabetes, and to determine whether these differential effects translate into altered progression of nephropathy. Studies included in the review had to be randomized clinical trials with at least 6 months of treatment, include a DCA or NDCA treatment arm, have one or more renal end points, and have been initiated after 1986. Summary data were extracted from 28 studies entered into two identical but separate databases, which were compared and evaluated by independent reviewers. The effects of each drug class on blood pressure (N= 1338) and proteinuria (N= 510) were assessed. After adjusting for sample size, study length, and baseline value, there were no statistically significant differences in the ability of either class of calcium antagonist to decrease blood pressure. The mean change in proteinuria was +2% for DCAs and -30% for NDCAs (95% CI, 10% to 54%, P= 0.01). Consistently greater reductions in proteinuria were associated with the use of NDCAs compared with DCAs, despite no significant differences in blood pressure reduction or presence of diabetes. This analysis supports (1) similar efficacy between subclasses of calcium antagonists to lower blood pressure, and (2) greater reductions in proteinuria by NDCAs compared to DCAs in the presence or absence of diabetes. Based on these findings, NDCAs, alone or in combination with an angiotensin-converting enzyme

  15. Integrative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Common Molecular Subclasses of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshida, Yujin; Nijman, Sebastian M.B.; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Chan, Jennifer A.; Brunet, Jean-Philippe; Chiang, Derek Y.; Villanueva, Augusto; Newell, Philippa; Ikeda, Kenji; Hashimoto, Masaji; Watanabe, Goro; Gabriel, Stacey; Friedman, Scott L.; Kumada, Hiromitsu; Llovet, Josep M.; Golub, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly heterogeneous disease, and prior attempts to develop genomics-based classification for HCC have yielded highly divergent results, indicating difficulty to identify unified molecular anatomy. We performed a meta-analysis of gene expression profiles in datasets from 8 independent patient cohorts across the world. In addition, aiming to establish the real world applicability of a classification system, we profiled 118 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from an additional patient cohort. A total of 603 patients were analyzed, representing the major etiologies of HCC (hepatitis B and C) collected from Western and Eastern countries. We observed 3 robust HCC subclasses (termed S1, S2, and S3), each correlated with clinical parameters such as tumor size, extent of cellular differentiation, and serum alpha-fetoprotein levels. An analysis of the components of the signatures indicated that S1 reflected aberrant activation of the WNT signaling pathway, S2 was characterized by proliferation as well as MYC and AKT activation, and S3 was associated with hepatocyte differentiation. Functional studies indicated that the WNT pathway activation signature characteristic of S1 tumors was not simply the result of beta-catenin mutation, but rather was the result of TGF-beta activation, thus representing a new mechanism of WNT pathway activation in HCC. These experiments establish the first consensus classification framework for HCC based on gene-expression profiles, and highlight the power of integrating of multiple datasets to define a robust molecular taxonomy of the disease. PMID:19723656

  16. Interrelationships between chronic tension-type headache, musculoskeletal pain, and vitamin D deficiency: Is osteomalacia responsible for both headache and musculoskeletal pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Headache, musculoskeletal symptoms, and vitamin D deficiency are common in the general population. However, the interrelations between these three have not been delineated in the literature. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively studied a consecutive series of patients who were diagnosed as having chronic tension-type headache (CTTH and were subjected to the estimation of serum vitamin D levels. The subjects were divided into two groups according to serum 25(OH D levels as normal (>20 ng/ml or vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/ml. Results: We identified 71 such patients. Fifty-two patients (73% had low serum 25(OH D (<20 ng/dl. Eighty-three percent patients reported musculoskeletal pain. Fifty-two percent patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for chronic widespread pain. About 50% patients fulfilled the criteria for biochemical osteomalacia. Low serum 25(OH D level (<20 ng/dl was significantly associated with headache, musculoskeletal pain, and osteomalacia. Discussion: These suggest that both chronic musculoskeletal pain and chronic headache may be related to vitamin D deficiency. Musculoskeletal pain associated with vitamin D deficiency is usually explained by osteomalacia of bones. Therefore, we speculate a possibility of osteomalacia of the skull for the generation of headache (osteomalacic cephalalgia?. It further suggests that both musculoskeletal pain and headaches may be the part of the same disease spectrum in a subset of patients with vitamin D deficiency (or osteomalacia, and vitamin D deficiency may be an important cause of secondary CTTH.

  17. Obesity development in neuron-specific lipoprotein lipase deficient mice is not responsive to increased dietary fat content or change in fat composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Taussig, Matthew D; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Bruce, Kimberley; Piomelli, Daniele; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency (NEXLPL-/-) become obese by 16weeks of age on chow. Moreover, these mice had reduced uptake of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein-derived fatty acids and lower levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in the hypothalamus. Here, we asked whether increased dietary fat content or altered dietary composition could modulate obesity development in NEXLPL-/- mice. Male NEXLPL-/- mice and littermate controls (WT) were randomly assigned one of three synthetic diets; a high carbohydrate diet (HC, 10% fat), a high-fat diet (HF, 45% fat), or a HC diet supplemented with n-3 PUFAs (HCn-3, 10% fat, Lovaza, GSK®). After 42weeks of HC feeding, body weight and fat mass were increased in the NEXLPL-/- mice compared to WT. WT mice fed a HF diet displayed typical diet-induced obesity, but weight gain was only marginal in HF-fed NEXLPL-/- mice, with no significant difference in body composition. Dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation did not prevent obesity in NEXLPL-/- mice, but was associated with differential modifications in hypothalamic gene expression and PUFA concentration compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that neuronal LPL is involved in the regulation of body weight and composition in response to either the change in quantity (HF feeding) or quality (n-3 PUFA-enriched) of dietary fat. The precise role of LPL in lipid sensing in the brain requires further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adaptations to iron deficiency: cardiac functional responsiveness to norepinephrine, arterial remodeling, and the effect of beta-blockade on cardiac hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker LeeAnn

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency (ID results in ventricular hypertrophy, believed to involve sympathetic stimulation. We hypothesized that with ID 1 intravenous norepinephrine would alter heart rate (HR and contractility, 2 abdominal aorta would be larger and more distensible, and 3 the beta-blocker propanolol would reduce hypertrophy. Methods 1 30 CD rats were fed an ID or replete diet for 1 week or 1 month. Norepinephrine was infused via jugular vein; pressure was monitored at carotid artery. Saline infusions were used as a control. The pressure trace was analyzed for HR, contractility, systolic and diastolic pressures. 2 Abdominal aorta catheters inflated the aorta, while digital microscopic images were recorded at stepwise pressures to measure arterial diameter and distensibility. 3 An additional 10 rats (5 ID, 5 control were given a daily injection of propanolol or saline. After 1 month, the hearts were excised and weighed. Results Enhanced contractility, but not HR, was associated with ID hypertrophic hearts. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were consistent with an increase in arterial diameter associated with ID. Aortic diameter at 100 mmHg and distensibility were increased with ID. Propanolol was associated with an increase in heart to body mass ratio. Conclusions ID cardiac hypertrophy results in an increased inotropic, but not chronotropic response to the sympathetic neurotransmitter, norepinephrine. Increased aortic diameter is consistent with a flow-dependent vascular remodeling; increased distensibility may reflect decreased vascular collagen content. The failure of propanolol to prevent hypertrophy suggests that ID hypertrophy is not mediated via beta-adrenergic neurotransmission.

  19. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitaro Tanoi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium ions (Mg2+ are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency.

  20. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  1. Klotho deficiency causes vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hu, Ming Chang; Shi, Mingjun; Zhang, Jianning; Quiñones, Henry; Griffith, Carolyn; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W

    2011-01-01

    Soft-tissue calcification is a prominent feature in both chronic kidney disease (CKD) and experimental Klotho deficiency, but whether Klotho deficiency is responsible for the calcification in CKD is unknown...

  2. Relationship of baseline HDL subclasses, small dense LDL and LDL triglyceride to cardiovascular events in the AIM-HIGH clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, John J; Slee, April; Fleg, Jerome L; O'Brien, Kevin D; Marcovina, Santica M

    2016-08-01

    Previous results of the AIM-HIGH trial showed that baseline levels of the conventional lipid parameters were not predictive of future cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. The aims of this secondary analysis were to examine the levels of cholesterol in high density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses (HDL2-C and HDL3-C), small dense low density lipoprotein (sdLDL-C), and LDL triglyceride (LDL-TG) at baseline, as well as the relationship between these levels and CV outcomes. Individuals with CV disease and low baseline HDL-C levels were randomized to simvastatin plus placebo or simvastatin plus extended release niacin (ERN), 1500 to 2000 mg/day, with ezetimibe added as needed in both groups to maintain an on-treatment LDL-C in the range of 40-80 mg/dL. The primary composite endpoint was death from coronary disease, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome, or symptom-driven coronary or cerebrovascular revascularization. HDL-C, HDL3-C, sdLDL-C and LDL-TG were measured at baseline by detergent-based homogeneous assays. HDL2-C was computed by the difference between HDL-C and HDL3-C. Analyses were performed on 3094 study participants who were already on statin therapy prior to enrollment in the trial. Independent contributions of lipoprotein fractions to CV events were determined by Cox proportional hazards modeling. Baseline HDL3-C was protective against CV events (HR: 0.84, p = 0.043) while HDL-C, HDL2-C, sdLDL-C and LDL-TG were not event-related (HR: 0.96, p = 0.369; HR: 1.07, p = 0.373; HR: 1.05, p = 0.492; HR: 1.03, p = 0.554, respectively). The results of this secondary analysis of the AIM-HIGH Study indicate that levels of HDL3-C, but not other lipoprotein fractions, are predictive of CV events, suggesting that the HDL3 subclass may be primarily responsible for the inverse association of HDL-C and CV disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Early diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis in newborn infants using IgG subclasses against two Toxoplasma gondii recombinant proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henryque de Souza e Silva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the utility of ELISA-based testing of total IgG (IgGt antibodies and its subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 against soluble (STAg and recombinant (rSAG1 and rMIC3 antigens of Toxoplasma gondii for diagnosing congenital toxoplasmosis. Sera from 217 newborns initially testing positive for specific IgM in filter paper dried blood spots were tested for specific IgM and IgG by ELFA-VIDAS®. Congenital toxoplasmosis was confirmed in 175 and ruled out in 42 infants. The validity of the ELISA tests was determined using the persistence of IgG antibodies (ELFA-VIDAS® kit at the end of 12 months, which is considered the reference test for the diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis. The frequency of positivity with IgGt against STAg, rSAG1 and rMIC3 was found in 97.2%, 96.3% and 80.2%, respectively, of the newborns with confirmed congenital toxoplasmosis. IgG1 reacted with all three antigens, while IgG3 and IgG4 reacted preferentially with rMIC3. Higher mean values of reactivity (sample optical density/cut-off were found for all subclasses when using rMIC3. All of the antigens showed high sensitivity and low specificity in detecting anti-T. gondii IgGt and IgG1 and low sensitivity and high specificity in detecting IgG3 and IgG4. In conclusion, the combined detection of IgG antibody subclasses against recombinant toxoplasmic antigens may be useful for the early diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis.

  4. Multivariate DoE Optimization of Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation Coupled to Quantitative LC-MS/MS for Analysis of Lipoprotein Subclasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Kuklenyik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this report we demonstrate a practical multivariate design of experiment (DoE approach for asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4 method optimization using separation of lipoprotein subclasses as an example. First, with the aid of commercially available software, we built a full factorial screening design where the theoretical outcomes were calculated by applying established formulas that govern AF4 channel performance for a 5–35 nm particle size range of interest for lipid particles. Second, using the desirable ranges of instrumental parameters established from theoretical optimization, we performed fractional factorial DoE for AF4 separation of pure albumin and ferritin with UV detection to narrow the range of instrumental parameters and allow optimum size resolution while minimizing losses from membrane immobilization. Third, the optimal range of conditions were tested using response surface DoE for sub-fractionation of high and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL in human serum, where the recovery of the analytes were monitored by fraction collection and isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS analysis of each individual fraction for cholesterol and apolipoproteins (ApoA-1 and ApoB-100. Our results show that DoE is an effective tool in combining AF4 theoretical knowledge and experimental data in finding the most optimal set of AF4 instrumental parameters for quantitative coupling with LC-MS/MS measurements.

  5. The different effector function capabilities of the seven equine IgG subclasses have implications for vaccine strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Melanie J.; Wagner, Bettina; Woof, Jenny M.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant versions of the seven equine IgG subclasses were expressed in CHO cells. All assembled into intact immunoglobulins stabilised by disulphide bridges, although, reminiscent of human IgG4, a small proportion of equine IgG4 and IgG7 were held together by non-covalent bonds alone. All seven IgGs were N-glycosylated. In addition IgG3 appeared to be O-glycosylated and could bind the lectin jacalin. Staphylococcal protein A displayed weak binding for the equine IgGs in the order: IgG1 > I...

  6. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaphalia, Lata [Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Boroumand, Nahal [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Hyunsu, Ju [Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Kaphalia, Bhupendra S., E-mail: bkaphali@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Calhoun, William J. [Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to < 1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. - Highlights: • Chronic

  7. Increased serum and bone matrix levels of transforming growth factor {beta}1 in patients with GH deficiency in response to GH treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueland, Thor; Lekva, Tove; Otterdal, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Patients with adult onset GH deficiency (aoGHD) have secondary osteoporosis, which is reversed by long-term GH substitution. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1 or TGFB1) is abundant in bone tissue and could mediate some effects of GH/IGFs on bone. We investigated its regulation by GH/IGF1 in vivo...

  8. Neuroglobin-deficiency exacerbates Hif1A and c-FOS response, but does not affect neuronal survival during severe hypoxia in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Luuk, Hendrik; Ilmjärv, Sten

    2011-01-01

    genetically Ngb-deficient (Ngb-null). Further, to evaluate whether the lack of Ngb has an effect on hypoxia-dependent gene regulation, we performed a transcriptome-wide analysis of differential gene expression using Affymetrix Mouse Gene 1.0 ST arrays. Differential expression was estimated by a novel data...

  9. Resposta da couve-da-Malásia (Brassica chinensis L. var. parachinensis (Bailey Sinskaja à deficiência nutricional = Response of Malaysian cabbage (Brassica chinensis L. var. parachinensis (Bailey Sinskaja to nutritional deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Magella Flôres da Mota

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Brassica chinensis var. parachinensis é uma hortaliça folhosa, de ciclo curto, introduzida no Brasil em 1992, em função de sua excelente qualidade nutricional. Apresenta elevado teor de b-caroteno, vitamina C, Ca e Fe, o que a torna importante alimento,especialmente no combate à anemia. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a produtividade biológica e agronômica da couve-da-Malásia, cultivada sob deficiência de N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, B, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo e Zn e comparada com o tratamento-testemunha que incluiu todos os macro e micronutrientes. As plantas cultivadas na ausência de N e Pconseguiram completar o ciclo, mas foram significativamente menos produtivas e pouco desenvolvidas em relação às que receberam nutrição completa. Além disso, apresentaram coloração das folhas verde-acinzentada e arroxeamento do pecíolo e nervuras. Na ausênciade B, todas as plantas morreram entre 30 e 37 dias após a semeadura e, na ausência de S, elas não produziram frutos, o que mostra a importância destes dois nutrientes para essa Brassicaceae.Brassica chinensis var. parachinensis is a vegetable with short cycle, which was introduced in Brazil in 1992 due to its highnutritional qualities. It presents high concentration of b-carotene, vitamin C, Ca, and Fe, becoming an important food for the prevention of anemia. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the biological and agronomic productivity of plants grown under N, P, K, Ca, Mg,S, B, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, and Zn deficiency. The results were compared with plants grown with all macro and micronutrients. Plants cultured without N and P completed their cycle, but had lower yield than those cultured with complete nutrition. Additionally, they had green-grayish leaves, and purple petiole and veins. Plants cultured without B died between 30 and 37 days after sowing, and without S they did not produce fruits. These results show the importance of S and B to this Brassicaceae.

  10. The maize CorA/MRS2/MGT-type Mg transporter, ZmMGT10, responses to magnesium deficiency and confers low magnesium tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyou; Wang, Ning; Ding, Jianzhou; Liu, Chan; Du, Hanmei; Huang, Kaifeng; Cao, Moju; Lu, Yanli; Gao, Shibin; Zhang, Suzhi

    2017-10-01

    ZmMGT10 was specifically expressed in maize roots and induced by a deficiency of magnesium. Overexpression of ZmMGT10 restored growth deficiency of the Salmonella typhimurium MM281 strain and enhanced the tolerance in Arabidopsis to stress induced by low magnesium levels by increasing uptake of Mg(2+) via roots. CorA/MRS2/MGT-type Mg(2+) transporters play a significant role in maintaining magnesium (Mg) homeostasis in plants. Although the maize CorA/MRS2/MGT family comprises of 12 members, currently no member has been functionally characterized. Here, we report the isolation and functional characterization of ZmMGT10 from the maize MRS2/MGT gene family. ZmMGT10 has a typical structure feature which includes two conserved TMs near the C-terminal end and an altered AMN tripeptide motif. The high sequence similarity and close phylogenetic relationship indicates that ZmMGT10 is probably the counterpart of Arabidopsis AtMGT6. The complementation of the Salmonella typhimurium mutated MM281 strain indicates that ZmMGT10 possesses the ability to transport Mg(2+). ZmMGT10 was specifically expressed in the plant roots and it can be stimulated by a deficiency of Mg. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants which overexpressed ZmMGT10 grew more vigorously than wild-type plants under low Mg conditions, exhibited by longer root length, higher plant fresh weight and chlorophyll content, suggesting ZmMGT10 was essential for plant growth and development under low Mg conditions. Further investigations found that high accumulation of Mg(2+) occurred in transgenic plants attributed to improved Mg(2+) uptake and thereby enhanced tolerance to Mg deficiency. Results from this investigation illustrate that ZmMGT10 is a Mg transporter of maize which can enhance the tolerance to Mg deficient conditions by improving Mg(2+) uptake in the transgenic plants of Arabidopsis.

  11. Brain and Hepatic Mt mRNA Is Reduced in Response to Mild Energy Restriction and n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Deficiency in Juvenile Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron A. Mehus

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metallothioneins (MTs perform important regulatory and cytoprotective functions in tissues including the brain. While it is known that energy restriction (ER and dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA deficiency impact postnatal brain growth and development, little data exist regarding the impact of undernutrition upon MT expression in growing animals. We tested the hypothesis that ER with and without dietary n-3 PUFA deficiency reduces MT expression in juvenile rats. ER rats were individually pair-fed at 75% of the ad libitum (AL intake of control rats provided diets consisting of either soybean oil (SO that is α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3 sufficient or corn oil (CO; ALA-deficient. Fatty acids (FA and metal concentrations of liver and brain regions were analyzed. Tissue expression of MTs (Mt1-3 and modulators of MT expression including glucocorticoid receptors (Nr3c1 and Nr3c2 and several mediators of thyroid hormone regulation (Dio1-3, Mct8, Oatp1c1, Thra, and Thrb were measured. Plasma corticosterone and triiodothyronine levels were also evaluated. ER, but not metal deficiency, reduced Mt2 expression in the cerebellum (50% and cerebral cortex (23%. In liver, a reduction in dietary n-3 PUFA reduced Mt1, Mt2, Nr3c1, Mct8, and Thrb. ER elevated Nr3c1, Dio1, and Thrb and reduced Thra in the liver. Given MT’s role in cellular protection, further studies are needed to evaluate whether ER or n-3 PUFA deficiency may leave the juvenile brain and/or liver more susceptible to endogenous or environmental stressors.

  12. A disparate trace element metabolism in zebu (Bos indicus) and crossbred (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) cattle in response to a copper-deficient diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermauw, V; De Cuyper, A; Duchateau, L; Waseyehon, A; Dierenfeld, E; Clauss, M; Peters, I R; Du Laing, G; Janssens, G P J

    2014-07-01

    Copper deficiency is a commonly diagnosed problem in cattle around the globe. In Jimma, Ethiopia, 8 zebu (Bos indicus) and 8 zebu ×: Holstein Friesian cross (Bos taurus ×: Bos indicus) heifers were used in an 11-wk study to investigate breed type differences and effects of Cu deficiency on concentrations of trace elements in plasma and edible tissues as well as mRNA expression of Cu-related genes. Heifers were fed a grass diet (6.4 ± 0.2 [SEM] mg Cu/kg DM) supplemented with 1 mg Mo/kg DM in wk 1 to 4 and 2 mg Mo/kg DM in wk 5 to 11, with blood samples collected every 2 wk and tissue collection postmortem. Plasma, liver, kidney, and semitendinosus and cardiac muscle were analyzed for Zn, Cu, Fe, Se, Mo, Co, and Mn. Expression of mRNA Cu-related genes was measured in aorta (lysyl oxidase [LOX]), liver (Cu transporting β-polypeptide [Atp7b], Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase [CCS], cytochrome c oxidase assembly homolog 17 [Cox17], Cu transporter 1 homolog [Ctr1], and superoxide dismutase 1 [Sod1]), and duodenum (diamine oxidase [DAO] and metallo-thionein-1A [Mt1a]) as well as the Se-related glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1). Zebu cattle maintained initial plasma Cu concentrations just below the threshold value for deficiency, whereas crossbred cattle gradually became severely Cu deficient over time (P taurus ×: B. indicus cattle resulting in greater sensitivity to Cu deficiency in B. taurus crossbred cattle.

  13. Phylogenetic relationships of the Subclass Peniculia (Oligohymenophorea, Ciliophora) inferred from small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strüder-Kypke, M C; Wright, A D; Fokin, S I; Lynn, D H

    2000-01-01

    Peniculine ciliates have been recognized as a distinct higher taxon of ciliates for almost 50 years. However, phylogenetic relationships within the Subclass Peniculia are still unsettled. To contribute to our understanding of their phylogeny and provide evidence for the position of Urocentrum turbo, we sequenced its small subunit (SS) rRNA gene and the SSrRNA genes from Lembadion bullinum, Frontonia sp., Paramecium caudatum, Paramecium multimicronucleatum, Paramecium putrinum, and Paramecium woodruffi. Urocentrum turbo was the only one of these species not to exhibit a shortened Helix E10_1, which we conclude characterizes the "higher" peniculines. Except for U. turbo, the peniculines are strongly supported as a monophyletic clade with Lembadion, Frontonia, and Paramecium species forming separate and strongly supported clades by bootstrap analysis using distance matrix, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood methods. Urocentrum turbo is associated with different lineages, depending upon the analysis used. The Paramecium species form at least four clades with the Paramecium aurelia subgroup being the most derived. We conclude that the Subclass Peniculia should be divided into two orders, the Order Urocentrida and Order Peniculida, with the latter order having two suborders, the Suborder Frontoniina and Peniculina. We place U. turbo with the peniculines because of shared morphological and stomatogenetic features.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 8 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body's immune response known as the complement system . The complement system is a group of proteins that work together ... complement component 8 deficiency Merck Manual Consumer Version: Complement System Orphanet: Immunodeficiency due to a late component of ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ... also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood loss isn't always obvious, and ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood ... treat iron-deficiency anemia. These doctors include pediatricians, family doctors, gynecologists/obstetricians, and internal medicine specialists. A ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...